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Sample records for high ct numbers

  1. Infradiaphragmatic bronchogenic cyst with high CT numbers in a boy with primitive neuroectodermal tumor.

    PubMed

    Fischbach, R; Benz-Bohm, G; Berthold, F; Eidt, S; Schmidt, R

    1994-01-01

    Abdominal bronchogenic cysts are very rare with less than 20 published cases. We report the case of a retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst in a 12-year-old boy, who initially presented with a primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the pelvis. Computed tomography (CT) showed a small, hyperdense nonenhancing mass adjacent to the right crus of the diaphragm. Follow-up CT after chemotherapy showed a decrease in CT attenuation of this mass, but a slight increase in size. At surgery the mass was loosely attached to the diaphragm and final pathology confirmed the diagnosis of a bronchogenic cyst.

  2. Energy Dependence of Measured CT Numbers on Substituted Materials Used for CT Number Calibration of Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Reza; Jabbari, Nasrollah; aghdasi, Mehdi; Khalkhali, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For accurate dose calculations, it is necessary to provide a correct relationship between the CT numbers and electron density in radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPSs). The purpose of this study was to investigate the energy dependence of measured CT numbers on substituted materials used for CT number calibration of radiotherapy TPSs and the resulting errors in the treatment planning calculation doses. Materials and Methods In this study, we designed a cylindrical water phantom with different materials used as tissue equivalent materials for the simulation of tissues and obtaining the related CT numbers. For evaluating the effect of CT number variations of substituted materials due to energy changing of scanner (kVp) on the dose calculation of TPS, the slices of the scanned phantom at three kVp's were imported into the desired TPSs (MIRS and CorePLAN). Dose calculations were performed on two TPSs. Results The mean absolute percentage differences between the CT numbers of CT scanner and two treatment planning systems for all the samples were 3.22%±2.57% for CorePLAN and 2.88%±2.11% for MIRS. It was also found that the maximum absolute percentage difference between all of the calculated doses from each photon beam of linac (6 and 15 MV) at three kVp's was less than 1.2%. Discussion The present study revealed that, for the materials with effective low atomic number, the mean CT number increased with increasing energy, which was opposite for the materials with an effective high atomic number. We concluded that the tissue substitute materials had a different behavior in the energy ranges from 80 to 130 kVp. So, it is necessary to consider the energy dependence of the substitute materials used for the measurement or calibration of CT number for radiotherapy treatment planning systems. PMID:27391672

  3. Technical Note: Exploring the limit for the conversion of energy-subtracted CT number to electron density for high-atomic-number materials

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Masatoshi; Tsukihara, Masayoshi

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: For accurate tissue inhomogeneity correction in radiotherapy treatment planning, the authors had previously proposed a novel conversion of the energy-subtracted CT number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide ρ{sub e} range. The purpose of this study is to address the limitations of the conversion method with respect to atomic number (Z) by elucidating the role of partial photon interactions in the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion process. Methods: The authors performed numerical analyses of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion for 105 human body tissues, as listed in ICRU Report 46, and elementary substances with Z = 1–40. Total and partial attenuation coefficients for these materials were calculated using the XCOM photon cross section database. The effective x-ray energies used to calculate the attenuation were chosen to imitate a dual-source CT scanner operated at 80–140 kV/Sn under well-calibrated and poorly calibrated conditions. Results: The accuracy of the resultant calibrated electron density,ρ{sub e}{sup cal}, for the ICRU-46 body tissues fully satisfied the IPEM-81 tolerance levels in radiotherapy treatment planning. If a criterion of ρ{sub e}{sup cal}/ρ{sub e} − 1 is assumed to be within ±2%, the predicted upper limit of Z applicable for the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion under the well-calibrated condition is Z = 27. In the case of the poorly calibrated condition, the upper limit of Z is approximately 16. The deviation from the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} linearity for higher Z substances is mainly caused by the anomalous variation in the photoelectric-absorption component. Conclusions: Compensation among the three partial components of the photon interactions provides for sufficient linearity of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion to be applicable for most human tissues even for poorly conditioned scans in which there exists a large variation of effective x

  4. 76 FR 58559 - Connecticut Disaster Number CT-00023

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Connecticut Disaster Number CT-00023 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment... Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate Administrator for Disaster Assistance....

  5. 76 FR 58329 - Connecticut Disaster Number CT-00024

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Connecticut Disaster Number CT-00024 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment.... (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate...

  6. 78 FR 7848 - Connecticut Disaster Number CT-00028

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Connecticut Disaster Number CT-00028 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment...: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road,...

  7. High Reynolds Number Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baals, D. D. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Fundamental aerodynamic questions for which high Reynolds number experimental capability is required are discussed. The operational characteristics and design features of the National Transonic Facility are reviewed.

  8. TU-F-18A-09: CT Number Stability Across Patient Sizes Using Virtual-Monoenergetic Dual-Energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Michalak, G; Grimes, J; Fletcher, J; McCollough, C; Halaweish, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Virtual-monoenergetic imaging uses dual-energy CT data to synthesize images corresponding to a single photon energy, thereby reducing beam-hardening artifacts. This work evaluated the ability of a commercial virtual-monoenergetic algorithm to achieve stable CT numbers across patient sizes. Methods: Test objects containing a range of iodine and calcium hydroxyapatite concentrations were placed inside 8 torso-shaped water phantoms, ranging in lateral width from 15 to 50 cm, and scanned on a dual-source CT system (Siemens Somatom Force). Single-energy scans were acquired from 70-150 kV in 10 kV increments; dual-energy scans were acquired using 4 energy pairs (low energy: 70, 80, 90, and 100 kV; high energy: 150 kV + 0.6 mm Sn). CTDIvol was matched for all single- and dual-energy scans for a given phantom size. All scans used 128×0.6 mm collimation and were reconstructed with 1-mm thickness at 0.8-mm increment and a medium smooth body kernel. Monoenergetic images were generated using commercial software (syngo Via Dual Energy, VA30). Iodine contrast was calculated as the difference in mean iodine and water CT numbers from respective regions-of-interest in 10 consecutive images. Results: CT numbers remained stable as phantom width varied from 15 to 50 cm for all dual-energy data sets (except for at 50 cm using 70/150Sn due to photon starvation effects). Relative to the 15 cm phantom, iodine contrast was within 5.2% of the 70 keV value for phantom sizes up to 45 cm. At 90/150Sn, photon starvation did not occur at 50 cm, and iodine contrast in the 50-cm phantom was within 1.4% of the 15-cm phantom. Conclusion: Monoenergetic imaging, as implemented in the evaluated commercial system, eliminated the variation in CT numbers due to patient size, and may provide more accurate data for quantitative tasks, including radiation therapy treatment planning. Siemens Healthcare.

  9. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, A.E.; Brand, H.; Hollerbach, K.; Logan, C.M.; Martz, H.E.

    1995-09-23

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling.

  10. High Reynolds number research - 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinney, L. W. (Editor); Baals, D. D. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The fundamental aerodynamic questions for which high Reynolds number experimental capability is required were examined. Potential experiments which maximize the research returns from the use of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) were outlined. Calibration plans were reviewed and the following topics were discussed: fluid dynamics; high lit; configuration aerodynamics; aeroelasticity and unsteady aerodynamics; wind tunnel/flight correlation; space vehicles; and theoretical aerodynamics

  11. Quasiperpendicular High Mach Number Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Burgess, D.; Fujimoto, M.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2015-09-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the Universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this Letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasiperpendicular shocks across 2 orders of magnitude in Alfvén Mach number (MA ) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted time scale of ˜0.3 τc , where τc is the ion gyroperiod. In addition, we experimentally reveal the relationship between reformation and MA and focus on the magnetic structure of such shocks to further show that for the same MA , a reforming shock exhibits stronger magnetic field amplification than a shock that is not reforming.

  12. Evaluation of a bilinear model for attenuation correction using CT numbers generated from a parametric method.

    PubMed

    Martinez, L C; Calzado, A

    2016-01-01

    A parametric model is used for the calculation of the CT number of some selected human tissues of known compositions (Hi) in two hybrid systems, one SPECT-CT and one PET-CT. Only one well characterized substance, not necessarily tissue-like, needs to be scanned with the protocol of interest. The linear attenuation coefficients of these tissues for some energies of interest (μ(i)) have been calculated from their tabulated compositions and the NIST databases. These coefficients have been compared with those calculated with the bilinear model from the CT number (μ(B)i). No relevant differences have been found for bones and lung. In the soft tissue region, the differences can be up to 5%. These discrepancies are attributed to the different chemical composition for the tissues assumed by both methods.

  13. CT Hounsfield Numbers of Soft Tissues on Unenhanced Abdominal CT Scans: Variability Between Two Different Manufacturers’ MDCT Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Ramit; McGahan, John P.; Corwin, Michael T.; Li, Chin-Shang; Tran, Tien; Seibert, J. Anthony; Boone, John M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study is to determine whether Hounsfield numbers of soft tissues on unenhanced abdominal CT of the same patient vary on repeat scans done on two different manufacturers’ MDCT scanners. MATERIALS AND METHODS A database search was performed to identify patients older than 18 years who underwent unenhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis performed both on a Volume CT (GE Healthcare) and a Definition AS Plus (Siemens Healthcare) 64-MDCT scanner within 12 months of each other. After excluding those patients for whom Hounsfield unit measurements would be affected by mitigating factors, 48 patients (mean age, 58.8 years) were identified. Hounsfield unit measurements were obtained in nine different soft-tissue anatomic locations on each scan, and the location of these sites was kept identical on each scan pair. Data were analyzed to evaluate Hounsfield unit differences between these scanners. RESULTS In general, there was a low consistency in the Hounsfield unit measurements for each of these sites on scans obtained by the two scanners, with the subcutaneous fat in the left posterolateral flank showing the lowest correlation (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.198). There were differences in the Hounsfield unit measurements obtained in all anatomic sites on scans obtained by both scanners. Mean Hounsfield unit measurements obtained on the Definition AS Plus scanner were lower than those obtained on the Volume CT scanner, with the intriguing exception of the anterior midline subcutaneous fat Hounsfield unit measurements, which were higher on the Definition AS Plus scanner. All differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION Hounsfield unit measurements for unenhanced abdominal soft tissues of the same patient vary between scanners of two common MDCT manufacturers. PMID:25341139

  14. SU-E-J-272: Auto-Segmentation of Regions with Differentiating CT Numbers for Treatment Response Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C; Noid, G; Dalah, E; Paulson, E; Li, X; Gilat-Schmidt, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It has been reported recently that the change of CT number (CTN) during and after radiation therapy (RT) may be used to assess RT response. The purpose of this work is to develop a tool to automatically segment the regions with differentiating CTN and/or with change of CTN in a series of CTs. Methods: A software tool was developed to identify regions with differentiating CTN using K-mean Cluster of CT numbers and to automatically delineate these regions using convex hull enclosing method. Pre- and Post-RT CT, PET, or MRI images acquired for sample lung and pancreatic cancer cases were used to test the software tool. K-mean cluster of CT numbers within the gross tumor volumes (GTVs) delineated based on PET SUV (standard uptake value of fludeoxyglucose) and/or MRI ADC (apparent diffusion coefficient) map was analyzed. The cluster centers with higher value were considered as active tumor volumes (ATV). The convex hull contours enclosing preset clusters were used to delineate these ATVs with color washed displays. The CTN defined ATVs were compared with the SUV- or ADC-defined ATVs. Results: CTN stability of the CT scanner used to acquire the CTs in this work is less than 1.5 Hounsfield Unit (HU) variation annually. K-mean cluster centers in the GTV have difference of ∼20 HU, much larger than variation due to CTN stability, for the lung cancer cases studied. The dice coefficient between the ATVs delineated based on convex hull enclosure of high CTN centers and the PET defined GTVs based on SUV cutoff value of 2.5 was 90(±5)%. Conclusion: A software tool was developed using K-mean cluster and convex hull contour to automatically segment high CTN regions which may not be identifiable using a simple threshold method. These CTN regions were reasonably overlapped with the PET or MRI defined GTVs.

  15. Highly accurate fast lung CT registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Jan; Heldmann, Stefan; Kipshagen, Till; Fischer, Bernd

    2013-03-01

    Lung registration in thoracic CT scans has received much attention in the medical imaging community. Possible applications range from follow-up analysis, motion correction for radiation therapy, monitoring of air flow and pulmonary function to lung elasticity analysis. In a clinical environment, runtime is always a critical issue, ruling out quite a few excellent registration approaches. In this paper, a highly efficient variational lung registration method based on minimizing the normalized gradient fields distance measure with curvature regularization is presented. The method ensures diffeomorphic deformations by an additional volume regularization. Supplemental user knowledge, like a segmentation of the lungs, may be incorporated as well. The accuracy of our method was evaluated on 40 test cases from clinical routine. In the EMPIRE10 lung registration challenge, our scheme ranks third, with respect to various validation criteria, out of 28 algorithms with an average landmark distance of 0.72 mm. The average runtime is about 1:50 min on a standard PC, making it by far the fastest approach of the top-ranking algorithms. Additionally, the ten publicly available DIR-Lab inhale-exhale scan pairs were registered to subvoxel accuracy at computation times of only 20 seconds. Our method thus combines very attractive runtimes with state-of-the-art accuracy in a unique way.

  16. Potential of dual-energy subtraction for converting CT numbers to electron density based on a single linear relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The conversion of the computed tomography (CT) number to electron density is one of the main processes that determine the accuracy of patient dose calculations in radiotherapy treatment planning. However, the CT number and electron density of tissues cannot be generally interrelated via a simple one-to-one correspondence because the CT number depends on the effective atomic number as well as the electron density. The purpose of this study is to present a simple conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number ({Delta}HU) by means of dual-energy CT (DECT) to the relative electron density ({rho}{sub e}) via a single linear relationship. Methods: The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion method was demonstrated by performing analytical DECT image simulations that were intended to imitate a second-generation dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner with an additional tin filtration for the high-kV tube. The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} calibration line was obtained from the image simulation with a 33 cm-diameter electron density calibration phantom equipped with 16 inserts including polytetrafluoroethylene, polyvinyl chloride, and aluminum; the elemental compositions of these three inserts were quite different to those of body tissues. The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion method was also applied to previously published experimental CT data, which were measured using two different CT scanners, to validate the clinical feasibility of the present approach. In addition, the effect of object size on {rho}{sub e}-calibrated images was investigated by image simulations using a 25 cm-diameter virtual phantom for two different filtrations: with and without the tin filter for the high-kV tube. Results: The simulated {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} plot exhibited a predictable linear relationship over a wide range of {rho}{sub e} from 0.00 (air) to 2.35 (aluminum). Resultant values of the coefficient of determination, slope, and intercept of the linear function fitted to the data were close to those

  17. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Bradford J.; Yanof, J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kruecker, J.; Bauer, C.; Seip, R.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.

    2006-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large

  18. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Bradford J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.; Yanof, J.; Bauer, C.; Kruecker, J.; Seip, R.

    2006-05-08

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large

  19. High resolution CT mammography for surgical biopsy specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Raptopoulos, V.; Baum, J.K.; Hochman, M.; Houlihan, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the performance of high resolution CT on breast biopsy specimens before considering the reevaluation of refined CT techniques in patients with breast abnormalities. High resolution CT was done in 44 surgical biopsy specimens following conventional X-ray specimen mammography. The specimens comprised 38 palpable and nonpalpable soft tissue abnormalities with mean size of 19 mm and 6 specimens with clustered microcalcifications only. There were 21 carcinomas, 10 fibroadenomas, and 13 other benign conditions. Evaluation of CT and conventional images was done separately, and a feature-grading list was used to compare the two modalities. In fatty specimens, grading of morphologic features of masses and the confidence to detect a soft tissue abnormality were equal with both techniques. CT significantly improved the confidence to detect a mass in 17 specimens with dense tissue: On a scale of 0-10, the mean score for detection was 3.8 with radiography and 5.8 with CT (p < 0.008). For clustered microcalcifications, X-ray was superior to CT. The mean CT attenuation of 18 malignant masses (82 HU) was significantly lower than the mean attenuation of 10 fibroadenomas (131 HU; p = 0.003). CT scans of the American College of Radiology test phantom met the requirements for X-ray accreditation. For soft tissue abnormalities, CT specimen mammography performed equally as or better than specimen radiography. These in vitro results suggest potential advantages for increased sensitivity and specificity with CT and justify further investigations. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Number Theory in the High School Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dence, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Demonstrates some of the usefulness of number theory to students on the high school setting in four areas: Fibonacci numbers, Diophantine equations, continued fractions, and algorithms for computing pi. (ASK)

  1. Volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT of the lung.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Mizuki; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2004-11-01

    We developed a volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT (HRCT) protocol that provides combined inspiratory and expiratory volumetric imaging of the lung without increasing radiation exposure, and conducted a preliminary feasibility assessment of this protocol to evaluate diffuse lung disease with small airway abnormalities. The volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT increased the detectability of the conducting airway to the areas of air trapping (P<0.0001), and added significant information about extent and distribution of air trapping (P<0.0001).

  2. Normal mediastinal lymph node size and number: CT and anatomic study

    SciTech Connect

    Genereux, G.P.; Howie, J.L.

    1984-06-01

    Normal lymph nodes were studied retrospectively by computed tomography (CT) in 39 patients and by dissection at autopsy in 12 cadavers. The mediastinum was divided arbitrarily into four zones relating to the left innominate vein (zone 1), pretracheal space (zone 2), precarinal/subcarinal compartment (zone 3), and aorticopulmonary window (zone 4). Of 225 lymph nodes from all zones in the CT study, 99% measured less than 16 mm in largest diameter. Using contiguous 10-mm CT scans, lymph nodes were detected in 65%-95% of patients, depending on the zone studies. The mean number of lymph nodes on a representative section was 1.1. There was a significant size difference between lymph nodes residing in the superior mediastinum compared with those in the middle mediastinum contiguous to the carina. Thus, only 7% of lymph nodes in zone 1 were larger than 5 mm, whereas 90% and 67% of lymph nodes in zones 3 and 4, respectively, were larger, in the 6-10 mm range.

  3. Effective atomic number accuracy for kidney stone characterization using spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, M.; Langan, D. A.; Sahani, D. S.; Kambadakone, A.; Aluri, S.; Procknow, K.; Wu, X.; Bhotika, R.; Okerlund, D.; Kulkarni, N.; Xu, D.

    2010-04-01

    The clinical application of Gemstone Spectral ImagingTM, a fast kV switching dual energy acquisition, is explored in the context of noninvasive kidney stone characterization. Utilizing projection-based material decomposition, effective atomic number and monochromatic images are generated for kidney stone characterization. Analytical and experimental measurements are reported and contrasted. Phantoms were constructed using stone specimens extracted from patients. This allowed for imaging of the different stone types under similar conditions. The stone specimens comprised of Uric Acid, Cystine, Struvite and Calcium-based compositions. Collectively, these stone types span an effective atomic number range of approximately 7 to 14. While Uric Acid and Calcium based stones are generally distinguishable in conventional CT, stone compositions like Cystine and Struvite are difficult to distinguish resulting in treatment uncertainty. Experimental phantom measurements, made under increasingly complex imaging conditions, illustrate the impact of various factors on measurement accuracy. Preliminary clinical studies are reported.

  4. The effects of field-of-view and patient size on CT numbers from cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seet, Katrina Y. T.; Barghi, Arvand; Yartsev, Slav; Van Dyk, Jake

    2009-10-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is used for patient alignment before treatment and is ideal for use in adaptive radiotherapy to account for tumor shrinkage, organ deformation and weight loss. However, CBCT images are prone to artifacts such as streaking and cupping effects, reducing image quality and CT number accuracy. Our goal was to determine the optimum combination of cone-beam imaging options to increase the accuracy of image CT numbers. Several phantoms with and without inserts of known relative electron densities were imaged using the Varian on-board imaging system. It was found that CT numbers are most influenced by the selection of field-of-view and are dependent on object size and filter type. Image acquisition in half-fan mode consistently produced more accurate CT numbers, regardless of phantom size. Values measured using full-fan mode can differ by up to 7% from planning CT values. No differences were found between CT numbers of all phantom images with low and standard dose modes.

  5. Metrology, applications and methods with high energy CT systems

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlmann, N.; Voland, V.; Salamon, M.; Hebele, S.; Boehnel, M.; Reims, N.; Schmitt, M.; Kasperl, S.

    2014-02-18

    The increase of Computed Tomography (CT) as an applicable metrology and Non Destructive Testing (NDT) method raises interest on developing the application fields to larger objects, which were rarely used in the past due to their requirements on the imaging system. Especially the classical X-ray generation techniques based on standard equipment restricted the applications of CT to typical material penetration lengths of only a few cm of steel. Even with accelerator technology that offers a suitable way to overcome these restrictions just the 2D radioscopy technique found a widespread application. Beside the production and detection of photons in the MeV range itself, the achievable image quality is limited using standard detectors due to the dominating absorption effect of Compton Scattering at high energies. Especially for CT reconstruction purposes these effects have to be considered on the development path from 2D to 3D imaging. Most High Energy CT applications are therefore based on line detectors shielding scattered radiation to a maximum with an increase in imaging quality but with time consuming large volume scan capabilities. In this contribution we present the High-Energy X-ray Imaging project at the Fraunhofer Development Centre for X-ray Technology with the characterization and the potential of the CT-system according to metrological and other application capabilities.

  6. Comparison of CT-Number and Gray Scale Value of Different Dental Materials and Hard Tissues in CT and CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Emadi, Naghmeh; Safi, Yaser; Akbarzadeh Bagheban, Alireza; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) are valuable diagnostic aids for many clinical applications. This study was designed to compare the gray scale value (GSV) and Hounsfield unit (HU) of selected dental materials and various hard tissues using CT or CBCT. Methods and Materials: Three samples of all test materials including amalgam (AM), composite resin (CR), glass ionomer (GI), zinc-oxide eugenol (ZOE), calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement, AH-26 root canal sealer (AH-26), gutta-percha (GP), Coltosol (Col), Dycal (DL), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), zinc phosphate (ZP), and polycarbonate cement (PC) were prepared and scanned together with samples of bone, dentin and enamel using two CBCT devices, Scanora 3D (S3D) and NewTom VGi (NTV) and a spiral CT (SCT) scanner (Somatom Emotion 16 multislice spiral CT);. Subsequently, the HU and GSV values were determined and evaluated. The data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The level of significance was determined at 0.05. Results: There were significant differences among the three different scanners (P<0.05). The differences between HU/GSV values of 12 selected dental materials using NTV was significant (P<0.05) and for S3D and SCT was insignificant (P>0.05). All tested materials showed maximum values in S3D and SCT (3094 and 3071, respectively); however, bone and dentin showed low/medium values (P<0.05). In contrast, the tested materials and tissues showed a range of values in NTV (366 to15383; P<0.05). Conclusion: Scanner system can influence the obtained HU/GSV of dental materials. NTV can discriminate various dental materials, in contrast to S3D/SCT scanners. NTV may be a more useful diagnostic aid for clinical practice. PMID:25386210

  7. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah

    2015-04-29

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ{sup 2} value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ{sup 2} value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies.

  8. Artifacts and pitfalls of high-resolution CT scans.

    PubMed

    Hahn, F J; Chu, W K; Anderson, J C; Dobry, C A

    1985-01-01

    Artifacts on CT images have been observed since the introduction of CT scanners. Some artifacts have been corrected with the improvement of technology and better understanding of the image formation and reconstruction algorithms. Some artifacts, however, are still observable in state-of-the-art high-resolution scans. Many investigations on CT artifacts have been reported. Some artifacts are obvious and some are similar to patterns commonly associated with pathological conditions. The present report summarizes some of the causes of artifacts and presents some artifacts that mimic pathology on clinical scans of the head and spine. It is the intention of this report to bring these artifacts and potential pitfalls to the attention of the radiologists so that misinterpretation can be avoided.

  9. High-resolution CT of temporal bone trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, B.A.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1984-08-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) finding in 18 patients with temporal bone trauma were reviewed. Eight patients suffered longitudinal fractures of the petrous bone, which were associated with ossicular dislocation in two patients. Transverse fractures were detected in six patients, with a contralateral mastoid fracture in one patient. In four patients, the fractures were restricted to the mastoid region. Of the 14 patients in whom adequate neurologic evaluation was available, seven had a permanent facial nerve or hearing deficit while five suffered at least a transient neurologic deficit related to the temporal bone trauma. Routine head CT (10 mm sections) demonstrated only eight of 19 petrous bone injuries. Evidence of brain trauma or extra-axial hemotoma was seen in 12 patients. In 13 cases, high-resolution CT was also performed, demonstrating temporal bone injuries in all. This latter technique allows rapid and detailed evaluation of temporal bone trauma.

  10. Decay of Turbulence at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinhuber, Michael; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Bewley, Gregory P.

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent motions in a fluid decay at a certain rate once stirring has stopped. The role of the most basic parameter in fluid mechanics, the Reynolds number, in setting the decay rate is not generally known. This Letter concerns the high-Reynolds-number limit of the process. In a classical grid-turbulence wind-tunnel experiment that both reaches higher Reynolds numbers than ever before and covers a wide range of them (1 04number independent, which contradicts some models and supports others.

  11. Chaotic behaviour of high Mach number flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varvoglis, H.; Ghosh, S.

    1985-01-01

    The stability of the super-Alfvenic flow of a two-fluid plasma model with respect to the Mach number and the angle between the flow direction and the magnetic field is investigated. It is found that, in general, a large scale chaotic region develops around the initial equilibrium of the laminar flow when the Mach number exceeds a certain threshold value. After reaching a maximum the size of this region begins shrinking and goes to zero as the Mach number tends to infinity. As a result high Mach number flows in time independent astrophysical plasmas may lead to the formation of 'quasi-shocks' in the presence of little or no dissipation.

  12. CTC-ask: a new algorithm for conversion of CT numbers to tissue parameters for Monte Carlo dose calculations applying DICOM RS knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottosson, Rickard O.; Behrens, Claus F.

    2011-11-01

    One of the building blocks in Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning is to convert patient CT data to MC compatible phantoms, consisting of density and media matrices. The resulting dose distribution is highly influenced by the accuracy of the conversion. Two major contributing factors are precise conversion of CT number to density and proper differentiation between air and lung. Existing tools do not address this issue specifically. Moreover, their density conversion may depend on the number of media used. Differentiation between air and lung is an important task in MC treatment planning and misassignment may lead to local dose errors on the order of 10%. A novel algorithm, CTC-ask, is presented in this study. It enables locally confined constraints for the media assignment and is independent of the number of media used for the conversion of CT number to density. MC compatible phantoms were generated for two clinical cases using a CT-conversion scheme implemented in both CTC-ask and the DICOM-RT toolbox. Full MC dose calculation was subsequently conducted and the resulting dose distributions were compared. The DICOM-RT toolbox inaccurately assigned lung in 9.9% and 12.2% of the voxels located outside of the lungs for the two cases studied, respectively. This was completely avoided by CTC-ask. CTC-ask is able to reduce anatomically irrational media assignment. The CTC-ask source code can be made available upon request to the authors.

  13. Application of offset-CT scanning to the inspection of high power feeder lines and connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneberk, Daniel; Maziuk, Robert; Soyfer, Boris; Shashishekhar, N.; Alreja, Rahul

    2016-02-01

    VJT is developing techniques and scanning methods for the in-situ Radiographic and Computed Tomographic inspection of underground high-power feeder cables. The goals for the inspection are to measure the 3D state of the cables and the cable-connections. Recent in-situ Digital Radiographic inspections performed by VJT have demonstrated the value of NDE inspection information for buried power lines. These NDE data have raised further questions as to the exact state of the cables and connections and pointed to the need for more 3D information of the type provided by volumetric CT scanning. VJT is pursuing a three phased approach to address the many issues involved in this type of inspection: 1) develop a high-power feeder-cable test-bed CT scanner, 2) acquire scans on underground feeder pipes that have been removed from service, and 3) from the work in 1) and 2) develop limited-angle CT scanning methods for extending in-situ Digital Radiography to volumetric CT measurements. To this end, VJT has developed and fielded a high-energy test-bed Gantry-type CT scanner (the source and detector move around the object) with a number of important properties. First, the geometry of the gantry-scans can be configured to match the techniques used in the in-situ radiographic inspection. The same X-ray source is employed as in portable Radiographic inspections, a 7.5 MeV Betatron coupled to a Perkin-Elmer Amorphous Silicon detector. Offset-CT scanning is employed as the high-power feeder line assembly is larger than the detector. A description of this scanner and the scan geometry will be presented showing the connection to in-situ radiography. Results from the CT scans of high-power feeder-cable specimens removed from service will be presented with a focus on the inspection potential of volumetric CT data on these assemblies. An evaluation of the scan performance properties of these data compared to the spectrum of life-cycle inspection issues will be presented. Continuing and

  14. Quark number fluctuations at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Petreczky, P.; Hegde, P.; Velytsky, A.

    2009-11-01

    We calculate the second, fourth and sixth order quark number fluctuations in the deconfined phase of 2+1 flavor QCD using lattices with temporal extent N{sub t} = 4,6,8 and 12. We consider light, strange and charm quarks. We use p4 action for valence quarks and gauge configurations generated with p4 action with physical value of the strange quark mass and light quark mass m{sub q} = 0.1 m{sub s} generated by the RBC-Bielefeld collaboration. We observe that for all quark masses the quark number fluctuations rapidly get close to the corresponding ideal gas limits. We compare our results to predictions of a quasi-particle model and resummed high temperature perturbative calculations. We also investigate correlations among different flavor channels.

  15. Prediction of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) positivity in patients with high-risk primary melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, Maria; Kjaer, Andreas; Wu, Max; Martineau, Lea; Nosrati, Mehdi; Leong, Stanley PL; Sagebiel, Richard W; III, James R Miller; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool to identify occult melanoma metastasis. To date, it is controversial which patients with primary cutaneous melanoma should have staging PET/CT. In this retrospective analysis of more than 800 consecutive patients with cutaneous melanoma, we sought to identify factors predictive of PET/CT positivity in the setting of newly-diagnosed high-risk primary melanoma to determine those patients most appropriate to undergo a PET/CT scan as part of their diagnostic work up. 167 patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk primary cutaneous melanoma underwent a PET/CT scan performed as part of their initial staging. Clinical and histologic factors were evaluated as possible predictors of melanoma metastasis identified on PET/CT scanning using both univariate and multivariate logistic regression. In all, 32 patients (19.2%) had a positive PET/CT finding of metastatic melanoma. In more than half of these patients (56.3%), PET/CT scanning identified disease that was not detectable on clinical examination. Mitotic rate, tumor thickness, lymphadenopathy, and bleeding were significantly predictive of PET/CT positivity. A combinatorial index constructed from these factors revealed a significant association between number of high-risk factors observed and prevalence of PET/CT positivity, which increased from 5.8% (with the presence of 0-2 factors) to 100.0%, when all four factors were present. These results indicate that combining clinical and histologic prognostic factors enables the identification of patients with a higher likelihood of a positive PET/CT scan. PMID:27766186

  16. Preston Probe Calibrations at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    The overall goal of the research effort is to study the performance of two Preston probes designed by NASA Langley Research Center across an unprecedented range of Reynolds number (based on friction velocity and probe diameter), and perform an accurate calibration over the same Reynolds number range. Using the Superpipe facility in Princeton, two rounds of experiments were performed. In each round of experiments for each Reynolds number, the pressure gradient, static pressure from the Preston probes and the total pressure from the Preston probes were measured. In the first round, 3 Preston probes having outer diameters of 0.058 inches, 0.083 inches and 0.203 inches were tested over a large range of pipe Reynolds numbers. Two data reduction methods were employed: first, the static pressure measured on the Preston probe was used to calculate P (modified Preston probe configuration), and secondly, the static pressure measured at the reference pressure tap was used to calculate P (un-modified Preston probe configuration). For both methods, the static pressure was adjusted to correspond with the static pressure at the Preston probe tip using the pressure gradient. The measurements for Preston probes with diameters of 0.058 inches, and 0.083 inches respectively were performed in the test pipe before it was polished a second time. Therefore, the measurements at high pipe Reynolds numbers may have been affected by roughness. In the second round of experiments the 0.058 inches and 0.083 inches diameter, un-modified probes were tested after the pipe was polished and prepared to ensure that the surface was smooth. The average velocity was estimated by assuming that the connection between the centerline velocity and the average velocity was known, and by using a Pitot tube to measure the centerline velocity. A preliminary error estimate suggests that it is possible to introduce a 1% to 2% error in estimating the average velocity using this approach. The evidence on the errors

  17. SU-E-J-268: Change of CT Number During the Course of Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X; Dalah, E; Liu, F; Li, X; Zhang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It has been observed radiation can induce changes in CT number (CTN) inside tumor during the course of radiation therapy (RT) for several tumor sites including lung and head and neck, suggesting that the CTN change may be potentially used to assess RT response. In this study, we investigate the CTN changes inside tumor during the course of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Daily diagnostic-quality CT data acquired during IGRT for 17 pancreatic head cancer patients using an in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were analyzed. All patients were treated with a radiation dose of 50.4 in 1.8 Gy per fraction. On each daily CT set, The contour of the pancreatic head, included in the treatment target, was generated by populating the pancreatic head contour from the planning CT or MRI using an auto-segmentation tool based on deformable registration (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing if necessary. The CTN at each voxel in the pancreatic head contour was extracted and the 3D distribution of the CTNs was processed using MATLAB. The mean value of CTN distribution was used to quantify the daily CTN change in the pancreatic head. Results: Reduction of CTN in pancreatic head was observed during the CRT delivery in 14 out the 17 (82%) patients studied. Although the average reduction is only 3.5 Houncefield Unit (HU), this change is significant (p<0.01). Among them, there are 7 patients who had a CTN drop larger than 5 HU, ranging from 6.0 to 11.8 HU. In contrast to this trend, CTN was increased in 3 patients. Conclusion: Measurable changes in the CT number in tumor target were observed during the course of chemoradiation therapy for the pancreas cancer patients, indicating this radiation-induced CTN change may be used to assess treatment response.

  18. Binary droplet collision at high Weber number.

    PubMed

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Chou, Ping-Chung; Tseng, Yu-Jen

    2009-09-01

    By using the techniques developed for generating high-speed droplets, we have systematically investigated binary droplet collision when the Weber number (We) was increased from the range usually tested in previous studies on the order of 10 to a much larger value of about 5100 for water (a droplet at 23 m/s with a diameter of 0.7 mm). Various liquids were also used to explore the effects of viscosity and surface tension. Specifically, beyond the well-known regimes at moderate We's, which exhibited coalescence, separation, and separation followed by satellite droplets, we found different behaviors showing a fingering lamella, separation after fingering, breakup of outer fingers, and prompt splattering into multiple secondary droplets as We was increased. The critical Weber numbers that mark the boundaries between these impact regimes are identified. The specific impact behaviors, such as fingering and prompt splattering or splashing, share essential similarity with those also observed in droplet-surface impacts, whereas substantial variations in the transition boundaries may result from the disparity of the boundary conditions at impacts. To compare the outcomes of both types of collisions, a simple model based on energy conservation was carried out to predict the maximum diameter of an expanding liquid disk for a binary droplet collision. The results oppose the dominance of viscous drag, as proposed by previous studies, as the main deceleration force to effect a Rayleigh-Taylor instability and ensuing periphery fingers, which may further lead to the formations of satellite droplets. PMID:19905206

  19. Binary droplet collision at high Weber number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Chou, Ping-Chung; Tseng, Yu-Jen

    2009-09-01

    By using the techniques developed for generating high-speed droplets, we have systematically investigated binary droplet collision when the Weber number (We) was increased from the range usually tested in previous studies on the order of 10 to a much larger value of about 5100 for water (a droplet at 23 m/s with a diameter of 0.7 mm). Various liquids were also used to explore the effects of viscosity and surface tension. Specifically, beyond the well-known regimes at moderate We’s, which exhibited coalescence, separation, and separation followed by satellite droplets, we found different behaviors showing a fingering lamella, separation after fingering, breakup of outer fingers, and prompt splattering into multiple secondary droplets as We was increased. The critical Weber numbers that mark the boundaries between these impact regimes are identified. The specific impact behaviors, such as fingering and prompt splattering or splashing, share essential similarity with those also observed in droplet-surface impacts, whereas substantial variations in the transition boundaries may result from the disparity of the boundary conditions at impacts. To compare the outcomes of both types of collisions, a simple model based on energy conservation was carried out to predict the maximum diameter of an expanding liquid disk for a binary droplet collision. The results oppose the dominance of viscous drag, as proposed by previous studies, as the main deceleration force to effect a Rayleigh-Taylor instability and ensuing periphery fingers, which may further lead to the formations of satellite droplets.

  20. Noise, sampling, and the number of projections in cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.; Gang, G. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the number of projection views on image noise in cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector. Methods: This fairly fundamental consideration in CBCT system design and operation was addressed experimentally (using a phantom presenting a uniform medium as well as statistically motivated “clutter”) and theoretically (using a cascaded systems model describing CBCT noise) to elucidate the contributing factors of quantum noise (σ{sub Q}), electronic noise (σ{sub E}), and view aliasing (σ{sub view}). Analysis included investigation of the noise, noise-power spectrum, and modulation transfer function as a function of the number of projections (N{sub proj}), dose (D{sub tot}), and voxel size (b{sub vox}). Results: The results reveal a nonmonotonic relationship between image noise andN{sub proj} at fixed total dose: for the CBCT system considered, noise decreased with increasing N{sub proj} due to reduction of view sampling effects in the regime N{sub proj} <∼200, above which noise increased with N{sub proj} due to increased electronic noise. View sampling effects were shown to depend on the heterogeneity of the object in a direct analytical relationship to power-law anatomical clutter of the form κ/f {sup β}—and a general model of individual noise components (σ{sub Q}, σ{sub E}, and σ{sub view}) demonstrated agreement with measurements over a broad range in N{sub proj}, D{sub tot}, and b{sub vox}. Conclusions: The work elucidates fairly basic elements of CBCT noise in a manner that demonstrates the role of distinct noise components (viz., quantum, electronic, and view sampling noise). For configurations fairly typical of CBCT with a flat-panel detector (FPD), the analysis reveals a “sweet spot” (i.e., minimum noise) in the rangeN{sub proj} ∼ 250–350, nearly an order of magnitude lower in N{sub proj} than typical of multidetector CT, owing to the relatively high electronic noise in FPDs. The analysis

  1. High Rayleigh number convection numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verzicco, Roberto

    2002-03-01

    temperature variance dissipations. The achieved results seem to support the idea that the observed transitional behaviors have to be attributed to the change in the topology of the mean flow rather than to a transition from a laminar to a turbulent state of the viscous boundary layers. Other issues accomplished by the simulation concern the study of the scaling properties of the turbulent quantities and length scales in terms of Ra. Finally, further details on the turbulence dynamics are obtained by the analysis of the power spectra and low order structure functions of both the temperature and the velocity components, computed from the numerical probes both within the bulk region and close to the walls. References Roche, PE; Castaing, B; Chabaud, B; Hebral, B. ``Observation of the 1/2 power law in Rayleigh-Benard convection'' Phys. Rev. E, 2001, 6304(4), p. 5303. Niemela, J.J.; Skrbek, L.; Sreenivasan, K.R. and Donnelly, R.J. ``Turbulent convection at very high Rayleigh numbers'' Nature, 405, 243-253 (11 May 2000). Verzicco, R. and Camussi, R. ``Prandtl number effects in convective turbulence'' J. of Fluid Mech., 383, (1999), 55-73.

  2. CCD-based optical CT scanning of highly attenuating phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Nowais, Shamsa; Doran, Simon J.

    2009-05-01

    The introduction of optical computed tomography (optical-CT) offers economic and easy to use 3-D optical readout for gel dosimeters. However, previous authors have noted some challenges regarding the accuracy of such imaging techniques at high values of optical density. In this paper, we take a closer look at the 'cupping' artefact evident in both light-scattering polymer systems and highly light absorbing phantoms using our CCD-based optical scanner. In addition, a technique is implemented whereby the maximum measurable optical absorbance is extended to correct for any errors that may have occurred in the estimated value of the dark current or ambient light reaching the detector. The results indicate that for absorbance values up to 2.0, the optical scanner results have good accuracy, whereas this is not the case at high absorbance values for reasons yet to be explained.

  3. A new method to measure electron density and effective atomic number using dual-energy CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Garcia, Luis Isaac; Pérez Azorin, José Fernando; Almansa, Julio F.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a new method to extract the electron density ({ρ\\text{e}} ) and the effective atomic number (Z eff) from dual-energy CT images, based on a Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) of the atomic cross section per electron. This method was used to calibrate a Siemens Definition CT using the CIRS phantom. The predicted electron density and effective atomic number using 80 kVp and 140 kVp were compared with a calibration phantom and an independent set of samples. The mean absolute deviations between the theoretical and calculated values for all the samples were 1.7 %  ±  0.1 % for {ρ\\text{e}} and 4.1 %  ±  0.3 % for Z eff. Finally, these results were compared with other stoichiometric method. The application of the KLE to represent the atomic cross section per electron is a promising method for calculating {ρ\\text{e}} and Z eff using dual-energy CT images.

  4. A new method to measure electron density and effective atomic number using dual-energy CT images.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Luis Isaac Ramos; Azorin, José Fernando Pérez; Almansa, Julio F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a new method to extract the electron density ([Formula: see text]) and the effective atomic number (Z eff) from dual-energy CT images, based on a Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) of the atomic cross section per electron. This method was used to calibrate a Siemens Definition CT using the CIRS phantom. The predicted electron density and effective atomic number using 80 kVp and 140 kVp were compared with a calibration phantom and an independent set of samples. The mean absolute deviations between the theoretical and calculated values for all the samples were 1.7 %  ±  0.1 % for [Formula: see text] and 4.1 %  ±  0.3 % for Z eff. Finally, these results were compared with other stoichiometric method. The application of the KLE to represent the atomic cross section per electron is a promising method for calculating [Formula: see text] and Z eff using dual-energy CT images.

  5. A new method to measure electron density and effective atomic number using dual-energy CT images.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Luis Isaac Ramos; Azorin, José Fernando Pérez; Almansa, Julio F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a new method to extract the electron density ([Formula: see text]) and the effective atomic number (Z eff) from dual-energy CT images, based on a Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) of the atomic cross section per electron. This method was used to calibrate a Siemens Definition CT using the CIRS phantom. The predicted electron density and effective atomic number using 80 kVp and 140 kVp were compared with a calibration phantom and an independent set of samples. The mean absolute deviations between the theoretical and calculated values for all the samples were 1.7 %  ±  0.1 % for [Formula: see text] and 4.1 %  ±  0.3 % for Z eff. Finally, these results were compared with other stoichiometric method. The application of the KLE to represent the atomic cross section per electron is a promising method for calculating [Formula: see text] and Z eff using dual-energy CT images. PMID:26649484

  6. Calibration of megavoltage cone-beam CT for radiotherapy dose calculations: correction of cupping artifacts and conversion of CT numbers to electron density.

    PubMed

    Petit, Steven F; van Elmpt, Wouter J C; Nijsten, Sebastiaan M J J G; Lambin, Philippe; Dekker, André L A J

    2008-03-01

    Megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV CBCT) is used for three-dimensional imaging of the patient anatomy on the treatment table prior to or just after radiotherapy treatment. To use MV CBCT images for radiotherapy dose calculation purposes, reliable electron density (ED) distributions are needed. Patient scatter, beam hardening and softening effects result in cupping artifacts in MV CBCT images and distort the CT number to ED conversion. A method based on transmission images is presented to correct for these effects without using prior knowledge of the object's geometry. The scatter distribution originating from the patient is calculated with pencil beam scatter kernels that are fitted based on transmission measurements. The radiological thickness is extracted from the scatter subtracted transmission images and is then converted to the primary transmission used in the cone-beam reconstruction. These corrections are performed in an iterative manner, without using prior knowledge regarding the geometry and composition of the object. The method was tested using various homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms with varying shapes and compositions, including a phantom with different electron density inserts, phantoms with large density variations, and an anthropomorphic head phantom. For all phantoms, the cupping artifact was substantially removed from the images and a linear relation between the CT number and electron density was found. After correction the deviations in reconstructed ED from the true values were reduced from up to 0.30 ED units to 0.03 for the majority of the phantoms; the residual difference is equal to the amount of noise in the images. The ED distributions were evaluated in terms of absolute dose calculation accuracy for homogeneous cylinders of different size; errors decreased from 7% to below 1% in the center of the objects for the uncorrected and corrected images, respectively, and maximum differences were reduced from 17% to 2%, respectively. The

  7. Calibration of megavoltage cone-beam CT for radiotherapy dose calculations: Correction of cupping artifacts and conversion of CT numbers to electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Steven F.; Elmpt, Wouter J. C. van; Nijsten, Sebastiaan M. J. J. G.; Lambin, Philippe; Dekker, Andre L. A. J.

    2008-03-15

    Megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV CBCT) is used for three-dimensional imaging of the patient anatomy on the treatment table prior to or just after radiotherapy treatment. To use MV CBCT images for radiotherapy dose calculation purposes, reliable electron density (ED) distributions are needed. Patient scatter, beam hardening and softening effects result in cupping artifacts in MV CBCT images and distort the CT number to ED conversion. A method based on transmission images is presented to correct for these effects without using prior knowledge of the object's geometry. The scatter distribution originating from the patient is calculated with pencil beam scatter kernels that are fitted based on transmission measurements. The radiological thickness is extracted from the scatter subtracted transmission images and is then converted to the primary transmission used in the cone-beam reconstruction. These corrections are performed in an iterative manner, without using prior knowledge regarding the geometry and composition of the object. The method was tested using various homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms with varying shapes and compositions, including a phantom with different electron density inserts, phantoms with large density variations, and an anthropomorphic head phantom. For all phantoms, the cupping artifact was substantially removed from the images and a linear relation between the CT number and electron density was found. After correction the deviations in reconstructed ED from the true values were reduced from up to 0.30 ED units to 0.03 for the majority of the phantoms; the residual difference is equal to the amount of noise in the images. The ED distributions were evaluated in terms of absolute dose calculation accuracy for homogeneous cylinders of different size; errors decreased from 7% to below 1% in the center of the objects for the uncorrected and corrected images, respectively, and maximum differences were reduced from 17% to 2%, respectively. The

  8. Impact of number of repeated scans on model observer performance for a low-contrast detection task in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chi; Yu, Lifeng; Chen, Baiyu; Vrieze, Thomas; Favazza, Christopher; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia

    2015-03-01

    In previous investigations on CT image quality, channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) models have been shown to well represent human observer performance in several phantom-based detection/discrimination tasks. In these studies, a large number of independent images was necessary to estimate the expectation images and covariance matrices for each test condition. The purpose of this study is to investigate how the number of repeated scans affects the precision and accuracy of the CHO's performance in a signal-known-exactly detection task. A phantom containing 21 low-contrast objects (3 contrast levels and 7 sizes) was scanned with a 128-slice CT scanner at three dose levels. For each dose level, 100 independent images were acquired for each test condition. All images were reconstructed using filtered-backprojection (FBP) and a commercial iterative reconstruction algorithm. For each combination of dose level and reconstruction method, the low-contrast detectability, quantified with the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (Az), was calculated using a previously validated CHO model. To determine the dependency of CHO performance on the number of repeated scans, the Az value was calculated for different number of channel filters, for each object size and contrast, and for different dose/reconstruction settings using all 100 repeated scans. The Az values were also calculated using randomly selected subsets of the scans (from 10 to 90 scans with an increment of 10 scans). Using the Az from the 100 scans as the reference, the accuracy of Az values calculated from a fewer number of scans was determined and the minimal number of scans was subsequently derived. For the studied signal-known-exactly detection task, results demonstrated that, the minimal number of scans depends on dose level, object size and contrast level, and channel filters.

  9. A comprehensive study on decreasing the kilovoltage cone-beam CT dose by reducing the projection number.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bo; Lu, Haibin; Palta, Jatinder

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on registration accuracy and image qualities with a reduced number of planar projections used in volumetric imaging reconstruction. The ultimate goal is to evaluate the possibility of reducing the patient dose while maintaining registration accuracy under different projection-number schemes for various clinical sites. An Elekta Synergy Linear accelerator with an onboard CBCT system was used in this study. The quality of the Elekta XVI cone-beam three-dimensional volumetric images reconstructed with a decreasing number of projections was quantitatively evaluated by a Catphan phantom. Subsequently, we tested the registration accuracy of imaging data sets on three rigid anthropomorphic phantoms and three real patient sites under the reduced projection-number (as low as 1/6th) reconstruction of CBCT data with different rectilinear shifts and rota-tions. CBCT scan results of the Catphan phantom indicated the CBCT images got noisier when the number of projections was reduced, but their spatial resolution and uniformity were hardly affected. The maximum registration errors under the small amount transformation of the reference CT images were found to be within 0.7 mm translation and 0.3 masculine rotation. However, when the projection number was lower than one-fourth of the full set with a large amount of transformation of reference CT images, the registration could easily be trapped into local minima solutions for a nonrigid anatomy. We concluded, by using projection-number reduction strategy under conscientious care, imaging-guided localization procedure could achieve a lower patient dose without losing the registration accuracy for various clinical sites and situations. A faster scanning time is the main advantage compared to the mA decrease-based, dose-reduction method.

  10. High-resolution and high-speed CT in industry and research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabler, S.; Fella, C.; Dietrich, A.; Nachtrab, F.; Salamon, Michael; Voland, V.; Ebensperger, T.; Oeckl, S.; Hanke, R.; Uhlmann, N.

    2012-10-01

    The application of industrial CT covers many orders of magnitude of object sizes, ranging from freight containers (few meters) down to liquid foams (i.e. for food industry) or even parts of insects which are only several hundreds of micrometers in size. Similarly, the specifications for acquisition speed extend over some orders of magnitude, from hours to sub-second CT. We present the current technology in terms of X-ray sources and detectors, along with numerous applications from industry and materials research: e.g. industrial high-speed CT of car pistons, in situ micro-CT of milk foam decay at micrometer spatial resolution and 8 s scan time, as well as ex situ scans of tensile tested Nickel-alloys. The Fraunhofer Development Center X-ray Technology (Fürth, Germany) and the Chair of X-ray Microscopy (University Würzburg, Germany) are currently working on extending the technological limits, demonstrated, e,g. by the development of advanced X-ray detectors or a new inhouse CT system which comprises a high-brilliance liquid metal jet anode.

  11. The High/Scope Report. Number Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Charles, Ed.

    This report provides articles on several topics related to the education of young children. In the introduction High/Scope President David P. Weikart suggests that public investment in preschool education is a wise and economically sound social policy. New studies of the long term effects of preschool are demonstrating the staying power of early…

  12. Future generation CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Walter, Deborah; De Man, Bruno; Iatrou, Maria; Edic, Peter M

    2004-02-01

    X-ray CT technology has been available for more than 30 years, yet continued technological advances have kept CT imaging at the forefront of medical imaging innovation. Consequently, the number of clinical CT applications has increased steadily. Other imaging modalities might be superior to CT imaging for some specific applications, but no other single modality is more often used in chest imaging today. Future technological developments in the area of high-resolution detectors, high-capacity x-ray tubes, advanced reconstruction algorithms, and improved visualization techniques will continue to expand the imaging capability. Future CT imaging technology will combine improved imaging capability with advanced and specific computer-assisted tools, which will expand the usefulness of CT imaging in many areas.

  13. Initial implementation of the conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number to electron density in tissue inhomogeneity corrections: An anthropomorphic phantom study of radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukihara, Masayoshi; Noto, Yoshiyuki; Sasamoto, Ryuta; Hayakawa, Takahide; Saito, Masatoshi

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To achieve accurate tissue inhomogeneity corrections in radiotherapy treatment planning, the authors had previously proposed a novel conversion of the energy-subtracted computed tomography (CT) number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide range of ρ{sub e}. The purpose of this study is to present an initial implementation of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method for a treatment planning system (TPS). In this paper, two example radiotherapy plans are used to evaluate the reliability of dose calculations in the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method. Methods: CT images were acquired using a clinical dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner operated in the dual-energy mode with two tube potential pairs and an additional tin (Sn) filter for the high-kV tube (80–140 kV/Sn and 100–140 kV/Sn). Single-energy CT using the same DSCT scanner was also performed at 120 kV to compare the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method with a conventional conversion from a CT number to ρ{sub e} (Hounsfield units, HU–ρ{sub e} conversion). Lookup tables for ρ{sub e} calibration were obtained from the CT image acquisitions for tissue substitutes in an electron density phantom (EDP). To investigate the beam-hardening effect on dosimetric uncertainties, two EDPs with different sizes (a body EDP and a head EDP) were used for the ρ{sub e} calibration. Each acquired lookup table was applied to two radiotherapy plans designed using the XiO TPS with the superposition algorithm for an anthropomorphic phantom. The first radiotherapy plan was for an oral cavity tumor and the second was for a lung tumor. Results: In both treatment plans, the performance of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion was superior to that of the conventional HU–ρ{sub e} conversion in terms of the reliability of dose calculations. Especially, for the oral tumor plan, which dealt with dentition and bony structures, treatment

  14. High-quality four-dimensional cone-beam CT by deforming prior images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Xuejun

    2013-01-01

    Due to a limited number of projections at each phase, severe view aliasing artifacts are present in four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) when reconstruction is performed using conventional algorithms. In this work, we aim to obtain high-quality 4D-CBCT of lung cancer patients in radiation therapy by deforming the planning CT. The deformation vector fields (DVF) to deform the planning CT are estimated through matching the forward projection of the deformed prior image and measured on-treatment CBCT projection. The estimation of the DVF is formulated as an unconstrained optimization problem, where the objective function to be minimized is the sum of the squared difference between the forward projection of the deformed planning CT and the measured 4D-CBCT projection. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the DVF. As the number of the variables in the DVF is much greater than the number of measurements, the solution to such a highly ill-posed problem is very sensitive to the initials during the optimization process. To improve the estimation accuracy of DVF, we proposed a new strategy to obtain better initials for the optimization. In this strategy, 4D-CBCT is first reconstructed by total variation minimization. Demons deformable registration is performed to register the planning CT and the 4D-CBCT reconstructed by total variation minimization. The resulted DVF from demons registration is then used as the initial parameters in the optimization process. A 4D nonuniform rotational B-spline-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom and a patient 4D-CBCT are used to evaluate the algorithm. Image quality of 4D-CBCT is substantially improved by using the proposed strategy in both NCAT phantom and patient studies. The proposed method has the potential to improve the temporal resolution of 4D-CBCT. Improved 4D-CBCT can better characterize the motion of lung tumors and will be a valuable tool for image-guided adaptive radiation therapy.

  15. High-pitch coronary CT angiography with third generation dual-source CT: limits of heart rate.

    PubMed

    Gordic, Sonja; Husarik, Daniela B; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2014-08-01

    To determine the average heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) required for diagnostic imaging of the coronary arteries in patients undergoing high-pitch CT-angiography (CTA) with third-generation dual-source CT. Fifty consecutive patients underwent CTA of the thoracic (n = 8) and thoracoabdominal (n = 42) aorta with third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT with prospective electrocardiography (ECG)-gating at a pitch of 3.2. No β-blockers were administered. Motion artifacts of coronary arteries were graded on a 4-point scale. Average HR and HRV were noted. The average HR was 66 ± 11 beats per minute (bpm) (range 45-96 bpm); the HRV was 7.3 ± 4.4 bpm (range 3-20 bpm). Interobserver agreement on grade of image quality for the 642 coronary segments evaluated by both observers was good (κ = 0.71). Diagnostic image quality was found for 608 of the 642 segments (95%) in 43 of 50 patients (86%). In 14% of the patients, image quality was nondiagnostic for at least one segment. HR (p = 0.001) was significantly higher in patients with at least one non-diagnostic segment compared to those without. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in HRV between patients with nondiagnostic segments and those with diagnostic images of all segments. All patients with a HR < 70 bpm had diagnostic image quality in all coronary segments. The effective radiation dose and scan time for the heart were 0.4 ± 0.1 mSv and 0.17 ± 0.02 s, respectively. Third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT allows for coronary angiography in the prospectively ECG-gated high-pitch mode with diagnostic image quality at HR up to 70 bpm. HRV is not significantly related to image quality of coronary CTA.

  16. A Simple Low-dose X-ray CT Simulation from High-dose Scan

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Dong; Huang, Jing; Bian, Zhaoying; Niu, Shanzhou; Zhang, Hua; Feng, Qianjin; Liang, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose X-ray computed tomography (CT) simulation from high-dose scan is required in optimizing radiation dose to patients. In this study, we propose a simple low-dose CT simulation strategy in sinogram domain using the raw data from high-dose scan. Specially, a relationship between the incident fluxes of low- and high- dose scans is first determined according to the repeated projection measurements and analysis. Second, the incident flux level of the simulated low-dose scan is generated by properly scaling the incident flux level of high-dose scan via the determined relationship in the first step. Third, the low-dose CT transmission data by energy integrating detection is simulated by adding a statistically independent Poisson noise distribution plus a statistically independent Gaussian noise distribution. Finally, a filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithm is implemented to reconstruct the resultant low-dose CT images. The present low-dose simulation strategy is verified on the simulations and real scans by comparing it with the existing low-dose CT simulation tool. Experimental results demonstrated that the present low-dose CT simulation strategy can generate accurate low-dose CT sinogram data from high-dose scan in terms of qualitative and quantitative measurements. PMID:26543245

  17. User Friendly Processing of Sediment CT Data: Software and Application in High Resolution Non-Destructive Sediment Core Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, B. T.; Stoner, J. S.; Wiest, J.; Abbott, M. B.; Francus, P.; Lapointe, F.

    2015-12-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) of sediment cores allow for high resolution images, three dimensional volumes, and down core profiles, generated through the attenuation of X-rays as a function of density and atomic number. When using a medical CT-Scanner, these quantitative data are stored in pixels using the Hounsfield scale, which are relative to the attenuation of X-rays in water and air at standard temperature and pressure. Here we present MATLAB based software specifically designed for sedimentary applications with a user friendly graphical interface to process DICOM files and stitch overlapping CT scans. For visualization, the software allows easy generation of core slice images with grayscale and false color relative to a user defined Hounsfield number range. For comparison to other high resolution non-destructive methods, down core Hounsfield number profiles are extracted using a method robust to coring imperfections, like deformation, bowing, gaps, and gas expansion. We demonstrate the usefulness of this technique with lacustrine sediment cores from the Western United States and Canadian High Arctic, including Fish Lake, Oregon, and Sawtooth Lake, Ellesmere Island. These sites represent two different depositional environments and provide examples for a variety of common coring defects and lithologies. The Hounsfield profiles and images can be used in combination with other high resolution data sets, including sediment magnetic parameters, XRF core scans and many other types of data, to provide unique insights into how lithology influences paleoenvironmental and paleomagnetic records and their interpretations.

  18. Mineral Volume and Morphology in Carotid Plaque Specimens Using High-Resolution MRI and CT

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Ronald L.; Wehrli, Suzanne L.; Popescu, Andra M.; Woo, John H.; Song, Hee Kwon; Wright, Alexander C.; Mohler, Emile R.; Harding, John D.; Zager, Eric L.; Fairman, Ronald M.; Golden, Michael A.; Velazquez, Omaida C.; Carpenter, Jeffrey P.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2006-01-01

    Objective High-resolution MRI methods have been used to evaluate carotid artery atherosclerotic plaque content. The purpose of this study was to assess the performance of high-resolution MRI in evaluation of the quantity and pattern of mineral deposition in carotid endarterectomy (CEA) specimens, with quantitative micro-CT as the gold standard. Methods and Results High-resolution MRI and CT were compared in 20 CEA specimens. Linear regression comparing mineral volumes generated from CT (VCT) and MRI (VMRI) data demonstrated good correlation using simple thresholding (VMRI=-0.01+0.98VCT; R2=0.90; threshold=4×noise) and k-means clustering methods (VMRI=-0.005+1.38VCT; R2=0.93). Bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC [mineral mass]) were calculated for CT data and BMC verified with ash weight. Patterns of mineralization like particles, granules, and sheets were more clearly depicted on CT. Conclusions Mineral volumes generated from MRI or CT data were highly correlated. CT provided a more detailed depiction of mineralization patterns and provided BMD and BMC in addition to mineral volume. The extent of mineralization as well as the morphology may ultimately be useful in assessing plaque stability. PMID:15947239

  19. High-Dynamic-Range CT Reconstruction Based on Varying Tube-Voltage Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    For complicated structural components characterized by wide X-ray attenuation ranges, the conventional computed tomography (CT) imaging using a single tube-voltage at each rotation angle cannot obtain all structural information. This limitation results in a shortage of CT information, because the effective thickness of the components along the direction of X-ray penetration exceeds the limitation of the dynamic range of the X-ray imaging system. To address this problem, high-dynamic-range CT (HDR-CT) reconstruction is proposed. For this new method, the tube’s voltage is adjusted several times to match the corresponding effective thickness about the local information from an object. Then, HDR fusion and HDR-CT are applied to obtain the full reconstruction information. An accompanying experiment demonstrates that this new technology can extend the dynamic range of X-ray imaging systems and provide the complete internal structures of complicated structural components. PMID:26544723

  20. High Resolution X-Ray Micro-CT of Ultra-Thin Wall Space Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Rauser, R. W.; Bowman, Randy R.; Bonacuse, Peter; Martin, Richard E.; Locci, I. E.; Kelley, M.

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution micro-CT system has been assembled and is being used to provide optimal characterization for ultra-thin wall space components. The Glenn Research Center NDE Sciences Team, using this CT system, has assumed the role of inspection vendor for the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) project at NASA. This article will discuss many aspects of the development of the CT scanning for this type of component, including CT system overview; inspection requirements; process development, software utilized and developed to visualize, process, and analyze results; calibration sample development; results on actual samples; correlation with optical/SEM characterization; CT modeling; and development of automatic flaw recognition software. Keywords: Nondestructive Evaluation, NDE, Computed Tomography, Imaging, X-ray, Metallic Components, Thin Wall Inspection

  1. Response of osteosarcoma to preoperative intravenous high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Mail, J.T.; Cohen, M.D.; Mirkin, L.D.; Provisor, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    The histologic response of an osteosarcoma to preamputation high-dose methotrexate therapy can be used to determine the optimum maintenance chemotherapy regimen to be administered after amputation. This study evaluates computed tomography (CT) as a method of assessing the response of the tumor to the methotrexate therapy. Nine patients with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma of an extremity had a CT scan of the tumor at initial presentation. This was compared with a second CT scan after four courses of high-dose intravenous methotrexate. Each set of scans was evaluated for changes in bony destruction, soft-tissue mass, pattern of calcification, and extent of tumor involvement of the marrow cavity. These findings were correlated with the histologic response of the tumor as measured by the degree of tumor necrosis. The changes seen on CT correlated well with the degree of the histologic response in seven of the nine patients.

  2. SU-E-J-190: Characterization of Radiation Induced CT Number Changes in Tumor and Normal Lung During Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C; Liu, F; Tai, A; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To measure CT number (CTN) changes in tumor and normal lung as a function of radiation therapy (RT) dose during the course of RT delivery for lung cancer using daily IGRT CT images and single respiration phase CT images. Methods: 4D CT acquired during planning simulation and daily 3D CT acquired during daily IGRT for 10 lung cancer cases randomly selected in terms of age, caner type and stage, were analyzed using an in-house developed software tool. All patients were treated in 2 Gy fractions to primary tumors and involved nodal regions. Regions enclosed by a series of isodose surfaces in normal lung were delineated. The obtained contours along with target contours (GTVs) were populated to each singlephase planning CT and daily CT. CTN in term of Hounsfield Unit (HU) of each voxel in these delineated regions were collectively analyzed using histogram, mean, mode and linear correlation. Results: Respiration induced normal lung CTN change, as analyzed from single-phase planning CTs, ranged from 9 to 23 (±2) HU for the patients studied. Normal lung CTN change was as large as 50 (±12) HU over the entire treatment course, was dose and patient dependent and was measurable with dose changes as low as 1.5 Gy. For patients with obvious tumor volume regression, CTN within the GTV drops monotonically as much as 10 (±1) HU during the early fractions with a total dose of 20 Gy delivered. The GTV and CTN reductions are significantly correlated with correlation coefficient >0.95. Conclusion: Significant RT dose induced CTN changes in lung tissue and tumor region can be observed during even the early phase of RT delivery, and may potentially be used for early prediction of radiation response. Single respiration phase CT images have dramatically reduced statistical noise in ROIs, making daily dose response evaluation possible.

  3. SU-E-J-271: Correlation of CT Number Change with Radiation Treatment Response for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dalah, E; Tai, A; Oshima, K; Hall, W; Knechtges, P; Erickson, B; Li, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It has been reported recently that radiation can induce CT number (CTN) change during radiation therapy (RT) delivery. In the effort to explore whether CTN can be used to assess RT response, we analyze the relationship between the pathological treatment response (PTR) and the changes of CTN, MRI, and PET before and after the neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCR) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods: The preand post-nCR CT, MRI, and PET data for a total of 8 patients with resectable, or borderline resectable pancreatic head adenocarcinoma treated with nCR were retrospectively analyzed. Radiographic characteristics were correlated to PTR data. The histograms, means and standard derivations (SD) of the CTNs in pancreatic head (CTNPH), the GTV defined by ADC (CTNGTV), and the rest of pancreatic head (CTNPH-CTNGTV) were compared. Changes before and after nCR were correlated with the corresponding changes of ADC, lean body mass normalized SUV (SUVlb), and PTR using Pearson’ s correlation coefficient test. Results: The average mean and SD in CTPH for all the patients analyzed were higher in post-nCR (53.17 ± 31.05 HU) compared to those at pre-nCR (28.09 ± 4.253 HU). The CTNGTV were generally higher than CTNPH and CTNPH-CTNGTV, though the differences were not significant. The post-nCR changes of mean CTN, ADC, and SUVlb values in pancreatic head were correlated with PTR (R=0.3273/P=0.5357, R=−0.5455/P<0.0001, and R=0.7638/P=0.0357, respectively). The mean difference in the maximum tumor dimension measured from CTN, ADC, and SUVlb as compared with pathological measurements was −2.1, −0.5, and 0.22 cm, respectively. Conclusion: The radiation-induced change of CTN in pancreas head after chemoradiation therapy of pancreatic cancer was observed, which may be related to treatment responses as assessed by biological imaging and pathology. More data are needed to determine whether the CTN can be used as a quantitative biomarker for response to neoadjuvant therapy.

  4. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, T.-H.; Liang, C.-H.; Wu, J.-K.; Lien, C.-Y.; Yang, B.-H.; Huang, Y.-H.; Lee, J. J. S.

    2009-07-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  5. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  6. Promoting Number Theory in High Schools or Birthday Problem and Number Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2010-01-01

    The author introduces the birthday problem in this article. This can amuse willing members of any birthday party. This problem can also be used as the motivational first day lecture in number theory for the gifted students in high schools or in community colleges or in undergraduate classes in colleges.

  7. An experimental investigation of turbulent boundary layers at high Mach number and Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    Skin friction, heat transfer and pressure measurements were obtained in laminar, transitional and turbulent boundary layers on flat plates at Mach numbers from 7 to 13 at wall-to-free stream stagnation temperature ratios from 0.1 to 0.3. Measurements in laminar flows were in excellent agreement with the theory of Cheng. Correlations of the transition measurements with measurements on flight vehicles and in ballistic ranges show good agreement. Our transition measurements do not correlate well with those of Pate and Schueler. Comparisons have been made between the skin friction and heat transfer measurements and the theories of Van Driest, Eckert and Spalding and Chi. These comparisons reveal in general that at the high end of our Mach number range (10-13) the theory of Van Driest is in best agreement with the data, whereas at lower Mach numbers (6.5-10) the Spalding Chi theory is in better agreement with the measurements.

  8. Enthalpy damping for high Mach number Euler solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moitra, Anutosh

    1990-01-01

    An improvement on the enthalpy damping procedure currently in use in solving supersonic flow fields is described. A correction based on entropy values is shown to produce a very efficient scheme for simulation of high Mach number three-dimensional flows. Substantial improvements in convergence rates have been achieved by incorporating this enthalpy damping scheme in a finite-volume Runge-Kutta method for solving the Euler equations. Results obtained for blended wing-body geometries at very high Mach numbers are presented.

