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Sample records for high energy density

  1. High Energy Density Capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    BEEST Project: Recapping is developing a capacitor that could rival the energy storage potential and price of today’s best EV batteries. When power is needed, the capacitor rapidly releases its stored energy, similar to lightning being discharged from a cloud. Capacitors are an ideal substitute for batteries if their energy storage capacity can be improved. Recapping is addressing storage capacity by experimenting with the material that separates the positive and negative electrodes of its capacitors. These separators could significantly improve the energy density of electrochemical devices.

  2. High energy density electrochemical cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, J. J.; Williams, D. L.

    1970-01-01

    Primary cell has an anode of lithium, a cathode containing dihaloisocyanuric acid, and a nonaqueous electrolyte comprised of a solution of lithium perchlorate in methyl formate. It produces an energy density of 213 watt hrs/lb and can achieve a high current density.

  3. High energy density aluminum battery

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  4. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A

    2004-11-11

    High-energy-density (HED) physics refers broadly to the study of macroscopic collections of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. The experimental facilities most widely used for these studies are high-power lasers and magnetic-pinch generators. The HED physics pursued on these facilities is still in its infancy, yet new regimes of experimental science are emerging. Examples from astrophysics include work relevant to planetary interiors, supernovae, astrophysical jets, and accreting compact objects (such as neutron stars and black holes). In this paper, we will review a selection of recent results in this new field of HED laboratory astrophysics and provide a brief look ahead to the coming decade.

  5. High-Energy-Density Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slenes, Kirk

    2003-01-01

    Capacitors capable of storing energy at high densities are being developed for use in pulse-power circuits in such diverse systems as defibrillators, particle- beam accelerators, microwave sources, and weapons. Like typical previously developed energy-storage capacitors, these capacitors are made from pairs of metal/solid-dielectric laminated sheets that are wound and pressed into compact shapes to fit into cans, which are then filled with dielectric fluids. Indeed, these capacitors can be fabricated largely by conventional fabrication techniques. The main features that distinguish these capacitors from previously developed ones are improvements in (1) the selection of laminate materials, (2) the fabrication of the laminated sheets from these materials, and (3) the selection of dielectric fluids. In simplest terms, a high-performance laminated sheet of the type used in these capacitors is made by casting a dielectric polymer onto a sheet of aluminized kraft paper. The dielectric polymer is a siloxane polymer that has been modified with polar pendant groups to increase its permittivity and dielectric strength. Potentially, this polymer is capable of withstanding an energy density of 7.5 J/cm3, which is four times that of the previous state-of-the-art-capacitor dielectric film material. However, the full potential of this polymer cannot be realized at present because (1) at thicknesses needed for optimum performance (.8.0 m), the mechanical strength of a film of this polymer is insufficient for incorporation into a wound capacitor and (2) at greater thickness, the achievable energy density decreases because of a logarithmic decrease in dielectric strength with increasing thickness. The aluminized kraft paper provides the mechanical strength needed for processing of the laminate and fabrication of the capacitor, and the aluminum film serves as an electrode layer. Because part of the thickness of the dielectric is not occupied by the modified siloxane polymer, the

  6. High Energy Density Extended Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2009-06-01

    Application of high pressure significantly alters the interatomic distance and, thus, the nature of intermolecular interaction, chemical bonding, molecular configuration, crystal structure, and stability of solid. With modern advances in high-pressure technologies, it is feasible to achieve a large (often up to a several-fold) compression of lattice, at which condition material can be easily forced into a new physical and chemical configuration. The high-pressure thus offers enhanced opportunities to discover new phases, both stable and metastable ones, and to tune novel properties in a wide-range of atomistic length scale, substantially greater than (often being several orders of) those achieved by other thermal (varying temperatures) and chemical (varying composition or making alloys) means. Over the past decade or two, a large number of new materials and novel phenomena have been discovered and predicted at extreme pressure-temperature conditions. Commonly observed under extreme conditions is the transformation of solids into more compact structures with itinerant electrons such as metallic and nonmetallic extended phases. Nonmolecular extended solids, particularly made of low Z elements such as hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine, constitute a new class of high energy density solids, which can store a large sum of energy in their three-dimensional network structure (˜ several eV/bond). Yet, a large cohesive energy of singly bonded (or sp3 hybridized) electrons gives rise to an extremely stiff lattice and novel electronic and optical properties. Broadly speaking, these molecular-to-nonmolecular transitions occur due to electron delocalization manifested as a rapid increase in electron kinetic energy at high density, but there are many outstanding questions as well regarding the exact nature of chemical bonding, phase stability, chemical mechanisms, and so on. These questions constitute fundamental chemistry unique to extreme pressure

  7. Oxides having high energy densities

    DOEpatents

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-09-10

    Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

  8. States of high energy density

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, M.

    1988-02-01

    The transverse energy, E/sub tau/ spectra for O/sup 16/ and S/sup 32/ incident for various elements at 200 GeVnucleon are shown. The target and projectile dependencies of the data are discussed. The energy density achieved is estimated. For O/sup 16/ on Tungsten the multiplicity spectrum is also presented as well as the pseudorapidity spectra as a function of the transverse energy. The multiplicity cross section dsigmadN as measured in the backward hemisphere (0.9 < /eta/ < 2.9/ is found to be very similar in shape to the transverse energy distribution dsigmadE/tau/ reflecting the particular geometry of nucleus nucleus nucleus collisions. The dependence on the atomic mass of the target, A/sub tau/ and projectile A/sub p/ is not what one would expect from naive considerations.

  9. Modeling High Energy Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albritton, J. R.; Liberman, D. A.; Wilson, B. G.

    1999-11-01

    Ultra-short-pulse lasers are being used to form plasmas at near normal/solid density, heating a target in a time shorter than that on which it can expand. Radiative signatures of the dense plasma conditions are a key diagnostic, and typically require the support of modeling for their design and interpretation. Modeling also often serves to guide the experimental program of work. Here we report on our first attempts to use the INFERNO average-atom atomic model to a construct detailed-configuration-accounting description of the plasma equation-of-state, that is, its distribution of ionization and excitation states, and further, its radiative line, edge, and continuum features.

  10. A promising high-energy-density material.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenquan; Zhang, Jiaheng; Deng, Mucong; Qi, Xiujuan; Nie, Fude; Zhang, Qinghua

    2017-08-03

    High-energy density materials represent a significant class of advanced materials and have been the focus of energetic materials community. The main challenge in this field is to design and synthesize energetic compounds with a highest possible density and a maximum possible chemical stability. Here we show an energetic compound, [2,2'-bi(1,3,4-oxadiazole)]-5,5'-dinitramide, is synthesized through a two-step reaction from commercially available reagents. It exhibits a surprisingly high density (1.99 g cm(-3) at 298 K), poor solubility in water and most organic solvents, decent thermal stability, a positive heat of formation and excellent detonation properties. The solid-state structural features of the synthesized compound are also investigated via X-ray diffraction and several theoretical techniques. The energetic and sensitivity properties of the explosive compound are similar to those of 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12-(hexanitrohexaaza)cyclododecane (CL-20), and the developed compound shows a great promise for potential applications as a high-energy density material.High energy density materials are of interest, but density is the limiting factor for many organic compounds. Here the authors show the formation of a high density energetic compound from a two-step reaction between commercially available compounds that exhibit good heat thermal stability and detonation properties.

  11. Strongly Interacting Matter at High Energy Density

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran,L.

    2008-09-07

    This lecture concerns the properties of strongly interacting matter (which is described by Quantum Chromodynamics) at very high energy density. I review the properties of matter at high temperature, discussing the deconfinement phase transition. At high baryon density and low temperature, large N{sub c} arguments are developed which suggest that high baryonic density matter is a third form of matter, Quarkyonic Matter, that is distinct from confined hadronic matter and deconfined matter. I finally discuss the Color Glass Condensate which controls the high energy limit of QCD, and forms the low x part of a hadron wavefunction. The Glasma is introduced as matter formed by the Color Glass Condensate which eventually thermalizes into a Quark Gluon Plasma.

  12. High Energy Density Film Capacitors (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    capacitor film, and the test of our first generation prototype capacitors . II. HIGH-K POLYMER DIELECTRIC MATERIALS Commercial polypropylene (PP...metallized polypropylene energy storage capacitors ”, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., 30(5): 1939 (2002). [2] W. Clelland, et al., Paktron Division of...AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2010-2127 HIGH ENERGY DENSITY FILM CAPACITORS (PREPRINT) Shihai Zhang, Brian Zellers, Jim Henrish, Shawn Rockey, and Dean

  13. Preface: High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciardi, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    This special issue marks the tenth High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics conference. Over 5 days in May 2014, 130 scientists from more than 20 countries gathered in Bordeaux (France) to present and discuss developments in this relatively young field. Testifying to its now well established international dimension, this was the first meeting held outside of the USA.

  14. High-energy-density cylindrical capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. D.; Zelik, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Manufacturing technique produces high quality metalized-film cylindrical capacitors of energy density greater than 0.1 J/g uncased, using either 24-gage polyvinylidene flouride or 14-gage polycarbonate film. Components are wound wrinkle-free on hollow PTFE cores, using winding machine that applies constant dynamically controlled tension to film during winding operation.

  15. Testing of High Energy Density Capacitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    extended amount of time. Secondly high potting a new capacitor allows the capacitor to go through self healing prior to high current being switched...believed that this was due to a self healing process taking place in the early shots of the capacitor. From the peak Q value, till the one hundredth...and manufacturer B’s capacitors are polypropylene metallized film capacitors. While energy density is a major concern for our tests; attributes

  16. Alternative Approaches to High Energy Density Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J.

    2016-10-01

    This paper explores selected approaches to High Energy Density (HED) fusion, beginning with discussion of ignition requirements at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The needed improvements to achieve ignition are closely tied to the ability to concentrate energy in the implosion, manifested in the stagnation pressure, Pstag. The energy that must be assembled in the imploded state to ignite varies roughly as Pstag-2, so among other requirements, there is a premium on reaching higher Pstag to achieve ignition with the available laser energy. The U.S. inertial confinement fusion program (ICF) is pursuing higher Pstag on NIF through improvements to capsule stability and symmetry. One can argue that recent experiments place an approximate upper bound on the ultimate ignition energy requirement. Scaling the implosions consistently in spatial, temporal and energy scales shows that implosions of the demonstrated quality ignite robustly at 9-15 times the current energy of NIF. While lasers are unlikely to reach that bounding energy, it appears that pulsed-power sources could plausibly do so, giving a range of paths forward for ICF depending on success in improving energy concentration. In this paper, I show the scaling arguments then discuss topics from my own involvement in HED fusion. The recent Viewfactor experiments at NIF have shed light on both the observed capsule drive deficit and errors in the detailed modelling of hohlraums. The latter could be important factors in the inability to achieve the needed symmetry and energy concentration. The paper then recounts earlier work in Fast Ignition and the uses of pulsed-power for HED and fusion applications. It concludes with a description of a method for improving pulsed-power driven hohlraums that could potentially provide a factor of 10 in energy at NTF-like drive conditions and reach the energy bound for indirect drive ICF.

  17. High energy density redox flow device

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

  18. Surprises in High Energy Density Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Edward Teller's work on what is now called High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) is not so well known as some of his work in other areas of physics. Yet he made substantial contributions since the 1940s and the models that he developed and the problems that he worked on are still relevant today. In this talk we shall look at two major areas in HEDP with the first treated more historically and the second more with a view to recent work that the author and others have undertaken which perhaps indicates future directions.

  19. High Energy Density Utracapacitors: Low-Cost, High Energy and Power Density, Nanotube-Enhanced Ultracapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: FastCAP is improving the performance of an ultracapacitor—a battery-like electronic device that can complement, and possibly even replace, an HEV or EV battery pack. Ultracapacitors have many advantages over conventional batteries, including long lifespans (over 1 million cycles, as compared to 10,000 for conventional batteries) and better durability. Ultracapacitors also charge more quickly than conventional batteries, and they release energy more quickly. However, ultracapacitors have fallen short of batteries in one key metric: energy density—high energy density means more energy storage. FastCAP is redesigning the ultracapacitor’s internal structure to increase its energy density. Ultracapacitors traditionally use electrodes made of irregularly shaped, porous carbon. FastCAP’s ultracapacitors are made of tiny, aligned carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes provide a regular path for ions moving in and out of the ultracapacitor’s electrode, increasing the overall efficiency and energy density of the device.

  20. High Energy Density Matter for Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrick, Patrick G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the High Energy Density Matter (HEDM) program is to identify, develop, and exploit high energy atomic and molecular systems as energetic sources for rocket propulsion applications. It is a high risk, high payoff program that incorporates both basic and applied research, experimental and theoretical efforts, and science and engineering efforts. The HEDM program is co-sponsored by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) and the Phillips Laboratory (PURKS). It includes both in-house and contracted University/Industry efforts. Technology developed by the HEDM program offers the opportunity for significant breakthroughs in propulsion system capabilities over the current state-of-the-art. One area of great interest is the use of cryogenic solids to increase the density of the propellant and to act as a stable matrix for storage of energetic materials. No cryogenic solid propellant has ever been used in a rocket, and there remain engineering challenges to such a propellant. However, these solids would enable a wide class of highly energetic materials by providing an environment that is at very low temperatures and is a physical barrier to recombination or energy loss reactions. Previous to our experiments only hydrogen atoms had been isolated in solid hydrogen. To date we have succeeded in trapping B, Al, Li, N, and Mg atoms in solid H2. Small molecules, such as B2 and LiB, are also of interest. Current efforts involve the search for new energetic small molecules, increasing free radical concentrations up to 5 mole percent, and scale-up for propulsion testing.

  1. High Energy Density aluminum/oxygen cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, E. J.; Gibbons, D. W.

    An alternative to a secondary battery as the power source for vehicle propulsion is a fuel cell, an example of which is the metal/air cell using metals such as aluminum, zinc, or iron. Aluminum is a particularly attractive candidate, with high energy and power densities, environmentally acceptable and having a large, established industrial base for production and distribution. An aluminum/oxygen system is currently under development for a prototype unmanned, undersea vehicle (UUV) for the US navy and recent work has focussed upon low corrosion aluminum alloys, and an electrolyte management system for processing the by-products of the energy-producing reactions. This paper summarizes the progress made in both areas. Anode materials capable of providing high utilization factors over current densities ranging from 5 to 150 mA/cm 2 have been identified, such materials being essential to realize mission life for the UUV. With respect to the electrolyte management system, a filter/precipitator unit has been successfully operated for over 250 h in a large scale, half-cell system.

  2. High energy density aluminum-oxygen cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, E. J.; Gibbons, D. W.

    1993-11-01

    An alternative to a secondary battery as the power source for vehicle propulsion is a fuel cell. An example of this is the metal-air fuel cell using metals such as aluminum, zinc, or iron. Aluminum is a particularly attractive candidate, having high energy and power densities, being environmentally acceptable, and having a large, established industrial base for production and distribution. An aluminum-oxygen system is currently under development for a UUV test vehicle, and recent work has focussed upon low corrosion aluminum alloys and an electrolyte management system for processing the by-products of the energy-producing reactions. This paper summarizes the progress made in both areas. Anode materials capable of providing high utilization factors over current densities ranging from S to 150 mA/sq cm have been identified. These materials are essential to realizing an acceptable mission life for the UUV. With respect to the electrolyte management system, a filter/precipitator unit has been successfully operated for over 250 hours in a large scale, half-cell system.

  3. High energy density aluminum-oxygen cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudd, E. J.; Gibbons, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    An alternative to a secondary battery as the power source for vehicle propulsion is a fuel cell. An example of this is the metal-air fuel cell using metals such as aluminum, zinc, or iron. Aluminum is a particularly attractive candidate, having high energy and power densities, being environmentally acceptable, and having a large, established industrial base for production and distribution. An aluminum-oxygen system is currently under development for a UUV test vehicle, and recent work has focussed upon low corrosion aluminum alloys and an electrolyte management system for processing the by-products of the energy-producing reactions. This paper summarizes the progress made in both areas. Anode materials capable of providing high utilization factors over current densities ranging from S to 150 mA/sq cm have been identified. These materials are essential to realizing an acceptable mission life for the UUV. With respect to the electrolyte management system, a filter/precipitator unit has been successfully operated for over 250 hours in a large scale, half-cell system.

  4. Perspectives on High-Energy-Density Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul

    2008-11-01

    Much of 21st century plasma physics will involve work to produce, understand, control, and exploit very non-traditional plasmas. High-energy density (HED) plasmas are often examples, variously involving strong Coulomb interactions and few particles per Debeye sphere, dominant radiation effects, strongly relativistic effects, or strongly quantum-mechanical behavior. Indeed, these and other modern plasma systems often fall outside the early standard theoretical definitions of ``plasma''. This presentation will focus on two types of HED plasmas that exhibit non-traditional behavior. Our first example will be the plasmas produced by extremely strong shock waves. Shock waves are present across the entire realm of plasma densities, often in space or astrophysical contexts. HED shock waves (at pressures > 1 Mbar) enable studies in many areas, from equations of state to hydrodynamics to radiation hydrodynamics. We will specifically consider strongly radiative shocks, in which the radiative energy fluxes are comparable to the mechanical energy fluxes that drive the shocks. Modern HED facilities can produce such shocks, which are also present in dense, energetic, astrophysical systems such as supernovae. These shocks are also excellent targets for advanced simulations due to their range of spatial scales and complex radiation transport. Our second example will be relativistic plasmas. In general, these vary from plasmas containing relativistic particle beams, produced for some decades in the laboratory, to the relativistic thermal plasmas present for example in pulsar winds. Laboratory HED relativistic plasmas to date have been those produced by laser beams of irradiance ˜ 10^18 to 10^22 W/cm^2 or by accelerator-produced HED electron beams. These have applications ranging from generation of intense x-rays to production of proton beams for radiation therapy to acceleration of electrons. Here we will focus on electron acceleration, a spectacular recent success and a rare

  5. High Energy Density Sciences with High Power Lasers at SACLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Ryosuke

    2013-10-01

    One of the interesting topics on high energy density sciences with high power lasers is creation of extremely high pressures in material. The pressures of more than 0.1 TPa are the energy density corresponding to the chemical bonding energy, resulting in expectation of dramatic changes in the chemical reactions. At pressures of more than TPa, most of material would be melted on the shock Hugoniot curve. However, if the temperature is less than 1eV or lower than a melting point at pressures of more than TPa, novel solid states of matter must be created through a pressured phase transition. One of the interesting materials must be carbon. At pressures of more than TPa, the diamond structure changes to BC and cubic at more than 3TPa. To create such novel states of matter, several kinds of isentropic-like compression techniques are being developed with high power lasers. To explore the ``Tera-Pascal Science,'' now we have a new tool which is an x-ray free electron laser as well as high power lasers. The XFEL will clear the details of the HED states and also efficiently create hot dense matter. We have started a new project on high energy density sciences using an XFEL (SACLA) in Japan, which is a HERMES (High Energy density Revolution of Matter in Extreme States) project.

  6. Research on high energy density capacitor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The Pulsed Plasma thruster is the simplest of all electric propulsion devices. It is a pulsed device which stores energy in capacitors for each pulse. The lifetimes and energy densities of these capacitors are critical parameters to the continued use of these thrusters. This report presents the result of a research effort conducted by JPL into the materials used in capacitors and the modes of failure. The dominant failure mechanism was determined to be material breakdown precipitated by heat build-up within the capacitors. The presence of unwanted gas was identified as the source of the heat. An aging phenomena was discovered in polycarbonate based capacitors. CO build-up was noted to increase with the number of times the capacitor had been discharged. Improved quality control was cited as being essential for the improvement of capacitor lifetimes.

  7. Research on high energy density capacitor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The Pulsed Plasma thruster is the simplest of all electric propulsion devices. It is a pulsed device which stores energy in capacitors for each pulse. The lifetimes and energy densities of these capacitors are critical parameters to the continued use of these thrusters. This report presents the result of a research effort conducted by JPL into the materials used in capacitors and the modes of failure. The dominant failure mechanism was determined to be material breakdown precipitated by heat build-up within the capacitors. The presence of unwanted gas was identified as the source of the heat. An aging phenomena was discovered in polycarbonate based capacitors. CO build-up was noted to increase with the number of times the capacitor had been discharged. Improved quality control was cited as being essential for the improvement of capacitor lifetimes.

  8. Highly Compressed Ion Beam for High Energy Density Science

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Briggs, R.J.; Callahan, D.A.; Caporaso, G.J.; Celata, C.M.; Davidson, R.C.; Faltens, A.; Grisham, L.; Grote, D.P.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich I.; Lee, E.P.; Lee, R.W.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Nelson, S.D.; Olson, C.L.; Penn, G.; Reginato,L.R.; Renk, T.; Rose, D.; Seessler, A.; Staples, J.W.; Tabak, M.; Thoma,C.; Waldron, W.; Welch, D.R.; Wurtele, J.; Yu, S.S.

    2005-05-16

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is developing the intense ion beams needed to drive matter to the High Energy Density regimes required for Inertial Fusion Energy and other applications. An interim goal is a facility for Warm Dense Matter studies, wherein a target is heated volumetrically without being shocked, so that well-defined states of matter at 1 to 10 eV are generated within a diagnosable region. In the approach they are pursuing, low to medium mass ions with energies just above the Bragg peak are directed onto thin target ''foils,'' which may in fact be foams with mean densities 1% to 10% of solid. This approach complements that being pursued at GSI Darmstadt, wherein high-energy ion beams deposit a small fraction of their energy in a cylindrically target. They present the beam requirements for Warm Dense Matter experiments. The authors discuss neutralized drift compression and final focus experiments and modeling. They describe suitable accelerator architectures based on Drift-Tube Linac, RF, single-gap, Ionization-Front Accelerator, and Pulse-Line Ion Accelerator concepts. The last of these is being pursued experimentally. Finally, they discuss plans toward a user facility for target experiments.

  9. Equation of state for titanium at high energy densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khishchenko, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    A caloric equation-of-state model, which represents the relation of pressure with density and internal energy, is applied for titanium in the bcc and liquid phases. Thermodynamic characteristics along the cold-compression curve at T = 0 and Hugoniots are calculated for the metal and compared with available data from shock-wave experiments at high energy densities.

  10. The creation of high energy densities with antimatter beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, W.R.; Kruk, J.W.; Rice Univ., Houston, TX . Bonner Nuclear Labs.)

    1989-01-01

    The use of antiprotons (and antideuterons) for the study of the behavior of nuclear matter at high energy density is considered. It is shown that high temperatures and high energy densities can be achieved for small volumes. Also investigated is the strangeness production in antimatter annihilation. It is found that the high rate of Lambda production seen in a recent experiment is easily understood. The Lambda and K-short rapidity distributions are also reproduced by the model considered. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Ultra high energy density and fast discharge nanocomposite capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Haixiong; Sodano, Henry A.

    2013-04-01

    Nanocomposites containing high dielectric permittivity ceramics embedded in high breakdown strength polymers are currently of considerable interest as a solution for the development of high energy density capacitors. However, the improvement of dielectric permittivity comes at expense of the breakdown strength leading to limit the final energy density. Here, an ultra-high energy density nanocomposite was fabricated based on high aspect ratio barium strontium titanate nanowires. The pyroelectric phase Ba0.2Sr0.8TiO3 was chosen for the nanowires combined with quenched PVDF to fabricate high energy density nanocomposite. The energy density with 7.5% Ba0.2Sr0.8TiO3 nanowires reached 14.86 J/cc at 450 MV/m, which represented a 42.9% increase in comparison to the PVDF with an energy density of 10.4 J/cc at the same electric field. The capacitors have 1138% greater than higher energy density than commercial biaxial oriented polypropylene capacitors (1.2 J/cc at 640). These results demonstrate that the high aspect ratio nanowires can be used to produce nanocomposite capacitors with greater performance than the neat polymers thus providing a novel process for the development of future pulsed-power capacitors.

  12. High-Energy-Density Electrolytic Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S.; Lewis, Carol R.

    1993-01-01

    Reductions in weight and volume make new application possible. Supercapacitors and improved ultracapacitors advanced electrolytic capacitors developed for use as electric-load-leveling devices in such applications as electric vehicle propulsion systems, portable power tools, and low-voltage pulsed power supplies. One primary advantage: offer power densities much higher than storage batteries. Capacitors used in pulse mode, with short charge and discharge times. Derived from commercially available ultracapacitors. Made of lightweight materials; incorporate electrode/electrolyte material systems capable of operation at voltages higher than previous electrode/electrolyte systems. By use of innovative designs and manufacturing processes, made in wide range of rated capacitances and in rated operating potentials ranging from few to several hundred volts.

  13. High Energy Density Polymer Film Capacitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    self - healing (failure safe), high current carrying capacitors, Sigma designed an oil printing system to produce segmented ectrode capacitor film...DESIGN AND FABRICATION 4.1 HEAVY EDGE-THIN ELECTRODE DESIGN Self - healing properties of metallized capacitors are enhanced significantly by increasing...are limited to low loss dielectrics such as polypropylene . Lower rep rate applications can beserved with higher loss dielectrics that include

  14. High energy density propulsion systems and small engine dynamometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Scope and Method of Study. This study investigates all possible methods of powering small unmanned vehicles, provides reasoning for the propulsion system down select, and covers in detail the design and production of a dynamometer to confirm theoretical energy density calculations for small engines. Initial energy density calculations are based upon manufacturer data, pressure vessel theory, and ideal thermodynamic cycle efficiencies. Engine tests are conducted with a braking type dynamometer for constant load energy density tests, and show true energy densities in excess of 1400 WH/lb of fuel. Findings and Conclusions. Theory predicts lithium polymer, the present unmanned system energy storage device of choice, to have much lower energy densities than other conversion energy sources. Small engines designed for efficiency, instead of maximum power, would provide the most advantageous method for powering small unmanned vehicles because these engines have widely variable power output, loss of mass during flight, and generate rotational power directly. Theoretical predictions for the energy density of small engines has been verified through testing. Tested values up to 1400 WH/lb can be seen under proper operating conditions. The implementation of such a high energy density system will require a significant amount of follow-on design work to enable the engines to tolerate the higher temperatures of lean operation. Suggestions are proposed to enable a reliable, small-engine propulsion system in future work. Performance calculations show that a mature system is capable of month long flight times, and unrefueled circumnavigation of the globe.

  15. Origins and impacts of high-density symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao-An

    2017-06-01

    What is nuclear symmetry energy? Why is it important? What do we know about it? Why is it so uncertain especially at high densities? Can the total symmetry energy or its kinetic part be negative? What are the effects of three-body and/or tensor force on symmetry energy? How can we probe the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy with terrestrial nuclear experiments? What observables of heavy-ion reactions are sensitive to the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy? How does the symmetry energy affect properties of neutron stars, gravitational waves and our understanding about the nature of strong-field gravity? In this lecture, we try to answer these questions as best as we can based on some of our recent work and/or understanding of research done by others. This note summarizes the main points of the lecture.

  16. Hybrid system for rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Zheng; Yang, Yaqiong; Wang, Xiaowei; Li, Minxia; Fu, Zhengwen; Wu, Yuping; Holze, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges of electrical energy storage (EES) is the development of environmentally friendly battery systems with high safety and high energy density. Rechargeable Mg batteries have been long considered as one highly promising system due to the use of low cost and dendrite-free magnesium metal. The bottleneck for traditional Mg batteries is to achieve high energy density since their output voltage is below 2.0 V. Here, we report a magnesium battery using Mg in Grignard reagent-based electrolyte as the negative electrode, a lithium intercalation compound in aqueous solution as the positive electrode, and a solid electrolyte as a separator. Its average discharge voltage is 2.1 V with stable discharge platform and good cycling life. The calculated energy density based on the two electrodes is high. These findings open another door to rechargeable magnesium batteries. PMID:26173624

  17. Frontiers for discovery in high energy density physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    2005-07-01

    Recent advances in extending the energy, power, and brightness of lasers, particle beams, and Z-pinch generators make it possible to create matter with extremely high energy density in the laboratory. The collective interaction of this matter, often in the plasma state, with itself, intense particle beams, and radiation fields, is a rapidly growing field of research called high energy density physics. It is a field characterized by extreme states of matter, previously unattainable in laboratory experiments, and not unlike the conditions occurring in many astrophysical systems. It is also a field rich in opportunities for scientific discovery and compelling applications, propelled by advances in high-performance computing and advanced instrumentation and measuring techniques. This plenary presentation will summarize the results of two recent national studies of high energy density physics commissioned by the National Academies -- National Research Council, and the Office of Science and Technology Policy's Interagency Working Group on the Physics of the Universe. It will also provide an overview of the exciting research opportunities of high intellectual value in this highly interdisciplinary field, with examples ranging from fast ignition in inertial confinement fusion, to the creation of quark-gluon plasmas characteristic of the very early Universe using heavy ion accelerators. For purposes of this presentation, the working definition of high energy density refers to energy densities exceeding 100 kilojoules per cubic centimeter, or equivalently, pressures exceeding one megabar. For reference, the bulk moduli of solid materials under standard conditions are about 100 kilojoules per cubic centimeter.

  18. High energy density nanocomposite capacitors using non-ferroelectric nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Haixiong; Sodano, Henry A.

    2013-02-01

    A high energy density nanocomposite capacitor is fabricated by incorporating high aspect ratio functionalized TiO2 nanowires (NWs) into a polyvinylidene-fluoride matrix. These nanocomposites exhibited energy density as high as 12.4 J/cc at 450 MV/m, which is nine times larger than commercial biaxially oriented polypropylene polypropylene capacitors (1.2 J/cc at 640 MV/m). Also, the power density can reach 1.77 MW/cc with a discharge speed of 2.89 μs. The results presented here demonstrate that nanowires can be used to develop nanocomposite capacitors with high energy density and fast discharge speed for future pulsed-power applications.

  19. Graphene supercapacitor with both high power and energy density.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Kannappan, Santhakumar; Samuthira Pandian, Amaresh; Jang, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Y S; Lu, Wu

    2017-08-30

    Supercapacitors, based on the fast ion transportation, are specialized to provide high power, long stability, and efficient energy storage with highly porous electrode materials. However, their low energy density prevents them from many potential applications that require both high energy density and high power density performances. Using a scalable nanoporous graphene synthesis method involving an annealing process in hydrogen, here we show supercapacitors with highly porous graphene electrodes capable of achieving not only a high power density of 41 kW kg-1 and a Coulombic efficiency of 97.5%, but also a high energy density of 148.75 Wh kg-1. A high specific gravimetric and volumetric capacitance (306.03 F g-1 and 64.27 F cm-3) are demonstrated. The devices can retain almost 100% capacitance after 7,000 charging/discharging cycles at a current density of 8A g-1. The superior performance of supercapacitors is attributed to the ideal pore size, pore uniformity, and good ion accessibility of the synthesized graphene. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  20. High Energy Density Regenerative Fuel Cell Systems for Terrestrial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A.

    1999-01-01

    Regenerative Fuel Cell System (RFCS) technology for energy storage has been a NASA power system concept for many years. Compared to battery-based energy storage systems, RFCS has received relatively little attention or resources for development because the energy density and electrical efficiency were not sufficiently attractive relative to advanced battery systems. Even today, RFCS remains at a very low technology readiness level (TRL of about 2 indicating feasibility has been demonstrated). Commercial development of the Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells for automobiles and other terrestrial applications and improvements in lightweight pressure vessel design to reduce weight and improve performance make possible a high energy density RFCS energy storage system. The results from this study of a lightweight RFCS energy storage system for a remotely piloted, solar-powered, high altitude aircraft indicate an energy density up to 790 w-h/kg with electrical efficiency of 53.4% is attainable. Such an energy storage system would allow a solar-powered aircraft to carry hundreds of kilograms of payload and remain in flight indefinitely for use in atmospheric research, earth observation, resource mapping. and telecommunications. Future developments in the areas of hydrogen and oxygen storage, pressure vessel design, higher temperature and higher- pressure fuel cell operation, unitized regenerative fuel cells, and commercial development of fuel cell technology will improve both the energy density and electrical efficiency of the RFCS.

  1. Thermospheric Density Model Including High-Latitude Energy Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, O. K.; Moe, M. M.

    2006-12-01

    As was predicted long ago by Sydney Chapman, there is a major contribution to thermospheric energy from the magnetosphere at all times. The contribution of this magnetospheric energy source produces a neutral density bulge at high latitudes even during geomagnetically quiet times. We present an analytical, semi- empirical model of the global neutral density at such quiet times. The total density is expressed as the sum of two terms: The first term describes the combined effects of the solar ultra-violet heating and various other contributions like the semi-annual variation; the second term gives the contribution to the density associated with particle precipitation and joule heating coming from magnetospheric sources during times of low geomagnetic activity. The region of density enhancement at high latitudes is associated with the locations of the dayside cusps. Therefore the model produces a density distribution which depends on universal time as well as on altitude, latitude, local time, and the usual solar UV energy source. The numerical values of the parameters in the empirical model were originally determined 30 years ago from density data collected by the Bell-MESA accelerometer on the LOGACS satellite and the pressure gauge on the SPADES satellite. As an example of the model output, we show a Mercator projection of the global density distribution at 400 km altitude at 12 hours GMT in late May at a time of moderate solar activity and low geomagnetic activity. The parameters in the model can now be substantially improved by using recent advances like the latest description of the semi-annual variation and by incorporating the precise density measurements made by the accelerometers on board the CHAMP and GRACE satellites. In the original model, density values at times of high geomagnetic activity were included in the second density term. The parameters in that term can also be improved as accurate storm-time densities become available.

  2. Fourth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Farhat

    2014-06-30

    The Fourth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics (ICHED 2013) was held in Saint Malo, France, at the Palais du Grand Large on 25-28 June 2013 (http://web.luli.polytechnique.fr/ICHED2013/). This meeting was the fourth in a series which was first held in 2008. This conference covered all the important aspects of High Energy Density Physics including fundamental topics from strong-field physics to creating new states of matter (including radiation-dominated, high-pressure quantum and relativistic plasmas) and ultra-fast lattice dynamics on the timescale of atomic transitions.

  3. A high energy density relaxor antiferroelectric pulsed capacitor dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Hwan Ryul; Lynch, Christopher S.

    2016-01-14

    Pulsed capacitors require high energy density and low loss, properties that can be realized through selection of composition. Ceramic (Pb{sub 0.88}La{sub 0.08})(Zr{sub 0.91}Ti{sub 0.09})O{sub 3} was found to be an ideal candidate. La{sup 3+} doping and excess PbO were used to produce relaxor antiferroelectric behavior with slim and slanted hysteresis loops to reduce the dielectric hysteresis loss, to increase the dielectric strength, and to increase the discharge energy density. The discharge energy density of this composition was found to be 3.04 J/cm{sup 3} with applied electric field of 170 kV/cm, and the energy efficiency, defined as the ratio of the discharge energy density to the charging energy density, was 0.920. This high efficiency reduces the heat generated under cyclic loading and improves the reliability. The properties were observed to degrade some with temperature increase above 80 °C. Repeated electric field cycles up to 10 000 cycles were applied to the specimen with no observed performance degradation.

  4. Laser-Plasma Interactions in High-Energy Density Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, C G; Baldis, H A; Schneider, M B; Hinkel, D E; Langdon, A B; Seka, W; Bahr, R; Depierreaux, S

    2005-08-24

    Laser-plasma interactions (LPI) have been studied experimentally in high-temperature, high-energy density plasmas. The studies have been performed using the Omega laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), Rochester, NY. Up to 10 TW of power was incident upon reduced-scale hohlraums, distributed in three laser beam cones. The hot hohlraums fill quickly with plasma. Late in the laser pulse, most of the laser energy is deposited at the laser entrance hole, where most of the LPI takes place. Due to the high electron temperature, the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectrum extends well beyond {omega}{sub 0}/2, due to the Bohm-Gross shift. This high-temperature, high-energy density regime provides a unique opportunity to study LPI beyond inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions.

  5. Ultra High Energy Density Cathodes with Carbon Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-10

    energy lithium ion batteries . The use of CNT additives with commercial high capacity lithium rich cathodes was shown to increase areal loadings and...collectors can result in battery energy density increases up to 15% (vs. mesocarbon microbead (MCMB)). 15. SUBJECT TERMS Carbon Nanotubes, CNT...a) Carbon nanotube paper coated with NCA cathode composite for testing as positive electrode in Li-ion battery (b) Comparison of NCA specific

  6. Plasma Focusing of High Energy Density Electron and Positron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Johnny S.T.

    2000-10-09

    We present results from the SLAC E-150 experiment on plasma focusing of high energy density electron and, for the first time, positron beams. We also present results on plasma lens-induced synchrotron radiation, longitudinal dynamics of plasma focusing, and laser- and beam-plasma interactions.

  7. High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Thomas; Colby, Eric

    2002-12-01

    We summarize the reported results and the principal technical discussions that occurred in our Working Group on High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Schemes at the 2002 workshop on Advanced Accelerator Concepts at the Mandalay Beach resort, June 22-28, 2002.

  8. Design for a High Energy Density Kelvin-Helmholtz Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O A

    2007-10-29

    While many high energy density physics (HEDP) Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments have been fielded as part of basic HEDP and astrophysics studies, not one HEDP Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) experiment has been successfully performed. Herein, a design for a novel HEDP x-ray driven KH experiment is presented along with supporting radiation-hydrodynamic simulation and theory.

  9. Frontiers for Discovery in High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R. C.; Katsouleas, T.; Arons, J.; Baring, M.; Deeney, C.; Di Mauro, L.; Ditmire, T.; Falcone, R.; Hammer, D.; Hill, W.; Jacak, B.; Joshi, C.; Lamb, F.; Lee, R.; Logan, B. G.; Melissinos, A.; Meyerhofer, D.; Mori, W.; Murnane, M.; Remington, B.; Rosner, R.; Schneider, D.; Silvera, I.; Stone, J.; Wilde, B.; Zajc. W.

    2004-07-20

    The report is intended to identify the compelling research opportunities of high intellectual value in high energy density physics. The opportunities for discovery include the broad scope of this highly interdisciplinary field that spans a wide range of physics areas including plasma physics, laser and particle beam physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science and condensed matter physics, intense radiation-matter interaction physics, fluid dynamics, and magnetohydrodynamics

  10. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J.

    2014-06-15

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance.

  11. Theoretically predicted Fox-7 based new high energy density molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanta, Susanta

    2016-08-01

    Computational investigation of CHNO based high energy density molecules (HEDM) are designed with FOX-7 (1, 1-dinitro 2, 2-diamino ethylene) skeleton. We report structures, stability and detonation properties of these new molecules. A systematic analysis is presented for the crystal density, activation energy for nitro to nitrite isomerisation and the C-NO2 bond dissociation energy of these molecules. The Atoms in molecules (AIM) calculations have been performed to interpret the intra-molecular weak H-bonding interactions and the stability of C-NO2 bonds. The structure optimization, frequency and bond dissociation energy calculations have been performed at B3LYP level of theory by using G03 quantum chemistry package. Some of the designed molecules are found to be more promising HEDM than FOX-7 molecule, and are proposed to be candidate for synthetic purpose.

  12. Microelectromechanical high-density energy storage/rapid release system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Allen, James J.; Meeks, Kent D.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.

    1999-08-01

    One highly desirable characteristic of electrostatically driven microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is that they consume very little power. The corresponding drawback is that the force they produce may be inadequate for many applications. It has previously been demonstrated that gear reduction units or microtransmissions can substantially increase the torque generated by microengines. Operating speed, however, is also reduced by the transmission gear ratio. Some applications require both high speed and high force. If this output is only required for a limited period of time, then energy could be stored in a mechanical system and rapidly released upon demand. We have designed, fabricated, and demonstrated a high-density energy storage/rapid release system that accomplishes this task. Built using a 5-level surface micromachining technology, the assembly closely resembles a medieval crossbow. Energy releases on the order of tens of nanojoules have already been demonstrated, and significantly higher energy systems are under development.

  13. High-Energy-Density Shear Flow and Instability Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, F. W.; Flippo, K. A.; Merritt, E. C.; di Stefano, C. A.; Devolder, B. G.; Kurien, S.; Kline, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    High-energy-density shear experiments have been performed by LANL at the OMEGA Laser Facility and National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments have been simulated using the LANL radiation-hydrocode RAGE and have been used to assess turbulence models' ability to function in the high-energy-density, inertial-fusion-relevant regime. Beginning with the basic configuration of two counter-oriented shock-driven flows of > 100 km/s, which initiate a strong shear instability across an initially solid-density, 20 μm thick Al plate, variations of the experiment to details of the initial conditions have been performed. These variations have included increasing the fluid densities (by modifying the plate material from Al to Ti and Cu), imposing sinusoidal seed perturbations on the plate, and directly modifying the plate's intrinsic surface roughness. Radiography of the unseeded layer has revealed the presence of emergent Kelvin-Helmholtz structures which may be analyzed to infer fluid-mechanical properties including turbulent energy density. This work is conducted by the US DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  14. Anti-Ferroelectric Ceramics for High Energy Density Capacitors

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Aditya; Patel, Satyanarayan; Vaish, Rahul; Bowen, Chris R.

    2015-01-01

    With an ever increasing dependence on electrical energy for powering modern equipment and electronics, research is focused on the development of efficient methods for the generation, storage and distribution of electrical power. In this regard, the development of suitable dielectric based solid-state capacitors will play a key role in revolutionizing modern day electronic and electrical devices. Among the popular dielectric materials, anti-ferroelectrics (AFE) display evidence of being a strong contender for future ceramic capacitors. AFE materials possess low dielectric loss, low coercive field, low remnant polarization, high energy density, high material efficiency, and fast discharge rates; all of these characteristics makes AFE materials a lucrative research direction. However, despite the evident advantages, there have only been limited attempts to develop this area. This article attempts to provide a focus to this area by presenting a timely review on the topic, on the relevant scientific advancements that have been made with respect to utilization and development of anti-ferroelectric materials for electric energy storage applications. The article begins with a general introduction discussing the need for high energy density capacitors, the present solutions being used to address this problem, and a brief discussion of various advantages of anti-ferroelectric materials for high energy storage applications. This is followed by a general description of anti-ferroelectricity and important anti-ferroelectric materials. The remainder of the paper is divided into two subsections, the first of which presents various physical routes for enhancing the energy storage density while the latter section describes chemical routes for enhanced storage density. This is followed by conclusions and future prospects and challenges which need to be addressed in this particular field. PMID:28793694

  15. Anti-Ferroelectric Ceramics for High Energy Density Capacitors.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Aditya; Patel, Satyanarayan; Vaish, Rahul; Bowen, Chris R

    2015-11-25

    With an ever increasing dependence on electrical energy for powering modern equipment and electronics, research is focused on the development of efficient methods for the generation, storage and distribution of electrical power. In this regard, the development of suitable dielectric based solid-state capacitors will play a key role in revolutionizing modern day electronic and electrical devices. Among the popular dielectric materials, anti-ferroelectrics (AFE) display evidence of being a strong contender for future ceramic capacitors. AFE materials possess low dielectric loss, low coercive field, low remnant polarization, high energy density, high material efficiency, and fast discharge rates; all of these characteristics makes AFE materials a lucrative research direction. However, despite the evident advantages, there have only been limited attempts to develop this area. This article attempts to provide a focus to this area by presenting a timely review on the topic, on the relevant scientific advancements that have been made with respect to utilization and development of anti-ferroelectric materials for electric energy storage applications. The article begins with a general introduction discussing the need for high energy density capacitors, the present solutions being used to address this problem, and a brief discussion of various advantages of anti-ferroelectric materials for high energy storage applications. This is followed by a general description of anti-ferroelectricity and important anti-ferroelectric materials. The remainder of the paper is divided into two subsections, the first of which presents various physical routes for enhancing the energy storage density while the latter section describes chemical routes for enhanced storage density. This is followed by conclusions and future prospects and challenges which need to be addressed in this particular field.

  16. Study of Volumetrically Heated Ultra-High Energy Density Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    2016-10-27

    Heating dense matter to millions of degrees is important for applications, but requires complex and expensive methods. The major goal of the project was to demonstrate using a compact laser the creation of a new ultra-high energy density plasma regime characterized by simultaneous extremely high temperature and high density, and to study it combining experimental measurements and advanced simulations. We have demonstrated that trapping of intense femtosecond laser pulses deep within ordered nanowire arrays can heat near solid density matter into a new ultra hot plasma regime. Extreme electron densities, and temperatures of several tens of million degrees were achieved using laser pulses of only 0.5 J energy from a compact laser. Our x-ray spectra and simulations showed that extremely highly ionized plasma volumes several micrometers in depth are generated by irradiation of gold and Nickel nanowire arrays with femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities. We obtained extraordinarily high degrees of ionization (e.g. we peeled 52 electrons from gold atoms, and up to 26 electrons from nickel atoms). In the process we generated Gigabar pressures only exceeded in the central hot spot of highly compressed thermonuclear fusion plasmas.. The plasma created after the dissolved wires expand, collide, and thermalize, is computed to have a thermal energy density of 0.3 GJ cm-3 and a pressure of 1-2 Gigabar. These are pressures only exceeded in highly compressed thermonuclear fusion plasmas. Scaling these results to higher laser intensities promises to create plasmas with temperatures and pressures exceeding those in the center of the sun.

  17. Collapsing Bubble in Metal for High Energy Density Physics Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, S F; Barnard, J J; Leung, P T; Yu, S S

    2011-04-13

    This paper presents a new idea to produce matter in the high energy density physics (HEDP) regime in the laboratory using an intense ion beam. A gas bubble created inside a solid metal may collapse by driving it with an intense ion beam. The melted metal will compress the gas bubble and supply extra energy to it. Simulations show that the spherical implosion ratio can be about 5 and at the stagnation point, the maximum density, temperature and pressure inside the gas bubble can go up to nearly 2 times solid density, 10 eV and a few megabar (Mbar) respectively. The proposed experiment is the first to permit access into the Mbar regime with existing or near-term ion facilities, and opens up possibilities for new physics gained through careful comparisons of simulations with measurements of quantities like stagnation radius, peak temperature and peak pressure at the metal wall.

  18. High energy-density science on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, E.M.; Cauble, R.; Remington, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility, as well as its French counterpart Le Laser Megajoule, have been designed to confront one of the most difficult and compelling problem in shock physics - the creation of a hot, compassed DT plasma surrounded and confined by cold, nearly degenerate DT fuel. At the same time, these laser facilities will present the shock physics community with unique tools for the study of high energy density matter at states unreachable by any other laboratory technique. Here we describe how these lasers can contribute to investigations of high energy density in the area of material properties and equations of state, extend present laboratory shock techniques such as high-speed jets to new regimes, and allow study of extreme conditions found in astrophysical phenomena.

  19. High Density Thermal Energy Storage with Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapathi, Gani B.; Wirz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to storing thermal energy with supercritical fluids is being investigated, which if successful, promises to transform the way thermal energy is captured and utilized. The use of supercritical fluids allows cost-affordable high-density storage with a combination of latent heat and sensible heat in the two-phase as well as the supercritical state. This technology will enhance penetration of several thermal power generation applications and high temperature water for commercial use if the overall cost of the technology can be demonstrated to be lower than the current state-of-the-art molten salt using sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate eutectic mixtures.

  20. High Density Thermal Energy Storage with Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapathi, Gani B.; Wirz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to storing thermal energy with supercritical fluids is being investigated, which if successful, promises to transform the way thermal energy is captured and utilized. The use of supercritical fluids allows cost-affordable high-density storage with a combination of latent heat and sensible heat in the two-phase as well as the supercritical state. This technology will enhance penetration of several thermal power generation applications and high temperature water for commercial use if the overall cost of the technology can be demonstrated to be lower than the current state-of-the-art molten salt using sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate eutectic mixtures.

  1. Optimizing liner implosions for high energy density physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, C.; Humphries, S. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Cylindrical metal shells imploded by magnetic fields - liners - are used as kinetic energy drivers for high energy density physics experiments in hydrodynamics and dynamic material property measurements. There are at least three ways in which liners have been, or are expected to be, used to produce high energy density, i.e., high pressure, in target materials. A common approach uses the liner as a convergent flyer plate, which impacts a material target cylinder after having been shocklessly accelerated across an intervening gap. The resultant shock and piston hydrodynamic flow in the target are used in exploration of a wide variety of phenomena and material properties. Another common method is to slowly compress a liner containing a material sample in a such fashion that little heating occurs. This technique is most useful for investigated physical properties at low temperature and extreme density. Finally, one can use a hybrid approach to shock heat with an impacting liner followed by slower adiabatic, if not isentropic, compression to explore material properties in extrema. The magnetic fields for driving these liners may be produced by either high explosive pulsed power generators or by capacitor banks. Here we will consider only capacitor banks.

  2. Lithium-Based High Energy Density Flow Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement a lithium-based high energy density flow battery. In one embodiment, a lithium-based high energy density flow battery includes a first anodic conductive solution that includes a lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex dissolved in a solvent, a second cathodic conductive solution that includes a cathodic complex dissolved in a solvent, a solid lithium ion conductor disposed so as to separate the first solution from the second solution, such that the first conductive solution, the second conductive solution, and the solid lithium ionic conductor define a circuit, where when the circuit is closed, lithium from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex in the first conductive solution dissociates from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex, migrates through the solid lithium ionic conductor, and associates with the cathodic complex of the second conductive solution, and a current is generated.

  3. High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T.; Colby, E.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    The High Energy Density and Exotic Acceleration working group took as our goal to reach beyond the community of plasma accelerator research with its applications to high energy physics, to promote exchange with other disciplines which are challenged by related and demanding beam physics issues. The scope of the group was to cover particle acceleration and beam transport that, unlike other groups at AAC, are not mediated by plasmas or by electromagnetic structures. At this Workshop, we saw an impressive advancement from years past in the area of Vacuum Acceleration, for example with the LEAP experiment at Stanford. And we saw an influx of exciting new beam physics topics involving particle propagation inside of solid-density plasmas or at extremely high charge density, particularly in the areas of laser acceleration of ions, and extreme beams for fusion energy research, including Heavy-ion Inertial Fusion beam physics. One example of the importance and extreme nature of beam physics in HED research is the requirement in the Fast Ignitor scheme of inertial fusion to heat a compressed DT fusion pellet to keV temperatures by injection of laser-driven electron or ion beams of giga-Amp current. Even in modest experiments presently being performed on the laser-acceleration of ions from solids, mega-amp currents of MeV electrons must be transported through solid foils, requiring almost complete return current neutralization, and giving rise to a wide variety of beam-plasma instabilities. As keynote talks our group promoted Ion Acceleration (plenary talk by A. MacKinnon), which historically has grown out of inertial fusion research, and HIF Accelerator Research (invited talk by A. Friedman), which will require impressive advancements in space-charge-limited ion beam physics and in understanding the generation and transport of neutralized ion beams. A unifying aspect of High Energy Density applications was the physics of particle beams inside of solids, which is proving to

  4. Laboratory testing of high energy density capacitors for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A. F.

    1991-10-01

    Laboratory tests of advanced, high energy density capacitors in the Battery Test Laboratory of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory have been performed to investigate their suitability for load-leveling the battery in an electric vehicle. Two types of devices were tested- 3 V, 70 Farad, spiral wound, carbon-based, single cell devices and 20 V, 3. 5 Farad, mixed-oxide, multi-cell bipolar devices. The energy density of the devices, based on energy stored during charge to the rated voltage, was found to be 1-2 W/kg, which agreed well with that claimed by the manufacturers. Constant power discharge tests were performed at power densities up to 1500 W/kg. Discharges at higher power densities could have been performed had equipment been available to maintain constant power during discharges of less than one second. It was found that the capacitance of the devices were rate dependent with the rate dependency of the carbon-based devices being higher than that of the mixed-oxide devices. The resistance of both types of devices were relatively low being 20-30 milliohms. Testing done in the study showed that the advanced high energy density capacitors can be charged and discharged over cycles which approximate the duty cycle that would be encountered if the devices are used to load-level the battery in an electric vehicle. Thermal tests of the advanced capacitors in an insulated environment using the PSFUDS cycle showed the devices do not overheat with their temperatures increasing only 4-5 C for tests that lasted 5-7 hours.

  5. High Energy Density Non-Aqueous Battery System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-31

    otherwise attractive couple from use. In this report are included, the corrosion studies of calcium and calcium lithium alloys in thionyl chloride ... lithium battery systems have been developed to fulfill the need for long shelf life high energy density batteries. The lithium - thionyl chloride system has... lithium - thionyl chloride battery claimed one life and two injuries (2) (4th of August 1976, Ogden, Utah). Thus lithium batteries have not reached the

  6. High Energy Density Dielectrics for Pulsed Power Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    next page). 14. ABSTRACT This report was developed under a SBIR contract. Aluminum oxynitride (AlON) capacitors exhibit several promising...characteristics for high energy density capacitor applications in extreme environments. Dielectric constants in the range of 9 and dielectric strength in...properties remain stable from cryogenic temperatures of -200 °C to temperatures above 400 °C. Stacked capacitor devices have been developed and

  7. High energy density capacitor testing for the AFWL SHIVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. L.; Reinovsky, R. E.

    Lifetime testing and analysis of small samples of high energy density (HED) discharge capacitors at the AFWL were conducted to find a component suitable for upgrading the SHIVA capacitor bank to a 6 MJ facility. Evaluation was performed with discharge conditions of approximately 250 kA per capacitor at 60 to 70% reversal and 2 microsec quarter period. Dielectric systems including Kraft paper with caster oil impregnant and Kraft paper, polypropylene with DiOctyl Phthalate (DOP) impregnant were tested.

