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Sample records for high cortical spreading

  1. Cortical spreading depression: An enigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, R. M.; Huang, H.; Wylie, J. J.

    2007-08-01

    The brain is a complex organ with active components composed largely of neurons, glial cells, and blood vessels. There exists an enormous experimental and theoretical literature on the mechanisms involved in the functioning of the brain, but we still do not have a good understanding of how it works on a gross mechanistic level. In general, the brain maintains a homeostatic state with relatively small ion concentration changes, the major ions being sodium, potassium, and chloride. Calcium ions are present in smaller quantities but still play an important role in many phenomena. Cortical spreading depression (CSD for short) was discovered over 60 years ago by A.A.P. Leão, a Brazilian physiologist doing his doctoral research on epilepsy at Harvard University, “Spreading depression of activity in the cerebral cortex," J. Neurophysiol., 7 (1944), pp. 359-390. Cortical spreading depression is characterized by massive changes in ionic concentrations and slow nonlinear chemical waves, with speeds on the order of mm/min, in the cortex of different brain structures in various experimental animals. In humans, CSD is associated with migraine with aura, where a light scintillation in the visual field propagates, then disappears, and is followed by a sustained headache. To date, CSD remains an enigma, and further detailed experimental and theoretical investigations are needed to develop a comprehensive picture of the diverse mechanisms involved in producing CSD. A number of mechanisms have been hypothesized to be important for CSD wave propagation. In this paper, we briefly describe several characteristics of CSD wave propagation, and examine some of the mechanisms that are believed to be important, including ion diffusion, membrane ionic currents, osmotic effects, spatial buffering, neurotransmitter substances, gap junctions, metabolic pumps, and synaptic connections. Continuum models of CSD, consisting of coupled nonlinear diffusion equations for the ion concentrations, and

  2. Distinct vascular conduction with cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Kevin C; Beltrán-Parrazal, Luis; López-Valdés, Hector E; Theriot, Jeremy; Toga, Arthur W; Charles, Andrew C

    2007-06-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is associated with significant vasodilatation and vasoconstriction, but the relationship between the cortical parenchymal and vascular phenomena remains poorly understood. We used optical intrinsic signal (OIS) imaging and electrophysiology to simultaneously examine the vascular and parenchymal changes that occur with CSD in anesthetized mice and rats. CSD was associated with a propagated multiphasic change in optical reflectance, with correlated negative DC shift in field potential. Dilatation of cortical surface arterioles propagated with a significantly greater intrinsic velocity than the parenchymal CSD wavefront measured by OIS and electrophysiology. Dilatation traveled in a circuitous pattern along individual arterioles, indicating specific vascular conduction as opposed to concentric propagation of a parenchymal signal. Arteriolar dilatation propagated into areas beyond the spread of parenchymal OIS and electrophysiological changes of CSD. Conversely, vasomotor activity could be experimentally dissociated from the parenchymal CSD wave. Frequent repetitive CSD evoked by continuous stimulation was associated with a reduced or absent arteriolar response despite preserved parenchymal OIS and electrophysiological changes. Similarly, dimethylsulfoxide at high concentrations (10%) inhibited arteriolar reactivity despite preserved parenchymal OIS and electrophysiological changes. These results suggest a mechanism, intrinsic to the vasculature, for propagation of vasodilatation associated with CSD. Distinct vascular conduction could be important for the pathogenesis of conditions that involve CSD, including migraine, stroke, and traumatic brain injury.

  3. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Ay, Ilknur; de Morais, Andreia Lopes; Qin, Tao; Zheng, Yi; Sadeghian, Homa; Oka, Fumiaki; Simon, Bruce; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-04-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation has recently been reported to improve symptoms of migraine. Cortical spreading depression is the electrophysiological event underlying migraine aura and is a trigger for headache. We tested whether vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression to explain its antimigraine effect. Unilateral vagus nerve stimulation was delivered either noninvasively through the skin or directly by electrodes placed around the nerve. Systemic physiology was monitored throughout the study. Both noninvasive transcutaneous and invasive direct vagus nerve stimulations significantly suppressed spreading depression susceptibility in the occipital cortex in rats. The electrical stimulation threshold to evoke a spreading depression was elevated by more than 2-fold, the frequency of spreading depressions during continuous topical 1 M KCl was reduced by ∼40%, and propagation speed of spreading depression was reduced by ∼15%. This effect developed within 30 minutes after vagus nerve stimulation and persisted for more than 3 hours. Noninvasive transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation was as efficacious as direct invasive vagus nerve stimulation, and the efficacy did not differ between the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres. Our findings provide a potential mechanism by which vagus nerve stimulation may be efficacious in migraine and suggest that susceptibility to spreading depression is a suitable platform to optimize its efficacy.

  4. Cortical spreading depression-induced preconditioning in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ping-ping; Hou, Shuai; Ma, Di; Zhao, Ming-ming; Zhu, Ming-qin; Zhang, Jing-dian; Feng, Liang-shu; Cui, Li; Feng, Jia-chun

    2016-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression is a technique used to depolarize neurons. During focal or global ischemia, cortical spreading depression-induced preconditioning can enhance tolerance of further injury. However, the underlying mechanism for this phenomenon remains relatively unclear. To date, numerous issues exist regarding the experimental model used to precondition the brain with cortical spreading depression, such as the administration route, concentration of potassium chloride, induction time, duration of the protection provided by the treatment, the regional distribution of the protective effect, and the types of neurons responsible for the greater tolerance. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms underlying cortical spreading depression-induced tolerance in the brain, considering excitatory neurotransmission and metabolism, nitric oxide, genomic reprogramming, inflammation, neurotropic factors, and cellular stress response. Specifically, we clarify the procedures and detailed information regarding cortical spreading depression-induced preconditioning and build a foundation for more comprehensive investigations in the field of neural regeneration and clinical application in the future. PMID:28123433

  5. [Cortical spreading depolarization: a new pathophysiological mechanism in neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Porras, Renán; Robles-Cabrera, Adriana; Santos, Edgar

    2014-05-20

    Cortical spreading depolarization is a wave of almost complete depolarization of the neuronal and glial cells that occurs in different neurological diseases such as migraine with aura, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, head trauma and stroke. These depolarization waves are characterized by a change in the negative potential with an amplitude between -10 and -30mV, duration of ∼1min and changes in the ion homeostasis between the intra- and extracellular space. This results in neuronal edema and dendritic distortion. Under pathologic states of hypoperfusion, cortical spreading depolarization can produce oxidative stress, worsen hypoxia and induce neuronal death. This is due to intense arterial vasoconstriction produced by an inverse response called spreading ischemia. Only in the last years there has been an electrophysiological confirmation of cortical spreading depolarization in human brains. Occurrence of cortical spreading depolarization has been associated with worse outcome in patients. Currently, increased knowledge regarding the pathophysiologic mechanisms supports the hypothetical correlation of cortical spreading depolarization with brain damage in humans. There are diverse therapeutic alternatives that promise inhibition of cortical spreading depolarization and subsequent better outcomes.

  6. Regulation of cerebral metabolism during cortical spreading depression

    PubMed Central

    Feuerstein, Delphine; Gramer, Markus; Takagaki, Masatoshi; Gabel, Paula; Kumagai, Tetsuya; Graf, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the metabolic response to cortical spreading depression that drastically increases local energy demand to restore ion homeostasis. During single and multiple cortical spreading depressions in the rat cortex, we simultaneously monitored extracellular levels of glucose and lactate using rapid sampling microdialysis and glucose influx using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography while tracking cortical spreading depression using laser speckle imaging. Combining the acquired data with steady-state requirements we developed a mass-conserving compartment model including neurons and glia that was consistent with the observed data. In summary, our findings are: (1) Early breakdown of glial glycogen provides a major source of energy during increased energy demand and leaves 80% of blood-borne glucose to neurons. (2) Lactate is used solely by neurons and only if extracellular lactate levels are >80% above normal. (3) Although the ratio of oxygen and glucose consumption transiently reaches levels <3, the major part (>90%) of the overall energy supply is from oxidative metabolism. (4) During cortical spreading depression, brain release of lactate exceeds its consumption suggesting that lactate is only a circumstantial energy substrate. Our findings provide a general scenario for the metabolic response to increased cerebral energy demand. PMID:26661217

  7. Cortico-cortical evoked potentials for sites of early versus late seizure spread in stereoelectroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Lega, Bradley; Dionisio, Sasha; Flanigan, Patrick; Bingaman, William; Najm, Imad; Nair, Dileep; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Cortico-cortical evoked potentials offer the possibility of understanding connectivity within seizure networks to improve diagnosis and more accurately identify candidates for seizure surgery. We sought to determine if cortico-cortical evoked potentials and post-stimulation oscillatory changes differ for sites of EARLY versus LATE ictal spread. 37 patients undergoing stereoelectroencephalography were tested using a cortico-cortical evoked potential paradigm. All electrodes were classified according to the speed of ictal spread. EARLY spread sites were matched to a LATE spread site equidistant from the onset zone. Root-mean-square was used to quantify evoked responses and post-stimulation gamma band power and coherence were extracted and compared. Sites of EARLY spread exhibited significantly greater evoked responses after stimulation across all patients (t(36)=2.973, p=0.004). Stimulation elicited enhanced gamma band activity at EARLY spread sites (t(36)=2.61, p=0.03, FDR corrected); this gamma band oscillation was highly coherent with the onset zone. Cortico-cortical evoked potentials and post-stimulation changes in gamma band activity differ between sites of EARLY versus LATE ictal spread. The oscillatory changes can help visualize connectivity within the seizure network.

  8. Cortical spreading depression occurs during elective neurosurgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Andrew P; William Shuttleworth, C; Mead, Brittany; Burlbaw, Brittany; Krasberg, Mark; Yonas, Howard

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cortical spreading depression (CSD) has been observed with relatively high frequency in the period following human brain injury, including traumatic brain injury and ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke. These events are characterized by loss of ionic gradients through massive cellular depolarization, neuronal dysfunction (depression of electrocorticographic [ECoG] activity) and slow spread (2-5 mm/min) across the cortical surface. Previous data obtained in animals have suggested that even in the absence of underlying injury, neurosurgical manipulation can induce CSD and could potentially be a modifiable factor in neurosurgical injury. The authors report their initial experience with direct intraoperative ECoG monitoring for CSD. METHODS The authors prospectively enrolled patients undergoing elective craniotomy for supratentorial lesions in cases in which the surgical procedure was expected to last > 2 hours. These patients were monitored for CSD from the time of dural opening through the time of dural closure, using a standard 1 × 6 platinum electrode coupled with an AC or full-spectrum DC amplifier. The data were processed using standard techniques to evaluate for slow potential changes coupled with suppression of high-frequency ECoG propagating across the electrodes. Data were compared with CSD validated in previous intensive care unit (ICU) studies, to evaluate recording conditions most likely to permit CSD detection, and identify likely events during the course of neurosurgical procedures using standard criteria. RESULTS Eleven patients underwent ECoG monitoring during elective neurosurgical procedures. During the periods of monitoring, 2 definite CSDs were observed to occur in 1 patient and 8 suspicious events were detected in 4 patients. In other patients, either no events were observed or artifact limited interpretation of the data. The DC-coupled amplifier system represented an improvement in stability of data compared with AC-coupled systems. Compared

  9. Biphasic direct current shift, haemoglobin desaturation and neurovascular uncoupling in cortical spreading depression

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Joshua C.; Shook, Lydia L.; Biag, Jonathan; Nguyen, Elaine N.; Toga, Arthur W.; Charles, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression is a propagating wave of depolarization that plays important roles in migraine, stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage and brain injury. Cortical spreading depression is associated with profound vascular changes that may be a significant factor in the clinical response to cortical spreading depression events. We used a combination of optical intrinsic signal imaging, electro-physiology, potassium sensitive electrodes and spectroscopy to investigate neurovascular changes associated with cortical spreading depression in the mouse. We identified two distinct phases of altered neurovascular function, one during the propagating cortical spreading depression wave and a second much longer phase after passage of the wave. The direct current shift associated with the cortical spreading depression wave was accompanied by marked arterial constriction and desaturation of cortical haemoglobin. After recovery from the initial cortical spreading depression wave, we observed a second phase of prolonged, negative direct current shift, arterial constriction and haemoglobin desaturation, lasting at least an hour. Persistent disruption of neurovascular coupling was demonstrated by a loss of coherence between electro-physiological activity and perfusion. Extracellular potassium concentration increased during the cortical spreading depression wave, but recovered and remained at baseline after passage of the wave, consistent with different mechanisms underlying the first and second phases of neurovascular dysfunction. These findings indicate that cortical spreading depression is associated with a multiphasic alteration in neurovascular function, including a novel second direct current shift accompanied by arterial constriction and decrease in tissue oxygen supply, that is temporally and mechanistically distinct from the initial propagated cortical spreading depression wave. Vascular/metabolic uncoupling with cortical spreading depression may have important

  10. In vivo optical imaging of cortical spreading depression in rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shangbin; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Weihua; Gong, Hui; Cheng, Haiying; Luo, Qingming

    2003-12-01

    Intrinsic optical signals imaging (IOSI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI) are both novel techniques for functional neuroimaging in vivo. Combining them to study cortical spreading depression (CSD) which is an important disease model for migraine and other neurological disorders. CSD were induced by pinprick in Sprague-Dawley rats. Intrinsic optical signals (IOS) at 540 nm showed CSD evolution happened in one hemisphere cortex at speeds of 3.7+/-0.4 mm/min, and the vasodilation closely correlated a four-phasic response. By LSI, we observed a transient and significant increase cerebral blood flow (CBF). In this paper, optical imaging would be showed as a powerful tool for describing the hemodynamic character during CSD in rat.

  11. Cortical spreading depression causes and coincides with tissue hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Takano, Takahiro; Tian, Guo-Feng; Peng, Weiguo; Lou, Nanhong; Lovatt, Ditte; Hansen, Anker J; Kasischke, Karl A; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2007-06-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a self-propagating wave of cellular depolarization that has been implicated in migraine and in progressive neuronal injury after stroke and head trauma. Using two-photon microscopic NADH imaging and oxygen sensor microelectrodes in live mouse cortex, we find that CSD is linked to severe hypoxia and marked neuronal swelling that can last up to several minutes. Changes in dendritic structures and loss of spines during CSD are comparable to those during anoxic depolarization. Increasing O2 availability shortens the duration of CSD and improves local redox state. Our results indicate that tissue hypoxia associated with CSD is caused by a transient increase in O2 demand exceeding vascular O2 supply.

  12. Mathematical approaches to modeling of cortical spreading depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Robert M.; Huang, Huaxiong; Wylie, Jonathan J.

    2013-12-01

    Migraine with aura (MwA) is a debilitating disease that afflicts about 25%-30% of migraine sufferers. During MwA, a visual illusion propagates in the visual field, then disappears, and is followed by a sustained headache. MwA was conjectured by Lashley to be related to some neurological phenomenon. A few years later, Leão observed electrophysiological waves in the brain that are now known as cortical spreading depression (CSD). CSD waves were soon conjectured to be the neurological phenomenon underlying MwA that had been suggested by Lashley. However, the confirmation of the link between MwA and CSD was not made until 2001 by Hadjikhani et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98, 4687-4692 (2001)] using functional MRI techniques. Despite the fact that CSD has been studied continuously since its discovery in 1944, our detailed understandings of the interactions between the mechanisms underlying CSD waves have remained elusive. The connection between MwA and CSD makes the understanding of CSD even more compelling and urgent. In addition to all of the information gleaned from the many experimental studies on CSD since its discovery, mathematical modeling studies provide a general and in some sense more precise alternative method for exploring a variety of mechanisms, which may be important to develop a comprehensive picture of the diverse mechanisms leading to CSD wave instigation and propagation. Some of the mechanisms that are believed to be important include ion diffusion, membrane ionic currents, osmotic effects, spatial buffering, neurotransmitter substances, gap junctions, metabolic pumps, and synaptic connections. Discrete and continuum models of CSD consist of coupled nonlinear differential equations for the ion concentrations. In this review of the current quantitative understanding of CSD, we focus on these modeling paradigms and various mechanisms that are felt to be important for CSD.

  13. Changes in hemodynamics and light scattering during cortical spreading depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengcheng; Yang, Yuanyuan; Luo, Qingming

    2005-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) has been known to play an important role in the mechanism of migraine, stroke and brain injure. Optical imaging of intrinsic signals has been shown a powerful method for characterizing the spatial and temporal pattern of the propagation of CSD. However, the possible physiological mechanisms underlying the intrinsic optical signal (IOS) during CSD still remain incompletely understood. In this study, a spectroscopic recording of the change in optical intrinsic signal during CSD was performed and an analysis method based on the modified Beer-Lambert law was used to estimate the changes in the concentration of HbO2 and Hb, and changes in light scattering from the spectra data. The CSD were induced by pinprick in 10 α-chloralose/urethane anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. In all experiments, four-phasic changes in optical reflectance were observed at 450 nm ~ 570 nm, and triphasic changes in optical reflectance were observed in the range of 570 nm ~750 nm. But at 750 nm ~ 850 nm, only biphasic changes of optical signal were detected. Converting the spectra data to the changes in light scattering and concentration of Hb and HbO2, we found that the CSD induced an initial increase in concentration of HbO2 (amplitude: 9.0+/-3.7%), which was 26.2+/-18.6 s earlier than the onset of increase of Hb concentration. Furthermore, the concentration of HbO2 showed a four-phasic change, whereas the concentration of Hb only showed a biphasic change. For the changes in light scattering during CSD, a triphasic change was observed.

  14. Mathematical Imaging and Modeling of Cortical Spreading Depression and Wound Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-05

    Spreading Depression and W mmd Healing Sb. GRANT NUMBER Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 611102 6. AUTHORS Sd. PROJECT NUMBER Tom Chou Se. TASK NUMBER...Spreading Depression and Wound Healing." The research conducted under this grant represents advances made in image analysis, front tracking, modeling...cortical spreading depressions waves in excitable media, and inverse problem the01y. It has resulted :~ ~:~ ~ ~ • • t..l: ~t-~ ...1

  15. Simultaneous imaging of intrinsic optical signals and cerebral vessel responses during cortical spreading depression in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengcheng; Chen, Shangbin; Luo, Weihua; Luo, Qingming

    2003-12-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is an important disease model for migraine and cerebral ischemia. We investigated the spatio-temporal characteristics of the intrinsic optical signals (IOS) at 570 nm and the cerebral blood vessel responses during CSD simultaneously by optical reflectance imaging in vivo. The CSD were induced by pinprick in 10 α-chloralose/urethane anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. A four-phasic IOS response was observed at pial arteries and parenchymal sites in all experimental animals and an initial slight pial arteries dilation (21.5%+/-13.6%) and constriction (-4.2%+/-3.5%) precedes the dramatic dilation (69.2%+/-26.1%) of pial arterioles was recorded. Our experimental results show a high correlation (r = 0.89+/-0.025) between the IOS response and the diameter changes of the cerebral blood vessels during CSD in rats.

  16. Caffeine/nutrition interaction in the rat brain: Influence on latent inhibition and cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Márlison José Lima; de Aguiar, Cilene Rejane Ramos Alves; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2011-01-10

    Caffeine, like malnutrition, can produce behavioral and electrophysiological alterations. However, the interaction of both factors remains unclear. Here this interaction has been studied in male Wistar rats previously malnourished during the lactation period by feeding their dams the "regional basic diet" of Northeast Brazil, containing about 8% protein, predominantly from vegetable sources (RBD(8)). At 70-75days of life, a subset of the pups was treated intraperitoneally with 30mg/kg caffeine for 4days while being tested according to the behavioral model of latent inhibition. Another group was subjected to an electrophysiological recording of the phenomenon known as cortical spreading depression, and the effects of caffeine injected during the recording session were evaluated. Caffeine did not affect cortical spreading depression, but antagonized latent inhibition in both the RBD(8)-malnourished rats and in the well-nourished control group fed a chow diet with 22% protein. This effect of caffeine was not seen in malnourished rats fed a protein-supplemented RBD (protein increased to 22% by increasing the proportion of foodstuffs from vegetable origin; RBD(22) group), suggesting that the amino acid imbalance of this diet may modulate the caffeine effects on latent inhibition. The results indicate a differential effect of caffeine in the latent inhibition behavioral model, as compared to the cortical spreading depression phenomenon, and this effect is influenced by the early nutritional status of the animal. We suggest that caffeine may modulate dopaminergic subcortical receptors participating in attention processes, but does not interact at the cortical level, in a way that would affect cortical spreading depression.

  17. The continuum of spreading depolarizations in acute cortical lesion development: Examining Leão's legacy.

    PubMed

    Hartings, Jed A; Shuttleworth, C William; Kirov, Sergei A; Ayata, Cenk; Hinzman, Jason M; Foreman, Brandon; Andrew, R David; Boutelle, Martyn G; Brennan, K C; Carlson, Andrew P; Dahlem, Markus A; Drenckhahn, Christoph; Dohmen, Christian; Fabricius, Martin; Farkas, Eszter; Feuerstein, Delphine; Graf, Rudolf; Helbok, Raimund; Lauritzen, Martin; Major, Sebastian; Oliveira-Ferreira, Ana I; Richter, Frank; Rosenthal, Eric S; Sakowitz, Oliver W; Sánchez-Porras, Renán; Santos, Edgar; Schöll, Michael; Strong, Anthony J; Urbach, Anja; Westover, M Brandon; Winkler, Maren Kl; Witte, Otto W; Woitzik, Johannes; Dreier, Jens P

    2016-01-01

    A modern understanding of how cerebral cortical lesions develop after acute brain injury is based on Aristides Leão's historic discoveries of spreading depression and asphyxial/anoxic depolarization. Treated as separate entities for decades, we now appreciate that these events define a continuum of spreading mass depolarizations, a concept that is central to understanding their pathologic effects. Within minutes of acute severe ischemia, the onset of persistent depolarization triggers the breakdown of ion homeostasis and development of cytotoxic edema. These persistent changes are diagnosed as diffusion restriction in magnetic resonance imaging and define the ischemic core. In delayed lesion growth, transient spreading depolarizations arise spontaneously in the ischemic penumbra and induce further persistent depolarization and excitotoxic damage, progressively expanding the ischemic core. The causal role of these waves in lesion development has been proven by real-time monitoring of electrophysiology, blood flow, and cytotoxic edema. The spreading depolarization continuum further applies to other models of acute cortical lesions, suggesting that it is a universal principle of cortical lesion development. These pathophysiologic concepts establish a working hypothesis for translation to human disease, where complex patterns of depolarizations are observed in acute brain injury and appear to mediate and signal ongoing secondary damage.

  18. [The Effect of Cortical Spreading Depression Wave on EEG Spectral Power Anaesthesed and Conscious Rats].

    PubMed

    Koroleva, V I; Sakharov, D S; Bogdanov, A V

    2016-01-01

    EEG power changes in anaesthetized and conscious rats were studied (under repeated experiments) in wide frequency band (0.1-200 Hz) during cortical spreading depression wave (SD). In anaesthetized rats the decrease of EEG spectral power was shown through all diapasons under consideration. The most pronounced decay of the EEG power was marked in the 30-40 Hz band (27.3 ± 18.5, p = 2.46 x 10-(11)). In other frequency ranges the power decrease was less but its significance remained high. In conscious rats the simultaneous decay of the EEG power from 20 to 100 Hz range was also the most informative index of SD wave. The maximum power loss was found for band 30-40 Hz (11.2 ± 7.8, p = 2.55 x 10(-7)). It was shown that besides of EEG power decay the development of SD wave was characterized by the appearance of high frequency activity in front of SD and at the end of it. The increase of high-frequency activity in front of SD wave appeared in the ipsilateral hemisphere and moved along the cortex with the velocity of the SD wave itself. However the bursts of high frequency activity at the end of unilateral SD occurred simultaneously in both hemispheres and lasted 1.5-2.5 min. Findings contribute to detection of SD wave on basis of EEG spectral analysis.

  19. Geometry Shapes Propagation: Assessing the Presence and Absence of Cortical Symmetries through a Computational Model of Cortical Spreading Depression

    PubMed Central

    Kroos, Julia M.; Diez, Ibai; Cortes, Jesus M.; Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Gerardo-Giorda, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD), a depolarization wave which originates in the visual cortex and travels toward the frontal lobe, has been suggested to be one neural correlate of aura migraine. To the date, little is known about the mechanisms which can trigger or stop aura migraine. Here, to shed some light on this problem and, under the hypothesis that CSD might mediate aura migraine, we aim to study different aspects favoring or disfavoring the propagation of CSD. In particular, by using a computational neuronal model distributed throughout a realistic cortical mesh, we study the role that the geometry has in shaping CSD. Our results are two-fold: first, we found significant differences in the propagation traveling patterns of CSD, both intra and inter-hemispherically, revealing important asymmetries in the propagation profile. Second, we developed methods able to identify brain regions featuring a peculiar behavior during CSD propagation. Our study reveals dynamical aspects of CSD, which, if applied to subject-specific cortical geometry, might shed some light on how to differentiate between healthy subjects and those suffering migraine. PMID:26869913

  20. Geometry Shapes Propagation: Assessing the Presence and Absence of Cortical Symmetries through a Computational Model of Cortical Spreading Depression.

    PubMed

    Kroos, Julia M; Diez, Ibai; Cortes, Jesus M; Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Gerardo-Giorda, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD), a depolarization wave which originates in the visual cortex and travels toward the frontal lobe, has been suggested to be one neural correlate of aura migraine. To the date, little is known about the mechanisms which can trigger or stop aura migraine. Here, to shed some light on this problem and, under the hypothesis that CSD might mediate aura migraine, we aim to study different aspects favoring or disfavoring the propagation of CSD. In particular, by using a computational neuronal model distributed throughout a realistic cortical mesh, we study the role that the geometry has in shaping CSD. Our results are two-fold: first, we found significant differences in the propagation traveling patterns of CSD, both intra and inter-hemispherically, revealing important asymmetries in the propagation profile. Second, we developed methods able to identify brain regions featuring a peculiar behavior during CSD propagation. Our study reveals dynamical aspects of CSD, which, if applied to subject-specific cortical geometry, might shed some light on how to differentiate between healthy subjects and those suffering migraine.

  1. Diffuse optical correlation tomography of cerebral blood flow during cortical spreading depression in rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Yu, Guoqiang; Furuya, Daisuke; Greenberg, Joel; Yodh, Arjun; Durduran, Turgut

    2006-02-01

    Diffuse optical correlation methods were adapted for three-dimensional (3D) tomography of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in small animal models. The image reconstruction was optimized using a noise model for diffuse correlation tomography which enabled better data selection and regularization. The tomographic approach was demonstrated with simulated data and during in-vivo cortical spreading depression (CSD) in rat brain. Three-dimensional images of CBF were obtained through intact skull in tissues(~4mm) deep below the cortex.

  2. Cortical spreading ischaemia is a novel process involved in ischaemic damage in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Jens P; Major, Sebastian; Manning, Andrew; Woitzik, Johannes; Drenckhahn, Chistoph; Steinbrink, Jens; Tolias, Christos; Oliveira-Ferreira, Ana I; Fabricius, Martin; Hartings, Jed A; Vajkoczy, Peter; Lauritzen, Martin; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Bohner, Georg; Strong, Anthony J

    2009-07-01

    The term cortical spreading depolarization (CSD) describes a wave of mass neuronal depolarization associated with net influx of cations and water. Clusters of prolonged CSDs were measured time-locked to progressive ischaemic damage in human cortex. CSD induces tone alterations in resistance vessels, causing either transient hyperperfusion (physiological haemodynamic response) in healthy tissue; or hypoperfusion [inverse haemodynamic response = cortical spreading ischaemia (CSI)] in tissue at risk for progressive damage, which has so far only been shown experimentally. Here, we performed a prospective, multicentre study in 13 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, using novel subdural opto-electrode technology for simultaneous laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and direct current-electrocorticography, combined with measurements of tissue partial pressure of oxygen (ptiO(2)). Regional cerebral blood flow and electrocorticography were simultaneously recorded in 417 CSDs. Isolated CSDs occurred in 12 patients and were associated with either physiological, absent or inverse haemodynamic responses. Whereas the physiological haemodynamic response caused tissue hyperoxia, the inverse response led to tissue hypoxia. Clusters of prolonged CSDs were measured in five patients in close proximity to structural brain damage as assessed by neuroimaging. Clusters were associated with CSD-induced spreading hypoperfusions, which were significantly longer in duration (up to 144 min) than those of isolated CSDs. Thus, oxygen depletion caused by the inverse haemodynamic response may contribute to the establishment of clusters of prolonged CSDs and lesion progression. Combined electrocorticography and perfusion monitoring also revealed a characteristic vascular signature that might be used for non-invasive detection of CSD. Low-frequency vascular fluctuations (LF-VF) (f < 0.1 Hz), detectable by functional imaging methods, are determined by the brain's resting neuronal activity

  3. NR2A contributes to genesis and propagation of cortical spreading depression in rats

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Fan; Du, Ruoxing; Li, Yi; Quinn, John P; Wang, Minyan

    2016-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a transient propagating excitation of synaptic activity followed by depression, which is implicated in migraine. Increasing evidence points to an essential role of NR2A-containing NMDA receptors in CSD propagation in vitro; however, whether these receptors mediate CSD genesis in vivo requires clarification and the role of NR2A on CSD propagation is still under debate. Using in vivo CSD in rats with electrophysiology and in vitro CSD in chick retina with intrinsic optical imaging, we addressed the role of NR2A in CSD. We demonstrated that NVP-AAM077, a potent antagonist for NR2A-containing receptors, perfused through microdialysis probes, markedly reduced cortex susceptibility to CSD, but also reduced magnitude of CSD genesis in rats. Additionally, NVP-AAM077 at 0.3 nmol perfused into the contralateral ventricle, considerably suppressed the magnitude of CSD propagation wave and propagation rate in rats. This reduction in CSD propagation was also observed with TCN-201, a negative allosteric modulator selective for NR2A, at 3 μM, in the chick retina. Our data provides strong evidence that NR2A subunit contributes to CSD genesis and propagation, suggesting drugs selectively antagonizing NR2A-containing receptors might constitute a highly specific strategy treating CSD associated migraine with a likely better safety profile. PMID:27001011

  4. NR2A contributes to genesis and propagation of cortical spreading depression in rats.

    PubMed

    Bu, Fan; Du, Ruoxing; Li, Yi; Quinn, John P; Wang, Minyan

    2016-03-22

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a transient propagating excitation of synaptic activity followed by depression, which is implicated in migraine. Increasing evidence points to an essential role of NR2A-containing NMDA receptors in CSD propagation in vitro; however, whether these receptors mediate CSD genesis in vivo requires clarification and the role of NR2A on CSD propagation is still under debate. Using in vivo CSD in rats with electrophysiology and in vitro CSD in chick retina with intrinsic optical imaging, we addressed the role of NR2A in CSD. We demonstrated that NVP-AAM077, a potent antagonist for NR2A-containing receptors, perfused through microdialysis probes, markedly reduced cortex susceptibility to CSD, but also reduced magnitude of CSD genesis in rats. Additionally, NVP-AAM077 at 0.3 nmol perfused into the contralateral ventricle, considerably suppressed the magnitude of CSD propagation wave and propagation rate in rats. This reduction in CSD propagation was also observed with TCN-201, a negative allosteric modulator selective for NR2A, at 3 μM, in the chick retina. Our data provides strong evidence that NR2A subunit contributes to CSD genesis and propagation, suggesting drugs selectively antagonizing NR2A-containing receptors might constitute a highly specific strategy treating CSD associated migraine with a likely better safety profile.

  5. Photothrombotic infarction triggers multiple episodes of cortical spreading depression in distant brain regions.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, W D; Feng, Z C; Leistra, H; Watson, B D; Rosenthal, M

    1994-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine whether cortical spreading depression occurs outside of the infarct produced by photothrombotic vascular occlusion, and also the direction of spreading. Focal cerebral thrombotic infarction was produced by irradiating the exposed skull of anesthetized rats with green light (560 nm) following systemic injection of rose bengal dye. At proximal sites (approximately 2 mm anterior to the infarct border), transient, severe hyperemic episodes (THEs) lasting 1-2 min were intermittently recorded. THE frequency was greatest in the first hour and declined over a 3-h period. THEs were accompanied (and usually preceded) by a precipitous rise in [K+]0 (from approximately 3 to > 40 mM) and were associated with increases in local tissue oxygen tension (tPO2). Following the rise in [K+]0, clearance of [K+]0 to its pre-THE baseline preceded baseline recovery of CBF. These data indicate that THEs were reactive to physiologic events resembling cortical spreading depression (CSD), which provoked increased demand for oxygen and blood flow, and which spread from proximal sites to areas more distal (approximately 4 mm) from the rim of the evolving infarct. MK-801 (1 mg/kg, i.v.) inhibited subsequent CSD-like episodes. We conclude that photothrombosis-induced ischemia provoked CSD which was triggered either within the infarct core or in the infarct rim and spread to more distal sites. Whether multiple episodes of CSD during infarct generation are responsible for the remote consequences of focal brain injury remains to be determined.

  6. Changes in Mice Brain Spontaneous Electrical Activity during Cortical Spreading Depression due to Mobile Phone Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Samera M.; Mohamed, Ehab I.; Dawood, Abdel-Fattah B.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate changes in spontaneous EEG activity during cortical spreading depression (CSD) in mice brain. The cortical region of anaesthetized mice were exposed to the electromagnetic fields (EMFs) emitted from a mobile phone (MP, 935.2-960.2 MHz, 41.8 mW/cm2). The effect of EMFs on EEG was investigated before and after exposure to different stimuli (MP, 2% KCl, and MP & 2% KCl). The records of brain spontaneous EEG activity, slow potential changes (SPC), and spindle shaped firings were obtained through an interfaced computer. The results showed increases in the amplitude of evoked spindles by about 87%, 17%, and 226% for MP, 2% KCl, and MP & 2% KCl; respectively, as compared to values for the control group. These results showed that the evoked spindle is a more sensitive indicator of the effect of exposure to EMFs from MP. PMID:23675079

  7. Cortical spreading depression in traumatic brain injuries: is there a role for astrocytes?

    PubMed

    Torrente, Daniel; Cabezas, Ricardo; Avila, Marco Fidel; García-Segura, Luis Miguel; Barreto, George E; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2014-04-17

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a presumably pathophysiological phenomenon that interrupts local cortical function for periods of minutes to hours. This phenomenon is important due to its association with different neurological disorders such as migraine, malignant stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Glial cells, especially astrocytes, play an important role in the regulation of CSD and in the protection of neurons under brain trauma. The correlation of TBI with CSD and the astrocytic function under these conditions remain unclear. This review discusses the possible link of TBI and CSD and its implication for neuronal survival. Additionally, we highlight the importance of astrocytic function for brain protection, and suggest possible therapeutic strategies targeting astrocytes to improve the outcome following TBI-associated CSD.

  8. A multidomain model for ionic electrodiffusion and osmosis with an application to cortical spreading depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yoichiro

    2015-07-01

    Ionic electrodiffusion and osmotic water flow are central processes in many physiological systems. We formulate a system of partial differential equations that governs ion movement and water flow in biological tissue. A salient feature of this model is that it satisfies a free energy identity, ensuring the thermodynamic consistency of the model. A numerical scheme is developed for the model in one spatial dimension and is applied to a model of cortical spreading depression, a propagating breakdown of ionic and cell volume homeostasis in the brain.

  9. Cortical High-Density Counterstream Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Markov, Nikola T.; Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária; Van Essen, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Small-world networks provide an appealing description of cortical architecture owing to their capacity for integration and segregation combined with an economy of connectivity. Previous reports of low-density interareal graphs and apparent small-world properties are challenged by data that reveal high-density cortical graphs in which economy of connections is achieved by weight heterogeneity and distance-weight correlations. These properties define a model that predicts many binary and weighted features of the cortical network including a core-periphery, a typical feature of self-organizing information processing systems. Feedback and feedforward pathways between areas exhibit a dual counterstream organization, and their integration into local circuits constrains cortical computation. Here, we propose a bow-tie representation of interareal architecture derived from the hierarchical laminar weights of pathways between the high-efficiency dense core and periphery. PMID:24179228

  10. Computational study on cortical spreading depression based on a generalized cellular automaton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shangbin; Hu, Lele; Li, Bing; Xu, Changcheng; Liu, Qian

    2009-02-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is an important neurophysiological phenomenon correlating with some neural disorders, such as migraine, cerebral ischemia and epilepsy. By now, we are still not clear about the mechanisms of CSD's initiation and propagation, also the relevance between CSD and those neural diseases. Nevertheless, characterization of CSD, especially the spatiotemporal evolution, will promote the understanding of the CSD's nature and mechanisms. Besides the previous experimental work on charactering the spatiotemporal evolution of CSD in rats by optical intrinsic signal imaging, a computational study based on a generalized cellular automaton (CA) model was proposed here. In the model, we exploited a generalized neighborhood connection rule: a central CA cell is related with a group of surrounding CA cells with different weight coefficients. By selecting special parameters, the generalized CA model could be transformed to the traditional CA models with von Neumann, Moore and hexagon neighborhood connection means. Hence, the new model covered several properties of CSD simulated in traditional CA models: 1) expanding from the origin site like a circular wave; 2) annihilation of two waves traveling in opposite directions after colliding; 3) wavefront of CSD breaking and recovering when and after encountering an obstacle. By setting different refractory period in the different CA lattice field, different connection coefficient in different direction within the defined neighborhood, inhomogeneous propagation of CSD was simulated with high fidelity. The computational results were analogous to the reported time-varying CSD waves by optical imaging. So, the generalized CA model would be useful to study CSD because of its intuitive appeal and computational efficiency.

  11. Spreading Photoparoxysmal EEG Response is Associated with an Abnormal Cortical Excitability Pattern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siniatchkin, Michael; Groppa, Sergey; Jerosch, Bettina; Muhle, Hiltrud; Kurth, Christoph; Shepherd, Alex J.; Siebner, Hartwig; Stephani, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Photosensitivity or photoparoxysmal response (PPR) is a highly heritable electroencephalographic trait characterized by an abnormal cortical response to intermittent photic stimulation (IPS). In PPR-positive individuals, IPS induces spikes, spike-waves or intermittent slow waves. The PPR may be restricted to posterior visual areas (i.e. local PPR…

  12. Poloxamer-188 and citicoline provide neuronal membrane integrity and protect membrane stability in cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Timur; Eylen, Alpaslan; Lule, Sevda; Erdener, Sefik Evren; Vural, Atay; Karatas, Hulya; Ozveren, Mehmet Faik; Dalkara, Turgay; Gursoy-Ozdemir, Yasemin

    2015-01-01

    Under pathological conditions such as brain trauma, subarachnoid hemorrhage and stroke, cortical spreading depression (CSD) or peri-infarct depolarizations contribute to brain damage in animal models of neurological disorders as well as in human neurological diseases. CSD causes transient megachannel opening on the neuronal membrane, which may compromise neuronal survival under pathological conditions. Poloxamer-188 (P-188) and citicoline are neuroprotectants with membrane sealing properties. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of P-188 and citicoline on the neuronal megachannel opening induced by CSD in the mouse brain. We have monitored megachannel opening with propidium iodide, a membrane impermeable fluorescent dye and, demonstrate that P-188 and citicoline strikingly decreased CSD-induced neuronal PI influx in cortex and hippocampal dentate gyrus. Therefore, these agents may be providing neuroprotection by blocking megachannel opening, which may be related to their membrane sealing action and warrant further investigation for treatment of traumatic brain injury and ischemic stroke.

  13. Critical role of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors in cortical spreading depression

    PubMed Central

    Tozzi, Alessandro; de Iure, Antonio; Di Filippo, Massimiliano; Costa, Cinzia; Caproni, Stefano; Pisani, Antonio; Bonsi, Paola; Picconi, Barbara; Cupini, Letizia M.; Materazzi, Serena; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Sarchielli, Paola; Calabresi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a key pathogenetic step in migraine with aura. Dysfunctions of voltage-dependent and receptor-operated channels have been implicated in the generation of CSD and in the pathophysiology of migraine. Although a known correlation exists between migraine and release of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), the possibility that CGRP is involved in CSD has not been examined in detail. We analyzed the pharmacological mechanisms underlying CSD and investigated the possibility that endogenous CGRP contributes to this phenomenon. CSD was analyzed in rat neocortical slices by imaging of the intrinsic optical signal. CSD was measured as the percentage of the maximal surface of a cortical slice covered by the propagation of intrinsic optical signal changes during an induction episode. Reproducible CSD episodes were induced through repetitive elevations of extracellular potassium concentration. AMPA glutamate receptor antagonism did not inhibit CSD, whereas NMDA receptor antagonism did inhibit CSD. Blockade of voltage-dependent sodium channels by TTX also reduced CSD. CSD was also decreased by the antiepileptic drug topiramate, but not by carbamazepine. Interestingly, endogenous CGRP was released in the cortical tissue in a calcium-dependent manner during CSD, and three different CGRP receptor antagonists had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on CSD, suggesting a critical role of CGRP in this phenomenon. Our findings show that both glutamate NMDA receptors and voltage-dependent sodium channels play roles in CSD. They also demonstrate that CGRP antagonism reduces CSD, supporting the possible use of drugs targeting central CGRP receptors as antimigraine agents. PMID:23112192

  14. Effects of sciatic nerve stimulation on the propagation of cortical spreading depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Yu, Zhidong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Li, Pengcheng

    2008-02-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is an important pathological model of migraine and is related to other neural disorders, such as cerebral ischemia and epilepsy. It has been reported that brain stimulation is a quite effective way to treat neural diseases. However, direct stimulation could cause harm to brain. If peripheral nerve stimulation could have the same treatment, it would be essential to investigate the mechanisms of peripheral nerve and the study of sciatic nerve stimulation would have profound clinical meaning. In this paper, we used optical intrinsic signal imaging (OISI) and extracellular electrophysiologic recording techniques to study the effects of sciatic nerve stimulation on the propagation of CSD. We found that: (1) continuous sciatic nerve stimulation on rats caused a decrease in light intensity on the whole cortex, which meant an increase in cerebral blood volume(CBV); (2) the spreading velocity of CSD declined from 3.63+/- 0.272 mm/min to 3.06+/-0.260 mm/min during sciatic nerve stimulation, compared with that without sciatic nerve stimulation. In summary, data suggests that sciatic nerve stimulation elicits a response of cortex and causes a slowdown in the propagation of CSD.

  15. A Mathematical Model of the Metabolic and Perfusion Effects on Cortical Spreading Depression

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Joshua C.; Brennan, Kevin C.; He, Dongdong; Huang, Huaxiong; Miura, Robert M.; Wilson, Phillip L.; Wylie, Jonathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a slow-moving ionic and metabolic disturbance that propagates in cortical brain tissue. In addition to massive cellular depolarizations, CSD also involves significant changes in perfusion and metabolism—aspects of CSD that had not been modeled and are important to traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage, stroke, and migraine. In this study, we develop a mathematical model for CSD where we focus on modeling the features essential to understanding the implications of neurovascular coupling during CSD. In our model, the sodium-potassium–ATPase, mainly responsible for ionic homeostasis and active during CSD, operates at a rate that is dependent on the supply of oxygen. The supply of oxygen is determined by modeling blood flow through a lumped vascular tree with an effective local vessel radius that is controlled by the extracellular potassium concentration. We show that during CSD, the metabolic demands of the cortex exceed the physiological limits placed on oxygen delivery, regardless of vascular constriction or dilation. However, vasoconstriction and vasodilation play important roles in the propagation of CSD and its recovery. Our model replicates the qualitative and quantitative behavior of CSD—vasoconstriction, oxygen depletion, extracellular potassium elevation, prolonged depolarization—found in experimental studies. We predict faster, longer duration CSD in vivo than in vitro due to the contribution of the vasculature. Our results also help explain some of the variability of CSD between species and even within the same animal. These results have clinical and translational implications, as they allow for more precise in vitro, in vivo, and in silico exploration of a phenomenon broadly relevant to neurological disease. PMID:23967075

  16. Physical exercise versus fluoxetine: antagonistic effects on cortical spreading depression in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mirelle Costa Monteiro, Heloísa; Lima Barreto-Silva, Nathália; Elizabete Dos Santos, Gracyelle; de Santana Santos, Amanda; Séfora Bezerra Sousa, Mariana; Amâncio-Dos-Santos, Ângela

    2015-09-05

    The antidepressant fluoxetine and physical exercise exert similar effects on the serotoninergic system by increasing brain serotonin availability, and both show antagonistic action on cortical excitability. Here we provide the first assessment of the interaction of the two together on cortical spreading depression (CSD) in young adult rats. Wistar rats (40-60 days of life) received fluoxetine (10mg/kg/d, orogastrically) or an equivalent volume of water. Half of the animals from each condition were assigned to perform physical exercise in a treadmill, and the other half formed the sedentary (non-treadmill) control groups. Body parameters (Lee index and thoracic and abdominal circumferences) and the velocity of CSD propagation were investigated. Fluoxetine+exercise animals had less weight gain (78.68±3.19g) than either the fluoxetine-only (93.34±4.77g) or exercise-only group (97.04±3.48g), but body parameters did not differ among them. The velocity of CSD propagation was reduced in the fluoxetine-only and exercise-only groups compared to sedentary water controls (3.24±0.39mm/min). For the fluoxetine+exercise group, CSD velocity values were significantly lower (2.92±0.22mm/min) than for fluoxetine only (3.03±0.35mm/min); however, they were similar to values for the exercise-only group (2.96±0.23mm/min). These findings confirm the similar effects of fluoxetine and exercise and suggest a greater effect of physical exercise in reducing brain excitability.

  17. A mathematical model of the metabolic and perfusion effects on cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Joshua C; Brennan, Kevin C; He, Dongdong; Huang, Huaxiong; Miura, Robert M; Wilson, Phillip L; Wylie, Jonathan J

    2013-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a slow-moving ionic and metabolic disturbance that propagates in cortical brain tissue. In addition to massive cellular depolarizations, CSD also involves significant changes in perfusion and metabolism-aspects of CSD that had not been modeled and are important to traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage, stroke, and migraine. In this study, we develop a mathematical model for CSD where we focus on modeling the features essential to understanding the implications of neurovascular coupling during CSD. In our model, the sodium-potassium-ATPase, mainly responsible for ionic homeostasis and active during CSD, operates at a rate that is dependent on the supply of oxygen. The supply of oxygen is determined by modeling blood flow through a lumped vascular tree with an effective local vessel radius that is controlled by the extracellular potassium concentration. We show that during CSD, the metabolic demands of the cortex exceed the physiological limits placed on oxygen delivery, regardless of vascular constriction or dilation. However, vasoconstriction and vasodilation play important roles in the propagation of CSD and its recovery. Our model replicates the qualitative and quantitative behavior of CSD--vasoconstriction, oxygen depletion, extracellular potassium elevation, prolonged depolarization--found in experimental studies. We predict faster, longer duration CSD in vivo than in vitro due to the contribution of the vasculature. Our results also help explain some of the variability of CSD between species and even within the same animal. These results have clinical and translational implications, as they allow for more precise in vitro, in vivo, and in silico exploration of a phenomenon broadly relevant to neurological disease.

  18. Aquaporin-4 Regulates the Velocity and Frequency of Cortical Spreading Depression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiaoming; Smith, Alex J.; Jin, Byung-Ju; Zador, Zsolt; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Verkman, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    The astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) regulates extracellular space (ECS) K+ concentration ([K+]e) and volume dynamics following neuronal activation. Here, we investigated how AQP4-mediated changes in [K+]e and ECS volume affect the velocity, frequency and amplitude of cortical spreading depression (CSD) depolarizations produced by surface KCl application in wild-type (AQP4+/+) and AQP4-deficient (AQP4−/−) mice. Contrary to initial expectations, both the velocity and frequency of CSD were significantly reduced in AQP4−/− mice when compared to AQP4+/+ mice, by 22% and 32%, respectively. Measurement of [K+]e with K+-selective microelectrodes demonstrated an increase to ~35 mM during spreading depolarizations in both AQP4+/+ and AQP4−/− mice, but the rates of [K+]e increase (3.5 vs. 1.5 mM/s) and reuptake (t1/2 33 vs. 61 s) were significantly reduced in AQP4−/− mice. ECS volume fraction measured by trimethylammonium iontophoresis was greatly reduced during depolarizations from 0.18 to 0.053 in AQP4+/+ mice, and 0.23 to 0.063 in AQP4−/− mice. Analysis of the experimental data using a mathematical model of CSD propagation suggested that the reduced velocity of CSD depolarizations in AQP4−/− mice was primarily a consequence of the slowed increase in [K+]e during neuronal depolarization. These results demonstrate that AQP4 effects on [K+]e and ECS volume dynamics accelerate CSD propagation. PMID:25944186

  19. Elicitation interval dependent spatiotemporal evolution of cortical spreading depression waves revealed by optical intrinsic signal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shangbin; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Li, Pengcheng

    2007-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the variation of propagation patterns of successive cortical spreading depression (CSD) waves induced by K + or pinprick in rat cortex. In the K + induction group, 18 Sprague-Dawley rats under Î+/--chloralose/urethane anesthesia were used to elicit CSD by 1 M KCl solution in the frontal cortex. Optical intrinsic signal imaging (OISI) at an isosbestic point of hemoglobin (550 nm) was applied to examine regional cerebral blood volume (CBV) changes in the parieto-occipital cortex. In 6 of the 18 rats, OISI was performed in conjunction with DC potential recording of the cortex. The results of this group were reported previously. In the pinprick group, 6 rats were used to induce CSD by pinprick with 8 min interval, and the other 6 rats were pricked with 4 min. CBV changes during CSD appeared as repetitive propagation of wave-like hyperemia at a speed of 3.7+/-0.4 mm/min, which was characterized by a significant negative peak (-14.3+/-3.2%) in the reflectance signal. Except for the first CSD wave, the following waves don't spread fully in the observed cortex all the time and they might abort in the medial area. Independent on the stimulation of pinprick or K+, a short interval of the current CSD to the last CSD no more than 4 min would induce the current CSD be partially propagated. For the first time, the data reveals the time-varying propagation patterns of CSD waves might be affected by the interval between CSD waves. The results suggest that the propagation patterns of a series of CSD waves are time-varying in different regions of rat cortex, and the variation is related to the interval between CSD waves.

  20. In vivo imaging reveals that pregabalin inhibits cortical spreading depression and propagation to subcortical brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Stuart M.; Bohnet, Barry; LeDue, Jeffrey; Yung, Andrew C.; Garcia, Esperanza; Tyson, John R.; Alles, Sascha R. A.; Han, Huili; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Kozlowski, Piotr; MacVicar, Brian A.; Snutch, Terrance P.

    2017-01-01

    Migraine is characterized by severe headaches that can be preceded by an aura likely caused by cortical spreading depression (SD). The antiepileptic pregabalin (Lyrica) shows clinical promise for migraine therapy, although its efficacy and mechanism of action are unclear. As detected by diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in wild-type (WT) mice, the acute systemic administration of pregabalin increased the threshold for SD initiation in vivo. In familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutant mice expressing human mutations (R192Q and S218L) in the CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channel subunit, pregabalin slowed the speed of SD propagation in vivo. Acute systemic administration of pregabalin in vivo also selectively prevented the migration of SD into subcortical striatal and hippocampal regions in the R192Q strain that exhibits a milder phenotype and gain of CaV2.1 channel function. At the cellular level, pregabalin inhibited glutamatergic synaptic transmission differentially in WT, R192Q, and S218L mice. The study describes a DW-MRI analysis method for tracking the progression of SD and provides support and a mechanism of action for pregabalin as a possible effective therapy in the treatment of migraine. PMID:28223480

  1. Computational model of cerebral blood flow redistribution during cortical spreading depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verisokin, Andrey Y.; Verveyko, Darya V.; Postnov, Dmitry E.

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades modelling studies on cortical spreading depression (CSD) and migraine waves successfully contributed to formation of modern view on these fundamental phenomena of brain physiology. However, due to the extreme complexity of object under study (brain cortex) and the diversity of involved physiological pathways, the development of new mathematical models of CSD is still a very relevant and challenging research problem. In our study we follow the functional modelling approach aimed to map the action of known physiological pathways to the specific nonlinear mechanisms that govern formation and evolution of CSD wave patterns. Specifically, we address the role of cerebral blood flow (CBF) redistribution that is caused by excessive neuronal activity by means of neurovascular coupling and mediates a spatial pattern of oxygen and glucose delivery. This in turn changes the local metabolic status of neural tissue. To build the model we simplify the web of known cell-to-cell interactions within a neurovascular unit by selecting the most relevant ones, such as local neuron-induced elevation of extracellular potassium concentration and biphasic response of arteriole radius. We propose the lumped description of distance-dependent hemodynamic coupling that fits the most recent experimental findings.

  2. Effects of the nitric oxide donor, DEA/NO on cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Obrenovitch, T P; Urenjak, J

    2003-06-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a transient disruption of local ionic homeostasis that may promote migraine attacks and the progression of stroke lesions. We reported previously that the local inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis with Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) delayed markedly the initiation of the recovery of ionic homeostasis from CSD. Here we describe a novel method for selective, controlled generation of exogenous NO in a functioning brain region. It is based on microdialysis perfusion of the NO donor, 2-(N,N-diethylamino)-diazenolate-2-oxide (DEA/NO). As DEA/NO does not generate NO at alkaline pH, and as the brain has a strong acid-base buffering capacity, DEA/NO was perfused in a medium adjusted at alkaline (but unbuffered) pH. Without DEA/NO, such a microdialysis perfusion medium did not alter CSD. DEA/NO (1, 10 and 100 microM) had little effect on CSD by itself, but it reversed in a concentration-dependent manner the effects of NOS inhibition by 1 mM L-NAME. These data demonstrate that increased formation of endogenous NO associated with CSD is critical for subsequent, rapid recovery of cellular ionic homeostasis. In this case, the molecular targets for NO may be located either on brain cells to suppress mechanisms directly involved in CSD genesis, or on local blood vessels to couple flow to the increased energy demand associated with CSD.

  3. Propagation of cortical spreading depression into the hippocampus: The role of the entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Martens-Mantai, Tanja; Speckmann, Erwin-Josef; Gorji, Ali

    2014-07-22

    Propagation of cortical spreading depression (CSD) to the subcortical structures could be the underlying mechanism of some neurological deficits in migraine with aura. The entorhinal cortex (EC) as a gray matter bridge between the neocortex and subcortical regions plays an important role in this propagation. In vitro combined neocortex-hippocampus brain slices were used to study the propagation pattern of CSD between the neocortex and the hippocampus. The effects of different compounds as well as tetanic electrical stimulations in the EC on propagation of CSD to the hippocampus were investigated. Repetitive induction of CSD by KCl injection in the somatosensory cortex enhanced the probability of CSD entrance to the hippocampus via EC. Local application of AMPA receptor blocker CNQX and cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55212-2 in EC facilitated the propagation of CSD to the hippocampus, whereas application of NMDA receptor blocker APV and GABAA receptor blocker bicuculline in this region reduced the probability of CSD penetration to the hippocampus. Application of tetanic stimulation in EC also facilitated the propagation of CSD entrance to the hippocampus. Our data suggest the importance of synaptic plasticity of EC in filtering the propagation of CSD into subcortical structures and possibly the occurrence of concomitant neurological deficits. Synapse, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Direct, live imaging of cortical spreading depression and anoxic depolarisation using a fluorescent, voltage-sensitive dye

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Eszter; Pratt, Rosalind; Sengpiel, Frank; Obrenovitch, Tihomir P

    2008-01-01

    Perilesion depolarisations, whether transient anoxic depolarisation (AD) or spreading depression (SD), occur in stroke models and in patients with acute brain ischaemia, but their contribution to lesion progression remains unclear. As these phenomena correspond to waves of cellular depolarisation, we have developed a technique for their live imaging with a fluorescent voltage-sensitive (VS) dye (RH-1838). Method development and validation were performed in two different preparations: chicken retina, to avoid any vascular interference; and cranial window exposing the cortical surface of anaesthetised rats. Spreading depression was produced by high-K medium, and AD by complete terminal ischaemia in rats. After dye loading, the preparation was illuminated at its excitation wavelength and fluorescence changes were recorded sequentially with a charge-coupled device camera. No light was recorded when the VS dye was omitted, ruling out the contribution of any endogenous fluorophore. With both preparations, the changes in VS dye fluorescence with SD were analogous to those of the DC (direct current) potential recorded with glass electrodes. Although some blood quenching of the emitted light was identified, the VS dye signatures of SD had a good signal-to-noise ratio and were reproducible. The changes in VS dye fluorescence associated with AD were more complex because of additional interferents, especially transient brain swelling with subsequent shrinkage. However, the kinetics of the AD-associated changes in VS dye fluorescence was also analogous to that of the DC potential. In conclusion, this method provides the imaging equivalent of electrical extracellular DC potential recording, with the SD and AD negative shifts translating directly to fluorescence increase. PMID:17971792

  5. Ignition's glow: Ultra-fast spread of global cortical activity accompanying local "ignitions" in visual cortex during conscious visual perception.

    PubMed

    Noy, N; Bickel, S; Zion-Golumbic, E; Harel, M; Golan, T; Davidesco, I; Schevon, C A; McKhann, G M; Goodman, R R; Schroeder, C E; Mehta, A D; Malach, R

    2015-09-01

    Despite extensive research, the spatiotemporal span of neuronal activations associated with the emergence of a conscious percept is still debated. The debate can be formulated in the context of local vs. global models, emphasizing local activity in visual cortex vs. a global fronto-parietal "workspace" as the key mechanisms of conscious visual perception. These alternative models lead to differential predictions with regard to the precise magnitude, timing and anatomical spread of neuronal activity during conscious perception. Here we aimed to test a specific aspect of these predictions in which local and global models appear to differ - namely the extent to which fronto-parietal regions modulate their activity during task performance under similar perceptual states. So far the main experimental results relevant to this debate have been obtained from non-invasive methods and led to conflicting interpretations. Here we examined these alternative predictions through large-scale intracranial measurements (Electrocorticogram - ECoG) in 43 patients and 4445 recording sites. Both ERP and broadband high frequency (50-150 Hz - BHF) responses were examined through the entire cortex during a simple 1-back visual recognition memory task. Our results reveal short latency intense visual responses, localized first in early visual cortex followed (at ∼200 ms) by higher order visual areas, but failed to show significant delayed (300 ms) visual activations. By contrast, oddball image repeat events, linked to overt motor responses, were associated with a significant increase in a delayed (300 ms) peak of BHF power in fronto-parietal cortex. Comparing BHF responses with ERP revealed an additional peak in the ERP response - having a similar latency to the well-studied P3 scalp EEG response. Posterior and temporal regions demonstrated robust visual category selectivity. An unexpected observation was that high-order visual cortex responses were essentially concurrent (at ∼200 ms

  6. Cytoarchitecture-Dependent Decrease in Propagation Velocity of Cortical Spreading Depression in the Rat Insular Cortex Revealed by Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Satoshi; Mizoguchi, Naoko; Aoki, Ryuhei; Cui, Yilong; Koshikawa, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Masayuki

    2016-04-01

    Cortical spreading depression (SD) is a self-propagating wave of depolarization accompanied by a substantial disturbance of the ionic distribution between the intra- and extracellular compartments. Glial cells, including astrocytes, play critical roles in maintenance of the extracellular environment, including ionic distribution. Therefore, SD propagation in the cerebral cortex may depend on the density of astrocytes. The present study aimed to examine the profile of SD propagation in the insular cortex (IC), which is located between the neocortex and paleocortex and is where the density of astrocytes gradually changes. The velocity of SD propagation in the neocortex, including the somatosensory, motor, and granular insular cortices (5.7 mm/min), was higher than that (2.8 mm/min) in the paleocortex (agranular insular and piriform cortices). Around thick vessels, including the middle cerebral artery, SD propagation was frequently delayed and sometimes disappeared. Immunohistological analysis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) demonstrated the sparse distribution of astrocytes in the somatosensory cortex and the IC dorsal to the rhinal fissure, whereas the ventral IC showed a higher density of astrocytes. These results suggest that cortical cytoarchitectonic features, which possibly involve the distribution of astrocytes, are crucial for regulating the velocity of SD propagation in the cerebral cortex.

  7. δ-Opioid receptor agonists inhibit migraine-related hyperalgesia, aversive state and cortical spreading depression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Amynah A; Smith, Monique L; Zyuzin, Jekaterina; Charles, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Migraine is an extraordinarily common brain disorder for which treatment options continue to be limited. Agonists that activate the δ-opioid receptor may be promising for the treatment of migraine as they are highly effective for the treatment of chronic rather than acute pain, do not induce hyperalgesia, have low abuse potential and have anxiolytic and antidepressant properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of δ-opioid receptor agonists for migraine by characterizing their effects in mouse migraine models. Experimental Approach Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed in mice treated with acute and chronic doses of nitroglycerin (NTG), a known human migraine trigger. Conditioned place aversion to NTG was also measured as a model of migraine-associated negative affect. In addition, we assessed evoked cortical spreading depression (CSD), an established model of migraine aura, in a thinned skull preparation. Key Results NTG evoked acute and chronic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in mice, as well as conditioned place aversion. Three different δ-opioid receptor agonists, SNC80, ARM390 and JNJ20788560, significantly reduced NTG-evoked hyperalgesia. SNC80 also abolished NTG-induced conditioned place aversion, suggesting that δ-opioid receptor activation may also alleviate the negative emotional state associated with migraine. We also found that SNC80 significantly attenuated CSD, a model that is considered predictive of migraine preventive therapies. Conclusions and Implications These data show that δ-opioid receptor agonists modulate multiple basic mechanisms associated with migraine, indicating that δ-opioid receptors are a promising therapeutic target for this disorder. PMID:24467301

  8. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations.

    PubMed

    Timme, Nicholas M; Ito, Shinya; Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Nigam, Sunny; Shimono, Masanori; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Hottowy, Pawel; Litke, Alan M; Beggs, John M

    2016-05-01

    Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree) or sends out (out-degree). To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series) and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts) to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to which a neuron

  9. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations

    PubMed Central

    Timme, Nicholas M.; Ito, Shinya; Shimono, Masanori; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Litke, Alan M.; Beggs, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree) or sends out (out-degree). To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series) and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts) to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to which a neuron

  10. Hyperperfusion counteracted by transient rapid vasoconstriction followed by long-lasting oligemia induced by cortical spreading depression in anesthetized mice

    PubMed Central

    Unekawa, Miyuki; Tomita, Yutaka; Toriumi, Haruki; Osada, Takashi; Masamoto, Kazuto; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Itoh, Yoshiaki; Kanno, Iwao; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) involves mass depolarization of neurons and glial cells accompanied with changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and energy metabolism. To further understand the mechanisms of CBF response, we examined the temporal diametric changes in pial arteries, pial veins, and cortical capillaries. In urethane-anesthetized mice, the diameters of these vessels were measured while simultaneously recording rCBF with a laser Doppler flowmeter. We observed a considerable increase in rCBF during depolarization in CSD induced by application of KCl, accompanied by a transient dip of rCBF with marked vasoconstriction of pial arteries, which resembled the response to pin-prick-induced CSD. Arterial constriction diminished or disappeared during the second and third passages of CSD, whereas the rCBF increase was maintained without a transient dip. Long-lasting oligemia with a decrease in the reciprocal of mean transit time of injected dye and mild constriction of pial arteries was observed after several passages of the CSD wave. These results indicate that CSD-induced rCBF changes consist of initial hyperemia with a transient dip and followed by a long-lasting oligemia, partially corresponding to the diametric changes of pial arteries, and further suggest that vessels other than pial arteries, such as intracortical vessels, are involved. PMID:25586145

  11. Basal forebrain degeneration precedes and predicts the cortical spread of Alzheimer's pathology

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Taylor W.; Nathan Spreng, R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Shaw, Leslie M.; Khachaturian, Zaven; Sorensen, Greg; Kuller, Lew; Raichle, Marc; Paul, Steven; Davies, Peter; Fillit, Howard; Hefti, Franz; Holtzman, Davie; Mesulam, M Marcel; Potter, William; Snyder, Peter; Schwartz, Adam; Montine, Tom; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Harvey, Danielle; Bernstein, Matthew; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Landau, Susan; Cairns, Nigel J.; Householder, Erin; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Faber, Kelley; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Thal, Leon; Buckholtz, Neil; Albert, Marylyn; Frank, Richard; Hsiao, John; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; de Toledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D'Agostino, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Terence Z.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H. S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, AnnMarie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging-Yuek; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristine; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Hudson, Leon; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Santulli, Robert B.; Kitzmiller, Tamar J.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Finger, Elizabether; Pasternak, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Drost, Dick; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Schultz, Susan K.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Shim, Hyungsub; Smith, Karen Elizabeth; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Raudin, Lisa; Smith, Amanda; Fargher, Kristin; Raj, Balebail Ashok; Neylan, Thomas; Grafman, Jordan; Davis, Melissa; Morrison, Rosemary; Hayes, Jacqueline; Finley, Shannon; Friedl, Karl; Fleischman, Debra; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; James, Olga; Massoglia, Dino; Fruehling, J. Jay; Harding, Sandra; Peskind, Elaine R.; Petrie, Eric C.; Li, Gail; Yesavage, Jerome A.; Taylor, Joy L.; Furst, Ansgar J.

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable debate whether Alzheimer's disease (AD) originates in basal forebrain or entorhinal cortex. Here we examined whether longitudinal decreases in basal forebrain and entorhinal cortex grey matter volume were interdependent and sequential. In a large cohort of age-matched older adults ranging from cognitively normal to AD, we demonstrate that basal forebrain volume predicts longitudinal entorhinal degeneration. Models of parallel degeneration or entorhinal origin received negligible support. We then integrated volumetric measures with an amyloid biomarker sensitive to pre-symptomatic AD pathology. Comparison between cognitively matched normal adult subgroups, delineated according to the amyloid biomarker, revealed abnormal degeneration in basal forebrain, but not entorhinal cortex. Abnormal degeneration in both basal forebrain and entorhinal cortex was only observed among prodromal (mildly amnestic) individuals. We provide evidence that basal forebrain pathology precedes and predicts both entorhinal pathology and memory impairment, challenging the widely held belief that AD has a cortical origin. PMID:27811848

  12. Prooxidant versus antioxidant brain action of ascorbic acid in well-nourished and malnourished rats as a function of dose: a cortical spreading depression and malondialdehyde analysis.

    PubMed

    Mendes-da-Silva, Rosângela Figueiredo; Lopes-de-Morais, Andréia Albuquerque Cunha; Bandim-da-Silva, Maria Eduarda; Cavalcanti, Gabriela de Araujo; Rodrigues, Ana Rafaela Oliveira; Andrade-da-Costa, Belmira Lara da Silveira; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2014-11-01

    Although ascorbic acid (AA) is an antioxidant, under certain conditions it can facilitate oxidation, which may underlie the opposite actions of AA on brain excitability in distinct seizure models. Here, we investigated whether chronic AA administration during brain development alters cortical excitability as a function of AA dose, as indexed by cortical spreading depression (CSD) and by the levels of lipid peroxidation-induced malondialdehyde. Well-nourished and early-malnourished rats received per gavage 30, 60, or 120 mg/kg/d of AA, saline, or no gavage treatment (naïve group) at postnatal days 7-28. CSD propagation and malondialdehyde levels were analyzed at 30-40 days. Confirming previous observations, CSD velocities were significantly higher in the early-malnourished groups than in the well-nourished groups. AA dose was important: 30 mg/kg/d AA decelerated CSD and reduced malondialdehyde levels, whereas 60 mg/kg/d and 120 mg/kg/d accelerated CSD and augmented malondialdehyde levels compared with the corresponding saline and naïve groups. Our findings reinforce previous suggestion that AA acts as an antioxidant in the brain when administered at low doses, but as a prooxidant at high doses, as indicated by CSD propagation and malondialdehyde levels.

  13. Resistance to High-Stakes Testing Spreads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaeffer, Bob

    2012-01-01

    A rising tide of protest is sweeping across the nation as growing numbers of parents, teachers, administrators and academics take action against high-stakes testing. Instead of test-and-punish policies, which have failed to improve academic performance or equity, the movement is pressing for broader forms of assessment. From Texas to New York and…

  14. Cortical Surface Reconstruction from High-Resolution MR Brain Images

    PubMed Central

    Osechinskiy, Sergey; Kruggel, Frithjof

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of the cerebral cortex from magnetic resonance (MR) images is an important step in quantitative analysis of the human brain structure, for example, in sulcal morphometry and in studies of cortical thickness. Existing cortical reconstruction approaches are typically optimized for standard resolution (~1 mm) data and are not directly applicable to higher resolution images. A new PDE-based method is presented for the automated cortical reconstruction that is computationally efficient and scales well with grid resolution, and thus is particularly suitable for high-resolution MR images with submillimeter voxel size. The method uses a mathematical model of a field in an inhomogeneous dielectric. This field mapping, similarly to a Laplacian mapping, has nice laminar properties in the cortical layer, and helps to identify the unresolved boundaries between cortical banks in narrow sulci. The pial cortical surface is reconstructed by advection along the field gradient as a geometric deformable model constrained by topology-preserving level set approach. The method's performance is illustrated on exvivo images with 0.25–0.35 mm isotropic voxels. The method is further evaluated by cross-comparison with results of the FreeSurfer software on standard resolution data sets from the OASIS database featuring pairs of repeated scans for 20 healthy young subjects. PMID:22481909

  15. Large-Scale Mass Spectrometry Imaging Investigation of Consequences of Cortical Spreading Depression in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreira, Ricardo J.; Shyti, Reinald; Balluff, Benjamin; Abdelmoula, Walid M.; van Heiningen, Sandra H.; van Zeijl, Rene J.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Ferrari, Michel D.; Tolner, Else A.; McDonnell, Liam A.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the electrophysiological correlate of migraine aura. Transgenic mice carrying the R192Q missense mutation in the Cacna1a gene, which in patients causes familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), exhibit increased propensity to CSD. Herein, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was applied for the first time to an animal cohort of transgenic and wild type mice to study the biomolecular changes following CSD in the brain. Ninety-six coronal brain sections from 32 mice were analyzed by MALDI-MSI. All MSI datasets were registered to the Allen Brain Atlas reference atlas of the mouse brain so that the molecular signatures of distinct brain regions could be compared. A number of metabolites and peptides showed substantial changes in the brain associated with CSD. Among those, different mass spectral features showed significant ( t-test, P < 0.05) changes in the cortex, 146 and 377 Da, and in the thalamus, 1820 and 1834 Da, of the CSD-affected hemisphere of FHM1 R192Q mice. Our findings reveal CSD- and genotype-specific molecular changes in the brain of FHM1 transgenic mice that may further our understanding about the role of CSD in migraine pathophysiology. The results also demonstrate the utility of aligning MSI datasets to a common reference atlas for large-scale MSI investigations.