  9. Vorticity transformation in high Karlovitz number premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobbitt, Brock; Lapointe, Simon; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the two-way coupling between turbulence and chemistry, the changes in turbulence characteristics through a premixed flame are investigated. Specifically, this study focuses on vorticity, ω, which is characteristic of the smallest length and time scales of turbulence, analyzing its behavior within and across high Karlovitz number (Ka) premixed flames. This is accomplished through a series of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of premixed n-heptane/air flames, modeled with a 35-species finite-rate chemical mechanism, whose conditions span a wide range of unburnt Karlovitz numbers and flame density ratios. The behavior of the terms in the enstrophy, ω2 = ω ṡ ω, transport equation is analyzed, and a scaling is proposed for each term. The resulting normalized enstrophy transport equation involves only a small set of parameters. Specifically, the theoretical analysis and DNS results support that, at high Karlovitz number, enstrophy transport obtains a balance of the viscous dissipation and production/vortex stretching terms. It is shown that, as a result, vorticity scales in the same manner as in homogeneous, isotropic turbulence within and across the flame, namely, scaling with the inverse of the Kolmogorov time scale, τη. As τη is a function only of the viscosity and dissipation rate, this work supports the validity of Kolmogorov's first similarity hypothesis in premixed turbulent flames for sufficiently high Ka numbers. Results are unaffected by the transport model, chemical model, turbulent Reynolds number, and finally the physical configuration.

  10. Impact of High Mathematics Education on the Number Sense

    PubMed Central

    Castronovo, Julie; Göbel, Silke M.

    2012-01-01

    In adult number processing two mechanisms are commonly used: approximate estimation of quantity and exact calculation. While the former relies on the approximate number sense (ANS) which we share with animals and preverbal infants, the latter has been proposed to rely on an exact number system (ENS) which develops later in life following the acquisition of symbolic number knowledge. The current study investigated the influence of high level math education on the ANS and the ENS. Our results showed that the precision of non-symbolic quantity representation was not significantly altered by high level math education. However, performance in a symbolic number comparison task as well as the ability to map accurately between symbolic and non-symbolic quantities was significantly better the higher mathematics achievement. Our findings suggest that high level math education in adults shows little influence on their ANS, but it seems to be associated with a better anchored ENS and better mapping abilities between ENS and ANS. PMID:22558077

  11. The cryogenic wind tunnel for high Reynolds number testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.; Dress, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of cryogenic wind tunnels is reviewed with reference to the theory and advantages of cryogenic tunnels, problems common to wind tunnels and their solution, and application of cryogenic wind tunnels to high Reynolds number testing. It is shown that cryogenic wind tunnels can achieve full-scale Reynolds number with reasonable tunnel size, dynamic pressure, and drive power; the use of such tunnels also makes it possible to separate the effects of Reynolds number, Mach number, and aeroelasticity. Application of the cryogenic tunnel concept is illustrated by three examples, namely an atmospheric low-speed cryogenic tunnel, a 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, and the National Transonic Facility now nearing completion.

  12. Optical measurement techniques for high Reynolds number train investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loose, S.; Richard, H.; Bosbach, J.; Thimm, M.; Becker, W.; Raffel, M.

    2006-04-01

    This article reports on experimental aerodynamic investigations on a generic high-speed train configuration performed within two different wind tunnels. Both wind tunnels are specialized facilities for high Reynolds number investigations and offer low turbulence levels. The wind tunnels are the cryogenic wind tunnel located in Cologne (KKK) and in the high-pressure wind tunnel located in Göttingen (HDG). Both facilities are part of the German Dutch wind tunnel association (DNW). The adaptation and application of three optical measurement techniques for such high Reynolds number investigations is described in the article. The optical methods are: Particle Image Velocimetry for the measurement of velocity fields, Background Oriented Schlieren technique for density gradient measurements, and a white light Digital Speckle Photography technique for model deformation monitoring.

  13. Probability density distribution of velocity differences at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praskovsky, Alexander A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent understanding of fine-scale turbulence structure in high Reynolds number flows is mostly based on Kolmogorov's original and revised models. The main finding of these models is that intrinsic characteristics of fine-scale fluctuations are universal ones at high Reynolds numbers, i.e., the functional behavior of any small-scale parameter is the same in all flows if the Reynolds number is high enough. The only large-scale quantity that directly affects small-scale fluctuations is the energy flux through a cascade. In dynamical equilibrium between large- and small-scale motions, this flux is equal to the mean rate of energy dissipation epsilon. The pdd of velocity difference is a very important characteristic for both the basic understanding of fully developed turbulence and engineering problems. Hence, it is important to test the findings: (1) the functional behavior of the tails of the probability density distribution (pdd) represented by P(delta(u)) is proportional to exp(-b(r) absolute value of delta(u)/sigma(sub delta(u))) and (2) the logarithmic decrement b(r) scales as b(r) is proportional to r(sup 0.15) when separation r lies in the inertial subrange in high Reynolds number laboratory shear flows.

  14. Wire-number effects on high-power annular z-pinches and some characteristics at high wire number

    SciTech Connect

    SANFORD,THOMAS W. L.

    2000-05-23

    Characteristics of annular wire-array z-pinches as a function of wire number and at high wire number are reviewed. The data, taken primarily using aluminum wires on Saturn are comprehensive. The experiments have provided important insights into the features of wire-array dynamics critical for high x-ray power generation, and have initiated a renaissance in z-pinches when high numbers of wires are used. In this regime, for example, radiation environments characteristic of those encountered during the early pulses required for indirect-drive ICF ignition on the NIF have been produced in hohlraums driven by x-rays from a z-pinch, and are commented on here.

  15. Vorticity isotropy in high Karlovitz number premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobbitt, Brock; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2016-10-01

    The isotropy of the smallest turbulent scales is investigated in premixed turbulent combustion by analyzing the vorticity vector in a series of high Karlovitz number premixed flame direct numerical simulations. It is found that increasing the Karlovitz number and the ratio of the integral length scale to the flame thickness both reduce the level of anisotropy. By analyzing the vorticity transport equation, it is determined that the vortex stretching term is primarily responsible for the development of any anisotropy. The local dynamics of the vortex stretching term and vorticity resemble that of homogeneous isotropic turbulence to a greater extent at higher Karlovitz numbers. This results in small scale isotropy at sufficiently high Karlovitz numbers and supports a fundamental similarity of the behavior of the smallest turbulent scales throughout the flame and in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. At lower Karlovitz numbers, the vortex stretching term and the vorticity alignment in the strain-rate tensor eigenframe are altered by the flame. The integral length scale has minimal impact on these local dynamics but promotes the effects of the flame to be equal in all directions. The resulting isotropy in vorticity does not reflect a fundamental similarity between the smallest turbulent scales in the flame and in homogeneous isotropic turbulence.

  16. Numerical solution of compressible viscous flows at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccormack, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    A new numerical method which was used to reduce the computation time required in fluid dynamics to solve the Navier-Stokes equations at flight Reynolds numbers is described. The method is the implicit analogue of the explicit finite different method. It uses this as its first stage, while the second stage removes the restrictive stability condition by recasting the difference equations in an implicit form. The resulting matrix equations to be solved are either upper or lower block bidiagonal equations. The new method makes it possible and practical to calculate many important three dimensional, high Reynolds number flow fields on computers.

  17. High Reynolds Number Effects on HSCT Stability and Control Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elzey, Michael B.; Owens, Lewis R., Jr.; Wahls, Richard A.; Wilson, Douglas L.

    1999-01-01

    Two wind tunnel tests during 1995 in the National Transonic Facility (NTF 070 and 073) served to define Reynolds number effects on longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control. Testing was completed at both high lift and transonic conditions. The effect of Reynolds number on the total airplane configuration, horizontal and vertical tail effectiveness, forebody chine performance, rudder control and model aeroelastics was investigated. This paper will present pertinent stability and control results from these two test entries. Note that while model aeroelastic effects are examined in this presentation, no corrections for these effects have been made to the data.

  18. Very high Mach number shocks - Theory. [in space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quest, Kevin B.

    1986-01-01

    The theory and simulation of collisionless perpendicular supercritical shock structure is reviewed, with major emphasis on recent research results. The primary tool of investigation is the hybrid simulation method, in which the Newtonian orbits of a large number of ion macroparticles are followed numerically, and in which the electrons are treated as a charge neutralizing fluid. The principal results include the following: (1) electron resistivity is not required to explain the observed quasi-stationarity of the earth's bow shock, (2) the structure of the perpendicular shock at very high Mach numbers depends sensitively on the upstream value of beta (the ratio of the thermal to magnetic pressure) and electron resistivity, (3) two-dimensional turbulence will become increasingly important as the Mach number is increased, and (4) nonadiabatic bulk electron heating will result when a thermal electron cannot complete a gyrorbit while transiting the shock.

  19. "High-precision, reconstructed 3D model" of skull scanned by conebeam CT: Reproducibility verified using CAD/CAM data.

    PubMed

    Katsumura, Seiko; Sato, Keita; Ikawa, Tomoko; Yamamura, Keiko; Ando, Eriko; Shigeta, Yuko; Ogawa, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning has recently been introduced into forensic medicine and dentistry. However, the presence of metal restorations in the dentition can adversely affect the quality of three-dimensional reconstruction from CT scans. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the reproducibility of a "high-precision, reconstructed 3D model" obtained from a conebeam CT scan of dentition, a method that might be particularly helpful in forensic medicine. We took conebeam CT and helical CT images of three dry skulls marked with 47 measuring points; reconstructed three-dimensional images; and measured the distances between the points in the 3D images with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) marker. We found that in comparison with the helical CT, conebeam CT is capable of reproducing measurements closer to those obtained from the actual samples. In conclusion, our study indicated that the image-reproduction from a conebeam CT scan was more accurate than that from a helical CT scan. Furthermore, the "high-precision reconstructed 3D model" facilitates reliable visualization of full-sized oral and maxillofacial regions in both helical and conebeam CT scans. PMID:26832374

  20. High Reynolds Number Transition Experiments in ETW (TELFONA project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perraud, J.; Archambaud, J.-P.; Schrauf, G.; Donelli, R. S.; Hanifi, A.; Quest, J.; Hein, S.; Streit, T.; Fey, U.; Egami, Y.

    A wind-tunnel experiment on laminar-turbulent transition has been performed in ETW (the European Transonic Wind Tunnel in Koln) at high Reynolds number and cryogenic conditions. The studied geometry is a sting mounted full model in swept-wing configuration. The transition location was determined by means of Temperature Sensitive Paint (CryoTSP). The experimental observations were further analysed using different transition prediction tools, based on linear stability theory.

  1. Number-ratio fluctuations in high-energy particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, P.; Haslum, E.; Stenlund, E.

    2009-09-01

    In this article we will discuss the previously proposed quantity νdyn [C. Pruneau, S. Gavin, and S. Voloshin, Phys. Rev. C 66, 044904 (2002)], as a measure of the number-ratio fluctuations in high-energy particle production. We will show that νdyn has pleasing mathematical properties making it ideal for the purpose. We will demonstrate its relation to two-particle correlations and how this measure can be generalized to higher-order correlations.

  2. Number-ratio fluctuations in high-energy particle production

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, P.; Haslum, E.; Stenlund, E.

    2009-09-15

    In this article we will discuss the previously proposed quantity {nu}{sub dyn}[C. Pruneau, S. Gavin, and S. Voloshin, Phys. Rev. C 66, 044904 (2002)], as a measure of the number-ratio fluctuations in high-energy particle production. We will show that {nu}{sub dyn} has pleasing mathematical properties making it ideal for the purpose. We will demonstrate its relation to two-particle correlations and how this measure can be generalized to higher-order correlations.

  3. CT imaging of the internal human ear: Test of a high resolution scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettuzzi, M.; Brancaccio, R.; Morigi, M. P.; Gallo, A.; Strolin, S.; Casali, F.; Lamanna, Ernesto; Ariù, Marilù

    2011-08-01

    During the course of 2009, in the framework of a project supported by the National Institute of Nuclear Physics, a number of tests were carried out at the Department of Physics of the University of Bologna in order to achieve a good quality CT scan of the internal human ear. The work was carried out in collaboration with the local “S. Orsola” Hospital in Bologna and a company (CEFLA) already involved in the production and commercialization of a CT scanner dedicated to dentistry. A laboratory scanner with a simple concept detector (CCD camera-lens-mirror-scintillator) was used to see to what extent it was possible to enhance the quality of a conventional CT scanner when examining the internal human ear. To test the system, some conventional measurements were made, such as the spatial resolution calculation with the MTF and dynamic range evaluation. Different scintillators were compared to select the most suitable for the purpose. With 0.5 mm thick structured cesium iodide and a field of view of 120×120 mm2, a spatial resolution of 6.5l p/mm at 5% MTF was obtained. The CT of a pair of human head phantoms was performed at an energy of 120 kVp. The first phantom was a rough representation of the human head shape, with soft tissue made of coarse slabs of Lucite. Some inserts, like small aluminum cylinders and cubes, with 1 mm diameter drilled holes, were used to simulate the channels that one finds inside the human inner ear. The second phantom is a plastic PVC fused head with a real human cranium inside. The bones in the cranium are well conserved and the inner ear features, such as the cochlea and semicircular channels, are clearly detectable. After a number of CT tests we obtained good results as far as structural representation and channel detection are concerned. Some images of the 3D rendering of the CT volume are shown below. The doctors of the local hospital who followed our experimentation expressed their satisfaction. The CT was compared to a virtual

  4. High Resolution Imaging of Murine Myocardial Infarction With Delayed Enhancement and Cine Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Nahrendorf, Matthias; Badea, Cristian; Hedlund, Laurence W; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Sosnovik, David E.; Johnson, G Allan; Weissleder, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility of delayed enhancement µCT imaging to quantify myocardial infarct size in experimental mouse models. Methods and Results A total of 20 mice were imaged 5 or 35 days after surgical ligation of the left coronary artery, or sham surgery (n=6–7 per group). We utilized a prototype εCT which covers a 3D volume with an isotropic spatial resolution of 100 µm. A series of image acquisitions were started after a 200 µL bolus of a high molecular weight blood pool CT agent to outline the ventricles. CT imaging was continuously performed over 60 minutes, while an intravenous constant infusion with iopamidol 370 was started at a dosage of 1 mL/h. Thirty minutes after the initiation of this infusion, signal intensity in Hounsfild Units was significantly higher in the infarct than in the remote, uninjured myocardium. Cardiac morphology and motion was visualized with excellent contrast and in fine detail. In vivo CT determination of infarct extension and transmurality was in good agreement with ex vivo staining with triphenyltetrazolium chloride (5 days post MI: r2= 0.86, p < 0.01; 35 days post MI r2=0.92, p < 0.01). In addition, we detected significant left ventricular remodeling consisting of left ventricular dilation and decreased ejection fraction. Conclusion 3D cine µCT reliably and rapidly quantifies infarct size and assesses murine anatomy and physiology after coronary ligation, despite the small size and the fast movement of the mouse heart. This efficient imaging tool is a valuable addition to the current phenotyping armamentarium and will allow rapid testing of novel drugs and cell based interventions in murine models. PMID:17322414

  5. High-accuracy registration of intraoperative CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oentoro, A.; Ellis, R. E.

    2010-02-01

    Image-guided interventions using intraoperative 3D imaging can be less cumbersome than systems dependent on preoperative images, especially by needing neither potentially invasive image-to-patient registration nor a lengthy process of segmenting and generating a 3D surface model. In this study, a method for computer-assisted surgery using direct navigation on intraoperative imaging is presented. In this system the registration step of a navigated procedure was divided into two stages: preoperative calibration of images to a ceiling-mounted optical tracking system, and intraoperative tracking during acquisition of the 3D medical image volume. The preoperative stage used a custom-made multi-modal calibrator that could be optically tracked and also contained fiducial spheres for radiological detection; a robust registration algorithm was used to compensate for the very high false-detection rate that was due to the high physical density of the optical light-emitting diodes. Intraoperatively, a tracking device was attached to plastic bone models that were also instrumented with radio-opaque spheres; A calibrated pointer was used to contact the latter spheres as a validation of the registration. Experiments showed that the fiducial registration error of the preoperative calibration stage was approximately 0.1 mm. The target registration error in the validation stage was approximately 1.2 mm. This study suggests that direct registration, coupled with procedure-specific graphical rendering, is potentially a highly accurate means of performing image-guided interventions in a fast, simple manner.

  6. Rotating plane Couette flow at high rotation number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryadi, A.; Tillmark, N.; Alfredsson, P. H.

    2012-11-01

    Flow structures in the rotating plane Couette flow facility at KTH (described in Tsukahara, et al. J. Fluid Mech. vol. 648) have been studied at high rotation numbers. The test section is 20 mm wide with a length of 1500 mm in the streamwise (x) and 360 mm in the spanwise (z) directions and can be rotated in the spanwise direction up to angular velocities of Ωz ~ 0 . 6 rad/s. The flow is characterised by: (1) the Reynolds number Re based on the test section's half-width (h) and half of the velocity difference between the moving walls, (2) the rotation number Ω = 2Ωzh2 / ν . For low rotation numbers the primary instability consists of streamwise-oriented roll cells, but Tsukahara, et al. showed the secondary instability in the form of wavy streamwise oriented roll-cells at Re = 100 and Ω = 3 - 12 , whereas for higher Ω, the flow structures again stabilize to streamwise-oriented roll cells. Here we find that at even higher Ω in the range 40 - 70 , a new type of secondary instability develops in the form of counter-rotating helical roll-cells. The structure of this instability, as well as other instabilities, are investigated by flow visualization as well as two-dimensional PIV-measurements in several xz -planes.

  7. Numerical Simulation of a High Mach Number Jet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. Ehtesham; Turkel, Eli; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1993-01-01

    The recent efforts to develop accurate numerical schemes for transition and turbulent flows are motivated, among other factors, by the need for accurate prediction of flow noise. The success of developing high speed civil transport plane (HSCT) is contingent upon our understanding and suppression of the jet exhaust noise. The radiated sound can be directly obtained by solving the full (time-dependent) compressible Navier-Stokes equations. However, this requires computational storage that is beyond currently available machines. This difficulty can be overcome by limiting the solution domain to the near field where the jet is nonlinear and then use acoustic analogy (e.g., Lighthill) to relate the far-field noise to the near-field sources. The later requires obtaining the time-dependent flow field. The other difficulty in aeroacoustics computations is that at high Reynolds numbers the turbulent flow has a large range of scales. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) cannot obtain all the scales of motion at high Reynolds number of technological interest. However, it is believed that the large scale structure is more efficient than the small-scale structure in radiating noise. Thus, one can model the small scales and calculate the acoustically active scales. The large scale structure in the noise-producing initial region of the jet can be viewed as a wavelike nature, the net radiated sound is the net cancellation after integration over space. As such, aeroacoustics computations are highly sensitive to errors in computing the sound sources. It is therefore essential to use a high-order numerical scheme to predict the flow field. The present paper presents the first step in a ongoing effort to predict jet noise. The emphasis here is in accurate prediction of the unsteady flow field. We solve the full time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations by a high order finite difference method. Time accurate spatial simulations of both plane and axisymmetric jet are presented. Jet Mach

  8. High-resolution CT findings in pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Hattori, Yuki; Matsui, Osamu; Gabata, Toshifumi; Tamori, Shunichi; Minato, Hiroshi; Ohta, Yasuhiko

    2007-11-01

    A 47-year-old man with pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma is herein presented. The patient, whose chief complaint was a mild cough, was found by chest radiograph to have multiple bilateral nodules. Subsequent high-resolution computed tomography demonstrated multiple slightly irregular nodules, perinodular ground-glass opacity, peribronchovascular interstitial thickening, and cysts. A mild enlargement of systemic lymph nodes was also noted. Laboratory tests disclosed a slight elevation in the C-reactive protein, gamma-globulin, interleukin-6, and soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels. A histopathologic examination of the specimen yielded from a thoracoscopic lung biopsy resulted in a definite diagnosis of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma. PMID:18043399

  9. Low-dose high-resolution CT of lung parenchyma

    SciTech Connect

    Zwirewich, C.V.; Mayo, J.R.; Mueller, N.L. )

    1991-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of low-dose high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in the assessment of lung parenchyma, three observers reviewed the scans of 31 patients. The 1.5-mm-collimation, 2-second, 120-kVp scans were obtained at 20 and 200 mA at selected identical levels in the chest. The observers evaluated the visualization of normal pulmonary anatomy, various parenchymal abnormalities and their distribution, and artifacts. The low-dose and conventional scans were equivalent in the evaluation of vessels, lobar and segmental bronchi, and anatomy of secondary pulmonary lobules, and in characterizing the extent and distribution of reticulation, honeycomb cysts, and thickened interlobular septa. The low-dose technique failed to demonstrate ground-glass opacity in two of 10 cases (20%) and emphysema in one of nine cases (11%), in which they were evident but subtle on the high-dose scans. These differences were not statistically significant. Linear streak artifact was more prominent on images acquired with the low-dose technique, but the two techniques were judged equally diagnostic in 97% of cases. The authors conclude that HRCT images acquired at 20 mA yield anatomic information equivalent to that obtained with 200-mA scans in the majority of patients, without significant loss of spatial resolution or image degradation due to linear streak artifact.

  10. Yttrium-90 internal pair production imaging using first generation PET/CT provides high-resolution images for qualitative diagnostic purposes.

    PubMed

    Kao, Y H; Tan, E H; Lim, K Y; Ng, C E; Goh, S W

    2012-07-01

    Yttrium-90 ((90)Y) internal pair production can be imaged by positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and is superior to bremsstrahlung single-photon emission CT/CT for evaluating hepatic (90)Y microsphere biodistribution. We illustrate a case of (90)Y imaging using first generation PET/CT technology, producing high-quality images for qualitative diagnostic purposes.

  11. Exploring crystallization kinetics in natural rhyolitic melts using high resolution CT imagery of spherulites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clow, T. W.; Befus, K. S.; Gardner, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Little of our understanding of crystallization kinetics has been directly derived from studies of natural samples. We examine crystallization of rhyolitic melts by quantifying spherulite sizes and number densities in obsidian collected from Yellowstone caldera using high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (CT) imagery. Spherulites are spherical to ellipsoidal masses of intergrown alkali feldspar and quartz in a radiating, fibrous structure. They are thought to form in response to relatively rapid crystallization of melt in response to large amounts of undercooling. Recent research using compositional gradients that form outside of spherulites has suggested that they nucleate at 700 to 500 ˚C and their growth slows exponentially until it eventually ceases at ~400 ˚C. By quantifying spherulite textures, and using those temperature constraints, we derive new kinetic information regarding crystallization in natural rhyolitic systems. We find that spherulites range from 0.2 to 12.3 mm in diameter, and are 0.004 to 49.5 mm3 in volume. Such values generate number densities of 70 to 185 spherulites cm-3. Histograms of size display positively skewed distributions indicating small spherulites are far more abundant than larger ones. Those distributions imply nucleation rates change as a function of temperature. At higher temperatures where the melt is undercooled by 400-500 ˚C, nucleation is rare and growth is favored. With decreasing temperature, nucleation rates increase rapidly until cold enough temperatures are reached that diffusion limits crystallization and causes it to cease (undercoolings of ~650 ˚C). Assuming a cooling rate for the host obsidian of 10-5 ˚C s-1, then overall spherulite nucleation rates are 0.01 to 0.03 spherulites cm-3 hour-1.

  12. ULTRASOUND SIMULATION IN THE DISTAL RADIUS USING CLINICAL HIGH-RESOLUTION PERIPHERAL-CT IMAGES

    PubMed Central

    Floch, Vincent Le; McMahon, Donald J.; Luo, Gangming; Cohen, Adi; Kaufman, Jonathan J.; Shane, Elizabeth; Siffert, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    The overall objective of this research is to develop an ultrasonic method for noninvasive assessment of the distal radius. The specific objective of this study was to examine the propagation of ultrasound through the distal radius and determine the relationships between bone mass and architecture and ultrasound parameters. Twenty-six high-resolution peripheral-CT clinical images were obtained from a set of subjects that were part of a larger study on secondary osteoporosis. A single midsection binary slice from each image was selected and used in the two-dimensional (2D) simulation of an ultrasound wave propagating from the anterior to the posterior surfaces of each radius. Mass and architectural parameters associated with each radius, including total (trabecular and cortical) bone mass, trabecular volume fraction, trabecular number and trabecular thickness were computed. Ultrasound parameters, including net time delay (NTD), broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and ultrasound velocity (UV) were also evaluated. Significant correlations were found between NTD and total bone mass (R2 = 0.92, p < 0.001), BUA and trabecular number (R2 = 0.78, p < 0.01) and UV and trabecular bone volume fraction (R2 = 0.82, p < 0.01). There was only weak, statistically insignificant correlation (R2 < 0.14, p = 0.21) found between trabecular thickness and any of the ultrasound parameters. The study shows that ultrasound measurements are correlated with bone mass and architecture at the distal radius and, thus, ultrasound may prove useful as a method for noninvasive assessment of osteoporosis and fracture risk. PMID:18343017

  13. Wall-bounded turbulence at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallikivi, Margit

    Measurements are reported that give new insight into the behavior of turbulent wall-bounded flows at high Reynolds number. Turbulent pipe and boundary layer flows are examined experimentally over a wide range of Reynolds numbers -- up to Retau=100,000 (Re D=6x106) in pipe flow, and up to Re tau=73,000 (ReD=235x103) in a flat plate zero pressure gradient boundary layer. A Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP) was developed for very high spatial and temporal resolution measurements. Sensors with wire lengths 30 and 60 mum were fabricated, tested and validated in known flows, and then used to obtain single-point measurements at high Reynolds numbers in pipe and boundary layers. The mean velocity data together with data from previous studies and extensive error analysis showed that the von Karman's constant in the log-law is kappa=0.40+/-0.02. It was shown that the streamwise Reynolds stress exhibits a logarithmic behavior in the inertial sublayer for Retau≥20,000, in both pipes and boundary layers. Variances as well as higher order even moments were compared for pipes and boundary layers and it was shown that all even moments have a logarithmic behavior in the inertial sublayer, suggesting a true scale separation. Streamwise turbulent spectra showed a clear k --5/3 region for up to two decades in wavenumber. No k--1 region was found to be present in any of the cases in the pipe or the boundary layer. The location of the outer spectral peak, associated with very large scale motions, was found to have only a weak dependence on Reynolds number. The loci of these peak occur at the same wall-normal distance where the streamwise stresses establish a logarithmic behavior and where the amplitude modulation coefficient has a zero value. This suggests that with Reynolds number increasing to infinity most of the energy is contained within a diminishing wall-layer in physical coordinates.

  14. Reynolds Number Effects at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Banks, Daniel W.; Hall, Robert M.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Lessons learned from comparisons between ground-based tests and flight measurements for the high-angle-of-attack programs on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), the X-29 forward-swept wing aircraft, and the X-31 enhanced fighter maneuverability aircraft are presented. On all three vehicles, Reynolds number effects were evident on the forebodies at high angles of attack. The correlation between flight and wind tunnel forebody pressure distributions for the F-18 HARV were improved by using twin longitudinal grit strips on the forebody of the wind-tunnel model. Pressure distributions obtained on the X-29 wind-tunnel model at flight Reynolds numbers showed excellent correlation with the flight data up to alpha = 50 deg. Above (alpha = 50 deg. the pressure distributions for both flight and wind tunnel became asymmetric and showed poorer agreement, possibly because of the different surface finish of the model and aircraft. The detrimental effect of a very sharp nose apex was demonstrated on the X-31 aircraft. Grit strips on the forebody of the X-31 reduced the randomness but increased the magnitude of the asymmetry. Nose strakes were required to reduce the forebody yawing moment asymmetries and the grit strips on the flight test noseboom improved the aircraft handling qualities.

  15. High-resolution CT findings of patients with pulmonary nocardiosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Naoki; Saraya, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Ken; Takata, Saori; Kurihara, Yasuyuki; Hiraoka, Sayuki; Makino, Hiroshi; Yonetani, Shota; Araki, Koji; Ishii, Haruyuki; Takizawa, Hajime

    2012-01-01

    Background Opportunistic pulmonary infection with Nocardia species is rare in humans, and only a few studies have radiologically analyzed patients with pulmonary nocardiosis using high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with pulmonary nocardiosis at our hospital between April 2006 and December 2011 to assess HRCT and clinical findings. We also searched the medical literature for pulmonary nocardiosis reported in Japan between 2002 and 2011 for comparison. Results We identified seven patients at our institution and 33 reported infections in Japan. Four of our patients were immunocompetent, whereas the other three had impaired cellular immunity due to type 2 diabetes mellitus or having been inappropriately treated with steroid. Thoracic HRCT revealed no zonal predominance, but tropism for distribution from the middle to the peripheral area, and radiological findings of nodules, cavitation, mass, consolidations, bronchial wall thickening, septal line thickening and ground glass opacity (GGO) were evident. The main HRCT finding in our study comprised nodules (n=5, 71.4%) <30 mm and four patients had multiple nodules as described in other reports. Furthermore, we discovered a crazy paving appearance (CPA) around nodules, cavities, masses or consolidations in five patients (71.4%). Conclusions Multiple nodules distributed from the middle to the peripheral area on HRCT might reflect pulmonary nocardiosis, and CPA seemed to be a worth paying attention to the diagnosis. PMID:23205281

  16. High Order Difference Method for Low Mach Number Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, B.; Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A high order finite difference method with improved accuracy and stability properties for computational aeroacoustics (CAA) at low Mach numbers is proposed. The Euler equations are split into a conservative and a symmetric non- conservative portion to allow the derivation of a generalized energy estimate. Since the symmetrization is based on entropy variables, that splitting of the flux derivatives is referred to as entropy splitting. Its discretization by high order central differences was found to need less numerical dissipation than conventional conservative schemes. Owing to the large disparity of acoustic and stagnation quantities in low Mach number aeroacoustics, the split Euler equations are formulated in perturbation form. The unknowns are the small changes of the conservative variables with respect to their large stagnation values. All nonlinearities and the conservation form of the conservative portion of the split flux derivatives can be retained, while cancellation errors are avoided with its discretization opposed to the conventional conservative form. The finite difference method is third-order accurate at the boundary and the conventional central sixth-order accurate stencil in the interior. The difference operator satisfies the summation by parts property analogous to the integration by parts in the continuous energy estimate. Thus, strict stability of the difference method follows automatically. Spurious high frequency oscillations are suppressed by a characteristic-based filter similar to but without limiter. The time derivative is approximated by a 4-stage low-storage second-order explicit Runge-Kutta method. The method has been applied to simulate vortex sound at low Mach numbers. We consider the Kirchhoff vortex, which is an elliptical patch of constant vorticity rotating with constant angular frequency in irrotational flow. The acoustic pressure generated by the Kirchhoff vortex is governed by the 2D Helmholtz equation, which can be solved

  17. A moving frame algorithm for high Mach number hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trac, Hy; Pen, Ue-Li

    2004-07-01

    We present a new approach to Eulerian computational fluid dynamics that is designed to work at high Mach numbers encountered in astrophysical hydrodynamic simulations. Standard Eulerian schemes that strictly conserve total energy suffer from the high Mach number problem and proposed solutions to additionally solve the entropy or thermal energy still have their limitations. In our approach, the Eulerian conservation equations are solved in an adaptive frame moving with the fluid where Mach numbers are minimized. The moving frame approach uses a velocity decomposition technique to define local kinetic variables while storing the bulk kinetic components in a smoothed background velocity field that is associated with the grid velocity. Gravitationally induced accelerations are added to the grid, thereby minimizing the spurious heating problem encountered in cold gas flows. Separately tracking local and bulk flow components allows thermodynamic variables to be accurately calculated in both subsonic and supersonic regions. A main feature of the algorithm, that is not possible in previous Eulerian implementations, is the ability to resolve shocks and prevent spurious heating where both the pre-shock and post-shock fluid are supersonic. The hybrid algorithm combines the high-resolution shock capturing ability of the second-order accurate Eulerian TVD scheme with a low-diffusion Lagrangian advection scheme. We have implemented a cosmological code where the hydrodynamic evolution of the baryons is captured using the moving frame algorithm while the gravitational evolution of the collisionless dark matter is tracked using a particle-mesh N-body algorithm. Hydrodynamic and cosmological tests are described and results presented. The current code is fast, memory-friendly, and parallelized for shared-memory machines.

  18. Computation of high Reynolds number internal/external flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, M. C.; Wilmoth, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    A general, user oriented computer program, called VNAF2, developed to calculate high Reynolds number internal/external flows is described. The program solves the two dimensional, time dependent Navier-Stokes equations. Turbulence is modeled with either a mixing length, a one transport equation, or a two transport equation model. Interior grid points are computed using the explicit MacCormack scheme with special procedures to speed up the calculation in the fine grid. All boundary conditions are calculated using a reference plane characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source terms. Several internal, external, and internal/external flow calculations are presented.

  19. Local isotropy in high Reynolds number turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saddoughi, Seyed G.

    1993-01-01

    This is a report on the continuation of experiments, which Dr. Srinivas Veeravalli and the present author started in 1991, to investigate the hypothesis of local isotropy in shear flows. This hypothesis, which states that at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers the small-scale structures of turbulent motions are independent of large-scale structures and mean deformations, has been used in theoretical studies of turbulence and computational methods like large-eddy simulation. The importance of Kolmogorov's ideas arises from the fact that they create a foundation for turbulence theory.

  20. Anisotropic Structure of Rotating Homogeneous Turbulence at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Squires, Kyle D.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Large eddy simulation is used to investigate the development of anisotropies and the evolution towards a quasi two-dimensional state in rotating homogeneous turbulence at high Reynolds number. The present study demonstrates the existence of two transitions in the development of anisotropy. The first transition marks the onset of anisotropy and occurs when a macro-Rossby number (based on a longitudinal integral lengthscale) has decreased to near unity while the second transition occurs when a micro-Rossby number (defined in this work as the ratio of the rms fluctuating vorticity to background vorticity) has decreased to unity. The anisotropy marked by the first transition corresponds to a reduction in dimensionality while the second transition corresponds to a polarization of the flow, i.e., relative dominance of the velocity components in the plane normal to the rotation axis. Polarization is reflected by emergence of anisotropy measures based on the two-dimensional component of the turbulence. Investigation of the vorticity structure shows that the second transition is also characterized by an increasing tendency for alignment between the fluctuating vorticity vector and the background angular velocity vector with a preference for corrotative vorticity.

  1. Resistance of plates and pipes at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, L; Hermann, R

    1931-01-01

    It was learned that the law of resistance for high R values does not follow the simple powers, and that the powers, which can be obtained approximately for the velocity distribution, gradually change. Since, moreover, very important investigations have recently been made on the resistance of plates at very high R values, it seemed of interest to apply the above line of reasoning to the new general law of resistance. For this purpose, the resistance and velocity distribution along the plate must always be equal to the values of the pipe flow at the corresponding Reynolds number. We made two kinds of calculations, of which the one given here is the simpler and more practical and also agrees better with the experimental results.

  2. Design of a high-resolution small-animal SPECT-CT system sharing a CdTe semiconductor detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Young-Jin; Lee, Seung-Wan; Cho, Hyo-Min; Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2012-07-01

    A single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system with a co-registered X-y computed tomography (CT) system allows the convergence of functional information and morphologic information. The localization of radiopharmaceuticals on a SPECT can be enhanced by combining the SPECT with an anatomical modality, such as X-ray CT. Gamma-ray imaging for nuclear medicine devices and X-ray imaging systems for diagnostics has recently been developed based on semiconductor detectors, and semiconductor detector materials such as cadmium telluride (CdTe) or cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) are available for both X-ray and gamma-ray systems for small-animal imaging. CdTe or CZT detectors provide strong absorption and high detection efficiency of high energy X-ray and gamma-ray photons because of their large atomic numbers. In this study, a pinhole collimator SPECT system sharing a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with a CT was designed. The GEANT4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) v.6.1 was used for the simulation. The pinhole collimator was designed to obtain a high spatial resolution of the SPECT system. The acquisition time for each projection was 40 seconds, and 60 projections were obtained for tomographic image acquisition. The reconstruction was performed using ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM) algorithms. The sensitivity and the spatial resolution were measured on the GATE simulation to evaluate the system characteristics. The spatial resolution of the system calculated from the FWHM of Gaussian fitted PSF curve was 0.69 mm, and the sensitivity of the system was measured to be 0.354 cps/kBq by using a Tc-99m point source of 1 MBq for 800 seconds. A phantom study was performed to verify the design of the dual imaging modality system. The system will be built as designed, and it can be applied as a pre-clinical imaging system.

  3. The assessment of the role of baseline low-dose CT scan in patients at high risk of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Walecka, Anna; Grodzki, Tomasz; Alchimowicz, Jacek; Smereczyński, Andrzej; Kiedrowicz, Radosław

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Despite the progress in contemporary medicine comprising diagnostic and therapeutic methods, lung cancer is still one of the biggest health concerns in many countries of the world. The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the detection rate of pulmonary nodules and lung cancer in the initial, helical low-dose CT of the chest as well as the analysis of the relationship between the size and the histopathological character of the detected nodules. Material/Methods We retrospectively evaluated 1999 initial, consecutive results of the CT examinations performed within the framework of early lung cancer detection program initiated in Szczecin. The project enrolled persons of both sexes, aged 55–65 years, with at least 20 pack-years of cigarette smoking or current smokers. The analysis included assessment of the number of positive results and the evaluation of the detected nodules in relationship to their size. All of the nodules were classified into I of VI groups and subsequently compared with histopathological type of the neoplastic and nonneoplastic pulmonary lesions. Results Pulmonary nodules were detected in 921 (46%) subjects. What is more, malignant lesions as well as lung cancer were significantly, more frequently discovered in the group of asymptomatic nodules of the largest dimension exceeding 15 mm. Conclusions The initial, low-dose helical CT of the lungs performed in high risk individuals enables detection of appreciable number of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In most of the asymptomatic patients with histopathologically proven pulmonary nodules greater than 15 mm, the mentioned lesions are malignant, what warrants further, intensified diagnostics. PMID:25057333

  4. Sensory epithelia of the fish inner ear in 3D: studied with high-resolution contrast enhanced microCT

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction While a number of studies have illustrated and analyzed 3D models of inner ears in higher vertebrates, inner ears in fishes have rarely been investigated in 3D, especially with regard to the sensory epithelia of the end organs, the maculae. It has been suggested that the 3D curvature of these maculae may also play an important role in hearing abilities in fishes. We therefore set out to develop a fast and reliable approach for detailed 3D visualization of whole inner ears as well as maculae. Results High-resolution microCT imaging of black mollies Poecilia sp. (Poeciliidae, Teleostei) and Steatocranus tinanti (Cichlidae, Teleostei) stained with phosphotungstic acid (PTA) resulted in good tissue contrast, enabling us to perform a reliable 3D reconstruction of all three sensory maculae of the inner ears. Comparison with maculae that have been 3D reconstructed based on histological serial sections and phalloidin-stained maculae showed high congruence in overall shape of the maculae studied here. Conclusions PTA staining and subsequent high-resolution contrast enhanced microCT imaging is a powerful method to obtain 3D models of fish inner ears and maculae in a fast and more reliable manner. Future studies investigating functional morphology, phylogenetic potential of inner ear features, or evolution of hearing and inner ear specialization in fishes may benefit from the use of 3D models of inner ears and maculae. PMID:24160754

  5. Stratified wakes, the high Froude number approximation, and potential flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasholz, David P.

    2011-12-01

    Properties of a steady wake generated by a body moving uniformly at constant depth through a stratified fluid are studied as a function of two parameters inserted into the linearized equations of motion. The first parameter, μ, multiplies the along-track gradient term in the source equation. When formal solutions for an arbitrary buoyancy frequency profile are written as eigenfunction expansions, one finds that the limit μ → 0 corresponds to a high Froude number approximation accompanied by a substantial reduction in the complexity of the calculation. For μ = 1, upstream effects are present and the eigenvalues correspond to critical speeds above which transverse waves disappear for any given mode. For sufficiently high modes, the high Froude number approximation is valid. The second tracer multiplies the square of the buoyancy frequency term in the linearized conservation of mass equation and enables direct comparisons with the limit of potential flow. Detailed results are given for the simplest possible profile, in which the buoyancy frequency is independent of depth; emphasis is placed upon quantities that can, in principle, be experimentally measured in a laboratory experiment. The vertical displacement field is written in terms of a stratified wake form factor {{H}} , which is the sum of a wavelike contribution that is non-zero downstream and an evanescent contribution that appears symmetrically upstream and downstream. First- and second-order cross-track moments of {{H}} are analyzed. First-order results predict enhanced upstream vertical displacements. Second-order results expand upon previous predictions of wavelike resonances and also predict evanescent resonance effects.

  6. High resolution multidetector CT aided tissue analysis and quantification of lung fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Karwoski, Ronald A.; Bartholmai, Brian; Robb, Richard A.

    2006-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, also known as Idiopathic Usual Interstitial Pneumontis, pathologically) is a progressive diffuse lung disease which has a median survival rate of less than four years with a prevalence of 15-20/100,000 in the United States. Global function changes are measured by pulmonary function tests and the diagnosis and extent of pulmonary structural changes are typically assessed by acquiring two-dimensional high resolution CT (HRCT) images. The acquisition and analysis of volumetric high resolution Multi-Detector CT (MDCT) images with nearly isotropic pixels offers the potential to measure both lung function and structure. This paper presents a new approach to three dimensional lung image analysis and classification of normal and abnormal structures in lungs with IPF.

  7. CT of multiple sclerosis: reassessment of delayed scanning with high doses of contrast material

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, S.M.; Vinuela, F.; Fox, A.J.; Pelz, D.M.

    1985-09-01

    A prospective study involving 87 patients was carried out to evaluate the necessity for a high dose of contrast material in addition to delayed computed tomographic (CT) scanning for optimal detection of the lesions of multiple sclerosis in the brain. In patients with either clinically definite multiple sclerosis or laboratory-supported definite multiple sclerosis, CT scans were obtained with a uniform protocol. Lesions consistent with multiple sclerosis were demonstrated on the second scan in 54 patients. In 36 of these 54 patients, the high-dose delayed scan added information. These results are quite similar to those of a previous study from this institution using different patients, in whom the second scan was obtained immediately after the bolus injection of contrast material containing 40 g of organically bound iodine. The lack of real difference in the results of the two studies indicate that the increased dose, not just the delay in scanning, is necessary for a proper study.

  8. Hysteresis phenomenon of hypersonic inlet at high Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Xiaoliang; Chang, Juntao; Wang, Zhongqi; Yu, Daren

    2016-11-01

    When the hypersonic inlet works at a Mach number higher than the design value, the hypersonic inlet is started with a regular reflection of the external compression shock at the cowl, whereas a Mach reflection will result in the shock propagating forwards to cause a shock detachment at the cowl lip, which is called "local unstart of inlet". As there are two operation modes of hypersonic inlet at high Mach number, the mode transition may occur with the operation condition of hypersonic inlet changing. A cowl-angle-variation-induced hysteresis and a downstream-pressure-variation-induced hysteresis in the hypersonic inlet start↔local unstart transition are obtained by viscous numerical simulations in this paper. The interaction of the external compression shock and boundary layer on the cowl plays a key role in the hysteresis phenomenon. Affected by the transition of external compression shock reflection at the cowl and the transition between separated and attached flow on the cowl, a hysteresis exists in the hypersonic inlet start↔local unstart transition. The hysteresis makes the operation of a hypersonic inlet very difficult to control. In order to avoid hysteresis phenomenon and keep the hypersonic inlet operating in a started mode, the control route should never pass through the local unstarted boundary.

  9. High Reynolds number magnetohydrodynamic turbulence using a Lagrangian model.

    PubMed

    Graham, J Pietarila; Mininni, P D; Pouquet, A

    2011-07-01

    With the help of a model of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence tested previously, we explore high Reynolds number regimes up to equivalent resolutions of 6000(3) grid points in the absence of forcing and with no imposed uniform magnetic field. For the given initial condition chosen here, with equal kinetic and magnetic energy, the flow ends up being dominated by the magnetic field, and the dynamics leads to an isotropic Iroshnikov-Kraichnan energy spectrum. However, the locally anisotropic magnetic field fluctuations perpendicular to the local mean field follow a Kolmogorov law. We find that the ratio of the eddy turnover time to the Alfvén time increases with wave number, contrary to the so-called critical balance hypothesis. Residual energy and helicity spectra are also considered; the role played by the conservation of magnetic helicity is studied, and scaling laws are found for the magnetic helicity and residual helicity spectra. We put these results in the context of the dynamics of a globally isotropic MHD flow that is locally anisotropic because of the influence of the strong large-scale magnetic field, leading to a partial equilibration between kinetic and magnetic modes for the energy and the helicity.

  10. High Reynolds number decay of turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschoof, Ruben A.; Huisman, Sander G.; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    We study the decay of high-Reynolds number turbulence in a Taylor-Couette facility for pure inner cylinder rotation. The rotation of the inner cylinder (Rei = 2 ×106) is suddenly decelerated as fast as possible, thus removing the energy input within seconds. Local velocity measurements show that the decay in this wall-bounded inhomogeneous flow is faster than observed for homogeneous isotropic turbulent flows, due to the strong viscous drag applied by the inner and outer cylinder surfaces. We found that the decay over time can be described with the differential equation Re . (t) =cf (Re)Re2 , where the effects of the walls are included through the friction coefficient. A self-similar behavior of the azimuthal velocity is found: its normalized velocity profile as a function of the radius collapses over time during the decay process.

  11. Mixing of two miscible fluids at high Schmidt number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Mark; Alberini, Federico; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2013-11-01

    The blending of two miscible liquids at high Schmidt number is an increasingly common industrial problem: as processes push towards shorter timescales yet the rheology of the fluids becomes increasingly complex. This leads to phenomena which resemble a quasi two-phase system with zero interfacial tension. In this study, we compare experimental results with computational fluid dynamics simulations using unstructured-mesh adaptivity for the flow of two Newtonian, or two power-law fluids through a complex geometry representative of a Kenics type static mixer used in industry. The geometry induces a stretching and folding of the fluid elements which causes exponential growth of the interface length down the geometry. The interfacial topology obtained from the simulations is compared with experiments carried out using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF), which enables the spatial distribution of each phase, and the interfaces between them, to be determined at the outlet of the geometry. EPSRC Programme Grant EP/K003976/1.

  12. Experimental investigations of He II flows at high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Sciver, Steve W.

    1991-01-01

    Fluid dynamics studies of He II at high Reynolds number (Re(d) greater than 10 exp 6) reveal characteristics which are best interpreted in terms of classical scaling relationships. In particular, the smooth tube friction factor is seen to correlate with the Von Karman-Nikuradse formulation. Also, the performance of a centrifugal pump is unchanged whether being used with He I or He II. These effects are expected to result provided the He II possesses a viscous sublayer and that the drag is determined by laminar flow within this layer. On the other hand, heat transfer in He II is substantially different from that of He I because of the unique internal convection mechanism present in this quantum fluid. These experiments are performed in the University of Wisconsin liquid helium flow facility which has unique capabilities of He II temperature, pressure and flow.

  13. A High Altitude-Low Reynolds Number Aerodynamic Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Don; Krake, Keith; Hamory, Phil; Drela, Mark; Lee, Seunghee (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A sailplane is currently being developed at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center to support a high altitude flight experiment. The purpose of the experiment is to measure the performance characteristics of an airfoil at altitudes between 100,000 and 70,000 feet at Mach numbers between 0.65 and 0.5. The airfoil lift and drag are measured from pilot and static pressures. The location of the separation bubble and vortex shedding are measured from a hot film strip. The details of the flight experiment are presented. A comparison of several estimates of the airfoil performance is also presented. The airfoil, APEX-16, was designed by Drela (MIT) with his MSES code. A two dimensional Navier-Stokes analysis has been performed by Tatineni and Zhong (UCLA) and another at the Dryden Flight Research Center. The role these analysis served to define the experiment is discussed.

  14. High-throughput multiple-mouse imaging with micro-PET/CT for whole-skeleton assessment.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Masashi; Arentsen, Luke; Shanley, Ryan M; Hui, Susanta K

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies have proven that skeleton-wide functional assessment is essential to comprehensively understand physiological aspects of the skeletal system. Therefore, in contrast to regional imaging studies utilizing a multiple-animal holder (mouse hotel), we attempted to develop and characterize a multiple-mouse imaging system with micro-PET/CT for high-throughput whole-skeleton assessment. Using items found in a laboratory, a simple mouse hotel that houses four mice linked with gas anesthesia was constructed. A mouse-simulating phantom was used to measure uniformity in a cross sectional area and flatness (Amax/Amin*100) along the axial, radial and tangential directions, where Amax and Amin are maximum and minimum activity concentration in the profile, respectively. Fourteen mice were used for single- or multiple-micro-PET/CT scans. NaF uptake was measured at eight skeletal sites (skull to tibia). Skeletal (18)F activities measured with mice in the mouse hotel were within 1.6 ± 4% (mean ± standard deviation) of those measured with mice in the single-mouse holder. Single-holder scanning yields slightly better uniformity and flatness over the hotel. Compared to use of the single-mouse holder, scanning with the mouse hotel reduced study time (by 65%), decreased the number of scans (four-fold), reduced cost, required less computer storage space (40%), and maximized (18)F usage. The mouse hotel allows high-throughput, quantitatively equivalent scanning compared to the single-mouse holder for micro-PET/CT imaging for whole-skeleton assessment of mice.

  15. Precise 3D dimensional metrology using high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (μCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunke, Oliver; Santillan, Javier; Suppes, Alexander

    2010-09-01

    Over the past decade computed tomography (CT) with conventional x-ray sources has evolved from an imaging method in medicine to a well established technology for industrial applications in fields such as material science, light metals and plastics processing, microelectronics and geology. By using modern microfocus and nanofocus X-ray tubes, parts can be scanned with sub-micrometer resolutions. Currently, micro-CT is a technology increasingly used for metrology applications in the automotive industry. CT offers big advantages compared with conventional tactile or optical coordinate measuring machines (CMMs). This is of greater importance if complex parts with hidden or difficult accessible surfaces have to be measured. In these cases, CT offers the advantage of a high density of measurement points and a non-destructive and fast capturing of the sample's complete geometry. When using this growing technology the question arises how precise a μCT based CMM can measure as compared to conventional and established methods for coordinate measurements. For characterizing the metrological capabilities of a tactile or optical CMM, internationally standardized parameters like length measurement error and probing error are defined and used. To increase the acceptance of CT as a metrological method, our work seeks to clarify the definition and usage of parameters used in the field of metrology as these apply to CT. In this paper, an overview of the process chain in CT based metrology will be given and metrological characteristics will be described. For the potential user of CT as 3D metrology tool it is important to show the measurement accuracy and repeatability on realistic samples. Following a discussion of CT metrology techniques, two samples are discussed. The first compares a measured CT Data set to CAD data using CMM data as a standard for comparison of results. The second data second realistic data set will compare the results of applying both the CMM method of

  16. Turbomachinery for Low-to-High Mach Number Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Choon S.; Shah, Parthiv N.

    2004-01-01

    The thrust capability of turbojet cycles is reduced at high flight Mach number (3+) by the increase in inlet stagnation temperature. The 'hot section' temperature limit imposed by materials technology sets the maximum heat addition and, hence, sets the maximum flight Mach number of the operating envelope. Compressor pre-cooling, either via a heat exchanger or mass-injection, has been suggested as a means to reduce compressor inlet temperature and increase mass flow capability, thereby increasing thrust. To date, however, no research has looked at compressor cooling (i.e., using a compressor both to perform work on the gas path air and extract heat from it simultaneously). We wish to assess the feasibility of this novel concept for use in low-to-high Mach number flight. The results to-date show that an axial compressor with cooling: (1) relieves choking in rear stages (hence opening up operability), (2) yields higher-pressure ratio and (3) yields higher efficiency for a given corrected speed and mass flow. The performance benefit is driven: (i) at the blade passage level, by a decrease in the total pressure reduction coefficient and an increase in the flow turning; and (ii) by the reduction in temperature that results in less work required for a given pressure ratio. The latter is a thermodynamic effect. As an example, calculations were performed for an eight-stage compressor with an adiabatic design pressure ratio of 5. By defining non-dimensional cooling as the percentage of compressor inlet stagnation enthalpy removed by a heat sink, the model shows that a non-dimensional cooling of percent in each blade row of the first two stages can increase the compressor pressure ratio by as much as 10-20 percent. Maximum corrected mass flow at a given corrected speed may increase by as much as 5 percent. In addition, efficiency may increase by as much as 5 points. A framework for characterizing and generating the performance map for a cooled compressor has been developed

  17. Substrate degradation in high-Rayleigh-number reactive convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, T. J.; Jensen, O. E.; Power, H.; Riley, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    We study buoyancy-induced convection of a solute in an ideal two-dimensional fluid-saturated porous medium, where the solute undergoes a second-order reaction with a chemical substrate that is fixed in the underlying matrix. Numerical simulations at high Rayleigh number show how a flow is established in which a thin dynamic boundary layer beneath the solute source feeds slender vertical plumes beneath. We examine how the substrate is reactively degraded, at a rate enhanced by convective mixing. For the case when the substrate is abundant, we derive a reduced-order model describing the slow degradation of the substrate, which is formulated as a novel one-dimensional free-boundary problem. Numerical simulations and the reduced model reveal how, when the reaction is rapid compared to the convective time scale, the plumes propagate deep into the flow domain with reaction confined to a narrow region at their base. In contrast, slow reaction allows plumes to fill the domain before degradation of the substrate proceeds homogeneously. An alternative model with a thin reaction front captures the rapid degradation of the substrate when the solute concentration is relatively high.

  18. Onset of turbulence in accelerated high-Reynolds-number flow.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Robey, Harry F; Buckingham, Alfred C

    2003-05-01

    A new criterion, flow drive time, is identified here as a necessary condition for transition to turbulence in accelerated, unsteady flows. Compressible, high-Reynolds-number flows initiated, for example, in shock tubes, supersonic wind tunnels with practical limitations on dimensions or reservoir capacity, and high energy density pulsed laser target vaporization experimental facilities may not provide flow duration adequate for turbulence development. In addition, for critical periods of the overall flow development, the driving background flow is often unsteady in the experiments as well as in the physical flow situations they are designed to mimic. In these situations transition to fully developed turbulence may not be realized despite achievement of flow Reynolds numbers associated with or exceeding stationary flow transitional criteria. Basically our transitional criterion and prediction procedure extends to accelerated, unsteady background flow situations the remarkably universal mixing transition criterion proposed by Dimotakis [P. E. Dimotakis, J. Fluid Mech. 409, 69 (2000)] for stationary flows. This provides a basis for the requisite space and time scaling. The emphasis here is placed on variable density flow instabilities initiated by constant acceleration Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) or impulsive (shock) acceleration Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) or combinations of both. The significant influences of compressibility on these developing transitional flows are discussed with their implications on the procedural model development. A fresh perspective for predictive modeling and design of experiments for the instability growth and turbulent mixing transitional interval is provided using an analogy between the well-established buoyancy-drag model with applications of a hierarchy of single point turbulent transport closure models. Experimental comparisons with the procedural results are presented where use is made of three distinctly different types

  19. High-resolution CT analysis of facial struts in trauma: 1. Normal anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, L.R.; Manor, W.F.; Turski, P.A.; Strother, C.M.

    1983-03-01

    The recent availability of high-spatial-resolution thin-section computed tomography (CT), capable of accurately depicting the thin body septa of the facial skeleton, has expanded the role that diagnostic radiology can play in the evaluation of the patient with facial trauma. A detailed knowledge of the normal CT anatomy of the face, however, is essential to optimally utilize this modality. The normal anatomy of the face was investigated in six cadavers using thin-section (1.5 mm) high-resolution CT. A systematic method of analysis that can facilitate evaluation of the face is presented. The face is conceptualized as three groups of interconnected osseous struts or buttresses that are oriented in the horizontal, sagittal, and coronal planes. Each group of struts is closely related to specific soft-tissue structures that are susceptible to injury. Sequential evaluation of each strut and its associated soft tissue assures a comprehensive evaluation of the face. While both axial and coronal sections are of value in some circumstances, the coronal ones are most helpful in accurately depicting the structures of the face that are most likely to be injured in trauma.

  20. Development of a high-speed CT imaging system using EMCCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thacker, Samta C.; Yang, Kai; Packard, Nathan; Gaysinskiy, Valeriy; Burkett, George; Miller, Stuart; Boone, John M.; Nagarkar, Vivek

    2009-02-01

    The limitations of current CCD-based microCT X-ray imaging systems arise from two important factors. First, readout speeds are curtailed in order to minimize system read noise, which increases significantly with increasing readout rates. Second, the afterglow associated with commercial scintillator films can introduce image lag, leading to substantial artifacts in reconstructed images, especially when the detector is operated at several hundred frames/second (fps). For high speed imaging systems, high-speed readout electronics and fast scintillator films are required. This paper presents an approach to developing a high-speed CT detector based on a novel, back-thinned electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) coupled to various bright, high resolution, low afterglow films. The EMCCD camera, when operated in its binned mode, is capable of acquiring data at up to 300 fps with reduced imaging area. CsI:Tl,Eu and ZnSe:Te films, recently fabricated at RMD, apart from being bright, showed very good afterglow properties, favorable for high-speed imaging. Since ZnSe:Te films were brighter than CsI:Tl,Eu films, for preliminary experiments a ZnSe:Te film was coupled to an EMCCD camera at UC Davis Medical Center. A high-throughput tungsten anode X-ray generator was used, as the X-ray fluence from a mini- or micro-focus source would be insufficient to achieve high-speed imaging. A euthanized mouse held in a glass tube was rotated 360 degrees in less than 3 seconds, while radiographic images were recorded at various readout rates (up to 300 fps); images were reconstructed using a conventional Feldkamp cone-beam reconstruction algorithm. We have found that this system allows volumetric CT imaging of small animals in approximately two seconds at ~110 to 190 μm resolution, compared to several minutes at 160 μm resolution needed for the best current systems.

  1. High-resolution three-dimensional visualization of the rat spinal cord microvasculature by synchrotron radiation micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jianzhong; Cao, Yong; Wu, Tianding; Li, Dongzhe; Lu, Hongbin

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Understanding the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of the spinal cord microvasculature has been limited by the lack of an effective high-resolution imaging technique. In this study, synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography (SRµCT), a novel imaging technique based on absorption imaging, was evaluated with regard to the detection of the 3D morphology of the rat spinal cord microvasculature. Methods: Ten Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this ex vivo study. After contrast agent perfusion, their spinal cords were isolated and scanned using conventional x-rays, conventional micro-CT (CµCT), and SRµCT. Results: Based on contrast agent perfusion, the microvasculature of the rat spinal cord was clearly visualized for the first time ex vivo in 3D by means of SRµCT scanning. Compared to conventional imaging techniques, SRµCT achieved higher resolution 3D vascular imaging, with the smallest vessel that could be distinguished approximately 7.4 μm in diameter. Additionally, a 3D pseudocolored image of the spinal cord microvasculature was generated in a single session of SRµCT imaging, which was conducive to detailed observation of the vessel morphology. Conclusions: The results of this study indicated that SRµCT scanning could provide higher resolution images of the vascular network of the spinal cord. This modality also has the potential to serve as a powerful imaging tool for the investigation of morphology changes in the 3D angioarchitecture of the neurovasculature in preclinical research.

  2. Dynamics of Active Separation Control at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Seifert, Avi

    2000-01-01

    A series of active flow control experiments were recently conducted at high Reynolds numbers on a generic separated configuration. The model simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick Glauert-Goldschmied type airfoil at zero angle of attack. The flow is fully turbulent since the tunnel sidewall boundary layer flows over the model. The main motivation for the experiments is to generate a comprehensive data base for validation of unsteady numerical simulation as a first step in the development of a CFD design tool, without which it would not be possible to effectively utilize the great potential of unsteady flow control. This paper focuses on the dynamics of several key features of the baseline as well as the controlled flow. It was found that the thickness of the upstream boundary layer has a negligible effect on the flow dynamics. It is speculated that separation is caused mainly by the highly convex surface while viscous effects are less important. The two-dimensional separated flow contains unsteady waves centered on a reduced frequency of 0.8, while in the three dimensional separated flow, frequencies around a reduced frequency of 0.3 and 1 are active. Several scenarios of resonant wave interaction take place at the separated shear-layer and in the pressure recovery region. The unstable reduced frequency bands for periodic excitation are centered on 1.5 and 5, but these reduced frequencies are based on the length of the baseline bubble that shortens due to the excitation. The conventional swept wing-scaling works well for the coherent wave features. Reproduction of these dynamic effects by a numerical simulation would provide benchmark validation.

  3. Interaction of upstream flow distortions with high Mach number cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, G. W.

    1981-01-01

    Features of the interaction of flow distortions, such as gusts and wakes with blade rows of advance type fans and compressors having high tip Mach numbers are modeled. A typical disturbance was assumed to have harmonic time dependence and was described, at a far upstream location, in three orthogonal spatial coordinates by a double Fourier series. It was convected at supersonic relative to a linear cascade described as an unrolled annulus. Conditions were selected so that the component of this velocity parallel to the axis of the turbomachine was subsonic, permitting interaction between blades through the upstream as well as downstream flow media. A strong, nearly normal shock was considered in the blade passages which was allowed curvature and displacement. The flows before and after the shock were linearized relative to uniform mean velocities in their respective regions. Solution of the descriptive equations was by adaption of the Wiener-Hopf technique, enabling a determination of distortion patterns through and downstream of the cascade as well as pressure distributions on the blade and surfaces. Details of interaction of the disturbance with the in-passage shock were discussed. Infuences of amplitude, wave length, and phase of the disturbance on lifts and moments of cascade configurations are presented. Numerical results are clarified by reference to an especially orderly pattern of upstream vertical motion in relation to the cascade parameters.

  4. Efficient simulation of detached flows at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Jose M.; Asensio, Victor; Herrero, Raul; Varas, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    A method is presented for the computationally efficient simulation of quasi-periodic detached flows in multi-parameter problems at very large Reynolds numbers, keeping in mind a variety of applications, including helicopter flight simulators, control and certification of unmanned aerial vehicles, control of wind turbines, conceptual design in aeronautics, and civil aerodynamics. In many of these applications, the large scale flows (ignoring the smaller turbulent scales) are at most quasi-periodic, namely the Fourier transform exhibits a finite set of concentrated peaks resulting from the nonlinear passive interaction of periodic wakes. The method consists in an offline preprocess and the online operation. In the preprocess, a standard CFD solver (such as URANS) is used in combination with several ingredients such as an iterative combination proper orthogonal decomposition and fast Fourier transform. The online operation is made with a combination of high order singular value decomposition and interpolation. The performance of the method is tested considering the ow over a fairly complex urban topography, for various free stream intensities and orientations, seeking real time online simulations.

  5. Statistics of High Atwood Number Turbulent Mixing Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltzer, Jon; Livescu, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The statistical properties of incompressible shear-driven planar mixing layers between two miscible streams of fluids with different densities are investigated by means of Direct Numerical Simulations. The simulations begin from a thin interface perturbed by a thin broadband random disturbance, and the mixing layers are allowed to develop to self-similar states. The temporal simulations are performed in unprecedented domain sizes, with grid sizes up to 6144 x 2048 x 1536, which allows turbulent structures to grow and merge naturally. This allows the flow to reach states far-removed from the initial disturbances, thereby enabling high-quality statistics to be obtained for higher moments, pdfs, and other quantities critical to developing closure models. A wide range of Atwood numbers are explored, ranging from nearly constant density to At=0.87. The consequences of increasing the density contrast are investigated for global quantities, such as growth rates, and asymmetries that form in statistical profiles. Additional simulations in smaller domains are performed to study the effects of domain size.

  6. High density resolution synchrotron radiation based x-ray microtomography (SR μCT) for quantitative 3D-morphometrics in zoological sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickel, Michael; Hammel, Jörg U.; Herzen, Julia; Bullinger, Eric; Beckmann, Felix

    2008-08-01

    Zoological sciences widely rely on morphological data to reconstruct and understand body structures of animals. The best suitable methods like tomography allow for a direct representation of 3D-structures. In recent years, synchrotron radiation based x-ray microtomography (SR μCT) placed high resolutions to the disposal of morphologists. With the development of highly brilliant and collimated third generation synchrotron sources, phase contrast SR μCT became widely available. A number of scientific contributions stressed the superiority of phase contrast over absorption contrast. However, here we demonstrate the power of high density resolution methods based on absorption-contrast SRμCT for quantitative 3D-measurements of tissues and other delicate bio-structures in zoological sciences. We used beamline BW2 at DORIS III (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) to perform microtomography on tissue and mineral skeletons of marine sponges (Porifera) which were shock frozen and/or fixed in a glutamate osmium tetroxide solution, followed by critical point drying. High density resolution tomographic reconstructions allowed running quantitative 3D-image analyses in Matlab and ImageJ. By applying contrast and shape rule based algorithms we semi-automatically extracted and measured sponge body structures like mineral spicules, elements of the canal system or tissue structures. This lead to a better understanding of sponge biology: from skeleton functional morphology and internal water flow regimes to body contractility. Our high density resolution based quantitative approach can be applied to a wide variety of biological structures. However, two prerequisites apply: (1) maximum density resolution is necessary; (2) edge effects as seen for example in phase outline contrast SR μCT must not be present. As a consequence, to allow biological sciences to fully exploit the power of SR μCT further increase of density resolution in absorption contrast methods is desirable.

  7. Nonalcoholic Hepatic Steatosis Is a Strong Predictor of High-Risk Coronary-Artery Plaques as Determined by Multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Kazuhiro; Miyoshi, Toru; Yamauchi, Kentarou; Koyama, Yasushi; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Sato, Shuhei; Kanazawa, Susumu; Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with a risk of coronary artery disease (e.g., diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome). We evaluated whether nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis is associated with high-risk plaques as assessed by multidetector computed tomography (CT). Methods This retrospective study involved 414 participants suspected of having coronary artery disease. Nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis was defined as a liver-to-spleen fat ratio of <1.0 and the presence and appropriate characteristics of coronary-artery plaques as assessed by coronary CT angiography. High-risk plaques were identified, as were low-density plaques, positive remodeling, and spotty calcification. Results Compared with patients who did not have nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis, patients with nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis had more low-density plaques (21% vs. 44%, p<0.01), positive remodeling (41% vs. 58%, p = 0.01), and spotty calcification (12% vs. 36%, p<0.01). The number of high-risk plaques in patients with nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis was greater than in those without nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis (p<0.01). Patients with nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis were more likely to have high-risk plaques than were those with only an elevated level of visceral adipose tissue (≥86 cm2; 35% vs. 16%, p<0.01). Multivariate analyses that included nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis, amount of visceral adipose tissue, and the presence/absence of traditional risk factors demonstrated that nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis was an independent predictor of high-risk plaques (odds ratio: 4.60; 95% confidence interval: 1.94–9.07, p<0.01). Conclusions Diagnosis of nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis may be of value when assessing the risk of coronary artery disease. PMID:26125952

  8. Numerical study of high frequency oscillatory air flow and convective mixing in a CT-based human airway model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jiwoong; Xia, Guohua; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2011-01-01

    High frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) is considered an efficient and safe respiratory technique to ventilate neonates and patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. HFOV has very different characteristics from normal breathing physiology, with a much smaller tidal volume and a higher breathing frequency. In this work, the high frequency oscillatory flow is studied using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis in three different geometrical models with increasing complexity: a straight tube, a single-bifurcation tube model, and a computed-tomography (CT)-based human airway model of up to seven generations. We aim to understand the counter-flow phenomenon at flow reversal and its role in convective mixing in these models using sinusoidal waveforms of different frequencies and Reynolds numbers. Mixing is quantified by the stretch rate analysis. In the straight-tube model, coaxial counter flow with opposing fluid streams is formed around flow reversal, agreeing with an analytical Womersley solution. However, counter flow yields no net convective mixing at end cycle. In the single-bifurcation model, counter flow at high Re is intervened with secondary vortices in the parent (child) branch at end expiration (inspiration), resulting in an irreversible mixing process. For the CT-based airway model three cases are considered, consisting of the normal breathing case, the high-frequency-normal-Re case, and the HFOV case. The counter-flow structure is more evident in the high-frequency-normal-Re case than the HFOV case. The instantaneous and time-averaged stretch rates at the end of two breathing cycles and in the vicinity of flow reversal are computed. It is found that counter flow contributes about 20% to mixing in HFOV. PMID:20614248

  9. Secondary Instabilities Developed in Upwellings of High Rayleigh Number Convection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubuffet, F.; Yuen, D. A.; Murphy, M. S.; Sevre, E. O.; Vecsey, L.