  8. Relaxor-ferroelectric superlattices: high energy density capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, N.; Kumar, A.; Scott, J. F.; Chrisey, Douglas B.; Tomazawa, M.; Kumari, Shalini; Diestra, D. G. B.; Katiyar, R. S.

    2012-11-01

    We report the breakdown electric field and energy density of laser ablated BaTiO3/Ba(1-x)SrxTiO3 (x = 0.7) (BT/BST) relaxor-ferroelectric superlattices (SLs) grown on (100) MgO single crystal substrates. The dielectric constant shows a frequency dispersion below the dielectric maximum temperature (Tm) with a merger above Tm behaving similarly to relaxors. It also follows the basic criteria of relaxor ferroelectrics such as low dielectric loss over wide temperature and frequency, and 50 K shift in Tm with change in probe frequency; the loss peaks follow a similar trend to the dielectric constant except that they increase with increase in frequency (˜40 kHz), and satisfy the nonlinear Vogel-Fulcher relation. Well-saturated ferroelectric hysteresis and 50-80% dielectric saturation are observed under high electric field (˜1.65 MV cm-1). The superlattices demonstrate an ‘in-built’ field in as grown samples at low probe frequency (<1 kHz), whereas it becomes more symmetric and centered with increase in the probe frequency system (>1 kHz) which rules out the effect of any space charge and interfacial polarization. The P-E loops show around 12.24 J cm-3 energy density within the experimental limit, but extrapolation of this data suggests that the potential energy density could reach 46 J cm-3. The current density versus applied electric field indicates an exceptionally high breakdown field (5.8-6.0 MV cm-1) and low current density (˜10-25 mA cm-2) near the breakdown voltage. The current-voltage characteristics reveal that the space charge limited conduction mechanism prevails at very high voltage.

  9. High energy density interpenetrating networks from ionic networks and silicone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liyun; Madsen, Frederikke B.; Hvilsted, Søren; Skov, Anne L.

    2015-04-01

    The energy density of dielectric elastomers (DEs) is sought increased for better exploitation of the DE technology since an increased energy density means that the driving voltage for a certain strain can be lowered in actuation mode or alternatively that more energy can be harvested in generator mode. One way to increase the energy density is to increase dielectric permittivity of the elastomer. A novel silicone elastomer system with high dielectric permittivity was prepared through the development of interpenetrating networks from ionically assembled silicone polymers and covalently crosslinked silicones. The system has many degrees of freedom since the ionic network is formed from two polymers (amine and carboxylic acid functional, respectively) of which the chain lengths can be varied, as well as the covalent silicone elastomer with many degrees of freedom arising from amongst many the varying content of silica particles. A parameter study is performed to elucidate which compositions are most favorable for the use as dielectric elastomers. The elastomers were furthermore shown to be self-repairing upon electrical breakdown.

  10. New potential high energy density compounds: Oxadiaziridine derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Chi, Wei-Jie

    2014-10-01

    The -CN, -N3, -NF2, -NH2, -NHNO2, -NO2, and -ONO2 derivatives of oxadiaziridine were studied using B3LYP/6-311G** level of density functional theory. The gas phase heats of formation of oxadiaziridine derivatives were calculated by isodesmic reaction. All these compounds have high and positive heats of formation due to strain energies of small ring. Detonation properties were calculated via Kamlet-Jacobes equations and specific impulse. The effects of substituent groups on detonation performance were discussed. The impact sensitivity was estimated according to the "available free space per molecule in unit cell" and "energy gaps" methods. The similar conclusions were given by two different methods. The effects of substituents on impact sensitivity were discussed. According to the given estimations of detonation performance and sensitivity, some oxadiaziridine derivatives may be considered promising high energies materials.

  11. X-ray Thomson scattering in high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Redmer, Ronald

    2009-10-15

    Accurate x-ray scattering techniques to measure the physical properties of dense plasmas have been developed for applications in high energy density physics. This class of experiments produces short-lived hot dense states of matter with electron densities in the range of solid density and higher where powerful penetrating x-ray sources have become available for probing. Experiments have employed laser-based x-ray sources that provide sufficient photon numbers in narrow bandwidth spectral lines, allowing spectrally resolved x-ray scattering measurements from these plasmas. The backscattering spectrum accesses the noncollective Compton scattering regime which provides accurate diagnostic information on the temperature, density, and ionization state. The forward scattering spectrum has been shown to measure the collective plasmon oscillations. Besides extracting the standard plasma parameters, density and temperature, forward scattering yields new observables such as a direct measure of collisions and quantum effects. Dense matter theory relates scattering spectra with the dielectric function and structure factors that determine the physical properties of matter. Applications to radiation-heated and shock-compressed matter have demonstrated accurate measurements of compression and heating with up to picosecond temporal resolution. The ongoing development of suitable x-ray sources and facilities will enable experiments in a wide range of research areas including inertial confinement fusion, radiation hydrodynamics, material science, or laboratory astrophysics.

  12. L. V. Al'tshuler, and High Energy Density Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Krikorian, Nerses H.; Keeler, R. Norris

    2012-03-01

    Knowledge of high energy densities critical to cosmology and astrophysics was achieved and exchanged among a very few scientists at a time when science was even more constrained by political considerations that it is today. Resources for the early studies necessarily involved atomic weaponry. A history of L. V. Al'tshuler and some others in his science is given in cosmological context. In the beginning of cosmology and the Universe, negative Fortov-Planck1 pressures c7h-1G-2 of 4.6 10115 Pa are overcome by inertial-vortex anti-gravity (dark energy) pressures to achieve a turbulent big bang and the first turbulent combustion with power 1066 watts at the Kolmogorov-Planck scale 10-35 meters. The big bang event ceased when negative- pressure gluon-viscous-forces extracted 10100 kg of mass-energy from the vacuum to produce the observed fossil vorticity turbulence Universe and its inflation with power 10145 watts.

  13. Combustion characteristics of high-energy/high-density hydrocarbon compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Segal, C.; Friedauer, M.J.; Udaykumar, H.S.; Shyy, W.

    1996-12-31

    The combustion characteristics of PCU Alkene Dimers (C{sub 22}H{sub 24}) are evaluated as solid fuels in high speed flows, at conditions typical for ramjet operation (i.e., Mach 0.25, stagnation temperature and pressure of 300 K and 150 kPa, respectively). Samples of the dimer are binded into a solid layer with a styrene-polybutadiene copolymer (8% w/w) on the test chamber wall and convectively ignited by a gaseous flame in air. The goals of this research are of both practical and fundamental relevance: (1) determine the ability of the high energy fuel to increase practical devices` performance, (2) quantify and improve the combustion characteristics of the alkene dimers (i.e., ignition, flame stability, particulate formation), (3) investigate the dynamics of the solid-gas interface combustion. To date, ignition times and rates of heat release were measured and the theoretical modelling was initiated. Preliminary results indicate that, in the present configuration, the dimer ignition times fall within the range reported in literature for other solid fuels. Large differences exist among different sets of data due primarily to nonsimilar geometrical configuration of the test. The dimer exhibits substantial rates of heat release in comparison with other solid fuels.

  14. Development of high energy density electrical double layer capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarajan, Thamarai selvi

    Electrochemical Double Layer capacitors (EDLCs) have shown themselves as a viable energy storage alternative. EDLCs have high power density, faster charge/discharge, wide operating temperature and long cycle life compared to batteries since it stores charge by physical separation. Despites all their advantages, their low energy density stand as a bottleneck for capacitors. This research aims to increase the energy density of EDLC without compromising the power density. Energy is proportional to the square of cell voltage. Cell voltage is mainly dependent on electrolyte breakdown. Electrolytes also provide ions for charge separation and conduction. Therefore various electrolytes (Solutes and Solvents) which can give high concentration, solubility and decomposition potential were characterized in the first part of the research. In that study, a novel ionic liquid OPBF4 had higher capacitance and comparable voltage window compared to commercial TEABF4 in Acetonitrile. However, the increased polarity of the fixed ring O-atom and the ion-ion interaction in OPBF4 was responsible for lowering its conductivity. Oxygenated ionic compounds with alkyl groups had lower stability due to beta elimination between two electron withdrawing atoms. Volume based thermodynamics and quantum chemical calculations were used to calculate ion size, HOMO/LUMO energies, and free energy changes and establish relationship with capacitance, redox potential and melting points respectively. In addition free energy of fusion was used to predict the melting point. Ion size had correlation with capacitance due to compact double layer formation. Free energy changes did not explain the differences in melting point and predicted dielectric constant was inconsistent with the polarity. This is presumably due to using Van der Waals volume instead of crystal structure volume and insufficient incorporation of polarization term. The HOMO/LUMO energies gave direct relation between oxidation and reduction

  15. Aromatic Polyurea Possessing High Electrical Energy Density and Low Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Yash; Lin, Minren; Wu, Shan; Zhang, Q. M.

    2016-10-01

    We report the development of a dielectric polymer, poly (ether methyl ether urea) (PEMEU), which possesses a dielectric constant of 4 and is thermally stable up to 150°C. The experimental results show that the ether units are effective in softening the rigid polymer and making it thermally processable, while the high dipole moment of urea units and glass structure of the polymer leads to a low dielectric loss and low conduction loss. As a result, PEMEU high quality thin films can be fabricated which exhibit exceptionally high breakdown field of >1.5 GV/m, and a low conduction loss at fields up to the breakdown. Consequently, the PEMEU films exhibit a high charge-discharge efficiency of 90% and a high discharged energy density of 36 J/cm3.

  16. Hydrodynamic Instabilities in High-Energy-Density Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Our understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities, in high-energy-density (HED) settings over past two decades has progressed enormously. The range of conditions where hydrodynamic instabilities are experimentally observed now includes direct and indirect drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) where surprises continue to emerge, linear and nonlinear regimes, classical interfaces vs. stabilized ablation fronts, tenuous ideal plasmas vs. high density Fermi degenerate plasmas, bulk fluid interpenetration vs. mixing down to the atomic level, in the presence of magnetic fields and/or intense radiation, and in solid state plastic flow at high pressures and strain rates. Regimes in ICF can involve extreme conditions of matter with temperatures up to kilovolts, densities of a thousand times solid densities, and time scales of nanoseconds. On the other hand, scaled conditions can be generated that map to exploding stars (supernovae) with length and time scales of millions of kilometers and hours to days or even years of instability evolution, planetary formation dynamics involving solid-state plastic flow which severely modifies the RT growth and continues to challenge reliable theoretical descriptions. This review will look broadly at progress in probing and understanding hydrodynamic instabilities in these very diverse HED settings, and then will examine a few cases in more depth to illustrate the detailed science involved. Experimental results on large-scale HED facilities such as the Omega, Nike, Gekko, and Shenguang lasers will be reviewed and the latest developments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Z machine will be covered. Finally, current overarching questions and challenges will be summarized to motivate research directions for future. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. High energy density capacitors using nano-structure multilayer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1992-08-01

    Today, many pulse power and industrial applications are limited by capacitor performance. While incremental improvements are anticipated from existing capacitor technologies, significant advances are needed in energy density to enable these applications for both the military and for American economic competitiveness. We propose a program to research and develop a novel technology for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Nano-structure multilayer technologies developed at LLNL may well provide a breakthrough in capacitor performance. Our controlled sputtering techniques are capable of laying down extraordinarily smooth sub-micron layers of dielectric and conductor materials. With this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density may be achievable. Well-understood dielectrics and new materials will be investigated for use with this technology. Capacitors developed by nano-structure multilayer technology are inherently solid state, exhibiting extraordinary mechanical and thermal properties. The conceptual design of a Notepad capacitor is discussed to illustrate capacitor and capacitor bank design and performance with this technology. We propose a two phase R&D program to address DNA`s capacitor needs for electro-thermal propulsion and similar pulse power programs. Phase 1 will prove the concept and further our understanding of dielectric materials and design tradeoffs with multilayers. Nano-structure multilayer capacitors will be developed and characterized. As our materials research and modeling prove successful, technology insertion in our capacitor designs will improve the possibility for dramatic performance improvements. In Phase 2, we will make Notepad capacitors, construct a capacitor bank and demonstrate its performance in a meaningful pulse power application. We will work with industrial partners to design full scale manufacturing and move this technology to industry for volume production.

  18. Develop and Perform Experiments for High Energy Density Implosion Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-20

    high energy density plasma implosion systems. In the area of laser-guided discharges the following tasks have been accomplished: a preliminary analysis of the laser-aerosol-air interactions, which are responsible for initiating laser breakdown, has been performed; and a detailed air chemistry code, CHMAIR, has been developed to follow the evolution of air plasmas created by CO2 lasers and other heating or ionization sources to determine their temperature and chemical composition. Simple hydrodynamic calculations have been performed to predict channel

  19. High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Katsouleas, T.

    2004-10-11

    The reported results and discussions in the Working Group on High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Concepts are summarized. The working group focused largely on laser-generated proton and ion beams from solid targets, but also considered laser vacuum acceleration results, active media accelerator proposals, ferroelectric-based accelerator technology advances and beam conditioning concepts for free electron lasers. The charge to the working group was to develop a laser-based proton injector exceeding current capabilities in at least one important parameter.

  20. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Shumlak, U. Golingo, R. P. Nelson, B. A. Bowers, C. A. Doty, S. A. Forbes, E. G. Hughes, M. C. Kim, B. Knecht, S. D. Lambert, K. K. Lowrie, W. Ross, M. P. Weed, J. R.

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and

  1. High Energy Density Science at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R W

    2007-10-19

    High energy density science (HEDS), as a discipline that has developed in the United States from National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA)-sponsored laboratory research programs, is, and will remain, a major component of the NNSA science and technology strategy. Its scientific borders are not restricted to NNSA. 'Frontiers in High Energy Density Physics: The X-Games of Contemporary Science' identified numerous exciting scientific opportunities in this field, while pointing to the need for a overarching interagency plan for its evolution. Meanwhile, construction of the first x-ray free-electron laser, the Office-of-Science-funded Linear Coherent Light Source-LCLS: the world's first free electron x-ray laser, with 100-fsec time resolution, tunable x-ray energies, a high rep rate, and a 10 order-of-magnitude increase in brightness over any other x-ray source--led to the realization that the scientific needs of NNSA and the broader scientific community could be well served by an LCLS HEDS endstation employing both short-pulse and high-energy optical lasers. Development of this concept has been well received in the community. NNSA requested a workshop on the applicability of LCLS to its needs. 'High Energy Density Science at the LCLS: NNSA Defense Programs Mission Need' was held in December 2006. The workshop provided strong support for the relevance of the endstation to NNSA strategic requirements. The range of science that was addressed covered a wide swath of the vast HEDS phase space. The unique possibilities provided by the LCLS in areas of intense interest to NNSA Defense Programs were discussed. The areas of focus included warm dense matter and equations of state, hot dense matter, and behavior of high-pressure materials under conditions of high strain-rate and extreme dynamic loading. Development of new and advanced diagnostic techniques was also addressed. This report lays out the relevant science, as brief summaries (Ch. II), expanded descriptions (Ch. V), and a

  2. Nuclear isomers as ultra-high-energy-density materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, C. H.; Weiss, M. S.; Anderson, J. D.

    1992-09-01

    A major energy advance could result if the enormous potential of nuclear energy storage could be tapped without the penalty of radioactive by-products. Recent research has uncovered a new method for nuclear energy storage with high energy density and no residual radioactivity. Nuclear isomers are metastable states of atomic nuclei which release their energy in a prompt burst of electromagnetic radiation; in many cases the product remaining after decay of isomer is stable and no activity is produced by the electromagnetic decay. Two kinds of nuclear isomers are known: spin isomers and shape isomers. The former lacks a release mechanism. Theory has predicted the existence of shape isomers in the mass range around mercury and gold where decay by fission is prohibited. Experiments on the existence of fissionless shape isomers have resulted in evidence for 27 different shape isomers in isotopes of mercury, lead, and thallium. Three potential candidates for release mechanisms have been identified to date: neutron catalysis (Hf- 178), laser-electron-nuclear coupling (Th-229), and Stark-shift-induced mixing (speculative). Ways of producing nonfissioning shape isomers are discussed.

  3. High-Energy-Density Physics, with Applications to Astrophysics*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, Bruce A.

    2002-04-01

    High-energy-density (HED) physics broadly refers to the study of collections of matter under extreme conditions of pressure, temperature, and density. The experimental facilities used for these studies are high power lasers, magnetic pinch generators, and charged particle beams. The HED physics pursued on these facilities is still in its infancy, yet a broad user community has nucleated, and new regimes of experimental science are emerging. [1, 2] Examples drawn from astrophysics include work relevant to supernovae and supernova remnants, astrophysical jets, radiatively driven molecular clouds, accreting black holes, planetary interiors, and gamma-ray bursts. A selection of science highlights in this field from the past decade will be reviewed, and a look ahead to the coming decade will be given. *This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48. 1. B.A. Remington, D. Arnett, R.P. Drake, and H. Takabe, Science 284, 1488 (1999); Phys. Plasmas 7, 1641 (2000). 2. Hideaki Takabe, Prog. Theor. Phys. Suppl. 143, 202 (2001).

  4. Strongly Interacting Matter at Very High Energy Density

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.

    2011-06-05

    The authors discuss the study of matter at very high energy density. In particular: what are the scientific questions; what are the opportunities to makes significant progress in the study of such matter and what facilities are now or might be available in the future to answer the scientific questions? The theoretical and experimental study of new forms of high energy density matter is still very much a 'wild west' field. There is much freedom for developing new concepts which can have order one effects on the way we think about such matter. It is also a largely 'lawless' field, in that concepts and methods are being developed as new information is generated. There is also great possibility for new experimental discovery. Most of the exciting results from RHIC experiments were unanticipated. The methods used for studying various effects like flow, jet quenching, the ridge, two particle correlations etc. were developed as experiments evolved. I believe this will continue to be the case at LHC and as we use existing and proposed accelerators to turn theoretical conjecture into tangible reality. At some point this will no doubt evolve into a precision science, and that will make the field more respectable, but for my taste, the 'wild west' times are the most fun.

  5. Laser-Plasma Interactions in High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baldis, H

    2006-10-17

    High temperature hohlraums (HTH) are designed to reach high radiation temperatures by coupling a maximum amount of laser energy into a small target in a short time. These 400-800 {micro}m diameter gold cylinders rapidly fill with hot plasma during irradiation with multiple beams in 1ns laser pulses. The high-Z plasmas are dense, (electron density, n{sub e}/n{sub c} {approx} 0.1-0.4), hot (electron temperature, T{sub e} {approx} 10keV) and are bathed in a high-temperature radiation field (radiation temperature, T{sub rad} {approx} 300eV). Here n{sub c}, the critical density, equals 9 x 10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3}. The laser beams heating this plasma are intense ({approx} 10{sup 15} - 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}). The coupling of the laser to the plasma is a rich regime for Laser-Plasma Interaction (LPI) physics. The LPI mechanisms in this study include beam deflection and forward scattering. In order to understand the LPI mechanisms, the plasma parameters must be known. An L-band spectrometer is used to measure the and electron temperature. A ride-along experiment is to develop the x-radiation emitted by the thin back wall of the half-hohlraum into a thermal radiation source.

  6. Diagnostics for ion beam driven high energy density physics experiments.

    PubMed

    Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Lidia, S; Ni, P A

    2010-10-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30 mA K(+) beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  7. DIAGNOSTICS FOR ION BEAM DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P.A.

    2010-01-04

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K{sup +} beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (VISAR), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  8. Diagnostics for ion beam driven high energy density physics experimentsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P. A.

    2010-10-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30 mA K+ beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  9. Diagnostic Spectrometers for High Energy Density X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, L. T.; Henins, A.; Seely, J. F.; Holland, G. E.

    2007-08-01

    A new generation of advanced laser, accelerator, and plasma confinement devices are emerging that are producing extreme states of light and matter that are unprecedented for laboratory study. Examples of such sources that will produce laboratory x-ray emissions with unprecedented characteristics include megajoule-class and ultrafast, ultraintense petawatt laser-produced plasmas; tabletop high-harmonic-generation x-ray sources; high-brightness zeta-pinch and magnetically confined plasma sources; and coherent x-ray free electron lasers and compact inverse-Compton x-ray sources. Characterizing the spectra, time structure, and intensity of x rays emitted by these and other novel sources is critical to assessing system performance and progress as well as pursuing the new and unpredictable physical interactions of interest to basic and applied high-energy-density (HED) science. As these technologies mature, increased emphasis will need to be placed on advanced diagnostic instrumentation and metrology, standard reference data, absolute calibrations and traceability of results. We are actively designing, fabricating, and fielding wavelength-calibrated x-ray spectrometers that have been employed to register spectra from a variety of exotic x-ray sources (electron beam ion trap, electron cyclotron resonance ion source, terawatt pulsed-power-driven accelerator, laser-produced plasmas). These instruments employ a variety of curved-crystal optics, detector technologies, and data acquisition strategies. In anticipation of the trends mentioned above, this paper will focus primarily on optical designs that can accommodate the high background signals produced in HED experiments while also registering their high-energy spectral emissions. In particular, we review the results of recent laboratory testing that explores off-Rowland circle imaging in an effort to reclaim the instrumental resolving power that is increasingly elusive at higher energies when using wavelength

  10. Frontiers in plasma science: a high energy density perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    The potential for ground-breaking research in plasma physics in high energy density (HED) regimes is compelling. The combination of HED facilities around the world spanning microjoules to megajoules, with time scales ranging from femtoseconds to microseconds enables new regimes of plasma science to be experimentally probed. The ability to shock and ramp compress samples and simultaneously probe them allows dense, strongly coupled, Fermi degenerate plasmas relevant to planetary interiors to be studied. Shock driven hydrodynamic instabilities evolving into turbulent flows relevant to the dynamics of exploding stars are being probed. The physics and dynamics of magnetized plasmas relevant to astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion are also starting to be studied. High temperature, high velocity interacting flows are being probed for evidence of astrophysical collisionless shock formation. Turbulent, high magnetic Reynolds number flows are being experimentally generated to look for evidence of the turbulent magnetic dynamo effect. And new results from thermonuclear reactions in dense hot plasmas relevant to stellar interiors are starting to emerge. A selection of examples providing a compelling vision for frontier plasma science in the coming decade will be presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Stability of Magnetically Implode Liners for High Energy Density Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Reinovsky, R.E.; Anderson, W.E.; Atchison, W.L.; Bartsch, R.R.; Clark, D.A.; Ekdahl, C.E.; Faehl, R.J.; Goforth, J.H.; Keinigs, R.K.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Morgan, D.; Rodriguez, G.; Tasker, D.G.; Trainor, R.J.; Shlachter, J.S.

    1998-10-18

    Magnetically imploded cylindrical metal shells (z-pinch liners) are attractive drivers for a wide variety of hydrodynamics and material properties experiments. The ultimate utility of liners depends on the acceleration of near-solid density shells to velocities exceeding 20 km/sec with good azimuthal symmetry and axial uniformity. Two pulse power systems (Ranchero and Atlas) currently operational or under development at Los Alamos provide electrical energy adequate to accelerate {approximately}50 gr. liners to 1-2 MJ/cm kinetic energy. As in all z-pinches, the outer surface of a magnetically imploded liner is unstable to magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) modes during acceleration. Large-scale distortion in the liners from RT modes growing from glide plane interactions or initial imperfections could make liners unusable for man experiments. On the other hand, material strength in the liner should, from first principles, reduce the growth rate of RT modes - and can render some combinations of wavelength and amplitude analytically stable. The growth of instabilities in both soft aluminum liners and in high strength aluminum alloy liners has been studied analytically, computationally and experimentally at liner kinetic energies up to 100 KJ/cm on the Pegasus capacitor bank using driving currents up to 12 MA.

  12. Sodium pentazolate: A nitrogen rich high energy density material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Brad A.; Oleynik, Ivan I.

    2016-01-01

    Sodium pentazolates NaN5 and Na2N5, new high energy density materials, are discovered during first principles crystal structure search for the compounds of varying amounts of elemental sodium and nitrogen. The pentazole anion (N5-) is stabilized in the condensed phase by sodium Na+ cations at pressures exceeding 20 GPa, and becomes metastable upon release of pressure. The sodium azide (NaN3) precursor is predicted to undergo a chemical transformation above 50 GPa into sodium pentazolates NaN5 and Na2N5. The calculated Raman spectrum of NaN5 is in agreement with the experimental Raman spectrum of a previously unidentified substance appearing upon compression and heating of NaN3.

  13. Ammonia-(Dinitramido)boranes: High-Energy-Density Materials.

    PubMed

    Bélanger-Chabot, Guillaume; Rahm, Martin; Haiges, Ralf; Christe, Karl O

    2015-09-28

    Two ammonia-(dinitramido)boranes were synthesized by the reaction of dinitroamine with ammonia-borane. These compounds are the first reported examples of (dinitramido)boranes. Ammonia-mono(dinitramido)borane is a perfectly oxygen-balanced high-energy-density material (HEDM) composed of an ammonia-BH2 fuel group and a strongly oxidizing dinitramido ligand. Although it is thermally not stable enough for practical applications, its predicted specific impulse as a solid rocket propellant would be 333 s. Its predicted performance as an explosive matches that of pentaerythtritol tetranitrate (PETN) and significantly exceeds that of trinitrotoluene (TNT). Its structure was established by X-ray crystallography and vibrational and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. Additionally, the over-oxidized ammoniabis(dinitramido)borane was detected by NMR spectroscopy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Bruce R. Kusse; Professor David A. Hammer

    2007-04-18

    This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.

  15. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  16. Average transverse momentum and energy density in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Emulsion chambers were used to measure the transverse momenta of photons or pi(0) mesons produced in high-energy cosmic-ray nucleus-nucleus collisions. A group of events having large average transverse momenta has been found which apparently exceeds the expected limiting values. Analysis of the events at early interaction times, of the order of 1 fm/c, indicates that the observed transverse momentum increases with both rapidity density and energy density.

  17. Average transverse momentum and energy density in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Emulsion chambers were used to measure the transverse momenta of photons or pi(0) mesons produced in high-energy cosmic-ray nucleus-nucleus collisions. A group of events having large average transverse momenta has been found which apparently exceeds the expected limiting values. Analysis of the events at early interaction times, of the order of 1 fm/c, indicates that the observed transverse momentum increases with both rapidity density and energy density.

  18. THE IRON OPACITY PROJECT: High-Energy-Density Plasma Opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palay, E.; Orban, C.; Nahar, S.; Pradhan, A.; Pinnsonoault, M.; Bailey, J.

    2013-05-01

    Opacity governs radiation flow in plasma sources. Accurate opacities are needed to model unobservable laboratory and astrophysical conditions. High-energy-density (HED) plasma conditions prevalent in stellar interiors can now be recreated in the laboratory. The Z-pinch fusion device at the Sandia National Lab can reproduce temperatures and densities near the boundary where radiation transport changes from diffusion to convection inside the Sun. To benchmark theoretical opacities experiments are essential to resolve the outstanding discrepancy in solar abundances. The most common volatile elements C, N, O, Ne, etc. have been spectroscopically measured to be up to 50% lower than the standard abundances. This introduces conflict in the derived values of basic solar parameters such as the radiation/convection boundary, sound speed, and the primordial He abundance with precisely measured oscillations of the Sun through Helioseismology. A potential solution is increment of stellar opacities, which has inverse but complex relation with abundacnes, at least 30%. New iron opacity calculations include hitherto neglected atomic physics of fine structure and resonances which are largely treated as lines in existing opacities calculations. Preliminary results on radiative transitions in Ne Partial support: DOE,NSF.

  19. High energy density physics issues related to Future Circular Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Wollmann, D.; Piriz, A. R.

    2017-07-01

    A design study for a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator named, Future Circular Collider (FCC), is being carried out by the International Scientific Community. A complete design report is expected to be ready by spring 2018. The FCC will accelerate two counter rotating beams of 50 TeV protons in a tunnel having a length (circumference) of 100 km. Each beam will be comprised of 10 600 proton bunches, with each bunch having an intensity of 1011 protons. The bunch length is of 0.5 ns, and two neighboring bunches are separated by 25 ns. Although there is an option for 5 ns bunch separation as well, in the present studies, we consider the former case only. The total energy stored in each FCC beam is about 8.5 GJ, which is equivalent to the kinetic energy of Airbus 380 (560 t) flying at a speed of 850 km/h. Machine protection is a very important issue while operating with such powerful beams. It is important to have an estimate of the damage caused to the equipment and accelerator components due to the accidental release of a partial or total beam at a given point. For this purpose, we carried out numerical simulations of full impact of one FCC beam on an extended solid copper target. These simulations have been done employing an energy deposition code, FLUKA, and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code, BIG2, iteratively. This study shows that although the static range of a single FCC proton and its shower is about 1.5 m in solid copper, the entire beam will penetrate around 350 m into the target. This substantial increase in the range is due to the hydrodynamic tunneling of the beam. Our calculations also show that a large part of the target will be converted into high energy density matter including warm dense matter and strongly coupled plasmas.

  20. Generation of Gigabar Pressures for High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theobald, W.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Mangino, D.; Casner, A.; Beg, F. N.; Llor Aisa, E.; Ribeyre, X.; Wei, M. S.; Schoff, M. E.; Florido, R.; Mancini, R. C.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments on the OMEGA laser were performed to study gigabar pressures in small (50- μm-diam) Ti and Cu target samples for high-energy-density plasma applications. The samples were precisely placed (better than 10 μm) at the center of a spherical plastic matrix that is irradiated at incident laser intensities of 5 ×1015 W /cm2 . The laser launches a spherical shock wave that converges in the center in order to reach Gbar pressures in the sample. The shock convergence produces a short burst ( 30ps) of x-ray emission. Time-resolved and time-integrated x-ray spectroscopy provides the means to diagnose the plasma conditions in the sample. The time-resolved spectra are compared to predictions from radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to infer the material conditions at Gbar pressures. A second x-ray flash delayed by 600ps caused by the breakout of the rebounded shock through the outer surface of the compressed plastic was observed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and by the Fusion Science Center under Grant No. DE-FC02-04ER54789.

  1. Metrology Challenges for High Energy Density Science Target Manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Seugling, R M; Bono, M J; Davis, P

    2009-02-19

    Currently, High Energy Density Science (HEDS) experiments are used to support and qualify predictive physics models. These models assume ideal conditions such as energy (input) and device (target) geometry. The experiments rely on precision targets constructed from components with dimensions in the millimeter range, while having micrometer-scale, functional features, including planar steps, sine waves, and step-joint geometry on hemispherical targets. Future target designs will likely have features and forms that rival or surpass current manufacturing and characterization capability. The dimensional metrology of these features is important for a number of reasons, including qualification of sub-components prior to assembly, quantification of critical features on the as-built assemblies and as a feedback mechanism for fabrication process development. Variations in geometry from part to part can lead to functional limitations, such as unpredictable instabilities during an experiment and the inability to assemble a target from poorly matched sub-components. Adding to the complexity are the large number and variety of materials, components, and shapes that render any single metrology technique difficult to use with low uncertainty. Common materials include metal and glass foams, doped transparent and opaque plastics and a variety of deposited and wrought metals. A suite of metrology tools and techniques developed to address the many critical issues relevant to the manufacture of HEDS targets including interferometry, x-ray radiography and contact metrology are presented including two sided interferometry for absolute thickness metrology and low force probe technology for micrometer feature coordinate metrology.

  2. Ferroelectric polymer networks with high energy density and improved discharged efficiency for dielectric energy storage.

    PubMed

    Khanchaitit, Paisan; Han, Kuo; Gadinski, Matthew R; Li, Qi; Wang, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Ferroelectric polymers are being actively explored as dielectric materials for electrical energy storage applications. However, their high dielectric constants and outstanding energy densities are accompanied by large dielectric loss due to ferroelectric hysteresis and electrical conduction, resulting in poor charge-discharge efficiencies under high electric fields. To address this long-standing problem, here we report the ferroelectric polymer networks exhibiting significantly reduced dielectric loss, superior polarization and greatly improved breakdown strength and reliability, while maintaining their fast discharge capability at a rate of microseconds. These concurrent improvements lead to unprecedented charge-discharge efficiencies and large values of the discharged energy density and also enable the operation of the ferroelectric polymers at elevated temperatures, which clearly outperforms the melt-extruded ferroelectric polymer films that represents the state of the art in dielectric polymers. The simplicity and scalability of the described method further suggest their potential for high energy density capacitors.

  3. Plasma polymerized high energy density dielectric films for capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamagishi, F. G.

    1983-01-01

    High energy density polymeric dielectric films were prepared by plasma polymerization of a variety of gaseous monomers. This technique gives thin, reproducible, pinhole free, conformable, adherent, and insoluble coatings and overcomes the processing problems found in the preparation of thin films with bulk polymers. Thus, devices are prepared completely in a vacuum environment. The plasma polymerized films prepared all showed dielectric strengths of greater than 1000 kV/cm and in some cases values of greater than 4000 kV/cm were observed. The dielectric loss of all films was generally less than 1% at frequencies below 10 kHz, but this value increased at higher frequencies. All films were self healing. The dielectric strength was a function of the polymerization technique, whereas the dielectric constant varied with the structure of the starting material. Because of the thin films used (thickness in the submicron range) surface smoothness of the metal electrodes was found to be critical in obtaining high dielectric strengths. High dielectric strength graft copolymers were also prepared. Plasma polymerized ethane was found to be thermally stable up to 150 C in the presence of air and 250 C in the absence of air. No glass transitions were observed for this material.

  4. Creating high energy density in nuclei with energetic antiparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of creating a phase change in nuclear matter using energetic antiprotons and antideuterons is examined. It is found that energy densities of the order of 2 GeV/c can be obtained for periods of approx.2 fm/c with the proper experimental selection of events. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  5. A high energy-density nickel-hydrogen battery design

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.

    1982-09-01

    A light-weight Ni-H/sub 2/ battery design concept (projected energy-density 46.7 Whr/Kg or 21.2 Whr/Lb) suitable for immediate or near-term spacecraft integration is described. The proposed design does not violate proven and qualified design concepts, or critical electrochemical component designs or functions.

  6. High field tunneling as a limiting factor of maximum energy density in dielectric energy storage capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qin; Wang, Yong; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, Shihai

    2008-04-01

    In several low loss dielectric materials, it was observed that the energy loss remains very small under low and medium electric fields but dramatically increases at high field which is believed to be due to tunneling current. The increase of tunneling current at high field is due to the decrease of barrier width and height and is a universal phenomenon in all dielectric materials. Due to the requirement of high energy efficiency, high field conduction places a limit for the maximum operation field, which could be lower than the breakdown field and act as the limiting factor of energy density.

  7. Characterizing high-energy-density propellants for space propulsion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokan, Timothy

    There exists wide ranging research interest in high-energy-density matter (HEDM) propellants as a potential replacement for existing industry standard fuels for liquid rocket engines. The U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army Research Lab, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and the NASA Glenn Research Center each either recently concluded or currently has ongoing programs in the synthesis and development of these potential new propellants. In order to perform conceptual designs using these new propellants, most conceptual rocket engine powerhead design tools (e.g. NPSS, ROCETS, and REDTOP-2) require several thermophysical properties of a given propellant over a wide range of temperature and pressure. These properties include enthalpy, entropy, density, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. Very little thermophysical property data exists for most of these potential new HEDM propellants. Experimental testing of these properties is both expensive and time consuming and is impractical in a conceptual vehicle design environment. A new technique for determining these thermophysical properties of potential new rocket engine propellants is presented. The technique uses a combination of three different computational methods to determine these properties. Quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics are used to model new propellants at a molecular level in order to calculate density, enthalpy, and entropy. Additivity methods are used to calculate the kinematic viscosity and thermal conductivity of new propellants. This new technique is validated via a series of verification experiments of HEDM compounds. Results are provided for two HEDM propellants: quadricyclane and 2-azido-N,N-dimethylethanamine (DMAZ). In each case, the new technique does a better job than the best current computational methods at accurately matching the experimental data of the HEDM compounds of interest. A case study is provided to help quantify the vehicle level impacts of using HEDM

  8. Atlas Pulsed Power Facility for High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Barr, G.W.; Bowman, D.W.; Chochrane, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Elizondo, J.M.; Gribble, R.F.; Griego, J.R.; Hicks, R.D.; Hinckley, W.B.; Hosack, K.W.; Nielsen, K.E.; Parker, J.V.; Parsons, M.O.; Rickets, R.L.; Salazar, H.R.; Sanchez, P.G.; Scudder, D.W.; Shapiro, C.; Thompson, M.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Valdez, G.A.; Vigil, B.N.; Watt, R.G.; Wysock, F.J.

    1999-06-07

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. It is intended to be an international user facility, providing opportunities for researchers from national laboratories and academic institutions around the world. Emphasizing institutions around the world. Emphasizing hydrodynamic experiments, Atlas will provide the capability for achieving steady shock pressures exceeding 10-Mbar in a volume of several cubic centimeters. In addition, the kinetic energy associated with solid liner implosion velocities exceeding 12 km/s is sufficient to drive dense, hydrodynamic targets into the ionized regime, permitting the study of complex issues associated with strongly-coupled plasmas. The primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently-removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-{micro}s risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line components has been completed. A complete maintenance module and its associated transmission line (the First Article) are now under construction and testing. The current Atlas schedule calls for construction of the machine to be complete by August, 2000. Acceptance testing is scheduled to begin in November, 2000, leading to initial operations in January, 2001.

  9. Upgrading of biorenewables to high energy density fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John C; Batista, Enrique R; Chen, Weizhong; Currier, Robert P; Dirmyer, Matthew R; John, Kevin D; Kim, Jin K; Keith, Jason; Martin, Richard L; Pierpont, Aaron W; Silks Ill, L. A. "" Pete; Smythe, Mathan C; Sutton, Andrew D; Taw, Felicia L; Trovitch, Ryan J; Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Waidmann, Christopher R; Wu, Ruilian; Baker, R. Thomas; Schlaf, Marcel

    2010-12-07

    According to a recent report, lignocellulose is the most abundant renewable biological resource on earth, with an annual production of {approx} 200 x 10{sup 9} tons. Conversion of lignocellulosics derived from wood, agricultural wastes, and woody grasses into liquid fuels and value-added chemical feedstocks is an active area of research that has seen an explosion of effort due to the need to replace petroleum based sources. The carbohydrates D-glucose (C{sub 6}), L-arabinose (C{sub 5}), and D-xylose (C{sub 5}) are readily obtained from the hydrolysis of lignocellulose and constitute the most abundant renewable organic carbon source on the planet. Because they are naturally produced on such a large scale, these sugars have the greatest potential to displace petrochemical derived transportation fuel. Recent efforts in our laboratories aimed towards the production of high energy density transportation fuels from carbohydrates have been structured around the parameters of selective carbohydrate carbon chain extension chemistries, low reaction temperatures, and the desired use of water or neat substrate as the solvent. Some of our efforts in this regard will be presented.

  10. Improving Robotic Assembly of Planar High Energy Density Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudt, D.; Carlson, L.; Alexander, N.; Boehm, K.

    2016-10-01

    Increased quantities of planar assemblies for high energy density targets are needed with higher shot rates being implemented at facilities such as the National Ignition Facility and the Matter in Extreme Conditions station of the Linac Coherent Light Source. To meet this growing demand, robotics are used to reduce assembly time. This project studies how machine vision and force feedback systems can be used to improve the quantity and quality of planar target assemblies. Vision-guided robotics can identify and locate parts, reducing laborious manual loading of parts into precision pallets and associated teaching of locations. On-board automated inspection can measure part pickup offsets to correct part drop-off placement into target assemblies. Force feedback systems can detect pickup locations and apply consistent force to produce more uniform glue bond thickness, thus improving the performance of the targets. System designs and performance evaluations will be presented. Work supported in part by the US DOE under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI) and ICF Target Fabrication DE-NA0001808.

  11. Flexible asymmetric supercapacitors with high energy and high power density in aqueous electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yingwen; Zhang, Hongbo; Lu, Songtao; Varanasi, Chakrapani V; Liu, Jie

    2013-02-07

    Supercapacitors with both high energy and high power densities are critical for many practical applications. In this paper, we discuss the design and demonstrate the fabrication of flexible asymmetric supercapacitors based on nanocomposite electrodes of MnO(2), activated carbon, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The combined unique properties of each of these components enable highly flexible and mechanically strong films that can serve as electrodes directly without using any current collectors or binders. Using these flexible electrodes and a roll-up approach, asymmetric supercapacitors with 2 V working voltage were successfully fabricated. The fabricated device showed excellent rate capability, with 78% of the original capacitance retained when the scan rate was increased from 2 mV s(-1) to 500 mV s(-1). Owing to the unique composite structure, these supercapacitors were able to deliver high energy density (24 W h kg(-1)) under high power density (7.8 kW kg(-1)) conditions. These features could enable supercapacitor based energy storage systems to be very attractive for a variety of critical applications, such as the power sources in hybrid electric vehicles and the back-up powers for wind and solar energy, where both high energy density and high power density are required.

  12. High Volumetric Energy Density Hybrid Supercapacitors Based on Reduced Graphene Oxide Scrolls.

    PubMed

    Rani, Janardhanan R; Thangavel, Ranjith; Oh, Se-I; Woo, Jeong Min; Chandra Das, Nayan; Kim, So-Yeon; Lee, Yun-Sung; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2017-07-12

    The low volumetric energy density of reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-based electrodes limits its application in commercial electrochemical energy storage devices that require high-performance energy storage capacities in small volumes. The volumetric energy density of rGO-based electrode materials is very low due to their low packing density. A supercapacitor with enhanced packing density and high volumetric energy density is fabricated using doped rGO scrolls (GFNSs) as the electrode material. The restacking of rGO sheets is successfully controlled through synthesizing the doped scroll structures while increasing the packing density. The fabricated cell exhibits an ultrahigh volumetric energy density of 49.66 Wh/L with excellent cycling stability (>10 000 cycles). This unique design strategy for the electrode material has significant potential for the future supercapacitors with high volumetric energy densities.

  13. TEMPO-based catholyte for high-energy density nonaqueous redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xu, Wu; Vijayakumar, Murugesan; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Liu, Tianbiao; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2014-12-03

    A TEMPO-based non-aqueous electrolyte with the TEMPO concentration as high as 2.0 m is demonstrated as a high-energy-density catholyte for redox flow battery applications. With a hybrid anode, Li|TEMPO flow cells using this electrolyte deliver an energy efficiency of ca. 70% and an impressively high energy density of 126 W h L(-1) .

  14. High Energy Density Rechargeable Batteries for Aerospace Power Requirements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-03

    Density Fuel Cells Spacecraft Power Requirements 4 -1 1 -. I i 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) The power...fuel cell technologies that are expected to be available for these missions are identified, and areas of technology development that will be required for...regenerative fuel cell is best suited to satisfying the high peak power needs in large power systems, but must undergo significant development to obtain the

  15. Density Functional Theory in High Energy Density Physics: phase-diagram and electrical conductivity of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Thomas R.

    2007-06-01

    Atomistic simulations employing Density Functional Theory (DFT) have recently emerged as a powerful way of increasing our understanding of materials and processes in high energy density physics. Knowledge of the properties of water (equation of state, electrical conductivity, diffusion, low-energy opacity) is essential for correctly describing the physics of giant planets as well as shock waves in water. Although a qualitative picture of water electrical conductivity has emerged, the necessary quantitative information is scarce over a wide range of temperature and density. Since experiments can only access certain areas of phase space, and often require modeling as a part of the analysis, Quantum Molecular Dynamics simulations play a vital role. Using finite-temperature density functional theory (FT-DFT), we have investigated the structure and electronic conductivity of water across three phase transitions (molecular liquid/ ionic liquid/ superionic/ electronic liquid). The ionic contribution to the conduction is calculated from proton diffusion and the electronic contribution is calculated using the Kubo-Greenwood formula. The calculations are performed with VASP, a plane-wave pseudo-potential code. There is a rapid transition to ionic conduction at 2000 K and 2 g/cm^3, whereas electronic conduction dominates at temperatures at and above 6000 K&[tilde;1]. Contrary to earlier results using the Car-Parrinello method&[tilde;2], we predict that the fluid bordering the superionic phase is conducting above 4000 K and 100 GPa. Our comprehensive use of FT-DFT explains the new findings. The calculated conductivity is compared to experimental data. I gratefully acknowledge Mike Desjarlais, my collaborator in this effort. The LDRD office at Sandia supported this work. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL

  16. High Energy Density Physics:. the Laser Field of Tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Richard R.

    2013-03-01

    Ever since its invention, the laser has become an increasingly important tool for physics research. Indeed, the laser has made it possible to not only study many extant physical phenomena, but also to actually produce matter in conditions that don't exist in nature, or more precisely, don't exist on the earth. In this lecture, I discuss how the development of lasers that produce ultra-short (˜fsec) and ultra-intense (≥1020 W/cm2) laser pulses actually produce plasmas that are at a density and temperature that exist only in stars. In doing so I discuss some of the basics of these extreme pulses interacting with electrons, yielding surprisingly intriguing physical phenomena. Finally, I argue that this field is an essential element in any comprehensive physical research endeavor, explicitly citing its fundamental relationship with the development of clean, unlimited fusion energy power.

  17. Fabrication and demonstration of high energy density lithium ion microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ke

    density on a limited footprint area. In chapter 4, Li-ion batteries based on the LiMn2O4-TiP 2O7 couple are manufactured on flexible paper substrates; where the use of light-weight paper substrates significantly increase the gravimetric energy density of this electrode couple as compared to traditional metal current collectors. In chapter 5, a novel nanowire growth mechanism will be explored to grow interdigitated metal oxide nanowire micro battery electrodes. The growth kinetics of this mechanism is systematically studied to understand how to optimize the growth process to produce electrodes with improved electrochemical properties.

  18. X-ray spectroscopy for high energy-density X pinch density and temperature measurements (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, S.A.; Shelkovenko, T.A.; Chandler, K.M.; Mitchell, M.D.; Hammer, D.A.; Skobelev, I.Y.; Shlyaptseva, A.S.; Hansen, S.B.

    2004-10-01

    X pinch plasmas produced from fine metal wires can reach near solid densities and temperatures of 1 keV or even more. Plasma conditions change on time scales as short as 5-10 ps as determined using an x-ray streak camera viewing a focusing crystal spectrograph or directly viewing the plasma through multiple filters on a single test. As a result, it is possible to determine plasma conditions from spectra with {approx}10 ps time resolution. Experiments and theory are now coming together to give a consistent picture of the dynamics and kinetics of these high energy density plasmas with very high temporal and spatial precision. A set of diagnostic techniques used in experiments for spectrally, temporally, and spatially resolved measurements of X pinch plasmas is described. Results of plasma parameter determination from these measurements are presented. X ray backlighting of one x-pinch by another with {approx}30 ps x-ray pulses enables the dynamics and kinetics to be correlated in time.

  19. Synthesis of Novel High Energy Density Materials Using Nitrocarbenes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-21

    accomplished starting with pentaerythritol which costs $10 per kilogram. The synthesis is shown below. While several grams of 14 were prepared, none of this...AD-A248 465 AO PAGE ft 07ŕ Februa re 21 , 992uq" Final~o Repotm 8//9 -12319 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNOING NUMBERS Synthesis of Novel High Energy...theory to predict the structures and energies of potential energetic molecules and to guide the synthesis of the more promising candidate molecules, 2

  20. High energy density in the collision of N kinks in the ϕ4 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjaneh, Aliakbar Moradi; Saadatmand, Danial; Zhou, Kun; Dmitriev, Sergey V.; Zomorrodian, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2017-08-01

    Recently for the sine-Gordon equation it has been established that during collisions of N slow kinks maximal energy density increases as N2. In this numerical study, the same scaling rule is established for the non-integrable ϕ4 model for N ≤ 5. For odd (even) N the maximal energy density is in the form of potential (kinetic) energy density. Maximal elastic strain is also calculated. In addition, the effect of the kink's internal modes on the maximal energy density is analysed for N = 1 , 2, and 3. Our results suggest that in multi-soliton collisions very high energy density can be achieved in a controllable manner.

  1. Toward Low-Cost, High-Energy Density, and High-Power Density Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianlin; Du, Zhijia; Ruther, Rose E.; AN, Seong Jin; David, Lamuel Abraham; Hays, Kevin; Wood, Marissa; Phillip, Nathan D.; Sheng, Yangping; Mao, Chengyu; Kalnaus, Sergiy; Daniel, Claus; Wood, David L.

    2017-06-01

    Reducing cost and increasing energy density are two barriers for widespread application of lithium-ion batteries in electric vehicles. Although the cost of electric vehicle batteries has been reduced by 70% from 2008 to 2015, the current battery pack cost (268/kWh in 2015) is still >2 times what the USABC targets (125/kWh). Even though many advancements in cell chemistry have been realized since the lithium-ion battery was first commercialized in 1991, few major breakthroughs have occurred in the past decade. Therefore, future cost reduction will rely on cell manufacturing and broader market acceptance. This article discusses three major aspects for cost reduction: (1) quality control to minimize scrap rate in cell manufacturing; (2) novel electrode processing and engineering to reduce processing cost and increase energy density and throughputs; and (3) material development and optimization for lithium-ion batteries with high-energy density. Insights on increasing energy and power densities of lithium-ion batteries are also addressed.

  2. Toward Low-Cost, High-Energy Density, and High-Power Density Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianlin; Du, Zhijia; Ruther, Rose E.; AN, Seong Jin; David, Lamuel Abraham; Hays, Kevin; Wood, Marissa; Phillip, Nathan D.; Sheng, Yangping; Mao, Chengyu; Kalnaus, Sergiy; Daniel, Claus; Wood, David L.

    2017-09-01

    Reducing cost and increasing energy density are two barriers for widespread application of lithium-ion batteries in electric vehicles. Although the cost of electric vehicle batteries has been reduced by 70% from 2008 to 2015, the current battery pack cost (268/kWh in 2015) is still >2 times what the USABC targets (125/kWh). Even though many advancements in cell chemistry have been realized since the lithium-ion battery was first commercialized in 1991, few major breakthroughs have occurred in the past decade. Therefore, future cost reduction will rely on cell manufacturing and broader market acceptance. This article discusses three major aspects for cost reduction: (1) quality control to minimize scrap rate in cell manufacturing; (2) novel electrode processing and engineering to reduce processing cost and increase energy density and throughputs; and (3) material development and optimization for lithium-ion batteries with high-energy density. Insights on increasing energy and power densities of lithium-ion batteries are also addressed.

  3. High-energy ion generation in interaction. of short laser pulse with high-density plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentoku, Y.; Bychenkov, V. Y.; Flippo, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mima, K.; Mourou, G.; Sheng, Z. M.; Umstadter, D.

    2002-03-01

    Multi-MeV ion production from the interaction of a short laser pulse with a high-density plasma, accompanied by an underdense preplasma, has been studied with a particle-in-cell simulation and good agreement is found with experiment. The mechanism primarily responsible for the acceleration of ions is identified. Comparison with experiments sheds light on the ion-energy dependence on laser intensity, preplasma scale length, and relative ion energies for a multi-species plasma. Two regimes of maximum ion-energy dependence on laser intensity, I, have been identified: subrelativistic, ∝I; and relativistic, ∝. Simulations show that the energy of the accelerated ions versus the preplasma scale length increases linearly and then saturates. In contrast, the ion energy decreases with the thickness of the solid-density plasma.

  4. First principles prediction of an insensitive high energy density material.

    PubMed

    Hirshberg, Barak; Denekamp, Chagit

    2013-10-28

    A new high performance yet insensitive explosive is proposed, based on an extensive computational study of tris(tetrazolyl)amine in the solid state and in the gas phase. The calculations for the solid state employ the PBE density functional with empirical dispersion correction while the gas phase calculations use the higher level of B3LYP and MP2. Two stable crystalline structures of tris(tertrazolyl)amine were located belonging to P1 and P21 space groups. The crystal structures obtained reveal that solid tris(tertrazolyl)amine is organized in layers with a very small interlayer spacing, due to π stacking, as well as significant inter and intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. Application of these results to the calculation of the detonation velocity and pressure indicate high performance for both phases, especially the P21 phase. At the same time the small value found for the interlayer spacing and the significant hydrogen bonding suggest relatively high stability. These results point to a promising new explosive material with a balance between high performance and insensitivity.

  5. Extended MHD Effects in High Energy Density Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyler, Charles

    2016-10-01

    The MHD model is the workhorse for computational modeling of HEDP experiments. Plasma models are inheritably limited in scope, but MHD is expected to be a very good model for studying plasmas at the high densities attained in HEDP experiments. There are, however, important ways in which MHD fails to adequately describe the results, most notably due to the omission of the Hall term in the Ohm's law (a form of extended MHD or XMHD). This talk will discuss these failings by directly comparing simulations of MHD and XMHD for particularly relevant cases. The methodology is to simulate HEDP experiments using a Hall-MHD (HMHD) code based on a highly accurate and robust Discontinuous Galerkin method, and by comparison of HMHD to MHD draw conclusions about the impact of the Hall term. We focus on simulating two experimental pulsed power machines under various scenarios. We examine the MagLIF experiment on the Z-machine at Sandia National Laboratories and liner experiments on the COBRA machine at Cornell. For the MagLIF experiment we find that power flow in the feed leads to low density plasma ablation into the region surrounding the liner. The inflow of this plasma compresses axial magnetic flux onto the liner. In MHD this axial flux tends to resistively decay, whereas in HMHD a force-free current layer sustains the axial flux on the liner leading to a larger ratio of axial to azimuthal flux. During the liner compression the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability leads to helical perturbations due to minimization of field line bending. Simulations of a cylindrical liner using the COBRA machine parameters can under certain conditions exhibit amplification of an axial field due to a force-free low-density current layer separated by some distance from the liner. This results in a configuration in which there is predominately axial field on the liner inside the current layer and azimuthal field outside the layer. We are currently attempting to experimentally verify the simulation

  6. Publications of Proceedings for the RF 2005 7th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF

    SciTech Connect

    Luhmann, Jr, N C

    2006-01-01

    The University of California, Davis hosted the High Energy Density and High Power RF 7th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF in Kalamata, Greece, 13-17 June, 2005. The Proceedings cost was supported by these funds from the U.S. Department of Energy. The Proceedings was published through the American Institute of Physics.