  16. Unexpected effects of peripherally administered kynurenic acid on cortical spreading depression and related blood–brain barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    Oláh, Gáspár; Herédi, Judit; Menyhárt, Ákos; Czinege, Zsolt; Nagy, Dávid; Fuzik, János; Kocsis, Kitti; Knapp, Levente; Krucsó, Erika; Gellért, Levente; Kis, Zsolt; Farkas, Tamás; Fülöp, Ferenc; Párdutz, Árpád; Tajti, János; Vécsei, László; Toldi, József

    2013-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) involves a slowly-propagating depolarization wave in the cortex, which can appear in numerous pathophysiological conditions, such as migraine with aura, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. Neurons and glial cells are also depolarized transiently during the phenomena. CSD is followed by a massive increase in glutamate release and by changes in the brain microcirculation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, endogenous kynurenic acid (KYNA) and dizocilpine, on CSD and the related blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability in rats. In intact animals, KYNA hardly crosses the BBB but has some positive features as compared with its precursor L-Kynurenine, which is frequently used in animal studies (KYNA cannot be metabolized to excitotoxic agents such as 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine and quinolinic acid). We therefore investigated the possible effects of peripherally administered KYNA. Repetitive CSD waves were elicited by the application of 1 M KCl solution to the cortex. Direct current-electrocorticograms were measured for 1 hour. Four parameters of the waves were compared. Evans blue dye and fluorescent microscopy were used to study the possible changes in the permeability of the BBB. The results demonstrated that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists can reduce the number of CSD waves and decrease the permeability of the BBB during CSD. These results suggest that KYNA itself or its derivatives may offer a new approach in the therapy of migraines. PMID:24068867

  17. N-Palmitoylethanolamine Prevents the Run-down of Amplitudes in Cortical Spreading Depression Possibly Implicating Proinflammatory Cytokine Release

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Frank; Koulen, Peter; Kaja, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD), a wave of neuronal depolarization in the cerebral cortex following traumatic brain injury or cerebral ischemia, significantly aggravates brain damage. Here, we tested whether N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA), a substance that effectively reduces lesion volumes and neurological deficits after ischemic stroke, influences CSD. CSD was elicited chemically in adult rats and occurrence, amplitude, duration and propagation velocity of CSD was determined prior to and for 6 hours after intraperitoneal injection of PEA. The chosen systemic administration of PEA stabilized the amplitude of CSD for at least four hours and prevented the run-down of amplitudes that is typically observed and was also seen in untreated controls. The propagation velocity of the CSD waves was unaltered indicating stable neuronal excitability. The stabilization of CSD amplitudes by PEA indicates that inhibition or prevention of CSD does not underlie PEA’s profound neuroprotective effect. Rather, PEA likely inhibits proinflammatory cytokine release thereby preventing the run-down of CSD amplitudes. This contribution of PEA to the maintenance of neuronal excitability in healthy tissue during CSD potentially adds to neuroprotection outside a damaged area, while other mechanisms control PEA-mediated neuroprotection in damaged tissue resulting from traumatic brain injury or cerebral ischemia. PMID:27004851

  18. Nitroglycerin enhances the propagation of cortical spreading depression: comparative studies with sumatriptan and novel kynurenic acid analogues

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Levente; Szita, Bence; Kocsis, Kitti; Vécsei, László; Toldi, József

    2017-01-01

    Background The complex pathophysiology of migraine is not yet clearly understood; therefore, experimental models are essential for the investigation of the processes related to migraine headache, which include cortical spreading depression (CSD) and NO donor-induced neurovascular changes. Data on the assessment of drug efficacy in these models are often limited, which prompted us to investigate a novel combined migraine model in which an effective pharmacon could be more easily identified. Materials and methods In vivo electrophysiological experiments were performed to investigate the effect of nitroglycerin (NTG) on CSD induced by KCl application. In addition, sumatriptan and newly synthesized neuroactive substances (analogues of the neuromodulator kynurenic acid [KYNA]) were also tested. Results The basic parameters of CSDs were unchanged following NTG administration; however, propagation failure was decreased compared to the controls. Sumatriptan decreased the number of CSDs, whereas propagation failure was as minimal as in the NTG group. On the other hand, both of the KYNA analogues restored the ratio of propagation to the control level. Discussion The ratio of propagation appeared to be the indicator of the effect of NTG. This is the first study providing direct evidence that NTG influences CSD; furthermore, we observed different effects of sumatriptan and KYNA analogues. Sumatriptan changed the generation of CSDs, whereas the analogues acted on the propagation of the waves. Our experimental design overlaps with a large spectrum of processes present in migraine pathophysiology, and it can be a useful experimental model for drug screening. PMID:28053504

  19. Transcriptomic Changes in Rat Cortex and Brainstem After Cortical Spreading Depression With or Without Pretreatment With Migraine Prophylactic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Sintas, Cèlia; Fernàndez-Castillo, Noèlia; Vila-Pueyo, Marta; Pozo-Rosich, Patricia; Macaya, Alfons; Cormand, Bru

    2017-04-01

    Migraine with aura is a subtype of migraine characterized by transient neurological disturbances that usually precede headache. Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the likely pathophysiological correlate of the aura phase of migraine, found in common and rare forms of migraine, such as familial hemiplegic migraine. CSD is a depolarization wave that propagates across the cerebral gray matter transiently suppressing neuronal activity. Prophylactic treatments for migraine, such as topiramate or valproate, reduce the number of CSD events. We evaluated changes in gene expression in rat cortex and brainstem after inducing CSD in the cortex, with and without a prophylactic treatment with topiramate or valproate. CSD induction showed similar transcriptomic profiles with and without treatment in cortex, involving genes related to hormone stimulus, apoptosis, synaptic transmission, and interleukin signaling. In brainstem, CSD with and without treatment, although to a lesser extent, also induced gene expression changes involving genes related to apoptosis. Half of the genes altered in brainstem after CSD were also differentially expressed in the same direction in cortex. No differences in gene expression were identified after CSD as a consequence of the treatments, neither in cortex nor in brainstem.

  20. Dynamic diameter response of intraparenchymal penetrating arteries during cortical spreading depression and elimination of vasoreactivity to hypercapnia in anesthetized mice.

    PubMed

    Unekawa, Miyuki; Tomita, Yutaka; Masamoto, Kazuto; Toriumi, Haruki; Osada, Takashi; Kanno, Iwao; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2017-02-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) induces marked hyperemia with a transient decrease of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), followed by sustained oligemia. To further understand the microcirculatory mechanisms associated with CSD, we examined the temporal changes of diameter of intraparenchymal penetrating arteries during CSD. In urethane-anesthetized mice, the diameter of single penetrating arteries at three depths was measured using two-photon microscopy during passage of repeated CSD, with continuous recordings of direct current potential and rCBF. The first CSD elicited marked constriction superimposed on the upstrokes of profound dilation throughout each depth of the penetrating artery, and the vasoreaction temporally corresponded to the change of rCBF. Second or later CSD elicited marked dilation with little or no constriction phase throughout each depth, and the vasodilation also temporally corresponded to the increase of rCBF. Furthermore, the peak dilation showed good negative correlations with basal diameter and increase of rCBF. Vasodilation induced by 5% CO2 inhalation was significantly suppressed after CSD passage at any depth as well as hyperperfusion. These results may indicate that CSD-induced rCBF changes mainly reflect the diametric changes of the intraparenchymal arteries, despite the elimination of responsiveness to hypercapnia.

  1. Collecting Autonomous Spreading Malware Using High-Interaction Honeypots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuge, Jianwei; Holz, Thorsten; Han, Xinhui; Song, Chengyu; Zou, Wei

    Autonomous spreading malware in the form of worms or bots has become a severe threat in today's Internet. Collecting the sample as early as possible is a necessary precondition for the further treatment of the spreading malware, e.g., to develop antivirus signatures. In this paper, we present an integrated toolkit called HoneyBow, which is able to collect autonomous spreading malware in an automated manner using high-interaction honeypots. Compared to low-interaction honeypots, HoneyBow has several advantages due to a wider range of captured samples and the capability of collecting malware which propagates by exploiting new vulnerabilities. We validate the properties of HoneyBow with experimental data collected during a period of about nine months, in which we collected thousands of malware binaries. Furthermore, we demonstrate the capability of collecting new malware via a case study of a certain bot.

  2. Cortical Spreading Depression Promotes Persistent Mechanical Sensitization of Intracranial Meningeal Afferents: Implications for the Intracranial Mechanosensitivity of Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Migraine is one of the most common and disabling diseases in the world. A major feature of migraine headache is its aggravation by maneuvers that momentarily increase intracranial pressure. A key hypothesis implicates mechanical sensitization of trigeminal afferents that innervate the intracranial meninges in mediating this feature of migraine. However, whether such pain-related neural response actually develops under endogenous conditions that are linked specifically to migraine remains to be established. Single-unit recordings in the trigeminal ganglion of anesthetized male rats were combined with quantitative mechanical stimulation of the cranial dura mater to determine whether cortical spreading depression (CSD), an endogenous migraine-triggering event, affects the mechanosensitivity of meningeal afferents. CSD gave rise to an almost threefold increase in the magnitude of the responses to mechanical stimuli in 17 of 23 of the afferents tested. CSD-evoked meningeal afferent mechanosensitization occurred with a delay of 23.1 ± 2.2 min and lasted 64.1 ± 6.8 min in recording sessions that lasted for 90 min and for 177.5 ± 22.1 min in recording sessions that were extended for 240 min. Some of the sensitized afferents also developed a shorter-lasting increase in their ongoing discharge rate that was not correlated with the increase in their mechanosensitivity, suggesting that CSD-evoked meningeal afferent sensitization and increase in ongoing activity are independent phenomena. These novel findings support the notion that mechanical sensitization of meningeal afferents serves as a key nociceptive process that underlies the worsening of migraine headache during conditions that momentarily increase intracranial pressure. PMID:28127585

  3. Up-regulated neuronal COX-2 expression after cortical spreading depression is involved in non-REM sleep induction in rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yilong; Kataoka, Yosky; Inui, Takashi; Mochizuki, Takatoshi; Onoe, Hirotaka; Matsumura, Kiyoshi; Urade, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Hisao; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2008-03-01

    Cortical spreading depression is an excitatory wave of depolarization spreading throughout cerebral cortex at a rate of 2-5 mm/min and has been implicated in various neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, migraine aura, and trauma. Although sleepiness or sleep is often induced by these neurological disorders, the cellular and molecular mechanism has remained unclear. To investigate whether and how the sleep-wake behavior is altered by such aberrant brain activity, we induced cortical spreading depression in freely moving rats, monitoring REM and non-REM (NREM) sleep and sleep-associated changes in cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and prostaglandins (PGs). In such a model for aberrant neuronal excitation in the cerebral cortex, the amount of NREM sleep, but not of REM sleep, increased subsequently for several hours, with an up-regulated expression of COX-2 in cortical neurons and considerable production of PGs. A specific inhibitor of COX-2 completely arrested the increase in NREM sleep. These results indicate that up-regulated neuronal COX-2 would be involved in aberrant brain excitation-induced NREM sleep via production of PGs.

  4. Characterization of cortical spreading depression in adult well-nourished and malnourished rats submitted to the association of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy plus streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Costa-Cruz, Raquel Raimunda Goldstein; Amâncio-dos-Santos, Angela; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2006-07-03

    Spreading depression was characterized in adult rats rendered epileptic by pilocarpine (350 mg/kg, i.p.) and thereafter made hyperglycemic with (i.p.) 60 mg/kg streptozotocin. Groups treated with only one of the above drugs, as well as control groups treated with their vehicles (saline and citrate buffer, respectively) were also studied. The animals treated with pilocarpine or streptozotocin presented, as a common feature, a reduction in the spreading depression propagation rate. However, they differed by the fact that pilocarpine, in some cases, blocked spreading depression propagation, whereas streptozotocin did not block it at all. In early-malnourished animals, streptozotocin-effects, but not pilocarpine-effects on spreading depression were attenuated. The treatment with both drugs did not potentiate their individual reducing effects on spreading depression propagation, irrespective of the animals' early nutritional status. These results extend previous observations on rats treated with both drugs separately, confirming their impairing action on spreading depression propagation. They also indicate that early malnutrition is more effective in changing the streptozotocin effects on spreading depression, as compared to the pilocarpine-effects. Since such effects were observed at adulthood, they indicate that the early malnutrition-induced cortical changes responsible for the here-described effects are long-lasting.

  5. The axial topographic high at intermediate and fast spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, Suzanne M.; MacDonald, Ken C.

    1994-12-01

    An axial topographic high is commonly observed at both fast spreading ridges and some segments of intermediate spreading ridges. At fast rates the axial high is primarily created by the buoyancy of hot rock and magma beneath the rise. As newly formed crust is transported off axis, little vestige of an axial high is observed on the ridge flanks. In contrast, at intermediate rates, a significant component of the positive topography may be a volcanic construction, preserved on the ridge flanks as abyssal hills, which are slit axial volcanoes. We suggest this difference in the nature of the axial high reflects a lithosphere strong enough to support construction of a volcanic crestal ridge at intermediate spreading rates, but only rarely at fast rates. Relict overlap ridges, found within the discordant zones left by overlapping spreading centers, is one class of ridge-flank topography which appears to have a significant volcanic constructional component even at fast spreading ridges. Unlike topography away from these discontinuities, the relief and shape of overlapping spreading centers is preserved as relict ridge tips are rafted onto the ridge flanks. Reduced magma supply at these discontinuities may give rise to an axial lithosphere strong enough to support volcanic construction of overlap ridges. Low axial lithospheric strength may also account for the lack of normal faults within the innermost 1-2 km of fast, and some intermediate, spreading ridges. With a thin/weak brittle layer at the ridge crest, tensile failure will predominate and few normal faults will form. Depths to the axial magma chamber reflector observed in multi-channel seismic data limit the thickness of the brittel layer on axis to less than 1-2 km for much of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). This depth is comparable to depths over which tensile failure within the oceanic crust will predominate, estimated from the Griffith criteria for fracture initiation (approx. 0.5-1.5 km). As the brittle layer

  6. In Vivo Voltage-Sensitive Dye Study of Lateral Spreading of Cortical Activity in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex Induced by a Current Impulse

    PubMed Central

    Fehérvári, Tamás Dávid; Sawai, Hajime; Yagi, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian primary visual cortex (V1), lateral spreading of excitatory potentials is believed to be involved in spatial integrative functions, but the underlying cortical mechanism is not well understood. Visually-evoked population-level responses have been shown to propagate beyond the V1 initial activation site in mouse, similar to higher mammals. Visually-evoked responses are, however, affected by neuronal circuits prior to V1 (retina, LGN), making the separate analysis of V1 difficult. Intracortical stimulation eliminates these initial processing steps. We used in vivo RH1691 voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging and intracortical microstimulation in adult C57BL/6 mice to elucidate the spatiotemporal properties of population-level signal spreading in V1 cortical circuits. The evoked response was qualitatively similar to that measured in single-cell electrophysiological experiments in rodents: a fast transient fluorescence peak followed by a fast and a slow decrease or hyperpolarization, similar to EPSP and fast and slow IPSPs in single cells. The early cortical response expanded at speeds commensurate with long horizontal projections (at 5% of the peak maximum, 0.08–0.15 m/s) however, the bulk of the VSD signal propagated slowly (at half-peak maximum, 0.05–0.08 m/s) suggesting an important role of regenerative multisynaptic transmission through short horizontal connections in V1 spatial integrative functions. We also found a tendency for a widespread and fast cortical response suppression in V1, which was eliminated by GABAA-antagonists gabazine and bicuculline methiodide. Our results help understand the neuronal circuitry involved in lateral spreading in V1. PMID:26230520

  7. Device for simultaneous positron emission tomography, laser speckle imaging and RGB reflectometry: validation and application to cortical spreading depression and brain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Gramer, M; Feuerstein, D; Steimers, A; Takagaki, M; Kumagai, T; Sué, M; Vollmar, S; Kohl-Bareis, M; Backes, H; Graf, R

    2014-07-01

    Brain function critically relies on the supply with energy substrates (oxygen and glucose) via blood flow. Alterations in energy demand as during neuronal activation induce dynamic changes in substrate fluxes and blood flow. To study the complex system that regulates cerebral metabolism requires the combination of methods for the simultaneous assessment of multiple parameters. We developed a multimodal imaging device to combine positron emission tomography (PET) with laser speckle imaging (LSI) and RGB reflectometry (RGBR). Depending on the radiotracer, PET provides 3-dimensional quantitative information of specific molecular processes, while LSI and RGBR measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) and hemoglobin oxygenation at high temporal and spatial resolution. We first tested the functional capability of each modality within our system and showed that interference between the modalities is negligible. We then cross-calibrated the system by simultaneously measuring absolute CBF using (15)O-H2O PET (CBF(PET)) and the inverse correlation time (ICT), the LSI surrogate for CBF. ICT and CBF(PET) correlated in multiple measurements in individuals as well as across different animals (R(2)=0.87, n=44 measurements) indicating that ICT can be used for absolute quantitative assessment of CBF. To demonstrate the potential of the combined system, we applied it to cortical spreading depression (CSD), a wave of transient cellular depolarization that served here as a model system for neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling. We analyzed time courses of hemoglobin oxygenation and CBF alterations coupled to CSD, and simultaneously measured regional uptake of (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) used as a radiotracer for regional glucose metabolism, in response to a single CSD and to a cluster of CSD waves. With this unique combination, we characterized the changes in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in real-time and showed a correlation between (18)F-FDG uptake and the

  8. Mapping of cortical activity in the first two decades of life: a high-density sleep electroencephalogram study.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Salomé; Ringli, Maya; Geiger, Anja; LeBourgeois, Monique; Jenni, Oskar G; Huber, Reto

    2010-10-06

    Evidence that electroencephalography (EEG) slow-wave activity (SWA) (EEG spectral power in the 1-4.5 Hz band) during non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) reflects plastic changes is increasing (Tononi and Cirelli, 2006). Regional assessment of gray matter development from neuroimaging studies reveals a posteroanterior trajectory of cortical maturation in the first three decades of life (Shaw et al., 2008). Our aim was to test whether this regional cortical maturation is reflected in regional changes of sleep SWA. We evaluated all-night high-density EEG (128 channels) in 55 healthy human subjects (2.4-19.4 years) and assessed age-related changes in NREM sleep topography. As in adults, we observed frequency-specific topographical distributions of sleep EEG power in all subjects. However, from early childhood to late adolescence, the location on the scalp showing maximal SWA underwent a shift from posterior to anterior regions. This shift along the posteroanterior axis was only present in the SWA frequency range and remained stable across the night. Changes in the topography of SWA during sleep parallel neuroimaging study findings indicating cortical maturation starts early in posterior areas and spreads rostrally over the frontal cortex. Thus, SWA might reflect the underlying processes of cortical maturation. In the future, sleep SWA assessments may be used as a clinical tool to detect aberrations in cortical maturation.

  9. RECOGNIZE: A Social Norms Campaign to Reduce Rumor Spreading in a Junior High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Jennifer E.; Peisner, William

    2009-01-01

    This article studied changes in rumor spreading and perceptions of peers' rumor spreading among students at one public junior high school following a social norms marketing campaign. Results of the study show that perceptions of peer rumor spreading fell following the campaign, but self-reports of rumor spreading did not decrease. Results suggest…

  10. Potentiation of spontaneous and evoked cortical electrical activity after spreading depression: in vivo analysis in well-nourished and malnourished rats.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Thays Kallyne Marinho; e Silva, Mariana Barros; Gomes, André Ricardson; de Oliveira, Hélio Magalhães; Moraes, Renato Barros; de Freitas Barbosa, Catão Temístocles; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2011-10-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is influenced by brain excitability and is related to neurological diseases, such as epilepsy. In vitro evidence indicates that neuronal electrical activity is potentiated after CSD. Malnutrition can cause electrophysiological changes in the brain, both in animals and in humans. Here, we investigated in vivo whether CSD potentiates the amplitude of electrocorticogram (ECoG) and of transcallosal evoked responses in adult well-nourished (W), early-malnourished (M), and food-restricted rats. ECoG amplitudes were compared before and after CSD, at two parietal regions (designated the anterior and posterior regions). In the anterior region, post-CSD amplitudes of the ECoG waves were 13-23% higher (P < 0.05) than the pre-CSD values in all groups. In the posterior region, amplitudes increased 22% in the M group only (P < 0.05). In a fourth CSD-free group, ECoG amplitude did not change during the four recording hours. Transcallosal electrically evoked cortical responses also increased 21.5 ± 9.6% and 41.8 ± 28.5%, after CSD, in the W and M conditions, respectively, as compared to pre-CSD values. The data support the hypothesis of an in vivo CSD potentiation on cortical excitability as recorded by spontaneous and evoked electrical activity and modulation by nutritional status.

  11. Spreading of Viscous Liquids at High Temperature: Silicate Glasseson Molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Moya, Jose S.; Tomsia,Antoni P.

    2004-12-15

    The spreading of Si-Ca-Al-Ti-O glasses on molybdenum has been investigated. By controlling the oxygen activity in the furnace, spreading can take place under reactive or non-reactive conditions. As the nucleation of the reaction product under reactive conditions is slow in comparison to the spreading kinetics, in both cases the glass front moves on the metal surface with similar spreading velocities. Spreading can be described using a molecular dynamics model where the main contribution to the wetting activation energy comes from the viscous interactions in the liquid. Enhanced interfacial diffusions in low-oxygen activities (reactive cases) form triple-line ridges that can pin the wetting front and cause a stick-slip motion.

  12. Enhanced excitatory transmission at cortical synapses as the basis for facilitated spreading depression in Ca(v)2.1 knockin migraine mice.

    PubMed

    Tottene, Angelita; Conti, Rossella; Fabbro, Alessandra; Vecchia, Dania; Shapovalova, Maryna; Santello, Mirko; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Ferrari, Michel D; Pietrobon, Daniela

    2009-03-12

    Migraine is a common disabling brain disorder. A subtype of migraine with aura (familial hemiplegic migraine type 1: FHM1) is caused by mutations in Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type) Ca(2+) channels. Knockin mice carrying a FHM1 mutation show increased neuronal P/Q-type current and facilitation of induction and propagation of cortical spreading depression (CSD), the phenomenon that underlies migraine aura and may activate migraine headache mechanisms. We studied cortical neurotransmission in neuronal microcultures and brain slices of FHM1 mice. We show gain of function of excitatory neurotransmission due to increased action-potential-evoked Ca(2+) influx and increased probability of glutamate release at pyramidal cell synapses but unaltered inhibitory neurotransmission at fast-spiking interneuron synapses. Using an in vitro model of CSD, we show a causative link between enhanced glutamate release and CSD facilitation. The synapse-specific effect of FHM1 mutations points to disruption of excitation-inhibition balance and neuronal hyperactivity as the basis for episodic vulnerability to CSD ignition in migraine.

  13. Cortical Thickness Reduction in Individuals at Ultra-High-Risk for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Wi Hoon; Kim, June Sic; Jang, Joon Hwan; Choi, Jung-Seok; Jung, Myung Hun; Park, Ji-Young; Han, Ji Yeon; Choi, Chi-Hoon; Kang, Do-Hyung; Chung, Chun Kee; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2011-01-01

    Although schizophrenia is characterized by gray matter (GM) abnormalities, particularly in the prefrontal and temporal cortices, it is unclear whether cerebral cortical GM is abnormal in individuals at ultra-high-risk (UHR) for psychosis. We addressed this issue by studying cortical thickness in this group with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We measured cortical thickness of 29 individuals with no family history of psychosis at UHR, 31 patients with schizophrenia, and 29 healthy matched control subjects using automated surface-based analysis of structural MRI data. Hemispheric mean and regional cortical thickness were significantly different according to the stage of the disease. Significant cortical differences across these 3 groups were found in the distributed area of cerebral cortices. UHR group showed significant cortical thinning in the prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, inferior parietal cortex, parahippocampal cortex, and superior temporal gyrus compared with healthy control subjects. Significant cortical thinning in schizophrenia group relative to UHR group was found in all the regions described above in addition with posterior cingulate cortex, insular cortex, and precentral cortex. These changes were more pronounced in the schizophrenia group compared with the control subjects. These findings suggest that UHR is associated with cortical thinning in regions that correspond to the structural abnormalities found in schizophrenia. These structural abnormalities might reflect functional decline at the prodromal stage of schizophrenia, and there may be progressive thinning of GM cortex over time. PMID:20026559

  14. Perfusion pressure-dependent recovery of cortical spreading depression is independent of tissue oxygenation over a wide physiologic range.

    PubMed

    Sukhotinsky, Inna; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Sakadzić, Sava; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Sims, John R; Boas, David A; Moskowitz, Michael A; Ayata, Cenk

    2010-06-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a slowly propagating wave of transient neuronal and glial depolarization that develops after stroke, trauma and subarachnoid hemorrhage. In compromised tissue, repetitive SD-like injury depolarizations reduce tissue viability by worsening the mismatch between blood flow and metabolism. Although the mechanism remains unknown, SDs show delayed electrophysiological recovery within the ischemic penumbra. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the recovery rate of SD can be varied by modulating tissue perfusion pressure and oxygenation. Systemic blood pressure and arterial pO(2) were simultaneously manipulated in anesthetized rats under full physiologic monitoring. We found that arterial hypotension doubled the SD duration, whereas hypertension reduced it by a third compared with normoxic normotensive rats. Hyperoxia failed to shorten the prolonged SD durations in hypotensive rats, despite restoring tissue pO(2). Indeed, varying arterial pO(2) (40 to 400 mm Hg) alone did not significantly influence SD duration, whereas blood pressure (40 to 160 mm Hg) was inversely related to SD duration in compromised tissue. These data suggest that cerebral perfusion pressure is a critical determinant of SD duration independent of tissue oxygenation over a wide range of arterial pO(2) levels, and that hypotension may be detrimental in stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage, where SD-like injury depolarizations have been observed.

  15. Neonatal L-glutamine modulates anxiety-like behavior, cortical spreading depression, and microglial immunoreactivity: analysis in developing rats suckled on normal size- and large size litters.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Denise Sandrelly Cavalcanti; Francisco, Elian da Silva; Lima, Cássia Borges; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2017-02-01

    In mammals, L-glutamine (Gln) can alter the glutamate-Gln cycle and consequently brain excitability. Here, we investigated in developing rats the effect of treatment with different doses of Gln on anxiety-like behavior, cortical spreading depression (CSD), and microglial activation expressed as Iba1-immunoreactivity. Wistar rats were suckled in litters with 9 and 15 pups (groups L 9 and L 15; respectively, normal size- and large size litters). From postnatal days (P) 7-27, the animals received Gln per gavage (250, 500 or 750 mg/kg/day), or vehicle (water), or no treatment (naive). At P28 and P30, we tested the animals, respectively, in the elevated plus maze and open field. At P30-35, we measured CSD parameters (velocity of propagation, amplitude, and duration). Fixative-perfused brains were processed for microglial immunolabeling with anti-IBA-1 antibodies to analyze cortical microglia. Rats treated with Gln presented an anxiolytic behavior and accelerated CSD propagation when compared to the water- and naive control groups. Furthermore, CSD velocity was higher (p < 0.001) in the L 15 compared to the L 9 condition. Gln treatment increased Iba1 immunolabeling both in the parietal cortex and CA1 hippocampus, indicating microglial activation. The Gln effect was dose-dependent for anxiety-like behavior and CSD in both litter sizes, and for microglial activation in the L 15 groups. Besides confirming previous electrophysiological findings (CSD acceleration after Gln), our data demonstrate for the first time a behavioral and microglial activation that is associated with early Gln treatment in developing animals, and that is possibly operated via changes in brain excitability.

  16. High levels of neuroticism are associated with decreased cortical folding of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Christoph Schultz, C; Warziniak, Heide; Koch, Kathrin; Schachtzabel, Claudia; Güllmar, Daniel; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Schlösser, Ralf G; Sauer, Heinrich; Wagner, Gerd

    2017-04-06

    The personality trait neuroticism has been identified as a vulnerability factor for common psychiatric diseases and defining potential neuroanatomical markers for early recognition and prevention strategies is mandatory. Because both personality traits and cortical folding patterns are early imprinted and timely stable there is reason to hypothesize an association between neuroticism and cortical folding. Thus, to identify a putative linkage, we tested whether the degree of neuroticism is associated with local cortical folding in a sample of 109 healthy individuals using a surface-based MRI approach. Based on previous findings we additionally tested for a potential association with cortical thickness. We found a highly significant negative correlation between the degree of neuroticism and local cortical folding of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), i.e., high levels of neuroticism were associated with low cortical folding of the left DLPFC. No association was found with cortical thickness. The present study is the first to describe a linkage between the extent of local cortical folding and the individual degree of neuroticism in healthy subjects. Because neuroticism is a vulnerability factor for common psychiatric diseases such as depression our finding indicates that alterations of DLPFC might constitute a neurobiological marker elevating risk for psychiatric burden.

  17. l-Citrulline ameliorates cerebral blood flow during cortical spreading depression in rats: Involvement of nitric oxide- and prostanoids-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Kurauchi, Yuki; Mokudai, Koichi; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Morita, Masahiko; Kamimura, Ayako; Ishii, Kunio

    2017-02-17

    l-Citrulline is a potent precursor of l-arginine, and exerts beneficial effect on cardiovascular system via nitric oxide (NO) production. Migraine is one of the most popular neurovascular disorder, and imbalance of cerebral blood flow (CBF) observed in cortical spreading depression (CSD) contributes to the mechanism of migraine aura. Here, we investigated the effect of l-citrulline on cardiovascular changes to KCl-induced CSD. in rats. Intravenous injection of l-citrulline prevented the decrease in CBF, monitored by laser Doppler flowmetry, without affecting mean arterial pressure and heart rate during CSD. Moreover, l-citrulline attenuated propagation velocity of CSD induced by KCl. The effect of l-citrulline on CBF change was prevented by l-NAME, an inhibitor of NO synthase, but not by indomethacin, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase. On the other hand, attenuation effect of l-citrulline on CSD propagation velocity was prevented not only by l-NAME but also by indomethacin. In addition, propagation velocity of CSD was attenuated by intravenous injection of NOR3, a NO donor, which was diminished by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase. These results suggest that NO/cyclic GMP- and prostanoids-mediated pathway differently contribute to the effect of l-citrulline on the maintenance of CBF.

  18. Modeling the contributions of Ca2+ flows to spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations and cortical spreading depression-triggered Ca2+ waves in astrocyte networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Chen, Shangbin; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Li, Pengcheng

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes participate in brain functions through Ca(2+) signals, including Ca(2+) waves and Ca(2+) oscillations. Currently the mechanisms of Ca(2+) signals in astrocytes are not fully clear. Here, we present a computational model to specify the relative contributions of different Ca(2+) flows between the extracellular space, the cytoplasm and the endoplasmic reticulum of astrocytes to the generation of spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations (CASs) and cortical spreading depression (CSD)-triggered Ca(2+) waves (CSDCWs) in a one-dimensional astrocyte network. This model shows that CASs depend primarily on Ca(2+) released from internal stores of astrocytes, and CSDCWs depend mainly on voltage-gated Ca(2+) influx. It predicts that voltage-gated Ca(2+) influx is able to generate Ca(2+) waves during the process of CSD even after depleting internal Ca(2+) stores. Furthermore, the model investigates the interactions between CASs and CSDCWs and shows that the pass of CSDCWs suppresses CASs, whereas CASs do not prevent the generation of CSDCWs. This work quantitatively analyzes the generation of astrocytic Ca(2+) signals and indicates different mechanisms underlying CSDCWs and non-CSDCWs. Research on the different types of Ca(2+) signals might help to understand the ways by which astrocytes participate in information processing in brain functions.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging assessed cortical porosity is highly correlated with μCT porosity.

    PubMed

    Bae, Won C; Patil, Shantanu; Biswas, Reni; Li, Shihong; Chang, Eric Y; Statum, Sheronda; D'Lima, Darryl D; Chung, Christine B; Du, Jiang

    2014-09-01

    Cortical bone is typically regarded as "MR invisible" with conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequences. However, recent studies have demonstrated that free water in the microscopic pores of cortical bone has a short T2* but a relatively long T2, and may be detectable with conventional clinical spin echo (SE) or fast spin echo (FSE) sequences. In this study we describe the use of a conventional two-dimensional (2D) FSE sequence to assess cortical bone microstructure and measure cortical porosity using a clinical 3T scanner. Twelve cadaveric human cortical bone samples were studied with MRI and microcomputed tomography (μCT) (downsampled to the same spatial resolution). Preliminary results show that FSE-determined porosity is highly correlated (R(2)=0.83; P<0.0001) with μCT porosity. Bland-Altman analysis suggested a good agreement between FSE and μCT with tight limit of agreement at around 3%. There is also a small bias of -2% for the FSE data, which suggested that the FSE approach slightly underestimated μCT porosity. The results demonstrate that cortical porosity can be directly assessed using conventional clinical FSE sequences. The clinical feasibility of this approach was also demonstrated on six healthy volunteers using 2D FSE sequences as well as 2D ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences with a minimal echo time (TE) of 8μs, which provide high contrast imaging of cortical bone in vivo.

  20. High-gravity spreading of liquid puddles on wetting flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen; Burrous, Adam; Xie, Jingjin; Shaikh, Hassan; Elike-Avion, Akofa; Rojas Rodriguez, Luis; Ramachandran, Adithya; Choi, Wonjae; Mazzeo, Aaron D.

    2016-02-01

    This letter describes a mechanical approach of using high gravity to decrease the capillary length and increase the spreading rate of liquid puddles on wetting flexible substrates. By using centrifugation and a flexible substrate floating on a high-density liquid, uniform acceleration enhances the spreading of liquid puddles. Under high gravity of 600 g, the capillary length reduces by a factor of 24.5 to ˜60 μm. The reduction in capillary length results in gravity dominating the spreading of small puddles that would otherwise have slower spreading driven by both surface tension and gravity of 1 g. The resulting measurements suggest that derived expressions in the literature for gravity-driven spreading of puddles under earth's standard gravity extend to predicting the behavior of sufficiently large puddles spreading on flexible substrates exposed to more than 100 g of acceleration. This work explores the spreading of puddles/coatings under high gravity, and the techniques described in this work will allow further interrogation of the transition between surface tension- and gravity-driven spreading.

  1. Cortical thickness and surface area in neonates at high risk for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Wang, Li; Shi, Feng; Lyall, Amanda E; Ahn, Mihye; Peng, Ziwen; Zhu, Hongtu; Lin, Weili; Gilmore, John H; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with subtle abnormal cortical thickness and cortical surface area. However, it is unclear whether these abnormalities exist in neonates associated with genetic risk for schizophrenia. To this end, this preliminary study was conducted to identify possible abnormalities of cortical thickness and surface area in the high-genetic-risk neonates. Structural magnetic resonance images were acquired from offspring of mothers (N = 21) who had schizophrenia (N = 12) or schizoaffective disorder (N = 9), and also matched healthy neonates of mothers who were free of psychiatric illness (N = 26). Neonatal cortical surfaces were reconstructed and parcellated as regions of interest (ROIs), and cortical thickness for each vertex was computed as the shortest distance between the inner and outer surfaces. Comparisons were made for the average cortical thickness and total surface area in each of 68 cortical ROIs. After false discovery rate (FDR) correction, it was found that the female high-genetic-risk neonates had significantly thinner cortical thickness in the right lateral occipital cortex than the female control neonates. Before FDR correction, the high-genetic-risk neonates had significantly thinner cortex in the left transverse temporal gyrus, left banks of superior temporal sulcus, left lingual gyrus, right paracentral cortex, right posterior cingulate cortex, right temporal pole, and right lateral occipital cortex, compared with the control neonates. Before FDR correction, in comparison with control neonates, male high-risk neonates had significantly thicker cortex in the left frontal pole, left cuneus cortex, and left lateral occipital cortex; while female high-risk neonates had significantly thinner cortex in the bilateral paracentral, bilateral lateral occipital, left transverse temporal, left pars opercularis, right cuneus, and right posterior cingulate cortices. The high-risk neonates also had significantly

  2. Cortical thickness and surface area in neonates at high risk for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Wang, Li; Shi, Feng; Lyall, Amanda E.; Ahn, Mihye; Peng, Ziwen; Zhu, Hongtu; Lin, Weili; Gilmore, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with subtle abnormal cortical thickness and cortical surface area. However, it is unclear whether these abnormalities exist in neonates associated with genetic risk for schizophrenia. To this end, this preliminary study was conducted to identify possible abnormalities of cortical thickness and surface area in the high-genetic-risk neonates. Structural magnetic resonance images were acquired from offspring of mothers (N = 21) who had schizophrenia (N = 12) or schizoaffective disorder (N = 9), and also matched healthy neonates of mothers who were free of psychiatric illness (N = 26). Neonatal cortical surfaces were reconstructed and parcellated as regions of interest (ROIs), and cortical thickness for each vertex was computed as the shortest distance between the inner and outer surfaces. Comparisons were made for the average cortical thickness and total surface area in each of 68 cortical ROIs. After false discovery rate (FDR) correction, it was found that the female high-genetic-risk neonates had significantly thinner cortical thickness in the right lateral occipital cortex than the female control neonates. Before FDR correction, the high-genetic-risk neonates had significantly thinner cortex in the left transverse temporal gyrus, left banks of superior temporal sulcus, left lingual gyrus, right paracentral cortex, right posterior cingulate cortex, right temporal pole, and right lateral occipital cortex, compared with the control neonates. Before FDR correction, in comparison with control neonates, male high-risk neonates had significantly thicker cortex in the left frontal pole, left cuneus cortex, and left lateral occipital cortex; while female high-risk neonates had significantly thinner cortex in the bilateral paracentral, bilateral lateral occipital, left transverse temporal, left pars opercularis, right cuneus, and right posterior cingulate cortices. The high-risk neonates also had significantly smaller

  3. High-expanding cortical regions in human development and evolution are related to higher intellectual abilities.

    PubMed

    Fjell, Anders M; Westlye, Lars T; Amlien, Inge; Tamnes, Christian K; Grydeland, Håkon; Engvig, Andreas; Espeseth, Thomas; Reinvang, Ivar; Lundervold, Astri J; Lundervold, Arvid; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2015-01-01

    Cortical surface area has tremendously expanded during human evolution, and similar patterns of cortical expansion have been observed during childhood development. An intriguing hypothesis is that the high-expanding cortical regions also show the strongest correlations with intellectual function in humans. However, we do not know how the regional distribution of correlations between intellectual function and cortical area maps onto expansion in development and evolution. Here, in a sample of 1048 participants, we show that regions in which cortical area correlates with visuospatial reasoning abilities are generally high expanding in both development and evolution. Several regions in the frontal cortex, especially the anterior cingulate, showed high expansion in both development and evolution. The area of these regions was related to intellectual functions in humans. Low-expanding areas were not related to cognitive scores. These findings suggest that cortical regions involved in higher intellectual functions have expanded the most during development and evolution. The radial unit hypothesis provides a common framework for interpretation of the findings in the context of evolution and prenatal development, while additional cellular mechanisms, such as synaptogenesis, gliogenesis, dendritic arborization, and intracortical myelination, likely impact area expansion in later childhood.

  4. Neonatal taurine and alanine modulate anxiety-like behavior and decelerate cortical spreading depression in rats previously suckled under different litter sizes.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Elian da Silva; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2015-11-01

    The amino acids taurine and alanine play a role in several physiological processes, including behavior and the electrical activity of the brain. In this study, we investigated the effect of treatment with taurine or alanine on anxiety-like behavior and the excitability-dependent phenomenon known as cortical spreading depression (CSD), using rats suckled in litters with 9 and 15 pups (groups L9 and L15). From postnatal days 7 to 27, the animals received per gavage 300 mg/kg/day of taurine or alanine or both. At 28 days, we tested the animals in the elevated plus maze, and at 33-35 days, we recorded CSD and analyzed its velocity of propagation, amplitude, and duration. Compared with water-treated controls, the L9 groups treated with taurine or alanine displayed anxiolytic behavior (higher number of entries in the open arms; p < 0.05), and reduced CSD velocity (p < 0.001). The effect of both amino acids on CSD was also found in the L15 groups and in five additional L9 groups (naïve, water, taurine, alanine, or both) treated at adulthood (90-110 days). The L15 condition resulted in smaller durations and higher CSD velocities compared with the L9 condition. Besides reinforcing previous evidence of behavioral modulation by taurine and alanine, our data are the first confirmation that treatment with these amino acids decelerates CSD regardless of lactation conditions (normal versus unfavorable lactation) or age at amino acid administration (young versus adult). The results suggest a modulating role for both amino acids on anxiety behavior and neuronal electrical activity.

  5. Retrieval of high-fidelity memory arises from distributed cortical networks.

    PubMed

    Wais, Peter E; Jahanikia, Sahar; Steiner, Daniel; Stark, Craig E L; Gazzaley, Adam

    2017-04-01

    Medial temporal lobe (MTL) function is well established as necessary for memory of facts and events. It is likely that lateral cortical regions critically guide cognitive control processes to tune in high-fidelity details that are most relevant for memory retrieval. Here, convergent results from functional and structural MRI show that retrieval of detailed episodic memory arises from lateral cortical-MTL networks, including regions of inferior frontal and angular gyrii. Results also suggest that recognition of items based on low-fidelity, generalized information, rather than memory arising from retrieval of relevant episodic details, is not associated with functional connectivity between MTL and lateral cortical regions. Additionally, individual differences in microstructural properties in white matter pathways, associated with distributed MTL-cortical networks, are positively correlated with better performance on a mnemonic discrimination task.

  6. Effective Suppression of Pathological Synchronization in Cortical Networks by Highly Heterogeneous Distribution of Inhibitory Connections

    PubMed Central

    Kada, Hisashi; Teramae, Jun-Nosuke; Tokuda, Isao T.

    2016-01-01

    Even without external random input, cortical networks in vivo sustain asynchronous irregular firing with low firing rate. In addition to detailed balance between excitatory and inhibitory activities, recent theoretical studies have revealed that another feature commonly observed in cortical networks, i.e., long-tailed distribution of excitatory synapses implying coexistence of many weak and a few extremely strong excitatory synapses, plays an essential role in realizing the self-sustained activity in recurrent networks of biologically plausible spiking neurons. The previous studies, however, have not considered highly non-random features of the synaptic connectivity, namely, bidirectional connections between cortical neurons are more common than expected by chance and strengths of synapses are positively correlated between pre- and postsynaptic neurons. The positive correlation of synaptic connections may destabilize asynchronous activity of networks with the long-tailed synaptic distribution and induce pathological synchronized firing among neurons. It remains unclear how the cortical network avoids such pathological synchronization. Here, we demonstrate that introduction of the correlated connections indeed gives rise to synchronized firings in a cortical network model with the long-tailed distribution. By using a simplified feed-forward network model of spiking neurons, we clarify the underlying mechanism of the synchronization. We then show that the synchronization can be efficiently suppressed by highly heterogeneous distribution, typically a lognormal distribution, of inhibitory-to-excitatory connection strengths in a recurrent network model of cortical neurons. PMID:27803659

  7. The effect of high voltage, high frequency pulsed electric field on slain ovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Asgarifar, Hajarossadat; Oloyede, Adekunle; Zare, Firuz

    2014-04-01

    High power, high frequency pulsed electric fields known as pulsed power (PP) has been applied recently in biology and medicine. However, little attention has been paid to investigate the application of pulse power in musculoskeletal system and its possible effect on functional behavior and biomechanical properties of bone tissue. This paper presents the first research investigating whether or not PP can be applied safely on bone tissue as a stimuli and what will be the possible effect of these signals on the characteristics of cortical bone by comparing the mechanical properties of this type of bone pre and post expose to PP and in comparison with the control samples. A positive buck-boost converter was applied to generate adjustable high voltage, high frequency pulses (up to 500 V and 10 kHz). The functional behavior of bone in response to pulse power excitation was elucidated by applying compressive loading until failure. The stiffness, failure stress (strength) and the total fracture energy (bone toughness) were determined as a measure of the main bone characteristics. Furthermore, an ultrasonic technique was applied to determine and comprise bone elasticity before and after pulse power stimulation. The elastic property of cortical bone samples appeared to remain unchanged following exposure to pulse power excitation for all three orthogonal directions obtained from ultrasonic technique and similarly from the compression test. Nevertheless, the compressive strength and toughness of bone samples were increased when they were exposed to 66 h of high power pulsed electromagnetic field compared to the control samples. As the toughness and the strength of the cortical bone tissue are directly associated with the quality and integrity of the collagen matrix whereas its stiffness is primarily related to bone mineral content these overall results may address that although, the pulse power stimulation can influence the arrangement or the quality of the collagen network

  8. Meta-cognition is associated with cortical thickness in youth at clinical high risk of psychosis.

    PubMed

    Buchy, Lisa; Stowkowy, Jacque; MacMaster, Frank P; Nyman, Karissa; Addington, Jean

    2015-09-30

    Meta-cognition is compromised in people with schizophrenia and people at clinical high risk (CHR) of psychosis. In the current work in a CHR sample, we hypothesized that meta-cognitive functions would correlate with cortical thickness in five brain regions implicated in the pathogenesis of psychosis: inferior and middle frontal cortices, anterior cingulate cortex, superior temporal cortex and insula. Secondly, we hypothesized that similar neural systems would underlie different meta-cognitive functions. Narratives were gathered for 29 youth at CHR of psychosis using a semi-structured interview. Four meta-cognitive functions within the narratives were measured with the Meta-cognition Assessment Scale and regressed on cortical thickness from our a priori regions of interest using FreeSurfer. Mapping statistics from our a priori regions of interest revealed that meta-cognition functions were associated with cortical thickness in inferior and middle frontal gyri, superior temporal cortex and insula. The distribution of cortical thickness was partially similar across the four MAS items. Results confirm our hypothesis that cortical thickness is significantly associated with meta-cognition in brain regions that consistently show gray matter reductions across the schizophrenia spectrum. Evidence for thickness covariation in a variety of regions suggests partial dependence in the neural architecture underlying various meta-cognitive functions in CHR.

  9. A method for isolating high quality RNA from mouse cortical and cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Natalie H; Schimenti, John C; Patrick Ross, F; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2014-11-01

    The high incidence of fragility fractures in cortico-cancellous bone locations, plus the fact that individual skeletal sites exhibit different responsiveness to load and disease, emphasizes the need to document separately gene expression in cortical and cancellous bone. A further confounding factor is marrow contamination since its high cellularity may effect gene expression measurements. We isolated RNA from cortical and cancellous bone of intact mouse tibiae, and also after marrow removal by flushing or centrifugation. RNA isolated from cancellous bone by each method was sufficient for gene expression analysis. Centrifugation removed contaminating cells more efficiently than flushing, as indexed by histology and decreased expression of Icam4, a highly expressed erythroid gene. In contrast, centrifuged cortical bone had 12- and 13- fold higher expression of the bone-related genes Col1a1 and Bglap, while levels in marrow-free cancellous bone were 30- and 31-fold higher when compared to bone where marrow was left intact. Furthermore, cortical bone had higher expression of Col1a1 and Bglap than cancellous bone. Thus, RNA isolated by this novel approach can reveal site-specific changes in gene expression in cortical and cancellous bone sites.

  10. Linking contemporary high resolution magnetic resonance imaging to the von Economo legacy: A study on the comparison of MRI cortical thickness and histological measurements of cortical structure.

    PubMed

    Scholtens, Lianne H; de Reus, Marcel A; van den Heuvel, Martijn P

    2015-08-01

    The cerebral cortex is a distinctive part of the mammalian nervous system, displaying a spatial variety in cyto-, chemico-, and myelinoarchitecture. As part of a rich history of histological findings, pioneering anatomists von Economo and Koskinas provided detailed mappings on the cellular structure of the human cortex, reporting on quantitative aspects of cytoarchitecture of cortical areas. Current day investigations into the structure of human cortex have embraced technological advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to assess macroscale thickness and organization of the cortical mantle in vivo. However, direct comparisons between current day MRI estimates and the quantitative measurements of early anatomists have been limited. Here, we report on a simple, but nevertheless important cross-analysis between the histological reports of von Economo and Koskinas on variation in thickness of the cortical mantle and MRI derived measurements of cortical thickness. We translated the von Economo cortical atlas to a subdivision of the commonly used Desikan-Killiany atlas (as part of the FreeSurfer Software package and a commonly used parcellation atlas in studies examining MRI cortical thickness). Next, values of "width of the cortical mantle" as provided by the measurements of von Economo and Koskinas were correlated to cortical thickness measurements derived from high-resolution anatomical MRI T1 data of 200+ subjects of the Human Connectome Project (HCP). Cross-correlation revealed a significant association between group-averaged MRI measurements of cortical thickness and histological recordings (r = 0.54, P < 0.001). Further validating such a correlation, we manually segmented the von Economo parcellation atlas on the standardized Colin27 brain dataset and applied the obtained three-dimensional von Economo segmentation atlas to the T1 data of each of the HCP subjects. Highly consistent with our findings for the mapping to the Desikan-Killiany regions, cross

  11. Spread of academic success in a high school social network.

    PubMed

    Blansky, Deanna; Kavanaugh, Christina; Boothroyd, Cara; Benson, Brianna; Gallagher, Julie; Endress, John; Sayama, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    Application of social network analysis to education has revealed how social network positions of K-12 students correlate with their behavior and academic achievements. However, no study has been conducted on how their social network influences their academic progress over time. Here we investigated correlations between high school students' academic progress over one year and the social environment that surrounds them in their friendship network. We found that students whose friends' average GPA (Grade Point Average) was greater (or less) than their own had a higher tendency toward increasing (or decreasing) their academic ranking over time, indicating social contagion of academic success taking place in their social network.

  12. Slow dynamics and high variability in balanced cortical networks with clustered connections.

    PubMed

    Litwin-Kumar, Ashok; Doiron, Brent

    2012-11-01

    Anatomical studies demonstrate that excitatory connections in cortex are not uniformly distributed across a network but instead exhibit clustering into groups of highly connected neurons. The implications of clustering for cortical activity are unclear. We studied the effect of clustered excitatory connections on the dynamics of neuronal networks that exhibited high spike time variability owing to a balance between excitation and inhibition. Even modest clustering substantially changed the behavior of these networks, introducing slow dynamics during which clusters of neurons transiently increased or decreased their firing rate. Consequently, neurons exhibited both fast spiking variability and slow firing rate fluctuations. A simplified model shows how stimuli bias networks toward particular activity states, thereby reducing firing rate variability as observed experimentally in many cortical areas. Our model thus relates cortical architecture to the reported variability in spontaneous and evoked spiking activity.

  13. High-Resolution Cortical Dipole Imaging Using Spatial Inverse Filter Based on Filtering Property

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cortical dipole imaging has been developed to visualize brain electrical activity in high spatial resolution. It is necessary to solve an inverse problem to estimate the cortical dipole distribution from the scalp potentials. In the present study, the accuracy of cortical dipole imaging was improved by focusing on filtering property of the spatial inverse filter. We proposed an inverse filter that optimizes filtering property using a sigmoid function. The ability of the proposed method was compared with the traditional inverse techniques, such as Tikhonov regularization, truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD), and truncated total least squares (TTLS), in a computer simulation. The proposed method was applied to human experimental data of visual evoked potentials. As a result, the estimation accuracy was improved and the localized dipole distribution was obtained with less noise. PMID:27688747

  14. Alterations in cortical thickness development in preterm-born individuals: Implications for high-order cognitive functions

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kie Woo; Castellanos, Nazareth; Simmons, Andrew; Froudist-Walsh, Seán; Allin, Matthew P.; Walshe, Muriel; Murray, Robin M.; Evans, Alan; Muehlboeck, J-Sebastian; Nosarti, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Very preterm birth (gestational age < 33 weeks) is associated with alterations in cortical thickness and with neuropsychological/behavioural impairments. Here we studied cortical thickness in very preterm born individuals and controls in mid-adolescence (mean age 15 years) and beginning of adulthood (mean age 20 years), as well as longitudinal changes between the two time points. Using univariate approaches, we showed both increases and decreases in cortical thickness in very preterm born individuals compared to controls. Specifically (1) very preterm born adolescents displayed extensive areas of greater cortical thickness, especially in occipitotemporal and prefrontal cortices, differences which decreased substantially by early adulthood; (2) at both time points, very preterm-born participants showed smaller cortical thickness, especially in parahippocampal and insular regions. We then employed a multivariate approach (support vector machine) to study spatially discriminating features between the two groups, which achieved a mean accuracy of 86.5%. The spatially distributed regions in which cortical thickness best discriminated between the groups (top 5%) included temporal, occipitotemporal, parietal and prefrontal cortices. Within these spatially distributed regions (top 1%), longitudinal changes in cortical thickness in left temporal pole, right occipitotemporal gyrus and left superior parietal lobe were significantly associated with scores on language-based tests of executive function. These results describe alterations in cortical thickness development in preterm-born individuals in their second decade of life, with implications for high-order cognitive processing. PMID:25871628

  15. Alterations of cortical pyramidal neurons in mice lacking high-affinity nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros-Yáñez, Inmaculada; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bourgeois, Jean-Pierre; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are allosteric membrane proteins involved in multiple cognitive processes, including attention, learning, and memory. The most abundant form of heterooligomeric nAChRs in the brain contains the β2- and α4- subunits and binds nicotinic agonists with high affinity. In the present study, we investigated in the mouse the consequences of the deletion of one of the nAChR components: the β2-subunit (β2−/−) on the microanatomy of cortical pyramidal cells. Using an intracellular injection method, complete basal dendritic arbors of 650 layer III pyramidal neurons were sampled from seven cortical fields, including primary sensory, motor, and associational areas, in both β2−/− and WT animals. We observed that the pyramidal cell phenotype shows significant quantitative differences among different cortical areas in mutant and WT mice. In WT mice, the density of dendritic spines was rather similar in all cortical fields, except in the prelimbic/infralimbic cortex, where it was significantly higher. In the absence of the β2-subunit, the most significant reduction in the density of spines took place in this high-order associational field. Our data suggest that the β2-subunit is involved in the dendritic morphogenesis of pyramidal neurons and, in particular, in the circuits that contribute to the high-order functional connectivity of the cerebral cortex. PMID:20534523

  16. High-spatial-resolution mapping of the oxygen concentration in cortical tissue (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaswal, Rajeshwer S.; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Fu, Buyin; Boas, David A.; Sakadžic, Sava

    2016-03-01

    Due to a lack of imaging tools for high-resolution imaging of cortical tissue oxygenation, the detailed maps of the oxygen partial pressure (PO2) around arterioles, venules, and capillaries remain largely unknown. Therefore, we have limited knowledge about the mechanisms that secure sufficient oxygen delivery in microvascular domains during brain activation, and provide some metabolic reserve capacity in diseases that affect either microvascular networks or the regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF). To address this challenge, we applied a Two-Photon PO2 Microscopy to map PO2 at different depths in mice cortices. Measurements were performed through the cranial window in the anesthetized healthy mice as well as in the mouse models of microvascular dysfunctions. In addition, microvascular morphology was recorded by the two-photon microscopy at the end of each experiment and subsequently segmented. Co-registration of the PO2 measurements and exact microvascular morphology enabled quantification of the tissue PO2 dependence on distance from the arterioles, capillaries, and venules at various depths. Our measurements reveal significant spatial heterogeneity of the cortical tissue PO2 distribution that is dominated by the high oxygenation in periarteriolar spaces. In cases of impaired oxygen delivery due to microvascular dysfunction, significant reduction in tissue oxygenation away from the arterioles was observed. These tissue domains may be the initial sites of cortical injury that can further exacerbate the progression of the disease.

  17. Role of the immune system in the peritoneal tumor spread of high grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Auer, Katharina; Bachmayr-Heyda, Anna; Sukhbaatar, Nyamdelger; Aust, Stefanie; Schmetterer, Klaus G; Meier, Samuel M; Gerner, Christopher; Grimm, Christoph; Horvat, Reinhard; Pils, Dietmar

    2016-09-20

    The immune system plays a critical role in cancer progression and overall survival. Still, it is unclear if differences in the immune response are associated with different patterns of tumor spread apparent in high grade serous ovarian cancer patients and previously described by us. In this study we aimed to assess the role of the immune system in miliary (widespread, millet-sized lesions) and non-miliary (bigger, exophytically growing implants) tumor spread. To achieve this we comprehensively analyzed tumor tissues, blood, and ascites from 41 patients using immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, RNA sequencing, multiplexed immunoassays, and immunohistochemistry. Results showed that inflammation markers were systemically higher in miliary. In contrast, in non-miliary lymphocyte and monocyte/macrophage infiltration into the ascites was higher as well as the levels of PD-1 expression in tumor associated cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and PD-L1 expression in tumor cells. Furthermore, in ascites of miliary patients more epithelial tumor cells were present compared to non-miliary, possibly due to the active down-regulation of anti-tumor responses by B-cells and regulatory T-cells. Summarizing, adaptive immune responses prevailed in patients with non-miliary spread, whereas in patients with miliary spread a higher involvement of the innate immune system was apparent while adaptive responses were counteracted by immune suppressive cells and factors.

  18. Role of the immune system in the peritoneal tumor spread of high grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Katharina; Bachmayr-Heyda, Anna; Sukhbaatar, Nyamdelger; Aust, Stefanie; Schmetterer, Klaus G.; Meier, Samuel M.; Gerner, Christopher; Grimm, Christoph; Horvat, Reinhard; Pils, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    The immune system plays a critical role in cancer progression and overall survival. Still, it is unclear if differences in the immune response are associated with different patterns of tumor spread apparent in high grade serous ovarian cancer patients and previously described by us. In this study we aimed to assess the role of the immune system in miliary (widespread, millet-sized lesions) and non-miliary (bigger, exophytically growing implants) tumor spread. To achieve this we comprehensively analyzed tumor tissues, blood, and ascites from 41 patients using immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, RNA sequencing, multiplexed immunoassays, and immunohistochemistry. Results showed that inflammation markers were systemically higher in miliary. In contrast, in non-miliary lymphocyte and monocyte/macrophage infiltration into the ascites was higher as well as the levels of PD-1 expression in tumor associated cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and PD-L1 expression in tumor cells. Furthermore, in ascites of miliary patients more epithelial tumor cells were present compared to non-miliary, possibly due to the active down-regulation of anti-tumor responses by B-cells and regulatory T-cells. Summarizing, adaptive immune responses prevailed in patients with non-miliary spread, whereas in patients with miliary spread a higher involvement of the innate immune system was apparent while adaptive responses were counteracted by immune suppressive cells and factors. PMID:27665539

  19. Small RNAs and the competing endogenous RNA network in high grade serous ovarian cancer tumor spread

    PubMed Central

    Bachmayr-Heyda, Anna; Auer, Katharina; Sukhbaatar, Nyamdelger; Aust, Stefanie; Deycmar, Simon; Reiner, Agnes T.; Polterauer, Stephan; Dekan, Sabine; Pils, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    High grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) is among the most deadly malignancies in women, frequently involving peritoneal tumor spread. Understanding molecular mechanisms of peritoneal metastasis is essential to develop urgently needed targeted therapies. We described two peritoneal tumor spread types in HGSOC apparent during surgery: miliary (numerous millet-sized implants) and non-miliary (few big, bulky implants). The former one is defined by a more epithelial-like tumor cell characteristic with less immune cell reactivity and with significant worse prognosis, even if corrected for typical clinicopathologic factors. 23 HGSOC patients were enrolled in this study. Isolated tumor cells from fresh tumor tissues of ovarian and peritoneal origin and from ascites were used for ribosomal RNA depleted RNA and small RNA sequencing. RT-qPCR was used to validate results and an independent cohort of 32 patients to validate the impact on survival. Large and small RNA sequencing data were integrated and a new gene-miRNA set analysis method was developed. Thousands of new small RNAs (miRNAs and piwi-interacting RNAs) were predicted and a 13 small RNA signature was developed to predict spread type from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. Furthermore, integrative analyses of RNA sequencing and small RNA sequencing data revealed a global upregulation of the competing endogenous RNA network in tumor tissues of non-miliary compared to miliary spread, i.e. higher expression of circular RNAs and long non-coding RNAs compared to coding RNAs but unchanged abundance of small RNAs. This global deregulated expression pattern could be co-responsible for the spread characteristic, miliary or non-miliary, in ovarian cancer. PMID:27172797

  20. Exponential quantum spreading in a class of kicked rotor systems near high-order resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Guarneri, Italo; Casati, Giulio; Gong, Jiangbin

    2013-11-01

    Long-lasting exponential quantum spreading was recently found in a simple but very rich dynamical model, namely, an on-resonance double-kicked rotor model [J. Wang, I. Guarneri, G. Casati, and J. B. Gong, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.234104 107, 234104 (2011)]. The underlying mechanism, unrelated to the chaotic motion in the classical limit but resting on quasi-integrable motion in a pseudoclassical limit, is identified for one special case. By presenting a detailed study of the same model, this work offers a framework to explain long-lasting exponential quantum spreading under much more general conditions. In particular, we adopt the so-called “spinor” representation to treat the kicked-rotor dynamics under high-order resonance conditions and then exploit the Born-Oppenheimer approximation to understand the dynamical evolution. It is found that the existence of a flat band (or an effectively flat band) is one important feature behind why and how the exponential dynamics emerges. It is also found that a quantitative prediction of the exponential spreading rate based on an interesting and simple pseudoclassical map may be inaccurate. In addition to general interests regarding the question of how exponential behavior in quantum systems may persist for a long time scale, our results should motivate further studies toward a better understanding of high-order resonance behavior in δ-kicked quantum systems.

  1. High spread of Schmallenberg virus among roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in Spain.

    PubMed

    Díaz, José M; Prieto, Alberto; López, Ceferino; Díaz, Pablo; Pérez, Ana; Panadero, Rosario; Pajares, Gerardo; Díez-Baños, Pablo; Morrondo, Patrocinio; Fernández, Gonzalo

    2015-10-01

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is an emergent virus in northwestern Europe since 2011. We conducted this study to evaluate the spread of this virus in a wild ruminant community. During 2013 and 2014, 75 serum samples of roe deer were collected from different locations of the Spanish geography and analysed for the presence of antibodies. The results revealed a widespread exposure to SBV, as well as a high seroprevalence (53.3%, CI95% 42.16–64.18). These findings demand more research with regard to the impact of SBV on roe deer health and the interactions with livestock. Results also show this species as potentially suitable for monitoring the spread of the virus through sylvatic areas.

  2. Resonant antidromic cortical circuit activation as a consequence of high-frequency subthalamic deep-brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Arbuthnott, G W; Jutras, M J; Goldberg, J A; Jaeger, D

    2007-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) for many patients. The most effective stimulation consists of high-frequency biphasic stimulation pulses around 130 Hz delivered between two active sites of an implanted depth electrode to the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS). Multiple studies have shown that a key effect of STN-DBS that correlates well with clinical outcome is the reduction of synchronous and oscillatory activity in cortical and basal ganglia networks. We hypothesized that antidromic cortical activation may provide an underlying mechanism responsible for this effect, because stimulation is usually performed in proximity to cortical efferent pathways. We show with intracellular cortical recordings in rats that STN-DBS did in fact lead to antidromic spiking of deep layer cortical neurons. Furthermore, antidromic spikes triggered a dampened oscillation of local field potentials in cortex with a resonant frequency around 120 Hz. The amplitude of antidromic activation was significantly correlated with an observed suppression of slow wave and beta band activity during STN-DBS. These findings were seen in ketamine-xylazine or isoflurane anesthesia in both normal and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. Thus antidromic resonant activation of cortical microcircuits may make an important contribution toward counteracting the overly synchronous and oscillatory activity characteristic of cortical activity in PD.

  3. Modelling the wind-borne spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus between farms.

    PubMed

    Ssematimba, Amos; Hagenaars, Thomas J; de Jong, Mart C M

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of the spread of contaminated farm dust between locations is a prerequisite for obtaining much-needed insight into one of the possible mechanisms of disease spread between farms. Here, we develop a model to calculate the quantity of contaminated farm-dust particles deposited at various locations downwind of a source farm and apply the model to assess the possible contribution of the wind-borne route to the transmission of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza virus (HPAI) during the 2003 epidemic in the Netherlands. The model is obtained from a Gaussian Plume Model by incorporating the dust deposition process, pathogen decay, and a model for the infection process on exposed farms. Using poultry- and avian influenza-specific parameter values we calculate the distance-dependent probability of between-farm transmission by this route. A comparison between the transmission risk pattern predicted by the model and the pattern observed during the 2003 epidemic reveals that the wind-borne route alone is insufficient to explain the observations although it could contribute substantially to the spread over short distance ranges, for example, explaining 24% of the transmission over distances up to 25 km.

  4. Cortical cytasters: a highly conserved developmental trait of Bilateria with similarities to Ctenophora

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cytasters (cytoplasmic asters) are centriole-based nucleation centers of microtubule polymerization that are observable in large numbers in the cortical cytoplasm of the egg and zygote of bilaterian organisms. In both protostome and deuterostome taxa, cytasters have been described to develop during oogenesis from vesicles of nuclear membrane that move to the cortical cytoplasm. They become associated with several cytoplasmic components, and participate in the reorganization of cortical cytoplasm after fertilization, patterning the antero-posterior and dorso-ventral body axes. Presentation of the hypothesis The specific resemblances in the development of cytasters in both protostome and deuterostome taxa suggest that an independent evolutionary origin is unlikely. An assessment of published data confirms that cytasters are present in several protostome and deuterostome phyla, but are absent in the non-bilaterian phyla Cnidaria and Ctenophora. We hypothesize that cytasters evolved in the lineage leading to Bilateria and were already present in the most recent common ancestor shared by protostomes and deuterostomes. Thus, cytasters would be an ancient and highly conserved trait that is homologous across the different bilaterian phyla. The alternative possibility is homoplasy, that is cytasters have evolved independently in different lineages of Bilateria. Testing the hypothesis So far, available published information shows that appropriate observations have been made in eight different bilaterian phyla. All of them present cytasters. This is consistent with the hypothesis of homology and conservation. However, there are several important groups for which there are no currently available data. The hypothesis of homology predicts that cytasters should be present in these groups. Increasing the taxonomic sample using modern techniques uniformly will test for evolutionary patterns supporting homology, homoplasy, or secondary loss of cytasters. Implications of

  5. High incidence and endemic spread of NDM-1-positive Enterobacteriaceae in Henan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shangshang; Fu, Ying; Zhang, Qijing; Qi, Hui; Wen, Jian Guo; Xu, Hui; Xu, Lijuan; Zeng, Li; Tian, Hao; Rong, Lijuan; Li, Yonghong; Shan, Lihong; Xu, Hongde; Yu, Yunsong; Feng, Xianju; Liu, Hong-Min

    2014-08-01

    The emergence and spread of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1)-producing carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) present an urgent threat to human health. In China, the bla(NDM-1 gene has been reported mostly in Acinetobacter spp. but is rarely found in Enterobacteriaceae. Here, we report a high incidence and endemic spread of NDM-1-producing CRE in Henan Province in China. Sixteen (33.3%) of the 48 CRE isolates obtained from patients during June 2011 to July 2012 were positive for bla(NDM-1), and the gene was found to be carried on plasmids of various sizes (∼ 55 to ∼ 360 kb). These plasmids were readily transferrable to recipient Escherichia coli by conjugation, conferred resistance to multiple antibiotics, and belonged to multiple replicon types. The bla(NDM-1)-positive CRE isolates were genetically diverse, and six new multilocus sequence typing (MLST) sequence types were linked to the carriage of NDM-1. Five of the isolates were classified as extensively drug-resistant (XDR) isolates, four of which also carried the fosA3 gene conferring resistance to fosfomycin, an alternative drug for treating infections by CRE. In each bla(NDM-1)-positive CRE isolate, the bla(NDM-1) gene was downstream of an intact ISAba125 element and upstream of the bleMBL gene. Furthermore, gene environment analysis suggested the possible transmission of bla(NDM-1)-containing sequences from Acinetobacter spp. to Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca. These findings reveal the emergence and active transmission of NDM-1-positive CRE in China and underscore the need for heightened measures to control their further spread.