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to show how these secondary instabilities can develop as a consequence of the interaction of the shear flow developed by the large-scale circulation and the rising plume. This will be conducted first within the framework of a constant viscosity fluid. First, we will employ a two-dimensional axisymmetric spherical-shell model within the framework of a Boussinesq fluid with an aspect-ratio of around six. Second, we have used a three-dimensional Boussinesq model with an aspect-ratio of 3x3x1. Two-dimensional simulations are carried out from 3*E7 to Ra=1010. Secondary plume bifurcation takes place at a Ra a little bit higher than 107 in 2-D. As Ra moves above 108, the tendency to plume branching increases and is accompanied by multiple foldings. In 3-D we have gone up to 5*E7 in a 5x5x1 box and did not find any signs of plume bending. Then at Ra=108 plumes are found to be bent severely by the large scale circulation produced at this high Ra and have gone to Ra=109. We may expect some sort of layered convection to take place in 3-D configuration for Ra between 3*E10 and 1011. We have demonstrated here within the framework of a constant viscosity model that the secondary instabilities can develop in a self-consistent manner in both 2-D and 3-D large aspect-ratio convection with bifurcation Rayleigh numbers of O(107) and O(108) respectively.

  10. Helicon waves in uniform plasmas. II. High m numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-09-15

    Helicons are whistler modes with azimuthal wave numbers. They have been studied in solids and plasmas where boundaries play a role. The present work shows that very similar modes exist in unbounded gaseous plasmas. Instead of boundaries, the antenna properties determine the topology of the wave packets. The simplest antenna is a magnetic loop which excites m = 0 or m = 1 helicons depending on whether the dipole moment is aligned parallel or perpendicular to the ambient background magnetic field B{sub 0}. While these low order helicons have been described by J. M. Urrutia and R. L. Stenzel [“Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. I. Low m modes,” Phys. Plasmas 22, 092111 (2015)], the present work focuses on high order modes up to m = 8. These are excited by antenna arrays forming magnetic multipoles. Their wave magnetic field has been measured in space and time in a large and uniform laboratory plasma free of boundary effects. The observed wave topology exhibits m pairs of unique field line spirals which may have inspired the name “helicon” to this mode. All field lines converge into these nested spirals which propagate like corkscrews along B{sub 0}. The field lines near the axis of helicons are perpendicular to B{sub 0} and circularly polarized as in parallel whistlers. Helical antennas couple to these transverse fields but not to the spiral fields of helicons. Using a circular antenna array of phased m = 0 loops, right or left rotating or non-rotating multipole antenna fields are generated. They excite m < 0 and m > 0 modes, showing that the plasma supports both modes equally well. The poor excitation of m < 0 modes is a characteristic of loops with dipole moment across B{sub 0}. The radiation efficiency of multipole antennas has been found to decrease with m.

  11. Numerical study of high-frequency oscillatory air flow and convective mixing in a CT-based human airway model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiwoong; Xia, Guohua; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2010-12-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) is considered an efficient and safe respiratory technique to ventilate neonates and patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. HFOV has very different characteristics from normal breathing physiology, with a much smaller tidal volume and a higher breathing frequency. In this study, the high-frequency oscillatory flow is studied using a computational fluid dynamics analysis in three different geometrical models with increasing complexity: a straight tube, a single-bifurcation tube model, and a computed tomography (CT)-based human airway model of up to seven generations. We aim to understand the counter-flow phenomenon at flow reversal and its role in convective mixing in these models using sinusoidal waveforms of different frequencies and Reynolds (Re) numbers. Mixing is quantified by the stretch rate analysis. In the straight-tube model, coaxial counter flow with opposing fluid streams is formed around flow reversal, agreeing with an analytical Womersley solution. However, counter flow yields no net convective mixing at end cycle. In the single-bifurcation model, counter flow at high Re is intervened with secondary vortices in the parent (child) branch at end expiration (inspiration), resulting in an irreversible mixing process. For the CT-based airway model three cases are considered, consisting of the normal breathing case, the high-frequency-normal-Re (HFNR) case, and the HFOV case. The counter-flow structure is more evident in the HFNR case than the HFOV case. The instantaneous and time-averaged stretch rates at the end of two breathing cycles and in the vicinity of flow reversal are computed. It is found that counter flow contributes about 20% to mixing in HFOV. PMID:20614248

  12. High liver FDG uptake on PET/CT in patient with lymphoma diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Infante, Jose R; Moreno, Manuel; Rayo, Juan I; Serrano, Justo; Dominguez, Maria L; Garcia, Lucia

    2015-06-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is an autosomal recessive disorder of iron metabolism resulting in toxic accumulation of iron in vital organs. We present a 64-year-old white man with non-Hodgkin lymphoma treated with high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplant that was subsequently diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis. F-FDG PET/CT was performed as routine follow-up and showed a pathological finding of homogeneous increased liver glucose metabolism. Increased FDG avidity in the liver suggested the presence of damage caused by hemochromatosis.

  13. Target delineation for radiosurgery of a small brain arteriovenous malformation using high-resolution contrast-enhanced cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    van der Bom, Imramsjah M J; Gounis, Matthew J; Ding, Linda; Kühn, Anna Luisa; Goff, David; Puri, Ajit S; Wakhloo, Ajay K

    2013-01-01

    Three years following endovascular embolization of a 3 mm ruptured arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the left superior colliculus in a 42-year-old man, digital subtraction angiography showed continuous regrowth of the lesion. Thin-slice MRI acquired for treatment planning did not show the AVM nidus. The patient was brought back to the angiography suite for high-resolution contrast-enhanced cone beam CT (VasoCT) acquired using an angiographic c-arm system. The lesion and nidus were visualized with VasoCT. MRI, CT and VasoCT data were transferred to radiation planning software and mutually co-registered. The nidus was annotated for radiation on VasoCT data by an experienced neurointerventional radiologist and a dose/treatment plan was completed. Due to image registration, the treatment area could be directly adopted into the MRI and CT data. The AVM was completely obliterated 10 months following completion of the radiosurgery treatment. PMID:23946527

  14. High Reynolds number effects on a localized stratified turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qi; Diamessis, Peter

    2015-11-01

    We report large-eddy simulations (LES) of the turbulent flow behind a sphere of diameter D translating at speed U in a linearly stratified Boussinesq fluid with buoyancy frequency N. These simulations are performed using a spectral-multidomain-penalty incompressible Navier-Stokes solver, at Reynolds numbers Re ≡ UD / ν ∈ { 5 ×103 , 105 , 4 ×105 } and Froude numbers Fr ≡ 2 U / (ND) ∈ { 4 , 16 , 64 } . An increasingly richer turbulent fine-structure is observed within the larger-scale quasi-horizontal vortices at later times. Turbulent transport of momentum is examined during the non-equilibrium (NEQ) regime of the turbulent life cycle, with an emphasis on the vertical transport that occurs after the establishment of local buoyancy control. The turbulent viscosities in both horizontal and vertical directions are estimated through the LES data; possible parameterization of the vertical turbulent viscosity with the buoyancy Reynolds number Reb = ɛ / (νN2) (or its easy-to-obtain surrogates) is discussed. The dynamical role of the buoyancy Reynolds number in choosing the vertical turbulence length scales is also investigated. ONR grant N00014-13-1-0665 (managed by Dr. R. Joslin); HPCMP Frontier Project FP-CFD-FY14-007 (P.I.: Dr. S. de Bruyn Kops).

  15. Numerical simulations of thermal convection at high Prandtl numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silano, Gabriella

    2008-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of thermal convection are conducted for a cylindrical cell of aspect ratio .5ex1-.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 . The Prandtl number (Pr) varies from 10^0 to 10^4 and the Rayleigh numbers (Ra) are moderate (10^5 < Ra < 10^9). This study is motivated by the fact that the role of the Prandtl number in convective heat transport is not yet fully understood. The three-dimensional behaviors of the temperature and velocity fields, of the viscous and thermal dissipation fields, and of the diffusive and convective heat fluxes are explored. In the ranges of Pr and Ra considered, we find steady, periodic and chaotic regimes, and large-scale structures which are more complex than the single recirculation cell filling the whole volume. Multiple flow structures are found to be associated with a given set of conditions. The multiple solutions seem to be more probable at higher Pr numbers and could explain the scatter in some data trends. In collaboration with Katepalli Raju Sreenivasan, The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics - Trieste, and Roberto Verzicco, DIM, Universitàdegli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata - Roma.

  16. Prediction of Very High Reynolds Number Compressible Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, John R.

    1998-01-01

    Flat plate skin friction calculations over a range of Mach numbers from 0.4 to 3.5 at Reynolds numbers from 16 million to 492 million using a Navier Stokes method with advanced turbulence modeling are compared with incompressible skin friction coefficient correlations. The semi-empirical correlation theories of van Driest; Cope; Winkler and Cha; and Sommer and Short T' are used to transform the predicted skin friction coefficients of solutions using two algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence models in the Navier-Stokes method PAB3D. In general, the predicted skin friction coefficients scaled well with each reference temperature theory though, overall the theory by Sommer and Short appeared to best collapse the predicted coefficients. At the lower Reynolds number 3 to 30 million, both the Girimaji and Shih, Zhu and Lumley turbulence models predicted skin-friction coefficients within 2% of the semi-empirical correlation skin friction coefficients. At the higher Reynolds numbers of 100 to 500 million, the turbulence models by Shih, Zhu and Lumley and Girimaji predicted coefficients that were 6% less and 10% greater, respectively, than the semi-empirical coefficients.

  17. Promising electron mobility and high thermal conductivity in Sc2CT2 (T = F, OH) MXenes.

    PubMed

    Zha, Xian-Hu; Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Yuhong; Huang, Qing; He, Jian; Francisco, Joseph S; Luo, Kan; Du, Shiyu

    2016-03-21

    MXenes, the new 2D transition metal carbides and nitrides, have recently attracted extensive attention due to their diverse applications and excellent performances. However, the thermal and electrical properties of most MXene materials are yet to be studied. In this work, we investigate the electrical and thermal properties of semiconducting Sc2CT2 (T = F, OH) MXenes using first-principles calculations. Both of the Sc2CT2 (T = F, OH) MXenes are determined to show excellent carrier mobilities. The electron mobility in the Sc2CF2 MXene is found to be strongly anisotropic at room temperature, with values of 5.03 × 10(3) and 1.07 × 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in the zigzag and armchair directions, respectively. The predicted electron mobility in the zigzag direction of the Sc2CF2 is nearly four-fold that in the armchair direction of the promising semiconductor phosphorene. In contrast to Sc2CF2, Sc2C(OH)2 presents approximately isotropic electron mobility. The values at room temperature in the zigzag and armchair directions are calculated as 2.06 × 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 2.19 × 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), respectively. In regard to the thermal properties, the thermal conductivities of the Sc2CT2 (T = F, OH) MXenes have been determined. The predicted values are higher than those of most metals and semiconducting low-dimensional materials, such as monolayer MoS2 and phosphorene. In particular, the room-temperature thermal conductivity along the Sc2CF2 armchair direction has been determined to be as high as 472 W m(-1) K(-1) based on a flake length of 5 μm, which is even higher than that of the best traditional conductor silver. The corresponding value in the zigzag direction of Sc2CF2 is calculated to be 178 W m(-1) K(-1). The thermal conductivity in Sc2C(OH)2 is less anisotropic and lower compared to that in Sc2CF2. The room-temperature value in the armchair (zigzag) direction is determined to be 173 W m(-1) K(-1) (107 W m(-1) K(-1)). Based on their excellent

  18. Promising electron mobility and high thermal conductivity in Sc2CT2 (T = F, OH) MXenes.

    PubMed

    Zha, Xian-Hu; Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Yuhong; Huang, Qing; He, Jian; Francisco, Joseph S; Luo, Kan; Du, Shiyu

    2016-03-21

    MXenes, the new 2D transition metal carbides and nitrides, have recently attracted extensive attention due to their diverse applications and excellent performances. However, the thermal and electrical properties of most MXene materials are yet to be studied. In this work, we investigate the electrical and thermal properties of semiconducting Sc2CT2 (T = F, OH) MXenes using first-principles calculations. Both of the Sc2CT2 (T = F, OH) MXenes are determined to show excellent carrier mobilities. The electron mobility in the Sc2CF2 MXene is found to be strongly anisotropic at room temperature, with values of 5.03 × 10(3) and 1.07 × 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in the zigzag and armchair directions, respectively. The predicted electron mobility in the zigzag direction of the Sc2CF2 is nearly four-fold that in the armchair direction of the promising semiconductor phosphorene. In contrast to Sc2CF2, Sc2C(OH)2 presents approximately isotropic electron mobility. The values at room temperature in the zigzag and armchair directions are calculated as 2.06 × 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 2.19 × 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), respectively. In regard to the thermal properties, the thermal conductivities of the Sc2CT2 (T = F, OH) MXenes have been determined. The predicted values are higher than those of most metals and semiconducting low-dimensional materials, such as monolayer MoS2 and phosphorene. In particular, the room-temperature thermal conductivity along the Sc2CF2 armchair direction has been determined to be as high as 472 W m(-1) K(-1) based on a flake length of 5 μm, which is even higher than that of the best traditional conductor silver. The corresponding value in the zigzag direction of Sc2CF2 is calculated to be 178 W m(-1) K(-1). The thermal conductivity in Sc2C(OH)2 is less anisotropic and lower compared to that in Sc2CF2. The room-temperature value in the armchair (zigzag) direction is determined to be 173 W m(-1) K(-1) (107 W m(-1) K(-1)). Based on their excellent

  19. High-resolution 3D micro-CT imaging of breast microcalcifications: a preliminary analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Detection of microcalcifications on mammograms indicates the presence of breast lesion, and the shapes of the microcalcifications as seen by conventional mammography correlates with the probability of malignancy. This preliminary study evaluated the 3D shape of breast microcalcifications using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and compared the findings with those obtained using anatomopathological analysis. Methods The study analyzed breast biopsy samples from 11 women with findings of suspicious microcalcifications on routine mammograms. The samples were imaged using a micro-CT (SkyScan 1076) at a resolution of 35 μm. Images were reconstructed using filtered back-projection and analyzed in 3D using surface rendering. The samples were subsequently analyzed by the pathology service. Reconstructed 3D images were compared with the corresponding histological slices. Results Anatomopathological analysis showed that 5 of 11 patients had ductal breast carcinoma in situ. One patient was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma. Individual object analysis was performed on 597 microcalcifications. Malignant microcalcifications tended to be thinner and to have a smaller volume and surface area, while their surface area-to-volume ratio was greater than that of benign microcalcifications. The structure model index values were the same for malignant and benign microcalcifications. Conclusions This is the first study to use micro-CT for quantitative 3D analysis of microcalcifications. This high-resolution imaging technique will be valuable for gaining a greater understanding of the morphologic characteristics of malignant and benign microcalcifications. The presence of many small microcalcifications can be an indication of malignancy. For the larger microcalcifications, 3D parameters confirmed the more irregular shape of malignant microcalcifications. PMID:24393444

  20. High-resolution CT analysis of facial struts in trauma: 1. Osseous and soft-tissue complications

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, L.R.; Manor, W.F.; Turski, P.A.; Strother, C.M.

    1983-03-01

    In six cadavers, high-resolution thin-section computed tomography (CT) was used to evaluate the sequelae of experimentally produced facial trauma. As confirmed by pluridirectional tomography, CT was an effective imaging method for the detection and classification of facial fractures. The ability of CT to simultaneously depict both osseous and soft-tissue structures expands the role that diagnostic radiology can play in the evaluation of the traumatized face. A method of evaluation is presented in which the face is geometrically conceptualized as a series of triplanar (horizontal, sagittal, and coronal) osseous struts. Sequential, systematic assessment of each strut for fracture and its adjacent soft tissue for injury can facilitate evaluation of the traumatized face. Using this approach the osseous and soft-tissue complications arising from experimentally produced trauma are reviewed and illustrated with CT.

  1. The riddle of high-energy baryon number violation

    SciTech Connect

    Mattis, M.P.

    1991-09-01

    The exciting possibility that anomalous baryon and lepton number violation might be observable at the next generation of supercolliders is suggested by an instanton calculation due to Ringwald and Espinosa. In these Lectures, the current controversial status of these claims is discussed, and several new technologies designed to analyze this question are reviewed. These technologies should contribute more generally to our understanding of weakly- coupled field theories in the nonperturbative regime where both energies and multiplicities are very large. 61 refs., 35 figs.

  2. Validation of the 4D NCAT simulation tools for use in high-resolution x-ray CT research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segars, W. P.; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Beck, T.; Frey, E. C.; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2005-04-01

    We validate the computer-based simulation tools developed in our laboratory for use in high-resolution CT research. The 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom was developed to provide a realistic and flexible model of the human anatomy and physiology. Unlike current phantoms in CT, the 4D NCAT has the advantage, due to its design, that its organ shapes can be changed to realistically model anatomical variations and patient motion. To efficiently simulate high-resolution CT images, we developed a unique analytic projection algorithm (including scatter and quantum noise) to accurately calculate projections directly from the surface definition of the phantom given parameters defining the CT scanner and geometry. The projection data are reconstructed into CT images using algorithms developed in our laboratory. The 4D NCAT phantom contains a level of detail that is close to impossible to produce in a physical test object. We, therefore, validate our CT simulation tools and methods through a series of direct comparisons with data obtained experimentally using existing, simple physical phantoms at different doses and using different x-ray energy spectra. In each case, the first-order simulations were found to produce comparable results (<12%). We reason that since the simulations produced equivalent results using simple test objects, they should be able to do the same in more anatomically realistic conditions. We conclude that, with the ability to provide realistic simulated CT image data close to that from actual patients, the simulation tools developed in this work will have applications in a broad range of CT imaging research.

  3. Baryon-Number Transfer in High-Energy hp Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, F.; Shabelski, Yu. M.

    2005-12-01

    The processes of baryon-number transfer due to string-junction propagation in rapidity is considered. It has a significant effect on the net baryon production in pp collisions at mid-rapidities and an even larger effect in the forward hemisphere in the cases of {pi}p and {gamma}p interactions. The results of numerical calculations in the framework of the quark-gluon string model are in reasonable agreement with the data with the same parameter values for different energies.

  4. High-Reynolds Number Taylor-Couette Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Taylor-Couette flow, the flow between two coaxial co- or counter-rotating cylinders, is one of the paradigmatic systems in the physics of fluids. The (dimensionless) control parameters are the Reynolds numbers of the inner and outer cylinders, the ratio of the cylinder radii, and the aspect ratio. One key response of the system is the torque required to retain constant angular velocities, which can be connected to the angular velocity transport through the gap. Whereas the low-Reynolds number regime was well explored in the 1980s and 1990s of the past century, in the fully turbulent regime major research activity developed only in the past decade. In this article, we review this recent progress in our understanding of fully developed Taylor-Couette turbulence from the experimental, numerical, and theoretical points of view. We focus on the parameter dependence of the global torque and on the local flow organization, including velocity profiles and boundary layers. Next, we discuss transitions between different (turbulent) flow states. We also elaborate on the relevance of this system for astrophysical disks (quasi-Keplerian flows). The review ends with a list of challenges for future research on turbulent Taylor-Couette flow.

  5. Nonlinear histogram binning for quantitative analysis of lung tissue fibrosis in high-resolution CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2007-03-01

    Diffuse lung diseases, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), can be characterized and quantified by analysis of volumetric high resolution CT scans of the lungs. These data sets typically have dimensions of 512 x 512 x 400. It is too subjective and labor intensive for a radiologist to analyze each slice and quantify regional abnormalities manually. Thus, computer aided techniques are necessary, particularly texture analysis techniques which classify various lung tissue types. Second and higher order statistics which relate the spatial variation of the intensity values are good discriminatory features for various textures. The intensity values in lung CT scans range between [-1024, 1024]. Calculation of second order statistics on this range is too computationally intensive so the data is typically binned between 16 or 32 gray levels. There are more effective ways of binning the gray level range to improve classification. An optimal and very efficient way to nonlinearly bin the histogram is to use a dynamic programming algorithm. The objective of this paper is to show that nonlinear binning using dynamic programming is computationally efficient and improves the discriminatory power of the second and higher order statistics for more accurate quantification of diffuse lung disease.

  6. High speed imaging of dynamic processes with a switched source x-ray CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, William M.; Lionheart, William R. B.; Morton, Edward J.; Cunningham, Mike; Luggar, Russell D.

    2015-05-01

    Conventional x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners are limited in their scanning speed by the mechanical constraints of their rotating gantries and as such do not provide the necessary temporal resolution for imaging of fast-moving dynamic processes, such as moving fluid flows. The Real Time Tomography (RTT) system is a family of fast cone beam CT scanners which instead use multiple fixed discrete sources and complete rings of detectors in an offset geometry. We demonstrate the potential of this system for use in the imaging of such high speed dynamic processes and give results using simulated and real experimental data. The unusual scanning geometry results in some challenges in image reconstruction, which are overcome using algebraic iterative reconstruction techniques and explicit regularisation. Through the use of a simple temporal regularisation term and by optimising the source firing pattern, we show that temporal resolution of the system may be increased at the expense of spatial resolution, which may be advantageous in some situations. Results are given showing temporal resolution of approximately 500 µs with simulated data and 3 ms with real experimental data.

  7. High-Resolution CT Imaging of Single Breast Cancer Microcalcifications In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kazumasa; Liu, Fangbing; Hoppin, Jack; Lunsford, Elaine P.; Lackas, Christian; Hesterman, Jacob; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Fujii, Hirofumi; Frangioni, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Microcalcification is a hallmark of breast cancer and a key diagnostic feature for mammography. We recently described the first robust animal model of breast cancer microcalcification. In this study, we hypothesized that high-resolution computed tomography (CT) could potentially detect the genesis of a single microcalcification in vivo and quantify its growth over time. Using a commercial CT scanner, we systematically optimized acquisition and reconstruction parameters. Two ray-tracing image reconstruction algorithms were tested, a voxel-driven “fast” cone beam algorithm (FCBA) and a detector-driven “exact” cone beam algorithm (ECBA). By optimizing acquisition and reconstruction parameters, we were able to achieve a resolution of 104 µm full-width at half maximum (FWHM). At an optimal detector sampling frequency, ECBA provided a 28 µm (21%) FWHM improvement in resolution over FCBA. In vitro, we were able to image a single 300 µm by 100 µm hydroxyapatite crystal. In a syngeneic rat model of breast cancer, we were able to detect the genesis of a single microcalcification in vivo and follow its growth longitudinally over weeks. Taken together, this study provides an in vivo “gold standard” for the development of calcification-specific contrast agents and a model system for studying the mechanism of breast cancer microcalcification. PMID:21504703

  8. Optimizing synchrotron microCT for high-throughput phenotyping of zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rivière, Patrick J.; Clark, Darin; Rojek, Alexandra; Vargas, Phillip; Xiao, Xianghui; DeCarlo, Francesco; Kindlmann, Gordon; Cheng, Keith

    2010-09-01

    We are creating a state-of-the-art 2D and 3D imaging atlas of zebrafish development. The atlas employs both 2D histology slides and 3D benchtop and synchrotron micro CT results. Through this atlas, we expect to document normal and abnormal organogenesis, to reveal new levels of structural detail, and to advance image informatics as a form of systems biology. The zebrafish has become a widely used model organism in biological and biomedical research for studies of vertebrate development and gene function. In this work, we will report on efforts to optimize synchrotron microCT imaging parameters for zebrafish at crucial developmental stages. The aim of these studies is to establish protocols for high-throughput phenotyping of normal, mutant and diseased zebrafish. We have developed staining and embedding protocols using different heavy metal stains (osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate) and different embedding media (Embed 812 and glycol methacrylate). We have explored the use of edge subtraction and multi-energy techniques for contrast enhancement and we have examined the use of different sample-detector distances with unstained samples to explore and optimize phase-contrast enhancement effects. We will report principally on our efforts to optimize energy choice for single- and multi-energy studies as well as our efforts to optimize the degree of phase contrast enhancement.

  9. Convection in an ideal gas at high Rayleigh numbers.

    PubMed

    Tilgner, A

    2011-08-01

    Numerical simulations of convection in a layer filled with ideal gas are presented. The control parameters are chosen such that there is a significant variation of density of the gas in going from the bottom to the top of the layer. The relations between the Rayleigh, Peclet, and Nusselt numbers depend on the density stratification. It is proposed to use a data reduction which accounts for the variable density by introducing into the scaling laws an effective density. The relevant density is the geometric mean of the maximum and minimum densities in the layer. A good fit to the data is then obtained with power laws with the same exponent as for fluids in the Boussinesq limit. Two relations connect the top and bottom boundary layers: The kinetic energy densities computed from free fall velocities are equal at the top and bottom, and the products of free fall velocities and maximum horizontal velocities are equal for both boundaries.

  10. Convection in an ideal gas at high Rayleigh numbers.

    PubMed

    Tilgner, A

    2011-08-01

    Numerical simulations of convection in a layer filled with ideal gas are presented. The control parameters are chosen such that there is a significant variation of density of the gas in going from the bottom to the top of the layer. The relations between the Rayleigh, Peclet, and Nusselt numbers depend on the density stratification. It is proposed to use a data reduction which accounts for the variable density by introducing into the scaling laws an effective density. The relevant density is the geometric mean of the maximum and minimum densities in the layer. A good fit to the data is then obtained with power laws with the same exponent as for fluids in the Boussinesq limit. Two relations connect the top and bottom boundary layers: The kinetic energy densities computed from free fall velocities are equal at the top and bottom, and the products of free fall velocities and maximum horizontal velocities are equal for both boundaries. PMID:21929106

  11. Numerical simulation of high Reynolds number bubble motion

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results of numerical simulations of bubble motion. All the results are for single bubbles in unbounded fluids. The liquid phase is quiescent except for the motion created by the bubble, which is axisymmetric. The main focus of the paper is on bubbles that are of order 1 mm in diameter in water. Of particular interest is the effect of surfactant molecules on bubble motion. Results for the {open_quotes}insoluble surfactant{close_quotes} model will be presented. These results extend research by other investigators to finite Reynolds numbers. The results indicate that, by assuming complete coverage of the bubble surface, one obtains good agreement with experimental observations of bubble motion in tap water. The effect of surfactant concentration on the separation angle is discussed.

  12. High-Resolution SPECT-CT/MR Molecular Imaging of Angiogenesis in the Vx2 Model

    PubMed Central

    Lijowski, Michal; Caruthers, Shelton; Hu, Grace; Zhang, Huiying; Scott, Michael J.; Williams, Todd; Erpelding, Todd; Schmieder, Anne H.; Kiefer, Garry; Gulyas, Gyongyi; Athey, Phillip S.; Gaffney, Patrick J.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2009-01-01

    Background The use of antiangiogenic therapy in conjunction with traditional chemotherapy is becoming increasingly in cancer management, but the optimal benefit of these targeted pharmaceuticals has been limited to a subset of the population treated. Improved imaging probes that permit sensitive detection and high-resolution characterization of tumor angiogenesis could improve patient risk-benefit stratification. Objectives The overarching objective of these experiments was to develop a dual modality αvβ3-targeted nanoparticle molecular imaging agent that affords sensitive nuclear detection in conjunction with high-resolution MR characterization of tumor angiogenesis. Materials and Methods In part 1, New Zealand white rabbits (n = 21) bearing 14d Vx2 tumor received either αvβ3-targeted 99mTc nanoparticles at doses of 11, 22, or 44 MBq/kg, nontargeted 99mTc nanoparticles at 22 MBq/kg, or αvβ3-targeted 99mTc nanoparticles (22 MBq/kg) competitively inhibited with unlabeled αvβ3-nanoparticles. All animals were imaged dynamically over 2 hours with a planar camera using a pinhole collimator. In part 2, the effectiveness of αvβ3-targeted 99mTc nanoparticles in the Vx2 rabbit model was demonstrated using clinical SPECT-CT imaging techniques. Next, MR functionality was incorporated into αvβ3-targeted 99mTc nanoparticles by inclusion of lipophilic gadolinium chelates into the outer phospholipid layer, and the concept of high sensitivity – high-resolution detection and characterization of tumor angiogenesis was shown using sequential SPECT-CT and MR molecular imaging with 3D neovascular mapping. Results αvβ3-Targeted 99mTc nanoparticles at 22 MBq/kg produced the highest tumor-to-muscle contrast ratio (8.56 ± 0.13, TMR) versus the 11MBq/kg (7.32 ± 0.12) and 44 MBq/kg (6.55 ± 0.07) doses, (P < 0.05). TMR of nontargeted particles at 22.2 MBq/kg (5.48 ± 0.09) was less (P < 0.05) than the equivalent dosage of αvβ3-targeted 99mTc nanoparticles. Competitively

  13. Comparison of the effects of salmon calcitonin (sCT) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in a number of in vivo and in vitro tests

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, S.P.; Brase, D.; Cooper, C.; Dewey, W.L.

    1986-03-05

    sCT and CGRP have been shown previously to have multiple activities in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent work has shown that CGRP (15 ..mu..g) intraventricularly (IVT) produces a naloxone reversible 37% inhibition in the p-phenylquinone test (PPQ) accompanied by severe diarrhea. The ED50 of sCT in the PPQ test is 362 ng and this effect is not reversed totally by naloxone. The onset of CGRP is more rapid than that of sCT. sCT and CGRP (10/sup -6/M) both produce naloxone reversible inhibition of the electrically stimulated guinea pig ileum (GPI) (25% and 50% respectively). Both sCT and CGRP (10/sup -6/ M) produce contracture (15% and 40% respectively) of the non-stimulated GPI that is not blocked by atropine. Both sCT and CGRP block the naloxone-induced contracture of the morphine (MS04) dependent ilea (29% and 68% respectively). Both sCT and CGRP produce biphasic shifts in the MS04 acetylcholine dose-effect curves in the stimulated and nonstimulated GPI, respectively. Neither sCT nor CGRP (10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -4/ M) displaces /sup 3/H-naloxone binding to mouse brain membranes. Both sCT and CGRP may produce their effects by modulation of CA/sup +2/ fluxes in the CNS and GPI.

  14. The Role of Chest Computed Tomography (CT) as a Surveillance Tool in Children with High-risk Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Federico, Sara M.; Brady, Samuel L.; Pappo, Alberto; Wu, Jianrong; Mao, Shenghua; McPherson, Valerie J.; Young, Alison; Furman, Wayne L.; Kaufman, Robert; Kaste, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Standardization of imaging obtained in children with neuroblastoma is not well established. This study examines chest CT in pediatric patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. Methods Medical records and imaging from 88 patients with high-risk neuroblastoma, diagnosed at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital between January, 2002 and December, 2009, were reviewed. Surveillance imaging was conducted through 2013. Ten patients with thoracic disease at diagnosis were excluded. Event free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated. Size specific dose estimates for CT scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis were used to estimate absolute organ doses to 23 organs. Organ dosimetry was used to calculate cohort effective dose. Results The 5 year OS and EFS were 51.9%±6.5% and 42.6%±6.5%, respectively. Forty-six (58.9%) patients progressed/recurred and 41 (52.6%) died of disease. Eleven patients (14%) developed thoracic disease progression/recurrence identified by chest CT (1 paraspinal mass, 1 pulmonary nodules, and 9 nodal). MIBG (metaiodobenzylguanidine) scans identified thoracic disease in 6 patients. Five of the 11 had normal chest MIBG scans; 3 were symptomatic and 2 were asymptomatic with normal chest MIBG scans but avid bone disease. The estimated radiation dose savings from surveillance without CT chest imaging was 42%, 34% when accounting for modern CT acquisition (2011-13). Conclusions Neuroblastoma progression/recurrence in the chest is rare and often presents with symptoms or is identified using standard non-CT imaging modalities. For patients with non-thoracic high-risk neuroblastoma at diagnosis, omission of surveillance chest CT imaging can save 35-42% of the radiation burden without compromising disease detection. PMID:25641708

  15. Automated method for relating regional pulmonary structure and function: integration of dynamic multislice CT and thin-slice high-resolution CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajik, Jehangir K.; Kugelmass, Steven D.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1993-07-01

    We have developed a method utilizing x-ray CT for relating pulmonary perfusion to global and regional anatomy, allowing for detailed study of structure to function relationships. A thick slice, high temporal resolution mode is used to follow a bolus contrast agent for blood flow evaluation and is fused with a high spatial resolution, thin slice mode to obtain structure- function detail. To aid analysis of blood flow, we have developed a software module, for our image analysis package (VIDA), to produce the combined structure-function image. Color coded images representing blood flow, mean transit time, regional tissue content, regional blood volume, regional air content, etc. are generated and imbedded in the high resolution volume image. A text file containing these values along with a voxel's 3-D coordinates is also generated. User input can be minimized to identifying the location of the pulmonary artery from which the input function to a blood flow model is derived. Any flow model utilizing one input and one output function can be easily added to a user selectable list. We present examples from our physiologic based research findings to demonstrate the strengths of combining dynamic CT and HRCT relative to other scanning modalities to uniquely characterize pulmonary normal and pathophysiology.

  16. Normalizations of High Taylor Reynolds Number Power Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puga, Alejandro; Koster, Timothy; Larue, John C.

    2014-11-01

    The velocity power spectrum provides insight in how the turbulent kinetic energy is transferred from larger to smaller scales. Wind tunnel experiments are conducted where high intensity turbulence is generated by means of an active turbulence grid modeled after Makita's 1991 design (Makita, 1991) as implemented by Mydlarski and Warhaft (M&W, 1998). The goal of this study is to document the evolution of the scaling region and assess the relative collapse of several proposed normalizations over a range of Rλ from 185 to 997. As predicted by Kolmogorov (1963), an asymptotic approach of the slope (n) of the inertial subrange to - 5 / 3 with increasing Rλ is observed. There are three velocity power spectrum normalizations as presented by Kolmogorov (1963), Von Karman and Howarth (1938) and George (1992). Results show that the Von Karman and Howarth normalization does not collapse the velocity power spectrum as well as the Kolmogorov and George normalizations. The Kolmogorov normalization does a good job of collapsing the velocity power spectrum in the normalized high wavenumber range of 0 . 0002 <= κλ <= 0 . 4 while the George normalization does a better job in the normalized mid-wavenumber range of 15 <= κλ <= 25 . University of California, Irvine Research Fund.

  17. Direct microCT imaging of non-mineralized connective tissues at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Naveh, Gili R S; Brumfeld, Vlad; Dean, Mason; Shahar, Ron; Weiner, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The 3D imaging of soft tissues in their native state is challenging, especially when high resolution is required. An X-ray-based microCT is, to date, the best choice for high resolution 3D imaging of soft tissues. However, since X-ray attenuation of soft tissues is very low, contrasting enhancement using different staining materials is needed. The staining procedure, which also usually involves tissue fixation, causes unwanted and to some extent unknown tissue alterations. Here, we demonstrate that a method that enables 3D imaging of soft tissues without fixing and staining using an X-ray-based bench-top microCT can be applied to a variety of different tissues. With the sample mounted in a custom-made loading device inside a humidity chamber, we obtained soft tissue contrast and generated 3D images of fresh, soft tissues with a resolution of 1 micron voxel size. We identified three critical conditions which make it possible to image soft tissues: humidified environment, mechanical stabilization of the sample and phase enhancement. We demonstrate the capability of the technique using different specimens: an intervertebral disc, the non-mineralized growth plate, stingray tessellated radials (calcified cartilage) and the collagenous network of the periodontal ligament. Since the scanned specimen is fresh an interesting advantage of this technique is the ability to scan a specimen under load and track the changes of the different structures. This method offers a unique opportunity for obtaining valuable insights into 3D structure-function relationships of soft tissues.

  18. Direct microCT imaging of non-mineralized connective tissues at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Naveh, Gili R S; Brumfeld, Vlad; Dean, Mason; Shahar, Ron; Weiner, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The 3D imaging of soft tissues in their native state is challenging, especially when high resolution is required. An X-ray-based microCT is, to date, the best choice for high resolution 3D imaging of soft tissues. However, since X-ray attenuation of soft tissues is very low, contrasting enhancement using different staining materials is needed. The staining procedure, which also usually involves tissue fixation, causes unwanted and to some extent unknown tissue alterations. Here, we demonstrate that a method that enables 3D imaging of soft tissues without fixing and staining using an X-ray-based bench-top microCT can be applied to a variety of different tissues. With the sample mounted in a custom-made loading device inside a humidity chamber, we obtained soft tissue contrast and generated 3D images of fresh, soft tissues with a resolution of 1 micron voxel size. We identified three critical conditions which make it possible to image soft tissues: humidified environment, mechanical stabilization of the sample and phase enhancement. We demonstrate the capability of the technique using different specimens: an intervertebral disc, the non-mineralized growth plate, stingray tessellated radials (calcified cartilage) and the collagenous network of the periodontal ligament. Since the scanned specimen is fresh an interesting advantage of this technique is the ability to scan a specimen under load and track the changes of the different structures. This method offers a unique opportunity for obtaining valuable insights into 3D structure-function relationships of soft tissues. PMID:24437605

  19. Rayleigh Taylor instability of viscoelastic drops at high Weber numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, D. D.; Beavers, G. S.; Funada, T.

    2002-02-01

    Movies of the breakup of viscous and viscoelastic drops in the high-speed airstream behind a shock wave in a shock tube have been reported by Joseph, Belanger & Beavers (1999). They performed a Rayleigh Taylor stability analysis for the initial breakup of a drop of Newtonian liquid and found that the most unstable Rayleigh Taylor wave fits nearly perfectly with waves measured on enhanced images of drops from the movies, but the effects of viscosity cannot be neglected. Here we construct a Rayleigh Taylor stability analysis for an Oldroyd-B fluid using measured data for acceleration, density, viscosity and relaxation time [lambda]1. The most unstable wave is a sensitive function of the retardation time [lambda]2 which fits experiments when [lambda]2/[lambda]1 = O(10-3). The growth rates for the most unstable wave are much larger than for the comparable viscous drop, which agrees with the surprising fact that the breakup times for viscoelastic drops are shorter. We construct an approximate analysis of Rayleigh Taylor instability based on viscoelastic potential flow which gives rise to nearly the same dispersion relation as the unapproximated analysis.

  20. Plasmoid instability in high-Lundquist-number magnetic reconnectiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Min; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2013-05-01

    Our understanding of magnetic reconnection in resistive magnetohydrodynamics has gone through a fundamental change in recent years. The conventional wisdom is that magnetic reconnection mediated by resistivity is slow in laminar high Lundquist (S) plasmas, constrained by the scaling of the reconnection rate predicted by Sweet-Parker theory. However, recent studies have shown that when S exceeds a critical value ˜104, the Sweet-Parker current sheet is unstable to a super-Alfvénic plasmoid instability, with a linear growth rate that scales as S1/4. In the fully developed statistical steady state of two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations, the normalized average reconnection rate is approximately 0.01, nearly independent of S, and the distribution function f(ψ) of plasmoid magnetic flux ψ follows a power law f(ψ)˜ψ-1. When Hall effects are included, the plasmoid instability may trigger onset of Hall reconnection even when the conventional criterion for onset is not satisfied. The rich variety of possible reconnection dynamics is organized in the framework of a phase diagram.

  1. Deriving effective atomic numbers from DECT based on a parameterization of the ratio of high and low linear attenuation coefficients.

    PubMed

    Landry, Guillaume; Seco, Joao; Gaudreault, Mathieu; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) can provide simultaneous estimation of relative electron density ρe and effective atomic number Zeff. The ability to obtain these quantities (ρe, Zeff) has been shown to benefit selected radiotherapy applications where tissue characterization is required. The conventional analysis method (spectral method) relies on knowledge of the CT scanner photon spectra which may be difficult to obtain accurately. Furthermore an approximate empirical attenuation correction of the photon spectrum through the patient is necessary. We present an alternative approach based on a parameterization of the measured ratio of low and high kVp linear attenuation coefficients for deriving Zeff which does not require the estimation of the CT scanner spectra. In a first approach, the tissue substitute method (TSM), the Rutherford parameterization of the linear attenuation coefficients was employed to derive a relation between Zeff and the ratio of the linear attenuation coefficients measured at the low and high kVp of the CT scanner. A phantom containing 16 tissue mimicking inserts was scanned with a dual source DECT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp. The data from the 16 inserts phantom was used to obtain model parameters for the relation between Zeff and [Formula: see text]. The accuracy of the method was evaluated with a second phantom containing 4 tissue mimicking inserts. The TSM was compared to a more complex approach, the reference tissue method (RTM), which requires the derivation of stoichiometric fit parameters. These were derived from the 16 inserts phantom scans and used to calculate CT numbers at 80 and 140 kVp for a set of tabulated reference human tissues. Model parameters for the parameterization of [Formula: see text] were estimated for this reference tissue dataset and compared to the results of the TSM. Residuals on Zeff for the reference tissue dataset for both TSM and RTM were compared to those obtained from the spectral method. The

  2. High-fidelity artifact correction for cone-beam CT imaging of the brain.

    PubMed

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Xu, J; Dang, H; Stayman, J W; Yorkston, J; Aygun, N; Koliatsos, V; Siewerdsen, J H

    2015-02-21

    CT is the frontline imaging modality for diagnosis of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI), involving the detection of fresh blood in the brain (contrast of 30-50 HU, detail size down to 1 mm) in a non-contrast-enhanced exam. A dedicated point-of-care imaging system based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) could benefit early detection of TBI and improve direction to appropriate therapy. However, flat-panel detector (FPD) CBCT is challenged by artifacts that degrade contrast resolution and limit application in soft-tissue imaging. We present and evaluate a fairly comprehensive framework for artifact correction to enable soft-tissue brain imaging with FPD CBCT. The framework includes a fast Monte Carlo (MC)-based scatter estimation method complemented by corrections for detector lag, veiling glare, and beam hardening.The fast MC scatter estimation combines GPU acceleration, variance reduction, and simulation with a low number of photon histories and reduced number of projection angles (sparse MC) augmented by kernel de-noising to yield a runtime of ~4 min per scan. Scatter correction is combined with two-pass beam hardening correction. Detector lag correction is based on temporal deconvolution of the measured lag response function. The effects of detector veiling glare are reduced by deconvolution of the glare response function representing the long range tails of the detector point-spread function. The performance of the correction framework is quantified in experiments using a realistic head phantom on a testbench for FPD CBCT.Uncorrected reconstructions were non-diagnostic for soft-tissue imaging tasks in the brain. After processing with the artifact correction framework, image uniformity was substantially improved, and artifacts were reduced to a level that enabled visualization of ~3 mm simulated bleeds throughout the brain. Non-uniformity (cupping) was reduced by a factor of 5, and contrast of simulated bleeds was improved from ~7 to 49.7 HU, in good agreement

  3. High-fidelity artifact correction for cone-beam CT imaging of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Xu, J.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Yorkston, J.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-02-01

    CT is the frontline imaging modality for diagnosis of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI), involving the detection of fresh blood in the brain (contrast of 30-50 HU, detail size down to 1 mm) in a non-contrast-enhanced exam. A dedicated point-of-care imaging system based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) could benefit early detection of TBI and improve direction to appropriate therapy. However, flat-panel detector (FPD) CBCT is challenged by artifacts that degrade contrast resolution and limit application in soft-tissue imaging. We present and evaluate a fairly comprehensive framework for artifact correction to enable soft-tissue brain imaging with FPD CBCT. The framework includes a fast Monte Carlo (MC)-based scatter estimation method complemented by corrections for detector lag, veiling glare, and beam hardening. The fast MC scatter estimation combines GPU acceleration, variance reduction, and simulation with a low number of photon histories and reduced number of projection angles (sparse MC) augmented by kernel de-noising to yield a runtime of ~4 min per scan. Scatter correction is combined with two-pass beam hardening correction. Detector lag correction is based on temporal deconvolution of the measured lag response function. The effects of detector veiling glare are reduced by deconvolution of the glare response function representing the long range tails of the detector point-spread function. The performance of the correction framework is quantified in experiments using a realistic head phantom on a testbench for FPD CBCT. Uncorrected reconstructions were non-diagnostic for soft-tissue imaging tasks in the brain. After processing with the artifact correction framework, image uniformity was substantially improved, and artifacts were reduced to a level that enabled visualization of ~3 mm simulated bleeds throughout the brain. Non-uniformity (cupping) was reduced by a factor of 5, and contrast of simulated bleeds was improved from ~7 to 49.7 HU, in good agreement

  4. Extracting material parameters from x-ray attenuation: a CT feasibility study using kilovoltage synchrotron x-rays incident upon low atomic number absorbers.

    PubMed

    Kirby, B J; Davis, J R; Grant, J A; Morgan, M J

    2003-10-21

    The work reported here is a feasibility study of the extraction of material parameters from measurements of the linear x-ray attenuation coefficient of low atomic number absorbers. Computed tomography (CT) scans of small samples containing several liquids and solids were carried out with synchrotron radiation at the Australian National Beamline Facility (BL 20B) in Japan. Average values of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient were extracted for each material for x-ray energies ranging from 11 keV to 20.5 keV. The electron density was estimated by applying results derived from a parametrization of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient first developed by Jackson and Hawkes and extended for this work. Average estimates for the electron density of triethanolamine and acetic acid were made to within +5.3% of the actual value. Other materials examined included furfuraldehyde, perspex and teflon, for which average estimates of the electron density were less than 10% in excess of the calculated value. PMID:14620065

  5. Automated Classification of Usual Interstitial Pneumonia using Regional Volumetric Texture Analysis in High-Resolution CT

    PubMed Central

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Chin, Anne S.; Leung, Ann N.; Terrone, Donato; Bristow, Michael; Rosen, Glenn; Rubin, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We propose a novel computational approach for the automated classification of classic versus atypical usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Materials and Methods 33 patients with UIP were enrolled in this study. They were classified as classic versus atypical UIP by a consensus of two thoracic radiologists with more than 15 years of experience using the American Thoracic Society evidence–based guidelines for CT diagnosis of UIP. Two cardiothoracic fellows with one year of subspecialty training provided independent readings. The system is based on regional characterization of the morphological tissue properties of lung using volumetric texture analysis of multiple detector CT images. A simple digital atlas with 36 lung subregions is used to locate texture properties, from which the responses of multi-directional Riesz wavelets are obtained. Machine learning is used to aggregate and to map the regional texture attributes to a simple score that can be used to stratify patients with UIP into classic and atypical subtypes. Results We compared the predictions based on regional volumetric texture analysis with the ground truth established by expert consensus. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the proposed score was estimated to be 0.81 using a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation, with high specificity for classic UIP. The performance of our automated method was found to be similar to that of the two fellows and to the agreement between experienced chest radiologists reported in the literature. However, the errors of our method and the fellows occurred on different cases, which suggests that combining human and computerized evaluations may be synergistic. Conclusions Our results are encouraging and suggest that an automated system may be useful in routine clinical practice as a diagnostic aid for identifying patients with complex lung disease such as classic UIP, obviating the need for invasive surgical lung biopsy and its

  6. Regularization design for high-quality cone-beam CT of intracranial hemorrhage using statistical reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with pathologies such as hemorrhagic stroke and traumatic brain injury. Multi-detector CT is the current front-line imaging modality for detecting ICH (fresh blood contrast 40-80 HU, down to 1 mm). Flat-panel detector (FPD) cone-beam CT (CBCT) offers a potential alternative with a smaller scanner footprint, greater portability, and lower cost potentially well suited to deployment at the point of care outside standard diagnostic radiology and emergency room settings. Previous studies have suggested reliable detection of ICH down to 3 mm in CBCT using high-fidelity artifact correction and penalized weighted least-squared (PWLS) image reconstruction with a post-artifact-correction noise model. However, ICH reconstructed by traditional image regularization exhibits nonuniform spatial resolution and noise due to interaction between the statistical weights and regularization, which potentially degrades the detectability of ICH. In this work, we propose three regularization methods designed to overcome these challenges. The first two compute spatially varying certainty for uniform spatial resolution and noise, respectively. The third computes spatially varying regularization strength to achieve uniform "detectability," combining both spatial resolution and noise in a manner analogous to a delta-function detection task. Experiments were conducted on a CBCT test-bench, and image quality was evaluated for simulated ICH in different regions of an anthropomorphic head. The first two methods improved the uniformity in spatial resolution and noise compared to traditional regularization. The third exhibited the highest uniformity in detectability among all methods and best overall image quality. The proposed regularization provides a valuable means to achieve uniform image quality in CBCT of ICH and is being incorporated in a CBCT prototype for ICH imaging.

  7. Flow and Noise Control in High Speed and High Reynolds Number Jets Using Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samimy, M.; Kastner, J.; Kim, J.-H.; Utkin, Y.; Adamovich, I.; Brown, C. A.

    2006-01-01

    The idea of manipulating flow to change its characteristics is over a century old. Manipulating instabilities of a jet to increase its mixing and to reduce its radiated noise started in the 1970s. While the effort has been successful in low-speed and low Reynolds number jets, available actuators capabilities in terms of their amplitude, bandwidth, and phasing have fallen short in control of high-speed and high Reynolds number jets of practical interest. Localized arc filament plasma actuators have recently been developed and extensively used at Gas Dynamics and Turbulence Laboratory (GDTL) for control of highspeed and high Reynolds number jets. While the technique has been quite successful and is very promising, all the work up to this point had been carried out using small high subsonic and low supersonic jets from a 2.54 cm diameter nozzle exit with a Reynolds number of about a million. The preliminary work reported in this paper is a first attempt to evaluate the scalability of the technique. The power supply/plasma generator was designed and built in-house at GDTL to operate 8 actuators simultaneously over a large frequency range (0 to 200 kHz) with independent control over phase and duty cycle of each actuator. This allowed forcing the small jet at GDTL with azimuthal modes m = 0, 1, 2, 3, plus or minus 1, plus or minus 2, and plus or minus 4 over a large range of frequencies. This power supply was taken to and used, with minor modifications, at the NASA Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig (NATR). At NATR, 32 actuators were distributed around the 7.5 in. nozzle (a linear increase with nozzle exit diameter would require 60 actuators). With this arrangement only 8 actuators could operate simultaneously, thus limiting the forcing of the jet at NATR to only three azimuthal modes m = plus or minus 1, 4, and 8. Very preliminary results at NATR indicate that the trends observed in the larger NASA facility in terms of the effects of actuation frequency and azimuthal modes are

  8. A survey of the three-dimensional high Reynolds number transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takashima, K.; Sawada, H.; Aoki, T.

    1982-01-01

    The facilities for aerodynamic testing of airplane models at transonic speeds and high Reynolds numbers are surveyed. The need for high Reynolds number testing is reviewed, using some experimental results. Some approaches to high Reynolds number testing such as the cryogenic wind tunnel, the induction driven wind tunnel, the Ludwieg tube, the Evans clean tunnel and the hydraulic driven wind tunnel are described. The level of development of high Reynolds number testing facilities in Japan is discussed.

  9. High-performance soft-tissue imaging in extremity cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbijewski, W.; Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Muhit, A.; Thawait, G.; Packard, N.; Senn, R.; Yang, D.; Yorkston, J.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Clinical performance studies of an extremity cone-beam CT (CBCT) system indicate excellent bone visualization, but point to the need for improvement of soft-tissue image quality. To this end, a rapid Monte Carlo (MC) scatter correction is proposed, and Penalized Likelihood (PL) reconstruction is evaluated for noise management. Methods: The accelerated MC scatter correction involved fast MC simulation with low number of photons implemented on a GPU (107 photons/sec), followed by Gaussian kernel smoothing in the detector plane and across projection angles. PL reconstructions were investigated for reduction of imaging dose for projections acquired at ~2 mGy. Results: The rapid scatter estimation yielded root-mean-squared-errors of scatter projections of ~15% of peak scatter intensity for 5ṡ106 photons/projection (runtime ~0.5 sec/projection) and 25% improvement in fat-muscle contrast in reconstructions of a cadaveric knee. PL reconstruction largely restored soft-tissue visualization at 2 mGy dose to that of 10 mGy FBP image. Conclusion: The combination of rapid (5-10 minutes/scan) MC-based, patient-specific scatter correction and PL reconstruction offers an important means to overcome the current limitations of extremity CBCT in soft-tissue imaging.

  10. HIGH-z QUASARS IN THE R {sub h} = ct UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Melia, Fulvio

    2013-02-10

    One cannot understand the early appearance of 10{sup 9} M {sub Sun} supermassive black holes without invoking anomalously high accretion rates or the creation of exotically massive seeds, neither of which is seen in the local universe. Recent observations have compounded this problem by demonstrating that most, if not all, of the high-z quasars appear to be accreting at the Eddington limit. In the context of {Lambda}CDM, the only viable alternative now appears to be the assemblage of supermassive black holes via mergers, as long as the seeds started forming at redshifts >40, but ceased being created by z {approx} 20-30. In this paper, we show that, whereas the high-z quasars may be difficult to explain within the framework of the standard model, they can instead be interpreted much more sensibly in the context of the R {sub h} = ct universe. In this cosmology, 5-20 M {sub Sun} seeds produced after the onset of re-ionization (at z {approx}< 15) could have easily grown to M {approx}> 10{sup 9} M {sub Sun} by z {approx}> 6, merely by accreting at the standard Eddington rate.

  11. High level cross of the esophagus with the descending aorta in scoliosis: CT study

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Koji; Kikuno, Motoyuki; Hyodoh, Hideki

    1996-05-01

    The esophagus occasionally crosses the descending aorta at an unusually high level (3-5 cm inferior to the carina) in right-sided scoliosis. The purpose of this study was to analyze the mechanism of this finding. We prospectively evaluated thoracic CT scans in 30 patients with right-sided scoliosis. We assessed the alterations in the positions of the esophagus and the descending aorta by the thoracic deformity. The descending aorta followed the scoliotic curve of the spine in 26 (87%) patients. The esophagus followed the scoliotic curve of the spine in 14 (47%) patients and did not in 16 (53%). The anteroposterior diameter of the thorax in the former group was significantly smaller than that in the latter (p < 0.01). High level cross of both structures was identified in 14 (47%) patients, and all of them belonged to the group in which the esophagus did not follow the scoliotic curve of the spine. The unusual high level cross of the esophagus with the descending aorta occasionally seen in scoliosis is due to a difference in the positional alterations of the two structures resulting from the scoliosis. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  12. A computer simulation method for low-dose CT images by use of real high-dose images: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Takenaga, Tomomi; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Goto, Makoto; Hatemura, Masahiro; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Shiraishi, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Practical simulations of low-dose CT images have a possibility of being helpful means for optimization of the CT exposure dose. Because current methods reported by several researchers are limited to specific vendor platforms and generally rely on raw sinogram data that are difficult to access, we have developed a new computerized scheme for producing simulated low-dose CT images from real high-dose images without use of raw sinogram data or of a particular phantom. Our computerized scheme for low-dose CT simulation was based on the addition of a simulated noise image to a real high-dose CT image reconstructed by the filtered back-projection algorithm. First, a sinogram was generated from the forward projection of a high-dose CT image. Then, an additional noise sinogram resulting from use of a reduced exposure dose was estimated from a predetermined noise model. Finally, a noise CT image was reconstructed with a predetermined filter and was added to the real high-dose CT image to create a simulated low-dose CT image. The noise power spectrum and modulation transfer function of the simulated low-dose images were very close to those of the real low-dose images. In order to confirm the feasibility of our method, we applied this method to clinical cases which were examined with the high dose initially and then followed with a low-dose CT. In conclusion, our proposed method could simulate the low-dose CT images from their real high-dose images with sufficient accuracy and could be used for determining the optimal dose setting for various clinical CT examinations.

  13. Value of Combined PET/CT for Radiation Planning in CT-Guided Percutaneous Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Single-Fraction Brachytherapy for Colorectal Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Ingo G.; Wust, Peter; Ruehl, Ricarda

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the additional value of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) for clinical target volume definition in the planning of computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial brachytherapy for liver metastases. Patients and Methods: A total of 19 patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer treated in 25 sessions were included in the present study. All patients had undergone fluorodeoxyglucose-PET for patient evaluation before interstitial CT-guided brachytherapy. A contrast-enhanced CT scan of the upper abdomen was obtained for radiation planning. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined by a radiation oncologist and radiologist. After registration of the CT scan with the PET data set, the target volume was defined again using the fusion images. Results: PET revealed one additional liver lesion that was not visible on CT. The median CT-CTV (defined using CT and magnetic resonance imaging) was 68 cm{sup 3} (range 4-260). The PET/CT-CTV (median, 78 cm{sup 3}; range, 4-273) was significantly larger, with a median gain of 24.5% (interquartile range, 2.1-71.5%; p = .022). An increased CTV was observed in 15 cases and a decrease in 6; in 4 cases, the CT-CTV and PET/CT-CTV were equal. Incomplete dose coverage of PET/CT-CTVs was indicative of early local progression (p = .004); however, CT-based radiation plans did not show significant differences in the local control rates when stratified by dose coverage. Conclusion: Retrospective implementation of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET for CTV specification for CT-guided brachytherapy for colorectal liver metastases revealed a significant change in the CTVs. Additional PET-positive tumor regions with incomplete dose coverage could explain unexpected early local progression.

  14. ESTIMATION OF GIARDIA CT VALUES AT HIGH PH FOR THE SURFACE WATER TREATMENT RULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency currently recommends Ct (disinfectant concentration multiplied by the exposure time) values to achieve required levels of inactivation of Giardia lamblia cysts by different disinfectants including free chlorine. Current guidance covers ina...

  15. A high-energy-density, high-Mach number single jet experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J. F.; Dittrich, T. R.; Elliott, J. B.; Glendinning, S. G.; Cotrell, D. L.

    2011-08-15

    A high-energy-density, x-ray-driven, high-Mach number (M{>=} 17) single jet experiment shows constant propagation speeds of the jet and its bowshock into the late time regime. The jet assumes a characteristic mushroom shape with a stalk and a head. The width of the head and the bowshock also grow linearly in time. The width of the stalk decreases exponentially toward an asymptotic value. In late time images, the stalk kinks and develops a filamentary nature, which is similar to experiments with applied magnetic fields. Numerical simulations match the experiment reasonably well, but ''exterior'' details of the laser target must be included to obtain a match at late times.

  16. C-arm cone beam CT guidance of sinus and skull base surgery: quantitative surgical performance evaluation and development of a novel high-fidelity phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vescan, A. D.; Chan, H.; Daly, M. J.; Witterick, I.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2009-02-01

    Surgical simulation has become a critical component of surgical practice and training in the era of high-precision image-guided surgery. While the ability to simulate surgery of the paranasal sinuses and skull base has been conventionally limited to 3D digital simulation or cadaveric dissection, we have developed novel methods employing rapid prototyping technology and 3D printing to create high-fidelity models from real patient images (CT or MR). Such advances allow creation of patient-specific models for preparation, simulation, and training before embarking on the actual surgery. A major challenge included the development of novel material formulations compatible with the rapid prototyping process while presenting anatomically realistic flexibility, cut-ability, drilling purchase, and density (CT number). Initial studies have yielded realistic models of the paranasal sinuses and skull base for simulation and training in image-guided surgery. The process of model development and material selection is reviewed along with the application of the phantoms in studies of high-precision surgery guided by C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT). Surgical performance is quantitatively evaluated under CBCT guidance, with the high-fidelity phantoms providing an excellent test-bed for reproducible studies across a broad spectrum of challenging surgical tasks. Future work will broaden the atlas of models to include normal anatomical variations as well as a broad spectrum of benign and malignant disease. The role of high-fidelity models produced by rapid prototyping is discussed in the context of patient-specific case simulation, novel technology development (specifically CBCT guidance), and training of future generations of sinus and skull base surgeons.

  17. Comparison of quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging CT to fluorescent microsphere-based flow from high-resolution cryo-images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Li, Yuemeng; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) has the potential to provide quantitative measures of myocardial blood flow (MBF) which can aid the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. We evaluated the quantitative accuracy of MPI-CT in a porcine model of balloon-induced LAD coronary artery ischemia guided by fractional flow reserve (FFR). We quantified MBF at baseline (FFR=1.0) and under moderate ischemia (FFR=0.7) using MPI-CT and compared to fluorescent microsphere-based MBF from high-resolution cryo-images. Dynamic, contrast-enhanced CT images were obtained using a spectral detector CT (Philips Healthcare). Projection-based mono-energetic images were reconstructed and processed to obtain MBF. Three MBF quantification approaches were evaluated: singular value decomposition (SVD) with fixed Tikhonov regularization (ThSVD), SVD with regularization determined by the L-Curve criterion (LSVD), and Johnson-Wilson parameter estimation (JW). The three approaches over-estimated MBF compared to cryo-images. JW produced the most accurate MBF, with average error 33.3+/-19.2mL/min/100g, whereas LSVD and ThSVD had greater over-estimation, 59.5+/-28.3mL/min/100g and 78.3+/-25.6 mL/min/100g, respectively. Relative blood flow as assessed by a flow ratio of LAD-to-remote myocardium was strongly correlated between JW and cryo-imaging, with R2=0.97, compared to R2=0.88 and 0.78 for LSVD and ThSVD, respectively. We assessed tissue impulse response functions (IRFs) from each approach for sources of error. While JW was constrained to physiologic solutions, both LSVD and ThSVD produced IRFs with non-physiologic properties due to noise. The L-curve provided noise-adaptive regularization but did not eliminate non-physiologic IRF properties or optimize for MBF accuracy. These findings suggest that model-based MPI-CT approaches may be more appropriate for quantitative MBF estimation and that cryo-imaging can support the development of MPI-CT by providing spatial distributions of MBF.

  18. Study of CT-based positron range correction in high resolution 3D PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cal-González, J.; Herraiz, J. L.; España, S.; Vicente, E.; Herranz, E.; Desco, M.; Vaquero, J. J.; Udías, J. M.

    2011-08-01

    Positron range limits the spatial resolution of PET images and has a different effect for different isotopes and positron propagation materials. Therefore it is important to consider it during image reconstruction, in order to obtain optimal image quality. Positron range distributions for most common isotopes used in PET in different materials were computed using the Monte Carlo simulations with PeneloPET. The range profiles were introduced into the 3D OSEM image reconstruction software FIRST and employed to blur the image either in the forward projection or in the forward and backward projection. The blurring introduced takes into account the different materials in which the positron propagates. Information on these materials may be obtained, for instance, from a segmentation of a CT image. The results of introducing positron blurring in both forward and backward projection operations was compared to using it only during forward projection. Further, the effect of different shapes of positron range profile in the quality of the reconstructed images with positron range correction was studied. For high positron energy isotopes, the reconstructed images show significant improvement in spatial resolution when positron range is taken into account during reconstruction, compared to reconstructions without positron range modeling.

  19. Seventh-generation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, G. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new dual-drum CT system architecture has been recently introduced with the potential to achieve significantly higher temporal resolution than is currently possible in medical imaging CT. The concept relies only on known technologies; in particular rotation speeds several times higher than what is possible today could be achieved leveraging typical x-ray tube designs and capabilities. However, the architecture lends itself to the development of a new arrangement of x-ray sources in a toroidal vacuum envelope containing a rotating cathode ring and a (optionally rotating) shared anode ring to potentially obtain increased individual beam power as well as increase total exposure per rotation. The new x-ray source sub-system design builds on previously described concepts and could make the provision of multiple conventional high-power cathodes in a CT system practical by distributing the anode target between the cathodes. In particular, relying on known magnetic-levitation technologies, it is in principle possible to more than double the relative speed of the electron-beam with respect to the target, thus potentially leading to significant individual beam power increases as compared to today's state-of-the-art. In one embodiment, the proposed design can be naturally leveraged by the dual-drum CT concept previously described to alleviate the problem of arranging a number of conventional rotating anode-stem x-ray tubes and power conditioners on the limited space of a CT gantry. In another embodiment, a system with three cathodes is suggested leveraging the architecture previously proposed by Franke.

  20. Image-based motion compensation for high-resolution extremities cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Cao, Q.; Yorkston, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Zbijewski, W.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) of the extremities provides high spatial resolution, but its quantitative accuracy may be challenged by involuntary sub-mm patient motion that cannot be eliminated with simple means of external immobilization. We investigate a two-step iterative motion compensation based on a multi-component metric of image sharpness. Methods: Motion is considered with respect to locally rigid motion within a particular region of interest, and the method supports application to multiple locally rigid regions. Motion is estimated by maximizing a cost function with three components: a gradient metric encouraging image sharpness, an entropy term that favors high contrast and penalizes streaks, and a penalty term encouraging smooth motion. Motion compensation involved initial coarse estimation of gross motion followed by estimation of fine-scale displacements using high resolution reconstructions. The method was evaluated in simulations with synthetic motion (1-4 mm) applied to a wrist volume obtained on a CMOS-based CBCT testbench. Structural similarity index (SSIM) quantified the agreement between motion-compensated and static data. The algorithm was also tested on a motion contaminated patient scan from dedicated extremities CBCT. Results: Excellent correction was achieved for the investigated range of displacements, indicated by good visual agreement with the static data. 10-15% improvement in SSIM was attained for 2-4 mm motions. The compensation was robust against increasing motion (4% decrease in SSIM across the investigated range, compared to 14% with no compensation). Consistent performance was achieved across a range of noise levels. Significant mitigation of artifacts was shown in patient data. Conclusion: The results indicate feasibility of image-based motion correction in extremities CBCT without the need for a priori motion models, external trackers, or fiducials.

  1. Multiresolution iterative reconstruction in high-resolution extremity cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qian; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Sisniega, Alejandro; Yorkston, John; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Webster Stayman, J.

    2016-10-01

    Application of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) to high resolution cone-beam CT (CBCT) is computationally challenging because of the very fine discretization (voxel size  <100 µm) of the reconstructed volume. Moreover, standard MBIR techniques require that the complete transaxial support for the acquired projections is reconstructed, thus precluding acceleration by restricting the reconstruction to a region-of-interest. To reduce the computational burden of high resolution MBIR, we propose a multiresolution penalized-weighted least squares (PWLS) algorithm, where the volume is parameterized as a union of fine and coarse voxel grids as well as selective binning of detector pixels. We introduce a penalty function designed to regularize across the boundaries between the two grids. The algorithm was evaluated in simulation studies emulating an extremity CBCT system and in a physical study on a test-bench. Artifacts arising from the mismatched discretization of the fine and coarse sub-volumes were investigated. The fine grid region was parameterized using 0.15 mm voxels and the voxel size in the coarse grid region was varied by changing a downsampling factor. No significant artifacts were found in either of the regions for downsampling factors of up to 4×. For a typical extremities CBCT volume size, this downsampling corresponds to an acceleration of the reconstruction that is more than five times faster than a brute force solution that applies fine voxel parameterization to the entire volume. For certain configurations of the coarse and fine grid regions, in particular when the boundary between the regions does not cross high attenuation gradients, downsampling factors as high as 10×  can be used without introducing artifacts, yielding a ~50×  speedup in PWLS. The proposed multiresolution algorithm significantly reduces the computational burden of high resolution iterative CBCT reconstruction and can be extended to other applications of

  2. High Fidelity System Modeling for High Quality Image Reconstruction in Clinical CT

    PubMed Central

    Do, Synho; Karl, William Clem; Singh, Sarabjeet; Kalra, Mannudeep; Brady, Tom; Shin, Ellie; Pien, Homer

    2014-01-01

    Today, while many researchers focus on the improvement of the regularization term in IR algorithms, they pay less concern to the improvement of the fidelity term. In this paper, we hypothesize that improving the fidelity term will further improve IR image quality in low-dose scanning, which typically causes more noise. The purpose of this paper is to systematically test and examine the role of high-fidelity system models using raw data in the performance of iterative image reconstruction approach minimizing energy functional. We first isolated the fidelity term and analyzed the importance of using focal spot area modeling, flying focal spot location modeling, and active detector area modeling as opposed to just flying focal spot motion. We then compared images using different permutations of all three factors. Next, we tested the ability of the fidelity terms to retain signals upon application of the regularization term with all three factors. We then compared the differences between images generated by the proposed method and Filtered-Back-Projection. Lastly, we compared images of low-dose in vivo data using Filtered-Back-Projection, Iterative Reconstruction in Image Space, and the proposed method using raw data. The initial comparison of difference maps of images constructed showed that the focal spot area model and the active detector area model also have significant impacts on the quality of images produced. Upon application of the regularization term, images generated using all three factors were able to substantially decrease model mismatch error, artifacts, and noise. When the images generated by the proposed method were tested, conspicuity greatly increased, noise standard deviation decreased by 90% in homogeneous regions, and resolution also greatly improved. In conclusion, the improvement of the fidelity term to model clinical scanners is essential to generating higher quality images in low-dose imaging. PMID:25390888

  3. The diagnostic and prognostic value of coronary CT angiography in asymptomatic high-risk patients: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Plank, Fabian; Friedrich, Guy; Dichtl, Wolfgang; Klauser, Andrea; Jaschke, Werner; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael; Feuchtner, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prospectively assess the value of coronary CT angiography (CTA) in asymptomatic patients with high ‘a priori’ risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods 711 consecutive asymptomatic patients (61.8 years; 40.1% female) with high ‘a priori’ risk of CAD were prospectively examined with a coronary calcium score (CCS) and CTA. Coronary arteries were evaluated for atherosclerotic plaque (non-calcified and calcified) and stenosis (mild <50%, intermediate 50–70% or high-grade >70%). Coronary Segment Involvement Score (SIS, total number of segments with plaque) and nc (non-calcified) SIS were calculated. Primary end points were major adverse cardiac events (ST-elevation MI, non-ST-elevation MI and cardiac death); secondary end points were coronary revascularisation and >50% stenosis by invasive angiography. Results Of 711 patients, 28.3% were negative for CAD and 71.7% positive (CAD+) by CTA (15.6% had plaques without stenosis, 23.9% mild, 10.7% intermediate and 21.5% high-grade stenosis). CCS zero prevalence was 306 (43%), out of those 100 (32.7%) had non-calcified plaque only. Mean follow-up period was 2.65 years. MACE rate was 0% in CAD negative and higher (1.2%) in CAD positive by CTA. Coronary revascularisation rate was 5.5%. Patients with SIS ≥5 had an HR of 6.5 (95% CI 1.6 to 25.8, p<0.013) for MACE, patients with ncSIS ≥1 had an HR of 2.4 (95% CI 1.2 to 4.6, p<0.01) for secondary end point. The sensitivity of CTA for stenosis >50% compared with invasive angiography was 92.9% (95% CI 83.0% to 98.1%). Negative predictive value of CTA was 99.4% (95% CI 98.3% to 99.8%) for combined end points. Conclusions CAD prevalence by CTA in asymptomatic high-risk patients is high. CCS zero does not exclude CAD. CTA is highly accurate to exclude CAD. Total coronary plaque burden and nc plaques, even if only one segment is involved, are associated with an increased risk of adverse outcome. PMID:25332810

  4. CT -- Body

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Computed tomography (CT) of the body uses special x-ray ... Body? What is CT Scanning of the Body? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  5. N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel I is a blowdown Facility that utilizes interchangeable test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel I is a blowdown Facility that utilizes interchangeable test sections and nozzles. The facility provides experimental support for the fluid mechanics research, including experimental verification of aerodynamic computer codes and boundary-layer and airfoil studies that require high Reynolds number simulation. (Tunnel 1)

  6. Texture-preserved penalized weighted least-squares reconstruction of low-dose CT image via image segmentation and high-order MRF modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hao; Zhang, Hao; Wei, Xinzhou; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we proposed a low-dose computed tomography (LdCT) image reconstruction method with the help of prior knowledge learning from previous high-quality or normal-dose CT (NdCT) scans. The well-established statistical penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) algorithm was adopted for image reconstruction, where the penalty term was formulated by a texture-based Gaussian Markov random field (gMRF) model. The NdCT scan was firstly segmented into different tissue types by a feature vector quantization (FVQ) approach. Then for each tissue type, a set of tissue-specific coefficients for the gMRF penalty was statistically learnt from the NdCT image via multiple-linear regression analysis. We also proposed a scheme to adaptively select the order of gMRF model for coefficients prediction. The tissue-specific gMRF patterns learnt from the NdCT image were finally used to form an adaptive MRF penalty for the PWLS reconstruction of LdCT image. The proposed texture-adaptive PWLS image reconstruction algorithm was shown to be more effective to preserve image textures than the conventional PWLS image reconstruction algorithm, and we further demonstrated the gain of high-order MRF modeling for texture-preserved LdCT PWLS image reconstruction.