  7. The National Ignition Facility: A New Era in High Energy Density Science

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2009-06-10

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's most energetic laser system, is now operational. This talk will describe NIF, the ignition campaign, and new opportunities in fusion energy and high energy density science enabled by NIF.

  8. High Energy Density Battery Lithium Thionyl Chloride Improved Reverse Voltage Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    BATTERY LITHIUM THIONYL CHLORIDE IMPROVED R-ETC(U) DEC 81 A E ZOLLA N660011-C-0310...HIGH ENERGY DENSITY BATTERY LITHIUM THIONYL CHLORIDE IMPROVED REVERSE VOLTAGE DESIGN Dr. A. E. Zolla Altus Corporation C:1 1610 Crane Court San Jose...reverse aide If necesary and identify by block number) Lithium Battery Lithium Thionyl Chloride High Energy Density Battery Voltage Reversal Battery

  9. Integration of high capacity materials into interdigitated mesostructured electrodes for high energy and high power density primary microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikul, James H.; Liu, Jinyun; Braun, Paul V.; King, William P.

    2016-05-01

    Microbatteries are increasingly important for powering electronic systems, however, the volumetric energy density of microbatteries lags behind that of conventional format batteries. This paper reports a primary microbattery with energy density 45.5 μWh cm-2 μm-1 and peak power 5300 μW cm-2 μm-1, enabled by the integration of large volume fractions of high capacity anode and cathode chemistry into porous micro-architectures. The interdigitated battery electrodes consist of a lithium metal anode and a mesoporous manganese oxide cathode. The key enabler of the high energy and power density is the integration of the high capacity manganese oxide conversion chemistry into a mesostructured high power interdigitated bicontinuous cathode architecture and an electrodeposited dense lithium metal anode. The resultant energy density is greater than previously reported three-dimensional microbatteries and is comparable to commercial conventional format lithium-based batteries.

  10. Development of novel cathodes for high energy density lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargav, Amruth

    Lithium based batteries have become ubiquitous with our everyday life. They have propelled a generation of smart personal electronics and electric transport. Their use is now percolating to various fields as a source of energy to facilitate the operation of devices from nanoscale to mega scale. This need for a portable energy source has led to tremendous scientific interest in this field to develop electrochemical devices like batteries with higher capacities, longer cycle life and increased safety at a low cost. To this end, the research presented in this thesis focuses on two emerging and promising technologies called lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) and lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. These batteries can offer an order of magnitude higher capacities through cheap, environmentally safe and abundant elements namely oxygen and sulfur. The first work introduces the concept of closed system lithium-oxygen batteries wherein the cell contains the discharge product of Li-O2 batteries namely, lithium peroxide (Li2O2) as the starting active material. The reversibility of this system is analyzed along with its rate performance. The possible use of such a cathode in a full cell is explored. Also, this concept is used to verify if all the lithium can be extracted from the cathode in the first charge. In the following work, lithium peroxide is chemically synthesized and deposited in a carbon nanofiber matrix. This forms a free standing cathode that shows high reversibility. It can be cycled up to 20 times and while using capacity control protocol, a cycle life of 50 is obtained. The cause of cell degradation and failure is also analyzed. In the work on full cell lithium-sulfur system, a novel electrolyte is developed that can support reversible lithium insertion and extraction from a graphite anode. A method to deposit solid lithium polysulfide is developed for the cathode. Coupling a lithiated graphite anode with the cathode using the new electrolyte yields a full cell whose

  11. High energy-density liquid rocket fuel performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Douglas C.

    1990-01-01

    A fuel performance database of liquid hydrocarbons and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuels was compiled using engine parametrics from the Space Transportation Engine Program as a baseline. Propellant performance parameters are introduced. General hydrocarbon fuel performance trends are discussed with respect to hydrogen-to-carbon ratio and heat of formation. Aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is discussed with respect to aluminum metal loading. Hydrocarbon and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is presented with respect to fuel density, specific impulse, and propellant density specific impulse.

  12. High energy-density liquid rocket fuel performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Douglas C.

    1990-01-01

    A fuel performance database of liquid hydrocarbons and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuels was compiled using engine parametrics from the Space Transportation Engine Program as a baseline. Propellant performance parameters are introduced. General hydrocarbon fuel performance trends are discussed with respect to hydrogen-to-carbon ratio and heat of formation. Aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is discussed with respect to aluminum metal loading. Hydrocarbon and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is presented with respect to fuel density, specific impulse and propellant density specific impulse.

  13. High energy-density liquid rocket fuel performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Douglas C.

    1990-01-01

    A fuel performance database of liquid hydrocarbons and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuels was compiled using engine parametrics from the Space Transportation Engine Program as a baseline. Propellant performance parameters are introduced. General hydrocarbon fuel performance trends are discussed with respect to hydrogen-to-carbon ratio and heat of formation. Aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is discussed with respect to aluminum metal loading. Hydrocarbon and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is presented with respect to fuel density, specific impulse and propellant density specific impulse.

  14. Meta-aromatic polyurea with high dipole moment and dipole density for energy storage capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shan; Lin, Minren; Burlingame, Quinn; Zhang, Q. M.

    2014-02-01

    A dielectric polymer, i.e., meta-aromatic polyurea(meta-PU) was developed and investigated for high energy density, low loss energy storage capacitors. Modifications to the molecular structure can tune the dipolar density and dipole moment in the polyurea systems to improve the dielectric properties. Meta-PU was synthesized via a green synthetic route with a higher volume dipolar density than the aromatic polyurea previously reported. The meta-PU has an enhanced dielectric constant, higher energy density, and a high electrical breakdown. A high storage electrical energy density of 13 J/cm3 and energy storage efficiency of 91% can be achieved at 670 MV/electric field.

  15. Plasma (Accretion) Disks with High Magnetic Energy Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, F.; Coppi, B.

    2006-04-01

    ``Corrugated'' plasma disks can form in the dominant gravity of a central object when the peak plasma pressure in the disk is of the same order as that of the pressure of the ``external'' magnetic field, while the magnetic field resulting from internal plasma currents is of the same order as the external field. The corrugation refers to a periodic variation of the plasma density in a region around the equatorial plane. The considered structure represents a transition between a ``classical'' accretion disk and a ``rings sequence'' configuration^2. The common feature of the ``corrugated'' and the ``rings sequence'' configurations is the ``crystal'' structure of the magnetic surfaces that consist of a sequence of pairs of oppositely directed toroidal current density filaments. The connection between the characteristics of these configurations and those of the marginally stable ballooning modes that can be found in a model accretion disk is pointed out and analyzed.

  16. High Energy Density Physics technical quarterly, October--December 1994. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The High Energy Density Physics Technical Quarterly (formerly the AGEX 2 Technical Quarterly) publishes short technical contributions on above ground experiments that use pulsed power and laser drivers. The Quarterly is intended to provide rapid exposure of timely technical ideas and results as well as a means for documenting High Energy Density Physics progress and scientific quality for the High Energy Density Physics community. Two articles are included in this volume. They are ``Simulation and Analysis of PEGII-25`` and ``Resistor Developments for Atlas Marx Modules``.

  17. Achieving tunable sensitivity in composite high-energy density materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashkeev, Sergey; Tsyshevsky, Roman; Kuklja, Maija

    2015-06-01

    Laser irradiation provides a unique opportunity for selective, predictive, and controlled initiation of energetic materials. We propose a consistent micro-scale mechanism of photoexcitation at the interface, formed by a molecular energetic material and a metal oxide. A specific PETN-MgO model composite is used to illustrate and explain seemingly puzzling experiments on selective laser initiation of energetic materials, which reported that the presence of metal oxide additives triggered the photoinitiation by an unusually low energy. We suggest that PETN photodecomposition is catalyzed by oxygen vacancies (F0 centers) at the MgO surface. The proposed model suggests ways to tune sensitivity of energetic molecular materials to photoinitiation. Our quantum-chemical calculations suggest that the structural defects (e.g., oxygen vacancies) strongly interact with the molecular material (e.g., adsorbed energetic molecules) by inducing a charge transfer at the interface and hence play an imperative role in governing both energy absorption and energy release in the system. Our approach and conclusions provide a solid basis for novel design of energetic interfaces with desired properties and offers a new perspective in the field of explosive materials and devices.

  18. Achieving tunable sensitivity in composite high-energy density materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklja, Maija M.; Tsyshevsky, Roman V.; Rashkeev, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Laser irradiation provides a unique opportunity for selective, predictive, and controlled initiation of energetic materials. We propose a consistent micro-scale mechanism of photoexcitation at the interface, formed by a molecular energetic material and a metal oxide. A specific PETN-MgO model composite is used to illustrate and explain seemingly puzzling experiments on selective laser initiation of energetic materials, which reported that the presence of metal oxide additives triggered the photoinitiation by an unusually low energy. We suggest that PETN photodecomposition is catalyzed by oxygen vacancies (F0 centers) at the MgO surface. The proposed model suggests ways to tune sensitivity of energetic molecular materials to photoinitiation. Our quantum-chemical calculations suggest that the structural point defects (e.g., oxygen vacancies) strongly interact with the molecular material (e.g., adsorbed energetic molecules) by inducing a charge transfer at the interface and hence play an imperative role in governing both energy absorption and energy release in the system. Our approach and conclusions provide a solid basis for novel design of energetic interfaces with desired properties and offers a new perspective in the field of explosive materials and devices.

  19. High-energy side-peak emission of exciton-polariton condensates in high density regime.

    PubMed

    Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Kamide, Kenji; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Byrnes, Tim; Ishida, Natsuko; Löffler, Andreas; Höfling, Sven; Shikano, Yutaka; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Forchel, Alfred; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-05-19

    In a standard semiconductor laser, electrons and holes recombine via stimulated emission to emit coherent light, in a process that is far from thermal equilibrium. Exciton-polariton condensates-sharing the same basic device structure as a semiconductor laser, consisting of quantum wells coupled to a microcavity-have been investigated primarily at densities far below the Mott density for signatures of Bose-Einstein condensation. At high densities approaching the Mott density, exciton-polariton condensates are generally thought to revert to a standard semiconductor laser, with the loss of strong coupling. Here, we report the observation of a photoluminescence sideband at high densities that cannot be accounted for by conventional semiconductor lasing. This also differs from an upper-polariton peak by the observation of the excitation power dependence in the peak-energy separation. Our interpretation as a persistent coherent electron-hole-photon coupling captures several features of this sideband, although a complete understanding of the experimental data is lacking. A full understanding of the observations should lead to a development in non-equilibrium many-body physics.

  20. High-energy side-peak emission of exciton-polariton condensates in high density regime

    PubMed Central

    Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Kamide, Kenji; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Byrnes, Tim; Ishida, Natsuko; Löffler, Andreas; Höfling, Sven; Shikano, Yutaka; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Forchel, Alfred; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    In a standard semiconductor laser, electrons and holes recombine via stimulated emission to emit coherent light, in a process that is far from thermal equilibrium. Exciton-polariton condensates–sharing the same basic device structure as a semiconductor laser, consisting of quantum wells coupled to a microcavity–have been investigated primarily at densities far below the Mott density for signatures of Bose-Einstein condensation. At high densities approaching the Mott density, exciton-polariton condensates are generally thought to revert to a standard semiconductor laser, with the loss of strong coupling. Here, we report the observation of a photoluminescence sideband at high densities that cannot be accounted for by conventional semiconductor lasing. This also differs from an upper-polariton peak by the observation of the excitation power dependence in the peak-energy separation. Our interpretation as a persistent coherent electron-hole-photon coupling captures several features of this sideband, although a complete understanding of the experimental data is lacking. A full understanding of the observations should lead to a development in non-equilibrium many-body physics. PMID:27193700

  1. The National Ignition Facility - Applications for Inertial Fusion Energy and High Energy Density Science

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, E.M.; Hogan, W.J.

    1999-08-12

    Over the past several decades, significant and steady progress has been made in the development of fusion energy and its associated technology and in the understanding of the physics of high-temperature plasmas. While the demonstration of net fusion energy (fusion energy production exceeding that required to heat and confine the plasma) remains a task for the next millennia and while challenges remain, this progress has significantly increased confidence that the ultimate goal of societally acceptable (e.g. cost, safety, environmental considerations including waste disposal) central power production can be achieved. This progress has been shared by the two principal approaches to controlled thermonuclear fusion--magnetic confinement (MFE) and inertial confinement (ICF). ICF, the focus of this article, is complementary and symbiotic to MFE. As shown, ICF invokes spherical implosion of the fuel to achieve high density, pressures, and temperatures, inertially confining the plasma for times sufficient long (t {approx} 10{sup -10} sec) that {approx} 30% of the fuel undergoes thermonuclear fusion.

  2. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M.; ...

    2015-02-24

    Large-scale energy storage systems are crucial for substantial deployment of renewable energy sources. Energy storage systems with high energy density, high safety, and low cost and environmental friendliness are desired. To overcome the major limitations of the current aqueous redox flow battery systems, namely lower energy density (~25 Wh L-1) and presence of strong acids and/or other hazardous, a high energy density aqueous zinc/polyiodide flow battery (ZIB) is designed with near neutral ZnI2 solutions as catholytes. The energy density of ZIB could reach 322 Wh L-1 at the solubility limit of ZnI2 in water (~7 M). We demonstrate charge andmore » discharge energy densities of 245.9 Wh/L and 166.7 Wh L-1 with ZnI2 electrolyte at 5.0 M, respectively. The addition of ethanol (EtOH) in ZnI2 electrolyte can effectively mitigate the growth of zinc dendrite at the anode and improve the stability of catholytes with wider temperature window (-20 to 50°C), which enable ZIB system to be a promising alternative as a high-energy and high- safety stationary energy storage system.« less

  3. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M.; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-24

    Large-scale energy storage systems are crucial for substantial deployment of renewable energy sources. Energy storage systems with high energy density, high safety, and low cost and environmental friendliness are desired. To overcome the major limitations of the current aqueous redox flow battery systems, namely lower energy density (~25 Wh L-1) and presence of strong acids and/or other hazardous, a high energy density aqueous zinc/polyiodide flow battery (ZIB) is designed with near neutral ZnI2 solutions as catholytes. The energy density of ZIB could reach 322 Wh L-1 at the solubility limit of ZnI2 in water (~7 M). We demonstrate charge and discharge energy densities of 245.9 Wh/L and 166.7 Wh L-1 with ZnI2 electrolyte at 5.0 M, respectively. The addition of ethanol (EtOH) in ZnI2 electrolyte can effectively mitigate the growth of zinc dendrite at the anode and improve the stability of catholytes with wider temperature window (-20 to 50°C), which enable ZIB system to be a promising alternative as a high-energy and high- safety stationary energy storage system.

  4. High power density energy harvester with high permeability magnetic material embedded in a rotating wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Zhang, Yi; Sun, Nian X.; McDaniel, J. Gregory; Wang, Ming L.

    2012-04-01

    This work presents an alternative design of a rotating energy harvester, which possesses the capability of powering electronic sensors and wireless sensor networks within vehicle. This energy harvester design is based on magnetostatic coupling between a stationary circular-arc hard magnet array and rotating magnetic solenoids, which consists of a unique core with high permeability (μr>10,000) to significantly increase the output power density. A prototype of this rotating energy harvesting system has been fabricated and demonstrated on a rotating wheel at speeds from 10 to 60 miles/hour (mph). Test of the prototype equipped with energy storage circuit and wireless transmission board on actual vehicle has been carried out. Results of different rotating frequencies show average power densities from 1 to 5 W/cm3. A numerical and experimental study of powering a real-time wireless tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) reveals that the energy harvester design generates constant and steady power sufficient for continuous operation of the TPMS.

  5. Wall shocks in high-energy-density shock tube experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, F. W.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Robey, H. F.

    2009-11-15

    The radiative precursor of a sufficiently fast shock has been observed to drive the vaporization of shock tube material ahead of the shock. The resulting expansion drives a converging blast wave into the gas volume of the tube. The effects of this wall shock may be observed and correlated with primary shock parameters. We demonstrate this process in experiments performed on the Omega Laser Facility, launching shocks propagating through xenon with speeds above 100 km/s driven by ablation pressures of approximately 50 Mbars. Wall shocks in laser experiments, in which the principal shock waves themselves should not be radiative, are also reported--in which the wall shocks have been launched by some other early energy source.

  6. Charged Particle Transport in High-Energy-Density Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Liam; Murillo, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Transport coefficients for dense plasmas have been numerically computed using an effective Boltzmann approach. We have developed a simplified effective potential approach that yields accurate fits for all of the relevant cross sections and collision integrals. Our results have been validated with molecular dynamics simulations for self-diffusion, interdiffusion, viscosity, thermal conductivity and stopping power. Molecular dynamics has also been used to examine the underlying assumptions of the Boltzmann approach through a categorization of behaviors of the velocity autocorrelation function in the Yukawa phase diagram. Using a velocity-dependent screening model, we examine the role of dynamical screening in transport as well. Implications of these results for Coulomb logarithm approaches are discussed. This work is performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. High energy density battery based on complex hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2016-04-26

    A battery and process of operating a battery system is provided using high hydrogen capacity complex hydrides in an organic non-aqueous solvent that allows the transport of hydride ions such as AlH.sub.4.sup.- and metal ions during respective discharging and charging steps.

  8. High energy density capacitors for power electronic applications using nano-structure multilayer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.

    1995-09-01

    Power electronics applications are currently limited by capacitor size and performance. Only incremental improvements are anticipated in existing capacitor technologies, while significant performance advances are required in energy density and overall performance to meet the technical needs of the applications which are important for U.S. economic competitiveness. One application, the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB), promises a second electronics revolution in power electronic design. High energy density capacitors with excellent electrical thermal and mechanical performance represent an enabling technology in the PEBB concept. We propose a continuing program to research and develop LLNL`s nano-structure multilayer technologies for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Our controlled deposition techniques are capable of synthesizing extraordinarily smooth sub-micron thick layers of dielectric and conductor materials. We have demonstrated that, with this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density are achievable.

  9. All-Nitrogen Compounds as High Energy Density Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    melting point (>75°C) was 2-azidoethyl hydrazinium azide, a possible monopropellant . Azidoethyl ammonium nitrate also melted too high to be an ideal ionic...AF/N\\ F F FN+ R 6. The use of perbromate as an ionic liquid component would require theoretical performance studies . Consideration of perbromate salts...as solid propellant components, e.g., ammonium perbromate as a replacement for AP, would depend on theoretical performance and environmental evaluation . 4

  10. Report of the Interagency Task Force on High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    2007-08-01

    Identifies the needs for improving Federal stewardship of specific aspects of high energy density physics, particularly the study of high energy density plasmas in the laboratory, and strengthening university activities in this latter discipline. The report articulates how HEDP fits into the portfolio of federally funded missions and includes agency actions to be taken that are necessary to further this area of study consistent with Federal priorities and plans, while being responsive to the needs of the scientific community.

  11. Highly Oriented Graphene Sponge Electrode for Ultra High Energy Density Lithium Ion Hybrid Capacitors.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Wook; Lee, Dong Un; Li, Ge; Feng, Kun; Wang, Xiaolei; Yu, Aiping; Lui, Gregory; Chen, Zhongwei

    2016-09-28

    Highly oriented rGO sponge (HOG) can be easily synthesized as an effective anode for application in high-capacity lithium ion hybrid capacitors. X-ray diffraction and morphological analyses show that successfully exfoliated rGO sponge on average consists of 4.2 graphene sheets, maintaining its three-dimensional structure with highly oriented morphology even after the thermal reduction procedure. Lithium-ion hybrid capacitors (LIC) are fabricated in this study based on a unique cell configuration which completely eliminates the predoping process of lithium ions. The full-cell LIC consisting of AC/HOG-Li configuration has resulted in remarkably high energy densities of 231.7 and 131.9 Wh kg(-1) obtained at 57 W kg(-1) and 2.8 kW kg(-1). This excellent performance is attributed to the lithium ion diffusivity related to the intercalation reaction of AC/HOG-Li which is 3.6 times higher that of AC/CG-Li. This unique cell design and configuration of LIC presented in this study using HOG as an effective anode is an unprecedented example of performance enhancement and improved energy density of LIC through successful increase in cell operation voltage window.

  12. High Energy Density and High Temperature Multilayer Capacitor Films for Electric Vehicle Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treufeld, Imre; Song, Michelle; Zhu, Lei; Baer, Eric; Snyder, Joe; Langhe, Deepak

    2015-03-01

    Multilayer films (MLFs) with high energy density and high temperature capability (>120 °C) have been developed at Case Western Reserve University. Such films offer a potential solution for electric car DC-link capacitors, where high ripple currents and high temperature tolerance are required. The current state-of-the-art capacitors used in electric cars for converting DC to AC use biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP), which can only operate at temperatures up to 85 °C requiring an external cooling system. The polycarbonate (PC)/poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) MLFs have a higher permittivity compared to that of BOPP (2.3), leading to higher energy density. They have good mechanical stability and reasonably low dielectric losses at 120 °C. Nonetheless, our preliminary dielectric measurements show that the MLFs exhibit appreciable dielectric losses (20%) at 120 °C, which would, despite all the other advantages, make them not suitable for practical applications. Our preliminary data showed that dielectric losses of the MLFs at 120 °C up to 400 MV/m and 1000 Hz originate mostly from impurity ionic conduction. This work is supported by the NSF PFI/BIC Program (IIP-1237708).

  13. Realizing both high energy and high power densities by twisting three carbon-nanotube-based hybrid fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Zhao, Yang; Cheng, Xunliang; Weng, Wei; Ren, Jing; Fang, Xin; Jiang, Yishu; Chen, Peining; Zhang, Zhitao; Wang, Yonggang; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-09-14

    Energy storage devices, such as lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors, are required for the modern electronics. However, the intrinsic characteristics of low power densities in batteries and low energy densities in supercapacitors have limited their applications. How to simultaneously realize high energy and power densities in one device remains a challenge. Herein a fiber-shaped hybrid energy-storage device (FESD) formed by twisting three carbon nanotube hybrid fibers demonstrates both high energy and power densities. For the FESD, the energy density (50 mWh cm(-3) or 90 Wh kg(-1) ) many times higher than for other forms of supercapacitors and approximately 3 times that of thin-film batteries; the power density (1 W cm(-3) or 5970 W kg(-1) ) is approximately 140 times of thin-film lithium-ion battery. The FESD is flexible, weaveable and wearable, which offers promising advantages in the modern electronics.

  14. An Ultraflexible Silicon-Oxygen Battery Fiber with High Energy Density.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Jiao, Yiding; Lu, Lijun; Wang, Lie; Chen, Taiqiang; Peng, Huisheng

    2017-09-21

    To satisfy the rapid development of portable and wearable electronics, it is highly desired to make batteries with both high energy densities and flexibility. Although some progress has been made in recent decades, the available batteries share critical problems of poor energy storage capacity and low flexibility. Herein, we have developed a silicon-oxygen battery fiber with high energy density and ultra-high flexibility by designing a coaxial architecture with a lithiated silicon/carbon nanotube hybrid fiber as inner anode, a polymer gel as middle electrolyte and a bare carbon nanotube sheet as outer cathode. The fiber showed a high energy density of 512 Wh kg(-1) and could effectively work after bending for 20 000 cycles. These battery fibers have been further woven into flexible textiles for a large-scale application. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Thulium heat source for high-endurance and high-energy density power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, C. E.; Kammeraad, J. E.; Vankonynenburg, R.; Vansant, J. H.

    1991-05-01

    We are studying the performance characteristics of radioisotope heat source designs for high-endurance and high-energy-density power systems that use thulium-170. Heat sources in the power range of 5 to 50 kW(sub th) coupled with a power conversion efficiency of approximately 30 percent, can easily satisfy current missions for autonomous underwater vehicles. New naval missions will be possible because thulium isotope power systems have a factor of one-to-two hundred higher endurance and energy density than chemical and electrochemical systems. Thulium-170 also has several other attractive features, including the fact that it decays to stable ytterbium-170 with a half-life of four months. For terrestrial applications, refueling on that time scale should be acceptable in view of the advantage of its benign decay. The heat source designs we are studying account for the requirements of isotope production, shielding, and integration with power conversion components. These requirements are driven by environmental and safety considerations. Thulium is present in the form of thin refractory thulia disks that allow power conversion at high peak temperature. We give estimates of power system state points, performance, mass, and volume characteristics. Monte Carlo radiation analysis provides a detailed assessment of shield requirements and heat transfer under normal and distressed conditions is also considered.

  16. High energy density micro plasma bunch from multiple laser interaction with thin target

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Han; Yu, Wei; Luan, S. X.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yu, M. Y.; Cai, H. B.; Zhou, C. T.; Yang, X. H.; Yin, Y.; Zhuo, H. B.; Wang, J. W.; Murakami, M.

    2014-01-13

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation is used to investigate radiation-pressure driven acceleration and compression of small solid-density plasma by intense laser pulses. It is found that multiple impacts by presently available short-pulse lasers on a small hemispheric shell target can create a long-living tiny quasineutral monoenergetic plasma bunch of very high energy density.

  17. High-energy-density electron jet generation from an opening gold cone filled with near-critical-density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, T. P. Shao, F. Q.; Zou, D. B.; Ge, Z. Y.; Zhang, G. B.; Wang, W. Q.; Li, X. H.; Liu, J. X.; Ouyang, J. M.; Yu, W.; Luan, S. X.; Wang, J. W.; Wong, A. Y.

    2015-01-14

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we propose a scheme for strong coupling of a petawatt laser with an opening gold cone filled with near-critical-density plasmas. When relevant parameters are properly chosen, most laser energy can be fully deposited inside the cone with only 10% leaving the tip opening. Due to the asymmetric ponderomotive acceleration by the strongly decayed laser pulse, high-energy-density electrons with net laser energy gain are accumulated inside the cone, which then stream out of the tip opening continuously, like a jet. The jet electrons are fully relativistic, with speeds around 0.98−0.998 c and densities at 10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3} level. The jet can keep for a long time over 200 fs, which may have diverse applications in practice.

  18. High-energy-density electron beam from interaction of two successive laser pulses with subcritical-density plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. W.; Yu, W.; Yu, M. Y.; Xu, H.; Ju, J. J.; Luan, S. X.; Murakami, M.; Zepf, M.; Rykovanov, S.

    2016-02-01

    It is shown by particle-in-cell simulations that a narrow electron beam with high energy and charge density can be generated in a subcritical-density plasma by two consecutive laser pulses. Although the first laser pulse dissipates rapidly, the second pulse can propagate for a long distance in the thin wake channel created by the first pulse and can further accelerate the preaccelerated electrons therein. Given that the second pulse also self-focuses, the resulting electron beam has a narrow waist and high charge and energy densities. Such beams are useful for enhancing the target-back space-charge field in target normal sheath acceleration of ions and bremsstrahlung sources, among others.

  19. A Low Cost Neutral Zinc-Iron Flow Battery with High Energy Density for Stationary Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianfeng; Xie, Congxin; Duan, Yinqi; Xu, Wenbin; Zhang, Huamin

    2017-10-05

    Flow battery (FB) is one of the most promising stationary energy storage devices for storing renewable energies. However, commercial progress of the FBs is limited by their high cost and low energy density. Here we report a neutral zinc-iron FB with very low cost and high energy density. By using highly soluble FeCl2/ZnBr2 species, a charge energy density of 56.30 Wh/L can be achieved. DFT calculations demonstrated that glycine can combine with iron to suppress hydrolysis and crossover of Fe3+/Fe2+. The results indicated that an energy efficiency of 86.66% can be obtained at 40 mA/cm2 and the battery can run stably for more than 100 cycles. Furthermore, a porous membrane with low cost was employed to lower the capital cost to less than 50 $/kWh, which was the lowest value that has ever been reported. Combining the features of low cost, high energy density and high energy efficiency, the neutral zinc-iron FB becomes a promising candidate for stationary energy storage applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. A high-energy-density, high-Mach number single jet experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J. F.; Dittrich, T. R.; Elliott, J. B.; Glendinning, S. G.; Cotrell, D. L.

    2011-08-15

    A high-energy-density, x-ray-driven, high-Mach number (M{>=} 17) single jet experiment shows constant propagation speeds of the jet and its bowshock into the late time regime. The jet assumes a characteristic mushroom shape with a stalk and a head. The width of the head and the bowshock also grow linearly in time. The width of the stalk decreases exponentially toward an asymptotic value. In late time images, the stalk kinks and develops a filamentary nature, which is similar to experiments with applied magnetic fields. Numerical simulations match the experiment reasonably well, but ''exterior'' details of the laser target must be included to obtain a match at late times.

  1. Toward high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and moderate-temperature chip-scale thermophotovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Chan, Walker R; Bermel, Peter; Pilawa-Podgurski, Robert C N; Marton, Christopher H; Jensen, Klavs F; Senkevich, Jay J; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljacic, Marin; Celanovic, Ivan

    2013-04-02

    The challenging problem of ultra-high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and small-scale portable power generation is addressed here using a distinctive thermophotovoltaic energy conversion mechanism and chip-based system design, which we name the microthermophotovoltaic (μTPV) generator. The approach is predicted to be capable of up to 32% efficient heat-to-electricity conversion within a millimeter-scale form factor. Although considerable technological barriers need to be overcome to reach full performance, we have performed a robust experimental demonstration that validates the theoretical framework and the key system components. Even with a much-simplified μTPV system design with theoretical efficiency prediction of 2.7%, we experimentally demonstrate 2.5% efficiency. The μTPV experimental system that was built and tested comprises a silicon propane microcombustor, an integrated high-temperature photonic crystal selective thermal emitter, four 0.55-eV GaInAsSb thermophotovoltaic diodes, and an ultra-high-efficiency maximum power-point tracking power electronics converter. The system was demonstrated to operate up to 800 °C (silicon microcombustor temperature) with an input thermal power of 13.7 W, generating 344 mW of electric power over a 1-cm(2) area.

  2. Toward high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and moderate-temperature chip-scale thermophotovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Walker R.; Bermel, Peter; Pilawa-Podgurski, Robert C. N.; Marton, Christopher H.; Jensen, Klavs F.; Senkevich, Jay J.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Celanovic, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The challenging problem of ultra-high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and small-scale portable power generation is addressed here using a distinctive thermophotovoltaic energy conversion mechanism and chip-based system design, which we name the microthermophotovoltaic (μTPV) generator. The approach is predicted to be capable of up to 32% efficient heat-to-electricity conversion within a millimeter-scale form factor. Although considerable technological barriers need to be overcome to reach full performance, we have performed a robust experimental demonstration that validates the theoretical framework and the key system components. Even with a much-simplified μTPV system design with theoretical efficiency prediction of 2.7%, we experimentally demonstrate 2.5% efficiency. The μTPV experimental system that was built and tested comprises a silicon propane microcombustor, an integrated high-temperature photonic crystal selective thermal emitter, four 0.55-eV GaInAsSb thermophotovoltaic diodes, and an ultra-high-efficiency maximum power-point tracking power electronics converter. The system was demonstrated to operate up to 800 °C (silicon microcombustor temperature) with an input thermal power of 13.7 W, generating 344 mW of electric power over a 1-cm2 area. PMID:23440220

  3. High-energy ions from near-critical density plasmas via magnetic vortex acceleration.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Bulanov, Sergei V; Esirkepov, Timur Zh; Kando, Masaki

    2010-09-24

    Ultraintense laser pulses propagating in near-critical density plasmas generate magnetic dipole vortex structures. In the region of decreasing plasma density, the vortex expands both in forward and lateral directions. The magnetic field pressure pushes electrons and ions to form a density jump along the vortex axis and induces a longitudinal electric field. This structure moves together with the expanding dipole vortex. The background ions located ahead of the electric field are accelerated to high energies. The energy scaling of ions generated by this magnetic vortex acceleration mechanism is derived and corroborated using particle-in-cell simulations.

  4. High-Energy Ions from Near-Critical Density Plasmas via Magnetic Vortex Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki

    2010-09-24

    Ultraintense laser pulses propagating in near-critical density plasmas generate magnetic dipole vortex structures. In the region of decreasing plasma density, the vortex expands both in forward and lateral directions. The magnetic field pressure pushes electrons and ions to form a density jump along the vortex axis and induces a longitudinal electric field. This structure moves together with the expanding dipole vortex. The background ions located ahead of the electric field are accelerated to high energies. The energy scaling of ions generated by this magnetic vortex acceleration mechanism is derived and corroborated using particle-in-cell simulations.

  5. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chiping

    2013-08-26

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  6. Density distribution of high energy electrons in pulsed corona discharge of NO+N2 mixture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenchun; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Younian

    2003-12-01

    Emission spectroscopy of the high-voltage pulsed positive corona discharge in a line-cylinder reactor is used to investigate the high-energy electron density distribution in the discharge gap. The relative overall emission intensity spatial distribution profile of the A2Sigma+ --> X2Pi transition of NO is successfully recorded against a severe electromagnetic pulse interference coming from the corona discharge at one atmosphere. The spectroscopic investigation shows that the high-energy electron density in the discharge has a nonlinearly decline in the radial distribution. When varying the discharge voltage, the absolute emission intensity of NO is different but the radial distribution profile is similar. If an oxygen flow was introduced into the discharge reactor, the emission intensity of NO decreases tremendously and, therefore, the high-energy electron density decreases reasonably.

  7. Strongly Dipolar Polythiourea and Polyurea Dielectrics with High Electrical Breakdown, Low Loss, and High Electrical Energy Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shan; Burlingame, Quinn; Cheng, Zhao-Xi; Lin, Minren; Zhang, Q. M.

    2014-12-01

    Dielectric materials with high electric energy density and low loss are of great importance for applications in modern electronics and electrical systems. Strongly dipolar materials have the potential to reach relatively higher dielectric constants than the widely used non-polar or weakly dipolar polymers, as well as a much lower loss than that of nonlinear high K polymer dielectrics or polymer-ceramic composites. To realize the high energy density while maintaining the low dielectric loss, aromatic polythioureas and polyureas with high dipole moments, high dipole densities, tunable molecular structures and dielectric properties were investigated. High energy density (>24 J/cm3), high breakdown strength (>800 MV/m), and high charge-discharge efficiency (>90%) can be achieved in the new polymers. The molecular structure and film surface morphology were also studied; it is of great importance to optimize the fabrication process to make high-quality thin films.

  8. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M.; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Redox flow batteries are receiving wide attention for electrochemical energy storage due to their unique architecture and advantages, but progress has so far been limited by their low energy density (~25 Wh l−1). Here we report a high-energy density aqueous zinc-polyiodide flow battery. Using the highly soluble iodide/triiodide redox couple, a discharge energy density of 167 Wh l−1 is demonstrated with a near-neutral 5.0 M ZnI2 electrolyte. Nuclear magnetic resonance study and density functional theory-based simulation along with flow test data indicate that the addition of an alcohol (ethanol) induces ligand formation between oxygen on the hydroxyl group and the zinc ions, which expands the stable electrolyte temperature window to from −20 to 50 °C, while ameliorating the zinc dendrite. With the high-energy density and its benign nature free from strong acids and corrosive components, zinc-polyiodide flow battery is a promising candidate for various energy storage applications. PMID:25709083

  9. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-24

    Redox flow batteries are receiving wide attention for electrochemical energy storage due to their unique architecture and advantages, but progress has so far been limited by their low energy density (~25 Wh l(-1)). Here we report a high-energy density aqueous zinc-polyiodide flow battery. Using the highly soluble iodide/triiodide redox couple, a discharge energy density of 167 Wh l(-1) is demonstrated with a near-neutral 5.0 M ZnI2 electrolyte. Nuclear magnetic resonance study and density functional theory-based simulation along with flow test data indicate that the addition of an alcohol (ethanol) induces ligand formation between oxygen on the hydroxyl group and the zinc ions, which expands the stable electrolyte temperature window to from -20 to 50 °C, while ameliorating the zinc dendrite. With the high-energy density and its benign nature free from strong acids and corrosive components, zinc-polyiodide flow battery is a promising candidate for various energy storage applications.

  10. Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometer electron density diagnostic for laser and pulsed power high energy density plasma experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; ...

    2016-04-21

    Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometry has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density plasmas. The technique can deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single Moiré image. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer was deployed using laser and x-pinch backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping was demonstrated for 25-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using copper foil targets. Moire pattern formation and grating survival was also observed using a copper x-pinch driven at 400 kA, ~1 kA/ns. Lastly, these results demonstrate the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas.

  11. Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometer electron density diagnostic for laser and pulsed power high energy density plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I.; Theobald, W.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.; Klein, S. R.; Munoz-Cordoves, G.; Vescovi, M.; Valenzuela-Villaseca, V.; Veloso, F.

    2016-04-21

    Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometry has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density plasmas. The technique can deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single Moiré image. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer was deployed using laser and x-pinch backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping was demonstrated for 25-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using copper foil targets. Moire pattern formation and grating survival was also observed using a copper x-pinch driven at 400 kA, ~1 kA/ns. Lastly, these results demonstrate the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas.

  12. Atomic physics calculations in support of studies for high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Moses, G.A.; Mehlhorn, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    The studies of high energy density plasmas require basic atomic data, equations of state, opacities, and stopping power. Unfortunately, the related experimental data are very limited. To obtain these data for a wide domain of plasma conditions, one must rely on theoretical calculations. The authors have developed an atomic physics calculation package which can provide high quality atomic data for numerical simulations of high energy density plasmas. In this paper, they give detailed descriptions of physics models used in the package. Particular emphasis will be on a hybrid model for equations of state, a self-consistent field model for ion stopping power, and opacity calculations.

  13. Development of a high-density energy-storage capacitor for Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, D.K.; Cooper, R.A.; Sevigny, J.A.; Merritt, B.T.; Carder, B.M.; Whitham, K.

    1981-10-22

    This paper covers Maxwell's approach to developing energy storage capacitors. Based on previous capacitor designs of 3 KJ, 5 KJ and 10 KJ, the final Nova 12.5 KJ capacitor evolved. At the outset of the Nova capacitor development program, a relatively new dielectric system, polypropylene-paper-DOP, seemed to show superiority in volumetric efficiency, life, and more importantly cost. However, as a result of studies performed at Maxwell, a high-density, energy-storage capacitor was developed utilizing new high-quality, high-density paper and caster oil as the dielectric. Test data have demonstrated that the Maxwell 12.5 KJ capacitor exceeds all LLNL's qualification requirements.

  14. Antiferroelectric Thin-Film Capacitors with High Energy-Storage Densities, Low Energy Losses, and Fast Discharge Times.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chang Won; Amarsanaa, Gantsooj; Won, Sung Sik; Chae, Song A; Lee, Dae Su; Kim, Ill Won

    2015-12-09

    We demonstrate a capacitor with high energy densities, low energy losses, fast discharge times, and high temperature stabilities, based on Pb(0.97)Y(0.02)[(Zr(0.6)Sn(0.4))(0.925)Ti(0.075)]O3 (PYZST) antiferroelectric thin-films. PYZST thin-films exhibited a high recoverable energy density of U(reco) = 21.0 J/cm(3) with a high energy-storage efficiency of η = 91.9% under an electric field of 1300 kV/cm, providing faster microsecond discharge times than those of commercial polypropylene capacitors. Moreover, PYZST thin-films exhibited high temperature stabilities with regard to their energy-storage properties over temperatures ranging from room temperature to 100 °C and also exhibited strong charge-discharge fatigue endurance up to 1 × 10(7) cycles.

  15. The National Ignition Facility and the Golden Age of High Energy Density Science

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2007-08-14

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam Nd:glass laser facility being constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct research in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high energy density (HED) science. When completed, NIF will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light, making it the world's largest and highest-energy laser system. The NIF is poised to become the world's preeminent facility for conducting ICF and fusion energy research and for studying matter at extreme densities and temperatures.

  16. The National Ignition Facility and the Golden Age of High Energy Density Science

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W; Moses, E I; Newton, M

    2007-09-27

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam Nd:glass laser facility being constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct research in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high energy density (HED) science. When completed, NIF will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light, making it the world's largest and highest-energy laser system. The NIF is poised to become the world's preeminent facility for conducting ICF and fusion energy research and for studying matter at extreme densities and temperatures.

  17. Nanocomposites with increased energy density through high aspect ratio PZT nanowires.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haixiong; Lin, Yirong; Andrews, Clark; Sodano, Henry A

    2011-01-07

    High energy storage plays an important role in the modern electric industry. Herein, we investigated the role of filler aspect ratio in nanocomposites for energy storage. Nanocomposites were synthesized using lead zirconate titanate (PZT) with two different aspect ratio (nanowires, nanorods) fillers at various volume fractions dispersed in a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) matrix. The permittivity constants of composites containing nanowires (NWs) were higher than those with nanorods (NRs) at the same inclusion volume fraction. It was also indicated that the high frequency loss tangent of samples with PZT nanowires was smaller than for those with nanorods, demonstrating the high electrical energy storage efficiency of the PZT NW nanocomposite. The high aspect ratio PZT NWs showed a 77.8% increase in energy density over the lower aspect ratio PZT NRs, under an electric field of 15 kV mm(-1) and 50% volume fraction. The breakdown strength was found to decrease with the increasing volume fraction of PZT NWs, but to only change slightly from a volume fraction of around 20%-50%. The maximum calculated energy density of nanocomposites is as high as 1.158 J cm(-3) at 50% PZT NWs in PVDF. Since the breakdown strength is lower compared to a PVDF copolymer such as poly(vinylidene fluoride-tertrifluoroethylene-terchlorotrifluoroethylene) P(VDF-TreEE-CTFE) and poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) P(VDF-HFP), the energy density of the nanocomposite could be significantly increased through the use of PZT NWs and a polymer with greater breakdown strength. These results indicate that higher aspect ratio fillers show promising potential to improve the energy density of nanocomposites, leading to the development of advanced capacitors with high energy density.

  18. Azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes as high-energy density solar thermal fuels.

    PubMed

    Kolpak, Alexie M; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2011-08-10

    Solar thermal fuels, which reversibly store solar energy in molecular bonds, are a tantalizing prospect for clean, renewable, and transportable energy conversion/storage. However, large-scale adoption requires enhanced energy storage capacity and thermal stability. Here we present a novel solar thermal fuel, composed of azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes, with the volumetric energy density of Li-ion batteries. Our work also demonstrates that the inclusion of nanoscale templates is an effective strategy for design of highly cyclable, thermally stable, and energy-dense solar thermal fuels.

  19. Application of a high-energy-density permanent magnet material in underwater systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, C. P.; Egan, C.; Krol, W. P.

    1996-06-01

    This paper addresses the application of high-energy-density permanent magnet (PM) technology to (1) the brushless, axial-field PM motor and (2) the integrated electric motor/pump system for under-water applications. Finite-element analysis and lumped parameter magnetic circuit analysis were used to calculate motor parameters and performance characteristics and to conduct tradeoff studies. Compact, efficient, reliable, and quiet underwater systems are attainable with the development of high-energy-density PM material, power electronic devices, and power integrated-circuit technology.

  20. Model of High-Energy-Density Battery Based on SiC Schottky Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    ARL -D J M MILLER ATTN AMSRD- ARL -CI-OK-T TECHL PUB (2 COPIES ) ATTN AMSRD- ARL -CI-OK-TL TECHL LIB (2 COPIES) ATTN AMSRD- ARL -SE-DE M LITZ ...Model of High-Energy-Density Battery Based on SiC Schottky Diodes by Yves Ngu, Marc Litz , and Bruce Geil ARL -TR-3981 Ocotber 2006...Spectrum September 2004, 36-41. 6. Litz , M .; et al. On-Demand High Energy Density Materials. Amer. Inst. of Aero. and Astro. 7. Litz , M

  1. Prevalence of bone mineral density testing and osteoporosis management following low- and high-energy fractures.

    PubMed

    Angthong, Chayanin; Rodjanawijitkul, Santi; Samart, Supawat; Angthong, Wirana

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report the prevalence of post-fracture bone mineral density (BMD) testing and osteoporosis treatment in patients admitted to the orthopedic department for low-energy or high-energy fractures and to identify factors affecting prevalence of post-fracture BMD testing and osteoporosis treatment. A total of 265 patients aged 45 years or older admitted with low-energy or high-energy fractures were reviewed between January 2010 and May 2011. Information regarding age, gender, fracture site and history of post-fracture BMD testing and osteoporosis treatment, including data reporting experiences of attending orthopedists (young: <10, senior: >10 years of experience) were recorded. Of the 265 patients (175 female, 90 male), 259 (97.7%) patients had low-energy fractures and 6 (2.3%) suffered high-energy fractures. Of 259 low-energy fractures, 99 (38.2%) underwent BMD testing and had mean total T-scores of -2.04±1.01 (proximal-femur) and -2.12±1.27 (lumbar-spine). Only one high-energy fracture patient (16.7%) underwent BMD testing, with a T-score of -1.1 (proximal-femur) and -2.7 (lumbar-spine). Eighty-six (32.5%) patients (85 low-energy fractures; 1 high-energy fracture) with diagnosis of osteopenia/osteoporosis from BMD testing were treated with calcium, vitamin D, and bisphosphonates. Bone mineral density testing was significantly higher in low-energy fracture patients who were treated by a young orthopedist, a common fracture site (proximal-femur, distal-radius, vertebrae) or were female (p<0.05). Bone mineral density investigation and treatment rates are currently suboptimal. The current gap in adequate care necessitates multidisciplinary intervention in order to lessen the incidence of future fractures, particularly in patients over the age of 45.

  2. Shock waves in a Z-pinch and the formation of high energy density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, H. U.; Wessel, F. J.; Ney, P.; Presura, R.; Ellahi, Rahmat; Shukla, P. K.

    2012-12-15

    A Z-pinch liner, imploding onto a target plasma, evolves in a step-wise manner, producing a stable, magneto-inertial, high-energy-density plasma compression. The typical configuration is a cylindrical, high-atomic-number liner imploding onto a low-atomic-number target. The parameters for a terawatt-class machine (e.g., Zebra at the University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada Terawatt Facility) have been simulated. The 2-1/2 D MHD code, MACH2, was used to study this configuration. The requirements are for an initial radius of a few mm for stable implosion; the material densities properly distributed, so that the target is effectively heated initially by shock heating and finally by adiabatic compression; and the liner's thickness adjusted to promote radial current transport and subsequent current amplification in the target. Since the shock velocity is smaller in the liner, than in the target, a stable-shock forms at the interface, allowing the central load to accelerate magnetically and inertially, producing a magneto-inertial implosion and high-energy density plasma. Comparing the implosion dynamics of a low-Z target with those of a high-Z target demonstrates the role of shock waves in terms of compression and heating. In the case of a high-Z target, the shock wave does not play a significant heating role. The shock waves carry current and transport the magnetic field, producing a high density on-axis, at relatively low temperature. Whereas, in the case of a low-Z target, the fast moving shock wave preheats the target during the initial implosion phase, and the later adiabatic compression further heats the target to very high energy density. As a result, the compression ratio required for heating the low-Z plasma to very high energy densities is greatly reduced.

  3. Coaxial wet-spun yarn supercapacitors for high-energy density and safe wearable electronics

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Liang; Huang, Tieqi; Zheng, Bingna; Han, Yi; Zhao, Xiaoli; Gopalsamy, Karthikeyan; Sun, Haiyan; Gao, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Yarn supercapacitors have great potential in future portable and wearable electronics because of their tiny volume, flexibility and weavability. However, low-energy density limits their development in the area of wearable high-energy density devices. How to enhance their energy densities while retaining their high-power densities is a critical challenge for yarn supercapacitor development. Here we propose a coaxial wet-spinning assembly approach to continuously spin polyelectrolyte-wrapped graphene/carbon nanotube core-sheath fibres, which are used directly as safe electrodes to assembly two-ply yarn supercapacitors. The yarn supercapacitors using liquid and solid electrolytes show ultra-high capacitances of 269 and 177 mF cm−2 and energy densities of 5.91 and 3.84 μWh cm−2, respectively. A cloth supercapacitor superior to commercial capacitor is further interwoven from two individual 40-cm-long coaxial fibres. The combination of scalable coaxial wet-spinning technology and excellent performance of yarn supercapacitors paves the way to wearable and safe electronics. PMID:24786366

  4. Density functional calculations for a high energy density compound of formula C6H 6-n (NO 2) n.

    PubMed

    Chi, Wei-Jie; Li, Lu-Lin; Li, Bu-Tong; Wu, Hai-Shun

    2012-08-01

    A series of polynitroprismanes, C(6)H(6-n )(NO(2))(n) (n = 1-6) intended for use as high energy density compounds (HEDCs) were designed computationally. Their electronic structures, heats of formation, interactions between nitro groups, specific enthalpies of combustion, bond dissociation energies, and explosive performances (detonation velocities and detonation pressures) were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) with the 6-311 G** basis set. The results showed that all of the polynitroprismanes had high positive heats of formation that increased with the number of substitutions for the prismane derivatives, while the specific enthalpy of combustion decreased as the number of nitro groups increased. In addition, the range of enthalpy of combustion reducing is getting smaller. Interactions between ortho (vicinal) groups deviate from the group additivity rule and decrease as the number of nitro groups increases. In terms of thermodynamic stability, all of the polynitroprismanes had higher bond dissociation energies (BDEs) than RDX and HMX. Detonation velocities and detonation pressures were estimated using modified Kamlet-Jacobs equations based on the heat of detonation (Q) and the theoretical density of the molecule (ρ). It was found that ρ, D, and P are strongly linearly related to the number of nitro groups. Taking both their energetic properties and thermal stabilities into account, pentanitroprismane and hexanitroprismane are potential candidate HEDCs.

  5. A High Power Density Single-Phase PWM Rectifier With Active Ripple Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ruxi; Wang, Fei; Boroyevich, Dushan; Burgos, Rolando; Lai, Rixin; Ning, Puqi; Rajashekara, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that single-phase pulse width modulation rectifiers have second-order harmonic currents and corresponding ripple voltages on the dc bus. The low-frequency harmonic current is normally filtered using a bulk capacitor in the bus, which results in low power density. However, pursuing high power density in converter design is a very important goal in the aerospace applications. This paper studies methods for reducing the energy storage capacitor for single-phase rectifiers. The minimum ripple energy storage requirement is derived independently of a specific topology. Based on theminimum ripple energy requirement, the feasibility of the active capacitor s reduction schemes is verified. Then, we propose a bidirectional buck boost converter as the ripple energy storage circuit, which can effectively reduce the energy storage capacitance. The analysis and design are validated by simulation and experimental results.

  6. Ionic liquid enabled FeS2 for high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tyler; Piper, Daniela Molina; Kim, Seul Cham; Han, Sang Sub; Bhat, Vinay; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Lee, Se-Hee

    2014-11-19

    High-energy-density FeS2 cathodes en-abled by a bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TFSI-) anion-based room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) electrolyte are demonstrated. A TFSI-based ionic liquid (IL) significantly mitigates polysulfide dissolution, and therefore the parasitic redox shuttle mechanism, that plagues sulfur-based electrode chemistries. FeS2 stabilization with a TFSI(-) -based IL results in one of the highest energy density cathodes, 542 W h kg(-1) (normalized to cathode composite mass), reported to date.

  7. Note: A high-energy-density Tesla-type pulse generator with novel insulating oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheng; Su, Jiancang; Fan, Xuliang

    2017-09-01

    A 10-GW high-energy-density Tesla-type pulse generator is developed with an improved insulating liquid based on a modified Tesla pulser—TPG700, of which the pulse forming line (PFL) is filled with novel insulating oil instead of transformer oil. Properties of insulating oil determining the stored energy density of the PFL are analyzed, and a criterion for appropriate oil is proposed. Midel 7131 is chosen as an application example. The results of insulating property experiment under tens-of-microsecond pulse charging demonstrate that the insulation capability of Midel 7131 is better than that of KI45X transformer oil. The application test in Tesla pulser TPG700 shows that the output power is increased to 10.5 GW with Midel 7131. The output energy density of TPG700 increases for about 60% with Midel 7131.

  8. Note: A high-energy-density Tesla-type pulse generator with novel insulating oil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng; Su, Jiancang; Fan, Xuliang

    2017-09-01

    A 10-GW high-energy-density Tesla-type pulse generator is developed with an improved insulating liquid based on a modified Tesla pulser-TPG700, of which the pulse forming line (PFL) is filled with novel insulating oil instead of transformer oil. Properties of insulating oil determining the stored energy density of the PFL are analyzed, and a criterion for appropriate oil is proposed. Midel 7131 is chosen as an application example. The results of insulating property experiment under tens-of-microsecond pulse charging demonstrate that the insulation capability of Midel 7131 is better than that of KI45X transformer oil. The application test in Tesla pulser TPG700 shows that the output power is increased to 10.5 GW with Midel 7131. The output energy density of TPG700 increases for about 60% with Midel 7131.