  6. High Incidence and Endemic Spread of NDM-1-Positive Enterobacteriaceae in Henan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shangshang; Fu, Ying; Zhang, Qijing; Qi, Hui; Wen, Jian Guo; Xu, Hui; Xu, Lijuan; Zeng, Li; Tian, Hao; Rong, Lijuan; Li, Yonghong; Shan, Lihong; Xu, Hongde; Yu, Yunsong

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and spread of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1)-producing carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) present an urgent threat to human health. In China, the blaNDM-1 gene has been reported mostly in Acinetobacter spp. but is rarely found in Enterobacteriaceae. Here, we report a high incidence and endemic spread of NDM-1-producing CRE in Henan Province in China. Sixteen (33.3%) of the 48 CRE isolates obtained from patients during June 2011 to July 2012 were positive for blaNDM-1, and the gene was found to be carried on plasmids of various sizes (∼55 to ∼360 kb). These plasmids were readily transferrable to recipient Escherichia coli by conjugation, conferred resistance to multiple antibiotics, and belonged to multiple replicon types. The blaNDM-1-positive CRE isolates were genetically diverse, and six new multilocus sequence typing (MLST) sequence types were linked to the carriage of NDM-1. Five of the isolates were classified as extensively drug-resistant (XDR) isolates, four of which also carried the fosA3 gene conferring resistance to fosfomycin, an alternative drug for treating infections by CRE. In each blaNDM-1-positive CRE isolate, the blaNDM-1 gene was downstream of an intact ISAba125 element and upstream of the bleMBL gene. Furthermore, gene environment analysis suggested the possible transmission of blaNDM-1-containing sequences from Acinetobacter spp. to Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca. These findings reveal the emergence and active transmission of NDM-1-positive CRE in China and underscore the need for heightened measures to control their further spread. PMID:24777095

  7. Cortical characterization of the perception of intelligible and unintelligible speech measured via high-density electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Utianski, Rene L; Caviness, John N; Liss, Julie M

    2015-01-01

    High-density electroencephalography was used to evaluate cortical activity during speech comprehension via a sentence verification task. Twenty-four participants assigned true or false to sentences produced with 3 noise-vocoded channel levels (1--unintelligible, 6--decipherable, 16--intelligible), during simultaneous EEG recording. Participant data were sorted into higher- (HP) and lower-performing (LP) groups. The identification of a late-event related potential for LP listeners in the intelligible condition and in all listeners when challenged with a 6-Ch signal supports the notion that this induced potential may be related to either processing degraded speech, or degraded processing of intelligible speech. Different cortical locations are identified as neural generators responsible for this activity; HP listeners are engaging motor aspects of their language system, utilizing an acoustic-phonetic based strategy to help resolve the sentence, while LP listeners do not. This study presents evidence for neurophysiological indices associated with more or less successful speech comprehension performance across listening conditions.

  8. Different modalities of painful somatosensory stimulations affect anticipatory cortical processes: a high-resolution EEG study.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Brancucci, Alfredo; Capotosto, Paolo; Del Percio, Claudio; Romani, Gian Luca; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2007-03-15

    Pain sensation is characterized by multiple features that allow to differentiate pricking, burning, aching, stinging, and electrical shock. These features are sub-served by neural pathways that might give flexibility and selectivity to the cerebral anticipatory processes. In this line, the present high-resolution electroencephalography (EEG) study tested the hypothesis that the anticipatory cortical processes are stronger for painful thermal (biologically relevant) than electrical ("artificial") stimuli with similar intensity. EEG data (128 electrodes) were recorded in normal subjects during the expectancy of painful electrical or laser stimuli (visual omitted stimulus paradigm; interval between two painful stimuli: 16s), delivered over the median nerve region of the right arm (nonpainful stimuli as controls). After each stimulus, the subject reported the perceived stimulus intensity. Surface Laplacian estimation of the EEG data spatially enhanced the anticipatory stimulus-preceding negativity (SPN), which reflects motivational relevance of the stimulus. Subjects perceived no difference in the intensity of the electrical versus laser stimuli in both painful and nonpainful conditions. However, the anticipatory SPN appeared over large scalp regions before painful laser but not electrical stimulation. The same was true for the nonpainful stimulations. The present results suggest that the motivational anticipatory cortical processes are induced by nonpainful and painful biologically/ecologically relevant laser stimuli rather than by "artificial" electrical stimuli with similar intensity.

  9. High fidelity point-spread function retrieval in the presence of electrostatic, hysteretic pixel response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Andrew; Guyonnet, Augustin; Lage, Craig; Antilogus, Pierre; Astier, Pierre; Doherty, Peter; Gilmore, Kirk; Kotov, Ivan; Lupton, Robert; Nomerotski, Andrei; O'Connor, Paul; Stubbs, Christopher; Tyson, Anthony; Walter, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    We employ electrostatic conversion drift calculations to match CCD pixel signal covariances observed in at field exposures acquired using candidate sensor devices for the LSST Camera.1, 2 We thus constrain pixel geometry distortions present at the end of integration, based on signal images recorded. We use available data from several operational voltage parameter settings to validate our understanding. Our primary goal is to optimize flux point spread function (FPSF) estimation quantitatively, and thereby minimize sensor-induced errors which may limit performance in precision astronomy applications. We consider alternative compensation scenarios that will take maximum advantage of our understanding of this underlying mechanism in data processing pipelines currently under development. To quantitatively capture the pixel response in high-contrast/high dynamic range operational extrema, we propose herein some straightforward laboratory tests that involve altering the time order of source illumination on sensors, within individual test exposures. Hence the word hysteretic in the title of this paper.

  10. A high-DC-voltage GaAs photoemission gun: Transverse emittance and momentum spread measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Engwall, D.; Bohn, C.; Cardman, L.

    1997-06-01

    We have built a high-DC-voltage photoemission gun and a diagnostic beamline permitting us to measure rms transverse emittance ({epsilon}{sub x}) and rms momentum spread ({delta}) of short-duration electron pulses produced by illuminating the cathode with light from a mode-locked, frequency-doubled Nd:YLF laser. The electron gun is a GaAs photocathode source designed to operate at 500kV. We have measured {epsilon}{sub x} and {delta} for conditions ranging from emittance-dominated to space-charge-dominated. We report these measurements as functions of microbunch charge for different beam radii, pulse lengths, and voltages/field gradients at the cathode, and compare them with PARMELA calculations.

  11. Multivariate high-dimensional cortical folding analysis, combining complexity and shape, in neonates with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Awate, Suyash P; Yushkevich, Paul; Song, Zhuang; Licht, Daniel; Gee, James C

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a novel statistical framework for cortical folding pattern analysis that relies on a rich multivariate descriptor of folding patterns in a region of interest (ROI). The ROI-based approach avoids problems faced by spatial-normalization-based approaches stemming from the severe deficiency of homologous features between typical human cerebral cortices. Unlike typical ROI-based methods that summarize folding complexity or shape by a single number, the proposed descriptor unifies complexity and shape of the surface in a high-dimensional space. In this way, the proposed framework couples the reliability of ROI-based analysis with the richness of the novel cortical folding pattern descriptor. Furthermore, the descriptor can easily incorporate additional variables, e.g. cortical thickness. The paper proposes a novel application of a nonparametric permutation-based approach for statistical hypothesis testing for any multivariate high-dimensional descriptor. While the proposed framework has a rigorous theoretical underpinning, it is straightforward to implement. The framework is validated via simulated and clinical data. The paper is the first to quantitatively evaluate cortical folding in neonates with complex congenital heart disease.

  12. Improved accuracy of cortical bone mineralization measured by polychromatic microcomputed tomography using a novel high mineral density composite calibration phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Deuerling, Justin M.; Rudy, David J.; Niebur, Glen L.; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) is increasingly used as a nondestructive alternative to ashing for measuring bone mineral content. Phantoms are utilized to calibrate the measured x-ray attenuation to discrete levels of mineral density, typically including levels up to 1000 mg HA/cm{sup 3}, which encompasses levels of bone mineral density (BMD) observed in trabecular bone. However, levels of BMD observed in cortical bone and levels of tissue mineral density (TMD) in both cortical and trabecular bone typically exceed 1000 mg HA/cm{sup 3}, requiring extrapolation of the calibration regression, which may result in error. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate (1) the relationship between x-ray attenuation and an expanded range of hydroxyapatite (HA) density in a less attenuating polymer matrix and (2) the effects of the calibration on the accuracy of subsequent measurements of mineralization in human cortical bone specimens. Methods: A novel HA-polymer composite phantom was prepared comprising a less attenuating polymer phase (polyethylene) and an expanded range of HA density (0-1860 mg HA/cm{sup 3}) inclusive of characteristic levels of BMD in cortical bone or TMD in cortical and trabecular bone. The BMD and TMD of cortical bone specimens measured using the new HA-polymer calibration phantom were compared to measurements using a conventional HA-polymer phantom comprising 0-800 mg HA/cm{sup 3} and the corresponding ash density measurements on the same specimens. Results: The HA-polymer composite phantom exhibited a nonlinear relationship between x-ray attenuation and HA density, rather than the linear relationship typically employed a priori, and obviated the need for extrapolation, when calibrating the measured x-ray attenuation to high levels of mineral density. The BMD and TMD of cortical bone specimens measured using the conventional phantom was significantly lower than the measured ash density by 19% (p<0.001, ANCOVA) and 33% (p<0

  13. Worldwide Alien Invasion: A Methodological Approach to Forecast the Potential Spread of a Highly Invasive Pollinator

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ecological impacts of alien species invasion are a major threat to global biodiversity. The increasing number of invasion events by alien species and the high cost and difficulty of eradicating invasive species once established require the development of new methods and tools for predicting the most susceptible areas to invasion. Invasive pollinators pose serious threats to biodiversity and human activity due to their close relationship with many plants (including crop species) and high potential competitiveness for resources with native pollinators. Although at an early stage of expansion, the bumblebee species Bombus terrestris is becoming a representative case of pollinator invasion at a global scale, particularly given its high velocity of invasive spread and the increasing number of reports of its impacts on native bees and crops in many countries. We present here a methodological framework of habitat suitability modeling that integrates new approaches for detecting habitats that are susceptible to Bombus terrestris invasion at a global scale. Our approach did not include reported invaded locations in the modeling procedure; instead, those locations were used exclusively to evaluate the accuracy of the models in predicting suitability over regions already invaded. Moreover, a new and more intuitive approach was developed to select the models and evaluate different algorithms based on their performance and predictive convergence. Finally, we present a comprehensive global map of susceptibility to Bombus terrestris invasion that highlights priority areas for monitoring. PMID:26882479

  14. Worldwide Alien Invasion: A Methodological Approach to Forecast the Potential Spread of a Highly Invasive Pollinator.

    PubMed

    Acosta, André L; Giannini, Tereza C; Imperatriz-Fonseca, Vera L; Saraiva, Antonio M

    2016-01-01

    The ecological impacts of alien species invasion are a major threat to global biodiversity. The increasing number of invasion events by alien species and the high cost and difficulty of eradicating invasive species once established require the development of new methods and tools for predicting the most susceptible areas to invasion. Invasive pollinators pose serious threats to biodiversity and human activity due to their close relationship with many plants (including crop species) and high potential competitiveness for resources with native pollinators. Although at an early stage of expansion, the bumblebee species Bombus terrestris is becoming a representative case of pollinator invasion at a global scale, particularly given its high velocity of invasive spread and the increasing number of reports of its impacts on native bees and crops in many countries. We present here a methodological framework of habitat suitability modeling that integrates new approaches for detecting habitats that are susceptible to Bombus terrestris invasion at a global scale. Our approach did not include reported invaded locations in the modeling procedure; instead, those locations were used exclusively to evaluate the accuracy of the models in predicting suitability over regions already invaded. Moreover, a new and more intuitive approach was developed to select the models and evaluate different algorithms based on their performance and predictive convergence. Finally, we present a comprehensive global map of susceptibility to Bombus terrestris invasion that highlights priority areas for monitoring.

  15. High-resolution interferometric radar images of equatorial spread F scattering structures using Capon's method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zewdie, G. K.; Rodrigues, F. S.; Paula, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    Coherent backscatter radar imaging techniques use measurements made by multiple antenna baselines (visibility estimates) to infer the spatial distribution of the scatterers (brightness function) responsible for the observed echoes. It has been proposed that the Capon method for spectral estimation can be used for high-resolution estimation of the brightness distribution. We investigate the application of the Capon method to measurements made by a small (7-baseline) 30 MHz ionospheric coherent backscatter radar interferometer in Sao Luis, Brazil. The longest baseline of the interferometer is only 15 times the wavelength of radar signal (10 m), and the ionospheric radar soundings have been made using only 4-8 kW transmitters. Nevertheless, we have been able to obtain high-resolution (kilometric scales in the zonal direction) images of scattering structures during equatorial spread F (ESF) events over a wide field of view (+/- 10 degrees off zenith). We will present numerical simulations demonstrating the performance of the technique for the Sao Luis radar setup as well as results of the Capon technique applied to actual measurements. We will discuss the behavior of the ESF scattering structures as seen in the Capon images. The high-resolution images can assist our interpretation of plasma instabilities in the equatorial ionosphere and serve to test our ability to model the behavior of ionospheric irregularities during space weather events such as those associated with ESF.

  16. Cortical Source Analysis of High-Density EEG Recordings in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bathelt, Joe; O'Reilly, Helen; de Haan, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    EEG is traditionally described as a neuroimaging technique with high temporal and low spatial resolution. Recent advances in biophysical modelling and signal processing make it possible to exploit information from other imaging modalities like structural MRI that provide high spatial resolution to overcome this constraint1. This is especially useful for investigations that require high resolution in the temporal as well as spatial domain. In addition, due to the easy application and low cost of EEG recordings, EEG is often the method of choice when working with populations, such as young children, that do not tolerate functional MRI scans well. However, in order to investigate which neural substrates are involved, anatomical information from structural MRI is still needed. Most EEG analysis packages work with standard head models that are based on adult anatomy. The accuracy of these models when used for children is limited2, because the composition and spatial configuration of head tissues changes dramatically over development3.  In the present paper, we provide an overview of our recent work in utilizing head models based on individual structural MRI scans or age specific head models to reconstruct the cortical generators of high density EEG. This article describes how EEG recordings are acquired, processed, and analyzed with pediatric populations at the London Baby Lab, including laboratory setup, task design, EEG preprocessing, MRI processing, and EEG channel level and source analysis.  PMID:25045930

  17. A Preliminary Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study of Cortical Inhibition and Excitability in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enticott, Peter G.; Rinehart, Nicole J.; Tonge, Bruce J.; Bradshaw, John L.; Fitzgerald, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Controversy surrounds the distinction between high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger disorder, but motor abnormalities are associated features of both conditions. This study examined motor cortical inhibition and excitability in HFA and Asperger disorder using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Method: Participants were diagnosed by…

  18. Stochastic spatio-temporal modelling of African swine fever spread in the European Union during the high risk period.

    PubMed

    Nigsch, Annette; Costard, Solenne; Jones, Bryony A; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Wieland, Barbara

    2013-03-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a notifiable viral pig disease with high mortality and serious socio-economic consequences. Since ASF emerged in Georgia in 2007 the disease has spread to several neighbouring countries and cases have been detected in areas bordering the European Union (EU). It is uncertain how fast the virus would be able to spread within the unrestricted European trading area if it were introduced into the EU. This project therefore aimed to develop a model for the spread of ASF within and between the 27 Member States (MS) of the EU during the high risk period (HRP) and to identify MS during that period would most likely contribute to ASF spread ("super-spreaders") or MS that would most likely receive cases from other MS ("super-receivers"). A stochastic spatio-temporal state-transition model using simulated individual farm records was developed to assess silent ASF virus spread during different predefined HRPs of 10-60 days duration. Infection was seeded into farms of different pig production types in each of the 27 MS. Direct pig-to-pig transmission and indirect transmission routes (pig transport lorries and professional contacts) were considered the main pathways during the early stages of an epidemic. The model was parameterised using data collated from EUROSTAT, TRACES, a questionnaire sent to MS, and the scientific literature. Model outputs showed that virus circulation was generally limited to 1-2 infected premises per outbreak (95% IQR: 1-4; maximum: 10) with large breeder farms as index case resulting in most infected premises. Seven MS caused between-MS spread due to intra-Community trade during the first 10 days after seeding infection. For a HRP of 60 days from virus introduction, movements of infected pigs will originate at least once from 16 MS, with 6 MS spreading ASF in more than 10% of iterations. Two thirds of all intra-Community spread was linked to six trade links only. Denmark, the Netherlands, Lithuania and Latvia were identified

  19. Epileptiform synchronization and high-frequency oscillations in brain slices comprising piriform and entorhinal cortices.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, S; Lévesque, M; Avoli, M

    2014-12-05

    We employed field potential recordings in extended in vitro brain slices form Sprague-Dawley rats containing the piriform and entorhinal cortices (PC and EC, respectively) to identify the characteristics of epileptiform discharges and concomitant high-frequency oscillations (HFOs, ripples: 80-200Hz, fast ripples: 250-500Hz) during bath application of 4-aminopyridine (4AP, 50μM). Ictal-like discharges occurred in PC and EC either synchronously or independently of each other; synchronous ictal discharges always emerged from a synchronous "fast" interictal background whereas asynchronous ictal discharges were preceded by a "slow" interictal event. In addition, asynchronous ictal discharges had longer duration and interval of occurrence than synchronous ictal discharges, and contained a higher proportion of ripples and fast ripples. Cutting the connections between PC and EC made synchronicity disappear and increased ictal discharges duration in the EC but failed in changing HFO occurrence in both areas. Finally, antagonizing ionotropic glutamatergic receptors abolished ictal activity in all experiments, increased the duration and rate of occurrence of interictal discharges occurring in PC-EC interconnected slices while it did not influence the slow asynchronous interictal discharges in both areas. Our results identify some novel in vitro interactions between olfactory (PC) and limbic (EC) structures that presumably contribute to in vivo ictogenesis as well.

  20. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells with high efficiency from human embryonic renal cortical cells

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ling; Chen, Ruifang; Wang, Pu; Zhang, Qi; Tang, Hailiang; Sun, Huaping

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) emerges as a prospective therapeutic angle in regenerative medicine and a tool for drug screening. Although increasing numbers of iPSCs from different sources have been generated, there has been limited progress in yield of iPSC. Here, we show that four Yamanaka factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc can convert human embryonic renal cortical cells (hERCCs) to pluripotent stem cells with a roughly 40-fold higher reprogramming efficiency compared with that of adult human dermal fibroblasts. These iPSCs show pluripotency in vitro and in vivo, as evidenced by expression of pluripotency associated genes, differentiation into three embryonic germ layers by teratoma tests, as well as neuronal fate specification by embryoid body formation. Moreover, the four exogenous genes are effectively silenced in these iPSCs. This study highlights the use of hERCCs to generate highly functional human iPSCs which may aid the study of genetic kidney diseases and accelerate the development of cell-based regenerative therapy. PMID:27904699

  1. High Precision Imaging of Microscopic Spread of Glioblastoma with a Targeted Ultrasensitive SERRS Molecular Imaging Probe

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruimin; Harmsen, Stefan; Samii, Jason M.; Karabeber, Hazem; Pitter, Kenneth L.; Holland, Eric C.; Kircher, Moritz F.

    2016-01-01

    The dismal prognosis of patients with malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is attributed mostly to their diffuse growth pattern and early microscopic tumor spread to distant regions of the brain. Because the microscopic tumor foci cannot be visualized with current imaging modalities, it remains impossible to direct treatments optimally. Here we explored the ability of integrin-targeted surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) nanoparticles to depict the true tumor extent in a GBM mouse model that closely mimics the pathology in humans. The recently developed SERRS-nanoparticles have a sensitivity of detection in the femtomolar range. An RGD-peptide-conjugated version for integrin-targeting (RGD-SERRS) was compared directly to its non-targeted RAD-SERRS control in the same mice via Raman multiplexing. Pre-blocking with RGD peptide before injection of RGD-SERRS nanoparticles was used to verify the specificity of integrin-targeting. In contrast to the current belief that the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect results in a baseline uptake of nanoparticles regardless of their surface chemistry, integrin-targeting was shown to be highly specific, with markedly lower accumulation after pre-blocking. While the non-targeted SERRS particles enabled delineation of the main tumor, the RGD-SERRS nanoparticles afforded a major improvement in visualization of the true extent and the diffuse margins of the main tumor. This included the detection of unexpected tumor areas distant to the main tumor, tracks of migrating cells of 2-3 cells in diameter, and even isolated distant tumor cell clusters of less than 5 cells. This Raman spectroscopy-based nanoparticle-imaging technology holds promise to allow high precision visualization of the true extent of malignant brain tumors. PMID:27279902

  2. Geology of a dying backarc spreading segment: results of high-density samplings of Godzilla Megamullion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Y.; Snow, J. E.; Michibayashi, K.; Dick, H. J.; Harigane, Y.; Tani, K.; Yamashita, H.; Ishizuka, O.; Loocke, M. P.; Ishii, T.; Okino, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Godzilla Megamullion is the largest known oceanic core complex (OCC), and is located in an extinct backarc basin in the Philippine Sea: the Parece Vela Basin (PVB). Earlier, based on poorly constrained magnetic data, we believed the basin was active from 26 to 12 Ma at an intermediate-spreading rate of 8.8-7.0 cm/year full-rate (Okino et al. 1998; Ohara et al. 2001, 2003). The tectono-magmatic characteristics of Godzilla Megamullion were thus thought unusual and paradoxical. Although a higher magmatic budget is expected for a fast- to intermediate-spreading ridge, the PVB shows features indicating a smaller magmatic budget, including oceanic core complexes and abundant peridotites and gabbros (Ohara et al., 2001; 2003). Many peridotites in the PVB are much less depleted than those exposed at comparable spreading rates on other mid-ocean ridge systems (Ohara et al. 2001, 2003; Ohara 2006). Zircon U-Pb dating of gabbroic and leucocratic rocks from Godzilla Megamullion now reveals that exhumation of the 125 km long detachment surface lasted for ~4 m.y., with continuous magmatic accretion at the spreading axis (Tani et al., 2011). The estimated denudation rate of the OCC was ~2.5 cm/y; significantly slower than the previous estimate based on magnetic data. The latest magmatism occurred at ~7.9 Ma or later, significantly younger than a previous estimate of 12 Ma. The new age data indicate that the terminal phase of PVB spreading was not at intermediate spreading rates, with a significant decline and asymmetry accompanying formation of Godzilla Megamullion in a "dying" backarc spreading segment. The recent field survey also supports a slow- to ultraslow-spreading environment for Godzilla Megamulllion, including increased melt stagnation in the shallow mantle, and decreasing degree of partial melting of the peridotites towards the termination of Godzilla Megamullion. We will be conducting a cruise (YK11-08) during October 2011 focused on the tectono-magmatic process

  3. The impact of high grade glial neoplasms on human cortical electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, Mrinal; Hacker, Carl D.; Bundy, David T.; Breshears, Jonathan D.; Sharma, Mohit; Shimony, Joshua S.; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The brain’s functional architecture of interconnected network-related oscillatory patterns in discrete cortical regions has been well established with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies or direct cortical electrophysiology from electrodes placed on the surface of the brain, or electrocorticography (ECoG). These resting state networks exhibit a robust functional architecture that persists through all stages of sleep and under anesthesia. While the stability of these networks provides a fundamental understanding of the organization of the brain, understanding how these regions can be perturbed is also critical in defining the brain’s ability to adapt while learning and recovering from injury. Methods Patients undergoing an awake craniotomy for resection of a tumor were studied as a unique model of an evolving injury to help define how the cortical physiology and the associated networks were altered by the presence of an invasive brain tumor. Results This study demonstrates that there is a distinct pattern of alteration of cortical physiology in the setting of a malignant glioma. These changes lead to a physiologic sequestration and progressive synaptic homogeneity suggesting that a de-learning phenomenon occurs within the tumoral tissue compared to its surroundings. Significance These findings provide insight into how the brain accommodates a region of “defunctionalized” cortex. Additionally, these findings may have important implications for emerging techniques in brain mapping using endogenous cortical physiology. PMID:28319187

  4. Mesoscale infraslow spontaneous membrane potential fluctuations recapitulate high-frequency activity cortical motifs.

    PubMed

    Chan, Allen W; Mohajerani, Majid H; LeDue, Jeffrey M; Wang, Yu Tian; Murphy, Timothy H

    2015-07-20

    Neuroimaging of spontaneous, resting-state infraslow (<0.1 Hz) brain activity has been used to reveal the regional functional organization of the brain and may lead to the identification of novel biomarkers of neurological disease. However, these imaging studies generally rely on indirect measures of neuronal activity and the nature of the neuronal activity correlate remains unclear. Here we show, using wide-field, voltage-sensitive dye imaging, the mesoscale spatiotemporal structure and pharmacological dependence of spontaneous, infraslow cortical activity in anaesthetized and awake mice. Spontaneous infraslow activity is regionally distinct, correlates with electroencephalography and local field potential recordings, and shows bilateral symmetry between cortical hemispheres. Infraslow activity is attenuated and its functional structure abolished after treatment with voltage-gated sodium channel and glutamate receptor antagonists. Correlation analysis reveals patterns of infraslow regional connectivity that are analogous to cortical motifs observed from higher-frequency spontaneous activity and reflect the underlying framework of intracortical axonal projections.

  5. Mesoscale infraslow spontaneous membrane potential fluctuations recapitulate high-frequency activity cortical motifs

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Allen W.; Mohajerani, Majid H.; LeDue, Jeffrey M.; Wang, Yu Tian; Murphy, Timothy H.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging of spontaneous, resting-state infraslow (<0.1 Hz) brain activity has been used to reveal the regional functional organization of the brain and may lead to the identification of novel biomarkers of neurological disease. However, these imaging studies generally rely on indirect measures of neuronal activity and the nature of the neuronal activity correlate remains unclear. Here we show, using wide-field, voltage-sensitive dye imaging, the mesoscale spatiotemporal structure and pharmacological dependence of spontaneous, infraslow cortical activity in anaesthetized and awake mice. Spontaneous infraslow activity is regionally distinct, correlates with electroencephalography and local field potential recordings, and shows bilateral symmetry between cortical hemispheres. Infraslow activity is attenuated and its functional structure abolished after treatment with voltage-gated sodium channel and glutamate receptor antagonists. Correlation analysis reveals patterns of infraslow regional connectivity that are analogous to cortical motifs observed from higher-frequency spontaneous activity and reflect the underlying framework of intracortical axonal projections. PMID:26190168

  6. High Frequency Drift Waves with Wavelengths Below the Ion Gyroradius in Equatorial Spread F

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    Freidberg and Gerwin, 1977; Gary and Sanderson, 1977) p" r kvdi 1 G = J dt exp iuot + b.(cost -l) - i —— sin t (h) and for...McClure Equatorial Spread F: Implications of VHF Radar Observations, J. Geophys. Res., JJ>, 7199, 1970. Freidberg , J. P., and R. A. Gerwin, Lower

  7. High fidelity optogenetic control of individual prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shinya; Baratta, Michael V; Pomrenze, Matthew B; Dolzani, Samuel D; Cooper, Donald C

    2012-01-01

    Precise spatial and temporal manipulation of neural activity in specific genetically defined cell populations is now possible with the advent of optogenetics. The emerging field of optogenetics consists of a set of naturally-occurring and engineered light-sensitive membrane proteins that are able to activate (e.g. channelrhodopsin-2, ChR2) or silence (e.g. halorhodopsin, NpHR) neural activity. Here we demonstrate the technique and the feasibility of using novel adeno-associated viral (AAV) tools to activate (AAV-CaMKllα-ChR2-eYFP) or silence (AAV-CaMKllα-eNpHR3.0-eYFP) neural activity of rat prefrontal cortical prelimbic (PL) pyramidal neurons  in vivo.  In vivo single unit extracellular recording of ChR2-transduced pyramidal neurons showed that delivery of brief (10 ms) blue (473 nm) light-pulse trains up to 20 Hz via a custom fiber optic-coupled recording electrode (optrode) induced spiking with high fidelity at 20 Hz for the duration of recording (up to two hours in some cases). To silence spontaneously active neurons, we transduced them with the NpHR construct and administered continuous green (532 nm) light to completely inhibit action potential activity for up to 10 seconds with 100% fidelity in most cases. These versatile photosensitive tools, combined with optrode recording methods, provide experimental control over activity of genetically defined neurons and can be used to investigate the functional relationship between neural activity and complex cognitive behavior.

  8. High fidelity optogenetic control of individual prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Donald C

    2012-01-01

    Precise spatial and temporal manipulation of neural activity in specific genetically defined cell populations is now possible with the advent of optogenetics. The emerging field of optogenetics consists of a set of naturally-occurring and engineered light-sensitive membrane proteins that are able to activate (e.g. channelrhodopsin-2, ChR2) or silence (e.g. halorhodopsin, NpHR) neural activity. Here we demonstrate the technique and the feasibility of using novel adeno-associated viral (AAV) tools to activate (AAV-CaMKllα-ChR2-eYFP) or silence (AAV-CaMKllα-eNpHR3.0-eYFP) neural activity of rat prefrontal cortical prelimbic (PL) pyramidal neurons  in vivo.  In vivo single unit extracellular recording of ChR2-transduced pyramidal neurons showed that delivery of brief (10 ms) blue (473 nm) light-pulse trains up to 20 Hz via a custom fiber optic-coupled recording electrode (optrode) induced spiking with high fidelity at 20 Hz for the duration of recording (up to two hours in some cases). To silence spontaneously active neurons, we transduced them with the NpHR construct and administered continuous green (532 nm) light to completely inhibit action potential activity for up to 10 seconds with 100% fidelity in most cases. These versatile photosensitive tools, combined with optrode recording methods, provide experimental control over activity of genetically defined neurons and can be used to investigate the functional relationship between neural activity and complex cognitive behavior. PMID:24555016

  9. Mapping cortical responses to speech using high-density diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hassanpour, Mahlega S.; Eggebrecht, Adam T.; Culver, Joseph P.; Peelle, Jonathan E.

    2015-01-01

    The functional neuroanatomy of speech processing has been investigated using positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for more than 20 years. However, these approaches have relatively poor temporal resolution and/or challenges of acoustic contamination due to the constraints of echoplanar fMRI. Furthermore, these methods are contraindicated because of safety concerns in longitudinal studies and research with children (PET) or in studies of patients with metal implants (fMRI). High-density diffuse optical tomography (HD-DOT) permits presenting speech in a quiet acoustic environment, has excellent temporal resolution relative to the hemodynamic response, and provides noninvasive and metal-compatible imaging. However, the performance of HD-DOT in imaging the brain regions involved in speech processing is not fully established. In the current study, we use an auditory sentence comprehension task to evaluate the ability of HD-DOT to map the cortical networks supporting speech processes. Using sentences with two levels of linguistic complexity, along with a control condition consisting of unintelligible noise-vocoded speech, we recovered a hierarchical organization of the speech network that matches the results of previous fMRI studies. Specifically, hearing intelligible speech resulted in increased activity in bilateral temporal cortex and left frontal cortex, with syntactically complex speech leading to additional activity in left posterior temporal cortex and left inferior frontal gyrus. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using HD-DOT to map spatially distributed brain networks supporting higher-order cognitive faculties such as spoken language. PMID:26026816

  10. High insulin levels in KK-Ay diabetic mice cause increased cortical bone mass and impaired trabecular micro-structure.

    PubMed

    Fu, Cen; Zhang, Xiaolin; Ye, Fei; Yang, Jianhong

    2015-04-13

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic disease characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and complications, including obesity and osteoporosis. Rodents have been widely used to model human T2DM and investigate its effect on the skeleton. We aimed to investigate skeletal alterations in Yellow Kuo Kondo (KK-Ay) diabetic mice displaying high insulin and glucose levels. Bone mineral density (BMD), micro-architecture and bone metabolism-related genes were analyzed. The total femoral areal BMD (aBMD), cortical volumetric BMD (vBMD) and thickness were significantly increased in KK-Ay mice, while the trabecular vBMD and mineralized bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV), trabecular thickness and number were decreased compared to C57BL mice. The expression of both osteoblast-related genes, such as osteocalcin (OC), bone sialoprotein, Type I Collagen, osteonectin, RUNX2 and OSX, and osteoclast-related genes, such as TRAP and TCIRG, were up-regulated in KK-Ay mice. Correlation analyses showed that serum insulin levels were positively associated with aBMD, cortical vBMD and thickness and negatively associated with trabecular vBMD and micro-architecture. In addition, serum insulin levels were positively related to osteoblast-related and osteoclast-related gene expression. Our data suggest that high insulin levels in KK-Ay diabetic mice may increase cortical bone mass and impair trabecular micro-structure by up-regulating osteoblast-and osteoclast-related gene expression.

  11. Modeling the coupled return-spread high frequency dynamics of large tick assets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curato, Gianbiagio; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Large tick assets, i.e. assets where one tick movement is a significant fraction of the price and bid-ask spread is almost always equal to one tick, display a dynamics in which price changes and spread are strongly coupled. We present an approach based on the hidden Markov model, also known in econometrics as the Markov switching model, for the dynamics of price changes, where the latent Markov process is described by the transitions between spreads. We then use a finite Markov mixture of logit regressions on past squared price changes to describe temporal dependencies in the dynamics of price changes. The model can thus be seen as a double chain Markov model. We show that the model describes the shape of the price change distribution at different time scales, volatility clustering, and the anomalous decrease of kurtosis. We calibrate our models based on Nasdaq stocks and we show that this model reproduces remarkably well the statistical properties of real data.

  12. Estimation of the cortical functional connectivity with the multimodal integration of high-resolution EEG and fMRI data by directed transfer function.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, F; Cincotti, F; Babiloni, C; Carducci, F; Mattia, D; Astolfi, L; Basilisco, A; Rossini, P M; Ding, L; Ni, Y; Cheng, J; Christine, K; Sweeney, J; He, B

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, several types of brain imaging device are available to provide images of the functional activity of the cerebral cortex based on hemodynamic, metabolic, or electromagnetic measurements. However, static images of brain regions activated during particular tasks do not convey the information of how these regions communicate with each other. In this study, advanced methods for the estimation of cortical connectivity from combined high-resolution electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data are presented. These methods include a subject's multicompartment head model (scalp, skull, dura mater, cortex) constructed from individual magnetic resonance images, multidipole source model, and regularized linear inverse source estimates of cortical current density. Determination of the priors in the resolution of the linear inverse problem was performed with the use of information from the hemodynamic responses of the cortical areas as revealed by block-designed (strength of activated voxels) fMRI. We estimate functional cortical connectivity by computing the directed transfer function (DTF) on the estimated cortical current density waveforms in regions of interest (ROIs) on the modeled cortical mantle. The proposed method was able to unveil the direction of the information flow between the cortical regions of interest, as it is directional in nature. Furthermore, this method allows to detect changes in the time course of information flow between cortical regions in different frequency bands. The reliability of these techniques was further demonstrated by elaboration of high-resolution EEG and fMRI signals collected during visually triggered finger movements in four healthy subjects. Connectivity patterns estimated for this task reveal an involvement of right parietal and bilateral premotor and prefrontal cortical areas. This cortical region involvement resembles that revealed in previous studies where visually triggered finger

  13. [Cortical blindness].

    PubMed

    Chokron, S

    2014-02-01

    Cortical blindness refers to a visual loss induced by a bilateral occipital lesion. The very strong cooperation between psychophysics, cognitive psychology, neurophysiology and neuropsychology these latter twenty years as well as recent progress in cerebral imagery have led to a better understanding of neurovisual deficits, such as cortical blindness. It thus becomes possible now to propose an earlier diagnosis of cortical blindness as well as new perspectives for rehabilitation in children as well as in adults. On the other hand, studying complex neurovisual deficits, such as cortical blindness is a way to infer normal functioning of the visual system.

  14. D2 dopamine receptors modulate neuronal resonance in subthalamic nucleus and cortical high-voltage spindles through HCN channels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Yan, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Julei; Gao, Guodong; Zhu, Junling; Wang, Wenting

    2016-06-01

    The high-voltage spindles (HVSs), one of the characteristic oscillations that include theta frequencies in the basal ganglia (BG)-cortical system, are involved in immobile behavior and show increasing power in Parkinson's disease (PD). Our previous results suggested that the D2 dopamine receptor might be involved in HVSs modulations in a rat model of PD. Membrane resonance is one of the cellular mechanisms of network oscillation; therefore, we investigated how dopamine modulates the theta frequency membrane resonance of neurons in the subthalamic nucleus (STN), a central pacemaker of BG, and whether such changes in STN neurons subsequently alter HVSs in the BG-cortical system. In particular, we tested whether dopamine modulates HVSs through hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels-dependent membrane resonance in STN neurons. We found that an antagonist of D2 receptors, but not of D1 receptors, inhibited membrane resonance and HCN currents of STN neurons through a G-protein activity in acute brain slices. Our further in vivo experiments using local injection of a D2 receptor antagonist or an HCN blocker in STNs of free-moving rats showed an increase in HVSs power and correlation in the BG-cortical system. Local injection of lamotrigine, an HCN agonist, counteracted the effect induced by the D2 antagonist. Taken together, our results revealed a potential cellular mechanism underlying HVSs activity modulation in the BG-cortical system, i.e. tuning HCN activities in STN neurons through dopamine D2 receptors. Our findings might lead to a new direction in PD treatment by providing promising new drug targets for HVSs activity modulation.

  15. Sparse and powerful cortical spikes.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Jason; Houweling, Arthur R; Brecht, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Activity in cortical networks is heterogeneous, sparse and often precisely timed. The functional significance of sparseness and precise spike timing is debated, but our understanding of the developmental and synaptic mechanisms that shape neuronal discharge patterns has improved. Evidence for highly specialized, selective and abstract cortical response properties is accumulating. Singe-cell stimulation experiments demonstrate a high sensitivity of cortical networks to the action potentials of some, but not all, single neurons. It is unclear how this sensitivity of cortical networks to small perturbations comes about and whether it is a generic property of cortex. The unforeseen sensitivity to cortical spikes puts serious constraints on the nature of neural coding schemes.

  16. Aberrant high-frequency desynchronization of cerebellar cortices in early-onset psychosis.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Tony W; Slason, Erin; Hernandez, Olivia O; Asherin, Ryan; Reite, Martin L; Teale, Peter D; Rojas, Donald C

    2009-10-30

    Sensorimotor integration deficits are routinely observed in both schizophreniform and mood-disordered psychoses. Neurobiological theories of schizophrenia and related psychoses have proposed that aberrations in large-scale cortico-thalamic-cerebellar-thalamic-cortical loops may underlie integration abnormalities, and that such dysfunctional connectivity may be central to the pathophysiology. In this study, we utilized a basic mechanoreception task to probe cortical-cerebellar circuitry in early-onset psychosis. Ten adolescents with psychosis and 10 controls completed unilateral tactile stimulation of the right and left index finger, as whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) data were acquired. MEG data were imaged in the frequency domain, using spatial filtering, and the resulting event-related synchronizations and desynchronizations (ERS/ERD) were subjected to voxel-wise analyses of group and task effects using statistical parametric mapping. Our results indicated bilateral ERD activation of cerebellar regions and postcentral gyri in both groups during stimulation of either hand. Interestingly, during left finger stimulations, adolescents with psychosis exhibited greater alpha and gamma ERD activity in right cerebellar cortices relative to controls. Subjects with psychosis also showed greater ERD in bilateral cerebellum and the right postcentral gyrus during right finger stimulation, and these differences were statistically stronger for higher frequency bins. Lastly, controls exhibited greater alpha ERS of the right postcentral gyrus during right finger stimulation. These findings provide new data on the neurodevelopmental trajectory of basic mechanoreception in adolescents, and also indicate aberrant cerebellar functioning in early-onset psychoses, especially in the right cerebellum, which may be the crucial dysfunctional node in cortico-thalamic-cerebellar-thalamic-cortical circuits.

  17. Cortical excitability changes after high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for central poststroke pain.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Koichi; Kishima, Haruhiko; Oshino, Satoru; Hirata, Masayuki; Tani, Naoki; Maruo, Tomoyuki; Yorifuji, Shiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Saitoh, Youichi

    2013-08-01

    Central poststroke pain (CPSP) is one of the most refractory chronic pain syndromes. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the primary motor cortex has been demonstrated to provide moderate pain relief for CPSP. However, the mechanism underlying the pain relief remains unclear. The objective of this study was to assess changes in cortical excitability in patients with intractable CPSP before and after rTMS of the primary motor cortex. Subjects were 21 patients with CPSP of the hand who underwent rTMS. The resting motor threshold, the amplitude of the motor evoked potential, duration of the cortical silent period, short interval intracortical inhibition, and intracortical facilitation were measured as parameters of cortical excitability before and after navigation-guided 5 Hz rTMS of the primary motor cortex corresponding to the painful hand. Pain reduction from rTMS was assessed with a visual analog scale. The same parameters were measured in both hemispheres of 8 healthy controls. Eight of 21 patients experienced ≥ 30% pain reduction after rTMS (responders). The resting motor threshold in the patients was higher than those in the controls at baseline (P=.035). Intracortical facilitation in the responders was lower than in the controls and the nonresponders at baseline (P=.035 and P=.019), and significantly increased after rTMS (P=.039). There were no significant differences or changes in the other parameters. Our findings suggest that restoration of abnormal cortical excitability might be one of the mechanisms underlying pain relief as a result of rTMS in CPSP.

  18. The spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza (subtype H5N1) clades in Bangladesh, 2010 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Osmani, Muzaffar G; Ward, Michael P; Giasuddin, Md; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Kalam, Abul

    2014-04-01

    Since the global spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 during 2005-2006, control programs have been successfully implemented in most affected countries. HPAI H5N1 was first reported in Bangladesh in 2007, and since then 546 outbreaks have been reported to the OIE. The disease has apparently become endemic in Bangladesh. Spatio-temporal information on 177 outbreaks of HPAI H5N1 occurring between February 2010 and April 2011 in Bangladesh, and 37 of these outbreaks in which isolated H5N1 viruses were phylogenetically characterized to clade, were analyzed. Three clades were identified, 2.2 (21 cases), 2.3.4 (2 cases) and 2.3.2.1 (14 cases). Clade 2.2 was identified throughout the time period and was widely distributed in a southeast-northwest orientation. Clade 2.3.2.1 appeared later and was generally confined to central Bangladesh in a north-south orientation. Based on a direction test, clade 2.2 viruses spread in a southeast-to-northwest direction, whereas clade 2.3.2.1 spread west-to-east. The magnitude of spread of clade 2.3.2.1 was greater relative to clade 2.2 (angular concentration 0.2765 versus 0.1860). In both cases, the first outbreak(s) were identified as early outliers, but in addition, early outbreaks (one each) of clade 2.2 were also identified in central Bangladesh and in northwest Bangladesh, a considerable distance apart. The spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 in Bangladesh is characterized by reported long-distance translocation events. This poses a challenge to disease control efforts. Increased enforcement of biosecurity and stronger control of movements between affected farms and susceptible farms, and better surveillance and reporting, is needed. Although the movement of poultry and equipment appears to be a more likely explanation for the patterns identified, the relative contribution of trade and the market chain versus wild birds in spreading the disease needs further investigation.

  19. Cortico-cortical communication dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Per E.; Hilgetag, Claus C.; Deco, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    In principle, cortico-cortical communication dynamics is simple: neurons in one cortical area communicate by sending action potentials that release glutamate and excite their target neurons in other cortical areas. In practice, knowledge about cortico-cortical communication dynamics is minute. One reason is that no current technique can capture the fast spatio-temporal cortico-cortical evolution of action potential transmission and membrane conductances with sufficient spatial resolution. A combination of optogenetics and monosynaptic tracing with virus can reveal the spatio-temporal cortico-cortical dynamics of specific neurons and their targets, but does not reveal how the dynamics evolves under natural conditions. Spontaneous ongoing action potentials also spread across cortical areas and are difficult to separate from structured evoked and intrinsic brain activity such as thinking. At a certain state of evolution, the dynamics may engage larger populations of neurons to drive the brain to decisions, percepts and behaviors. For example, successfully evolving dynamics to sensory transients can appear at the mesoscopic scale revealing how the transient is perceived. As a consequence of these methodological and conceptual difficulties, studies in this field comprise a wide range of computational models, large-scale measurements (e.g., by MEG, EEG), and a combination of invasive measurements in animal experiments. Further obstacles and challenges of studying cortico-cortical communication dynamics are outlined in this critical review. PMID:24847217

  20. High-resolution coherent backscatter interferometric radar images of equatorial spread F using Capon's method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Fabiano S.; de Paula, Eurico R.; Zewdie, Gebreab K.

    2017-03-01

    We present results of Capon's method for estimation of in-beam images of ionospheric scattering structures observed by a small, low-power coherent backscatter interferometer. The radar interferometer operated in the equatorial site of São Luís, Brazil (2.59° S, 44.21° W, -2.35° dip latitude). We show numerical simulations that evaluate the performance of the Capon method for typical F region measurement conditions. Numerical simulations show that, despite the short baselines of the São Luís radar, the Capon technique is capable of distinguishing localized features with kilometric scale sizes (in the zonal direction) at F region heights. Following the simulations, we applied the Capon algorithm to actual measurements made by the São Luís interferometer during a typical equatorial spread F (ESF) event. As indicated by the simulations, the Capon method produced images that were better resolved than those produced by the Fourier method. The Capon images show narrow (a few kilometers wide) scattering channels associated with ESF plumes and scattering regions spaced by only a few tens of kilometers in the zonal direction. The images are also capable of resolving bifurcations and the C shape of scattering structures.

  1. Direct imaging with highly diluted apertures - II. Properties of the point spread function of a hypertelescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, F.; Tarmoul, N.; Mourard, D.; Lardière, O.

    2009-06-01

    In the future, optical stellar interferometers will provide true images thanks to larger number of telescopes and to advanced cophasing subsystems. These conditions are required to have sufficient resolution elements (resel) in the image and to provide direct images in the hypertelescope mode. It has already been shown that hypertelescopes provide snapshot images with a significant gain in sensitivity without inducing any loss of the useful field of view for direct imaging applications. This paper aims at studying the properties of the point spread functions of future large arrays using the hypertelescope mode. Numerical simulations have been performed and criteria have been defined to study the image properties. It is shown that the choice of the configuration of the array is a trade-off between the resolution, the halo level and the field of view. A regular pattern of the array of telescopes optimizes the image quality (low halo level and maximum encircled energy in the central peak), but decreases the useful field of view. Moreover, a non-redundant array is less sensitive to the space aliasing effect than a redundant array.

  2. The Effect of Noscapine on Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation on Primary Murine Cortical Neurons in High Glucose Condition.

    PubMed

    Vahabzadeh, Gelareh; Ebrahimi, Soltan-Ahmed; Rahbar-Roshandel, Nahid; Mahmoudian, Massoud

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we set out to investigate the neuroprotective effects of noscapine (0.5-2 µM) in presence of D-glucose on primary murine foetal cortical neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation/24 h. recovery. Cell viability, nitric oxide production and intracellular calcium ((ca(2+))i) levels were evaluated by MTT assay, the modified Griess method and Fura-2 respectively. 25 and 100 mM D-glucose could, in a concentration dependent manner, improve cell viability and decrease NO production and (ca(2+))i level in neuronal cells after ischemic insult. Moreover, pre-incubation of cells with noscapine, noticeably enhanced protective effects of 25 and 100 mM D-glucose compared to similar conditions without noscapine pre-treatment. In fact, noscapine attenuated NO production in a dose-dependent fashion, after 30 minutes (min) OGD, during high-glucose (HG) condition in cortical neurons. Pretreatment with 2 μM noscapine and 25 or 100 mM D-glucose, was shown to decrease the rise in (ca(2+))i induced by Sodium azide/glucose deprivation (chemical OGD) model. These effects were more pronounced than that of 25 or 100 mM D-glucose alone. The present study demonstrated that the neuroprotective effects of HG before an ischemic insult were augmented by pre-treatment with noscapine. Our results also suggested that the neuroprotection offered by both HG and noscapine involve attenuation of NO production and (ca(2+))i levels stimulated by the experimental ischemia in cortical neurons.

  3. The Effect of Noscapine on Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation on Primary Murine Cortical Neurons in High Glucose Condition

    PubMed Central

    Vahabzadeh, Gelareh; Ebrahimi, Soltan-Ahmed; Rahbar-Roshandel, Nahid; Mahmoudian, Massoud

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we set out to investigate the neuroprotective effects of noscapine (0.5-2 µM) in presence of D-glucose on primary murine foetal cortical neurons after oxygen–glucose deprivation/24 h. recovery. Cell viability, nitric oxide production and intracellular calcium ((ca2+)i) levels were evaluated by MTT assay, the modified Griess method and Fura-2 respectively. 25 and 100 mM D-glucose could, in a concentration dependent manner, improve cell viability and decrease NO production and (ca2+)i level in neuronal cells after ischemic insult. Moreover, pre-incubation of cells with noscapine, noticeably enhanced protective effects of 25 and 100 mM D-glucose compared to similar conditions without noscapine pre-treatment. In fact, noscapine attenuated NO production in a dose-dependent fashion, after 30 minutes (min) OGD, during high-glucose (HG) condition in cortical neurons. Pretreatment with 2 μM noscapine and 25 or 100 mM D-glucose, was shown to decrease the rise in (ca2+)i induced by Sodium azide/glucose deprivation (chemical OGD) model. These effects were more pronounced than that of 25 or 100 mM D-glucose alone. The present study demonstrated that the neuroprotective effects of HG before an ischemic insult were augmented by pre-treatment with noscapine. Our results also suggested that the neuroprotection offered by both HG and noscapine involve attenuation of NO production and (ca2+)i levels stimulated by the experimental ischemia in cortical neurons. PMID:27642321

  4. Measurements of Doppler and multipath spread on oblique high-latitude HF paths and their use in characterizing data modem performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angling, Matthew J.; Cannon, Paul S.; Davies, Nigel C.; Willink, Tricia J.; Jodalen, Vivianne; Lundborg, Bengt

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of Doppler spread, multipath spread, and signal-to-noise ratio have been made on four high-latitude high-frequency (HF) communications paths. The measurement system and analysis techniques are outlined, and an analysis of the data pertinent to the design of robust HF data modems is presented. A summary of the spreads that are exceeded for 5% of time is presented for each path. Doppler spreads range from 2 to 55 Hz, while multipath spreads range from 1 to 11 ms. Physical interpretations of the data are made, and the data are related to the measured performance characteristics of an HF data modem to estimate the modem availability on the paths considered. When there is mode support, availabilities range from 64% to 100% for a signal-to-noise ratio of 0 dB, although the data indicate that the availabilities can generally be increased by optimizing frequency selection.

  5. High-Resolution fMRI of Auditory Cortical Map Changes in Unilateral Hearing Loss and Tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Ghazaleh, Naghmeh; Zwaag, Wietske van der; Clarke, Stephanie; Ville, Dimitri Van De; Maire, Raphael; Saenz, Melissa

    2017-02-06

    Animal models of hearing loss and tinnitus observe pathological neural activity in the tonotopic frequency maps of the primary auditory cortex. Here, we applied ultra high-field fMRI at 7 T to test whether human patients with unilateral hearing loss and tinnitus also show altered functional activity in the primary auditory cortex. The high spatial resolution afforded by 7 T imaging allowed tonotopic mapping of primary auditory cortex on an individual subject basis. Eleven patients with unilateral hearing loss and tinnitus were compared to normal-hearing controls. Patients showed an over-representation and hyperactivity in a region of the cortical map corresponding to low frequencies sounds, irrespective of the hearing loss and tinnitus range, which in most cases affected higher frequencies. This finding of hyperactivity in low frequency map regions, irrespective of hearing loss range, is consistent with some previous studies in animal models and corroborates a previous study of human tinnitus. Thus these findings contribute to accumulating evidence that gross cortical tonotopic map reorganization is not a causal factor of tinnitus.

  6. Exposure to high glutamate concentration activates aerobic glycolysis but inhibits ATP-linked respiration in cultured cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yao; Tian, Yueyang; Shi, Xiaojie; Yang, Jianbo; Ouyang, Li; Gao, Jieqiong; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-08-01

    Astrocytes play a key role in removing the synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space and maintaining the glutamate below neurotoxic level in the brain. However, high concentration of glutamate leads to toxicity in astrocytes, and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether energy metabolism disorder, especially impairment of mitochondrial respiration, is involved in the glutamate-induced gliotoxicity. Exposure to 10-mM glutamate for 48 h stimulated glycolysis and respiration in astrocytes. However, the increased oxygen consumption was used for proton leak and non-mitochondrial respiration, but not for oxidative phosphorylation and ATP generation. When the exposure time extended to 72 h, glycolysis was still activated for ATP generation, but the mitochondrial ATP-linked respiration of astrocytes was reduced. The glutamate-induced astrocyte damage can be mimicked by the non-metabolized substrate d-aspartate but reversed by the non-selective glutamate transporter inhibitor TBOA. In addition, the glutamate toxicity can be partially reversed by vitamin E. These findings demonstrate that changes of bioenergetic profile occur in cultured cortical astrocytes exposed to high concentration of glutamate and highlight the role of mitochondria respiration in glutamate-induced gliotoxicity in cortical astrocytes.

  7. High-resolution cortical dipole layer imaging based on noise covariance matrix.

    PubMed

    Hori, Junichi; Watanabe, Satoru

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the suitable spatial filters for inverse estimation of cortical dipole imaging from the scalp electroencephalogram. The effects of incorporating statistical information of noise into inverse procedures were examined by computer simulations and experimental studies. The parametric projection filter (PPF) was applied to an inhomogeneous three-sphere volume conductor head model. The noise covariance matrix was estimated by applying independent component analysis (ICA) to the scalp potentials. Moreover, the sampling method of the noise information was examined for calculating the noise covariance matrix. The simulation results suggest that the spatial resolution was improved while the effect of noise was suppressed by including the separated noise at the time instant of imaging and by adjusting the number of samples according to the signal to noise ratio.

  8. High-level expression of alternative oxidase protein sequences enhances the spread of viral vectors in resistant and susceptible plants.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Alex M; Gilliland, Androulla; York, Caroline J; Hyman, Belinda; Carr, John P

    2004-12-01

    The alternative oxidase (AOX) is the terminal oxidase of the cyanide-resistant alternative respiratory pathway in plants and has been implicated in resistance to viruses. When tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) vectors were used to drive very high levels of expression of either AOX or AOX mutated in its active site (AOX-E), virus spread was enhanced. This was visualized as the induction of larger hypersensitive-response lesions after inoculation onto NN-genotype tobacco than those produced by vectors bearing sequences of comparable length [the green fluorescent protein (gfp) gene sequence or antisense aox] or the 'empty' viral vector. Also, in the highly susceptible host Nicotiana benthamiana, systemic movement of TMV vectors expressing AOX or AOX-E was faster than that of TMV constructs bearing gfp or antisense aox sequences. Notably, in N. benthamiana, TMV.AOX and TMV.AOX-E induced symptoms that were severe and ultimately included cell death, whereas the empty vector, TMV.GFP and the TMV vector expressing antisense aox sequences never induced necrosis. The results show that, if expressed at sufficiently high levels, active and inactive AOX proteins can affect virus spread and symptomology in plants.

  9. Afferent inputs to cortical fast-spiking interneurons organize pyramidal cell network oscillations at high-gamma frequencies (60–200 Hz)

    PubMed Central

    Crone, Nathan E.; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.

    2014-01-01

    High-gamma activity, ranging in frequency between ∼60 Hz and 200 Hz, has been observed in local field potential, electrocorticography, EEG and magnetoencephalography signals during cortical activation, in a variety of functional brain systems. The origin of these signals is yet unknown. Using computational modeling, we show that a cortical network model receiving thalamic input generates high-gamma responses comparable to those observed in local field potential recorded in monkey somatosensory cortex during vibrotactile stimulation. These high-gamma oscillations appear to be mediated mostly by an excited population of inhibitory fast-spiking interneurons firing at high-gamma frequencies and pacing excitatory regular-spiking pyramidal cells, which fire at lower rates but in phase with the population rhythm. The physiological correlates of high-gamma activity, in this model of local cortical circuits, appear to be similar to those proposed for hippocampal ripples generated by subsets of interneurons that regulate the discharge of principal cells. PMID:25210164

  10. Differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells of cortical neurons of the superficial layers amenable to psychiatric disease modeling and high-throughput drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Boissart, C; Poulet, A; Georges, P; Darville, H; Julita, E; Delorme, R; Bourgeron, T; Peschanski, M; Benchoua, A

    2013-01-01

    Cortical neurons of the superficial layers (II-IV) represent a pivotal neuronal population involved in the higher cognitive functions of the human and are particularly affected by psychiatric diseases with developmental manifestations such as schizophrenia and autism. Differentiation protocols of human pluripotent stem cells (PSC) into cortical neurons have been achieved, opening the way to in vitro modeling of neuropsychiatric diseases. However, these protocols commonly result in the asynchronous production of neurons typical for the different layers of the cortex within an extended period of culture, thus precluding the analysis of specific subtypes of neurons in a standardized manner. Addressing this issue, we have successfully captured a stable population of self-renewing late cortical progenitors (LCPs) that synchronously and massively differentiate into glutamatergic cortical neurons of the upper layers. The short time course of differentiation into neurons of these progenitors has made them amenable to high-throughput assays. This has allowed us to analyze the capability of LCPs at differentiating into post mitotic neurons as well as extending and branching neurites in response to a collection of selected bioactive molecules. LCPs and cortical neurons of the upper layers were successfully produced from patient-derived-induced PSC, indicating that this system enables functional studies of individual-specific cortical neurons ex vivo for disease modeling and therapeutic purposes. PMID:23962924

  11. Practices associated with Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza spread in traditional poultry marketing chains: Social and economic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Paul, Mathilde; Baritaux, Virginie; Wongnarkpet, Sirichai; Poolkhet, Chaithep; Thanapongtharm, Weerapong; Roger, François; Bonnet, Pascal; Ducrot, Christian

    2013-04-01

    In developing countries, smallholder poultry production contributes to food security and poverty alleviation in rural areas. However, traditional poultry marketing chains have been threatened by the epidemics caused by the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (H5N1) virus. The article presents a value chain analysis conducted on the traditional poultry marketing chain in the rural province of Phitsanulok, Thailand. The analysis is based on quantitative data collected on 470 backyard chicken farms, and on qualitative data collected on 28 poultry collectors, slaughterhouses and market retailers, using semi-structured interviews. The article examines the organization of poultry marketing chains in time and space, and shows how this may contribute to the spread of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 in the small-scale poultry sector. The article also discusses the practices and strategies developed by value chain actors facing poultry mortality, with their economic and social determinants. More broadly, this study also illustrates how value chain analysis can contribute to a better understanding of the complex mechanisms associated with the spread of epidemics in rural communities.

  12. Estimation of the effective and functional human cortical connectivity with structural equation modeling and directed transfer function applied to high-resolution EEG.

    PubMed

    Astolfi, Laura; Cincotti, Febo; Mattia, Donatella; Salinari, Serenella; Babiloni, Claudio; Basilisco, Alessandra; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Ding, Lei; Ni, Ying; He, Bin; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Babiloni, Fabio

    2004-12-01

    Different brain imaging devices are presently available to provide images of the human functional cortical activity, based on hemodynamic, metabolic or electromagnetic measurements. However, static images of brain regions activated during particular tasks do not convey the information of how these regions are interconnected. The concept of brain connectivity plays a central role in the neuroscience, and different definitions of connectivity, functional and effective, have been adopted in literature. While the functional connectivity is defined as the temporal coherence among the activities of different brain areas, the effective connectivity is defined as the simplest brain circuit that would produce the same temporal relationship as observed experimentally among cortical sites. The structural equation modeling (SEM) is the most used method to estimate effective connectivity in neuroscience, and its typical application is on data related to brain hemodynamic behavior tested by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), whereas the directed transfer function (DTF) method is a frequency-domain approach based on both a multivariate autoregressive (MVAR) modeling of time series and on the concept of Granger causality. This study presents advanced methods for the estimation of cortical connectivity by applying SEM and DTF on the cortical signals estimated from high-resolution electroencephalography (EEG) recordings, since these signals exhibit a higher spatial resolution than conventional cerebral electromagnetic measures. To estimate correctly the cortical signals, we used a subject's multicompartment head model (scalp, skull, dura mater, cortex) constructed from individual MRI, a distributed source model and a regularized linear inverse source estimates of cortical current density. Before the application of SEM and DTF methodology to the cortical waveforms estimated from high-resolution EEG data, we performed a simulation study, in which different main factors

  13. Visual recovery in cortical blindness is limited by high internal noise

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, Matthew R.; Zhang, Ruyuan; Melnick, Michael D.; Das, Anasuya; Roberts, Mariel; Tadin, Duje; Carrasco, Marisa; Huxlin, Krystel R.

    2015-01-01

    Damage to the primary visual cortex typically causes cortical blindness (CB) in the hemifield contralateral to the damaged hemisphere. Recent evidence indicates that visual training can partially reverse CB at trained locations. Whereas training induces near-complete recovery of coarse direction and orientation discriminations, deficits in fine motion processing remain. Here, we systematically disentangle components of the perceptual inefficiencies present in CB fields before and after coarse direction discrimination training. In seven human CB subjects, we measured threshold versus noise functions before and after coarse direction discrimination training in the blind field and at corresponding intact field locations. Threshold versus noise functions were analyzed within the framework of the linear amplifier model and the perceptual template model. Linear amplifier model analysis identified internal noise as a key factor differentiating motion processing across the tested areas, with visual training reducing internal noise in the blind field. Differences in internal noise also explained residual perceptual deficits at retrained locations. These findings were confirmed with perceptual template model analysis, which further revealed that the major residual deficits between retrained and intact field locations could be explained by differences in internal additive noise. There were no significant differences in multiplicative noise or the ability to process external noise. Together, these results highlight the critical role of altered internal noise processing in mediating training-induced visual recovery in CB fields, and may explain residual perceptual deficits relative to intact regions of the visual field. PMID:26389544

  14. Visual recovery in cortical blindness is limited by high internal noise.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Matthew R; Zhang, Ruyuan; Melnick, Michael D; Das, Anasuya; Roberts, Mariel; Tadin, Duje; Carrasco, Marisa; Huxlin, Krystel R

    2015-01-01

    Damage to the primary visual cortex typically causes cortical blindness (CB) in the hemifield contralateral to the damaged hemisphere. Recent evidence indicates that visual training can partially reverse CB at trained locations. Whereas training induces near-complete recovery of coarse direction and orientation discriminations, deficits in fine motion processing remain. Here, we systematically disentangle components of the perceptual inefficiencies present in CB fields before and after coarse direction discrimination training. In seven human CB subjects, we measured threshold versus noise functions before and after coarse direction discrimination training in the blind field and at corresponding intact field locations. Threshold versus noise functions were analyzed within the framework of the linear amplifier model and the perceptual template model. Linear amplifier model analysis identified internal noise as a key factor differentiating motion processing across the tested areas, with visual training reducing internal noise in the blind field. Differences in internal noise also explained residual perceptual deficits at retrained locations. These findings were confirmed with perceptual template model analysis, which further revealed that the major residual deficits between retrained and intact field locations could be explained by differences in internal additive noise. There were no significant differences in multiplicative noise or the ability to process external noise. Together, these results highlight the critical role of altered internal noise processing in mediating training-induced visual recovery in CB fields, and may explain residual perceptual deficits relative to intact regions of the visual field.

  15. An annular high-current electron beam with an energy spread in a coaxial magnetically insulated diode

    SciTech Connect

    Grishkov, A. A. Pegel, I. V.

    2013-11-15

    An elementary theory of an annular high-current electron beam in a uniform transport channel and a coaxial magnetically insulated diode is generalized to the case of counterpropagating electron beams with a spread over kinetic energies. Expressions for the sum of the absolute values of the forward and backward currents in a uniform transport channel and for the flux of the longitudinal component of the generalized momentum in a coaxial magnetically insulated diode as functions of the maximum electron kinetic energy are derived for different values of the relative width of the energy distribution function. It is shown that, in a diode with an expanding transport channel and a virtual cathode limiting the extracted current, counterpropagating particle flows are established between the cathode and the virtual cathode within a certain time interval after the beginning of electron emission. The accumulation of electrons in these flows is accompanied by an increase in their spread over kinetic energies and the simultaneous decrease in the maximum kinetic energy. The developed model agrees with the results of particle-in-cell simulations performed using the KARAT and OOPIC-Pro codes.

  16. Effects on axial momentum spread on the electron-ion two-stream instability in high-intensity ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    R. Davidso; H. Qin

    2000-06-15

    Use is made of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations to describe the electron-ion two-stream instability driven by the directed axial motion of a high-intensity ion beam propagating through a stationary population of (unwanted) background electrons. The ion beam is treated as continuous in the z-direction, and the electrons are electrostatically confined in the transverse direction by the space-charge potential produced by the excession charge. The analysis is carried out for arbitrary beam intensity, consistent with transverse confinement of the beam particles, and arbitrary fractional charge neutralization by the background electrons. For the case of overlapping step-function ion and electron density profiles, corresponding to monoenergetic electrons and ions in the transverse direction, detailed stability properties are calculated, including the important effects of an axial momentum spread, over a wide range of system parameters for dipole perturbations with azimuthal mode number l=1. The two-stream instability growth rate is found to increase with increasing beam intensity, increasing fractional charge neutralization, and decreasing proximity of the conducting wall. It is shown that Landau damping associated with a modest axial momentum spread of the beam ions and background electrons has a strong stabilizing influence on the instability.

  17. Fighting High School Senior Slump: The Spread of an Alternative Senior Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Taron

    1999-01-01

    At several New York State high schools, seniors hold internships in architectural firms, Planned Parenthood, dentists' offices, and television and radio stations. Some make documentaries or pursue independent study in various subjects. These opportunities arise through a program (WISE) allowing second-semester seniors to design and complete their…

  18. Minimally invasive endovascular stent-electrode array for high-fidelity, chronic recordings of cortical neural activity.

    PubMed

    Oxley, Thomas J; Opie, Nicholas L; John, Sam E; Rind, Gil S; Ronayne, Stephen M; Wheeler, Tracey L; Judy, Jack W; McDonald, Alan J; Dornom, Anthony; Lovell, Timothy J H; Steward, Christopher; Garrett, David J; Moffat, Bradford A; Lui, Elaine H; Yassi, Nawaf; Campbell, Bruce C V; Wong, Yan T; Fox, Kate E; Nurse, Ewan S; Bennett, Iwan E; Bauquier, Sébastien H; Liyanage, Kishan A; van der Nagel, Nicole R; Perucca, Piero; Ahnood, Arman; Gill, Katherine P; Yan, Bernard; Churilov, Leonid; French, Christopher R; Desmond, Patricia M; Horne, Malcolm K; Kiers, Lynette; Prawer, Steven; Davis, Stephen M; Burkitt, Anthony N; Mitchell, Peter J; Grayden, David B; May, Clive N; O'Brien, Terence J

    2016-03-01

    High-fidelity intracranial electrode arrays for recording and stimulating brain activity have facilitated major advances in the treatment of neurological conditions over the past decade. Traditional arrays require direct implantation into the brain via open craniotomy, which can lead to inflammatory tissue responses, necessitating development of minimally invasive approaches that avoid brain trauma. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of chronically recording brain activity from within a vein using a passive stent-electrode recording array (stentrode). We achieved implantation into a superficial cortical vein overlying the motor cortex via catheter angiography and demonstrate neural recordings in freely moving sheep for up to 190 d. Spectral content and bandwidth of vascular electrocorticography were comparable to those of recordings from epidural surface arrays. Venous internal lumen patency was maintained for the duration of implantation. Stentrodes may have wide ranging applications as a neural interface for treatment of a range of neurological conditions.

  19. Cortical responses to the mirror box illusion: a high-resolution EEG study.

    PubMed

    Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Petrini, Laura; Christoffersen, Giselle; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2011-12-01

    The mirror box illusion has proven a helpful therapy in pathologies such as phantom limb pain, and although the effect has been suggested to be a result of the interaction between pain, vision, touch, and proprioception, the mechanisms are still unknown. Multichannel (124) brain responses were investigated in healthy men (N = 11) and women (N = 14) during the mirror box illusion. Tactile somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded from the right thumb during two control conditions and two illusions: (control 1) no mirror: looking at the physical right thumb during stimulation, (control 2) no mirror: looking at the physical left thumb during stimulation, (illusion 1) mirror: the illusion that both thumbs were stimulated, and (illusion 2) mirror: the illusion that none of the thumbs were stimulated. In men, a significant medial shift in the y coordinate of the N70 dipole in illusion 2 (P = 0.021) was found when compared with illusion 1. No dipole shift was found for women. Additionally, men showed higher prevalence of P180 cingulate cortex activation during illusion 2 when compared with control 1 and 2 (P = 0.002). During illusion 2, the degree of conformity with the statement "The hand in the mirror feels like my other hand" was negatively correlated with the N70 x coordinate for men and positively correlated with the N70 z coordinate for women. In conclusion, short-term cortical plasticity can be induced by a mismatch between visual input and location of tactile stimulation in men. The present study suggests that gender differences exist in the perception of the mirror box illusion.