  7. Ga-68-DOTATOC: Feasibility of high throughput screening by small animal PET using a clinical high-resolution PET/CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Michael; Weitzel, Thilo; Krause, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    As radio peptide tracers have been developed in recent years for the high sensitive detection of neuroendocrine tumors, still the broad application of other peptides to breast and prostate cancer is missing. A rapid screening of new peptides can, in theory, be based on in vivo screening in animals by PET/CT. To test this hypothesis and to asses the minimum screening time needed per animal, we used the application of Ga-68-DOTATOC PET/CT in rats as test system. The Ga-68-DOTATOC yields in a hot spot imaging with minimal background. To delineate liver and spleen, we performed PET/CT of 10 animals on a SIEMENS Biograph 16 LSO HIGHREZ after intravenous injection of 1.5 MBq Ga-68-DOTATOC per animal. Animals were mounted in an '18 slot' holding device and scanned for a single-bed position. The emission times for the PET scan was varied from 1 to 20 min. The images were assessed first for "PET only" and afterwards in PET/CT fusion mode. The detection of the two organs was good at emission times down to 1 min in PET/CT fusion mode. In the "PET only" scans, the liver was clearly to be identified down to 1 min emission in all animals. But the spleen could only be delineated only by 1 min of emission in the PET/CT-fusion mode. In conclusion the screening of "hot spot" enriching peptides is feasible. "PET only" is in terms of delineation of small organs by far inferior to PET/CT fusion. If animal tumors are above a diameter of 10 mm small, animal PET/CT using clinical high resolution scanners will enable rapid screening. Even the determination of bio-distributions becomes feasible by using list mode tools. The time for the whole survey of 18 animals including anesthesia, preparation and mounting was approximately 20 min. By use of several holding devices mounted simultaneously, a survey time of less than 1 h for 180 animals can be expected.

  8. Mixed-derivative skewness for high Prandtl and Reynolds numbers in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briard, Antoine; Gomez, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The mixed-derivative skewness Suθ of a passive scalar field in high Reynolds and Prandtl numbers decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence is studied numerically using eddy-damped quasi-normal Markovian closure, for Reλ ≥ 103 up to Pr = 105. A convergence of Suθ for Pr ≥ 103 is observed for any high enough Reynolds number. This asymptotic high Pr regime can be interpreted as a saturation of the mixing properties of the flow at small scales. The decay of the derivative skewnesses from high to low Reynolds numbers and the influence of large scales initial conditions are investigated as well.

  9. Micro-CT scan reveals an unexpected high-volume and interconnected pore network in a Cretaceous Sanagasta dinosaur eggshell.

    PubMed

    Hechenleitner, E Martín; Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Foley, Matthew; Fiorelli, Lucas E; Thompson, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    The Cretaceous Sanagasta neosauropod nesting site (La Rioja, Argentina) was the first confirmed instance of extinct dinosaurs using geothermal-generated heat to incubate their eggs. The nesting strategy and hydrothermal activities at this site led to the conclusion that the surprisingly 7 mm thick-shelled eggs were adapted to harsh hydrothermal microenvironments. We used micro-CT scans in this study to obtain the first three-dimensional microcharacterization of these eggshells. Micro-CT-based analyses provide a robust assessment of gas conductance in fossil dinosaur eggshells with complex pore canal systems, allowing calculation, for the first time, of the shell conductance through its thickness. This novel approach suggests that the shell conductance could have risen during incubation to seven times more than previously estimated as the eggshell erodes. In addition, micro-CT observations reveal that the constant widening and branching of pore canals form a complex funnel-like pore canal system. Furthermore, the high density of pore canals and the presence of a lateral canal network in the shell reduce the risks of pore obstruction during the extended incubation of these eggs in a relatively highly humid and muddy nesting environment. PMID:27009182

  10. Large Eddy Simulations of Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities at high Reynolds number stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Dana; Goodman, Lou; Raessi, Mehdi

    2015-11-01

    Simulations of Kelvin Helmholtz Instabilities (KHI) at high Reynolds numbers are performed using the Large Eddy Simulation technique. Reynolds numbers up to 100,000 are achieved using our model. The resulting data set is used to examine the effect of Reynolds number on various statistics, including dissipation flux coefficient, turbulent kinetic energy budget, and Thorpe length scale. It is shown that KHI are qualitatively different at high Re, up to and including the onset of vortex pairing and billow collapse and quantitatively different afterward. The effect of Richardson number is also examined. The results are discussed as they apply to ocean experiments.

  11. Imaging of pore networks and related interfaces in soil systems by using high resolution X-ray micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacher, Gerhard; Eickhorst, Thilo; Schmidt, Hannes; Halisch, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Today's high-resolution X-ray CT with its powerful tubes and great detail detectability lends itself naturally to geological and pedological applications. Those include the non-destructive interior examination and textural analysis of rock and soil samples and their permeability and porosity - to name only a few. Especially spatial distribution and geometry of pores, mineral phases and fractures are important for the evaluation of hydrologic and aeration properties in soils as well as for root development in the soil matrix. The possibility to visualize a whole soil aggregate or root tissue in a non-destructive way is undoubtedly the most valuable feature of this type of analysis and is a new area for routine application of high resolution X-ray micro-CT. The paper outlines recent developments in hard- and software requirements for high resolution CT. It highlights several pedological applications which were performed with the phoenix nanotom m, the first 180 kV nanofocus CT system tailored specifically for extremely high-resolution scans of variable sized samples with voxel-resolutions down to < 300 nm. In addition very good contrast resolution can be obtained as well which is necessary to distinguish biogenic material in soil aggregates amongst others. We will address visualization and quantification of porous networks in 3D in different environmental samples ranging from clastic sedimentary rock to soil cores and individual soil aggregates. As several processes and habitat functions are related to various pore sizes imaging of the intact soil matrix will be presented on different scales of interest - from the mm-scale representing the connectivity of macro-pores down to the micro-scale representing the space of microbial habitats. Therefore, soils were impregnated with resin and scanned via X-ray CT. Scans at higher resolution were obtained from sub-volumes cut from the entire resin impregnated block and from crop roots surrounded by rhizosphere soil. Within the

  12. Calculation of the vacuum Green's function valid for high toroidal mode number in tokamaks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Morrell; Turnbull, Alan

    2005-10-01

    The present evaluation of the Green's function used for the magmetic scalar potential in vacuum calculations for axisymmetric geometry in the vacuum segments of gato, pest and other mhd stability codes has been found to be deficient for moderately high toroidal mode numbers. This was due to the loss of numerical precision arising from the upward recursion relation used for generating the functions to high mode numbers. The recursion is initiated from the complete elliptic integrals of the first and second kinds. To ameliorate this, a direct integration of the integral representation of the function was crafted to achieve the necessary high accuracy for moderately high mode numbers. At very high mode numbers the loss of numerical precision due to the oscillatory behavior of the integrand is further avoided by judiciously deforming the integration contour in the complex plane. Machine precision, roughly 14 -- 16 digits, accuracy can be achieved by using a combination of both these techniques.

  13. Performance evaluation of the General Electric eXplore CT 120 micro-CT using the vmCT phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahri, M. A.; Warnock, G.; Plenevaux, A.; Choquet, P.; Constantinesco, A.; Salmon, E.; Luxen, A.; Seret, A.

    2011-08-01

    The eXplore CT 120 is the latest generation micro-CT from General Electric. It is equipped with a high-power tube and a flat-panel detector. It allows high resolution and high contrast fast CT scanning of small animals. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of the eXplore CT 120 with that of the eXplore Ultra, its predecessor for which the methodology using the vmCT phantom has already been described [1].The phantom was imaged using typical a rat (fast scan or F) or mouse (in vivo bone scan or H) scanning protocols. With the slanted edge method, a 10% modulation transfer function (MTF) was observed at 4.4 (F) and 3.9-4.4 (H) mm-1 corresponding to 114 μm resolution. A fairly larger MTF was obtained by the coil method with the MTF for the thinnest coil (3.3 mm-1) equal to 0.32 (F) and 0.34 (H). The geometric accuracy was better than 0.3%. There was a highly linear (R2>0.999) relationship between measured and expected CT numbers for both the CT number accuracy and linearity sections of the phantom. A cupping effect was clearly seen on the uniform slices and the uniformity-to-noise ratio ranged from 0.52 (F) to 0.89 (H). The air CT number depended on the amount of polycarbonate surrounding the area where it was measured; a difference as high as approximately 200 HU was observed. This hindered the calibration of this scanner in HU. This is likely due to the absence of corrections for beam hardening and scatter in the reconstruction software. However in view of the high linearity of the system, the implementation of these corrections would allow a good quality calibration of the scanner in HU. In conclusion, the eXplore CT 120 achieved a better spatial resolution than the eXplore Ultra (based on previously reported specifications) and future software developments will include beam hardening and scatter corrections that will make the new generation CT scanner even more promising.

  14. High Reynolds number analysis of an axisymmetric afterbody with flow separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, John R.; Reubush, David E.

    1996-01-01

    The ability of a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes method, PAB3D, to predict nozzle afterbody flow at high Reynolds number was assessed. Predicted surface pressure coefficient distributions and integrated afterbody drag are compared with experimental data obtained from the NASA-Langley 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. Predicted afterbody surface pressures matched experimental data fairly closely. The change in the pressure coefficient distribution with Reynolds number was slightly over-predicted. Integrated afterbody drag was typically high compared to the experimental data. The change in afterbody pressure drag with Reynolds number was fairly small. The predicted point of flow separation on the nozzle was slightly downstream of that observed from oilflow data at low Reynolds numbers and had a very slight Reynolds number dependence, moving slightly further downstream as Reynolds number increased.

  15. X-ray microtomography (micro-CT): a reference technology for high-resolution quantification of xylem embolism in trees.

    PubMed

    Cochard, H; Delzon, S; Badel, E

    2015-01-01

    As current methods for measuring xylem embolism in trees are indirect and prone to artefacts, there is an ongoing controversy over the capacity of trees to resist or recover from embolism. The debate will not end until we get direct visualization of the vessel content. Here, we propose desktop X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) as a reference direct technique to quantify xylem embolism and thus validate more widespread measurements based upon either hydraulic or acoustic methods. We used desktop micro-CT to measure embolism levels in dehydrated or centrifuged shoots of laurel - a long-vesseled species thought to display daily cycles of embolism formation and refilling. Our direct observations demonstrate that this Mediterranean species is highly resistant to embolism and is not vulnerable to drought-induced embolism in a normal range of xylem tensions. We therefore recommend that embolism studies in long-vesseled species should be validated by direct methods such as micro-CT to clear up any misunderstandings on their physiology.

  16. Statistical Analysis of Yarn Feature Parameters in C/Epoxy Plain-Weave Composite Using Micro CT with High-Resolution Lens-Coupled Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Zhong-wei

    2016-08-01

    C/Epoxy plain-weave composite is difficult to clear imaging in Micro CT with flat panel detector due to the similar atomic numbers of component materials. To solve this problem, a new Micro CT equipment with high-resolution lens-coupled detector is used to reconstruct 3D images of C/Epoxy. Slice data correction with ellipse projection is used to acquire real yarn normal cross-section information. A reference period method suitable for plain-weave composite is then detailed to evaluate statistical properties of yarn feature parameters. In the process of determination of real extreme slices, dislocation phenomenon existed in the laminated composite is discovered. Several possible reasons caused this phenomenon are discussed. Systematic trends, standard deviations and correlation lengths of stochastic deviations with original and corrected data are evaluated respectively by the application of reference period method. The statistical results show that mean out-of-plane yarn waviness, semi-axes, cross-section area and aspect ratio exhibit periodic characteristics, and the maximum effect of slice data correction on all statistical properties of feature parameters is twist angle.

  17. High-efficiency quantum-nondemolition single-photon-number-resolving detector

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, W.J.; Nemoto, Kae; Beausoleil, R.G.; Spiller, T.P.

    2005-03-01

    We discuss an approach to the problem of creating a photon-number-resolving detector using the giant Kerr nonlinearities available in electromagnetically induced transparency. Our scheme can implement a photon-number quantum-nondemolition measurement with high efficiency ({approx}99%) using fewer than 1600 atoms embedded in a dielectric waveguide.

  18. Unstable resonator modes for lasers with circular mirrors and high Fresnel numbers.

    PubMed

    Larson, A R

    1993-10-20

    The design of unstable resonators for large lasers with high Fresnel numbers and circular mirrors requires an ability to calculate their mode structures. Four methods for obtaining mode structure by solving the complex integral equation are analyzed. Included are a numerical method, two hybrid methods, and a virtual-source method. The hybrid methods are basically analytical methods with special numerical integration of analytical solutions (over the feedback mirror) to obtain improved solutions in the output annulus. The hybrid methods are designed for use with high-Fresnel-number resonators. However, their applicability extends into the low-Fresnel-number regime, where a comparison shows one of the hybrid methods agreeing exceptionally well with the numerical method. For analysis at high Fresnel numbers, the hybrid and virtual-source methods are compared with each other. The two hybrid methods are expected to differ from each other in the central core region when the Fresnel number is low, but they are expected to agree with each other when the Fresnel number is high. For the hybrid comparison at a high Fresnel number, the next to lowest loss modes show a similar structure. However, lack of agreement for the lowest loss mode shows that approximations in the development of the second hybrid method cause the selection of the wrong geometrical mode. PMID:20856409

  19. Reynolds Number Effects on a Supersonic Transport at Subsonic High-Lift Conditions (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L.R.; Wahls, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    A High Speed Civil Transport configuration was tested in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of NASA's High Speed Research Program. The primary purposes of the tests were to assess Reynolds number scale effects and high Reynolds number aerodynamic characteristics of a realistic, second generation supersonic transport while providing data for the assessment of computational methods. The tests included longitudinal and lateral/directional studies at transonic and low-speed, high-lift conditions across a range of Reynolds numbers from that available in conventional wind tunnels to near flight conditions. Results are presented which focus on Reynolds number and static aeroelastic sensitivities of longitudinal characteristics at Mach 0.30 for a configuration without an empennage. A fundamental change in flow-state occurred between Reynolds numbers of 30 to 40 million, which is characterized by significantly earlier inboard leading-edge separation at the high Reynolds numbers. Force and moment levels change but Reynolds number trends are consistent between the two states.

  20. SU-E-I-04: Improving CT Quality for Radiation Therapy of Patients with High Body Mass Index Using Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Noid, G; Tai, A; Li, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms are developed to improve CT image quality (IQ) by reducing noise without diminishing spatial resolution or contrast. The CT IQ for patients with a high Body Mass Index (BMI) can suffer from increased noise due to photon starvation. The purpose of this study is to investigate and to quantify the IQ enhancement for high BMI patients through the application of IR algorithms. Methods: CT raw data collected for 6 radiotherapy (RT) patients with BMI, greater than or equal to 30 were retrospectively analyzed. All CT data were acquired using a CT scanner (Somaton Definition AS Open, Siemens) installed in a linac room (CT-on-rails) using standard imaging protocols. The CT data were reconstructed using the Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) and Filtered Back Projection (FBP) methods. IQ metrics of the obtained CTs were compared and correlated with patient depth and BMI. The patient depth was defined as the largest distance from anterior to posterior along the bilateral symmetry axis. Results: IR techniques are demonstrated to preserve contrast and reduce noise in comparison to traditional FBP. Driven by the reduction in noise, the contrast to noise ratio is roughly doubled by adopting the highest SAFIRE strength. A significant correlation was observed between patient depth and IR noise reduction through Pearson’s correlation test (R = 0.9429/P = 0.0167). The mean patient depth was 30.4 cm and the average relative noise reduction for the strongest iterative reconstruction was 55%. Conclusion: The IR techniques produce a measureable enhancement to CT IQ by reducing the noise. Dramatic noise reduction is evident for the high BMI patients. The improved CT IQ enables more accurate delineation of tumors and organs at risk and more accuarte dose calculations for RT planning and delivery guidance. Supported by Siemens.

  1. Flat-Panel Computed Tomography (DYNA-CT) in Neuroradiology. From High-Resolution Imaging of Implants to One-Stop-Shopping for Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, A; Gölitz, P; Engelhorn, T; Kloska, S; Struffert, T

    2015-10-01

    Originally aimed at improving standard radiography by providing higher absorption efficiency and a wider dynamic range, flat-panel detector technology has meanwhile got widely accepted in the neuroradiological community. Especially flat-panel detector computed tomography (FD-CT) using rotational C-arm mounted flat-panel detector technology is capable of volumetric imaging with a high spatial resolution. By providing CT-like images of the brain within the angio suite, FD-CT is able to rapidly visualize hemorrhage and may thus improve complication management without the need of patient transfer. As "Angiographic CT" FD-CT may be helpful during many diagnostic and neurointerventional procedures and for noninvasive monitoring and follow-up. In addition, spinal interventions and high-resolution imaging of the temporal bone might also benefit from FD-CT. Finally, using novel dynamic perfusion and angiographic protocols, FD-CT may provide functional information on brain perfusion and vasculature with the potential to replace standard imaging in selected acute stroke patients.

  2. High Reynolds number and turbulence effects on aerodynamics and heat transfer in a turbine cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Frederick C.; Hippensteele, Steven A.; Vanfossen, G. James; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Ameri, Ali

    1993-01-01

    Experimental data on pressure distribution and heat transfer on a turbine airfoil were obtained over a range of Reynolds numbers from 0.75 to 7.5 x 10 exp 6 and a range of turbulence intensities from 1.8 to about 15 percent. The purpose of this study was to obtain fundamental heat transfer and pressure distribution data over a wide range of high Reynolds numbers and to extend the heat transfer data base to include the range of Reynolds numbers encountered in the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) turbopump turbines. Specifically, the study aimed to determine (1) the effect of Reynolds number on heat transfer, (2) the effect of upstream turbulence on heat transfer and pressure distribution, and (3) the relationship between heat transfer at high Reynolds numbers and the current data base. The results of this study indicated that Reynolds number and turbulence intensity have a large effect on both the transition from laminar to turbulent flow and the resulting heat transfer. For a given turbulence intensity, heat transfer for all Reynolds numbers at the leading edge can be correlated with the Frossling number developed for lower Reynolds numbers. For a given turbulence intensity, heat transfer for the airfoil surfaces downstream of the leading edge can be approximately correlated with a dimensionless parameter. Comparison of the experimental results were also made with a numerical solution from a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code.

  3. Turbulent Boundary Layer Measurements in the Princeton/ONR High Reynolds Number Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, James; Smits, Alexander

    2003-11-01

    Zero pressure gradient, high Reynolds number boundary layers are studied in the Princeton/ONR High Reynolds Number Test Facility (HRTF). The HRTF uses air at pressures up to 2500Ψ as the working fluid. Mean flow velocity profiles and turbulence measurements have been obtained at Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness from 5× 10^3 up to 10^5. The log region at this Reynolds number is approximately two decades long in terms of y^+. The maximum y^+ achieved before departure from the log curve is of order y^+≃ 10,000. Results will be presented on the form of the best fit for the log law over this large Reynolds number range.

  4. High-mode-number ballooning modes in a heliotron/torsatron system: 2, Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, N.

    1996-05-01

    In heliotron/torsantron systems that have a large Shafranov shift, the local magnetic shear is found to have no stabilizing effect on high-mode-number ballooning modes at the outer side of the torus, even in the region where the global shear is stellarator-like in nature. The disappearance of this stabilization, in combination with the compression of the flux surfaces at the outer side of the torus, leads at relatively low values of the plasma pressure to significant modifications of the stabilizing effect due to magnetic field-line bending on high-mode-number ballooning modes-specifically, that the field-line bending stabilization can be remarkably suppressed or enhanced. In an equilibrium that is slightly Mercier-unstable or completely Mercier-stable due to peaked pressure profiles, such as those used in standaxd stability calculations or observed in experiments on the Compact Helical System, high-mode-number ballooning modes are destabilized due to these modified stability effects, with their eigenfunctions highly localized along the field line. Highly localized mode structures such as these cause the ballooning mode eigenvalues {omega} {sup 2} to have a strong field line dependence through the strong dependence of the local magnetic curvature, such that the level surfaces of {omega} {sup 2} ({psi}, {theta} {sub k}, {alpha}), (<0) become spheroids in ({theta} {sub k}, {alpha}) space, where {psi} labels flux surfaces and {theta} {sub k} is the radial wavenumber. Because the spheroidal level surfaces for unstable eigenvalues are surrounded by level surfaces for stable eigenvalues of high-mode-number toroidal Alfven eigenmodes, those high-mode-number ballooning modes never lead to low-mode-number modes. In configuration space, these high- mode-number modes are localized in a single toroidal pitch of the helical coils, and hence they may experience substantial stabilization due to finite Larmor radius effects.

  5. High-resolution dynamic CT scanner based on a variable-zoom XRII and a linear photodiode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drangova, Maria; Holdsworth, David W.; Fenster, Aaron

    1993-09-01

    We have developed a CT scanner with high temporal and spatial resolution which can be used to acquire dynamic images of objects undergoing periodic motion. Our system comprises of an x-ray image intensifier (XRII) optically coupled to a linear photo-diode array (PDA) camera. The XRII has been modified to vary electronically the magnification of the image continuously over fields-of-view (FOV) ranging between 8 and 24 cm, and thus increasing the resolution from 1.4 mm-1 to 3.8 mm-1. In this way, we can select a magnification which maximizes the image resolution for a given object.

  6. Use of CT in detection of internal damage and repair and determination of authenticity in high-quality bowed stringed instruments.

    PubMed

    Sirr, S A; Waddle, J R

    1999-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was used to evaluate 17 high-quality violins and cellos crafted between 1633 and 1872 by master craftsmen such as Guarneri, Amati, and Stradivari. Multiple high-resolution CT scans were obtained in each instrument, and additional scans were obtained when defects or repair was detected. Varying degrees of internal damage (eg, wormholes, air gaps, plastic deformities of wood) or repair (eg, glue lines, filler material, wooden cleats and patches) not seen at visual inspection were detected in all 17 instruments. In addition, CT allowed noninvasive identification of the internal wood grain pattern unique to each instrument, thereby facilitating verification of authenticity to help protect against loss, theft, or forgery. The information provided by CT analysis of valuable bowed stringed instruments may prove useful to prospective buyers or to insurance companies that specialize in insuring such instruments against accidental loss or damage.

  7. Object-constrained meshless deformable algorithm for high speed 3D nonrigid registration between CT and CBCT

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Ting; Kim, Sung; Goyal, Sharad; Jabbour, Salma; Zhou Jinghao; Rajagopal, Gunaretnum; Haffty, Bruce; Yue Ning

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: High-speed nonrigid registration between the planning CT and the treatment CBCT data is critical for real time image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) to improve the dose distribution and to reduce the toxicity to adjacent organs. The authors propose a new fully automatic 3D registration framework that integrates object-based global and seed constraints with the grayscale-based ''demons'' algorithm. Methods: Clinical objects were segmented on the planning CT images and were utilized as meshless deformable models during the nonrigid registration process. The meshless models reinforced a global constraint in addition to the grayscale difference between CT and CBCT in order to maintain the shape and the volume of geometrically complex 3D objects during the registration. To expedite the registration process, the framework was stratified into hierarchies, and the authors used a frequency domain formulation to diffuse the displacement between the reference and the target in each hierarchy. Also during the registration of pelvis images, they replaced the air region inside the rectum with estimated pixel values from the surrounding rectal wall and introduced an additional seed constraint to robustly track and match the seeds implanted into the prostate. The proposed registration framework and algorithm were evaluated on 15 real prostate cancer patients. For each patient, prostate gland, seminal vesicle, bladder, and rectum were first segmented by a radiation oncologist on planning CT images for radiotherapy planning purpose. The same radiation oncologist also manually delineated the tumor volumes and critical anatomical structures in the corresponding CBCT images acquired at treatment. These delineated structures on the CBCT were only used as the ground truth for the quantitative validation, while structures on the planning CT were used both as the input to the registration method and the ground truth in validation. By registering the planning CT to the CBCT, a

  8. High Stakes Testing and High School Completion. NBETPP Statements, Volume 1, Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Marguerite; Haney, Walter; Madaus, George

    This report examines how high stakes assessments affect dropout and high school completion rates. The focus is on five suggestive lines of evidence about this relationship. This evidence is drawn in part from studies done at Boston College or by researchers for the National Board on Educational Testing and Public Policy. The conclusion drawn is…

  9. Multigrid solution of the convection-diffusion equation with high-Reynolds number

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun

    1996-12-31

    A fourth-order compact finite difference scheme is employed with the multigrid technique to solve the variable coefficient convection-diffusion equation with high-Reynolds number. Scaled inter-grid transfer operators and potential on vectorization and parallelization are discussed. The high-order multigrid method is unconditionally stable and produces solution of 4th-order accuracy. Numerical experiments are included.

  10. SPECT/CT Imaging of High-Risk Atherosclerotic Plaques using Integrin-Binding RGD Dimer Peptides.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jung Sun; Lee, Jonghwan; Jung, Jae Ho; Moon, Byung Seok; Kim, Soonhag; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Sang Eun

    2015-06-30

    Vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques with unique biological signatures are responsible for most major cardiovascular events including acute myocardial infarction and stroke. However, current clinical diagnostic approaches for atherosclerosis focus on anatomical measurements such as the degree of luminal stenosis and wall thickness. An abundance of neovessels with elevated expression of integrin αvβ3 is closely associated with an increased risk of plaque rupture. Herein we evaluated the potential of an αvβ3 integrin-targeting radiotracer, (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2, for SPECT/CT imaging of high-risk plaque in murine atherosclerosis models. In vivo uptake of (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 was significantly higher in atherosclerotic aortas than in relatively normal aortas. Comparison with the negative-control peptide, (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RADfK)]2, proved specific binding of (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 for plaque lesions in in vivo SPECT/CT and ex vivo autoradiographic imaging. Histopathological characterization revealed that a prominent SPECT signal of (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 corresponded to the presence of high-risk plaques with a large necrotic core, a thin fibrous cap, and vibrant neoangiogenic events. Notably, the RGD dimer based (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 showed better imaging performance in comparison with the common monomeric RGD peptide probe (123)I-c(RGDyV) and fluorescence tissue assay corroborated this. Our preclinical data demonstrated that (99m)Tc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 SPECT/CT is a sensitive tool to noninvasively gauge atherosclerosis beyond vascular anatomy by assessing culprit plaque neovascularization.

  11. SPECT/CT Imaging of High-Risk Atherosclerotic Plaques using Integrin-Binding RGD Dimer Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sun Yoo, Jung; Lee, Jonghwan; Ho Jung, Jae; Seok Moon, Byung; Kim, Soonhag; Chul Lee, Byung; Eun Kim, Sang

    2015-01-01

    Vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques with unique biological signatures are responsible for most major cardiovascular events including acute myocardial infarction and stroke. However, current clinical diagnostic approaches for atherosclerosis focus on anatomical measurements such as the degree of luminal stenosis and wall thickness. An abundance of neovessels with elevated expression of integrin αvβ3 is closely associated with an increased risk of plaque rupture. Herein we evaluated the potential of an αvβ3 integrin-targeting radiotracer, 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2, for SPECT/CT imaging of high-risk plaque in murine atherosclerosis models. In vivo uptake of 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 was significantly higher in atherosclerotic aortas than in relatively normal aortas. Comparison with the negative-control peptide, 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RADfK)]2, proved specific binding of 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 for plaque lesions in in vivo SPECT/CT and ex vivo autoradiographic imaging. Histopathological characterization revealed that a prominent SPECT signal of 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 corresponded to the presence of high-risk plaques with a large necrotic core, a thin fibrous cap, and vibrant neoangiogenic events. Notably, the RGD dimer based 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 showed better imaging performance in comparison with the common monomeric RGD peptide probe 123I-c(RGDyV) and fluorescence tissue assay corroborated this. Our preclinical data demonstrated that 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 SPECT/CT is a sensitive tool to noninvasively gauge atherosclerosis beyond vascular anatomy by assessing culprit plaque neovascularization. PMID:26123253

  12. Segmenting the papillary muscles and the trabeculae from high resolution cardiac CT through restoration of topological handles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingchen; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Shaoting; Qian, Zhen; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a novel algorithm for segmenting the high resolution CT images of the left ventricle (LV), particularly the papillary muscles and the trabeculae. High quality segmentations of these structures are necessary in order to better understand the anatomical function and geometrical properties of LV. These fine structures, however, are extremely challenging to capture due to their delicate and complex nature in both geometry and topology. Our algorithm computes the potential missing topological structures of a given initial segmentation. Using techniques from computational topology, e.g. persistent homology, our algorithm find topological handles which are likely to be the true signal. To further increase accuracy, these proposals are measured by the saliency and confidence from a trained classifier. Handles with high scores are restored in the final segmentation, leading to high quality segmentation results of the complex structures. PMID:24683968

  13. Prediction of stall and post-stall behavior of airfoils at low and high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Roknaldin, F.; Carr, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    An interactive boundary-layer method, together with the e(super n)-approach to the calculation of transition, has been used to predict the stall and post-stall behavior of airfoils at low and high Reynolds numbers. The turbulence model is based on the Cebeci-Smith algebraic eddy-viscosity formulation with improvements for strong pressure gradient effects and transitional flows at low Reynolds numbers. Comparison of calculated results for incompressible flows indicate good agreement with experiment for a wide range of Reynolds numbers. Preliminary calculations for low Mach number flows with this interactive method with compressibility corrections to the panel method indicate that, at a Mach number of 0.3, the compressibility effect on (C sub Q)max is not negligible.

  14. High Resolution Mapping of Genetic Factors Affecting Abdominal Bristle Number in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Long, A. D.; Mullaney, S. L.; Reid, L. A.; Fry, J. D.; Langley, C. H.; Mackay, TFC.

    1995-01-01

    Factors responsible for selection response for abdominal bristle number and correlated responses in sternopleural bristle number were mapped to the X and third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. Lines divergent for high and low abdominal bristle number were created by 25 generations of artificial selection from a large base population, with an intensity of 25 individuals of each sex selected from 100 individuals of each sex scored per generation. Isogenic chromosome substitution lines in which the high (H) X or third chromosome were placed in an isogenic low (L) background were derived from the selection lines and from the 93 recombinant isogenic (RI) HL X and 67 RI chromosome 3 lines constructed from them. Highly polymorphic neutral r00 transposable elements were hybridized in situ to the polytene chromosomes of the RI lines to create a set of cytogenetic markers. These techniques yielded a dense map with an average spacing of 4 cM between informative markers. Factors affecting bristle number, and relative viability of the chromosome 3 RI lines, were mapped using a multiple regression interval mapping approach, conditioning on all markers >/=10 cM from the tested interval. Two factors with large effects on abdominal bristle number were mapped on the X chromosome and five factors on the third chromosome. One factor with a large effect on sternopleural bristle number was mapped to the X and two were mapped to the third chromosome; all factors with sternopleural effects corresponded to those with effects on abdominal bristle number. Two of the chromosome 3 factors with large effects on abdominal bristle number were also associated with reduced viability. Significant sex-specific effects and epistatic interactions between mapped factors of the same order of magnitude as the additive effects were observed. All factors mapped to the approximate positions of likely candidate loci (ASC, bb, emc, h, mab, Dl and E(spl)), previously characterized by mutations with large

  15. Self-consistent high-Reynolds-number asymptotics for zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkewitz, Peter A.; Chauhan, Kapil A.; Nagib, Hassan M.

    2007-11-01

    The asymptotic behavior of mean velocity and integral parameters in flat plate turbulent boundary layers under zero pressure gradient are studied for Reynolds numbers approaching infinity. Using the classical two-layer approach of Millikan, Rotta, and Clauser with a logarithmic velocity profile in the overlap region between "inner" and "outer" layers, a fully self-consistent leading-order description of the mean velocity profile and all integral parameters is developed. It is shown that this description fits most high Reynolds number data, and in particular their Reynolds number dependence, exceedingly well; i.e., within experimental errors.

  16. Denoising and artefact reduction in dynamic flat detector CT perfusion imaging using high speed acquisition: first experimental and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Manhart, Michael T; Aichert, André; Struffert, Tobias; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Kowarschik, Markus; Maier, Andreas K; Hornegger, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2014-08-21

    Flat detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) is a novel technique using C-arm angiography systems for interventional dynamic tissue perfusion measurement with high potential benefits for catheter-guided treatment of stroke. However, FD-CTP is challenging since C-arms rotate slower than conventional CT systems. Furthermore, noise and artefacts affect the measurement of contrast agent flow in tissue. Recent robotic C-arms are able to use high speed protocols (HSP), which allow sampling of the contrast agent flow with improved temporal resolution. However, low angular sampling of projection images leads to streak artefacts, which are translated to the perfusion maps. We recently introduced the FDK-JBF denoising technique based on Feldkamp (FDK) reconstruction followed by joint bilateral filtering (JBF). As this edge-preserving noise reduction preserves streak artefacts, an empirical streak reduction (SR) technique is presented in this work. The SR method exploits spatial and temporal information in the form of total variation and time-curve analysis to detect and remove streaks. The novel approach is evaluated in a numerical brain phantom and a patient study. An improved noise and artefact reduction compared to existing post-processing methods and faster computation speed compared to an algebraic reconstruction method are achieved.

  17. Denoising and artefact reduction in dynamic flat detector CT perfusion imaging using high speed acquisition: first experimental and clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manhart, Michael T.; Aichert, André; Struffert, Tobias; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Kowarschik, Markus; Maier, Andreas K.; Hornegger, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2014-08-01

    Flat detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) is a novel technique using C-arm angiography systems for interventional dynamic tissue perfusion measurement with high potential benefits for catheter-guided treatment of stroke. However, FD-CTP is challenging since C-arms rotate slower than conventional CT systems. Furthermore, noise and artefacts affect the measurement of contrast agent flow in tissue. Recent robotic C-arms are able to use high speed protocols (HSP), which allow sampling of the contrast agent flow with improved temporal resolution. However, low angular sampling of projection images leads to streak artefacts, which are translated to the perfusion maps. We recently introduced the FDK-JBF denoising technique based on Feldkamp (FDK) reconstruction followed by joint bilateral filtering (JBF). As this edge-preserving noise reduction preserves streak artefacts, an empirical streak reduction (SR) technique is presented in this work. The SR method exploits spatial and temporal information in the form of total variation and time-curve analysis to detect and remove streaks. The novel approach is evaluated in a numerical brain phantom and a patient study. An improved noise and artefact reduction compared to existing post-processing methods and faster computation speed compared to an algebraic reconstruction method are achieved.

  18. Quadruplex MAPH: improvement of throughput in high-resolution copy number screening

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, Jess; Majerus, Tamsin MO; Walker, Susan; Armour, John AL

    2009-01-01

    Background Copy number variation (CNV) in the human genome is recognised as a widespread and important source of human genetic variation. Now the challenge is to screen for these CNVs at high resolution in a reliable, accurate and cost-effective way. Results Multiplex Amplifiable Probe Hybridisation (MAPH) is a sensitive, high-resolution technology appropriate for screening for CNVs in a defined region, for a targeted population. We have developed MAPH to a highly multiplexed format ("QuadMAPH") that allows the user a four-fold increase in the number of loci tested simultaneously. We have used this method to analyse a genomic region of 210 kb, including the MSH2 gene and 120 kb of flanking DNA. We show that the QuadMAPH probes report copy number with equivalent accuracy to simplex MAPH, reliably demonstrating diploid copy number in control samples and accurately detecting deletions in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) samples. Conclusion QuadMAPH is an accurate, high-resolution method that allows targeted screening of large numbers of subjects without the expense of genome-wide approaches. Whilst we have applied this technique to a region of the human genome, it is equally applicable to the genomes of other organisms. PMID:19785739

  19. High-performance C-arm cone-beam CT guidance of thoracic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Sebastian; Otake, Yoshito; Uneri, Ali; Mirota, Daniel J.; Nithiananthan, Sajendra; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Graumann, Rainer; Sussman, Marc; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2012-02-01

    Localizing sub-palpable nodules in minimally invasive video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) presents a significant challenge. To overcome inherent problems of preoperative nodule tagging using CT fluoroscopic guidance, an intraoperative C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) image-guidance system has been developed for direct localization of subpalpable tumors in the OR, including real-time tracking of surgical tools (including thoracoscope), and video-CBCT registration for augmentation of the thoracoscopic scene. Acquisition protocols for nodule visibility in the inflated and deflated lung were delineated in phantom and animal/cadaver studies. Motion compensated reconstruction was implemented to account for motion induced by the ventilated contralateral lung. Experience in CBCT-guided targeting of simulated lung nodules included phantoms, porcine models, and cadavers. Phantom studies defined low-dose acquisition protocols providing contrast-to-noise ratio sufficient for lung nodule visualization, confirmed in porcine specimens with simulated nodules (3-6mm diameter PE spheres, ~100-150HU contrast, 2.1mGy). Nodule visibility in CBCT of the collapsed lung, with reduced contrast according to air volume retention, was more challenging, but initial studies confirmed visibility using scan protocols at slightly increased dose (~4.6-11.1mGy). Motion compensated reconstruction employing a 4D deformation map in the backprojection process reduced artifacts associated with motion blur. Augmentation of thoracoscopic video with renderings of the target and critical structures (e.g., pulmonary artery) showed geometric accuracy consistent with camera calibration and the tracking system (2.4mm registration error). Initial results suggest a potentially valuable role for CBCT guidance in VATS, improving precision in minimally invasive, lungconserving surgeries, avoid critical structures, obviate the burdens of preoperative localization, and improve patient safety.

  20. Active Control of Flow Separation on a High-Lift System with Slotted Flap at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khodadoust, Abdollah; Washburn, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Energy Efficient Transport (EET) airfoil was tested at NASA Langley's Low- Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) to assess the effectiveness of distributed Active Flow Control (AFC) concepts on a high-lift system at flight scale Reynolds numbers for a medium-sized transport. The test results indicate presence of strong Reynolds number effects on the high-lift system with the AFC operational, implying the importance of flight-scale testing for implementation of such systems during design of future flight vehicles with AFC. This paper describes the wind tunnel test results obtained at the LTPT for the EET high-lift system for various AFC concepts examined on this airfoil.

  1. Rapid selection using G418 of high copy number transformants of Pichia pastoris for high-level foreign gene expression.

    PubMed

    Scorer, C A; Clare, J J; McCombie, W R; Romanos, M A; Sreekrishna, K

    1994-02-01

    Pichia pastoris is a methylotrophic yeast increasingly important in the production of therapeutic proteins. Expression vectors are based on the methanol-inducible AOX1 promoter and are integrated into the host chromosome. In most cases high copy number integration has been shown to be important for high-level expression. Since this occurs at low frequency during transformation, we previously used DNA dot blot screens to identify suitable clones. In this paper we report the use of vectors containing the Tn903 kanr gene conferring G418-resistance. Initial experiments demonstrated that copy number showed a tight correlation with drug-resistance. Using a G418 growth inhibition screen, we readily isolated a series of transformants, containing progressively increasing numbers (1 to 12) of a vector expressing HIV-1 ENV, which we used to examine the relationship between copy number and foreign mRNA levels. Northern blot analysis indicated that ENV mRNA levels from a single-copy clone were nearly as high as AOX1 mRNA, and increased progressively with increasing copy number so as to greatly exceed AOX1 mRNA. We have also developed protocols for the selection, using G418, of high copy number transformants following spheroplast transformation or electroporation. We anticipate that these protocols will simplify the use of Pichia as a biotechnological tool.

  2. Numerical and approximate solution of the high Reynolds number small separation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Several possible methods of solving the small separation problem at high Reynolds number are investigated. In addition to using analytical methods, there are several numerical approaches which are used. High Reynolds number laminar two dimensional problems are used for simplicity. A brief discussion is given of the finite difference methods since these methods are discussed in detail. Most of the emphasis is placed on developing an approximate integral method. As a model problem the supersonic compression ramp problem is chosen since several numerical solutions along with experimental data are available. The techniques discussed are modified and applied to other similar type wall geometries.

  3. Dispersive nature of high mach number collisionless plasma shocks: Poynting flux of oblique whistler waves.

    PubMed

    Sundkvist, David; Krasnoselskikh, V; Bale, S D; Schwartz, S J; Soucek, J; Mozer, F

    2012-01-13

    Whistler wave trains are observed in the foot region of high Mach number quasiperpendicular shocks. The waves are oblique with respect to the ambient magnetic field as well as the shock normal. The Poynting flux of the waves is directed upstream in the shock normal frame starting from the ramp of the shock. This suggests that the waves are an integral part of the shock structure with the dispersive shock as the source of the waves. These observations lead to the conclusion that the shock ramp structure of supercritical high Mach number shocks is formed as a balance of dispersion and nonlinearity.

  4. Technical Note: Skin thickness measurements using high-resolution flat-panel cone-beam dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Linxi; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the mean and range of location-averaged breast skin thickness using high-resolution dedicated breast CT for use in Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients. Methods: This study retrospectively analyzed image data from a clinical study investigating dedicated breast CT. An algorithm similar to that described by Huang et al.['The effect of skin thickness determined using breast CT on mammographic dosimetry,' Med. Phys. 35(4), 1199-1206 (2008)] was used to determine the skin thickness in 137 dedicated breast CT volumes from 136 women. The location-averaged mean breast skin thickness for each breast was estimated and the study population mean and range were determined. Pathology results were available for 132 women, and were used to investigate if the distribution of location-averaged mean breast skin thickness varied with pathology. The effect of surface fitting to account for breast curvature was also studied. Results: The study mean ({+-} interbreast SD) for breast skin thickness was 1.44 {+-} 0.25 mm (range: 0.87-2.34 mm), which was in excellent agreement with Huang et al. Based on pathology, pair-wise statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) indicated that at the 0.05 significance level, there were no significant difference in the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness distributions between the groups: benign vs malignant (p= 0.223), benign vs hyperplasia (p= 0.651), hyperplasia vs malignant (p= 0.229), and malignant vs nonmalignant (p= 0.172). Conclusions: Considering this study used a different clinical prototype system, and the study participants were from a different geographical location, the observed agreement between the two studies suggests that the choice of 1.45 mm thick skin layer comprising the epidermis and the dermis for breast dosimetry is appropriate. While some benign and malignant conditions could cause skin thickening, in this study cohort the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness

  5. Two-dimensional temperature distribution measurement of flames by absorption CT employing CO{sub 2} (Experimental study on the wave number employed and the accuracy of measurement)

    SciTech Connect

    Wakai, Kazunori; Moroto, Masakazu; Takahashi, Shuhei; Bhattacharjee, S.

    1999-07-01

    The authors have developed the algorithm of infrared two-band absorption CT (computed tomography) not only for short optical path where Lambert-Beer law is applicable but also for long optical path where some band model should be applied. The authors have also shown employing CO{sub 2} as an absorption medium, statistical model as a band model and Curtis-Godson model to treat non-uniform temperature fields that when optical path is long and spectrum has steep change, there are suitable wavelengths and widths to keep good accuracy. However, it was done only by computer simulation, and in this report, those results are discussed experimentally. The flat burner was used to compare temperature measured by above method with the temperature measured by sodium D-line reversal method. The results showed good correspondence and it means that the predicted suitable wavelengths and widths are experimentally confirmed. The accuracy, namely, standard deviation of the temperature, at the best wavelength conditions was lower than 20K. Temperature distributions around non-uniform temperature distribution on the flat disk burner and domestic boiler were also measured as applications and the results show that this method is applicable for the measurement of rather complicated two-dimensional temperature distributions.

  6. Transition Documentation on a Three-Element High-Lift Configuration at High Reynolds Numbers: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertelrud, Arild; Anders, J. B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A 2-D high-lift system experiment was conducted in August of 1996 in the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA. The purpose of the experiment was to obtain transition measurements on a three element high-lift system for CFD code validation studies. A transition database has been created using the data from this experiment. The present report contains the analysis of the surface hot film data in terms of the transition locations on the three elements. It also includes relevant information regarding the pressure loads and distributions and the wakes behind the model to aid in the interpretation of the transition data. For some of the configurations the current pressure data has been compared with previous wind tunnel entries of the same model. The methodology used to determine the regions of transitional flow is outlined and each configuration tested has been analyzed. A discussion of interference effects, repeatability, and three-dimensional effects on the data is included.

  7. High-order lattice Boltzmann models for wall-bounded flows at finite Knudsen numbers.

    PubMed

    Feuchter, C; Schleifenbaum, W

    2016-07-01

    We analyze a large number of high-order discrete velocity models for solving the Boltzmann-Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation for finite Knudsen number flows. Using the Chapman-Enskog formalism, we prove for isothermal flows a relation identifying the resolved flow regimes for low Mach numbers. Although high-order lattice Boltzmann models recover flow regimes beyond the Navier-Stokes level, we observe for several models significant deviations from reference results. We found this to be caused by their inability to recover the Maxwell boundary condition exactly. By using supplementary conditions for the gas-surface interaction it is shown how to systematically generate discrete velocity models of any order with the inherent ability to fulfill the diffuse Maxwell boundary condition accurately. Both high-order quadratures and an exact representation of the boundary condition turn out to be crucial for achieving reliable results. For Poiseuille flow, we can reproduce the mass flow and slip velocity up to the Knudsen number of 1. Moreover, for small Knudsen numbers, the Knudsen layer behavior is recovered. PMID:27575233

  8. High-order lattice Boltzmann models for wall-bounded flows at finite Knudsen numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuchter, C.; Schleifenbaum, W.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze a large number of high-order discrete velocity models for solving the Boltzmann-Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation for finite Knudsen number flows. Using the Chapman-Enskog formalism, we prove for isothermal flows a relation identifying the resolved flow regimes for low Mach numbers. Although high-order lattice Boltzmann models recover flow regimes beyond the Navier-Stokes level, we observe for several models significant deviations from reference results. We found this to be caused by their inability to recover the Maxwell boundary condition exactly. By using supplementary conditions for the gas-surface interaction it is shown how to systematically generate discrete velocity models of any order with the inherent ability to fulfill the diffuse Maxwell boundary condition accurately. Both high-order quadratures and an exact representation of the boundary condition turn out to be crucial for achieving reliable results. For Poiseuille flow, we can reproduce the mass flow and slip velocity up to the Knudsen number of 1. Moreover, for small Knudsen numbers, the Knudsen layer behavior is recovered.

  9. High-throughput assessment of transgene copy number in sugarcane using real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Casu, Rosanne E; Selivanova, Alexandra; Perroux, Jai M

    2012-01-01

    Accurate and timely detection of transgene copy number in sugarcane is currently hampered by the requirement to use Southern blotting, needing relatively large amounts of genomic DNA and, therefore, the continued growth and maintenance of bulky plants in containment glasshouses. In addition, the sugarcane genome is both polyploid and aneuploid, complicating the identification of appropriate genes for use as references in the development of a high-throughput method. Using bioinformatic techniques followed by in vitro testing, two genes that appear to occur once per base genome of sugarcane were identified. Using these genes as reference genes, a high-throughput assay employing RT-qPCR was developed and tested using a group of sugarcane plants that contained unknown numbers of copies of the nptII gene encoding kanamycin resistance. Using this assay, transgene copy numbers from 3 to more than 50 were identified. In comparison, Southern blotting accurately identified the number of transgene copies for one line and by inference for another, but was not able to provide an accurate estimation for transgenic lines containing numerous copies of the nptII gene. Using the reference genes identified in this study, a high-throughput assay for the determination of transgene copy number was developed and tested for sugarcane. This method requires much less input DNA, can be performed much earlier in the production of transgenic sugarcane plants and allows much more efficient assessment of numerous potentially transgenic lines than Southern blotting.

  10. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  11. A review of some Reynolds number effects related to bodies at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    A review of some effects of Reynolds number on selected aerodynamic characteristics of two- and three-dimensional bodies of various cross sections in relation to fuselages at high angles of attack at subsonic and transonic speeds is presented. Emphasis is placed on the Reynolds number ranges above the subcritical and angles of attack where lee side vortex flow or unsteady wake type flows predominate. Lists of references, arranged in subject categories, are presented with emphasis on those which include data over a reasonable Reynolds number range. Selected Reynolds number data representative of various aerodynamic flows around bodies are presented and analyzed and some effects of these flows on fuselage aerodynamic parameters are discussed.

  12. Dose-volume parameters and clinical outcome of CT-guided free-hand high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Ye, Wei-Jun; Du, Le-Hui; Li, Ai-Ju; Ren, Yu-Feng; Cao, Xin-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Currently, image-based 3-dimentional (3D) planning brachytherapy allows for a better assessment of gross tumor volume (GTV) and the definition and delineation of target volume in cervix cancer. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of our novel computed tomography (CT)-guided free-hand high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDRISBT) technique for cervical cancer by evaluating the dosimetry and preliminary clinical outcome of this approach. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters were analyzed according to the Gynecological GEC-ESTRO Working Group recommendations for image-based 3D treatment in cervical cancer. Twenty cervical cancer patients who underwent CT-guided free-hand HDRISBT between March 2009 and June 2010 were studied. With a median of 5 (range, 4–7) implanted needles for each patient, the median dose of brachytherapy alone delivered to 90% of the target volume (D90) was 45 (range, 33–54) Gyα/β10 for high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) and 30 (range, 20–36) Gyα/β10 for intermediate-risk clinical target volume (IR-CTV). The percentage of the CTV covered by the prescribed dose (V100) of HR-CTV with brachytherapy alone was 81.9%–99.2% (median, 96.7%). With an additional dose of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), the median D90 was 94 (range, 83–104) Gyα/β10 for HR-CTV and 77 (range, 70–87) Gyα/β10 for IR-CTV; the median dose delivered to 100% of the target volume (D100) was 75 (range, 66–84) Gyα/β10 for HR-CTV and 65 (range, 57–73) Gyα/β10 for IR-CTV. The minimum dose to the most irradiated 2 cc volume (D2cc) was 73–96 (median, 83) Gyα/β3 for the bladder, 64–98 (median, 73) Gyα/β3 for the rectum, and 52–69 (median, 61) Gyα/β3 for the sigmoid colon. After a median follow-up of 15 months (range, 3–24 months), two patients experienced local failure, and 1 showed internal iliac nodal metastasis. Despite the relatively small number of needles used, CT-guided HDRISBT for cervical cancer showed favorable

  13. In vitro and in vivo CT imaging using bismuth sulfide modified with a highly biocompatible Pluronic F127

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Meng, Yuan-Zheng; Huang, Huan-Huan; Qin, Meng-Yao; Yan, Dong-Mei; Zhao, Yuan-Di; Ma, Zhi-Ya

    2014-07-01

    Probe bismuth sulfide modified with Pluronic F127 (Bi2S3-PF127), which has high biocompatibility and dispersibility, is synthesized using triblock copolymer Pluronic F127 to modify hydrophobic Bi2S3 nanoparticles that are prepared by a hot injection method. TEM results show that most of the probe has a length of about 14.85 ± 1.70 nm and a breadth of about 4.79 ± 0.63 nm. After injected into the tail vein of a mouse, the probe has obvious CT contrast enhancement capability from x-ray CT imaging results. Meanwhile, the probe’s in vivo toxicity is also studied. It is found that hematoxylin and eosin stains of major organs have no change. A biochemical analysis (alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase) prove the probe has no adverse effects. The results of a blood analysis (white blood cell count, red blood cell count, hemoglobin, and platelet count) are also normal. The biological distribution of Bi by ICP-AES shows that most of nanoparticles are cleaned out after injection 48 h, and the circulation half-life of the probe is 5.0 h, suggesting that Bi2S3-PF127 has a long circulation and indicating that the Bi2S3-PF127 probe has good biocompatibility and safety.

  14. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method for immiscible fluids at high Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Fakhari, Abbas; Lee, Taehun

    2013-02-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method for immiscible multiphase flows with large density ratio is extended to high Reynolds number flows using a multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) collision operator, and its stability and accuracy are assessed by simulating the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The MRT model is successful at damping high-frequency oscillations in the kinetic energy emerging from traveling waves generated by the inclusion of curvature. Numerical results are shown to be in good agreement with prior studies using adaptive mesh refinement techniques applied to the Navier-Stokes equations. Effects of viscosity and surface tension, as well as density ratio, are investigated in terms of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. It is shown that increasing the Reynolds number results in a more chaotic interface evolution and eventually shattering of the interface, while surface tension is shown to have a stabilizing effect.

  15. Wind Tunnel Tests of Wind Turbine Airfoils at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorente, E.; Gorostidi, A.; Jacobs, M.; Timmer, W. A.; Munduate, X.; Pires, O.

    2014-06-01

    Wind tunnel tests have been performed to measure the two-dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of two different airfoil families at high Reynolds numbers (from 3 to 12 millions) in the DNW High Pressure Wind Tunnel in Gottingen (HDG), Germany. Also, tests at a Reynolds number of 3 millions have been performed in the Low-Speed Low- Turbulence Wind Tunnel of Delft University, The Netherlands. The airfoils tested belong to two wind turbine dedicated families: the TU-Delft DU family and the ACCIONA Windpower AWA family that was designed in collaboration with CENER. Reynolds number effects on airfoil performance have been obtained in the range of 3 to 12 millions. The availability of data from two different wind tunnels has brought the opportunity to cross compare the results from the two facilities.

  16. Quantitative imaging using high-energy X-ray phase-contrast CT with a 70 kVp polychromatic X-ray spectrum.

    PubMed

    Sarapata, Adrian; Willner, Marian; Walter, Marco; Duttenhofer, Thomas; Kaiser, Konradin; Meyer, Pascal; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander; Noël, Peter B; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2015-01-12

    Imaging of large and dense objects with grating-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography requires high X-ray photon energy and large fields of view. It has become increasingly possible due to the improvements in the grating manufacturing processes. Using a high-energy X-ray phase-contrast CT setup with a large (10 cm in diameter) analyzer grating and operated at an acceleration tube voltage of 70 kVp, we investigate the complementarity of both attenuation and phase contrast modalities with materials of various atomic numbers (Z). We confirm experimentally that for low-Z materials, phase contrast yields no additional information content over attenuation images, yet it provides increased contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). The complementarity of both signals can be seen again with increasing Z of the materials and a more comprehensive material characterization is thus possible. Imaging of a part of a human cervical spine with intervertebral discs surrounded by bones and various soft tissue types showcases the benefit of high-energy X-ray phase-contrast system. Phase-contrast reconstruction reveals the internal structure of the discs and makes the boundary between the disc annulus and nucleus pulposus visible. Despite the fact that it still remains challenging to develop a high-energy grating interferometer with a broad polychromatic source with satisfactory optical performance, improved image quality for phase contrast as compared to attenuation contrast can be obtained and new exciting applications foreseen. PMID:25835698

  17. Dynamic unified RANS-LES simulations of high Reynolds number separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtarpoor, Reza; Heinz, Stefan; Stoellinger, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The development of hybrid RANS-LES methods is seen to be a very promising approach to enable efficient simulations of high Reynolds number turbulent flows involving flow separation. To contribute to further advances, we present a new, theoretically well based, dynamic hybrid RANS-LES method, referred to as DLUM. It is applied to a high Reynolds number flow involving both attached and separated flow regimes: a periodic hill flow is simulated at a Reynolds number of 37 000. Its performance is compared to pure LES, pure RANS, other hybrid RANS-LES (given by DLUM modifications), and experimental observations. It is shown that the use of this computational method offers huge cost reductions (which scale with Re/200, Re refers to the Reynolds number) of very high Reynolds number flow simulations compared to LES, it is much more accurate than RANS, and more accurate than LES, which is not fully resolved. In particular, this conclusion does also apply to the comparison of DLUM and pure LES simulations on rather coarse grids, which are often simply required to deal with simulations of very high Reynolds number flows: the DLUM provides mean velocity fields which are hardly affected by the grid, whereas LES velocity fields reveal significant shortcomings. We identified the reason for the superior performance of our new dynamic hybrid RANS-LES method compared to LES: it is the model's ability to respond to a changing resolution with adequate turbulent viscosity changes by ensuring simultaneously a physically correct turbulence length scale specification under the presence of interacting RANS and LES modes.

  18. Application of Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems to Ultra-High Reynolds Number Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P.

    1996-01-01

    The current status of wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system development is briefly reviewed. Technical work currently underway at NASA Langley Research Center is detailed, where it relates to the ultra-high Reynolds number application. The application itself is addressed, concluded to be quite feasible, and broad design recommendations given.

  19. Preparation of high-principal-quantum-number circular'' states of rubidium

    SciTech Connect

    Nussenzveig, P.; Bernardot, F.; Brune, M.; Hare, J.; Raimond, J.M.; Haroche, S.; Gawlik, W. )

    1993-11-01

    We describe a rubidium circular-state-preparation technique suited to high principal quantum numbers. It combines an excellent selectivity and a good efficiency. Preliminary spectroscopic tests on the [ital n]=50[r arrow][ital n]=51 circular to circular transition at 51 GHz are reported.

  20. Dynamics of high Weber number drops impacting on hydrophobic surfaces with closed micro-cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Hao, Pengfei; Zhang, Xiwen; He, Feng

    2016-06-29

    The impact dynamics and bouncing performance of high Weber number drops on hydrophobic surfaces with open and closed micro-cells are investigated. Central wetted rings are observed on both closed-cell and open-cell surfaces under high Weber number collisions, which are proposed to constitute the key element affecting the bouncing behaviour. It is found that the drops rebound on closed-cell surfaces where the central area is in the "hybrid wetting state" at high Weber numbers, while the drops adhere to the open-cell surfaces where the central region is in the Wenzel state. A theoretical model is developed to explain this interesting phenomenon, in which the liquid cannot reach the bottom of the closed-cell hydrophobic surfaces since the air stored in micro-cavities prevents the sliding motion of the liquid film and functions as a "gas spring" lifting the liquid lamella. This indicates that the hydrophobic surface with simple micro cavities can maintain the water-repellent characteristics under drop impacts at high Weber numbers. These findings are expected to be crucial to a fundamental understanding of the rapid collisions between drops and micro-structured surfaces, as well as a valuable strategy to guide the fabrication of novel super water-repellant and anti-icing surfaces. PMID:27306824

  1. The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center High Reynolds Number Wind Tunnel Technical Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwin, H. S.

    1975-01-01

    The High Reynolds Number Wind Tunnel at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center is described. The following items are presented to illustrate the operation and capabilities of the facility: facility descriptions and specifications, operational and performance characteristics, model design criteria, instrumentation and data recording equipment, data processing and presentation, and preliminary test information required.

  2. Effects of Aspect Ratio on Air Flow at High Subsonic Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W F; Humphreys, Milton D

    1952-01-01

    Schlieren photographs were used in an investigation to determine the effects of changing the aspect ratio from infinity to 2 on the air flow past a wing at high subsonic Mach numbers. The results indicated that the decreased effects of compressibility on drag coefficients for the finite wing are produced by a reduction in the compression shock and flow separation.

  3. Turbulence Model Comparisons and Reynolds Number Effects Over a High-Speed Aircraft at Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Melissa B.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper gives the results of a grid study, a turbulence model study, and a Reynolds number effect study for transonic flows over a high-speed aircraft using the thin-layer, upwind, Navier-Stokes CFL3D code. The four turbulence models evaluated are the algebraic Baldwin-Lomax model with the Degani-Schiff modifications, the one-equation Baldwin-Barth model, the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model, and Menter's two-equation Shear-Stress-Transport (SST) model. The flow conditions, which correspond to tests performed in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF), are a Mach number of 0.90 and a Reynolds number of 30 million based on chord for a range of angle-of-attacks (1 degree to 10 degrees). For the Reynolds number effect study, Reynolds numbers of 10 and 80 million based on chord were also evaluated. Computed forces and surface pressures compare reasonably well with the experimental data for all four of the turbulence models. The Baldwin-Lomax model with the Degani-Schiff modifications and the one-equation Baldwin-Barth model show the best agreement with experiment overall. The Reynolds number effects are evaluated using the Baldwin-Lomax with the Degani-Schiff modifications and the Baldwin-Barth turbulence models. Five angles-of-attack were evaluated for the Reynolds number effect study at three different Reynolds numbers. More work is needed to determine the ability of CFL3D to accurately predict Reynolds number effects.

  4. Assessment of algorithms for high throughput detection of genomic copy number variation in oligonucleotide microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Baross, Ágnes; Delaney, Allen D; Li, H Irene; Nayar, Tarun; Flibotte, Stephane; Qian, Hong; Chan, Susanna Y; Asano, Jennifer; Ally, Adrian; Cao, Manqiu; Birch, Patricia; Brown-John, Mabel; Fernandes, Nicole; Go, Anne; Kennedy, Giulia; Langlois, Sylvie; Eydoux, Patrice; Friedman, JM; Marra, Marco A

    2007-01-01

    Background Genomic deletions and duplications are important in the pathogenesis of diseases, such as cancer and mental retardation, and have recently been shown to occur frequently in unaffected individuals as polymorphisms. Affymetrix GeneChip whole genome sampling analysis (WGSA) combined with 100 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays is one of several microarray-based approaches that are now being used to detect such structural genomic changes. The popularity of this technology and its associated open source data format have resulted in the development of an increasing number of software packages for the analysis of copy number changes using these SNP arrays. Results We evaluated four publicly available software packages for high throughput copy number analysis using synthetic and empirical 100 K SNP array data sets, the latter obtained from 107 mental retardation (MR) patients and their unaffected parents and siblings. We evaluated the software with regards to overall suitability for high-throughput 100 K SNP array data analysis, as well as effectiveness of normalization, scaling with various reference sets and feature extraction, as well as true and false positive rates of genomic copy number variant (CNV) detection. Conclusion We observed considerable variation among the numbers and types of candidate CNVs detected by different analysis approaches, and found that multiple programs were needed to find all real aberrations in our test set. The frequency of false positive deletions was substantial, but could be greatly reduced by using the SNP genotype information to confirm loss of heterozygosity. PMID:17910767

  5. Baryon-Plus Number Violation at High Temperatures for Arbitrary Higgs Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xu.

    In this thesis, baryon-plus-lepton (B + L) number violation in the electroweak theory of the Weinberg-Salam model is systematically studied. B + L number non-conservation in the electroweak theory is believed to be a consequence of the axial U(1) anomaly. It is argued that sphaleron, not instanton dominates the topological vacuum-to-vacuum transitions for B + L number change at high temperatures. The rate of change is reduced to a dimensionless prefactor kappa which is related to the determinants of small fluctuations around the sphaleron configuration. And kappa is exactly computed at high temperatures exploiting symmetries of sphaleron under spatial rotations combined with isospin and custodial SU(2) transformations. For the ratio lambda/g^2 of scalar four point coupling lambda to gauge coupling g^2 near unity, it is found that kappa is 0.03. and the rate of B + L number change at temperatures of order 1 Tev is about 8 to 9 orders of magnitude faster than the expansion rate of the big bang theory. For lambda/g ^2 large corresponding to a strongly coupled Higgs phase, or for lambda/g^2 very small tending to the Coleman-Weinberg limit, it is found that the determinant strongly suppresses the rate of baryon number changing processes.

  6. Large scale dynamics in a turbulent compressible rotor/stator cavity flow at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachize, C.; Verhille, G.; Le Gal, P.

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation of a turbulent flow confined within a rotor/stator cavity of aspect ratio close to unity at high Reynolds number. The experiments have been driven by changing both the rotation rate of the disk and the thermodynamical properties of the working fluid. This fluid is sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) whose physical properties are adjusted by imposing the operating temperature and the absolute pressure in a pressurized vessel, especially near the critical point of SF6 reached for T c = 45.58 ◦C, P c = 37.55 bar. This original set-up allows to obtain Reynolds numbers as high as 2 × 107 together with compressibility effects as the Mach number can reach 0.5. Pressure measurements reveal that the resulting fully turbulent flow shows both a direct and an inverse cascade as observed in rotating turbulence and in accordance with Kraichnan conjecture for 2D-turbulence. The spectra are however dominated by low-frequency peaks, which are subharmonics of the rotating disk frequency, involving large scale structures at small azimuthal wavenumbers. These modes appear for a Reynolds number around 105 and experience a transition at a critical Reynolds number Re c ≈ 106. Moreover they show an unexpected nonlinear behavior that we understand with the help of a low dimensional amplitude equations.

  7. The 2-micron plasmid as a nonselectable, stable, high copy number yeast vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, D. L.; Bruschi, C. V.

    1991-01-01

    The endogenous 2-microns plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used extensively for the construction of yeast cloning and expression plasmids because it is a native yeast plasmid that is able to be maintained stably in cells at high copy number. Almost invariably, these plasmid constructs, containing some or all 2-microns sequences, exhibit copy number levels lower than 2-microns and are maintained stably only under selective conditions. We were interested in determining if there was a means by which 2-microns could be utilized for vector construction, without forfeiting either copy number or nonselective stability. We identified sites in the 2-microns plasmid that could be used for the insertion of genetic sequences without disrupting 2-microns coding elements and then assessed subsequent plasmid constructs for stability and copy number in vivo. We demonstrate the utility of a previously described 2-microns recombination chimera, pBH-2L, for the manipulation and transformation of 2-microns as a pure yeast plasmid vector. We show that the HpaI site near the STB element in the 2-microns plasmid can be utilized to clone yeast DNA of at least 3.9 kb with no loss of plasmid stability. Additionally, the copy number of these constructs is as high as levels reported for the endogenous 2-microns.