  9. Structured block copolymer thin film composites for ultra-high energy density capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samant, Saumil; Hailu, Shimelis; Grabowski, Christopher; Durstock, Michael; Raghavan, Dharmaraj; Karim, Alamgir

    2014-03-01

    Development of high energy density capacitors is essential for future applications like hybrid vehicles and directed energy weaponry. Fundamentally, energy density is governed by product of dielectric permittivity ɛ and breakdown strength Vbd. Hence, improvements in energy density are greatly reliant on improving either ɛ or Vbd or a combination of both. Polymer films are widely used in capacitors due to high Vbd and low loss but they suffer from very low permittivities. Composite dielectrics offer a unique opportunity to combine the high ɛ of inorganic fillers with the high Vbd of a polymer matrix. For enhancement of dielectric properties, it is essential to improve matrix-filler interaction and control the spatial distribution of fillers for which nanostructured block copolymers BCP act as ideal templates. We use Directed Self-assembly of block copolymers to rapidly fabricate highly aligned BCP-TiO2 composite nanostructures in thin films under dynamic thermal gradient field to synergistically combine the high ɛ of functionalized TiO2 and high Vbd of BCP matrix. The results of impact of BCP morphology, processing conditions and concentration of TiO2 on capacitor performance will be reported. U.S. Air Force of Scientific Research under contract FA9550-12-1-0306

  10. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium-nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Chang, Hee -Jung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-02-11

    Here we demonstrate for the first time that planar Na-NiCl2 batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190°C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh/kg, which is 3 times higher than that of conventional tubular Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at 280°C, was obtained for planar Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at 190°C over a long-term cell test (1000 cycles). The high energy density and superior cycle stability are attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials (NaCl and Ni) at 190°C. The results reported in this work demonstrate that planar Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at an intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs.

  11. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium-nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; ...

    2016-02-11

    Here we demonstrate for the first time that planar Na-NiCl2 batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190°C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh/kg, which is 3 times higher than that of conventional tubular Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at 280°C, was obtained for planar Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at 190°C over a long-term cell test (1000 cycles). The high energy density and superior cycle stability are attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials (NaCl and Ni) at 190°C. The results reported in this work demonstrate that planar Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at anmore » intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs.« less

  12. Studies on High Energy Density Reactions for Development of Nanostructured Hybrid Supercapacitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-25

    specific capacitance , energy density and power density of 417 F g1, 58 Wh kg1and17.85 kWkg-1, respectively at a current density of 0.9 Ag-1. Graphene...supercapacitors and electrochemical sensors . The nanocomposite of macroCuO with graphene has been successfully used as supercapacitor electrode material for...energy storage. Electrochemical measurements of this system revealed the maximum specific capacitance , energy density and power density of 417 F g1

  13. First-principles investigation of high energy density in PVDF copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, V.; Lu, Liping; Buongiorno Nardelli, M.; Bernholc, J.

    2008-03-01

    PVDF and its copolymers exhibit excellent electromechanical properties and in the case of PVDF-CTFE also a very high energy density [1]. We have investigated the phase diagram of these systems and can quantitatively explain the observed energy density of PVDF-CTFE as due to a para to ferroelectric phase transition in a disordered, multidomain structure [2]. Our results show that pure PVDF prefers the α phase at zero field. Electric field lowers the free energy of the β phase, resulting in a structural phase transition at a sufficiently high field. Copolymer admixture lowers the critical field and eventually leads to an energetic preference for the β phase even at zero field. For PVDF-CTFE with CTFE content below 17 %, the α phase is still preferred and the field-induced phase transformation reversibly stores large amounts of energy. For PVDF-TeFE, the total energy difference between the two phases is much smaller, resulting in substantially smaller energy density. [1] B. Chu et al., Science 313, 334 (2006). [2] V. Ranjan et al., PRL 99, 047801 (2007).

  14. An x-ray backlit Talbot-Lau deflectometer for high-energy-density electron density diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-02-10

    X-ray phase-contrast techniques can measure electron density gradients in high-energy-density plasmas through refraction induced phase shifts. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer consisting of free standing ultrathin gratings was deployed at an ultra-short, high-intensity laser system using K-shell emission from a 1-30 J, 8 ps laser pulse focused on thin Cu foil targets. Grating survival was demonstrated for 30 J, 8 ps laser pulses. The first x-ray deflectometry images obtained under laser backlighting showed up to 25% image contrast and thus enabled detection of electron areal density gradients with a maximum value of 8.1 ± 0.5 × 1023 cm₋3 in a low-Z millimeter sized sample. An electron density profile was obtained from refraction measurements with an error of <8%. We found the 50 ± 15 μm spatial resolution achieved across the full field of view was limited by the x-ray source-size, similar to conventional radiography.

  15. An x-ray backlit Talbot-Lau deflectometer for high-energy-density electron density diagnostics

    DOE PAGES

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; ...

    2016-02-10

    X-ray phase-contrast techniques can measure electron density gradients in high-energy-density plasmas through refraction induced phase shifts. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer consisting of free standing ultrathin gratings was deployed at an ultra-short, high-intensity laser system using K-shell emission from a 1-30 J, 8 ps laser pulse focused on thin Cu foil targets. Grating survival was demonstrated for 30 J, 8 ps laser pulses. The first x-ray deflectometry images obtained under laser backlighting showed up to 25% image contrast and thus enabled detection of electron areal density gradients with a maximum value of 8.1 ± 0.5 × 1023 cm₋3 in amore » low-Z millimeter sized sample. An electron density profile was obtained from refraction measurements with an error of <8%. We found the 50 ± 15 μm spatial resolution achieved across the full field of view was limited by the x-ray source-size, similar to conventional radiography.« less

  16. An x-ray backlit Talbot-Lau deflectometer for high-energy-density electron density diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, M P; Stutman, D; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W; Mileham, C; Begishev, I A; Bromage, J; Regan, S P

    2016-02-01

    X-ray phase-contrast techniques can measure electron density gradients in high-energy-density plasmas through refraction induced phase shifts. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer consisting of free standing ultrathin gratings was deployed at an ultra-short, high-intensity laser system using K-shell emission from a 1-30 J, 8 ps laser pulse focused on thin Cu foil targets. Grating survival was demonstrated for 30 J, 8 ps laser pulses. The first x-ray deflectometry images obtained under laser backlighting showed up to 25% image contrast and thus enabled detection of electron areal density gradients with a maximum value of 8.1 ± 0.5 × 10(23) cm(-3) in a low-Z millimeter sized sample. An electron density profile was obtained from refraction measurements with an error of <8%. The 50 ± 15 μm spatial resolution achieved across the full field of view was found to be limited by the x-ray source-size, similar to conventional radiography.

  17. Robust Pitaya-Structured Pyrite as High Energy Density Cathode for High-Rate Lithium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xijun; Liu, Jun; Liu, Zhengbo; Shen, Jiadong; Hu, Renzong; Liu, Jiangwen; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Min

    2017-08-21

    To solve the serious problems (the agglomeration of nano-Fe(0), dissolution of polysulfide, and low electronic conductivity of Li2S) of earth-abundant pyrite (FeS2) cathodes for lithium batteries, a simple in situ encapsulation and transformation route has been successfully developed to synthesis pitaya-structured porous carbon embedded with FeS2 nanoparticles. Due to such a hierarchical architecture design, this cathode of pitaya-structured FeS2@C can effectively avoid the serious agglomeration and coarsening of small Fe nanoparticles, reduce the dissolution of polysulfide, and provide superior kinetics toward lithium storage, resulting in enhanced reversibility and rate capability. Cycling in the voltage region of 1.0-3.0 V at 0.3 A g(-1), the current conversion-based FeS2@C cathode displays a high and stable energy density (about 1100 Wh kg(-1)), ultrahigh rate capability (a reversible capability of 660, 609, 554, 499, 449, and 400 mA h g(-1) at 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, and 10 A g(-1), respectively), and stable cycling performance.

  18. A Microelectromechanical High-Density Energy Storage/Rapid Release System

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Allen, Jim J.; Meeks, Kent D.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Sam L.

    1999-07-21

    One highly desirable characteristic of electrostatically driven microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is that they consume very little power. The corresponding drawback is that the force they produce may be inadequate for many applications. It has previously been demonstrated that gear reduction units or microtransmissions can substantially increase the torque generated by microengines. Operating speed, however, is also reduced by the transmission gear ratio. Some applications require both high speed and high force. If this output is only required for a limited period of time, then energy could be stored in a mechanical system and rapidly released upon demand. We have designed, fabricated, and demonstrated a high-density energy storage/rapid release system that accomplishes this task. Built using a 5-level surface micromachining technology, the assembly closely resembles a medieval crossbow. Energy releases on the order of tens of nanojoules have already been demonstrated, and significantly higher energy systems are under development.

  19. Holographic Dark Energy Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Hassan

    2011-06-01

    In this article we consider the cosmological model based on the holographic dark energy. We study dark energy density in Universe with arbitrary spatially curvature described by the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric. We use Chevallier-Polarski-Linder parametrization to specify dark energy density.

  20. High-energy-density electron beam generation in ultra intense laser-plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianxun; Ma, Yanyun; Yang, Xiaohu; Zhao, Jun; Yu, Tongpu; Shao, Fuqiu; Zhuo, Hongbin; Gan, Longfei; Zhang, Guobo; Zhao, Yuan; Yang, Jingkang

    2017-01-01

    By using a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, we demonstrate a scheme for high-energy-density electron beam generation by irradiating an ultra intense laser pulse onto an aluminum (Al) target. With the laser having a peak intensity of 4 × 1023 W cm‑2, a high quality electron beam with a maximum density of 117nc and a kinetic energy density up to 8.79 × 1018 J m‑3 is generated. The temperature of the electron beam can be 416 MeV, and the beam divergence is only 7.25°. As the laser peak intensity increases (e.g., 1024 W cm‑2), both the beam energy density (3.56 × 1019 J m‑3) and the temperature (545 MeV) are increased, and the beam collimation is well controlled. The maximum density of the electron beam can even reach 180nc. Such beams should have potential applications in the areas of antiparticle generation, laboratory astrophysics, etc. This work is financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475260, 11305264, 11622547, 91230205, and 11474360), the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2013CBA01504), and the Research Project of NUDT (No. JC14-02-02).

  1. Edge-enriched, porous carbon-based, high energy density supercapacitors for hybrid electric vehicles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Jung; Yang, Cheol-Min; Park, Ki Chul; Kaneko, Katsumi; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Noguchi, Minoru; Fujino, Takeshi; Oyama, Shigeki; Endo, Morinobu

    2012-03-12

    Supercapacitors can store and deliver energy by a simple charge separation, and thus they could be an attractive option to meet transient high energy density in operating fuel cells and in electric and hybrid electric vehicles. To achieve such requirements, intensive studies have been carried out to improve the volumetric capacitance in supercapacitors using various types and forms of carbons including carbon nanotubes and graphenes. However, conventional porous carbons are not suitable for use as electrode material in supercapacitors for such high energy density applications. Here, we show that edge-enriched porous carbons are the best electrode material for high energy density supercapacitors to be used in vehicles as an auxiliary powertrain. Molten potassium hydroxide penetrates well-aligned graphene layers vertically and consequently generates both suitable pores that are easily accessible to the electrolyte and a large fraction of electrochemically active edge sites. We expect that our findings will motivate further research related to energy storage devices and also environmentally friendly electric vehicles. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The Dawn of a New Era for High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E; McCrory, R; Meyerhofer, D; Keane, C

    2009-02-26

    The field of High Energy Density (HED) physics is on the verge of a revolutionary event - the achievement of fusion ignition in the laboratory. New laser facilities, the OMEGA Extended Performance (EP) laser at the University of Rochester and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, greatly extend the range of high energy density (HED) plasma conditions (including ignition) accessible in the laboratory. These conditions are among the most extreme obtainable, with pressures in excess of {approx}1,000,000 atmospheres. Experiments at these facilities will elucidate fundamental new science in astrophysics, materials science, laser-matter interactions, and other areas. The demonstration of fusion ignition will be the culmination of decades of research, and for the first time, will open the burning plasma regime to laboratory exploration. Ignition will spur the development of advanced options for clean, environmentally sustainable energy.

  3. High-energy-density Targets Fabricated by The University of Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Sallee; Davis, J. S.; Gao, L.; Gillespie, R. S.; MacDonald, M. J.; Malamud, G.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Wan, W. C.; Young, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Keiter, P. A.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-10-01

    The University of Michigan has been fabricating their own targets for high-energy-density physics experiments for well over the past decade. We utilize the process of machined acrylic bodies and tightly toleranced mating components that serve as constraints, enabling our group to build repeatable targets. We favor traditional machining, utilizing 3D printing when it suits, taking advantage of the very best part of both of these methods of creating precision parts for our targets. Here we present several campaigns shot at the OMEGA, Titan and Trident facilities and methods used to those fabricate targets. This work is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0002956, and the National Laser User Facility Program, Grant Number DE-NA0002719.

  4. Strongly Interacting Matter Matter at Very High Energy Density: 3 Lectures in Zakopane

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.

    2010-06-09

    These lectures concern the properties of strongly interacting matter at very high energy density. I begin with the Color Glass Condensate and the Glasma, matter that controls the earliest times in hadronic collisions. I then describe the Quark Gluon Plasma, matter produced from the thermalized remnants of the Glasma. Finally, I describe high density baryonic matter, in particular Quarkyonic matter. The discussion will be intuitive and based on simple structural aspects of QCD. There will be some discussion of experimental tests of these ideas.

  5. Generalized acoustic energy density.

    PubMed

    Xu, Buye; Sommerfeldt, Scott D; Leishman, Timothy W

    2011-09-01

    The properties of acoustic kinetic energy density and total energy density of sound fields in lightly damped enclosures have been explored thoroughly in the literature. Their increased spatial uniformity makes them more favorable measurement quantities for various applications than acoustic potential energy density (or squared pressure), which is most often used. In this paper, a generalized acoustic energy density (GED), will be introduced. It is defined by introducing weighting factors into the formulation of total acoustic energy density. With an additional degree of freedom, the GED can conform to the traditional acoustic energy density quantities, or it can be optimized for different applications. The properties of the GED will be explored in this paper for individual room modes, a diffuse sound field, and a sound field below the Schroeder frequency. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  6. Examination of level density prescriptions for the interpretation of high-energy γ -ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Srijit; Pandit, Deepak; Dey, Balaram; Mondal, Debasish; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; De, A.; Banerjee, S. R.

    2014-11-01

    High-energy γ -ray spectra measured by our group involving the compound nuclei (CN) 63Cu at excitation energy E*˜36 MeV with average angular momentum J =12 -17 ℏ , 97Tc at E*˜29 -50 MeV with J =12 -14 ℏ , 113Sb at E*=109 and 121 MeV with J =49 -59 ℏ , and 201Tl at E*=39.5 and 47.5 MeV with J =18 -24 ℏ have been analyzed utilizing the level density prescriptions of (i) Ignatyuk, Smirenkin, and Tishin (IST), (ii) Budtz-Jorgensen and Knitter (BJK), and (iii) Kataria, Ramamurthy, and Kapoor (KRK). These three prescriptions have been tested for the correct statistical model description of high-energy γ rays in the light of extracting the giant dipole resonance (GDR) parameters at low excitation energy and spin where shell effects might play an important role, as well as at high excitation energy where shell effects have melted. Interestingly, only the IST level density prescription could explain the high-energy γ -ray spectra with reasonable GDR parameters for all four nuclei.

  7. Highly biocompatible, nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite synthesized in a solvothermal process driven by high energy density microwave radiation

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, Dariusz; Chudoba, Tadeusz; Malka, Iwona; Kedzierska, Aleksandra; Lojkowski, Witold; Swieszkowski, Wojciech; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof Jan; Kolodziejczyk-Mierzynska, Małgorzata; Lewandowska-Szumiel, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    A microwave, solvothermal synthesis of highly biocompatible hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanopowder was developed. The process was conducted in a microwave radiation field having a high energy density of 5 W/mL and over a time less than 2 minutes. The sample measurements included: powder X-ray diffraction, density, specific surface area, and chemical composition. The morphology and structure were investigated by scanning electron microscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thermal behavior analysis was conducted using a simultaneous thermal analysis technique coupled with quadruple mass spectrometry. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy tests of heated samples were performed. A degradation test and a biocompatibility study in vitro using human osteoblast cells were also conducted. The developed method enables the synthesis of pure, fully crystalline hexagonal HAp nanopowder with a specific surface area close to 240 m2/g and a Ca/P molar ratio equal to 1.57. TEM measurements showed that this method results in particles with an average grain size below 6 nm. A 28-day degradation test conducted according to the ISO standard indicated a 22% loss of initial weight and a calcium ion concentration at 200 μmol/dm3 in the tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane hydrochloride test solution. The cytocompatibility of the obtained material was confirmed in a culture of human bone derived cells, both in an indirect test using the material extract, and in direct contact. A quantitative analysis was based on the 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide. Viability assay as well as on DNA content measurements in the PicoGreen test. Indirect observations were performed at one point in time according to the ISO standard for in vitro cytotoxicity (ie, after 24 hours of cell exposure to the extracts). The direct contact tests were completed at three time points: after 24 hours, on day 7, and on day 14 of a culture in an osteogenic

  8. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium-nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Y.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Chang, Hee Jung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-02-01

    Sodium-metal halide batteries have been considered as one of the more attractive technologies for stationary electrical energy storage, however, they are not used for broader applications despite their relatively well-known redox system. One of the roadblocks hindering market penetration is the high-operating temperature. Here we demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190 °C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh kg-1, higher than that of conventional tubular sodium-nickel chloride batteries (280 °C), is obtained for planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at 190 °C over a long-term cell test (1,000 cycles), and it attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials at the lower operating temperature. Results reported here demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at an intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs.

  9. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium-nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density.

    PubMed

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Y; Meinhardt, Kerry D; Chang, Hee Jung; Canfield, Nathan L; Sprenkle, Vincent L

    2016-02-11

    Sodium-metal halide batteries have been considered as one of the more attractive technologies for stationary electrical energy storage, however, they are not used for broader applications despite their relatively well-known redox system. One of the roadblocks hindering market penetration is the high-operating temperature. Here we demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190 °C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh kg(-1), higher than that of conventional tubular sodium-nickel chloride batteries (280 °C), is obtained for planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at 190 °C over a long-term cell test (1,000 cycles), and it attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials at the lower operating temperature. Results reported here demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at an intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs.

  10. Tailoring the dipole properties in dielectric polymers to realize high energy density with high breakdown strength and low dielectric loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Yash; Lin, Minren; Wu, Shan; Cheng, Zhaoxi; Jeong, D.-Y.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2015-03-01

    High energy density polymer materials are desirable for a broad range of modern power electronic systems. Here, we report the development of a new class of polymer dielectrics based on polyurea and polythiourea, which possess high thermal stability. By increasing the dipole density, the dielectric constant of meta-phenylene polyurea and methylene polythiourea can be increased to 5.7, compared with aromatic polyurea and aromatic polythiourea, which have a dielectric constant in the range of 4.1-4.3. The random dipoles with high dipolar moment and amorphous structure of these polyurea and polythiourea based polymers provide strong scattering to the charge carriers, resulting in low losses even at high electric fields. Consequently, this new class of polymers exhibit a linear dielectric response to the highest field measured (>700 MV/m) with a high breakdown strength, achieving high energy density (>13 J/cm3) with high efficiency (>90%).

  11. Tailoring the dipole properties in dielectric polymers to realize high energy density with high breakdown strength and low dielectric loss

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, Yash; Lin, Minren; Wu, Shan; Zhang, Q. M. E-mail: qxz1@psu.edu; Cheng, Zhaoxi; Jeong, D.-Y. E-mail: qxz1@psu.edu

    2015-03-21

    High energy density polymer materials are desirable for a broad range of modern power electronic systems. Here, we report the development of a new class of polymer dielectrics based on polyurea and polythiourea, which possess high thermal stability. By increasing the dipole density, the dielectric constant of meta-phenylene polyurea and methylene polythiourea can be increased to 5.7, compared with aromatic polyurea and aromatic polythiourea, which have a dielectric constant in the range of 4.1–4.3. The random dipoles with high dipolar moment and amorphous structure of these polyurea and polythiourea based polymers provide strong scattering to the charge carriers, resulting in low losses even at high electric fields. Consequently, this new class of polymers exhibit a linear dielectric response to the highest field measured (>700 MV/m) with a high breakdown strength, achieving high energy density (>13 J/cm{sup 3}) with high efficiency (>90%)

  12. The high-energy-density counterpropagating shear experiment and turbulent self-heating

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, F. W.; Fincke, J. R.; Loomis, E. N.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Flippo, K. A.

    2013-12-06

    The counterpropagating shear experiment has previously demonstrated the ability to create regions of shockdriven shear, balanced symmetrically in pressure and experiencing minimal net drift. This allows for the creation of a high-Mach-number high-energy-density shear environment. New data from the counterpropagating shear campaign is presented, and both hydrocode modeling and theoretical analysis in the context of a Reynolds-averaged-Navier-Stokes model suggest turbulent dissipation of energy from the supersonic flow bounding the layer is a significant driver in its expansion. A theoretical minimum shear flow Mach number threshold is suggested for substantial thermal-turbulence coupling.

  13. The high-energy-density counterpropagating shear experiment and turbulent self-heating

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, F. W.; Fincke, J. R.; Loomis, E. N.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Flippo, K. A.

    2013-12-15

    The counterpropagating shear experiment has previously demonstrated the ability to create regions of shock-driven shear, balanced symmetrically in pressure, and experiencing minimal net drift. This allows for the creation of a high-Mach-number high-energy-density shear environment. New data from the counterpropagating shear campaign is presented, and both hydrocode modeling and theoretical analysis in the context of a Reynolds-averaged-Navier-Stokes model suggest turbulent dissipation of energy from the supersonic flow bounding the layer is a significant driver in its expansion. A theoretical minimum shear flow Mach number threshold is suggested for substantial thermal-turbulence coupling.

  14. A high-energy-density redox flow battery based on zinc/polyhalide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqun; Lai, Qinzhi; Zhang, Jianlu; Zhang, Huamin

    2012-05-01

    Zn and the Art of Battery Development: A zinc/polyhalide redox flow battery employs Br(-) /ClBr(2-) and Zn/Zn(2+) redox couples in its positive and negative half-cells, respectively. The performance of the battery is evaluated by charge-discharge cycling tests and reveals a high energy efficiency of 81%, based on a Coulombic efficiency of 96% and voltage efficiency of 84%. The new battery technology can provide high performance and energy density at an acceptable cost.

  15. High energy density rechargeable magnesium battery using earth-abundant and non-toxic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orikasa, Yuki; Masese, Titus; Koyama, Yukinori; Mori, Takuya; Hattori, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Okado, Tetsuya; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Minato, Taketoshi; Tassel, Cédric; Kim, Jungeun; Kobayashi, Yoji; Abe, Takeshi; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2014-07-01

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries are poised to be viable candidates for large-scale energy storage devices in smart grid communities and electric vehicles. However, the energy density of previously proposed rechargeable magnesium batteries is low, limited mainly by the cathode materials. Here, we present new design approaches for the cathode in order to realize a high-energy-density rechargeable magnesium battery system. Ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 demonstrates a high reversible capacity exceeding 300 mAh.g-1 at a voltage of approximately 2.4 V vs. Mg. Further, the electronic and crystal structure of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 changes during the charging and discharging processes, which demonstrates the (de)insertion of magnesium in the host structure. The combination of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 with a magnesium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-triglyme electrolyte system proposed in this work provides a low-cost and practical rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density, free from corrosion and safety problems.

  16. High energy density rechargeable magnesium battery using earth-abundant and non-toxic elements

    PubMed Central

    Orikasa, Yuki; Masese, Titus; Koyama, Yukinori; Mori, Takuya; Hattori, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Okado, Tetsuya; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Minato, Taketoshi; Tassel, Cédric; Kim, Jungeun; Kobayashi, Yoji; Abe, Takeshi; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2014-01-01

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries are poised to be viable candidates for large-scale energy storage devices in smart grid communities and electric vehicles. However, the energy density of previously proposed rechargeable magnesium batteries is low, limited mainly by the cathode materials. Here, we present new design approaches for the cathode in order to realize a high-energy-density rechargeable magnesium battery system. Ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 demonstrates a high reversible capacity exceeding 300 mAh·g−1 at a voltage of approximately 2.4 V vs. Mg. Further, the electronic and crystal structure of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 changes during the charging and discharging processes, which demonstrates the (de)insertion of magnesium in the host structure. The combination of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 with a magnesium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide–triglyme electrolyte system proposed in this work provides a low-cost and practical rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density, free from corrosion and safety problems. PMID:25011939

  17. High energy density rechargeable magnesium battery using earth-abundant and non-toxic elements.

    PubMed

    Orikasa, Yuki; Masese, Titus; Koyama, Yukinori; Mori, Takuya; Hattori, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Okado, Tetsuya; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Minato, Taketoshi; Tassel, Cédric; Kim, Jungeun; Kobayashi, Yoji; Abe, Takeshi; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2014-07-11

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries are poised to be viable candidates for large-scale energy storage devices in smart grid communities and electric vehicles. However, the energy density of previously proposed rechargeable magnesium batteries is low, limited mainly by the cathode materials. Here, we present new design approaches for the cathode in order to realize a high-energy-density rechargeable magnesium battery system. Ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 demonstrates a high reversible capacity exceeding 300 Ah · g(-1) at a voltage of approximately 2.4 V vs. Mg. Further, the electronic and crystal structure of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 changes during the charging and discharging processes, which demonstrates the (de)insertion of magnesium in the host structure. The combination of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 with a magnesium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-triglyme electrolyte system proposed in this work provides a low-cost and practical rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density, free from corrosion and safety problems.

  18. High Energy Storage Density and Impedance Response of PLZT2/95/5 Antiferroelectric Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, Bi; Liu, Qiuxiang; Tang, Xingui; Zhang, Tianfu; Jiang, Yanping; Li, Wenhua; Luo, Jie

    2017-02-08

    (Pb0.97La0.02)(Zr0.95Ti0.05)O₃ (PLZT2/95/5) ceramics were successfully prepared via a solid-state reaction route. The dielectric properties were investigated in the temperature region of 26-650 °C. The dielectric diffuse anomaly in the dielectric relaxation was found in the high temperature region of 600-650 °C with increasing the measuring frequency, which was related to the dynamic thermal process of ionized oxygen vacancies generated in the high temperature. Two phase transition points were detected during heating, which were found to coexist from 150 to 200 °C. Electric field induced ferroelectric to antiferroelectric phase transition behavior of the (Pb0.97La0.02)(Zr0.95Ti0.05)O₃ ceramics was investigated in this work with an emphasis on energy storage properties. A recoverable energy-storage density of 0.83 J/cm³ and efficiency of 70% was obtained in (Pb0.97La0.02)(Zr0.95Ti0.05)O₃ ceramics at 55 kV/cm. Based on these results, (Pb0.97La0.02)(Zr0.95Ti0.05)O₃ ceramics with a large recoverable energy-storage density could be a potential candidate for the applications in high energy-storage density ceramic capacitors.

  19. Advanced High Energy Density Secondary Batteries with Multi-Electron Reaction Materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renjie; Luo, Rui; Huang, Yongxin; Wu, Feng; Li, Li

    2016-10-01

    Secondary batteries have become important for smart grid and electric vehicle applications, and massive effort has been dedicated to optimizing the current generation and improving their energy density. Multi-electron chemistry has paved a new path for the breaking of the barriers that exist in traditional battery research and applications, and provided new ideas for developing new battery systems that meet energy density requirements. An in-depth understanding of multi-electron chemistries in terms of the charge transfer mechanisms occuring during their electrochemical processes is necessary and urgent for the modification of secondary battery materials and development of secondary battery systems. In this Review, multi-electron chemistry for high energy density electrode materials and the corresponding secondary battery systems are discussed. Specifically, four battery systems based on multi-electron reactions are classified in this review: lithium- and sodium-ion batteries based on monovalent cations; rechargeable batteries based on the insertion of polyvalent cations beyond those of alkali metals; metal-air batteries, and Li-S batteries. It is noted that challenges still exist in the development of multi-electron chemistries that must be overcome to meet the energy density requirements of different battery systems, and much effort has more effort to be devoted to this.

  20. Advanced High Energy Density Secondary Batteries with Multi‐Electron Reaction Materials

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Rui; Huang, Yongxin; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Secondary batteries have become important for smart grid and electric vehicle applications, and massive effort has been dedicated to optimizing the current generation and improving their energy density. Multi‐electron chemistry has paved a new path for the breaking of the barriers that exist in traditional battery research and applications, and provided new ideas for developing new battery systems that meet energy density requirements. An in‐depth understanding of multi‐electron chemistries in terms of the charge transfer mechanisms occuring during their electrochemical processes is necessary and urgent for the modification of secondary battery materials and development of secondary battery systems. In this Review, multi‐electron chemistry for high energy density electrode materials and the corresponding secondary battery systems are discussed. Specifically, four battery systems based on multi‐electron reactions are classified in this review: lithium‐ and sodium‐ion batteries based on monovalent cations; rechargeable batteries based on the insertion of polyvalent cations beyond those of alkali metals; metal–air batteries, and Li–S batteries. It is noted that challenges still exist in the development of multi‐electron chemistries that must be overcome to meet the energy density requirements of different battery systems, and much effort has more effort to be devoted to this. PMID:27840796

  1. A high-energy-density sugar biobattery based on a synthetic enzymatic pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiguang; Kin Tam, Tsz; Sun, Fangfang; You, Chun; Percival Zhang, Y-H

    2014-01-01

    High-energy-density, green, safe batteries are highly desirable for meeting the rapidly growing needs of portable electronics. The incomplete oxidation of sugars mediated by one or a few enzymes in enzymatic fuel cells suffers from low energy densities and slow reaction rates. Here we show that nearly 24 electrons per glucose unit of maltodextrin can be produced through a synthetic catabolic pathway that comprises 13 enzymes in an air-breathing enzymatic fuel cell. This enzymatic fuel cell is based on non-immobilized enzymes that exhibit a maximum power output of 0.8 mW cm(-2) and a maximum current density of 6 mA cm(-2), which are far higher than the values for systems based on immobilized enzymes. Enzymatic fuel cells containing a 15% (wt/v) maltodextrin solution have an energy-storage density of 596 Ah kg(-1), which is one order of magnitude higher than that of lithium-ion batteries. Sugar-powered biobatteries could serve as next-generation green power sources, particularly for portable electronics.

  2. Pulse Power Capability Of High Energy Density Capacitors Based on a New Dielectric Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winsor, Paul; Scholz, Tim; Hudis, Martin; Slenes, Kirk M.

    1999-01-01

    A new dielectric composite consisting of a polymer coated onto a high-density metallized Kraft has been developed for application in high energy density pulse power capacitors. The polymer coating is custom formulated for high dielectric constant and strength with minimum dielectric losses. The composite can be wound and processed using conventional wound film capacitor manufacturing equipment. This new system has the potential to achieve 2 to 3 J/cu cm whole capacitor energy density at voltage levels above 3.0 kV, and can maintain its mechanical properties to temperatures above 150 C. The technical and manufacturing development of the composite material and fabrication into capacitors are summarized in this paper. Energy discharge testing, including capacitance and charge-discharge efficiency at normal and elevated temperatures, as well as DC life testing were performed on capacitors manufactured using this material. TPL (Albuquerque, NM) has developed the material and Aerovox (New Bedford, MA) has used the material to build and test actual capacitors. The results of the testing will focus on pulse power applications specifically those found in electro-magnetic armor and guns, high power microwave sources and defibrillators.

  3. Pulse Power Capability Of High Energy Density Capacitors Based on a New Dielectric Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winsor, Paul; Scholz, Tim; Hudis, Martin; Slenes, Kirk M.

    1999-01-01

    A new dielectric composite consisting of a polymer coated onto a high-density metallized Kraft has been developed for application in high energy density pulse power capacitors. The polymer coating is custom formulated for high dielectric constant and strength with minimum dielectric losses. The composite can be wound and processed using conventional wound film capacitor manufacturing equipment. This new system has the potential to achieve 2 to 3 J/cu cm whole capacitor energy density at voltage levels above 3.0 kV, and can maintain its mechanical properties to temperatures above 150 C. The technical and manufacturing development of the composite material and fabrication into capacitors are summarized in this paper. Energy discharge testing, including capacitance and charge-discharge efficiency at normal and elevated temperatures, as well as DC life testing were performed on capacitors manufactured using this material. TPL (Albuquerque, NM) has developed the material and Aerovox (New Bedford, MA) has used the material to build and test actual capacitors. The results of the testing will focus on pulse power applications specifically those found in electro-magnetic armor and guns, high power microwave sources and defibrillators.

  4. Mixed metal oxides as alternate cathodes for high energy density electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    Silver (II) oxide is currently the Navy`s cathode of choice in high energy density, high rate batteries for torpedo and mobile target applications, for medium rate applications such as Seal Delivery Vehicles, and may be useful for low rate, long endurance UUV missions. While it is certainly a versatile material, silver (II) oxide is expensive to produce and has a lower faradaic (storage) capacity than desired. New research being conducted at the NUWC electric propulsion laboratory is focused toward developing new, lower cost cathode materials with energy densities at least comparable to silver (II) oxide. Mixed metal oxides, with silver (II) oxide as one component, are under investigation. Other materials, without a silver component, are also being considered. This poster will illustrate recent developments in the modification of the silver (II) oxide cathode for Navy applications.

  5. Enhancing Understanding of High Energy Density Plasmas Using Fluid Modeling with Kinetic Closures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, David; Held, Eric; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Masti, Robert; King, Jake

    2016-10-01

    This work seeks to understand possible stabilization mechanisms of the early-time electrothermal instability in the evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) experiments. Such mechanisms may include electron thermal conduction, viscosity, and large magnetic fields. Experiments have shown that the high-energy density plasmas from wire-array implosions require physics modelling that goes well beyond simple models such as ideal MHD. The plan is to develop a multi-fluid extended-MHD model that includes kinetic closures for thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity using codes that are easily available to the wider research community. Such an effort would provide the community with a well-benchmarked tool capable of advanced modeling of high-energy-density plasmas.

  6. Visualizing fast electron energy transport into laser-compressed high-density fast-ignition targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrott, L. C.; Wei, M. S.; McGuffey, C.; Solodov, A. A.; Theobald, W.; Qiao, B.; Stoeckl, C.; Betti, R.; Chen, H.; Delettrez, J.; Döppner, T.; Giraldez, E. M.; Glebov, V. Y.; Habara, H.; Iwawaki, T.; Key, M. H.; Luo, R. W.; Marshall, F. J.; McLean, H. S.; Mileham, C.; Patel, P. K.; Santos, J. J.; Sawada, H.; Stephens, R. B.; Yabuuchi, T.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-05-01

    Recent progress in kilojoule-scale high-intensity lasers has opened up new areas of research in radiography, laboratory astrophysics, high-energy-density physics, and fast-ignition (FI) laser fusion. FI requires efficient heating of pre-compressed high-density fuel by an intense relativistic electron beam produced from laser-matter interaction. Understanding the details of electron beam generation and transport is crucial for FI. Here we report on the first visualization of fast electron spatial energy deposition in a laser-compressed cone-in-shell FI target, facilitated by doping the shell with copper and imaging the K-shell radiation. Multi-scale simulations accompanying the experiments clearly show the location of fast electrons and reveal key parameters affecting energy coupling. The approach provides a more direct way to infer energy coupling and guide experimental designs that significantly improve the laser-to-core coupling to 7%. Our findings lay the groundwork for further improving efficiency, with 15% energy coupling predicted in FI experiments using an existing megajoule-scale laser driver.

  7. High energy-density physics: From nuclear testing to the superlasers

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, E.; Campbell, E.M.; Holmes, N.C.; Libby, S.B.; Remington, B.A.

    1995-08-14

    The authors describe the role for the next-generation ``superlasers`` in the study of matter under extremely high energy density conditions, in comparison to previous uses of nuclear explosives for this purpose. As examples, the authors focus on three important areas of physics that have unresolved issues which must be addressed by experiment: equations of state, turbulent hydrodynamics, and the transport of radiation. They describe the advantages the large lasers will have in a comprehensive experimental program.

  8. Talbot-Lau x-ray interferometry for high energy density plasma diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.

    2011-11-15

    High resolution density diagnostics are difficult in high energy density laboratory plasmas (HEDLP) experiments due to the scarcity of probes that can penetrate above solid density plasmas. Hard x-rays are one possible probe for such dense plasmas. We study the possibility of applying an x-ray method recently developed for medical imaging, differential phase-contrast with Talbot-Lau interferometers, for the diagnostic of electron density and small-scale hydrodynamic instabilities in HEDLP experiments. The Talbot method uses micro-periodic gratings to measure the refraction and ultra-small angle scatter of x-rays through an object and is attractive for HEDLP diagnostic due to its capability to work with incoherent and polychromatic x-ray sources such as the laser driven backlighters used for HEDLP radiography. Our paper studies the potential of the Talbot method for HEDLP diagnostic, its adaptation to the HEDLP environment, and its extension of high x-ray energy using micro-periodic mirrors. The analysis is illustrated with experimental results obtained using a laboratory Talbot interferometer.

  9. Talbot-Lau x-ray interferometry for high energy density plasma diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Stutman, D; Finkenthal, M

    2011-11-01

    High resolution density diagnostics are difficult in high energy density laboratory plasmas (HEDLP) experiments due to the scarcity of probes that can penetrate above solid density plasmas. Hard x-rays are one possible probe for such dense plasmas. We study the possibility of applying an x-ray method recently developed for medical imaging, differential phase-contrast with Talbot-Lau interferometers, for the diagnostic of electron density and small-scale hydrodynamic instabilities in HEDLP experiments. The Talbot method uses micro-periodic gratings to measure the refraction and ultra-small angle scatter of x-rays through an object and is attractive for HEDLP diagnostic due to its capability to work with incoherent and polychromatic x-ray sources such as the laser driven backlighters used for HEDLP radiography. Our paper studies the potential of the Talbot method for HEDLP diagnostic, its adaptation to the HEDLP environment, and its extension of high x-ray energy using micro-periodic mirrors. The analysis is illustrated with experimental results obtained using a laboratory Talbot interferometer. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  10. Activated Microporous Carbon Derived from Almond Shells for High Energy Density Asymmetric Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun; Yang, Shaoran; Cai, Junjie; Zhang, Qiaobao; Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Kaili

    2016-06-22

    Via the activation treatment of carbonized almond shells with HNO3 and KOH, activated microporous carbon (AMC-3 and AMC-2) was successfully synthesized. These two AMC electrodes demonstrate remarkable electrochemical behaviors such as high rate capability, high specific capacitance, and excellent cycle stability when serving as electrodes for supercapacitors. More importantly, through the use of a Zn-Ni-Co ternary oxide (ZNCO) positive electrode and the AMC negative electrode, asymmetric supercapacitors (ASC) were assembled that deliver superior energy density (53.3 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 1126.1 W kg(-1) for ASC-2 and 53.6 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 1124.5 W kg(-1) for ASC-3) and excellent stability (82.7% and 83.4% specific capacitance retention for ZNCO//AMC ASC-2 and ZNCO//AMC ASC-3, respectively, after 5000 cycles). Through these two methods, low-cost, renewable, and environmentally friendly electrode materials can be provided for high energy density supercapacitors.

  11. Theory and High-Energy-Density Laser Experiments Relevant to Accretion Processes in Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauland, Christine; Drake, R.; Loupias, B.; Falize, E.; Busschaert, C.; Ravasio, A.; Yurchak, R.; Pelka, A.; Koenig, M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Plewa, T.; Huntington, C. M.; Kaczala, D. N.; Klein, S.; Sweeney, R.; Villete, B.; Young, R.; Keiter, P. A.

    2012-05-01

    We present results from high-energy-density (HED) laboratory experiments that explore the contribution of radiative shock waves to the evolving dynamics of the cataclysmic variable (CV) systems in which they reside. CVs can be classified under two main categories, non-magnetic and magnetic. In the process of accretion, both types involve strongly radiating shocks that provide the main source of radiation in the binary systems. This radiation can cause varying structure to develop depending on the optical properties of the material on either side of the shock. The ability of high-intensity lasers to create large energy densities in targets of millimeter-scale volume makes it feasible to create similar radiative shocks in the laboratory. We provide an overview of both CV systems and their connection to the designed and executed laboratory experiments preformed on two laser facilities. Available data and accompanying simulations will likewise be shown. Funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Prog. in High-Energy-Density Lab. Plasmas, by the Nat. Laser User Facility Prog. in NNSA-DS and by the Predictive Sci. Acad. Alliances Prog. in NNSA-ASC, under grant numbers are DE-FG52-09NA29548, DE-FG52-09NA29034, and DE-FC52-08NA28616.

  12. Hydrate-melt electrolytes for high-energy-density aqueous batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yuki; Usui, Kenji; Sodeyama, Keitaro; Ko, Seongjae; Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Yamada, Atsuo

    2016-10-01

    Aqueous Li-ion batteries are attracting increasing attention because they are potentially low in cost, safe and environmentally friendly. However, their low energy density (<100 Wh kg-1 based on total electrode weight), which results from the narrow operating potential window of water and the limited selection of suitable negative electrodes, is problematic for their future widespread application. Here, we explore optimized eutectic systems of several organic Li salts and show that a room-temperature hydrate melt of Li salts can be used as a stable aqueous electrolyte in which all water molecules participate in Li+ hydration shells while retaining fluidity. This hydrate-melt electrolyte enables a reversible reaction at a commercial Li4Ti5O12 negative electrode with a low reaction potential (1.55 V versus Li+/Li) and a high capacity (175 mAh g-1). The resultant aqueous Li-ion batteries with high energy density (>130 Wh kg-1) and high voltage (˜2.3-3.1 V) represent significant progress towards performance comparable to that of commercial non-aqueous batteries (with energy densities of ˜150-400 Wh kg-1 and voltages of ˜2.4-3.8 V).

  13. α MnMoO₄/graphene hybrid composite: high energy density supercapacitor electrode material.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debasis; Giri, Soumen; Moniruzzaman, Md; Basu, Tanya; Mandal, Manas; Das, Chapal Kumar

    2014-07-28

    A unique and cost effective hydrothermal procedure has been carried out for the synthesis of hexahedron shaped α MnMoO4 and its hybrid composite with graphene using three different weight percentages of graphene. Characterization techniques, such as XRD, Raman and FTIR analysis, established the phase and formation of the composite. The electrochemical characterization of the pseudocapacitive MnMoO4 and the MnMoO4/graphene composites in 1 M Na2SO4 displayed highest specific capacitances of 234 F g(-1) and 364 F g(-1), respectively at a current density of 2 A g(-1). Unlike many other pseudocapacitive electrode materials our prepared materials responded in a wide range of working potentials of (-)1 V to (+)1 V, which indeed resulted in a high energy density without substantial loss of power density. The highest energy densities of 130 Wh kg(-1) and 202.2 Wh kg(-1) were achieved, respectively for the MnMoO4 and the MnMoO4/graphene composite at a constant power delivery rate of 2000 W kg(-1). The synergistic effect of the graphene with the pseudocapacitive MnMoO4 caused an increased cycle stability of 88% specific capacitance retention after 1000 consecutive charge discharge cycles at 8 A g(-1) constant current density, which was higher than the virgin MnMoO4 with 84% specific capacitance retention.

  14. Differential heating: A versatile method for thermal conductivity measurements in high-energy-density matter

    DOE PAGES

    Ping, Y.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Sio, H.; ...

    2015-09-04

    We propose a method for thermal conductivity measurements of high energy density matter based on differential heating. A temperature gradient is created either by surface heating of one material or at an interface between two materials by different energy deposition. The subsequent heat conduction across the temperature gradient is observed by various time-resolved probing techniques. Conceptual designs of such measurements using laser heating, proton heating, and x-ray heating are presented. As a result, the sensitivity of the measurements to thermal conductivity is confirmed by simulations.

  15. Differential heating: A versatile method for thermal conductivity measurements in high-energy-density matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Y.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Sio, H.; Correa, A.; Shepherd, R.; Landen, O.; London, R. A.; Sterne, P. A.; Whitley, H. D.; Fratanduono, D.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, G. W.

    2015-09-01

    We propose a method for thermal conductivity measurements of high energy density matter based on differential heating. A temperature gradient is created either by surface heating of one material or at an interface between two materials by different energy deposition. The subsequent heat conduction across the temperature gradient is observed by various time-resolved probing techniques. Conceptual designs of such measurements using laser heating, proton heating, and x-ray heating are presented. The sensitivity of the measurements to thermal conductivity is confirmed by simulations.

  16. Differential heating: A versatile method for thermal conductivity measurements in high-energy-density matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, Y.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Correa, A.; Shepherd, R.; Landen, O.; London, R. A.; Sterne, P. A.; Whitley, H. D.; Fratanduono, D.; Collins, G. W.; Sio, H.; Boehly, T. R.

    2015-09-15

    We propose a method for thermal conductivity measurements of high energy density matter based on differential heating. A temperature gradient is created either by surface heating of one material or at an interface between two materials by different energy deposition. The subsequent heat conduction across the temperature gradient is observed by various time-resolved probing techniques. Conceptual designs of such measurements using laser heating, proton heating, and x-ray heating are presented. The sensitivity of the measurements to thermal conductivity is confirmed by simulations.

  17. Novel LLM series high density energy materials: Synthesis, characterization, and thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagoria, Philip; Zhang, Maoxi; Tsyshevskiy, Roman; Kuklja, Maija

    Novel high density energy materials must satisfy specific requirements, such as an increased performance, reliably high stability to external stimuli, cost-efficiency and ease of synthesis, be environmentally benign, and be safe for handling and transportation. During the last decade, the attention of researchers has drifted from widely used nitroester-, nitramine-, and nitroaromatic-based explosives to nitrogen-rich heterocyclic compounds. Good thermal stability, the low melting point, high density, and moderate sensitivity make heterocycle materials attractive candidates for use as oxidizers in rocket propellants and fuels, secondary explosives, and possibly as melt-castable ingredients of high explosive formulations. In this report, the synthesis, characterization, and results of quantum-chemical DFT study of thermal stability of LLM-191, LLM-192 and LLM-200 high density energy materials are presented. Work performed under the auspices of the DOE by the LLNL (Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344). This research is supported in part by ONR (Grant N00014-12-1-0529) and NSF. We used NSF XSEDE (Grant DMR-130077) and DOE NERSC (Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231) resources.

  18. The impact of Hall physics on magnetized high energy density plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdain, P.-A.; Seyler, C. E.; Atoyan, L.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.; Pikuz, S. A.; Potter, W. M.; Schrafel, P. C.; Shelkovenko, T. A.

    2014-05-15

    Hall physics is often neglected in high energy density plasma jets due to the relatively high electron density of such jets (n{sub e} ∼ 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}). However, the vacuum region surrounding the jet has much lower densities and is dominated by Hall electric field. This electric field redirects plasma flows towards or away from the axis, depending on the radial current direction. A resulting change in the jet density has been observed experimentally. Furthermore, if an axial field is applied on the jet, the Hall effect is enhanced and ignoring it leads to serious discrepancies between experimental results and numerical simulations. By combining high currents (∼1 MA) and magnetic field helicity (15° angle) in a pulsed power generator such as COBRA, plasma jets can be magnetized with a 10 T axial field. The resulting field enhances the impact of the Hall effect by altering the density profile of current-free plasma jets and the stability of current-carrying plasma jets (e.g., Z-pinches)

  19. Ferroelectric polymer thin films with high energy density and low loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandas, Ishac Lamei Nagiub

    Dielectric materials with large electric energy density are actively pursued for many applications. Among commercially available polymer capacitor film, poly(vinylidene fluoride chlorotrifluoroethylene) P(VDF-CTFE) stands out due to its excellent capability to store electrical energy with relatively high efficiency. In this dissertation, we employed crosslinking approaches to improve energy density of the copolymer by concurrently reducing loss, enhancing permittivity, and improving breakdown strength of the copolymer. The fundamental idea of this effort is to introduce covalent bonding between the polymer chains to confine and destabilize the formation of ferroelectric domain. By carefully controlling of the process conditions and varying the polymer/crosslinking agents feeding ratios the copolymer structures were systematically tuned for optimized dielectric and electrical properties. The crosslinking method leads to the copolymer film with impressive 64% decreased of total loss, 24% improvement of polarization level (under 250 MV/m field) and 70 % improvement of breakdown strength compared to the pristine. All of above improvements have been synergized and consequently 315 % enhancement of energy density can be achieved in the crosslinked copolymers.

  20. Pie-like electrode design for high-energy density lithium–sulfur batteries

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jin Tao; Chen, Yu Ming; Li, Ju; Lou, Xiong Wen (David)

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the overwhelming advantage in energy density, lithium–sulfur (Li–S) battery is a promising next-generation electrochemical energy storage system. Despite many efforts in pursuing long cycle life, relatively little emphasis has been placed on increasing the areal energy density. Herein, we have designed and developed a ‘pie' structured electrode, which provides an excellent balance between gravimetric and areal energy densities. Combining lotus root-like multichannel carbon nanofibers ‘filling' and amino-functionalized graphene ‘crust', the free-standing paper electrode (S mass loading: 3.6 mg cm−2) delivers high specific capacity of 1,314 mAh g−1 (4.7 mAh cm−2) at 0.1 C (0.6 mA cm−2) accompanied with good cycling stability. Moreover, the areal capacity can be further boosted to more than 8 mAh cm−2 by stacking three layers of paper electrodes with S mass loading of 10.8 mg cm−2. PMID:26608228

  1. Pie-like electrode design for high-energy density lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jin Tao; Chen, Yu Ming; Li, Ju; Lou, Xiong Wen (David)

    2015-11-01

    Owing to the overwhelming advantage in energy density, lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising next-generation electrochemical energy storage system. Despite many efforts in pursuing long cycle life, relatively little emphasis has been placed on increasing the areal energy density. Herein, we have designed and developed a `pie' structured electrode, which provides an excellent balance between gravimetric and areal energy densities. Combining lotus root-like multichannel carbon nanofibers `filling' and amino-functionalized graphene `crust', the free-standing paper electrode (S mass loading: 3.6 mg cm-2) delivers high specific capacity of 1,314 mAh g-1 (4.7 mAh cm-2) at 0.1 C (0.6 mA cm-2) accompanied with good cycling stability. Moreover, the areal capacity can be further boosted to more than 8 mAh cm-2 by stacking three layers of paper electrodes with S mass loading of 10.8 mg cm-2.

  2. Pie-like electrode design for high-energy density lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jin Tao; Chen, Yu Ming; Li, Ju; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2015-11-26

    Owing to the overwhelming advantage in energy density, lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising next-generation electrochemical energy storage system. Despite many efforts in pursuing long cycle life, relatively little emphasis has been placed on increasing the areal energy density. Herein, we have designed and developed a 'pie' structured electrode, which provides an excellent balance between gravimetric and areal energy densities. Combining lotus root-like multichannel carbon nanofibers 'filling' and amino-functionalized graphene 'crust', the free-standing paper electrode (S mass loading: 3.6 mg cm(-2)) delivers high specific capacity of 1,314 mAh g(-1) (4.7 mAh cm(-2)) at 0.1 C (0.6 mA cm(-2)) accompanied with good cycling stability. Moreover, the areal capacity can be further boosted to more than 8 mAh cm(-2) by stacking three layers of paper electrodes with S mass loading of 10.8 mg cm(-2).

  3. High-temperature, high-power-density thermionic energy conversion for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretic converter outputs and efficiencies indicate the need to consider thermionic energy conversion (TEC) with greater power densities and higher temperatures within reasonable limits for space missions. Converter-output power density, voltage, and efficiency as functions of current density were determined for 1400-to-2000 K emitters with 725-to-1000 K collectors. The results encourage utilization of TEC with hotter-than-1650 K emitters and greater-than-6W sq cm outputs to attain better efficiencies, greater voltages, and higher waste-heat-rejection temperatures for multihundred-kilowatt space-power applications. For example, 1800 K, 30 A sq cm TEC operation for NEP compared with the 1650 K, 5 A/sq cm case should allow much lower radiation weights, substantially fewer and/or smaller emitter heat pipes, significantly reduced reactor and shield-related weights, many fewer converters and associated current-collecting bus bars, less power conditioning, and lower transmission losses. Integration of these effects should yield considerably reduced NEP specific weights.

  4. Design and simulation of high-energy-density shear experiments on OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, F. W.; Devolder, B.; di Stefano, C.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.; Kot, L.; Loomis, E. N.; Merritt, E. C.; Perry, T. S.; MacLaren, S. A.; Wang, P.; Zhou, Y. K.