  20. Stochastic multiscale modelling of cortical bone elasticity based on high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, Vittorio; Gagliardi, Davide; Desceliers, Christophe; Bousson, Valérie; Laredo, Jean-Denis; Peyrin, Françoise; Haïat, Guillaume; Naili, Salah

    2016-02-01

    Accurate and reliable assessment of bone quality requires predictive methods which could probe bone microstructure and provide information on bone mechanical properties. Multiscale modelling and simulation represent a fast and powerful way to predict bone mechanical properties based on experimental information on bone microstructure as obtained through X-ray-based methods. However, technical limitations of experimental devices used to inspect bone microstructure may produce blurry data, especially in in vivo conditions. Uncertainties affecting the experimental data (input) may question the reliability of the results predicted by the model (output). Since input data are uncertain, deterministic approaches are limited and new modelling paradigms are required. In this paper, a novel stochastic multiscale model is developed to estimate the elastic properties of bone while taking into account uncertainties on bone composition. Effective elastic properties of cortical bone tissue were computed using a multiscale model based on continuum micromechanics. Volume fractions of bone components (collagen, mineral, and water) were considered as random variables whose probabilistic description was built using the maximum entropy principle. The relevance of this approach was proved by analysing a human bone sample taken from the inferior femoral neck. The sample was imaged using synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography. 3-D distributions of Haversian porosity and tissue mineral density extracted from these images supplied the experimental information needed to build the stochastic models of the volume fractions. Thus, the stochastic multiscale model provided reliable statistical information (such as mean values and confidence intervals) on bone elastic properties at the tissue scale. Moreover, the existence of a simpler "nominal model", accounting for the main features of the stochastic model, was investigated. It was shown that such a model does exist, and its relevance

  1. High effective cytosolic H+ buffering in mouse cortical astrocytes attributable to fast bicarbonate transport.

    PubMed

    Theparambil, Shefeeq M; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2015-09-01

    Cytosolic H(+) buffering plays a major role for shaping intracellular H(+) shifts and hence for the availability of H(+) for biochemical reactions and acid/base-coupled transport processes. H(+) buffering is one of the prime means to protect the cell from large acid/base shifts. We have used the H(+) indicator dye BCECF and confocal microscopy to monitor the cytosolic H(+) concentration, [H(+)]i, in cultured cortical astrocytes of wild-type mice and of mice deficient in sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1 (NBCe1-KO) or in carbonic anhydrase isoform II (CAII-KO). The steady-state buffer strength was calculated from the amplitude of [H(+)]i transients as evoked by CO2/HCO3(-) and by butyric acid in the presence and absence of CO2/HCO3(-). We tested the hypotheses if, in addition to instantaneous physicochemical H(+) buffering, rapid acid/base transport across the cell membrane contributes to the total, "effective" cytosolic H(+) buffering. In the presence of 5% CO2/26 mM HCO3(-), H(+) buffer strength in astrocytes was increased 4-6 fold, as compared with that in non-bicarbonate, HEPES-buffered solution, which was largely attributable to fast HCO3 (-) transport into the cells via NBCe1, supported by CAII activity. Our results show that within the time frame of determining physiological H(+) buffering in cells, fast transport and equilibration of CO2/H(+)/HCO3(-) can make a major contribution to the total "effective" H(+) buffer strength. Thus, "effective" cellular H(+) buffering is, to a large extent, attributable to membrane transport of base equivalents rather than a purely passive physicochemical process, and can be much larger than reported so far. Not only physicochemical H(+) buffering, but also rapid import of HCO3(-) via the electrogenic sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1, supported by carbonic anhydrase II (CA II), was identified to enhance cytosolic H(+) buffer strength substantially.

  2. Rapid spread of the defensive endosymbiont Spiroplasma in Drosophila hydei under high parasitoid wasp pressure.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jialei; Winter, Caitlyn; Winter, Lauryn; Mateos, Mariana

    2015-02-01

    Maternally transmitted endosymbionts of insects are ubiquitous in nature and play diverse roles in the ecology and evolution of their hosts. To persist in host lineages, many symbionts manipulate host reproduction to their advantage (e.g. cytoplasmic incompatibility and male-killing), or confer fitness benefits to their hosts (e.g. metabolic provisioning and defense against natural enemies). Recent studies suggest that strains of the bacterial genus Spiroplasma protect their host (flies in the genus Drosophila) against parasitoid attack. The Spiroplasma-conferred protection is partial and flies surviving a wasp attack have reduced adult longevity and fecundity. Therefore, it is unclear whether protection against wasps alone can counter Spiroplasma loss by imperfect maternal transmission and any possible fitness costs to harboring Spiroplasma. To address this question, we conducted a population cage study comparing Spiroplasma frequencies over time (host generations) under conditions of high wasp pressure and no wasp pressure. A dramatic increase of Spiroplasma prevalence was observed under high wasp pressure. In contrast, Spiroplasma prevalence in the absence of wasps did not change significantly over time; a pattern consistent with random drift. Thus, the defensive mechanism may contribute to the high prevalence of Spiroplasma in host populations despite imperfect vertical transmission.

  3. Spread of a New Parasitic B Chromosome Variant Is Facilitated by High Gene Flow

    PubMed Central

    Manrique-Poyato, María Inmaculada; López-León, María Dolores; Cabrero, Josefa; Perfectti, Francisco; Camacho, Juan Pedro M.

    2013-01-01

    The B24 chromosome variant emerged several decades ago in a Spanish population of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans and is currently reaching adjacent populations. Here we report, for the first time, how a parasitic B chromosome (a strictly vertically transmitted parasite) expands its geographical range aided by high gene flow in the host species. For six years we analyzed B frequency in several populations to the east and west of the original population and found extensive spatial variation, but only a slight temporal trend. The highest B24 frequency was found in its original population (Torrox) and it decreased closer to both the eastern and the western populations. The analysis of Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) markers showed the existence of a low but significant degree of population subdivision, as well as significant isolation by distance (IBD). Pairwise Nem estimates suggested the existence of high gene flow between the four populations located in the Torrox area, with higher values towards the east. No significant barriers to gene flow were found among these four populations, and we conclude that high gene flow is facilitating B24 diffusion both eastward and westward, with minor role for B24 drive due to the arrival of drive suppressor genes which are also frequent in the donor population. PMID:24386259

  4. Transient cortical blindness after coronary artery angiography.

    PubMed

    Terlecki, Michał; Wojciechowska, Wiktoria; Rajzer, Marek; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Bazan-Socha, Stanisława; Bryniarski, Leszek; Czarnecka, Danuta

    2013-01-01

    Coronary angiography is the current gold standard for the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease and therefore the prevalence of percutaneous coronary procedures such as angiography and angioplasty is high. The occurrence of cerebral complications after coronary angiography and coronary angioplasty is low and it mainly includes transient ischemic attack and stroke. The prevalence of transient cortical blindness after X-ray contrast media is low and it is usually seen after cerebral angiography. Until now only a few cases of transient cortical blindness have been described after coronary artery angiography. Regarding the spread of coronary angiography worldwide and in Poland this complication is uniquely rare. A 32-year-old man with multiple extrasystolic ventricular arrhythmia suggesting Brugada syndrome diagnosis according to morphology of the left bundle branch block and with decreased left ventricular ejection fraction was admitted to the First Department of Cardiology and Hypertension, Medical College of the Jagiellonian University in Krakow. Coronary angiography was performed in order to exclude ischemic etiology of the observed abnormalities. No arteriosclerotic lesions were found in coronary arteries. Transient cortical blindness was observed directly after angiography which may have been caused by the neurotoxic effect of the used X-ray contrast medium. In ophthalmologic and neurologic examination as well as in the cerebral computed tomography scan no pathologies were found. Visual impairment disappeared totally within several hours.

  5. Control of energy spread and dark current in proton and ion beams generated in high-contrast laser solid interactions.

    PubMed

    Dollar, F; Matsuoka, T; Petrov, G M; Thomas, A G R; Bulanov, S S; Chvykov, V; Davis, J; Kalinchenko, G; McGuffey, C; Willingale, L; Yanovsky, V; Maksimchuk, A; Krushelnick, K

    2011-08-05

    By using temporal pulse shaping of high-contrast, short pulse laser interactions with solid density targets at intensities of 2 × 10(21) W cm(-2) at a 45° incident angle, we show that it is possible to reproducibly generate quasimonoenergetic proton and ion energy spectra. The presence of a short pulse prepulse 33 ps prior to the main pulse produced proton spectra with an energy spread between 25% and 60% (ΔE/E) with energy of several MeV, with light ions becoming quasimonoenergetic for 50 nm targets. When the prepulse was removed, the energy spectra was broad. Numerical simulations suggest that expansion of the rear-side contaminant layer allowed for density conditions that prevented the protons from being screened from the sheath field, thus providing a low energy cutoff in the observed spectra normal to the target surface.

  6. An optimal point spread function subtraction algorithm for high-contrast imaging: a demonstration with angular differential imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lafreniere, D; Marois, C; Doyon, R; Artigau, E; Nadeau, D

    2006-09-19

    Direct imaging of exoplanets is limited by bright quasi-static speckles in the point spread function (PSF) of the central star. This limitation can be reduced by subtraction of reference PSF images. We have developed an algorithm to construct an optimal reference PSF image from an arbitrary set of reference images. This image is built as a linear combination of all available images and is optimized independently inside multiple subsections of the image to ensure that the absolute minimum residual noise is achieved within each subsection. The algorithm developed is completely general and can be used with many high contrast imaging observing strategies, such as angular differential imaging (ADI), roll subtraction, spectral differential imaging, reference star observations, etc. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated for ADI data. It is shown that for this type of data the new algorithm provides a gain in sensitivity by up 22 to a factor 3 at small separation over the algorithm previously used.

  7. Blacksmithing in a high-tech environment: ''Under the spreading CNC mill the laboratories' smithy stands''

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, R.

    1987-04-22

    In some mass production processes, closed die forgings or drop forgings are applicable; however, the tooling costs and respective set-up times are generally quite high. Rarely does anyone in a prototype application ever think of heating a piece of stock to achieve thermally enhanced plasticity and then hand-hammering it on the anvil to form it to the desired shape. Yet at Sandia National Laboratories it has been found that a blacksmith shop complete with a coal fired forge, hammers, and anvil is a valuable asset, cost effective, and greatly enhances capabilities for producing prototype parts.

  8. [Characteristics of cortical activity in persons with high and low verbal creativity: analysis of alpha1,2 rhythms].

    PubMed

    Razumnikova, O M; Tarasova, I V; Vol'f, N V

    2009-01-01

    Creativity-related changes in alpha power in low-frequency (8-10 Hz) and high-frequency (10-13 Hz) bands were studied in university students having regard to generation of original ideas during performance of two verbal tasks. A high-creative group enrolled 16 subjects asked to generate original words--associates to the triads of verbal stimuli and 14 subjects who were asked to compose a sentence using triads of nouns from remote semantic categories. Low-creative groups included 22 and 13 individuals, respectively. In low-frequency band, highly creative subjects showed a higher level of alpha power than low creative individuals. In the high-frequency band, task-related alpha2 power desynchronization was different in these groups: high-creative individuals had higher power score than low-creative mostly in the anterior and parietal cortical areas. These data and a factor structure of alpha rhythm indices may be evidence of different strategies of information selection in highly and low creative persons.

  9. High correlation of Middle East respiratory syndrome spread with Google search and Twitter trends in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Seo, Dong-Woo; An, Jisun; Kwak, Haewoon; Kim, Sung-Han; Gwack, Jin; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-01-01

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was exported to Korea in 2015, resulting in a threat to neighboring nations. We evaluated the possibility of using a digital surveillance system based on web searches and social media data to monitor this MERS outbreak. We collected the number of daily laboratory-confirmed MERS cases and quarantined cases from May 11, 2015 to June 26, 2015 using the Korean government MERS portal. The daily trends observed via Google search and Twitter during the same time period were also ascertained using Google Trends and Topsy. Correlations among the data were then examined using Spearman correlation analysis. We found high correlations (>0.7) between Google search and Twitter results and the number of confirmed MERS cases for the previous three days using only four simple keywords: “MERS”, “” (“MERS (in Korean)”), “” (“MERS symptoms (in Korean)”), and “” (“MERS hospital (in Korean)”). Additionally, we found high correlations between the Google search and Twitter results and the number of quarantined cases using the above keywords. This study demonstrates the possibility of using a digital surveillance system to monitor the outbreak of MERS. PMID:27595921

  10. High correlation of Middle East respiratory syndrome spread with Google search and Twitter trends in Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Seo, Dong-Woo; An, Jisun; Kwak, Haewoon; Kim, Sung-Han; Gwack, Jin; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-09-06

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was exported to Korea in 2015, resulting in a threat to neighboring nations. We evaluated the possibility of using a digital surveillance system based on web searches and social media data to monitor this MERS outbreak. We collected the number of daily laboratory-confirmed MERS cases and quarantined cases from May 11, 2015 to June 26, 2015 using the Korean government MERS portal. The daily trends observed via Google search and Twitter during the same time period were also ascertained using Google Trends and Topsy. Correlations among the data were then examined using Spearman correlation analysis. We found high correlations (>0.7) between Google search and Twitter results and the number of confirmed MERS cases for the previous three days using only four simple keywords: "MERS", " ("MERS (in Korean)"), " ("MERS symptoms (in Korean)"), and " ("MERS hospital (in Korean)"). Additionally, we found high correlations between the Google search and Twitter results and the number of quarantined cases using the above keywords. This study demonstrates the possibility of using a digital surveillance system to monitor the outbreak of MERS.

  11. First Discovery and Investigation of a High-Temperature Hydrothermal Vent Field on the Ultra- Slow Spreading Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, C.; Lin, J.; Guo, S.; Chen, Y. J.; Wu, G.; Han, X.; German, C. R.; Yoerger, D. R.; Zhu, J.; Zhou, N.; Su, X.; Baker, E. T.; Party, S.

    2007-12-01

    Two recent cruises on board the Chinese research vessel Dayang Yihao have successfully investigated the first active hydrothermal vent field to be located along the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) and collected hydrothermal sulfide deposit samples. The newly discovered hydrothermal vent field is located on the western end of a magmatically robust spreading segment immediately west of the Gallieni transform fault. Preliminary evidence of strong turbidity anomalies was first measured during a Nov. 2005 cruise on board Dayang Yihao (InterRidge News, vol. 15, pp. 33-34, 2006). Color video footages of the seafloor in the vent-field area were first obtained by a deep-towed video camera in February 2007 during DY115-19 Leg 1, when significant water column turbidity anomalies, noticeable temperature anomalies and methane anomalies were also measured. The vent field was then precisely located, mapped, and photographed in great detail in February- March 2007 during the DY115-19 Leg 2, using the autonomous underwater vehicle ABE of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. A high-resolution bathymetric map, more than 5,000 near-bottom color photos, and several types of water column data were all obtained during three phases of ABE dives. Within the approximately 120-m-long by 100-m-wide hydrothermal field, three groups of active high-temperature vents were identified and color images of black smokers and associated biological communities were obtained from ABE, flying 5 m above the seafloor. Hydrothermal sulfide deposits were then successfully obtained using a TV-guided grab.

  12. First Discovery and Investigation of a High-Temperature Hydrothermal Vent Field on the Ultra- Slow Spreading Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, C.; Lin, J.; Guo, S.; Chen, Y. J.; Wu, G.; Han, X.; German, C. R.; Yoerger, D. R.; Zhu, J.; Zhou, N.; Su, X.; Baker, E. T.; Party, S.

    2004-12-01

    Two recent cruises on board the Chinese research vessel Dayang Yihao have successfully investigated the first active hydrothermal vent field to be located along the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) and collected hydrothermal sulfide deposit samples. The newly discovered hydrothermal vent field is located on the western end of a magmatically robust spreading segment immediately west of the Gallieni transform fault. Preliminary evidence of strong turbidity anomalies was first measured during a Nov. 2005 cruise on board Dayang Yihao (InterRidge News, vol. 15, pp. 33-34, 2006). Color video footages of the seafloor in the vent-field area were first obtained by a deep-towed video camera in February 2007 during DY115-19 Leg 1, when significant water column turbidity anomalies, noticeable temperature anomalies and methane anomalies were also measured. The vent field was then precisely located, mapped, and photographed in great detail in February- March 2007 during the DY115-19 Leg 2, using the autonomous underwater vehicle ABE of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. A high-resolution bathymetric map, more than 5,000 near-bottom color photos, and several types of water column data were all obtained during three phases of ABE dives. Within the approximately 120-m-long by 100-m-wide hydrothermal field, three groups of active high-temperature vents were identified and color images of black smokers and associated biological communities were obtained from ABE, flying 5 m above the seafloor. Hydrothermal sulfide deposits were then successfully obtained using a TV-guided grab.

  13. Cortical commands in active touch.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The neocortex is an enormous network of extensively interconnected neurons. It has become clear that the computations performed by individual cortical neurons will critically depend on the quantitative composition of cortical activity. Here we discuss quantitative aspects of cortical activity and modes of cortical processing in the context of rodent active touch. Through in vivo whole-cell recordings one observes widespread subthreshold and very sparse evoked action potential (AP) activity in the somatosensory cortex both for passive whisker deflection in anaesthetized animals and during active whisker movements in awake animals. Neurons of the somatosensory cortex become either suppressed during whisking or activated by an efference copy of whisker movement signal that depolarize cells at certain phases of the whisking cycle. To probe the read out of cortical motor commands we applied intracellular stimulation in rat whisker motor cortex. We find that APs in individual cortical neurons can evoke long sequences of small whisker movements. The capacity of an individual neuron to evoke movements is most astonishing given the large number of neurons in whisker motor cortex. Thus, few cortical APs may suffice to control motor behaviour and such APs can be translated into action with the utmost precision. We conclude that there is very widespread subthreshold cortical activity and very sparse, highly specific cortical AP activity.

  14. High-resolution and site-specific scanning spreading resistance microscopy and its applications to silicon devices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Koike, M.; Takeno, S.; Hara, K.

    2012-11-06

    Due to the continuous reduction of the critical dimensions of semiconductor devices, it becomes very important to know the two dimensional (2D) doping profile for improving device performance. Scanning spreading resistance microscopy (SSRM) performed in high vacuum is a powerful technique for quantitative 2D-doping profiling, with high spatial resolution and wide dynamic range of carrier concentration, as well as capability of site-specific analysis for accurate position. In this paper, we review SSRM applications to source/drain engineering in Si devices and their correlation with device characteristics by demonstrating several case studies. Direct observation of (110)/(100) CMOSFETs clarified significant differences between both pFETs and nFETs on (110) and (100) silicon substrates, revealing 2D channeling effect of boron ion implantation in pFETs; as well as silicidation impact on junction leakage-current characteristics in nFETs. Furthermore, our sample-preparation breakthrough enables site-specific SSRM characterization within 60 nm ultra thin samples and therefore failure analysis of real SRAM devices, demonstrating the high potential of SSRM technology for further device scaling and for failure analysis.

  15. Resveratrol supplementation confers neuroprotection in cortical brain tissue of nonhuman primates fed a high-fat/sucrose diet

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Michel; Wahl, Devin; Ali, Ahmed; Allard, Joanne; Faulkner, Shakeela; Wnorowski, Artur; Sanghvi, Mitesh; Moaddel, Ruin; Alfaras, Irene; Mattison, Julie A.; Tarantini, Stefano; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna; Pearson, Kevin J.; de Cabo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown positive effects of long-term resveratrol (RSV) supplementation in preventing pancreatic beta cell dysfunction, arterial stiffening and metabolic decline induced by high-fat/high-sugar (HFS) diet in nonhuman primates. Here, the analysis was extended to examine whether RSV may reduce dietary stress toxicity in the cerebral cortex of the same cohort of treated animals. Middle-aged male rhesus monkeys were fed for 2 years with HFS alone or combined with RSV, after which whole-genome microarray analysis of cerebral cortex tissue was carried out along with ELISA, immunofluorescence, and biochemical analyses to examine markers of vascular health and inflammation in the cerebral cortices. A number of genes and pathways that were differentially modulated in these dietary interventions indicated an exacerbation of neuroinflammation (e.g., oxidative stress markers, apoptosis, NF-κB activation) in HFS-fed animals and protection by RSV treatment. The decreased expression of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, dysregulation in endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and reduced capillary density induced by HFS stress were rescued by RSV supplementation. Our results suggest that long-term RSV treatment confers neuroprotection against cerebral vascular dysfunction during nutrient stress. PMID:27070252

  16. Mechanical strain, induced noninvasively in the high-frequency domain, is anabolic to cancellous bone, but not cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Rubin, C; Turner, A S; Mallinckrodt, C; Jerome, C; McLeod, K; Bain, S

    2002-03-01

    Departing from the premise that it is the large-amplitude signals inherent to intense functional activity that define bone morphology, we propose that it is the far lower magnitude, high-frequency mechanical signals that continually barrage the skeleton during longer term activities such as standing, which regulate skeletal architecture. To examine this hypothesis, we proposed that brief exposure to slight elevations in these endogenous mechanical signals would suffice to increase bone mass in those bones subject to the stimulus. This was tested by exposing the hind limbs of adult female sheep (n = 9) to 20 min/day of low-level (0.3g), high-frequency (30 Hz) mechanical signals, sufficient to induce a peak of approximately 5 microstrain (micro epsilon) in the tibia. Following euthanasia, peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) was used to segregate the cortical shell from the trabecular envelope of the proximal femur, revealing a 34.2% increase in bone density in the experimental animals as compared with controls (p = 0.01). Histomorphometric examination of the femur supported these density measurements, with bone volume per total volume increasing by 32% (p = 0.04). This density increase was achieved by two separate strategies: trabecular spacing decreased by 36.1% (p = 0.02), whereas trabecular number increased by 45.6% (p = 0.01), indicating the formation of cancellous bone de novo. There were no significant differences in the radii of animals subject to the stimulus, indicating that the adaptive response was local rather than systemic. The anabolic potential of the signal was evident only in trabecular bone, and there were no differences, as measured by any assay, in the cortical bone. These data suggest that subtle mechanical signals generated during predominant activities such as posture may be potent determinants of skeletal morphology. Given that these strain levels are three orders of magnitude below strains that can damage bone tissue, we

  17. High gamma power in ECoG reflects cortical electrical stimulation effects on unit activity in layers V/VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdan-Shahmorad, Azadeh; Kipke, Daryl R.; Lehmkuhle, Mark J.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Cortical electrical stimulation (CES) has been used extensively in experimental neuroscience to modulate neuronal or behavioral activity, which has led this technique to be considered in neurorehabilitation. Because the cortex and the surrounding anatomy have irregular geometries as well as inhomogeneous and anisotropic electrical properties, the mechanism by which CES has therapeutic effects is poorly understood. Therapeutic effects of CES can be improved by optimizing the stimulation parameters based on the effects of various stimulation parameters on target brain regions. Approach. In this study we have compared the effects of CES pulse polarity, frequency, and amplitude on unit activity recorded from rat primary motor cortex with the effects on the corresponding local field potentials (LFP), and electrocorticograms (ECoG). CES was applied at the surface of the cortex and the unit activity and LFPs were recorded using a penetrating electrode array, which was implanted below the stimulation site. ECoGs were recorded from the vicinity of the stimulation site. Main results. Time-frequency analysis of LFPs following CES showed correlation of gamma frequencies with unit activity response in all layers. More importantly, high gamma power of ECoG signals only correlated with the unit activity in lower layers (V-VI) following CES. Time-frequency correlations, which were found between LFPs, ECoGs and unit activity, were frequency- and amplitude-dependent. Significance. The signature of the neural activity observed in LFP and ECoG signals provides a better understanding of the effects of stimulation on network activity, representative of large numbers of neurons responding to stimulation. These results demonstrate that the neurorehabilitation and neuroprosthetic applications of CES targeting layered cortex can be further improved by using field potential recordings as surrogates to unit activity aimed at optimizing stimulation efficacy. Likewise, the signatures

  18. Correlates of spreading depolarization in human scalp electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Drenckhahn, Christoph; Winkler, Maren K L; Major, Sebastian; Scheel, Michael; Kang, Eun-Jeung; Pinczolits, Alexandra; Grozea, Cristian; Hartings, Jed A; Woitzik, Johannes; Dreier, Jens P

    2012-03-01

    It has been known for decades that suppression of spontaneous scalp electroencephalographic activity occurs during ischaemia. Trend analysis for such suppression was found useful for intraoperative monitoring during carotid endarterectomy, or as a screening tool to detect delayed cerebral ischaemia after aneurismal subarachnoid haemorrhage. Nevertheless, pathogenesis of such suppression of activity has remained unclear. In five patients with aneurismal subarachnoid haemorrhage and four patients with decompressive hemicraniectomy after malignant hemispheric stroke due to middle cerebral artery occlusion, we here performed simultaneously full-band direct and alternating current electroencephalography at the scalp and direct and alternating current electrocorticography at the cortical surface. After subarachnoid haemorrhage, 275 slow potential changes, identifying spreading depolarizations, were recorded electrocorticographically over 694 h. Visual inspection of time-compressed scalp electroencephalography identified 193 (70.2%) slow potential changes [amplitude: -272 (-174, -375) µV (median quartiles), duration: 5.4 (4.0, 7.1) min, electrocorticography-electroencephalography delay: 1.8 (0.8, 3.5) min]. Intervals between successive spreading depolarizations were significantly shorter for depolarizations with electroencephalographically identified slow potential change [33.0 (27.0, 76.5) versus 53.0 (28.0, 130.5) min, P = 0.009]. Electroencephalography was thus more likely to display slow potential changes of clustered than isolated spreading depolarizations. In contrast to electrocorticography, no spread of electroencephalographic slow potential changes was seen, presumably due to superposition of volume-conducted electroencephalographic signals from widespread cortical generators. In two of five patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage, serial magnetic resonance imaging revealed large delayed infarcts at the recording site, while electrocorticography showed clusters

  19. The Role of Epidemic Resistance Plasmids and International High-Risk Clones in the Spread of Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Mathers, Amy J.; Peirano, Gisele

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) and Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 emerged in the 2000s as important human pathogens, have spread extensively throughout the world, and are responsible for the rapid increase in antimicrobial resistance among E. coli and K. pneumoniae strains, respectively. E. coli ST131 causes extraintestinal infections and is often fluoroquinolone resistant and associated with extended-spectrum β-lactamase production, especially CTX-M-15. K. pneumoniae ST258 causes urinary and respiratory tract infections and is associated with carbapenemases, most often KPC-2 and KPC-3. The most prevalent lineage within ST131 is named fimH30 because it contains the H30 variant of the type 1 fimbrial adhesin gene, and recent molecular studies have demonstrated that this lineage emerged in the early 2000s and was then followed by the rapid expansion of its sublineages H30-R and H30-Rx. K. pneumoniae ST258 comprises 2 distinct lineages, namely clade I and clade II. Moreover, it seems that ST258 is a hybrid clone that was created by a large recombination event between ST11 and ST442. Epidemic plasmids with blaCTX-M and blaKPC belonging to incompatibility group F have contributed significantly to the success of these clones. E. coli ST131 and K. pneumoniae ST258 are the quintessential examples of international multidrug-resistant high-risk clones. PMID:25926236

  20. Improving Transferability of Introduced Species’ Distribution Models: New Tools to Forecast the Spread of a Highly Invasive Seaweed

    PubMed Central

    Verbruggen, Heroen; Tyberghein, Lennert; Belton, Gareth S.; Mineur, Frederic; Jueterbock, Alexander; Hoarau, Galice; Gurgel, C. Frederico D.; De Clerck, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The utility of species distribution models for applications in invasion and global change biology is critically dependent on their transferability between regions or points in time, respectively. We introduce two methods that aim to improve the transferability of presence-only models: density-based occurrence thinning and performance-based predictor selection. We evaluate the effect of these methods along with the impact of the choice of model complexity and geographic background on the transferability of a species distribution model between geographic regions. Our multifactorial experiment focuses on the notorious invasive seaweed Caulerpacylindracea (previously Caulerparacemosa var. cylindracea) and uses Maxent, a commonly used presence-only modeling technique. We show that model transferability is markedly improved by appropriate predictor selection, with occurrence thinning, model complexity and background choice having relatively minor effects. The data shows that, if available, occurrence records from the native and invaded regions should be combined as this leads to models with high predictive power while reducing the sensitivity to choices made in the modeling process. The inferred distribution model of Caulerpacylindracea shows the potential for this species to further spread along the coasts of Western Europe, western Africa and the south coast of Australia. PMID:23950789

  1. High energy x-ray diffraction/x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for high-throughput analysis of composition spread thin films.

    PubMed

    Gregoire, John M; Dale, Darren; Kazimirov, Alexander; DiSalvo, Francis J; van Dover, R Bruce

    2009-12-01

    High-throughput crystallography is an important tool in materials research, particularly for the rapid assessment of structure-property relationships. We present a technique for simultaneous acquisition of diffraction images and fluorescence spectra on a continuous composition spread thin film using a 60 keV x-ray source. Subsequent noninteractive data processing provides maps of the diffraction profiles, thin film fiber texture, and composition. Even for highly textured films, our diffraction technique provides detection of diffraction from each family of Bragg reflections, which affords direct comparison of the measured profiles with powder patterns of known phases. These techniques are important for high throughput combinatorial studies as they provide structure and composition maps which may be correlated with performance trends within an inorganic library.

  2. Explaining the high voice superiority effect in polyphonic music: evidence from cortical evoked potentials and peripheral auditory models.

    PubMed

    Trainor, Laurel J; Marie, Céline; Bruce, Ian C; Bidelman, Gavin M

    2014-02-01

    Natural auditory environments contain multiple simultaneously-sounding objects and the auditory system must parse the incoming complex sound wave they collectively create into parts that represent each of these individual objects. Music often similarly requires processing of more than one voice or stream at the same time, and behavioral studies demonstrate that human listeners show a systematic perceptual bias in processing the highest voice in multi-voiced music. Here, we review studies utilizing event-related brain potentials (ERPs), which support the notions that (1) separate memory traces are formed for two simultaneous voices (even without conscious awareness) in auditory cortex and (2) adults show more robust encoding (i.e., larger ERP responses) to deviant pitches in the higher than in the lower voice, indicating better encoding of the former. Furthermore, infants also show this high-voice superiority effect, suggesting that the perceptual dominance observed across studies might result from neurophysiological characteristics of the peripheral auditory system. Although musically untrained adults show smaller responses in general than musically trained adults, both groups similarly show a more robust cortical representation of the higher than of the lower voice. Finally, years of experience playing a bass-range instrument reduces but does not reverse the high voice superiority effect, indicating that although it can be modified, it is not highly neuroplastic. Results of new modeling experiments examined the possibility that characteristics of middle-ear filtering and cochlear dynamics (e.g., suppression) reflected in auditory nerve firing patterns might account for the higher-voice superiority effect. Simulations show that both place and temporal AN coding schemes well-predict a high-voice superiority across a wide range of interval spacings and registers. Collectively, we infer an innate, peripheral origin for the higher-voice superiority observed in human

  3. High-resolution ERP mapping of cortical activation related to implicit object-location memory.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jonathan S; Wynne, Ciara E; O'Rourke, Edel M; Commins, Seán; Roche, Richard A P

    2009-12-01

    High-density event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during an object recognition task which involved task-irrelevant changes in the location of studied objects. Participants categorised objects as studied or novel while data were analysed to ascertain the effect of the location changes on performance and waveform topography. Our results indicate that humans can classify objects faster and more accurately when using implicit spatial memory. Individual differences observed in object recognition proficiency were absent if objects were presented in their 'correct' location. In a second experiment we replicated the behavioural findings while manipulating viewpoint to discount scene recognition as an underlying factor. We propose a model which includes activation of the right medial temporal lobe prior to P300 elicitation to account for the prophylactic effect of implicit processing on object recognition. Hemispheric differences in parietal componentry dependant on sex of participant were also observed and are discussed in relation to differential strategies.

  4. Changes in cortical activity measured with EEG during a high-intensity cycling exercise

    PubMed Central

    Cortese, Filomeno; Maurer, Christian; Baltich, Jennifer; Protzner, Andrea B.; Nigg, Benno M.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a high-intensity cycling exercise on changes in spectral and temporal aspects of electroencephalography (EEG) measured from 10 experienced cyclists. Cyclists performed a maximum aerobic power test on the first testing day followed by a time-to-exhaustion trial at 85% of their maximum power output on 2 subsequent days that were separated by ∼48 h. EEG was recorded using a 64-channel system at 500 Hz. Independent component (IC) analysis parsed the EEG scalp data into maximal ICs. An equivalent current dipole model was calculated for each IC, and results were clustered across subjects. A time-frequency analysis of the identified electrocortical clusters was performed to investigate the magnitude and timing of event-related spectral perturbations. Significant changes (P < 0.05) in electrocortical activity were found in frontal, supplementary motor and parietal areas of the cortex. Overall, there was a significant increase in EEG power as fatigue developed throughout the exercise. The strongest increase was found in the frontal area of the cortex. The timing of event-related desynchronization within the supplementary motor area corresponds with the onset of force production and the transition from flexion to extension in the pedaling cycle. The results indicate an involvement of the cerebral cortex during the pedaling task that most likely involves executive control function, as well as motor planning and execution. PMID:26538604

  5. Cortical Visual Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Cortical Visual Impairment En Español Read in Chinese What is cortical visual impairment? Cortical visual impairment (CVI) is a decreased ...

  6. High-fidelity optical excitation of cortico-cortical projections at physiological frequencies.

    PubMed

    Hass, Charles A; Glickfeld, Lindsey L

    2016-11-01

    Optogenetic activation of axons is a powerful approach for determining the synaptic properties and impact of long-range projections both in vivo and in vitro. However, because of the difficulty of measuring activity in axons, our knowledge of the reliability of optogenetic axonal stimulation has relied on data from somatic recordings. Yet, there are many reasons why activation of axons may not be comparable to cell bodies. Thus we have developed an approach to more directly assess the fidelity of optogenetic activation of axonal projections. We expressed opsins (ChR2, Chronos, or oChIEF) in the mouse primary visual cortex (V1) and recorded extracellular, pharmacologically isolated presynaptic action potentials in response to axonal activation in the higher visual areas. Repetitive stimulation of axons with ChR2 resulted in a 70% reduction in the fiber volley amplitude and a 60% increase in the latency at all frequencies tested (10-40 Hz). Thus ChR2 cannot reliably recruit axons during repetitive stimulation, even at frequencies that are reliable for somatic stimulation, likely due to pronounced channel inactivation at the high light powers required to evoke action potentials. By comparison, oChIEF and Chronos evoked photocurrents that inactivated minimally and could produce reliable axon stimulation at frequencies up to 60 Hz. Our approach provides a more direct and accurate evaluation of the efficacy of new optogenetic tools and has identified Chronos and oChIEF as viable tools to interrogate the synaptic and circuit function of long-range projections.

  7. Effects of high temperature and exposure to air on mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Lmk 1819) hemocyte phagocytosis: modulation of spreading and oxidative response.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Francesco; Narcisi, Valeria; Calzetta, Angela; Gioia, Luisa; Finoia, Maria G; Latini, Mario; Tiscar, Pietro G

    2013-06-01

    Hemocytes are a critical component of the mussel defense system and the present study aims at investigating their spreading and oxidative properties during phagocytosis under in vivo experimental stress conditions. The spreading ability was measured by an automated cell analyzer on the basis of the circularity, a parameter corresponding to the hemocyte roundness. The oxidative activity was investigated by micromethod assay, measuring the respiratory burst as expression of the fluorescence generated by the oxidation of specific probe. Following the application of high temperature and exposure to air, there was evidence of negative modulation of spreading and oxidative response, as revealed by a cell roundness increase and fluorescence generation decrease. Therefore, the fall of respiratory burst appeared as matched with the inhibition of hemocyte morphological activation, suggesting a potential depression of the phagocytosis process and confirming the application of the circularity parameter as potential stress marker, both in experimental and field studies.

  8. High cardiorespiratory fitness in early to late middle age preserves the cortical circuitry associated with brain-heart integration during volitional exercise.

    PubMed

    Wood, Katelyn N; Luchyshyn, Torri A; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2017-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that high cardiorespiratory fitness (peak oxygen uptake) preserves the cortical circuitry associated with cardiac arousal during exercise in middle- to older-aged individuals. Observations of changes in heart rate (HR) and in cortical blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) images were made in 52 healthy, active individuals (45-73 yr; 16 women, 36 men) across a range of fitness (26-66 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)). Seven repeated bouts of isometric handgrip (IHG) at 40% maximal voluntary contraction force were performed with functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T, with each contraction lasting 20 s and separated by 40 s of rest. HR responses to IHG showed high variability across individuals. Linear regression revealed that cardiorespiratory fitness was not a strong predictor of the HR response (r(2) = 0.09). In a region-of-interest analysis both the IHG task and the HR time course correlated with increased cortical activation in the bilateral insula and decreased activation relative to baseline in the anterior and posterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). t-Test results revealed greater deactivation at the MPFC with higher fitness levels beyond that of guideline-based activity. Therefore, whereas high cardiorespiratory fitness failed to affect absolute HR responses to IHG in this age range, a select effect was observed in cortical regions known to be associated with cardiovascular arousal.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Our first observation suggests that fitness does not strongly predict the heart rate (HR) response to a volitional handgrip task in middle- to older-aged adults. Second, the BOLD response associated with the handgrip task, and with the HR time course, was associated with response patterns in the cortical autonomic network. Finally, whereas high cardiorespiratory fitness failed to affect absolute HR responses to isometric handgrip in this age range, a select effect was observed in cortical regions known to be

  9. Spreading and slope instability at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna, imaged by high-resolution 2D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Felix; Krastel, Sebastian; Behrmann, Jan-Hinrich; Papenberg, Cord; Geersen, Jacob; Ridente, Domenico; Latino Chiocci, Francesco; Urlaub, Morelia; Bialas, Jörg; Micallef, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Mount Etna is the largest active volcano in Europe. Its volcano edifice is located on top of continental crust close to the Ionian shore in east Sicily. Instability of the eastern flank of the volcano edifice is well documented onshore. The continental margin is supposed to deform as well. Little, however, is known about the offshore extension of the eastern volcano flank and its adjacent continental margin, which is a serious shortcoming in stability models. In order to better constrain the active tectonics of the continental margin offshore the eastern flank of the volcano, we acquired and processed a new marine high-resolution seismic and hydro-acoustic dataset. The data provide new detailed insights into the heterogeneous geology and tectonics of shallow continental margin structures offshore Mt Etna. In a similiar manner as observed onshore, the submarine realm is characterized by different blocks, which are controlled by local- and regional tectonics. We image a compressional regime at the toe of the continental margin, which is bound to an asymmetric basin system confining the eastward movement of the flank. In addition, we constrain the proposed southern boundary of the moving flank, which is identified as a right lateral oblique fault movement north of Catania Canyon. From our findings, we consider a major coupled volcano edifice instability and continental margin gravitational collapse and spreading to be present at Mt Etna, as we see a clear link between on- and offshore tectonic structures across the entire eastern flank. The new findings will help to evaluate hazards and risks accompanied by Mt Etna's slope- and continental margin instability and will be used as a base for future investigations in this region.

  10. High-definition transcranial direct current stimulation to both primary motor cortices improves unimanual and bimanual dexterity.

    PubMed

    Pixa, Nils H; Steinberg, Fabian; Doppelmayr, Michael

    2017-03-16

    While most research on brain stimulation with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) targets unimanual motor tasks, little is known about its effects on bimanual motor performance. This study aims to investigate the effects of tDCS on unimanual as well as bimanual motor dexterity. We examined the effects of bihemispheric anodal high-definition tDCS (HD-atDCS) on both primary motor cortices (M1) applied concurrent with unimanual and bimanual motor training. We then measured the effects with the Purdue Pegboard Test (PPT) and compared them to a sham stimulation. Between a pretest and posttest, 31 healthy, right-handed participants practiced the PPT on three consecutive days and received - simultaneous to motor practice - either HD-atDCS over the left and right M1 (STIM, n=16) or a sham stimulation (SHAM, n=15). Five to seven days after the posttest, a follow-up test was conducted. Two-way ANOVAs with repeated measures showed significantly increased performance for all PPT-scores (p<0.001) in both groups. The scores for the right hand, both hands, and overall showed significant TIME x GROUP interactions (p<.05) with more improved performance for the STIM group, while left hand performance was not significantly altered. These effects were most pronounced in the follow-up test. Thus, we can conclude that a bihemispheric HD-atDCS of both M1's improves performance of unimanual and bimanual dexterity. The strength of the effects, however, depends on which hand is used in the unimanual task and the type of bimanual task performed.

  11. Non-invasive predictors of human cortical bone mechanical properties: T(2)-discriminated H NMR compared with high resolution X-ray.

    PubMed

    Horch, R Adam; Gochberg, Daniel F; Nyman, Jeffry S; Does, Mark D

    2011-01-21

    Recent advancements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled clinical imaging of human cortical bone, providing a potentially powerful new means for assessing bone health with molecular-scale sensitivities unavailable to conventional X-ray-based diagnostics. To this end, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and high-resolution X-ray signals from human cortical bone samples were correlated with mechanical properties of bone. Results showed that (1)H NMR signals were better predictors of yield stress, peak stress, and pre-yield toughness than were the X-ray derived signals. These (1)H NMR signals can, in principle, be extracted from clinical MRI, thus offering the potential for improved clinical assessment of fracture risk.

  12. Pain catastrophizing and cortical responses in amputees with varying levels of phantom limb pain: a high-density EEG brain-mapping study.

    PubMed

    Vase, Lene; Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Nikolajsen, Lone; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2012-05-01

    Pain catastrophizing has been associated with phantom limb pain, but so far the cortical processes and the brain regions involved in this relationship have not been investigated. It was therefore tested whether catastrophizing was related to (1) spontaneous pain, (2) somatosensory activity and (3) cortical responses in phantom limb pain patients. The cortical responses were investigated via electroencephalography (EEG) as it has a high temporal resolution which may be ideal for investigating especially the attentional and hypervigilance aspect of catastrophizing to standardized acute stimuli. Eighteen upper limb amputees completed the pain catastrophizing scale. Patients' spontaneous pain levels (worst and average pain, numerical rating scales) and thresholds to electrical stimulation (sensory detection and VRS2: intense but not painful) were determined. Non-painful electrical stimuli were applied to both the affected and non-affected arm, while high-resolution (128 channels) EEG signals were recorded. Catastrophizing accounted for significant amounts of the variance in relation to spontaneous pain, especially worst pain (64.1%), and it was significantly associated with thresholds. At the affected side, catastrophizing was significantly related to the power RMS of the N/P135 dipole located in the area around the secondary somatosensory cortex which has been shown to be associated with arousal and expectations. These findings corroborate the attentional model of pain catastrophizing by indicating that even non-painful stimuli are related to enhanced attention to and negative expectations of stimuli, and they suggest that memory processes may be central to understanding the link between catastrophizing and pain.

  13. Highly impregnated slow-spread lithosphere : microstructure and geochemistry of olivine-rich troctolites from IODP Hole U1309D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ildefonse, B.; Drouin, M.; Godard, M.

    2009-04-01

    IODP Expeditions 304-305 sampled the Atlantis Massif, an oceanic core complex located at 30°N in the inside corner of the intersection of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge with the Atlantis Fracture Zone. IODP Hole U1309D was drilled to 1415.5 meters below seafloor; it is the second deepest hole in slow-spreading crust, after Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 735B on the Southwest Indian Ridge. The recovered rocks are mostly gabbroic. We present a petrostructural (EBSD) and in-situ geochemical (EPMA, LA-ICPMS and LA-HR-ICPMS) study of olivine-rich troctolites (ol > 70%; 5.5 % of recovered section) and associated gabbros. Olivine-rich troctolites from Hole U1309D display poikilitic textures, with olivine ranging from coarse-grained subhedral crystals to medium-grained rounded crystals, embedded in large, undeformed clinopyroxene and plagioclase poikiloblasts. Trace element compositions of clinopyroxene and plagioclase poikiloblasts indicate that they crystallized from the same depleted MORB melt in both olivine-rich troctolites and associated gabbros. Olivine trace element compositions appear too depleted in light REE to be in equilibrium with plagioclase and clinopyroxene. Olivine crystallographic preferred orientations are weak, and misorientations are consistent with deformation by dislocation creep with activation of the high-temperature (010) [100] slip system, commonly described in asthenospheric mantle. The fabrics also display a relatively strong uncommon [001] concentration that we interpret as resulting from abundant melt impregnation. The joint study of geochemical processes and microstructures in these rocks suggest a complex crystallization history in an open system with percolation of large volume of MORB-type melt that postdate olivine crystal-plastic deformation. Although the mantle origin of the olivine is difficult to demonstrate unequivocally, we propose that olivine-rich troctolites represent the ultimate residue of melt-mantle reaction processes. Our

  14. The high bone mass phenotype is characterised by a combined cortical and trabecular bone phenotype: findings from a pQCT case-control study.

    PubMed

    Gregson, Celia L; Sayers, Adrian; Lazar, Victor; Steel, Sue; Dennison, Elaine M; Cooper, Cyrus; Smith, George Davey; Rittweger, Jörn; Tobias, Jon H

    2013-01-01

    High bone mass (HBM), detected in 0.2% of DXA scans, is characterised by a mild skeletal dysplasia largely unexplained by known genetic mutations. We conducted the first systematic assessment of the skeletal phenotype in unexplained HBM using pQCT in our unique HBM population identified from screening routine UK NHS DXA scans. pQCT measurements from the mid and distal tibia and radius in 98 HBM cases were compared with (i) 65 family controls (constituting unaffected relatives and spouses), and (ii) 692 general population controls. HBM cases had substantially greater trabecular density at the distal tibia (340 [320, 359] mg/cm(3)), compared to both family (294 [276, 312]) and population controls (290 [281, 299]) (p<0.001 for both, adjusted for age, gender, weight, height, alcohol, smoking, malignancy, menopause, steroid and estrogen replacement use). Similar results were obtained at the distal radius. Greater cortical bone mineral density (cBMD) was observed in HBM cases, both at the midtibia and radius (adjusted p<0.001). Total bone area (TBA) was higher in HBM cases, at the distal and mid tibia and radius (adjusted p<0.05 versus family controls), suggesting greater periosteal apposition. Cortical thickness was increased at the mid tibia and radius (adjusted p<0.001), implying reduced endosteal expansion. Together, these changes resulted in greater predicted cortical strength (strength strain index [SSI]) in both tibia and radius (p<0.001). We then examined relationships with age; tibial cBMD remained constant with increasing age amongst HBM cases (adjusted β -0.01 [-0.02, 0.01], p=0.41), but declined in family controls (-0.05 [-0.03, -0.07], p<0.001) interaction p=0.002; age-related changes in tibial trabecular BMD, CBA and SSI were also divergent. In contrast, at the radius HBM cases and controls showed parallel age-related declines in cBMD and trabecular BMD. HBM is characterised by increased trabecular BMD and by alterations in cortical bone density and

  15. Different Mode of Afferents Determines the Frequency Range of High Frequency Activities in the Human Brain: Direct Electrocorticographic Comparison between Peripheral Nerve and Direct Cortical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Riki; Matsuhashi, Masao; Usami, Kiyohide; Shimotake, Akihiro; Kunieda, Takeharu; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Physiological high frequency activities (HFA) are related to various brain functions. Factors, however, regulating its frequency have not been well elucidated in humans. To validate the hypothesis that different propagation modes (thalamo-cortical vs. cortico-coritcal projections), or different terminal layers (layer IV vs. layer II/III) affect its frequency, we, in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), compared HFAs induced by median nerve stimulation with those induced by electrical stimulation of the cortex connecting to SI. We employed 6 patients who underwent chronic subdural electrode implantation for presurgical evaluation. We evaluated the HFA power values in reference to the baseline overriding N20 (earliest cortical response) and N80 (late response) of somatosensory evoked potentials (HFASEP(N20) and HFASEP(N80)) and compared those overriding N1 and N2 (first and second responses) of cortico-cortical evoked potentials (HFACCEP(N1) and HFACCEP(N2)). HFASEP(N20) showed the power peak in the frequency above 200 Hz, while HFACCEP(N1) had its power peak in the frequency below 200 Hz. Different propagation modes and/or different terminal layers seemed to determine HFA frequency. Since HFACCEP(N1) and HFA induced during various brain functions share a similar broadband profile of the power spectrum, cortico-coritcal horizontal propagation seems to represent common mode of neural transmission for processing these functions. PMID:26087042

  16. Different Mode of Afferents Determines the Frequency Range of High Frequency Activities in the Human Brain: Direct Electrocorticographic Comparison between Peripheral Nerve and Direct Cortical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Riki; Matsuhashi, Masao; Usami, Kiyohide; Shimotake, Akihiro; Kunieda, Takeharu; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Physiological high frequency activities (HFA) are related to various brain functions. Factors, however, regulating its frequency have not been well elucidated in humans. To validate the hypothesis that different propagation modes (thalamo-cortical vs. cortico-coritcal projections), or different terminal layers (layer IV vs. layer II/III) affect its frequency, we, in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), compared HFAs induced by median nerve stimulation with those induced by electrical stimulation of the cortex connecting to SI. We employed 6 patients who underwent chronic subdural electrode implantation for presurgical evaluation. We evaluated the HFA power values in reference to the baseline overriding N20 (earliest cortical response) and N80 (late response) of somatosensory evoked potentials (HFA(SEP(N20)) and HFA(SEP(N80))) and compared those overriding N1 and N2 (first and second responses) of cortico-cortical evoked potentials (HFA(CCEP(N1)) and HFA(CCEP(N2))). HFA(SEP(N20)) showed the power peak in the frequency above 200 Hz, while HFA(CCEP(N1)) had its power peak in the frequency below 200 Hz. Different propagation modes and/or different terminal layers seemed to determine HFA frequency. Since HFA(CCEP(N1)) and HFA induced during various brain functions share a similar broadband profile of the power spectrum, cortico-coritcal horizontal propagation seems to represent common mode of neural transmission for processing these functions.

  17. High Definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Induces Both Acute and Persistent Changes in Broadband Cortical Synchronization: a Simultaneous tDCS-EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Abhrajeet; Baxter, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop methods for simultaneously acquiring electrophysiological data during high definition transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) using high resolution electroencephalography (EEG). Previous studies have pointed to the after effects of tDCS on both motor and cognitive performance, and there appears to be potential for using tDCS in a variety of clinical applications. However, little is known about the real-time effects of tDCS on rhythmic cortical activity in humans due to the technical challenges of simultaneously obtaining electrophysiological data during ongoing stimulation. Furthermore, the mechanisms of action of tDCS in humans are not well understood. We have conducted a simultaneous tDCS-EEG study in a group of healthy human subjects. Significant acute and persistent changes in spontaneous neural activity and event related synchronization (ERS) were observed during and after the application of high definition tDCS over the left sensorimotor cortex. Both anodal and cathodal stimulation resulted in acute global changes in broadband cortical activity which were significantly different than the changes observed in response to sham stimulation. For the group of 8 subjects studied, broadband individual changes in spontaneous activity during stimulation were apparent both locally and globally. In addition, we found that high definition tDCS of the left sensorimotor cortex can induce significant ipsilateral and contralateral changes in event related desynchronization (ERD) and ERS during motor imagination following the end of the stimulation period. Overall, our results demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring high resolution EEG during high definition tDCS and provide evidence that tDCS in humans directly modulates rhythmic cortical synchronization during and after its administration. PMID:24956615

  18. Consequences for selected high-elevation butterflies and moths from the spread of Pinus mugo into the alpine zone in the High Sudetes Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Šipoš, Jan; Kindlmann, Pavel; Kuras, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Due to changes in the global climate, isolated alpine sites have become one of the most vulnerable habitats worldwide. The indigenous fauna in these habitats is threatened by an invasive species, dwarf pine (Pinus mugo), which is highly competitive and could be important in determining the composition of the invertebrate community. In this study, the association of species richness and abundance of butterflies with the extent of Pinus mugo cover at individual alpine sites was determined. Butterflies at alpine sites in the High Sudetes Mountains (Mts.) were sampled using Moericke yellow water traps. The results of a Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) indicated that at a local scale the area of alpine habitats is the main limiting factor for native species of alpine butterflies. Butterfly assemblages are associated with distance to the tree-line with the optimum situated in the lower forest zone. In addition the CCA revealed that biotic factors (i.e. Pinus mugo and alpine tundra vegetation) accounted for a significant amount of the variability in species data. Regionally, the CCA identified that the species composition of butterflies and moths is associated with presence and origin of Pinus mugo. Our study provides evidence that the structure of the Lepidopteran fauna that formed during the postglacial period and also the present composition of species assemblages is associated with the presence of Pinus mugo. With global warming, Pinus mugo has the potential to spread further into alpine areas and negatively affect the local species communities. PMID:27330857

  19. Consequences for selected high-elevation butterflies and moths from the spread of Pinus mugo into the alpine zone in the High Sudetes Mountains.

    PubMed

    Bílá, Karolína; Šipoš, Jan; Kindlmann, Pavel; Kuras, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Due to changes in the global climate, isolated alpine sites have become one of the most vulnerable habitats worldwide. The indigenous fauna in these habitats is threatened by an invasive species, dwarf pine (Pinus mugo), which is highly competitive and could be important in determining the composition of the invertebrate community. In this study, the association of species richness and abundance of butterflies with the extent of Pinus mugo cover at individual alpine sites was determined. Butterflies at alpine sites in the High Sudetes Mountains (Mts.) were sampled using Moericke yellow water traps. The results of a Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) indicated that at a local scale the area of alpine habitats is the main limiting factor for native species of alpine butterflies. Butterfly assemblages are associated with distance to the tree-line with the optimum situated in the lower forest zone. In addition the CCA revealed that biotic factors (i.e. Pinus mugo and alpine tundra vegetation) accounted for a significant amount of the variability in species data. Regionally, the CCA identified that the species composition of butterflies and moths is associated with presence and origin of Pinus mugo. Our study provides evidence that the structure of the Lepidopteran fauna that formed during the postglacial period and also the present composition of species assemblages is associated with the presence of Pinus mugo. With global warming, Pinus mugo has the potential to spread further into alpine areas and negatively affect the local species communities.

  20. Cortical Modulation of Motor Control Biofeedback among the Elderly with High Fall Risk during a Posture Perturbation Task with Augmented Reality

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Ju; Yang, Tsui-Fen; Yang, Sai-Wei; Chern, Jen-Suh

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral cortex provides sensorimotor integration and coordination during motor control of daily functional activities. Power spectrum density based on electroencephalography (EEG) has been employed as an approach that allows an investigation of the spatial–temporal characteristics of neuromuscular modulation; however, the biofeedback mechanism associated with cortical activation during motor control remains unclear among elderly individuals. Thirty one community-dwelling elderly participants were divided into low fall-risk potential (LF) and high fall-risk potential (HF) groups based upon the results obtained from a receiver operating characteristic analysis of the ellipse area of the center of pressure. Electroencephalography (EEG) was performed while the participants stood on a 6-degree-of-freedom Stewart platform, which generated continuous perturbations and done either with or without the virtual reality scene. The present study showed that when there was visual stimulation and poor somatosensory coordination, a higher level of cortical response was activated in order to keep postural balance. The elderly participants in the LF group demonstrated a significant and strong correlation between postural-related cortical regions; however, the elderly individuals in the HF group did not show such a relationship. Moreover, we were able to clarify the roles of various brainwave bands functioning in motor control. Specifically, the gamma and beta bands in the parietal–occipital region facilitate the high-level cortical modulation and sensorimotor integration, whereas the theta band in the frontal–central region is responsible for mediating error detection during perceptual motor tasks. Finally, the alpha band is associated with processing visual challenges in the occipital lobe.With a variety of motor control demands, increment in brainwave band coordination is required to maintain postural stability. These investigations shed light on the cortical modulation

  1. Cortical Modulation of Motor Control Biofeedback among the Elderly with High Fall Risk during a Posture Perturbation Task with Augmented Reality.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Ju; Yang, Tsui-Fen; Yang, Sai-Wei; Chern, Jen-Suh

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral cortex provides sensorimotor integration and coordination during motor control of daily functional activities. Power spectrum density based on electroencephalography (EEG) has been employed as an approach that allows an investigation of the spatial-temporal characteristics of neuromuscular modulation; however, the biofeedback mechanism associated with cortical activation during motor control remains unclear among elderly individuals. Thirty one community-dwelling elderly participants were divided into low fall-risk potential (LF) and high fall-risk potential (HF) groups based upon the results obtained from a receiver operating characteristic analysis of the ellipse area of the center of pressure. Electroencephalography (EEG) was performed while the participants stood on a 6-degree-of-freedom Stewart platform, which generated continuous perturbations and done either with or without the virtual reality scene. The present study showed that when there was visual stimulation and poor somatosensory coordination, a higher level of cortical response was activated in order to keep postural balance. The elderly participants in the LF group demonstrated a significant and strong correlation between postural-related cortical regions; however, the elderly individuals in the HF group did not show such a relationship. Moreover, we were able to clarify the roles of various brainwave bands functioning in motor control. Specifically, the gamma and beta bands in the parietal-occipital region facilitate the high-level cortical modulation and sensorimotor integration, whereas the theta band in the frontal-central region is responsible for mediating error detection during perceptual motor tasks. Finally, the alpha band is associated with processing visual challenges in the occipital lobe.With a variety of motor control demands, increment in brainwave band coordination is required to maintain postural stability. These investigations shed light on the cortical modulation of

  2. A characterization of intermediate-scale spread F structure from four years of high-resolution C/NOFS satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rino, Charles L.; Carrano, Charles S.; Groves, Keith M.; Roddy, Patrick A.

    2016-06-01

    Power law spectra have been invoked to interpret equatorial scintillation data for decades. Published analyses of intensity and phase scintillation data typically report power law spectra of the form q-p with 2.4 < p < 2.6. However, in situ rocket and satellite measurements of equatorial spread F have shown evidence of spectra with two power law components. Strong scatter simulations and recent theoretical results have shown that two-component power law spectra can reconcile simultaneous equatorial scintillation observations from VHF to S-Band. The Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite Planar Langmuir Probe generated a multiyear high-resolution sampling of equatorial spread F, but published analyses to date have reported only single-component power laws over scales from tens of kilometers to 70 m. This paper summarizes the analysis of high-resolution C/NOFS data collected over the four year period 2011 to 2014. Following an earlier investigation of several months of C/NOFS data by the authors of this paper, the extended data set revealed a pattern of occurrence of two-component spectra in the most highly disturbed data sets. The results confirm a known inverse correlation between turbulent strength and spectral index. The new results are interpreted as an equatorial spread F life cycle pattern with two-component spectra in the early development phase giving way to single-component spectra in the decay phase.

  3. Rapid conversion of an oceanic spreading center to a subduction zone inferred from high-precision geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Timothy E.; Encarnación, John; Buchwaldt, Robert; Fernandez, Dan; Mattinson, James; Rasoazanamparany, Christine; Luetkemeyer, P. Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    Where and how subduction zones initiate is a fundamental tectonic problem, yet there are few well-constrained geologic tests that address the tectonic settings and dynamics of the process. Numerical modeling has shown that oceanic spreading centers are some of the weakest parts of the plate tectonic system [Gurnis M, Hall C, Lavier L (2004) Geochem Geophys Geosys 5:Q07001], but previous studies have not favored them for subduction initiation because of the positive buoyancy of young lithosphere. Instead, other weak zones, such as fracture zones, have been invoked. Because these models differ in terms of the ages of crust that are juxtaposed at the site of subduction initiation, they can be tested by dating the protoliths of metamorphosed oceanic crust that is formed by underthrusting at the beginning of subduction and comparing that age with the age of the overlying lithosphere and the timing of subduction initiation itself. In the western Philippines, we find that oceanic crust was less than ˜1 My old when it was underthrust and metamorphosed at the onset of subduction in Palawan, Philippines, implying forced subduction initiation at a spreading center. This result shows that young and positively buoyant, but weak, lithosphere was the preferred site for subduction nucleation despite the proximity of other potential weak zones with older, denser lithosphere and that plate motion rapidly changed from divergence to convergence.

  4. Rapid conversion of an oceanic spreading center to a subduction zone inferred from high-precision geochronology.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Timothy E; Encarnación, John; Buchwaldt, Robert; Fernandez, Dan; Mattinson, James; Rasoazanamparany, Christine; Luetkemeyer, P Benjamin

    2016-11-22

    Where and how subduction zones initiate is a fundamental tectonic problem, yet there are few well-constrained geologic tests that address the tectonic settings and dynamics of the process. Numerical modeling has shown that oceanic spreading centers are some of the weakest parts of the plate tectonic system [Gurnis M, Hall C, Lavier L (2004) Geochem Geophys Geosys 5:Q07001], but previous studies have not favored them for subduction initiation because of the positive buoyancy of young lithosphere. Instead, other weak zones, such as fracture zones, have been invoked. Because these models differ in terms of the ages of crust that are juxtaposed at the site of subduction initiation, they can be tested by dating the protoliths of metamorphosed oceanic crust that is formed by underthrusting at the beginning of subduction and comparing that age with the age of the overlying lithosphere and the timing of subduction initiation itself. In the western Philippines, we find that oceanic crust was less than ∼1 My old when it was underthrust and metamorphosed at the onset of subduction in Palawan, Philippines, implying forced subduction initiation at a spreading center. This result shows that young and positively buoyant, but weak, lithosphere was the preferred site for subduction nucleation despite the proximity of other potential weak zones with older, denser lithosphere and that plate motion rapidly changed from divergence to convergence.

  5. High-affinity sites form an interaction network to facilitate spreading of the MSL complex across the X chromosome in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Fidel; Lingg, Thomas; Toscano, Sarah; Lam, Kin Chung; Georgiev, Plamen; Chung, Ho-Ryun; Lajoie, Bryan; de Wit, Elzo; Zhan, Ye; de Laat, Wouter; Dekker, Job; Manke, Thomas; Akhtar, Asifa

    2016-01-01

    Summary Dosage compensation mechanisms provide a paradigm to study the contribution of chromosomal conformation towards targeting and spreading of epigenetic regulators over a specific chromosome. By using Hi-C and 4C analyses we show that high-affinity sites (HAS), landing platforms of the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex, are enriched around topologically associating domain (TAD) boundaries on the X chromosome and harbor more long-range contacts in a sex-independent manner. Ectopically expressed roX1 and roX2 RNA target HAS on the X chromosome in trans and, via spatial proximity, induce spreading of the MSL complex in cis, leading to increased expression of neighboring autosomal genes. We show that the MSL complex regulates nucleosome positioning at HAS, thus acting locally rather than influencing the overall chromosomal architecture. We propose that sex-independent three-dimensional conformation of the X chromosome poises it for exploitation by the MSL complex, thereby facilitating spreading in males. PMID:26431028

  6. The application of GIS and RS for epidemics: a case study of the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza in China in 2004-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shaobo; Lan, Guiwen; Zhu, Haiguo; Wen, Renqiang; Zhao, Qiansheng; Huang, Quanyi

    2008-12-01

    Because of their inherent advantages, Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) are extremely useful for dealing with geographically referenced information. In the study of epidemics, most data are geographically referenced, which makes GIS and RS the perfect even necessary tools for processing, analysis, representation of epidemic data. Comprehensively considering the data requirements in the study of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) coupled with the quality of the existing remotely sensed data in terms of the resolution of space, time and spectra, the data sensed by MODIS are chosen and the relevant methods and procedures of data processing from RS and GIS for some environmental factors are proposed. Through using spatial analysis functions and Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis (ESDA) of GIS, some results of relationship between HPAI occurrences and these potential factors are presented. The role played by bird migration is also preliminarily illustrated with some operations such as visualization, overlapping etc. provided by GIS. Through the work of this paper, we conclude: Firstly, the migration of birds causes the spread of HPAI all over the country in 2004-2005. Secondly, the migration of birds is the reason why the spread of HPAI is perturbed. That is, for some classic communicable diseases, their spread exhibits obvious spatial diffusion process. However, the spread of HPAI breaks this general rule. We think leap diffusion and time lag are the probable reasons for this kind of phenomena. Potential distribution of HPAI viruses (corresponding to the distribution of flyways and putative risk sources) is not completely consistent with the occurrences of HPAI. For this phenomenon, we think, in addition to the flyways of birds, all kinds of geographical, climatic factors also have important effect on the occurrences of HPAI. Through the case study of HPAI, we can see that GIS and RS can play very important roles in the study of epidemics.

  7. Spreading of Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulard, Christophe

    2004-11-01

    A cyanobiphenyl liquid crystal drop in the nematic phase should spread on a silicon wafer. In fact, the drop hardly spreads due to the strong antagonist anchoring on the substrate and at the free surface. In a humidity controlled box at high RH and on a hydrophilic substrate, the friction is considerably reduced and the drop spreads easily. A well defined instability develops at the contact line, with two characteristic wavelengths, associated with a modulation of the drop thickness. A theoretical analysis, made by M. Ben Amar and L. Cummings, allows to understand one of the wavelength by an elastic approach and gives a wavelength proportionnal to the local drop's thickness.

  8. Cortical microtubule rearrangements and cell wall patterning

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Plant cortical microtubules, which form a highly ordered array beneath the plasma membrane, play essential roles in determining cell shape and function by directing the arrangement of cellulosic and non-cellulosic compounds on the cell surface. Interphase transverse arrays of cortical microtubules self-organize through their dynamic instability and inter-microtubule interactions, and by branch-form microtubule nucleation and severing. Recent studies revealed that distinct spatial signals including ROP GTPase, cellular geometry, and mechanical stress regulate the behavior of cortical microtubules at the subcellular and supercellular levels, giving rise to dramatic rearrangements in the cortical microtubule array in response to internal and external cues. Increasing evidence indicates that negative regulators of microtubules also contribute to the rearrangement of the cortical microtubule array. In this review, I summarize recent insights into how the rearrangement of the cortical microtubule array leads to proper, flexible cell wall patterning. PMID:25904930

  9. Detection and quantification of regional cortical gray matter damage in multiple sclerosis utilizing gradient echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jie; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A; Luo, Jie; Lancia, Samantha; Hildebolt, Charles; Cross, Anne H

    2015-01-01

    Cortical gray matter (GM) damage is now widely recognized in multiple sclerosis (MS). The standard MRI does not reliably detect cortical GM lesions, although cortical volume loss can be measured. In this study, we demonstrate that the gradient echo MRI can reliably and quantitatively assess cortical GM damage in MS patients using standard clinical scanners. High resolution multi-gradient echo MRI was used for regional mapping of tissue-specific MRI signal transverse relaxation rate values (R2(*)) in 10 each relapsing-remitting, primary-progressive and secondary-progressive MS subjects. A voxel spread function method was used to correct artifacts induced by background field gradients. R2(*) values from healthy controls (HCs) of varying ages were obtained to establish baseline data and calculate ΔR2(*) values - age-adjusted differences between MS patients and HC. Thickness of cortical regions was also measured in all subjects. In cortical regions, ΔR2(*) values of MS patients were also adjusted for changes in cortical thickness. Symbol digit modalities (SDMT) and paced auditory serial addition (PASAT) neurocognitive tests, as well as Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg test results were also obtained on all MS subjects. We found that ΔR2(*) values were lower in multiple cortical GM and normal appearing white matter (NAWM) regions in MS compared with HC. ΔR2(*) values of global cortical GM and several specific cortical regions showed significant (p < 0.05) correlations with SDMT and PASAT scores, and showed better correlations than volumetric measures of the same regions. Neurological tests not focused on cognition (Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg tests) showed no correlation with cortical GM ΔR2(*) values. The technique presented here is robust and reproducible. It requires less than 10 min and can be implemented on any MRI scanner. Our results show that quantitative tissue-specific R2

  10. Effect of auroral substorms on the ionospheric range spread-F enhancements at high southern midlatitudes using real time vertical-sounding ionograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajkowicz, Lech A.