  8. Design and installation of a high Reynolds number recirculating water tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Libin

    The High-Reynolds Number Fluid Mechanics Laboratory has recently been established at Oklahoma State University (OSU). The three primary components of the laboratory are 1) a recirculating water tunnel, 2) a multiphase pipe flow facility, and 3) a multi-scale flow visualization system. This thesis focuses on the design and fabrication of the water tunnel, which will be used for high-Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer research. Two main design criteria for the water tunnel were to achieve a momentum thickness based Reynolds number in excess of 104 and to have high optical access to the flow surfaces in the test section. This is being achieved with a 1 m. long test section and a maximum flow speed of 10 m/s. This Reynolds number was targeted to bridge the gap between typical university water tunnels (103) and the world's largest water tunnel facilities (105). The water tunnel is powered by a 150 hp motor and a 4500 gpm capacity centrifugal pump. The water tunnel is designed for a maximum operating pressure of 40 psi. This will make the facility a low cost option to perform high-Reynolds number aerodynamic and hydrodynamic tests. Improved flow imaging capability is a major advantage to liquid based fluid facilities because of the increased density for seeding and reduced field-of-view for equivalent Reynolds number. The laboratory's state-of-the-art flow visualization system can be used for time-resolved and phase averaged stereo- particle-image-velocimetry (sPIV), laser-induced-fluorescence, and high-speed imaging. Design provisions are also made to allow a multi-phase loop to share the pump and motor configuration of this water tunnel facility. The major design decisions that went into the design of the water tunnel facility are discussed. The design considerations that were taken into account for the test section, flow conditioning sections and the entire flow loop are discussed in greater detail. The final configuration and the technical drawings of the water

  9. Analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to achieve high Mach numbers and high thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henneberry, Hugh M.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to enhance performance by increasing Mach number capability and by increasing thrust is described. The liquids are injected, either separately or together, into the subsonic diffuser ahead of the engine compressor. A turbojet engine and a mixed-flow turbofan engine (MFTF) are examined, and in pursuit of maximum thrust, both engines are fitted with afterburners. The results indicate that water injection alone can extend the performance envelope of both engine types by one and one-half Mach numbers at which point water-air ratios reach 17 or 18 percent and liquid specific impulse is reduced to some 390 to 470 seconds, a level about equal to the impulse of a high energy rocket engine. The envelope can be further extended, but only with increasing sacrifices in liquid specific impulse. Oxygen-airflow ratios as high as 15 percent were investigated for increasing thrust. Using 15 percent oxygen in combination with water injection at high supersonic Mach numbers resulted in thrust augmentation as high as 76 percent without any significant decrease in liquid specific impulse. The stoichiometric afterburner exit temperature increased with increasing oxygen flow, reaching 4822 deg R in the turbojet engine at a Mach number of 3.5. At the transonic Mach number of 0.95 where no water injection is needed, an oxygen-air ratio of 15 percent increased thrust by some 55 percent in both engines, along with a decrease in liquid specific impulse of 62 percent. Afterburner temperature was approximately 4700 deg R at this high thrust condition. Water and/or oxygen injection are simple and straightforward strategies to improve engine performance and they will add little to engine weight. However, if large Mach number and thrust increases are required, liquid flows become significant, so that operation at these conditions will necessarily be of short duration.

  10. Design and Predictions for High-Altitude (Low Reynolds Number) Aerodynamic Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Donald; Harmory, Phil; Krake, Keith; Drela, Mark

    2000-01-01

    A sailplane being developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center will support a high-altitude flight experiment. The experiment will measure the performance parameters or an airfoil at high altitudes (70,000 - 100,000 ft), low Reynolds numbers (2 x 10(exp 5) - 7 x 10(exp 5)), and high subsonic Mach numbers (0.5 and 0.65). The airfoil section lift and drag are determined from pilot and static pressure measurements. The locations of the separation bubble, Tollmien-Schlichting boundary-layer instability frequencies, and vortex shedding are measured from a hot-film strip. The details of the planned flight experiment are presented as well as several predictions of the airfoil performance.

  11. Design and Predictions for a High-Altitude (Low-Reynolds-Number) Aerodynamic Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Donald; Hamory, Phil; Krake, Keith; Drela, Mark

    1999-01-01

    A sailplane being developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center will support a high-altitude flight experiment. The experiment will measure the performance parameters of an airfoil at high altitudes (70,000 to 100,000 ft), low Reynolds numbers (200,000 to 700,000), and high subsonic Mach numbers (0.5 and 0.65). The airfoil section lift and drag are determined from pitot and static pressure measurements. The locations of the separation bubble, Tollmien-Schlichting boundary layer instability frequencies, and vortex shedding are measured from a hot-film strip. The details of the planned flight experiment are presented. Several predictions of the airfoil performance are also presented. Mark Drela from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology designed the APEX-16 airfoil, using the MSES code. Two-dimensional Navier-Stokes analyses were performed by Mahidhar Tatineni and Xiaolin Zhong from the University of California, Los Angeles, and by the authors at NASA Dryden.

  12. Magnus effects at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Ringel, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Magnus force and moment experienced by a yawed, spinning cylinder were studied experimentally in low speed and subsonic flows at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers. Flow-field visualization aided in describing a flow model that divides the Magnus phenomenon into a subcritical region, where reverse Magnus loads are experienced, and a supercritical region where these loads are not encountered. The roles of the spin rate, angle of attack, and crossflow Reynolds number in determining the boundaries of the subcritical region and the variations of the Magnus loads were studied.

  13. An experimental study of high Reynolds number turbulence in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhruva, Brindesh R.

    2000-11-01

    High Reynolds number turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer has been investigated using constant temperature hot-wire anemometry. The Taylor microscale Reynolds numbers (Rλ) were typically between 5 × 103 at 2 meters in the salt flats of Western Utah and 2 × 104 at 35 meters on the meterological tower of Brookhaven National Laboratory in Long Island. The measurements were used to study the statistical properties of inertial range quantities, Reynolds stress and wind direction. The identification of possible self- similar behavior in the inertial range is a primary goal in turbulence research. To motivate the need for high Reynolds number measurements we demonstrate the Reynolds number effect on the existence and extent of the inertial range. We find that the inertial range is non-existent at typical laboratory Reynolds numbers. We thus turn to high Reynolds numbers and analyze the asymmetry in the probability distribution function (pdf) of the longitudinal velocity increment. We compute the scaling exponents of the positive and negative structure functions and find that the negative exponents are more anomalous than the positive ones. Furthermore, we quantify the contribution to the asymmetry-or the skewness-from different regions of the pdf. We find that the core region of the pdf is more or less symmetric and the skewness comes primarily from the rare large amplitude events contained in the tails of the pdf. We discuss this result in the context of the down-scale cascade of energy. Next it is shown that even at Rλ ~ 20,000 the structure functions do not scale unambiguously-although the situation is far better than that at low Reynolds numbers. By applying various filtering techniques and conditional sampling it is shown that this lack of strict scaling even at very high Reynolds numbers is due to large scale ``corrupting effects'' on the inertial range. We propose a plausible scheme to remove the large scale effects. Next, we characterize the

  14. [Number, viability, and diversity of the filterable forms of prokaryotes in sphagnous high-moor peat].

    PubMed

    Lysak, L V; Lapygina, E V; Kadulin, M S; Konova, I A

    2014-01-01

    The number, potential viability, and taxonomic diversity (at the level of phylum) of the filterable forms of prokaryotes (FFP) are estimated in the main genetic horizons of high-moor peat. It was shown that the number of FFP reached 500 million cells in 1 g, i.e., up to 5% of the general size bacteria. The portion of viable cells among FFP (93-98%) was higher than that for the general size bacteria (60-68%). FISH-analysis (fluorescence in situ hybridization) showed that FFP contained the same phylogenetic groups as the population of general size bacteria (domain Archea and phylum Actinobacteria, Cytophaga, and Proteobacteria of the domain Bacteria).

  15. [Comparative evaluation of ultrasonography, computerized tomography, angiography and lipiodol CT in defining extent of hepatocarcinoma. A multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Dalla Palma, L; Pozzi Mucelli, R; Sponza, M; Bartolozzi, C; De Santis, M; Gandini, G; Mannella, P; Matricardi, L; Rossi, C; Simonetti, G

    1995-03-01

    The authors report the results of a multicentric trial on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, whose lesions were confirmed with biopsy or by high (> 400 ng/ml) alpha-fetoprotein levels. The series consisted of 149 patients examined in 8 different centers and submitted to ultrasonography (US), Computed Tomography (CT) before and after contrast agent administration, angiography and Lipiodol CT. According to lesion size and number, the patients were divided with each imaging modality into three groups: a) group 1: unifocal HCC < 5 cm diameter; b) group 2: multifocal HCC with 2-3 nodules and/or tumor mass < 80 ml; c) multifocal HCC with more than 3 nodules (with total tumor mass not exceeding 40% of liver volume) or with total tumor mass > 80 ml. In 77 patients all the examinations were available for comparison. US and CT diagnosed more patients as belonging to group 1 than angiography and Lipiodol CT, while more patients were classified as groups 2 and 3 with angiography and Lipiodol CT, meaning that US and CT may understage some HCC cases (about 15%) because they show a lower number of nodules. This observation was confirmed by the direct comparison between US and Lipiodol CT (in 114 patients), CT and Lipiodol CT (in 103 patients) and angiography and Lipiodol CT (in 116 patients). US and Lipiodol CT were in disagreement in 18 cases, CT and Lipiodol CT in 16 cases and angiography and Lipiodol CT in 13 cases. In most of these cases, Lipiodol CT showed more lesions than the other techniques. The size of the undetected lesions was small, ranging few mm to 2 cm in nearly all cases. To conclude, the results of this multicentric trial show that Lipiodol CT is a fundamental tool to evaluate HCC extent. In contrast, conventional CT appeared not to add any significant piece of information and can therefore be excluded from the diagnostic protocol of HCC.

  16. Prohibitin Expression Deregulation in Gastric Cancer Is Associated with the 3′ Untranslated Region 1630 C>T Polymorphism and Copy Number Variation

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Cirilo, Priscila Daniele Ramos; Mazzotti, Tatiane Katsue Furuya; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Wisnieski, Fernanda; Demachki, Samia; Martinez, Margarita Cortes; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Chammas, Roger; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; Smith, Marília Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    PHB is a reported oncogene and tumor suppressor in gastric cancer. Here, we evaluated whether the PHB copy number and the rs6917 polymorphism affect its expression in gastric cancer. Down-regulation and up-regulation of PHB were observed in the evaluated tumors. Reduced expression was associated with tumor dedifferentiation and cancer initiation. The T allele of the rs6917 polymorphism was associated with reduced PHB mRNA levels. Moreover, the up-regulation of PHB appeared to be regulated by the gain of additional gene copies. Thus, PHB copy number variation and differential expression of the rs6917 polymorphism may play a role in PHB transcriptional regulation. PMID:24879411

  17. Prohibitin expression deregulation in gastric cancer is associated with the 3' untranslated region 1630 C>T polymorphism and copy number variation.

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Cirilo, Priscila Daniele Ramos; Mazzotti, Tatiane Katsue Furuya; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Wisnieski, Fernanda; Demachki, Samia; Martinez, Margarita Cortes; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Chammas, Roger; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; Smith, Marília Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    PHB is a reported oncogene and tumor suppressor in gastric cancer. Here, we evaluated whether the PHB copy number and the rs6917 polymorphism affect its expression in gastric cancer. Down-regulation and up-regulation of PHB were observed in the evaluated tumors. Reduced expression was associated with tumor dedifferentiation and cancer initiation. The T allele of the rs6917 polymorphism was associated with reduced PHB mRNA levels. Moreover, the up-regulation of PHB appeared to be regulated by the gain of additional gene copies. Thus, PHB copy number variation and differential expression of the rs6917 polymorphism may play a role in PHB transcriptional regulation. PMID:24879411

  18. SU-D-207-06: Clinical Validations of Shading Correction for Cone-Beam CT Using Planning CT as a Prior

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, T; Zhu, L; Wei, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Current cone-beam CT (CBCT) images contain severe shading artifacts mainly due to scatter, hindering their quantitative use in current radiation therapy. We have previously proposed an effective shading correction method for CBCT using planning CT (pCT) as prior knowledge. In this work, we investigate the method robustness via statistical analyses on studies of a large patient group and compare the performance with that of a state-of-the-art method implemented on the current commercial radiation therapy machine -- the Varian Truebeam system. Methods: Since radiotherapy patients routinely undergo multiple-detector CT (MDCT) scans in the planning procedure, we use the high-quality pCT as “free” prior knowledge for CBCT image improvement. The CBCT image with no correction is first spatially registered with the pCT. Primary CBCT projections are estimated via forward projections of the registered image. The low frequency errors in the projections, which stem from mainly scatter, are estimated by filtering the difference between original line integral and the estimated scatter projections. The corrected CBCT image is then reconstructed from the scatter corrected projections. The proposed method is evaluated on 40 cancer patients. Results: On all patient images, we compare errors on CT number, spatial non-uniformity (SNU) and image contrast, using pCT as the ground truth. T-tests show that our algorithm improves over the Varian method on CBCT accuracies of CT number and SNU with 90% confident. The average CT number error is reduced from 54.8 HU on the Varian method to 40.9 HU, and the SNU error is reduced from 7.7% to 3.8%. There is no obvious improvement on image contrast. Conclusion: Large-group patient studies show that the proposed pCT-based algorithm outperforms the Varian method of the Truebeam system on CBCT shading correction, by providing CBCT images with higher CT number accuracy and greater image uniformity.

  19. Neutral pion number fluctuations at high multiplicity in pp-interactions at 50 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, A. G.; Aleev, A. N.; Ardashev, E. N.; Avdeichikov, V. V.; Balandin, V. P.; Basiladze, S. G.; Batouritski, M. A.; Berezhnev, S. F.; Bogdanova, G. A.; Borzunov, Yu. T.; Budilov, V. A.; Chentsov, Yu. A.; Ermakov, G. G.; Ermolov, P. F.; Furmanets, N. F.; Golovkin, V. F.; Golovnya, S. N.; Gorokhov, S. A.; Grishin, N. I.; Grishkevich, Ya. V.; Karmanov, D. E.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Kholodenko, A. G.; Kireev, V. I.; Kiryakov, A. A.; Kokoulina, E. S.; Kramarenko, V. N.; Konstantinov, V. V.; Kubarovsky, A. V.; Kurchaninov, L. L.; Kutov, A. Ya.; Lanschikov, G. I.; Leflat, A. K.; Lobanov, I. S.; Lobanova, E. V.; Lyutov, S. I.; Lysan, V. N.; Merkin, M. M.; Mitrofanov, G. A.; Myalkovskiy, V. V.; Nikitin, V. A.; Peshehonov, V. D.; Petrov, V. S.; Petukhov, Y. P.; Pleskach, A. V.; Polkovnikov, M. K.; Popov, V. V.; Ronzhin, V. N.; Rufanov, I. A.; Ryadovikov, V. N.; Senko, V. A.; Shalanda, N. A.; Soldatov, M. M.; Tikhonova, L. A.; Tsyupa, Yu. P.; Vishnevskaya, A. M.; Volkov, V. Yu.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Voronin, A. G.; Yakimchuk, V. I.; Yukaev, A. I.; Zapolskii, V. N.; Zhidkov, N. K.; Zotkin, S. A.; Zverev, E. G.

    2012-12-01

    The results of E-190 experiment (project Thermalization) with 50 GeV proton beam irradiation of SVD-2 setup are presented. MC simulation has shown the linear dependence of number of photons detected in electromagnetic calorimeter and the average number of neutral pions. Multiplicity distribution of neutral pion, N0, for total number of particles in the event, Ntot = Nch + N0, are obtained with corrections on the setup acceptance, triggering and efficiency of the event reconstruction. The scaled variance of neutral pion fluctuations, ω = D/ < N0 >, versus total multiplicity is measured. The fluctuations increase at Ntot > 18. According to quantum statistics models this behavior can indicate a pion condensate formation in the high pion multiplicity system. This effect has been observed for the first time.

  20. Measurements of Molecular Mixing in a High Schmidt Number Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N J; Schilling, O; Youngs, D L; Andrews, M

    2007-12-03

    Molecular mixing measurements are performed for a high Schmidt number (Sc {approx} 10{sup 3}), small Atwood number (A {approx} 7.5 x 10{sup -4}) buoyancy-driven turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer in a water channel facility. Salt was added to the top stream to create the desired density difference. The degree of molecular mixing was measured as a function of time by monitoring a diffusion-limited chemical reaction between the two fluid streams. The pH of each stream was modified by the addition of acid or alkali such that a local neutralization reaction occurred as the two fluids molecularly mixed. The progress of this neutralization reaction was tracked by the addition of phenolphthalein - a pH-sensitive chemical indicator - to the acidic stream. Accurately calibrated backlit optical techniques were used to measure the average concentration of the colored chemical indicator. Comparisons of chemical product formation for pre-transitional buoyancy- and shear-driven mixing layers are given. It is also shown that experiments performed at different equivalence ratios (acid/alkali concentration) can be combined to obtain a mathematical relationship between the colored product formed and the density variance. This relationship was used to obtain high-fidelity, quantitative measures of the degree of molecular mixing which are independent of probe resolution constraints. The dependence of such mixing parameters on the Schmidt and Reynolds numbers is examined by comparing the current Sc {approx} 10{sup 3} measurements with Sc = 0.7 gas-phase and Pr = 7 liquid-phase measurements. This comparison indicates that the Schmidt number has a large effect on the bulk quantity of mixed fluid at small Reynolds numbers Re{sub h} < 10{sup 3}. At late times, all mixing parameters indicated a greater degree of molecular mixing and a decreased Schmidt number dependence. Implications for the development and quantitative assessment of turbulent transport and mixing models appropriate for

  1. The role of high-resolution chest CT in the diagnosis of neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy - A rare form of pediatric interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Julia; Sanchez, Thomas Ray; Zhang, Yanhong; Jhawar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is rare in infancy or early childhood. Differentiating between the different types of ILD is important for reasons of treatment, monitoring of clinical course and prognosis. We present a case of a 5-month old female with tachypnea and hypoxemia. The clinical suspicion of neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy (NEHI) was confirmed by high-resolution chest CT and subsequent lung biopsy. We conclude that high-resolution chest CT has characteristics findings that can be used as a non-invasive test to support the clinical diagnosis of neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy.

  2. NASA High-Reynolds Number Circulation Control Research - Overview of CFD and Planned Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milholen, W. E., II; Jones, Greg S.; Cagle, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    A new capability to test active flow control concepts and propulsion simulations at high Reynolds numbers in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center is being developed. This technique is focused on the use of semi-span models due to their increased model size and relative ease of routing high-pressure air to the model. A new dual flow-path high-pressure air delivery station has been designed, along with a new high performance transonic sem -si pan wing model. The modular wind tunnel model is designed for testing circulation control concepts at both transonic cruise and low-speed high-lift conditions. The ability of the model to test other active flow control techniques will be highlighted. In addition, a new higher capacity semi-span force and moment wind tunnel balance has been completed and calibrated to enable testing at transonic conditions.

  3. On the high Mach number shock structure singularity caused by overreach of Maxwellian molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Myong, R. S.

    2014-05-15

    The high Mach number shock structure singularity arising in moment equations of the Boltzmann equation was investigated. The source of the singularity is shown to be the unbalanced treatment between two high order kinematic and dissipation terms caused by the overreach of Maxwellian molecule assumption. In compressive gaseous flow, the high order stress-strain coupling term of quadratic nature will grow far faster than the strain term, resulting in an imbalance with the linear dissipation term and eventually a blow-up singularity in high thermal nonequilibrium. On the other hand, the singularity arising from unbalanced treatment does not occur in the case of velocity shear and expansion flows, since the high order effects are cancelled under the constraint of the free-molecular asymptotic behavior. As an alternative method to achieve the balanced treatment, Eu's generalized hydrodynamics, consistent with the second law of thermodynamics, was revisited. After introducing the canonical distribution function in exponential form and applying the cumulant expansion to the explicit calculation of the dissipation term, a natural platform suitable for the balanced treatment was derived. The resulting constitutive equation with the nonlinear factor was then shown to be well-posed for all regimes, effectively removing the high Mach number shock structure singularity.

  4. On the instabilities of supersonic mixing layers - A high-Mach-number asymptotic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsa, Thomas F.; Goldstein, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    The stability of a family of tanh mixing layers is studied at large Mach numbers using perturbation methods. It is found that the eigenfunction develops a multilayered structure, and the eigenvalue is obtained by solving a simplified version of the Rayleigh equation (with homogeneous boundary conditions) in one of these layers which lies in either of the external streams. This analysis leads to a simple hypersonic similarity law which explains how spatial and temporal phase speeds and growth rates scale with Mach number and temperature ratio. Comparisons are made with numerical results, and it is found that this similarity law provides a good qualitative guide for the behavior of the instability at high Mach numbers. In addition to this asymptotic theory, some fully numerical results are also presented (with no limitation on the Mach number) in order to explain the origin of the hypersonic modes (through mode splitting) and to discuss the role of oblique modes over a very wide range of Mach number and temperature ratio.

  5. Assessment of microcalcifications with limited number of high-precision macrobiopsies.

    PubMed

    Harries, Richard; Lawson, Sarah; Bruckers, Liesbeth

    2010-09-01

    Stereotactic biopsy assessment of microcalcification clusters with direct and frontal macrobiopsies was performed in a population of 46 women screened for breast cancer. The only clinical finding in these women was microcalcification. Sensitivity of the procedure was 98% and calcifications were detected in 107 out of 148 tissue specimens (73%). This is the highest reported ratio so far. Interestingly, the total number of cores was inversely correlated with the success rate, suggesting that the accuracy of the direct and frontal approach is high. Four out of 46 women underwent surgery for malignancy indicating that 41 women escaped intervention with a mean follow-up of at least 1 year. Patient satisfaction is high, in particular regarding reported pain, fear and overall appreciation. No complications were seen. The data suggest that a lower number of macrobiopsies for microcalcifications could be acceptable with direct and frontal biopsy methods without reducing sensitivity. Lowering the number of biopsies can optimize the interpretation of surgical margin and reduce the number of biopsy-related mastectomies. PMID:20495463

  6. High-capacity quantum key distribution using Chebyshev-map values corresponding to Lucas numbers coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hong; Orgun, Mehmet A.; Pieprzyk, Josef; Li, Jing; Luo, Mingxing; Xiao, Jinghua; Xiao, Fuyuan

    2016-08-01

    We propose an approach that achieves high-capacity quantum key distribution using Chebyshev-map values corresponding to Lucas numbers coding. In particular, we encode a key with the Chebyshev-map values corresponding to Lucas numbers and then use k-Chebyshev maps to achieve consecutive and flexible key expansion and apply the pre-shared classical information between Alice and Bob and fountain codes for privacy amplification to solve the security of the exchange of classical information via the classical channel. Consequently, our high-capacity protocol does not have the limitations imposed by orbital angular momentum and down-conversion bandwidths, and it meets the requirements for longer distances and lower error rates simultaneously.

  7. PUFKEY: A High-Security and High-Throughput Hardware True Random Number Generator for Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongfang; Lu, Zhaojun; Zou, Xuecheng; Liu, Zhenglin

    2015-01-01

    Random number generators (RNG) play an important role in many sensor network systems and applications, such as those requiring secure and robust communications. In this paper, we develop a high-security and high-throughput hardware true random number generator, called PUFKEY, which consists of two kinds of physical unclonable function (PUF) elements. Combined with a conditioning algorithm, true random seeds are extracted from the noise on the start-up pattern of SRAM memories. These true random seeds contain full entropy. Then, the true random seeds are used as the input for a non-deterministic hardware RNG to generate a stream of true random bits with a throughput as high as 803 Mbps. The experimental results show that the bitstream generated by the proposed PUFKEY can pass all standard national institute of standards and technology (NIST) randomness tests and is resilient to a wide range of security attacks. PMID:26501283

  8. Axisymmetric instability of the Poiseuille-Couette flow between concentric cylinders at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenkov, I. V.

    2015-02-01

    For the pressure-driven flow in an annular channel with a wall moving in the axial direction, its linear instability with respect to axisymmetric perturbations at high Reynolds numbers is investigated within the framework of the triple-deck theory. When the gap between the cylinders is sufficiently small (as compared to the radii of the cylinders), it is shown that the perturbations can split into two wave packets, the first of which grows faster and moves at a higher velocity.

  9. Measured and modelled cloud condensation nuclei number concentration at the high alpine site Jungfraujoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurányi, Z.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Decarlo, P. F.; Kammermann, L.; Baltensperger, U.

    2010-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles are able to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and are therefore important for the climate and the hydrological cycle, but their properties are not fully understood. Total CCN number concentrations at 10 different supersaturations in the range of SS=0.12-1.18% were measured in May 2008 at the remote high alpine research station, Jungfraujoch, Switzerland (3580 m a.s.l.). In this paper, we present a closure study between measured and predicted CCN number concentrations. CCN predictions were done using dry number size distribution (scanning particle mobility sizer, SMPS) and bulk chemical composition data (aerosol mass spectrometer, AMS, and multi-angle absorption photometer, MAAP) in a simplified Köhler theory. The predicted and the measured CCN number concentrations agree very well and are highly correlated. A sensitivity study showed that the temporal variability of the chemical composition at the Jungfraujoch can be neglected for a reliable CCN prediction, whereas it is important to know the mean chemical composition. The exact bias introduced by using a too low or too high hygroscopicity parameter for CCN prediction was further quantified and shown to be substantial for the lowest supersaturation. Despite the high average organic mass fraction (~45%) in the fine mode, there was no indication that the surface tension was substantially reduced at the point of CCN activation. A comparison between hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA), AMS/MAAP, and CCN derived κ values showed that HTDMA measurements can be used to determine particle hygroscopicity required for CCN predictions if no suitable chemical composition data are available.

  10. Cone Beam CT-Based Three-Dimensional Planning in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Halabi, Hani; Portelance, Lorraine; Duclos, Marie; Reniers, Brigitte; Bahoric, Boris; Souhami, Luis

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of bladder and rectum from the use of cone beam CT (CBCT)-based three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning in intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for cervical cancer patients and to compare these parameters with International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) of rectal and bladder reference point dose measurements. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with cervical cancer underwent HDRB insertions. CT-compatible tandem and ovoid applicators were used to obtain intraoperative CBCT images. The use of a rectal tube and injection of bladder contrast before scanning facilitated contouring the rectum and bladder. All patients underwent intraoperative orthogonal x-ray filming, and treatments were prescribed using standard two-dimensional planning and dosimetry. DVHs for the bladder and rectum were constructed for each treatment. The minimum dose in the most irradiated 2.0-cm{sup 3} volume of bladder (B{sub D2V}) and rectum (R{sub D2V}) were determined from DVHs and compared to ICRU reference point estimates of bladder (B{sub ICRU}) and rectum (R{sub ICRU}) doses. Results: Twenty-six CBCT-based plans were evaluated. The median B{sub ICRU} dose (347 cGy; range, 164-601 cGy) was significantly lower (p < 0.001) than the median B{sub D2V} (594 cGy; range, 260-969 cGy). The median R{sub ICRU} dose (405 cGy; range, 189-700 cGy) was also significantly lower (p = 0.037) than the median R{sub D2V} (488 cGy; range, 227-786 cGy). Conclusions: CBCT-based 3D planning can be used in HDRB for cervical cancer and is a convenient alternative to CT-based planning, with the advantage of minimizing applicator motion. Correlation with late effects will further define the role of CBCT-based 3D dosimetry in HDRB planning.

  11. HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Chibani, Omar C-M Ma, Charlie

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR

  12. Evaluation of Computational Method of High Reynolds Number Slurry Flow for Caverns Backfilling

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Giorgia

    2015-05-01

    The abandonment of salt caverns used for brining or product storage poses a significant environmental and economic risk. Risk mitigation can in part be address ed by the process of backfilling which can improve the cavern geomechanical stability and reduce the risk o f fluid loss to the environment. This study evaluate s a currently available computational tool , Barracuda, to simulate such process es as slurry flow at high Reynolds number with high particle loading . Using Barracuda software, a parametric sequence of simu lations evaluated slurry flow at Re ynolds number up to 15000 and loading up to 25%. Li mitations come into the long time required to run these simulation s due in particular to the mesh size requirement at the jet nozzle. This study has found that slurry - jet width and centerline velocities are functions of Re ynold s number and volume fractio n The solid phase was found to spread less than the water - phase with a spreading rate smaller than 1 , dependent on the volume fraction. Particle size distribution does seem to have a large influence on the jet flow development. This study constitutes a first step to understand the behavior of highly loaded slurries and their ultimate application to cavern backfilling.

  13. Heat transfer for falling film evaporation of industrially relevant fluids up to very high Prandtl numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdon, Mathias; Karlsson, Erik; Innings, Fredrik; Jongsma, Alfred; Vamling, Lennart

    2016-02-01

    In many industrial applications, falling film evaporation is an attractive technique for solvent removal due to high heat transfer and low residence times. Examples are the powder production in the dairy industry and in kraft pulp production process to remove water from so called black liquor. Common for both applications is that the fluids exhibit high viscosities in industrial practice. In this paper, results from experimental studies on both black liquor and a dairy product are reported for Prandtl numbers up to 800. The results are compared with several existing correlation in literature, and the need for a modified correlation is recognized especially to cover higher Prandtl-numbers. The following correlation for the turbulent flow region with 3 < Pr < 800 was derived from the data: {Nu}t = 0.0085 \\cdot Re^{0.2} \\cdot {Pr^{0.65}} The correlation has been compared to literature data from one additional study on two other fluids (propylene glycol and cyclohexanol) with fairly high Prandtl-numbers, from 40 to 58 and from 45 to 155 respectively and the agreement was within ±40 %.

  14. Tomo-PIV Measurement of High Reynolds Number Dissipation Scale Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worth, Nicholas; Nickels, Timothy

    2008-11-01

    Understanding the sources of dissipative intermittency in high Reynolds number turbulence is of significant interest, especially given the increasing affordability of LES. Coherent dissipation scale structures have been identified in numerous numerical and experiment investigations, although the latter are typically restricted by the need for accurate resolution of extremely small fast motions. These investigations are therefore often limited to one-dimensional measurements, making the study of these 3D structures and their relationship to the dissipation field difficult. The current investigation employs a very large water mixing tank (2m in diameter), which uses counter-rotating impellors to generate high Reynolds number turbulence (Rλ 1000) that is close to isotropic and homogeneous. The large scale of the tank brings the smallest scales within the resolution of Tomo-PIV, allowing full 3D realization of these structures. This unique experimental setup presents a number of challenges, which include: seeding density limitations imposed by optical attenuation through the tank; demanding light sheet intensity requirements; and the extremely high computational cost of Tomographic reconstruction for the thousands of velocity fields required for statistical analysis. Initial results will be presented along with future plans for measurement refinement.

  15. Palladacycle-Catalyzed Carbonylative Suzuki-Miyaura Coupling with High Turnover Number and Turnover Frequency.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Prashant; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2015-08-01

    This work reports the carbonylative Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of aryl iodides catalyzed by palladacycles. More importantly, the palladacycles have been used to generate high turnover numbers (TON's) and turnover frequencies (TOF's). A range of aryl iodides can be coupled with arylboronic acids, generating TON's in the range of 10(6) to 10(7) and TOF's in the range of 10(5) to 10(6) h(-1). Comparison of the palladacycles with a conventional palladium source shows their superiority in generating high TON's and TOF's. PMID:26166246

  16. Unstructured and adaptive mesh generation for high Reynolds number viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for generating and adaptively refining a highly stretched unstructured mesh suitable for the computation of high-Reynolds-number viscous flows about arbitrary two-dimensional geometries was developed. The method is based on the Delaunay triangulation of a predetermined set of points and employs a local mapping in order to achieve the high stretching rates required in the boundary-layer and wake regions. The initial mesh-point distribution is determined in a geometry-adaptive manner which clusters points in regions of high curvature and sharp corners. Adaptive mesh refinement is achieved by adding new points in regions of large flow gradients, and locally retriangulating; thus, obviating the need for global mesh regeneration. Initial and adapted meshes about complex multi-element airfoil geometries are shown and compressible flow solutions are computed on these meshes.

  17. Sweep and Compressibility Effects on Active Separation Control at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifert, Avi; Pack, LaTunia G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper explores the effects of compressibility, sweep and excitation location on active separation control at high Reynolds numbers. The model, which was tested in a cryogenic pressurized wind tunnel, simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick GlauertGoldschmied type airfoil at zero angle of attack. The flow is fully turbulent since the tunnel sidewall boundary layer flows over the model. Without control, the flow separates at the highly convex area and a large turbulent separation bubble is formed. Periodic excitation is applied to gradually eliminate the separation bubble. Two alternative blowing slot locations as well as the effect of compressibility, sweep and steady suction or blowing were studied. During the test the Reynolds numbers ranged from 2 to 40 million and Mach numbers ranged from 0.2 to 0.7. Sweep angles were 0 and 30 deg. It was found that excitation must be introduced slightly upstream of the separation region regardless of the sweep angle at low Mach number. Introduction of excitation upstream of the shock wave is more effective than at its foot. Compressibility reduces the ability of steady mass transfer and periodic excitation to control the separation bubble but excitation has an effect on the integral parameters, which is similar to that observed in low Mach numbers. The conventional swept flow scaling is valid for fully and even partially attached flow, but different scaling is required for the separated 3D flow. The effectiveness of the active control is not reduced by sweep. Detailed flow field dynamics are described in the accompanying paper.

  18. Sweep and Compressibility Effects on Active Separation Control at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifert, Avi; Pack, LaTunia G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper explores the effects of compressibility, sweep and excitation location on active separation control at high Reynolds numbers. The model, which was tested in a cryogenic pressurized wind tunnel, simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick Glauert Goldschmied type airfoil at zero angle of attack. The flow is fully turbulent since the tunnel sidewall boundary layer flows over the model. Without control, the flow separates at the highly convex area and a large turbulent separation bubble is formed. Periodic excitation is applied to gradually eliminate the separation bubble. Two alternative blowing slot locations as well as the effect of compressibility, sweep and steady suction or blowing were studied. During the test the Reynolds numbers ranged from 2 to 40 million and Mach numbers ranged from 0.2 to 0.7. Sweep angles were 0 and 30 deg. It was found that excitation must be introduced slightly upstream of the separation region regardless of the sweep angle at low Mach number. Introduction of excitation upstream of the shock wave is more effective than at its foot. Compressibility reduces the ability of steady mass transfer and periodic excitation to control the separation bubble but excitation has an effect on the integral parameters, which is similar to that observed in low Mach numbers. The conventional swept flow scaling is valid for fully and even partially attached flow, but different scaling is required for the separated 3D flow. The effectiveness of the active control is not reduced by sweep. Detailed flow field dynamics are described in the accompanying paper.

  19. A high-resolution imaging technique using a whole-body, research photon counting detector CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, S.; Yu, Z.; Halaweish, A.; Kappler, S.; Hahn, K.; Henning, A.; Li, Z.; Lane, J.; Levin, D. L.; Jorgensen, S.; Ritman, E.; McCollough, C.

    2016-03-01

    A high-resolution (HR) data collection mode has been introduced to a whole-body, research photon-counting-detector CT system installed in our laboratory. In this mode, 64 rows of 0.45 mm x 0.45 mm detector pixels were used, which corresponded to a pixel size of 0.25 mm x 0.25 mm at the iso-center. Spatial resolution of this HR mode was quantified by measuring the MTF from a scan of a 50 micron wire phantom. An anthropomorphic lung phantom, cadaveric swine lung, temporal bone and heart specimens were scanned using the HR mode, and image quality was subjectively assessed by two experienced radiologists. High spatial resolution of the HR mode was evidenced by the MTF measurement, with 15 lp/cm and 20 lp/cm at 10% and 2% modulation. Images from anthropomorphic phantom and cadaveric specimens showed clear delineation of small structures, such as lung vessels, lung nodules, temporal bone structures, and coronary arteries. Temporal bone images showed critical anatomy (i.e. stapes superstructure) that was clearly visible in the PCD system. These results demonstrated the potential application of this imaging mode in lung, temporal bone, and vascular imaging. Other clinical applications that require high spatial resolution, such as musculoskeletal imaging, may also benefit from this high resolution mode.

  20. [CrF(O2 C(t) Bu)2 ]9 : Synthesis and Characterization of a Regular Homometallic Ring with an Odd Number of Metal Centers and Electrons.

    PubMed

    Woolfson, Robert J; Timco, Grigore A; Chiesa, Alessandro; Vitorica-Yrezabal, Inigo J; Tuna, Floriana; Guidi, Tatiana; Pavarini, Eva; Santini, Paolo; Carretta, Stefano; Winpenny, Richard E P

    2016-07-25

    The first regular homometallic ring containing an odd number of metal centers is reported. The ring was synthesized by means of amine-templated self-assembly. Extensive physical characterization studies, including magnetic measurements, powder inelastic neutron scattering (INS), and DFT calculations, show that the molecule has a near perfect match to the expected behavior for a frustrated system with the lowest energy pair of S=1/2 spin states separated by only 0.1 meV (0.8 cm(-1) ). PMID:27294807

  1. Medipix-based Spectral Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiong; He, Peng; Bennett, James; Amir, Raja; Dobbs, Bruce; Mou, Xuanqin; Wei, Biao; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phillip; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Since Hounsfield's Nobel Prize winning breakthrough decades ago, X-ray CT has been widely applied in the clinical and preclinical applications - producing a huge number of tomographic gray-scale images. However, these images are often insufficient to distinguish crucial differences needed for diagnosis. They have poor soft tissue contrast due to inherent photon-count issues, involving high radiation dose. By physics, the X-ray spectrum is polychromatic, and it is now feasible to obtain multi-energy, spectral, or true-color, CT images. Such spectral images promise powerful new diagnostic information. The emerging Medipix technology promises energy-sensitive, high-resolution, accurate and rapid X-ray detection. In this paper, we will review the recent progress of Medipix-based spectral micro-CT with the emphasis on the results obtained by our team. It includes the state- of-the-art Medipix detector, the system and method of a commercial MARS (Medipix All Resolution System) spectral micro-CT, and the design and color diffusion of a hybrid spectral micro-CT. PMID:24194631

  2. Clinical application of in vivo treatment delivery verification based on PET/CT imaging of positron activity induced at high energy photon therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janek Strååt, Sara; Andreassen, Björn; Jonsson, Cathrine; Noz, Marilyn E.; Maguire, Gerald Q., Jr.; Näfstadius, Peder; Näslund, Ingemar; Schoenahl, Frederic; Brahme, Anders

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in vivo verification of radiation treatment with high energy photon beams using PET/CT to image the induced positron activity. The measurements of the positron activation induced in a preoperative rectal cancer patient and a prostate cancer patient following 50 MV photon treatments are presented. A total dose of 5 and 8 Gy, respectively, were delivered to the tumors. Imaging was performed with a 64-slice PET/CT scanner for 30 min, starting 7 min after the end of the treatment. The CT volume from the PET/CT and the treatment planning CT were coregistered by matching anatomical reference points in the patient. The treatment delivery was imaged in vivo based on the distribution of the induced positron emitters produced by photonuclear reactions in tissue mapped on to the associated dose distribution of the treatment plan. The results showed that spatial distribution of induced activity in both patients agreed well with the delivered beam portals of the treatment plans in the entrance subcutaneous fat regions but less so in blood and oxygen rich soft tissues. For the preoperative rectal cancer patient however, a 2 ± (0.5) cm misalignment was observed in the cranial-caudal direction of the patient between the induced activity distribution and treatment plan, indicating a beam patient setup error. No misalignment of this kind was seen in the prostate cancer patient. However, due to a fast patient setup error in the PET/CT scanner a slight mis-position of the patient in the PET/CT was observed in all three planes, resulting in a deformed activity distribution compared to the treatment plan. The present study indicates that the induced positron emitters by high energy photon beams can be measured quite accurately using PET imaging of subcutaneous fat to allow portal verification of the delivered treatment beams. Measurement of the induced activity in the patient 7 min after receiving 5 Gy involved count rates which were about

  3. High-Reynolds Number Circulation Control Testing in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milholen, William E., II; Jones, Gregory S.; Chan, David T.; Goodliff, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    A new capability to test active flow control concepts and propulsion simulations at high Reynolds numbers in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center is being developed. The first active flow control experiment was completed using the new FAST-MAC semi-span model to study Reynolds number scaling effects for several circulation control concepts. Testing was conducted over a wide range of Mach numbers, up to chord Reynolds numbers of 30 million. The model was equipped with four onboard flow control valves allowing independent control of the circulation control plenums, which were directed over a 15% chord simple-hinged flap. Preliminary analysis of the uncorrected lift data showed that the circulation control increased the low-speed maximum lift coefficient by 33%. At transonic speeds, the circulation control was capable of positively altering the shockwave pattern on the upper wing surface and reducing flow separation. Furthermore, application of the technique to only the outboard portion of the wing demonstrated the feasibility of a pneumatic based roll control capability.

  4. Time dependent heat transfer rates in high Reynolds number hypersonic flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    Time dependent heat transfer rates have been calculated from time dependent temperature measurements in the vicinity of shock-wave boundary-layer interactions due to conical compression ramps on an axisymmetric body. The basic model is a cylindrical body with a 10 degree conical nose. Four conical ramps, 20, 25, 30, and 35 degrees serve as shock wave generators. Flowfield surveys have been made in the vicinity of the conical ramp vertex, the separation point, and the reattachment point. A significant effort was made to characterize the natural frequencies and relative powers of the resulting fluctuations in heat transfer rates. This research effort, sponsored jointly by NASA and the Air Force, was conducted in the Air Force Flight Dynamics Directorate High Reynolds Facility. The nominal freestream Mach number was 6, and the freestream Reynolds numbers ranged from 2.2 million/ft to 30.0 million/ft. Experimental results quantify temperature response and the resulting heat transfer rates as a function of ramp angle and Reynolds number. The temperature response within the flowfield appears to be steady-state for all compression ramp angles and all Reynolds numbers, and hence, the heat transfer rates appear to be steady-state.

  5. Control of a high Reynolds number Mach 0.9 heated jet using plasma actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney-Fischer, M.; Kim, J.-H.; Samimy, M.

    2009-09-15

    The results of particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements in a high subsonic, heated, jet forced using localized arc filament plasma actuators (LAFPAs) show that LAFPAs can consistently produce significant mixing enhancement over a wide range of temperatures. These actuators have been used successfully in high Reynolds number, high-speed unheated jets. The facility consists of an axisymmetric jet with different nozzle blocks of exit diameter of 2.54 cm and variable jet temperature in an anechoic chamber. The focus of this paper is on a high subsonic (M{sub j}=0.9) jet. Twelve experiments with various forcing azimuthal modes (m=0, 1, and {+-}1) and temperatures (T{sub o}/T{sub a}=1.0, 1.4, and 2.0) at a fixed forcing Strouhal number (St{sub DF}=0.3) have been conducted and PIV results compared with the baseline results to characterize the effectiveness of LAFPAs for mixing enhancement. Centerline velocity and turbulent kinetic energy as well as jet width are used for determining the LAFPAs' effectiveness. The characteristics of large-scale structures are analyzed through the use of Galilean streamlines and swirling strength. Across the range of temperatures collected, the effectiveness of LAFPAs improves as temperature increases. Possible reasons for the increase in effectiveness are discussed.

  6. Fast response temperature and humidity sensors for measurements in high Reynolds number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuyang; Arwatz, Gilad; Vallikivi, Margit; Hultmark, Marcus

    2013-11-01

    Conventional hot/cold wires have been widely used in measuring velocity and temperature in turbulent flows due to their fine resolutions and fast response. However, for very high Reynolds number flows, limitations on the resolution appear. A very high Reynolds number flow is the atmospheric boundary layer. In order to accurately predict the energy balance at the Earth's surface, one needs information about the different turbulent scalar fields, mainly temperature and humidity, which together with velocity, contribute to the turbulent fluxes away from the surface. The nano-scaled thermal anemometry probe (NSTAP) was previously developed at Princeton and has proven to have much higher spatial and temporal resolution than the regular hot wires. Here we introduce new fast-response temperature and humidity sensors that have been developed and tested. These sensors are made in-house using standard MEMS manufacturing techniques, leaving high flexibility in the process for optimization to different conditions. The small dimensions of these novel sensors enable very high spatial resolution while the small thermal mass allows significant improvements in the frequency response. These sensors have shown promising results in acquiring un-biased data of turbulent scalar and vector fields. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  7. DNA hypomethylation-mediated activation of Cancer/Testis Antigen 45 (CT45) genes is associated with disease progression and reduced survival in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wa; Barger, Carter J; Link, Petra A; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Miller, Austin; Akers, Stacey N; Odunsi, Kunle; Karpf, Adam R

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a highly lethal malignancy due to a lack of early detection approaches coupled with poor outcomes for patients with clinically advanced disease. Cancer-testis (CT) or cancer-germline genes encode antigens known to generate spontaneous anti-tumor immunity in cancer patients. CT45 genes are a recently discovered 6-member family of X-linked CT genes with oncogenic function. Here, we determined CT45 expression in EOC and fully defined its epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation. CT45 was silent and hypermethylated in normal control tissues, but a large subset of EOC samples showed increased CT45 expression in conjunction with promoter DNA hypomethylation. In contrast, copy number status did not correlate with CT45 expression in the TCGA database for EOC. CT45 promoter methylation inversely correlated with both CT45 mRNA and protein expression, the latter determined using IHC staining of an EOC TMA. CT45 expression was increased and CT45 promoter methylation was decreased in late-stage and high-grade EOC, and both measures were associated with poor survival. CT45 hypomethylation was directly associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation, and CT45 was frequently co-expressed with other CT antigen genes in EOC. Decitabine treatment induced CT45 mRNA and protein expression in EOC cells, and promoter transgene analyses indicated that DNA methylation directly represses CT45 promoter activity. These data verify CT45 expression and promoter hypomethylation as possible prognostic biomarkers, and suggest CT45 as an immunological or therapeutic target in EOC. Treatment with decitabine or other epigenetic modulators could provide a means for more effective immunological targeting of CT45.

  8. DNA hypomethylation-mediated activation of Cancer/Testis Antigen 45 (CT45) genes is associated with disease progression and reduced survival in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wa; Barger, Carter J; Link, Petra A; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Miller, Austin; Akers, Stacey N; Odunsi, Kunle; Karpf, Adam R

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a highly lethal malignancy due to a lack of early detection approaches coupled with poor outcomes for patients with clinically advanced disease. Cancer-testis (CT) or cancer-germline genes encode antigens known to generate spontaneous anti-tumor immunity in cancer patients. CT45 genes are a recently discovered 6-member family of X-linked CT genes with oncogenic function. Here, we determined CT45 expression in EOC and fully defined its epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation. CT45 was silent and hypermethylated in normal control tissues, but a large subset of EOC samples showed increased CT45 expression in conjunction with promoter DNA hypomethylation. In contrast, copy number status did not correlate with CT45 expression in the TCGA database for EOC. CT45 promoter methylation inversely correlated with both CT45 mRNA and protein expression, the latter determined using IHC staining of an EOC TMA. CT45 expression was increased and CT45 promoter methylation was decreased in late-stage and high-grade EOC, and both measures were associated with poor survival. CT45 hypomethylation was directly associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation, and CT45 was frequently co-expressed with other CT antigen genes in EOC. Decitabine treatment induced CT45 mRNA and protein expression in EOC cells, and promoter transgene analyses indicated that DNA methylation directly represses CT45 promoter activity. These data verify CT45 expression and promoter hypomethylation as possible prognostic biomarkers, and suggest CT45 as an immunological or therapeutic target in EOC. Treatment with decitabine or other epigenetic modulators could provide a means for more effective immunological targeting of CT45. PMID:26098711

  9. Large-scale magnetic fields at high Reynolds numbers in magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

    PubMed

    Hotta, H; Rempel, M; Yokoyama, T

    2016-03-25

    The 11-year solar magnetic cycle shows a high degree of coherence in spite of the turbulent nature of the solar convection zone. It has been found in recent high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations that the maintenance of a large-scale coherent magnetic field is difficult with small viscosity and magnetic diffusivity (≲10 (12) square centimenters per second). We reproduced previous findings that indicate a reduction of the energy in the large-scale magnetic field for lower diffusivities and demonstrate the recovery of the global-scale magnetic field using unprecedentedly high resolution. We found an efficient small-scale dynamo that suppresses small-scale flows, which mimics the properties of large diffusivity. As a result, the global-scale magnetic field is maintained even in the regime of small diffusivities-that is, large Reynolds numbers.

  10. High-speed quantum-random number generation by continuous measurement of arrival time of photons

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Qiurong; Zhao, Baosheng; Hua, Zhang; Liao, Qinghong; Yang, Hao

    2015-07-15

    We demonstrate a novel high speed and multi-bit optical quantum random number generator by continuously measuring arrival time of photons with a common starting point. To obtain the unbiased and post-processing free random bits, the measured photon arrival time is converted into the sum of integral multiple of a fixed period and a phase time. Theoretical and experimental results show that the phase time is an independent and uniform random variable. A random bit extraction method by encoding the phase time is proposed. An experimental setup has been built and the unbiased random bit generation rate could reach 128 Mb/s, with random bit generation efficiency of 8 bits per detected photon. The random numbers passed all tests in the statistical test suite.

  11. An improved high order texture features extraction method with application to pathological diagnosis of colon lesions for CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bowen; Zhang, Guopeng; Lu, Hongbing; Wang, Huafeng; Han, Fangfang; Zhu, Wei; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-03-01

    Differentiation of colon lesions according to underlying pathology, e.g., neoplastic and non-neoplastic, is of fundamental importance for patient management. Image intensity based textural features have been recognized as a useful biomarker for the differentiation task. In this paper, we introduce high order texture features, beyond the intensity, such as gradient and curvature, for that task. Based on the Haralick texture analysis method, we introduce a virtual pathological method to explore the utility of texture features from high order differentiations, i.e., gradient and curvature, of the image intensity distribution. The texture features were validated on database consisting of 148 colon lesions, of which 35 are non-neoplastic lesions, using the random forest classifier and the merit of area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristics. The results show that after applying the high order features, the AUC was improved from 0.8069 to 0.8544 in differentiating non-neoplastic lesion from neoplastic ones, e.g., hyperplastic polyps from tubular adenomas, tubulovillous adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The experimental results demonstrated that texture features from the higher order images can significantly improve the classification accuracy in pathological differentiation of colorectal lesions. The gain in differentiation capability shall increase the potential of computed tomography (CT) colonography for colorectal cancer screening by not only detecting polyps but also classifying them from optimal polyp management for the best outcome in personalized medicine.

  12. Investigating the limits of PET/CT imaging at very low true count rates and high random fractions in ion-beam therapy monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kurz, Christopher Bauer, Julia; Conti, Maurizio; Guérin, Laura; Eriksson, Lars; Parodi, Katia

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy with protons and heavier ions enables a tighter conformation of the applied dose to arbitrarily shaped tumor volumes with respect to photons, but is more sensitive to uncertainties in the radiotherapeutic treatment chain. Consequently, an independent verification of the applied treatment is highly desirable. For this purpose, the irradiation-induced β{sup +}-emitter distribution within the patient is detected shortly after irradiation by a commercial full-ring positron emission tomography/x-ray computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner installed next to the treatment rooms at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). A major challenge to this approach is posed by the small number of detected coincidences. This contribution aims at characterizing the performance of the used PET/CT device and identifying the best-performing reconstruction algorithm under the particular statistical conditions of PET-based treatment monitoring. Moreover, this study addresses the impact of radiation background from the intrinsically radioactive lutetium-oxyorthosilicate (LSO)-based detectors at low counts. Methods: The authors have acquired 30 subsequent PET scans of a cylindrical phantom emulating a patientlike activity pattern and spanning the entire patient counting regime in terms of true coincidences and random fractions (RFs). Accuracy and precision of activity quantification, image noise, and geometrical fidelity of the scanner have been investigated for various reconstruction algorithms and settings in order to identify a practical, well-suited reconstruction scheme for PET-based treatment verification. Truncated listmode data have been utilized for separating the effects of small true count numbers and high RFs on the reconstructed images. A corresponding simulation study enabled extending the results to an even wider range of counting statistics and to additionally investigate the impact of scatter coincidences. Eventually, the recommended

  13. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation, {sigma}{sub g} of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and {sigma}{sub g} decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 {mu}m and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented.

  14. Experimental investigation of acoustic streaming in a cylindrical wave guide up to high streaming Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Valière, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of streaming velocity are performed by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Particle Image Velociimetry in an experimental apparatus consisting of a cylindrical waveguide having one loudspeaker at each end for high intensity sound levels. The case of high nonlinear Reynolds number ReNL is particularly investigated. The variation of axial streaming velocity with respect to the axial and to the transverse coordinates are compared to available Rayleigh streaming theory. As expected, the measured streaming velocity agrees well with the Rayleigh streaming theory for small ReNL but deviates significantly from such predictions for high ReNL. When the nonlinear Reynolds number is increased, the outer centerline axial streaming velocity gets distorted towards the acoustic velocity nodes until counter-rotating additional vortices are generated near the acoustic velocity antinodes. This kind of behavior is followed by outer streaming cells only and measurements in the near wall region show that inner streaming vortices are less affected by this substantial evolution of fast streaming pattern. Measurements of the transient evolution of streaming velocity provide an additional insight into the evolution of fast streaming.

  15. Highly conformal CT based surface mould brachytherapy for non-melanoma skin cancers of earlobe and nose

    PubMed Central

    Kozłowski, Sławomir; Pietraszek, Andrzej; Pietrzykowska-Kuncman, Malwina; Danielska, Justyna; Sobotkowski, Janusz; Łuniewska-Bury, Jolanta; Fijuth, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Brachytherapy (BT), due to rapid dose fall off and minor set-up errors, should be superior to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for treatment of lesions in difficult locations like nose and earlobe. Evidences in this field are scarce. We describe computed tomography (CT) based surface mould BT for non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC), and compare its conformity, dose coverage, and tissue sparing ability to EBRT. Material and methods We describe procedure of preparation of surface mould applicator and dosimetry parameters of BT plans, which were implemented in 10 individuals with NMSC of nose and earlobe. We evaluated dose coverage by minimal dose to 90% of planning target volume (PTV) (D90), volumes of PTV receiving 90-150% of prescribed dose (PD) (VPTV90-150), conformal index for 90 and 100% of PD (COIN90, COIN100), dose homogeneity index (DHI), dose nonuniformity ratio (DNR), exposure of organs. Prospectively, we created CT-based photons and electrons plans. We compared conformity (COIN90, COIN100), dose coverage of PTV (D90, VPTV90, VPTV100), volumes of body receiving 10-90% of PD (V10-V90) of EBRT and BT plans. Results We obtained mean BT-DHI = 0.76, BT-DNR = 0.23, EBRT-DHI = 1.26. We observed no significant differences in VPTV90 and D90 between BT and EBRT. Mean BT-VPTV100 (89.4%) was higher than EBRT-VPTV100 (71.2%). Both COIN90 (BT-COIN90 = 0.46 vs. EBRT-COIN90 = 0.21) and COIN100 (BT-COIN100 = 0.52 vs. EBRT-COIN100 = 0.26) were superior for BT plans. We observed more exposure of normal tissues for small doses in BT plans (V10, V20), for high doses in EBRT plans (V70, V90). Conclusions Computed tmography-based surface mould brachytherapy for superficial lesions on irregular surfaces is a highly conformal method with good homogeneity. Brachytherapy is superior to EBRT in those locations in terms of conformity and normal tissue sparing ability in high doses. PMID:27504128

  16. A high-copy-number CACTA family transposon in temperate grasses and cereals.

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Tim; Jenkins, Glyn; Hasterok, Robert; Jones, R Neil; King, Ian P

    2003-01-01

    A lineage of CACTA family transposons has been identified in temperate grasses and cereals, and a full-length representative of the subfamily from Lolium perenne has been sequenced. Both the size and internal organization of the L. perenne element are typical of other CACTA family elements but its high copy number and strong conservation are unexpected. Comparison with homologs in other species suggests that this lineage has adopted a distinct and novel evolutionary strategy, which has allowed it to maintain its presence in genomes over long periods of time. PMID:12663547

  17. Changes in intracortical microporosities induced by pharmaceutical treatment of osteoporosis as detected by high resolution micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini S. M.; Miller L.; Trinward, A.; Acerbo, A.S.; De Carlo F. and Judex, S.

    2011-12-28

    Bone's microporosities play important biologic and mechanical roles. Here, we quantified 3D changes in cortical osteocyte-lacunae and other small porosities induced by estrogen withdrawal and two different osteoporosistreatments. Unlike 2D measurements, these data collected via synchrotron radiation-based {mu}CT describe the size and 3D spatial distribution of a large number of porous structures. Six-month old female Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into four groups of age-matched controls, untreated OVX, OVX treated with PTH, and OVX treated with Alendronate (ALN). Intracortical microporosity of the medial quadrant of the femoral diaphysis was quantified at endosteal, intracortical, and periosteal regions of the samples, allowing the quantification of osteocyte lacunae that were formed primarily before versus after the start of treatment. Across the overall thickness of the medial cortex, lacunar volume fraction (Lc.V/TV) was significantly lower in ALN treated rats compared to PTH. In the endosteal region, average osteocyte lacunar volume (< Lc.V >) of untreated OVX rats was significantly lower than in age-matched controls, indicating a decrease in osteocyte lacunar size in bone formed on the endosteal surface after estrogen withdrawal. The effect of treatment (OVX, ALN, PTH) on the number of lacunae per tissue volume (Lc.N/TV) was dependent on the specific location within the cortex (endosteal, intracortical, periosteal). In both the endosteal and intracortical regions, Lc.N/TV was significantly lower in ALN than in untreated OVX, suggesting a site-specific effect in osteocyte lacuna density with ALN treatment. There also were a significantly greater number of small pores (5-100 {micro}m{sup 3} in volume) in the endosteal region for PTH compared to ALN. The mechanical impact of this altered microporosity structure is unknown, but might serve to enhance, rather than deteriorate bone strength with PTH treatment, as smaller osteocyte lacunae may be better able to

  18. High quantum-efficiency photon-number-resolving detector for photonic on-chip information processing.

    PubMed

    Calkins, Brice; Mennea, Paolo L; Lita, Adriana E; Metcalf, Benjamin J; Kolthammer, W Steven; Lamas-Linares, Antia; Spring, Justin B; Humphreys, Peter C; Mirin, Richard P; Gates, James C; Smith, Peter G R; Walmsley, Ian A; Gerrits, Thomas; Nam, Sae Woo

    2013-09-23

    The integrated optical circuit is a promising architecture for the realization of complex quantum optical states and information networks. One element that is required for many of these applications is a high-efficiency photon detector capable of photon-number discrimination. We present an integrated photonic system in the telecom band at 1550 nm based on UV-written silica-on-silicon waveguides and modified transition-edge sensors capable of number resolution and over 40 % efficiency. Exploiting the mode transmission failure of these devices, we multiplex three detectors in series to demonstrate a combined 79 % ± 2 % detection efficiency with a single pass, and 88 % ± 3 % at the operating wavelength of an on-chip terminal reflection grating. Furthermore, our optical measurements clearly demonstrate no significant unexplained loss in this system due to scattering or reflections. This waveguide and detector design therefore allows the placement of number-resolving single-photon detectors of predictable efficiency at arbitrary locations within a photonic circuit - a capability that offers great potential for many quantum optical applications. PMID:24104153

  19. Instability of thermocapillary convection in long liquid bridges of high Prandtl number fluids in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Koichi; Yano, Taishi; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Ueno, Ichiro; Ermakov, Michael K.

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports experimental results on the instability of thermocapillary convection in long half-zone liquid bridges of high Prandtl number fluids (Pr=67, 112 and 207 for 5, 10 and 20 cSt silicone oils, respectively). The experiments were carried out in microgravity on the International Space Station, which allowed sufficiently long waiting period for the development of instability. Critical temperature differences were measured for liquid bridges of 30 and 50 mm diameters and up to 62.5 mm length. The resultant critical Marangoni numbers (Mac) were obtained for a wide range of aspect ratio (=height/diameter), AR, up to AR=2.0. Linear stability analyses for Pr=67 were also carried out to obtain numerical data for comparison. The present experimental results for Pr=67 indicate 5.0×1031.25) and they are in good agreement with the present linear stability analysis result. In contrast, the present results are considerably smaller than the previous data (Pr=74) taken in the Space Shuttle experiments. It is shown that this difference is due to the effect of heating rate of the liquid bridge. The data for oscillation frequency and azimuthal mode number are also presented. The non-dimensional oscillation frequencies as well as Mac for Pr=67 have shown a sudden decrease at around AR=1.25, suggesting the bifurcation of neutral stability curves.

  20. DNS/LES Simulations of Separated Flows at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2015-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large-eddy simulations (LES) simulations of flow through a periodic channel with a constriction are performed using the dynamic Smagorinsky model at two Reynolds numbers of 2800 and 10595. The LES equations are solved using higher order compact schemes. DNS are performed for the lower Reynolds number case using a fine grid and the data are used to validate the LES results obtained with a coarse and a medium size grid. LES simulations are also performed for the higher Reynolds number case using a coarse and a medium size grid. The results are compared with an existing reference data set. The DNS and LES results agreed well with the reference data. Reynolds stresses, sub-grid eddy viscosity, and the budgets for the turbulent kinetic energy are also presented. It is found that the turbulent fluctuations in the normal and spanwise directions have the same magnitude. The turbulent kinetic energy budget shows that the production peaks near the separation point region and the production to dissipation ratio is very high on the order of five in this region. It is also observed that the production is balanced by the advection, diffusion, and dissipation in the shear layer region. The dominant term is the turbulent diffusion that is about two times the molecular dissipation.

  1. Development of a high-frequency electronic integrator for photon-number resolving detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Kristina; Wayne, Michael; Kwiat, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Efficient photon-number-resolving single-photon detectors are a critical resource for optical quantum information processing, e.g., for realizing deterministic single-photon production. Previously, we have developed Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPCs) that can detect single photons with high quantum efficiency. The detector configuration allows photons to initiate multiple electron avalanches simultaneously, creating a signal with a charge proportional to the number of photons detected. One current obstacle is the extraction of the total charge of each pulse at frequencies ranging from 200 MHz to 20 GHz. The charge of each pulse is proportional to the area under the input signal and so we are currently developing an electronic integrator that, with appropriate signal amplification, will produce an output signal of pulses with heights equal to the integral of the VLPC pulse, thereby fully realizing the photon-number resolving capabilities of these detectors. Finally, we are also studying the use of optical annealing to reduce the detector's dark counts.

  2. Measurement of High Reynolds Number Near-Field Turbulent Sphere Wakes under Stratified Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalumuck, Kenneth; Brandt, Alan; Decker, Kirk; Shipley, Kara

    2015-11-01

    To characterize the near-field of a stratified wake at Reynolds numbers, Re = 2 x 105 - 106, experiments were conducted with a large diameter (0.5 m) sphere towed through a thermally stratified fresh water lake. Stratification produced BV frequencies, N, up to 0.07/s (42 cph) resulting in Froude numbers F = U/ND >= 15. The submerged sphere and associated instrumentation including two Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) and an array of fast response thermistors were affixed to a common frame towed over a range of speeds. Three components of the instantaneous wake velocities were obtained simultaneously at two cross-wake locations with the ADVs while density fluctuations were inferred from temperature measurements made by the thermistors. These measurements were used to determine the mean, rms, and spectra of all three components of the turbulent velocity field and density fluctuations at multiple locations. The turbulence power spectra follow the expected -5/3 slope with wavenumber. Existing stratified near-field wake data for spheres are for Re =104 and less, and only a very limited set of data under unstratified conditions exists at these large values of Re. Those data are primarily measurements of the sphere drag, surface pressure distribution, and separation rather than in wake turbulence. Advances in CFD modeling have enabled simulations at these high Reynolds numbers without quantitative data available for validation. Sponsored by ONR Turbulence and Wakes program.

  3. Development of localized arc filament RF plasma actuators for high-speed and high Reynolds number flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.-H.; Nishihara, M.; Adamovich, I. V.; Samimy, M.; Gorbatov, S. V.; Pliavaka, F. V.

    2010-08-01

    Recently developed localized arc filament plasma actuators (LAFPAs) have shown tremendous control authority in high-speed and high Reynolds number flow for mixing enhancement and noise mitigation. Previously, these actuators were powered by a high-voltage pulsed DC plasma generator with low energy coupling efficiency of 5-10%. In the present work, a new custom-designed 8-channel pulsed radio frequency (RF) plasma generator has been developed to power up to 8 plasma actuators operated over a wide range of forcing frequencies (up to 50 kHz) and duty cycles (1-50%), and at high energy coupling efficiency (up to 80-85%). This reduces input electrical power requirements by approximately an order of magnitude, down to 12 W per actuator operating at 10% duty cycle. The new pulsed RF plasma generator is scalable to a system with a large number of channels. Performance of pulsed RF plasma actuators used for flow control was studied in a Mach 0.9 circular jet with a Reynolds number of about 623,000 and compared with that of pulsed DC actuators. Eight actuators were distributed uniformly on the perimeter of a 2.54-cm diameter circular nozzle extension. Both types of actuators coupled approximately the same amount of power to the flow, but with drastically different electrical inputs to the power supplies. Particle image velocimetry measurements showed that jet centerline Mach number decay produced by DC and RF actuators operating at the same forcing frequencies and duty cycles is very similar. At a forcing Strouhal number near 0.3, close to the jet column instability frequency, well-organized periodic structures, with similar patterns and dimensions, were generated in the jets forced by both DC and RF actuators. Far-field acoustic measurements demonstrated similar trends in the overall sound pressure level (OASPL) change produced by both types of actuators, resulting in OASPL reduction up to 1.2-1.5 dB in both cases. We conclude that pulsed RF actuators demonstrate flow

  4. Whole genome DNA copy number changes identified by high density oligonucleotide arrays

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Changes in DNA copy number are one of the hallmarks of the genetic instability common to most human cancers. Previous micro-array-based methods have been used to identify chromosomal gains and losses; however, they are unable to genotype alleles at the level of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Here we describe a novel algorithm that uses a recently developed high-density oligonucleotide array-based SNP genotyping method, whole genome sampling analysis (WGSA), to identify genome-wide chromosomal gains and losses at high resolution. WGSA simultaneously genotypes over 10,000 SNPs by allele-specific hybridisation to perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes synthesised on a single array. The copy number algorithm jointly uses PM intensity and discrimination ratios between paired PM and MM intensity values to identify and estimate genetic copy number changes. Values from an experimental sample are compared with SNP-specific distributions derived from a reference set containing over 100 normal individuals to gain statistical power. Genomic regions with statistically significant copy number changes can be identified using both single point analysis and contiguous point analysis of SNP intensities. We identified multiple regions of amplification and deletion using a panel of human breast cancer cell lines. We verified these results using an independent method based on quantitative polymerase chain reaction and found that our approach is both sensitive and specific and can tolerate samples which contain a mixture of both tumour and normal DNA. In addition, by using known allele frequencies from the reference set, statistically significant genomic intervals can be identified containing contiguous stretches of homozygous markers, potentially allowing the detection of regions undergoing loss of heterozygosity (LOH) without the need for a matched normal control sample. The coupling of LOH analysis, via SNP genotyping, with copy number estimations using a single array

  5. High Reynolds Number Effects on Multi-Hole Probes and Hot Wire Anemometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Smith, A.; Gerry, G.; Kauffman, W.

    1995-01-01

    The paper reports on the results from an experimental investigation of the response of multi-hole and hot wire probes at high flow Reynolds numbers (Re approx. 10(exp 6)). The limited results available in literature for 5-hole probes are restricted to Re approx. 10(exp 4). The experiment aims to investigate the probe response (in terms of dimensionless pressure ratios, characterizing pitch, and yaw angles and the total and static pressures) at high Re values and to gauge their effect on the calculated velocity vector. Hot wire calibrations were also undertaken with a parametric variation of the flow pressure, velocity and temperature. Different correction and calibration schemes are sought to be tested against the acquired data set. The data is in the analysis stage at the present time. The test provided good benchmark quality data that can be used to test future calibration and testing methods.

  6. On large-scale dynamo action at high magnetic Reynolds number

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, F.; Tobias, S. M.