    2015-11-01

    High-energy-density shear experiments have been performed by LANL at the OMEGA Laser Facility and National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments have been simulated using the LANL radiation-hydrocode RAGE and have been used to assess turbulence models' ability to function in the high-energy-density, inertial-fusion-relevant regime. Beginning with the basic configuration of two counter-oriented shock-driven flows of > 100 km/s, which initiate a strong shear instability across an initially solid density, 20 micron thick Al plate, variations of the experiment have been performed and are studied. These variations have included increasing the fluid density (by modifying the metal plate material from Al to Ti), imposing sinusoidal perturbations on the plate, and directly modifying the plate's intrinsic surface roughness. In addition to examining the shear-induced mixing, the simulations reveal other physics, such as how the interaction of our indirect-drive halfraums with a mated shock tube's ablator impedes a stagnation-driven shock. This work is conducted by the US DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396, and NIF facility operations by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Rare isotope accelerator project in Korea and its application to high energy density sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, M.; Chung, Y. S.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, B. J.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    2014-01-01

    As a national science project, the Korean government has recently established the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) with the goal of conducting world-class research in basic sciences. One of the core facilities for the IBS will be the rare isotope accelerator which can produce high-intensity rare isotope beams to investigate the fundamental properties of nature, and also to support a broad research program in material sciences, medical and biosciences, and future nuclear energy technologies. The construction of the accelerator is scheduled to be completed by approximately 2017. The design of the accelerator complex is optimized to deliver high average beam current on targets, and to maximize the production of rare isotope beams through the simultaneous use of Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) and In-Flight Fragmentation (IFF) methods. The proposed accelerator is, however, not optimal for high energy density science, which usually requires very high peak currents on the target. In this study, we present possible beam-plasma experiments that can be done within the scope of the current accelerator design, and we also investigate possible future extension paths that may enable high energy density science with intense pulsed heavy ion beams.

  6. High-Energy Density and Superhard Nitrogen-Rich B-N Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinwei; Hao, Jian; Liu, Hanyu; Lu, Siyu; Tse, John S.

    2015-09-01

    The pressure-induced transformation of diatomic nitrogen into nonmolecular polymeric phases may produce potentially useful high-energy-density materials. We combine first-principles calculations with structure searching to predict a new class of nitrogen-rich boron nitrides with a stoichiometry of B3N5 that are stable or metastable relative to solid N2 and h -BN at ambient pressure. The most stable phase at ambient pressure has a layered structure (h -B3N5 ) containing hexagonal B3N3 layers sandwiched with intercalated freely rotating N2 molecules. At 15 GPa, a three-dimensional C 2 2 21 structure with single N-N bonds becomes the most stable. This pressure is much lower than that required for triple-to-single bond transformation in pure solid nitrogen (110 GPa). More importantly, C 2 2 21-B3N5 is metastable, and can be recovered under ambient conditions. Its energy density of ˜3.44 kJ /g makes it a potential high-energy-density material. In addition, stress-strain calculations estimate a Vicker's hardness of ˜4 4 GPa . Structure searching reveals a new clathrate sodalitelike BN structure that is metastable under ambient conditions.

  7. Novel Quaternary Chalcogenide/Reduced Graphene Oxide-Based Asymmetric Supercapacitor with High Energy Density.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Samrat; Howli, Promita; Das, Biswajit; Das, Nirmalya Sankar; Samanta, Madhupriya; Das, G C; Chattopadhyay, K K

    2017-07-12

    In this work we have synthesized quaternary chalcogenide Cu2NiSnS4 (QC) nanoparticles grown in situ on 2D reduced graphene oxide (rGO) for application as anode material of solid-state asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). Thorough characterization of the synthesized composite validates the proper phase, stoichiometry, and morphology. Detailed electrochemical study of the electrode materials and ASCs has been performed. The as-fabricated device delivers an exceptionally high areal capacitance (655.1 mF cm(-2)), which is much superior to that of commercial micro-supercapacitors. Furthermore, a remarkable volumetric capacitance of 16.38 F cm(-3) is obtained at a current density of 5 mA cm(-2) combined with a very high energy density of 5.68 mW h cm(-3), which is comparable to that of commercially available lithium thin film batteries. The device retains 89.2% of the initial capacitance after running for 2000 cycles, suggesting its long-term capability. Consequently, the enhanced areal and volumetric capacitances combined with decent cycle stability and impressive energy density endow the uniquely decorated QC/rGO composite material as a promising candidate in the arena of energy storage devices. Moreover, Cu2NiSnS4 being a narrow band gap photovoltaic material, this work offers a novel protocol for the development of self-charging supercapacitors in the days to come.

  8. Measurements of ion stopping around the Bragg peak in high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Frenje, J. A.; Grabowski, P. E.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-09

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of ion stopping at energies about the Bragg peak (or peak ion stopping, which occurs at an ion velocity comparable to the average thermal electron velocity), and its dependence on electron temperature (Te) and electron number density (ne) in the range of 0.5 – 4.0 keV and 3 × 1022 – 3 × 1023 cm-3 have been conducted, respectively. It is experimentally demonstrated that the position and amplitude of the Bragg peak varies strongly with Te with ne. As a result, the importance of including quantum diffraction is also demonstrated in the stopping-power modeling of High-Energy-Density Plasmas.

  9. Measurements of ion stopping around the Bragg peak in high-energy-density plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Frenje, J. A.; Grabowski, P. E.; Li, C. K.; ...

    2015-11-09

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of ion stopping at energies about the Bragg peak (or peak ion stopping, which occurs at an ion velocity comparable to the average thermal electron velocity), and its dependence on electron temperature (Te) and electron number density (ne) in the range of 0.5 – 4.0 keV and 3 × 1022 – 3 × 1023 cm-3 have been conducted, respectively. It is experimentally demonstrated that the position and amplitude of the Bragg peak varies strongly with Te with ne. As a result, the importance of including quantum diffraction is also demonstrated in the stopping-power modelingmore » of High-Energy-Density Plasmas.« less

  10. High-Energy Density science at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S. H.; Fletcher, L. B.; Hastings, J. B.

    2016-04-01

    The Matter in Extreme Conditions end station at the Linac Coherent Light Source holds great promise for novel pump-probe experiments to make new discoveries in high- energy density science. Recently, our experiments have demonstrated the first spectrally- resolved measurements of plasmons using a seeded 8-keV x-ray laser beam. Forward x-ray Thomson scattering spectra from isochorically heated solid aluminum show a well-resolved plasmon feature that is down-shifted in energy by 19 eV from the incident 8 keV elastic scattering feature. In this spectral range, the simultaneously measured backscatter spectrum shows no spectral features indicating observation of collective plasmon oscillations on a scattering length comparable to the screening length. Moreover, this technique is a prerequisite for Thomson scattering measurements in compressed matter where the plasmon shift is a sensitive function of the free electron density and where the plasmon intensity provides information on temperature.

  11. Measurements of Ion Stopping Around the Bragg Peak in High-Energy-Density Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Frenje, J A; Grabowski, P E; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Zylstra, A B; Gatu Johnson, M; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C

    2015-11-13

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of ion stopping at energies around the Bragg peak (or peak ion stopping, which occurs at an ion velocity comparable to the average thermal electron velocity), and its dependence on electron temperature (T(e)) and electron number density (n(e)) in the range of 0.5-4.0 keV and 3×10(22) to 3×10(23) cm(-3) have been conducted, respectively. It is experimentally demonstrated that the position and amplitude of the Bragg peak varies strongly with T(e) with n(e). The importance of including quantum diffraction is also demonstrated in the stopping-power modeling of high-energy-density plasmas.

  12. Tin-based inorganic-organic hybrid polymers for high energy-density applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Huan; Kuma, Arun; Pilania, Ghanshyam; Ramprasad, Rampi

    2014-03-01

    In one of our recent works[1], an organotin polymer was synthesized and suggested to be promising polymeric dielectric, simultaneously exhibiting a high dielectric constant ɛ and a high band gap Eg. Motivated by this result, we study a family of inorganic-organic hybrid polymers based on -(SnF2) x-(CH2) y - as the repeating structural unit (x = 2 , y = 4 , 8 , and 12). The stable structures of these hybrid polymers, predicted by the minima-hopping method, are studied by first-principles calculations at the level of density functional theory. Our calculations show that these polymers are wide band gap materials (up to 6.07 eV). In addition, their dielectric constants are between 4.6 and 7.8, well above that of polypropylene (ɛ ~= 2 . 2), the standard dielectric material for high energy-density capacitors. Therefore, we suggest that the hybrid polymers based on -(SnF2) x-(CH2) y - are promising candidates for high energy-density applications. Our work is supported by the Office of Naval Research through the Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI).

  13. Strain-tolerant High Capacity Silicon Anodes via Directed Lithium Ion Transport for High Energy Density Lithium-ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Jason

    2012-02-01

    Energy storage is an essential component of modern technology, with applications including public infrastructure, transportation systems, and consumer electronics. Lithium-ion batteries are the preeminent form of energy storage when high energy / moderate power densities are required. Improvements to lithium-ion battery energy / power density through the adoption of silicon anodes—with approximately an order of magnitude greater gravimetric capacity than traditional carbon-based anodes--have been limited by ˜300% strains during electrochemical lithium insertion which result in short operational lifetimes. In two different systems we demonstrated improvements to silicon-based anode performance via directed lithium ion transport. The first system demonstrated a crystallographic-dependent anisotropic electrochemical lithium insertion in single-crystalline silicon anode microstructures. Exploiting this anisotropy, we highlight model silicon anode architectures that limit the maximum strain during electrochemical lithium insertion. This self-strain-limiting is a result of selecting a specific microstructure design such that during lithiation the anisotropic evolution of strain, above a given threshold, blocks further lithium intercalation. Exemplary design rules have achieved self-strain-limited charging capacities ranging from 677 mAhg-1 to 2833 mAhg-1. A second system with variably encapsulated silicon-based anodes demonstrated greater than 98% of their initial capacity after 130+ cycles. This anode also can operate stably at high energy/power densities. A lithium-ion battery with this anode was able to continuously (dis)charge in 10 minutes, corresponding to a power / energy density of ˜1460 W/kg and ˜243 Wh/kg--up to 780% greater power density and 220% higher energy density than conventional lithium-ion batteries. Anodes were also demonstrated with areal capacities of 12.7 mAh/cm^2, two orders of magnitude greater than traditional thin-film silicon anodes.[4pt

  14. Aromatic poly(arylene ether urea) with high dipole moment for high thermal stability and high energy density capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhaoxi; Lin, Minren; Wu, Shan; Thakur, Yash; Zhou, Yue; Jeong, Dae-Yong; Shen, Qundong; Zhang, Q. M.

    2015-05-01

    Developing dielectric polymers with higher dielectric constant without sacrificing loss and thermal stability is of great importance for next generation of high energy density capacitors. We show here that by replacing the CH2 group in the aromatic polyurea (ArPU) with the polar ether group, thus raising the dipole moment of the molecular unit, poly(arylene ether urea) (PEEU) shows an increased dielectric constant of 4.7, compared with 4.2 of ArPU. Moreover, PEEU maintains the low dielectric loss and is thermally stable up to 250 °C. As a result, the polymer delivers 13 J/cm3 discharged energy density at room temperature and 9 J/cm3 at 120 °C. The high quality films perform well in terms of both breakdown strength (at 700 MV/m at room temperature) and leakage current from room temperature to elevated temperature. At 120 °C, the breakdown strength is 600 MV/m and the conductivity is 1.58 × 10-14 S/cm measured under 100 MV/m.

  15. Series asymmetric supercapacitors based on free-standing inner-connection electrodes for high energy density and high output voltage.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jiayou; Liu, Nishuang; Rao, Jiangyu; Ding, Longwei; Al Bahrani, Majid Raissan; Li, Luying; Su, Jun; Gao, Yihua

    2014-12-21

    Asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs) based on free-standing membranes with high energy density and high output voltage are reported. MnO(2) nanowire/carbon nanotube (CNT) composites and MoO(3) nanobelt/CNT composites are selected as the anode and the cathode materials of the devices, respectively. The ASC has a high volumetric capacitance of 50.2 F cm(-3) at a scan rate of 2 mV s(-1) and a high operation voltage window of 2.0 V. Especially, after a middle layer with an inner-connection structure was inserted between the anode and the cathode, the output voltage of the whole device can achieve 4.0 V. The full cell of series ASCs (SASC) with an inner-connection middle layer has a high energy density of 28.6 mW h cm(-3) at a power density of 261.4 mW cm(-3), and exhibits excellent cycling performance of 99.6% capacitance retention over 10,000 cycles. This strategy of designing the hybridized structure for SASCs provides a promising route for next-generation SCs with high energy density and high output voltage.

  16. Nanostructured metal-oxides for use as high power and energy density storage electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondragón-Rodríguez, G. C.; Saruhan, Bilge

    2014-06-01

    The most significant advantage of double layer supercapacitors over batteries is their ability of being almost continuously charged and discharged without degradation. This is why batteries and supercapacitors are complementary to each other. The supercapacitors can supply power to the system when there are surges or energy bursts relying on their fast charge/discharge ability while the batteries can supply the bulk energy since they can store and deliver larger amount of energy over a longer period of time resulting in a higher discharge capacitance. With the introduction of new electrodes, super-capacitors will provide higher energy densities and charge rapidly with longer lifetimes, relying on the addition of pseudo-capacitance as well as higher surface areas. Pseudo-capacitance is achieved by the use of metal-oxides yielding faradaic reactions over redox couples. Capacitive charge-storage properties of mesoporous films made of complex metal-oxides preferably in core + shell architecture are superior to those of nonporous crystalline metal-oxides. RuO2 yields the highest energy densities however is not attractive for commercial use due to high cost. Other promising candidates are MnO2, Co2O3, NiO, etc. which need to be improved for achievement of long-term stability. Additionally, the type of electrolyte is important in terms of supercapacitor's performance and thus, needs to be optimized considering the characteristics of the employed electrode material. This work describes the fabrication and performance of mesoporous double oxides (MnCu, MnNi, MnCo) in aqueous electrolytes. Thin films are deposited by sputtering technique on graphite foils. Specific capacitance, energy and power densities are calculated and the role of electrolyte on electrode performance is discussed.

  17. A low cost, high energy density and long cycle life potassium-sulfur battery for grid-scale energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Bowden, Mark E.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun

    2015-08-15

    Alkali metal-sulfur batteries are attractive for energy storage applications because of their high energy density. Among the batteries, lithium-sulfur batteries typically use liquid in the battery electrolyte, which causes problems in both performance and safety. Sodium-sulfur batteries can use a solid electrolyte such as beta alumina but this requires a high operating temperature. Here we report a novel potassium-sulfur battery with K+-conducting beta-alumina as the electrolyte. Our studies indicate that liquid potassium exhibits much better wettability on the surface of beta-alumina compared to liquid sodium at lower temperatures. Based on this observation, we develop a potassium-sulfur battery that can operate at as low as 150°C with excellent performance. In particular, the battery shows excellent cycle life with negligible capacity fade in 1000 cycles because of the dense ceramic membrane. This study demonstrates a new battery with a high energy density, long cycle life, low cost and high safety, which is ideal for grid-scale energy storage.

  18. High energy and power density asymmetric supercapacitors using electrospun cobalt oxide nanowire anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyadharan, Baiju; Aziz, Radhiyah Abd; Misnon, Izan Izwan; Anil Kumar, Gopinathan M.; Ismail, Jamil; Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Jose, Rajan

    2014-12-01

    Electrochemical materials are under rigorous search for building advanced energy storage devices. Herein, supercapacitive properties of highly crystalline and ultrathin cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanowires (diameter ∼30-60 nm) synthesized using an aqueous polymeric solution based electrospinning process are reported. These nanowire electrodes show a specific capacitance (CS) of ∼1110 F g-1 in 6 M KOH at a current density of 1 A g-1 with coulombic efficiency ∼100%. Asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs) (CS ∼175 F g-1 at 2 A g-1 galvanostatic cycling) are fabricated using the Co3O4 as anode and commercial activated carbon (AC) as cathode and compared their performance with symmetric electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) fabricated using AC (CS ∼31 F g-1 at 2 A g-1 galvanostatic cycling). The Co3O4//AC ASCs deliver specific energy densities (ES) of 47.6, 35.4, 20 and 8 Wh kg-1 at specific power densities (PS) 1392, 3500, 7000 and 7400 W kg-1, respectively. The performance of ASCs is much superior to the control EDLCs, which deliver ES of 9.2, 8.9, 8.4 and 6.8 Wh kg-1 at PS 358, 695, 1400 and 3500 W kg-1, respectively. The ASCs show nearly six times higher energy density (∼47.6 Wh kg-1) than EDLC (8.4 Wh kg-1) without compromising its power density (∼1400 W kg-1) at similar galvanostatic cycling conditions (2 A g-1).

  19. Properties of high-density, well-ordered, and high-energy metallic glass phase designed by pressurized quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Narumasa; Lo, Yu-Chieh; Wakeda, Masato; Ogata, Shigenobu

    2016-08-01

    We applied gigapascal-level compressive hydrostatic pressure to the melt-quenching process of metallic glass to obtain a unique high-pressure glass state with high density that is well-ordered yet has high energy. This state contradicts the common understanding that high-density, well-ordered metallic glass states have low energy. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we found that the high-pressure glass state of the metallic glass Zr50Cu40Al10 has a rich anti-free volume and that its relaxation is dominated by the annihilation of full icosahedra and the rich anti-free volume. The aging rate of the high-pressure metallic glass state (energy reduction rate) is almost the same as that of typical high-energy metallic glass, suggesting that it has a lifetime similar to that of a typical high-energy metallic glass that has been experimentally realized and reported previously [Wakeda et al., Sci. Rep. 5, 10545 (2015)]. Thus, the high-pressure phase can be realized even under the experimental cooling rate, suggesting its suitability for practical applications.

  20. Development of high energy density fuels from mild gasification of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The overall objective of the program is the determination of the minimal processing requirements to produce High Energy Density Fuels (HEDF), meeting a minimal energy density of 130,000 Btu/gal (conventional jet fuels have energy densities in the vicinity of 115,000--120,000 Btu/gal) and having acceptable advanced fuel specifications in accordance with the three defined categories of HEDF. The program encompasses assessing current technology capability; selecting acceptable processing and refining schemes; and generating samples of advanced test fuels. A task breakdown structure was developed containing eight key tasks. This report summarizes the work that Amoco Oil Company (AOC), as key subcontractor, performed in the execution of Task 4, Proposed Upgrading Schemes for Advanced Fuel. The intent of the Task 4 study was to represent all the candidate processing options, that were either studied in the experimental efforts of Task 3 or were available from the prior art in the open literature, in a linear program (LP) model. The LP model would allow scaling of the bench-scale Task 3 results to commercial scale and would perform economic evaluations on any combination of the processes which might be used to make HEDF. Section 2.0 of this report summarizes the process and economic bases used. Sections 3.0 and 4.0 details the economics and processing sensitivities for HEDF production. 1 ref., 15 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Enabling High Energy Density Li-Ion Batteries through Li{sub 2}O Activation.

    SciTech Connect

    Abouimrane, Ali; Cui, Yanjie; Chen, Zonghai; Belharouak, Ilias; Yahia, Hamdi B.; Wu, Huiming; Assary, Rajeev; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil

    2016-09-01

    Lithium oxide (Li2O) is activated in the presence of a layered composite cathode material (HEM) significantly increasing the energy density of lithium-ion batteries. The degree of activation depends on the current rate, electrolyte salt, and anode type. In full-cell tests, the Li2O was used as a lithium source to counter the first-cycle irreversibility of high-capacity composite alloy anodes. When Li2O is mixed with HEM to serve as a cathode, the electrochemical performance was improved in a full cell having an SiO-SnCoC composite as an anode. The mechanism behind the Li2O activation could also explain the first charge plateau and the abnormal high capacity associated with these high energy cathode materials.

  2. Polyurethane induced high breakdown strength and high energy storage density in polyurethane/poly(vinylidene fluoride) composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ming-Sheng; Zha, Jun-Wei; Yang, Yu; Han, Peng; Hu, Chao-He; Wen, Yong-Qiang; Dang, Zhi-Min

    2017-06-01

    A series of composites blending thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) with poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) were prepared in this work to realize a high energy storage density. Low loading of TPU (<3 vol. %) shows a uniform dispersion state in the PVDF matrix. We demonstrate that the incorporation of TPU induces high breakdown strength which results in promoted energy storage performance. In addition, the influence of the different TPU hardnesses (65, 75, and 85) on the breakdown strength of TPU/PVDF composites was also investigated. Finally, a maximum value up to 537.8 MV/m at 3 vol. % TPU with a hardness of 65 was obtained, which led to a high energy density of 10.36 J/cm3.

  3. High-power density piezoelectric energy harvesting using radially strained ultrathin trigonal tellurium nanowire assembly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Il; Lee, Sangmin; Lee, Eungkyu; Sohn, Sungwoo; Lee, Yean; Lee, Sujeong; Moon, Geondae; Kim, Dohyang; Kim, Youn Sang; Myoung, Jae Min; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-06-04

    A high-yield solution-processed ultrathin (<10 nm) trigonal tellurium (t-Te) nanowire (NW) is introduced as a new class of piezoelectric nanomaterial with a six-fold higher piezoelectric constant compared to conventional ZnO NWs for a high-volume power-density nanogenerator (NG). While determining the energy-harvesting principle in a NG consisting of t-Te NW, it is theoretically and experimentally found that t-Te NW is piezoelectrically activated only by creating strain in its radial direction, along which it has an asymmetric crystal structure. Based upon this mechanism, a NG with a monolayer consisting of well-aligned t-Te NWs and a power density of 9 mW/cm(3) is fabricated.

  4. Sparingly solvating electrolytes for high energy density Lithium–sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Curtiss, Larry A.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Gewirth, Andrew A.; Shao, Yuyan; Gallagher, Kevin G.

    2016-07-11

    Moving to lighter and less expensive battery chemistries compared to lithium-ion requires the control of energy storage mechanisms based on chemical transformations rather than intercalation. Lithium sulfur (Li/S) has tremendous theoretical specific energy, but contemporary approaches to control this solution-mediated, precipitation-dissolution chemistry requires using large excesses of electrolyte to fully solubilize the polysulfide intermediate. Achieving reversible electrochemistry under lean electrolyte operation is the only path for Li/S to move beyond niche applications to potentially transformational performance. An emerging topic for Li/S research is the use of sparingly solvating electrolytes and the creation of design rules for discovering new electrolyte systems that fundamentally decouple electrolyte volume from reaction mechanism. Furthermore, this perspective presents an outlook for sparingly solvating electrolytes as the key path forward for longer-lived, high-energy density Li/S batteries including an overview of this promising new concept and some strategies for accomplishing it.

  5. Sparingly solvating electrolytes for high energy density Lithium–sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Curtiss, Larry A.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Gewirth, Andrew A.; Shao, Yuyan; Gallagher, Kevin G.

    2016-07-11

    Moving to lighter and less expensive battery chemistries compared to lithium-ion requires the control of energy storage mechanisms based on chemical transformations rather than intercalation. Lithium sulfur (Li/S) has tremendous theoretical specific energy, but contemporary approaches to control this solution-mediated, precipitation-dissolution chemistry requires using large excesses of electrolyte to fully solubilize the polysulfide intermediate. Achieving reversible electrochemistry under lean electrolyte operation is the only path for Li/S to move beyond niche applications to potentially transformational performance. An emerging topic for Li/S research is the use of sparingly solvating electrolytes and the creation of design rules for discovering new electrolyte systems that fundamentally decouple electrolyte volume from reaction mechanism. Furthermore, this perspective presents an outlook for sparingly solvating electrolytes as the key path forward for longer-lived, high-energy density Li/S batteries including an overview of this promising new concept and some strategies for accomplishing it.

  6. Sparingly Solvating Electrolytes for High Energy Density Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Curtiss, Larry A.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Gewirth, Andrew A.; Shao, Yuyan; Gallagher, Kevin

    2016-07-11

    Moving to lighter and less expensive battery chemistries compared to lithium-ion requires the control of energy storage mechanisms based on chemical transformations rather than intercalation. Lithium sulfur (Li/S) has tremendous theoretical specific energy, but contemporary approaches to control this solution-mediated, precipitation-dissolution chemistry requires using large excesses of electrolyte to fully solubilize the polysulfide intermediate. Achieving reversible electrochemistry under lean electrolyte operation is the only path for Li/S to move beyond niche applications to potentially transformational performance. An emerging topic for Li/S research is the use of sparingly solvating electrolytes and the creation of design rules for discovering new electrolyte systems that fundamentally decouple electrolyte volume from reaction mechanism. This perspective presents an outlook for sparingly solvating electrolytes as the key path forward for longer-lived, high-energy density Li/S batteries including an overview of this promising new concept and some strategies for accomplishing it.

  7. High Energy Density Thermal Batteries: Thermoelectric Reactors for Efficient Automotive Thermal Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-15

    HEATS Project: Sheetak is developing a new HVAC system to store the energy required for heating and cooling in EVs. This system will replace the traditional refrigerant-based vapor compressors and inefficient heaters used in today’s EVs with efficient, light, and rechargeable hot-and-cold thermal batteries. The high energy density thermal battery—which does not use any hazardous substances—can be recharged by an integrated solid-state thermoelectric energy converter while the vehicle is parked and its electrical battery is being charged. Sheetak’s converters can also run on the electric battery if needed and provide the required cooling and heating to the passengers—eliminating the space constraint and reducing the weight of EVs that use more traditional compressors and heaters.

  8. High-Energy-Density Poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fei; Xu, Zhuo; Xia, Weimin; Ye, Hongjun; Wei, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Zhicheng

    2013-12-01

    The dielectric response of poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) (PSAN) thin films fabricated by a solution casting process was investigated in this work. Linear dielectric behavior was obtained in PSAN films under an electric field at frequencies from 100 Hz to 1 MHz and temperature of -50°C to 100°C. The polymer films exhibited an intermediate dielectric permittivity of 4 and low dielectric loss (tan δ) of 0.027. Under 400 MV/m, the energy density of the PSAN films was 6.8 J/cm3, which is three times higher than that of biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) (about 1.6 J/cm3). However, their charge-discharge efficiency (about 90%) was rather close to that of BOPP. The calculated effective dielectric permittivity of the PSAN films under high electric field was as high as 9, which may be attributed to the improved displacement of the cyanide groups (-CN) polarized at high electric fields. These high-performance features make PSAN attractive for high-energy-density capacitor applications.

  9. Solar Thermal Energy Storage Device: Hybrid Nanostructures for High-Energy-Density Solar Thermal Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-09

    HEATS Project: MIT is developing a thermal energy storage device that captures energy from the sun; this energy can be stored and released at a later time when it is needed most. Within the device, the absorption of sunlight causes the solar thermal fuel’s photoactive molecules to change shape, which allows energy to be stored within their chemical bonds. A trigger is applied to release the stored energy as heat, where it can be converted into electricity or used directly as heat. The molecules would then revert to their original shape, and can be recharged using sunlight to begin the process anew. MIT’s technology would be 100% renewable, rechargeable like a battery, and emissions-free. Devices using these solar thermal fuels—called Hybrisol—can also be used without a grid infrastructure for applications such as de-icing, heating, cooking, and water purification.

  10. Energetic multifunctionalized nitraminopyrazoles and their ionic derivatives: ternary hydrogen-bond induced high energy density materials.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ping; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2015-04-15

    Diverse functionalization was introduced into the pyrazole framework giving rise to a new family of ternary hydrogen-bond induced high energy density materials. By incorporating extended cationic interactions, nitramine-based ionic derivatives exhibit good energetic performance and enhanced molecular stability. Performance parameters including heats of formation and detonation properties were calculated by using Gaussian 03 and EXPLO5 v6.01 programs, respectively. It is noteworthy to find that 5-nitramino-3,4-dinitropyrazole, 4, has a remarkable measured density of 1.97 g cm(-3) at 298 K, which is consistent with its crystal density (2.032 g cm(-3), 150 K), and ranks highest among azole-based CHNO compounds. Energetic evaluation indicates that, in addition to the molecular compound 4, some ionic derivatives, 9, 11, 12, 17, 19, and 22, also have high densities (1.83-1.97 g cm(-3)), excellent detonation pressures and velocities (P, 35.6-41.6 GPa; vD, 8880-9430 m s(-1)), as well as acceptable impact and friction sensitivities (IS, 4-30 J; FS, 40-240 N). These attractive features highlight the application potential of nitramino hydrogen-bonded interactions in the design of advanced energetic materials.

  11. A high energy density shock driven Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Robey, H. F.; Remington, B. A.; Bono, M. J.; Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2009-05-15

    Radiographic data from a novel and highly successful high energy density Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability experiment is presented along with synapses of the theory and simulation behind the target design. Data on instability growth are compared to predictions from simulation and theory. The key role played by baroclinic vorticity production in the functioning of the target and the key design parameters are also discussed. The data show the complete evolution of large distinct KH eddies, from formation to turbulent break-up. Unexpectedly, low density bubbles comparable to the vortex size are observed forming in the free-stream region above each vortex at late time. These bubbles have the appearance of localized shocks, possibly supporting a theoretical fluid dynamics conjecture about the existence of supersonic bubbles over the vortical structure [transonic convective Mach numbers, D. Papamoschou and A. Roshko, J. Fluid Mech. 197, 453 (1988)] that support localized shocks (shocklets) not extending into the free stream (P. E. Dimotakis, Proceedings of the 22nd Fluid Dynamics, Plasma Dynamics and Lasers Conference, 1991, Paper No. AIAA 91-1724). However, it is also possible that these low density bubbles are the result of a cavitationlike effect. Hypothesis that may explain the appearance of low density bubbles will be discussed.

  12. Toward High-Energy-Density, High-Efficiency, and Moderate-Temperature Chip-Scale Thermophotovoltaics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-02

    to simplify the test and character- ization. Thermal energy generated from chemical reaction inside the reactor heats up the Si and is consequently...for μTPV and TPV systems in general. As we shall see below, high-temperature material stability and reactivity of the Si reactor prompt the use of a Si...based photonic crystal thermal emitter. Experimental Results for Two Silicon Reactor Designs The theoretical formalism developed can accurately

  13. Achieving High-Energy-High-Power Density in a Flexible Quasi-Solid-State Sodium Ion Capacitor.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongsen; Peng, Lele; Zhu, Yue; Zhang, Xiaogang; Yu, Guihua

    2016-09-14

    Simultaneous integration of high-energy output with high-power delivery is a major challenge for electrochemical energy storage systems, limiting dual fine attributes on a device. We introduce a quasi-solid-state sodium ion capacitor (NIC) based on a battery type urchin-like Na2Ti3O7 anode and a capacitor type peanut shell derived carbon cathode, using a sodium ion conducting gel polymer as electrolyte, achieving high-energy-high-power characteristics in solid state. Energy densities can reach 111.2 Wh kg(-1) at power density of 800 W kg(-1), and 33.2 Wh kg(-1) at power density of 11200 W kg(-1), which are among the best reported state-of-the-art NICs. The designed device also exhibits long-term cycling stability over 3000 cycles with capacity retention ∼86%. Furthermore, we demonstrate the assembly of a highly flexible quasi-solid-state NIC and it shows no obvious capacity loss under different bending conditions.

  14. Note: Experimental platform for magnetized high-energy-density plasma studies at the omega laser facility.

    PubMed

    Fiksel, G; Agliata, A; Barnak, D; Brent, G; Chang, P-Y; Folnsbee, L; Gates, G; Hasset, D; Lonobile, D; Magoon, J; Mastrosimone, D; Shoup, M J; Betti, R

    2015-01-01

    An upgrade of the pulsed magnetic field generator magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system [O. Gotchev et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043504 (2009)] is described. The device is used to study magnetized high-energy-density plasma and is capable of producing a pulsed magnetic field of tens of tesla in a volume of a few cubic centimeters. The magnetic field is created by discharging a high-voltage capacitor through a small wire-wound coil. The coil current pulse has a duration of about 1 μs and a peak value of 40 kA. Compared to the original, the updated version has a larger energy storage and improved switching system. In addition, magnetic coils are fabricated using 3-D printing technology which allows for a greater variety of the magnetic field topology.

  15. Note: Experimental platform for magnetized high-energy-density plasma studies at the omega laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiksel, G.; Agliata, A.; Barnak, D.; Brent, G.; Chang, P.-Y.; Folnsbee, L.; Gates, G.; Hasset, D.; Lonobile, D.; Magoon, J.; Mastrosimone, D.; Shoup, M. J.; Betti, R.

    2015-01-01

    An upgrade of the pulsed magnetic field generator magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system [O. Gotchev et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043504 (2009)] is described. The device is used to study magnetized high-energy-density plasma and is capable of producing a pulsed magnetic field of tens of tesla in a volume of a few cubic centimeters. The magnetic field is created by discharging a high-voltage capacitor through a small wire-wound coil. The coil current pulse has a duration of about 1 μs and a peak value of 40 kA. Compared to the original, the updated version has a larger energy storage and improved switching system. In addition, magnetic coils are fabricated using 3-D printing technology which allows for a greater variety of the magnetic field topology.

  16. Note: Experimental platform for magnetized high-energy-density plasma studies at the omega laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fiksel, G.; Agliata, A.; Barnak, D.; Brent, G.; Chang, P. -Y.; Folnsbee, L.; Gates, G.; Hasset, D.; Lonobile, D.; Magoon, J.; Mastrosimone, D.; Shoup, III, M. J.; Betti, R.

    2015-01-12

    Here, an upgrade of the pulsed magnetic field generator magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system [O. Gotchev et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043504 (2009)] is described. The device is used to study magnetized high-energy-density plasma and is capable of producing a pulsed magnetic field of tens of tesla in a volume of a few cubic centimeters. The magnetic field is created by discharging a high-voltage capacitor through a small wire-wound coil. The coil current pulse has a duration of about 1 μs and a peak value of 40 kA. Compared to the original, the updated version has a larger energy storage and improved switching system. In addition, magnetic coils are fabricated using 3-D printing technology which allows for a greater variety of the magnetic field topology.

  17. A novel zirconium Kα imager for high energy density physics research.

    PubMed

    Akli, K U; Sanchez del Rio, M; Jiang, S; Storm, M S; Krygier, A; Stephens, R B; Pereira, N R; Baronova, E O; Theobald, W; Ping, Y; McLean, H S; Patel, P K; Key, M H; Freeman, R R

    2011-12-01

    We report on the development and characterization of a zirconium Kα imager for high energy density physics research. The imager consists of a spherically bent quartz crystal operating at 15.7 keV photon energy. We compare the performance of the imager in terms of integrated reflectivity (R(int)) and temperature dependent collection efficiency (η(Te)) to that of the widely used Cu Kα imager. Our collisional-radiative simulations show that the new imager can be reliably used up to 250 eV plasma temperature. Monte Carlo simulations show that for a 25 μm thick tracer layer of zirconium, the contribution to Kα production from photo-pumping is only 2%. We present, for the first time, 2D spatially resolved images of zirconium plasmas generated by a high intensity short pulse laser interacting with Zr solid targets.

  18. Hybrid Kinetic-Fluid Electromagnetic Simulations of Imploding High Energy Density Plasmas for IFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Dale; Rose, Dave; Thoma, Carsten; Genoni, Thomas; Bruner, Nichelle; Clark, Robert; Stygar, William; Leeper, Ramon

    2011-10-01

    A new simulation technique is being developed to study high current and moderate density-radius product (ρR) z-pinch plasmas relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). Fully kinetic, collisional, and electromagnetic simulations of the time evolution of up to 40-MA current (deuterium and DT) z-pinches, but with relatively low ρR, have yielded new insights into the mechanisms of neutron production. At fusion relevant conditions (ρR > 0.01 gm/cm2) , however, this technique requires a prohibitively large number of cells and particles. A new hybrid implicit technique has been developed that accurately describes high-density and magnetized imploding plasmas. The technique adapts a recently published algorithm, that enables accurate descriptions of highly magnetized particle orbits, to high density plasmas and also makes use of an improved kinetic particle remap technique. We will discuss the new technique, stable range of operation, and application to an IFE relevant z-pinch design at 60 MA. Work supported by Sandia National Laboratories.

  19. 2D quasi-ordered nitrogen-enriched porous carbon nanohybrids for high energy density supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Kan, Kan; Wang, Lei; Yu, Peng; Jiang, Baojiang; Shi, Keying; Fu, Honggang

    2016-05-21

    Two-dimensional (2D) quasi-ordered nitrogen-enriched porous carbon (QNPC) nanohybrids, with the characteristics of an ultrathin graphite nanosheet framework and thick quasi-ordered nitrogen-doped carbon cladding with a porous texture, have been synthesized via an in situ polymerization assembly method. In the synthesis, the expandable graphite (EG) is enlarged by an intermittent microwave method, and then aniline monomers are intercalated into the interlayers of the expanded EG with the assistance of a vacuum. Subsequently, the intercalated aniline monomers could assemble on the interlayer surface of the expanded EG, accompanied by the in situ polymerization from aniline monomers to polyaniline. Meanwhile, the expanded EG could be exfoliated to graphite nanosheets. By subsequent pyrolysis and activation processes, the QNPC nanohybrids could be prepared. As supercapacitor electrodes, a typical QNPC12-700 sample derived from the precursor containing an EG content of 12%, with a high level of nitrogen doping of 5.22 at%, offers a high specific capacitance of 305.7 F g(-1) (1 A g(-1)), excellent rate-capability and long-term stability. Notably, an extremely high energy density of 95.7 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 449.7 W kg(-1) in an ionic liquid electrolyte can be achieved. The unique structural features and moderate heteroatom doping of the QNPC nanohybrids combines electrochemical double layer and faradaic capacitance contributions, which make these nanohybrids ideal candidates as electrode materials for high-performance energy storage devices.

  20. Graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres with ultra-high sulfur loading for high energy density lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya; Guo, Jinxin; Zhang, Jun; Su, Qingmei; Du, Gaohui

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery with high theoretical energy density is one of the most promising energy storage systems for electric vehicles and intermittent renewable energy. However, due to the poor conductivity of the active material, considerable weight of the electrode is occupied by the conductive additives. Here we report a graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres composite (S-nanosphere@G) with sulfur content up to 91 wt% as the high energy density cathode material for Li-S battery. The sulfur nanospheres with diameter of 400-500 nm are synthesized through a solution-based approach with the existence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Then the sulfur nanospheres are uniformly wrapped by conductive graphene sheets through the electrostatic interaction between graphene oxide and PVP, followed by reducing of graphene oxide with hydrazine. The design of graphene wrapped sulfur nanoarchitecture provides flexible conductive graphene coating with void space to accommodate the volume expansion of sulfur and to minimize polysulfide dissolution. As a result, the S-nanosphere@G nanocomposite with 91 wt% sulfur shows a reversible initial capacity of 970 mA h g-1 and an average columbic efficiency > 96% over 100 cycles at a rate of 0.2 C. Taking the total mass of electrode into account, the S-nanosphere@G composite is a promising cathode material for high energy density Li-S batteries.

  1. Bubbler---A Novel Ultra High Power Density Energy Harvesting Method Based on Reverse Electrowetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Tsung-Hsing

    A novel approach to direct conversion of mechanical energy into electrical energy has been proposed and experimentally and theoretically investigated. The method combines previously demonstrated reverse electrowetting on dielectric (REWOD) phenomenon with the fast self-oscillating process of bubble growth and collapse inside a conductive liquid placed in contact with a dielectric-covered electrode. Fast bubble dynamics, used in conjunction with REWOD, can enable extremely high power densities, in excess of 10 kW/m2. The method can be scaled in power from microwatts to tens of watts, and can enable direct coupling to a wide range of mechanical energy sources, which make it particularly attractive for energy harvesting applications. We believe that this approach can enable extraction of useful energy from various non-traditional sources including thermal expansion of buildings, human motion, and vehicle and machinery movement. Also, this makes the fabrication of small light-weight energy harvesting devices capable of producing a wide range of power outputs feasible.

  2. Energy in density gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.; Kono, M.

    2015-01-15

    Inhomogeneous plasmas and fluids contain energy stored in inhomogeneity and they naturally tend to relax into lower energy states by developing instabilities or by diffusion. But the actual amount of energy in such inhomogeneities has remained unknown. In the present work, the amount of energy stored in a density gradient is calculated for several specific density profiles in a cylindrical configuration. This is of practical importance for drift wave instability in various plasmas, and, in particular, in its application in models dealing with the heating of solar corona because the instability is accompanied with stochastic heating, so the energy contained in inhomogeneity is effectively transformed into heat. It is shown that even for a rather moderate increase of the density at the axis in magnetic structures in the corona by a factor 1.5 or 3, the amount of excess energy per unit volume stored in such a density gradient becomes several orders of magnitude greater than the amount of total energy losses per unit volume (per second) in quiet regions in the corona. Consequently, within the life-time of a magnetic structure such energy losses can easily be compensated by the stochastic drift wave heating.

  3. Generation of high-energy-density ion bunches by ultraintense laser-cone-target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X. H.; Zhuo, H. B. Ma, Y. Y.; Zou, D. B.; Yu, T. P.; Ge, Z. Y.; Yin, Y.; Shao, F. Q.; Yu, W.; Xu, H.; Borghesi, M.

    2014-06-15

    A scheme in which carbon ion bunches are accelerated to a high energy and density by a laser pulse (∼10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}) irradiating cone targets is proposed and investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. The laser pulse is focused by the cone and drives forward an ultrathin foil located at the cone's tip. In the course of the work, best results were obtained employing target configurations combining a low-Z cone with a multispecies foil transversely shaped to match the laser intensity profile.

  4. The Early Years of Indirect Drive Development for High Energy Density Physics Experiments at AWE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Brian

    2016-10-01

    The importance of laser driven indirect drive for high energy density physics experiments was recognised at A WE in 1971. The two beam 1TW HELEN laser was procured to work in this area and experiments with this system began in 1980. Early experiments in hohlraum coupling and performance scaling with both l.06μm and 0.53μm will be described together with experiments specifically designed to confirm the understanding of radiation wave propagation, hohlraum heating and hohlraum plasma filling. The use of indirect drive for early experiments to study spherical and cylindrical implosions, opacity, EOS, mix and planar radiation hydrodynamics experiments will also be described.

  5. Massive parallel simulation of phenomena in condensed matter at high energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortov, Vladimir

    2005-03-01

    This talk deals with computational hydrodynamics, advanced material properties and phenomena at high energy density. New results of massive parallel 3D simulation done with method of individual particles in cells have been obtained. The gas dynamic code includes advanced physical models of matter such as multi-phase equations of state, elastic-plastic, spallation, optic properties and ion-beams stopping. Investigated are the influence on hypervelocity impact processes effects of equation of state, elastic-plastic and spallation. We also report results of numerical modeling of the action of intense heavy ion beams on metallic targets in comparison with new experimental data.

  6. A Discussion of the High Energy Density Primary Battery Employed in the FOTON M3 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennetti, A.; Reece, D.; Spurrett, R.; Schautz, M.; Green, K.

    2008-09-01

    In 2005, ABSL Space Products (ABSL) was contracted by QinetiQ to deliver the lithium sulfuryl chloride primary battery system for the FOTON M3 ESA (European Space Agency) mission. FOTON M3 was led by the ESA Directorate of Human Spaceflight & Exploration and carried a number of materials science, fluid physics and biology experiments as well as technology demonstration payloads. A number of the experiments required a very high energy density primary battery power source. This battery was manufactured by ABSL, and the mission was successfully completed in September 2007 following a twelve days orbiting in Low Earth Orbit (LEO).

  7. Three-dimensional modeling and analysis of a high energy density Kelvin-Helmholtz experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, K. S.; Hurricane, O. A.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Drake, R. P.; Krauland, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Hansen, J. F.; Harding, E. C.

    2012-09-15

    A recent series of experiments on the OMEGA laser provided the first controlled demonstration of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability in a high-energy-density physics context [E. C. Harding et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 045005, (2009); O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056305, (2009)]. We present 3D simulations which resolve previously reported discrepancies between those experiments and the 2D simulation used to design them. Our new simulations reveal a three-dimensional mechanism behind the low density 'bubble' structures which appeared in the experimental x-ray radiographs at late times but were completely absent in the 2D simulations. We also demonstrate that the three-dimensional expansion of the walls of the target is sufficient to explain the 20% overprediction by 2D simulation of the late-time growth of the KH rollups. The implications of these results for the design of future experiments are discussed.

  8. Schlieren technique applied to the arc temperature measurement in a high energy density cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Artana, G.; Kelly, H.

    2010-01-15

    Plasma temperature and radial density profiles of the plasma species in a high energy density cutting arc have been obtained by using a quantitative schlieren technique. A Z-type two-mirror schlieren system was used in this research. Due to its great sensibility such technique allows measuring plasma composition and temperature from the arc axis to the surrounding medium by processing the gray-level contrast values of digital schlieren images recorded at the observation plane for a given position of a transverse knife located at the exit focal plane of the system. The technique has provided a good visualization of the plasma flow emerging from the nozzle and its interactions with the surrounding medium and the anode. The obtained temperature values are in good agreement with those values previously obtained by the authors on the same torch using Langmuir probes.

  9. Schlieren technique applied to the arc temperature measurement in a high energy density cutting torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevosto, L.; Artana, G.; Mancinelli, B.; Kelly, H.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma temperature and radial density profiles of the plasma species in a high energy density cutting arc have been obtained by using a quantitative schlieren technique. A Z-type two-mirror schlieren system was used in this research. Due to its great sensibility such technique allows measuring plasma composition and temperature from the arc axis to the surrounding medium by processing the gray-level contrast values of digital schlieren images recorded at the observation plane for a given position of a transverse knife located at the exit focal plane of the system. The technique has provided a good visualization of the plasma flow emerging from the nozzle and its interactions with the surrounding medium and the anode. The obtained temperature values are in good agreement with those values previously obtained by the authors on the same torch using Langmuir probes.

  10. First-principle Calculations of Equation of State for Metals at High Energy Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakov, Dmitry; Levashov, Pavel; Khishchenko, Konstantin

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we present quantum molecular dynamics calculations of the shock Hugoniots of solid and porous samples as well as release isentropes and isentropic sound velocity behind the shock front for aluminum. Also we perform similar calculations for nickel and iron. We use the VASP code with ultrasoft and PAW pseudopotentials and GGA exchange-correlation functional. Up to 512 particles have been used in calculations. To calculate Hugoniots we solve the Hugoniot equation numerically. To obtain release isentropes, we use Zel'dovich's approach and integrate an ordinary differential equation for the temperature thus restoring all thermodynamic parameters. Isentropic sound velocity is calculated by differentiation of pressure along isentropes. The results of our calculations are in good agreement with experimental data at densities both higher and lower than the normal one. Thus, quantum molecular dynamics results can be effectively used for verification or calibration of semiempirical equations of state under conditions of lack of experimental information at high energy densities.

  11. Extended CO Solid: A New Class of High Energy Density Material

    SciTech Connect

    Lipp, M J; Evans, W J; Baer, B J; Yoo, C

    2004-10-14

    Covalently bonded extended phases of molecular solids made of first- and second-row elements at high pressures are a new class of materials with advanced optical, mechanical and energetic properties. The existence of such extended solids has recently been demonstrated using diamond anvil cells in several systems, including N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2},and CO. However, the microscopic quantities produced at the formidable high-pressure/temperature conditions have limited the characterization of their predicted novel properties including high-energy content. In this paper, we present the first experimental evidence that these extended low-Z solids are indeed high energy density materials via milligram-scale high-pressure synthesis, recovery and characterization of polymeric CO (p-CO). Our spectroscopic data reveal that p-CO is a random polymer made of lactonic entities and conjugated C=C with an energy content rivaling or exceeding that of HMX. Solid p-CO explosively decomposes to CO{sub 2} and glassy carbon and thus might be used as an advanced energetic material.

  12. Unique aqueous Li-ion/sulfur chemistry with high energy density and reversibility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chongyin; Suo, Liumin; Borodin, Oleg; Wang, Fei; Sun, Wei; Gao, Tao; Fan, Xiulin; Hou, Singyuk; Ma, Zhaohui; Amine, Khalil; Xu, Kang; Wang, Chunsheng

    2017-06-13

    Leveraging the most recent success in expanding the electrochemical stability window of aqueous electrolytes, in this work we create a unique Li-ion/sulfur chemistry of both high energy density and safety. We show that in the superconcentrated aqueous electrolyte, lithiation of sulfur experiences phase change from a high-order polysulfide to low-order polysulfides through solid-liquid two-phase reaction pathway, where the liquid polysulfide phase in the sulfide electrode is thermodynamically phase-separated from the superconcentrated aqueous electrolyte. The sulfur with solid-liquid two-phase exhibits a reversible capacity of 1,327 mAh/(g of S), along with fast reaction kinetics and negligible polysulfide dissolution. By coupling a sulfur anode with different Li-ion cathode materials, the aqueous Li-ion/sulfur full cell delivers record-high energy densities up to 200 Wh/(kg of total electrode mass) for >1,000 cycles at ∼100% coulombic efficiency. These performances already approach that of commercial lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) using a nonaqueous electrolyte, along with intrinsic safety not possessed by the latter. The excellent performance of this aqueous battery chemistry significantly promotes the practical possibility of aqueous LIBs in large-format applications.

  13. Ag incorporated Mn3O4/AC nanocomposite based supercapacitor devices with high energy density and power density.

    PubMed

    Nagamuthu, S; Vijayakumar, S; Muralidharan, G

    2014-12-14

    Silver incorporated Mn3O4/amorphous carbon (AC) nanocomposites are synthesized by a green chemistry method. X-ray diffraction studies revealed the structural changes in Mn3O4/AC nanocomposites attributable to the addition of silver. Cyclic voltammetry, charge-discharge and ac-impedance studies indicated that the Ag-Mn3O4/AC-5 electrode was the most suitable candidate for supercapacitor applications. From the galvanostatic charge-discharge studies, a higher specific capacitance of 981 F g(-1) at a specific current of 1 A g(-1) was obtained. An Ag-Mn3O4/AC-symmetric supercapacitor consisting of an Ag-incorporated Mn3O4/AC composite as an anode as well as a cathode, and an asymmetric supercapacitor consisting of an Ag-incorporated Mn3O4/AC composite as a cathode and an activated carbon as an anode have been fabricated. The symmetric device exhibits a specific cell capacitance of 72 F g(-1) at a specific current of 1 A g(-1) whereas the asymmetric device delivers a specific cell capacitance of 180 F g(-1) at a high current rate of 10 A g(-1). The asymmetric supercapacitor device yields a high energy density of 81 W h kg(-1). This is higher than that of lead acid batteries and comparable with that of nickel hydride batteries.

  14. High-Energy Density science with an ultra-bright x-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    This talk will review recent progress in high-energy density physics using the world's brightest x-ray source, the Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC's free electron x-ray laser. These experiments investigate laser-driven matter in extreme conditions where powerful x-ray scattering and imaging techniques have been applied to resolve ionic interactions at atomic (Ångstrom) scale lengths and to visualize the formation of dense plasma states. Major research areas include dynamic compression experiments of solid targets to determine structural properties and to discover and characterize phase transitions at mega-bar pressures. A second area studies extreme fields produced by high-intensity radiation where fundamental questions of laboratory plasmas can be related to cosmological phenomena. Each of these areas takes advantage of the unique properties of the LCLS x-ray beam. They include small foci for achieving high intensity or high spatial resolution, high photon flux for dynamic structure factor measurements in single shots, and high spectral bandwidth to resolve plasmon (Langmuir) waves or ion acoustic waves in dense plasmas. We will further describe new developments of ultrafast pump-probe technique at high repetition rates. These include studies on dense cryogenic hydrogen that have begun providing fundamental insights into the physical properties of matter in extreme conditions that are important for astrophysics, fusion experiments and generation of radiation sources. This work was supported by DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under FWP 100182.

  15. Development of a Big Area BackLighter for high energy density experiments.

    PubMed

    Flippo, K A; Kline, J L; Doss, F W; Loomis, E N; Emerich, M; Devolder, B; Murphy, T J; Fournier, K B; Kalantar, D H; Regan, S P; Barrios, M A; Merritt, E C; Perry, T S; Tregillis, I L; Welser-Sherrill, L; Fincke, J R

    2014-09-01

    A very large area (7.5 mm(2)) laser-driven x-ray backlighter, termed the Big Area BackLighter (BABL) has been developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to support high energy density experiments. The BABL provides an alternative to Pinhole-Apertured point-projection Backlighting (PABL) for a large field of view. This bypasses the challenges for PABL in the equatorial plane of the NIF target chamber where space is limited because of the unconverted laser light that threatens the diagnostic aperture, the backlighter foil, and the pinhole substrate. A transmission experiment using 132 kJ of NIF laser energy at a maximum intensity of 8.52 × 10(14) W/cm(2) illuminating the BABL demonstrated good conversion efficiency of >3.5% into K-shell emission producing ~4.6 kJ of high energy x rays, while yielding high contrast images with a highly uniform background that agree well with 2D simulated spectra and spatial profiles.

  16. Energy conservation potential in low-rise, high-density housing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The result of a year's investigation into the energy conservation potential in new urban residential construction is reported. It was made by a Study Team comprised of Pratt Institute faculty, students, and outside consultants. First, a careful study was made of the energy consumption in eleven existing New York Housing Authority projects. With this background, and with the current New York State Energy Conservation Construction Code as a design parameter, the Team designed and analyzed a row house-type base building. Investigation continued with the analysis - by computer simulation - of the effects of 113 design options, or variances to the base building. The energy use characteristics were further evaluated economically under several funding and inflation-rate assumptions. Then the most cost-effective options were ranked, and four extremely efficient, innovative composite buildings hypothesized. The results of this study should prove useful in the design of urban infill housing, as well as providing a beginning for further investigation in the area of energy-efficient, low-rise, high-density housing.