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive study has been undertaken on the effect of magnetic substorm onsets (as deduced from the auroral hourly electrojet AE-index) on the occurrence of high midlatitude (or sub-auroral latitude) ionospheric range spread-F (Sr). Unlike the previous reports real-time ionograms were used in this analysis thus eliminating ambiguities stemming from the correlating secondary evidence of spread-F with auroral substorms. The Australian southernmost ionosonde station Hobart (51.6°S geom.) proved to be uniquely suitable for the task as being sufficiently close to the southern auroral zone. Sr was assigned in km to each hourly nighttime ionogram at two sounding frequencies: Sr1 (at 2 MHz) and Sr2 (at 6 MHz) for four months in 2002: January and June (representing southern summer and winter solstices), and March and September (representing autumn and vernal equinoxes). It is evident that the southern winter solstitial period (June) is associated with high endemic midlatitude spread-F activity. All other seasons are closely linked with temporal sequences of enhanced spread-F activity following substorm onsets. For the first time it was possible not only find a simultaneous occurrence pattern of these diverse phenomena but to deduce numerical characteristics of the response of midlatitude ionosphere to the global auroral stimulus. Excellent case events, hitherto unpublished, are shown illustrating the presence of the AE peaks (in nT) being ahead of Sr peaks (in km) by a time shift ∆t (in h). Sr1 magnitude showed a significant correlation with the magnitudes of the preceding AE with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.51 (probability of the occurrence by chance less than 0.01). Sr2 peaks were more sensitive to auroral disturbances but were not correlated with the AE magnitude variations. The time shift (∆t) was on average 4 h with a standard deviation of 3 h. The general pattern in the occurrence of magnetic substorms and spread-F is very similar. A number of

  11. Invasion of Seawater-Derived Fluids at Very High Temperatures in the Oman Ophiolite - a Key for Cooling the Deep Crust at Fast-Spreading Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, J.; Mueller, T.; Linsler, S.; Schuth, S.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C. D.; McCaig, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Prominent conceptual models for the formation of the deep, fast-spread crust are the "gabbro-glacier" model, where the lower crust is formed in the axial melt lens, and the "sheeted sill" model, where the lower gabbros are generated by the intrusion of sills of gabbroic mushes. A requirement for the latter model is a substantial hydrothermal cooling of the oceanic crust in the depth, and as long as the "Rosetta stone" for the mechanism of this deep cooling is not found, the "sheeted sill" model and derivatives cannot be accepted as reliable option how the deep oceanic fast-spread crust is formed. In recent field campaigns for establishing a geochemical and petrological profile through typical fast-spreading oceanic crust in the Wadi Gideah (Wadi Tayin massif, Oman ophiolite), we discovered several, often more than 100 m wide fault zones, cutting a coherent series of layered gabbro at many places. These zones are characterized by pervasive alteration, mainly in greenschist and sub-greenschist facies. Isotope geochemical studies of these zones imply that these zones can be interpreted as pathways for channeled hydrothermal flux, in accord with observations of Coogan et al. (2006). In most of the fault zones, we observed the occurrence of varitextured hornblende gabbro, alternating with zones of former layered gabbros showing intense overgrowth of high- temperature amphibole, and sometimes with flasered amphibolites. The petrologic record implies fluid flux in the center of this zones at very high temperatures (≤ 1000°C), enabling even the production of hornblende gabbros by hydrous partial melting of layered gabbro, shielded by zones formed at high-temperature conditions (formation of high-T amphiboles) and at low-temperature conditions (greenschist facies rocks). First thermal modeling based on the petrological record of these zones are in progress. Coogan LA, Howard KA, Gillis KM, Bickle MJ, Chapman H, Boyce AJ, Jenkin GRT, Wilson RN (2006) Am. J. Sci. 306: 389-427

  12. Trabecular and Cortical Bone of Growing C3H Mice Is Highly Responsive to the Removal of Weightbearing

    PubMed Central

    Judex, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Genetic make-up strongly influences the skeleton’s susceptibility to the loss of weight bearing with some inbred mouse strains experiencing great amounts of bone loss while others lose bone at much smaller rates. At young adulthood, female inbred C3H/HeJ (C3H) mice are largely resistant to catabolic pressure induced by unloading. Here, we tested whether the depressed responsivity to unloading is inherent to the C3H genetic make-up or whether a younger age facilitates a robust skeletal response to unloading. Nine-week-old, skeletally immature, female C3H mice were subjected to 3wk of hindlimb unloading (HLU, n = 12) or served as normal baseline controls (BC, n = 10) or age-matched controls (AC, n = 12). In all mice, cortical and trabecular architecture of the femur, as well as levels of bone formation and resorption, were assessed with μCT, histomorphometry, and histology. Changes in bone marrow progenitor cell populations were determined with flow cytometry. Following 21d of unloading, HLU mice had 52% less trabecular bone in the distal femur than normal age-matched controls. Reflecting a loss of trabecular tissue compared to baseline controls, trabecular bone formation rates (BFR/BS) in HLU mice were 40% lower than in age-matched controls. Surfaces undergoing osteoclastic resorption were not significantly different between groups. In the mid-diaphysis, HLU inhibited cortical bone growth leading to 14% less bone area compared to age-matched controls. Compared to AC, BFR/BS of HLU mice were 53% lower at the endo-cortical surface and 49% lower at the periosteal surface of the mid-diaphysis. The enriched osteoprogenitor cell population (OPC) comprised 2% of the bone marrow stem cells in HLU mice, significantly different from 3% OPC in the AC group. These data show that bone tissue in actively growing C3H mice is lost rapidly, or fails to grow, during the removal of functional weight bearing—in contrast to the insignificant response previously demonstrated in

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of trabecular and cortical bone in mice: comparison of high resolution in vivo and ex vivo MR images with corresponding histology.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael H; Sharp, Jonathan C; Latta, Peter; Sramek, Milos; Hassard, H Thomas; Orr, F William

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of bone morphometry and remodeling have been shown to reflect bone strength and can be used to diagnose degenerative bone disease. In this study, in vivo and ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to assess trabecular and cortical bone properties have been compared to each other and to histology as a novel means for the quantification of bone. Femurs of C57Bl/6 mice were examined both in vivo and ex vivo on an 11.7 T MRI scanner, followed by histologic processing and morphometry. A thresholding analysis technique was applied to the MRI images to generate contour lines and to delineate the boundaries between bone and marrow. Using MRI, an optimal correlation with histology was obtained with an in vivo longitudinal sectioned short echo time gradient-echo versus an in vivo long echo time spin-echo sequence or an ex vivo pulse sequence. Gradient-echo images were acquired with a maximum in-plane resolution of 35 microm. Our results demonstrated that in both the in vivo and ex vivo data sets, the percent area of marrow increases and percent area of trabecular bone and cortical bone thickness decreases moving from the epiphyseal growth plate to the diaphysis. These changes, observed with MRI, correlate with the histological data. Investigations using in vivo MRI gradient-echo sequences consistently gave the best correlation with histology. Our quantitative evaluation using both ex vivo and in vivo MRI was found to be an effective means to visualize non-invasively the normal variation in trabecular and cortical bone as compared to a histological "gold standard" The experiments validated in vivo MRI as a potential high resolution technique for investigating both soft tissue, such as marrow, and bone without radiation exposure.

  14. Ketamine Dysregulates the Amplitude and Connectivity of High-Frequency Oscillations in Cortical-Subcortical Networks in Humans: Evidence From Resting-State Magnetoencephalography-Recordings.

    PubMed

    Rivolta, Davide; Heidegger, Tonio; Scheller, Bertram; Sauer, Andreas; Schaum, Michael; Birkner, Katharina; Singer, Wolf; Wibral, Michael; Uhlhaas, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Hypofunctioning of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) has been prominently implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (ScZ). The current study tested the effects of ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic and NMDA-R antagonist, on resting-state activity recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) in healthy volunteers. In a single-blind cross-over design, each participant (n = 12) received, on 2 different sessions, a subanesthetic dose of S-ketamine (0.006 mg/Kg) and saline injection. MEG-data were analyzed at sensor- and source-level in the beta (13-30 Hz) and gamma (30-90 Hz) frequency ranges. In addition, connectivity analysis at source-level was performed using transfer entropy (TE). Ketamine increased gamma-power while beta-band activity was decreased. Specifically, elevated 30-90 Hz activity was pronounced in subcortical (thalamus and hippocampus) and cortical (frontal and temporal cortex) regions, whilst reductions in beta-band power were localized to the precuneus, cerebellum, anterior cingulate, temporal and visual cortex. TE analysis demonstrated increased information transfer in a thalamo-cortical network after ketamine administration. The findings are consistent with the pronounced dysregulation of high-frequency oscillations following the inhibition of NMDA-R in animal models of ScZ as well as with evidence from electroencephalogram-data in ScZ-patients and increased functional connectivity during early illness stages. Moreover, our data highlight the potential contribution of thalamo-cortical connectivity patterns towards ketamine-induced neuronal dysregulation, which may be relevant for the understanding of ScZ as a disorder of disinhibition of neural circuits.

  15. Persistent patterns of interconnection in time-varying cortical networks estimated from high-resolution EEG recordings in humans during a simple motor act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVico Fallani, F.; Latora, V.; Astolfi, L.; Cincotti, F.; Mattia, D.; Marciani, M. G.; Salinari, S.; Colosimo, A.; Babiloni, F.

    2008-06-01

    In this work, a novel approach based on the estimate of time-varying graph indices is proposed in order to capture the basic schemes of communication within the functional brain networks during a simple motor act. To achieve this, we used a cascade of computational tools able to estimate first the electrical activity of the cortical surface by using high-resolution EEG techniques. From the cortical signals of different regions of interests we estimated the time-varying functional connectivity patterns by means of the adaptive partial directed coherence. The time-varying connectivity estimation returns a series of networks evolving during the examined task which can be summarized and interpreted with the aid of mathematical indices based on graph theory. The combination of all these methods is demonstrated on a set of high-resolution EEG data recorded from a group of healthy subjects performing a simple foot movement. It can be anticipated that the combination of the time-varying connectivity with the theoretical graph analysis is able to reveal precious information about the interconnections of the cerebral network as the significant persistence of mutual links and three-node motifs.

  16. Intrinsic mechanical behavior of femoral cortical bone in young, osteoporotic and bisphosphonate-treated individuals in low- and high energy fracture conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schmidt, Felix N.; Riedel, Christoph; Krause, Matthias; Vettorazzi, Eik; Acevedo, Claire; Hahn, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Tang, Simon; Amling, Michael; Ritchie, Robert O.; Busse, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are a common treatment to reduce osteoporotic fractures. This treatment induces osseous structural and compositional changes accompanied by positive effects on osteoblasts and osteocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that restored osseous cell behavior, which resembles characteristics of younger, healthy cortical bone, leads to improved bone quality. Microarchitecture and mechanical properties of young, treatment-naïve osteoporosis, and bisphosphonate-treated cases were investigated in femoral cortices. Tissue strength was measured using three-point bending. Collagen fibril-level deformation was assessed in non-traumatic and traumatic fracture states using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at low and high strain rates. The lower modulus, strength and fibril deformation measured at low strain rates reflects susceptibility for osteoporotic low-energy fragility fractures. Independent of age, disease and treatment status, SAXS revealed reduced fibril plasticity at high strain rates, characteristic of traumatic fracture. The significantly reduced mechanical integrity in osteoporosis may originate from porosity and alterations to the intra/extrafibrillar structure, while the fibril deformation under treatment indicates improved nano-scale characteristics. In conclusion, losses in strength and fibril deformation at low strain rates correlate with the occurrence of fragility fractures in osteoporosis, while improvements in structural and mechanical properties following bisphosphonate treatment may foster resistance to fracture during physiological strain rates. PMID:26879146

  17. Intrinsic mechanical behavior of femoral cortical bone in young, osteoporotic and bisphosphonate-treated individuals in low- and high energy fracture conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schmidt, Felix N.; Riedel, Christoph; Krause, Matthias; Vettorazzi, Eik; Acevedo, Claire; Hahn, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Tang, Simon; Amling, Michael; Ritchie, Robert O.; Busse, Björn

    2016-02-16

    Bisphosphonates are a common treatment to reduce osteoporotic fractures. This treatment induces osseous structural and compositional changes accompanied by positive effects on osteoblasts and osteocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that restored osseous cell behavior, which resembles characteristics of younger, healthy cortical bone, leads to improved bone quality. Microarchitecture and mechanical properties of young, treatment-naïve osteoporosis, and bisphosphonate-treated cases were investigated in femoral cortices. Tissue strength was measured using three-point bending. Collagen fibril-level deformation was assessed in non-traumatic and traumatic fracture states using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at low and high strain rates. The lower modulus, strength and fibril deformation measured at low strain rates reflects susceptibility for osteoporotic low-energy fragility fractures. Independent of age, disease and treatment status, SAXS revealed reduced fibril plasticity at high strain rates, characteristic of traumatic fracture. We find the significantly reduced mechanical integrity in osteoporosis may originate from porosity and alterations to the intra/extrafibrillar structure, while the fibril deformation under treatment indicates improved nano-scale characteristics. In conclusion, losses in strength and fibril deformation at low strain rates correlate with the occurrence of fragility fractures in osteoporosis, while improvements in structural and mechanical properties following bisphosphonate treatment may foster resistance to fracture during physiological strain rates.

  18. Intrinsic mechanical behavior of femoral cortical bone in young, osteoporotic and bisphosphonate-treated individuals in low- and high energy fracture conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Gludovatz, Bernd; ...

    2016-02-16

    Bisphosphonates are a common treatment to reduce osteoporotic fractures. This treatment induces osseous structural and compositional changes accompanied by positive effects on osteoblasts and osteocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that restored osseous cell behavior, which resembles characteristics of younger, healthy cortical bone, leads to improved bone quality. Microarchitecture and mechanical properties of young, treatment-naïve osteoporosis, and bisphosphonate-treated cases were investigated in femoral cortices. Tissue strength was measured using three-point bending. Collagen fibril-level deformation was assessed in non-traumatic and traumatic fracture states using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at low and high strain rates. The lower modulus, strength and fibrilmore » deformation measured at low strain rates reflects susceptibility for osteoporotic low-energy fragility fractures. Independent of age, disease and treatment status, SAXS revealed reduced fibril plasticity at high strain rates, characteristic of traumatic fracture. We find the significantly reduced mechanical integrity in osteoporosis may originate from porosity and alterations to the intra/extrafibrillar structure, while the fibril deformation under treatment indicates improved nano-scale characteristics. In conclusion, losses in strength and fibril deformation at low strain rates correlate with the occurrence of fragility fractures in osteoporosis, while improvements in structural and mechanical properties following bisphosphonate treatment may foster resistance to fracture during physiological strain rates.« less

  19. Intrinsic mechanical behavior of femoral cortical bone in young, osteoporotic and bisphosphonate-treated individuals in low- and high energy fracture conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schmidt, Felix N.; Riedel, Christoph; Krause, Matthias; Vettorazzi, Eik; Acevedo, Claire; Hahn, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Tang, Simon; Amling, Michael; Ritchie, Robert O.; Busse, Björn

    2016-02-01

    Bisphosphonates are a common treatment to reduce osteoporotic fractures. This treatment induces osseous structural and compositional changes accompanied by positive effects on osteoblasts and osteocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that restored osseous cell behavior, which resembles characteristics of younger, healthy cortical bone, leads to improved bone quality. Microarchitecture and mechanical properties of young, treatment-naïve osteoporosis, and bisphosphonate-treated cases were investigated in femoral cortices. Tissue strength was measured using three-point bending. Collagen fibril-level deformation was assessed in non-traumatic and traumatic fracture states using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at low and high strain rates. The lower modulus, strength and fibril deformation measured at low strain rates reflects susceptibility for osteoporotic low-energy fragility fractures. Independent of age, disease and treatment status, SAXS revealed reduced fibril plasticity at high strain rates, characteristic of traumatic fracture. The significantly reduced mechanical integrity in osteoporosis may originate from porosity and alterations to the intra/extrafibrillar structure, while the fibril deformation under treatment indicates improved nano-scale characteristics. In conclusion, losses in strength and fibril deformation at low strain rates correlate with the occurrence of fragility fractures in osteoporosis, while improvements in structural and mechanical properties following bisphosphonate treatment may foster resistance to fracture during physiological strain rates.

  20. Auditory processing in schizophrenia during the middle latency period (10–50 ms): high-density electrical mapping and source analysis reveal subcortical antecedents to early cortical deficits

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, Victoria M.; Molholm, Sophie; Ritter, Walter; Shpaner, Marina; Foxe, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Auditory sensory processing dysfunction is a core component of schizophrenia, with deficits occurring at 50 ms post-stimulus firmly established in the literature. Given that the initial afference of primary auditory cortex occurs at least 35 ms earlier, however, an essential question remains: how early in sensory processing do such deficits arise, and do they occur during initial cortical afference or earlier, which would implicate subcortical auditory dysfunction. Objective To establish the onset of the earliest deficits in auditory processing, we examined the time window demarcating the transition from subcortical to cortical processing: 10 ms to 50 ms during the so-called middle latency responses (MLRs). These remain to be adequately characterized in patients with schizophrenia. Methods We recorded auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) to simple tone-pips from 15 control subjects and 21 medicated patients with longer-term schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (illness duration 16 yr, standard deviation [SD] 9.4 yr), using high-density electrical scalp recordings. Between-group analyses assessed the integrity of the MLRs across groups. In addition, 2 source-localization models were conducted to address whether a distinction between subcortical and cortical generators of the MLRs can be made and whether evidence for differential dorsal and ventral pathway contributions to auditory processing deficits can be established. Results Robust auditory processing deficits were found for patients as early as 15 ms. Evidence for subcortical generators of the earliest MLR component (P20) was provided by source analysis. Topographical mapping and source localization also pointed to greater decrements in processing in the dorsal auditory pathway of patients, providing support for a theory of pervasive deficits that are organized along the lines of a dorsal–ventral distinction. Conclusions Auditory sensory dysfunction in schizophrenia begins extremely early in

  1. Disease spread models to estimate highly uncertain emerging diseases losses for animal agriculture insurance policies: an application to the U.S. farm-raised catfish industry.

    PubMed

    Zagmutt, Francisco J; Sempier, Stephen H; Hanson, Terril R

    2013-10-01

    Emerging diseases (ED) can have devastating effects on agriculture. Consequently, agricultural insurance for ED can develop if basic insurability criteria are met, including the capability to estimate the severity of ED outbreaks with associated uncertainty. The U.S. farm-raised channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) industry was used to evaluate the feasibility of using a disease spread simulation modeling framework to estimate the potential losses from new ED for agricultural insurance purposes. Two stochastic models were used to simulate the spread of ED between and within channel catfish ponds in Mississippi (MS) under high, medium, and low disease impact scenarios. The mean (95% prediction interval (PI)) proportion of ponds infected within disease-impacted farms was 7.6% (3.8%, 22.8%), 24.5% (3.8%, 72.0%), and 45.6% (4.0%, 92.3%), and the mean (95% PI) proportion of fish mortalities in ponds affected by the disease was 9.8% (1.4%, 26.7%), 49.2% (4.7%, 60.7%), and 88.3% (85.9%, 90.5%) for the low, medium, and high impact scenarios, respectively. The farm-level mortality losses from an ED were up to 40.3% of the total farm inventory and can be used for insurance premium rate development. Disease spread modeling provides a systematic way to organize the current knowledge on the ED perils and, ultimately, use this information to help develop actuarially sound agricultural insurance policies and premiums. However, the estimates obtained will include a large amount of uncertainty driven by the stochastic nature of disease outbreaks, by the uncertainty in the frequency of future ED occurrences, and by the often sparse data available from past outbreaks.

  2. High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus counteracts cortical expression of major histocompatibility complex genes in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Grieb, Benjamin; Engler, Gerhard; Sharott, Andrew; von Nicolai, Constantin; Streichert, Thomas; Papageorgiou, Ismini; Schulte, Alexander; Westphal, Manfred; Lamszus, Katrin; Engel, Andreas K; Moll, Christian K E; Hamel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS) is widely used as therapeutic intervention in patients suffering from advanced Parkinson's disease. STN-HFS exerts a powerful modulatory effect on cortical motor control by orthodromic modulation of basal ganglia outflow and via antidromic activation of corticofugal fibers. However, STN-HFS-induced changes of the sensorimotor cortex are hitherto unexplored. To address this question at a genomic level, we performed mRNA expression analyses using Affymetrix microarray gene chips and real-time RT-PCR in sensorimotor cortex of parkinsonian and control rats following STN-HFS. Experimental parkinsonism was induced in Brown Norway rats by bilateral nigral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine and was assessed histologically, behaviorally, and electrophysiologically. We applied prolonged (23h) unilateral STN-HFS in awake and freely moving animals, with the non-stimulated hemisphere serving as an internal control for gene expression analyses. Gene enrichment analysis revealed strongest regulation in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) related genes. STN-HFS led to a cortical downregulation of several MHC class II (RT1-Da, Db1, Ba, and Cd74) and MHC class I (RT1CE) encoding genes. The same set of genes showed increased expression levels in a comparison addressing the effect of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning. Hence, our data suggest the possible association of altered microglial activity and synaptic transmission by STN-HFS within the sensorimotor cortex of 6-hydroxydopamine treated rats.

  3. Test-retest variability of high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of cortical serotonin (5HT2A) receptors in older, healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Position emission tomography (PET) imaging using [18F]-setoperone to quantify cortical 5-HT2A receptors has the potential to inform pharmacological treatments for geriatric depression and dementia. Prior reports indicate a significant normal aging effect on serotonin 5HT2A receptor (5HT2AR) binding potential. The purpose of this study was to assess the test-retest variability of [18F]-setoperone PET with a high resolution scanner (HRRT) for measuring 5HT2AR availability in subjects greater than 60 years old. Methods: Six healthy subjects (age range = 65–78 years) completed two [18F]-setoperone PET scans on two separate occasions 5–16 weeks apart. Results The average difference in the binding potential (BPND) as measured on the two occasions in the frontal and temporal cortical regions ranged between 2 and 12%, with the lowest intraclass correlation coefficient in anterior cingulate regions. Conclusion We conclude that the test-retest variability of [18F]-setoperone PET in elderly subjects is comparable to that of [18F]-setoperone and other 5HT2AR radiotracers in younger subject samples. PMID:19580676

  4. Functional brain network organisation of children between 2 and 5 years derived from reconstructed activity of cortical sources of high-density EEG recordings.

    PubMed

    Bathelt, Joe; O'Reilly, Helen; Clayden, Jonathan D; Cross, J Helen; de Haan, Michelle

    2013-11-15

    There is increasing interest in applying connectivity analysis to brain measures (Rubinov and Sporns, 2010), but most studies have relied on fMRI, which substantially limits the participant groups and numbers that can be studied. High-density EEG recordings offer a comparatively inexpensive easy-to-use alternative, but require channel-level connectivity analysis which currently lacks a common analytic framework and is very limited in spatial resolution. To address this problem, we have developed a new technique for studies of network development that overcomes the spatial constraint and obtains functional networks of cortical areas by using EEG source reconstruction with age-matched average MRI templates (He et al., 1999). In contrast to previously reported channel-level analysis, this approach provides information about the cortical areas most likely to be involved in the network as well as their functional relationship (Babiloni et al., 2005; De Vico Fallani et al., 2007). In this study, we applied source reconstruction with age-matched templates to task-free high-density EEG recordings in typically-developing children between 2 and 6 years of age (O'Reilly, 2012). Graph theory was then applied to the association strengths of 68 cortical regions of interest based on the Desikan-Killiany atlas. We found linear increases of mean node degree, mean clustering coefficient and maximum betweenness centrality between 2 years and 6 years of age. Characteristic path length was negatively correlated with age. The correlation of the network measures with age indicates network development towards more closely integrated networks similar to reports from other imaging modalities (Fair et al., 2008; Power et al., 2010). We also applied eigenvalue decomposition to obtain functional modules (Clayden et al., 2013). Connection strength within these modules did not change with age, and the modules resembled hub networks previously described for MRI (Hagmann et al., 2010; Power et al

  5. Differential recruitment of high frequency wavelets (600 Hz) and primary cortical response (N20) in human median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Klostermann, F; Nolte, G; Losch, F; Curio, G

    1998-11-06

    Human median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials contain a burst of high-frequency (600 Hz) wavelets superimposed on the primary cortical response (N20). These presumably reflect highly-synchronized repetitive thalamic and/or intracortical population spike bursts and are diminished in non-REM sleep with N20 persisting. Here the burst/N20 relation in awake subjects was examined by using eight different intensities of electric median nerve stimuli. In all subjects the amplitude recruitment of both N20 and burst could be modeled adequately as a sigmoidal function of stimulus intensity. While 8/10 subjects showed a parallel recruitment, 2/10 subjects required significantly higher stimulation intensities for burst than for N20 recruitment. This dampened burst recruitment possibly reflects slight vigilance fluctuations in open-eyed awake subjects; a further increase of burst thresholds could explain the burst attenuation when entering shallow sleep.

  6. Correlates of spreading depolarization in human scalp electroencephalography

    PubMed Central

    Drenckhahn, Christoph; Winkler, Maren K. L.; Major, Sebastian; Scheel, Michael; Kang, Eun-Jeung; Pinczolits, Alexandra; Grozea, Cristian; Hartings, Jed A.; Woitzik, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    It has been known for decades that suppression of spontaneous scalp electroencephalographic activity occurs during ischaemia. Trend analysis for such suppression was found useful for intraoperative monitoring during carotid endarterectomy, or as a screening tool to detect delayed cerebral ischaemia after aneurismal subarachnoid haemorrhage. Nevertheless, pathogenesis of such suppression of activity has remained unclear. In five patients with aneurismal subarachnoid haemorrhage and four patients with decompressive hemicraniectomy after malignant hemispheric stroke due to middle cerebral artery occlusion, we here performed simultaneously full-band direct and alternating current electroencephalography at the scalp and direct and alternating current electrocorticography at the cortical surface. After subarachnoid haemorrhage, 275 slow potential changes, identifying spreading depolarizations, were recorded electrocorticographically over 694 h. Visual inspection of time-compressed scalp electroencephalography identified 193 (70.2%) slow potential changes [amplitude: −272 (−174, −375) µV (median quartiles), duration: 5.4 (4.0, 7.1) min, electrocorticography–electroencephalography delay: 1.8 (0.8, 3.5) min]. Intervals between successive spreading depolarizations were significantly shorter for depolarizations with electroencephalographically identified slow potential change [33.0 (27.0, 76.5) versus 53.0 (28.0, 130.5) min, P = 0.009]. Electroencephalography was thus more likely to display slow potential changes of clustered than isolated spreading depolarizations. In contrast to electrocorticography, no spread of electroencephalographic slow potential changes was seen, presumably due to superposition of volume-conducted electroencephalographic signals from widespread cortical generators. In two of five patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage, serial magnetic resonance imaging revealed large delayed infarcts at the recording site, while electrocorticography

  7. A Comparison of the Spread of the Folk High School Idea in Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, and the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Dean Gordon

    Comparing folk high schools in the United States and Scandinavia, this study investigated the philosophical and historical development of the movement, the relationship of folk high schools to other institutions in each nation studied, and conditions which have contributed to successful implementation of the idea. Data came from a literature…

  8. Cortical Depth Dependence of the Diffusion Anisotropy in the Human Cortical Gray Matter In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Trong-Kha; Guidon, Arnaud; Song, Allen W.

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is typically used to study white matter fiber pathways, but may also be valuable to assess the microstructure of cortical gray matter. Although cortical diffusion anisotropy has previously been observed in vivo, its cortical depth dependence has mostly been examined in high-resolution ex vivo studies. This study thus aims to investigate the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo on a clinical 3 T scanner. Specifically, a novel multishot constant-density spiral DTI technique with inherent correction of motion-induced phase errors was used to achieve a high spatial resolution (0.625×0.625×3 mm) and high spatial fidelity with no scan time penalty. The results show: (i) a diffusion anisotropy in the cortical gray matter, with a primarily radial diffusion orientation, as observed in previous ex vivo and in vivo studies, and (ii) a cortical depth dependence of the fractional anisotropy, with consistently higher values in the middle cortical lamina than in the deep and superficial cortical laminae, as observed in previous ex vivo studies. These results, which are consistent across subjects, demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for investigating the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo. PMID:24608869

  9. Cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortical gray matter in vivo.

    PubMed

    Truong, Trong-Kha; Guidon, Arnaud; Song, Allen W

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is typically used to study white matter fiber pathways, but may also be valuable to assess the microstructure of cortical gray matter. Although cortical diffusion anisotropy has previously been observed in vivo, its cortical depth dependence has mostly been examined in high-resolution ex vivo studies. This study thus aims to investigate the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo on a clinical 3 T scanner. Specifically, a novel multishot constant-density spiral DTI technique with inherent correction of motion-induced phase errors was used to achieve a high spatial resolution (0.625 × 0.625 × 3 mm) and high spatial fidelity with no scan time penalty. The results show: (i) a diffusion anisotropy in the cortical gray matter, with a primarily radial diffusion orientation, as observed in previous ex vivo and in vivo studies, and (ii) a cortical depth dependence of the fractional anisotropy, with consistently higher values in the middle cortical lamina than in the deep and superficial cortical laminae, as observed in previous ex vivo studies. These results, which are consistent across subjects, demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for investigating the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo.

  10. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease with a prion protein gene codon 180 mutation presenting asymmetric cortical high-intensity on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Amano, Yuko; Kimura, Noriyuki; Hanaoka, Takuya; Aso, Yasuhiro; Hirano, Teruyuki; Murai, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Katsuya; Matsubara, Etsuro

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a genetically confirmed case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with a prion protein gene codon 180 mutation presenting atypical magnetic resonance imaging findings. The present case exhibited an acute onset and lateralized neurologic signs, and progressive cognitive impairment. No myoclonus or periodic synchronous discharges on electroencephalography were observed. Diffusion-weighted images revealed areas of high signal intensity in the right frontal and temporal cortices at onset that extended to the whole cortex and basal ganglia of the right cerebral hemisphere at 3 months. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was initially negative for neuron specific enolase, tau protein, 14-3-3 protein, and abnormal prion protein, the CSF was positive for these brain-derived proteins at 3 months after onset.

  11. High frequency green function for aerodynamic noise in moving media. I - General theory. II - Noise from a spreading jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown how a high frequency analysis can be made for general problems involving flow-generated noise. In the parallel shear flow problem treated by Balsa (1976) and Goldstein (1982), the equation governing sound propagation in the moving medium could be transformed into a wave equation for a stationary medium with an inhomogeneous index of refraction. It is noted that the procedure of Avila and Keller (1963) was then used to construct a high frequency Green function. This procedure involves matching a solution valid in an inner region around the point source to an outer, ray-acoustics solution. This same procedure is used here to construct the Green function for a source in an arbitrary mean flow. In view of the fact that there is no restriction to parallel flow, the governing equations cannot be transformed into a wave equation; the analysis therefore proceeds from the equations of motion themselves.

  12. The Internet Alert Project: spreading the word about high-risk sexual activities advertised on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Kachur, R E

    2004-11-01

    The Internet is an emerging venue for facilitating high-risk sexual behavior; in particular, use of the Internet to seek out sex partners has been shown to be associated with high-risk sexual behaviors, such as an increase in number of sexual partners and an increase in anal sex, which can increase the risk of contracting and transmitting sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) including HIV. In an effort to assist health departments around the country, the Internet Alert Project was developed to provide Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) project officers and field staff with information about Internet-advertised, high-risk sexual activities in areas that do not have access to sexually explicit material on the Internet. An evaluation was conducted to determine the utility of the Internet Alert Project, its effect on knowledge and awareness of recipients and on public health efforts. Results of the evaluation show the alerts are a useful and valuable tool. The alerts have helped to increase knowledge about sexually-related uses of the Internet and have also driven public health efforts in the field. The results also indicate the need for project areas to access information found on the Internet in order to keep up with the ever-changing behaviors of at-risk populations.

  13. A Cross-Sectional Study of the Relationship between Cortical Bone and High-Impact Activity in Young Adult Males and Females

    PubMed Central

    Deere, K.; Sayers, A.; Rittweger, J.

    2012-01-01

    Context: The factors that govern skeletal responses to physical activity remain poorly understood. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether gender or fat mass influences relationships between cortical bone and physical activity, after partitioning accelerometer outputs into low (0.5–2.1 g), medium (2.1–4.2 g), or high (>4.2 g) impacts, where g represents gravitational force. Design/Setting: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis in participants from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Participants: We studied 675 adolescents (272 boys; mean age, 17.7 yr). Outcome Measures: We measured cortical bone parameters from peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans of the mid-tibia, adjusted for height, fat mass, and lean mass. Results: High-impact activity was positively associated with periosteal circumference (PC) in males but not females [coefficients (95% confidence intervals), 0.054 (0.007, 0.100) and 0.07 (−0.028, 0.041), respectively; showing sd change per doubling in activity]. There was also weak evidence that medium impacts were positively related to PC in males but not females (P = 0.03 for gender interaction). On stratifying by fat mass, the positive relationship between high-impact activity and PC was greatest in those with the highest fat mass [high impact vs. PC in males, 0.01 (−0.064, 0.085), 0.045 (−0.040, 0.131), 0.098 (0.012, 0.185), for lower, middle, and upper fat tertiles, respectively; high impact vs. PC in females, −0.041 (−0.101, 0.020), −0.028 (−0.077, 0.022), 0.082 (0.015, 0.148), P = 0.01 for fat mass interaction]. Similar findings were observed for strength parameters, cross-sectional moment of inertia, and strength-strain index. Conclusions: In late adolescence, associations between high-impact activity and PC are attenuated by female gender and low body fat, suggesting that the skeletal response to high-impact activity is particularly reduced in young women with low fat mass. PMID

  14. New Introductions, Spread of Existing Matrilines, and High Rates of Pyrethroid Resistance Result in Chronic Infestations of Bed Bugs (Cimex lectularius L.) in Lower-Income Housing

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Ronald W.; Moore, Julia E.; Vargo, Edward L.; Rose, Lucy; Raab, Julie; Culbreth, Madeline; Burzumato, Gracie; Koyee, Aurvan; McCarthy, Brittany; Raffaele, Jennifer; Schal, Coby; Vaidyanathan, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    Infestations of the common bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) have increased substantially in the United States in the past 10–15 years. The housing authority in Harrisonburg, Virginia, conducts heat-treatments after bed bugs are detected in a lower-income housing complex, by treating each infested unit at 60°C for 4–6 hours. However, a high frequency of recurrent infestations called into question the efficacy of this strategy. Genetic analysis using Bayesian clustering of polymorphic microsatellite loci from 123 bed bugs collected from 23 units from May 2012 to April 2013 in one building indicated that (a) 16/21 (73%) infestations were genetically similar, suggesting ineffective heat-treatments or reintroductions from within the building or from a common external source, followed by local spread of existing populations; and (b) up to 5 of the infestations represented new genotypes, indicating that 5 new populations were introduced into this building in one year, assuming they were not missed in earlier screens. There was little to no gene flow among the 8 genetic clusters identified in the building. Bed bugs in the U.S. often possess one or both point mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel, termed knockdown resistance (kdr), from valine to leucine (V419L) and leucine to isoleucine (L925I) that confer target-site resistance against pyrethroid insecticides. We found that 48/121 (40%) bed bugs were homozygous for both kdr mutations (L419/I925), and a further 59% possessed at least one of the kdr mutations. We conclude that ineffective heat treatments, new introductions, reintroductions and local spread, and an exceptionally high frequency of pyrethroid resistance are responsible for chronic infestations in lower-income housing. Because heat treatments fail to protect from reintroductions, and pesticide use has not decreased the frequency of infestations, preventing new introductions and early detection are the most effective strategies to avoid bed bug

  15. New Introductions, Spread of Existing Matrilines, and High Rates of Pyrethroid Resistance Result in Chronic Infestations of Bed Bugs (Cimex lectularius L.) in Lower-Income Housing.

    PubMed

    Raab, Ronald W; Moore, Julia E; Vargo, Edward L; Rose, Lucy; Raab, Julie; Culbreth, Madeline; Burzumato, Gracie; Koyee, Aurvan; McCarthy, Brittany; Raffaele, Jennifer; Schal, Coby; Vaidyanathan, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    Infestations of the common bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) have increased substantially in the United States in the past 10-15 years. The housing authority in Harrisonburg, Virginia, conducts heat-treatments after bed bugs are detected in a lower-income housing complex, by treating each infested unit at 60°C for 4-6 hours. However, a high frequency of recurrent infestations called into question the efficacy of this strategy. Genetic analysis using Bayesian clustering of polymorphic microsatellite loci from 123 bed bugs collected from 23 units from May 2012 to April 2013 in one building indicated that (a) 16/21 (73%) infestations were genetically similar, suggesting ineffective heat-treatments or reintroductions from within the building or from a common external source, followed by local spread of existing populations; and (b) up to 5 of the infestations represented new genotypes, indicating that 5 new populations were introduced into this building in one year, assuming they were not missed in earlier screens. There was little to no gene flow among the 8 genetic clusters identified in the building. Bed bugs in the U.S. often possess one or both point mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel, termed knockdown resistance (kdr), from valine to leucine (V419L) and leucine to isoleucine (L925I) that confer target-site resistance against pyrethroid insecticides. We found that 48/121 (40%) bed bugs were homozygous for both kdr mutations (L419/I925), and a further 59% possessed at least one of the kdr mutations. We conclude that ineffective heat treatments, new introductions, reintroductions and local spread, and an exceptionally high frequency of pyrethroid resistance are responsible for chronic infestations in lower-income housing. Because heat treatments fail to protect from reintroductions, and pesticide use has not decreased the frequency of infestations, preventing new introductions and early detection are the most effective strategies to avoid bed bug

  16. Learning to Characterize Submarine Lava Flow Morphology at Seamounts and Spreading Centers using High Definition Video and Photomosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fundis, A. T.; Sautter, L. R.; Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J. R.; Kerr-Riess, M.; Denny, A. R.; Elend, M.

    2010-12-01

    In August, 2010 the UW ENLIGHTEN ’10 expedition provided ~140 hours of seafloor HD video footage at Axial Seamount, the most magmatically robust submarine volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. During this expedition, direct imagery from an Insite Pacific HD camera mounted on the ROV Jason 2 was used to classify broad expanses of seafloor where high power (8 kw) and high bandwidth (10 Gb/s) fiber optic cable will be laid as part of the Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) component of the NSF funded Ocean Observatories Initiative. The cable will provide power and two-way, real-time communication to an array of >20 sensors deployed at the summit of the volcano and at active sites of hydrothermal venting to investigate how active processes within the volcano and at seafloor hot springs within the caldera are connected. In addition to HD imagery, over 10,000 overlapping photographs from a down-looking still camera were merged and co-registered to create high resolution photomosaics of two areas within Axial’s caldera. Thousands of additional images were taken to characterize the seafloor along proposed cable routes, allowing optimal routes to be planned well in advance of deployment. Lowest risk areas included those free of large collapse basins, steep flow fronts and fissures. Characterizing the modes of lava distribution across the seafloor is crucial to understanding the construction history of the upper oceanic crust at mid-ocean ridges. In part, reconstruction of crustal development and eruptive histories can be inferred from surface flow morphologies, which provide insights into lava emplacement dynamics and effusion rates of past eruptions. An online resource is under development that will educate students about lava flow morphologies through the use of HD video and still photographs. The objective of the LavaFlow exercise is to map out a proposed cable route across the Axial Seamount caldera. Students are first trained in appropriate terminology and background content

  17. High Level of Vector Competence of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus from Ten American Countries as a Crucial Factor in the Spread of Chikungunya Virus

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Rúa, Anubis; Zouache, Karima; Girod, Romain

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes a major public health problem. In 2004, CHIKV began an unprecedented global expansion and has been responsible for epidemics in Africa, Asia, islands in the Indian Ocean region, and surprisingly, in temperate regions, such as Europe. Intriguingly, no local transmission of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) had been reported in the Americas until recently, despite the presence of vectors and annually reported imported cases. Here, we assessed the vector competence of 35 American Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquito populations for three CHIKV genotypes. We also compared the number of viral particles of different CHIKV strains in mosquito saliva at two different times postinfection. Primarily, viral dissemination rates were high for all mosquito populations irrespective of the tested CHIKV isolate. In contrast, differences in transmission efficiency (TE) were underlined in populations of both species through the Americas, suggesting the role of salivary glands in selecting CHIKV for highly efficient transmission. Nonetheless, both mosquito species were capable of transmitting all three CHIKV genotypes, and TE reached alarming rates as high as 83.3% and 96.7% in A. aegypti and A. albopictus populations, respectively. A. albopictus better transmitted the epidemic mutant strain CHIKV_0621 of the East-Central-South African (ECSA) genotype than did A. aegypti, whereas the latter species was more capable of transmitting the original ECSA CHIKV_115 strain and also the Asian genotype CHIKV_NC. Therefore, a high risk of establishment and spread of CHIKV throughout the tropical, subtropical, and even temperate regions of the Americas is more real than ever. IMPORTANCE Until recently, the Americas had never reported chikungunya (CHIK) autochthonous transmission despite its global expansion beginning in 2004. Large regions of the continent are highly infested with Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes, and millions of dengue (DEN

  18. Development of cortical motor circuits between childhood and adulthood: A navigated TMS-HdEEG study.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Sara; Könönen, Mervi; Kallioniemi, Elisa; Lakka, Timo; Lintu, Niina; Lindi, Virpi; Ferreri, Florinda; Ponzo, David; Säisänen, Laura

    2017-02-20

    Motor functions improve during childhood and adolescence, but little is still known about the development of cortical motor circuits during early life. To elucidate the neurophysiological hallmarks of motor cortex development, we investigated the differences in motor cortical excitability and connectivity between healthy children, adolescents, and adults by means of navigated suprathreshold motor cortex transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) combined with high-density electroencephalography (EEG). We demonstrated that with development, the excitability of the motor system increases, the TMS-evoked EEG waveform increases in complexity, the magnitude of induced activation decreases, and signal spreading increases. Furthermore, the phase of the oscillatory response to TMS becomes less consistent with age. These changes parallel an improvement in manual dexterity and may reflect developmental changes in functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Potential spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 by wildfowl: dispersal ranges and rates determined from large-scale satellite telemetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaidet, Nicolas; Cappelle, Julien; Takekawa, John Y.; Prosser, Diann J.; Iverson, Samuel A.; Douglas, David C.; Perry, William M.; Mundkur, Taej; Newman, Scott H.

    2010-01-01

    1. Migratory birds are major candidates for long-distance dispersal of zoonotic pathogens. In recent years, wildfowl have been suspected of contributing to the rapid geographic spread of the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus. Experimental infection studies reveal that some wild ducks, geese and swans shed this virus asymptomatically and hence have the potential to spread it as they move. 2. We evaluate the dispersive potential of HPAI H5N1 viruses by wildfowl through an analysis of the movement range and movement rate of birds monitored by satellite telemetry in relation to the apparent asymptomatic infection duration (AID) measured in experimental studies. We analysed the first large-scale data set of wildfowl movements, including 228 birds from 19 species monitored by satellite telemetry in 2006–2009, over HPAI H5N1 affected regions of Asia, Europe and Africa. 3. Our results indicate that individual migratory wildfowl have the potential to disperse HPAI H5N1 over extensive distances, being able to perform movements of up to 2900 km within timeframes compatible with the duration of asymptomatic infection. 4. However, the likelihood of such virus dispersal over long distances by individual wildfowl is low: we estimate that for an individual migratory bird there are, on average, only 5–15 days per year when infection could result in the dispersal of HPAI H5N1 virus over 500 km. 5. Staging at stopover sites during migration is typically longer than the period of infection and viral shedding, preventing birds from dispersing a virus over several consecutive but interrupted long-distance movements. Intercontinental virus dispersion would therefore probably require relay transmission between a series of successively infected migratory birds. 6. Synthesis and applications. Our results provide a detailed quantitative assessment of the dispersive potential of HPAI H5N1 virus by selected migratory birds. Such dispersive potential rests on the

  20. Automatic Sulcal Curve Extraction on the Human Cortical Surface

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Ilwoo; Kim, Sun Hyung; Styner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of sulcal regions on the cortical surface is an important task to shape analysis and landmark detection. However, it is challenging especially in a complex, rough human cortex. In this paper, we focus on the extraction of sulcal curves from the human cortical surface. The previous sulcal extraction methods are time-consuming in practice and often have a difficulty to delineate curves correctly along the sulcal regions in the presence of significant noise. Our pipeline is summarized in two main steps: 1) We extract candidate sulcal points spread over the sulcal regions. We further reduce the size of the candidate points by applying a line simplification method. 2) Since the candidate points are potentially located away from the exact valley regions, we propose a novel approach to connect candidate sulcal points so as to obtain a set of complete curves (line segments). We have shown in experiment that our method achieves high computational efficiency, improved robustness to noise, and high reliability in a test-retest situation as compared to a well-known existing method. PMID:26028801

  1. High-resolution surveys along the hot spot-affected Gálapagos Spreading Center: 3. Black smoker discoveries and the implications for geological controls on hydrothermal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haymon, Rachel M.; White, Scott M.; Baker, Edward T.; Anderson, Peter G.; MacDonald, Ken C.; Resing, Joseph A.

    2008-12-01

    To explore effects of hot spots on mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems, we conducted nested sonar, hydrothermal plume, and near-bottom photographic surveys along the portion of the Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC) influenced by the Galápagos hot spot, from longitude 95°-89.5°W. We report the first active high-temperature black smokers to be found on the GSC, at longitudes 94°4.5'W and 91°56.2'-54.3'W; describe two areas of recently inactive smokers, at longitudes 91°23.4'-23.7'W and 91°13.8'W; and document an older inactive site, at longitude 90°33.4'W. All imaged vents issue either from dike-induced fissures along linear axial volcanic ridges and collapses or from a caldera. Magmatic control of hydrothermal systems also is revealed by spatial clustering of plumes within the topographically elevated middles of volcanic ridge segments with inferred centralized melt supply. In searched areas, smokers are more typical than diffuse flow vents, but total GSC plume incidence is half of that expected from the spreading rate. Why? Dike-fed fissures provide permeable pathways for efficient hydrothermal extraction of magmatic heat, but cones without calderas do not. Among many point-source cones surveyed, only the two with calderas had detectable plumes. Possibly, dominance of point-source over linear-source melt delivery on the GSC decreases plume incidence. Also, similar maturities of observed vents and their host lava flows indicate that hydrothermally active volcanic segments along the western GSC are contemporaneously in a waning phase of volcanic-hydrothermal activity. Perhaps ridge/hot spot interaction produces melt pulses that drive near-synchronous volcanic-hydrothermal activity on the volcanic segments spanning the hot spot. During active periods, hydrothermally active dike-fed fissures and calderas may be more abundant than we currently observe.

  2. Satellite Tracking on the Flyways of Brown-Headed Gulls and Their Potential Role in the Spread of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ratanakorn, Parntep; Wiratsudakul, Anuwat; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Eiamampai, Krairat; Farmer, Adrian H.; Webster, Robert G.; Chaichoune, Kridsada; Suwanpakdee, Sarin; Pothieng, Duangrat; Puthavathana, Pilaipan

    2012-01-01

    Brown-headed gulls (Larus brunnicephalus), winter visitors of Thailand, were tracked by satellite telemetry during 2008–2011 for investigating their roles in the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus spread. Eight gulls negative for influenza virus infection were marked with solar-powered satellite platform transmitters at Bang Poo study site in Samut Prakarn province, Thailand; their movements were monitored by the Argos satellite tracking system, and locations were mapped. Five gulls completed their migratory cycles, which spanned 7 countries (China, Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam) affected by the HPAI H5N1 virus. Gulls migrated from their breeding grounds in China to stay overwinter in Thailand and Cambodia; while Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, and Vietnam were the places of stopovers during migration. Gulls traveled an average distance of about 2400 km between Thailand and China and spent 1–2 weeks on migration. Although AI surveillance among gulls was conducted at the study site, no AI virus was isolated and no H5N1 viral genome or specific antibody was detected in the 75 gulls tested, but 6.6% of blood samples were positive for pan-influenza A antibody. No AI outbreaks were reported in areas along flyways of gulls in Thailand during the study period. Distance and duration of migration, tolerability of the captive gulls to survive the HPAI H5N1 virus challenge and days at viral shedding after the virus challenging suggested that the Brown-headed gull could be a potential species for AI spread, especially among Southeast Asian countries, the epicenter of H5N1 AI outbreak. PMID:23209623

  3. B7-H3 and B7x are highly expressed in human prostate cancer and associated with disease spread and poor outcome

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Xingxing; Thompson, R. Houston; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A.; Serio, Angel M.; Reuter, Victor E.; Eastham, James A.; Scardino, Peter T.; Sharma, Padmanee; Allison, James P.

    2007-01-01

    B7-H3 and B7x are recently discovered members of the B7-CD28 family thought to dampen peripheral immune responses via negative costimulation. We evaluated their potential expression in human prostate cancer using a large cohort of patients with 7 years of follow-up. We identified 823 patients with tissue available treated with radical prostatectomy between 1985 and 2003. Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue microarray sections using anti-B7-H3 and -B7x. The percentage and intensity of immunoreactivity by tumor cells were blindly evaluated by two urological pathologists, and outcome analyses were conducted. Both B7-H3 and B7x were highly expressed; 93% and 99% of tumors had aberrant expression, respectively. The median percentage of tumor cells staining positive was 80% for each molecule. Strong intensity for B7-H3 and B7x was noted in 212 (26%) and 120 (15%) patients, respectively. Patients with strong intensity for B7-H3 and B7x were significantly more likely to have disease spread at time of surgery (P < 0.001 and P = 0.005, respectively). Additionally, patients with strong intensity for B7-H3 and B7x were at significantly increased risk of clinical cancer recurrence (P < 0.001 and P = 0.005) and cancer-specific death (P = 0.004 and P = 0.04, respectively). To our knowledge, we present the largest investigation of B7 family molecules in a human malignancy and a previously undescribed evaluation of B7x in prostate cancer. B7-H3 and B7x are abundantly expressed in prostate cancer and associated with disease spread and poor outcome. Given the proposed immune-inhibitory mechanisms of B7-H3 and B7x, these molecules represent attractive targets for therapeutic manipulation in prostate cancer. PMID:18042703

  4. Satellite tracking on the flyways of brown-headed gulls and their potential role in the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus.

    PubMed

    Ratanakorn, Parntep; Wiratsudakul, Anuwat; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Eiamampai, Krairat; Farmer, Adrian H; Webster, Robert G; Chaichoune, Kridsada; Suwanpakdee, Sarin; Pothieng, Duangrat; Puthavathana, Pilaipan

    2012-01-01

    Brown-headed gulls (Larus brunnicephalus), winter visitors of Thailand, were tracked by satellite telemetry during 2008-2011 for investigating their roles in the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus spread. Eight gulls negative for influenza virus infection were marked with solar-powered satellite platform transmitters at Bang Poo study site in Samut Prakarn province, Thailand; their movements were monitored by the Argos satellite tracking system, and locations were mapped. Five gulls completed their migratory cycles, which spanned 7 countries (China, Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam) affected by the HPAI H5N1 virus. Gulls migrated from their breeding grounds in China to stay overwinter in Thailand and Cambodia; while Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, and Vietnam were the places of stopovers during migration. Gulls traveled an average distance of about 2400 km between Thailand and China and spent 1-2 weeks on migration. Although AI surveillance among gulls was conducted at the study site, no AI virus was isolated and no H5N1 viral genome or specific antibody was detected in the 75 gulls tested, but 6.6% of blood samples were positive for pan-influenza A antibody. No AI outbreaks were reported in areas along flyways of gulls in Thailand during the study period. Distance and duration of migration, tolerability of the captive gulls to survive the HPAI H5N1 virus challenge and days at viral shedding after the virus challenging suggested that the Brown-headed gull could be a potential species for AI spread, especially among Southeast Asian countries, the epicenter of H5N1 AI outbreak.

  5. The spreading of disorder.

    PubMed

    Keizer, Kees; Lindenberg, Siegwart; Steg, Linda

    2008-12-12

    Imagine that the neighborhood you are living in is covered with graffiti, litter, and unreturned shopping carts. Would this reality cause you to litter more, trespass, or even steal? A thesis known as the broken windows theory suggests that signs of disorderly and petty criminal behavior trigger more disorderly and petty criminal behavior, thus causing the behavior to spread. This may cause neighborhoods to decay and the quality of life of its inhabitants to deteriorate. For a city government, this may be a vital policy issue. But does disorder really spread in neighborhoods? So far there has not been strong empirical support, and it is not clear what constitutes disorder and what may make it spread. We generated hypotheses about the spread of disorder and tested them in six field experiments. We found that, when people observe that others violated a certain social norm or legitimate rule, they are more likely to violate other norms or rules, which causes disorder to spread.

  6. Flame spread across liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D.; Miller, Fletcher; Schiller, David; Sirignano, William

    1995-01-01

    Recent reviews of our understanding of flame spread across liquids show that there are many unresolved issues regarding the phenomenology and causal mechanisms affecting ignition susceptibility, flame spread characteristics, and flame spread rates. One area of discrepancy is the effect of buoyancy in both the uniform and pulsating spread regimes. The approach we have taken to resolving the importance of buoyancy for these flames is: (1) normal gravity (1g) and microgravity (micro g) experiments; and (2) numerical modeling at different gravitational levels. Of special interest to this work, as discussed at the previous workshop, is the determination of whether, and under what conditions, pulsating spread occurs in micro g. Microgravity offers a unique ability to modify and control the gas-phase flow pattern by utilizing a forced air flow over the pool surface.

  7. Movement, confusion, and orienting in frontal cortices.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Michael

    2011-10-20

    In this issue, two studies, by Ehrlich et al. and Hill et al., address the role of the frontal motor cortices in behavior of the rat and suggest a potential role for this structure in high-level control of diverse behaviors. Hill et al. show that motor cortical neurons predict whisker movements even without sensory feedback and that their activity reflects efferent control. Surprisingly, Ehrlich et al. report the participation of this same cortical region in the preparation and execution of orienting behaviors.

  8. High expression of podoplanin in squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue occurs predominantly in patients ≤40 years but does not correlate with tumour spread

    PubMed Central

    Lindell Jonsson, Eva; Boldrup, Linda; Califano, Luigi; Coates, Philip J; Tartaro, Gianpaolo; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Fåhraeus, Robin; Colella, Giuseppe; Dell'Aversana Orabona, Giovanni; Loljung, Lotta; Santagata, Mario; Rossiello, Riccardo; Wilms, Torben; Danielsson, Karin; Laurell, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Abstract More than 30% of patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the mobile tongue have clinically undetectable lymph node metastasis. Tumour cells can spread as single cells or collectively. A protein known to play a role in both processes is podoplanin, which is expressed in endothelial cells not only in lymph vessels but also in some aggressive tumours with high invasive and metastatic potential. Here we studied samples from 129 patients with primary SCC of the tongue for expression of podoplanin using immunohistochemistry. mRNA levels were analysed in another 27 cases of tongue SCC with adjacent clinically tumour‐free tongue tissue and 14 tongue samples from healthy donors. Higher levels of podoplanin were seen in tumours compared to both normal tongue and clinically normal tongue in the tumour vicinity. No association was found between levels of podoplanin, presence of lymph node metastases or other clinical factors. Patients aged 40 or less were more likely to express high levels of podoplanin protein compared to older patients (p = 0.027). We conclude that levels of podoplanin in primary tongue SCCs are not associated with lymph node metastases. However, tongue SCCs arising in young patients (≤40 years of age) are more likely to express high levels of podoplanin than tongue SCCs that arise in the more elderly. The data suggest that podoplanin has a distinctive role in young patients, who are known to have a poor prognosis: these patients may, therefore, benefit from podoplanin inhibitory therapies. PMID:27499910

  9. High expression of podoplanin in squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue occurs predominantly in patients ≤40 years but does not correlate with tumour spread.

    PubMed

    Sgaramella, Nicola; Lindell Jonsson, Eva; Boldrup, Linda; Califano, Luigi; Coates, Philip J; Tartaro, Gianpaolo; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Fåhraeus, Robin; Colella, Giuseppe; Dell'Aversana Orabona, Giovanni; Loljung, Lotta; Santagata, Mario; Rossiello, Riccardo; Wilms, Torben; Danielsson, Karin; Laurell, Göran; Nylander, Karin

    2016-01-01

    More than 30% of patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the mobile tongue have clinically undetectable lymph node metastasis. Tumour cells can spread as single cells or collectively. A protein known to play a role in both processes is podoplanin, which is expressed in endothelial cells not only in lymph vessels but also in some aggressive tumours with high invasive and metastatic potential. Here we studied samples from 129 patients with primary SCC of the tongue for expression of podoplanin using immunohistochemistry. mRNA levels were analysed in another 27 cases of tongue SCC with adjacent clinically tumour-free tongue tissue and 14 tongue samples from healthy donors. Higher levels of podoplanin were seen in tumours compared to both normal tongue and clinically normal tongue in the tumour vicinity. No association was found between levels of podoplanin, presence of lymph node metastases or other clinical factors. Patients aged 40 or less were more likely to express high levels of podoplanin protein compared to older patients (p = 0.027). We conclude that levels of podoplanin in primary tongue SCCs are not associated with lymph node metastases. However, tongue SCCs arising in young patients (≤40 years of age) are more likely to express high levels of podoplanin than tongue SCCs that arise in the more elderly. The data suggest that podoplanin has a distinctive role in young patients, who are known to have a poor prognosis: these patients may, therefore, benefit from podoplanin inhibitory therapies.

  10. Evolution of cortical neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Mannan, Omar; Cheung, Amanda F P; Molnár, Zoltán

    2008-03-18

    The neurons of the mammalian neocortex are organised into six layers. By contrast, the reptilian and avian dorsal cortices only have three layers which are thought to be equivalent to layers I, V and VI of mammals. Increased repertoire of mammalian higher cognitive functions is likely a result of an expanded cortical surface area. The majority of cortical cell proliferation in mammals occurs in the ventricular zone (VZ) and subventricular zone (SVZ), with a small number of scattered divisions outside the germinal zone. Comparative developmental studies suggest that the appearance of SVZ coincides with the laminar expansion of the cortex to six layers, as well as the tangential expansion of the cortical sheet seen within mammals. In spite of great variation and further compartmentalisation in the mitotic compartments, the number of neurons in an arbitrary cortical column appears to be remarkably constant within mammals. The current challenge is to understand how the emergence and elaboration of the SVZ has contributed to increased cortical cell diversity, tangential expansion and gyrus formation of the mammalian neocortex. This review discusses neurogenic processes that are believed to underlie these major changes in cortical dimensions in vertebrates.

  11. Flame Spread Across Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D.; Miller, Fletcher J.; Sirignano, William A.; Schiller, David

    1997-01-01

    The principal goal of our recent research on flame spread across liquid pools is the detailed identification of the mechanisms that control the rate and nature of flame spread when the liquid pool is initially at an isothermal bulk temperature that is below the fuel's flash point temperature. In our project, we specialize the subject to highlight the roles of buoyancy-related processes regarding the mechanisms of flame spread, an area of research cited recently by Linan and Williams as one that needs further attention and which microgravity (micro-g) experiments could help to resolve. Toward resolving the effects of buoyancy on this flame spread problem, comparisons - between 1-g and micro-g experimental observations, and between model predictions and experimental data at each of these gravitational levels - are extensively utilized. The present experimental and computational foundation is presented to support identification of the mechanisms that control flame spread in the pulsating flame spread regime for which long-duration, micro-g flame spread experiments have been conducted aboard a sounding rocket.

  12. Dynamics of large-scale cortical interactions at high gamma frequencies during word production: event related causality (ERC) analysis of human electrocorticography (ECoG).

    PubMed

    Korzeniewska, Anna; Franaszczuk, Piotr J; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M; Kuś, Rafał; Crone, Nathan E

    2011-06-15

    Intracranial EEG studies in humans have shown that functional brain activation in a variety of functional-anatomic domains of human cortex is associated with an increase in power at a broad range of high gamma (>60Hz) frequencies. Although these electrophysiological responses are highly specific for the location and timing of cortical processing and in animal recordings are highly correlated with increased population firing rates, there has been little direct empirical evidence for causal interactions between different recording sites at high gamma frequencies. Such causal interactions are hypothesized to occur during cognitive tasks that activate multiple brain regions. To determine whether such causal interactions occur at high gamma frequencies and to investigate their functional significance, we used event-related causality (ERC) analysis to estimate the dynamics, directionality, and magnitude of event-related causal interactions using subdural electrocorticography (ECoG) recorded during two word production tasks: picture naming and auditory word repetition. A clinical subject who had normal hearing but was skilled in American Signed Language (ASL) provided a unique opportunity to test our hypothesis with reference to a predictable pattern of causal interactions, i.e. that language cortex interacts with different areas of sensorimotor cortex during spoken vs. signed responses. Our ERC analyses confirmed this prediction. During word production with spoken responses, perisylvian language sites had prominent causal interactions with mouth/tongue areas of motor cortex, and when responses were gestured in sign language, the most prominent interactions involved hand and arm areas of motor cortex. Furthermore, we found that the sites from which the most numerous and prominent causal interactions originated, i.e. sites with a pattern of ERC "divergence", were also sites where high gamma power increases were most prominent and where electrocortical stimulation mapping

  13. The Cortical Peptidoglycan from Spores of Bacillus Megaterium and Bacillus Subtilis Is Not Highly Cross-Linked

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    Bacilius megaterium and Bacillus subtilis Is Not Highly Cross-Linked 6. AUTHOR(S) David L. Popham and Peter Setlow 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...Determination by amino acid analyses of the percentage of diaminopimelic acid in the spore cortex of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus subtilis which is...Peptidoglycan from Spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus subtilis Is Not Highly Cross-Linked DAVID L. POPHAM ANDl PETER SETLOW* Department of Biochemistry

  14. Quantum Spread Spectrum Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that spectral teleportation can coherently dilate the spectral probability amplitude of a single photon. In preserving the encoded quantum information, this variant of teleportation subsequently enables a form of quantum spread spectrum communication.

  15. Postpartum cortical blindness.

    PubMed

    Faiz, Shakeel Ahmed

    2008-09-01

    A 30-years-old third gravida with previous normal pregnancies and an unremarkable prenatal course had an emergency lower segment caesarean section at a periphery hospital for failure of labour to progress. She developed bilateral cortical blindness immediately after recovery from anesthesia due to cerebral angiopathy shown by CT and MR scan as cortical infarct cerebral angiopathy, which is a rare complication of a normal pregnancy.

  16. Line-Bisecting Performance in Highly Skilled Athletes: Does Preponderance of Rightward Error Reflect Unique Cortical Organization and Functioning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlstedt, Roland A.

    2004-01-01

    A line-bisecting test was administered to 250 highly skilled right-handed athletes and a control group of 60 right-handed age matched non-athletes. Results revealed that athletes made overwhelmingly more rightward errors than non-athletes, who predominantly bisected lines to the left of the veridical center. These findings were interpreted in the…

  17. Adaptive shaping of cortical response selectivity in the vibrissa pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, He J. V.; Wang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    One embodiment of context-dependent sensory processing is bottom-up adaptation, where persistent stimuli decrease neuronal firing rate over hundreds of milliseconds. Adaptation is not, however, simply the fatigue of the sensory pathway, but shapes the information flow and selectivity to stimulus features. Adaptation enhances spatial discriminability (distinguishing stimulus location) while degrading detectability (reporting presence of the stimulus), for both the ideal observer of the cortex and awake, behaving animals. However, how the dynamics of the adaptation shape the cortical response and this detection and discrimination tradeoff is unknown, as is to what degree this phenomenon occurs on a continuum as opposed to a switching of processing modes. Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging in anesthetized rats to capture the temporal and spatial characteristics of the cortical response to tactile inputs, we showed that the suppression of the cortical response, in both magnitude and spatial spread, is continuously modulated by the increasing amount of energy in the adapting stimulus, which is nonuniquely determined by its frequency and velocity. Single-trial ideal observer analysis demonstrated a tradeoff between detectability and spatial discriminability up to a moderate amount of adaptation, which corresponds to the frequency range in natural whisking. This was accompanied by a decrease in both detectability and discriminability with high-energy adaptation, which indicates a more complex coupling between detection and discrimination than a simple switching of modes. Taken together, the results suggest that adaptation operates on a continuum and modulates the tradeoff between detectability and discriminability that has implications for information processing in ethological contexts. PMID:25787959

  18. Cortical hot spots and labyrinths: why cortical neuromodulation for episodic migraine with aura should be personalized.

    PubMed

    Dahlem, Markus A; Schmidt, Bernd; Bojak, Ingo; Boie, Sebastian; Kneer, Frederike; Hadjikhani, Nouchine; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation protocols for medical devices should be rationally designed. For episodic migraine with aura we outline model-based design strategies toward preventive and acute therapies using stereotactic cortical neuromodulation. To this end, we regard a localized spreading depression (SD) wave segment as a central element in migraine pathophysiology. To describe nucleation and propagation features of the SD wave segment, we define the new concepts of cortical hot spots and labyrinths, respectively. In particular, we firstly focus exclusively on curvature-induced dynamical properties by studying a generic reaction-diffusion model of SD on the folded cortical surface. This surface is described with increasing level of details, including finally personalized simulations using patient's magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner readings. At this stage, the only relevant factor that can modulate nucleation and propagation paths is the Gaussian curvature, which has the advantage of being rather readily accessible by MRI. We conclude with discussing further anatomical factors, such as areal, laminar, and cellular heterogeneity, that in addition to and in relation to Gaussian curvature determine the generalized concept of cortical hot spots and labyrinths as target structures for neuromodulation. Our numerical simulations suggest that these target structures are like fingerprints, they are individual features of each migraine sufferer. The goal in the future will be to provide individualized neural tissue simulations. These simulations should predict the clinical data and therefore can also serve as a test bed for exploring stereotactic cortical neuromodulation.

  19. Cortical hot spots and labyrinths: why cortical neuromodulation for episodic migraine with aura should be personalized

    PubMed Central

    Dahlem, Markus A.; Schmidt, Bernd; Bojak, Ingo; Boie, Sebastian; Kneer, Frederike; Hadjikhani, Nouchine; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation protocols for medical devices should be rationally designed. For episodic migraine with aura we outline model-based design strategies toward preventive and acute therapies using stereotactic cortical neuromodulation. To this end, we regard a localized spreading depression (SD) wave segment as a central element in migraine pathophysiology. To describe nucleation and propagation features of the SD wave segment, we define the new concepts of cortical hot spots and labyrinths, respectively. In particular, we firstly focus exclusively on curvature-induced dynamical properties by studying a generic reaction-diffusion model of SD on the folded cortical surface. This surface is described with increasing level of details, including finally personalized simulations using patient's magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner readings. At this stage, the only relevant factor that can modulate nucleation and propagation paths is the Gaussian curvature, which has the advantage of being rather readily accessible by MRI. We conclude with discussing further anatomical factors, such as areal, laminar, and cellular heterogeneity, that in addition to and in relation to Gaussian curvature determine the generalized concept of cortical hot spots and labyrinths as target structures for neuromodulation. Our numerical simulations suggest that these target structures are like fingerprints, they are individual features of each migraine sufferer. The goal in the future will be to provide individualized neural tissue simulations. These simulations should predict the clinical data and therefore can also serve as a test bed for exploring stereotactic cortical neuromodulation. PMID:25798103

  20. Expectancy of pain is influenced by motor preparation: a high-resolution EEG study of cortical alpha rhythms.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Brancucci, Alfredo; Capotosto, Paolo; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Chen, Andrew C N; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2005-04-01

    This high-resolution electroencephalographic (EEG) study on alpha event-related desynchronization (ERD) evaluated whether anticipatory activity precedes a sensorimotor interaction induced by concomitant painful stimuli and sensorimotor demand. An omitted-stimulus paradigm induced the expectancy of the painful stimulation at the left hand. In the experimental condition, the painful stimulation was associated with a visual go/no-go task triggering right-hand movements. Two control conditions manipulated the painful sensorimotor interaction variable. Compared with the control conditions, the expectancy of the painful sensorimotor interaction increased the high-band alpha EEG oscillations over the right primary sensorimotor cortex contralateral to the nociceptive stimuli and, to a lesser extent, over the centroparietal midline. These findings suggest that concomitant painful stimuli and simple sensorimotor go/no-go demands affect anticipatory activity as revealed by alpha ERD.

  1. Precaution for volume conduction in rodent cortical electroencephalography using high-density polyimide-based microelectrode arrays on the skull.

    PubMed

    Stienen, P J; Venzi, M; Poppendieck, W; Hoffmann, K P; Åberg, E

    2016-04-01

    In humans, significant progress has been made to link spatial changes in electroencephalographic (EEG) spectral density, connectivity strength, and phase-amplitude modulation to neurological, physiological, and psychological correlates. In contrast, standard rodent EEG techniques employ only few electrodes, which results in poor spatial resolution. Recently, a technique was developed to overcome this limitation in mice. This technique was based on a polyimide-based microelectrode (PBM) array applied on the mouse skull, maintaining a significant number of electrodes with consistent contact, electrode impedance, and mechanical stability. The present study built on this technique by extending it to rats. Therefore, a similar PBM array, but adapted to rats, was designed and fabricated. In addition, this array was connected to a wireless EEG headstage, allowing recording in untethered, freely moving rats. The advantage of a high-density array relies on the assumption that the signal recorded from the different electrodes is generated from distinct sources, i.e., not volume-conducted. Therefore, the utility and validity of the array were evaluated by determining the level of synchrony between channels due to true synchrony or volume conduction during basal vigilance states and following a subanesthetic dose of ketamine. Although the PBM array allowed recording with high signal quality, under both drug and drug-free conditions, high synchronization existed due to volume conduction between the electrodes even in the higher spectral frequency range. Discrimination existed only between frontally and centrally/distally grouped electrode pairs. Therefore, caution should be used in interpreting spatial data obtained from high-density PBM arrays in rodents.

  2. Hypoxia in high glucose followed by reoxygenation in normal glucose reduces the viability of cortical astrocytes through increased permeability of connexin 43 hemichannels

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Juan A.; Hernández, Diego E.; Ezan, Pascal; Velarde, Victoria; Bennett, Michael V. L.; Giaume, Christian; Sáez, Juan C.