    2014-07-01

    We consider the generation of magnetic activity—dynamo waves—in the astrophysical limit of very large magnetic Reynolds number. We consider kinematic dynamo action for a system consisting of helical flow and large-scale shear. We demonstrate that large-scale dynamo waves persist at high Rm if the helical flow is characterized by a narrow band of spatial scales and the shear is large enough. However, for a wide band of scales the dynamo becomes small scale with a further increase of Rm, with dynamo waves re-emerging only if the shear is then increased. We show that at high Rm, the key effect of the shear is to suppress small-scale dynamo action, allowing large-scale dynamo action to be observed. We conjecture that this supports a general 'suppression principle'—large-scale dynamo action can only be observed if there is a mechanism that suppresses the small-scale fluctuations.

  7. Simulation study of magnetic reconnection in high magnetic Reynolds number plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakabo, T.; Kusano, K.; Miyoshi, T.; Vekstein, G.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an important process for dynamics in space and laboratory plasmas. Magnetic reconnection is basically dominated by magnetic diffusion at thin current sheet as proposed by Sweet (1958) and Parker (1963). According to their theory, the reconnection rate must be inversely proportional to the square root of the magnetic Reynolds number (S). In magnetosphere and the solar corona, however, in spite of high magnetic Reynolds number (>10^12), reconnection rate is measured to be about 10^-2 that is much higher than the Sweet and Parker's prediction. Although Petschek proposed that the slow mode shock may accelerate reconnection, numerical simulations suggested that the Petschek's type reconnection cannot be sustained with uniform resistivity. On the other hand, it is pointed out that in high magnetic Reynolds number, the thin current sheet becomes unstable to the so-called secondary tearing instability, which generates many plasmoids and drives a sort of fast reconnection. Although Baty (2012) recently investigated the possibility of Petschek-like structure in relatively high-S (~10^4) regime, it is still unclear whether and how the magnetic reconnection is able to be accelerated in higher-S regime (S>10^5). In this paper, we developed the high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of magnetic reconnection for very high-S (S~10^4-10^6) aiming at revealing the acceleration mechanism of magnetic reconnection. We applied the HLLD Riemann solver, which was developed by Miyoshi and Kusano (2005), to the high resolution two-dimensional MHD simulation of current sheet dynamics. In our model, the initial state is given by the Harris sheet equilibrium plus perturbation. As a result, in the case for S=10^5, multiple X-line reconnection appears as a result of the secondary tearing instability and magnetic reconnection is accelerated through the formation of multiple magnetic islands as pointed out by the previous studies. Furthermore, we found that

  8. High Reynolds Number Hybrid Laminar Flow Control (HLFC) Flight Experiment. Report 2; Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the aerodynamic design of an experimental hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) wing panel intended for use on a Boeing 757 airplane to provide a facility for flight research on high Reynolds number HLFC and to demonstrate practical HLFC operation on a full-scale commercial transport airplane. The design consists of revised wing leading edge contour designed to produce a pressure distribution favorable to laminar flow, definition of suction flow requirements to laminarize the boundary layer, provisions at the inboard end of the test panel to prevent attachment-line boundary layer transition, and a Krueger leading edge flap that serves both as a high lift device and as a shield to prevent insect accretion on the leading edge when the airplane is taking off or landing.

  9. High-Schmidt-number scalar transfer in regular and fractal grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroki; Nagata, Kouji; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Ukai, Ryota

    2010-12-01

    Turbulent mixing of high-Schmidt-number passive scalars in regular and fractal grid turbulence is experimentally investigated using a water channel. A turbulence-generating grid is installed at the entrance of the test section, which is 1.5 m in length and 0.1 m×0.1 m in cross section. Two types of grids are used: one is a regular grid consisting of square-mesh and biplane constructions, and the other is a square-type fractal grid, which was first investigated by Hurst and Vassilicos (2007 Phys. Fluids 19 035103) and Seoud and Vassilicos (2007 Phys. Fluids 19 105108). The two grids have the same solidity of 0.36. The Reynolds number based on the mesh size, ReM=U0Meff/ν, is 2500 in both flows, where U0 is the cross-sectionally averaged mean velocity, Meff is the effective mesh size and ν is the kinematic viscosity. A fluorescent dye (rhodamine B) is homogeneously premixed only in the lower stream and therefore the scalar mixing layers with an initial step profile develop downstream of the grids. The Schmidt number of the dye is O(103). The time-resolved particle image velocimetry and the planar laser-induced fluorescence techniques are used to measure the velocity and concentration fields. The results show that the turbulent mixing in fractal grid turbulence is more strongly enhanced than that in regular grid turbulence for the same mesh Reynolds number ReM. The profile of instantaneous scalar dissipation shows that scalar dissipation takes place locally even in the far downstream region at x/Meff=120 in fractal grid turbulence.

  10. Flying and swimming animals cruise at a Strouhal number tuned for high power efficiency.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham K; Nudds, Robert L; Thomas, Adrian L R

    2003-10-16

    Dimensionless numbers are important in biomechanics because their constancy can imply dynamic similarity between systems, despite possible differences in medium or scale. A dimensionless parameter that describes the tail or wing kinematics of swimming and flying animals is the Strouhal number, St = fA/U, which divides stroke frequency (f) and amplitude (A) by forward speed (U). St is known to govern a well-defined series of vortex growth and shedding regimes for airfoils undergoing pitching and heaving motions. Propulsive efficiency is high over a narrow range of St and usually peaks within the interval 0.2 < St < 0.4 (refs 3-8). Because natural selection is likely to tune animals for high propulsive efficiency, we expect it to constrain the range of St that animals use. This seems to be true for dolphins, sharks and bony fish, which swim at 0.2 < St < 0.4. Here we show that birds, bats and insects also converge on the same narrow range of St, but only when cruising. Tuning cruise kinematics to optimize St therefore seems to be a general principle of oscillatory lift-based propulsion.

  11. Flying and swimming animals cruise at a Strouhal number tuned for high power efficiency.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham K; Nudds, Robert L; Thomas, Adrian L R

    2003-10-16

    Dimensionless numbers are important in biomechanics because their constancy can imply dynamic similarity between systems, despite possible differences in medium or scale. A dimensionless parameter that describes the tail or wing kinematics of swimming and flying animals is the Strouhal number, St = fA/U, which divides stroke frequency (f) and amplitude (A) by forward speed (U). St is known to govern a well-defined series of vortex growth and shedding regimes for airfoils undergoing pitching and heaving motions. Propulsive efficiency is high over a narrow range of St and usually peaks within the interval 0.2 < St < 0.4 (refs 3-8). Because natural selection is likely to tune animals for high propulsive efficiency, we expect it to constrain the range of St that animals use. This seems to be true for dolphins, sharks and bony fish, which swim at 0.2 < St < 0.4. Here we show that birds, bats and insects also converge on the same narrow range of St, but only when cruising. Tuning cruise kinematics to optimize St therefore seems to be a general principle of oscillatory lift-based propulsion. PMID:14562101

  12. The high Reynolds number flow through an axial-flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierke, W. C.; Straka, W. A.; Taylor, P. D.

    1993-11-01

    The high Reynolds number pump (HIREP) facility at ARL Penn State has been used to perform a low-speed, large-scale experiment of the incompressible flow of water through a two-blade-row turbomachine. HIREP can involve blade chord Reynolds numbers as high as 6,000,000 and can accommodate a variety of instrumentation in both a stationary and a rotating frame of reference. The objectives of this experiment were as follows: to provide a database for comparison with three-dimensional, viscous (turbulent) flow computations; to evaluate the engineering models; and to improve our physical understanding of many of the phenomena involved in this complex flow field. The experimental results include a large quantity of data acquired throughout HIREP. A five-hole probe survey of the inlet flow 37.0 percent chord upstream of the inlet guide vane (IGV) leading edge is sufficient to give information for the inflow boundary conditions, while some static-pressure information is available to help establish an outflow boundary condition.

  13. The effect of high frequency sound on Culicoides numbers collected with suction light traps.

    PubMed

    Venter, Gert J; Labuschagne, Karien; Boikanyo, Solomon N B; Morey, Liesl

    2012-11-07

    Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), are involved in the transmission of various pathogens that cause important diseases of livestock worldwide. The use of insect repellents to reduce the attack rate of these insects on livestock could play an important role as part of an integrated control programme against diseases transmitted by these midges. The objective of this study was to determine whether high frequency sound has any repellent effect on Culicoides midges. The number of midges collected with 220 V Onderstepoort white light traps fitted with electronic mosquito repellents (EMRs), emitting 5-20 KHz multi-frequency sound waves, was compared with that of two untreated traps. Treatments were rotated in two replicates of a 4 x 4 randomised Latin square design. Although fewer midges were collected in the two traps fitted with EMRs, the average number collected over eight consecutive nights was not significantly different. The EMRs also had no influence on any of the physiological groups of Culicoides imicola Kieffer or the species composition of the Culicoides population as determined with light traps. The results indicate that high frequency sound has no repellent effect on Culicoides midges. There is therefore no evidence to support their promotion or use in the protection of animals against pathogens transmitted by Culicoides midges.

  14. A haptic VR milling surgery simulator--using high-resolution CT-data.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Magnus; Dixon, Mark; Wikander, Jan

    2006-01-01

    A haptic virtual reality milling simulator using high resolution volumetric data is presented in this paper. We discuss the graphical rendering performed from an iso-surface generated using marching cubes with a hierarchical storage method to optimize for fast dynamic changes to the data during the milling process. We also present a stable proxy-based haptic algorithm used to maintain a tip position on the surface avoiding haptic fall-through.

  15. Dual quantum cascade laser trace gas instrument with astigmatic Herriott cell at high pass number.

    PubMed

    McManus, J Barry; Zahniser, Mark S; Nelson, David D

    2011-02-01

    We have developed and demonstrated a high-sensitivity trace gas instrument employing two mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers and an astigmatic Herriott sample cell with up to a 240 m path length. Several aspects of astigmatic Herriott cell optics have been addressed to enable operation at a high pass number (up to 554), including aberrations and pattern selection to minimize interference fringes. The new instrument design, based on the 200 m cell, can measure various atmospheric trace gases, depending on the installed lasers, with multiple trace gases measured simultaneously. Demonstrated concentration noise levels (1 s average) are 40 parts per trillion [(ppt) 10(-12)] for formaldehyde, 10 ppt for carbonyl sulfide, 110 ppt for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and 180 ppt for nitrous acid (HONO). High-precision measurements of nitrous oxide and methane have been recorded at the same time as high-sensitivity measurements of HONO and H2O2.

  16. Using SNOMED CT as a reference terminology to cross map two highly pre-coordinated classification systems.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven H; Husser, Casey S; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind; Bailey, Sandra; Nugent, Linda; Porter, Karla; Bauer, Brent A; Elkin, Peter L

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that SNOMED CT, a granular formal reference terminology, could be used to assist in the creation of a valid crosswalk between two administrative classifications: the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) and the U.S. Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) disability code set. To establish a baseline, we created an ICD-9-CM terminology server and directly mapped textual descriptions of the VBA disability codes to ICD-9-CM. We next mapped ICD-9-CM and the VBA Disability codes to SNOMED CT. The SNOMED CT mappings were matched across classification systems and terms from related concepts were displayed for an expert coder's review. We report the rate of direct ICD-9-CM to VBA Disability Code mapping (26%), the eventual success of the SNOMED CT based crosswalk (95%) and the rate at which the reviewer had to add codes to complete the mapping (99%). The method using the SNOMED CT crosswalk provided significantly better coverage than the ICD-9-CM direct mapping alone (Pearson Chi Square test; p<0.001). We conclude that SNOMED CT can be a useful adjunct to direct mapping between administrative classifications. PMID:17911794

  17. Using SNOMED CT as a reference terminology to cross map two highly pre-coordinated classification systems.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven H; Husser, Casey S; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind; Bailey, Sandra; Nugent, Linda; Porter, Karla; Bauer, Brent A; Elkin, Peter L

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that SNOMED CT, a granular formal reference terminology, could be used to assist in the creation of a valid crosswalk between two administrative classifications: the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) and the U.S. Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) disability code set. To establish a baseline, we created an ICD-9-CM terminology server and directly mapped textual descriptions of the VBA disability codes to ICD-9-CM. We next mapped ICD-9-CM and the VBA Disability codes to SNOMED CT. The SNOMED CT mappings were matched across classification systems and terms from related concepts were displayed for an expert coder's review. We report the rate of direct ICD-9-CM to VBA Disability Code mapping (26%), the eventual success of the SNOMED CT based crosswalk (95%) and the rate at which the reviewer had to add codes to complete the mapping (99%). The method using the SNOMED CT crosswalk provided significantly better coverage than the ICD-9-CM direct mapping alone (Pearson Chi Square test; p<0.001). We conclude that SNOMED CT can be a useful adjunct to direct mapping between administrative classifications.

  18. High night temperatures during grain number determination reduce wheat and barley grain yield: a field study.

    PubMed

    García, Guillermo A; Dreccer, M Fernanda; Miralles, Daniel J; Serrago, Román A

    2015-11-01

    Warm nights are a widespread predicted feature of climate change. This study investigated the impact of high night temperatures during the critical period for grain yield determination in wheat and barley crops under field conditions, assessing the effects on development, growth and partitioning crop-level processes driving grain number per unit area (GN). Experiments combined: (i) two contrasting radiation and temperature environments: late sowing in 2011 and early sowing in 2013, (ii) two well-adapted crops with similar phenology: bread wheat and two-row malting barley and (iii) two temperature regimes: ambient and high night temperatures. The night temperature increase (ca. 3.9 °C in both crops and growing seasons) was achieved using purpose-built heating chambers placed on the crop at 19:000 hours and removed at 7:00 hours every day from the third detectable stem node to 10 days post-flowering. Across growing seasons and crops, the average minimum temperature during the critical period ranged from 11.2 to 17.2 °C. Wheat and barley grain yield were similarly reduced under warm nights (ca. 7% °C(-1) ), due to GN reductions (ca. 6% °C(-1) ) linked to a lower number of spikes per m(2) . An accelerated development under high night temperatures led to a shorter critical period duration, reducing solar radiation capture with negative consequences for biomass production, GN and therefore, grain yield. The information generated could be used as a starting point to design management and/or breeding strategies to improve crop adaptation facing climate change.

  19. High night temperatures during grain number determination reduce wheat and barley grain yield: a field study.

    PubMed

    García, Guillermo A; Dreccer, M Fernanda; Miralles, Daniel J; Serrago, Román A

    2015-11-01

    Warm nights are a widespread predicted feature of climate change. This study investigated the impact of high night temperatures during the critical period for grain yield determination in wheat and barley crops under field conditions, assessing the effects on development, growth and partitioning crop-level processes driving grain number per unit area (GN). Experiments combined: (i) two contrasting radiation and temperature environments: late sowing in 2011 and early sowing in 2013, (ii) two well-adapted crops with similar phenology: bread wheat and two-row malting barley and (iii) two temperature regimes: ambient and high night temperatures. The night temperature increase (ca. 3.9 °C in both crops and growing seasons) was achieved using purpose-built heating chambers placed on the crop at 19:000 hours and removed at 7:00 hours every day from the third detectable stem node to 10 days post-flowering. Across growing seasons and crops, the average minimum temperature during the critical period ranged from 11.2 to 17.2 °C. Wheat and barley grain yield were similarly reduced under warm nights (ca. 7% °C(-1) ), due to GN reductions (ca. 6% °C(-1) ) linked to a lower number of spikes per m(2) . An accelerated development under high night temperatures led to a shorter critical period duration, reducing solar radiation capture with negative consequences for biomass production, GN and therefore, grain yield. The information generated could be used as a starting point to design management and/or breeding strategies to improve crop adaptation facing climate change. PMID:26111197

  20. Post-reconstruction non-local means filtering methods using CT side information for quantitative SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Se Young; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Dewaraja, Yuni K.

    2013-09-01

    Quantitative SPECT techniques are important for many applications including internal emitter therapy dosimetry where accurate estimation of total target activity and activity distribution within targets are both potentially important for dose-response evaluations. We investigated non-local means (NLM) post-reconstruction filtering for accurate I-131 SPECT estimation of both total target activity and the 3D activity distribution. We first investigated activity estimation versus number of ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) iterations. We performed simulations using the XCAT phantom with tumors containing a uniform and a non-uniform activity distribution, and measured the recovery coefficient (RC) and the root mean squared error (RMSE) to quantify total target activity and activity distribution, respectively. We observed that using more OSEM iterations is essential for accurate estimation of RC, but may or may not improve RMSE. We then investigated various post-reconstruction filtering methods to suppress noise at high iteration while preserving image details so that both RC and RMSE can be improved. Recently, NLM filtering methods have shown promising results for noise reduction. Moreover, NLM methods using high-quality side information can improve image quality further. We investigated several NLM methods with and without CT side information for I-131 SPECT imaging and compared them to conventional Gaussian filtering and to unfiltered methods. We studied four different ways of incorporating CT information in the NLM methods: two known (NLM CT-B and NLM CT-M) and two newly considered (NLM CT-S and NLM CT-H). We also evaluated the robustness of NLM filtering using CT information to erroneous CT. NLM CT-S and NLM CT-H yielded comparable RC values to unfiltered images while substantially reducing RMSE. NLM CT-S achieved -2.7 to 2.6% increase of RC compared to no filtering and NLM CT-H yielded up to 6% decrease in RC while other methods yielded lower RCs

  1. 4D cone beam CT phase sorting using high frequency optical surface measurement during image guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, G. J.; Marchant, T. E.; Parkhurst, J. M.; Sharrock, P. J.; Whitfield, G. A.; Moore, C. J.

    2011-03-01

    In image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) two of the most promising recent developments are four dimensional cone beam CT (4D CBCT) and dynamic optical metrology of patient surfaces. 4D CBCT is now becoming commercially available and finds use in treatment planning and verification, and whilst optical monitoring is a young technology, its ability to measure during treatment delivery without dose consequences has led to its uptake in many institutes. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of dynamic patient surfaces, simultaneously captured during CBCT acquisition using an optical sensor, to phase sort projection images for 4D CBCT volume reconstruction. The dual modality approach we describe means that in addition to 4D volumetric data, the system provides correlated wide field measurements of the patient's skin surface with high spatial and temporal resolution. As well as the value of such complementary data in verification and motion analysis studies, it introduces flexibility into the acquisition of the signal required for phase sorting. The specific technique used may be varied according to individual patient circumstances and the imaging target. We give details of three different methods of obtaining a suitable signal from the optical surfaces: simply following the motion of triangulation spots used to calibrate the surfaces' absolute height; monitoring the surface height in a single, arbitrarily selected, camera pixel; and tracking, in three dimensions, the movement of a surface feature. In addition to describing the system and methodology, we present initial results from a case study oesophageal cancer patient.

  2. X-Ray CT of Highly-Attenuating Objects: 9- or 15- MV Spectra?

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, G; Trebes, J; Perry, R; Schneberk, D; Logan, C

    2005-08-29

    We imaged-highly attenuating test objects in three dimensions with 9-MV (at LLNL) and 15-MV (at Hill Air Force Base) x-ray spectra. While we used the same detector and motion control, there were differences that we could not control in the two radiography bays and in the sources. The results show better spatial resolution for the 9-MV spectrum and better contrast for the 15-MV spectrum. The 15-MV data contains a noise pattern that obfuscates the data. It is our judgment that if sufficient attention were given to design of the bay, beam dump, collimation, filtration and linac spot size; a 15-MV imaging system using a flat panel could be developed with spatial resolution of 5 lp/mm and contrastive performance better than we have demonstrated using a 9-MV spectrum.

  3. High-resolution CT of the jugular foramen: anatomy and vascular variants and anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, W.W.M.; Solti-Bohman, L.G.

    1984-03-01

    In high-resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) images of dry skulls and patients, the anatomy of the jugular foramen and its neighboring structures was demonstrated to excellent advantage. Among those structures visualized were the cortical margins of the jugular compartments, which are important in evaluating tumor involvement, the anatomic relationship between the jugular fossa and hypotympanum, and the adjacent basal foramina. The inferior tympanic canaliculus, which transmits the inferior tympanic artery and nerve and houses one fifth of the glomus formation, thereby playing a role in arterial anomalies as well as glomus tumors, was occasionally recognizable. In addition, subtle bone findings associated with vascular anomalies in and around the jugular foramen, critically important in the differential diagnosis of glomus tumors, were visualized. Examples of these findings are presented.

  4. Diffusion velocity correlation for nuclear graphite gasification at high temperature and low Reynolds numbers

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M. S.; Tournier, J. M. P.

    2012-07-01

    The safety analysis of High-Temperature and Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactors requires reliable estimates of nuclear graphite gasification as a function of temperature, among other parameters, in the unlikely event of an air ingress accident. Although the rates of the prevailing chemical reactions increase exponentially with temperature, graphite gasification at high temperatures is limited by the oxygen diffusion through the boundary layer. The effective diffusion velocity depends on the total flow rate and pressure of the bulk air-gas mixture. This paper develops a semi-empirical Sherwood number correlation for calculating the oxygen diffusion velocity. The correlation is based on a compiled database of the results of convective heat transfer experiments with wires and cylinders of different diameters in air, water and paraffin oil at 0.006 {<=} Re {<=} 1,604 and 0.068 {<=} Sc {<=} 35.2, and of mass transfer experiments at 4.8 {<=} Re {<=} 77 and 1,300 {<=} Sc {<=} 2,000. The developed correlation is within {+-} 8% of the compiled database of 567 data points and consistent with reported gasification rate measurements at higher temperatures in experiments using different size specimens of nuclear graphite grades of NBG-18 and NB-25, IG-11, IG-110 and IG-430 in atmospheric air at 0.08 {<=} Re {<=} 30. Unlike the Graetz solution that gives a constant Sh of 3.66 at Re {<=} 1.0, the present correlation shows Sh decreases monotonically to much lower values with decreasing Re. (authors)

  5. Metabarcoding analysis of home composts reveals distinctive fungal communities with a high number of unassigned sequences.

    PubMed

    Langarica-Fuentes, Adrian; Fox, Graeme; Robson, Geoffrey D

    2015-10-01

    Home composting has been strongly advocated in the UK, Europe and North America to divert organic waste away from conventional waste processing. Despite this, little attention has been given to microbial communities and their diversity in these systems. In this study, we examined the diversity of fungal species in 10 different domestic composts by 454 tag-encoded pyrosequencing. We report the recovery of 478 different molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs) from the 10 composts with a mean of 176.7 ± 19.6 MOTUs per compost and a mean of 12.9 ± 3.8 unique MOTUs per sample. Microascales (17.21 %), Hypocreales (16.76 %), Sordariales (14.89 %), Eurotiales (11.25 %) and Mortierellales (7.38 %) were the dominant orders in the community, with Pseudallescheria (9.52 %), Penicillium (8.43 %), Mortierella (3.60 %) and Fusarium (3.31 %) being the most abundant genera. Fungal communities in home composts were substantially different to large-scale commercial composts, with thermophilic and thermotolerant fungi present in much lower numbers. Significantly, 46.2 % of all sequences were identified as uncultured fungi or could not be assigned above the family level, suggesting there are a high number of new genera and species in these environments still to be described. PMID:26243286

  6. Number of holes contained within the Fermi surface volume in underdoped high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, N.

    2016-08-01

    We provide a potential solution to the longstanding problem relating Fermi surface reconstruction to the number of holes contained within the Fermi surface volume in underdoped high Tc superconductors. On considering uniaxial and biaxial charge-density wave order, we show that there exists a relationship between the ordering wave vector, the hole doping, and the cross-sectional area of the reconstructed Fermi surface whose precise form depends on the volume of the starting Fermi surface. We consider a "large" starting Fermi surface comprising 1 +p hole carriers, as predicted by band structure calculations, and a "small" starting Fermi surface comprising p hole carriers, as proposed in models in which the Coulomb repulsion remains the dominant energy. Using the reconstructed Fermi surface cross-sectional area obtained in quantum oscillation experiments in YBa2Cu3O6 +x and HgBa2CuO4 +x and the established methods for estimating the chemical hole doping, we find the ordering vectors obtained from x-ray scattering measurements to show a close correspondence with those expected for the small starting Fermi surface. We therefore show the quantum oscillation frequency and charge-density wave vectors provide accurate estimates for the number of holes contributing to the Fermi surface volume in the pseudogap regime.

  7. Optimizing sparse sequencing of single cells for highly multiplex copy number profiling

    PubMed Central

    Baslan, Timour; Kendall, Jude; Ward, Brian; Cox, Hilary; Leotta, Anthony; Rodgers, Linda; Riggs, Michael; D'Italia, Sean; Sun, Guoli; Yong, Mao; Miskimen, Kristy; Gilmore, Hannah; Saborowski, Michael; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Krasnitz, Alexander; Harris, Lyndsay; Wigler, Michael; Hicks, James

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide analysis at the level of single cells has recently emerged as a powerful tool to dissect genome heterogeneity in cancer, neurobiology, and development. To be truly transformative, single-cell approaches must affordably accommodate large numbers of single cells. This is feasible in the case of copy number variation (CNV), because CNV determination requires only sparse sequence coverage. We have used a combination of bioinformatic and molecular approaches to optimize single-cell DNA amplification and library preparation for highly multiplexed sequencing, yielding a method that can produce genome-wide CNV profiles of up to a hundred individual cells on a single lane of an Illumina HiSeq instrument. We apply the method to human cancer cell lines and biopsied cancer tissue, thereby illustrating its efficiency, reproducibility, and power to reveal underlying genetic heterogeneity and clonal phylogeny. The capacity of the method to facilitate the rapid profiling of hundreds to thousands of single-cell genomes represents a key step in making single-cell profiling an easily accessible tool for studying cell lineage. PMID:25858951

  8. Optimizing sparse sequencing of single cells for highly multiplex copy number profiling.

    PubMed

    Baslan, Timour; Kendall, Jude; Ward, Brian; Cox, Hilary; Leotta, Anthony; Rodgers, Linda; Riggs, Michael; D'Italia, Sean; Sun, Guoli; Yong, Mao; Miskimen, Kristy; Gilmore, Hannah; Saborowski, Michael; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Krasnitz, Alexander; Harris, Lyndsay; Wigler, Michael; Hicks, James

    2015-05-01

    Genome-wide analysis at the level of single cells has recently emerged as a powerful tool to dissect genome heterogeneity in cancer, neurobiology, and development. To be truly transformative, single-cell approaches must affordably accommodate large numbers of single cells. This is feasible in the case of copy number variation (CNV), because CNV determination requires only sparse sequence coverage. We have used a combination of bioinformatic and molecular approaches to optimize single-cell DNA amplification and library preparation for highly multiplexed sequencing, yielding a method that can produce genome-wide CNV profiles of up to a hundred individual cells on a single lane of an Illumina HiSeq instrument. We apply the method to human cancer cell lines and biopsied cancer tissue, thereby illustrating its efficiency, reproducibility, and power to reveal underlying genetic heterogeneity and clonal phylogeny. The capacity of the method to facilitate the rapid profiling of hundreds to thousands of single-cell genomes represents a key step in making single-cell profiling an easily accessible tool for studying cell lineage. PMID:25858951

  9. Jet Velocity Profile Effects on Spray Characteristics of Impinging Jets at High Reynolds and Weber Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Neil S.; Kulkarni, Varun; Sojka, Paul E.

    2014-11-01

    While like-on-like doublet impinging jet atomization has been extensively studied in the literature, there is poor agreement between experimentally observed spray characteristics and theoretical predictions (Ryan et al. 1995, Anderson et al. 2006). Recent works (Bremond and Villermaux 2006, Choo and Kang 2007) have introduced a non-uniform jet velocity profile, which lead to a deviation from the standard assumptions for the sheet velocity and the sheet thickness parameter. These works have assumed a parabolic profile to serve as another limit to the traditional uniform jet velocity profile assumption. Incorporating a non-uniform jet velocity profile results in the sheet velocity and the sheet thickness parameter depending on the sheet azimuthal angle. In this work, the 1/7th power-law turbulent velocity profile is assumed to provide a closer match to the flow behavior of jets at high Reynolds and Weber numbers, which correspond to the impact wave regime. Predictions for the maximum wavelength, sheet breakup length, ligament diameter, and drop diameter are compared with experimental observations. The results demonstrate better agreement between experimentally measured values and predictions, compared to previous models. U.S. Army Research Office under the Multi-University Research Initiative Grant Number W911NF-08-1-0171.

  10. Optimizing sparse sequencing of single cells for highly multiplex copy number profiling.

    PubMed

    Baslan, Timour; Kendall, Jude; Ward, Brian; Cox, Hilary; Leotta, Anthony; Rodgers, Linda; Riggs, Michael; D'Italia, Sean; Sun, Guoli; Yong, Mao; Miskimen, Kristy; Gilmore, Hannah; Saborowski, Michael; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Krasnitz, Alexander; Harris, Lyndsay; Wigler, Michael; Hicks, James

    2015-05-01

    Genome-wide analysis at the level of single cells has recently emerged as a powerful tool to dissect genome heterogeneity in cancer, neurobiology, and development. To be truly transformative, single-cell approaches must affordably accommodate large numbers of single cells. This is feasible in the case of copy number variation (CNV), because CNV determination requires only sparse sequence coverage. We have used a combination of bioinformatic and molecular approaches to optimize single-cell DNA amplification and library preparation for highly multiplexed sequencing, yielding a method that can produce genome-wide CNV profiles of up to a hundred individual cells on a single lane of an Illumina HiSeq instrument. We apply the method to human cancer cell lines and biopsied cancer tissue, thereby illustrating its efficiency, reproducibility, and power to reveal underlying genetic heterogeneity and clonal phylogeny. The capacity of the method to facilitate the rapid profiling of hundreds to thousands of single-cell genomes represents a key step in making single-cell profiling an easily accessible tool for studying cell lineage.

  11. Energetics and dynamics of droplet evaporation in high temperature intermediate Reynolds number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renksizbulut, M.

    Nusselt Numbers and drag coefficients of single-component liquid droplets and solid spheres in high temperature, intermediate Reynolds Number flows were investigated. The evaporation of suspended water, Methanol and n-Heptane droplets were followed in laminar air streams up to 1059 K in temperature using a steady-state measurement technique. It is found that the dynamic blowing effect of evaporation causes large reductions in heat transfer rates, and that the film conditions constitute an appropriate reference state for the evaluation of thermophysical properties. The numerical results indicate that the blowing effect of evaporation on momentum transfer is to reduce friction drag very significantly but at the same time increase pressure drag by almost an equal amount; the net effect on the total drag force being only a marginal reduction. In all cases, it is found that thermophysical property variations play a very dominant role in reducing the drag forces acting on cold particles. Results are analysed and a correlation for stagnation-point heat transfer is also presented.

  12. Heat transfer predictions for two turbine nozzle geometries at high Reynolds and Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Jackson, R.

    1995-01-01

    Predictions of turbine vane and endwall heat transfer and pressure distributions are compared with experimental measurements for two vane geometries. The differences in geometries were due to differences in the hub profile, and both geometries were derived from the design of a high rim speed turbine (HRST). The experiments were conducted in the Isentropic Light Piston Facility (ILPF) at Pyestock at a Reynolds number of 5.3 x 10(exp 6), a Mach number of 1.2, and a wall-to-gas temperature ratio of 0.66. Predictions are given for two different steady-state three-dimensional Navier-Stokes computational analyses. C-type meshes were used, and algebraic models were employed to calculate the turbulent eddy viscosity. The effects of different turbulence modeling assumptions on the predicted results are examined. Comparisons are also given between predicted and measured total pressure distributions behind the vane. The combination of realistic engine geometries and flow conditions proved to be quite demanding in terms of the convergence of the CFD solutions. An appropriate method of grid generation, which resulted in consistently converged CFD solutions, was identified.

  13. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Mean number in highly inclined events

    DOE PAGES

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-03-09

    We present the first hybrid measurement of the average muon number in air showers at ultra-high energies, initiated by cosmic rays with zenith angles between 62° and 80° . Our measurement is based on 174 hybrid events recorded simultaneously with the Surface Detector array and the Fluorescence Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The muon number for each shower is derived by scaling a simulated reference profile of the lateral muon density distribution at the ground until it fits the data. A 1019 eV shower with a zenith angle of 67°, which arrives at the Surface Detector array at anmore » altitude of 1450 m above sea level, contains on average (2.68 ± 0.04 ± 0.48 (sys.)) × 107 muons with energies larger than 0.3 GeV. Finally, the logarithmic gain d ln Nµ/d ln E of muons with increasing energy between 4 × 1018 eV and 5 × 1019 eV is measured to be (1.029 ± 0.024 ± 0.030 (sys.)).« less

  14. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Mean number in highly inclined events

    SciTech Connect

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-03-09

    We present the first hybrid measurement of the average muon number in air showers at ultra-high energies, initiated by cosmic rays with zenith angles between 62° and 80° . Our measurement is based on 174 hybrid events recorded simultaneously with the Surface Detector array and the Fluorescence Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The muon number for each shower is derived by scaling a simulated reference profile of the lateral muon density distribution at the ground until it fits the data. A 1019 eV shower with a zenith angle of 67°, which arrives at the Surface Detector array at an altitude of 1450 m above sea level, contains on average (2.68 ± 0.04 ± 0.48 (sys.)) × 107 muons with energies larger than 0.3 GeV. Finally, the logarithmic gain d ln Nµ/d ln E of muons with increasing energy between 4 × 1018 eV and 5 × 1019 eV is measured to be (1.029 ± 0.024 ± 0.030 (sys.)).

  15. Improvements of a nano-scale crossed hot-wire for high Reynolds number measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuyang; Hultmark, Marcus

    2015-11-01

    Hot-wire anemometry, despite its limited spatial and temporal resolution, is still the preferred tool for high Reynolds number flow measurements, mainly due to the continuous signal. To address the resolution issues, the Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP) was developed at Princeton University. The NSTAP has a sensing volume more than one order of magnitude smaller than conventional hot-wires, and it has displayed superior performance. However, the NSTAP can only measure a single component of the velocity. Using a novel combining method, a probe that enables two-component velocity measurements has been created (the x-NSTAP). The measurement volume is approximately 50 × 50 × 50 μ m, more than one order of magnitude smaller in all directions compared to conventional crossed hot-wires. The x-NSTAP has been further improved to allow more accurate measurements with the help of flow visualization using a scaled model but matching Reynolds number. Results from turbulent flow measurements with the new x-NSTAP are also presented. Supported under NSF grant CBET-1510100 (program manager Dimitrios Papavassiliou).

  16. Time evolution of atmospheric particle number concentration during high-intensity pyrotechnic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, Javier; Yubero, Eduardo; Nicolás, Jose F.; Caballero, Sandra; Galindo, Nuria

    2014-10-01

    The Mascletàs are high-intensity pyrotechnic events, typical of eastern Spanish festivals, in which thousands of firecrackers are burnt at ground level in an intense, short-time (<8 min) deafening spectacle that generates short-lived, thick aerosol clouds. In this study, the impact of such events on air quality has been evaluated by means of particle number concentration measurements performed close to the venue during the June festival in Alicante (southeastern Spain). Peak concentrations and dilution times observed throughout the Mascletàs have been compared to those measured when conventional aerial fireworks were launched 2 km away from the monitoring site. The impact of the Mascletàs on the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.3 μm was higher (maximum ˜2·104 cm-3) than that of fireworks (maximum ˜2·103 cm-3). The effect of fireworks depended on whether the dominant meteorological conditions favoured the transport of the plume to the measurement location. However, the time required for particle concentrations to return to background levels is longer and more variable for firework displays (minutes to hours) than for the Mascletàs (<25 min).

  17. High-resolution CT and angiographic evaluation of NexStent wall adaptation.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Balázs; Lukács, Levente; Balázs, György; Dósa, Edit; Bérczi, Viktor; Hüttl, Kálmán

    2009-05-01

    Carotid stenting is a minimally invasive treatment for extracranial carotid artery stenosis. Stent design may affect technical success and complications in a certain subgroup of patients. We examined the wall adaptability of a new closed-cell carotid stent (NexStent), which has a unique rolled sheet design. Forty-one patients had 42 carotid arteries treated with angioplasty and stenting for internal carotid artery stenosis. The mean patient age was 65 +/- 10 years. All patients underwent high-resolution computed tomographic angiography after the stent implantation. Data analysis included pre- and postprocedural stenosis, procedure complications, plaque calcification, and stent apposition. We reviewed the angiographic and computed tomographic images for plaque coverage and stent expansion. All procedures were technically successful. Mean stenosis was reduced from 84 +/- 8% before the procedure to 15.7 +/- 7% after stenting. Two patients experienced transient ischemic attack; one patient had bradycardia and hypotension. Stent induced kinking was observed in one case. Good plaque coverage and proper overlapping of the rolled sheet was achieved in all cases. There was weak correlation between the residual stenosis and the amount of calcification. The stent provides adequate expansion and adaptation to the tapering anatomy of the bifurcation. PMID:19159971

  18. High-Resolution CT and Angiographic Evaluation of NexStent Wall Adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Nemes, Balazs Lukacs, Levente; Balazs, Gyoergy; Dosa, Edit; Berczi, Viktor; Huettl, Kalman

    2009-05-15

    Carotid stenting is a minimally invasive treatment for extracranial carotid artery stenosis. Stent design may affect technical success and complications in a certain subgroup of patients. We examined the wall adaptability of a new closed-cell carotid stent (NexStent), which has a unique rolled sheet design. Forty-one patients had 42 carotid arteries treated with angioplasty and stenting for internal carotid artery stenosis. The mean patient age was 65 {+-} 10 years. All patients underwent high-resolution computed tomographic angiography after the stent implantation. Data analysis included pre- and postprocedural stenosis, procedure complications, plaque calcification, and stent apposition. We reviewed the angiographic and computed tomographic images for plaque coverage and stent expansion. All procedures were technically successful. Mean stenosis was reduced from 84 {+-} 8% before the procedure to 15.7 {+-} 7% after stenting. Two patients experienced transient ischemic attack; one patient had bradycardia and hypotension. Stent induced kinking was observed in one case. Good plaque coverage and proper overlapping of the rolled sheet was achieved in all cases. There was weak correlation between the residual stenosis and the amount of calcification. The stent provides adequate expansion and adaptation to the tapering anatomy of the bifurcation.

  19. Preliminary engineering study: Quick opening valve MSFC high Reynolds number wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    FluiDyne Engineering Corporation has conducted a preliminary engineering study of a quick-opening valve for the MSFC High Reynolds Number Wind Tunnel under NASA Contract NAS8-35056. The subject valve is intended to replace the Mylar diaphragm system as the flow initiation device for the tunnel. Only valves capable of opening within 0.05 sec. and providing a minimum of 11.4 square feet of flow area were considered. Also, the study focused on valves which combined the quick-opening and tight shutoff features in a single unit. A ring sleeve valve concept was chosen for refinement and pricing. Sealing for tight shutoff, ring sleeve closure release and sleeve actuation were considered. The resulting cost estimate includes the valve and requisite modifications to the facility to accommodate the valve as well as the associated design and development work.

  20. Local isotropy in distorted turbulent boundary layers at high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saddoughi, Seyed G.

    1993-01-01

    This is a report on the continuation of our experimental investigations of the hypothesis of local isotropy in shear flows. This hypothesis, which states that at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers the small-scale structures of turbulent motions are independent of large-scale structures and mean deformations, has been used in theoretical studies of turbulence and computational methods such as large-eddy simulation. Since Kolmogorov proposed his theory, there have been many experiments, conducted in wakes, jets, mixing layers, a tidal channel, and atmospheric and laboratory boundary layers, in which attempts have been made to verify - or refute - the local-isotropy hypothesis. However, a review of the literature over the last five decades indicated that, despite all these experiments in shear flows, there was no consensus in the scientific community regarding this hypothesis, and, therefore, it seemed worthwhile to undertake a fresh experimental investigation into this question.

  1. Dissipative particle dynamics of diffusion-NMR requires high Schmidt-numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar, Mueed; Greiner, Andreas; Korvink, Jan G.; Kauzlarić, David

    2016-06-01

    We present an efficient mesoscale model to simulate the diffusion measurement with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). On the level of mesoscopic thermal motion of fluid particles, we couple the Bloch equations with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). Thereby we establish a physically consistent scaling relation between the diffusion constant measured for DPD-particles and the diffusion constant of a real fluid. The latter is based on a splitting into a centre-of-mass contribution represented by DPD, and an internal contribution which is not resolved in the DPD-level of description. As a consequence, simulating the centre-of-mass contribution with DPD requires high Schmidt numbers. After a verification for fundamental pulse sequences, we apply the NMR-DPD method to NMR diffusion measurements of anisotropic fluids, and of fluids restricted by walls of microfluidic channels. For the latter, the free diffusion and the localisation regime are considered.

  2. Kinetic energy and scalar spectra in high Rayleigh number axially homogeneous buoyancy driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Shashikant S.; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    2016-06-01

    Kinetic energy and scalar spectra from the measurements in high Rayleigh number axially homogeneous buoyancy driven turbulent flow are presented. Kinetic energy and concentration (scalar) spectra are obtained from the experiments wherein density difference is created using brine and fresh water and temperature spectra are obtained from the experiments in which heat is used. Scaling of the frequency spectra of lateral and longitudinal velocity near the tube axis is closer to the Kolmogorov-Obukhov scaling, while the scalar spectra show some evidence of dual scaling, Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling followed by Obukhov-Corrsin scaling. These scalings are also observed in the corresponding second order spatial structure functions of velocity and concentration fluctuations.

  3. Dissipative particle dynamics of diffusion-NMR requires high Schmidt-numbers.

    PubMed

    Azhar, Mueed; Greiner, Andreas; Korvink, Jan G; Kauzlarić, David

    2016-06-28

    We present an efficient mesoscale model to simulate the diffusion measurement with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). On the level of mesoscopic thermal motion of fluid particles, we couple the Bloch equations with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). Thereby we establish a physically consistent scaling relation between the diffusion constant measured for DPD-particles and the diffusion constant of a real fluid. The latter is based on a splitting into a centre-of-mass contribution represented by DPD, and an internal contribution which is not resolved in the DPD-level of description. As a consequence, simulating the centre-of-mass contribution with DPD requires high Schmidt numbers. After a verification for fundamental pulse sequences, we apply the NMR-DPD method to NMR diffusion measurements of anisotropic fluids, and of fluids restricted by walls of microfluidic channels. For the latter, the free diffusion and the localisation regime are considered. PMID:27369491

  4. Drag coefficient of the weakly ionized plasma in the high Knudsen number regime

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, H.-Y.; Si, M.-C.; Lin, S.-B.

    2009-06-15

    The drag force acting on a micron-sized polystyrene particle in the high Knudsen number regime is investigated. Analysis of the particle trajectories in stationary neutral argon gas environment suggests the damping time constant {tau}{proportional_to}p{sup -1.20{+-}}{sup 0.04} and Epstein drag force coefficient {delta}=1.40. The neutral drag coefficient is compared with the drag coefficient measurement in dust-free plasma. The phenomena of the reduced drag in weakly viscous and weakly ionized rf plasma are also observed in this report. It is shown that the slight changes in rf power and pressure would enhance the reduced drag effect, which suggests that there is an additional electrostatic force acting along the particle motion in the plasma.

  5. Measuring Absolute RNA Copy Numbers at High Temporal Resolution Reveals Transcriptome Kinetics in Development.

    PubMed

    Owens, Nick D L; Blitz, Ira L; Lane, Maura A; Patrushev, Ilya; Overton, John D; Gilchrist, Michael J; Cho, Ken W Y; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2016-01-26

    Transcript regulation is essential for cell function, and misregulation can lead to disease. Despite technologies to survey the transcriptome, we lack a comprehensive understanding of transcript kinetics, which limits quantitative biology. This is an acute challenge in embryonic development, where rapid changes in gene expression dictate cell fate decisions. By ultra-high-frequency sampling of Xenopus embryos and absolute normalization of sequence reads, we present smooth gene expression trajectories in absolute transcript numbers. During a developmental period approximating the first 8 weeks of human gestation, transcript kinetics vary by eight orders of magnitude. Ordering genes by expression dynamics, we find that "temporal synexpression" predicts common gene function. Remarkably, a single parameter, the characteristic timescale, can classify transcript kinetics globally and distinguish genes regulating development from those involved in cellular metabolism. Overall, our analysis provides unprecedented insight into the reorganization of maternal and embryonic transcripts and redefines our ability to perform quantitative biology.

  6. Stable transformation of a mosquito cell line results in extraordinarily high copy numbers of the plasmid.

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, T J; Muhlmann-Diaz, M C; Kovach, M J; Carlson, J O; Bedford, J S; Beaty, B J

    1992-01-01

    Stable incorporation of high copy numbers (greater than 10,000 per cell) of a plasmid vector containing a gene conferring resistance to the antibiotic hygromycin was achieved in a cell line derived from the Aedes albopictus mosquito. Plasmid sequences were readily observed by ethidium bromide staining of cellular DNA after restriction endonuclease digestion and agarose gel electrophoresis. The plasmid was demonstrated by in situ hybridization to be present in large arrays integrated in metaphase chromosomes and in minute and double-minute replicating elements. In one subclone, approximately 60,000 copies of the plasmid were organized in a large array that resembles a chromosome, morphologically and in the segregation of its chromatids during anaphase. The original as well as modified versions of the plasmid were rescued by transformation of Escherichia coli using total cellular DNA. Southern blot analyses of recovered plasmids indicate the presence of mosquito-derived sequences. Images PMID:1631052

  7. Analogies Between Colloidal Sedimentation and Turbulent Convection at High Prandtl Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, P.; Ackerson, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    A new set of coarse-grained equations of motion is proposed to describe concentration and velocity fluctuations in a dilute sedimenting suspension of non-Brownian particles. With these equations, colloidal sedimentation is found to be analogous to turbulent convection at high Prandtl numbers. Using Kraichnan's mixing-length theory, we obtain scaling relations for the diffusive dissipation length delta(sub theta), the velocity variance delta u, and the concentration variance delta phi. The obtained scaling laws over varying particle radius alpha and volume fraction phi(sub ) are in excellent agreement with the recent experiment by Segre, Herbolzheimer, and Chaikin. The analogy between colloidal sedimentation and turbulent convection gives a simple interpretation for the existence of a velocity cut-off length, which prevents hydrodynamic dispersion coefficients from being divergent. It also provides a coherent framework for the study of sedimentation dynamics in different colloidal systems.

  8. Anomalous dissipation and kinetic-energy distribution in pipes at very high Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wei, Bo-Bo; Hussain, Fazle; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-01-01

    A symmetry-based theory is developed for the description of (streamwise) kinetic energy K in turbulent pipes at extremely high Reynolds numbers (Re's). The theory assumes a mesolayer with continual deformation of wall-attached eddies which introduce an anomalous dissipation, breaking the exact balance between production and dissipation. An outer peak of K is predicted above a critical Re of 10^{4}, in good agreement with experimental data. The theory offers an alternative explanation for the recently discovered logarithmic distribution of K. The concept of anomalous dissipation is further supported by a significant modification of the k-ω equation, yielding an accurate prediction of the entire K profile. PMID:26871016

  9. Double large field stereoscopic PIV in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudert, S.; Foucaut, J. M.; Kostas, J.; Stanislas, M.; Braud, P.; Fourment, C.; Delville, J.; Tutkun, M.; Mehdi, F.; Johansson, P.; George, W. K.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds number has been carried out in the Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (LML, UMR CNRS 8107) wind tunnel. This experiment was performed jointly with LEA (UMR CNRS 6609) in Poitiers (France) and Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden), in the frame of the WALLTURB European project. The simultaneous recording of 143 hot wires in one transverse plane and of two perpendicular stereoscopic PIV fields was performed successfully. The first SPIV plane is 1 cm upstream of the hot wire rake and the second is both orthogonal to the first one and to the wall. The first PIV results show a blockage effect which based on both statistical results (i.e. mean, RMS and spatial correlation) and a potential model does not seem to affect the turbulence organization.

  10. Three-dimensional analysis of vesicle and crystal fragment textures in pumice using high-resolution X-ray CT: Textural evidence of eruptive processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketcham, R. A.; Gardner, J. E.; Abbott, S.

    2011-12-01

    Three-dimensional analysis of high-resolution X-ray computed tomographic (CT) imagery of pumice from Popocatépetl Volcano in central Mexico yields fresh insights into processes of vesicle formation and coalescence and crystal fragmentation that occur during explosive volcanism. Six ~2 cm pumice fragments of varying bulk vesicularity were imaged at ~20 μm resolution. Three-dimensional blob and fabric analysis quantitatively document textural features, and visualization facilitated contextualization of measurements and overall interpretation. Vesicles range in size from mm-scale to below the resolution of the scan data. By comparing the whole-sample 3D vesicle size distributions derived from CT with more detailed distributions from sub-volumes obtained by standard petrographic analysis, we can discern two distinct, roughly log-normal populations in each sample. Vesicles in all samples have preferred orientations, and fabric analysis based on the star volume distribution and displayed as 3D rose diagrams documents a range of preferred shapes from elongate to flattened. Aspect ratios range from 1 to 6, and converge to values of ~2-3 with increasing size. Surface to volume ratios show increasing departure from sphericity with increasing size, which is probably attributable in large part to irregular shapes caused by coalescence. The vesicle fabric was strongest in the highest-vesicularity sample. Some pumices showed evidence of welding or poor mixing between two or more differently devolatilized portions of melt. Interfaces are in some cases apparently welded, with low-vesicularity glass contact zones, and in others are simply sub-planar intersections between distinct glasses. In one instance of the latter, correlated vesicle and phenocryst orientations across both melt portions and not parallel to their interface suggests that their juxtaposition took place before final eruption, while there was still time for fabric development. The pumices show abundant evidence of

  11. The Spectral Amplitude of Stellar Convection and Its Scaling in the High-Rayleigh-number Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Hindman, Bradley W.

    2016-02-01

    Convection plays a central role in the dynamics of any stellar interior, and yet its operation remains largely hidden from direct observation. As a result, much of our understanding concerning stellar convection necessarily derives from theoretical and computational models. The Sun is, however, exceptional in that regard. The wealth of observational data afforded by its proximity provides a unique test bed for comparing convection models against observations. When such comparisons are carried out, surprising inconsistencies between those models and observations become apparent. Both photospheric and helioseismic measurements suggest that convection simulations may overestimate convective flow speeds on large spatial scales. Moreover, many solar convection simulations have difficulty reproducing the observed solar differential rotation owing to this apparent overestimation. We present a series of three-dimensional stellar convection simulations designed to examine how the amplitude and spectral distribution of convective flows are established within a star’s interior. While these simulations are nonmagnetic and nonrotating in nature, they demonstrate two robust phenomena. When run with sufficiently high Rayleigh number, the integrated kinetic energy of the convection becomes effectively independent of thermal diffusion, but the spectral distribution of that kinetic energy remains sensitive to both of these quantities. A simulation that has converged to a diffusion-independent value of kinetic energy will divide that energy between spatial scales such that low-wavenumber power is overestimated and high-wavenumber power is underestimated relative to a comparable system possessing higher Rayleigh number. We discuss the implications of these results in light of the current inconsistencies between models and observations.

  12. The number of sexual partners and health-risking sexual behavior: prediction from high school entry to high school exit.

    PubMed

    Van Ryzin, Mark J; Johnson, Amber B; Leve, Leslie D; Kim, Hyoun K

    2011-10-01

    Precursors to adolescent health-risking sexual behavior (HRSB) were examined in a normative sample of 373 adolescents (48.0% female, n = 178). Using a variable-oriented approach, we regressed the number of sexual partners at high school exit (age 17) on parental monitoring, association with delinquent peers, romantic relationship status, problem behavior, physical maturity, and tobacco and alcohol use at high school entry (age 14); all emerged as significant predictors except alcohol use and physical maturity (we found sex differences in physical maturity and romantic relationship status, with females being more advanced in both areas). Sexual experimentation at high school entry served to partially or fully mediate the impact of these factors. A person-oriented approach, using a broader measure of HRSB, found three subgroups of adolescents: abstainers, low-risk-takers, and high-risk-takers. Results predicting membership in these groups generally followed those from the variable-oriented analysis. Implications for the prevention of HRSB and future research directions are discussed.

  13. The Number of Sexual Partners and Health-Risking Sexual Behavior: Prediction from High School Entry to High School Exit

    PubMed Central

    Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Johnson, Amber B.; Leve, Leslie D.; Hyoun, Kim K.

    2013-01-01

    Precursors to adolescent health-risking sexual behavior (HRSB) were examined in a normative sample of 373 adolescents (48.0% female, n = 178). Using a variable-oriented approach, we regressed the number of sexual partners at high school exit (age 17) on parental monitoring, association with delinquent peers, romantic relationship status, problem behavior, physical maturity, and tobacco and alcohol use at high school entry (age 14); all emerged as significant predictors except alcohol use and physical maturity (we found sex differences in physical maturity and romantic relationship status, with females being more advanced in both areas). Sexual experimentation at high school entry served to partially or fully mediate the impact of these factors. A person-oriented approach, using a broader measure of HRSB, found three subgroups of adolescents: abstainers, low-risk-takers, and high-risk-takers. Results predicting membership in these groups generally followed those from the variable-oriented analysis. Implications for the prevention of HRSB and future research directions are discussed. PMID:20703789

  14. Impact of a high-phosphorus diet on the sonographic and CT appearance of kidneys in degus, and possible concurrence with dental problems.

    PubMed

    Gumpenberger, M; Jeklova, E; Skoric, M; Hauptman, K; Stehlik, L; Dengg, S; Jekl, V

    2012-02-11

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the impact of pelleted diet of different mineral composition on the sonographic and CT appearance of kidneys in degus (Octodon degus). A total of 35 animals were randomly divided into five groups, fed diets containing different calcium and phosphorus contents (13.5 g/kg calcium and 6.3 g/kg phosphorus, or 9.1 g/kg calcium and 9.5 g/kg phosphorus) and given different amounts of exposure to UV light. Endoscopic examination of the oral cavity as well as renal ultrasonography and CT was performed four times at four-month intervals throughout the study. After 14 months of feeding an experimental diet, all degus were euthanased and subsequently all kidneys were collected for histopathological examination. Animals fed a diet with high dietary phosphate and improper calcium to phosphorus ratio showed severe nephrocalcinosis. Ultrasonographic and CT kidney abnormalities presented as hyperechogenicity and hyperdensity (interpreted as nephrocalcinosis), respectively. The most striking changes were seen at the corticomedullary zone. Ultrasonography and CT correlated in all cases with histopathological findings. Dental disease developed quickly in groups fed diets with an improper calcium and phosphorus content, with obvious apical and coronal elongation of all the teeth. A possible influence of UV light access could not be proved in this study.

  15. High quality copy number and genotype data from FFPE samples using Molecular Inversion Probe (MIP) microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuker; Carlton, Victoria E.H.; Karlin-Neumann, George; Sapolsky, Ronald; Zhang, Li; Moorhead, Martin; Wang, Zhigang C.; Richardson, Andrea L.; Warren, Robert; Walther, Axel; Bondy, Melissa; Sahin, Aysegul; Krahe, Ralf; Tuna, Musaffe; Thompson, Patricia A.; Spellman, Paul T.; Gray, Joe W.; Mills, Gordon B.; Faham, Malek

    2009-02-24

    A major challenge facing DNA copy number (CN) studies of tumors is that most banked samples with extensive clinical follow-up information are Formalin-Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE). DNA from FFPE samples generally underperforms or suffers high failure rates compared to fresh frozen samples because of DNA degradation and cross-linking during FFPE fixation and processing. As FFPE protocols may vary widely between labs and samples may be stored for decades at room temperature, an ideal FFPE CN technology should work on diverse sample sets. Molecular Inversion Probe (MIP) technology has been applied successfully to obtain high quality CN and genotype data from cell line and frozen tumor DNA. Since the MIP probes require only a small ({approx}40 bp) target binding site, we reasoned they may be well suited to assess degraded FFPE DNA. We assessed CN with a MIP panel of 50,000 markers in 93 FFPE tumor samples from 7 diverse collections. For 38 FFPE samples from three collections we were also able to asses CN in matched fresh frozen tumor tissue. Using an input of 37 ng genomic DNA, we generated high quality CN data with MIP technology in 88% of FFPE samples from seven diverse collections. When matched fresh frozen tissue was available, the performance of FFPE DNA was comparable to that of DNA obtained from matched frozen tumor (genotype concordance averaged 99.9%), with only a modest loss in performance in FFPE. MIP technology can be used to generate high quality CN and genotype data in FFPE as well as fresh frozen samples.

  16. Velocity Resolved---Scalar Modeled Simulations of High Schmidt Number Turbulent Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Siddhartha

    The objective of this thesis is to develop a framework to conduct velocity resolved - scalar modeled (VR-SM) simulations, which will enable accurate simulations at higher Reynolds and Schmidt (Sc) numbers than are currently feasible. The framework established will serve as a first step to enable future simulation studies for practical applications. To achieve this goal, in-depth analyses of the physical, numerical, and modeling aspects related to Sc " 1 are presented, specifically when modeling in the viscous-convective subrange. Transport characteristics are scrutinized by examining scalar-velocity Fourier mode interactions in Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) datasets and suggest that scalar modes in the viscous-convective subrange do not directly affect large-scale transport for high Sc . Further observations confirm that discretization errors inherent in numerical schemes can be sufficiently large to wipe out any meaningful contribution from subfilter models. This provides strong incentive to develop more effective numerical schemes to support high Sc simulations. To lower numerical dissipation while maintaining physically and mathematically appropriate scalar bounds during the convection step, a novel method of enforcing bounds is formulated, specifically for use with cubic Hermite polynomials. Boundedness of the scalar being transported is effected by applying derivative limiting techniques, and physically plausible single sub-cell extrema are allowed to exist to help minimize numerical dissipation. The proposed bounding algorithm results in significant performance gain in DNS of turbulent mixing layers and of homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Next, the combined physical/mathematical behavior of the subfilter scalar-flux vector is analyzed in homogeneous isotropic turbulence, by examining vector orientation in the strain-rate eigenframe. The results indicate no discernible dependence on the modeled scalar field, and lead to the identification of the tensor

  17. CT evaluation of intracholecystic bile

    SciTech Connect

    Rebner, M.; Ruggieri, P.M.; Gross, B.H.; Glazer, G.M.

    1985-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used to detect a variety of gallbladder abnormalities, but the accuracy of routine abdominal CT in evaluating intracholecystic bile has not been established. Forty-six patients were identified in whom abdominal CT and sonography were performed within 1 week of each other. Using sonographic results as the standard, sensitivity specificity, and accuracy of CT gallbladder evaluation were calculated; both initial CT interpretations and retrospective review of scans were used for this analysis. In the retrospective review, visual interpretation of gallbladder images and measurement of intracholecystic bile attenuation were analyzed. The most common cause of high-attenuation bile in the series was sludge, a cause not previously reported. It was concluded that intracholecystic bile is poorly evaluated on routine abdominal CT, particularly because of low sensitivity in disease detection.

  18. Analysis of the high Reynolds number 2D tests on a wind turbine airfoil performed at two different wind tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, O.; Munduate, X.; Ceyhan, O.; Jacobs, M.; Madsen, J.; Schepers, J. G.

    2016-09-01

    2D wind tunnel tests at high Reynolds numbers have been done within the EU FP7 AVATAR project (Advanced Aerodynamic Tools of lArge Rotors) on the DU00-W-212 airfoil and at two different test facilities: the DNW High Pressure Wind Tunnel in Gottingen (HDG) and the LM Wind Power in-house wind tunnel. Two conditions of Reynolds numbers have been performed in both tests: 3 and 6 million. The Mach number and turbulence intensity values are similar in both wind tunnels at the 3 million Reynolds number test, while they are significantly different at 6 million Reynolds number. The paper presents a comparison of the data obtained from the two wind tunnels, showing good repeatability at 3 million Reynolds number and differences at 6 million Reynolds number that are consistent with the different Mach number and turbulence intensity values.

  19. Sliding slice: A novel approach for high accuracy and automatic 3D localization of seeds from CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Tubic, Dragan; Beaulieu, Luc

    2005-01-01

    We present a conceptually novel principle for 3D reconstruction of prostate seed implants. Unlike existing methods for implant reconstruction, the proposed algorithm uses raw CT data (sinograms) instead of reconstructed CT slices. Using raw CT data solves several inevitable problems related to the reconstruction from CT slices. First, the sinograms are not affected by reconstruction artifacts in the presence of metallic objects and seeds in the patient body. Second, the scanning axis is not undersampled as in the case of CT slices; as a matter of fact the scanning axis is the most densely sampled and each seed is typically represented by several hundred samples. Moreover, the shape of a single seed in a sinogram can be modeled exactly, thus facilitating the detection. All this allows very accurate 3D reconstruction of both position and the orientation of the seeds. Preliminary results indicate that the seed position can be estimated with 0.15 mm accuracy (average), while the orientation estimate accuracy is within 3 deg. on average. Although the main contribution of the paper is to present a new principle of reconstruction, a preliminary implementation is also presented as a proof of concept. The implemented algorithm has been tested on a phantom and the obtained results are presented to validate the proposed approach.

  20. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 3,2015 ... facts MDCT is a very fast type of computed tomography (CT) scan. MDCT creates pictures of the healthy ...

  1. Performance evaluation of a sub-millimetre spectrally resolved CT system on high- and low-frequency imaging tasks: a simulation.

    PubMed

    Yveborg, Moa; Danielsson, Mats; Bornefalk, Hans

    2012-04-21

    We are developing a photon-counting silicon strip detector with 0.4 × 0.5 mm² detector elements for clinical CT applications. Except for the limited detection efficiency of approximately 0.8 for a spectrum of 80 kVp, the largest discrepancies from ideal spectral behaviour have been shown to be Compton interactions in the detector and electronic noise. Using the framework of cascaded system analysis, we reconstruct the 3D MTF and NPS of a silicon strip detector including the influence of scatter and charge sharing inside the detector. We compare the reconstructed noise and signal characteristics with a reconstructed 3D MTF and NPS of an ideal energy-integrating detector system with unity detection efficiency, no scatter or charge sharing inside the detector, unity presampling MTF and 1 × 1 mm² detector elements. The comparison is done by calculating the dose-normalized detectability index for some clinically relevant imaging tasks and spectra. This work demonstrates that although the detection efficiency of the silicon detector rapidly drops for the acceleration voltages encountered in clinical computed tomography practice, and despite the high fraction of Compton interactions due to the low atomic number, silicon detectors can perform on a par with ideal energy-integrating detectors for routine imaging tasks containing low-frequency components. For imaging tasks containing high-frequency components, the proposed silicon detector system can perform approximately 1.1-1.3 times better than a fully ideal energy-integrating system.

  2. Numerical aspects in modeling high Deborah number flow and elastic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Youngdon

    2014-05-01

    Investigating highly nonlinear viscoelastic flow in 2D domain, we explore problem as well as property possibly inherent in the streamline upwinding technique (SUPG) and then present various results of elastic instability. The mathematically stable Leonov model written in tensor-logarithmic formulation is employed in the framework of finite element method for spatial discretization of several representative problem domains. For enhancement of computation speed, decoupled integration scheme is applied for shear thinning and Boger-type fluids. From the analysis of 4:1 contraction flow at low and moderate values of the Deborah number (De) the solution with SUPG method does not show noticeable difference from the one by the computation without upwinding. On the other hand, in the flow regime of high De, especially in the state of elastic instability the SUPG significantly distorts the flow field and the result differs considerably from the solution acquired straightforwardly. When the strength of elastic flow and thus the nonlinearity further increase, the computational scheme with upwinding fails to converge and evolutionary solution does not become available any more. All this result suggests that extreme care has to be taken on occasions where upwinding is applied, and one has to first of all prove validity of this algorithm in the case of high nonlinearity. On the contrary, the straightforward computation with no upwinding can efficiently model representative phenomena of elastic instability in such benchmark problems as 4:1 contraction flow, flow over a circular cylinder and flow over asymmetric array of cylinders. Asymmetry of the flow field occurring in the symmetric domain, enhanced spatial and temporal fluctuation of dynamic variables and flow effects caused by extension hardening are properly described in this study.

  3. Ground Boundary Conditions for Thermal Convection Over Horizontal Surfaces at High Rayleigh Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanjalić, K.; Hrebtov, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present "wall functions" for treating the ground boundary conditions in the computation of thermal convection over horizontal surfaces at high Rayleigh numbers using coarse numerical grids. The functions are formulated for an algebraic-flux model closed by transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy, its dissipation rate and scalar variance, but could also be applied to other turbulence models. The three-equation algebraic-flux model, solved in a T-RANS mode ("Transient" Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes, based on triple decomposition), was shown earlier to reproduce well a number of generic buoyancy-driven flows over heated surfaces, albeit by integrating equations up to the wall. Here we show that by using a set of wall functions satisfactory results are found for the ensemble-averaged properties even on a very coarse computational grid. This is illustrated by the computations of the time evolution of a penetrative mixed layer and Rayleigh-Bénard (open-ended, 4:4:1 domain) convection, using 10 × 10 × 100 and 10 × 10 × 20 grids, compared also with finer grids (e.g. 60 × 60 × 100), as well as with one-dimensional treatment using 1 × 1 × 100 and 1 × 1 × 20 nodes. The approach is deemed functional for simulations of a convective boundary layer and mesoscale atmospheric flows, and pollutant transport over realistic complex hilly terrain with heat islands, urban and natural canopies, for diurnal cycles, or subjected to other time and space variations in ground conditions and stratification.

  4. Review of Skin Friction Measurements Including Recent High-Reynolds Number Results from NASA Langley NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Ralph D.; Hall, Robert M.; Anders, John B.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews flat plate skin friction data from early correlations of drag on plates in water to measurements in the cryogenic environment of The NASA Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF) in late 1996. The flat plate (zero pressure gradient with negligible surface curvature) incompressible skin friction at high Reynolds numbers is emphasized in this paper, due to its importance in assessing the accuracy of measurements, and as being important to the aerodynamics of large scale vehicles. A correlation of zero pressure gradient skin friction data minimizing extraneous effects between tests is often used as the first step in the calculation of skin friction in complex flows. Early data compiled by Schoenherr for a range of momentum thickness Reynolds numbers, R(sub Theta) from 860 to 370,000 contained large scatter, but has proved surprisingly accurate in its correlated form. Subsequent measurements in wind tunnels under more carefully controlled conditions have provided inputs to this database, usually to a maximum R(sub Theta) of about 40,000. Data on a large axisymmetric model in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility extends the upper limit in incompressible R(sub Theta) to 619,800 using the van Driest transformation. Previous data, test techniques, and error sources ar discussed, and the NTF data will be discussed in detail. The NTF Preston tube and Clauser inferred data accuracy is estimated to be within -2 percent of a power-law curve fit, and falls above the Spalding theory by 1 percent at R(sub Theta) of about 600,000.

  5. N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel Facility (An example of a Versatile Wind Tunnel) Tunnel 1 I is a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel Facility (An example of a Versatile Wind Tunnel) Tunnel 1 I is a blowdown Facility that utilizes interchangeable test sections and nozzles. The facility provides experimental support for the fluid mechanics research, including experimental verification of aerodynamic computer codes and boundary-layer and airfoil studies that require high Reynolds number simulation. (Tunnel 1)

  6. Energization of Radiation Belt Electrons by High and Low Azimuthal Mode Number Poloidal Mode ULF Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Brito, T.; Elkington, S. R.; Kress, B. T.; Liang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    CME-shock and CIR-driven geomagnetic storms are characterized by enhanced ULF wave activity in the magnetosphere. This enhanced ULF wave power produces both coherent and diffusive transport and energization, as well as pitch angle modification of radiation belt electrons in drift resonance with azimuthally propagating ULF waves. Recent observations of two CME-driven storms1,2 have suggested that poloidal mode waves with both low and high azimuthal mode number may be efficient at accelerating radiation belt electrons. We extend up to m = 50 the analysis of Ozeke and Mann3 who examined drift resonance for poloidal modes up to m = 40. We calculate radial diffusion coefficients for source population electrons in the 50 -500 keV range, and continued resonance with lower m-numbers at higher energies for ULF waves in the Pc 5, 0.4 - 10 mHz range. We use an analytic model for ULF waves superimposed on a compressed dipole, developed for equatorial plane studies by Elkington et al.4 and extended to 3D by Perry et al.4 Assuming a power spectrum which varies as ω-2, consistent with earlier observations, we find greater efficiency for radial transport and acceleration at lower m number where there is greater power for drift resonance at a given frequency. This assumption is consistent with 3D global MHD simulations using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry code which we have carried out for realistic solar wind driving conditions during storms. Coherent interaction with ULF waves can also occur at a rate which exceeds nominal radial diffusion estimates but is slower than prompt injection on a drift time scale. Depending on initial electron drift phase, some electrons are accelerated due to the westward azimuthal electric field Eφ, while others are decelerated by eastward Eφ, decreasing their pitch angle. A subset of trapped electrons are seen to precipitate to the atmosphere in 3D LFM simulations, showing modulation at the coherent poloidal mode ULF wave frequency in both simulations

  7. Highly resolved two-dimensional ¹H spectroscopy of the human brain using ISIS CT-PRESS with resolution enhancement.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hidehiro; Takaya, Nobuhiro; Mitsumori, Fumiyuki

    2012-01-01

    In constant time (CT) point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS), echo centers shift with the fast decay of short T₂* on two-dimensional (2D) time domain (TD) data under inhomogeneous B₀ field like in vivo conditions. Though ¹H decoupling along the F₁ direction is a feature of this method, the tilted and broadened peak pattern on the F₁-F₂ plane after reconstruction causes the peaks to overlap. To enhance resolution to achieve highly resolved 2D CT-PRESS spectra in the human brain, we propose a 2-part window function that comprises an enhancement part for shifting echoes with fast decay and a conventional part, such as Lorentzian, Gaussian, or sine-bell function. We obtained 2D spectra from human brains at 4.7T. The 3 diagonal peaks of C4H of glutamate (Glu C4H) at 2.35 ppm, C2H of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA C2H) at 2.28 ppm, and C4H of glutamine (Gln C4H) at 2.44 ppm-overlapped on the spectra processed with the conventional window but clearly resolved on the spectra using the proposed enhancement window. The signal-to-noise ratio per unit measurement time of Glu C4H on a CT-PRESS spectrum of the human brain was 1.7 times higher than that on a spectrum obtained by CT-correlation spectroscopic (COSY). In conclusion, 2D CT-PRESS spectra processed with the proposed window function to enhance resolution can resolve peaks of coupled ¹H spins with higher accuracy and sensitivity.