  17. Reduced entropic model for studies of multidimensional nonlocal transport in high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sorbo, D.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Dubroca, B.; Guisset, S.; Touati, M.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2015-08-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations of high-energy-density plasmas require a detailed description of energy fluxes. For low and intermediate atomic number materials, the leading mechanism is the electron transport, which may be a nonlocal phenomenon requiring a kinetic modeling. In this paper, we present and test the results of a nonlocal model based on the first angular moments of a simplified Fokker-Planck equation. This multidimensional model is closed thanks to an entropic relation (the Boltzman H-theorem). It provides a better description of the electron distribution function, thus enabling studies of small scale kinetic effects within the hydrodynamic framework. Examples of instabilities of electron plasma and ion-acoustic waves, driven by the heat flux, are presented and compared with the classical formula.

  18. Reduced entropic model for studies of multidimensional nonlocal transport in high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Del Sorbo, D.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Dubroca, B.; Guisset, S.; Touati, M.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2015-08-15

    Hydrodynamic simulations of high-energy-density plasmas require a detailed description of energy fluxes. For low and intermediate atomic number materials, the leading mechanism is the electron transport, which may be a nonlocal phenomenon requiring a kinetic modeling. In this paper, we present and test the results of a nonlocal model based on the first angular moments of a simplified Fokker-Planck equation. This multidimensional model is closed thanks to an entropic relation (the Boltzman H-theorem). It provides a better description of the electron distribution function, thus enabling studies of small scale kinetic effects within the hydrodynamic framework. Examples of instabilities of electron plasma and ion-acoustic waves, driven by the heat flux, are presented and compared with the classical formula.

  19. Studies of high energy density physics and laboratory astrophysics driven by intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.

    2016-10-01

    Laser plasmas are capable of creating unique physical conditions with extreme high energy density, which are not only closely relevant to inertial fusion energy studies, but also to laboratory simulation of some astrophysical processes. In this paper, we highlight some recent progress made by our research teams. The first part is about directional hot electron beam generation and transport for fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion, as well as a new scheme of fast ignition by use of a strong external DC magnetic field. The second part concerns laboratory modeling of some astrophysical phenomena, including 1) studies of the topological structure of magnetic reconnection/annihilation that relates closely to geomagnetic substorms, loop-top X-ray source and mass ejection in solar flares, and 2) magnetic field generation and evolution in collisionless shock formation.

  20. Extra-galactic high-energy transients: event rate density and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2015-08-01

    Several types of extra-galactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with a relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the reshift-dependent event rate densities and luminosity functions of these extra-galactic high-energy transients. We consider star formation history as the tracer of the redshift distribution for long GRBs and SBOs. For short GRBs, we consider the compact star merger model to introduce several possible merger delay time distribution models. For TDEs, we consider the mass distribution of supermassive black holes as a function of redshift. We derive some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate density for different types of transients. Based on the observed events, we derive the local specific event rate density, ρ0,L ∝ dρ0/dL for each type of transient, which represents its luminosity function. All the transients are consistent with having a single power law luminosity function, except the high luminosity long GRBs (HL-lGRBs), whose luminosity function can be well described by a broken power law. The total event rate density for a particular transient depends on the luminosity threshold, and we obtain the following values in units of Gpc-3 yr-1: 2.82^{+0.41}_{-0.36} for HL-lGRBs above 4×1049 erg s-1 218^{+130}_{-86} for low luminosity long GRBs above 6×1046 erg s-1 3.18^{+0.88}_{-0.70}, 2.87^{+0.80}_{-0.64}, and 6.25^{+1.73}_{-1.38} above 5×1049 erg s-1 for short GRBs with three different merger delay models (Gaussian, log-normal, and power law); 2.0^{+2.6}_{-1.3}×104 above 9×1043 erg s-1 for SBOs, 3.0^{+1.0}_{-0.8}×105 for normal TDEs above 1042 erg s-1 and 6.2^{+8.2}_{-4.0} above 3×1047 erg s-1for TDE jets as discovered by Swift. Intriguingly, the global specific event rate densities

  1. Directing the Lithium–Sulfur Reaction Pathway via Sparingly Solvating Electrolytes for High Energy Density Batteries

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The lithium–sulfur battery has long been seen as a potential next generation battery chemistry for electric vehicles owing to the high theoretical specific energy and low cost of sulfur. However, even state-of-the-art lithium–sulfur batteries suffer from short lifetimes due to the migration of highly soluble polysulfide intermediates and exhibit less than desired energy density due to the required excess electrolyte. The use of sparingly solvating electrolytes in lithium–sulfur batteries is a promising approach to decouple electrolyte quantity from reaction mechanism, thus creating a pathway toward high energy density that deviates from the current catholyte approach. Herein, we demonstrate that sparingly solvating electrolytes based on compact, polar molecules with a 2:1 ratio of a functional group to lithium salt can fundamentally redirect the lithium–sulfur reaction pathway by inhibiting the traditional mechanism that is based on fully solvated intermediates. In contrast to the standard catholyte sulfur electrochemistry, sparingly solvating electrolytes promote intermediate- and short-chain polysulfide formation during the first third of discharge, before disproportionation results in crystalline lithium sulfide and a restricted fraction of soluble polysulfides which are further reduced during the remaining discharge. Moreover, operation at intermediate temperatures ca. 50 °C allows for minimal overpotentials and high utilization of sulfur at practical rates. This discovery opens the door to a new wave of scientific inquiry based on modifying the electrolyte local structure to tune and control the reaction pathway of many precipitation–dissolution chemistries, lithium–sulfur and beyond. PMID:28691072

  2. Directing the Lithium-Sulfur Reaction Pathway via Sparingly Solvating Electrolytes for High Energy Density Batteries.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Wook; Pang, Quan; Ha, Seungbum; Cheng, Lei; Han, Sang-Don; Zavadil, Kevin R; Gallagher, Kevin G; Nazar, Linda F; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam

    2017-06-28

    The lithium-sulfur battery has long been seen as a potential next generation battery chemistry for electric vehicles owing to the high theoretical specific energy and low cost of sulfur. However, even state-of-the-art lithium-sulfur batteries suffer from short lifetimes due to the migration of highly soluble polysulfide intermediates and exhibit less than desired energy density due to the required excess electrolyte. The use of sparingly solvating electrolytes in lithium-sulfur batteries is a promising approach to decouple electrolyte quantity from reaction mechanism, thus creating a pathway toward high energy density that deviates from the current catholyte approach. Herein, we demonstrate that sparingly solvating electrolytes based on compact, polar molecules with a 2:1 ratio of a functional group to lithium salt can fundamentally redirect the lithium-sulfur reaction pathway by inhibiting the traditional mechanism that is based on fully solvated intermediates. In contrast to the standard catholyte sulfur electrochemistry, sparingly solvating electrolytes promote intermediate- and short-chain polysulfide formation during the first third of discharge, before disproportionation results in crystalline lithium sulfide and a restricted fraction of soluble polysulfides which are further reduced during the remaining discharge. Moreover, operation at intermediate temperatures ca. 50 °C allows for minimal overpotentials and high utilization of sulfur at practical rates. This discovery opens the door to a new wave of scientific inquiry based on modifying the electrolyte local structure to tune and control the reaction pathway of many precipitation-dissolution chemistries, lithium-sulfur and beyond.

  3. Directing the lithium–sulfur reaction pathway via sparingly solvating electrolytes for high energy density batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Chang -Wook; Pang, Quan; Ha, Seungbum; ...

    2017-05-25

    The lithium–sulfur battery has long been seen as a potential next generation battery chemistry for electric vehicles owing to the high theoretical specific energy and low cost of sulfur. However, even state-of-the-art lithium–sulfur batteries suffer from short lifetimes due to the migration of highly soluble polysulfide intermediates and exhibit less than desired energy density due to the required excess electrolyte. The use of sparingly solvating electrolytes in lithium–sulfur batteries is a promising approach to decouple electrolyte quantity from reaction mechanism, thus creating a pathway toward high energy density that deviates from the current catholyte approach. Herein, we demonstrate that sparinglymore » solvating electrolytes based on compact, polar molecules with a 2:1 ratio of a functional group to lithium salt can fundamentally redirect the lithium–sulfur reaction pathway by inhibiting the traditional mechanism that is based on fully solvated intermediates. In contrast to the standard catholyte sulfur electrochemistry, sparingly solvating electrolytes promote intermediate- and short-chain polysulfide formation during the first third of discharge, before disproportionation results in crystalline lithium sulfide and a restricted fraction of soluble polysulfides which are further reduced during the remaining discharge. Moreover, operation at intermediate temperatures ca. 50 °C allows for minimal overpotentials and high utilization of sulfur at practical rates. Finally, this discovery opens the door to a new wave of scientific inquiry based on modifying the electrolyte local structure to tune and control the reaction pathway of many precipitation–dissolution chemistries, lithium–sulfur and beyond.« less

  4. Cloud transmission and its impact on the Cherenkov light density at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Katarzyna; Sobczyńska, Dorota

    2017-01-01

    The Cherenkov light produced by Extensive Air Shower (EAS) can be absorbed by clouds. In case of the experiments that are based on the air Cherenkov technique, this effiect causes the deterioration of the sensitivity during possible observations under cloudiness conditions. In this paper we study the cloud transmission in the wavelength range between 200 and 1000 nm based on extinction coefficients given in [1]. We investigate the lateral distribution of the Cherenkov photon density in 10 TeV γ-ray induced showers using the standard CORSIKA code. We compare lateral density distributions that were obtained without and with taking into account an additional cloud absorption. We consider water and ice clouds (with various transmissions) located at fixed altitude of 7 km a.s.l.. We conclude that both water and ice clouds have the highest impact on Cherenkov photon densities close to the bump position. We expect that the high energy γ-ray may trigger small size telescope (SST) even with the presence of the quite opaque clods located at the high altitude.

  5. High-Energy-Density Laboratory Astrophysics Studies of Jets and Bow Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. M.; Wilde, B. H.; Rosen, P. A.; Williams, R. J. R.; Blue, B. E.; Coker, R. F.; Drake, R. P.; Frank, A.; Keiter, P. A.; Khokhlov, A. M.; Knauer, J. P.; Perry, T. S.

    2005-11-01

    We present the first results from high-energy-density laboratory astrophysics experiments that explore the interaction of supersonic jets/outflows with an ambient medium. Our experiments were conducted on the Omega laser facility, a large Inertial Confinement Fusion facility. In our experiments, a laser pulse drives a supersonic jet into foam. High-resolution X-ray radiography reveals the resulting highly structured bow shock. These are the first laboratory astrophysics experiments to capture the behavior of both the jet and the bow shock. We discuss the astrophysical relevance of the flow processes that we observe in the experiments and in the accompanying numerical models. Scaling arguments suggest that our experiments are most directly relevant to active galactic nucleus jets and planetary nebula outflows, while future work may allow our experiments to extend into regimes relevant to radiative outflows from young stellar objects. Contains material © British Crown Copyright 2005/MOD, reprinted with permission.

  6. Development of optics for x-ray phase-contrast imaging of high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Moldovan, N.

    2010-10-15

    Phase-contrast or refraction-enhanced x-ray radiography can be useful for the diagnostic of low-Z high energy density plasmas, such as imploding inertial confinement fusion (ICF) pellets, due to its sensitivity to density gradients. To separate and quantify the absorption and refraction contributions to x-ray images, methods based on microperiodic optics, such as shearing interferometry, can be used. To enable applying such methods with the energetic x rays needed for ICF radiography, we investigate a new type of optics consisting of grazing incidence microperiodic mirrors. Using such mirrors, efficient phase-contrast imaging systems could be built for energies up to {approx}100 keV. In addition, a simple lithographic method is proposed for the production of the microperiodic x-ray mirrors based on the difference in the total reflection between a low-Z substrate and a high-Z film. Prototype mirrors fabricated with this method show promising characteristics in laboratory tests.

  7. Hierarchical columnar silicon anode structures for high energy density lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwko, Markus; Kuntze, Thomas; Winkler, Sebastian; Straach, Steffen; Härtel, Paul; Althues, Holger; Kaskel, Stefan

    2017-05-01

    Silicon is a promising anode material for next generation lithium secondary batteries. To significantly increase the energy density of state of the art batteries with silicon, new concepts have to be developed and electrode structuring will become a key technology. Structuring is essential to reduce the macroscopic and microscopic electrode deformation, caused by the volume change during cycling. We report pulsed laser structuring for the generation of hierarchical columnar silicon films with outstanding high areal capacities up to 7.5 mAh cm-2 and good capacity retention. Unstructured columnar electrodes form a micron-sized block structure during the first cycle to compensate the volume expansion leading to macroscopic electrode deformation. At increased silicon loading, without additional structuring, pronounced distortion and the formation of cracks through the current collector causes cell failure. Pulsed laser ablation instead is demonstrated to avoid macroscopic electrode deformation by initial formation of the block structure. A full cell with lithiated silicon versus a carbon-sulfur cathode is assembled with only 15% overbalanced anode and low electrolyte amount (8 μl mgsulfur-1). While the capacity retention over 50 cycles is identical to a cell with high excess lithium anode, the volumetric energy density could be increased by 30%.

  8. Development of optics for x-ray phase-contrast imaging of high energy density plasmas.

    PubMed

    Stutman, D; Finkenthal, M; Moldovan, N

    2010-10-01

    Phase-contrast or refraction-enhanced x-ray radiography can be useful for the diagnostic of low-Z high energy density plasmas, such as imploding inertial confinement fusion (ICF) pellets, due to its sensitivity to density gradients. To separate and quantify the absorption and refraction contributions to x-ray images, methods based on microperiodic optics, such as shearing interferometry, can be used. To enable applying such methods with the energetic x rays needed for ICF radiography, we investigate a new type of optics consisting of grazing incidence microperiodic mirrors. Using such mirrors, efficient phase-contrast imaging systems could be built for energies up to ∼100 keV. In addition, a simple lithographic method is proposed for the production of the microperiodic x-ray mirrors based on the difference in the total reflection between a low-Z substrate and a high-Z film. Prototype mirrors fabricated with this method show promising characteristics in laboratory tests.

  9. Graphene/heparin template-controlled polyaniline nanofibers composite for high energy density supercapacitor electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniruzzaman Sk, Md; Yue, Chee Yoon; Jena, Rajeeb Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Graphene/PANI nanofibers composites are prepared for the first time using a novel in situ polymerization method based on the chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline using heparin as a soft template. The even dispersion of individual graphene sheet within the polymer nanofibers matrix enhances the kinetics for both charge transfer and ion transport throughout the electrode. This novel G25PNF75 composite (weight ratio of GO:PANI = 25:75) shows a high specific capacitance of 890.79 F g-1 and an excellent energy density of 123.81 Wh kg-1 at a constant discharge current of 0.5 mA. The composite exhibits excellent cycle life with 88.78% specific capacitance retention after 1000 charge-discharge cycles. The excellent performance of the composite is due to the synergistic combination of graphene which provides good electrical conductivity and mechanical stability, and PANI nanofiber which provides good redox activity that consequently contributed such high energy density.

  10. Extragalactic High-energy Transients: Event Rate Densities and Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2015-10-01

    Several types of extragalactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with an associated relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the redshift-dependent event rate densities and the global luminosity functions (GLFs; ignoring redshift evolution) of these transients. We introduce some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate densities for different types of transients and derive the local specific event rate density, which also represents its GLF. Long GRBs (LGRBs) have a large enough sample to reveal features in the GLF, which is best charaterized as a triple power law (PL). All the other transients are consistent with having a single-power-law (SPL) LF. The total event rate density depends on the minimum luminosity, and we obtain the following values in units of Gpc-3 yr-1: {0.8}-0.1+0.1 for high-luminosity LGRBs above 1050 erg s-1 {164}-65+98 for low-luminosity LGRBs above 5 × 1046 erg s-1 {1.3}-0.3+0.4, {1.2}-0.3+0.4, and {3.3}-0.8+1.0 above 1050 erg s-1 for short GRBs with three different merger delay models (Gaussian, lognormal, and PL); {1.9}-1.2+2.4× {10}4 above 1044 erg s-1 for SBOs, {4.8}-2.1+3.2× {10}2 for normal TDEs above 1044 erg s-1 and {0.03}-0.02+0.04 above 1048 erg s-1 for TDE jets as discovered by Swift. Intriguingly, the GLFs of different kinds of transients, which cover over 12 orders of magnitude, are consistent with an SPL with an index of -1.6.

  11. Transition metal sulfides grown on graphene fibers for wearable asymmetric supercapacitors with high volumetric capacitance and high energy density.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weihua; Lai, Ting; Lai, Jianwei; Xie, Haoting; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Ye, Jianshan; Yu, Chengzhong

    2016-06-01

    Fiber shaped supercapacitors are promising candidates for wearable electronics because they are flexible and light-weight. However, a critical challenge of the widespread application of these energy storage devices is their low cell voltages and low energy densities, resulting in limited run-time of the electronics. Here, we demonstrate a 1.5 V high cell voltage and high volumetric energy density asymmetric fiber supercapacitor in aqueous electrolyte. The lightweight (0.24 g cm(-3)), highly conductive (39 S cm(-1)), and mechanically robust (221 MPa) graphene fibers were firstly fabricated and then coated by NiCo2S4 nanoparticles (GF/NiCo2S4) via the solvothermal deposition method. The GF/NiCo2S4 display high volumetric capacitance up to 388 F cm(-3) at 2 mV s(-1) in a three-electrode cell and 300 F cm(-3) at 175.7 mA cm(-3) (568 mF cm(-2) at 0.5 mA cm(-2)) in a two-electrode cell. The electrochemical characterizations show 1000% higher capacitance of the GF/NiCo2S4 as compared to that of neat graphene fibers. The fabricated device achieves high energy density up to 12.3 mWh cm(-3) with a maximum power density of 1600 mW cm(-3), outperforming the thin-film lithium battery. Therefore, these supercapacitors are promising for the next generation flexible and wearable electronic devices.

  12. Transition metal sulfides grown on graphene fibers for wearable asymmetric supercapacitors with high volumetric capacitance and high energy density

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weihua; Lai, Ting; Lai, Jianwei; Xie, Haoting; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Ye, Jianshan; Yu, Chengzhong

    2016-01-01

    Fiber shaped supercapacitors are promising candidates for wearable electronics because they are flexible and light-weight. However, a critical challenge of the widespread application of these energy storage devices is their low cell voltages and low energy densities, resulting in limited run-time of the electronics. Here, we demonstrate a 1.5 V high cell voltage and high volumetric energy density asymmetric fiber supercapacitor in aqueous electrolyte. The lightweight (0.24 g cm−3), highly conductive (39 S cm−1), and mechanically robust (221 MPa) graphene fibers were firstly fabricated and then coated by NiCo2S4 nanoparticles (GF/NiCo2S4) via the solvothermal deposition method. The GF/NiCo2S4 display high volumetric capacitance up to 388 F cm−3 at 2 mV s−1 in a three-electrode cell and 300 F cm−3 at 175.7 mA cm−3 (568 mF cm−2 at 0.5 mA cm−2) in a two-electrode cell. The electrochemical characterizations show 1000% higher capacitance of the GF/NiCo2S4 as compared to that of neat graphene fibers. The fabricated device achieves high energy density up to 12.3 mWh cm−3 with a maximum power density of 1600 mW cm−3, outperforming the thin-film lithium battery. Therefore, these supercapacitors are promising for the next generation flexible and wearable electronic devices. PMID:27248510

  13. Transition metal sulfides grown on graphene fibers for wearable asymmetric supercapacitors with high volumetric capacitance and high energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weihua; Lai, Ting; Lai, Jianwei; Xie, Haoting; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Ye, Jianshan; Yu, Chengzhong

    2016-06-01

    Fiber shaped supercapacitors are promising candidates for wearable electronics because they are flexible and light-weight. However, a critical challenge of the widespread application of these energy storage devices is their low cell voltages and low energy densities, resulting in limited run-time of the electronics. Here, we demonstrate a 1.5 V high cell voltage and high volumetric energy density asymmetric fiber supercapacitor in aqueous electrolyte. The lightweight (0.24 g cm‑3), highly conductive (39 S cm‑1), and mechanically robust (221 MPa) graphene fibers were firstly fabricated and then coated by NiCo2S4 nanoparticles (GF/NiCo2S4) via the solvothermal deposition method. The GF/NiCo2S4 display high volumetric capacitance up to 388 F cm‑3 at 2 mV s‑1 in a three-electrode cell and 300 F cm‑3 at 175.7 mA cm‑3 (568 mF cm‑2 at 0.5 mA cm‑2) in a two-electrode cell. The electrochemical characterizations show 1000% higher capacitance of the GF/NiCo2S4 as compared to that of neat graphene fibers. The fabricated device achieves high energy density up to 12.3 mWh cm‑3 with a maximum power density of 1600 mW cm‑3, outperforming the thin-film lithium battery. Therefore, these supercapacitors are promising for the next generation flexible and wearable electronic devices.

  14. Nonlinear dielectric thin films for high-power electric storage with energy density comparable with electrochemical supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kui; Chen, Shuting; Rahimabady, Mojtaba; Mirshekarloo, Meysam Sharifzadeh; Yu, Shuhui; Tay, Francis Eng Hock; Sritharan, Thirumany; Lu, Li

    2011-09-01

    Although batteries possess high energy storage density, their output power is limited by the slow movement of charge carriers, and thus capacitors are often required to deliver high power output. Dielectric capacitors have high power density with fast discharge rate, but their energy density is typically much lower than electrochemical supercapacitors. Increasing the energy density of dielectric materials is highly desired to extend their applications in many emerging power system applications. In this paper, we review the mechanisms and major characteristics of electric energy storage with electrochemical supercapacitors and dielectric capacitors. Three types of in-house-produced ferroic nonlinear dielectric thin film materials with high energy density are described, including (Pb(0.97)La(0.02))(Zr(0.90)Sn(0.05)Ti(0.05))O(3) (PLZST) antiferroelectric ceramic thin films, Pb(Zn(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3-)Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3-)PbTiO(3) (PZN-PMN-PT) relaxor ferroelectric ceramic thin films, and poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)-based polymer blend thin films. The results showed that these thin film materials are promising for electric storage with outstandingly high power density and fairly high energy density, comparable with electrochemical supercapacitors.

  15. Metastable Polymeric Nitrogen: The Ultimate Green High-Energy-Density Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciezak, Jennifer

    2007-06-01

    High-energy-high-density materials offering increased stability, vulnerability, and environmental safety are being aggressively pursued to meet the requirements of the DoD Joint Visions and Future Force. Nearly two decades ago, it was proposed that polymeric nitrogen would exceed all of these requirements and possess nearly five times the energy of any conventional energetic material in use today. The present study details an investigation into nitrogen polymerization using a novel high-pressure approach utilizing sodium azide as the starting material. Due to the weaker bonding structure of the anionic azide chains in comparison to a N-N triple bond, one expects that the azide chains will create single-covalently bonded polymeric networks more easily than diatomic nitrogen. A polymeric form of sodium azide was synthesized at high pressures, but the material was not metastable at ambient conditions, which precluded performance testing. Quantum chemical calculations have indicated stabilization of the polymeric structure at ambient conditions may be possible with the addition of hydrogen. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization suggests that a meta-stable polymeric form of nitrogen has been synthesized under high-pressure using sodium azide/hydrogen as the starting materials. This material remains stable at ambient conditions upwards of two weeks depending on the storage conditions.

  16. High energy efficiency and high power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Velev, Omourtag A.; Parthasathy, Arvind; Manko, David J.; Appleby, A. John

    1991-01-01

    The development of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plants with high energy efficiencies and high power densities is gaining momentum because of the vital need of such high levels of performance for extraterrestrial (space, underwater) and terrestrial (power source for electric vehicles) applications. Since 1987, considerable progress has been made in achieving energy efficiencies of about 60 percent at a current density of 200 mA/sq cm and high power densities (greater than 1 W/sq cm) in PEM fuel cells with high (4 mg/sq cm) or low (0.4 mg/sq cm) platinum loadings in electrodes. The following areas are discussed: (1) methods to obtain these high levels of performance with low Pt loading electrodes - by proton conductor impregnation into electrodes, localization of Pt near front surface; (2) a novel microelectrode technique which yields electrode kinetic parameters for oxygen reduction and mass transport parameters; (3) demonstration of lack of water transport from anode to cathode; (4) modeling analysis of PEM fuel cell for comparison with experimental results and predicting further improvements in performance; and (5) recommendations of needed research and development for achieving the above goals.

  17. High energy efficiency and high power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Velev, Omourtag A.; Parthasathy, Arvind; Manko, David J.; Appleby, A. John

    1991-01-01

    The development of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plants with high energy efficiencies and high power densities is gaining momentum because of the vital need of such high levels of performance for extraterrestrial (space, underwater) and terrestrial (power source for electric vehicles) applications. Since 1987, considerable progress has been made in achieving energy efficiencies of about 60 percent at a current density of 200 mA/sq cm and high power densities (greater than 1 W/sq cm) in PEM fuel cells with high (4 mg/sq cm) or low (0.4 mg/sq cm) platinum loadings in electrodes. The following areas are discussed: (1) methods to obtain these high levels of performance with low Pt loading electrodes - by proton conductor impregnation into electrodes, localization of Pt near front surface; (2) a novel microelectrode technique which yields electrode kinetic parameters for oxygen reduction and mass transport parameters; (3) demonstration of lack of water transport from anode to cathode; (4) modeling analysis of PEM fuel cell for comparison with experimental results and predicting further improvements in performance; and (5) recommendations of needed research and development for achieving the above goals.

  18. Molecularly Engineered Azobenzene Derivatives for High Energy Density Solid-State Solar Thermal Fuels.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eugene N; Zhitomirsky, David; Han, Grace G D; Liu, Yun; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2017-03-15

    Solar thermal fuels (STFs) harvest and store solar energy in a closed cycle system through conformational change of molecules and can release the energy in the form of heat on demand. With the aim of developing tunable and optimized STFs for solid-state applications, we designed three azobenzene derivatives functionalized with bulky aromatic groups (phenyl, biphenyl, and tert-butyl phenyl groups). In contrast to pristine azobenzene, which crystallizes and makes nonuniform films, the bulky azobenzene derivatives formed uniform amorphous films that can be charged and discharged with light and heat for many cycles. Thermal stability of the films, a critical metric for thermally triggerable STFs, was greatly increased by the bulky functionalization (up to 180 °C), and we were able to achieve record high energy density of 135 J/g for solid-state STFs, over a 30% improvement compared to previous solid-state reports. Furthermore, the chargeability in the solid state was improved, up to 80% charged from 40% charged in previous solid-state reports. Our results point toward molecular engineering as an effective method to increase energy storage in STFs, improve chargeability, and improve the thermal stability of the thin film.

  19. The National Ignition Facility Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High Energy Density Experimental Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuest, Craig R.

    2001-03-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is 192-beam, 1.8 Megajoule, 500 Terawatt, 351 nm laser for inertial confinement fusion and high energy density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency to provide an experimental test bed for the US Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country’s nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program for NIF will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% of the shots will be dedicated to basic science research. Additionally, most of the shots on NIF will be conducted in unclassified configurations that will allow participation from the greater scientific community in planned applied physics experiments. This presentation will provide a look at the status of the construction project as well as a description of the scientific uses of NIF. NIF is currently scheduled to provide first light in 2004 and will be completed in 2008. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  20. A stencil printed, high energy density silver oxide battery using a novel photopolymerizable poly(acrylic acid) separator.

    PubMed

    Braam, Kyle; Subramanian, Vivek

    2015-01-27

    A novel photopolymerized poly(acrylic acid) separator is demonstrated in a printed, high-energy-density silver oxide battery. The printed battery demonstrates a high capacity of 5.4 mA h cm(-2) at a discharge current density of 2.75 mA cm(-2) (C/2 rate) while delivering good mechanical flexibility and robustness.

  1. High Energy Density Additives for Hybrid Fuel Rockets to Improve Performance and Enhance Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a conceptual study of prototype strained hydrocarbon molecules as high energy density additives for hybrid rocket fuels to boost the performance of these rockets without compromising safety and reliability. Use of these additives could extend the range of applications for which hybrid rockets become an attractive alternative to conventional solid or liquid fuel rockets. The objectives of the study were to confirm and quantify the high enthalpy of these strained molecules and to assess improvement in rocket performance that would be expected if these additives were blended with conventional fuels. We confirmed the chemical properties (including enthalpy) of these additives. However, the predicted improvement in rocket performance was too small to make this a useful strategy for boosting hybrid rocket performance.

  2. Infant-mortality testing of high-energy-density capacitors used on Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, B.T.; Whitham, K.

    1983-01-01

    Nova is a solid-state large laser for inertial-confinement fusion research. Its flashlamps are driven by a 60-MJ capacitor bank. Part of this bank is being built with high-energy-density capacitors, 52-..mu..F, 22 kV, 12.5 kJ. A total of 2645 of these capacitors have been purchased from two manufacturers. Each capacitor was infant-mortality tested. The first test consisted of a high-potential test, bushing-to-case, since these capacitors have dual bushings. Then the capacitors were discharged 500 times with circuit conditions approximating the capacitors normal flashlamp load. Failure of either of these tests or if the capacitor was leaking was cause for rejection.

  3. 2D quasi-ordered nitrogen-enriched porous carbon nanohybrids for high energy density supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Kan; Wang, Lei; Yu, Peng; Jiang, Baojiang; Shi, Keying; Fu, Honggang

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) quasi-ordered nitrogen-enriched porous carbon (QNPC) nanohybrids, with the characteristics of an ultrathin graphite nanosheet framework and thick quasi-ordered nitrogen-doped carbon cladding with a porous texture, have been synthesized via an in situ polymerization assembly method. In the synthesis, the expandable graphite (EG) is enlarged by an intermittent microwave method, and then aniline monomers are intercalated into the interlayers of the expanded EG with the assistance of a vacuum. Subsequently, the intercalated aniline monomers could assemble on the interlayer surface of the expanded EG, accompanied by the in situ polymerization from aniline monomers to polyaniline. Meanwhile, the expanded EG could be exfoliated to graphite nanosheets. By subsequent pyrolysis and activation processes, the QNPC nanohybrids could be prepared. As supercapacitor electrodes, a typical QNPC12-700 sample derived from the precursor containing an EG content of 12%, with a high level of nitrogen doping of 5.22 at%, offers a high specific capacitance of 305.7 F g-1 (1 A g-1), excellent rate-capability and long-term stability. Notably, an extremely high energy density of 95.7 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 449.7 W kg-1 in an ionic liquid electrolyte can be achieved. The unique structural features and moderate heteroatom doping of the QNPC nanohybrids combines electrochemical double layer and faradaic capacitance contributions, which make these nanohybrids ideal candidates as electrode materials for high-performance energy storage devices.Two-dimensional (2D) quasi-ordered nitrogen-enriched porous carbon (QNPC) nanohybrids, with the characteristics of an ultrathin graphite nanosheet framework and thick quasi-ordered nitrogen-doped carbon cladding with a porous texture, have been synthesized via an in situ polymerization assembly method. In the synthesis, the expandable graphite (EG) is enlarged by an intermittent microwave method, and then aniline monomers are

  4. Evaluation of room-temperature chloroaluminate molten salts as electrolytes for high energy density batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, R. L.

    1990-04-01

    This report reviews past battery studies using room-temperature chloroaluminate electrolytes, pointing out problems experienced. The report then summarizes attempts to circumvent these problems. A cell is described that uses a sodium anode, a copper (II) chloride cathode, and room-temperature chloroaluminate electrolyte buffered to the neutral composition. Cells give an open circuit voltage greater than 2.75 volts and discharge near 1 milliAmperes per centimeters squared at voltages greater than 2 volts for more than 20 hours. Cell failure is attributed to the formation of a nonconductive coating on the sodium electrode. Suggestions for future studies are presented. While the room-temperature chloroaluminates appear suitable for high-voltage, low-current batteries, their physical properties may limit their potential for high energy density batteries.

  5. Note: Experimental platform for magnetized high-energy-density plasma studies at the omega laser facility

    DOE PAGES

    Fiksel, G.; Agliata, A.; Barnak, D.; ...

    2015-01-12

    Here, an upgrade of the pulsed magnetic field generator magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system [O. Gotchev et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043504 (2009)] is described. The device is used to study magnetized high-energy-density plasma and is capable of producing a pulsed magnetic field of tens of tesla in a volume of a few cubic centimeters. The magnetic field is created by discharging a high-voltage capacitor through a small wire-wound coil. The coil current pulse has a duration of about 1 μs and a peak value of 40 kA. Compared to the original, the updated version has a larger energymore » storage and improved switching system. In addition, magnetic coils are fabricated using 3-D printing technology which allows for a greater variety of the magnetic field topology.« less

  6. Time- and space-resolved elliptical crystal spectrometers for high energy density physics research

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, P.W.; Bailey, J.E.; Rochau, G.A.; Moore, T.C.; Petmecky, D.; Gard, P.

    2004-10-01

    X-ray spectrometers used in high energy density plasma experiments must provide high time, space, and spectral resolution while overcoming the difficulties imposed by x-ray background, debris, and mechanical shocks. At the Z facility these problems are addressed using a suite of elliptical crystal spectrometers. The elliptical geometry isolates the detector from the line of sight with a slit placed at the elliptical focus, while the sensitivity enables locating the crystal 2-4 m from the plasma source. Space and time resolution are obtained by using an array of slits to project one dimensional plasma images onto the crystal and recording the spectrally dispersed images with a gated microchannel plate detector.

  7. Femtosecond laser-generated high-energy-density states studied by x-ray FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsutsumi, M.; Appel, K.; Baehtz, C.; Chen, B.; Cowan, T. E.; Göde, S.; Konopkova, Z.; Pelka, A.; Priebe, G.; Schmidt, A.; Sukharnikov, K.; Thorpe, I.; Tschentscher, Th; Zastrau, U.

    2017-01-01

    The combination of powerful optical lasers and an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) provides unique capabilities to study the transient behaviour of matter in extreme conditions. The high energy density science instrument (HED instrument) at the European XFEL will provide the experimental platform on which an unique x-ray source can be combined with various types of high-power optical lasers. In this paper, we highlight selected scientific examples together with the associated x-ray techniques, with particular emphasis on femtosecond (fs)-timescale pump-probe experiments. Subsequently, we present the current design status of the HED instrument, outlining how the experiments could be performed. First user experiments will start at the beginning of 2018, after which various optical lasers will be commissioned and made available to the international scientific community.

  8. Stable High-Energy Density Super-Atom Clusters of Aluminum Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Ke-yan; Jiang, Yuan-fei; Fei, De-hou; Feng, Wei; Jin, Ming-xing; Ding, Da-jun; Luo, Yi

    2012-04-01

    With the concept of super-atom, first principles calculations propose a new type of super stable cage clusters AlnH3n that are much more energetic stable than the well established clusters, AlnHn+2. In the new clusters, the aluminum core-frame acts as a super-atom with n vertexes and 2n Al-Al edges, which allow to adsorb n hydrogen atoms at the top-site and 2n at the bridge-site. Using Al12H36 as the basic unit, stable chain structures, (Al12H36)m, have been constructed following the same connection mechanism as for (AlH3)n linear polymeric structures. Apart from high hydrogen percentage per molecule, calculations have shown that these new clusters possess large heat of formation values and their combustion heat is about 4.8 times of the methane, making them a promising high energy density material.

  9. First-Principles Studies of Octacyclopropylcubane: A Novel High-Energy Density Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Steven L.; Allen, Reeshemah N.; Finkenstadt, Daniel; Mehl, Michael J.; Pederson, Mark R.

    2009-03-01

    The ongoing quest for synthesizing novel high-energy density materials (HEDMs) is clearly motivated by a search for new propellants and explosives. Recently de Meijere et al. have synthesized a new HEDM, octacyclopropylcubane (C32H40), in which the eight hydrogen atoms of cubane were replaced by cyclopropyl groups. In this work we report the results of a first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculation using the suite of codes known as NRLMOL (Naval Research Laboratory Molecular Orbital Library) to compute the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of octacyclopropylcubane. We have calculated the vibrational properties of C32H40 and compare our results with experiment. We have also employed a DFT-based tight-binding scheme to compute the vibrational density of states for octacyclopropylcubane and compare our results with our full DFT-based results. Interesting enough, the geometry of the cyclopropyl groups in C32H40 does not allow for the quartic- concerted torsional mode (QCTM) that we and other workers have previously studied in octanitrocubane.

  10. Molecular design of 1,2,4,5-tetrazine-based high-energy density materials.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tao; Zhu, Weihua; Zhang, Xiaowen; Li, Yu-Fang; Xiao, Heming

    2009-08-20

    The heats of formation (HOFs) for a series of 1,2,4,5-tetrazine derivatives were calculated by using density functional theory (DFT), Hartree Fork (HF), and Møller-Plesset (MP2) as well as semiempirical methods. The effects of different basis bets on HOFs were also considered. Our results show that the -CN or -N3 group plays a very important role in increasing the HOF values of the 1,2,4,5-tetrazine derivatives. An analysis of the bond dissociation energies for the weakest bonds indicates that substitutions of the -N3, -NH2, -CN, -OH, or -Cl group are favorable for enhancing the thermal stability of 1,2,4,5-tetrazine, but the -NHNH2, -NHNO2, -NO2, -NF2, or -COOH group produces opposite effects. The calculated detonation velocities and pressures indicate that the -NF2 or -NO2 group is very helpful for enhancing the detonation performance for the derivatives, but the case is quite the contrary for the -CN, -NH2, or -OH group. Considered the detonation performance and thermal stability, three derivatives may be regarded as potential candidates of high-energy density materials (HEDMs).

  11. High-Energy Density science at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Glenzer, S. H.; Fletcher, L. B.; Hastings, J. B.

    2016-04-01

    The Matter in Extreme Conditions end station at the Linac Coherent Light Source holds great promise for novel pump-probe experiments to make new discoveries in high- energy density science. Recently, our experiments have demonstrated the first spectrally- resolved measurements of plasmons using a seeded 8-keV x-ray laser beam. Forward x-ray Thomson scattering spectra from isochorically heated solid aluminum show a well-resolved plasmon feature that is down-shifted in energy by 19 eV from the incident 8 keV elastic scattering feature. In this spectral range, the simultaneously measured backscatter spectrum shows no spectral features indicating observation of collective plasmon oscillations on amore » scattering length comparable to the screening length. Moreover, this technique is a prerequisite for Thomson scattering measurements in compressed matter where the plasmon shift is a sensitive function of the free electron density and where the plasmon intensity provides information on temperature.« less

  12. Aluminum manganese oxides with mixed crystal structure: high-energy-density cathodes for rechargeable sodium batteries.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong-Wook; Ku, Jun-Hwan; Kim, Ryoung-Hee; Yun, Dong-Jin; Lee, Seok-Soo; Doo, Seok-Gwang

    2014-07-01

    We report a new discovery for enhancing the energy density of manganese oxide (Nax MnO2 ) cathode materials for sodium rechargeable batteries by incorporation of aluminum. The Al incorporation results in NaAl(0.1) Mn(0.9) O2 with a mixture of tunnel and layered crystal structures. NaAl(0.1) Mn(0.9) O2 shows a much higher initial discharge capacity and superior cycling performance compared to pristine Na(0.65) MnO2 . We ascribe this enhancement in performance to the formation of a new orthorhombic layered NaMnO2 phase merged with a small amount of tunnel Na(0.44) MnO2 phase in NaAl(0.1) Mn(0.9) O2 , and to improvements in the surface stability of the NaAl(0.1) Mn(0.9) O2 particles caused by the formation of Al-O bonds on their surfaces. Our findings regarding the phase transformation and structure stabilization induced by incorporation of aluminum, closely related to the structural analogy between orthorhombic Na(0.44) MnO2 and NaAl(0.1) Mn(0.9) O2 , suggest a strategy for achieving sodium rechargeable batteries with high energy density and stability.

  13. High solids emulsions produced by ultrasound as a function of energy density.

    PubMed

    Consoli, Larissa; de Figueiredo Furtado, Guilherme; da Cunha, Rosiane Lopes; Hubinger, Míriam Dupas

    2017-09-01

    The use of emulsifying methods is frequently required before spray drying food ingredients, where using high concentration of solids increases the drying process yield. In this work, we used ultrasound to obtain kinetically stable palm oil-in-water emulsions with 30g solids/100g of emulsion. Sodium caseinate, maltodextrin and dried glucose syrup were used as stabilizing agents. Sonication time of 3, 7 and 11min were evaluated at power of 72, 105 and 148W (which represents 50%, 75% and 100% of power amplitude in relation to the nominal power of the equipment). Energy density required for each assay was calculated. Emulsions were characterized for droplets mean diameter and size distribution, optical microscopy, confocal microscopy, ζ-potential, creaming index (CI) and rheological behavior. Emulsions presented bimodal size distribution, with D[3,2] ranging from 0.7 to 1.4μm and CI between 5% and 12%, being these parameters inversely proportional to sonication time and power, but with a visual kinetically stabilization after the treatment at 148W at 7min sonication. D[3,2] showed to depend of energy density as a power function. Sonication presented as an effective method to be integrated to spray drying when emulsification is needed before the drying process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Large Hadron Collider at CERN: Beams generating high-energy-density matter.

    PubMed

    Tahir, N A; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Piriz, A R; Hoffmann, D H H; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations that have been carried out to study the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic responses of a solid copper cylindrical target that is facially irradiated along the axis by one of the two Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 7 TeV/ c proton beams. The energy deposition by protons in solid copper has been calculated using an established particle interaction and Monte Carlo code, FLUKA, which is capable of simulating all components of the particle cascades in matter, up to multi-TeV energies. These data have been used as input to a sophisticated two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code BIG2 that has been employed to study this problem. The prime purpose of these investigations was to assess the damage caused to the equipment if the entire LHC beam is lost at a single place. The FLUKA calculations show that the energy of protons will be deposited in solid copper within about 1 m assuming constant material parameters. Nevertheless, our hydrodynamic simulations have shown that the energy deposition region will extend to a length of about 35 m over the beam duration. This is due to the fact that first few tens of bunches deposit sufficient energy that leads to high pressure that generates an outgoing radial shock wave. Shock propagation leads to continuous reduction in the density at the target center that allows the protons delivered in subsequent bunches to penetrate deeper and deeper into the target. This phenomenon has also been seen in case of heavy-ion heated targets [N. A. Tahir, A. Kozyreva, P. Spiller, D. H. H. Hoffmann, and A. Shutov, Phys. Rev. E 63, 036407 (2001)]. This effect needs to be considered in the design of a sacrificial beam stopper. These simulations have also shown that the target is severely damaged and is converted into a huge sample of high-energy density (HED) matter. In fact, the inner part of the target is transformed into a strongly coupled plasma with fairly uniform physical conditions. This work, therefore, has

  15. The CERN Large Hadron Collider as a tool to study high-energy density matter.

    PubMed

    Tahir, N A; Kain, V; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Gryaznov, V; Piriz, A R; Temporal, M; Hoffmann, D H H; Fortov, V E

    2005-04-08

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate two extremely powerful 7 TeV proton beams. Each beam will consist of 2808 bunches with an intensity per bunch of 1.15x10(11) protons so that the total number of protons in one beam will be about 3x10(14) and the total energy will be 362 MJ. Each bunch will have a duration of 0.5 ns and two successive bunches will be separated by 25 ns, while the power distribution in the radial direction will be Gaussian with a standard deviation, sigma=0.2 mm. The total duration of the beam will be about 89 mus. Using a 2D hydrodynamic code, we have carried out numerical simulations of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of a solid copper target that is irradiated with one of the LHC beams. These calculations show that only the first few hundred proton bunches will deposit a high specific energy of 400 kJ/g that will induce exotic states of high energy density in matter.

  16. Experimental investigation of opacity models for stellar interior, inertial fusion, and high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Mancini, R. C.; Iglesias, C. A.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. E.; Blancard, C.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.

    2009-05-15

    Theoretical opacities are required for calculating energy transport in plasmas. In particular, understanding stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and Z pinches depends on the opacities of mid-atomic-number elements over a wide range of temperatures. The 150-300 eV temperature range is particularly interesting. The opacity models are complex and experimental validation is crucial. For example, solar models presently disagree with helioseismology and one possible explanation is inadequate theoretical opacities. Testing these opacities requires well-characterized plasmas at temperatures high enough to produce the ion charge states that exist in the sun. Typical opacity experiments heat a sample using x rays and measure the spectrally resolved transmission with a backlight. The difficulty grows as the temperature increases because the heating x-ray source must supply more energy and the backlight must be bright enough to overwhelm the plasma self-emission. These problems can be overcome with the new generation of high energy density (HED) facilities. For example, recent experiments at Sandia's Z facility [M. K. Matzen et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055503 (2005)] measured the transmission of a mixed Mg and Fe plasma heated to 156{+-}6 eV. This capability will also advance opacity science for other HED plasmas. This tutorial reviews experimental methods for testing opacity models, including experiment design, transmission measurement methods, accuracy evaluation, and plasma diagnostics. The solar interior serves as a focal problem and Z facility experiments illustrate the techniques.

  17. High power densities from high-temperature material interactions. [in thermionic energy conversion and metallic fluid heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) and metallic-fluid heat pipes (MFHPs), offering unique advantages in terrestrial and space energy processing by virtue of operating on working-fluid vaporization/condensation cycles that accept great thermal power densities at high temperatures, share complex materials problems. Simplified equations are presented that verify and solve such problems, suggesting the possibility of cost-effective applications in the near term for TEC and MFHP devices. Among the problems discussed are: the limitation of alkali-metal corrosion, protection against hot external gases, external and internal vaporization, interfacial reactions and diffusion, expansion coefficient matching, and creep deformation.

  18. High power densities from high-temperature material interactions. [in thermionic energy conversion and metallic fluid heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) and metallic-fluid heat pipes (MFHPs), offering unique advantages in terrestrial and space energy processing by virtue of operating on working-fluid vaporization/condensation cycles that accept great thermal power densities at high temperatures, share complex materials problems. Simplified equations are presented that verify and solve such problems, suggesting the possibility of cost-effective applications in the near term for TEC and MFHP devices. Among the problems discussed are: the limitation of alkali-metal corrosion, protection against hot external gases, external and internal vaporization, interfacial reactions and diffusion, expansion coefficient matching, and creep deformation.

  19. High-energy density nonaqueous all redox flow lithium battery enabled with a polymeric membrane.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chuankun; Pan, Feng; Zhu, Yun Guang; Huang, Qizhao; Lu, Li; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are considered one of the most promising large-scale energy storage technologies. However, conventional RFBs suffer from low energy density due to the low solubility of the active materials in electrolyte. On the basis of the redox targeting reactions of battery materials, the redox flow lithium battery (RFLB) demonstrated in this report presents a disruptive approach to drastically enhancing the energy density of flow batteries. With LiFePO4 and TiO2 as the cathodic and anodic Li storage materials, respectively, the tank energy density of RFLB could reach ~500 watt-hours per liter (50% porosity), which is 10 times higher than that of a vanadium redox flow battery. The cell exhibits good electrochemical performance under a prolonged cycling test. Our prototype RFLB full cell paves the way toward the development of a new generation of flow batteries for large-scale energy storage.

  20. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments.

    PubMed

    Hill, K W; Bitter, M; Delgado-Aparacio, L; Efthimion, P; Pablant, N A; Lu, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Magee, E

    2014-11-01

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/ΔE of order 10,000 and spatial resolution better than 10 μm. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  1. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W. Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Pablant, N. A.; Lu, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Magee, E.

    2014-11-15

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/ΔE of order 10 000 and spatial resolution better than 10 μm. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  2. Using high energy angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy to reveal the charge density in solids.

    PubMed

    Månsson, M; Claesson, T; Finazzi, M; Dallera, C; Brookes, N B; Tjernberg, O

    2008-11-28

    The charge density in solids is a fundamental parameter. Here we demonstrate that the charge density can be determined by the use of angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The method, which involves a Fourier-like transform from momentum space to real space, is demonstrated by utilizing soft x-ray angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy to sample the complete three-dimensional Brillouin zone of copper. It is also shown that this can be done in an energy resolved way as to extract the charge density contribution from states of a particular energy.

  3. Experimental and Computational Studies of High Energy Density Plasma Streams Ablated from Fine Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Greenly, John B.; Seyler, Charles

    2014-03-30

    Experimental and computational studies of high energy density plasma streams ablated from fine wires. Laboratory of Plasma Studies, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University. Principal Investigators: Dr. John B. Greenly and Dr. Charles E. Seyler. This report summarizes progress during the final year of this project to study the physics of high energy density (HED) plasma streams of 10^17-10^20/cm3 density and high velocity (~100-500 km/s). Such streams are produced from 5-250 micrometer diameter wires heated and ionized by a 1 MA, 250 ns current pulse on the COBRA pulsed power facility at Cornell University. Plasma is ablated from the wires and is driven away to high velocity by unbalanced JxB force. A wire, or an array of wires, can persist as an essentially stationary, continuous source of this streaming plasma for >200 ns, even with driving magnetic fields of many Tesla and peak current densities in the plasma of many MA/cm2. At the heart of the ablation stream generation is the continuous transport of mass from the relatively cold, near-solid-density wire "core" into current-carrying plasma within 1 mm of the wire, followed by the magnetic acceleration of that plasma and its trapped flux to form a directed stream. In the first two years of this program, an advancing understanding of ablation physics led to the discovery of several novel wire ablation experimental regimes. In the final year, one of these new HED plasma regimes has been studied in quantitative detail. This regime studies highly reproducible magnetic reconnection in strongly radiating plasma with supersonic and superalfvenic flow, and shock structures in the outflow. The key discovery is that very heavy wires, e.g. 250 micrometer diameter Al or 150 micrometer Cu, behave in a qualitatively different way than the lighter wires typically used in wire-array Z-pinches. Such wires can be configured to produce a static magnetic X-point null geometry that stores magnetic and

  4. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Y; Kiyama, S; Fujiwara, Y; Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H

    2015-11-01

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm(2)) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E(ib) ≈ 150-200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E(ib) is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  5. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Y. E-mail: hirano.yoichi@phys.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Sakakita, H.

    2015-11-15

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm{sup 2}) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E{sub ib} ≈ 150–200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E{sub ib} is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  6. Advanced Materials Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition for High Energy Density Rechargeable Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin

    In order to meet the ever increasing energy needs of society and realize the US Department of Energy (DOE)'s target for energy storage, acquiring a fundamental understanding of the chemical mechanisms in batteries for direct guidance and searching novel advanced materials with high energy density are critical. To realize rechargeable batteries with superior energy density, great cathodes and excellent anodes are required. LiMn2O4 (LMO) has been considered as a simpler surrogate for high energy cathode materials like NMC. Previous studies demonstrated that Al2O3 coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) improved the capacity of LMO cathodes. This improvement was attributed to a reduction in surface area and diminished Mn dissolution. However, here we propose a different mechanism for ALD Al 2O3 on LMO based on in-situ and ex-situ investigations coupled with density functional theory calculations. We discovered that Al2O 3 not only coats the LMO, but also dopes the LMO surface with Al leading to changes in the Mn oxidation state. Different thicknesses of Al2O 3 were deposited on nonstoichiometric LiMn2O4 for electrochemical measurements. The LMO treated with one cycle of ALD Al2O3 (1xAl 2O3 LMO) to produce a sub-monolayer coating yielded a remarkable initial capacity, 16.4% higher than its uncoated LMO counterpart in full cells. The stability of 1xAl2O3 LMO is also much better as a result of stabilized defects with Al species. Furthermore, 4xAl 2O3 LMO demonstrates remarkable capacity retention. Stoichiometric LiMn2O4 was also evaluated with similar improved performance achieved. All superior results, accomplished by great stability and reduced Mn dissolution, is thanks to the synergetic effects of Al-doping and ALD Al2O 3 coating. Turning our attention to the anode, we again utilized aluminum oxide ALD to form conformal films on lithium. We elaborately designed and studied, for the first time, the growth mechanism during Al2O3 ALD on lithium metal in

  7. Rescaling of metal oxide nanocrystals for energy storage having high capacitance and energy density with robust cycle life.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyung Mo; Choi, Kyung Min; Cheng, Tao; Lee, Dong Ki; Zhou, Renjia; Ock, Il Woo; Milliron, Delia J; Goddard, William A; Kang, Jeung Ku

    2015-06-30

    Nanocrystals are promising structures, but they are too large for achieving maximum energy storage performance. We show that rescaling 3-nm particles through lithiation followed by delithiation leads to high-performance energy storage by realizing high capacitance close to the theoretical capacitance available via ion-to-atom redox reactions. Reactive force-field (ReaxFF) molecular dynamics simulations support the conclusion that Li atoms react with nickel oxide nanocrystals (NiO-n) to form lithiated core-shell structures (Ni:Li2O), whereas subsequent delithiation causes Ni:Li2O to form atomic clusters of NiO-a. This is consistent with in situ X-ray photoelectron and optical spectroscopy results showing that Ni(2+) of the nanocrystal changes during lithiation-delithiation through Ni(0) and back to Ni(2+). These processes are also demonstrated to provide a generic route to rescale another metal oxide. Furthermore, assembling NiO-a into the positive electrode of an asymmetric device enables extraction of full capacitance for a counter negative electrode, giving high energy density in addition to robust capacitance retention over 100,000 cycles.