    2009-01-01

    Brain ischemia causes more extensive injury in hyperglycemic than normoglycemic subjects, and the increased damage is to astroglia as well as neurons. In the present work, we found that in cortical astrocytes from rat or mouse, reoxygenation after hypoxia in a medium mimicking interstitial fluid during ischemia increases hemichannel activity and decreases cell-cell communication via gap junctions as indicated by dye uptake and dye coupling, respectively. These effects were potentiated by high glucose during the hypoxia in a concentration-dependent manner (and by zero glucose) and were not observed in connexin 43−/− astrocytes. The responses were transient or persistent after short and long periods of hypoxia, respectively. The persistent responses were associated with a progressive reduction in cell viability that was prevented by La3+ or peptides that block connexin 43 (Cx43) hemichannels or by inhibition of p38 MAP kinase prior to hypoxia-reoxygenation but not by treatments that block pannexin hemichannels. Block of Cx43 hemichannels did not affect the reduction in gap junction mediated dye coupling observed during reoxygenation. Cx43 hemichannels may be a novel therapeutic target to reduce cell death following stroke, particularly in hyperglycemic conditions. PMID:19705457

  3. Abnormal white matter tractography of visual pathways detected by high-angular-resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) corresponds to visual dysfunction in cortical/cerebral visual impairment.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Corinna M; Heidary, Gena; Koo, Bang-Bon; Killiany, Ronald J; Bex, Peter; Merabet, Lotfi B

    2014-08-01

    Cortical (cerebral) visual impairment (CVI) is characterized by visual dysfunction associated with damage to the optic radiations and/or visual cortex. Typically it results from pre- or perinatal hypoxic damage to postchiasmal visual structures and pathways. The neuroanatomical basis of this condition remains poorly understood, particularly with regard to how the resulting maldevelopment of visual processing pathways relates to observations in the clinical setting. We report our investigation of 2 young adults diagnosed with CVI and visual dysfunction characterized by difficulties related to visually guided attention and visuospatial processing. Using high-angular-resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), we characterized and compared their individual white matter projections of the extrageniculo-striate visual system with a normal-sighted control. Compared to a sighted control, both CVI cases revealed a striking reduction in association fibers, including the inferior frontal-occipital fasciculus as well as superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi. This reduction in fibers associated with the major pathways implicated in visual processing may provide a neuroanatomical basis for the visual dysfunctions observed in these patients.

  4. Agro-ecological features of the introduction and spread of the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 in northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Giuliano; Ilemobade, Albert; Le Brun, Yvon; Hogerwerf, Lenny; Slingenbergh, Jan

    2008-11-01

    Nigeria was the first African country to report highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus outbreaks in February 2006 and has since been the most severely hit country in sub-Saharan Africa. A retrospective survey carried out towards the end of 2007, coupled with follow-up spatial analysis, support the notion that the H5N1 virus may have spread from rural areas of northern Nigeria near wetlands frequented by palaearctic migratory birds. Possibly, this could have happened already during November to December 2005, one or two months prior to the first officially reported outbreak in a commercial poultry farm (Kaduna state). It is plausible that backyard poultry played a more important role in the H5N1 propagation than thought previously. Farming landscapes with significant numbers of domestic ducks may have helped to bridge the geographical and ecological gap between the waterfowl in the wetlands and the densely populated poultry rich states in north-central Nigeria, where the virus had more sizeable, visible impact.

  5. The limits of seaward spreading and slope instability at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna, imaged by high-resolution 2D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Felix; Krastel, Sebastian; Geersen, Jacob; Behrmann, Jan Hinrich; Ridente, Domenico; Chiocci, Francesco Latino; Bialas, Jörg; Papenberg, Cord; Cukur, Deniz; Urlaub, Morelia; Micallef, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Mount Etna is the largest active volcano in Europe. Instability of its eastern flank is well documented onshore, and continuously monitored by geodetic and InSAR measurements. Little is known, however, about the offshore extension of the eastern volcano flank, defining a serious shortcoming in stability models. In order to better constrain the active tectonics of the continental margin offshore the eastern flank of the volcano, we acquired a new high-resolution 2D reflection seismic dataset. The data provide new insights into the heterogeneous geology and tectonics at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna. The submarine realm is characterized by different blocks, which are controlled by local- and regional tectonics. A compressional regime is found at the toe of the continental margin, which is bound to a complex basin system. Both, the clear link between on- and offshore tectonic structures as well as the compressional regime at the easternmost flank edge, indicate a continental margin gravitational collapse as well as spreading to be present at Mt Etna. Moreover, we find evidence for the offshore southern boundary of the moving flank, which is identified as a right lateral oblique fault north of Catania Canyon. Our findings suggest a coupled volcano edifice/continental margin instability at Mt Etna, demonstrating first order linkage between on- and offshore tectonic processes.

  6. High-resolution magnetic signature of active hydrothermal systems in the back-arc spreading region of the southern Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Masakazu; Okino, Kyoko; Honsho, Chie; Dyment, Jerome; Szitkar, Florent; Mochizuki, Nobutatsu; Asada, Miho

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution vector magnetic measurements were performed on five hydrothermal vent fields of the back-arc spreading region of the southern Mariana Trough using Shinkai 6500, a deep-sea manned submersible. A new 3-D forward scheme was applied that exploits the surrounding bathymetry and varying altitudes of the submersible to estimate absolute crustal magnetization. The results revealed that magnetic-anomaly-derived absolute magnetizations show a reasonable correlation with natural remanent magnetizations of rock samples collected from the seafloor of the same region. The distribution of magnetic-anomaly-derived absolute magnetization suggests that all five andesite-hosted hydrothermal fields are associated with a lack of magnetization, as is generally observed at basalt-hosted hydrothermal sites. Furthermore, both the Pika and Urashima sites were found to have their own distinct low-magnetization zones, which could not be distinguished in magnetic anomaly data collected at higher altitudes by autonomous underwater vehicle due to their limited extension. The spatial extent of the resulting low magnetization is approximately 10 times wider at off-axis sites than at on-axis sites, possibly reflecting larger accumulations of nonmagnetic sulfides, stockwork zones, and/or alteration zones at the off-axis sites.

  7. Ponticulin is the major high affinity link between the plasma membrane and the cortical actin network in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Interactions between the plasma membrane and underlying actin-based cortex have been implicated in membrane organization and stability, the control of cell shape, and various motile processes. To ascertain the function of high affinity actin-membrane associations, we have disrupted by homologous recombination the gene encoding ponticulin, the major high affinity actin-membrane link in Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae. Cells lacking detectable amounts of ponticulin message and protein also are deficient in high affinity actin-membrane binding by several criteria. First, only 10-13% as much endogenous actin cosediments through sucrose and crude plasma membranes from ponticulin- minus cells, as compared with membranes from the parental strain. Second, purified plasma membranes exhibit little or no binding or nucleation of exogenous actin in vitro. Finally, only 10-30% as much endogenous actin partitions with plasma membranes from ponticulin-minus cells after these cells are mechanically unroofed with polylysine- coated coverslips. The loss of the cell's major actin-binding membrane protein appears to be surprisingly benign under laboratory conditions. Ponticulin-minus cells grow normally in axenic culture and pinocytose FITC-dextran at the same rate as do parental cells. The rate of phagocytosis of particles by ponticulin-minus cells in growth media also is unaffected. By contrast, after initiation of development, cells lacking ponticulin aggregate faster than the parental cells. Subsequent morphogenesis proceeds asynchronously, but viable spores can form. These results indicate that ponticulin is not required for cellular translocation, but apparently plays a role in cell patterning during development. PMID:8089176

  8. Contributions of Early Cortical Processing and Reading Ability to Functional Status in Individuals at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Ricardo E.; Cornblatt, Barbara A.; McLaughlin, Danielle; Chang, Jeremy; Auther, Andrea M.; Olsen, Ruth H.; Javitt, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a growing recognition that individuals at clinical high risk need intervention for functional impairments, along with emerging psychosis, as the majority of clinical high risk (CHR) individuals show persistent deficits in social and role functioning regardless of transition to psychosis. Recent studies have demonstrated reduced reading ability as a potential cause of functional disability in schizophrenia, related to underlying deficits in generation of mismatch negativity (MMN). The present study extends these findings to subjects at CHR. Methods The sample consisted of 34 CHR individuals and 33 healthy comparisons subjects (CNTLs) from the Recognition and Prevention (RAP) Program at the Zucker Hillside Hospital in New York. At baseline, reading measures were collected, along with MMN to pitch, duration, and intensity deviants, and measures of neurocognition, and social and role (academic/work) functioning. Results CHR subjects showed impairments in reading ability, neurocognition, and MMN generation, relative to CNTLs. Lower-amplitude MMN responses were correlated with worse reading ability, slower processing speed, and poorer social and role functioning. However, when entered into a simultaneous regression, only reduced responses to deviance in sound duration and volume predicted poor social and role functioning, respectively. Conclusions Deficits in reading ability exist even prior to illness onset in schizophrenia and may represent a decline in performance from prior abilities. As in schizophrenia, deficits are related to impaired MMN generation, suggesting specific contributions of sensory-level impairment to neurocognitive processes related to social and role function. PMID:25728833

  9. ECoG high gamma activity reveals distinct cortical representations of lyrics passages, harmonic and timbre-related changes in a rock song.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Irene; Blankertz, Benjamin; Potes, Cristhian; Schalk, Gerwin; Curio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Listening to music moves our minds and moods, stirring interest in its neural underpinnings. A multitude of compositional features drives the appeal of natural music. How such original music, where a composer's opus is not manipulated for experimental purposes, engages a listener's brain has not been studied until recently. Here, we report an in-depth analysis of two electrocorticographic (ECoG) data sets obtained over the left hemisphere in ten patients during presentation of either a rock song or a read-out narrative. First, the time courses of five acoustic features (intensity, presence/absence of vocals with lyrics, spectral centroid, harmonic change, and pulse clarity) were extracted from the audio tracks and found to be correlated with each other to varying degrees. In a second step, we uncovered the specific impact of each musical feature on ECoG high-gamma power (70-170 Hz) by calculating partial correlations to remove the influence of the other four features. In the music condition, the onset and offset of vocal lyrics in ongoing instrumental music was consistently identified within the group as the dominant driver for ECoG high-gamma power changes over temporal auditory areas, while concurrently subject-individual activation spots were identified for sound intensity, timbral, and harmonic features. The distinct cortical activations to vocal speech-related content embedded in instrumental music directly demonstrate that song integrated in instrumental music represents a distinct dimension in complex music. In contrast, in the speech condition, the full sound envelope was reflected in the high gamma response rather than the onset or offset of the vocal lyrics. This demonstrates how the contributions of stimulus features that modulate the brain response differ across the two examples of a full-length natural stimulus, which suggests a context-dependent feature selection in the processing of complex auditory stimuli.

  10. ECoG high gamma activity reveals distinct cortical representations of lyrics passages, harmonic and timbre-related changes in a rock song

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Irene; Blankertz, Benjamin; Potes, Cristhian; Schalk, Gerwin; Curio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Listening to music moves our minds and moods, stirring interest in its neural underpinnings. A multitude of compositional features drives the appeal of natural music. How such original music, where a composer's opus is not manipulated for experimental purposes, engages a listener's brain has not been studied until recently. Here, we report an in-depth analysis of two electrocorticographic (ECoG) data sets obtained over the left hemisphere in ten patients during presentation of either a rock song or a read-out narrative. First, the time courses of five acoustic features (intensity, presence/absence of vocals with lyrics, spectral centroid, harmonic change, and pulse clarity) were extracted from the audio tracks and found to be correlated with each other to varying degrees. In a second step, we uncovered the specific impact of each musical feature on ECoG high-gamma power (70–170 Hz) by calculating partial correlations to remove the influence of the other four features. In the music condition, the onset and offset of vocal lyrics in ongoing instrumental music was consistently identified within the group as the dominant driver for ECoG high-gamma power changes over temporal auditory areas, while concurrently subject-individual activation spots were identified for sound intensity, timbral, and harmonic features. The distinct cortical activations to vocal speech-related content embedded in instrumental music directly demonstrate that song integrated in instrumental music represents a distinct dimension in complex music. In contrast, in the speech condition, the full sound envelope was reflected in the high gamma response rather than the onset or offset of the vocal lyrics. This demonstrates how the contributions of stimulus features that modulate the brain response differ across the two examples of a full-length natural stimulus, which suggests a context-dependent feature selection in the processing of complex auditory stimuli. PMID:25352799

  11. Layer-specific gene expression in epileptogenic type II focal cortical dysplasia: normal-looking neurons reveal the presence of a hidden laminar organization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Type II focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) are malformations of cortical development characterised by the disorganisation of the normal neocortical structure and the presence of dysmorphic neurons (DNs) and balloon cells (BCs). The pathogenesis of FCDs has not yet been clearly established, although a number of histopathological patterns and molecular findings suggest that they may be due to abnormal neuronal and glial proliferation and migration processes. In order to gain further insights into cortical layering disruption and investigate the origin of DNs and BCs, we used in situ RNA hybridisation of human surgical specimens with a neuropathologically definite diagnosis of Type IIa/b FCD and a panel of layer-specific genes (LSGs) whose expression covers all cortical layers. We also used anti-phospho-S6 ribosomal protein antibody to investigate mTOR pathway hyperactivation. Results LSGs were expressed in both normal and abnormal cells (BCs and DNs) but their distribution was different. Normal-looking neurons, which were visibly reduced in the core of the lesion, were apparently located in the appropriate cortical laminae thus indicating a partial laminar organisation. On the contrary, DNs and BCs, labelled with anti-phospho-S6 ribosomal protein antibody, were spread throughout the cortex without any apparent rule and showed a highly variable LSG expression pattern. Moreover, LSGs did not reveal any differences between Type IIa and IIb FCD. Conclusion These findings suggest the existence of hidden cortical lamination involving normal-looking neurons, which retain their ability to migrate correctly in the cortex, unlike DNs which, in addition to their morphological abnormalities and mTOR hyperactivation, show an altered migratory pattern. Taken together these data suggest that an external or environmental hit affecting selected precursor cells during the very early stages of cortical development may disrupt normal cortical development. PMID:24735483

  12. A Large-Scale Distribution of Milk-Based Fortified Spreads: Evidence for a New Approach in Regions with High Burden of Acute Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Defourny, Isabelle; Minetti, Andrea; Harczi, Géza; Doyon, Stéphane; Shepherd, Susan; Tectonidis, Milton; Bradol, Jean-Hervé; Golden, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background There are 146 million underweight children in the developing world, which contribute to up to half of the world's child deaths. In high burden regions for malnutrition, the treatment of individual children is limited by available resources. Here, we evaluate a large-scale distribution of a nutritional supplement on the prevention of wasting. Methods and Findings A new ready-to-use food (RUF) was developed as a diet supplement for children under three. The intervention consisted of six monthly distributions of RUF during the 2007 hunger gap in a district of Maradi region, Niger, for approximately 60,000 children (length: 60–85 cm). At each distribution, all children over 65 cm had their Mid-Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) recorded. Admission trends for severe wasting (WFH<70% NCHS) in Maradi, 2002–2005 show an increase every year during the hunger gap. In contrast, in 2007, throughout the period of the distribution, the incidence of severe acute malnutrition (MUAC<110 mm) remained at extremely low levels. Comparison of year-over-year admissions to the therapeutic feeding program shows that the 2007 blanket distribution had essentially the same flattening effect on the seasonal rise in admissions as the 2006 individualized treatment of almost 60,000 children moderately wasted. Conclusions These results demonstrate the potential for distribution of fortified spreads to reduce the incidence of severe wasting in large population of children 6–36 months of age. Although further information is needed on the cost-effectiveness of such distributions, these results highlight the importance of re-evaluating current nutritional strategies and international recommendations for high burden areas of childhood malnutrition. PMID:19421316

  13. High GUD Incidence in the Early 20th Century Created a Particularly Permissive Time Window for the Origin and Initial Spread of Epidemic HIV Strains

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, João Dinis; Müller, Viktor; Lemey, Philippe; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke

    2010-01-01

    The processes that permitted a few SIV strains to emerge epidemically as HIV groups remain elusive. Paradigmatic theories propose factors that may have facilitated adaptation to the human host (e.g., unsafe injections), none of which provide a coherent explanation for the timing, geographical origin, and scarcity of epidemic HIV strains. Our updated molecular clock analyses established relatively narrow time intervals (roughly 1880–1940) for major SIV transfers to humans. Factors that could favor HIV emergence in this time frame may have been genital ulcer disease (GUD), resulting in high HIV-1 transmissibility (4–43%), largely exceeding parenteral transmissibility; lack of male circumcision increasing male HIV infection risk; and gender-skewed city growth increasing sexual promiscuity. We surveyed colonial medical literature reporting incidences of GUD for the relevant regions, concentrating on cities, suffering less reporting biases than rural areas. Coinciding in time with the origin of the major HIV groups, colonial cities showed intense GUD outbreaks with incidences 1.5–2.5 orders of magnitude higher than in mid 20th century. We surveyed ethnographic literature, and concluded that male circumcision frequencies were lower in early 20th century than nowadays, with low rates correlating spatially with the emergence of HIV groups. We developed computer simulations to model the early spread of HIV-1 group M in Kinshasa before, during and after the estimated origin of the virus, using parameters derived from the colonial literature. These confirmed that the early 20th century was particularly permissive for the emergence of HIV by heterosexual transmission. The strongest potential facilitating factor was high GUD levels. Remarkably, the direct effects of city population size and circumcision frequency seemed relatively small. Our results suggest that intense GUD in promiscuous urban communities was the main factor driving HIV emergence. Low circumcision rates

  14. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and potential cortical and trigeminothalamic mechanisms in migraine

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Anna P.; Holland, Philip R.; Akerman, Simon; Summ, Oliver; Fredrick, Joe

    2016-01-01

    A single pulse of transcranial magnetic stimulation has been shown to be effective for the acute treatment of migraine with and without aura. Here we aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms of action of transcranial magnetic stimulation, using a transcortical approach, in preclinical migraine models. We tested the susceptibility of cortical spreading depression, the experimental correlate of migraine aura, and further evaluated the response of spontaneous and evoked trigeminovascular activity of second order trigemontothalamic and third order thalamocortical neurons in rats. Single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly inhibited both mechanical and chemically-induced cortical spreading depression when administered immediately post-induction in rats, but not when administered preinduction, and when controlled by a sham stimulation. Additionally transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly inhibited the spontaneous and evoked firing rate of third order thalamocortical projection neurons, but not second order neurons in the trigeminocervical complex, suggesting a potential modulatory effect that may underlie its utility in migraine. In gyrencephalic cat cortices, when administered post-cortical spreading depression, transcranial magnetic stimulation blocked the propagation of cortical spreading depression in two of eight animals. These results are the first to demonstrate that cortical spreading depression can be blocked in vivo using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation and further highlight a novel thalamocortical modulatory capacity that may explain the efficacy of magnetic stimulation in the treatment of migraine with and without aura. PMID:27246325

  15. A high density of human communication-associated genes in chromosome 7q31-q36: differential expression in human and non-human primate cortices.

    PubMed

    Schneider, E; Jensen, L R; Farcas, R; Kondova, I; Bontrop, R E; Navarro, B; Fuchs, E; Kuss, A W; Haaf, T

    2012-01-01

    The human brain is distinguished by its remarkable size, high energy consumption, and cognitive abilities compared to all other mammals and non-human primates. However, little is known about what has accelerated brain evolution in the human lineage. One possible explanation is that the appearance of advanced communication skills and language has been a driving force of human brain development. The phenotypic adaptations in brain structure and function which occurred on the way to modern humans may be associated with specific molecular signatures in today's human genome and/or transcriptome. Genes that have been linked to language, reading, and/or autism spectrum disorders are prime candidates when searching for genes for human-specific communication abilities. The database and genome-wide expression analyses we present here revealed a clustering of such communication-associated genes (COAG) on human chromosomes X and 7, in particular chromosome 7q31-q36. Compared to the rest of the genome, we found a high number of COAG to be differentially expressed in the cortices of humans and non-human primates (chimpanzee, baboon, and/or marmoset). The role of X-linked genes for the development of human-specific cognitive abilities is well known. We now propose that chromosome 7q31-q36 also represents a hot spot for the evolution of human-specific communication abilities. Selective pressure on the T cell receptor beta locus on chromosome 7q34, which plays a pivotal role in the immune system, could have led to rapid dissemination of positive gene variants in hitchhiking COAG.

  16. Topography driven spreading.

    PubMed

    McHale, G; Shirtcliffe, N J; Aqil, S; Perry, C C; Newton, M I

    2004-07-16

    Roughening a hydrophobic surface enhances its nonwetting properties into superhydrophobicity. For liquids other than water, roughness can induce a complete rollup of a droplet. However, topographic effects can also enhance partial wetting by a given liquid into complete wetting to create superwetting. In this work, a model system of spreading droplets of a nonvolatile liquid on surfaces having lithographically produced pillars is used to show that superwetting also modifies the dynamics of spreading. The edge speed-dynamic contact angle relation is shown to obey a simple power law, and such power laws are shown to apply to naturally occurring surfaces.

  17. Role of wild birds in the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 and implications for global surveillance.

    PubMed

    Feare, Chris J

    2010-03-01

    This paper reviews outbreaks of Asian-lineage highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 in wild birds since June 2006, surveillance strategies, and research on virus epidemiology in wild birds to summarize advances in understanding the role of wild birds in the spread of HPAIV H5N1 and the risk that infected wild birds pose for the poultry industry and for public health. Surveillance of apparently healthy wild birds ("active" surveillance) has not provided early warning of likely infection for the poultry industry, whereas searches for and reports of dead birds ("passive" surveillance) have provided evidence of environmental presence of the virus, but not necessarily its source. Most outbreaks in wild birds have occurred during periods when they are experiencing environmental, physiologic, and possibly psychological stress, including adverse winter weather and molt, but not, apparently, long-distance migration. Examination of carcasses of infected birds and experimental challenge with strains of HPAIV H5N1 have provided insight into the course of infection, the extent of virus shedding, and the relative importance of cloacal vs. oropharyngeal excretion. Satellite telemetry of migrating birds is now providing data on the routes taken by individual birds, their speed of migration, and the duration of stopovers. It is still not clear how virus shedding during the apparently clinically silent phase of infection relates to the distance travelled by infected birds. Mounting an immune response and undertaking strenuous exercise associated with long migratory flights may be competitive. This is an area where further research should be directed in order to discover whether wild birds infected with HPAIV H5N1 are able or willing to embark on migration.

  18. Spreading of a granular droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Eric; Sanchez, Ivan; Raynaud, Franck; Lanuza, Jose; Andreotti, Bruno; Aranson, Igor

    2008-03-01

    The influence of controlled vibrations on the granular rheology is investigated in a specifically designed experiment in which a granular film spreads under the action of horizontal vibrations. A nonlinear diffusion equation is derived theoretically that describes the evolution of the deposit shape. A self-similar parabolic shape (the``granular droplet'') and a spreading dynamics are predicted that both agree quantitatively with the experimental results. The theoretical analysis is used to extract effective friction coefficients between the base and the granular layer under sustained and controlled vibrations. A shear thickening regime characteristic of dense granular flows is evidenced at low vibration energy, both for glass beads and natural sand. Conversely, shear thinning is observed at high agitation.

  19. Spreading of a granular droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Iván; Raynaud, Franck; Lanuza, José; Andreotti, Bruno; Clément, Eric; Aranson, Igor S.

    2007-12-01

    The influence of controlled vibrations on the granular rheology is investigated in a specifically designed experiment in which a granular film spreads under the action of horizontal vibrations. A nonlinear diffusion equation is derived theoretically that describes the evolution of the deposit shape. A self-similar parabolic shape (the“granular droplet”) and a spreading dynamics are predicted that both agree quantitatively with the experimental results. The theoretical analysis is used to extract effective friction coefficients between the base and the granular layer under sustained and controlled vibrations. A shear thickening regime characteristic of dense granular flows is evidenced at low vibration energy, both for glass beads and natural sand. Conversely, shear thinning is observed at high agitation.

  20. Alterations of lateral temporal cortical gray matter and facial memory as vulnerability indicators for schizophrenia: an MRI study in youth at familial high-risk for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Brent, Benjamin K.; Rosso, Isabelle M.; Thermenos, Heidi W.; Holt, Daphne J.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Makris, Nikos; Tsuang, Ming T.; Seidman, Larry J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Structural alterations of the lateral temporal cortex (LTC) in association with memory impairments have been reported in schizophrenia. This study investigated whether alterations of LTC structure were linked with impaired facial and/or verbal memory in young first-degree relatives of people with schizophrenia and, thus, may be indicators of vulnerability to the illness. Methods Subjects included 27 non-psychotic, first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients, and 48 healthy controls, between the ages of 13 and 28. Participants underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1.5 Tesla. The LTC was parcellated into superior temporal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, and temporal pole. Total cerebral and LTC volumes were measured using semi-automated morphometry. The Wechsler Memory Scale – Third Edition and the Children’s Memory Scale – Third Edition assessed facial and verbal memory. General linear models tested for associations among LTC subregion volumes, familial risk and memory. Results Compared with controls, relatives had significantly smaller bilateral middle temporal gyri. Moreover, right middle temporal gyral volume showed a significant positive association with delayed facial memory in relatives. Conclusion These results support the hypothesis that smaller middle temporal gyri are related to the genetic liability to schizophrenia and may be linked with reduced facial memory in persons at genetic risk for the illness. The findings add to the growing evidence that children at risk for schizophrenia on the basis of positive family history have cortical and subcortical structural brain abnormalities well before psychotic illness occurs. PMID:26621001

  1. Low and then high frequency oscillations of distinct right cortical networks are progressively enhanced by medium and long term Satyananda Yoga meditation practice

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, John; Jamieson, Graham; Cohen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Meditation proficiency is related to trait-like (learned) effects on brain function, developed over time. Previous studies show increases in EEG power in lower frequency bands (theta, alpha) in experienced meditators in both meditation states and baseline conditions. Higher gamma band power has been found in advanced Buddhist meditators, yet it is not known if this occurs in Yoga meditation practices. This study used eLORETA to compare differences in cortical source activity underlying scalp EEG from intermediate (mean experience 4 years) and advanced (mean experience 30 years) Australian meditators from the Satyananda Yoga tradition during a body-steadiness meditation, mantra meditation, and non-meditation mental calculation condition. Intermediate Yoga meditators showed greater source activity in low frequencies (particularly theta and alpha1) during mental calculation, body-steadiness and mantra meditation. A similar spatial pattern of significant differences was found in all conditions but the number of significant voxels was double during body-steadiness and mantra meditation than in the non-meditation (calculation) condition. These differences were greatest in right (R) superior frontal and R precentral gyri and extended back to include the R parietal and occipital lobes. Advanced Yoga meditators showed greater activity in high frequencies (beta and especially gamma) in all conditions but greatly expanded during meditation practice. Across all conditions (meditation and non-meditation) differences were greatest in the same regions: R insula, R inferior frontal gyrus and R anterior temporal lobe. Distinct R core networks were identified in alpha1 (8–10 Hz) and gamma (25–42 Hz) bands, respectively. The voxels recruited to these networks greatly expanded during meditation practice to include homologous regions of the left hemisphere. Functional interpretation parallels traditionally described stages of development in Yoga proficiency. PMID:24959124

  2. Mapping cortical mesoscopic networks of single spiking cortical or sub-cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dongsheng; Vanni, Matthieu P; Mitelut, Catalin C; Chan, Allen W; LeDue, Jeffrey M; Xie, Yicheng; Chen, Andrew Cn; Swindale, Nicholas V; Murphy, Timothy H

    2017-02-04

    Understanding the basis of brain function requires knowledge of cortical operations over wide-spatial scales, but also within the context of single neurons. In vivo, wide-field GCaMP imaging and sub-cortical/cortical cellular electrophysiology were used in mice to investigate relationships between spontaneous single neuron spiking and mesoscopic cortical activity. We make use of a rich set of cortical activity motifs that are present in spontaneous activity in anesthetized and awake animals. A mesoscale spike-triggered averaging procedure allowed the identification of motifs that are preferentially linked to individual spiking neurons by employing genetically targeted indicators of neuronal activity. Thalamic neurons predicted and reported specific cycles of wide-scale cortical inhibition/excitation. In contrast, spike-triggered maps derived from single cortical neurons yielded spatio-temporal maps expected for regional cortical consensus function. This approach can define network relationships between any point source of neuronal spiking and mesoscale cortical maps.

  3. Spreading of miscible liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Daniel J.; Haward, Simon J.; Shen, Amy Q.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2016-05-01

    Miscible liquids commonly contact one another in natural and technological situations, often in the proximity of a solid substrate. In the scenario where a drop of one liquid finds itself on a solid surface and immersed within a second, miscible liquid, it will spread spontaneously across the surface. We show experimental findings of the spreading of sessile drops in miscible environments that have distinctly different shape evolution and power-law dynamics from sessile drops that spread in immiscible environments, which have been reported previously. We develop a characteristic time to scale radial data of the spreading sessile drops based on a drainage flow due to gravity. This time scale is effective for a homologous subset of the liquids studied. However, it has limitations when applied to significantly chemically different, yet miscible, liquid pairings; we postulate that the surface energies between each liquid and the solid surface becomes important for this other subset of the liquids studied. Initial experiments performed with pendant drops in miscible environments support the drainage flow observed in the sessile drop systems.

  4. Cortical thickness abnormalities in late adolescence with online gaming addiction.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kai; Cheng, Ping; Dong, Tao; Bi, Yanzhi; Xing, Lihong; Yu, Dahua; Zhao, Limei; Dong, Minghao; von Deneen, Karen M; Liu, Yijun; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Online gaming addiction, as the most popular subtype of Internet addiction, had gained more and more attention from the whole world. However, the structural differences in cortical thickness of the brain between adolescents with online gaming addiction and healthy controls are not well unknown; neither was its association with the impaired cognitive control ability. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans from late adolescence with online gaming addiction (n = 18) and age-, education- and gender-matched controls (n = 18) were acquired. The cortical thickness measurement method was employed to investigate alterations of cortical thickness in individuals with online gaming addiction. The color-word Stroop task was employed to investigate the functional implications of the cortical thickness abnormalities. Imaging data revealed increased cortical thickness in the left precentral cortex, precuneus, middle frontal cortex, inferior temporal and middle temporal cortices in late adolescence with online gaming addiction; meanwhile, the cortical thicknesses of the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), insula, lingual gyrus, the right postcentral gyrus, entorhinal cortex and inferior parietal cortex were decreased. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the cortical thicknesses of the left precentral cortex, precuneus and lingual gyrus correlated with duration of online gaming addiction and the cortical thickness of the OFC correlated with the impaired task performance during the color-word Stroop task in adolescents with online gaming addiction. The findings in the current study suggested that the cortical thickness abnormalities of these regions may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of online gaming addiction.

  5. Spreading rate dependence of three-dimensional structure in oceanic spreading centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, E. M.; Morgant, Jason Phipps

    1990-11-01

    SEGMENTATION by transform faults and other types of along-axis discontinuity1 is a well described but poorly explained characteristic of oceanic spreading centres. Here we use numerical experiments to explore the dynamics of mantle flow and melting beneath a mid-ocean ridge. Buoyant upwelling, driven by compositional density variations resulting from the extraction of the melt that forms the ocean crust, exhibits a spreading-rate-dependent transition between two-dimensional and three-dimensional upwelling structures. For low spreading rates and mantle viscosities an initial two-dimensional structure transforms into a three-dimensional one; at high spreading rates, an initially two-dimensional structure remains two-dimensional. These results suggest that the origin of spreading-centre segmentation may be different at fast and slow spreading rates.

  6. Spread of entanglement and causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casini, Horacio; Liu, Hong; Mezei, Márk

    2016-07-01

    We investigate causality constraints on the time evolution of entanglement entropy after a global quench in relativistic theories. We first provide a general proof that the so-called tsunami velocity is bounded by the speed of light. We then generalize the free particle streaming model of [1] to general dimensions and to an arbitrary entanglement pattern of the initial state. In more than two spacetime dimensions the spread of entanglement in these models is highly sensitive to the initial entanglement pattern, but we are able to prove an upper bound on the normalized rate of growth of entanglement entropy, and hence the tsunami velocity. The bound is smaller than what one gets for quenches in holographic theories, which highlights the importance of interactions in the spread of entanglement in many-body systems. We propose an interacting model which we believe provides an upper bound on the spread of entanglement for interacting relativistic theories. In two spacetime dimensions with multiple intervals, this model and its variations are able to reproduce intricate results exhibited by holographic theories for a significant part of the parameter space. For higher dimensions, the model bounds the tsunami velocity at the speed of light. Finally, we construct a geometric model for entanglement propagation based on a tensor network construction for global quenches.

  7. Discovering Cortical Folding Patterns in Neonatal Cortical Surfaces Using Large-Scale Dataset

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yu; Li, Gang; Wang, Li; Lin, Weili; Gilmore, John H.

    2017-01-01

    The cortical folding of the human brain is highly complex and variable across individuals. Mining the major patterns of cortical folding from modern large-scale neuroimaging datasets is of great importance in advancing techniques for neuroimaging analysis and understanding the inter-individual variations of cortical folding and its relationship with cognitive function and disorders. As the primary cortical folding is genetically influenced and has been established at term birth, neonates with the minimal exposure to the complicated postnatal environmental influence are the ideal candidates for understanding the major patterns of cortical folding. In this paper, for the first time, we propose a novel method for discovering the major patterns of cortical folding in a large-scale dataset of neonatal brain MR images (N = 677). In our method, first, cortical folding is characterized by the distribution of sulcal pits, which are the locally deepest points in cortical sulci. Because deep sulcal pits are genetically related, relatively consistent across individuals, and also stable during brain development, they are well suitable for representing and characterizing cortical folding. Then, the similarities between sulcal pit distributions of any two subjects are measured from spatial, geometrical, and topological points of view. Next, these different measurements are adaptively fused together using a similarity network fusion technique, to preserve their common information and also catch their complementary information. Finally, leveraging the fused similarity measurements, a hierarchical affinity propagation algorithm is used to group similar sulcal folding patterns together. The proposed method has been applied to 677 neonatal brains (the largest neonatal dataset to our knowledge) in the central sulcus, superior temporal sulcus, and cingulate sulcus, and revealed multiple distinct and meaningful folding patterns in each region. PMID:28229131

  8. Functional rehabilitation of partial cortical blindness?

    PubMed

    Stoerig, Petra

    2008-01-01

    The current doctrine regards fields of partial cortical blindness as permanent once a temporally restricted window for spontaneous recovery has passed. Accordingly, neuropsychological rehabilitation mainly applies compensatory procedures that train patients to make better use of their sighted field. The more ambitious goal of functional recovery depends on the survival of pathways that continue to transmit retinal information from the blind field. Although wide-spread antero- and retrograde degeneration follows lesions that destroy or denervate the primary visual cortex and cause partial cortical blindness, several retinofugal pathways survive in cats, monkeys, and humans. In all three species, they subserve a variety of visual functions which develop and improve with practice. Post lesion plasticity is greater when the lesion occurs early in life, but changes in behavioural performance and brain responses have also been demonstrated in late lesion subjects. Although the extent of functional improvement is variable, and the most effective approaches still need to be established across cohorts, the evidence for perceptual learning in fields of cortical blindness indicates that the visual processes mediated by the surviving parts of the visual system can be harnessed to improve functional outcome.

  9. Partial volume correction using cortical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaasvær, Kamille R.; Haubro, Camilla D.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Borghammer, Per; Otzen, Daniel; Ostergaard, Lasse R.

    2010-03-01

    Partial volume effect (PVE) in positron emission tomography (PET) leads to inaccurate estimation of regional metabolic activities among neighbouring tissues with different tracer concentration. This may be one of the main limiting factors in the utilization of PET in clinical practice. Partial volume correction (PVC) methods have been widely studied to address this issue. MRI based PVC methods are well-established.1 Their performance depend on the quality of the co-registration of the MR and PET dataset, on the correctness of the estimated point-spread function (PSF) of the PET scanner and largely on the performance of the segmentation method that divide the brain into brain tissue compartments.1, 2 In the present study a method for PVC is suggested, that utilizes cortical surfaces, to obtain detailed anatomical information. The objectives are to improve the performance of PVC, facilitate a study of the relationship between metabolic activity in the cerebral cortex and cortical thicknesses, and to obtain an improved visualization of PET data. The gray matter metabolic activity after performing PVC was recovered by 99.7 - 99.8 % , in relation to the true activity when testing on simple simulated data with different PSFs and by 97.9 - 100 % when testing on simulated brain PET data at different cortical thicknesses. When studying the relationship between metabolic activities and anatomical structures it was shown on simulated brain PET data, that it is important to correct for PVE in order to get the true relationship.

  10. Characterization of high-dose and high-energy implanted gate and source diode and analysis of lateral spreading of p gate profile in high voltage SiC static induction transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onose, Hidekatsu; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Onuki, Jin

    2017-03-01

    The effect of the p gate dose on the characteristics of the gate-source diode in SiC static induction transistors (SIT) was investigated. It was found that a dose of 1.5 × 1014 cm-2 yields a pn junction breakdown voltage higher than 60 V and good forward characteristics. A normally on SiC SIT was fabricated and demonstrated. A blocking voltage higher than 2.0 kV at a gate-source voltage of -50 V and on-resistance of 70 mΩ cm2 were obtained. Device simulations were performed to investigate the effect of the lateral spreading. By comparing the measured I-V curves with simulation results, the lateral spreading factor was estimated to be about 0.5. The lateral spreading detrimentally affected the electrical properties of the SIT made using implantations at energies higher than 1 MeV.

  11. Neural Correlates of Indicators of Sound Change in Cantonese: Evidence from Cortical and Subcortical Processes

    PubMed Central

    Maggu, Akshay R.; Liu, Fang; Antoniou, Mark; Wong, Patrick C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Across time, languages undergo changes in phonetic, syntactic, and semantic dimensions. Social, cognitive, and cultural factors contribute to sound change, a phenomenon in which the phonetics of a language undergo changes over time. Individuals who misperceive and produce speech in a slightly divergent manner (called innovators) contribute to variability in the society, eventually leading to sound change. However, the cause of variability in these individuals is still unknown. In this study, we examined whether such misperceptions are represented in neural processes of the auditory system. We investigated behavioral, subcortical (via FFR), and cortical (via P300) manifestations of sound change processing in Cantonese, a Chinese language in which several lexical tones are merging. Across the merging categories, we observed a similar gradation of speech perception abilities in both behavior and the brain (subcortical and cortical processes). Further, we also found that behavioral evidence of tone merging correlated with subjects' encoding at the subcortical and cortical levels. These findings indicate that tone-merger categories, that are indicators of sound change in Cantonese, are represented neurophysiologically with high fidelity. Using our results, we speculate that innovators encode speech in a slightly deviant neurophysiological manner, and thus produce speech divergently that eventually spreads across the community and contributes to sound change. PMID:28066218

  12. Spread spectrum image steganography.

    PubMed

    Marvel, L M; Boncelet, C R; Retter, C T

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new method of digital steganography, entitled spread spectrum image steganography (SSIS). Steganography, which means "covered writing" in Greek, is the science of communicating in a hidden manner. Following a discussion of steganographic communication theory and review of existing techniques, the new method, SSIS, is introduced. This system hides and recovers a message of substantial length within digital imagery while maintaining the original image size and dynamic range. The hidden message can be recovered using appropriate keys without any knowledge of the original image. Image restoration, error-control coding, and techniques similar to spread spectrum are described, and the performance of the system is illustrated. A message embedded by this method can be in the form of text, imagery, or any other digital signal. Applications for such a data-hiding scheme include in-band captioning, covert communication, image tamperproofing, authentication, embedded control, and revision tracking.

  13. Reaction spreading on graphs.

    PubMed

    Burioni, Raffaella; Chibbaro, Sergio; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2012-11-01

    We study reaction-diffusion processes on graphs through an extension of the standard reaction-diffusion equation starting from first principles. We focus on reaction spreading, i.e., on the time evolution of the reaction product M(t). At variance with pure diffusive processes, characterized by the spectral dimension d{s}, the important quantity for reaction spreading is found to be the connectivity dimension d{l}. Numerical data, in agreement with analytical estimates based on the features of n independent random walkers on the graph, show that M(t)∼t{d{l}}. In the case of Erdös-Renyi random graphs, the reaction product is characterized by an exponential growth M(t)e{αt} with α proportional to ln(k), where (k) is the average degree of the graph.

  14. High Occurrence of Aberrant Lymph Node Spread on Magnetic Resonance Lymphography in Prostate Cancer Patients With a Biochemical Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Meijer, Hanneke J.M.; Lin, Emile N. van; Debats, Oscar A.; Witjes, J. Alfred; Span, Paul N.; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Barentsz, Jelle O.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the pattern of lymph node spread in prostate cancer patients with a biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy, eligible for salvage radiotherapy; and to determine whether the clinical target volume (CTV) for elective pelvic irradiation in the primary setting can be applied in the salvage setting for patients with (a high risk of) lymph node metastases. Methods and Materials: The charts of 47 prostate cancer patients with PSA recurrence after prostatectomy who had positive lymph nodes on magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL) were reviewed. Positive lymph nodes were assigned to a lymph node region according to the guidelines of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) for delineation of the CTV for pelvic irradiation (RTOG-CTV). We defined four lymph node regions for positive nodes outside this RTOG-CTV: the para-aortal, proximal common iliac, pararectal, and paravesical regions. They were referred to as aberrant lymph node regions. For each patient, clinical and pathologic features were recorded, and their association with aberrant lymph drainage was investigated. The distribution of positive lymph nodes was analyzed separately for patients with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <1.0 ng/mL. Results: MRL detected positive aberrant lymph nodes in 37 patients (79%). In 20 patients (43%) a positive lymph node was found in the pararectal region. Higher PSA at the time of MRL was associated with the presence of positive lymph nodes in the para-aortic region (2.49 vs. 0.82 ng/mL; p = 0.007) and in the proximal common iliac region (1.95 vs. 0.59 ng/mL; p = 0.009). There were 18 patients with a PSA <1.0 ng/mL. Ten of these patients (61%) had at least one aberrant positive lymph node. Conclusion: Seventy-nine percent of the PSA-recurrent patients had at least one aberrant positive lymph node. Application of the standard RTOG-CTV for pelvic irradiation in the salvage setting therefore seems to be inappropriate.

  15. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor regulates ROMK-like K+ channel activity in the renal cortical collecting duct during high dietary K+ adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yi; Zavilowitz, Beth; Ren, Jin; Liu, Wen; Chan, Pokman; Rohatgi, Rajeev; Estilo, Genevieve; Jackson, Edwin K.; Wang, Wen-Hui; Satlin, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    The kidney adjusts K+ excretion to match intake in part by regulation of the activity of apical K+ secretory channels, including renal outer medullary K+ (ROMK)-like K+ channels, in the cortical collecting duct (CCD). ANG II inhibits ROMK channels via the ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) during dietary K+ restriction. Because AT1Rs and ANG II type 2 receptors (AT2Rs) generally function in an antagonistic manner, we sought to characterize the regulation of ROMK channels by the AT2R. Patch-clamp experiments revealed that ANG II increased ROMK channel activity in CCDs isolated from high-K+ (HK)-fed but not normal K+ (NK)-fed rats. This response was blocked by PD-123319, an AT2R antagonist, but not by losartan, an AT1R antagonist, and was mimicked by the AT2R agonist CGP-42112. Nitric oxide (NO) synthase is present in CCD cells that express ROMK channels. Blockade of NO synthase with N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and free NO with 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt completely abolished ANG II-stimulated ROMK channel activity. NO enhances the synthesis of cGMP, which inhibits phosphodiesterases (PDEs) that normally degrade cAMP; cAMP increases ROMK channel activity. Pretreatment of CCDs with IBMX, a broad-spectrum PDE inhibitor, or cilostamide, a PDE3 inhibitor, abolished the stimulatory effect of ANG II on ROMK channels. Furthermore, PKA inhibitor peptide, but not an activator of the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), also prevented the stimulatory effect of ANG II. We conclude that ANG II acts at the AT2R to stimulate ROMK channel activity in CCDs from HK-fed rats, a response opposite to that mediated by the AT1R in dietary K+-restricted animals, via a NO/cGMP pathway linked to a cAMP-PKA pathway. PMID:25100281

  16. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor regulates ROMK-like K⁺ channel activity in the renal cortical collecting duct during high dietary K⁺ adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuan; Liao, Yi; Zavilowitz, Beth; Ren, Jin; Liu, Wen; Chan, Pokman; Rohatgi, Rajeev; Estilo, Genevieve; Jackson, Edwin K; Wang, Wen-Hui; Satlin, Lisa M

    2014-10-01

    The kidney adjusts K⁺ excretion to match intake in part by regulation of the activity of apical K⁺ secretory channels, including renal outer medullary K⁺ (ROMK)-like K⁺ channels, in the cortical collecting duct (CCD). ANG II inhibits ROMK channels via the ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) during dietary K⁺ restriction. Because AT1Rs and ANG II type 2 receptors (AT2Rs) generally function in an antagonistic manner, we sought to characterize the regulation of ROMK channels by the AT2R. Patch-clamp experiments revealed that ANG II increased ROMK channel activity in CCDs isolated from high-K⁺ (HK)-fed but not normal K⁺ (NK)-fed rats. This response was blocked by PD-123319, an AT2R antagonist, but not by losartan, an AT1R antagonist, and was mimicked by the AT2R agonist CGP-42112. Nitric oxide (NO) synthase is present in CCD cells that express ROMK channels. Blockade of NO synthase with N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and free NO with 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt completely abolished ANG II-stimulated ROMK channel activity. NO enhances the synthesis of cGMP, which inhibits phosphodiesterases (PDEs) that normally degrade cAMP; cAMP increases ROMK channel activity. Pretreatment of CCDs with IBMX, a broad-spectrum PDE inhibitor, or cilostamide, a PDE3 inhibitor, abolished the stimulatory effect of ANG II on ROMK channels. Furthermore, PKA inhibitor peptide, but not an activator of the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), also prevented the stimulatory effect of ANG II. We conclude that ANG II acts at the AT2R to stimulate ROMK channel activity in CCDs from HK-fed rats, a response opposite to that mediated by the AT1R in dietary K⁺-restricted animals, via a NO/cGMP pathway linked to a cAMP-PKA pathway.

  17. High glutamate attenuates S100B and LDH outputs from rat cortical slices enhanced by either oxygen-glucose deprivation or menadione.

    PubMed

    Demircan, Celaleddin; Gül, Zülfiye; Büyükuysal, R Levent

    2014-07-01

    One hour incubation of rat cortical slices in a medium without oxygen and glucose (oxygen-glucose deprivation, OGD) increased S100B release to 6.53 ± 0.3 ng/ml/mg protein from its control value of 3.61 ± 0.2 ng/ml/mg protein. When these slices were then transferred to a medium containing oxygen and glucose (reoxygenation, REO), S100B release rose to 344 % of its control value. REO also caused 192 % increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage. Glutamate added at millimolar concentration into the medium decreased OGD or REO-induced S100B release and REO-induced LDH leakage. Alpha-ketoglutarate, a metabolic product of glutamate, was found to be as effective as glutamate in decreasing the S100B and LDH outputs. Similarly lactate, 2-ketobutyrate and ethyl pyruvate, a lipophilic derivative of pyruvate, also exerted a glutamate-like effect on S100B and LDH outputs. Preincubation with menadione, which produces H2O2 intracellularly, significantly increased S100B and LDH levels in normoxic medium. All drugs tested in the present study, with the exception of pyruvate, showed a complete protection against menadione preincubation. Additionally, each OGD-REO, menadione or H2O2-induced mitochondrial energy impairments determined by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and OGD-REO or menadione-induced increases in reactive oxygen substances (ROS) determined by 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) were also recovered by glutamate. Interestingly, H2O2-induced increase in fluorescence intensity derived from DCFH-DA in a slice-free physiological medium was attenuated significantly by glutamate and alpha-keto acids. All these drug actions support the conclusion that high glutamate, such as alpha-ketoglutarate and other keto acids, protects the slices against OGD- and REO-induced S100B and LDH outputs probably by scavenging ROS in addition to its energy substrate metabolite property.

  18. Self-organization and neuronal avalanches in networks of dissociated cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Pasquale, V; Massobrio, P; Bologna, L L; Chiappalone, M; Martinoia, S

    2008-06-02

    Dissociated cortical neurons from rat embryos cultured onto micro-electrode arrays exhibit characteristic patterns of electrophysiological activity, ranging from isolated spikes in the first days of development to highly synchronized bursts after 3-4 weeks in vitro. In this work we analyzed these features by considering the approach proposed by the self-organized criticality theory: we found that networks of dissociated cortical neurons also generate spontaneous events of spreading activity, previously observed in cortical slices, in the form of neuronal avalanches. Choosing an appropriate time scale of observation to detect such neuronal avalanches, we studied the dynamics by considering the spontaneous activity during acute recordings in mature cultures and following the development of the network. We observed different behaviors, i.e. sub-critical, critical or super-critical distributions of avalanche sizes and durations, depending on both the age and the development of cultures. In order to clarify this variability, neuronal avalanches were correlated with other statistical parameters describing the global activity of the network. Criticality was found in correspondence to medium synchronization among bursts and high ratio between bursting and spiking activity. Then, the action of specific drugs affecting global bursting dynamics (i.e. acetylcholine and bicuculline) was investigated to confirm the correlation between criticality and regulated balance between synchronization and variability in the bursting activity. Finally, a computational model of neuronal network was developed in order to interpret the experimental results and understand which parameters (e.g. connectivity, excitability) influence the distribution of avalanches. In summary, cortical neurons preserve their capability to self-organize in an effective network even when dissociated and cultured in vitro. The distribution of avalanche features seems to be critical in those cultures displaying

  19. Security of Classic PN-Spreading Codes for Hybrid DS/FH Spread-Spectrum Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Xiao; Olama, Mohammed M; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Smith, Stephen Fulton; Djouadi, Seddik M

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid direct sequence/frequency hopping (DS/FH) spread-spectrum communication systems have recently received considerable interest in commercial applications in addition to their use in military communications because they accommodate high data rates with high link integrity, even in the presence of significant multipath effects and interfering signals. The security of hybrid DS/FH systems strongly depends on the choice of PN-spreading code employed. In this paper, we examine the security, in terms of unicity distance, of linear maximal-length, Gold, and Kasami PN-spreading codes for DS, FH, and hybrid DS/FH spread-spectrum systems without additional encryption methods. The unicity distance is a measure of the minimum amount of ciphertext required by an eavesdropper to uniquely determine the specific key used in a cryptosystem and hence break the cipher. Numerical results are presented to compare the security of the considered PN-spreading codes under known-ciphertext attacks.

  20. Cortical Gyrification Patterns Associated with Trait Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Miskovich, Tara A.; Pedersen, Walker S.; Belleau, Emily L.; Shollenbarger, Skyler; Lisdahl, Krista M.; Larson, Christine L.

    2016-01-01

    Dispositional anxiety is a stable personality trait that is a key risk factor for internalizing disorders, and understanding the neural correlates of trait anxiety may help us better understand the development of these disorders. Abnormal cortical folding is thought to reflect differences in cortical connectivity occurring during brain development. Therefore, assessing gyrification may advance understanding of cortical development and organization associated with trait anxiety. Previous literature has revealed structural abnormalities in trait anxiety and related disorders, but no study to our knowledge has examined gyrification in trait anxiety. We utilized a relatively novel measure, the local gyrification index (LGI), to explore differences in gyrification as a function of trait anxiety. We obtained structural MRI scans using a 3T magnetic resonance scanner on 113 young adults. Results indicated a negative correlation between trait anxiety and LGI in the left superior parietal cortex, specifically the precuneus, reflecting less cortical complexity among those high on trait anxiety. Our findings suggest that aberrations in cortical gyrification in a key region of the default mode network is a correlate of trait anxiety and may reflect disrupted local parietal connectivity. PMID:26872350

  1. Cortical Morphology Differences in Subjects at Increased Vulnerability for Developing a Psychotic Disorder: A Comparison between Subjects with Ultra-High Risk and 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Geor; Caan, Matthan W. A.; Vingerhoets, Wilhelmina A. M.; da Silva- Alves, Fabiana; de Koning, Mariken; Boot, Erik; Nieman, Dorien H.; de Haan, Lieuwe; Bloemen, Oswald J.; Booij, Jan; van Amelsvoort, Thérèse A. M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Subjects with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) and subjects with ultra-high risk for psychosis (UHR) share a risk of approximately 30% to develop a psychotic disorder. Studying these groups helps identify biological markers of pathophysiological processes involved in the development of psychosis. Total cortical surface area (cSA), total cortical grey matter volume (cGMV), cortical thickness (CT), and local gyrification index (LGI) of the cortical structure have a distinct neurodevelopmental origin making them important target markers to study in relation to the development of psychosis. Materials and Methods Structural T1-weighted high resolution images were acquired using a 3 Tesla Intera MRI system in 18 UHR subjects, 18 22q11DS subjects, and 24 matched healthy control (HC) subjects. Total cSA, total cGMV, mean CT, and regional vertex-wise differences in CT and LGI were assessed using FreeSurfer software. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale was used to assess psychotic symptom severity in UHR and 22q11DS subjects at time of scanning. Results 22q11DS subjects had lower total cSA and total cGMV compared to UHR and HC subjects. The 22q11DS subjects showed bilateral lower LGI in the i) prefrontal cortex, ii) precuneus, iii) precentral gyrus and iv) cuneus compared to UHR subjects. Additionally, lower LGI was found in the left i) fusiform gyrus and right i) pars opercularis, ii) superior, and iii) inferior temporal gyrus in 22q11DS subjects compared to HC. In comparison to 22q11DS subjects, the UHR subjects had lower CT of the insula. For both risk groups, positive symptom severity was negatively correlated to rostral middle frontal gyrus CT. Conclusion A shared negative correlation between positive symptom severity and rostral middle frontal gyrus CT in UHR and 22q11DS may be related to their increased vulnerability to develop a psychotic disorder. 22q11DS subjects were characterised by widespread lower degree of cortical gyrification linked to

  2. Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C

    2013-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is characterized by a progressive decline in visuospatial, visuoperceptual, literacy and praxic skills. The progressive neurodegeneration affecting parietal, occipital and occipito-temporal cortices which underlies PCA is attributable to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the majority of patients. However, alternative underlying aetiologies including Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and prion disease have also been identified, and not all PCA patients have atrophy on clinical imaging. This heterogeneity has led to diagnostic and terminological inconsistencies, caused difficulty comparing studies from different centres, and limited the generalizability of clinical trials and investigations of factors driving phenotypic variability. Significant challenges remain in identifying the factors associated with both the selective vulnerability of posterior cortical regions and the young age of onset seen in PCA. Greater awareness of the syndrome and agreement over the correspondence between syndrome-and disease-level classifications are required in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, research study design and clinical management. PMID:22265212

  3. Contact line arrest in solidifying spreading drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruiter, Rielle; Colinet, Pierre; Snoeijer, Jacco; Gelderblom, Hanneke

    2016-11-01

    When does a drop, deposited on a cold substrate, stop spreading? Despite the practical relevance of this question, for example in airplane icing and 3D metal printing, the exact mechanism of arrest in solidifying spreading drops has not yet been unraveled. Here, we consider the spreading and arrest of hexadecane drops of constant volume on two smooth wettable substrates; copper with a high thermal conductivity and glass with a low thermal conductivity. We record the spreading radius and contact angle in time for a range of substrate temperatures. We show that our measurements on both copper and glass are well explained by a contact line arrest condition based on crystallization kinetics, which takes into account the effect of kinetic undercooling and the thermal conductivity of the substrate.

  4. Reactive spreading: Adsorption, ridging and compound formation

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, E.; Cannon, R.M.; Tomsia, A.P.

    2000-09-11

    Reactive spreading, in which a chemically active element is added to promote wetting of noble metals on nonmetallic materials, is evaluated. Theories for the energetics and kinetics of the necessary steps involved in spreading are outlined and compared to the steps in compound formation that typically accompany reactive wetting. These include: fluid flow, active metal adsorption, including nonequilibrium effects, and triple line ridging. All of these can be faster than compound nucleation under certain conditions. Analysis and assessment of recently reported experiments on metal/ceramic systems lead to a focus on those conditions under which spreading proceeds ahead of the actual formation of a new phase at the interface. This scenario may be more typical than believed, and perhaps the most effective situation leading to enhanced spreading. A rationale for the pervasive variability and hysteresis observed during high temperature wetting also emerges.

  5. Cortical Specializations Underlying Fast Computations.

    PubMed

    Volgushev, Maxim

    2016-04-01

    The time course of behaviorally relevant environmental events sets temporal constraints on neuronal processing. How does the mammalian brain make use of the increasingly complex networks of the neocortex, while making decisions and executing behavioral reactions within a reasonable time? The key parameter determining the speed of computations in neuronal networks is a time interval that neuronal ensembles need to process changes at their input and communicate results of this processing to downstream neurons. Theoretical analysis identified basic requirements for fast processing: use of neuronal populations for encoding, background activity, and fast onset dynamics of action potentials in neurons. Experimental evidence shows that populations of neocortical neurons fulfil these requirements. Indeed, they can change firing rate in response to input perturbations very quickly, within 1 to 3 ms, and encode high-frequency components of the input by phase-locking their spiking to frequencies up to 300 to 1000 Hz. This implies that time unit of computations by cortical ensembles is only few, 1 to 3 ms, which is considerably faster than the membrane time constant of individual neurons. The ability of cortical neuronal ensembles to communicate on a millisecond time scale allows for complex, multiple-step processing and precise coordination of neuronal activity in parallel processing streams, while keeping the speed of behavioral reactions within environmentally set temporal constraints.

  6. Gyrification from constrained cortical expansion

    PubMed Central

    Tallinen, Tuomas; Chung, Jun Young; Biggins, John S.; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-01

    The exterior of the mammalian brain—the cerebral cortex—has a conserved layered structure whose thickness varies little across species. However, selection pressures over evolutionary time scales have led to cortices that have a large surface area to volume ratio in some organisms, with the result that the brain is strongly convoluted into sulci and gyri. Here we show that the gyrification can arise as a nonlinear consequence of a simple mechanical instability driven by tangential expansion of the gray matter constrained by the white matter. A physical mimic of the process using a layered swelling gel captures the essence of the mechanism, and numerical simulations of the brain treated as a soft solid lead to the formation of cusped sulci and smooth gyri similar to those in the brain. The resulting gyrification patterns are a function of relative cortical expansion and relative thickness (compared with brain size), and are consistent with observations of a wide range of brains, ranging from smooth to highly convoluted. Furthermore, this dependence on two simple geometric parameters that characterize the brain also allows us to qualitatively explain how variations in these parameters lead to anatomical anomalies in such situations as polymicrogyria, pachygyria, and lissencephalia. PMID:25136099

  7. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F [London, TN; Dress, William B [Camas, WA

    2010-02-09

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method, includes receiving a hybrid spread spectrum signal including: fast frequency hopping demodulating and direct sequence demodulating a direct sequence spread spectrum signal, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time and each bit is represented by chip transmissions at multiple frequencies.

  8. Illusory spreading of watercolor

    PubMed Central

    Devinck, Frédéric; Hardy, Joseph L.; Delahunt, Peter B.; Spillmann, Lothar; Werner, John S.

    2008-01-01

    The watercolor effect (WCE) is a phenomenon of long-range color assimilation occurring when a dark chromatic contour delineating a figure is flanked on the inside by a brighter chromatic contour; the brighter color spreads into the entire enclosed area. Here, we determined the optimal chromatic parameters and the cone signals supporting the WCE. To that end, we quantified the effect of color assimilation using hue cancellation as a function of hue, colorimetric purity, and cone modulation of inducing contours. When the inner and outer contours had chromaticities that were in opposite directions in color space, a stronger WCE was obtained as compared with other color directions. Additionally, equal colorimetric purity between the outer and inner contours was necessary to obtain a large effect compared with conditions in which the contours differed in colorimetric purity. However, there was no further increase in the magnitude of the effect when the colorimetric purity increased beyond a value corresponding to an equal vector length between the inner and outer contours. Finally, L–M-cone-modulated WCE was perceptually stronger than S-cone-modulated WCE for our conditions. This last result demonstrates that both L–M-cone and S-cone pathways are important for watercolor spreading. Our data suggest that the WCE depends critically upon the particular spatiochromatic arrangement in the display, with the relative chromatic contrast between the inducing contours being particularly important. PMID:16881793

  9. Susceptibility of Primary Sensory Cortex to Spreading Depolarizations

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov, Volodymyr B.; Middleton, Natalie A.; Theriot, Jeremy J.; Parker, Patrick D.; Abdullah, Osama M.; Ju, Y. Sungtaek; Hartings, Jed A.

    2016-01-01

    Spreading depolarizations (SDs) are recognized as actors in neurological disorders as diverse as migraine and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Migraine aura involves sensory percepts, suggesting that sensory cortices might be intrinsically susceptible to SDs. We used optical imaging, MRI, and field potential and potassium electrode recordings in mice and electrocorticographic recordings in humans to determine the susceptibility of different brain regions to SDs. Optical imaging experiments in mice under isoflurane anesthesia showed that both cortical spreading depression and terminal anoxic depolarization arose preferentially in the whisker barrel region of parietal sensory cortex. MRI recordings under isoflurane, ketamine/xylazine, ketamine/isoflurane, and urethane anesthesia demonstrated that the depolarizations did not propagate from a subcortical source. Potassium concentrations showed larger increases in sensory cortex, suggesting a mechanism of susceptibility. Sensory stimulation biased the timing but not the location of depolarization onset. In humans with TBI, there was a trend toward increased incidence of SDs in parietal/temporal sensory cortex compared with other regions. In conclusion, SDs are inducible preferentially in primary sensory cortex in mice and most likely in humans. This tropism can explain the predominant sensory phenomenology of migraine aura. It also demonstrates that sensory cortices are vulnerable in brain injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Spreading depolarizations (SDs) are involved in neurologic disorders as diverse as migraine and traumatic brain injury. In migraine, the nature of aura symptoms suggests that sensory cortex may be preferentially susceptible. In brain injury, SDs occur at a vulnerable time, during which the issue of sensory stimulation is much debated. We show, in mouse and human, that sensory cortex is more susceptible to SDs. We find that sensory stimulation biases the timing but not the location of the depolarizations

  10. Mapping cortical thickness and gray matter concentration in first episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Narr, Katherine L; Bilder, Robert M; Toga, Arthur W; Woods, Roger P; Rex, David E; Szeszko, Philip R; Robinson, Delbert; Sevy, Serge; Gunduz-Bruce, Handan; Wang, Yung-Ping; DeLuca, Heather; Thompson, Paul M

    2005-06-01

    We mapped regional changes in cortical thickness and intensity-based cortical gray matter concentration in first episode schizophrenia. High-resolution magnetic resonance images were obtained from 72 (51 male, 21 female) first episode patients and 78 (37 male, 41 female) healthy subjects similar in age. Cortical pattern matching methods allowed comparisons of cortical thickness and gray matter concentration at thousands of homologous cortical locations between subjects in three dimensions. Principal components analyses reduced measures obtained across the cortex to identify global differences in cortical thickness/gray matter concentration. First principal component factor scores showed significant effects of diagnosis, sex and age for both cortical measures. Diagnosis and age effects remained significant after brain size correction. Cortical thickness and gray matter concentration values were highly correlated. Statistical maps showed significant regional gray matter thinning in frontal, temporal and parietal heteromodal association cortices bilaterally in first episode patients. Regional reductions in cortical gray matter concentration were similar but pronounced in the superior temporal lobe. Regional reductions in cortical thickness and gray matter concentration are present at disease onset in brain regions linked with functional disturbances in schizophrenia. Cortical thickness and gray matter concentration mapping produce similar results, although the concentration metric may be influenced by diagnostic differences in extra-cortical cerebrospinal fluid and surface curvature/complexity.

  11. Cortical Clefts and Cortical Bumps: A Continuous Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Furruqh, Farha; Thirunavukarasu, Suresh; Vivekandan, Ravichandran

    2016-01-01

    Cortical ‘clefts’ (schizencephaly) and cortical ‘bumps’ (polymicrogyria) are malformations arising due to defects in postmigrational development of neurons. They are frequently encountered together, with schizencephalic clefts being lined by polymicrogyria. We present the case of an eight-year-old boy who presented with seizures. Imaging revealed closed lip schizencephaly, polymicrogyria and a deep ‘incomplete’ cleft lined by polymicrogyria not communicating with the lateral ventricle. We speculate that hypoperfusion or ischaemic cortical injury during neuronal development may lead to a spectrum of malformations ranging from polymicrogyria to incomplete cortical clefts to schizencephaly. PMID:27630923

  12. Evidence for alterations of cortical folding in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Schultz, C Christoph; Wagner, Gerd; de la Cruz, Feliberto; Berger, Sandy; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Sauer, Heinrich; Bär, Karl J

    2017-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is highly heritable, and the perspective on the etiology of AN has changed from a behavioral to a neurobiological and neurodevelopmental view. However, cortical folding as an important marker for deviations in brain development has yet rarely been explored in AN. Hence, in order to determine potential cortical folding alterations, we investigated fine-grained cortical folding in a cohort of 26 patients with AN, of whom 6 patients were recovered regarding their weight at the time point of MRI measurement. MRI-derived cortical folding was computed and compared between patients and healthy controls at about 150,000 points per hemisphere using a surface-based technique (FreeSurfer). Patients with AN exhibited highly significant increased cortical folding in a right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex region (DLPFC). Furthermore, a statistical trend in the same direction was found in the right visual cortex. We did not find a correlation of local cortical folding and current symptoms of the disease. In conclusion, our analyses provide first evidence that altered DLPFC cortical folding plays a role in the etiology of AN. The absence of correlations with clinical parameters implicates a relatively independence of cortical folding alterations from the current symptomatology and might thus be regarded as a trait characteristic of the disease potentially related to other neurobiological features of AN.

  13. Cytoskeleton mediated spreading dynamics of immune cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, King-Lam; Wayt, Jessica; Grooman, Brian; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2009-03-01

    We have studied the spreading of Jurkat T-cells on anti-CD3 antibody-coated substrates as a model of immune synapse formation. Cell adhesion area versus time was measured via interference reflection contrast microscopy. We found that the spread area exhibited a sigmoidal growth as a function of time in contrast to the previously proposed universal power-law growth for spreading cells. We used high-resolution total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of these cells transfected with GFP-actin to study cytoskeletal dynamics during the spreading process. Actin filaments spontaneously organized into a variety of structures including traveling waves, target patterns, and mobile clusters emanating from an organizing center. We quantify these dynamic structures and relate them to the spreading rates. We propose that the spreading kinetics are determined by active rearrangements of the cytoskeleton initiated by signaling events upon antibody binding by T-cell receptors. Membrane deformations induced by such wavelike organization of the cytoskeleton may be a general phenomenon that underlies cell movement and cell-substrate interactions.

  14. Emergence of blind areas in information spreading.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Ke; Zhang, Chu-Xu; Han, Xiao-Pu; Liu, Chuang

    2014-01-01

    Recently, contagion-based (disease, information, etc.) spreading on social networks has been extensively studied. In this paper, other than traditional full interaction, we propose a partial interaction based spreading model, considering that the informed individuals would transmit information to only a certain fraction of their neighbors due to the transmission ability in real-world social networks. Simulation results on three representative networks (BA, ER, WS) indicate that the spreading efficiency is highly correlated with the network heterogeneity. In addition, a special phenomenon, namely Information Blind Areas where the network is separated by several information-unreachable clusters, will emerge from the spreading process. Furthermore, we also find that the size distribution of such information blind areas obeys power-law-like distribution, which has very similar exponent with that of site percolation. Detailed analyses show that the critical value is decreasing along with the network heterogeneity for the spreading process, which is complete the contrary to that of random selection. Moreover, the critical value in the latter process is also larger than that of the former for the same network. Those findings might shed some lights in in-depth understanding the effect of network properties on information spreading.

  15. Reconstructing cortical current density by exploring sparseness in the transform domain.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lei

    2009-05-07

    In the present study, we have developed a novel electromagnetic source imaging approach to reconstruct extended cortical sources by means of cortical current density (CCD) modeling and a novel EEG imaging algorithm which explores sparseness in cortical source representations through the use of L1-norm in objective functions. The new sparse cortical current density (SCCD) imaging algorithm is unique since it reconstructs cortical sources by attaining sparseness in a transform domain (the variation map of cortical source distributions). While large variations are expected to occur along boundaries (sparseness) between active and inactive cortical regions, cortical sources can be reconstructed and their spatial extents can be estimated by locating these boundaries. We studied the SCCD algorithm using numerous simulations to investigate its capability in reconstructing cortical sources with different extents and in reconstructing multiple cortical sources with different extent contrasts. The SCCD algorithm was compared with two L2-norm solutions, i.e. weighted minimum norm estimate (wMNE) and cortical LORETA. Our simulation data from the comparison study show that the proposed sparse source imaging algorithm is able to accurately and efficiently recover extended cortical sources and is promising to provide high-accuracy estimation of cortical source extents.

  16. Cortical sensory plasticity in a model of migraine with aura.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Jeremy J; Toga, Arthur W; Prakash, Neal; Ju, Y Sungtaek; Brennan, K C

    2012-10-31

    The migraine attack is characterized by alterations in sensory perception, such as photophobia or allodynia, which have in common an uncomfortable amplification of the percept. It is not known how these changes arise. We evaluated the ability of cortical spreading depression (CSD), the proposed mechanism of the migraine aura, to shape the cortical activity that underlies sensory perception. We measured forepaw- and hindpaw-evoked sensory responses in rat, before and after CSD, using multielectrode array recordings and two-dimensional optical spectroscopy. CSD significantly altered cortical sensory processing on a timescale compatible with the duration of the migraine attack. Both electrophysiological and hemodynamic maps had a reduced surface area (were sharpened) after CSD. Electrophysiological responses were potentiated at the receptive field center but suppressed in surround regions. Finally, the normal adaptation of sensory-evoked responses was attenuated at the receptive field center. In summary, we show that CSD induces changes in the evoked cortical response that are consistent with known mechanisms of cortical plasticity. These mechanisms provide a novel neurobiological substrate to explain the sensory alterations of the migraine attack.