  8. Detectable change of lung nodule volume with CT in a phantom study with high and low signal to background contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrielides, Marios A.; Li, Qin; Zeng, Rongping; Gong, Qi; Myers, Kyle; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    In previous work we developed a method for predicting the minimum detectable change (MDC) in nodule volume based on volumetric CT measurements. MDC was defined as the minimum increase/decrease in a nodule volume distinguishable from the baseline measurement at a specified level of detection performance, assessed using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). In this work we derived volume estimates of a set of synthetic nodules and calculated the detection performance for distinguishing them from baseline measurements. Eight spherical objects of 100HU radio density ranging in diameter from 5.0mm to 5.75mm and 8.0mm to 8.75mm with 0.25mm increments were placed in an anthropomorphic phantom with either no background (high-contrast task) or gelatin background (low-contrast task). The baseline was defined as 5.0mm for the first set of nodules and 8.0mm for the second set. The phantom was scanned using varying exposures, and reconstructed with slice thickness of 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0mm and two reconstruction kernels (standard and smooth). Volume measurements were derived using a previously developed matched- filter approach. Results showed that nodule size, slice thickness, and nodule-to-background contrast affected detectable change in nodule volume when using our volume estimator and the acquisition settings from our study. We also compared our experimental results to the values estimated by our previously-developed MDC prediction method. We found that experimental data for the 8mm baseline nodules matched very well with our predicted values of MDC. These results support considering the use of this metric when standardizing imaging protocols for lung nodule size change assessment.

  9. High resolution micro-CT of low attenuating organic materials using large area photon-counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumpová, I.; Vavřík, D.; Fíla, T.; Koudelka, P.; Jandejsek, I.; Jakůbek, J.; Kytýř, D.; Zlámal, P.; Vopálenský, M.; Gantar, A.

    2016-02-01

    To overcome certain limitations of contemporary materials used for bone tissue engineering, such as inflammatory response after implantation, a whole new class of materials based on polysaccharide compounds is being developed. Here, nanoparticulate bioactive glass reinforced gelan-gum (GG-BAG) has recently been proposed for the production of bone scaffolds. This material offers promising biocompatibility properties, including bioactivity and biodegradability, with the possibility of producing scaffolds with directly controlled microgeometry. However, to utilize such a scaffold with application-optimized properties, large sets of complex numerical simulations using the real microgeometry of the material have to be carried out during the development process. Because the GG-BAG is a material with intrinsically very low attenuation to X-rays, its radiographical imaging, including tomographical scanning and reconstructions, with resolution required by numerical simulations might be a very challenging task. In this paper, we present a study on X-ray imaging of GG-BAG samples. High-resolution volumetric images of investigated specimens were generated on the basis of micro-CT measurements using a large area flat-panel detector and a large area photon-counting detector. The photon-counting detector was composed of a 010× 1 matrix of Timepix edgeless silicon pixelated detectors with tiling based on overlaying rows (i.e. assembled so that no gap is present between individual rows of detectors). We compare the results from both detectors with the scanning electron microscopy on selected slices in transversal plane. It has been shown that the photon counting detector can provide approx. 3× better resolution of the details in low-attenuating materials than the integrating flat panel detectors. We demonstrate that employment of a large area photon counting detector is a good choice for imaging of low attenuating materials with the resolution sufficient for numerical simulations.

  10. Limited Reliability of CT perfusion acute infarct volume measurements compared to DWI in anterior circulation stroke

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Pamela W.; Souza, Leticia; Kamalian, Shervin; Hirsch, Joshua A.; Yoo, Albert J.; Kamalian, Shahmir; Gonzalez, R. Gilberto; Lev, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose DWI can reliably identify critically ischemic tissue (CIT) shortly after stroke onset. We tested if thresholded CT-CBF and CT-CBV maps are sufficiently accurate to substitute for DWI for estimating CIT volume. Methods Ischemic volumes of 55 patients with acute anterior circulation stroke were assessed on DWI by visual segmentation, and CT-CBF and CT-CBV with segmentation using 15% and 30% thresholds, respectively. The contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of ischemic regions on the DWI and CTP images were measured. Correlation and Bland-Altman analyses were used to assess reliability of CTP. Results Mean CNRs for DWI, CT-CBF and CT-CBV were 4.3, 0.9 and 0.4, respectively. CTP and DWI lesion volumes were highly correlated (R2=0.87 for CT-CBF; R2=0.83 for CT-CBV; p<0.001). Bland-Altman analyses revealed little systemic bias (−2.6 ml) but high measurement variability (95% CI ±56.7 ml) between mean CT-CBF and DWI lesion volumes, and systemic bias (−26 ml) and high measurement variability (95% CI ±64.0 ml) between mean CT-CBV and DWI lesion volumes. A simulated treatment study demonstrated that using CTP-CBF instead of DWI for detecting a statistically significant effect would require at least twice as many patients. Conclusions The poor CNRs of CT-CBV and CT-CBF compared to DWI result in large measurement error making it problematic to substitute CTP for DWI in selecting individual acute stroke patients for treatment. CTP could be used for treatment studies of patient groups, but the number of patients needed to identify a significant effect is much higher than if DWI is used. PMID:25550366

  11. A case of acute interstitial pneumonia indistinguishable from bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia/cryptogenic organizing pneumonia: high-resolution CT findings and pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Ichikado, K; Johkoh, T; Ikezoe, J; Yoshida, S; Honda, O; Mihara, N; Nakamura, H; Tsujimura, T; Suga, M; Ando, M

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of histologically proved acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) with subacute onset whose high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings were indistinguishable from those of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP)/cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP). The HRCT findings were air-space consolidation with air-bronchiologram associated with little ground-glass attenuation, and nodules. Some cases of AIP present HRCT findings indistinguishable from those of BOOP/COP.

  12. Drag measurements on long thin cylinders at small angles and high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, William L.; Cipolla, Kimberly M.; Hart, David R.; Furey, Deborah A.

    2005-06-01

    Measurements of the drag caused by turbulent boundary layer mean wall shear stress on cylinders at small angles of attack and high length Reynolds numbers (8×106high-speed towing tank enabled the development of turbulent boundary layers on cylinders made of stainless steel, aluminum, titanium, and polyvinyl chloride. The diameter of all cylinders in this experiment was 12.7 mm; two cylinder lengths, 3.05 m and 6.10 m, were used, corresponding to aspect ratio values L/a=480 and 960, respectively. Materials of various densities were towed at critical angles, resulting in linear cylinder geometry for tow speeds ranging from 2.6 m/s to 20.7 m/s and angles between 0° and 12°. Towing angles were measured with digital photography, and streamwise drag was measured with a strut-mounted load cell at the tow point. The measured tangential drag was very sensitive to small increases in angle at all tow speeds. A momentum thickness length scale is proposed to scale the tangential drag coefficient. The effects of the cross-flow resulting from the small angles of tow have a significant effect on the tangential drag coefficient values. A scaling for the orthogonal force on the cylinders was determined and provides a correction to published normal drag coefficient values for pure cross-flow. The presence of the axial turbulent boundary layer has a significant effect on these orthogonal forces.

  13. MHC variability supports dog domestication from a large number of wolves: high diversity in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Niskanen, A K; Hagström, E; Lohi, H; Ruokonen, M; Esparza-Salas, R; Aspi, J; Savolainen, P

    2013-01-01

    The process of dog domestication is still somewhat unresolved. Earlier studies indicate that domestic dogs from all over the world have a common origin in Asia. So far, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) diversity has not been studied in detail in Asian dogs, although high levels of genetic diversity are expected at the domestication locality. We sequenced the second exon of the canine MHC gene DLA–DRB1 from 128 Asian dogs and compared our data with a previously published large data set of MHC alleles, mostly from European dogs. Our results show that Asian dogs have a higher MHC diversity than European dogs. We also estimated that there is only a small probability that new alleles have arisen by mutation since domestication. Based on the assumption that all of the currently known 102 DLA–DRB1 alleles come from the founding wolf population, we simulated the number of founding wolf individuals. Our simulations indicate an effective population size of at least 500 founding wolves, suggesting that the founding wolf population was large or that backcrossing has taken place. PMID:23073392

  14. Laboratory Study of Homogeneous and Isotropic Turbulence at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecenak, Zachary; Dou, Zhongwang; Yang, Fan; Cao, Lujie; Liang, Zach; Meng, Hui

    2013-11-01

    To study particle dynamics modified by isotropic turbulence at high Reynolds numbers and provide experimental data for DNS validation, we have developed a soccer-ball-shaped truncated icosahedron turbulence chamber with 20 adjoining hexagon surfaces, 12 pentagon surfaces and twenty symettrically displaced fans, which form an enclosed chamber of 1m diameter. We use Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique to characterize the base turbulent flow, using different PIV set ups to capture various characteristic scales of turbulence. Results show that the stationary isotropic turbulence field is a spherical domain with diameter of 40 mm with quasi-zero mean velocities. The maximum rms velocity is ~1.5 m/s, corresponding to a Taylor microscale Re of 450. We extract from the PIV velocity field the whole set of turbulent flow parameters including: turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent intensity, kinetic energy dissipation rate, large eddy length and time scales, the Kolmogorov length, time and velocity scales, Taylor microscale and Re, which are critical to the study of inter-particle statistics modified by turbulence. This research is funded by an NSF grant CBET-0967407.

  15. Effect of Ambient Turbulence on the Drag Force of Particle at High Stokes Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Masaya; Oshima, Nobuyuki; Tsubokura, Makoto; Nakashima, Takuji

    2008-11-01

    Velocity of solid particle (diameter is 2 mm) free-falling in a nearly isotropic turbulent airflow has been investigated using an ingenious experimental setup to achieve high Stokes number. Turbulent intensity around the particle is large enough to have eddies of comparable size to the thickness of boundary layer (approximately 0.2 mm) that is estimated in a laminar flow. As a result of measurement, an ensemble averaged particle velocity is larger than the velocity predicted with Schiller and Naumann's drag coefficient (Muto et al., 2007). To investigate this reduction of drag force, flow aspects near the particle are observed using a numerical simulation of rotating spherical particle (periodically rotates in opposite direction) in a uniform flow. As a result, a modulation of drag force is found and it depends on period and amplitude of the rotation. A reason of the change of drag force in both experiment and numerical simulation is deduced that eddies included in an approach flow to particle, or periodic rotation of particle affect its boundary layer, and the wake of particle is suppressed.

  16. Using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Experiments to Design Sweeping Jets for High Reynolds Number Cruise Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Gregory S.; Milholen, William E., II; Fell, Jared S.; Webb, Sandy R.; Cagle, C. Mark

    2016-01-01

    The application of a sweeping jet actuator to a circulation control system was initiated by a risk reduction series of experiments to optimize the authority of a single sweeping jet actuator. The sweeping jet design was integrated into the existing Fundamental Aerodynamic Subsonic Transonic- Modular Active Control (FAST-MAC) model by replacing the steady blowing system with an array of thirty-nine sweeping jet cartridges. A constant slot height to wing chord ratio was similar to the steady blowing configuration resulting in each actuator having a unique in size for the sweeping jet configuration. While this paper will describe the scaling and optimization of the actuators for future high Reynolds number applications, the major focus of this effort was to target the transonic flight regime by increasing the amplitude authority of the actuator. This was accomplished by modifying the diffuser of the sweeping jet actuator, and this paper highlights twelve different diffuser designs. The experimental portion of this work was completed in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility.

  17. Origin of high particle number concentrations reaching the St. Louis, Midwest Supersite.

    PubMed

    de Foy, Benjamin; Schauer, James J

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafine particles are associated with adverse health effects. Total Particle Number Concentration (TNC) of fine particles were measured during 2002 at the St. Louis - Midwest supersite. The time series showed overall low level with frequent large peaks. The time series was analyzed alongside criteria pollutant measurements and meteorological observations. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify further contributing factors and to determine the association of different pollutants with TNC levels. This showed the strong contribution of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) to high TNC levels. The analysis also suggested that increased dispersion resulting from faster winds and higher mixing heights led to higher TNC levels. Overall, the results show that there were intense particle nucleation events in a SO2 rich plume reaching the site which contributed around 29% of TNC. A further 40% was associated with primary emissions from mobile sources. By separating the remaining TNC by time of day and clear sky conditions, we suggest that most likely 8% of TNC are due to regional nucleation events and 23% are associated with the general urban background.

  18. Magnetic characteristics of a high-layer-number NiFe/FeMn multilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, G. W. Gonçalves, F. J. T.; McFadzean, S.; Stamps, R. L.; O'Reilly, S.; Bowman, R.

    2015-11-28

    We report the static and dynamic magnetic characteristics of a high-layer-number NiFe/FeMn multilayer test structure with potential applications in broadband absorber and filter devices. To allow fine control over the absorption linewidths and to understand the mechanisms governing the resonances in a tailored structure similar to that expected to be used in real world applications, the multilayer was intentionally designed to have layer thickness and interface roughness variations. Magnetometry measurements show that the sample has complex hysteresis loops with features consistent with single ferromagnetic film reversals. Characterisation by transmission electron microscopy allows us to correlate the magnetic properties with structural features, including the film widths and interface roughnesses. Analysis of resonance frequencies from broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements as a function of field magnitude and orientation provide values of the local exchange bias, rotatable anisotropy, and uniaxial anisotropy fields for specific layers in the stack and explain the observed mode softening. The linewidths of the multilayer are adjustable around the bias field, approaching twice that seen at larger fields, allowing control over the bandwidth of devices formed from the structure.

  19. High Reynolds number rough wall turbulent boundary layer experiments using Braille surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Michael; Monty, Jason; Nova, Todd; Allen, James; Chong, Min

    2007-11-01

    This paper details smooth, transitional and fully rough turbulent boundary layer experiments in the New Mexico State high Reynolds number rough wall wind tunnel. The initial surface tested was generated with a Braille printer and consisted of an uniform array of Braille points. The average point height being 0.5mm, the spacing between the points in the span was 0.5mm and the surface consisted of span wise rows separated by 4mm. The wavelength to peak ratio was 8:1. The boundary layer thickness at the measurement location was 190mm giving a large separation of roughness height to layer thickness. The maximum friction velocity was uτ=1.5m/s at Rex=3.8 x10^7. Results for the skin friction co-efficient show that this surface follows a Nikuradse type inflectional curve and that Townsends outer layer similarity hypothesis is valid for rough wall flows with a large separation of scales. Mean flow and turbulence statistics will be presented.

  20. MHC variability supports dog domestication from a large number of wolves: high diversity in Asia.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, A K; Hagström, E; Lohi, H; Ruokonen, M; Esparza-Salas, R; Aspi, J; Savolainen, P

    2013-01-01

    The process of dog domestication is still somewhat unresolved. Earlier studies indicate that domestic dogs from all over the world have a common origin in Asia. So far, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) diversity has not been studied in detail in Asian dogs, although high levels of genetic diversity are expected at the domestication locality. We sequenced the second exon of the canine MHC gene DLA-DRB1 from 128 Asian dogs and compared our data with a previously published large data set of MHC alleles, mostly from European dogs. Our results show that Asian dogs have a higher MHC diversity than European dogs. We also estimated that there is only a small probability that new alleles have arisen by mutation since domestication. Based on the assumption that all of the currently known 102 DLA-DRB1 alleles come from the founding wolf population, we simulated the number of founding wolf individuals. Our simulations indicate an effective population size of at least 500 founding wolves, suggesting that the founding wolf population was large or that backcrossing has taken place.

  1. Origin of high particle number concentrations reaching the St. Louis, Midwest Supersite.

    PubMed

    de Foy, Benjamin; Schauer, James J

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafine particles are associated with adverse health effects. Total Particle Number Concentration (TNC) of fine particles were measured during 2002 at the St. Louis - Midwest supersite. The time series showed overall low level with frequent large peaks. The time series was analyzed alongside criteria pollutant measurements and meteorological observations. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify further contributing factors and to determine the association of different pollutants with TNC levels. This showed the strong contribution of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) to high TNC levels. The analysis also suggested that increased dispersion resulting from faster winds and higher mixing heights led to higher TNC levels. Overall, the results show that there were intense particle nucleation events in a SO2 rich plume reaching the site which contributed around 29% of TNC. A further 40% was associated with primary emissions from mobile sources. By separating the remaining TNC by time of day and clear sky conditions, we suggest that most likely 8% of TNC are due to regional nucleation events and 23% are associated with the general urban background. PMID:26257365

  2. Linear drag law for high-Reynolds-number flow past an oscillating body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agre, Natalie; Childress, Stephen; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif

    2016-07-01

    An object immersed in a fast flow typically experiences fluid forces that increase with the square of speed. Here we explore how this high-Reynolds-number force-speed relationship is affected by unsteady motions of a body. Experiments on disks that are driven to oscillate while progressing through air reveal two distinct regimes: a conventional quadratic relationship for slow oscillations and an anomalous scaling for fast flapping in which the time-averaged drag increases linearly with flow speed. In the linear regime, flow visualization shows that a pair of counterrotating vortices is shed with each oscillation and a model that views a train of such dipoles as a momentum jet reproduces the linearity. We also show that appropriate scaling variables collapse the experimental data from both regimes and for different oscillatory motions into a single drag-speed relationship. These results could provide insight into the aerodynamic resistance incurred by oscillating wings in flight and they suggest that vibrations can be an effective means to actively control the drag on an object.

  3. The effect of tip speed ratio on a vertical axis wind turbine at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Colin M.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2016-05-01

    This work visualizes the flow surrounding a scaled model vertical axis wind turbine at realistic operating conditions. The model closely matches geometric and dynamic properties—tip speed ratio and Reynolds number—of a full-size turbine. The flow is visualized using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) in the midplane upstream, around, and after (up to 4 turbine diameters downstream) the turbine, as well as a vertical plane behind the turbine. Time-averaged results show an asymmetric wake behind the turbine, regardless of tip speed ratio, with a larger velocity deficit for a higher tip speed ratio. For the higher tip speed ratio, an area of averaged flow reversal is present with a maximum reverse flow of -0.04U_∞. Phase-averaged vorticity fields—achieved by syncing the PIV system with the rotation of the turbine—show distinct structures form from each turbine blade. There were distinct differences in results by tip speed ratios of 0.9, 1.3, and 2.2 of when in the cycle structures are shed into the wake—switching from two pairs to a single pair of vortices being shed—and how they convect into the wake—the middle tip speed ratio vortices convect downstream inside the wake, while the high tip speed ratio pair is shed into the shear layer of the wake. Finally, results show that the wake structure is much more sensitive to changes in tip speed ratio than to changes in Reynolds number.

  4. Triple-deck analysis of transonic high Reynolds number flow through slender channels.

    PubMed

    Kluwick, A; Kornfeld, M

    2014-07-28

    In this work, laminar transonic weakly three-dimensional flows at high Reynolds numbers in slender channels, as found in microsupersonic nozzles and turbomachines of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are considered. The channel height is taken so small that the viscous wall layers forming at the channel walls start to interact strongly rather than weakly with the inviscid core flow and, therefore, the classical boundary layer approach fails. The resulting viscous-inviscid interaction problem is formulated using matched asymptotic expansions and found to be governed by a triple-deck structure. As a consequence, the properties of the predominantly inviscid core region and the viscous wall layers have to be calculated simultaneously in the interaction region. Weakly three-dimensional effects caused by surface roughness, upstream propagating flow perturbations, boundary layer separation as well as bifurcating solutions are discussed. Representative results for subsonic as well as supersonic conditions are presented, and the importance of these flow phenomena in technical applications as, for example, a means to reduce shock losses through the use of deformed geometry is addressed.

  5. An ultrasmall and metabolizable PEGylated NaGdF4:Dy nanoprobe for high-performance T(1)/T(2)-weighted MR and CT multimodal imaging.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoying; Fang, Fang; Liu, Jianhua; Jiang, Chunhuan; Han, Xueli; Song, Zhongkai; Chen, Jinxing; Sun, Guoying; Lei, Hao; Lu, Lehui

    2015-10-14

    Lanthanide-based multimodal probes with high sensitivity, simple synthesis strategy, and good biocompatibility promise new applications for clinical diagnosis. However, today's challenge is not only to develop high-performance multimodal probes for more accurate and reliable diagnosis, but also to understand the fate of these probes in vivo. In this context, a novel PEGylated Dy-doped NaGdF4 nanoprobe (PEG-NaGdF4:Dy) was designed and fabricated as a T1/T2-weighted MRI/CT imaging agent. This nanoprobe has a distinct longitudinal relaxivity (r1 = 5.17 mM(-1) s(-1)), relatively high transverse relaxivity (r2 = 10.64 mM(-1) s(-1)), and exhibits strong X-ray attenuation properties (44.70 HU L g(-1)) in vitro. Furthermore, T1/T2-weighted MRI/CT imaging in vivo confirmed that this PEG-NaGdF4:Dy nanoprobe could lead to a significant contrast enhancement effect on liver, spleen and kidney at 24 h post injection. The MTT assay, histological analysis, and biodistribution investigation demonstrated that this multifunctional nanoprobe possessed relatively low cytotoxicity, negligible tissue damage and could be completely excreted out of the body of mice as time prolonged. Therefore, the present PEG-NaGdF4:Dy nanoprobe has the potential for the development of multifunctional T1/T2-weighted MRI/CT imaging to provide more comprehensive and accurate diagnosis information. PMID:26350491

  6. Application of a Planar Doppler Velocimetry System to a High Reynolds Number Compressible Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    A Planar Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) system has been constructed and used to investigate the instantaneous turbulent velocity structure of a round high-speed compressible air jet with a low-speed co-flow. The exit condition was Mach=0.85 at ambient pressure, yielding a Reynolds number of about 650,000 on diameter. The PDV system was installed at NASA Langley Research Center in the Small Anechoic Jet Facility (SAJF), a chamber in which both the acoustic and aerodynamic properties of jets can be studied. For this test, the goal was to gather data which can be used to relate the turbulence structure of the jet to the levels and character of the acoustic noise produced by the jet. The current PDV system can acquire single-velocity-component, single-shot, planar images (15ns exposures) at 30 Hz. For this paper, the primary data set consists of 240 frames of velocity data acquired with both the jet and the low-speed co-flow seeded with light-scattering articles. Thus, velocities could be measured everywhere in the jet shear layer, both in the jet fluid and in the entrained co-flow. Some data were also taken with only the jet flow seeded. These provided mixing concentration images along with the reduced velocity fields. Other images were taken with only the co-flow seeded. These produced unique quantitative images of high speed entrainment. Optical "laser speckle" noise is the largest source of random noise in pulsed PDV systems. Components for the PDV imaging system were specifically selected to minimize speckle noise. To reduce systematic velocity errors due to laser drift, a frequency monitoring reference leg with a temperature-tuned reference iodine cell, was employed. In the course of this study, a novel flow seeder was developed. It enabled continuously variable seeding of the flow with particles of Sheared Pyrogenic Amorphous Hydrophobic Silica (SPAHS). The seeder comprised a dry fluidized bed hopper and a supersonic nozzle "pickup." Shearing action in the pickup

  7. High-pitch coronary CT angiography at 70 kVp with low contrast medium volume: comparison of 80 and 100 kVp high-pitch protocols.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Qi, Li; De Cecco, Carlo N; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Spearman, James V; Schoepf, U Joseph; Lu, Guang Ming

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate image quality and radiation dose of prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered high-pitch coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) at 70 kVp and 30 mL contrast medium.One hundred fifty patients with a heart rate ≤70 beats per minute (bpm) underwent CCTA using a second-generation dual-source computed tomography (CT) scanner and were randomized into 3 groups according to tube voltage and contrast medium volume (370 mg/mL iodine concentration) (100 kVp group, 100 kVp/60 mL, n = 55; 80 kVp group, 80 kVp/60 mL, n = 44; 70 kVp group, 70 kVp/30 mL, n = 51). Objective and subjective image quality along with the effect of heart rate (HR) and body mass index (BMI) was evaluated and compared between the groups. Radiation dose was estimated for each patient.CT attenuation and image noise were higher in the 80 and 70 kVp groups than in the 100 kVp group (all P < 0.001). Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were lower in the 70 kVp group than in the 80 and 100 kVp groups (all P < 0.05). There was no difference for subjective image quality between the groups (P > 0.05). HR did not affect subjective image quality (all P > 0.05), while patients with BMI <23 kg/m had higher image quality than patients with BMI ≥23 kg/m (P < 0.05). Compared with the 100 kVp group, the radiation dose of the 70 kVp group was reduced by 75%.In conclusion, prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch 70 kVp/30 mL CCTA can obtain diagnostic image quality with lower radiation dose in selected patients with BMI <23 kg/m compared with 80/100 kVp/60 mL CCTA. PMID:25396334

  8. High-Resolution 4D Imaging of Technetium Transport in Porous Media using Preclinical SPECT-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, M.; DeVol, T. A.; Groen, H.; Moysey, S. M.; Ramakers, R.; Powell, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Preclinical SPECT-CT (single-photon emission computed tomography with integrated X-ray computed tomography) offers the potential to quantitatively image the dynamic three-dimensional distribution of radioisotopes with sub-millimeter resolution, overlaid with structural CT images (20-200 micron resolution), making this an attractive method for studying transport in porous media. A preclinical SPECT-CT system (U-SPECT4CT, MILabs BV. Utrecht, The Netherlands) was evaluated for imaging flow and transport of 99mTc (t1/2=6hrs) using a 46,5mm by 156,4mm column packed with individual layers consisting of <0.2mm diameter silica gel, 0.2-0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0mm diameter glass beads, and a natural soil sample obtained from the Savannah River Site. The column was saturated with water prior to injecting the 99mTc solution. During the injection the flow was interrupted intermittently for 10 minute periods to allow for the acquisition of a SPECT image of the transport front. Non-uniformity of the front was clearly observed in the images as well as the retarded movement of 99mTc in the soil layer. The latter is suggesting good potential for monitoring transport processes occurring on the timescale of hours. After breakthrough of 99mTc was achieved, the flow was stopped and SPECT data were collected in one hour increments to evaluate the sensitivity of the instrument as the isotope decayed. Fused SPECT- CT images allowed for improved interpretation of 99mTc distributions within individual pore spaces. With ~3 MBq remaining in the column, the lowest activity imaged, it was not possible to clearly discriminate any of the pore spaces.

  9. Fast, high-resolution 3D dosimetry utilizing a novel optical-CT scanner incorporating tertiary telecentric collimation.

    PubMed

    Sakhalkar, H S; Oldham, M

    2008-01-01

    This study introduces a charge coupled device (CCD) area detector based optical-computed tomography (optical-CT) scanner for comprehensive verification of radiation dose distributions recorded in nonscattering radiochromic dosimeters. Defining characteristics include: (i) a very fast scanning time of approximately 5 min to acquire a complete three-dimensional (3D) dataset, (ii) improved image formation through the use of custom telecentric optics, which ensures accurate projection images and minimizes artifacts from scattered and stray-light sources, and (iii) high resolution (potentially 50 microm) isotropic 3D dose readout. The performance of the CCD scanner for 3D dose readout was evaluated by comparison with independent 3D readout from the single laser beam OCTOPUS-scanner for the same PRESAGE dosimeters. The OCTOPUS scanner was considered the "gold standard" technique in light of prior studies demonstrating its accuracy. Additional comparisons were made against calculated dose distributions from the ECLIPSE treatment-planning system. Dose readout for the following treatments were investigated: (i) a single rectangular beam irradiation to investigate small field and very steep dose gradient dosimetry away from edge effects, (ii) a 2-field open beam parallel-opposed irradiation to investigate dosimetry along steep dose gradients, and (iii) a 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) irradiation to investigate dosimetry for complex treatment delivery involving modulation of fluence and for dosimetry along moderate dose gradients. Dose profiles, dose-difference plots, and gamma maps were employed to evaluate quantitative estimates of agreement between independently measured and calculated dose distributions. Results indicated that dose readout from the CCD scanner was in agreement with independent gold-standard readout from the OCTOPUS-scanner as well as the calculated ECLIPSE dose distribution for all treatments, except in regions within a few

  10. Fast, high-resolution 3D dosimetry utilizing a novel optical-CT scanner incorporating tertiary telecentric collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Sakhalkar, H. S.; Oldham, M.

    2008-01-15

    This study introduces a charge coupled device (CCD) area detector based optical-computed tomography (optical-CT) scanner for comprehensive verification of radiation dose distributions recorded in nonscattering radiochromic dosimeters. Defining characteristics include: (i) a very fast scanning time of {approx}5 min to acquire a complete three-dimensional (3D) dataset, (ii) improved image formation through the use of custom telecentric optics, which ensures accurate projection images and minimizes artifacts from scattered and stray-light sources, and (iii) high resolution (potentially 50 {mu}m) isotropic 3D dose readout. The performance of the CCD scanner for 3D dose readout was evaluated by comparison with independent 3D readout from the single laser beam OCTOPUS-scanner for the same PRESAGE dosimeters. The OCTOPUS scanner was considered the 'gold standard' technique in light of prior studies demonstrating its accuracy. Additional comparisons were made against calculated dose distributions from the ECLIPSE treatment-planning system. Dose readout for the following treatments were investigated: (i) a single rectangular beam irradiation to investigate small field and very steep dose gradient dosimetry away from edge effects, (ii) a 2-field open beam parallel-opposed irradiation to investigate dosimetry along steep dose gradients, and (iii) a 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) irradiation to investigate dosimetry for complex treatment delivery involving modulation of fluence and for dosimetry along moderate dose gradients. Dose profiles, dose-difference plots, and gamma maps were employed to evaluate quantitative estimates of agreement between independently measured and calculated dose distributions. Results indicated that dose readout from the CCD scanner was in agreement with independent gold-standard readout from the OCTOPUS-scanner as well as the calculated ECLIPSE dose distribution for all treatments, except in regions within a few millimeters of

  11. Unsteady pressure measurements on a supercritical airfoil at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    Steady and unsteady pressures were measured on a 14 percent supercritical airfoil at transonic Mach numbers at Reynolds numbers from 6,000,000 to 35,000,000. Instrumentation techniques were developed to measure unsteady pressures in a cryogenic tunnel at flight Reynolds numbers. Experimental steady data, corrected for wall effects show very good agreement with calculations from a full potential code with an interacted boundary layer. The steady and unsteady pressures both show a shock position that is dependent on Reynolds number. For a supercritical pressure distribution at a chord Reynolds number of 35,000,000 laminar flow was observed between the leading edge and the shock wave at 45 percent chord.

  12. Measurements of fluctuating pressure in a rectangular cavity in transonic flow at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tracy, M. B.; Plentovich, E. B.; Chu, Julio

    1992-01-01

    An experiment was performed in the Langley 0.3 meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel to study the internal acoustic field generated by rectangular cavities in transonic and subsonic flows and to determine the effect of Reynolds number and angle of yaw on the field. The cavity was 11.25 in. long and 2.50 in. wide. The cavity depth was varied to obtain length-to-height (l/h) ratios of 4.40, 6.70, 12.67, and 20.00. Data were obtained for a free stream Mach number range from 0.20 to 0.90, a Reynolds number range from 2 x 10(exp 6) to 100 x 10(exp 6) per foot with a nearly constant boundary layer thickness, and for two angles of yaw of 0 and 15 degs. Results show that Reynolds number has little effect on the acoustic field in rectangular cavities at angle of yaw of 0 deg. Cavities with l/h = 4.40 and 6.70 generated tones at transonic speeds, whereas those with l/h = 20.00 did not. This trend agrees with data obtained previously at supersonic speeds. As Mach number decreased, the amplitude, and bandwidth of the tones changed. No tones appeared for Mach number = 0.20. For a cavity with l/h = 12.67, tones appeared at Mach number = 0.60, indicating a possible change in flow field type. Changes in acoustic spectra with angle of yaw varied with Reynolds number, Mach number, l/h ratios, and acoustic mode number.

  13. CNV Workshop: an integrated platform for high-throughput copy number variation discovery and clinical diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that copy number variations (CNVs) are frequent in higher eukaryotes and associated with a substantial portion of inherited and acquired risk for various human diseases. The increasing availability of high-resolution genome surveillance platforms provides opportunity for rapidly assessing research and clinical samples for CNV content, as well as for determining the potential pathogenicity of identified variants. However, few informatics tools for accurate and efficient CNV detection and assessment currently exist. Results We developed a suite of software tools and resources (CNV Workshop) for automated, genome-wide CNV detection from a variety of SNP array platforms. CNV Workshop includes three major components: detection, annotation, and presentation of structural variants from genome array data. CNV detection utilizes a robust and genotype-specific extension of the Circular Binary Segmentation algorithm, and the use of additional detection algorithms is supported. Predicted CNVs are captured in a MySQL database that supports cohort-based projects and incorporates a secure user authentication layer and user/admin roles. To assist with determination of pathogenicity, detected CNVs are also annotated automatically for gene content, known disease loci, and gene-based literature references. Results are easily queried, sorted, filtered, and visualized via a web-based presentation layer that includes a GBrowse-based graphical representation of CNV content and relevant public data, integration with the UCSC Genome Browser, and tabular displays of genomic attributes for each CNV. Conclusions To our knowledge, CNV Workshop represents the first cohesive and convenient platform for detection, annotation, and assessment of the biological and clinical significance of structural variants. CNV Workshop has been successfully utilized for assessment of genomic variation in healthy individuals and disease cohorts and is an ideal platform for

  14. Parameter identification of the rotordynamic coefficients of high-Reynolds-number hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvas, Constantinos

    The research presented here concentrates on experimental and analytical methods to identify the twelve rotordynamic coefficients of high-Reynolds-number hydrostatic bearings. Fluid-flow-induced noise (turbulence, cavitation) presents a significant problem in testing these bearings, since this noise exists in the same frequency range as the test signals. This common frequency range eliminates the possibility of rejecting the noise through filtering. A frequency-domain analysis method has been developed to extract the rotordynamic coefficients from data obtained by multi-frequency sequential excitation testing. Power-spectral-density estimates are used to reject noise that is independent of the applied excitation. The method is verified experimentally by single-frequency excitation, and repeatability tests. A second power-spectral-density based identification method has been developed and applied to simultaneous excitation test data. Here, two independent random excitations are applied simultaneously to the bearing, and their effects are separated by computing appropriate power-spectral-density estimates, while, at the same time, maintaining excellent noise rejection properties. This method yields results identical to the sequential excitation procedure, and reduces the actual test and analysis times by one half. Last, an analysis method in the time domain has been developed and implemented. In essence it is a direct application of least squares to the bearing housing equations of motion. For this method, it is shown that for the low-frequency noise present in the measurements, differentiation of the signals is acceptable, and preferable over integration. The twelve rotordynamic coefficients are obtained from a recursive formulation of least squares, and the results are shown to have acceptable convergence. Also, the coefficients extracted from this method are found to reconstruct the bearing response more accurately than the coefficients extracted from the power

  15. On the Formation Mechanisms of Artificially Generated High Reynolds Number Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-López, Eduardo; Bruce, Paul J. K.; Buxton, Oliver R. H.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the evolution of an artificially thick turbulent boundary layer generated by two families of small obstacles (divided into uniform and non-uniform wall normal distributions of blockage). One- and two-point velocity measurements using constant temperature anemometry show that the canonical behaviour of a boundary layer is recovered after an adaptation region downstream of the trips presenting 150~% higher momentum thickness (or equivalently, Reynolds number) than the natural case for the same downstream distance (x≈ 3 m). The effect of the degree of immersion of the trips for h/δ ≳ 1 is shown to play a secondary role. The one-point diagnostic quantities used to assess the degree of recovery of the canonical properties are the friction coefficient (representative of the inner motions), the shape factor and wake parameter (representative of the wake regions); they provide a severe test to be applied to artificially generated boundary layers. Simultaneous two-point velocity measurements of both spanwise and wall-normal correlations and the modulation of inner velocity by the outer structures show that there are two different formation mechanisms for the boundary layer. The trips with high aspect ratio and uniform distributed blockage leave the inner motions of the boundary layer relatively undisturbed, which subsequently drive the mixing of the obstacles' wake with the wall-bounded flow (wall-driven). In contrast, the low aspect-ratio trips with non-uniform blockage destroy the inner structures, which are then re-formed further downstream under the influence of the wake of the trips (wake-driven).

  16. The Effect of Number and Presentation Order of High-Constraint Sentences on Second Language Word Learning

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tengfei; Chen, Ran; Dunlap, Susan; Chen, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experiment that investigated the effects of number and presentation order of high-constraint sentences on semantic processing of unknown second language (L2) words (pseudowords) through reading. All participants were Chinese native speakers who learned English as a foreign language. In the experiment, sentence constraint and order of different constraint sentences were manipulated in English sentences, as well as L2 proficiency level of participants. We found that the number of high-constraint sentences was supportive for L2 word learning except in the condition in which high-constraint exposure was presented first. Moreover, when the number of high-constraint sentences was the same, learning was significantly better when the first exposure was a high-constraint exposure. And no proficiency level effects were found. Our results provided direct evidence that L2 word learning benefited from high quality language input and first presentations of high quality language input. PMID:27695432

  17. The Effect of Number and Presentation Order of High-Constraint Sentences on Second Language Word Learning

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tengfei; Chen, Ran; Dunlap, Susan; Chen, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experiment that investigated the effects of number and presentation order of high-constraint sentences on semantic processing of unknown second language (L2) words (pseudowords) through reading. All participants were Chinese native speakers who learned English as a foreign language. In the experiment, sentence constraint and order of different constraint sentences were manipulated in English sentences, as well as L2 proficiency level of participants. We found that the number of high-constraint sentences was supportive for L2 word learning except in the condition in which high-constraint exposure was presented first. Moreover, when the number of high-constraint sentences was the same, learning was significantly better when the first exposure was a high-constraint exposure. And no proficiency level effects were found. Our results provided direct evidence that L2 word learning benefited from high quality language input and first presentations of high quality language input.

  18. The relationship between ovarioles number and female size in blackflies of the high Andes of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, L A; Moncada, L I; Panza, C A; Camacho, I G; Colorado, F A; Matta, N E

    2015-02-01

    Fitness of a single species is often measured in terms of the number of viable offspring produced. We explore the relationship between the number of ovarioles and the size of females in five species of Simuliidae in two páramo regions of Colombia. Individuals of seven species of female blackflies that landed on animals were collected from mules in the Ucumarí Regional Park (RPNU) and from cattle in the Chingaza Natural National Park (ChNNP). The ovarioles of the five most abundant species were dissected out and counted, and a one-factor ANOVA was performed to explore differences in the mean number of ovarioles produced by different female size categories. Simulium ignescens Roubaud and S. ignescens-like species were collected in RPNU and S. ignescens, Simulium muiscorum Bueno et al, Simulium cormonsi Wygodzinsky and Simulium pautense Coscarón & Takaoka, in ChNNP. In addition, we also analyzed the Pearson product-moment correlation between the mean number of ovarioles per blackfly and female size within species using those which more than 20 individuals were collected. Ovarioles were meroistic-polytrophic type. A multiple range test (least significant difference) indicated that the largest size group had the largest mean number of ovarioles per female. In the other size groups, there were approximately equal numbers of ovarioles per female. Pearson's correlation coefficient was separately measured and indicated a 50% correlation between female size and ovariole number in S. ignescens. Although ovariole number is probably a genetically driven feature, other environmental and physiological conditions, including infections, can influence the number of eggs. PMID:26013017

  19. Excitable dynamics in high-Lewis number premixed gas combustion at normal and microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard

    1995-01-01

    Freely-propagating, premixed gas flames in high-Lewis (Le) number, quiescent mixtures are studied experimentally in tubes of various diameter at normal (lg) and microgravity (mu g). A premixture of lean butane and oxygen diluted with helium, argon, neon, nitrogen or a mixture of multiple diluents is examined such that the thermal diffusivity of the mixture (and to a lesser extent, the mass diffusivity of the rate-limiting component) is systematically varied. In effect, different diluents allow variation of the Le without changing the chemistry. The flames are recorded with high speed cinematography and their stability is visually assessed. Different modes of propagation were observed depending on the diameter of the tubes (different conductive heat loss), the composition of the mixture and the g-level. At 1g, four modes of propagation were observed in small and intermediate diameter tubes (large conductive heat loss): (1) steadily propagating flames, (2) radial and longitudinal pulsating flames, (3) 'wavering' flames, and (4) rotating spiral flames. As the diameter of the tube increases, the radial modes become more pronounced while the longitudinal modes systematically disappear. Also, multiple, simultaneous, spatially-separated 'pacemaker' sites are observed in intermediate and large diameter tubes. Each site starts as a small region of high luminosity and develops into a flamelet which assumes the form of one of the fore mentioned modes. These flamelets eventually interact, annihilate each other in their regions of intersection and merge at their newly created free-ends. For very large tubes, radially-propagating wave-trains (believed to be 'trigger waves') are observed. These are analogous to the radial pulsations observed in the smaller diameter tubes. At mu g, three modes of propagation have been observed: (1) steadily propagating flames, (2) radial and longitudinal pulsating flames, and (3) multi-armed, rotating flames. Since the pulsating mode exists at mu

  20. TIPS bilateral noise reduction in 4D CT perfusion scans produces high-quality cerebral blood flow maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendrik, Adriënne M.; Vonken, Evert-jan; van Ginneken, Bram; de Jong, Hugo W.; Riordan, Alan; van Seeters, Tom; Smit, Ewoud J.; Viergever, Max A.; Prokop, Mathias

    2011-07-01

    Cerebral computed tomography perfusion (CTP) scans are acquired to detect areas of abnormal perfusion in patients with cerebrovascular diseases. These 4D CTP scans consist of multiple sequential 3D CT scans over time. Therefore, to reduce radiation exposure to the patient, the amount of x-ray radiation that can be used per sequential scan is limited, which results in a high level of noise. To detect areas of abnormal perfusion, perfusion parameters are derived from the CTP data, such as the cerebral blood flow (CBF). Algorithms to determine perfusion parameters, especially singular value decomposition, are very sensitive to noise. Therefore, noise reduction is an important preprocessing step for CTP analysis. In this paper, we propose a time-intensity profile similarity (TIPS) bilateral filter to reduce noise in 4D CTP scans, while preserving the time-intensity profiles (fourth dimension) that are essential for determining the perfusion parameters. The proposed TIPS bilateral filter is compared to standard Gaussian filtering, and 4D and 3D (applied separately to each sequential scan) bilateral filtering on both phantom and patient data. Results on the phantom data show that the TIPS bilateral filter is best able to approach the ground truth (noise-free phantom), compared to the other filtering methods (lowest root mean square error). An observer study is performed using CBF maps derived from fifteen CTP scans of acute stroke patients filtered with standard Gaussian, 3D, 4D and TIPS bilateral filtering. These CBF maps were blindly presented to two observers that indicated which map they preferred for (1) gray/white matter differentiation, (2) detectability of infarcted area and (3) overall image quality. Based on these results, the TIPS bilateral filter ranked best and its CBF maps were scored to have the best overall image quality in 100% of the cases by both observers. Furthermore, quantitative CBF and cerebral blood volume values in both the phantom and the

  1. An autostereoscopic display with high resolution and large number of view zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wu-Li; Hsu, Wei-Liang; Tsai, Chao-Hsu; Wang, Chy-Lin; Wu, Chang-Shuo; Yang, Jinn-Cherng; Cheng, Shu-Chuan

    2008-02-01

    For a spatial-multiplexed 3D display, trade-off between resolution and number of view-zones are usually unavoidable due to the limited number of pixels on the screen. In this paper, we present a new autostereoscopic system, named as "integrated-screen system," to substantially increase the total number of pixels on the screen, which in turn increase both the resolution and number of view-zones. In the integrated-screen system, a large number of mini-projectors are arrayed and the images are tiled together without seams in between. For displaying 3D images, the lenticular screen with predesigned tilted angle is used for distributing different viewing zones. In order to achieve good performance, we design a brand-new projector with special lens set to meet the low-distortion requirement because the distortion of the image will induce serious crosstalk between view-zones. The proposed system has two advantages. One is the extensibility of the screen size. The size of the display can be chosen based on the applications we deal with, including the size of the projected pixel and the number of viewing zones. The other advantage is that the integrated-screen system provides projected pixels in great density to solve the major problem of the poor resolution that a lenticular-type 3D display has.

  2. Differences in Factors Affecting Various Crash Types with High Numbers of Fatalities and Injuries in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; He, Jie; Ding, Jianxun; Shi, Qin; Wang, Changjun; Li, Pingfan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Road traffic crashes that involve very high numbers of fatalities and injuries arouse public concern wherever they occur. In China, there are two categories of such crashes: a crash that results in 10–30 fatalities, 50–100 serious injuries or a total cost of 50–100 million RMB ($US8-16m) is a “serious road traffic crash” (SRTC), while a crash that is even more severe or costly is a “particularly serious road traffic crash” (PSRTC). The aim of this study is to identify the main factors affecting different types of these crashes (single-vehicle, head-on, rear-end and side impact) with the ultimate goal of informing prevention activities and policies. Methods Detailed descriptions of the SRTCs and PSRTCs that occurred from 2007 to 2014 were collected from the database “In-depth Investigation and Analysis System for Major Road Traffic Crashes” (IIASMRTC), which is maintained by the Traffic Management Research Institute of the Ministry of Public Security of China (TMRI). 18 main risk factors, which were categorized into four areas (participant, vehicle, road and environment-related) were chosen as potential independent variables for the multinomial logistic regression analysis. Comparisons were made among the single-vehicle, head-on, rear-end and side impact crashes in terms of factors affecting crash occurrence. Findings Five risk factors were significant for the six multinomial logistic regression models, which were location, vertical alignment, roadside safety rating, driver distraction and overloading of cargo. It was indicated that intersections were more likely to have side impact SRTCs and PSRTCs, especially with poor visibility at night. Overloaded freight vehicles were more likely to be involved in a rear-end crash than other freight vehicles. Driver distraction is an important risk factor for head-on crashes, while vertical alignment and roadside safety rating are positively associated with single-vehicle crashes. Conclusion Based

  3. Synthesis and biological studies of highly concentrated lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles for CT tracking of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghann, William E.; Aras, Omer; Fleiter, Thorsten; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2011-05-01

    For patients with a history of heart attack or stroke, the prevention of another cardiovascular or cerebrovascular event is crucial. The development of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis has been associated with overexpression of tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Recently, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown great potential as X-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents. Since lisinopril is an ACE inhibitor, it has been used as coating on GNPs for targeted imaging of tissue ACE in prevention of fibrosis. Herein, lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles (LIS-GNPs) were synthesized up to a concentration of 55 mgAu/mL. Their contrast was measured using CT and the results were compared to Omnipaque, a commonly used iodine-based contrast agent. The targeting ability of these LIS-GNPs was also assessed.

  4. Multimodality thoracic imaging of juvenile systemic sclerosis: emphasis on clinical correlation and high-resolution CT of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Valeur, Natalie S; Stevens, Anne M; Ferguson, Mark R; Effmann, Eric L; Iyer, Ramesh S

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. Juvenile systemic sclerosis is a rare multisystem autoimmune disorder characterized by vasculopathy and multiorgan fibrosis. Cardiopulmonary complications are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Although pulmonary fibrosis is the complication that is most common and well described, cardiovascular and esophageal involvement may also be observed. In this article, common thoracic findings in juvenile systemic sclerosis will be discussed. We will focus on chest CT, including CT findings of pulmonary fibrosis and associated grading methods, as well as cardiac MRI and esophageal imaging. CONCLUSION. Radiologists play a pivotal role in the initial diagnosis and follow-up evaluation of pediatric patients with systemic sclerosis. Treatment decisions and prognostic assessment are directly related to imaging findings along with clinical evaluation.

  5. Data-fusion of high resolution X-ray CT, SEM and EDS for 3D and pseudo-3D chemical and structural characterization of sandstone.

    PubMed

    De Boever, Wesley; Derluyn, Hannelore; Van Loo, Denis; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2015-07-01

    When dealing with the characterization of the structure and composition of natural stones, problems of representativeness and choice of analysis technique almost always occur. Since feature-sizes are typically spread over the nanometer to centimeter range, there is never one single technique that allows a rapid and complete characterization. Over the last few decades, high resolution X-ray CT (μ-CT) has become an invaluable tool for the 3D characterization of many materials, including natural stones. This technique has many important advantages, but there are also some limitations, including a tradeoff between resolution and sample size and a lack of chemical information. For geologists, this chemical information is of importance for the determination of minerals inside samples. We suggest a workflow for the complete chemical and structural characterization of a representative volume of a heterogeneous geological material. This workflow consists of combining information derived from CT scans at different spatial resolutions with information from scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. PMID:25939085

  6. Data-fusion of high resolution X-ray CT, SEM and EDS for 3D and pseudo-3D chemical and structural characterization of sandstone.

    PubMed

    De Boever, Wesley; Derluyn, Hannelore; Van Loo, Denis; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2015-07-01

    When dealing with the characterization of the structure and composition of natural stones, problems of representativeness and choice of analysis technique almost always occur. Since feature-sizes are typically spread over the nanometer to centimeter range, there is never one single technique that allows a rapid and complete characterization. Over the last few decades, high resolution X-ray CT (μ-CT) has become an invaluable tool for the 3D characterization of many materials, including natural stones. This technique has many important advantages, but there are also some limitations, including a tradeoff between resolution and sample size and a lack of chemical information. For geologists, this chemical information is of importance for the determination of minerals inside samples. We suggest a workflow for the complete chemical and structural characterization of a representative volume of a heterogeneous geological material. This workflow consists of combining information derived from CT scans at different spatial resolutions with information from scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  7. Performance evaluation of the Ingenuity TF PET/CT scanner with a focus on high count-rate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolthammer, Jeffrey A.; Su, Kuan-Hao; Grover, Anu; Narayanan, Manoj; Jordan, David W.; Muzic, Raymond F.

    2014-07-01

    This study evaluated the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging performance of the Ingenuity TF 128 PET/computed tomography (CT) scanner which has a PET component that was designed to support a wider radioactivity range than is possible with those of Gemini TF PET/CT and Ingenuity TF PET/MR. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate characteristics and image quality were evaluated according to the NEMA NU 2-2007 standard and ACR phantom accreditation procedures; these were supplemented by additional measurements intended to characterize the system under conditions that would be encountered during quantitative cardiac imaging with 82Rb. Image quality was evaluated using a hot spheres phantom, and various contrast recovery and noise measurements were made from replicated images. Timing and energy resolution, dead time, and the linearity of the image activity concentration, were all measured over a wide range of count rates. Spatial resolution (4.8-5.1 mm FWHM), sensitivity (7.3 cps kBq-1), peak noise-equivalent count rate (124 kcps), and peak trues rate (365 kcps) were similar to those of the Gemini TF PET/CT. Contrast recovery was higher with a 2 mm, body-detail reconstruction than with a 4 mm, body reconstruction, although the precision was reduced. The noise equivalent count rate peak was broad (within 10% of peak from 241-609 MBq). The activity measured in phantom images was within 10% of the true activity for count rates up to those observed in 82Rb cardiac PET studies.

  8. Evaluation of high Reynolds number flow in a 180 degree turn-around-duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandborn, V. A.; Marcy, S. J.

    1991-10-01

    Mean and turbulent velocities were measured for the flow in a 180 degree turn-around-duct over a Reynolds number range from 600,000 to greater than 900,000. The measurements were made in water using a forward scattering laser velocimeter. A duct of 100 x 10 cm constant cross-section, with a mean radius of curvature (centerline) of 10 cm was employed for the study. The measurements are in agreement with previous studies in that the use of local bulk velocity to nondimensionalize the mean and turbulent velocities reduce the Reynolds number variations. The basic phenomenon of relaminarization along the inner surface at the exit of the turn are similar to the flow observed at low Reynolds numbers. The separation bubble region shows a systematic variation with Reynolds number, however the Reynolds number effect may be of second order in the calculation of the overall flow. Large tangential, radial, and lateral turbulent velocities are measured along the outer surface of the turn.

  9. Inferring Haplotypes of Copy Number Variations From High-Throughput Data With Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mamoru; Yoon, Seungtai; Hosono, Naoya; Leotta, Anthony; Sebat, Jonathan; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Zhang, Michael Q.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate information on haplotypes and diplotypes (haplotype pairs) is required for population-genetic analyses; however, microarrays do not provide data on a haplotype or diplotype at a copy number variation (CNV) locus; they only provide data on the total number of copies over a diplotype or an unphased sequence genotype (e.g., AAB, unlike AB of single nucleotide polymorphism). Moreover, such copy numbers or genotypes are often incorrectly determined when microarray signal intensities derived from different copy numbers or genotypes are not clearly separated due to noise. Here we report an algorithm to infer CNV haplotypes and individuals’ diplotypes at multiple loci from noisy microarray data, utilizing the probability that a signal intensity may be derived from different underlying copy numbers or genotypes. Performing simulation studies based on known diplotypes and an error model obtained from real microarray data, we demonstrate that this probabilistic approach succeeds in accurate inference (error rate: 1–2%) from noisy data, whereas previous deterministic approaches failed (error rate: 12–18%). Applying this algorithm to real microarray data, we estimated haplotype frequencies and diplotypes in 1486 CNV regions for 100 individuals. Our algorithm will facilitate accurate population-genetic analyses and powerful disease association studies of CNVs. PMID:22384316

  10. Coherent large-scale structures in high Reynolds number supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Burrin, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The flow structure of a 50.8 mm (2 in) diameter jet operated at a full expanded Mach number of 1.37, with Reynolds numbers in the range 1.7 to 2.35 million, was examined for the first 20 jet diameters. To facilitate the study of the large scale structure, and determine any coherence, a discrete tone acoustic excitation method was used. Phase locked flow visualization as well as laser velocimeter quantitative measurements were made. The main conclusions derived from this study are: (1) large scale coherent like turbulence structures do exist in large Reynolds number supersonic jets, and they prevail even beyond the potential core; (2) the most preferential Strouhal number for these structures is in the vicinity of 0.4; and (3) quantitatively, the peak amplitudes of these structures are rather low, and are about 1% of the jet exit velocity. Finally, since a number of unique problems related to LV measurements in supersonic jets were encountered, a summary of these problems and lessons learned therefrom are also reported.

  11. Discrete-Roughness-Element-Enhanced Swept-Wing Natural Laminar Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb; Liao, Wei; Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear parabolized stability equations and secondary-instability analyses are used to provide a computational assessment of the potential use of the discrete-roughness-element technology for extending swept-wing natural laminar flow at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. Computations performed for the boundary layer on a natural-laminar-flow airfoil with a leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6 deg, freestream Mach number of 0.75, and chord Reynolds numbers of 17 × 10(exp 6), 24 × 10(exp 6), and 30 × 10(exp 6) suggest that discrete roughness elements could delay laminar-turbulent transition by about 20% when transition is caused by stationary crossflow disturbances. Computations show that the introduction of small-wavelength stationary crossflow disturbances (i.e., discrete roughness element) also suppresses the growth of most amplified traveling crossflow disturbances.

  12. DRE-Enhanced Swept-Wing Natural Laminar Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb; Liao, Wei; Li, Fe; Choudhari, Meelan

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear parabolized stability equations and secondary instability analyses are used to provide a computational assessment of the potential use of the discrete roughness elements (DRE) technology for extending swept-wing natural laminar flow at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. Computations performed for the boundary layer on a natural laminar flow airfoil with a leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6deg, free-stream Mach number of 0.75 and chord Reynolds numbers of 17 x 10(exp 6), 24 x 10(exp 6) and 30 x 10(exp 6) suggest that DRE could delay laminar-turbulent transition by about 20% when transition is caused by stationary crossflow disturbances. Computations show that the introduction of small wavelength stationary crossflow disturbances (i.e., DRE) also suppresses the growth of most amplified traveling crossflow disturbances.

  13. Airfoil stall penetration at constant pitch rate and high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorber, Peter F.; Carta, Franklin O.

    1989-01-01

    The model wing consists of a set of fiberglass panels mounted on a steel spar that spans the 8 ft test section of the UTRC Large Subsonic Wind Tunnel. The first use of this system was to measure surface pressures and flow conditions for a series of constant pitch rate ramps and sinusoidal oscillations a Mach number range, a Reynolds number range, and a pitch angle range. It is concluded that an increased pitch rate causes stall events to be delayed, strengthening of the stall vortex, increase in vortex propagation, and increase in unsteady airloads. The Mach number range causes a supersonic zone near the leading edge, stall vortex to be weaker, and a reduction of unsteady airloads.

  14. Inertial migration of spherical particles in circular Poiseuille flow at moderately high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xueming; Yu, Zhaosheng; Sun, Bo

    2008-10-01

    The inertial migration of spherical particles in a circular Poiseuille flow is numerically investigated for the tube Reynolds number up to 2200. The periodic boundary condition is imposed in the streamwise direction. The equilibrium positions, the migration velocity, and the angular velocity of a single particle in a tube cell are examined at different Reynolds numbers, particle-tube size ratios, and tube lengths. Inner equilibrium positions are observed as the Reynolds number exceeds a critical value, in qualitatively agreement with the previous experimental observations [J.-P. Matas, J. F. Morris, and E. Guazzelli, J. Fluid Mech. 515, 171 (2004)]. Our results indicate that the hydrodynamic interactions between the particles in different periodic cells have significant effects on the migration of the particles at the tube length being even as large as 6.7 particle diameters and they tend to stabilize the particles at the outer Segré-Silberberg equilibrium positions and to suppress the emergence of the inner equilibrium positions. A mirror-symmetric traveling-wave-like structure is observed when the particle Reynolds number is large enough. A pair of counter-rotating streamwise vortices exists at both upstream and downstream of the particle but with different rotating directions. The fluids in the half of the pipe without the particle flow more slowly and most fluids in the other half with the particle move faster with respect to the parabolic profile. The intensity of the structure is influenced by the local particle Reynolds number, the particle motion, and the tube length. In addition, the migration of multiple particles in a periodic tube cell is examined. We attribute the disparity in the critical particle Reynolds number for the occurrence of the inner particle annulus for the experiments and our simulations to the effect of the tube length or the periodic boundary condition in our numerical model.

  15. Nature's microfluidic transporter: rotational cytoplasmic streaming at high Péclet numbers.

    PubMed

    van de Meent, Jan-Willem; Tuval, Idan; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2008-10-24

    Cytoplasmic streaming circulates the contents of large eukaryotic cells, often with complex flow geometries. A largely unanswered question is the significance of these flows for molecular transport and mixing. Motivated by "rotational streaming" in Characean algae, we solve the advection-diffusion dynamics of flow in a cylinder with bidirectional helical forcing at the wall. A circulatory flow transverse to the cylinder's long axis, akin to Dean vortices at finite Reynolds numbers, arises from the chiral geometry. Strongly enhanced lateral transport and longitudinal homogenization occur if the transverse Péclet number is sufficiently large, with scaling laws arising from boundary layers.

  16. A High-Level Formalization of Floating-Point Number in PVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldo, Sylvie; Munoz, Cesar

    2006-01-01

    We develop a formalization of floating-point numbers in PVS based on a well-known formalization in Coq. We first describe the definitions of all the needed notions, e.g., floating-point number, format, rounding modes, etc.; then, we present an application to polynomial evaluation for elementary function evaluation. The application already existed in Coq, but our formalization shows a clear improvement in the quality of the result due to the automation provided by PVS. We finally integrate our formalization into a PVS hardware-level formalization of the IEEE-854 standard previously developed at NASA.

  17. A High-Resolution Map of Segmental DNA Copy Number Variation in the Mouse Genome

    PubMed Central

    Graubert, Timothy A; Selzer, Rebecca R; Richmond, Todd A; Eis, Peggy S; Shannon, William D; Li, Xia; McLeod, Howard L; Cheverud, James M; Ley, Timothy J

    2007-01-01

    Submicroscopic (less than 2 Mb) segmental DNA copy number changes are a recently recognized source of genetic variability between individuals. The biological consequences of copy number variants (CNVs) are largely undefined. In some cases, CNVs that cause gene dosage effects have been implicated in phenotypic variation. CNVs have been detected in diverse species, including mice and humans. Published studies in mice have been limited by resolution and strain selection. We chose to study 21 well-characterized inbred mouse strains that are the focus of an international effort to measure, catalog, and disseminate phenotype data. We performed comparative genomic hybridization using long oligomer arrays to characterize CNVs in these strains. This technique increased the resolution of CNV detection by more than an order of magnitude over previous methodologies. The CNVs range in size from 21 to 2,002 kb. Clustering strains by CNV profile recapitulates aspects of the known ancestry of these strains. Most of the CNVs (77.5%) contain annotated genes, and many (47.5%) colocalize with previously mapped segmental duplications in the mouse genome. We demonstrate that this technique can identify copy number differences associated with known polymorphic traits. The phenotype of previously uncharacterized strains can be predicted based on their copy number at these loci. Annotation of CNVs in the mouse genome combined with sequence-based analysis provides an important resource that will help define the genetic basis of complex traits. PMID:17206864

  18. Fine mapping of copy number variations on two cattle genome assemblies using high density SNP array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Btau_4.0 and UMD3.1 are two distinct cattle reference genome assemblies. In our previous study using the low density BovineSNP50 array, we reported a copy number variation (CNV) analysis on Btau_4.0 with 521 animals of 21 cattle breeds, yielding 682 CNV regions with a total length of 139.8 megabases...

  19. Efficient isolation of polymorphic microsatellites from high-throughput sequence data based on number of repeats.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Sara D; Gonçalves, David; Robalo, Joana I; Almada, Vitor C; Canário, Adelino V M; Oliveira, Rui F

    2013-09-01

    Transcriptome data are a good resource to develop microsatellites due to their potential in targeting candidate genes. However, developing microsatellites can be a time-consuming enterprise due to the numerous primer pairs to be tested. Therefore, the use of methodologies that make it efficient to identify polymorphic microsatellites is desirable. Here we used a 62,038 contigs transcriptome assembly, obtained from pyrosequencing a peacock blenny (Salaria pavo) multi-tissue cDNA library, to mine for microsatellites and in silico evaluation of their polymorphism. A total of 4190 microsatellites were identified in 3670 unique unigenes, and from these microsatellites, in silico polymorphism was detected in 733. We selected microsatellites based either on their in silico polymorphism and annotation results or based only on their number of repeats. Using these two approaches, 28 microsatellites were successfully amplified in twenty-six individuals, and all but 2 were found to be polymorphic, being the first genetic markers for this species. Our results showed that the strategy of selection based on number of repeats is more efficient in obtaining polymorphic microsatellites than the strategy of in silico polymorphism (allelic richness was 8.2±3.85 and 4.56±2.45 respectively). This study demonstrates that combining the knowledge of number of repeats with other predictors of variability, for example in silico microsatellite polymorphism, improves the rates of polymorphism, yielding microsatellites with higher allelic richness, and decreases the number of monomorphic microsatellites obtained. PMID:23665344

  20. A two-dimensional, TVD numerical scheme for inviscid, high Mach number flows in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, S.; Palmer, G.

    1986-01-01

    A new algorithm has been developed for hypervelocity flows in chemical equilibrium. Solutions have been achieved for Mach numbers up to 15 with no adverse effect on convergence. Two methods of coupling an equilibrium chemistry package have been tested, with the simpler method proving to be more robust. Improvements in boundary conditions are still required for a production-quality code.

  1. High School: The American Walkabout. Occasional Paper Series: Volume X, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donavel, David F.

    In September 1989, Masconomet Regional High School in Topsfield, Massachusetts, initiated a school-restructuring program called the Renaissance Program. Although the program was highly successful, the school committee voted to discontinue it in October 1990. This paper, written by a teacher at the high school, tries to understand why the program…

  2. Thermal convection and magnetic field generation in a rotating spherical shell at high Rayleigh number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, F.; Matsushima, M.; Honkura, Y.

    2004-12-01

    We have carried out 3D numerical simulations of MHD dynamo in a rotating spherical shell to investigate behavior of the convection structure and the generated magnetic field. Here, we focus on Rayleigh number (Ra) dependence of numerical dynamos to make extrapolation to the geodynamo regime, and thus, performed parameter survey varying Ra up to about 53 times the critical value, Rac. To make wider parameter survey, we use moderate value of the Ekman number (10-4). Using the other fixed parameters, the Prandtl number Pr=1, the magnetic Prandtl number Pm=2, and radius ratio ri/r_o=0.35, dynamos undergo a series of bifurcations with increasing Ra from well known dipolar dynamos without convection inside the tangent cylinder (TC), DP1, to the ones with active convection inside TC generating the toroidal magnetic field through the ω -effect, DP2, non-dipolar dynamos, NDP, and then TC-dominating dynamos, TCD. Between DP2 and NDP transition, the magnetic energy shows a dramatic reduction, and then increases again, whereas the kinetic energy monotonically increases. TCD dynamos are also found in Glatzmaier and Roberts dynamo model using hyperdiffusivity. In this regime, advection term in the momentum equation plays a role in momentum balance, while other dynamos at lower Ra are essentially in geostrophic state. The Lorentz force counteracts the advection term to inhibit disturbance in convection structure due to vortex stretching. It seems that viscous effects still play a role in momentum balance. Using the results obtained in this study, it is suggested that the magnetic Reynolds number similar to the Earth's core would be achieved at Ra ˜ 80Rac.

  3. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E

    2012-01-21

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging. PMID:22156174

  4. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  5. Increased recombinant protein production owing to expanded opportunities for vector integration in high chromosome number Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Noriko; Takahashi, Mai; Ali Haghparast, Seyed Mohammad; Onitsuka, Masayoshi; Kumamoto, Toshitaka; Frank, Jana; Omasa, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal instability is a characteristic of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Cultures of these cells gradually develop heterogeneity even if established from a single cell clone. We isolated cells containing different numbers of chromosomes from a CHO-DG44-based human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF)-producing cell line and found that high chromosome number cells showed higher hGM-CSF productivity. Therefore, we focused on the relationship between chromosome aneuploidy of CHO cells and high recombinant protein-producing cell lines. Distribution and stability of chromosomes were examined in CHO-DG44 cells, and two cell lines expressing different numbers of chromosomes were isolated from the original CHO-DG44 cell line to investigate the effect of aneuploid cells on recombinant protein production. Both cell lines were stably transfected with a vector that expresses immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3), and specific antibody production rates were compared. Cells containing more than 30 chromosomes had higher specific antibody production rates than those with normal chromosome number. Single cell analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein (Egfp)-gene transfected cells revealed that increased GFP expression was relative to the number of gene integration sites rather than the difference in chromosome numbers or vector locations. Our results suggest that CHO cells with high numbers of chromosomes contain more sites for vector integration, a characteristic that could be advantageous in biopharmaceutical production.