  8. Rescaling of metal oxide nanocrystals for energy storage having high capacitance and energy density with robust cycle life

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyung Mo; Choi, Kyung Min; Cheng, Tao; Lee, Dong Ki; Zhou, Renjia; Ock, Il Woo; Milliron, Delia J.; Goddard, William A.; Kang, Jeung Ku

    2015-01-01

    Nanocrystals are promising structures, but they are too large for achieving maximum energy storage performance. We show that rescaling 3-nm particles through lithiation followed by delithiation leads to high-performance energy storage by realizing high capacitance close to the theoretical capacitance available via ion-to-atom redox reactions. Reactive force-field (ReaxFF) molecular dynamics simulations support the conclusion that Li atoms react with nickel oxide nanocrystals (NiO-n) to form lithiated core–shell structures (Ni:Li2O), whereas subsequent delithiation causes Ni:Li2O to form atomic clusters of NiO-a. This is consistent with in situ X-ray photoelectron and optical spectroscopy results showing that Ni2+ of the nanocrystal changes during lithiation–delithiation through Ni0 and back to Ni2+. These processes are also demonstrated to provide a generic route to rescale another metal oxide. Furthermore, assembling NiO-a into the positive electrode of an asymmetric device enables extraction of full capacitance for a counter negative electrode, giving high energy density in addition to robust capacitance retention over 100,000 cycles. PMID:26080421

  9. Symmetry energy effects on the mixed hadron-quark phase at high baryon density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Toro, M.; Liu, B.; Greco, V.; Baran, V.; Colonna, M.; Plumari, S.

    2011-01-01

    The phase transition of hadronic to quark matter at high baryon and isospin density is analyzed. Relativistic mean-field models are used to describe hadronic matter, and the MIT bag model is adopted for quark matter. The boundaries of the mixed phase and the related critical points for symmetric and asymmetric matter are obtained. Due to the different symmetry term in the two phases, isospin effects appear to be rather significant. With increasing isospin asymmetry the binodal transition line of the (T,ρB) diagram is lowered to a region accessible through heavy-ion collisions in the energy range of the new planned facilities (e.g., the FAIR/NICA projects). Some observable effects are suggested, in particular an isospin distillation mechanism with a more isospin asymmetric quark phase, to be seen in charged meson yield ratios, and an onset of quark number scaling of the meson-baryon elliptic flows. The presented isospin effects on the mixed phase appear to be robust with respect to even large variations of the poorly known symmetry term at high baryon density in the hadron phase. The dependence of the results on a suitable treatment of isospin contributions in effective QCD Lagrangian approaches, at the level of explicit isovector parts and/or quark condensates, is discussed.

  10. Surface modified CFx cathode material for ultrafast discharge and high energy density

    DOE PAGES

    Dai, Yang; Zhu, Yimei; Cai, Sendan; ...

    2014-11-10

    Li/CFx primary possesses the highest energy density of 2180 W h kg⁻¹ among all primary lithium batteries. However, a key limitation for the utility of this type of battery is in its poor rate capability because the cathode material, CFx, is an intrinsically poor electronic conductor. Here, we report on our development of a controlled process of surface de-fluorination under mild hydrothermal conditions to modify the highly fluorinated CFx. The modified CFx, consisting of an in situ generated shell component of F-graphene layers, possesses good electronic conductivity and removes the transporting barrier for lithium ions, yielding a high-capacity performance andmore » an excellent rate-capability. Indeed, a capacity of 500 mA h g⁻¹ and a maximum power density of 44 800 W kg⁻¹ can be realized at the ultrafast rate of 30 C (24 A g⁻¹), which is over one order of magnitude higher than that of the state-of-the-art primary lithium-ion batteries.« less

  11. Surface modified CFx cathode material for ultrafast discharge and high energy density

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Yang; Zhu, Yimei; Cai, Sendan; Wu, Lijun; Yang, Weijing; Xie, Jingying; Wen, Wen; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Zheng, Yi

    2014-11-10

    Li/CFx primary possesses the highest energy density of 2180 W h kg⁻¹ among all primary lithium batteries. However, a key limitation for the utility of this type of battery is in its poor rate capability because the cathode material, CFx, is an intrinsically poor electronic conductor. Here, we report on our development of a controlled process of surface de-fluorination under mild hydrothermal conditions to modify the highly fluorinated CFx. The modified CFx, consisting of an in situ generated shell component of F-graphene layers, possesses good electronic conductivity and removes the transporting barrier for lithium ions, yielding a high-capacity performance and an excellent rate-capability. Indeed, a capacity of 500 mA h g⁻¹ and a maximum power density of 44 800 W kg⁻¹ can be realized at the ultrafast rate of 30 C (24 A g⁻¹), which is over one order of magnitude higher than that of the state-of-the-art primary lithium-ion batteries.

  12. Symmetry energy effects on the mixed hadron-quark phase at high baryon density

    SciTech Connect

    Di Toro, M.; Greco, V.; Plumari, S.; Liu, B.; Baran, V.; Colonna, M.

    2011-01-15

    The phase transition of hadronic to quark matter at high baryon and isospin density is analyzed. Relativistic mean-field models are used to describe hadronic matter, and the MIT bag model is adopted for quark matter. The boundaries of the mixed phase and the related critical points for symmetric and asymmetric matter are obtained. Due to the different symmetry term in the two phases, isospin effects appear to be rather significant. With increasing isospin asymmetry the binodal transition line of the (T,{rho}{sub B}) diagram is lowered to a region accessible through heavy-ion collisions in the energy range of the new planned facilities (e.g., the FAIR/NICA projects). Some observable effects are suggested, in particular an isospin distillation mechanism with a more isospin asymmetric quark phase, to be seen in charged meson yield ratios, and an onset of quark number scaling of the meson-baryon elliptic flows. The presented isospin effects on the mixed phase appear to be robust with respect to even large variations of the poorly known symmetry term at high baryon density in the hadron phase. The dependence of the results on a suitable treatment of isospin contributions in effective QCD Lagrangian approaches, at the level of explicit isovector parts and/or quark condensates, is discussed.

  13. Microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation with associated extremely low photon flux densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, A.; Jain, V. K.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation in extremely low flux density conditions. With wide deployment in mind, potential applications range from nuclear non-proliferation, to hospital radiation-safety. The daunting challenge is the low level of photon flux densities - emerging from a Scintillation Crystal (SC) on to a ~1 mm-square detector, which are a factor of 10000 or so lower than those acceptable to recently reported photonic chips (including `single-photon detection' chips), due to a combination of low Lux, small detector size, and short duration SC output pulses - on the order of 1 μs. These challenges are attempted to be overcome by the design of an innovative `System on a Chip' type microchip, with high detector sensitivity, and effective coupling from the SC to the photodetector. The microchip houses a tiny n+ diff p-epi photodiode (PD) as well as the associated analog amplification and other related circuitry, all fabricated in 0.5micron, 3-metal 2-poly CMOS technology. The amplification, together with pulse-shaping of the photocurrent-induced voltage signal, is achieved through a tandem of two capacitively coupled, double-cascode amplifiers. Included in the paper are theoretical estimates and experimental results.

  14. Pressure-induced stable BeN4 as a high-energy density material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shoutao; Zhao, Ziyuan; Liu, Lulu; Yang, Guochun

    2017-10-01

    Polynitrogens are the ideal rocket fuels or propellants. Due to strong triple N≡N bond in N2, the direct polymerization of nitrogen is rather difficult (i.e. extreme high temperature and high pressure). However, the use of nitrides as precursors or the reaction of N2 with other elements has been proved to be an effective way to obtain polynitrogens. Here, with assistance of the advanced first-principles swarm-intelligence structure searches, we found that P 1 bar -BeN4, containing infinite zigzag-like polymeric nitrogen chains, can be synthesized by compressing the mixture of Be3N2 and N2 at 25.4 GPa, which is greatly lower than 110 GPa for synthesizing cubic gauche nitrogen and other polynitrogen compounds (e.g. bulk CNO at 52 GPa and SN4 at 49 GPa). Its structural stability can be attributed to the coexistence of ionic Be-N and covalent N-N bonds. Intriguingly, this phase has high kinetic stability and remains metastable at ambient pressure. The exceptional properties, including high energy density (3.60 kJ g-1), high nitrogen content (86.1%), high dynamical stability, and low polymerization pressure, make P 1 bar -structured BeN4 a promising high energy material. Infinite nitrogen chains in P 1 bar -BeN4 transform to N10 rings network in P21/c phase at 115.1 GPa. P 1 bar -BeN4 is metallic, while P21/c-BeN4 is an insulator.

  15. Sparingly solvating electrolytes for high energy density Lithium–sulfur batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Lei; Curtiss, Larry A.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; ...

    2016-07-11

    Moving to lighter and less expensive battery chemistries compared to lithium-ion requires the control of energy storage mechanisms based on chemical transformations rather than intercalation. Lithium sulfur (Li/S) has tremendous theoretical specific energy, but contemporary approaches to control this solution-mediated, precipitation-dissolution chemistry requires using large excesses of electrolyte to fully solubilize the polysulfide intermediate. Achieving reversible electrochemistry under lean electrolyte operation is the only path for Li/S to move beyond niche applications to potentially transformational performance. An emerging topic for Li/S research is the use of sparingly solvating electrolytes and the creation of design rules for discovering new electrolyte systemsmore » that fundamentally decouple electrolyte volume from reaction mechanism. Furthermore, this perspective presents an outlook for sparingly solvating electrolytes as the key path forward for longer-lived, high-energy density Li/S batteries including an overview of this promising new concept and some strategies for accomplishing it.« less

  16. Inertial Fusion and High-Energy-Density Science in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Tarter, C B

    2001-09-06

    Inertial fusion and high-energy density science worldwide is poised to take a great leap forward. In the US, programs at the University of Rochester, Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Naval Research Laboratory, and many smaller laboratories have laid the groundwork for building a facility in which fusion ignition can be studied in the laboratory for the first time. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is being built by the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Agency to provide an experimental test bed for the US Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) to ensure the dependability of the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. NIF and other large laser systems being planned such as the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) in France will also make important contributions to basic science, the development of inertial fusion energy, and other scientific and technological endeavors. NIF will be able to produce extreme temperatures and pressures in matter. This will allow simulating astrophysical phenomena (on a tiny scale) and measuring the equation of state of material under conditions that exist in planetary cores.

  17. Graphene-based lithium ion capacitor with high gravimetric energy and power densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajuria, Jon; Arnaiz, Maria; Botas, Cristina; Carriazo, Daniel; Mysyk, Roman; Rojo, Teofilo; Talyzin, Alexandr V.; Goikolea, Eider

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid capacitor configurations are now of increasing interest to overcome the current energy limitations of supercapacitors. In this work, we report a lithium ion capacitor (LIC) entirely based on graphene. On the one hand, the negative -battery-type- electrode consists of a self-standing, binder-free 3D macroporous foam formed by reduced graphene oxide and decorated with tin oxide nanoparticles (SnO2-rGO). On the other hand, the positive -capacitor-type- electrode is based on a thermally expanded and physically activated reduced graphene oxide (a-TEGO). For comparison purposes, a symmetric electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC) using the same activated graphene in 1.5 M Et4NBF4/ACN electrolyte is also assembled. Built in 1 M LiPF6 EC:DMC, the graphene-based LIC shows an outstanding, 10-fold increase in energy density with respect to its EDLC counterpart at low discharge rates (up to 200 Wh kg-1). Furthermore, it is still capable to deliver double the energy in the high power region, within a discharge time of few seconds.

  18. The NIF: An international high energy density science and inertial fusion user facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, E. I.; Storm, E.

    2013-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8-MJ/500-TW Nd:Glass laser facility designed to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density science (HEDS), is operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A primary goal of NIF is to create the conditions necessary to demonstrate laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and burn. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began late in FY2009 as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), an international effort to achieve fusion ignition in the laboratory. To date, all of the capabilities to conduct implosion experiments are in place with the goal of demonstrating ignition and developing a predictable fusion experimental platform in 2012. The results from experiments completed are encouraging for the near-term achievement of ignition. Capsule implosion experiments at energies up to 1.6 MJ have demonstrated laser energetics, radiation temperatures, and symmetry control that scale to ignition conditions. Of particular importance is the demonstration of peak hohlraum temperatures near 300 eV with overall backscatter less than 15%. Important national security and basic science experiments have also been conducted on NIF. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). This paper will describe the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the beginning of fundamental science experiments and the plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to HEDS and fusion energy researchers around the world.

  19. Richtmyer-Meshkov evolution under steady shock conditions in the high-energy-density regime

    DOE PAGES

    Di Stefano, C. A.; Malamud, G.; Kuranz, C. C.; ...

    2015-03-17

    This work presents direct experimental evidence of long-predicted nonlinear aspects of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) process, in which new modes first arise from the coupling of initially-present modes, and in which shorter-wavelength modes are eventually overtaken by longer-wavelength modes. This is accomplished using a technique we developed employing a long driving laser pulse to create a strong (Mach ~ 8) shock across a well-characterized material interface seeded by a two-mode sinusoidal perturbation. Furthermore, this technique further permits the shock to be sustained, without decay of the high-energy-density flow conditions, long enough for the system to evolve into the nonlinear phase.

  20. A 100 J-level nanosecond DPSSL for high energy density experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Thomas; Mason, Paul; Banerjee, Saumyabrata; Ertel, Klaus; Phillips, P. Jonathan; Smith, Jodie; De Vido, Mariastefania; Chekhlov, Oleg; Divoky, Martin; Pilat, Jan; Priebe, Gerd; Toncian, Toma; Shaikh, Waseem; Hooker, Chris; Lucianetti, Antonio; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Mocek, Tomas; Edwards, Chris; Collier, John

    2017-05-01

    We present an overview of the cryo-amplifier concept and design utilized in the DiPOLE100 laser system built for use at the HiLASE Center, which has been successfully tested operating at an average power of 1kW. Following this we describe the alterations made to the design in the second generation system being constructed for high energy density (HED) experiments in the HED beamline at the European XFEL. These changes are predominantly geometric in nature, however also include improved mount design and improved control over the temporal shape of the output pulse. Finally, we comment on future plans for development of the DiPOLE laser amplifier architecture.

  1. Nuclear science research with dynamic high energy density plasmas at NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaughnessy, D. A.; Gharibyan, N.; Moody, K. J.; Despotopulos, J. D.; Grant, P. M.; Yeamans, C. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Cerjan, C. J.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Faye, S.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear reaction measurements are performed at the National Ignition Facility in a high energy density plasma environment by adding target materials to the outside of the hohlraum thermo-mechanical package on an indirect-drive exploding pusher shot. Materials are activated with 14.1-MeV neutrons and the post-shot debris is collected via the Solid Radiochemistry diagnostic, which consists of metal discs fielded 50 cm from target chamber center. The discs are removed post-shot and analyzed via radiation counting and mass spectrometry. Results from a shot using Nd and Tm foils as targets are presented, which indicate enhanced collection of the debris in the line of sight of a given collector. The capsule performance was not diminished due to the extra material. This provides a platform for future measurements of nuclear reaction data through the use of experimental packages mounted external to the hohlraum.

  2. Collaborative comparison of simulation codes for high-energy-density physics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatenejad, M.; Fryxell, B.; Wohlbier, J.; Myra, E.; Lamb, D.; Fryer, C.; Graziani, C.

    2013-03-01

    Advances in plasma physics, powerful lasers, and pulsed-power machines have made possible experiments allowing detailed exploration and discoveries about states of matter at high energy densities. Since these experiments are expensive to perform and difficult to diagnose, numerical simulations have played an important part in designing and understanding them. A number of sophisticated radiation-hydrodynamic codes have been developed to perform this task. We will describe a new collaboration to compare three of these codes for a variety of test problems. Current members of this collaboration are the Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) at the University of Michigan, the FLASH Center at the University of Chicago, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These code comparisons have enabled us to understand differences in numerical methods, physical approximations, microphysical parameters, etc. The net result has been an improvement in the codes and higher confidence in the simulation results. This paper presents the results of a subset of these comparison tests.

  3. Performance of bent-crystal x-ray microscopes for high energy density physics research.

    PubMed

    Schollmeier, Marius S; Geissel, Matthias; Shores, Jonathon E; Smith, Ian C; Porter, John L

    2015-06-01

    We present calculations for the field of view (FOV), image fluence, image monochromaticity, spectral acceptance, and image aberrations for spherical crystal microscopes, which are used as self-emission imaging or backlighter systems at large-scale high energy density physics facilities. Our analytic results are benchmarked with ray-tracing calculations as well as with experimental measurements from the 6.151 keV backlighter system at Sandia National Laboratories. The analytic expressions can be used for x-ray source positions anywhere between the Rowland circle and object plane. This enables quick optimization of the performance of proposed but untested, bent-crystal microscope systems to find the best compromise between FOV, image fluence, and spatial resolution for a particular application.

  4. Monochromatic radiography of high energy density physics experiments on the MAGPIE generator

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G. N. Burdiak, G. C.; Suttle, L.; Stuart, N. H.; Swadling, G. F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Smith, R. A.; Patankar, S.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Grouchy, P. de; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Bennett, M.; Bland, S. N.; Pickworth, L.; Skidmore, J.

    2014-11-15

    A monochromatic X-ray backlighter based on Bragg reflection from a spherically bent quartz crystal has been developed for the MAGPIE pulsed power generator at Imperial College (1.4 MA, 240 ns) [I. H. Mitchell et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 1533 (2005)]. This instrument has been used to diagnose high energy density physics experiments with 1.865 keV radiation (Silicon He-α) from a laser plasma source driven by a ∼7 J, 1 ns pulse from the Cerberus laser. The design of the diagnostic, its characterisation and performance, and initial results in which the instrument was used to radiograph a shock physics experiment on MAGPIE are discussed.

  5. Monochromatic radiography of high energy density physics experiments on the MAGPIE generator.

    PubMed

    Hall, G N; Burdiak, G C; Suttle, L; Stuart, N H; Swadling, G F; Lebedev, S V; Smith, R A; Patankar, S; Suzuki-Vidal, F; de Grouchy, P; Harvey-Thompson, A J; Bennett, M; Bland, S N; Pickworth, L; Skidmore, J

    2014-11-01

    A monochromatic X-ray backlighter based on Bragg reflection from a spherically bent quartz crystal has been developed for the MAGPIE pulsed power generator at Imperial College (1.4 MA, 240 ns) [I. H. Mitchell et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 1533 (2005)]. This instrument has been used to diagnose high energy density physics experiments with 1.865 keV radiation (Silicon He-α) from a laser plasma source driven by a ∼7 J, 1 ns pulse from the Cerberus laser. The design of the diagnostic, its characterisation and performance, and initial results in which the instrument was used to radiograph a shock physics experiment on MAGPIE are discussed.

  6. Asymmetric battery having a semi-solid cathode and high energy density anode

    DOEpatents

    Tan, Taison; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Ota, Naoki; Wilder, Throop; Duduta, Mihai

    2016-09-06

    Embodiments described herein relate generally to devices, systems and methods of producing high energy density batteries having a semi-solid cathode that is thicker than the anode. An electrochemical cell can include a positive electrode current collector, a negative electrode current collector and an ion-permeable membrane disposed between the positive electrode current collector and the negative electrode current collector. The ion-permeable membrane is spaced a first distance from the positive electrode current collector and at least partially defines a positive electroactive zone. The ion-permeable membrane is spaced a second distance from the negative electrode current collector and at least partially defines a negative electroactive zone. The second distance is less than the first distance. A semi-solid cathode that includes a suspension of an active material and a conductive material in a non-aqueous liquid electrolyte is disposed in the positive electroactive zone, and an anode is disposed in the negative electroactive zone.

  7. Demonstration of repeatability in a high-energy-density planar shear mixing layer experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Di Stefano, C. A.; Flippo, K. A.; Rasmus, A. M.; Schmidt, D. W.

    2017-06-01

    On laser-driven platforms the assumption of experiment repeatability is particularly important due to a typically low data acquisition rate that doesn't often allow for data redundancy. If the platform is repeatable, then measurements of the repeatable dynamics from multiple experiments can be treated as measurements of the same system. In high-energy-density hydrodynamic instability experiments the interface growth is assumed to be one of the repeatable aspects of the system. In this paper we demonstrate the repeatability of the instability growth in the counter-propagating shear experiment at the OMEGA laser facility, where the instability growth is characterized by the tracer layer thickness or mix-width evolution. In our previous experiment campaigns we have assumed the instability growth was repeatable enough to identify trends, but in this work we explicitly show that the mix-width measurements for nominally identical experiments are repeatable within the measurement error bars.

  8. Demonstration of x-ray fluorescence imaging of a high-energy-density plasma.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, M J; Keiter, P A; Montgomery, D S; Biener, M M; Fein, J R; Fournier, K B; Gamboa, E J; Klein, S R; Kuranz, C C; LeFevre, H J; Manuel, M J-E; Streit, J; Wan, W C; Drake, R P

    2014-11-01

    Experiments at the Trident Laser Facility have successfully demonstrated the use of x-ray fluorescence imaging (XRFI) to diagnose shocked carbonized resorcinol formaldehyde (CRF) foams doped with Ti. One laser beam created a shock wave in the doped foam. A second laser beam produced a flux of vanadium He-α x-rays, which in turn induced Ti K-shell fluorescence within the foam. Spectrally resolved 1D imaging of the x-ray fluorescence provided shock location and compression measurements. Additionally, experiments using a collimator demonstrated that one can probe specific regions within a target. These results show that XRFI is a capable alternative to path-integrated measurements for diagnosing hydrodynamic experiments at high energy density.

  9. Performance of bent-crystal x-ray microscopes for high energy density physics research

    DOE PAGES

    Schollmeier, Marius S.; Geissel, Matthias; Shores, Jonathon E.; ...

    2015-05-29

    We present calculations for the field of view (FOV), image fluence, image monochromaticity, spectral acceptance, and image aberrations for spherical crystal microscopes, which are used as self-emission imaging or backlighter systems at large-scale high energy density physics facilities. Our analytic results are benchmarked with ray-tracing calculations as well as with experimental measurements from the 6.151 keV backlighter system at Sandia National Laboratories. Furthermore, the analytic expressions can be used for x-ray source positions anywhere between the Rowland circle and object plane. We discovered that this enables quick optimization of the performance of proposed but untested, bent-crystal microscope systems to findmore » the best compromise between FOV, image fluence, and spatial resolution for a particular application.« less

  10. Demonstration of x-ray fluorescence imaging of a high-energy-density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, M. J. Gamboa, E. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Fein, J. R.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.; Montgomery, D. S.; Biener, M. M.; Fournier, K. B.; Streit, J.

    2014-11-15

    Experiments at the Trident Laser Facility have successfully demonstrated the use of x-ray fluorescence imaging (XRFI) to diagnose shocked carbonized resorcinol formaldehyde (CRF) foams doped with Ti. One laser beam created a shock wave in the doped foam. A second laser beam produced a flux of vanadium He-α x-rays, which in turn induced Ti K-shell fluorescence within the foam. Spectrally resolved 1D imaging of the x-ray fluorescence provided shock location and compression measurements. Additionally, experiments using a collimator demonstrated that one can probe specific regions within a target. These results show that XRFI is a capable alternative to path-integrated measurements for diagnosing hydrodynamic experiments at high energy density.

  11. Performance of bent-crystal x-ray microscopes for high energy density physics research

    SciTech Connect

    Schollmeier, Marius S.; Geissel, Matthias; Shores, Jonathon E.; Smith, Ian C.; Porter, John L.

    2015-05-29

    We present calculations for the field of view (FOV), image fluence, image monochromaticity, spectral acceptance, and image aberrations for spherical crystal microscopes, which are used as self-emission imaging or backlighter systems at large-scale high energy density physics facilities. Our analytic results are benchmarked with ray-tracing calculations as well as with experimental measurements from the 6.151 keV backlighter system at Sandia National Laboratories. Furthermore, the analytic expressions can be used for x-ray source positions anywhere between the Rowland circle and object plane. We discovered that this enables quick optimization of the performance of proposed but untested, bent-crystal microscope systems to find the best compromise between FOV, image fluence, and spatial resolution for a particular application.

  12. Experimental investigation of opacity models for stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and high energy density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James

    2008-11-01

    Theoretical opacities are required for calculating energy transport in plasmas. In particular, understanding stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and Z-pinches depends on the opacities of mid-atomic-number elements in the 150-300 eV temperature range. These models are complex and experimental validation is crucial. For example, solar models presently disagree with helioseismology and one possible explanation is inadequate opacities. Testing these opacities requires a uniform plasma at temperatures high enough to produce the ion charge states that exist in the sun. Typical opacity experiments heat a sample using x-rays and measure the spectrally resolved transmission with a backlight. The difficulty grows as the temperature increases because the heating x-ray source must supply more energy and the backlighter source must be bright enough to overwhelm the plasma self emission. These problems were overcome using the dynamic hohlraum x-ray source at Sandia's Z facility to measure the transmission of a mixed Mg-Fe plasma heated above 150 eV. This capability will also advance opacity science for other high energy density plasmas. This tutorial describes opacity experiment challenges including accurate transmission measurements, plasma diagnostics, and quantitative model comparisons. The solar interior serves as a focal problem and Z facility experiments are used to illustrate the techniques. **In collaboration with C. Iglesias (LLNL), R. Mancini (U. Nevada), J.MacFarlane, I. Golovkin and P. Wang (Prism), C. Blancard, Ph. Cosse, G. Faussurier, F. Gilleron, and J.C. Pain (CEA), J. Abdallah Jr. (LANL), and G.A. Rochau and P.W. Lake (Sandia). ++Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Measurements of Ion Stopping around the Bragg Peak in High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, Johan

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades, ion stopping in weakly- to strongly-coupled High-Energy-Density (HED) plasmas has been subject to extensive analytical and numerical studies, but only a limited set of experimental data exists to check the validity of these theories. Most of these experiments also did not probe the detailed characteristics of the Bragg peak (peak ion stopping) where the ion velocity is similar to the average thermal electron velocity. To the best of our knowledge, only one exploratory attempt to do this was conducted by Hicks et al., who were able to describe qualitatively the behavior of the Bragg peak for one plasma condition. The work described in this presentation makes significant advances over previous experimental efforts by quantitatively assessing the characteristics of the ion stopping, ranging from low-velocity stopping, through the Bragg peak, to high-velocity stopping for different HED plasma conditions. This was achieved by measuring the energy loss of DD-tritons, D3He-alphas, DD-protons and D3He-protons, with distinctly different velocities, and the results indicate that the stopping power varies strongly with Te and ne. This effort represents the first experimental test of state-of-art plasma-stopping-power theories around the Bragg peak, which is an important first step in our efforts of getting a fundamental understanding of DT-alpha stopping in HED plasmas, a prerequisite for understanding ignition margins in various implosion designs with varying hot spot areal density at the National Ignition Facility. The work described here was performed in part at the LLE National Laser User's Facility (NLUF), and was supported in part by US DOE (Grant No. DE-FG03- 03SF22691), LLNL (subcontract Grant No. B504974) and LLE (subcontract Grant No. 412160-001G).

  14. High energy density capacitors for vacuum operation with a pulsed plasma load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guman, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    Results of the effort of designing, fabricating, and testing of a 40 joules/lb (88.2 joules/Kg) high voltage energy storage capacitor suitable for operating a pulsed plasma thruster in a vacuum environment for millions of pulses are presented. Using vacuum brazing and heli-arc welding techniques followed by vacuum and high pressure helium leak tests it was possible to produce a hermetically sealed relatively light weight enclosure for the dielectric system. An energy density of 40 joules/lb was realized with a KF-polyvinylidene fluoride dielectric system. One capacitor was D.C. life tested at 4 KV (107.8 joules/lb) for 2,000 hours before it failed. Another exceeded 2,670 hours without failure at 38.3 joules/lb. Pulse life testing in a vacuum exceeded 300,000 discharges with testing still in progress. The D.C. life test data shows a small decrease in capacitance and an increase in dissipation factor with time. Heat transfer from the load to the capacitor must also be considered besides the self-heat generated by the capacitor.

  15. Observation of finite-wavelength screening in high-energy-density matter

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, D. A.; Vorberger, J.; Fletcher, L. B.; Baggott, R. A.; Divol, L.; Döppner, T.; Falcone, R. W.; Glenzer, S. H.; Gregori, G.; Guymer, T. M.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; Pak, A. E.; Gericke, D. O.

    2015-01-01

    A key component for the description of charged particle systems is the screening of the Coulomb interaction between charge carriers. First investigated in the 1920s by Debye and Hückel for electrolytes, charge screening is important for determining the structural and transport properties of matter as diverse as astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, nuclear matter such as quark-gluon plasmas, electrons in solids, planetary cores and charged macromolecules. For systems with negligible dynamics, screening is still mostly described using a Debye–Hückel-type approach. Here, we report the novel observation of a significant departure from the Debye–Hückel-type model in high-energy-density matter by probing laser-driven, shock-compressed plastic with high-energy X-rays. We use spectrally resolved X-ray scattering in a geometry that enables direct investigation of the screening cloud, and demonstrate that the observed elastic scattering amplitude is only well described within a more general approach. PMID:25904218

  16. Observation of finite-wavelength screening in high-energy-density matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, D. A.; Vorberger, J.; Fletcher, L. B.; Baggott, R. A.; Divol, L.; Döppner, T.; Falcone, R. W.; Glenzer, S. H.; Gregori, G.; Guymer, T. M.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; Pak, A. E.; Gericke, D. O.

    2015-04-01

    A key component for the description of charged particle systems is the screening of the Coulomb interaction between charge carriers. First investigated in the 1920s by Debye and Hückel for electrolytes, charge screening is important for determining the structural and transport properties of matter as diverse as astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, nuclear matter such as quark-gluon plasmas, electrons in solids, planetary cores and charged macromolecules. For systems with negligible dynamics, screening is still mostly described using a Debye-Hückel-type approach. Here, we report the novel observation of a significant departure from the Debye-Hückel-type model in high-energy-density matter by probing laser-driven, shock-compressed plastic with high-energy X-rays. We use spectrally resolved X-ray scattering in a geometry that enables direct investigation of the screening cloud, and demonstrate that the observed elastic scattering amplitude is only well described within a more general approach.

  17. Observation of finite-wavelength screening in high-energy-density matter

    DOE PAGES

    Chapman, D. A.; Vorberger, J.; Fletcher, L. B.; ...

    2015-04-23

    A key component for the description of charged particle systems is the screening of the Coulomb interaction between charge carriers. First investigated in the 1920s by Debye and Hückel for electrolytes, charge screening is important for determining the structural and transport properties of matter as diverse as astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, nuclear matter such as quark-gluon plasmas, electrons in solids, planetary cores and charged macromolecules. For systems with negligible dynamics, screening is still mostly described using a Debye–Hückel-type approach. Here, we report the novel observation of a significant departure from the Debye–Hückel-type model in high-energy-density matter by probing laser-driven, shock-compressedmore » plastic with high-energy X-rays. We use spectrally resolved X-ray scattering in a geometry that enables direct investigation of the screening cloud, and demonstrate that the observed elastic scattering amplitude is only well described within a more general approach.« less

  18. Observation of finite-wavelength screening in high-energy-density matter

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, D. A.; Vorberger, J.; Fletcher, L. B.; Baggott, R. A.; Divol, L.; Döppner, T.; Falcone, R. W.; Glenzer, S. H.; Gregori, G.; Guymer, T. M.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; Pak, A. E.; Gericke, D. O.

    2015-04-23

    A key component for the description of charged particle systems is the screening of the Coulomb interaction between charge carriers. First investigated in the 1920s by Debye and Hückel for electrolytes, charge screening is important for determining the structural and transport properties of matter as diverse as astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, nuclear matter such as quark-gluon plasmas, electrons in solids, planetary cores and charged macromolecules. For systems with negligible dynamics, screening is still mostly described using a Debye–Hückel-type approach. Here, we report the novel observation of a significant departure from the Debye–Hückel-type model in high-energy-density matter by probing laser-driven, shock-compressed plastic with high-energy X-rays. We use spectrally resolved X-ray scattering in a geometry that enables direct investigation of the screening cloud, and demonstrate that the observed elastic scattering amplitude is only well described within a more general approach.

  19. Observation of finite-wavelength screening in high-energy-density matter.

    PubMed

    Chapman, D A; Vorberger, J; Fletcher, L B; Baggott, R A; Divol, L; Döppner, T; Falcone, R W; Glenzer, S H; Gregori, G; Guymer, T M; Kritcher, A L; Landen, O L; Ma, T; Pak, A E; Gericke, D O

    2015-04-23

    A key component for the description of charged particle systems is the screening of the Coulomb interaction between charge carriers. First investigated in the 1920s by Debye and Hückel for electrolytes, charge screening is important for determining the structural and transport properties of matter as diverse as astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, nuclear matter such as quark-gluon plasmas, electrons in solids, planetary cores and charged macromolecules. For systems with negligible dynamics, screening is still mostly described using a Debye-Hückel-type approach. Here, we report the novel observation of a significant departure from the Debye-Hückel-type model in high-energy-density matter by probing laser-driven, shock-compressed plastic with high-energy X-rays. We use spectrally resolved X-ray scattering in a geometry that enables direct investigation of the screening cloud, and demonstrate that the observed elastic scattering amplitude is only well described within a more general approach.

  20. BaTiO3/PVDF Nanocomposite Film with High Energy Storage Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohui

    2016-03-01

    A gradated multilayer BaTiO3/poly(vinylidenefluoride) thin film structure is presented to achieve both a higher breakdown strength and a superior energy-storage capability. Key to the process is the sequential deposition of uniform dispersions of the single component source, which generate a blended PVDF-BTO-PVDF structure prior to full evaporation of solvent, and thermal treatment of the dielectric. The result is like sandwich structure with partial 0-3 character. The central layer designed to provide the high electric displacement, is composed of high volume fraction 6-10 nm BTO nanocrystals produced by a TEG-sol method. The outer layers of the structure are predominantly PVDF, with a significantly lower volume fraction of BTO, taking advantage of the higher dielectric strength for pure PVDF at the electrode-nanocomposite interface. The film is mechanically flexible, and can be removed from the substrate, with total thicknesses in the range 1.2 - 1.5 μm. Parallel plate capacitance devices improved dielectric performances, compared to reported values for BTO-PVDF 0-3 nanocomposites, with a maximal discharged energy density of 19.4J/cm3 and dielectric breakdown strengths of up to 495 kV/mm.

  1. Z-pinches as intense x-ray sources for high energy density physics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzen, M. Keith

    1996-11-01

    Fast z-pinch implosions can convert more than 10% of the stored electrical energy in a pulsed-power accelerator into x rays. These x rays are produced when an imploding cylindrical plasma, driven by the magnetic field pressure associated with very large axial currents, stagnates upon the cylindrical axis of symmetry. On the Saturn pulsed-power accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories, for example, currents of 6 to 8 MA with a risetime of less than 50 ns are driven through cylindrically-symmetric loads (typically gas jets, arrays of wires, thin foils, or low density foams), producing implosions velocities as high as 100 cm/μs and x-ray energies as high as 500 kJ. The keV component of the resulting x-ray spectrum has been used for many years as a source for material response studies. Alternatively, the x-ray output can be thermalized into a near-Planckian x-ray source by containing it within a large cylindrical radiation case (a hohlraum). These large volume ( 6000 mm^3), long-lived ( 20 ns) radiation sources have recently been used for ICF-relevant ablator physics experiments as well as astrophysical opacity and radiation-material interaction experiments. Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and load symmetry are critical, limiting factors in determining the assembled plasma densities and temperatures, and thus in the x-ray pulsewidths that can be produced on these accelerators. In recent experiments on the Saturn accelerator, these implosion nonuniformities have been minimized by using uniform-fill gas puff loads or by using wire arrays with as many a 192 wires. These techniques produced significant improvements in the pinched plasma quality, reproducibility, and x-ray output power. X-ray pulsewidths of less than 5 ns and peak powers of 75?10 TW have been achieved with arrays of 120 tungsten wires. These powers represent greater than a factor of three in power amplification over the electrical power of the accelerator, and are a record for x-ray powers in the

  2. A broadband high-resolution elliptical crystal x-ray spectrometer for high energy density physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Heeter, R F; Booth, R; Emig, J; Fulkerson, S; McCarville, T; Norman, D; Young, B F

    2006-03-31

    Spectroscopic investigation of high temperature laser produced plasmas in general, and x-ray opacity experiments in particular, often requires instruments with both a broad coverage of x-ray energies and high spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution. We analyze the design, model the response, and report the commissioning of a spectrometer using elliptical crystals in conjunction with a large format, gated microchannel plate detector. Measurements taken with this instrument at the JANUS laser facilities demonstrate the designed spectral range of 0.24 to 5.8 keV, and spectral resolution E/{Delta}E > 500, resulting in 2 to 3 times more spectral data than achieved by previous spectrometer designs. The observed 100 picosecond temporal resolution and 35 {micro}m spatial resolution are consistent with the requirements of high energy density opacity experiments.

  3. Additions and Improvements to the FLASH Code for Simulating High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Daley, C.; Dubey, A.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Lee, D.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.

    2015-11-01

    FLASH is an open source, finite-volume Eulerian, spatially adaptive radiation hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics code that incorporates capabilities for a broad range of physical processes, performs well on a wide range of computer architectures, and has a broad user base. Extensive capabilities have been added to FLASH to make it an open toolset for the academic high energy density physics (HEDP) community. We summarize these capabilities, with particular emphasis on recent additions and improvements. These include advancements in the optical ray tracing laser package, with methods such as bi-cubic 2D and tri-cubic 3D interpolation of electron number density, adaptive stepping and 2nd-, 3rd-, and 4th-order Runge-Kutta integration methods. Moreover, we showcase the simulated magnetic field diagnostic capabilities of the code, including induction coils, Faraday rotation, and proton radiography. We also describe several collaborations with the National Laboratories and the academic community in which FLASH has been used to simulate HEDP experiments. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by the DOE NNSA ASC through the Argonne Institute for Computing in Science under field work proposal 57789; and the NSF under grant PHY-0903997.

  4. The formation of reverse shocks in magnetized high energy density supersonic plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, S. V. E-mail: l.suttle10@imperial.ac.uk; Suttle, L.; Swadling, G. F.; Bennett, M.; Bland, S. N.; Burdiak, G. C.; Chittenden, J. P.; Grouchy, P. de; Hall, G. N.; Hare, J. D.; Kalmoni, N.; Niasse, N.; Patankar, S.; Smith, R. A.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Burgess, D.; Clemens, A.; Ciardi, A.; Sheng, L.; Yuan, J.; and others

    2014-05-15

    A new experimental platform was developed, based on the use of supersonic plasma flow from the ablation stage of an inverse wire array z-pinch, for studies of shocks in magnetized high energy density physics plasmas in a well-defined and diagnosable 1-D interaction geometry. The mechanism of flow generation ensures that the plasma flow (Re{sub M} ∼ 50, M{sub S} ∼ 5, M{sub A} ∼ 8, V{sub flow} ≈ 100 km/s) has a frozen-in magnetic field at a level sufficient to affect shocks formed by its interaction with obstacles. It is found that in addition to the expected accumulation of stagnated plasma in a thin layer at the surface of a planar obstacle, the presence of the magnetic field leads to the formation of an additional detached density jump in the upstream plasma, at a distance of ∼c/ω{sub pi} from the obstacle. Analysis of the data obtained with Thomson scattering, interferometry, and local magnetic probes suggests that the sub-shock develops due to the pile-up of the magnetic flux advected by the plasma flow.

  5. V.sub.2O.sub.5 electrodes with high power and energy densities

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Guozhong; Liu, Yanyi

    2016-12-06

    Methods are provided for forming films of orthorhombic V.sub.2O.sub.5. Additionally provided are the orthorhombic V.sub.2O.sub.5 films themselves, as well as batteries incorporating the films as cathode materials. The methods use electrodeposition from a precursor solution to form a V.sub.2O.sub.5 sol gel on a substrate. The V.sub.2O.sub.5 gel can be annealed to provide an orthorhombic V.sub.2O.sub.5 film on the substrate. The V.sub.2O.sub.5 film can be freestanding such that it can be removed from the substrate and integrated without binders or conductive filler into a battery as a cathode element. Due to the improved intercalation properties of the orthorhombic V.sub.2O.sub.5 films, batteries formed using the V.sub.2O.sub.5 films have extraordinarily high energy density, power density, and capacity.

  6. Tuning Phase Composition of Polymer Nanocomposites toward High Energy Density and High Discharge Efficiency by Nonequilibrium Processing.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianyong; Zhang, Xin; Dan, Zhenkang; Ma, Jing; Lin, Yuanhua; Li, Ming; Nan, Ce-Wen; Shen, Yang

    2017-09-06

    Polymer nanocomposite dielectrics with high energy density and low loss are major enablers for a number of applications in modern electronic and electrical industry. Conventional fabrication of nanocomposites by solution routes involves equilibrium process, which is slow and results in structural imperfections, hence high leakage current and compromised reliability of the nanocomposites. We propose and demonstrate that a nonequilibrium process, which synergistically integrates electrospinning, hot-pressing and thermal quenching, is capable of yielding nanocomposites of very high quality. In the nonequilibrium nanocomposites of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (P(VDF-HFP)) and BaTiO3 nanoparticles (BTO_nps), an ultrahigh Weibull modulus β of ∼30 is achieved, which is comparable to the quality of the bench-mark biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) fabricated with melt-extrusion process by much more sophisticated and expensive industrial apparatus. Favorable phase composition and small crystalline size are also induced by the nonequilibrium process, which leads to concomitant enhancement of electric displacement and breakdown strength of the nanocomposite hence a high energy density of ∼21 J/cm(3). Study on the polarization behavior and phase transformation at high electric field indicates that BTO_nps could facilitate the phase transformation from α- to β-polymorph at low electric field.

  7. High resolution 17 keV to 75 keV backlighters for High Energy Density experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Maddox, B R; Giraldez, E; Hatchett, S P; Hudson, L; Izumi, N; Key, M H; Pape, S L; MacKinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; Patel, P K; Phillips, T W; Remington, B A; Seely, J F; Tommasini, R; Town, R; Workman, J

    2008-02-25

    We have developed 17 keV to 75 keV 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional high-resolution (< 10 {micro}m) radiography using high-intensity short pulse lasers. High energy K-{alpha} sources are created by fluorescence from hot electrons interacting in the target material after irradiation by lasers with intensity I{sub L} > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. We have achieved high resolution point projection 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional radiography using micro-foil and micro-wire targets attached to low-Z substrate materials. The micro-wire size was 10 {micro}m x 10 {micro}m x 300 {micro}m on a 300 {micro}m x 300 {micro}m x 5 {micro}m CH substrate. The radiography performance was demonstrated using the Titan laser at LLNL. We observed that the resolution is dominated by the micro-wire target size and there is very little degradation from the plasma plume, implying that the high energy x-ray photons are generated mostly within the micro-wire volume. We also observe that there are enough K{alpha} photons created with a 300 J, 1-{omega}, 40 ps pulse laser from these small volume targets, and that the signal-to-noise ratio is sufficiently high, for single shot radiography experiments. This unique technique will be used on future high energy density (HED) experiments at the new Omega-EP, ZR and NIF facilities.

  8. Fully-kinetic simulations of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, E. Paulo; Mori, Warren B.; Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in high-energy-density (HED) plasmas is a central problem in a wide range of scenarios. It dictates, for instance, the dynamics of supernovae in astrophysical plasmas, and is also recognized as a critical challenge to achieving ignition in inertial confinement fusion. In some of these conditions the Larmor radius or Coulomb mean free path (m.f.p.) is finite, allowing kinetic effects to become important, and it is not fully clear how the development of the RTI deviates from standard hydrodynamic behavior. In order to obtain an accurate description of the RTI in these HED conditions it is essential to capture the self-consistent interplay between collisional and collisionless plasma processes, and the role of self-generated electric and magnetic fields. We have explored the dynamics of the RTI in HED plasma conditions using first-principles particle-in-cell simulations combined with Monte Carlo binary collisions. Our simulations capture the role of kinetic diffusion as well as the self-generated electric (e.g. space-charge) and magnetic (e.g. Biermann battery) fields on the growth rate and nonlinear evolution of the RTI for different plasma conditions. We will discuss how different collisional m.f.p. relative to the collisionless plasma skin depth affect the RTI development. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science (FWP 100182).

  9. High energy density soft X-ray momentum coupling to comet analogs for NEO mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remo, J. L.; Lawrence, R. J.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Furnish, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    We applied MBBAY high fluence pulsed radiation intensity driven momentum transfer analysis to calculate X-ray momentum coupling coefficients CM=(Pa s)/(J/m2) for two simplified comet analog materials: i) water ice, and ii) 70% water ice and 30% distributed olivine grains. The momentum coupling coefficients (CM) max of 50×10-5 s/m, are about an order of magnitude greater than experimentally determined and computed MBBAY values for meteoritic materials that are analogs for asteroids. From the values for comet analog materials we infer applied energies (via momentum transfer) required to deflect an Earth crossing comet from impacting Earth by a sufficient amount ( 1 cm/s) to avert collision a year in advance. Comet model calculations indicate for CM=5×10-4 s/m the deflection of a 2 km comet with a density 600 kg/m3 by 1 cm/s requires an applied energy on the target surface of 5×1013 J, the equivalent of 12 kT of TNT. Depending on the geometrical configuration of the interaction the explosive yield required could be an order of magnitude higher.

  10. High energy density soft X-ray momentum coupling to comet analogs for NEO mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Remo, J. L.; Lawrence, R. J.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Furnish, M. D.

    2016-09-27

    Here, we applied MBBAY high fluence pulsed radiation intensity driven momentum transfer analysis to calculate X-ray momentum coupling coefficients CM=(Pa s)/(J/m2) for two simplified comet analog materials: i) water ice, and ii) 70% water ice and 30% distributed olivine grains. The momentum coupling coefficients (CM)max of 50×10–5 s/m, are about an order of magnitude greater than experimentally determined and computed MBBAY values for meteoritic materials that are analogs for asteroids. From the values for comet analog materials we infer applied energies (via momentum transfer) required to deflect an Earth crossing comet from impacting Earth by a sufficient amount (~1 cm/s) to avert collision ~a year in advance. Comet model calculations indicate for CM = 5 × 10–4 s/m the deflection of a 2 km comet with a density 600 kg/m3 by 1 cm/s requires an applied energy on the target surface of 5 × 1013 J, the equivalent of 12 kT of TNT. Depending on the geometrical configuration of the interaction the explosive yield required could be an order of magnitude higher.

  11. High energy density soft X-ray momentum coupling to comet analogs for NEO mitigation

    DOE PAGES

    Remo, J. L.; Lawrence, R. J.; Jacobsen, S. B.; ...

    2016-09-27

    Here, we applied MBBAY high fluence pulsed radiation intensity driven momentum transfer analysis to calculate X-ray momentum coupling coefficients CM=(Pa s)/(J/m2) for two simplified comet analog materials: i) water ice, and ii) 70% water ice and 30% distributed olivine grains. The momentum coupling coefficients (CM)max of 50×10–5 s/m, are about an order of magnitude greater than experimentally determined and computed MBBAY values for meteoritic materials that are analogs for asteroids. From the values for comet analog materials we infer applied energies (via momentum transfer) required to deflect an Earth crossing comet from impacting Earth by a sufficient amount (~1 cm/s)more » to avert collision ~a year in advance. Comet model calculations indicate for CM = 5 × 10–4 s/m the deflection of a 2 km comet with a density 600 kg/m3 by 1 cm/s requires an applied energy on the target surface of 5 × 1013 J, the equivalent of 12 kT of TNT. Depending on the geometrical configuration of the interaction the explosive yield required could be an order of magnitude higher.« less

  12. High energy density soft X-ray momentum coupling to comet analogs for NEO mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Remo, J. L.; Lawrence, R. J.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Furnish, M. D.

    2016-09-27

    Here, we applied MBBAY high fluence pulsed radiation intensity driven momentum transfer analysis to calculate X-ray momentum coupling coefficients CM=(Pa s)/(J/m2) for two simplified comet analog materials: i) water ice, and ii) 70% water ice and 30% distributed olivine grains. The momentum coupling coefficients (CM)max of 50×10–5 s/m, are about an order of magnitude greater than experimentally determined and computed MBBAY values for meteoritic materials that are analogs for asteroids. From the values for comet analog materials we infer applied energies (via momentum transfer) required to deflect an Earth crossing comet from impacting Earth by a sufficient amount (~1 cm/s) to avert collision ~a year in advance. Comet model calculations indicate for CM = 5 × 10–4 s/m the deflection of a 2 km comet with a density 600 kg/m3 by 1 cm/s requires an applied energy on the target surface of 5 × 1013 J, the equivalent of 12 kT of TNT. Depending on the geometrical configuration of the interaction the explosive yield required could be an order of magnitude higher.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamics of high-energy-density-plasma in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Kazuki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Sano, Takayoshi; Zhang, Zhe; Sakawa, Youichi; Hara, Yukiko; Shimogawara, Hiroshi; Airikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shouhei; Law, Kingfaifarley; Lee, Seungho; Kojima, Sadaoki; Katou, Hiroki; Shigemori, Keisuke; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    The magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) of a high-energy-density-plasma (HEDP) in a strong external magnetic field contains a lot of fundamental and essential physics related to astro- and solar- physics and B-assisted inertial confinement fusion energy development. Especially, hydrodynamic instability in a strong magnetic field is a key physics for success of B-assisted inertial confinement fusion. Hydrodynamic instability growth is affected by strong magnetic field as a result of non-uniform heat flow. Experiments were conducted with a corrugated plastic target that is set between a pair of capacitor-coil. A pair of capacitor-coil targets was used to generate spatially uniform magnetic field. The plastic targets were irradiated by an intense laser pulse having 1013 W/cm2 of intensity. Temporal evolution of perturbation growth was observed with x-ray backlight technique. Enhancement of the perturbation growth in strong magnetic field was observed experimentally, and the result was consistent with hydrodynamic simulation.

  14. A High Energy Density Shock Driven Kelvin-Helmholtz Shear Layer Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, Omar

    2008-11-01

    In 2002, a high energy density Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability experiment was designed (O.A. Hurricane, High Energy Density Phys., 2008) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Early Light experiment. However, the long backlighter delay, required for the experiments success, could not be accommodated by NIF at that time. In early 2008, this experiment proposal was resurrected by our team, the target was fabricated at Livermore with final assembly at the University of Michigan, and then fielded at the Omega laser facility. The data return from the four shots of the experiment series exceeded expectation. In this paper, we describe the theory and simulation behind the experiment design, the unusual target construction, and present the radiographic data from the Omega experiment in raw form and a preliminary analysis of the data. Discussion of the target design theory and simulations focuses on the key role played by baroclinic vorticity production in the functioning of the target and also illuminates the key design parameters. The data shows the complete evolution of large distinct KH eddies, from formation to turbulent break-up. The data appears to graphically confirm a theoretical fluid dynamics conjecture about the existence of supersonic bubbles over the vortical structure [transonic convective Mach numbers (D. Papamoschou and A. Roshko, J. Fluid Mech., 197, 1988)] that support localized shocks (shocklets) not extending into the free-stream^ (P.E. Dimotakis, AIAA 91-1724, Proc. 22^nd Fluid Dyn., Plasma Dyn., & Lasers Conf., 1991). The consequences of these observations on understanding the turbulent transition, growth-rates and mixing in compressible supersonic turbulent shear layers will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. A National Laser Users Facility grant also supported this work. Collaborators: J.F. Hansen, E.C. Harding , R

  15. Beamed-Energy Propulsion (BEP): Considerations for Beaming High Energy-Density Electromagnetic Waves Through the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    A study to determine the feasibility of employing beamed electromagnetic energy for vehicle propulsion within and outside the Earth's atmosphere was co-funded by NASA and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency that began in June 2010 and culminated in a Summary Presentation in April 2011. A detailed report entitled "Beamed-Energy Propulsion (BEP) Study" appeared in February 2012 as NASA/TM-2012-217014. Of the very many nuances of this subject that were addressed in this report, the effects of transferring the required high energy-density electromagnetic fields through the atmosphere were discussed. However, due to the limitations of the length of the report, only a summary of the results of the detailed analyses were able to be included. It is the intent of the present work to make available the complete analytical modeling work that was done for the BEP project with regard to electromagnetic wave propagation issues. In particular, the present technical memorandum contains two documents that were prepared in 2011. The first one, entitled "Effects of Beaming Energy Through the Atmosphere" contains an overview of the analysis of the nonlinear problem inherent with the transfer of large amounts of energy through the atmosphere that gives rise to thermally-induced changes in the refractive index; application is then made to specific beamed propulsion scenarios. A brief portion of this report appeared as Appendix G of the 2012 Technical Memorandum. The second report, entitled "An Analytical Assessment of the Thermal Blooming Effects on the Propagation of Optical and Millimeter- Wave Focused Beam Waves For Power Beaming Applications" was written in October 2010 (not previously published), provides a more detailed treatment of the propagation problem and its effect on the overall characteristics of the beam such as its deflection as well as its radius. Comparisons are then made for power beaming using the disparate electromagnetic wavelengths of 1.06 microns and 2

  16. Metal-Organic Frameworks as Highly Active Electrocatalysts for High-Energy Density, Aqueous Zinc-Polyiodide Redox Flow Batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Liu, Jian; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Wei; Reed, David; Liu, Jun; McGrail, Pete; Sprenkle, Vincent

    2016-07-13

    The new aqueous zinc-polyiodide redox flow battery (RFB) system with highly soluble active materials as well as ambipolar and bifunctional designs demonstrated significantly enhanced energy density, which shows great potential to reduce RFB cost. However, the poor kinetic reversibility and electrochemical activity of the redox reaction of I3(-)/I(-) couples on graphite felts (GFs) electrode can result in low energy efficiency. Two nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), MIL-125-NH2 and UiO-66-CH3, that have high surface areas when introduced to GF surfaces accelerated the I3(-)/I(-) redox reaction. The flow cell with MOF-modified GFs serving as a positive electrode showed higher energy efficiency than the pristine GFs; increases of about 6.4% and 2.7% occurred at the current density of 30 mA/cm(2) for MIL-125-NH2 and UiO-66-CH3, respectively. Moreover, UiO-66-CH3 is more promising due to its excellent chemical stability in the weakly acidic electrolyte. This letter highlights a way for MOFs to be used in the field of RFBs.