  17. Cortical sensory plasticity in a model of migraine with aura

    PubMed Central

    Theriot, Jeremy J.; Toga, Arthur W.; Prakash, Neal; Ju, Y. Sungtaek; Brennan, K.C.

    2012-01-01

    The migraine attack is characterized by alterations in sensory perception, such as photophobia or allodynia, which have in common an uncomfortable amplification of the percept. It is not known how these changes arise. We evaluated the ability of cortical spreading depression (CSD), the proposed mechanism of the migraine aura, to shape the cortical activity that underlies sensory perception. We measured forepaw- and hindpaw-evoked sensory responses in rat, before and after CSD, using multi-electrode array recordings and 2-dimensional optical spectroscopy. CSD significantly altered cortical sensory processing on a timescale compatible with the duration of the migraine attack. Both electrophysiological and hemodynamic maps had a reduced surface area (were sharpened) after CSD. Electrophysiological responses were potentiated at the receptive field center, but suppressed in surround regions. Finally, the normal adaptation of sensory evoked responses was attenuated at the receptive field center. In summary, we show that CSD induces changes in the evoked cortical response that are consistent with known mechanisms of cortical plasticity. These mechanisms provide a novel neurobiological substrate to explain the sensory alterations of the migraine attack. PMID:23115163

  18. Diffeomorphic spectral matching of cortical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lombaert, Herve; Sporring, Jon; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2013-01-01

    Accurate matching of cortical surfaces is necessary in many neuroscience applications. In this context diffeomorphisms are often sought, because they facilitate further statistical analysis and atlas building. Present methods for computing diffeomorphisms are based on optimizing flows or on inflating surfaces to a common template, but they are often computationally expensive. It typically takes several hours on a conventional desktop computer to match a single pair of cortical surfaces having a few hundred thousand vertices. We propose a very fast alternative based on an application of spectral graph theory on a novel association graph. Our symmetric approach can generate a diffeomorphic correspondence map within a few minutes on high-resolution meshes while avoiding the sign and multiplicity ambiguities of conventional spectral matching methods. The eigenfunctions are shared between surfaces and provide a smooth parameterization of surfaces. These properties are exploited to compute differentials on highly folded cortical surfaces. Diffeomorphisms can thus be verified and invalid surface folding detected. Our method is demonstrated to attain a vertex accuracy that is at least as good as that of FreeSurfer and Spherical Demons but in only a fraction of their processing time. As a practical experiment, we construct an unbiased atlas of cortical surfaces with a speed several orders of magnitude faster than current methods.

  19. Cortical source localization of infant cognition.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Greg D; Richards, John E

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission topography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been utilized with older children and adults to identify cortical sources of perceptual and cognitive processes. However, due to practical and ethical concerns, these techniques cannot be routinely applied to infant participants. An alternative to such neuroimaging techniques appropriate for use with infant participants is high-density electroencephalogram (EEG) recording and cortical source localization techniques. The current article provides an overview of a method developed for such analyses. The method consists of four steps: (1) recording high-density (e.g., 128-channel) EEG. (2) Analysis of individual participant raw segmented data with independent component analysis (ICA). (3) Estimation of equivalent current dipoles (ECDs) that represent cortical sources for the observed ICA component clusters. (4) Calculation of component activations in relation to experimental factors. We discuss an example of research applying this technique to investigate the development of visual attention and recognition memory. We also describe the application of "realistic head modeling" to address some of the current limitations of infant cortical source localization.

  20. Increased Cortical Thickness in Professional On-Line Gamers

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Gi Jung; Shin, Yong Wook; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Jin, Seong Nam

    2013-01-01

    Objective The bulk of recent studies have tested whether video games change the brain in terms of activity and cortical volume. However, such studies are limited by several factors including cross-sectional comparisons, co-morbidity, and short-term follow-up periods. In the present study, we hypothesized that cognitive flexibility and the volume of brain cortex would be correlated with the career length of on-line pro-gamers. Methods High-resolution magnetic resonance scans were acquired in twenty-three pro-gamers recruited from StarCraft pro-game teams. We measured cortical thickness in each individual using FreeSurfer and the cortical thickness was correlated with the career length and the performance of the pro-gamers. Results Career length was positively correlated with cortical thickness in three brain regions: right superior frontal gyrus, right superior parietal gyrus, and right precentral gyrus. Additionally, increased cortical thickness in the prefrontal cortex was correlated with winning rates of the pro-game league. Increased cortical thickness in the prefrontal and parietal cortices was also associated with higher performance of Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Conclusion Our results suggest that in individuals without pathologic conditions, regular, long-term playing of on-line games is associated with volume changes in the prefrontal and parietal cortices, which are associated with cognitive flexibility. PMID:24474988

  1. Mapping cortical mesoscopic networks of single spiking cortical or sub-cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dongsheng; Vanni, Matthieu P; Mitelut, Catalin C; Chan, Allen W; LeDue, Jeffrey M; Xie, Yicheng; Chen, Andrew CN; Swindale, Nicholas V; Murphy, Timothy H

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the basis of brain function requires knowledge of cortical operations over wide-spatial scales, but also within the context of single neurons. In vivo, wide-field GCaMP imaging and sub-cortical/cortical cellular electrophysiology were used in mice to investigate relationships between spontaneous single neuron spiking and mesoscopic cortical activity. We make use of a rich set of cortical activity motifs that are present in spontaneous activity in anesthetized and awake animals. A mesoscale spike-triggered averaging procedure allowed the identification of motifs that are preferentially linked to individual spiking neurons by employing genetically targeted indicators of neuronal activity. Thalamic neurons predicted and reported specific cycles of wide-scale cortical inhibition/excitation. In contrast, spike-triggered maps derived from single cortical neurons yielded spatio-temporal maps expected for regional cortical consensus function. This approach can define network relationships between any point source of neuronal spiking and mesoscale cortical maps. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19976.001 PMID:28160463

  2. Hormone-induced cortical maturation ensures the slow block to polyspermy and does not couple with meiotic maturation in starfish.

    PubMed

    Hirohashi, Noritaka; Harada, Kaori; Chiba, Kazuyoshi

    2008-06-01

    Meiotic progression in starfish oocytes is reinitiated by a maturation-inducing hormone called 1-methyladenine (1-MeAde). In addition to meiotic maturation, 1-MeAde induces cortical maturation in which cortical granules become competent to discharge in response to fusion of a single sperm, which results in the formation of the fertilization envelope. We found that subthreshold concentrations of 1-MeAde induce cortical maturation without germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD). During cortical maturation, the IP3 sensitivity of calcium stores was increased as well as during meiotic maturation. When oocytes were exposed with 1-MeAde only on a hemisphere of oocytes, the IP3 sensitivity of the cortical region was increased only in the exposed hemisphere, suggesting that signals and components involved in cortical maturation do not readily spread in the cytoplasm. Although a specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, LY294002 blocked both GVBD and cortical maturation, a Cdc2 kinase inhibitor, roscovitine did not block cortical maturation. Inhibition of Akt activation by injecting the competitors for Akt phosphorylation and membrane recruitment also blocked cortical maturation. These results suggest that the signaling pathway leading to Akt activation is common in cortical maturation and meiotic maturation, and Cdc2 activation was not required for cortical maturation.

  3. Evaluating Mandibular Cortical Index Quantitatively

    PubMed Central

    Yasar, Fusun; Akgunlu, Faruk

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to assess whether Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity analysis can discriminate patients having different mandibular cortical shape. Methods Panoramic radiographs of 52 patients were evaluated for mandibular cortical index. Weighted Kappa between the observations were varying between 0.718–0.805. These radiographs were scanned and converted to binary images. Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity were calculated from the regions where best represents the cortical morphology. Results It was found that there were statistically significant difference between the Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity of radiographs which were classified as having Cl 1 and Cl 2 (Fractal Dimension P:0.000; Lacunarity P:0.003); and Cl 1 and Cl 3 cortical morphology (Fractal Dimension P:0.008; Lacunarity P:0.001); but there was no statistically significant difference between Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity of radiographs which were classified as having Cl 2 and Cl 3 cortical morphology (Fractal Dimension P:1.000; Lacunarity P:0.758). Conclusions FD and L can differentiate Cl 1 mandibular cortical shape from both Cl 2 and Cl 3 mandibular cortical shape but cannot differentiate Cl 2 from Cl 3 mandibular cortical shape on panoramic radiographs. PMID:19212535

  4. The Diversity of Cortical Inhibitory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Yoshiyuki; Karube, Fuyuki; Nomura, Masaki; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    The most typical and well known inhibitory action in the cortical microcircuit is a strong inhibition on the target neuron by axo-somatic synapses. However, it has become clear that synaptic inhibition in the cortex is much more diverse and complicated. Firstly, at least ten or more inhibitory non-pyramidal cell subtypes engage in diverse inhibitory functions to produce the elaborate activity characteristic of the different cortical states. Each distinct non-pyramidal cell subtype has its own independent inhibitory function. Secondly, the inhibitory synapses innervate different neuronal domains, such as axons, spines, dendrites and soma, and their inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP) size is not uniform. Thus, cortical inhibition is highly complex, with a wide variety of anatomical and physiological modes. Moreover, the functional significance of the various inhibitory synapse innervation styles and their unique structural dynamic behaviors differ from those of excitatory synapses. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the inhibitory mechanisms of the cortical microcircuit. PMID:27199670

  5. Parallel Impurity Spreading During Massive Gas Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    Extended-MHD simulations of disruption mitigation in DIII-D demonstrate that both pre-existing islands (locked-modes) and plasma rotation can significantly influence toroidal spreading of impurities following massive gas injection (MGI). Given the importance of successful disruption mitigation in ITER and the large disparity in device parameters, empirical demonstrations of disruption mitigation strategies in present tokamaks are insufficient to inspire unreserved confidence for ITER. Here, MHD simulations elucidate how impurities injected as a localized jet spread toroidally and poloidally. Simulations with large pre-existing islands at the q = 2 surface reveal that the magnetic topology strongly influences the rate of impurity spreading parallel to the field lines. Parallel spreading is largely driven by rapid parallel heat conduction, and is much faster at low order rational surfaces, where a short parallel connection length leads to faster thermal equilibration. Consequently, the presence of large islands, which alter the connection length, can slow impurity transport; but the simulations also show that the appearance of a 4/2 harmonic of the 2/1 mode, which breaks up the large islands, can increase the rate of spreading. This effect is seen both for simulations with spontaneously growing and directly imposed 4/2 modes. Given the prevalence of locked-modes as a cause of disruptions, understanding the effect of large islands is of particular importance. Simulations with and without islands also show that rotation can alter impurity spreading, even reversing the predominant direction of spreading, which is toward the high-field-side in the absence of rotation. Given expected differences in rotation for ITER vs. DIII-D, rotation effects are another important consideration when extrapolating experimental results. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FG02-95ER54309.

  6. Failure of feedback as a putative common mechanism of spreading depolarizations in migraine and stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlem, Markus A.; Schneider, Felix M.; Schöll, Eckehard

    2008-06-01

    The stability of cortical function depends critically on proper regulation. Under conditions of migraine and stroke a breakdown of transmembrane chemical gradients can spread through cortical tissue. A concomitant component of this emergent spatio-temporal pattern is a depolarization of cells detected as slow voltage variations. The propagation velocity of ˜3mm/min indicates a contribution of diffusion. We propose a mechanism for spreading depolarizations (SD) that rests upon a nonlocal or noninstantaneous feedback in a reaction-diffusion system. Depending upon the characteristic space and time scales of the feedback, the propagation of cortical SD can be suppressed by shifting the bifurcation line, which separates the parameter regime of pulse propagation from the regime where a local disturbance dies out. The optimization of this feedback is elaborated for different control schemes and ranges of control parameters.

  7. Unsupervised fetal cortical surface parcellation

    PubMed Central

    Dahdouh, Sonia; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    At the core of many neuro-imaging studies, atlas-based brain parcellations are used for example to study normal brain evolution across the lifespan. These atlases rely on the assumption that the same anatomical features are present on all subjects to be studied and that these features are stable enough to allow meaningful comparisons between different brain surfaces and structures These methods, however, often fail when applied to fetal MRI data, due to the lack of consistent anatomical features present across gestation. This paper presents a novel surface-based fetal cortical parcellation framework which attempts to circumvent the lack of consistent anatomical features by proposing a brain parcellation scheme that is based solely on learned geometrical features. A mesh signature incorporating both extrinsic and intrinsic geometrical features is proposed and used in a clustering scheme to define a parcellation of the fetal brain. This parcellation is then learned using a Random Forest (RF) based learning approach and then further refined in an alpha-expansion graph-cut scheme. Based on the votes obtained by the RF inference procedure, a probability map is computed and used as a data term in the graph-cut procedure. The smoothness term is defined by learning a transition matrix based on the dihedral angles of the faces. Qualitative and quantitative results on a cohort of both healthy and high-risk fetuses are presented. Both visual and quantitative assessments show good results demonstrating a reliable method for fetal brain data and the possibility of obtaining a parcellation of the fetal cortical surfaces using only geometrical features. PMID:27413248

  8. Unsupervised fetal cortical surface parcellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahdouh, Sonia; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    At the core of many neuro-imaging studies, atlas-based brain parcellations are used for example to study normal brain evolution across the lifespan. These atlases rely on the assumption that the same anatomical features are present on all subjects to be studied and that these features are stable enough to allow meaningful comparisons between different brain surfaces and structures These methods, however, often fail when applied to fetal MRI data, due to the lack of consistent anatomical features present across gestation. This paper presents a novel surface-based fetal cortical parcellation framework which attempts to circumvent the lack of consistent anatomical features by proposing a brain parcellation scheme that is based solely on learned geometrical features. A mesh signature incorporating both extrinsic and intrinsic geometrical features is proposed and used in a clustering scheme to define a parcellation of the fetal brain. This parcellation is then learned using a Random Forest (RF) based learning approach and then further refined in an alpha-expansion graph-cut scheme. Based on the votes obtained by the RF inference procedure, a probability map is computed and used as a data term in the graph-cut procedure. The smoothness term is defined by learning a transition matrix based on the dihedral angles of the faces. Qualitative and quantitative results on a cohort of both healthy and high-risk fetuses are presented. Both visual and quantitative assessments show good results demonstrating a reliable method for fetal brain data and the possibility of obtaining a parcellation of the fetal cortical surfaces using only geometrical features.

  9. Modeling cortical circuits.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2010-09-01

    The neocortex is perhaps the highest region of the human brain, where audio and visual perception takes place along with many important cognitive functions. An important research goal is to describe the mechanisms implemented by the neocortex. There is an apparent regularity in the structure of the neocortex [Brodmann 1909, Mountcastle 1957] which may help simplify this task. The work reported here addresses the problem of how to describe the putative repeated units ('cortical circuits') in a manner that is easily understood and manipulated, with the long-term goal of developing a mathematical and algorithmic description of their function. The approach is to reduce each algorithm to an enhanced perceptron-like structure and describe its computation using difference equations. We organize this algorithmic processing into larger structures based on physiological observations, and implement key modeling concepts in software which runs on parallel computing hardware.

  10. Rapid epigenetic adaptation to uncontrolled heterochromatin spreading

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiyong; Reddy, Bharat D; Jia, Songtao

    2015-01-01

    Heterochromatin, a highly compact chromatin state characterized by histone H3K9 methylation and HP1 protein binding, silences the underlying DNA and influences the expression of neighboring genes. However, the mechanisms that regulate heterochromatin spreading are not well understood. In this study, we show that the conserved Mst2 histone acetyltransferase complex in fission yeast regulates histone turnover at heterochromatin regions to control heterochromatin spreading and prevents ectopic heterochromatin assembly. The combined loss of Mst2 and the JmjC domain protein Epe1 results in uncontrolled heterochromatin spreading and massive ectopic heterochromatin, leading to severe growth defects due to the inactivation of essential genes. Interestingly, these cells quickly recover by accumulating heterochromatin at genes essential for heterochromatin assembly, leading to their reduced expression to restrain heterochromatin spreading. Our studies discover redundant pathways that control heterochromatin spreading and prevent ectopic heterochromatin assembly and reveal a fast epigenetic adaptation response to changes in heterochromatin landscape. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06179.001 PMID:25774602

  11. Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia: cortical or non-cortical origin.

    PubMed

    van Strien, Teun W; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Hilgevoord, Anthony A J; Linssen, Wim H J P; Groffen, Alexander J A; Tijssen, Marina A J

    2012-06-01

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is characterized by involuntary dystonia and/or chorea triggered by a sudden movement. Cases are usually familial with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Hypotheses regarding the pathogenesis of PKD focus on the controversy whether PKD has a cortical or non-cortical origin. A combined familial trait of PKD and benign familial infantile seizures has been reported as the infantile convulsions and paroxysmal choreoathetosis (ICCA) syndrome. Here, we report a family diagnosed with ICCA syndrome with an Arg217STOP mutation. The index patient showed interictal EEG focal changes compatible with paroxysmal dystonic movements of his contralateral leg. This might support cortical involvement in PKD.

  12. Hydrothermal mineralization at seafloor spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    1984-01-01

    The recent recognition that metallic mineral deposits are concentrated by hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers constitutes a scientific breakthrough that opens active sites at seafloor spreading centers as natural laboratories to investigate ore-forming processes of such economically useful deposits as massive sulfides in volcanogenic rocks on land, and that enhances the metallic mineral potential of oceanic crust covering two-thirds of the Earth both beneath ocean basins and exposed on land in ophiolite belts. This paper reviews our knowledge of processes of hydrothermal mineralization and the occurrence and distribution of hydrothermal mineral deposits at the global oceanic ridge-rift system. Sub-seafloor hydrothermal convection involving circulation of seawater through fractured rocks of oceanic crust driven by heat supplied by generation of new lithosphere is nearly ubiquitous at seafloor spreading centers. However, ore-forming hydrothermal systems are extremely localized where conditions of anomalously high thermal gradients and permeability increase hydrothermal activity from the ubiquitous low-intensity background level (⩽ 200°C) to high-intensity characterized by high temperatures ( > 200-c.400°C), and a rate and volume of flow sufficient to sustain chemical reactions that produce acid, reducing, metal-rich primary hydrothermal solutions. A series of mineral phases with sulfides and oxides as high- and low-temperature end members, respectively, are precipitated along the upwelling limb and in the discharge zone of single-phase systems as a function of increasing admixture of normal seawater. The occurrence of hydrothermal mineral deposits is considered in terms of spatial and temporal frames of reference. Spatial frames of reference comprise structural features along-axis (linear sections that are the loci of seafloor spreading alternating with transform faults) and perpendicular to axis (axial zone of volcanic extrusion and marginal

  13. Increased Spreading Activation in Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Paul S.; Yung, Raegan C.; Branch, Kaylei K.; Stringer, Kristi; Ferguson, Brad J.; Sullivan, William; Drago, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is implicated in depressive disorders and research has also shown that dopamine constricts lexical/semantic networks by reducing spreading activation. Hence, depression, which is linked to reductions of dopamine, may be associated with increased spreading activation. However, research has generally found no effects of…

  14. Islamic Universities Spread through Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindow, Megan

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on new universities for Muslims, many supported by groups in the Middle East, which are spreading through the sub-Saharan region. The Islamic University in Uganda is a prime example of a new kind of institution that has slowly been spreading its way across the continent. Embracing both conservative Muslim values and modern…

  15. Impact of cerebellar atrophy on cortical gray matter and cerebellar peduncles as assessed by voxel-based morphometry and high angular resolution diffusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Michael; Olivito, Giusy; Molinari, Marco; Cercignani, Mara; Bozzali, Marco; Leggio, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary In recent years the cerebellum has been attributed a more important role in higher-level functions than previously believed. We examined a cohort of patients suffering from cerebellar atrophy resulting in ataxia, with two main objectives: first to investigate which regions of the cerebrum were affected by the cerebellar degeneration, and second to assess whether diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) metrics within the medial (MCP) and superior cerebellar peduncle (SCP) – namely fractional anisotropy (FA) and radial diffusivity (RD) – could be used as a biomarker in patients with this condition. Structural and dMRI data of seven patients with cerebellar atrophy (2 with spinocerebellar atrophy type 2, 1 with Friedreich’s ataxia, 4 with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia) and no visible cortical lesions or cortical atrophy were investigated with Freesurfer and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of gray matter (GM) as well as MCP and SCP FA maps. Correlations of MCP and SCP mean FA with ataxia scores and subscores were also evaluated. Freesurfer showed that patients had significantly reduced volume of the thalamus, ventral diencephalon and pallidum. VBM also demonstrated significantly lower local GM volumes in patients, notably in the head of the caudate nucleus, posterior cingulate gyrus and orbitofrontal cortex bilaterally, as well as in Broca’s area in the left hemisphere, and a significant increase in RD in the MCP and SCP of both hemispheres. A significant correlation was found between MCP mean FA and total ataxia score (R=−0.7, p=0.03), and subscores for kinetic functions (R=−0.74, p=0.03) and oculomotor disorders (R=−0.70, p=0.04). The regions of the cerebrum found to have significantly lower local GM volumes have been described to be involved in higher-level cerebellar functions such as initiation of voluntary movements, emotional control, memory retrieval and general cognition. Our findings corroborate recent research pointing to a more

  16. Sinking, wedging, spreading - viscous spreading on a layer of fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergemann, Nico; Juel, Anne; Heil, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    We study the axisymmetric spreading of a sessile drop on a pre-existing layer of the same fluid in a regime where the drop is sufficiently large so that the spreading is driven by gravity while capillary and inertial effects are negligible. Experiments performed with 5 ml drops and layer thicknesses in the range 0.1 mm <= h <= 1 mm show that at long times the radius of the drop evolves as R tn , where the spreading exponent n increases with the layer thickness h. Numerical simulations, based on the axisymmetric free-surface Navier-Stokes equations, reveal three distinct spreading regimes depending on the layer thickness. For thick layers the drop sinks into the layer, accompanied by significant flow in the layer. By contrast, for thin layers the layer ahead of the propagating front is at rest and the spreading behaviour resembles that of a gravity-driven drop spreading on a dry substrate. In the intermediate regime the spreading is characterised by an advancing wedge, which is sustained by fluid flow from the drop into the layer.

  17. Cortical Development and Neuroplasticity in Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anu; Cardon, Garrett

    2015-01-01

    Cortical development is dependent to a large extent on stimulus-driven input. Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder (ANSD) is a recently described form of hearing impairment where neural dys-synchrony is the predominant characteristic. Children with ANSD provide a unique platform to examine the effects of asynchronous and degraded afferent stimulation on cortical auditory neuroplasticity and behavioral processing of sound. In this review, we describe patterns of auditory cortical maturation in children with ANSD. The disruption of cortical maturation that leads to these various patterns includes high levels of intra-individual cortical variability and deficits in cortical phase synchronization of oscillatory neural responses. These neurodevelopmental changes, which are constrained by sensitive periods for central auditory maturation, are correlated with behavioral outcomes for children with ANSD. Overall, we hypothesize that patterns of cortical development in children with ANSD appear to be markers of the severity of the underlying neural dys-synchrony, providing prognostic indicators of success of clinical intervention with amplification and/or electrical stimulation. PMID:26070426

  18. Prefrontal Cortical Thickness Deficit in Detoxified Alcohol-dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sujin; Kang, Ilhyang; Lee, Boung Chul; Jeon, Yujin; Cho, Han Byul; Yoon, Sujung; Lim, Soo Mee; Kim, Jungyoon; Lyoo, In Kyoon

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a serious disorder that can be related with a number of potential health-related and social consequences. Cortical thickness measurements would provide important information on the cortical structural alterations in patients with alcohol dependence. Twenty-one patients with alcohol dependence and 22 healthy comparison subjects have been recruited and underwent high-resolution brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinical assessments. T1-weighted MR images were analyzed using the cortical thickness analysis program. Significantly thinner cortical thickness in patients with alcohol dependence than healthy comparison subjects was noted in the left superior frontal cortical region, correcting for multiple comparisons and adjusting with age and hemispheric average cortical thickness. There was a significant association between thickness in the cluster of the left superior frontal cortex and the duration of alcohol use. The prefrontal cortical region may particularly be vulnerable to chronic alcohol exposure. It is also possible that the pre-existing deficit in this region may have rendered individuals more susceptible to alcohol dependence. PMID:28035184

  19. Cortical thinning explains changes in sleep slow waves during adulthood.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Jonathan; Lafortune, Marjolaine; Bedetti, Christophe; Bouchard, Maude; Gagnon, Jean François; Doyon, Julien; Evans, Alan C; Lina, Jean-Marc; Carrier, Julie

    2015-05-20

    Sleep slow waves (SWs) change considerably throughout normal aging. In humans, SWs are generated and propagate on a structural backbone of highly interconnected cortical regions that form most of the default mode network, such as the insula, cingulate cortices, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, and medial frontal lobe. Regions in this network undergo cortical thinning and breakdown in structural and functional connectivity over the course of normal aging. In this study, we investigated how changes in cortical thickness (CT), a measure of gray matter integrity, are involved in modifications of sleep SWs during adulthood in humans. Thirty young (mean age = 23.49 years; SD = 2.79) and 33 older (mean age = 60.35 years; SD = 5.71) healthy subjects underwent a nocturnal polysomnography and T1 MRI. We show that, when controlling for age, higher SW density (nb/min of nonrapid eye movement sleep) was associated with higher CT in cortical regions involved in SW generation surrounding the lateral fissure (insula, superior temporal, parietal, middle frontal), whereas higher SW amplitude was associated with higher CT in middle frontal, medial prefrontal, and medial posterior regions. Mediation analyses demonstrated that thinning in a network of cortical regions involved in SW generation and propagation, but also in cognitive functions, explained the age-related decrease in SW density and amplitude. Altogether, our results suggest that microstructural degradation of specific cortical regions compromise SW generation and propagation in older subjects, critically contributing to age-related changes in SW oscillations.

  20. Censoring Distances Based on Labeled Cortical Distance Maps in Cortical Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Ceyhan, Elvan; Nishino, Tomoyuki; Alexopolous, Dimitrios; Todd, Richard D.; Botteron, Kelly N.; Miller, Michael I.; Ratnanather, J. Tilak

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that shape differences in cortical structures may be manifested in neuropsychiatric disorders. Such morphometric differences can be measured by labeled cortical distance mapping (LCDM) which characterizes the morphometry of the laminar cortical mantle of cortical structures. LCDM data consist of signed/labeled distances of gray matter (GM) voxels with respect to GM/white matter (WM) surface. Volumes and other summary measures for each subject and the pooled distances can help determine the morphometric differences between diagnostic groups, however they do not reveal all the morphometric information contained in LCDM distances. To extract more information from LCDM data, censoring of the pooled distances is introduced for each diagnostic group where the range of LCDM distances is partitioned at a fixed increment size; and at each censoring step, the distances not exceeding the censoring distance are kept. Censored LCDM distances inherit the advantages of the pooled distances but also provide information about the location of morphometric differences which cannot be obtained from the pooled distances. However, at each step, the censored distances aggregate, which might confound the results. The influence of data aggregation is investigated with an extensive Monte Carlo simulation analysis and it is demonstrated that this influence is negligible. As an illustrative example, GM of ventral medial prefrontal cortices (VMPFCs) of subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD), subjects at high risk (HR) of MDD, and healthy control (Ctrl) subjects are used. A significant reduction in laminar thickness of the VMPFC in MDD and HR subjects is observed compared to Ctrl subjects. Moreover, the GM LCDM distances (i.e., locations with respect to the GM/WM surface) for which these differences start to occur are determined. The methodology is also applicable to LCDM-based morphometric measures of other cortical structures affected by disease. PMID:24133482

  1. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid’s viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop’s motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop’s effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated viscosity within the precursor film to hinder spreading. A low-order model provides explicit predictions of the variances in spreading rate and drop location, which are validated against simulations. PMID:27843398

  2. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver E.

    2016-10-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid's viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop's motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop's effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated viscosity within the precursor film to hinder spreading. A low-order model provides explicit predictions of the variances in spreading rate and drop location, which are validated against simulations.

  3. An abrupt change in ridge axis gravity with spreading rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, Christopher; Sandwell, David T.

    1989-01-01

    A total of 44 Geosat profiles over ridges with spreading rates ranging from 14 to 155 mm/yr were analyzed. In agreement with previous studies, it is found that slow spreading ridges usually have high amplitude gravity troughs, while fast spreading ridges are characterized by low-amplitude ridge axis highs. Unexpectedly, it is found that the transition from axial trough to axial high occurs abruptly at a spreading rate of 60-70 mm/yr. Ridge axis gravity signatures are highly variable for rates less than 65 mm/yr and very uniform at higher rates. The transition of the gravity signature appears to get more abrupt than the transition of the topographic signature, suggesting an abrupt change in the style of isostatic compensation with spreading rate. Published models of ridge axis dynamics do not explain this sharp transition.

  4. Reduced Regional Brain Cortical Thickness in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Yadav, Santosh K.; Palomares, Jose A.; Park, Bumhee; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Ogren, Jennifer A.; Macey, Paul M.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Harper, Ronald M.; Woo, Mary A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Autonomic, cognitive, and neuropsychologic deficits appear in heart failure (HF) subjects, and these compromised functions depend on cerebral cortex integrity in addition to that of subcortical and brainstem sites. Impaired autoregulation, low cardiac output, sleep-disordered-breathing, hypertension, and diabetic conditions in HF offer considerable potential to affect cortical areas by loss of neurons and glia, which would be expressed as reduced cortical thicknesses. However, except for gross descriptions of cortical volume loss/injury, regional cortical thickness integrity in HF is unknown. Our goal was to assess regional cortical thicknesses across the brain in HF, compared to control subjects. Methods and Results We examined localized cortical thicknesses in 35 HF and 61 control subjects with high-resolution T1-weighted images (3.0-Tesla MRI) using FreeSurfer software, and assessed group differences with analysis-of-covariance (covariates; age, gender; p<0.05; FDR). Significantly-reduced cortical thicknesses appeared in HF over controls in multiple areas, including the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes, more markedly on the left side, within areas that control autonomic, cognitive, affective, language, and visual functions. Conclusion Heart failure subjects show reduced regional cortical thicknesses in sites that control autonomic, cognitive, affective, language, and visual functions that are deficient in the condition. The findings suggest chronic tissue alterations, with regional changes reflecting loss of neurons and glia, and presumably are related to earlier-described axonal changes. The pathological mechanisms contributing to reduced cortical thicknesses likely include hypoxia/ischemia, accompanying impaired cerebral perfusion from reduced cardiac output and sleep-disordered-breathing and other comorbidities in HF. PMID:25962164

  5. Functional mapping of thalamic nuclei and their integration into cortico-striatal-thalamo-cortical loops via ultra-high resolution imaging—from animal anatomy to in vivo imaging in humans

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Coraline D.; van der Werf, Ysbrand D.; Walter, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The thalamus, a crucial node in the well-described cortico-striatal-thalamo-cortical circuits, has been the focus of functional and structural imaging studies investigating human emotion, cognition and memory. Invasive work in animals and post-mortem investigations have revealed the rich cytoarchitectonics and functional specificity of the thalamus. Given current restrictions in the spatial resolution of non-invasive imaging modalities, there is, however, a translational gap between functional and structural information on these circuits in humans and animals as well as between histological and cellular evidence and their relationship to psychological functioning. With the advance of higher field strengths for MR approaches, better spatial resolution is now available promising to overcome this conceptual problem. We here review these two levels, which exist for both neuroscientific and clinical investigations, and then focus on current attempts to overcome conceptual boundaries of these observations with the help of ultra-high resolution imaging. PMID:23658535

  6. Oceanic core complex development at the ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, N. W.; Grindlay, N.; Perfit, M. R.; Mann, P.; Leroy, S.; Mercier De Lepinay, B. F.

    2011-12-01

    The Mid-Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC) was one of the early localities for seafloor studies of upper mantle and lower crustal exhumation during seafloor spreading. It has since garnered new attention as an accessible locality in which to study an ultraslow spreading center (15-17 mm per year, full rate) that hosts both axial and axial-flank hydrothermal vent sites. Additionally, there is a longstanding suggestion that the end-member axial depth, crustal thickness, and basalt composition at the MCSC are due to the thermal structure of the underlying mantle, a relationship widely applied at other spreading centers. Through a compilation of both previously published and unpublished data, the MCSC is here shown to have intraridge rift walls defined by kilometer-scale steeply-dipping escarpments and curviplanar massifs. Dredging and near-bottom work has imaged and sampled predominantly basaltic lavas from the greatest axial depths and about 15 percent peridotite surrounded by gabbroic rocks from the prominent massifs. The gabbroic rocks exhibit wide compositional variation (troctolites to ferrogabbros) and in many places contain high-temperature (amphibolite to granulite facies) shear zones. Gabbroic compositions primarily reflect the accumulation of near-liquidus phases that crystallized from a range of basaltic melts, as well as from interactions with interstitial melts in a subaxial mush zone. Magnetization variations inverted from aeromagnetic data are consistent with a discontinuous distribution of basaltic lavas and asymmetric spreading since the end of the Eocene rift-to-drift transition. These observations support an Oceanic Core Complex model for MCSC seafloor spreading through mush zone and detachment fault crustal processes. Additional near-bottom work in the MCSC along with seismic data acquisition will be required to further evaluate the magmatic system, kinematics of seafloor spreading, and importance and dynamics of mantle exhumation, in this potential

  7. Analysis of Cortical Flow Models In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Benink, Hélène A.; Mandato, Craig A.; Bement, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Cortical flow, the directed movement of cortical F-actin and cortical organelles, is a basic cellular motility process. Microtubules are thought to somehow direct cortical flow, but whether they do so by stimulating or inhibiting contraction of the cortical actin cytoskeleton is the subject of debate. Treatment of Xenopus oocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) triggers cortical flow toward the animal pole of the oocyte; this flow is suppressed by microtubules. To determine how this suppression occurs and whether it can control the direction of cortical flow, oocytes were subjected to localized manipulation of either the contractile stimulus (PMA) or microtubules. Localized PMA application resulted in redirection of cortical flow toward the site of application, as judged by movement of cortical pigment granules, cortical F-actin, and cortical myosin-2A. Such redirected flow was accelerated by microtubule depolymerization, showing that the suppression of cortical flow by microtubules is independent of the direction of flow. Direct observation of cortical F-actin by time-lapse confocal analysis in combination with photobleaching showed that cortical flow is driven by contraction of the cortical F-actin network and that microtubules suppress this contraction. The oocyte germinal vesicle serves as a microtubule organizing center in Xenopus oocytes; experimental displacement of the germinal vesicle toward the animal pole resulted in localized flow away from the animal pole. The results show that 1) cortical flow is directed toward areas of localized contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; 2) microtubules suppress cortical flow by inhibiting contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; and 3) localized, microtubule-dependent suppression of actomyosin-based contraction can control the direction of cortical flow. We discuss these findings in light of current models of cortical flow. PMID:10930453

  8. Altered Cortical Activation in Adolescents With Acute Migraine: A Magnetoencephalography Study

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jing; deGrauw, Xinyao; Korostenskaja, Milena; Korman, Abraham M.; O’Brien, Hope L.; Kabbouche, Marielle A.; Powers, Scott W.; Hershey, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    To quantitatively assess cortical dysfunction in pediatric migraine, 31 adolescents with acute migraine and age- and gender-matched controls were studied using a magnetoencephalography (MEG) system at a sampling rate of 6,000 Hz. Neuromagnetic brain activation was elicited by a finger-tapping task. The spectral and spatial signatures of magnetoencephalography data in 5 to 2,884 Hz were analyzed using Morlet wavelet and beamformers. Compared with controls, 31 migraine subjects during their headache attack phases (ictal) showed significantly prolonged latencies of neuromagnetic activation in 5 to 30 Hz, increased spectral power in 100 to 200 Hz, and a higher likelihood of neuromagnetic activation in the supplementary motor area, the occipital and ipsilateral sensorimotor cortices, in 2,200 to 2,800 Hz. Of the 31 migraine subjects, 16 migraine subjects during their headache-free phases (interictal) showed that there were no significant differences between interictal and control MEG data except that interictal spectral power in 100 to 200 Hz was significantly decreased. The results demonstrated that migraine subjects had significantly aberrant ictal brain activation, which can normalize interictally. The spread of abnormal ictal brain activation in both low- and high-frequency ranges triggered by movements may play a key role in the cascade of migraine attacks. Perspective This is the first study focusing on the spectral and spatial signatures of cortical dysfunction in adolescents with migraine using MEG signals in a frequency range of 5 to 2,884 Hz. This analyzing aberrant brain activation may be important for developing new therapeutic interventions for migraine in the future. PMID:23792072

  9. Characteristics of two duck farming systems in the Mekong Delta of Viet Nam: stationary flocks and moving flocks, and their potential relevance to the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza.

    PubMed

    Henning, Joerg; Henning, Kate A; Long, Ngo Thanh; Ha, Nguyen Truc; Vu, Le Tri; Meers, Joanne

    2013-03-01

    Ducks are considered to play a major role in the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 in Viet Nam, but detailed information on their management is limited. We distinguished two different systems (1) stationary duck flocks that are not commonly driven to rice fields beyond village boundaries and that are confined overnight on farms and (2) moving duck flocks that are intentionally driven to rice fields beyond village boundaries, that are not returning to home farms for extended periods and that are housed overnight in temporary enclosures in rice paddies. A total of 115 stationary and 22 moving flock farmers were interviewed in 2007 in the Mekong Delta of Viet Nam. Moving duck flocks are larger than stationary flocks, which is indicative of their more commercial production. Moving flock farmers apparently are more aware of HPAI risks than stationary flock farmers, as their flocks are more likely fully vaccinated and have less contact with chickens during scavenging. On the other hand, the spread of HPAI virus between birds might be promoted by moving duck flocks as they repeatedly use transport vehicles and numerous rice paddies for scavenging and are often visited by hatchery owners in the field for purchasing duck eggs. In addition, long distances travelled by moving duck flocks might also result in widespread dissemination of HPAI virus. Further studies are necessary to describe HPAI prevalence and travel patterns of moving duck flocks and to explore the moving duck flock network in detail.

  10. Parcellating cortical functional networks in individuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Danhong; Buckner, Randy L; Fox, Michael D; Holt, Daphne J; Holmes, Avram J; Stoecklein, Sophia; Langs, Georg; Pan, Ruiqi; Qian, Tianyi; Li, Kuncheng; Baker, Justin T; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Wang, Kai; Wang, Xiaomin; Hong, Bo; Liu, Hesheng

    2015-12-01

    The capacity to identify the unique functional architecture of an individual's brain is a crucial step toward personalized medicine and understanding the neural basis of variation in human cognition and behavior. Here we developed a cortical parcellation approach to accurately map functional organization at the individual level using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). A population-based functional atlas and a map of inter-individual variability were employed to guide the iterative search for functional networks in individual subjects. Functional networks mapped by this approach were highly reproducible within subjects and effectively captured the variability across subjects, including individual differences in brain lateralization. The algorithm performed well across different subject populations and data types, including task fMRI data. The approach was then validated by invasive cortical stimulation mapping in surgical patients, suggesting potential for use in clinical applications.

  11. Parcellating Cortical Functional Networks in Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danhong; Buckner, Randy L.; Fox, Michael D.; Holt, Daphne J.; Holmes, Avram J.; Stoecklein, Sophia; Langs, Georg; Pan, Ruiqi; Qian, Tianyi; Li, Kuncheng; Baker, Justin T.; Stufflebeam, Steven M.; Wang, Kai; Wang, Xiaomin; Hong, Bo; Liu, Hesheng

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to identify the unique functional architecture of an individual’s brain is a critical step towards personalized medicine and understanding the neural basis of variations in human cognition and behavior. Here, we developed a novel cortical parcellation approach to accurately map functional organization at the individual level using resting-state fMRI. A population-based functional atlas and a map of inter-individual variability were employed to guide the iterative search for functional networks in individual subjects. Functional networks mapped by this approach were highly reproducible within subjects and effectively captured the variability across subjects, including individual differences in brain lateralization. The algorithm performed well across different subject populations and data types including task fMRI data. The approach was then validated by invasive cortical stimulation mapping in surgical patients, suggesting great potential for use in clinical applications. PMID:26551545

  12. Spreading dynamics of polymer nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, David R.; Grest, Gary S.; Webb, Edmund B.

    2003-12-01

    The spreading of polymer droplets is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. To study the dynamics of both the precursor foot and the bulk droplet, large hemispherical drops of 200 000 monomers are simulated using a bead-spring model for polymers of chain length 10, 20, and 40 monomers per chain. We compare spreading on flat and atomistic surfaces, chain length effects, and different applications of the Langevin and dissipative particle dynamics thermostats. We find diffusive behavior for the precursor foot and good agreement with the molecular kinetic model of droplet spreading using both flat and atomistic surfaces. Despite the large system size and long simulation time relative to previous simulations, we find that even larger systems are required to observe hydrodynamic behavior in the hemispherical spreading droplet.

  13. Large Scale Cortical Functional Networks Associated with Slow-Wave and Spindle-Burst-Related Spontaneous Activity

    PubMed Central

    McVea, David A.; Murphy, Timothy H.; Mohajerani, Majid H.

    2016-01-01

    Cortical sensory systems are active with rich patterns of activity during sleep and under light anesthesia. Remarkably, this activity shares many characteristics with those present when the awake brain responds to sensory stimuli. We review two specific forms of such activity: slow-wave activity (SWA) in the adult brain and spindle bursts in developing brain. SWA is composed of 0.5–4 Hz resting potential fluctuations. Although these fluctuations synchronize wide regions of cortex, recent large-scale imaging has shown spatial details of their distribution that reflect underlying cortical structural projections and networks. These networks are regulated, as prior awake experiences alter both the spatial and temporal features of SWA in subsequent sleep. Activity patterns of the immature brain, however, are very different from those of the adult. SWA is absent, and the dominant pattern is spindle bursts, intermittent high frequency oscillations superimposed on slower depolarizations within sensory cortices. These bursts are driven by intrinsic brain activity, which act to generate peripheral inputs, for example via limb twitches. They are present within developing sensory cortex before they are mature enough to exhibit directed movements and respond to external stimuli. Like in the adult, these patterns resemble those evoked by sensory stimulation when awake. It is suggested that spindle-burst activity is generated purposefully by the developing nervous system as a proxy for true external stimuli. While the sleep-related functions of both slow-wave and spindle-burst activity may not be entirely clear, they reflect robust regulated phenomena which can engage select wide-spread cortical circuits. These circuits are similar to those activated during sensory processing and volitional events. We highlight these two patterns of brain activity because both are prominent and well-studied forms of spontaneous activity that will yield valuable insights into brain function in

  14. The effect of shockwaves on mature and healing cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Forriol, F; Solchaga, L; Moreno, J L; Canãdell, J

    1994-10-01

    It has been proposed that high energy shockwaves could be used to create microfractures in cortical bone. This quality might be exploited clinically to perform closed osteotomies and promote healing in nonunion (15). However, no study has previously documented the effect of shockwaves on cortical bone "in vivo". We report an investigation designed to demonstrate the effect of shockwaves on mature cortical and healing bone. An osteotomy was performed on the tibiae of 37 lambs; two weeks later the operation site was exposed to shockwaves. Three weeks later the lambs were killed and specimens of the bone examined histologically and radiographically. Shockwaves had no effect on the periosteal surface of mature cortical bone, but on the endosteal surface some new trabecular bone was seen. Healing of bone was delayed by the shockwave therapy. We conclude that there is currently little place for shockwave treatment in clinical orthopaedics.

  15. Scaled experiments of volcanic spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, Olivier; Borgia, Andrea

    1996-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the spreading of volcanic constructs. Volcanoes are simulated by a sand cone, and the volcanic substratum is simulated by a sand layer (brittle substratum) overlying a silicone layer (ductile substratum). Similarity conditions between natural volcanoes and experimental prototypes led to the definition of dimensionless π numbers. Experiments determine π values which predict whether or not spreading takes place. Of particular importance are the ratio between the thickness of the brittle substratum and the height of the volcano (π2) and the brittle/ductile ratio of the substratum (π3). π2 indicates that the volcano must be large enough to "break" the substratum before spreading occurs, whereas π3 controls the style of deformation. During spreading, these dimensionless numbers change with time, reaching values that tend toward those observed for stable configurations. Experimental values are compared with those from well-constrained natural examples. It is found that an essential requirement for volcanic spreading is the presence of a low-viscosity layer within the substratum. Flow of the weak layer away from the excess load is responsible for the spreading. The overlying edifice displays radial intersecting grabens, due to concentric stretching, dissected summit areas; concentric zones of thrusts and folds form in the substratum around the edifice, and diapirs of the ductile substratum rise within the fault zones.

  16. Flame spread across liquid pools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard; Miller, Fletcher; Schiller, David; Sirignano, William A.

    1993-01-01

    For flame spread over liquid fuel pools, the existing literature suggests three gravitational influences: (1) liquid phase buoyant convection, delaying ignition and assisting flame spread; (2) hydrostatic pressure variation, due to variation in the liquid pool height caused by thermocapillary-induced convection; and (3) gas-phase buoyant convection in the opposite direction to the liquid phase motion. No current model accounts for all three influences. In fact, prior to this work, there was no ability to determine whether ignition delay times and flame spread rates would be greater or lesser in low gravity. Flame spread over liquid fuel pools is most commonly characterized by the relationship of the initial pool temperature to the fuel's idealized flash point temperature, with four or five separate characteristic regimes having been identified. In the uniform spread regime, control has been attributed to: (1) gas-phase conduction and radiation; (2) gas-phase conduction only; (3) gas-phase convection and liquid conduction, and most recently (4) liquid convection ahead of the flame. Suggestions were made that the liquid convection was owed to both vuoyancy and thermocapillarity. Of special interest to this work is the determination of whether, and under what conditions, pulsating spread can and will occur in microgravity in the absence of buoyant flows in both phases. The approach we have taken to resolving the importance of buoyancy for these flames is: (1) normal gravity experiments and advanced diagnostics; (2) microgravity experiments; and (3) numerical modelling at arbitrary gravitational level.

  17. Spread dynamics of invasive species

    PubMed Central

    Arim, Matías; Abades, Sebastián R.; Neill, Paula E.; Lima, Mauricio; Marquet, Pablo A.

    2006-01-01

    Species invasions are a principal component of global change, causing large losses in biodiversity as well as economic damage. Invasion theory attempts to understand and predict invasion success and patterns of spread. However, there is no consensus regarding which species or community attributes enhance invader success or explain spread dynamics. Experimental and theoretical studies suggest that regulation of spread dynamics is possible; however, the conditions for its existence have not yet been empirically demonstrated. If invasion spread is a regulated process, the structure that accounts for this regulation will be a main determinant of invasion dynamics. Here we explore the existence of regulation underlying changes in the rate of new site colonization. We employ concepts and analytical tools from the study of abundance dynamics and show that spread dynamics are, in fact, regulated processes and that the regulation structure is notably consistent among invasions occurring in widely different contexts. We base our conclusions on the analysis of the spread dynamics of 30 species invasions, including birds, amphibians, fish, invertebrates, plants, and a virus, all of which exhibited similar regulation structures. In contrast to current beliefs that species invasions are idiosyncratic phenomena, here we provide evidence that general patterns do indeed exist. PMID:16387862

  18. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  19. SETI: Spreading the net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstairs, Ian R.

    2002-12-01

    Ian R Carstairs reports on efforts to extend the search for extraterrestrial intelligence to X and γ-ray regions. Traditional Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) strategies have used radio, microwave and, to a limited extent, optical searches. But this ignores the higher energy X and γ-ray regions that a technologically advanced extraterrestrial civilization might use to attract our attention - using messages encoded in discrete photon-counting exchange, much like the signals seen from pulsars. Here, the methods used in high-energy pulsar detection and analysis are reviewed and applied to this new SETI initiative.

  20. Model-Based Segmentation of Cortical Regions of Interest for Multi-subject Analysis of fMRI Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Karin; Brechmann, Andr'e.; Toennies, Klaus

    The high inter-subject variability of human neuroanatomy complicates the analysis of functional imaging data across subjects. We propose a method for the correct segmentation of cortical regions of interest based on the cortical surface. First results on the segmentation of Heschl's gyrus indicate the capability of our approach for correct comparison of functional activations in relation to individual cortical patterns.

  1. Cardiovascular fitness, cortical plasticity, and aging.

    PubMed

    Colcombe, Stanley J; Kramer, Arthur F; Erickson, Kirk I; Scalf, Paige; McAuley, Edward; Cohen, Neal J; Webb, Andrew; Jerome, Gerry J; Marquez, David X; Elavsky, Steriani

    2004-03-02

    Cardiovascular fitness is thought to offset declines in cognitive performance, but little is known about the cortical mechanisms that underlie these changes in humans. Research using animal models shows that aerobic training increases cortical capillary supplies, the number of synaptic connections, and the development of new neurons. The end result is a brain that is more efficient, plastic, and adaptive, which translates into better performance in aging animals. Here, in two separate experiments, we demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge, in humans that increases in cardiovascular fitness results in increased functioning of key aspects of the attentional network of the brain during a cognitively challenging task. Specifically, highly fit (Study 1) or aerobically trained (Study 2) persons show greater task-related activity in regions of the prefrontal and parietal cortices that are involved in spatial selection and inhibitory functioning, when compared with low-fit (Study 1) or nonaerobic control (Study 2) participants. Additionally, in both studies there exist groupwise differences in activation of the anterior cingulate cortex, which is thought to monitor for conflict in the attentional system, and signal the need for adaptation in the attentional network. These data suggest that increased cardiovascular fitness can affect improvements in the plasticity of the aging human brain, and may serve to reduce both biological and cognitive senescence in humans.

  2. Relationships between cortical myeloarchitecture and electrophysiological networks

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Benjamin A. E.; Tewarie, Prejaas K.; Mougin, Olivier E.; Geades, Nicolas; Singh, Krish D.; Morris, Peter G.; Gowland, Penny A.; Brookes, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    The human brain relies upon the dynamic formation and dissolution of a hierarchy of functional networks to support ongoing cognition. However, how functional connectivities underlying such networks are supported by cortical microstructure remains poorly understood. Recent animal work has demonstrated that electrical activity promotes myelination. Inspired by this, we test a hypothesis that gray-matter myelin is related to electrophysiological connectivity. Using ultra-high field MRI and the principle of structural covariance, we derive a structural network showing how myelin density differs across cortical regions and how separate regions can exhibit similar myeloarchitecture. Building upon recent evidence that neural oscillations mediate connectivity, we use magnetoencephalography to elucidate networks that represent the major electrophysiological pathways of communication in the brain. Finally, we show that a significant relationship exists between our functional and structural networks; this relationship differs as a function of neural oscillatory frequency and becomes stronger when integrating oscillations over frequency bands. Our study sheds light on the way in which cortical microstructure supports functional networks. Further, it paves the way for future investigations of the gray-matter structure/function relationship and its breakdown in pathology. PMID:27830650

  3. CENTS: Cortical Enhanced Neonatal Tissue Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Feng; Shen, Dinggang; Yap, Pew-Thian; Fan, Yong; Cheng, Jie-Zhi; An, Hongyu; Wald, Lawrence L.; Gerig, Guido; Gilmore, John H.; Lin, Weili

    2010-01-01

    The acquisition of high-quality magnetic resonance (MR) images of neonatal brains is largely hampered by their characteristically small head size and insufficient tissue contrast. As a result, subsequent image processing and analysis, especially brain tissue segmentation, are often affected. To overcome this problem, a dedicated phased array neonatal head coil is utilized to improve MR image quality by augmenting signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution without lengthening data acquisition time. In addition, a specialized hybrid atlas-based tissue segmentation algorithm is developed for the delineation of fine structures in the acquired neonatal brain MR images. The proposed tissue segmentation method first enhances the sheet-like cortical gray matter (GM) structures in the to-be-segmented neonatal image with a Hessian filter for generation of a cortical GM confidence map. A neonatal population atlas is then generated by averaging the presegmented images of a population, weighted by their cortical GM similarity with respect to the to-be-segmented image. Finally, the neonatal population atlas is combined with the GM confidence map, and the resulting enhanced tissue probability maps for each tissue form a hybrid atlas that is used for atlas-based segmentation. Various experiments are conducted to compare the segmentations of the proposed method with manual segmentation (on both images acquired with a dedicated phased array coil and a conventional volume coil), as well as with the segmentations of two population-atlas-based methods. Results show the proposed method is capable of segmenting the neonatal brain with the best accuracy, and also preserving the most structural details in the cortical regions. PMID:20690143

  4. CFD Simulation of Spread Risks of Infectious Disease due to Interactive Wind and Ventilation Airflows via Window Openings in High-Rise Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, J. L.; Gao, N. P.

    2010-05-01

    One of the concerns is that there may exist multiple infectious disease transmission routes across households in high-rise residential buildings, one of which is the natural ventilative airflow through open windows between flats, caused by buoyancy effects. This study presents the modeling of this cascade effect using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. It is found that the presence of the pollutants generated in the lower floor is generally lower in the immediate upper floor by two orders of magnitude, but the risk of infection calculated by the Wells-Riley equation is only around one order of magnitude lower. It is found that, with single-side open-window conditions, wind blowing perpendicularly to the building may either reinforce or suppress the upward transport, depending on the wind speed. High-speed winds can restrain the convective transfer of heat and mass between flats, functioning like an air curtain. Despite the complexities of the air flow involved, it is clear that this transmission route should be taken into account in infection control.

  5. A Circuit for Motor Cortical Modulation of Auditory Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Anders; Schneider, David M.; Takatoh, Jun; Sakurai, Katsuyasu; Wang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Normal hearing depends on the ability to distinguish self-generated sounds from other sounds, and this ability is thought to involve neural circuits that convey copies of motor command signals to various levels of the auditory system. Although such interactions at the cortical level are believed to facilitate auditory comprehension during movements and drive auditory hallucinations in pathological states, the synaptic organization and function of circuitry linking the motor and auditory cortices remain unclear. Here we describe experiments in the mouse that characterize circuitry well suited to transmit motor-related signals to the auditory cortex. Using retrograde viral tracing, we established that neurons in superficial and deep layers of the medial agranular motor cortex (M2) project directly to the auditory cortex and that the axons of some of these deep-layer cells also target brainstem motor regions. Using in vitro whole-cell physiology, optogenetics, and pharmacology, we determined that M2 axons make excitatory synapses in the auditory cortex but exert a primarily suppressive effect on auditory cortical neuron activity mediated in part by feedforward inhibition involving parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Using in vivo intracellular physiology, optogenetics, and sound playback, we also found that directly activating M2 axon terminals in the auditory cortex suppresses spontaneous and stimulus-evoked synaptic activity in auditory cortical neurons and that this effect depends on the relative timing of motor cortical activity and auditory stimulation. These experiments delineate the structural and functional properties of a corticocortical circuit that could enable movement-related suppression of auditory cortical activity. PMID:24005287

  6. A circuit for motor cortical modulation of auditory cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Anders; Schneider, David M; Takatoh, Jun; Sakurai, Katsuyasu; Wang, Fan; Mooney, Richard

    2013-09-04

    Normal hearing depends on the ability to distinguish self-generated sounds from other sounds, and this ability is thought to involve neural circuits that convey copies of motor command signals to various levels of the auditory system. Although such interactions at the cortical level are believed to facilitate auditory comprehension during movements and drive auditory hallucinations in pathological states, the synaptic organization and function of circuitry linking the motor and auditory cortices remain unclear. Here we describe experiments in the mouse that characterize circuitry well suited to transmit motor-related signals to the auditory cortex. Using retrograde viral tracing, we established that neurons in superficial and deep layers of the medial agranular motor cortex (M2) project directly to the auditory cortex and that the axons of some of these deep-layer cells also target brainstem motor regions. Using in vitro whole-cell physiology, optogenetics, and pharmacology, we determined that M2 axons make excitatory synapses in the auditory cortex but exert a primarily suppressive effect on auditory cortical neuron activity mediated in part by feedforward inhibition involving parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Using in vivo intracellular physiology, optogenetics, and sound playback, we also found that directly activating M2 axon terminals in the auditory cortex suppresses spontaneous and stimulus-evoked synaptic activity in auditory cortical neurons and that this effect depends on the relative timing of motor cortical activity and auditory stimulation. These experiments delineate the structural and functional properties of a corticocortical circuit that could enable movement-related suppression of auditory cortical activity.

  7. Components of vestibular cortical function.

    PubMed

    Klingner, Carsten M; Volk, Gerd F; Flatz, Claudia; Brodoehl, Stefan; Dieterich, Marianne; Witte, Otto W; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the functional response (e.g., nystagmus) to caloric vestibular stimulation is delayed and prolonged compared with the stimulus-response timing of other sensory systems. Imaging studies have used different models to predict cortical responses and to determine the areas of the brain that are involved. These studies have revealed a widespread network of vestibular brain regions. However, there is some disagreement regarding the brain areas involved, which may partly be caused by differences in the models used. This disagreement indicates the possible existence of multiple cortical components with different temporal characteristics that underlie cortical vestibular processing. However, data-driven methods have yet to be used to analyze the underlying hemodynamic components during and after vestibular stimulation. We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on 12 healthy subjects during caloric stimulation and analyzed these data using a model-free analysis method (ICA). We found seven independent stimulus-induced components that outline a robust pattern of cortical activation and deactivation. These independent components demonstrated significant differences in their time courses. No single-modeled response function was able to cover the entire range of these independent components. The response functions determined in the present study should improve model-based studies investigating vestibular cortical processing.

  8. Spreading of the ocean floor: new evidence.

    PubMed

    Vine, F J

    1966-12-16

    It is suggested that the entire history of the ocean basins, in terms of oceanfloor spreading,is contained frozen in the oceanic crust. Variations in the intensity and polarity of Earth's magnetic field are considered to be recorded in the remanent magnetism of the igneous rocks as they solidified and cooled through the Curie temperature at the crest of an oceanic ridge, and subsequently spread away from it at a steady rate. The hypothesis is supported by the extreme linearity and continuity of oceanic magnetic anomalies and their symmetry about the axes of ridges. If the proposed reversal time scale for the last 4 million years is combined with the model, computed anomaly profiles show remarkably good agreement with those observed, and one can deduce rates of spreading for all active parts of the midoceanic ridge system for which magnetic profilesor surveys are available. The rates obtained are in exact agreement with those needed to account for continental drift. An exceptionally high rate of spreading (approximately 4.5 cm/year) in the South Pacific enables one to deduce by extrapolation considerable details of the reversal time scale back to 11.5 million years ago. Again, this scale can be applied to other parts of the ridge system. Thus one isled to the suggestion that the crest of the East Pacific Rise in the northeast Pacific has been overridden and modified by the westward drift of North America, with the production of the anomalous width and unique features of the American cordillera in the western United States. The oceanicmagnetic anomalies also indicate that there was a change in derection of crustal spreading in this region during Pliocene time from eastwest to southeast-northwest. A profile from the crest to the boundary of the East Pacific Rise, and the difference between axial-zone and flank anomalies over ridges, suggest increase in the frequency of reversal of Earth's magnetic field, together, possibly, with decrease in its intensity

  9. A gradient in cortical pathology in multiple sclerosis by in vivo quantitative 7 T imaging.

    PubMed

    Mainero, Caterina; Louapre, Céline; Govindarajan, Sindhuja T; Giannì, Costanza; Nielsen, A Scott; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Sloane, Jacob; Kinkel, Revere P

    2015-04-01

    We used a surface-based analysis of T2* relaxation rates at 7 T magnetic resonance imaging, which allows sampling quantitative T2* throughout the cortical width, to map in vivo the spatial distribution of intracortical pathology in multiple sclerosis. Ultra-high resolution quantitative T2* maps were obtained in 10 subjects with clinically isolated syndrome/early multiple sclerosis (≤ 3 years disease duration), 18 subjects with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (≥ 4 years disease duration), 13 subjects with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, and in 17 age-matched healthy controls. Quantitative T2* maps were registered to anatomical cortical surfaces for sampling T2* at 25%, 50% and 75% depth from the pial surface. Differences in laminar quantitative T2* between each patient group and controls were assessed using general linear model (P < 0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons). In all 41 multiple sclerosis cases, we tested for associations between laminar quantitative T2*, neurological disability, Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score, cortical thickness, and white matter lesions. In patients, we measured, T2* in intracortical lesions and in the intracortical portion of leukocortical lesions visually detected on 7 T scans. Cortical lesional T2* was compared with patients' normal-appearing cortical grey matter T2* (paired t-test) and with mean cortical T2* in controls (linear regression using age as nuisance factor). Subjects with multiple sclerosis exhibited relative to controls, independent from cortical thickness, significantly increased T2*, consistent with cortical myelin and iron loss. In early disease, T2* changes were focal and mainly confined at 25% depth, and in cortical sulci. In later disease stages T2* changes involved deeper cortical laminae, multiple cortical areas and gyri. In patients, T2* in intracortical and leukocortical lesions was increased compared with normal-appearing cortical grey matter (P < 10(-10) and P < 10(-7)), and mean

  10. Worldwide spreading of economic crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garas, Antonios; Argyrakis, Panos; Rozenblat, Céline; Tomassini, Marco; Havlin, Shlomo

    2010-11-01

    We model the spreading of a crisis by constructing a global economic network and applying the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) epidemic model with a variable probability of infection. The probability of infection depends on the strength of economic relations between a given pair of countries and the strength of the target country. It is expected that a crisis that originates in a large country, such as the USA, has the potential to spread globally, such as the recent crisis. Surprisingly, we also show that countries with a much lower GDP, such as Belgium, are able to initiate a global crisis. Using the k-shell decomposition method to quantify the spreading power (of a node), we obtain a measure of 'centrality' as a spreader of each country in the economic network. We thus rank the different countries according to the shell they belong to, and find the 12 most central ones. These countries are the most likely to spread a crisis globally. Of these 12, only six are large economies, while the other six are medium/small ones, a result that could not have been otherwise anticipated. Furthermore, we use our model to predict the crisis spreading potential of countries belonging to different shells according to the crisis magnitude.

  11. Direct-Sequence Spread Spectrum System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    by directly modulating a conventional narrowband frequency-modulated (FM) carrier by a high rate digital code. The direct modulation is binary phase ...specification of the DSSS system will not be developed. The results of the evaluation phase of this research will be compared against theoretical...spread spectrum is called binary phase -shift keying 19 (BPSK). BPSK is a modulation in which a binary Ŕ" represents a 0-degree relative phase

  12. Cortical thickness differences between bipolar depression and major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Martin J; Chhetry, Binod Thapa; Oquendo, Maria A; Sublette, M Elizabeth; Sullivan, Gregory; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Bipolar disorder (BD) is a psychiatric disorder with high morbidity and mortality that cannot be distinguished from major depressive disorder (MDD) until the first manic episode. A biomarker able to differentiate BD and MDD could help clinicians avoid risks of treating BD with antidepressants without mood stabilizers. Methods Cortical thickness differences were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging in BD depressed patients (n = 18), MDD depressed patients (n = 56), and healthy volunteers (HVs) (n = 54). A general linear model identified clusters of cortical thickness difference between diagnostic groups. Results Compared to the HV group, the BD group had decreased cortical thickness in six regions, after controlling for age and sex, located within frontal and parietal lobes, and posterior cingulate cortex. Mean cortical thickness changes in clusters ranged from 7.6–9.6% (cluster wise p-values from 1.0 e−4 to 0.037). When compared to MDD, three clusters of lower cortical thickness in BD were identified that overlapped with clusters that differentiated the BD and HV groups. Mean cortical thickness changes in the clusters ranged from 7.5–8.2% (cluster wise p-values from 1.0 e−4 to 0.023). The difference in cortical thickness was more pronounced when the subgroup of subjects with bipolar I disorder (BD-I) was compared to the MDD group. Conclusions Cortical thickness patterns were distinct between BD and MDD. These results are a step toward developing an imaging test to differentiate the two disorders. PMID:24428430

  13. High-grade contact metamorphism in the Reykjanes geothermal system: Implications for fluid-rock interactions at mid-oceanic ridge spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Naomi; Schiffman, Peter; Zierenberg, Robert A.

    2011-08-01

    Granoblastic hornfels identified in cuttings from the Reykjanes seawater-dominated hydrothermal system contains secondary pyroxene, anorthite, and hornblendic amphibole in locally equilibrated assemblages. Granoblastic assemblages containing secondary orthopyroxene, olivine, and, locally, cordierite and spinel occur within groups of cuttings that show dominantly greenschist facies hydrothermal alteration. Granoblastic plagioclase ranges continuously in composition from An54 to An96, in contrast with relict igneous plagioclase that ranges from An42 to An80. Typical hydrothermal clinopyroxene compositions range from Wo49En3Fs48 to Wo53En30Fo17; clinopyroxene from the granoblastic grains is less calcic with an average composition of Wo48En27Fs25. The hornfels is interpreted to form during contact metamorphism in response to dike emplacement, resulting in local recrystallization of previously hydrothermally altered basalts. Temperatures of granoblastic recrystallization estimated from the 2-pyroxene geothermometer range from 927°C to 967°C. Redox estimates based on the 2-oxide oxybarometer range from log fO2 of -13.4 to -15.9. Granoblastic hornfels comprised of clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, and calcic plagioclase have been described in a number of ancient hydrothermal systems from the conductive boundary layer between the hydrothermal system and the underlying magma source, most notably in Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Hole 1256D, Ocean Drilling Program Hole 504B, and in the Troodos and Oman ophiolites. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of high-grade contact metamorphism from an active geothermal system and the first description of equilibrated amphibole-absent pyroxene hornfels facies contact metamorphism in any mid-ocean ridge (MOR) hydrothermal system. This contribution describes how these assemblages develop through metamorphic reactions and allows us to predict that higher-temperature assemblages may also be present in MOR systems.

  14. Cortical myoclonus in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P D; Bhatia, K P; Brown, P; Davis, M B; Pires, M; Quinn, N P; Luthert, P; Honovar, M; O'Brien, M D; Marsden, C D

    1994-11-01

    We describe three patients with Huntington's disease, from two families, in whom myoclonus was the predominant clinical feature. The diagnosis was confirmed at autopsy in two cases and by DNA analysis in all three. These patients all presented before the age of 30 years and were the offspring of affected fathers. Neurophysiological studies documented generalised and multifocal action myoclonus of cortical origin that was strikingly stimulus sensitive, without enlargement of the cortical somatosensory evoked potential. The myoclonus improved with piracetam therapy in one patient and a combination of sodium valproate and clonazepam in the other two. Cortical reflex myoclonus is a rare but disabling component of the complex movement disorder of Huntington's disease, which may lead to substantial diagnostic difficulties.

  15. Colony spreading in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kaito, Chikara; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2007-03-01

    Wild-type Staphylococcus aureus rapidly expands on the surface of soft agar plates. The rates of expansion and the shapes of the resultant giant colonies were distinct for different strains of laboratory stocks and clinical isolates. The colony spreading abilities did not correlate with the biofilm-forming abilities in these strains. Insertional disruption of the dltABCD operon, which functions at the step of D-alanine addition to teichoic acids, and of the tagO gene, which is responsible for the synthesis of wall teichoic acids, decreased the colony spreading ability. The results indicate that wall teichoic acids and D-alanylation of teichoic acids are required for colony spreading.

  16. Cortical folding and the potential for prognostic neuroimaging in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shuixia; Iwabuchi, Sarina; Balain, Vijender; Feng, Jianfeng; Liddle, Peter; Palaniyappan, Lena

    2015-01-01

    In 41 patients with schizophrenia, we used neuroanatomical information derived from structural imaging to identify patients with more severe illness, characterised by high symptom burden, low processing speed, high degree of illness persistence and lower social and occupational functional capacity. Cortical folding, but not thickness or volume, showed a high discriminatory ability in correctly identifying patients with more severe illness. PMID:26206860

  17. 9 CFR 319.762 - Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products. 319.762 Section 319.762 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... Salads and Meat Spreads § 319.762 Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products. “Ham Spread,”...

  18. Braze alloy spreading on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siewert, T. A.; Heine, R. W.; Lagally, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron microscopy (AEM) were employed to observe elemental surface decomposition resulting from the brazing of a copper-treated steel. Two types of steel were used for the study, stainless steel (treated with a eutectic silver-copper alloy), and low-carbon steel (treated with pure copper). Attention is given to oxygen partial pressure during the processes; a low enough pressure (8 x 10 to the -5th torr) was found to totally inhibit the spreading of the filler material at a fixed heating cycle. With both types of steel, copper treatment enhanced even spreading at a decreased temperature.