  6. An ultrasmall and metabolizable PEGylated NaGdF4:Dy nanoprobe for high-performance T1/T2-weighted MR and CT multimodal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiaoying; Fang, Fang; Liu, Jianhua; Jiang, Chunhuan; Han, Xueli; Song, Zhongkai; Chen, Jinxing; Sun, Guoying; Lei, Hao; Lu, Lehui

    2015-09-01

    Lanthanide-based multimodal probes with high sensitivity, simple synthesis strategy, and good biocompatibility promise new applications for clinical diagnosis. However, today's challenge is not only to develop high-performance multimodal probes for more accurate and reliable diagnosis, but also to understand the fate of these probes in vivo. In this context, a novel PEGylated Dy-doped NaGdF4 nanoprobe (PEG-NaGdF4:Dy) was designed and fabricated as a T1/T2-weighted MRI/CT imaging agent. This nanoprobe has a distinct longitudinal relaxivity (r1 = 5.17 mM-1 s-1), relatively high transverse relaxivity (r2 = 10.64 mM-1 s-1), and exhibits strong X-ray attenuation properties (44.70 HU L g-1) in vitro. Furthermore, T1/T2-weighted MRI/CT imaging in vivo confirmed that this PEG-NaGdF4:Dy nanoprobe could lead to a significant contrast enhancement effect on liver, spleen and kidney at 24 h post injection. The MTT assay, histological analysis, and biodistribution investigation demonstrated that this multifunctional nanoprobe possessed relatively low cytotoxicity, negligible tissue damage and could be completely excreted out of the body of mice as time prolonged. Therefore, the present PEG-NaGdF4:Dy nanoprobe has the potential for the development of multifunctional T1/T2-weighted MRI/CT imaging to provide more comprehensive and accurate diagnosis information.Lanthanide-based multimodal probes with high sensitivity, simple synthesis strategy, and good biocompatibility promise new applications for clinical diagnosis. However, today's challenge is not only to develop high-performance multimodal probes for more accurate and reliable diagnosis, but also to understand the fate of these probes in vivo. In this context, a novel PEGylated Dy-doped NaGdF4 nanoprobe (PEG-NaGdF4:Dy) was designed and fabricated as a T1/T2-weighted MRI/CT imaging agent. This nanoprobe has a distinct longitudinal relaxivity (r1 = 5.17 mM-1 s-1), relatively high transverse relaxivity (r2 = 10.64 mM-1 s-1), and

  7. Development and Application of Plasma Actuators for Active Control of High-Speed and High Reynolds Number Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammy, Mo

    2010-01-01

    Active flow control is often used to manipulate flow instabilities to achieve a desired goal (e.g. prevent separation, enhance mixing, reduce noise, etc.). Instability frequencies normally scale with flow velocity scale and inversely with flow length scale (U/l). In a laboratory setting for such flow experiments, U is high, but l is low, resulting in high instability frequency. In addition, high momentum and high background noise & turbulence in the flow necessitate high amplitude actuation. Developing a high amplitude and high frequency actuator is a major challenge. Ironically, these requirements ease up in application (but other issues arise).

  8. The cryogenic wind tunnel for high Reynolds number testing. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments performed at the NASA Langley Research Center in a cryogenic low-speed continuous-flow tunnel and in a cryogenic transonic continuous-flow pressure tunnel have demonstrated the predicted changes in Reynolds number, drive power, and fan speed with temperature, while operating with nitrogen as the test gas. The experiments have also demonstrated that cooling to cryogenic temperatures by spraying liquid nitrogen directly into the tunnel circuit is practical and that tunnel temperature can be controlled within very close limits. Whereas most types of wind tunnel could operate with advantage at cryogenic temperatures, the continuous-flow fan-driven tunnel is particularly well suited to take full advantage of operating at these temperatures. A continuous-flow fan-driven cryogenic tunnel to satisfy current requirements for test Reynolds number can be constructed and operated using existing techniques. Both capital and operating costs appear acceptable.

  9. Compressible Boundary Layer Predictions at High Reynolds Number using Hybrid LES/RANS Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Jung-Il; Edwards, Jack R.; Baurle, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Simulations of compressible boundary layer flow at three different Reynolds numbers (Re(sub delta) = 5.59x10(exp 4), 1.78x10(exp 5), and 1.58x10(exp 6) are performed using a hybrid large-eddy/Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method. Variations in the recycling/rescaling method, the higher-order extension, the choice of primitive variables, the RANS/LES transition parameters, and the mesh resolution are considered in order to assess the model. The results indicate that the present model can provide good predictions of the mean flow properties and second-moment statistics of the boundary layers considered. Normalized Reynolds stresses in the outer layer are found to be independent of Reynolds number, similar to incompressible turbulent boundary layers.

  10. Dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor driven flows at high Atwood numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaeil, Mark; Akula, Bhanesh; Finn, Thomas; Ranjan, Devesh

    2014-11-01

    For the first time, detailed simultaneous density and velocity turbulent statistics for Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at Atwood number of 0.75 are measured. A new density probe capable of measuring gas volumetric concentration directly is used in parallel to a three-wire probe to obtain instantaneous density and velocity components simultaneously. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is also implemented to obtain field-wise measurements. The self-similarity behavior of the velocity statistics, corresponding probability density function (PDF) and spectra are presented. Mie-scattering images taken in both stream-wise and span-wise direction at different instability times have illustrated the turbulent structures visible in the instability. This work is graciously supported by DOE-National Nuclear Security Administration Grant Number DE-NA0001786.

  11. Skin Friction at Very High Reynolds Numbers in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Ralph D.; Anders, John B.; Hall, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    Skin friction coefficients were derived from measurements using standard measurement technologies on an axisymmetric cylinder in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF) at Mach numbers from 0.2 to 0.85. The pressure gradient was nominally zero, the wall temperature was nominally adiabatic, and the ratio of boundary layer thickness to model diameter within the measurement region was 0.10 to 0.14, varying with distance along the model. Reynolds numbers based on momentum thicknesses ranged from 37,000 to 605,000. The measurements approximately doubled the range of available data for flat plate skin friction coefficients. Three different techniques were used to measure surface shear. The maximum error of Preston tube measurements was estimated to be 2.5 percent, while that of Clauser derived measurements was estimated to be approximately 5 percent. Direct measurements by skin friction balance proved to be subject to large errors and were not considered reliable.

  12. Application of shock tubes to transonic airfoil testing at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.; Chaney, M. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    Performance analysis of a gas-driven shock tube shows that transonic airfoil flows with chord Reynolds numbers of the order of 100 million can be produced, with limitations being imposed by the structural integrity of the facility or the model. A study of flow development over a simple circular arc airfoil at zero angle of attack was carried out in a shock tube at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers to assess the testing technique. Results obtained from schlieren photography and airfoil pressure measurements show that steady transonic flows similar to those produced for the same airfoil in a wind tunnel can be generated within the available testing time in a shock tube with properly contoured test section walls.

  13. Designing of High-Volume PET/CT Facility with Optimal Reduction of Radiation Exposure to the Staff: Implementation and Optimization in a Tertiary Health Care Facility in India

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Ashish Kumar; Singh, Abhijith Mohan; Mithun, Sneha; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu C.; Shetye, Bhakti; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been in use for a few decades but with its fusion with computed tomography (CT) in 2001, the new PET/CT integrated system has become very popular and is now a key influential modality for patient management in oncology. However, along with its growing popularity, a growing concern of radiation safety among the radiation professionals has become evident. We have judiciously developed a PET/CT facility with optimal shielding, along with an efficient workflow to perform high volume procedures and minimize the radiation exposure to the staff and the general public by reducing unnecessary patient proximity to the staff and general public. PMID:26420990

  14. High-topological-number magnetic skyrmions and topologically protected dissipative structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Ezawa, Motohiko

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic skyrmion with the topological number of unity (Q =1 ) is a well-known nanometric swirling spin structure in the nonlinear σ model with the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Here we show that magnetic skyrmion with the topological number of two (Q =2 ) can be created and stabilized by applying vertical spin-polarized current though it cannot exist as a static stable excitation. Magnetic skyrmion with Q =2 is a nonequilibrium dynamic object, subsisting on a balance between the energy injection from the current and the energy dissipation by the Gilbert damping. Once it is created, it becomes a topologically protected object against fluctuations of various variables including the injected current itself. Hence we may call it a topologically protected dissipative structure. We also elucidate the nucleation and destruction mechanisms of the magnetic skyrmion with Q =2 by studying the evolutions of the magnetization distribution, the topological charge density, as well as the energy density. Our results will be useful for the study of the nontrivial topology of magnetic skyrmions with higher topological numbers.

  15. A Highly Polymorphic Copy Number Variant in the NSF Gene is Associated with Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Cabana-Domínguez, Judit; Roncero, Carlos; Grau-López, Lara; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Barral, Carmen; Abad, Alfonso C.; Erikson, Galina; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Torrico, Bàrbara; Arenas, Concepció; Casas, Miquel; Ribasés, Marta; Cormand, Bru; Fernàndez-Castillo, Noèlia

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is a complex psychiatric disorder involving both genetic and environmental factors. Several neurotransmitter systems mediate cocaine’s effects, dependence and relapse, being the components of the neurotransmitter release machinery good candidates for the disorder. Previously, we identified a risk haplotype for cocaine dependence in the NSF gene, encoding the protein N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor essential for synaptic vesicle turnover. Here we examined the possible contribution to cocaine dependence of a large copy number variant (CNV) that encompasses part of the NSF gene. We performed a case-control association study in a discovery sample (359 cases and 356 controls) and identified an association between cocaine dependence and the CNV (P = 0.013), that was confirmed in the replication sample (508 cases and 569 controls, P = 7.1e-03) and in a pooled analysis (P = 1.8e-04), with an over-representation of low number of copies in cases. Subsequently, we studied the functional impact of the CNV on gene expression and found that the levels of two NSF transcripts were significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) along with the number of copies of the CNV. These results, together with a previous study from our group, support the role of NSF in the susceptibility to cocaine dependence. PMID:27498889

  16. A Highly Polymorphic Copy Number Variant in the NSF Gene is Associated with Cocaine Dependence.

    PubMed

    Cabana-Domínguez, Judit; Roncero, Carlos; Grau-López, Lara; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Barral, Carmen; Abad, Alfonso C; Erikson, Galina; Wineinger, Nathan E; Torrico, Bàrbara; Arenas, Concepció; Casas, Miquel; Ribasés, Marta; Cormand, Bru; Fernàndez-Castillo, Noèlia

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is a complex psychiatric disorder involving both genetic and environmental factors. Several neurotransmitter systems mediate cocaine's effects, dependence and relapse, being the components of the neurotransmitter release machinery good candidates for the disorder. Previously, we identified a risk haplotype for cocaine dependence in the NSF gene, encoding the protein N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor essential for synaptic vesicle turnover. Here we examined the possible contribution to cocaine dependence of a large copy number variant (CNV) that encompasses part of the NSF gene. We performed a case-control association study in a discovery sample (359 cases and 356 controls) and identified an association between cocaine dependence and the CNV (P = 0.013), that was confirmed in the replication sample (508 cases and 569 controls, P = 7.1e-03) and in a pooled analysis (P = 1.8e-04), with an over-representation of low number of copies in cases. Subsequently, we studied the functional impact of the CNV on gene expression and found that the levels of two NSF transcripts were significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) along with the number of copies of the CNV. These results, together with a previous study from our group, support the role of NSF in the susceptibility to cocaine dependence. PMID:27498889

  17. Optimization of Proton CT Detector System and Image Reconstruction Algorithm for On-Line Proton Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chae Young; Song, Hankyeol; Park, Chan Woo; Chung, Yong Hyun; Kim, Jin Sung; Park, Justin C

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to optimize a proton computed tomography system (pCT) for proton range verification and to confirm the pCT image reconstruction algorithm based on projection images generated with optimized parameters. For this purpose, we developed a new pCT scanner using the Geometry and Tracking (GEANT) 4.9.6 simulation toolkit. GEANT4 simulations were performed to optimize the geometric parameters representing the detector thickness and the distance between the detectors for pCT. The system consisted of four silicon strip detectors for particle tracking and a calorimeter to measure the residual energies of the individual protons. The optimized pCT system design was then adjusted to ensure that the solution to a CS-based convex optimization problem would converge to yield the desired pCT images after a reasonable number of iterative corrections. In particular, we used a total variation-based formulation that has been useful in exploiting prior knowledge about the minimal variations of proton attenuation characteristics in the human body. Examinations performed using our CS algorithm showed that high-quality pCT images could be reconstructed using sets of 72 projections within 20 iterations and without any streaks or noise, which can be caused by under-sampling and proton starvation. Moreover, the images yielded by this CS algorithm were found to be of higher quality than those obtained using other reconstruction algorithms. The optimized pCT scanner system demonstrated the potential to perform high-quality pCT during on-line image-guided proton therapy, without increasing the imaging dose, by applying our CS based proton CT reconstruction algorithm. Further, we make our optimized detector system and CS-based proton CT reconstruction algorithm potentially useful in on-line proton therapy.

  18. Optimization of Proton CT Detector System and Image Reconstruction Algorithm for On-Line Proton Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chae Young; Song, Hankyeol; Park, Chan Woo; Chung, Yong Hyun; Kim, Jin Sung; Park, Justin C

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to optimize a proton computed tomography system (pCT) for proton range verification and to confirm the pCT image reconstruction algorithm based on projection images generated with optimized parameters. For this purpose, we developed a new pCT scanner using the Geometry and Tracking (GEANT) 4.9.6 simulation toolkit. GEANT4 simulations were performed to optimize the geometric parameters representing the detector thickness and the distance between the detectors for pCT. The system consisted of four silicon strip detectors for particle tracking and a calorimeter to measure the residual energies of the individual protons. The optimized pCT system design was then adjusted to ensure that the solution to a CS-based convex optimization problem would converge to yield the desired pCT images after a reasonable number of iterative corrections. In particular, we used a total variation-based formulation that has been useful in exploiting prior knowledge about the minimal variations of proton attenuation characteristics in the human body. Examinations performed using our CS algorithm showed that high-quality pCT images could be reconstructed using sets of 72 projections within 20 iterations and without any streaks or noise, which can be caused by under-sampling and proton starvation. Moreover, the images yielded by this CS algorithm were found to be of higher quality than those obtained using other reconstruction algorithms. The optimized pCT scanner system demonstrated the potential to perform high-quality pCT during on-line image-guided proton therapy, without increasing the imaging dose, by applying our CS based proton CT reconstruction algorithm. Further, we make our optimized detector system and CS-based proton CT reconstruction algorithm potentially useful in on-line proton therapy. PMID:27243822

  19. A new CT system architecture for high temporal resolution with applications to improved geometric dose efficiency and sparse sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, G. M.

    2015-03-01

    A new scalable CT system architecture is introduced with the potential to achieve much higher temporal resolution than is possible with current CT designs while maintaining the flux per rotation near today's levels. Higher effective rotation speeds can be achieved leveraging today's x-ray tube designs and capabilities. The new CT architecture comprises the following elements: (1) decoupling of the source rotation from the detector rotation through the provision of two independent, coaxial and coplanar rotating gantries (drums); (2) observation of a source at a range of azimuthal angles with respect to a given detector cell; (3) utilization of a multiplicity of x-ray sources; (4) use of a wide-angle iso-centered detector mounted on the independent detector drum; (5) the detector drum presents a wide angular aperture allowing x-rays from the various sources to pass through, with the active detector cells occupying about 240-degrees in one configuration, and the wide aperture the complementary 120-degrees; (6) anti-scatter grids with absorbing lamellas oriented substantially parallel to the main gantry plane; (7) optional sparse view acquisition in "bunches," a unique sparse sampling pattern potentially enabling further data acquisition speed-up for specific applications. Temporal resolution gains are achieved when multiple sources are simultaneously in view of the extended detector. Accurate data acquisition then relies on multiplexing in space, time, or spectra. Thus the use of an energy-discriminating detector, such as a photon-counting detector, and of tube pulsing will be advantageous. Volume-based scatter correction methods have the potential to apply when space multiplexing is used.

  20. Colloids containing gadolinium-capped gold nanoparticles as high relaxivity dual-modality contrast agents for CT and MRI.

    PubMed

    Zeng, ChengCai; Shi, XiaoNi; Wu, Bo; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, WeiLu

    2014-11-01

    A type of novel macromolecular colloid was prepared from gadolinium-based poly(l-succinimide) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with Au-S covalent bonds. The colloid displayed improved stability in aqueous media and regular arrays in partial region. Moreover, these materials enhanced the contrast 9 times more than that of the corresponding uncoated Au compound when the Au mass content was only 0.15%. Therefore, these materials might have potential as dual-modality contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT).

  1. The Polish Folk High Schools. Occasional Papers in Continuing Education. Number 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulich, Jindra; Bron-Wojciechowska, Agnieszka

    Polish folk high schools are modeled after schools developed in the mid-1850s in Denmark to provide general, non-credit education for young adults in rural areas. The main objectives of the folk high schools are to provide a climate for individual student development and to serve as centers where young adults can learn about their cultural…

  2. High School Redesign. Diplomas Count, 2016. Education Week. Volume 35, Number 33

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Virginia B., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    This year's report focuses on efforts to redesign high schools. Those include incorporating student voice, implementing a rigorous and relevant curriculum, embracing career exploration, and more. The report also includes the latest statistics on the nation's overall, on-time high school graduation rate. Articles include: (1) To Build a Better High…

  3. Experimental study of the effects of Reynolds number on high angle of attack aerodynamic characteristics of forebodies during rotary motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauley, H.; Ralston, J.; Dickes, E.

    1995-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Defense Research Agency (United Kingdom) have ongoing experimental research programs in rotary-flow aerodynamics. A cooperative effort between the two agencies is currently underway to collect an extensive database for the development of high angle of attack computational methods to predict the effects of Reynolds number on the forebody flowfield at dynamic conditions, as well as to study the use of low Reynolds number data for the evaluation of high Reynolds number characteristics. Rotary balance experiments, including force and moment and surface pressure measurements, were conducted on circular and rectangular aftbodies with hemispherical and ogive noses at the Bedford and Farnborough wind tunnel facilities in the United Kingdom. The bodies were tested at 60 and 90 deg angle of attack for a wide range of Reynolds numbers in order to observe the effects of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow separation on the forebody characteristics when rolling about the velocity vector.

  4. Dual-phase CT for the assessment of acute vascular injuries in high-energy blunt trauma: the imaging findings and management implications.

    PubMed

    Iacobellis, Francesca; Ierardi, Anna M; Mazzei, Maria A; Magenta Biasina, Alberto; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Nicola, Refky; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Acute vascular injuries are the second most common cause of fatalities in patients with multiple traumatic injuries; thus, prompt identification and management is essential for patient survival. Over the past few years, multidetector CT (MDCT) using dual-phase scanning protocol has become the imaging modality of choice in high-energy deceleration traumas. The objective of this article was to review the role of dual-phase MDCT in the identification and management of acute vascular injuries, particularly in the chest and abdomen following multiple traumatic injuries. In addition, this article will provide examples of MDCT features of acute vascular injuries with correlative surgical and interventional findings.

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen ... and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  6. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... 2016:chap 133. Radiologyinfo.org. Computed tomography (CT) - abdomen and pelvis. Updated June 16, 2016. www.radiologyinfo. ...

  7. Number Sense-Based Strategies Used by High-Achieving Sixth Grade Students Who Experienced Reform Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsawaie, Othman N.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore strategies used by high-achieving 6th grade students in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to solve basic arithmetic problems involving number sense. The sample for the study consisted of 15 high-achieving boys and 15 high-achieving girls in grade 6 from 2 schools in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, UAE. Data for the…

  8. Analysis of Fluctuating Static Pressure Measurements in a Large High Reynolds Number Transonic Cryogenic Wind Tunnel. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igoe, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic measurements of fluctuating static pressure levels were made using flush mounted high frequency response pressure transducers at eleven locations in the circuit of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) over the complete operating range of this wind tunnel. Measurements were made at test section Mach numbers from 0.2 to 1.2, at pressure from 1 to 8.6 atmospheres and at temperatures from ambient to -250 F, resulting in dynamic flow disturbance measurements at the highest Reynolds numbers available in a transonic ground test facility. Tests were also made independently at variable Mach number, variable Reynolds number, and variable drivepower, each time keeping the other two variables constant thus allowing for the first time, a distinct separation of these three important variables. A description of the NTF emphasizing its flow quality features, details on the calibration of the instrumentation, results of measurements with the test section slots covered, downstream choke, effects of liquid nitrogen injection and gaseous nitrogen venting, comparisons between air and nitrogen, isolation of the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and fan drive power, and identification of the sources of significant flow disturbances is included. The results indicate that primary sources of flow disturbance in the NTF may be edge-tones generated by test section sidewall re-entry flaps and the venting of nitrogen gas from the return leg of the tunnel circuit between turns 3 and 4 in the cryogenic mode of operation. The tests to isolate the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and drive power indicate that Mach number effects predominate. A comparison with other transonic wind tunnels shows that the NTF has low levels of test section fluctuating static pressure especially in the high subsonic Mach number range from 0.7 to 0.9.

  9. Large-Eddy Simulation of the Flat-plate Turbulent Boundary Layer at High Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Michio

    The near-wall, subgrid-scale (SGS) model [Chung and Pullin, "Large-eddy simulation and wall-modeling of turbulent channel flow'', J. Fluid Mech. 631, 281--309 (2009)] is used to perform large-eddy simulations (LES) of the incompressible developing, smooth-wall, flat-plate turbulent boundary layer. In this model, the stretched-vortex, SGS closure is utilized in conjunction with a tailored, near-wall model designed to incorporate anisotropic vorticity scales in the presence of the wall. The composite SGS-wall model is presently incorporated into a computer code suitable for the LES of developing flat-plate boundary layers. This is then used to study several aspects of zero- and adverse-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers. First, LES of the zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer are performed at Reynolds numbers Retheta based on the free-stream velocity and the momentum thickness in the range Retheta = 103-1012. Results include the inverse skin friction coefficient, 2/Cf , velocity profiles, the shape factor H, the Karman "constant", and the Coles wake factor as functions of Re theta. Comparisons with some direct numerical simulation (DNS) and experiment are made, including turbulent intensity data from atmospheric-layer measurements at Retheta = O (106). At extremely large Retheta , the empirical Coles-Fernholz relation for skin-friction coefficient provides a reasonable representation of the LES predictions. While the present LES methodology cannot of itself probe the structure of the near-wall region, the present results show turbulence intensities that scale on the wall-friction velocity and on the Clauser length scale over almost all of the outer boundary layer. It is argued that the LES is suggestive of the asymptotic, infinite Reynolds-number limit for the smooth-wall turbulent boundary layer and different ways in which this limit can be approached are discussed. The maximum Retheta of the present simulations appears to be limited by machine

  10. Effect of reduced aft diameter and increased blade number on high-speed counterrotation propeller performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Gayle E.; Jeracki, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Performance data of 0.17-scale model counterrotation pusher propeller configurations were taken in the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers of 0.66, 0.71, 0.75, and 0.79. These tests investigated the aerodynamic performance of the unducted fan (UDF) demonstrator propeller engine developed in a joint program by General Electric and NASA. Data were recorded to show the effect on counterrotation propeller cruise efficiency of two takeoff noise-reduction concepts. These two concepts are reduced aft blade diameter and increased forward blade number. The four configurations tested were a baseline (F1/A1 8/8) configuration, a reduced aft diameter (F1/A3 8/8) configuration, an increase forward blade number (F1/A1 9/8) configuration, and a combination of the latter two (F1/A3 9/8) configurations. Data were collected with a complex counterrotation propeller test rig via rotating thrust and torque balances and pressure instrumentation. Data comparisons documented the power differences between the baseline and the reduced aft diameter concepts. Performance comparisons to the baseline configuration showed that reducing the aft blade diameter reduced the net efficiency, and adding a blade to the front rotor increased the net efficiency. The combination of the two concepts showed only slightly lower net efficiency than the baseline configuration. It was also found that the counterrotation demonstrator propeller model (F7/A7 8/8) configuration outperformed the baseline (F1/A1 8/8) configuration.

  11. High-throughput quantitative analysis with cell growth kinetic curves for low copy number mutant cells.

    PubMed

    Xing, James Z; Gabos, Stephan; Huang, Biao; Pan, Tianhong; Huang, Min; Chen, Jie

    2012-10-01

    The mutation rate in cells induced by environmental genotoxic hazards is very low and difficult to detect using traditional cell counting assays. The established genetic toxicity tests currently recognized by regulatory authorities, such as conventional Ames and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) assays, are not well suited for higher-throughput screening as they require large amounts of test compounds and are very time consuming. In this study, we developed a novel cell-based assay for quantitative analysis of low numbers of cell copies with HPRT mutation induced by an environmental mutagen. The HPRT gene mutant cells induced by the mutagen were selected by 6-thioguanine (6-TG) and the cell's kinetic growth curve monitored by a real-time cell electronic sensor (RT-CES) system. When a threshold is set at a certain cell index (CI) level, samples with different initial mutant cell copies take different amounts of time in order for their growth (or CI accumulation) to cross this threshold. The more cells that are initially seeded in the test well, the faster the cell accumulation and therefore the shorter the time required to cross this threshold. Therefore, the culture time period required to cross the threshold of each sample corresponds to the original number of cells in the sample. A mutant cell growth time threshold (MT) value of each sample can be calculated to predict the number of original mutant cells. For mutagenesis determination, the RT-CES assay displayed an equal sensitivity (p > 0.05) and coefficients of variation values with good correlation to conventional HPRT mutagenic assays. Most importantly, the RT-CES mutation assay has a higher throughput than conventional cellular assays.

  12. Limited growth of the number of sources and decrease of inelasticity in high-energy reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, R.M. ); Wilk, G. Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw ); Wlodarczyk, Z. Institute of Physics, Pedagogical University, Kielce )

    1992-04-01

    The limited growth of the number of sources {l angle}{ital C}{r angle} found some time ago from the analysis of multiparticle distributions is explained in terms of the interacting gluon model. It turns out to be closely related to another characteristic property of strong interactions, namely the decrease with energy of the inelasticity {l angle}{ital K}{r angle} and is due to the specific energy dependence of the gluon-gluon cross section and the form of the gluonic structure functions.

  13. Thermal attractor in chaotic convection with high-Prandtl-number fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Alain P.; Yuen, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The onset of chaotic convection in large-Prandtl-number fluids has been found to occur in the form of elongated cells with aperiodic boundary-layer instabilities. The dynamics of this phenomenon has been monitored in the physical domain, and also in the spectral and phase spaces. In order to describe more precisely the underlying mechanisms of chaotic thermal convection, the notion of 'thermal attractor' is introduced in the physical domain and a systematic study is conducted of the evolution of the spectral energy surfaces. A relationship between this thermal attractor and the presence of a strange attractor in the phase space is proposed.

  14. Design of high-Reynolds-number flat-plate experiments in the NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S.

    1988-01-01

    The design of an experiment to measure skin friction and turbulent boundary layer characteristics at Reynolds numbers exceeding 1 x 10 to the 9th is described. The experiment will be conducted in a zero-pressure-gradient flow on a flat plate in the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The development of computational codes to analyze the aerodynamic loads and the blockage is documented. Novel instrumentation techniques and models, designed to operate in cryogenic environments, are presented. Special problems associated with aerodynamic loads, surface finish, and hot-wire anemometers are discussed.

  15. Analysis of high Reynolds numbers effects on a wind turbine airfoil using 2D wind tunnel test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, O.; Munduate, X.; Ceyhan, O.; Jacobs, M.; Snel, H.

    2016-09-01

    The aerodynamic behaviour of a wind turbine airfoil has been measured in a dedicated 2D wind tunnel test at the DNW High Pressure Wind Tunnel in Gottingen (HDG), Germany. The tests have been performed on the DU00W212 airfoil at different Reynolds numbers: 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 million, and at low Mach numbers (below 0.1). Both clean and tripped conditions of the airfoil have been measured. An analysis of the impact of a wide Reynolds number variation over the aerodynamic characteristics of this airfoil has been performed.

  16. Analysis of Turbulent Flow and Heat Transfer on a Flat Plate at High Mach Numbers with Variable Fluid Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, R. G.; Loeffler, A. L., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    A previous analysis of turbulent heat transfer and flow with variable fluid properties in smooth passages is extended to flow over a flat plate at high Mach numbers, and the results are compared with experimental data. Velocity and temperature distributions are calculated for a boundary layer with appreciative effects of frictional heating and external heat transfer. Viscosity and thermal conductivity are assumed to vary as a power or the temperature, while Prandtl number and specific heat are taken as constant. Skin-friction and heat-transfer coefficients are calculated and compared with the incompressible values. The rate of boundary-layer growth is obtained for various Mach numbers.

  17. Entropy Splitting for High Order Numerical Simulation of Vortex Sound at Low Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, B.; Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A method of minimizing numerical errors, and improving nonlinear stability and accuracy associated with low Mach number computational aeroacoustics (CAA) is proposed. The method consists of two levels. From the governing equation level, we condition the Euler equations in two steps. The first step is to split the inviscid flux derivatives into a conservative and a non-conservative portion that satisfies a so called generalized energy estimate. This involves the symmetrization of the Euler equations via a transformation of variables that are functions of the physical entropy. Owing to the large disparity of acoustic and stagnation quantities in low Mach number aeroacoustics, the second step is to reformulate the split Euler equations in perturbation form with the new unknowns as the small changes of the conservative variables with respect to their large stagnation values. From the numerical scheme level, a stable sixth-order central interior scheme with a third-order boundary schemes that satisfies the discrete analogue of the integration-by-parts procedure used in the continuous energy estimate (summation-by-parts property) is employed.

  18. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Mean number in highly inclined events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J. J.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Newton, D.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    We present the first hybrid measurement of the average muon number in air showers at ultrahigh energies, initiated by cosmic rays with zenith angles between 62° and 80°. The measurement is based on 174 hybrid events recorded simultaneously with the surface detector array and the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The muon number for each shower is derived by scaling a simulated reference profile of the lateral muon density distribution at the ground until it fits the data. A 1019 eV shower with a zenith angle of 67°, which arrives at the surface detector array at an altitude of 1450 m above sea level, contains on average (2.68 ±0.04 ±0.48 (sys))×107 muons with energies larger than 0.3 GeV. The logarithmic gain d ln Nμ/d ln E of muons with increasing energy between 4 ×1018 eV and 5 ×1019 eV is measured to be (1.029 ±0.024 ±0.030 (sys)) .

  19. Properties of R1162, a broad-host-range, high-copy-number plasmid.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, R; Hinds, M; Brasch, M

    1982-01-01

    Regions of plasmid DNA encoding characteristic properties of the IncQ (P-4) group plasmid R1162 were identified by mutagenesis and in vitro cloning. Coding sequences sufficient for expression of incompatibility and efficient conjugal mobilization by plasmid R751 were found to be linked to the origin of DNA replication. In contrast, there was a region remote from the origin, and active in trans, that was required for plasmid maintenance. A derivative that was temperature sensitive for stability was isolated. The defect mapped at or near the region required for plasmid maintenance and resulted in far fewer copies of supercoiled plasmid DNA per cell under permissive conditions. A second region required for stability was also identified from the behavior of a deletion derivative of R1162, which did not, however, show an altered number of supercoiled plasmid DNA copies. Finally, a plasmid DNA mutation resulting in a substantially higher copy number was isolated. Plasmid reconstruction experiments suggested that the mutation was linked to the replicative origin. Images PMID:6279561

  20. Natural convection of a high Prandlt number fluid in a cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Poujol, F.T.; Rojas, J.; Ramos, E.

    2000-01-01

    The dynamic and thermal properties of transient natural convection in cavities have been studied in the context of limnology, geophysics, solar energy and mixing applications as an effort to build realistic models of various physical phenomena. It is of interest to understand the heat transfer process to be able to enhance or reduce it, depending on the requirements. Here, transient natural convection in a square cavity heated with a time-dependent heat flux on one vertical wall and cooled by maintaining the opposite wall at a constant temperature was studied experimentally and numerically. The working fluid was silicon oil (Dow Corning fluid 20--200) with a prandtl number of 230. All experiments were carried out in a cubic cavity of 0.13 m in each side. The heating rate used was 460 W/m{sup 2}, which corresponds to a Rayleigh number of 2 x 10{sup 9}. Experimental data included temperature records at particular points and velocity measurements obtained from video images of tracers. The dynamics of the transition to the steady state is characterized by a vortex structure that forms near the heated wall. This structure is generated by shear at the heated wall boundary layer. The results were compared with a numerical simulation and qualitative agreement was obtained.

  1. Revisiting Turbulence Model Validation for High-Mach Number Axisymmetric Compression Corner Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Huang, George P.

    2015-01-01

    Two axisymmetric shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction (SWBLI) cases are used to benchmark one- and two-equation Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models. This validation exercise was executed in the philosophy of the NASA Turbulence Modeling Resource and the AIAA Turbulence Model Benchmarking Working Group. Both SWBLI cases are from the experiments of Kussoy and Horstman for axisymmetric compression corner geometries with SWBLI inducing flares of 20 and 30 degrees, respectively. The freestream Mach number was approximately 7. The RANS closures examined are the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model and the Menter family of kappa - omega two equation models including the Baseline and Shear Stress Transport formulations. The Wind-US and CFL3D RANS solvers are employed to simulate the SWBLI cases. Comparisons of RANS solutions to experimental data are made for a boundary layer survey plane just upstream of the SWBLI region. In the SWBLI region, comparisons of surface pressure and heat transfer are made. The effects of inflow modeling strategy, grid resolution, grid orthogonality, turbulent Prandtl number, and code-to-code variations are also addressed.

  2. A New Automated Way to Measure Polyethylene Wear in THA Using a High Resolution CT Scanner: Method and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.; Noz, Marilyn E.; Olivecrona, Henrik; Zeleznik, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    As the most advantageous total hip arthroplasty (THA) operation is the first, timely replacement of only the liner is socially and economically important because the utilization of THA is increasing as younger and more active patients are receiving implants and they are living longer. Automatic algorithms were developed to infer liner wear by estimating the separation between the acetabular cup and femoral component head given a computed tomography (CT) volume. Two series of CT volumes of a hip phantom were acquired with the femoral component head placed at 14 different positions relative to the acetabular cup. The mean and standard deviation (SD) of the diameter of the acetabular cup and femoral component head, in addition to the range of error in the expected wear values and the repeatability of all the measurements, were calculated. The algorithms resulted in a mean (±SD) for the diameter of the acetabular cup of 54.21 (±0.011) mm and for the femoral component head of 22.09 (±0.02) mm. The wear error was ±0.1 mm and the repeatability was 0.077 mm. This approach is applicable clinically as it utilizes readily available computed tomography imaging systems and requires only five minutes of human interaction. PMID:24587727

  3. [Mobile hospital -real time mobile telehealthcare system with ultrasound and CT van using high-speed satellite communication-].

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Masaomi; Miyashita, Toyohisa; Murase, Sumio; Kanda, Hirohito; Karaki, Yoshiaki; Yagi, Kazuo; Ohue, Toru

    2003-01-01

    A real-time telescreening system is developed to detect early diseases for rural area residents using two types of mobile vans with a portable satellite station. The system consists of a satellite communication system with 1.5Mbps of the JCSAT-1B satellite, a spiral CT van, an ultrasound imaging van with two video conference system, a DICOM server and a multicast communication unit. The video image and examination image data are transmitted from the van to hospitals and the university simultaneously. Physician in the hospital observes and interprets exam images from the van and watches the video images of the position of ultrasound transducer on screenee in the van. After the observation images, physician explains a results of the examination by the video conference system. Seventy lung CT screening and 203 ultrasound screening were done from March to June 2002. The trial of this real time screening suggested that rural residents are given better healthcare without visit to the hospital. And it will open the gateway to reduce the medical cost and medical divide between city area and rural area.

  4. Home advantage in high-level volleyball varies according to set number.

    PubMed

    Marcelino, Rui; Mesquita, Isabel; Palao Andrés, José Manuel; Sampaio, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the probability of winning each Volleyball set according to game location (home, away). Archival data was obtained from 275 sets in the 2005 Men's Senior World League and 65,949 actions were analysed. Set result (win, loss), game location (home, away), set number (first, second, third, fourth and fifth) and performance indicators (serve, reception, set, attack, dig and block) were the variables considered in this study. In a first moment, performance indicators were used in a logistic model of set result, by binary logistic regression analysis. After finding the adjusted logistic model, the log-odds of winning the set were analysed according to game location and set number. The results showed that winning a set is significantly related to performance indicators (Chisquare(18)=660.97, p<0.01). Analyses of log-odds of winning a set demonstrate that home teams always have more probability of winning the game than away teams, regardless of the set number. Home teams have more advantage at the beginning of the game (first set) and in the two last sets of the game (fourth and fifth sets), probably due to facilities familiarity and crowd effects. Different game actions explain these advantages and showed that to win the first set is more important to take risk, through a better performance in the attack and block, and to win the final set is important to manage the risk through a better performance on the reception. These results may suggest intra-game variation in home advantage and can be most useful to better prepare and direct the competition. Key pointsHome teams always have more probability of winning the game than away teams.Home teams have higher performance in reception, set and attack in the total of the sets.The advantage of home teams is more pronounced at the beginning of the game (first set) and in two last sets of the game (fourth and fifth sets) suggesting intra-game variation in home advantage.Analysis by sets

  5. Home advantage in high-level volleyball varies according to set number.

    PubMed

    Marcelino, Rui; Mesquita, Isabel; Palao Andrés, José Manuel; Sampaio, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the probability of winning each Volleyball set according to game location (home, away). Archival data was obtained from 275 sets in the 2005 Men's Senior World League and 65,949 actions were analysed. Set result (win, loss), game location (home, away), set number (first, second, third, fourth and fifth) and performance indicators (serve, reception, set, attack, dig and block) were the variables considered in this study. In a first moment, performance indicators were used in a logistic model of set result, by binary logistic regression analysis. After finding the adjusted logistic model, the log-odds of winning the set were analysed according to game location and set number. The results showed that winning a set is significantly related to performance indicators (Chisquare(18)=660.97, p<0.01). Analyses of log-odds of winning a set demonstrate that home teams always have more probability of winning the game than away teams, regardless of the set number. Home teams have more advantage at the beginning of the game (first set) and in the two last sets of the game (fourth and fifth sets), probably due to facilities familiarity and crowd effects. Different game actions explain these advantages and showed that to win the first set is more important to take risk, through a better performance in the attack and block, and to win the final set is important to manage the risk through a better performance on the reception. These results may suggest intra-game variation in home advantage and can be most useful to better prepare and direct the competition. Key pointsHome teams always have more probability of winning the game than away teams.Home teams have higher performance in reception, set and attack in the total of the sets.The advantage of home teams is more pronounced at the beginning of the game (first set) and in two last sets of the game (fourth and fifth sets) suggesting intra-game variation in home advantage.Analysis by sets

  6. Three dimensional spatio-temporal instabilities in two-layer flows at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valluri, Prashant; O'Na'Raigh, Lennon; Spelt, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Interfacial instabilities in Newtonian two-layer flows are investigated via three-dimensional direct numerical simulations using the diffuse-interface method to capture the interface. The simulations study the effect of waves, generated by a random 3D noise, at the inlet on the spatio-temporal behaviour of the instabilities. Of specific interest are the conditions of growth/decay of the spanwise interfacial perturbation. Preliminary results show a sustained growth of the spanwise mode, irrespective of the primary streamwise mode, at various streamwise locations in the domain. At positions close to the inlet the spanwise wave grows linearly until a non-linear distortion which eventually saturates the amplitude. This work extends our recently reported two-dimensional studies on spatiotemporal interfacial instabilities (J. Fluid Mech. (2010), vol. 656, pp. 458--480) to i) three dimensions and ii) higher Reynolds numbers.

  7. High Weber number SMD correlations for pressure atomizers. [Sauter Mean Diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    Recently acquired experimental data are presented which reveal that, for Weber number (We) greater than 10.0, the atomization from simplex pressure atomizers is significantly greater than would be predicted from previously derived Sauter mean diameter (SMD) correlations. A different SMD correlation is required to accurately predict the experimental data. Below We of about 10.0, the atomization is dominated by inertial forces and bag-type breakup results. Above We of about 10.0, shear-type breakup occurs and results in a very fine spray which can accurately be predicted using a quadratic expression in Delta P. The correlation is extended to include fuel property effects, and SMD is found to vary linearly with fuel surface tension, while the influence of the fuel viscosity is not apparent.

  8. Tests of Full-Scale Helicopter Rotors at High Advancing Tip Mach Numbers and Advance Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggers, James C.; McCloud, John L., III; Stroub, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    As a continuation of the studies of reference 1, three full-scale helicopter rotors have been tested in the Ames Research Center 40- by SO-foot wind tunnel. All three of them were two-bladed, teetering rotors. One of the rotors incorporated the NACA 0012 airfoil section over the entire length of the blade. This rotor was tested at advance ratios up to 1.05. Both of the other rotors were tapered in thickness and incorporated leading-edge camber over the outer 20 percent of the blade radius. The larger of these rotors was tested at advancing tip Mach numbers up to 1.02. Data were obtained for a wide range of lift and propulsive force, and are presented without discussion.

  9. Low Reynolds Number Biofilm Streamers Form as Highly Viscous Liquid Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Aloke; Hassanpourfard, Mahtab; Das, Siddhartha

    2014-11-01

    There are recent experimental investigations that suggest that in presence of low Reynolds number (Re << 1) transport, preformed bacterial biofilms may deform into filamentous structures termed as streamers. Streamer formation time-scales usually far exceed reported rheological relaxation time scales for biofilms. Here we propose a theory that hypothesizes that streamers form due to the viscous response of the viscoelastic biofilms. The theoretical model is based on a stability analysis and can accurately explain hitherto unresolved issues, such as extremely large time needed for appearance of streamers and exponential growth of streamer dimensions after it has formed. We also provide results from our own initial experiments that indicate towards the validity of this ``liquid-state'' hypothesis.

  10. High Reynolds number experimentation in the US Navy's William B Morgan Large Cavitation Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etter, Robert J.; Cutbirth, J. Michael; Ceccio, Steven L.; Dowling, David R.; Perlin, Marc

    2005-09-01

    The William B Morgan Large Cavitation Channel (LCC) is a large variable-pressure closed-loop water tunnel that has been operated by the US Navy in Memphis, TN, USA, since 1991. This facility is well designed for a wide variety of hydrodynamic and hydroacoustic tests. Its overall size and capabilities allow test-model Reynolds numbers to approach, or even achieve, those of full-scale air- or water-borne transportation systems. This paper describes the facility along with some novel implementations of measurement techniques that have been successfully utilized there. In addition, highlights are presented from past test programmes involving (i) cavitation, (ii) near-zero pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers, (iii) the near-wake flow characteristics of a two-dimensional hydrofoil and (iv) a full-scale research torpedo.

  11. Theory of viscous transonic flow over airfoils at high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melnik, R. E.; Chow, R.; Mead, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers viscous flows with unseparated turbulent boundary layers over two-dimensional airfoils at transonic speeds. Conventional theoretical methods are based on boundary layer formulations which do not account for the effect of the curved wake and static pressure variations across the boundary layer in the trailing edge region. In this investigation an extended viscous theory is developed that accounts for both effects. The theory is based on a rational analysis of the strong turbulent interaction at airfoil trailing edges. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is employed to develop formal series solutions of the full Reynolds equations in the limit of Reynolds numbers tending to infinity. Procedures are developed for combining the local trailing edge solution with numerical methods for solving the full potential flow and boundary layer equations. Theoretical results indicate that conventional boundary layer methods account for only about 50% of the viscous effect on lift, the remaining contribution arising from wake curvature and normal pressure gradient effects.

  12. Magnetic reconnection and stochastic plasmoid chains in high-Lundquist-number plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, N. F.; Samtaney, R.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Uzdensky, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    A numerical study of magnetic reconnection in the large-Lundquist-number (S), plasmoid-dominated regime is carried out for S up to 107. The theoretical model of Uzdensky et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 235002 (2010)] is confirmed and partially amended. The normalized reconnection rate is E~eff~0.02 independently of S for S>>104. The plasmoid flux (Ψ) and half-width (wx) distribution functions scale as f(Ψ)~Ψ-2 and f(wx)~wx-2. The joint distribution of Ψ and wx shows that plasmoids populate a triangular region wx>~Ψ/B0, where B0 is the reconnecting field. It is argued that this feature is due to plasmoid coalescence. Macroscopic ``monster'' plasmoids with wx~10% of the system size are shown to emerge in just a few Alfvén times, independently of S, suggesting that large disruptive events are an inevitable feature of large-S reconnection.

  13. Quantitative x-ray phase-contrast imaging of air-assisted water sprays with high Weber numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. J.; Im, Kyoung-Su; Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W. K.; Wang, Jin; Micheli, P.; Laub, C.

    2006-10-01

    X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging along with a single-image phase retrieval reconstruction was used to visualize the near-nozzle breakup of optically dense water jets atomized by a high-speed, annular air flow. The influence of the atomizing air on water mass distribution was investigated to reveal the complex air/liquid interactions at various breakup stages. Unlike low-Weber-number jets, the breakup of high-Weber-number jets can occur in the liquid core, which causes sudden decreases in liquid volume fraction.

  14. High Reynolds Number Predictions for the Baseline Arrow Wing at Mach 2.48

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Melissa; Wahls, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The NASA High Speed Research (HSR) Program is intended to establish a technology base enabling industry development of an economically viable and environmentally acceptable second generation high speed civil transport (HSCT). The objective of the Configuration Aerodynamics task of the program is the development of aerodynamic drag reduction, stability and control, and propulsion airframe integration technologies required to support the HSCT development process. Aerodynamic design tools are being developed, evaluated, and validated through ground based experimental testing. In addition, methods for ground to flight scaling are being developed and refined.

  15. Optical-CT imaging of complex 3D dose distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark; Kim, Leonard; Hugo, Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    The limitations of conventional dosimeters restrict the comprehensiveness of verification that can be performed for advanced radiation treatments presenting an immediate and substantial problem for clinics attempting to implement these techniques. In essence, the rapid advances in the technology of radiation delivery have not been paralleled by corresponding advances in the ability to verify these treatments. Optical-CT gel-dosimetry is a relatively new technique with potential to address this imbalance by providing high resolution 3D dose maps in polymer and radiochromic gel dosimeters. We have constructed a 1st generation optical-CT scanner capable of high resolution 3D dosimetry and applied it to a number of simple and increasingly complex dose distributions including intensity-modulated-radiation-therapy (IMRT). Prior to application to IMRT, the robustness of optical-CT gel dosimetry was investigated on geometry and variable attenuation phantoms. Physical techniques and image processing methods were developed to minimize deleterious effects of refraction, reflection, and scattered laser light. Here we present results of investigations into achieving accurate high-resolution 3D dosimetry with optical-CT, and show clinical examples of 3D IMRT dosimetry verification. In conclusion, optical-CT gel dosimetry can provide high resolution 3D dose maps that greatly facilitate comprehensive verification of complex 3D radiation treatments. Good agreement was observed at high dose levels (>50%) between planned and measured dose distributions. Some systematic discrepancies were observed however (rms discrepancy 3% at high dose levels) indicating further work is required to eliminate confounding factors presently compromising the accuracy of optical-CT 3D gel-dosimetry.

  16. The Danish Folk High Schools. Bulletin, 1914, No. 22. Whole Number 595

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foght, H. W.

    1914-01-01

    This bulletin contains the third section of Harold W. Foght's report on the rural schools of Denmark. This section of the report pertains almost wholly to the folk high schools, which have by common consent been the most important factor in the transformation in the rural life of Denmark and in the phenomenal economic and social development of…

  17. Is High School Economically Relevant for Noncollege Youth? Number 95-19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stull, William J.

    A rational apathy (RAP) model has been proposed that divides high school students into groups that face different sets of short-term rewards for school involvement. Students bound for competitive and less competitive colleges make up the first two groups, but those who do not intend to pursue higher education are the third group. The RAP model…

  18. OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING FOR TOMORROW'S WORLD OF WORK. NUMBER 2, HIGH SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BOTTUM, JOHN S.; TAYLOR, ROBERT E.

    THERE ARE FEWER EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR UNSKILLED AND SEMISKILLED PERSONS TODAY, AS MORE OCCUPATIONS REQUIRE SPECIALIZED TRAINING. SUFFICIENT OCCUPATIONAL TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES WOULD HELP TO SOLVE THE PROBLEM, AND HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMS OFFER ONE ALTERNATIVE. OTHER ALTERNATIVES ARE DISCUSSED IN VT 001 353, VT 001 355 - VT 001 358. IN 1963, 6…

  19. Teacher-made Test Items in American History: Emphasis Junior High School. Bulletin Number 40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurfman, Dana

    Designed originally for use in junior-high-school classes, this bulletin provides an extensive file of 420 multiple-choice test questions in American history. The test items are intended to measure substantive understandings as well as such abilities as interpretation, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and application. The initial questions were…

  20. Are Credit Card Rates Too High? At Home with Consumers. Volume 8, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    At Home with Consumers, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The four articles in this journal issue examine the pros and cons of the proposition that credit card rates are too high. In "How Congress and Consumers Will Crack the Credit Card Market," Congressman Charles E. Schumer argues that banks can get away with their excessive rates because of consumer misinformation and the unfair competitive edge held…

  1. Public and Private High Schools. Bulletin, 1912, No. 22. Whole Number 494

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1912

    1912-01-01

    In every State the public high school is now firmly established as a part of the educational system. It is no longer merely a link between elementary school and the college, but attempts to prepare for intelligent citizenship the common-school pupil who has not the time or the means for requiring a higher education. The public school systems in…

  2. Selector's Guide for Junior High School Science Programs. EPIE Report: Number 89m.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Products Information Exchange Inst., Stony Brook, NY.

    This EPIE report contains parallel, common language descriptions of 26 life, physical, and earth science offerings for junior high school students from nine commercial publishers. Materials have been designed for one-year courses and have copyright dates from 1975-1980. Information for each program is presented under the following headings: (1)…

  3. Highly Mobile Students: Educational Problems and Possible Solutions. ERIC/CUE Digest, Number 73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, New York, NY.

    The following two types of student mobility stand out as causing educational problems: (1) inner-city mobility, which is prompted largely by fluctuations in the job market; and (2) intra-city mobility, which is caused by upward mobility or by poverty and homelessness. Most research indicates that high mobility negatively affects student…

  4. High-resolution X-ray CT for 3D petrography of ferruginous sandstone for an investigation of building stone decay.

    PubMed

    Cnudde, Veerle; Dewanckele, Jan; Boone, Matthieu; de Kock, Tim; Boone, Marijn; Brabant, Loes; Dusar, Michiel; de Ceukelaire, Marleen; de Clercq, Hilde; Hayen, Roald; Jacobs, Patric

    2011-11-01

    Diestian ferruginous sandstone has been used as the dominant building stone for monuments in the Hageland, a natural landscape in east-central Belgium. Like all rocks, this stone type is sensitive to weathering. Case hardening was observed in combination with blackening of the exterior parts of the dressed stones. To determine the 3D petrography and to identify the structural differences between the exterior and interior parts, X-ray computed tomography was used in combination with more traditional research techniques like optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The 3D characterization of the ferruginous sandstone was performed with a high-resolution X-ray CT scanner (www.ugct.ugent.be) in combination with the flexible 3D analysis software Morpho+, which provides the necessary petrophysical parameters of the scanned samples in 3D. Besides providing the required 3D parameters like porosity, pore-size distribution, grain size, grain orientation, and surface analysis, the results of the 3D analysis can also be visualized, which enables to understand and interpret the analysis results in a straightforward way. The complementarities between high-quality X-ray CT images and flexible 3D software and its relation with the more traditional microscopical research techniques are opening up new gateways in the study of weathering processes of natural building stones.

  5. New highly linear tunable transconductor circuits with low number of MOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucel, Firat; Yuce, Erkan

    2016-08-01

    In this article, two new highly linear tunable transconductor circuits are proposed. The transconductors employ only six MOS transistors operated in saturation region. The second transconductor is derived from the first one with a slight modification. Transconductance of both transconductors can be tuned by a control voltage. Both of the transconductors do not need any additional bias voltages and currents. Another important feature of the transconductors is their high input and output impedances for cascadability with other circuits. Besides, total harmonic distortions are less than 1.5% for both transconductors. A positive lossless grounded inductor simulator with a grounded capacitor is given as an application example of the transconductors. Simulation and experimental test results are included to show effectiveness of the proposed circuits.

  6. Structures with high number density of carbon nanotubes and 3-dimensional distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Zheng (Inventor); Tzeng, Yonhua (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A composite is described having a three dimensional distribution of carbon nanotubes. The critical aspect of such composites is a nonwoven network of randomly oriented fibers connected at their junctions to afford macropores in the spaces between the fibers. A variety of fibers may be employed, including metallic fibers, and especially nickel fibers. The composite has quite desirable properties for cold field electron emission applications, such as a relatively low turn-on electric field, high electric field enhancement factors, and high current densities. The composites of this invention also show favorable properties for other an electrode applications. Several methods, which also have general application in carbon nanotube production, of preparing these composites are described and employ a liquid feedstock of oxyhydrocarbons as carbon nanotube precursors.

  7. Nonlinear effects on sound propagation through high subsonic Mach number flows in variable area ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callegari, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    A nonlinear theory for sound propagation in variable area ducts carrying a nearly sonic flow is presented. Linear acoustic theory is shown to be singular and the detailed nature of the singularity is used to develop the correct nonlinear theory. The theory is based on a quasi-one dimensional model. It is derived by the method of matched asymptotic expansions. In a nearly chocked flow, the theory indicates the following processes to be acting: a transonic trapping of upstream propagating sound causing an intensification of this sound in the throat region of the duct; generation of superharmonics and an acoustic streaming effect; development of shocks in the acoustic quantities near the throat. Several specific problems are solved analytically and numerical parameter studies are carried out. Results indicate that appreciable acoustic power is shifted to higher harmonics as shocked conditions are approached. The effect of the throat Mach number on the attenuation of upstream propagating sound excited by a fixed source is also determined.

  8. High number of diarrhoeal co-infections in travellers to Benin, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Travellers’ diarrhoea (TD) is the most frequent health problem among travellers to the tropics. Using routine techniques, the aetiology mostly remains unresolved, whereas modern molecular methods enable reducing the number of equivocal cases considerably. While many studies address the aetiology of TD in Asian, Central American and North African tourist resorts, only few focus on Western Africa. Methods Stool samples from 45 travellers travelling in Benin, West Africa, were analyzed by a new multiplex qPCR assay for Salmonella, Yersinia, Campylobacter, Vibrio cholerae, Shigella or enteroinvasive (EIEC), enterohaemorrhagic (EHEC), enterotoxigenic (ETEC), enteroaggregative (EAEC), and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). Results All 18 pre-travel samples proved negative for bacterial pathogens. Of the 39/45 (87%) travellers having had TD, EPEC was detected in post-travel samples in 30 (77%) cases, EAEC in 23 (59%), ETEC in 22 (56%), Shigella or EIEC in 7 (18%), EHEC in two (5%), and Salmonella in one (3%). In 31(79%) of the TD cases two or more bacterial pathogens were identified. Two (8%) samples remained negative: both patients had taken antimicrobials for TD. Conclusions EPEC, EAEC and ETEC were the most common findings. 79% of the cases had a co-infection. As modern diagnostics reveals in most patients a multitude of pathogens, the role of each pathogen should be re-evaluated. PMID:24521079

  9. Transient high-Rayleigh-number thermal convection with large viscosity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davaille, Anne; Jaupart, Claude

    1993-08-01

    Results of laboratory studies of the characteristics of thermal convection in a fluid whose viscosity varies strongly with temperature are presented. The upper boundary of an isothermal layer of Golden Syrup is cooled rapidly and maintained at a fixed temperature. The fluid layer is insulated at the bottom and cools continuously. Rayleigh number calculated with the viscosity of the well-mixed interior are between 10 exp 6 and 10 exp 8, and viscosity contrasts are up to 10 exp 6. Thermal convection develops only in the lower part of the thermal boundary layer, and the upper part remains stagnant. At the onset of convection, the viscosity contrast across the unstable boundary layer has a value of about 3. In fully developed convection, this viscosity contrast is higher, with a typical value of 10. The heat flux through the top of the layer depends solely on local conditions in the unstable boundary layer. The magnitude of temperature fluctuations and the thickness of the stagnant lid are calculated to be in excellent agreement with the experimental data.

  10. High numbers of Staphylococcus aureus at three bathing beaches in South Florida.

    PubMed

    Esiobu, Nwadiuto; Green, Melissa; Echeverry, Andrea; Bonilla, Tonya D; Stinson, Corine Melanie; Hartz, Aaron; Rogerson, Andrew; McCorquodale, Donald S

    2013-01-01

    While the value of Staphylococcus aureus as an indicator for non-enteric diseases is unclear, understanding its prevalence in recreational beaches would prove useful, given its pathogenic potential. Staphylococcus aureus levels were evaluated in sand and seawater at three beaches during one year. To elucidate possible S. aureus sources or colonization trends, distribution in sand was analyzed at Hollywood Beach. Staphylococcus aureus levels fluctuated throughout the study with highest average densities detected in dry sand (3.46 × 10⁵ CFU/g, Hobie Beach), particularly at beaches with high human density. Patchy distribution marked hotspots of human use and/or possible bacterial re-growth. Data from a brief epidemiological survey indicated a very slight association between beach usage and skin conditions; suggesting high S. aureus levels in sand may not necessarily constitute major health risks. Because the possibility of disease transmission exists, particularly to children and immuno-compromised beach-goers, periodic surveying of highly frequented beaches seems warranted.

  11. Implementation of a parallel-beam optical-CT apparatus for three-dimensional radiation dosimetry using a high-resolution CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Tzeng; Chen, Chin-Hsing; Hung, Chao-Nan; Tuan, Chiu-Ching; Chang, Yuan-Jen

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera with 2-megapixel (1920×1080-pixel) and 12-bit resolution was developed for optical computed tomography(optical CT). The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of our system was 30.12 dB, better than that of commercially available CCD cameras (25.31 dB). The 50% modulation transfer function (MTF50) of our 1920×1080-pixel camera gave a line width per picture height (LW/PH) of 745, which is 73% of the diffraction-limited resolution. Compared with a commercially available 1-megapixel CCD camera (1296×966-pixel) with a LW/PH=358 and 46.6% of the diffraction-limited resolution, our camera system provided higher spatial resolution and better image quality. The NIPAM gel dosimeter was used to evaluate the optical CT with a 2-megapixel CCD. A clinical five-field irradiation treatment plan was generated using the Eclipse planning system (Varian Corp., Palo Alto, CA, USA). The gel phantom was irradiated using a 6-MV Varian Clinac IX linear accelerator (Varian). The measured NIPAM gel dose distributions and the calculated dose distributions, generated by the treatment planning software (TPS), were compared using the 3% dose-difference and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criteria. The gamma pass rate was as high as 98.2% when 2-megapixel CCD camera was used in optical CT. However, the gamma pass rate was only 96.0% when a commercially available 1-megapixel CCD camera was used.

  12. GPU Implementation of Two-Dimensional Rayleigh-Benard Code with High Resolution and Extremely High Rayleigh Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, C. M.; Sanchez, D. A.; Yuen, D. A.; Wright, G. B.; Barnett, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    As computational modeling became prolific throughout the physical sciences community, newer and more efficient ways of processing large amounts of data needed to be devised. One particular method for processing such large amounts of data arose in the form of using a graphics processing unit (GPU) for calculations. Computational scientists were attracted to the GPU as a computational tool as the performance, growth, and availability of GPUs over the past decade increased. Scientists began to utilize the GPU as the sole workhorse for their brute force calculations and modeling. The GPUs, however, were not originally designed for this style of use. As a result, difficulty arose when trying to find a use for the GPU from a scientific standpoint. A lack of parallel programming routines was the main culprit behind the difficulty in programming with a GPU, but with time and a rise in popularity, NVIDIA released a proprietary architecture named Fermi. The Fermi architecture, when used in conjunction with development tools such as CUDA, allowed the programmer easier access to routines that made parallel programming with the NVIDIA GPUs an ease. This new architecture enabled the programmer full access to faster memory, double-precision support, and large amounts of global memory at their fingertips. Our model was based on using a second-order, spatially correct finite difference method and a third order Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme for studying the 2D Rayleigh-Benard code. The code extensively used the CUBLAS routines to do the heavy linear algebra calculations. The calculations themselves were completed using a single GPU, the NVDIA C2070 Fermi, which boasts 6 GB of global memory. The overall scientific goal of our work was to apply the Tesla C2070's computing potential to achieve an onset of flow reversals as a function of increasing large Rayleigh numbers. Previous investigations were successful using a smaller grid size of 1000x1999 and a Rayleigh number of 10^9. The

  13. High total metabolic tumor volume in PET/CT predicts worse prognosis in diffuse large B cell lymphoma patients with bone marrow involvement in rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Song, Moo-Kon; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Lee, Gyeong-Won; Lim, Sung-Nam; Shin, Seunghyeon; Pak, Kyoung June; Kwon, Seong Young; Shim, Hye Kyung; Choi, Bong-Hoi; Kim, In-Suk; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Geun; Oh, So-Yeon

    2016-03-01

    Bone marrow involvement (BMI) in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) was naively regarded as an adverse clinical factor. However, it has been unknown which factor would separate clinical outcomes in DLBCL patients with BMI. Recently, metabolic tumor volume (MTV) on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was suggested to predict prognosis in several lymphoma types. Therefore, we investigated whether MTV would separate the outcomes in DLBCL patients with BMI. MTV on PET/CT was defined as an initial tumor burden as target lesion ≥ standard uptake value, 2.5 in 107 patients with BMI. Intramedullary (IM) MTV was defined as extent of BMI and total MTV was as whole tumor burden. 260.5 cm(3) and 601.2 cm(3) were ideal cut-off values for dividing high and low MTV status in the IM and total lymphoma lesions in Receiver Operating Curve analysis. High risk NCCN-IPI (p<0.001, p<0.001), bulky disease (p=0.011, p=0.005), concordant subtype (p=0.025, p=0.029), high IM MTV status (p<0.001, p<0.001), high total MTV status (p<0.001, p<0.001), and ≥ 2CAs in BM (p=0.037, p=0.033) were significantly associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) than other groups. In multivariate analysis, high risk NCCN-IPI (PFS, p=0.006; OS, p=0.013), concordant subtype (PFS, p=0.005; OS, p=0.007), and high total MTV status (PFS, p<0.001; OS, p<0.001) had independent clinical impacts. MTV had prognostic significances for survivals in DLBCL with BMI. PMID:26851438

  14. High rate of disease-related copy number variations in childhood onset schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ahn, K; Gotay, N; Andersen, T M; Anvari, A A; Gochman, P; Lee, Y; Sanders, S; Guha, S; Darvasi, A; Glessner, J T; Hakonarson, H; Lencz, T; State, M W; Shugart, Y Y; Rapoport, J L

    2014-05-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) are risk factors in neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism, epilepsy, intellectual disability (ID) and schizophrenia. Childhood onset schizophrenia (COS), defined as onset before the age of 13 years, is a rare and severe form of the disorder, with more striking array of prepsychotic developmental disorders and abnormalities in brain development. Because of the well-known phenotypic variability associated with pathogenic CNVs, we conducted whole genome genotyping to detect CNVs and then focused on a group of 46 rare CNVs that had well-documented risk for adult onset schizophrenia (AOS), autism, epilepsy and/or ID. We evaluated 126 COS probands, 69 of which also had a healthy full sibling. When COS probands were compared with their matched related controls, significantly more affected individuals carried disease-related CNVs (P=0.017). Moreover, COS probands showed a higher rate than that found in AOS probands (P<0.0001). A total of 15 (11.9%) subjects exhibited at least one such CNV and four of these subjects (26.7%) had two. Five of 15 (4.0% of the sample) had a 2.5-3 Mb deletion mapping to 22q11.2, a rate higher than that reported for adult onset (0.3-1%) (P<0.001) or autism spectrum disorder and, indeed, the highest rate reported for any clinical population to date. For one COS subject, a duplication found at 22q13.3 had previously only been associated with autism, and for four patients CNVs at 8q11.2, 10q22.3, 16p11.2 and 17q21.3 had only previously been associated with ID. Taken together, these findings support the well-known pleiotropic effects of these CNVs suggesting shared abnormalities early in brain development. Clinically, broad CNV-based population screening is needed to assess their overall clinical burden. PMID:23689535

  15. Engineering high α-amylase levels in wheat grain lowers Falling Number but improves baking properties.

    PubMed

    Ral, Jean-Philippe; Whan, Alex; Larroque, Oscar; Leyne, Emmett; Pritchard, Jeni; Dielen, Anne-Sophie; Howitt, Crispin A; Morell, Matthew K; Newberry, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Late maturity α-amylase (LMA) and preharvest sprouting (PHS) are genetic defects in wheat. They are both characterized by the expression of specific isoforms of α-amylase in particular genotypes in the grain prior to harvest. The enhanced expression of α-amylase in both LMA and PHS results in a reduction in Falling Number (FN), a test of gel viscosity, and subsequent downgrading of the grain, along with a reduced price for growers. The FN test is unable to distinguish between LMA and PHS; thus, both defects are treated similarly when grain is traded. However, in PHS-affected grains, proteases and other degradative process are activated, and this has been shown to have a negative impact on end product quality. No studies have been conducted to determine whether LMA is detrimental to end product quality. This work demonstrated that wheat in which an isoform α-amylase (TaAmy3) was overexpressed in the endosperm of developing grain to levels of up to 100-fold higher than the wild-type resulted in low FN similar to those seen in LMA- or PHS-affected grains. This increase had no detrimental effect on starch structure, flour composition and enhanced baking quality, in small-scale 10-g baking tests. In these small-scale tests, overexpression of TaAmy3 led to increased loaf volume and Maillard-related browning to levels higher than those in control flours when baking improver was added. These findings raise questions as to the validity of the assumption that (i) LMA is detrimental to end product quality and (ii) a low FN is always indicative of a reduction in quality. This work suggests the need for a better understanding of the impact of elevated expression of specific α-amylase on end product quality.

  16. High frequency of copy number imbalances in Rubinstein–Taybi patients negative to CREBBP mutational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gervasini, Cristina; Mottadelli, Federica; Ciccone, Roberto; Castronovo, Paola; Milani, Donatella; Scarano, Gioacchino; Bedeschi, Maria Francesca; Belli, Serena; Pilotta, Alba; Selicorni, Angelo; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Larizza, Lidia

    2010-01-01

    Rubinstein–Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterised by facial dysmorphisms, growth and psychomotor development delay, and skeletal defects. The known genetic causes are point mutations or deletions of the CREBBP (50–60%) and EP300 (5%) genes. To detect chromosomal rearrangements indicating novel positional candidate RSTS genes, we used a-CGH to study 26 patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for RSTS who were negative at fluorescence in situ hybridisation analyses of the CREBBP and EP300 regions, and direct sequencing analyses of the CREBBP gene. We found seven imbalances (27%): four de novo and three inherited rearrangements not reported among the copy number variants. A de novo 7p21.1 deletion of 500 kb included the TWIST1 gene, a suggested candidate for RSTS that is responsible for the Saethre–Chotzen syndrome, an entity that enters in differential diagnosis with RSTS. A similar issue of differential diagnosis was raised by a large 4.3 Mb 2q22.3q23.1 deletion encompassing ZEB2, the gene responsible for the Mowat–Wilson syndrome, whose signs may overlap with RSTS. Positional candidate genes could not be sought in the remaining pathogenetic imbalances, because of the size of the involved region (a 9 Mb 2q24.3q31.1 deletion) and/or the relative paucity of suitable genes (a 5 Mb 3p13p12.3 duplication). One of the inherited rearrangements, the 17q11.2 379Kb duplication, represents the reciprocal event of the deletion underlying an overgrowth syndrome, both being mediated by the NF1-REP-P1 and REP-P2 sub-duplicons. The contribution of this and the other detected CNVs to the clinical RSTS phenotype is difficult to assess. PMID:20125191

  17. A PLANNING GUIDE FOR VOCATIONAL-INDUSTRIAL AND VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL BUILDING FACILITIES FOR COMPREHENSIVE HIGH SCHOOLS, NUMBER 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Albany.

    THIS BOOKLET IS INTENDED AS A GUIDE FOR THOSE RESPONSIBLE FOR PLANNING VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL FACILITIES. DISCUSSION OF TYPES OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION, PLANNING PROCEDURES, AND GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS ARE INCLUDED AND INFORMATION IS GIVEN ON--(1) SIZES, SHAPES, AND NUMBER OF SHOPS, (2) BUILDING FLEXIBILITY, (3) LAYOUT OF FLOOR SPACE, (4) SERVICES IN…

  18. Organotin-catalyzed highly regioselective thiocarbonylation of nonprotected carbohydrates and synthesis of deoxy carbohydrates in a minimum number of steps.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Wataru; Tanigawa, Satoko; Takemoto, Yuki; Yoshimatsu, Hirofumi; Onomura, Osamu

    2012-04-16

    Nonprotected carbohydrates: The catalytic regioselective thiocarbonylation of carbohydrates by using