  19. Spectral and Spread Spectral Teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state is teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of a teleported waveform can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread spectral variant of teleportation. We present analytical fidelities for spectral and spread spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are prepared using a proposed experimental approach, and we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  20. Spontaneous rhythmic field potentials of isolated mouse hippocampal-subicular-entorhinal cortices in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wu, C P; Huang, H L; Asl, M Nassiri; He, J W; Gillis, J; Skinner, F K; Zhang, L

    2006-10-15

    The rodent hippocampal circuit is capable of exhibiting in vitro spontaneous rhythmic field potentials (SRFPs) of 1-4 Hz that originate from the CA3 area and spread to the CA1 area. These SRFPs are largely correlated with GABA-A IPSPs in pyramidal neurons and repetitive discharges in inhibitory interneurons. As such, their generation is thought to result from cooperative network activities involving both pyramidal neurons and GABAergic interneurons. Considering that the hippocampus, subiculum and entorhinal cortex function as an integrated system crucial for memory and cognition, it is of interest to know whether similar SRFPs occur in hippocampal output structures (that is, the subiculum and entorhinal cortex), and if so, to understand the cellular basis of these subicular and entorhinal SRFPs as well as their temporal relation to hippocampal SRFPs. We explored these issues in the present study using thick hippocampal-subicular-entorhinal cortical slices prepared from adult mice. SRFPs were found to spread from the CA1 area to the subicular and entorhinal cortical areas. Subicular and entorhinal cortical SRFPs were correlated with mixed IPSPs/EPSPs in local pyramidal neurons, and their generation was dependent upon the activities of GABA-A and AMPA glutamate receptors. In addition, the isolated subicular circuit could elicit SRFPs independent of CA3 inputs. We hypothesize that the SRFPs represent a basal oscillatory activity of the hippocampal-subicular-entorhinal cortices and that the subiculum functions as both a relay and an amplifier, spreading the SRFPs from the hippocampus to the entorhinal cortex.

  1. An overlapping propagating spreading center at 87 deg 30 min W on the Galapagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perram, Laura Jean; MacDonald, Ken C.

    1994-01-01

    In September of 1987 nwe completed a SeaMARC II (SMII) survey of the propagating spreading center located at 87 deg 30 min W on the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC). The spreading rate in the area is intermediate with a full rate of approximately 70 mm/yr and the spreading axis is marked by an axial high. Analysis of bathymetry, sidescan sonar and surface magnetic data indicates 90 - 100 mm/yr eastward propagation of the 26 km offset. The morphology of the feature is that of an overlapping spreading center pair (OSC). It fits a kinematic model of overlapping ridges with cyclic failure of the dying rift. There are marked differences in the morphology and kinematics of the propagator compared to the propagator at 95 deg 30 min W where the spreading rate and offset are comparable. The 87 deg 30 min W propagator is marked by an axial high and greater than 40 km of overlap in contrast to the axial rift valley and small amount of overlap associated with the 95 deg 30 min W propagator. Near-field stresses associated with variable axial topography contribute to decrease crack propagation forces at the 95 deg 30 min W propagator and increase those at the 87 deg 30 min W propagator. Differences in crack propagation forces and morphology may be due to a fundamental difference in the amount of available magma. This difference is evident in dominance of volcanism near 87 deg 30 min W as opposed to the dominance of tectonism near 95 deg 30 min W.

  2. Unexplained high BMD in DXA-scanned patients is generalized throughout the skeleton and characterized by thicker cortical and trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Lomholt, S; Amstrup, A K; Moser, E; Jakobsen, N F B; Mosekilde, L; Vestergaard, P; Rejnmark, L

    2015-04-01

    Unexplained high bone mineral density (BMD) is a rare condition and the mechanisms responsible are yet to be described in detail. The aim of the study was to identify patients with unexplained high BMD from a local DXA database and compare their radiological phenotype with an age- and a gender-matched group of population-based controls. We defined high BMD as a DXA Z-score ≥ + 2.5 at the total hip and lumbar spine. We characterized the findings as "unexplained" if no osteodegenerative changes, bone metabolic disease, or arthritis at the hip or lumbar spine was observed. All participants were investigated with high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT), QCT, DXA, fasting blood samples, a 24-h urine sample, and questionnaires. The DXA database contained data on 25,118 patients. Initially, 138 (0.55%) potential participants with high BMD were identified, and during the study ten additional cases were identified from new DXA scans. Sixty-seven patients accepted to participate in the study, and among these we identified 15 women and one man with unexplained high BMD. These 15 women had higher BMD throughout the skeleton relative to controls, similar area/volume at the hip and the distal extremities, a higher number of trabeculae, which was thicker than in the controls, and a higher finite element estimated bone strength. The 15 women were heavier and had a higher fat mass then controls. We conclude that patients with unexplained high BMD have a generalized high BMD phenotype throughout their skeleton, which is characterized with a denser microarchitecture.

  3. Dual polarized, heat spreading rectenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, Larry W. (Inventor); Khan, Abdur R. (Inventor); Smith, R. Peter (Inventor); Smith, Hugh K. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An aperture coupled patch splits energy from two different polarization components to different locations to spread heat. In addition, there is no physical electrical connection between the slot, patch and circuitry. The circuitry is located under a ground plane which shields against harmonic radiation back to the RF source.

  4. Spreading dynamics in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Sen; Makse, Hernán A.

    2013-12-01

    Searching for influential spreaders in complex networks is an issue of great significance for applications across various domains, ranging from epidemic control, innovation diffusion, viral marketing, and social movement to idea propagation. In this paper, we first display some of the most important theoretical models that describe spreading processes, and then discuss the problem of locating both the individual and multiple influential spreaders respectively. Recent approaches in these two topics are presented. For the identification of privileged single spreaders, we summarize several widely used centralities, such as degree, betweenness centrality, PageRank, k-shell, etc. We investigate the empirical diffusion data in a large scale online social community—LiveJournal. With this extensive dataset, we find that various measures can convey very distinct information of nodes. Of all the users in the LiveJournal social network, only a small fraction of them are involved in spreading. For the spreading processes in LiveJournal, while degree can locate nodes participating in information diffusion with higher probability, k-shell is more effective in finding nodes with a large influence. Our results should provide useful information for designing efficient spreading strategies in reality.

  5. Tuning magnetofluidic spreading in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaomeng; Varma, V. B.; Wang, Z. P.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetofluidic spreading (MFS) is a phenomenon in which a uniform magnetic field is used to induce spreading of a ferrofluid core cladded by diamagnetic fluidic streams in a three-stream channel. Applications of MFS include micromixing, cell sorting and novel microfluidic lab-on-a-chip design. However, the relative importance of the parameters which govern MFS is still unclear, leading to non-optimal control of MFS. Hence, in this work, the effect of various key parameters on MFS was experimentally and numerically studied. Our multi-physics model, which combines magnetic and fluidic analysis, showed excellent agreement between theory and experiment. It was found that spreading was mainly due to cross-sectional convection induced by magnetic forces, and can be enhanced by tuning various parameters. Smaller flow rate ratio, higher magnetic field, higher core stream or lower cladding stream dynamic viscosity, and larger magnetic particle size can increase MFS. These results can be used to tune magnetofluidic spreading in microchannels.

  6. International Spread and Persistence of TEM-24 Is Caused by the Confluence of Highly Penetrating Enterobacteriaceae Clones and an IncA/C2 Plasmid Containing Tn1696::Tn1 and IS5075-Tn21▿

    PubMed Central

    Novais, Ângela; Baquero, Fernando; Machado, Elisabete; Cantón, Rafael; Peixe, Luísa; Coque, Teresa M.

    2010-01-01

    TEM-24 remains one of the most widespread TEM-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) among Enterobacteriaceae. To analyze the reasons influencing its spread and persistence, a multilevel population genetics study was carried out on 28 representative TEM-24 producers from Belgium, France, Portugal, and Spain (13 Enterobacter aerogenes isolates, 6 Escherichia coli isolates, 6 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates, 2 Proteus mirabilis isolates, and 1 Klebsiella oxytoca isolate, from 1998 to 2004). Clonal relatedness (XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE] and E. coli phylogroups) and antibiotic susceptibility were determined by standard procedures. Plasmid analysis included determination of the incompatibility group (by PCR, hybridization, and/or sequencing) and comparison of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns. Characterization of genetic elements conferring antibiotic resistance included integrons (classes 1, 2, and 3) and transposons (Tn3, Tn21, and Tn402). Similar PFGE patterns were identified among E. aerogenes, K. pneumoniae, and P. mirabilis isolates, while E. coli strains were diverse (phylogenetic groups A, B2, and D). Highly related 180-kb IncA/C2 plasmids conferring resistance to kanamycin, tobramycin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, and sulfonamides were identified. Each plasmid contained defective In0-Tn402 (dfrA1-aadA1, aacA4, or aacA4-aacC1-orfE-aadA2-cmlA1) and In4-Tn402 (aacA4 or dfrA1-aadA1) variants. These integrons were located within Tn21, Tn1696, or hybrids of these transposons, with IS5075 interrupting their IRtnp and IRmer. In all cases, blaTEM-24 was part of an IS5075-ΔTn1 transposon within tnp1696, mimicking other genetic elements containing blaTEM-2 and blaTEM-3 variants. The international dissemination of TEM-24 is fuelled by an IncA/C2 plasmid acquired by different enterobacterial clones which seem to evolve by gaining diverse genetic elements. This work highlights the risks of a confluence between highly

  7. [Infantile cortical hyperostosis: Case report].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Mónica; Martínez, Luz Elena; Cortés, José; de Uña, Armando; Vega, Valentina; Acosta, Mario

    Infantile Cortical Hyperostosis, or Caffey-Silverman disease, is a rare condition characterised by generalised bone proliferation mediated by an acute inflammatory process. Diagnosis can be made through clinical evaluation and X-ray studies. The course is generally self-limiting and prognosis is excellent.

  8. Biomechanics of Single Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bernick, Kristin B.; Prevost, Thibault P.; Suresh, Subra; Socrate, Simona

    2011-01-01

    This study presents experimental results and computational analysis of the large strain dynamic behavior of single neurons in vitro with the objective of formulating a novel quantitative framework for the biomechanics of cortical neurons. Relying on the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique, novel testing protocols are developed to enable the characterization of neural soma deformability over a range of indentation rates spanning three orders of magnitude – 10, 1, and 0.1 μm/s. Modified spherical AFM probes were utilized to compress the cell bodies of neonatal rat cortical neurons in load, unload, reload and relaxation conditions. The cell response showed marked hysteretic features, strong non-linearities, and substantial time/rate dependencies. The rheological data were complemented with geometrical measurements of cell body morphology, i.e. cross-diameter and height estimates. A constitutive model, validated by the present experiments, is proposed to quantify the mechanical behavior of cortical neurons. The model aimed to correlate empirical findings with measurable degrees of (hyper-) elastic resilience and viscosity at the cell level. The proposed formulation, predicated upon previous constitutive model developments undertaken at the cortical tissue level, was implemented into a three-dimensional finite element framework. The simulated cell response was calibrated to the experimental measurements under the selected test conditions, providing a novel single cell model that could form the basis for further refinements. PMID:20971217

  9. Dynamic functional tuning of nonlinear cortical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetter, Martin

    2006-03-01

    The mammalian neocortex is a highly complex and nonlinear dynamic system. One of its most prominent features is an omnipresent spontaneous neuronal activity. Here the possible functional role of this global background for cognitive flexibility is studied in a prototypic mean-field model area. It is demonstrated that the level of global background current efficiently controls the stimulus-response threshold and the stability and properties of short-term memory states. Moreover, it can dynamically gate arbitrary cortical subnetworks, when applied to parts of the area as a weak bias signal. These results suggest a central functional role of the level of background activation: the dynamic functional tuning of neocortical circuits.

  10. Directed differentiation and functional maturation of cortical interneurons from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Maroof, Asif M; Keros, Sotirios; Tyson, Jennifer A; Ying, Shui-Wang; Ganat, Yosif M; Merkle, Florian T; Liu, Becky; Goulburn, Adam; Stanley, Edouard G; Elefanty, Andrew G; Widmer, Hans Ruedi; Eggan, Kevin; Goldstein, Peter A; Anderson, Stewart A; Studer, Lorenz

    2013-05-02

    Human pluripotent stem cells are a powerful tool for modeling brain development and disease. The human cortex is composed of two major neuronal populations: projection neurons and local interneurons. Cortical interneurons comprise a diverse class of cell types expressing the neurotransmitter GABA. Dysfunction of cortical interneurons has been implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases, including schizophrenia, autism, and epilepsy. Here, we demonstrate the highly efficient derivation of human cortical interneurons in an NKX2.1::GFP human embryonic stem cell reporter line. Manipulating the timing of SHH activation yields three distinct GFP+ populations with specific transcriptional profiles, neurotransmitter phenotypes, and migratory behaviors. Further differentiation in a murine cortical environment yields parvalbumin- and somatostatin-expressing neurons that exhibit synaptic inputs and electrophysiological properties of cortical interneurons. Our study defines the signals sufficient for modeling human ventral forebrain development in vitro and lays the foundation for studying cortical interneuron involvement in human disease pathology.

  11. Oceanic core complex development at the ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, Nicholas W.; Grindlay, Nancy R.; Perfit, Michael R.; Mann, Paul; Leroy, Sylvie; de LéPinay, Bernard Mercier

    2011-03-01

    Roughly a third of the global mid-ocean ridge system spreads at <20 mm/yr (full rate) with predicted low crustal thicknesses, great axial depths, end-member basalt compositions, and prominent axial faults. These predictions are here further investigated along the ultraslow (15-17 mm/yr) Mid-Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC) through a compilation of both previously published and unpublished data. The MCSC sits along the Caribbean-North American plate boundary and is one of the world's deepest (>6 km) spreading centers, and thought to accrete some of the thinnest (˜3 km) crust. The MCSC generates end-member mid-ocean ridge basalt compositions and hosts recently discovered hydrothermal vents. Multibeam bathymetric data reveal that axial depth varies along the MCSC with intraridge rift walls defined by kilometer-scale escarpments and massifs. Dredging and near-bottom work has imaged and sampled predominantly basaltic lavas from the greatest axial depths and ˜15% peridotite surrounded by gabbroic rocks from the prominent massifs. The gabbroic rocks exhibit wide compositional variation (troctolites to ferrogabbros) and in many places contain high-temperature (amphibolite to granulite facies) shear zones. Gabbroic compositions primarily reflect the accumulation of near-liquidus phases that crystallized from a range of basaltic melts, as well as from interactions with interstitial melts in a subaxial mush zone. Magnetization variations inverted from aeromagnetic data are consistent with a discontinuous distribution of basaltic lavas and structurally asymmetric spreading. These observations support an oceanic core complex model for MCSC seafloor spreading, potentially making it a type example of ultraslow seafloor spreading through mush zone and detachment fault crustal processes.

  12. Active Chemical Thermodynamics promoted by activity of cortical actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Rao, Madan

    2011-03-01

    The spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of the nanoclusters of cell surface proteins is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we have proposed a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. We study the consequences of such active actin-based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that the active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in efficiency and extent of conformational spread, even at low levels of expression at the cell surface. We define a activity temperature (τa) arising due to actin activities which can be used to describe chemical thermodynamics of the system. We plot TTT (time-temparature-transformation) curves and compute the Arrhenius factors which depend on τa . With this, the active asters can be treated as enzymes whose enzymatic reaction rate can be related to the activity.

  13. Branching dynamics of viral information spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iribarren, José Luis; Moro, Esteban

    2011-10-01

    Despite its importance for rumors or innovations propagation, peer-to-peer collaboration, social networking, or marketing, the dynamics of information spreading is not well understood. Since the diffusion depends on the heterogeneous patterns of human behavior and is driven by the participants’ decisions, its propagation dynamics shows surprising properties not explained by traditional epidemic or contagion models. Here we present a detailed analysis of our study of real viral marketing campaigns where tracking the propagation of a controlled message allowed us to analyze the structure and dynamics of a diffusion graph involving over 31 000 individuals. We found that information spreading displays a non-Markovian branching dynamics that can be modeled by a two-step Bellman-Harris branching process that generalizes the static models known in the literature and incorporates the high variability of human behavior. It explains accurately all the features of information propagation under the “tipping point” and can be used for prediction and management of viral information spreading processes.

  14. Branching dynamics of viral information spreading.

    PubMed

    Iribarren, José Luis; Moro, Esteban

    2011-10-01

    Despite its importance for rumors or innovations propagation, peer-to-peer collaboration, social networking, or marketing, the dynamics of information spreading is not well understood. Since the diffusion depends on the heterogeneous patterns of human behavior and is driven by the participants' decisions, its propagation dynamics shows surprising properties not explained by traditional epidemic or contagion models. Here we present a detailed analysis of our study of real viral marketing campaigns where tracking the propagation of a controlled message allowed us to analyze the structure and dynamics of a diffusion graph involving over 31,000 individuals. We found that information spreading displays a non-Markovian branching dynamics that can be modeled by a two-step Bellman-Harris branching process that generalizes the static models known in the literature and incorporates the high variability of human behavior. It explains accurately all the features of information propagation under the "tipping point" and can be used for prediction and management of viral information spreading processes.

  15. Cortical Hubs Form a Module for Multisensory Integration on Top of the Hierarchy of Cortical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zamora-López, Gorka; Zhou, Changsong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Sensory stimuli entering the nervous system follow particular paths of processing, typically separated (segregated) from the paths of other modal information. However, sensory perception, awareness and cognition emerge from the combination of information (integration). The corticocortical networks of cats and macaque monkeys display three prominent characteristics: (i) modular organisation (facilitating the segregation), (ii) abundant alternative processing paths and (iii) the presence of highly connected hubs. Here, we study in detail the organisation and potential function of the cortical hubs by graph analysis and information theoretical methods. We find that the cortical hubs form a spatially delocalised, but topologically central module with the capacity to integrate multisensory information in a collaborative manner. With this, we resolve the underlying anatomical substrate that supports the simultaneous capacity of the cortex to segregate and to integrate multisensory information. PMID:20428515

  16. Cortical hubs form a module for multisensory integration on top of the hierarchy of cortical networks.

    PubMed

    Zamora-López, Gorka; Zhou, Changsong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Sensory stimuli entering the nervous system follow particular paths of processing, typically separated (segregated) from the paths of other modal information. However, sensory perception, awareness and cognition emerge from the combination of information (integration). The corticocortical networks of cats and macaque monkeys display three prominent characteristics: (i) modular organisation (facilitating the segregation), (ii) abundant alternative processing paths and (iii) the presence of highly connected hubs. Here, we study in detail the organisation and potential function of the cortical hubs by graph analysis and information theoretical methods. We find that the cortical hubs form a spatially delocalised, but topologically central module with the capacity to integrate multisensory information in a collaborative manner. With this, we resolve the underlying anatomical substrate that supports the simultaneous capacity of the cortex to segregate and to integrate multisensory information.

  17. Decoding of Covert Vowel Articulation Using Electroencephalography Cortical Currents

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Natsue; Nishimoto, Atsushi; Belkacem, Abdelkader Nasreddine; Shin, Duk; Kambara, Hiroyuki; Hanakawa, Takashi; Koike, Yasuharu

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of providing assistive technology for the communication impaired, we proposed electroencephalography (EEG) cortical currents as a new approach for EEG-based brain-computer interface spellers. EEG cortical currents were estimated with a variational Bayesian method that uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data as a hierarchical prior. EEG and fMRI data were recorded from ten healthy participants during covert articulation of Japanese vowels /a/ and /i/, as well as during a no-imagery control task. Applying a sparse logistic regression (SLR) method to classify the three tasks, mean classification accuracy using EEG cortical currents was significantly higher than that using EEG sensor signals and was also comparable to accuracies in previous studies using electrocorticography. SLR weight analysis revealed vertices of EEG cortical currents that were highly contributive to classification for each participant, and the vertices showed discriminative time series signals according to the three tasks. Furthermore, functional connectivity analysis focusing on the highly contributive vertices revealed positive and negative correlations among areas related to speech processing. As the same findings were not observed using EEG sensor signals, our results demonstrate the potential utility of EEG cortical currents not only for engineering purposes such as brain-computer interfaces but also for neuroscientific purposes such as the identification of neural signaling related to language processing. PMID:27199638

  18. Visual-Gustatory Interaction: Orbitofrontal and Insular Cortices Mediate the Effect of High-Calorie Visual Food Cues on Taste Pleasantness

    PubMed Central

    Ohla, Kathrin; Toepel, Ulrike; le Coutre, Johannes; Hudry, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Vision provides a primary sensory input for food perception. It raises expectations on taste and nutritional value and drives acceptance or rejection. So far, the impact of visual food cues varying in energy content on subsequent taste integration remains unexplored. Using electrical neuroimaging, we assessed whether high- and low-calorie food cues differentially influence the brain processing and perception of a subsequent neutral electric taste. When viewing high-calorie food images, participants reported the subsequent taste to be more pleasant than when low-calorie food images preceded the identical taste. Moreover, the taste-evoked neural activity was stronger in the bilateral insula and the adjacent frontal operculum (FOP) within 100 ms after taste onset when preceded by high- versus low-calorie cues. A similar pattern evolved in the anterior cingulate (ACC) and medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) around 180 ms, as well as, in the right insula, around 360 ms. The activation differences in the OFC correlated positively with changes in taste pleasantness, a finding that is an accord with the role of the OFC in the hedonic evaluation of taste. Later activation differences in the right insula likely indicate revaluation of interoceptive taste awareness. Our findings reveal previously unknown mechanisms of cross-modal, visual-gustatory, sensory interactions underlying food evaluation. PMID:22431974

  19. Secretory function in subplate neurons during cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Shinichi; Al-Hasani, Hannah; Hoerder-Suabedissen, Anna; Wang, Wei Zhi; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Subplate cells are among the first generated neurons in the mammalian cerebral cortex and have been implicated in the establishment of cortical wiring. In rodents some subplate neurons persist into adulthood. Here we would like to highlight several converging findings which suggest a novel secretory function of subplate neurons during cortical development. Throughout the postnatal period in rodents, subplate neurons have highly developed rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are under an ER stress condition. By comparing gene expression between subplate and layer 6, we found that several genes encoding secreted proteins are highly expressed in subplate neurons. One of these secreted proteins, neuroserpin, encoded by the serpini1 gene, is localized to the ER in subplate cells. We propose that subplate might influence cortical circuit formation through a transient secretory function. PMID:25859180

  20. Bidirectional plasticity of cortical pattern recognition and behavioral sensory acuity

    PubMed Central

    Chapuis, Julie; Wilson, Donald A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning to adapt to a complex and fluctuating environment requires the ability to adjust neural representations of sensory stimuli. Through pattern completion processes, cortical networks can reconstruct familiar patterns from degraded input patterns, while pattern separation processes allow discrimination of even highly overlapping inputs. Here we show that the balance between pattern separation and completion is experience-dependent. Rats given extensive training with overlapping complex odorant mixtures show improved behavioral discrimination ability and enhanced cortical ensemble pattern separation. In contrast, behavioral training to disregard normally detectable differences between overlapping mixtures results in impaired cortical ensemble pattern separation (enhanced pattern completion) and impaired discrimination. This bidirectional effect was not found in the olfactory bulb, and may be due to plasticity within olfactory cortex itself. Thus pattern recognition, and the balance between pattern separation and completion, is highly malleable based on task demands and occurs in concert with changes in perceptual performance. PMID:22101640

  1. Embedding of Cortical Representations by the Superficial Patch System

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Nuno M. A.; Girardin, Cyrille C.; Naaman, Shmuel; Omer, David B.; Ruesch, Elisha; Grinvald, Amiram; Douglas, Rodney J.

    2011-01-01

    Pyramidal cells in layers 2 and 3 of the neocortex of many species collectively form a clustered system of lateral axonal projections (the superficial patch system—Lund JS, Angelucci A, Bressloff PC. 2003. Anatomical substrates for functional columns in macaque monkey primary visual cortex. Cereb Cortex. 13:15–24. or daisy architecture—Douglas RJ, Martin KAC. 2004. Neuronal circuits of the neocortex. Annu Rev Neurosci. 27:419–451.), but the function performed by this general feature of the cortical architecture remains obscure. By comparing the spatial configuration of labeled patches with the configuration of responses to drifting grating stimuli, we found the spatial organizations both of the patch system and of the cortical response to be highly conserved between cat and monkey primary visual cortex. More importantly, the configuration of the superficial patch system is directly reflected in the arrangement of function across monkey primary visual cortex. Our results indicate a close relationship between the structure of the superficial patch system and cortical responses encoding a single value across the surface of visual cortex (self-consistent states). This relationship is consistent with the spontaneous emergence of orientation response–like activity patterns during ongoing cortical activity (Kenet T, Bibitchkov D, Tsodyks M, Grinvald A, Arieli A. 2003. Spontaneously emerging cortical representations of visual attributes. Nature. 425:954–956.). We conclude that the superficial patch system is the physical encoding of self-consistent cortical states, and that a set of concurrently labeled patches participate in a network of mutually consistent representations of cortical input. PMID:21383233

  2. Visual change detection recruits auditory cortices in early deafness.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Davide; Heimler, Benedetta; Caclin, Anne; Dalmolin, Anna; Giard, Marie-Hélène; Pavani, Francesco

    2014-07-01

    Although cross-modal recruitment of early sensory areas in deafness and blindness is well established, the constraints and limits of these plastic changes remain to be understood. In the case of human deafness, for instance, it is known that visual, tactile or visuo-tactile stimuli can elicit a response within the auditory cortices. Nonetheless, both the timing of these evoked responses and the functional contribution of cross-modally recruited areas remain to be ascertained. In the present study, we examined to what extent auditory cortices of deaf humans participate in high-order visual processes, such as visual change detection. By measuring visual ERPs, in particular the visual MisMatch Negativity (vMMN), and performing source localization, we show that individuals with early deafness (N=12) recruit the auditory cortices when a change in motion direction during shape deformation occurs in a continuous visual motion stream. Remarkably this "auditory" response for visual events emerged with the same timing as the visual MMN in hearing controls (N=12), between 150 and 300 ms after the visual change. Furthermore, the recruitment of auditory cortices for visual change detection in early deaf was paired with a reduction of response within the visual system, indicating a shift from visual to auditory cortices of part of the computational process. The present study suggests that the deafened auditory cortices participate at extracting and storing the visual information and at comparing on-line the upcoming visual events, thus indicating that cross-modally recruited auditory cortices can reach this level of computation.

  3. Drop Spreading with Random Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Airway mucus acts as a barrier to protect the lung. However as a biological material, its physical properties are known imperfectly and can be spatially heterogeneous. In this study we assess the impact of these uncertainties on the rate of spreading of a drop (representing an inhaled aerosol) over a mucus film. We model the film as Newtonian, having a viscosity that depends linearly on the concentration of a passive solute (a crude proxy for mucin proteins). Given an initial random solute (and hence viscosity) distribution, described as a Gaussian random field with a given correlation structure, we seek to quantify the uncertainties in outcomes as the drop spreads. Using lubrication theory, we describe the spreading of the drop in terms of a system of coupled nonlinear PDEs governing the evolution of film height and the vertically-averaged solute concentration. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to predict the variability in the drop centre location and width (1D) or area (2D). We show how simulation results are well described (at much lower computational cost) by a low-order model using a weak disorder expansion. Our results show for example how variability in the drop location is a non-monotonic function of the solute correlation length increases. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  4. TDCS increases cortical excitability: direct evidence from TMS-EEG.

    PubMed

    Romero Lauro, Leonor J; Rosanova, Mario; Mattavelli, Giulia; Convento, Silvia; Pisoni, Alberto; Opitz, Alexander; Bolognini, Nadia; Vallar, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Despite transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is increasingly used in experimental and clinical settings, its precise mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. At a neuronal level, tDCS modulates the resting membrane potential in a polarity-dependent fashion: anodal stimulation increases cortical excitability in the stimulated region, while cathodal decreases it. So far, the neurophysiological underpinnings of the immediate and delayed effects of tDCS, and to what extent the stimulation of a given cerebral region may affect the activity of anatomically connected regions, remain unclear. In the present study, we used a combination of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and Electroencephalography (EEG) in order to explore local and global cortical excitability modulation during and after active and sham tDCS. Single pulse TMS was delivered over the left posterior parietal cortex (PPC), before, during, and after 15 min of tDCS over the right PPC, while EEG was recorded from 60 channels. For each session, indexes of global and local cerebral excitability were obtained, computed as global and local mean field power (Global Mean Field Power, GMFP and Local Mean Field Power, LMFP) on mean TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs) for three temporal windows: 0-50, 50-100, and 100-150 msec. The global index was computed on all 60 channels. The local indexes were computed in six clusters of electrodes: left and right in frontal, parietal and temporal regions. GMFP increased, compared to baseline, both during and after active tDCS in the 0-100 msec temporal window. LMFP increased after the end of stimulation in parietal and frontal clusters bilaterally, while no difference was found in the temporal clusters. In sum, a diffuse rise of cortical excitability occurred, both during and after active tDCS. This evidence highlights the spreading of the effects of anodal tDCS over remote cortical regions of stimulated and contralateral hemispheres.

  5. Cortical cartography reveals political and physical maps.

    PubMed

    Loring, David W; Gaillard, William Davis; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Meador, Kimford J; Ojemann, Jeffrey G

    2014-05-01

    Advances in functional imaging have provided noninvasive techniques to probe brain organization of multiple constructs including language and memory. Because of high overall rates of agreements with older techniques, including Wada testing and cortical stimulation mapping (CSM), some have proposed that those approaches should be largely abandoned because of their invasiveness, and replaced with noninvasive functional imaging methods. High overall agreement, however, is based largely on concordant language lateralization in series dominated by cases of typical cerebral dominance. Advocating a universal switch from Wada testing and cortical stimulation mapping to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) or magnetoencephalography (MEG) ignores the differences in specific expertise across epilepsy centers, many of which often have greater skill with one approach rather than the other, and that Wada, CSM, fMRI, and MEG protocols vary across institutions resulting in different outcomes and reliability. Specific patient characteristics also affect whether Wada or CSM might influence surgical management, making it difficult to accept broad recommendations against currently useful clinical tools. Although the development of noninvasive techniques has diminished the frequency of more invasive approaches, advocating their use to replace Wada testing and CSM across all epilepsy surgery programs without consideration of the different skills, protocols, and expertise at any given center site is ill-advised.

  6. Mapping longitudinal development of local cortical gyrification in infants from birth to 2 years of age.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Wang, Li; Shi, Feng; Lyall, Amanda E; Lin, Weili; Gilmore, John H; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-03-19

    Human cortical folding is believed to correlate with cognitive functions. This likely correlation may have something to do with why abnormalities of cortical folding have been found in many neurodevelopmental disorders. However, little is known about how cortical gyrification, the cortical folding process, develops in the first 2 years of life, a period of dynamic and regionally heterogeneous cortex growth. In this article, we show how we developed a novel infant-specific method for mapping longitudinal development of local cortical gyrification in infants. By using this method, via 219 longitudinal 3T magnetic resonance imaging scans from 73 healthy infants, we systemically and quantitatively characterized for the first time the longitudinal cortical global gyrification index (GI) and local GI (LGI) development in the first 2 years of life. We found that the cortical GI had age-related and marked development, with 16.1% increase in the first year and 6.6% increase in the second year. We also found marked and regionally heterogeneous cortical LGI development in the first 2 years of life, with the high-growth regions located in the association cortex, whereas the low-growth regions located in sensorimotor, auditory, and visual cortices. Meanwhile, we also showed that LGI growth in most cortical regions was positively correlated with the brain volume growth, which is particularly significant in the prefrontal cortex in the first year. In addition, we observed gender differences in both cortical GIs and LGIs in the first 2 years, with the males having larger GIs than females at 2 years of age. This study provides valuable information on normal cortical folding development in infancy and early childhood.

  7. Distinct Genetic Influences on Cortical and Subcortical Brain Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Wei; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Mather, Karen A.; Zhu, Wanlin; Jiang, Jiyang; de Micheaux, Pierre Lafaye; Wright, Margaret J.; Ames, David; Sachdev, Perminder S.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the heritability of brain grey matter structures in a subsample of older adult twins (93 MZ and 68 DZ twin pairs; mean age 70 years) from the Older Australian Twins Study. The heritability estimates of subcortical regions ranged from 0.41 (amygdala) to 0.73 (hippocampus), and of cortical regions, from 0.55 (parietal lobe) to 0.78 (frontal lobe). Corresponding structures in the two hemispheres were influenced by the same genetic factors and high genetic correlations were observed between the two hemispheric regions. There were three genetically correlated clusters, comprising (i) the cortical lobes (frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes); (ii) the basal ganglia (caudate, putamen and pallidum) with weak genetic correlations with cortical lobes, and (iii) the amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus and nucleus accumbens grouped together, which genetically correlated with both basal ganglia and cortical lobes, albeit relatively weakly. Our study demonstrates a complex but patterned and clustered genetic architecture of the human brain, with divergent genetic determinants of cortical and subcortical structures, in particular the basal ganglia. PMID:27595976

  8. Quantitative Cortical Mapping of Fractional Anisotropy in Developing Rat Brains

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Yamamoto, Akria; Hossain, Mir Ahamed; Younes, Laurent; Mori, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Cortical development is associated with a series of events that involve axon and dendrite growth and synaptic formation. Although these developmental processes have been investigated in detail with histology, three-dimensional and quantitative imaging methods for rodent brains may be useful for genetic and pharmacological studies in which cortical developmental abnormalities are suspected. It has been shown that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can delineate the columnar organization of the fetal and early neonatal cortex based on a high degree of diffusion anisotropy along the columnar structures. This anisotropy is known to decrease during brain development. In this study, we applied DTI to developing rat brains at five developmental stages, postnatal days 0, 3, 7, 11 and 19, and used diffusion anisotropy as an index to characterize the structural change. Statistical analysis reveals four distinctive cortical areas that demonstrate a characteristic time course of anisotropy loss. This method may provide a means to delineate specific cortical areas and a quantitative method to detect abnormalities in cortical development in rodent pathological models. PMID:18256263

  9. The relationship of cortical folding and brain arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manish N.; Smith, Sarah E.; Dierker, Donna L.; Herbert, Joseph P.; Coalson, Timothy S.; Bruck, Brent S.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Van Essen, David C.; Dacey, Ralph G.

    2016-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of human intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) is not well understood; this study aims to quantitatively assess cortical folding in patients with these lesions. Methods Seven adult participants, 4 male and 3 female, with unruptured, surgically unresectable intracranial AVMs were prospectively enrolled in the study, with a mean age of 42.1 years and Spetzler-Martin grade range of II–IV. High-resolution brain MRI T1 and T2 sequences were obtained. After standard preprocessing, segmentation and registration techniques, three measures of cortical folding, the depth difference index (DDI), coordinate distance index (CDI) and gyrification index (GI)), were calculated for the affected and unaffected hemispheres of each subject as well as a healthy control subject set. Results Of the three metrics, CDI, DDI and GI, used for cortical folding assessment, none demonstrated significant differences between the participants and previously studied healthy adults. There was a significant negative correlation between the DDI ratio between affected and unaffected hemispheres and AVM volume (correlation coefficient r = −0.74, p = 0.04). Conclusion This study is the first to quantitatively assess human brain cortical folding in the presence of intracranial AVMs and no significant differences between AVM-affected versus unaffected hemispheres were found in a small dataset. We suggest longitudinal, larger human MRI-based cortical folding studies to assess whether AVMs are congenital lesions of vascular development or de novo, dynamic lesions. PMID:28009020

  10. Cortical neuronal activity does not regulate sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, M-H; Chen, M C; Lu, J

    2015-06-25

    The neural substrate of sleep homeostasis is unclear, but both cortical and subcortical structures are thought to be involved in sleep regulation. To test whether prior neuronal activity in the cortex or in subcortical regions drives sleep rebound, we systemically administered atropine (100mg/kg) to rats, producing a dissociated state with slow-wave cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) but waking behavior (e.g. locomotion). Atropine injections during the light period produced 6h of slow-wave cortical EEG but also subcortical arousal. Afterward, rats showed a significant increase in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, compared to the same period on a baseline day. Consistent with the behavioral and cortical EEG state produced by systemic atropine, c-Fos expression was low in the cortex but high in multiple subcortical arousal systems. These data suggest that subcortical arousal and behavior are sufficient to drive sleep homeostasis, while a sleep-like pattern of cortical activity is not sufficient to satisfy sleep homeostasis.

  11. Unimodal primary sensory cortices are directly connected by long-range horizontal projections in the rat sensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Stehberg, Jimmy; Dang, Phat T.; Frostig, Ron D.

    2014-01-01

    Research based on functional imaging and neuronal recordings in the barrel cortex subdivision of primary somatosensory cortex (SI) of the adult rat has revealed novel aspects of structure-function relationships in this cortex. Specifically, it has demonstrated that single whisker stimulation evokes subthreshold neuronal activity that spreads symmetrically within gray matter from the appropriate barrel area, crosses cytoarchitectural borders of SI and reaches deeply into other unimodal primary cortices such as primary auditory (AI) and primary visual (VI). It was further demonstrated that this spread is supported by a spatially matching underlying diffuse network of border-crossing, long-range projections that could also reach deeply into AI and VI. Here we seek to determine whether such a network of border-crossing, long-range projections is unique to barrel cortex or characterizes also other primary, unimodal sensory cortices and therefore could directly connect them. Using anterograde (BDA) and retrograde (CTb) tract-tracing techniques, we demonstrate that such diffuse horizontal networks directly and mutually connect VI, AI and SI. These findings suggest that diffuse, border-crossing axonal projections connecting directly primary cortices are an important organizational motif common to all major primary sensory cortices in the rat. Potential implications of these findings for topics including cortical structure-function relationships, multisensory integration, functional imaging, and cortical parcellation are discussed. PMID:25309339

  12. Assessing similarity to primary tissue and cortical layer identity in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neurons through single-cell transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Handel, Adam E; Chintawar, Satyan; Lalic, Tatjana; Whiteley, Emma; Vowles, Jane; Giustacchini, Alice; Argoud, Karene; Sopp, Paul; Nakanishi, Mahito; Bowden, Rory; Cowley, Sally; Newey, Sarah; Akerman, Colin; Ponting, Chris P; Cader, M Zameel

    2016-03-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cortical neurons potentially present a powerful new model to understand corticogenesis and neurological disease. Previous work has established that differentiation protocols can produce cortical neurons, but little has been done to characterize these at cellular resolution. In particular, it is unclear to what extent in vitro two-dimensional, relatively disordered culture conditions recapitulate the development of in vivo cortical layer identity. Single-cell multiplex reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to interrogate the expression of genes previously implicated in cortical layer or phenotypic identity in individual cells. Totally, 93.6% of single cells derived from iPSCs expressed genes indicative of neuronal identity. High proportions of single neurons derived from iPSCs expressed glutamatergic receptors and synaptic genes. And, 68.4% of iPSC-derived neurons expressing at least one layer marker could be assigned to a laminar identity using canonical cortical layer marker genes. We compared single-cell RNA-seq of our iPSC-derived neurons to available single-cell RNA-seq data from human fetal and adult brain and found that iPSC-derived cortical neurons closely resembled primary fetal brain cells. Unexpectedly, a subpopulation of iPSC-derived neurons co-expressed canonical fetal deep and upper cortical layer markers. However, this appeared to be concordant with data from primary cells. Our results therefore provide reassurance that iPSC-derived cortical neurons are highly similar to primary cortical neurons at the level of single cells but suggest that current layer markers, although effective, may not be able to disambiguate cortical layer identity in all cells.

  13. Influence of trust in the spreading of information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hongrun; Arenas, Alex; Gómez, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The understanding and prediction of information diffusion processes on networks is a major challenge in network theory with many implications in social sciences. Many theoretical advances occurred due to stochastic spreading models. Nevertheless, these stochastic models overlooked the influence of rational decisions on the outcome of the process. For instance, different levels of trust in acquaintances do play a role in information spreading, and actors may change their spreading decisions during the information diffusion process accordingly. Here, we study an information-spreading model in which the decision to transmit or not is based on trust. We explore the interplay between the propagation of information and the trust dynamics happening on a two-layer multiplex network. Actors' trustable or untrustable states are defined as accumulated cooperation or defection behaviors, respectively, in a Prisoner's Dilemma setup, and they are controlled by a memory span. The propagation of information is abstracted as a threshold model on the information-spreading layer, where the threshold depends on the trustability of agents. The analysis of the model is performed using a tree approximation and validated on homogeneous and heterogeneous networks. The results show that the memory of previous actions has a significant effect on the spreading of information. For example, the less memory that is considered, the higher is the diffusion. Information is highly promoted by the emergence of trustable acquaintances. These results provide insight into the effect of plausible biases on spreading dynamics in a multilevel networked system.

  14. How cells flow in the spreading of cellular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Beaune, Grégory; Stirbat, Tomita Vasilica; Khalifat, Nada; Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Garcia, Simon; Gurchenkov, Vasily Valérïévitch; Murrell, Michael P; Dufour, Sylvie; Cuvelier, Damien; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2014-06-03

    Like liquid droplets, cellular aggregates, also called "living droplets," spread onto adhesive surfaces. When deposited onto fibronectin-coated glass or polyacrylamide gels, they adhere and spread by protruding a cellular monolayer (precursor film) that expands around the droplet. The dynamics of spreading results from a balance between the pulling forces exerted by the highly motile cells at the periphery of the film, and friction forces associated with two types of cellular flows: (i) permeation, corresponding to the entry of the cells from the aggregates into the film; and (ii) slippage as the film expands. We characterize these flow fields within a spreading aggregate by using fluorescent tracking of individual cells and particle imaging velocimetry of cell populations. We find that permeation is limited to a narrow ring of width ξ (approximately a few cells) at the edge of the aggregate and regulates the dynamics of spreading. Furthermore, we find that the subsequent spreading of the monolayer depends heavily on the substrate rigidity. On rigid substrates, the migration of the cells in the monolayer is similar to the flow of a viscous liquid. By contrast, as the substrate gets softer, the film under tension becomes unstable with nucleation and growth of holes, flows are irregular, and cohesion decreases. Our results demonstrate that the mechanical properties of the environment influence the balance of forces that modulate collective cell migration, and therefore have important implications for the spreading behavior of tissues in both early development and cancer.

  15. Extrathalamic Modulation of Cortical Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-27

    and c7rtico-cortical systems. For example, we have shown that primate LC-NA neurons are more acti during waking than sleep and exhibit bursts of...infusion needle. Infusion of the alpha-adrenergic agonist clonidine (CLON), in concentrations ranging from 5-20 uM (67-270pg/50 nl injection...ind hippocampal EEG (HEEG) typically exhibit activity similar to that of a lightly sleeping animal. However, periods of "waking" EEG are sometimes

  16. Reverse preferential spread in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoizumi, Hiroshi; Tani, Seiichi; Miyoshi, Naoto; Okamoto, Yoshio

    2012-08-01

    Large-degree nodes may have a larger influence on the network, but they can be bottlenecks for spreading information since spreading attempts tend to concentrate on these nodes and become redundant. We discuss that the reverse preferential spread (distributing information inversely proportional to the degree of the receiving node) has an advantage over other spread mechanisms. In large uncorrelated networks, we show that the mean number of nodes that receive information under the reverse preferential spread is an upper bound among any other weight-based spread mechanisms, and this upper bound is indeed a logistic growth independent of the degree distribution.

  17. Self-organized model of cascade spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualdi, S.; Medo, M.; Zhang, Y.-C.

    2011-01-01

    We study simultaneous price drops of real stocks and show that for high drop thresholds they follow a power-law distribution. To reproduce these collective downturns, we propose a minimal self-organized model of cascade spreading based on a probabilistic response of the system elements to stress conditions. This model is solvable using the theory of branching processes and the mean-field approximation. For a wide range of parameters, the system is in a critical state and displays a power-law cascade-size distribution similar to the empirically observed one. We further generalize the model to reproduce volatility clustering and other observed properties of real stocks.

  18. [Parietal Cortices and Body Information].

    PubMed

    Naito, Eiichi; Amemiya, Kaoru; Morita, Tomoyo

    2016-11-01

    Proprioceptive signals originating from skeletal muscles and joints contribute to the formation of both the human body schema and the body image. In this chapter, we introduce various types of bodily illusions that are elicited by proprioceptive inputs, and we discuss distinct functions implemented by different parietal cortices. First, we illustrate the primary importance of the motor network in the processing of proprioceptive (kinesthetic) signals originating from muscle spindles. Next, we argue that the right inferior parietal cortex, in concert with the inferior frontal cortex (both regions connected by the inferior branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus-SLF III), may be involved in the conscious experience of body image. Further, we hypothesize other functions of distinct parietal regions: the association between internal hand motor representation with external object representation in the left inferior parietal cortex, visuo-kinesthetic processing in the bilateral posterior parietal cortices, and the integration of somatic signals from different body parts in the higher-order somatosensory parietal cortices. Our results indicate that a distinct parietal region, in concert with its anatomically and functionally connected frontal regions, probably plays specialized roles in the processing of body-related information.

  19. 99mtechnetium penicillamine: a renal cortical scanning agent.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A; Davis, G; Halpern, S; Ashburn, W

    1977-04-01

    99mTechnetium penicillamine, a renal cortical imaging agent, can be used to provide a rapid, safe and non-invasive assessment of renal morphology and the renal vascular supply. Since this agent is not excreted significantly during the imaging procedure cortical scans of high quality can be obtained without image deterioration owing to a superimposed collecting system. These scans, which are clearly superior in anatomical detail to earlier scans using 131I hippuran, can be obtained along with the 131I hippuran renogram when the patient comes to the nuclear medicine department. Herein we demonstrate the anatomical detail it is now possible to achieve by presenting the cortical renal scans and accompanying radiograms from 5 patients with different renal pathology.

  20. Basal forebrain control of wakefulness and cortical rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Anaclet, Christelle; Pedersen, Nigel P.; Ferrari, Loris L.; Venner, Anne; Bass, Caroline E.; Arrigoni, Elda; Fuller, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Wakefulness, along with fast cortical rhythms and associated cognition, depend on the basal forebrain (BF). BF cholinergic cell loss in dementia and the sedative effect of anti-cholinergic drugs have long implicated these neurons as important for cognition and wakefulness. The BF also contains intermingled inhibitory GABAergic and excitatory glutamatergic cell groups whose exact neurobiological roles are unclear. Here we show that genetically targeted chemogenetic activation of BF cholinergic or glutamatergic neurons in behaving mice produced significant effects on state consolidation and/or the electroencephalogram but had no effect on total wake. Similar activation of BF GABAergic neurons produced sustained wakefulness and high-frequency cortical rhythms, whereas chemogenetic inhibition increased sleep. Our findings reveal a major contribution of BF GABAergic neurons to wakefulness and the fast cortical rhythms associated with cognition. These findings may be clinically applicable to manipulations aimed at increasing forebrain activation in dementia and the minimally conscious state. PMID:26524973

  1. Toward a Genetic Dissection of Cortical Circuits in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Z. Josh

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex gives rise to a wide range of mental activities and consists of a constellation of interconnected areas that are built from a set of basic circuit templates. Major obstacles to understanding cortical architecture include the diversity of cell types, their highly recurrent local and global connectivity, dynamic circuit operations, and a convoluted developmental assembly process rooted in the genome. With our increasing knowledge of gene expression and developmental genetic principles, it is now feasible to launch a program of genetic dissection of cortical circuits through systematic targeting of cell types and fate-mapping of neural progenitors. Strategic design of even a modest number of mouse driver lines will facilitate efforts to compile a cell type parts list, build a Cortical Cell Atlas, establish experimental access to modern tools, and provide coordinates for tracing developmental trajectory from circuit assembly to functional operation. PMID:25233312

  2. Cortical Parvalbumin Interneurons and Cognitive Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, David A.; Curley, Allison A.; Glausier, Jill; Volk, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Deficits in cognitive control, a core disturbance of schizophrenia, appear to emerge from impaired prefrontal gamma oscillations. Cortical gamma oscillations require strong inhibitory inputs to pyramidal neurons from the parvalbumin basket cell (PVBC) class of GABAergic neurons. Recent findings indicate that schizophrenia is associated with multiple pre- and post-synaptic abnormalities in PVBCs, each of which weakens their inhibitory control of pyramidal cells. These findings suggest a new model of cortical dysfunction in schizophrenia in which PVBC inhibition is decreased to compensate for an upstream deficit in pyramidal cell excitation. This compensation is thought to re-balance cortical excitation and inhibition, but at a level insufficient to generate the gamma oscillation power required for high levels of cognitive control. PMID:22154068

  3. Model-based estimation of intra-cortical connectivity using electrophysiological data.

    PubMed

    Aram, P; Freestone, D R; Cook, M J; Kadirkamanathan, V; Grayden, D B

    2015-09-01

    This paper provides a new method for model-based estimation of intra-cortical connectivity from electrophysiological measurements. A novel closed-form solution for the connectivity function of the Amari neural field equations is derived as a function of electrophysiological observations. The resultant intra-cortical connectivity estimate is driven from experimental data, but constrained by the mesoscopic neurodynamics that are encoded in the computational model. A demonstration is provided to show how the method can be used to image physiological mechanisms that govern cortical dynamics, which are normally hidden in clinical data from epilepsy patients. Accurate estimation performance is demonstrated using synthetic data. Following the computational testing, results from patient data are obtained that indicate a dominant increase in surround inhibition prior to seizure onset that subsides in the cases when the seizures spread.

  4. Outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 clade 2.3.2.1c in hunting falcons and kept wild birds in Dubai implicate intercontinental virus spread.

    PubMed

    Naguib, Mahmoud M; Kinne, Jörg; Chen, Honglin; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Joseph, Sunitha; Wong, Po-Chun; Woo, Patrick C Y; Wernery, Renate; Beer, Martin; Wernery, Ulrich; Harder, Timm C

    2015-11-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) of subtype H5N1 have continued to perpetuate with divergent genetic variants in poultry within Asia since 2003. Further dissemination of Asian-derived H5 HPAIVs to Europe, Africa and, most recently, to the North American continent has occurred. We report an outbreak of HPAIV H5N1 among falcons kept for hunting and other wild bird species bred as falcon prey in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, during the autumn of 2014. The causative agent was identified as avian influenza virus subtype H5N1, clade 2.3.2.1c, by genetic and phylogenetic analyses. High mortality in infected birds was in accordance with systemic pathomorphological and histological alterations in affected falcons. Genetic analysis showed the HPAIV H5N1 of clade 2.3.2.1c is a reassortant in which the PB2 segment was derived from an Asian-origin H9N2 virus lineage. The Dubai H5N1 viruses were closely related to contemporary H5N1 HPAIVs from Nigeria, Burkina-Faso, Romania and Bulgaria. Median-joining network analysis of 2.3.2.1c viruses revealed that the Dubai outbreak was an episode of a westward spread of these viruses on a larger scale from unidentified Asian sources. The incursion into Dubai, possibly via infected captive hunting falcons returning from hunting trips to central Asian countries, preceded outbreaks in Nigeria and other West African countries. The alarmingly enhanced geographical mobility of clade 2.3.2.1.c and clade 2.3.4.4 viruses may represent another wave of transcontinental dissemination of Asian-origin HPAIV H5 viruses, such as the outbreak at Qinghai Lake caused by clade 2.2 (‘Qinghai’ lineage) in 2005.

  5. Spreading Depression, Spreading Depolarizations, and the Cerebral Vasculature.

    PubMed

    Ayata, Cenk; Lauritzen, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a transient wave of near-complete neuronal and glial depolarization associated with massive transmembrane ionic and water shifts. It is evolutionarily conserved in the central nervous systems of a wide variety of species from locust to human. The depolarization spreads slowly at a rate of only millimeters per minute by way of grey matter contiguity, irrespective of functional or vascular divisions, and lasts up to a minute in otherwise normal tissue. As such, SD is a radically different breed of electrophysiological activity compared with everyday neural activity, such as action potentials and synaptic transmission. Seventy years after its discovery by Leão, the mechanisms of SD and its profound metabolic and hemodynamic effects are still debated. What we did learn of consequence, however, is that SD plays a central role in the pathophysiology of a number of diseases including migraine, ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury. An intriguing overlap among them is that they are all neurovascular disorders. Therefore, the interplay between neurons and vascular elements is critical for our understanding of the impact of this homeostatic breakdown in patients. The challenges of translating experimental data into human pathophysiology notwithstanding, this review provides a detailed account of bidirectional interactions between brain parenchyma and the cerebral vasculature during SD and puts this in the context of neurovascular diseases.

  6. Spreading Depression, Spreading Depolarizations, and the Cerebral Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Ayata, Cenk; Lauritzen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a transient wave of near-complete neuronal and glial depolarization associated with massive transmembrane ionic and water shifts. It is evolutionarily conserved in the central nervous systems of a wide variety of species from locust to human. The depolarization spreads slowly at a rate of only millimeters per minute by way of grey matter contiguity, irrespective of functional or vascular divisions, and lasts up to a minute in otherwise normal tissue. As such, SD is a radically different breed of electrophysiological activity compared with everyday neural activity, such as action potentials and synaptic transmission. Seventy years after its discovery by Leão, the mechanisms of SD and its profound metabolic and hemodynamic effects are still debated. What we did learn of consequence, however, is that SD plays a central role in the pathophysiology of a number of diseases including migraine, ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury. An intriguing overlap among them is that they are all neurovascular disorders. Therefore, the interplay between neurons and vascular elements is critical for our understanding of the impact of this homeostatic breakdown in patients. The challenges of translating experimental data into human pathophysiology notwithstanding, this review provides a detailed account of bidirectional interactions between brain parenchyma and the cerebral vasculature during SD and puts this in the context of neurovascular diseases. PMID:26133935

  7. Geodynamic environments of ultra-slow spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhan, Andrey; Dubinin, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-slow spreading is clearly distinguished as an outstanding type of crustal accretion by recent studies. Spreading ridges with ultra-slow velocities of extension are studied rather well. But ultra-slow spreading is characteristic feature of not only spreading ridges, it can be observed also on convergent and transform plate boundaries. Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on divergent plate boundaries: 1. On spreading ridges with ultra-slow spreading, both modern (f.e. Gakkel, South-West Indian, Aden spreading center) and ceased (Labrador spreading center, Aegir ridge); 2. During transition from continental rifting to early stages of oceanic spreading (all spreading ridges during incipient stages of their formation); 3. During incipient stages of formation of spreading ridges on oceanic crust as a result of ridge jumps and reorganization of plate boundaries (f.e. Mathematicians rise and East Pacific rise); 4. During propagation of spreading ridge into the continental crust under influence of hotspot (Aden spreading center and Afar triple junction), under presence of strike-slip faults preceding propagation (possibly, rift zone of California Bay). Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on transform plate boundaries: 1. In transit zones between two "typical" spreading ridges (f.e. Knipovich ridge); 2. In semi strike-slip/extension zones on the oceanic crust (f.e. American-Antarctic ridge); 3. In the zones of local extension in regional strike-slip areas in pull-apart basins along transform boundaries (Cayman trough, pull-apart basins of the southern border of Scotia plate). Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on convergent plate boundaries: 1. During back-arc rifting on the stage of transition into back-arc spreading (central

  8. Constructing 4D infant cortical surface atlases based on dynamic developmental trajectories of the cortex.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Wang, Li; Shi, Feng; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Cortical surface atlases play an increasingly important role for analysis, visualization, and comparison of results across different neuroimaging studies. As the first two years of life is the most dynamic period of postnatal structural and functional development of the highly-folded cerebral cortex, longitudinal (4D) cortical surface atlases for the infant brains during this period is highly desired yet still lacking for early brain development studies. In this paper, we construct the first longitudinal (4D) cortical surface atlases for the dynamic developing infant cortical structures at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months of age, based on 202 serial MRI scans from 35 healthy infants. To ensure longitudinal consistency and unbiasedness of the 4D infant cortical surface atlases, we first compute the within-subject mean cortical folding geometries by groupwise registration of longitudinal surfaces of each infant. Then we establish intersubject cortical correspondences by groupwise registration of the within-subject mean cortical folding geometries of all infants. More importantly, for the first time, we further parcellate the 4D infant surface atlases into developmentally and functionally distinctive regions based solely on the dynamic developmental trajectories of the cortical thickness, by using the spectral clustering method. Specifically, to deal with the problem that each infant has different number of scans, we first compute the within-subject affinity matrix of vertices' cortical thickness trajectories of each infant, and then we use the averaged affinity matrix of all infants for parcellation. Our constructed 4D infant cortical surface atlases with developmental trajectories based parcellation will greatly facilitate the surface-based analysis of dynamic brain development in infants.

  9. Modeling the Spread of Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Do, Tae Sug; Lee, Young S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to create a mathematical model to better understand the spread of Ebola, the mathematical dynamics of the disease, and preventative behaviors. Methods An epidemiological model is created with a system of nonlinear differential equations, and the model examines the disease transmission dynamics with isolation through stability analysis. All parameters are approximated, and results are also exploited by simulations. Sensitivity analysis is used to discuss the effect of intervention strategies. Results The system has only one equilibrium point, which is the disease-free state (S,L,I,R,D) = (N,0,0,0,0). If traditional burials of Ebola victims are allowed, the possible end state is never stable. Provided that safe burial practices with no traditional rituals are followed, the endemic-free state is stable if the basic reproductive number, R0, is less than 1. Model behaviors correspond to empirical facts. The model simulation agrees with the data of the Nigeria outbreak in 2004: 12 recoveries, eight deaths, Ebola free in about 3 months, and an R0 value of about 2.6 initially, which signifies swift spread of the infection. The best way to reduce R0 is achieving the speedy net effect of intervention strategies. One day's delay in full compliance with building rings around the virus with isolation, close observation, and clear education may double the number of infected cases. Conclusion The model can predict the total number of infected cases, number of deaths, and duration of outbreaks among others. The model can be used to better understand the spread of Ebola, educate about prophylactic behaviors, and develop strategies that alter environment to achieve a disease-free state. A future work is to incorporate vaccination in the model when the vaccines are developed and the effects of vaccines are known better. PMID:26981342

  10. In vivo models of cortical acquired epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Soltani, Sara; Seigneur, Josée; Timofeev, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The neocortex is the site of origin of several forms of acquired epilepsy. Here we provide a brief review of experimental models that were recently developed to study neocortical epileptogenesis as well as some major results obtained with these methods. Most of neocortical seizures appear to be nocturnal and it is known that neuronal activities reveal high levels of synchrony during slow-wave sleep. Therefore, we start the review with a description of mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and major forms of synchronized normal and pathological activities. Then, we describe three experimental models of seizures and epileptogenesis: ketamine-xylazine anesthesia as feline seizure triggered factor, cortical undercut as cortical penetrating wound model and neocortical kindling. Besides specific technical details describing these models we also provide major features of pathological brain activities recorded during epileptogenesis and seizures. The most common feature of all models of neocortical epileptogenesis is the increased duration of network silent states that up-regulates neuronal excitability and eventually leads to epilepsy. PMID:26343530

  11. In vivo models of cortical acquired epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Soltani, Sara; Seigneur, Josée; Timofeev, Igor

    2016-02-15

    The neocortex is the site of origin of several forms of acquired epilepsy. Here we provide a brief review of experimental models that were recently developed to study neocortical epileptogenesis as well as some major results obtained with these methods. Most of neocortical seizures appear to be nocturnal and it is known that neuronal activities reveal high levels of synchrony during slow-wave sleep. Therefore, we start the review with a description of mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and major forms of synchronized normal and pathological activities. Then, we describe three experimental models of seizures and epileptogenesis: ketamine-xylazine anesthesia as feline seizure triggered factor, cortical undercut as cortical penetrating wound model and neocortical kindling. Besides specific technical details describing these models we also provide major features of pathological brain activities recorded during epileptogenesis and seizures. The most common feature of all models of neocortical epileptogenesis is the increased duration of network silent states that up-regulates neuronal excitability and eventually leads to epilepsy.

  12. Visual experience without lines: effect on developing cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, J D; Freeman, R D

    1973-11-09

    Kittens were reared in a planetarium-like visual environment that lacked straight line contours. Cortical neurons were subsequently highly sensitive to spots of light but not to straight lines, in marked contrast to those from a normal cat. If linear contour processing is an innate function it appears to be subject to substantial modification by early visual experience.

  13. Cortical functional connectivity under different auditory attentional efforts.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiangfei; Tong, Shanbao

    2012-01-01

    Auditory attentional effort (AAE) could be tuned to different levels in a top-down manner, while its neural correlates are still poorly understood. In this paper, we investigate the cortical connectivity under different levels of AAE. Multichannel EEG signals were recorded from nine subjects (male/female=6=3) in an auditory discrimination task under low or high AAE. Behavioral results showed that subjects paid more attention under high AAE and detected the probe stimuli better than low AAE. Partial directed coherence (PDC) was used to study the cortical functional connectivity within the first 300 ms post-stimulus period which includes the N100 and P200 components in the event-related potential (ERP). Majority of the cortical connections were strengthened with the increase of AAE. The right hemispheric dominance of connectivity in maintaining auditory attention was found under low AAE, which disappeared when the AAE was increased, indicating that the right hemispheric dominance previously reported might be due to a relatively lower AAE. Besides, most cortical connections under high AAE were found to be from the parietal cortex to the prefrontal cortex, which suggested the initiative role of parietal cortex in maintaining a high AAE.

  14. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F.; Dress, William B.

    2010-02-02

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method includes modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control an amplification circuit that provides a gain to the signal. Another method includes: modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control a fast hopping frequency synthesizer; and fast frequency hopping the signal with the fast hopping frequency synthesizer, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time.

  15. Atypical cortical representation of peripheral visual space in children with an autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Frey, Hans-Peter; Molholm, Sophie; Lalor, Edmund C; Russo, Natalie N; Foxe, John J

    2013-07-01

    A key feature of early visual cortical regions is that they contain discretely organized retinotopic maps. Titration of these maps must occur through experience, and the fidelity of their spatial tuning will depend on the consistency and accuracy of the eye movement system. Anomalies in fixation patterns and the ballistics of eye movements are well documented in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), with off-center fixations a hallmark of the phenotype. We hypothesized that these atypicalities might affect the development of visuo-spatial maps and specifically that peripheral inputs might receive altered processing in ASD. Using high-density recordings of visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and a novel system-identification approach known as VESPA (visual evoked spread spectrum analysis), we assessed sensory responses to centrally and peripherally presented stimuli. Additionally, input luminance was varied to bias responsiveness to the magnocellular system, given previous suggestions of magnocellular-specific deficits in ASD. Participants were 22 ASD children (7-17 years of age) and 31 age- and performance-IQ-matched neurotypical controls. Both VEP and VESPA responses to central presentations were indistinguishable between groups. In contrast, peripheral presentations resulted in significantly greater early VEP and VESPA amplitudes in the ASD cohort. We found no evidence that anomalous enhancement was restricted to magnocellular-biased responses. The extent of peripheral response enhancement was related to the severity of stereotyped behaviors and restricted interests, cardinal symptoms of ASD. The current results point to differential visuo-spatial cortical mapping in ASD, shedding light on the consequences of peculiarities in gaze and stereotyped visual behaviors often reported by clinicians working with this population.

  16. Lexical Ambiguity: Making a Case against Spread

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Jennifer J.; Rogness, Neal T.; Fisher, Diane G.

    2012-01-01

    We argue for decreasing the use of the word "spread" when describing the statistical idea of dispersion or variability in introductory statistics courses. In addition, we argue for increasing the use of the word "variability" as a replacement for "spread."

  17. Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Ronald E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents the Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) instructional module on Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults. The module includes activities and materials required, procedures, summary questions, and extension ideas for teaching Sea-Floor Spreading. (SL)

  18. Sensitivity of atypical lateral fire spread to wind and slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Colin. C.; Sharples, Jason J.; Evans, Jason P.

    2016-02-01

    This study presents new knowledge of the environmental sensitivity of a dynamic mode of atypical wildland fire spread on steep lee-facing slopes. This is achieved through a series of idealized numerical simulations performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and WRF-Fire coupled atmosphere-fire models. The sensitivity of the atypical lateral fire spread across lee slopes is tested for a varying background wind speed, wind direction relative to the terrain aspect, and lee slope steepness. The results indicate that the lateral spread characteristics are highly sensitive to each of these environmental conditions, and there is a broad agreement with the empirical thresholds calculated for lateral spread events observed in the 2003 Canberra bushfires. A theory to explain these environmental thresholds and their apparent interdependency is presented. The results are expected to have important implications for the management of wildland fires in rugged terrain.

  19. nem_spread Ver. 5.10

    SciTech Connect

    HENNIGAN, GARY; SHADID, JOHN; SJAARDEMA, GREGORY; HUTCHINSON, SCOTT

    2009-06-08

    Nem_spread reads it's input command file (default name nem_spread.inp), takes the named ExodusII geometry definition and spreads out the geometry (and optionally results) contained in that file out to a parallel disk system. The decomposition is taken from a scalar Nemesis load balance file generated by the companion utility nem_slice.

  20. The spreading of misinformation online

    PubMed Central

    Del Vicario, Michela; Bessi, Alessandro; Zollo, Fabiana; Petroni, Fabio; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H. Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The wide availability of user-provided content in online social media facilitates the aggregation of people around common interests, worldviews, and narratives. However, the World Wide Web (WWW) also allows for the rapid dissemination of unsubstantiated rumors and conspiracy theories that often elicit rapid, large, but naive social responses such as the recent case of Jade Helm 15––where a simple military exercise turned out to be perceived as the beginning of a new civil war in the United States. In this work, we address the determinants governing misinformation spreading through a thorough quantitative analysis. In particular, we focus on how Facebook users consume information related to two distinct narratives: scientific and conspiracy news. We find that, although consumers of scientific and conspiracy stories present similar consumption patterns with respect to content, cascade dynamics differ. Selective exposure to content is the primary driver of content diffusion and generates the formation of homogeneous clusters, i.e., “echo chambers.” Indeed, homogeneity appears to be the primary driver for the diffusion of contents and each echo chamber has its own cascade dynamics. Finally, we introduce a data-driven percolation model mimicking rumor spreading and we show that homogeneity and polarization are the main determinants for predicting cascades’ size. PMID:26729863

  1. The spreading of misinformation online.

    PubMed

    Del Vicario, Michela; Bessi, Alessandro; Zollo, Fabiana; Petroni, Fabio; Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2016-01-19

    The wide availability of user-provided content in online social media facilitates the aggregation of people around common interests, worldviews, and narratives. However, the World Wide Web (WWW) also allows for the rapid dissemination of unsubstantiated rumors and conspiracy theories that often elicit rapid, large, but naive social responses such as the recent case of Jade Helm 15--where a simple military exercise turned out to be perceived as the beginning of a new civil war in the United States. In this work, we address the determinants governing misinformation spreading through a thorough quantitative analysis. In particular, we focus on how Facebook users consume information related to two distinct narratives: scientific and conspiracy news. We find that, although consumers of scientific and conspiracy stories present similar consumption patterns with respect to content, cascade dynamics differ. Selective exposure to content is the primary driver of content diffusion and generates the formation of homogeneous clusters, i.e., "echo chambers." Indeed, homogeneity appears to be the primary driver for the diffusion of contents and each echo chamber has its own cascade dynamics. Finally, we introduce a data-driven percolation model mimicking rumor spreading and we show that homogeneity and polarization are the main determinants for predicting cascades' size.

  2. Contagion spreading on complex networks with local deterministic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manshour, Pouya; Montakhab, Afshin

    2014-07-01

    Typically, contagion strength is modeled by a transmission rate λ, whereby all nodes in a network are treated uniformly in a mean-field approximation. However, local agents react differently to the same contagion based on their local characteristics. Following our recent work (Montakhab and Manshour, 2012 [42]), we investigate contagion spreading models with local dynamics on complex networks. We therefore quantify contagions by their quality, 0⩽α⩽1, and follow their spreading as their transmission condition (fitness) is evaluated by local agents. Instead of considering stochastic dynamics, here we consider various deterministic local rules. We find that initial spreading with exponential quality-dependent time scales is followed by a stationary state with a prevalence depending on the quality of the contagion. We also observe various interesting phenomena, for example, high prevalence without the participation of the hubs. This special feature of our "threshold rule" provides a mechanism for high prevalence spreading without the participation of "super-spreaders", in sharp contrast with many standard mechanism of spreading where hubs are believed to play the central role. On the other hand, if local nodes act as agents who stop the transmission once a threshold is reached, we find that spreading is severely hindered in a heterogeneous population while in a homogeneous one significant spreading may occur. We further decouple local characteristics from underlying topology in order to study the role of network topology in various models and find that as long as small-world effect exists, the underlying topology does not contribute to the final stationary state but only affects the initial spreading velocity.

  3. Subthalamic stimulation modulates cortical motor network activity and synchronization in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Daniel; Klotz, Rosa; Govindan, Rathinaswamy B; Scholten, Marlieke; Naros, Georgios; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Bunjes, Friedemann; Meisner, Christoph; Plewnia, Christian; Krüger, Rejko; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-03-01

    coherence in the beta band was significantly attenuated over the bilateral sensorimotor areas. Similarly, the global cortico-cortical phase synchronization was attenuated, and the topographic differentiation revealed stronger desynchronization over the (ipsilateral) right-hemispheric prefrontal, premotor and sensorimotor areas compared to 'stimulation off'. We further demonstrated that the cortico-cortical phase synchronization was largely dominated by genuine neuronal coupling. The clinical improvement with 'stimulation on' compared to 'stimulation off' could be predicted from this cortical decoupling with multiple regressions, and the reduction of synchronization over the right prefrontal area showed a linear univariate correlation with clinical improvement. Our study demonstrates wide-spread activity and synchronization modulations of the cortical motor network, and highlights subthalamic stimulation as a network-modulating therapy. Accordingly, subthalamic stimulation may release bilateral cortical computational resources by facilitating movement-related desynchronization. Moreover, the subthalamic nucleus is critical to balance inhibitory and facilitatory cortical players within the motor program.

  4. Electroconvulsive therapy increases temporal gray matter volume and cortical thickness.