  17. High-energy-density sol-gel thin film based on neat 2-cyanoethyltrimethoxysilane.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunsang; Kathaperumal, Mohanalingam; Smith, O'Neil L; Pan, Ming-Jen; Cai, Ye; Sandhage, Kenneth H; Perry, Joseph W

    2013-03-13

    Hybrid organic-inorganic sol-gel dielectric thin films from a neat 2-cyanoethyltrimethoxysilane (CNETMS) precursor have been fabricated and their permittivity, dielectric strength, and energy density characterized. CNETMS sol-gel films possess compact, polar cyanoethyl groups and exhibit a relative permittivity of 20 at 1 kHz and breakdown strengths ranging from 650 V/μm to 250 V/μm for film thicknesses of 1.3 to 3.5 μm. Capacitors based on CNETMS films exhibit extractable energy densities of 7 J/cm(3) at 300 V/μm, as determined by charge-discharge and polarization-electric field measurements, as well as an energy extraction efficiency of ~91%. The large extractable energy resulting from the linear dielectric polarization behavior suggests that CNETMS films are promising sol-gel materials for pulsed power applications.

  18. Probing matter at the extremes: new frontiers in high energy density physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, Bruce A.

    2008-04-01

    The ability to experimentally study scaled aspects of the explosion dynamics of core- collapse supernovae (massive stars that explode from the inside out) or the radiation kinetics of accreting neutron stars or black holes on high energy density (HED) facilities, such as high power lasers and magnetic pinch facilities, is an exciting scientific development over the last two decades. [2] Additional areas of research that become accessible on modern HED facilities are studies of fundamental properties of matter in conditions relevant to planetary and stellar interiors, protostellar jet dynamics, and with ultraintense short-pulse lasers, strong field effects, possibly relevant to gamma-ray burst dynamics. With the added tool of thermonuclear ignition on the National Ignition Facility, excited state (``multi-hit'') nuclear physics studies, possibly relevant to nucleosynthesis, may also become possible. Techniques and methodologies for studying aspects of the physics of such extreme phenomena of the universe in submillimeter scale parcels of matter in the laboratory will be discussed. [2] ``Experimental astrophysics with high power lasers and Z pinches,'' B.A. Remington, R.P. Drake, D.D. Ryutov, Rev. Mod. Phys. 78, 755 (2006).

  19. High-Energy-Density, Low-Temperature Li/CFx Primary Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitacre, Jay; Bugga, Ratnakumar; Smart, Marshall; Prakash, G.; Yazami, Rachid

    2007-01-01

    High-energy-density primary (nonrechargeable) electrochemical cells capable of relatively high discharge currents at temperatures as low as -40 C have been developed through modification of the chemistry of commercial Li/CFx cells and batteries. The commercial Li/CFx units are not suitable for high-current and low-temperature applications because they are current limited and their maximum discharge rates decrease with decreasing temperature. The term "Li/CFx" refers to an anode made of lithium and a cathode made of a fluorinated carbonaceous material (typically graphite). In commercial cells, x typically ranges from 1.05 to 1.1. This cell composition makes it possible to attain specific energies up to 800 Wh/kg, but in order to prevent cell polarization and the consequent large loss of cell capacity, it is typically necessary to keep discharge currents below C/50 (where C is numerically equal to the current that, flowing during a charge or discharge time of one hour, would integrate to the nominal charge or discharge capacity of a cell). This limitation has been attributed to the low electronic conductivity of CFx for x approx. 1. To some extent, the limitation might be overcome by making cathodes thinner, and some battery manufacturers have obtained promising results using thin cathode structures in spiral configurations. The present approach includes not only making cathodes relatively thin [.2 mils (.0.051 mm)] but also using sub-fluorinated CFx cathode materials (x < 1) in conjunction with electrolytes formulated for use at low temperatures. The reason for choosing sub-fluorinated CFx cathode materials is that their electronic conductivities are high, relative to those for which x > 1. It was known from recent prior research that cells containing sub-fluorinated CFx cathodes (x between 0.33 and 0.66) are capable of retaining substantial portions of their nominal low-current specific energies when discharged at rates as high as 5C at room temperature. However

  20. Development and characterization of high temperature, high energy density dielectric materials to establish routes towards power electronics capacitive devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, Dennis P.

    The maximum electrostatic energy density of a capacitor is a function of the relative permittivity (epsilonr) and the square of the dielectric breakdown strength (Eb). Currently, state-of-the art high temperature (>200 °C), SiC-based power electronics utilize CaZrO3-rich NP0/C0G-type capacitors, which have low relative permittivities of epsilonr ˜ 30-40, high breakdown strengths (> 1.0 MV/cm), and are chosen for their minimal change in energy storage with temperature. However, with operating temperatures exceeding the rated temperatures for such capacitors, there is an opportunity to develop new dielectric ceramics having higher energy densities and volumetric efficiencies at high temperatures (>200 °C) by utilizing higher permittivity dielectrics while maintaining high breakdown strengths via doping. The solid solution behavior of was characterized in order to determine the optimal composition for balancing permittivity and dielectric breakdown strength to obtain high energy densities at elevated temperatures. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed Vegard's law behavior across the solid solution with minimal 2nd phases. To determine a Ca(TixZr1-x)O3 composition that will also minimize electronic or band conduction, the optical properties of the Ca(TixZr1-x)O3 solid solution were investigated to identify a composition on the CaTiO3 - rich end of the solid solution with a large band gap. Both ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and spectroscopic ellipsometry were utilized to determine the Ca(TixZr1-x)O3 band gaps and optical properties. The resistivity at 250 °C scaled with the band gap energy across the solid solution. Comparing the current-voltage (I--V) behavior at 250 °C for Ca(Tix-yMnyZr0.2)O3 (CTZ + Mn) where x = 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, and y = 0.005, it was found that the Ca(Ti 0.795Mn0.005Zr0.2)O3 composition showed the lowest current density and a decrease in current density of 5 orders of magnitude compared to the un

  1. High Confinement and High Density with Stationary Plasma Energy and Strong Edge Radiation Cooling in Textor-94

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messiaen, A. M.

    1996-11-01

    A new discharge regime has been observed on the pumped limiter tokamak TEXTOR-94 in the presence of strong radiation cooling and for different scenarii of additional hearing. The radiated power fraction (up to 90%) is feedback controlled by the amount of Ne seeded in the edge. This regime meets many of the necessary conditions for a future fusion reactor. Energy confinement increases with increasing densities (reminiscent of the Z-mode obtained at ISX-B) and as good as ELM-free H-mode confinement (enhancement factor verus ITERH93-P up to 1.2) is obtained at high densities (up to 1.2 times the Greenwald limit) with peaked density profiles showing a peaking factor of about 2 and central density values around 10^14cm-3. In experiments where the energy content of the discharges is kept constant with an energy feedback loop acting on the amount of ICRH power, stable and stationary discharges are obtained for intervals of more than 5s, i.e. 100 times the energy confinement time or about equal to the skin resistive time, even with the cylindrical q_α as low as 2.8 β-values up to the β-limits of TEXTOR-94 are achieved (i.e. β n ≈ 2 of and β p ≈ 1.5) and the figure of merit for ignition margin f_Hqa in these discharges can be as high as 0.7. No detrimental effects of the seeded impurity on the reactivity of the plasma are observed. He removal in these discharges has also been investigated. [1] Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas-Laboratorium voor Plasmafysica, Association "EURATOM-Belgian State", Ecole Royale Militaire-Koninklijke Militaire School, Brussels, Belgium [2] Institut für Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, GmbH, Association "EURATOM-KFA", Jülich, Germany [3] Fusion Energy Research Program, Mechanical Engineering Division, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, USA [4] FOM Institüt voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen, Associatie "FOM-EURATOM", Nieuwegein, The Netherlands [*] Researcher at NFSR, Belgium itemize

  2. Technological development of cylindrical and flat shaped high energy density capacitors. [using polymeric films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelik, J. A.; Parker, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Cylindrical wound metallized film capacitors rated 2 micron F 500 VDC that had an energy density greater than 0.3 J/g, and flat flexible metallized film capacitors rated at 2 micron F 500 VDC that had an energy density greater than 0.1 J/g were developed. Polysulfone, polycarbonate, and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVF2) were investigated as dielectrics for the cylindrical units. PVF2 in 6.0 micron m thickness was employed in the final components of both types. Capacitance and dissipation factor measurements were made over the range 25 C to 100 C, and 10 Hz to 10 kHz. No pre-life-test burning was performed, and six of ten cylindrical units survived a 2500 hour AC plus DC lift test. Three of the four failures were infant mortality. All but two of the flat components survived 400 hours. Finished energy densities were 0.104 J/g at 500 V and 0.200 J/g at 700 V, the energy density being limited by the availability of thin PVF2 films.

  3. High-Energy-Density, Laboratory-Astrophysics Studies of Jets and Bow Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J M; Wilde, B H; Rosen, P A; Perry, T S; Khokhlov, A M; Coker, R F; Frank, A; Keiter, P A; Blue, B E; Drake, R P; Knauer, J P; Williams, R R

    2005-01-24

    Large-scale directional outflows of supersonic plasma, also known as ''jets'', are ubiquitous phenomena in astrophysics [1]. The interaction of such jets with surrounding matter often results in spectacular bow shocks, and intense radiation from radio to gamma-ray wavelengths. The traditional approach to understanding such phenomena is through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. However, such numerical simulations have limited resolution, often assume axial symmetry, do not include all relevant physical processes, and fail to scale correctly in Reynolds number and perhaps other key dimensionless parameters. Additionally, they are frequently not tested by comparison with laboratory experiments. Recent advances in high-energy-density physics using large inertial-confinement-fusion devices now allow controlled laboratory experiments on macroscopic volumes of plasma of direct relevance relevant to astrophysics [2]. In this Letter we report the first results of experiments designed to study the evolution of supersonic plasma jets and the bow shocks they drive into a surrounding medium. Our experiments reveal both regular and highly complex flow patterns in the bow shock, thus opening a new window--complementary to computer simulations--into understanding the nature of three-dimensional astrophysical jets.

  4. Laser-induced generation of ultraintense proton beams for high energy-density science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badziak, J.; Antici, P.; Fuchs, J.; Jabłoński, S.; Mancic, A.; Parys, P.; Rosiński, M.; Suchańska, R.; Szydłowski, A.; Wołowski, J.

    2008-06-01

    Basic properties of high-current high-intensity ion beam generation using laser-induced skin-layer ponderomotive acceleration (SLPA) are discussed. The results of a recent experiment, in which 0.35-ps laser pulse of intensity up to 2×1019 W/cm2 irradiated a thin (1-3 μm) PS (plastic) or Au/PS target (PS covered by 0.1-0.2 μm Au front layer), are presented. It is shown that multi-MA proton beams of current densities >1 TA/cm2 and intensities > 1018 W/cm2 at the source can be produced when the laser-target interaction conditions approach the SLPA requirements. The proton beam parameters as well as the laser-protons energy conversion efficiency substantially depend on the target structure and can be significantly increased with the use of a double-layer Au/PS target. A prospect for the application of SLPA-driven proton beams in ICF fast ignition research is outlined.

  5. Functionalization of Polypyrrole Nanopipes with Redox-Active Polyoxometalates for High Energy Density Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Dubal, Deepak P; Ballesteros, Belén; Mohite, Ashwini A; Gómez-Romero, Pedro

    2017-02-22

    Hybrid materials are very attractive for the fabrication of high-performance supercapacitors. Here, we have explored organic-inorganic hybrid materials based on open-end porous 1 D polypyrrole nanopipes (PPy-NPipes) and heteropolyoxometalates (phosphotungstate ([PW12 O40 ](3-) , PW12 ) or phosphomolybdate ([PMo12 O40 ](3-) , PMo12 )) that display excellent areal capacitances. Two different hybrid materials (PMo12 @PPy and PW12 @PPy) were effectively synthesized and used for symmetric supercapacitors. The anchoring of the inorganic nanoclusters onto the conducting polymer nanopipes led to electrodes that stood up to our best expectations exhibiting outstanding areal capacitances that are almost 1.5 to 2 fold higher than that of pristine PPy-NPipes. In addition, symmetric cells based on PMo12 @PPy and PW12 @PPy hybrid electrodes were fabricated and showed significant improvement in cell performance with very high volumetric capacitances in the range of 6.3-6.8 F cm(-3) (considering the volume of whole device). Indeed, they provide extended potential windows in acidic electrolytes (up to 1.5 V) which led to ultrahigh energy densities of 1.5 and 2.2 mWh cm(-3) for PMo12 @PPy and PW12 @PPy cells, respectively. Thus, these unique organic-inorganic hybrid symmetric cells displayed extraordinary electrochemical performances far exceeding those of more complex asymmetric systems. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Using Magnetic Fields to Create and Control High Energy Density Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Mark

    2012-05-09

    The recently refurbished Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories is the world’s largest pulsed power driver. Z can efficiently deliver currents as large as 26 Million Amperes to centimeter scale loads. These large currents create large magnetic fields that, in turn, create very large pressures in conducting materials. These very large pressures have been used to create unique conditions for high energy density science experiments for a variety of applications. Recently, we have been exploring the use of very strong magnetic fields to significantly relax the requirements for achieving inertial confinement fusion self heating1. The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept relies on a cylindrically imploding liner, an axial magnetic field, and a laser heated fuel region. We hope to achieve significant fusion yield on the Z facility with this concept. Initial experiments assessing the growth of the Magneto-Rayleigh Taylor instability are promising and recent calculational work has identified an approach to achieving high gain with this concept.

  7. Megagauss field generation for high-energy-density plasma science experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Rovang, Dean Curtis; Struve, Kenneth William; Porter, John Larry Jr.

    2008-10-01

    There is a need to generate magnetic fields both above and below 1 megagauss (100 T) with compact generators for laser-plasma experiments in the Beamlet and Petawatt test chambers for focused research on fundamental properties of high energy density magnetic plasmas. Some of the important topics that could be addressed with such a capability are magnetic field diffusion, particle confinement, plasma instabilities, spectroscopic diagnostic development, material properties, flux compression, and alternate confinement schemes, all of which could directly support experiments on Z. This report summarizes a two-month study to develop preliminary designs of magnetic field generators for three design regimes. These are, (1) a design for a relatively low-field (10 to 50 T), compact generator for modest volumes (1 to 10 cm3), (2) a high-field (50 to 200 T) design for smaller volumes (10 to 100 mm3), and (3) an extreme field (greater than 600 T) design that uses flux compression. These designs rely on existing Sandia pulsed-power expertise and equipment, and address issues of magnetic field scaling with capacitor bank design and field inductance, vacuum interface, and trade-offs between inductance and coil designs.

  8. High Energy-Density Plasma Dynamics in Plasma-Filled Rod-Pinch Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    integrated x-ray images. A self-similar hydrodynamic expansion model based on Sesame -tabulated equation of state data indicates the maximum energy density...L lines. The energy shift is attributed to an average ionization of +17 and the Lβ2 line shape is attributed to ionization states in the +10 to +28...energy and broadened by multiple ionization states between +10 and +28 (from Ref. 6). strips are staggered to make an array of 20 diodes with 0.5 mm

  9. Observations of subsonic and supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.

    2009-11-01

    Shear layers containing strong velocity gradients appear in many high-energy-density (HED) systems and play important roles in mixing and the transition to turbulence. Yet few laboratory experiments have been carried out to study their detailed evolution in this extreme environment where plasmas are compressible, actively ionizing, often involve strong shock waves and have complex material properties. Many shear flows produce the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, which initiates the mixing at a fluid interface. We present results from two dedicated shear flow experiments that produced overall subsonic and supersonic flows using novel target designs. In the subsonic case, the Omega laser was used to drive a blast wave along a rippled interface between plastic and foam, shocking both the materials to produce two fluids separated by a sharp shear layer. The interface subsequently rolled-upped into large KH vortices that were accompanied by bubble-like structures of unknown origin. This was the first time the evolution of a well-resolved KH instability was observed in a HED plasma in the laboratory. We have analyzed the properties and dynamics of the plasma based on the data and fundamental models, without resorting to simulated values. In the second, supersonic experiment the Nike laser was used to drive a supersonic flow of Al plasma along a rippled, low-density foam surface. Here again the flowing plasma drove a shock into the second material, so that two fluids were separated by a shear layer. In contrast to the subsonic case, the flow developed shocks around the ripples in response to the supersonic flow of Al. Collaborators: R.P. Drake, O.A. Hurricane, J.F. Hansen, Y. Aglitskiy, T. Plewa, B.A. Remington, H.F. Robey, J.L. Weaver, A.L. Velikovich, R.S. Gillespie, M.J. Bono, M.J. Grosskopf, C.C. Kuranz, A. Visco.

  10. Probing nuclear symmetry energy at high densities using pion, kaon, eta and photon productions in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhi-Gang; Yong, Gao-Chan; Chen, Lie-Wen; Li, Bao-An; Zhang, Ming; Xiao, Guo-Qing; Xu, Nu

    2014-02-01

    The high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy is among the most uncertain properties of dense neutron-rich matter. Its accurate determination has significant ramifications in understanding not only the reaction dynamics of heavy-ion reactions, especially those induced by radioactive beams, but also many interesting phenomena in astrophysics, such as the explosion mechanism of supernova and the properties of neutron stars. The heavy-ion physics community has devoted much effort during the last few years to constrain the high-density symmetry using various probes. In particular, the / ratio has been most extensively studied both theoretically and experimentally. All models have consistently predicted qualitatively that the / ratio is a sensitive probe of the high-density symmetry energy especially with beam energies near the pion production threshold. However, the predicted values of the / ratio are still quite model dependent mostly because of the complexity of modeling pion production and reabsorption dynamics in heavy-ion collisions, leading to currently still controversial conclusions regarding the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy from comparing various model calculations with available experimental data. As more / data become available and a deeper understanding about the pion dynamics in heavy-ion reactions is obtained, more penetrating probes, such as the K +/ K 0 ratio, meson and high-energy photons are also being investigated or planned at several facilities. Here, we review some of our recent contributions to the community effort of constraining the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions. In addition, the status of some worldwide experiments for studying the high-density symmetry energy, including the HIRFL-CSR external target experiment (CEE) are briefly introduced.

  11. Star Formation in High Pressure, High Energy Density Environments: Laboratory Experiments of ISM Dust Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Bajt, S; Bradley, J; Bringa, E; Dai, Z; Felter, T; Graham, G; Kucheyev, S; Torres, D; Tielens, A; Baragiola, R; Dukes, C; Loeffler, M

    2005-01-05

    Dust grains control the chemistry and cooling, and thus the gravitational collapse of interstellar clouds. Energetic particles, shocks and ionizing radiation can have a profound influence on the structure, lifetime and chemical reactivity of the dust, and therefore on the star formation efficiency. This would be especially important in forming galaxies, which exhibit powerful starburst (supernovae) and AGN (active galactic nucleus) activity. How dust properties are affected in such environments may be crucial for a proper understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. The authors present the results of experiments at LLNL which show that irradiation of the interstellar medium (ISM) dust analog forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) with swift heavy ions (10 MeV Xe) and a large electronic energy deposition amorphizes its crystalline structure, without changing its chemical composition. From the data they predict that silicate grains in the ISM, even in dense and cold giant molecular clouds, can be amorphized by heavy cosmic rays (CR's). This might provide an explanation for the observed absence of crystalline dust in the ISM clouds of the Milky Way galaxy. This processing of dust by CR's would be even more important in forming galaxies and galaxies with active black holes.

  12. High capacity and high density functional conductive polymer and SiO anode for high-energy lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Yuca, Neslihan; Zheng, Ziyan; Fu, Yanbao; Battaglia, Vincent S; Abdelbast, Guerfi; Zaghib, Karim; Liu, Gao

    2015-01-14

    High capacity and high density functional conductive polymer binder/SiO electrodes are fabricated and calendered to various porosities. The effect of calendering is investigated in the reduction of thickness and porosity, as well as the increase of density. SiO particle size remains unchanged after calendering. When compressed to an appropriate density, an improved cycling performance and increased energy density are shown compared to the uncalendered electrode and overcalendered electrode. The calendered electrode has a high-density of ∼1.2 g/cm(3). A high loading electrode with an areal capacity of ∼3.5 mAh/cm(2) at a C/10 rate is achieved using functional conductive polymer binder and simple and effective calendering method.

  13. Electron density profile measurements at a self-focusing ion beam with high current density and low energy extracted through concave electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y. Nakamiya, A.; Sakakita, H.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.

    2014-02-15

    The self-focusing phenomenon has been observed in a high current density and low energy ion beam. In order to study the mechanism of this phenomenon, a special designed double probe to measure the electron density and temperature is installed into the chamber where the high current density ion beam is injected. Electron density profile is successfully measured without the influence of the ion beam components. Estimated electron temperature and density are ∼0.9 eV and ∼8 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −3} at the center of ion beam cross section, respectively. It was found that a large amount of electrons are spontaneously accumulated in the ion beam line in the case of self-forcing state.

  14. Publication of Proceedings for the 6th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF (RF 2003)

    SciTech Connect

    Victor L. Granatstein

    2004-08-08

    The 6th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF (RF 2003) was held from June 22 to June 26 at the Coolfont Resort and Conference Center in Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. The Workshop was hosted by the Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics (IREAP) of the University of Maryland, College Park and by the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC. As its name implies this was the sixth in a series of biennial workshops devoted to exchanging information and ideas on high power microwave sources and components. The applications addressed included particle accelerators, radar, HPM, space exploration, neutron sources and plasma heating and current driven in controlled thermonuclear fusion research. This Final Report includes a brief description of the RF 2003 Workshop and the distribution of the published proceedings.

  15. Two volt, high power, high energy density rechargeable lithium polymer battery

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, J.

    1997-12-01

    Research and development of organo-sulfur polymer composite cathodes has produced a family of materials which are electroactive and rechargeable in nonaqueous systems. This publication describes the latest improvements in performance of AA cells and indicates directions to be taken for further development. Applications oriented performance characteristics (including high-rate charge and GSM pulse discharge) of AA cells are described. Initial Regulatory Agency abuse tests are outlined.

  16. Counter-facing plasma focus system as a repetitive and/or long-pulse high energy density plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Yutaka; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-11-15

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial plasma guns is proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that with an assist of breakdown and outer electrode connections, current sheets evolved into a configuration for stable plasma confinement at the center of the electrodes. The current sheets could successively compress and confine the high energy density plasma every half period of the discharge current, enabling highly repetitive light emissions in extreme ultraviolet region with time durations in at least ten microseconds.

  17. Counter-facing plasma focus system as a repetitive and/or long-pulse high energy density plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Yutaka; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-11-01

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial plasma guns is proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that with an assist of breakdown and outer electrode connections, current sheets evolved into a configuration for stable plasma confinement at the center of the electrodes. The current sheets could successively compress and confine the high energy density plasma every half period of the discharge current, enabling highly repetitive light emissions in extreme ultraviolet region with time durations in at least ten microseconds.

  18. A high-resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer for high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Magee, E.; Nagel, S. R.; Park, J.; Schneider, M. B.; Stone, G.; Williams, G. J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M. E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Hill, K. W.; Kerr, S.

    2014-11-15

    Adapting a concept developed for magnetic confinement fusion experiments, an imaging crystal spectrometer has been designed and tested for HED plasmas. The instrument uses a spherically bent quartz [211] crystal with radius of curvature of 490.8 mm. The instrument was tested at the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by irradiating titanium slabs with laser intensities of 10{sup 19}–10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. He-like and Li-like Ti lines were recorded, from which the spectrometer performance was evaluated. This spectrometer provides very high spectral resolving power (E/dE > 7000) while acquiring a one-dimensional image of the source.

  19. A high-resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer for high energy density plasmas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Kerr, S; Magee, E; Nagel, S R; Park, J; Schneider, M B; Stone, G; Williams, G J; Beiersdorfer, P

    2014-11-01

    Adapting a concept developed for magnetic confinement fusion experiments, an imaging crystal spectrometer has been designed and tested for HED plasmas. The instrument uses a spherically bent quartz [211] crystal with radius of curvature of 490.8 mm. The instrument was tested at the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by irradiating titanium slabs with laser intensities of 10(19)-10(20) W/cm(2). He-like and Li-like Ti lines were recorded, from which the spectrometer performance was evaluated. This spectrometer provides very high spectral resolving power (E/dE > 7000) while acquiring a one-dimensional image of the source.

  20. Low-energy density and high fiber intake are dietary concerns in female endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Melin, A; Tornberg, Å B; Skouby, S; Møller, S S; Faber, J; Sundgot-Borgen, J; Sjödin, A

    2016-09-01

    Low or reduced energy availability (LEA) is linked to functional hypothalamic oligomenorrhea/amenorrhea (FHA), which is frequently reported in weight-sensitive sports. This makes LEA a major nutritional concern for female athletes. The aim of this study was to describe dietary characteristics of athletes with LEA and/or FHA. Endurance athletes (n = 45) were recruited from national teams and competitive clubs. Protocols included gynecological examination, body composition, eating disorder evaluation, and 7-day dietary intake and EA assessment. Athletes with disordered eating behavior/eating disorders (n = 11), menstrual dysfunction other than FHA (n = 5), and low dietary record validity (n = 4) were excluded. Remaining subjects (n = 25) were characterized by EA [optimal: ≥ 45 kcal (188 kJ)/kg fat-free mass (FFM)/day (n = 11), LEA: < 45 kcal (188 kJ)/kg FFM/day (n = 14)] and reproductive function [eumenorrhea (EUM; n = 10), FHA (n = 15)]. There was no difference in EA between FHA and EUM subjects. However, FHA and LEA subjects shared the same dietary characteristics of lower energy density (ED) [(P = 0.012; P = 0.020), respectively], and fat content [(P = 0.047; P = 0.027), respectively]. Furthermore, FHA subjects had a lower intake of carbohydrate-rich foods (P = 0.019), higher fiber content (P < 0.001), and drive for thinness score (P = 0.003). Conclusively, low ED together with high fiber content may constitute targets for dietary intervention in order to prevent and treat LEA and FHA in female athletes.

  1. Scaling a High-Energy-Density Shear Experiment from Omega to the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, Forrest W.

    2014-10-01

    Shear instability in high-energy-density (HED) physics is important for elucidating issues in compressible turbulence and in understanding the late time quenching of, for example, inertial fusion capsules. A counterflowing shear experiment initially designed for the Omega Laser Facility studies shear instability in isolation by launching 100+ km/s shocks into opposite sides of a foam-filled shock tube bisected by an Al tracer plate. When the shocks cross at the tube center, a region of intense shear is created (~ 150 km/s velocity difference from one side of the plate to the other). As the tracer layer goes unstable it mixes with the surrounding foam and expands into the tube volume. Radiography recording the spreading of the mixing layer is compared to simulations using the LANL hydrocode RAGE. Analysis of this data demonstrated the likely presence of features, such as strong coupling between the thermodynamics and turbulence during the experiment, of special or unique importance to the HED regime. However, the Omega experiments are limited to 1 ns impulsive drive, compared to the 16 ns of observation times, and are dominated by transients, barely if at all reaching the state of developed turbulence. Our recent shots on the NIF take the experiment to larger volumes, to faster speeds, and to the use of indirect drive halfraums to launch steadily supported shocks. These improvements take advantage of the increased energy of the NIF to eliminate transients and drive more steadily the approach to turbulent transition. Analysis of radiographs confirms our ability to model the hydrodynamic drive and evolution, while comparing images of the developing turbulence between the two facilities suggests morphological differences related possibly to the change in drive conditions. This work was supported by the US DOE and operated by LANS under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  2. Collective Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses for High-energy Density Physics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2011-04-27

    The collective focusing concept in which a weak magnetic lens provides strong focusing of an intense ion beam pulse carrying a neutralizing electron background is investigated by making use of advanced particle-in-cell simulations and reduced analytical models. The original analysis by Robertson Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 149 (1982) is extended to the parameter regimes of particular importance for several high-energy density physics applications. The present paper investigates (1) the effects of non-neutral collective focusing in a moderately strong magnetic field; (2) the diamagnetic effects leading to suppression of the applied magnetic field due to the presence of the beam pulse; and (3) the influence of a finite-radius conducting wall surrounding the beam cross-section on beam neutralization. In addition, it is demonstrated that the use of the collective focusing lens can significantly simplify the technical realization of the final focusing of ion beam pulses in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-I (NDCX-I) , and the conceptual designs of possible experiments on NDCX-I are investigated by making use of advanced numerical simulations. 2011 American Institute of Physics

  3. Demonstration of repeatability in a high-energy-density planar shear mixing layer experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Merritt, Elizabeth Catherine; Doss, Forrest William; Di Stefano, Carlos A.; ...

    2017-03-11

    On laser-driven platforms the assumption of experiment repeatability is particularly important due to a typically low data acquisition rate that doesn’t often allow for data redundancy. If the platform is repeatable, then measurements of the repeatable dynamics from multiple experiments can be treated as measurements of the same system. In high-energy-density hydrodynamic instability experiments the interface growth is assumed to be one of the repeatable aspects of the system. In this paper we demonstrate the repeatability of the instability growth in the counter-propagating shear experiment at the OMEGA laser facility, where the instability growth is characterized by the tracer layermore » thickness or mix-width evolution. Furthermore, in our previous experiment campaigns we have assumed the instability growth was repeatable enough to identify trends, but in this work we explicitly show that the mix-width measurements for nominally identical experiments are repeatable within the measurement error bars.« less

  4. Fiber optic timing, firing and control system for high energy density physics experiments at Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C.R.; Rohlev, L.; Earley, L.; Cochrane, J.

    1995-12-01

    Several fiber optic systems have been designed and implemented for the high energy density experiments at Pegasus II. The main fiber optic system developed for Pegasus II, remotely controls both the charging and discharging of the capacitor discharge unit (CDU). This fiber optic system is also used to distribute the timing and firing information specific to each experiment to the operators and experimenters. The timing and firing information includes the voltage on the CDU as it is being charged, a confirmation signal indicating the CDU has discharged and common timing signals based on the output signals on the load ring of the CDU. Various fiber optic systems were implemented to transfer diagnostic information related to the discharge of the main capacitor bank to the control room. The diagnostics include the current, electric field, and vacuum pressure at the target area. Not only do these fiber optic systems provide the control and monitor signals for the experiments at Pegasus II, they have the added value of preventing premature firing of the capacitor bank, eliminating ground loops between the test area and the control room and providing overall increased operator safety.

  5. A new active Li-Mn-O compound for high energy density Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, M.; Kosova, N. V.; Jordy, C.; Chateigner, D.; Lebedev, O. I.; Maignan, A.; Pralong, V.

    2016-02-01

    The search for new materials that could improve the energy density of Li-ion batteries is one of today’s most challenging issues. Many families of transition metal oxides as well as transition metal polyanionic frameworks have been proposed during the past twenty years. Among them, manganese oxides, such as the LiMn2O4 spinel or the overlithiated oxide Li[Li1/3Mn2/3]O2, have been intensively studied owing to the low toxicity of manganese-based materials and the high redox potential of the Mn3+/Mn4+ couple. In this work, we report on a new electrochemically active compound with the `Li4Mn2O5’ composition, prepared by direct mechanochemical synthesis at room temperature. This rock-salt-type nanostructured material shows a discharge capacity of 355 mAh g-1, which is the highest yet reported among the known lithium manganese oxide electrode materials. According to the magnetic measurements, this exceptional capacity results from the electrochemical activity of the Mn3+/Mn4+ and O2-/O- redox couples, and, importantly, of the Mn4+/Mn5+ couple also.

  6. Additions and improvements to the high energy density physics capabilities in the FLASH code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.

    2016-10-01

    FLASH is an open source, finite-volume Eulerian, spatially adaptive radiation magnetohydrodynamics code that has the capabilities to treat a broad range of physical processes. FLASH performs well on a wide range of computer architectures, and has a broad user base. Extensive high energy density physics (HEDP) capabilities have been added to FLASH to make it an open toolset for the academic HEDP community. We summarize these capabilities, emphasizing recent additions and improvements. In particular, we showcase the ability of FLASH to simulate the Faraday Rotation Measure produced by the presence of magnetic fields; and proton radiography, proton self-emission, and Thomson scattering diagnostics with and without the presence of magnetic fields. We also describe several collaborations with the academic HEDP community in which FLASH simulations were used to design and interpret HEDP experiments. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by the DOE NNSA ASC through the Argonne Institute for Computing in Science under field work proposal 57789; and the NSF under Grant PHY-0903997.

  7. High energy density strategies: from hydride-forming materials research to battery integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notten, P. H. L.; Ouwerkerk, M.; van Hal, H.; Beelen, D.; Keur, W.; Zhou, J.; Feil, H.

    Two different strategies are outlined to develop both high energy density and space-efficient batteries, including the most widely applied rechargeable nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) and Li-ion batteries. The hydrogen storage capacity of fluorite-structured Mg-containing compounds are shown to have a reversible electrochemical storage capacity of more than four times that of the commonly used MischMetal-based AB 5 compounds in NiMH, i.e. 1500 mAh/g (5.6 wt.%). The formation of octahedral sites within the crystal lattice is argued to be very crucial for the improved kinetics of hydrogen absorption and desorption. It is shown that the fluorite-structure can be conserved with both precious Sc and the less expensive Ti up to a Mg content of 80 at.%. Both thermodynamic and kinetic data are presented in relation to the materials composition. In addition, the development of preshaped batteries, as the first step to battery integration, has contributed to a much higher level of design freedom for portable electronic equipment. The manufacturing process of preshaped batteries will be described together with their electrochemical characteristics. Advantageously, the mechanical stability is provided locally by polymer rivets, allowing to get rid of heavy metallic casings and to make use of a much wider range of battery shapes.

  8. Collaborative comparison of high-energy-density physics codes (LA-UR-12-22121)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryxell, Bruce; Fatenejad, Milad; Wohlbier, John; Myra, Eric; Lamb, Don; Fryer, Chris; Graziani, Carlos; Medin, Zach; Rauenzahn, Rick

    2012-10-01

    Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations are vital to understanding high-energy-density physics (HEDP) experiments. We are in the process of comparing three HEDP codes, including CRASH (U. of Michigan), FLASH (U. of Chicago), and xRAGE (LANL) on a wide variety of problems, ranging from simple tests to full HEDP experiments. The goals are to understand the differences between the codes and how they influence the results, to determine which codes contain the most accurate algorithms and physics models, and where possible, to improve the other codes to produce more faithful representations of HEDP experiments. The calculations discussed here include simple temperature relaxation problems in an infinite, uniform medium, tests of the diffusion solvers (both conduction and radiation), and tests that add hydrodynamic effects, The eventual goal is to compare the results from all of the codes on simulations of radiative shock experiments being performed by The Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) at the University of Michigan and to understand any discrepancies between the results of the simulations and the experiments.

  9. Pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic interchange instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Seguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Landen, O. L.; Town, R. P. J.; Betti, R.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Soures, J. M.

    2009-07-15

    Recent experiments using proton backlighting of laser-foil interactions provide unique opportunities for studying magnetized plasma instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas. Time-gated proton radiograph images indicate that the outer structure of a magnetic field entrained in a hemispherical plasma bubble becomes distinctly asymmetric after the laser turns off. It is shown that this asymmetry is a consequence of pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) interchange instabilities. In contrast to the predictions made by ideal MHD theory, the increasing plasma resistivity after laser turn-off allows for greater low-mode destabilization (m>1) from reduced stabilization by field-line bending. For laser-generated plasmas presented herein, a mode-number cutoff for stabilization of perturbations with m>{approx}[8{pi}{beta}(1+D{sub m}k{sub perpendicular}{sup 2}{gamma}{sub max}{sup -1})]{sup 1/2} is found in the linear growth regime. The growth is measured and is found to be in reasonable agreement with model predictions.

  10. A journey from nuclear criticality methods to high energy density radflow experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2016-11-08

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a nuclear weapons laboratory supporting our nation's defense. In support of this mission is a high energy-density physics program in which we design and execute experiments to study radiationhydrodynamics phenomena and improve the predictive capability of our largescale multi-physics software codes on our big-iron computers. The Radflow project’s main experimental effort now is to understand why we haven't been able to predict opacities on Sandia National Laboratory's Z-machine. We are modeling an increasing fraction of the Z-machine's dynamic hohlraum to find multi-physics explanations for the experimental results. Further, we are building an entirely different opacity platform on Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's National Ignition Facility (NIF), which is set to get results early 2017. Will the results match our predictions, match the Z-machine, or give us something entirely different? The new platform brings new challenges such as designing hohlraums and spectrometers. The speaker will recount his history, starting with one-dimensional Monte Carlo nuclear criticality methods in graduate school, radiative transfer methods research and software development for his first 16 years at LANL, and, now, radflow technology and experiments. Who knew that the real world was more than just radiation transport? Experiments aren't easy and they are as saturated with politics as a presidential election, but they sure are fun.

  11. High energy density laser interactions with planetary and astrophysical materials: methodology and data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remo, John L.; Adams, Richard G.

    2008-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories NLS (1064 nm) and Z-Beamlet (527 nm) pulsed lasers @ ~ 100 GW/cm2 and 10 TW/cm2 were used to attain pressures at 20 - 525 GPa on a variety of metallic and mineral targets. A simple, inexpensive and innovative electro-optical real-time methodology monitored rear surface mechanical deformation and associated particle and shock wave velocities that differ considerably between metals and non-metals. A reference calibration metal (Aluminum) and a reference non-metal (graphite) were used to demonstrate the validity of this methodology. Normative equations of state and momentum coupling coefficients were obtained for dunite, carbonaceous meteorites, graphite, iron and nickel. These experimental results on inhomogeneous materials can be applied to a variety of high energy density interactions involving stellar and planetary material formation, dynamic interactions, geophysical models, space propulsion systems, orbital debris, materials processing, near-earth space (lunar and asteroid) resource recovery, and near-earth object mitigation models.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamics of laser-produced high-energy-density plasma in a strong external magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kazuki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Zhang, Zhe; Nicolai, Philippe; Sano, Takayoshi; Sakata, Shohei; Kojima, Sadaoki; Lee, Seung Ho; Law, King Fai Farley; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakawa, Youichi; Morita, Taichi; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2017-05-01

    Recent progress in the generation in the laboratory of a strong (>100-T) magnetic field enables us to investigate experimentally unexplored magnetohydrodynamics phenomena of a high-energy-density plasma, which an external magnetic field of 200-300 T notably affects due to anisotropic thermal conduction, even when the magnetic field pressure is much lower than the plasma pressure. The external magnetic field reduces electron thermal conduction across the external magnetic field lines because the Larmor radius of the thermal electrons in the external magnetic field is much shorter than the mean free path of the thermal electrons. The velocity of a thin polystyrene foil driven by intense laser beams in the strong external magnetic field is faster than that in the absence of the external magnetic field. Growth of sinusoidal corrugation imposed initially on the laser-driven polystyrene surface is enhanced by the external magnetic field because the plasma pressure distribution becomes nonuniform due to the external magnetic-field structure modulated by the perturbed plasma flow ablated from the corrugated surface.

  13. Investigating the Effects of Anisotropic Mass Transport on Dendrite Growth in High Energy Density Lithium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Jinwang; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Ferris, Kim F.; Ryan, Emily M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendrite formation on the electrode surface of high energy density lithium (Li) batteries causes safety problems and limits their applications. Suppressing dendrite growth could significantly improve Li battery performance. Dendrite growth and morphology is a function of the mixing in the electrolyte near the anode interface. Most research into dendrites in batteries focuses on dendrite formation in isotropic electrolytes (i.e., electrolytes with isotropic diffusion coefficient). In this work, an anisotropic diffusion reaction model is developed to study the anisotropic mixing effect on dendrite growth in Li batteries. The model uses a Lagrangian particle-based method to model dendrite growth in an anisotropic electrolyte solution. The model is verified by comparing the numerical simulation results with analytical solutions, and its accuracy is shown to be better than previous particle-based anisotropic diffusion models. Several parametric studies of dendrite growth in an anisotropic electrolyte are performed and the results demonstrate the effects of anisotropic transport on dendrite growth and morphology, and show the possible advantages of anisotropic electrolytes for dendrite suppression.

  14. Machine learning applied to proton radiography of high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nicholas F. Y.; Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Ratan, Naren; Sadler, James; Levy, Matthew C.; Trines, Raoul; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Proton radiography is a technique extensively used to resolve magnetic field structures in high-energy-density plasmas, revealing a whole variety of interesting phenomena such as magnetic reconnection and collisionless shocks found in astrophysical systems. Existing methods of analyzing proton radiographs give mostly qualitative results or specific quantitative parameters, such as magnetic field strength, and recent work showed that the line-integrated transverse magnetic field can be reconstructed in specific regimes where many simplifying assumptions were needed. Using artificial neural networks, we demonstrate for the first time 3D reconstruction of magnetic fields in the nonlinear regime, an improvement over existing methods, which reconstruct only in 2D and in the linear regime. A proof of concept is presented here, with mean reconstruction errors of less than 5% even after introducing noise. We demonstrate that over the long term, this approach is more computationally efficient compared to other techniques. We also highlight the need for proton tomography because (i) certain field structures cannot be reconstructed from a single radiograph and (ii) errors can be further reduced when reconstruction is performed on radiographs generated by proton beams fired in different directions.

  15. Characterization of magnetic reconnection in the high-energy-density regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, B.; Xu, Z.; Chang, H. X.; Wu, S. Z.; Zhou, C. T.; Wang, X. G.; He, X. T.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection (MR), breaking and reorganizing the topology of magnetic field dramatically, is a fundamental process observed in many space, laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. In this talk, we report recent investigations on characterization of magnetic reconnection (MR) in the high-energy-density (HED) regime, where the plasma inflow is strongly driven and the total thermal pressure is larger than the magnetic pressure (β > 1) . This extreme regime of MR occurs frequently in astrophysics and recent HED experiments. Comparing the particle-in-cell simulation results for the interactions of colliding laser-produced plasma bubbles with induced anti-parallel and parallel poloidal magnetic fields respectively, the consequences caused by MR are distinguished from those by plasma bubble collisions and two-fluid effects. It is found that the out-of-plane quadrupole magnetic field, bipolar poloidal electric field, plasma heating and even the out-of-plane electric field appear in both cases, which cannot be recognized as evidences of MR here as previously thought. The Lorentz-invariant scalar quantity De =γe \\Jdot ⇀ . (E ⇀ + v ⇀ × B ⇀) [γe = (1 -ve2 /c2)- 1 / 2 is the Lorentz factor] in the electron dissipation region is proposed as the key sign of MR occurrence in the HED regime.

  16. Characterization of magnetic reconnection in the high-energy-density regime.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Qiao, B; Chang, H X; Yao, W P; Wu, S Z; Yan, X Q; Zhou, C T; Wang, X G; He, X T

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of magnetic reconnection (MR) in the high-energy-density (HED) regime, where the plasma inflow is strongly driven and the thermal pressure is larger than the magnetic pressure (β>1), is reexamined theoretically and by particle-in-cell simulations. Interactions of two colliding laser-produced plasma bubbles with self-generated poloidal magnetic fields of, respectively, antiparallel and parallel field lines are considered. Through comparison, it is found that the quadrupole magnetic field, bipolar poloidal electric field, plasma heating, and even the out-of-plane electric field can appear in both cases due to the mere plasma bubble collision, which may not be individually recognized as evidences of MR in the HED regime separately. The Lorentz-invariant scalar quantity D(e) ≃ γ(e)j · (E + v(e) × B) (γ(e) = [1-(v(e)/c)(2)](-1/2)) in the electron dissipation region is proposed as the key sign of MR occurrence in this regime.

  17. Parameter scaling toward high-energy density in a quasi-steady flow Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, M. C.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Golingo, R. P.; Claveau, E. L.; Doty, S. A.; Forbes, E. G.; Kim, B.; Ross, M. P.

    2016-10-01

    Sheared axial flows are utilized by the ZaP Flow Z-Pinch Experiment to stabilize MHD instabilities. The pinches formed are 50 cm long with radii ranging from 0.3 to 1.0 cm. The plasma is generated in a coaxial acceleration region, similar to a Marshall gun, which provides a steady supply of plasma for approximately 100 us. The power to the plasma is partially decoupled between the acceleration and pinch assembly regions through the use of separate power supplies. Adiabatic scaling of the Bennett relation gives targets for future devices to reach high-energy density conditions or fusion reactors. The applicability of an adiabatic assumption is explored and work is done experimentally to clarify the plasma compression process, which may be more generally polytropic. The device is capable of a much larger parameter space than previous machine iterations, allowing flexibility in the initial conditions of the compression process to preserve stability. This work is supported by DoE FES and NNSA.

  18. Pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic interchange instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas.

    PubMed

    Li, C K; Frenje, J A; Petrasso, R D; Séguin, F H; Amendt, P A; Landen, O L; Town, R P J; Betti, R; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Soures, J M

    2009-07-01

    Recent experiments using proton backlighting of laser-foil interactions provide unique opportunities for studying magnetized plasma instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas. Time-gated proton radiograph images indicate that the outer structure of a magnetic field entrained in a hemispherical plasma bubble becomes distinctly asymmetric after the laser turns off. It is shown that this asymmetry is a consequence of pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) interchange instabilities. In contrast to the predictions made by ideal MHD theory, the increasing plasma resistivity after laser turn-off allows for greater low-mode destabilization (m>1) from reduced stabilization by field-line bending. For laser-generated plasmas presented herein, a mode-number cutoff for stabilization of perturbations with m> approximately [8pibeta(1+D_{m}k_{ perpendicular};{2}gamma_{max};{-1})];{1/2} is found in the linear growth regime. The growth is measured and is found to be in reasonable agreement with model predictions.

  19. Machine learning applied to proton radiography of high-energy-density plasmas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nicholas F Y; Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Ratan, Naren; Sadler, James; Levy, Matthew C; Trines, Raoul; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Proton radiography is a technique extensively used to resolve magnetic field structures in high-energy-density plasmas, revealing a whole variety of interesting phenomena such as magnetic reconnection and collisionless shocks found in astrophysical systems. Existing methods of analyzing proton radiographs give mostly qualitative results or specific quantitative parameters, such as magnetic field strength, and recent work showed that the line-integrated transverse magnetic field can be reconstructed in specific regimes where many simplifying assumptions were needed. Using artificial neural networks, we demonstrate for the first time 3D reconstruction of magnetic fields in the nonlinear regime, an improvement over existing methods, which reconstruct only in 2D and in the linear regime. A proof of concept is presented here, with mean reconstruction errors of less than 5% even after introducing noise. We demonstrate that over the long term, this approach is more computationally efficient compared to other techniques. We also highlight the need for proton tomography because (i) certain field structures cannot be reconstructed from a single radiograph and (ii) errors can be further reduced when reconstruction is performed on radiographs generated by proton beams fired in different directions.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamics of laser-produced high-energy-density plasma in a strong external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Kazuki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Zhang, Zhe; Nicolai, Philippe; Sano, Takayoshi; Sakata, Shohei; Kojima, Sadaoki; Lee, Seung Ho; Law, King Fai Farley; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakawa, Youichi; Morita, Taichi; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2017-05-01

    Recent progress in the generation in the laboratory of a strong (>100 -T) magnetic field enables us to investigate experimentally unexplored magnetohydrodynamics phenomena of a high-energy-density plasma, which an external magnetic field of 200-300 T notably affects due to anisotropic thermal conduction, even when the magnetic field pressure is much lower than the plasma pressure. The external magnetic field reduces electron thermal conduction across the external magnetic field lines because the Larmor radius of the thermal electrons in the external magnetic field is much shorter than the mean free path of the thermal electrons. The velocity of a thin polystyrene foil driven by intense laser beams in the strong external magnetic field is faster than that in the absence of the external magnetic field. Growth of sinusoidal corrugation imposed initially on the laser-driven polystyrene surface is enhanced by the external magnetic field because the plasma pressure distribution becomes nonuniform due to the external magnetic-field structure modulated by the perturbed plasma flow ablated from the corrugated surface.

  1. A new active Li-Mn-O compound for high energy density Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Freire, M; Kosova, N V; Jordy, C; Chateigner, D; Lebedev, O I; Maignan, A; Pralong, V

    2016-02-01

    The search for new materials that could improve the energy density of Li-ion batteries is one of today's most challenging issues. Many families of transition metal oxides as well as transition metal polyanionic frameworks have been proposed during the past twenty years. Among them, manganese oxides, such as the LiMn2O4 spinel or the overlithiated oxide Li[Li1/3Mn2/3]O2, have been intensively studied owing to the low toxicity of manganese-based materials and the high redox potential of the Mn(3+)/Mn(4+) couple. In this work, we report on a new electrochemically active compound with the 'Li4Mn2O5' composition, prepared by direct mechanochemical synthesis at room temperature. This rock-salt-type nanostructured material shows a discharge capacity of 355 mAh g(-1), which is the highest yet reported among the known lithium manganese oxide electrode materials. According to the magnetic measurements, this exceptional capacity results from the electrochemical activity of the Mn(3+)/Mn(4+) and O(2-)/O(-) redox couples, and, importantly, of the Mn(4+)/Mn(5+) couple also.

  2. High-Energy-Density Metal-Oxygen Batteries: Lithium-Oxygen Batteries vs Sodium-Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyeongse; Agyeman, Daniel Adjei; Park, Mihui; Yang, Junghoon; Kang, Yong-Mook

    2017-09-21

    The development of next-generation energy-storage devices with high power, high energy density, and safety is critical for the success of large-scale energy-storage systems (ESSs), such as electric vehicles. Rechargeable sodium-oxygen (Na-O2 ) batteries offer a new and promising opportunity for low-cost, high-energy-density, and relatively efficient electrochemical systems. Although the specific energy density of the Na-O2 battery is lower than that of the lithium-oxygen (Li-O2 ) battery, the abundance and low cost of sodium resources offer major advantages for its practical application in the near future. However, little has so far been reported regarding the cell chemistry, to explain the rate-limiting parameters and the corresponding low round-trip efficiency and cycle degradation. Consequently, an elucidation of the reaction mechanism is needed for both lithium-oxygen and sodium-oxygen cells. An in-depth understanding of the differences and similarities between Li-O2 and Na-O2 battery systems, in terms of thermodynamics and a structural viewpoint, will be meaningful to promote the development of advanced metal-oxygen batteries. State-of-the-art battery design principles for high-energy-density lithium-oxygen and sodium-oxygen batteries are thus reviewed in depth here. Major drawbacks, reaction mechanisms, and recent strategies to improve performance are also summarized. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. SAMURAI-TPC: A Time Projection Chamber for Constraining the Asymmetry Energy at High Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, A. B.; Maass, N.; Yennello, S. J.; Barney, J.; Chajecki, Z.; Chan, C. F.; Dunn, J. W.; Estee, J.; Gilbert, J.; Lu, F.; Lynch, W. G.; Shane, R.; Tsang, M. B.; Famiano, M.; Isobe, T.; Sakurai, H.; Taketani, A.; Murakami, T.; Samurai-Tpc Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The SAMURAI-TPC is a time projection chamber designed to measure pions and light charged particles. By measuring pion yield ratios and particle flow in heavy ion collisions around E = 200A MeV, we expect to constrain the behavior of the nuclear asymmetry energy around twice saturation density. In this talk, the design and construction of the TPC components will be discussed. Upon completion, the SAMURAI-TPC will be installed in the SAMURAI spectrometer at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Facility at RIKEN, Japan. This work is supported by the Department of Energy (DE-SC0004835).

  4. A High Power Density Single-Phase PWM Rectifier with Active Ripple Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, Puqi; Wang, Ruxi; Wang, Fei; Boroyevich, Dushan

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that there exist second-order harmonic current and corresponding ripple voltage on dc bus for single phase PWM rectifiers. The low frequency harmonic current is normally filtered using a bulk capacitor in the bus which results in low power density. This paper proposed an active ripple energy storage method that can effectively reduce the energy storage capacitance. The feed-forward control method and design considerations are provided. Simulation and 15 kW experimental results are provided for verification purposes.

  5. High-energy spin-density-wave correlated fluctuations in paramagnetic Cr + 5 at. % V

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, S.A.; Fawcett, E.; Elmiger, M.W.; Shirane, G.

    1992-11-01

    Measurements of the magnetic fluctuations, termed spin-density-wave (SDW) paramagnons, in the nearly antiferromagnetic alloy Cr + 5 at.%V are extended up in energy to about 80 MeV. These fluctuating spin-spin correlations occur at incommensurate positions, corresponding to the SDW wavevector Q. Their characteristic energy is at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the magnetic fluctuations seen in the paramagnetic phase of pure Cr, but their intensity is more than two orders of magnitude smaller. We find that the dynamic susceptibility decreases by about 50% between temperature T = 10K and 300K.

  6. High-energy spin-density-wave correlated fluctuations in paramagnetic Cr + 5 at. % V

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, S.A. . Dept. of Physics); Fawcett, E. . Dept. of Physics); Elmiger, M.W.; Shirane, G. )

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the magnetic fluctuations, termed spin-density-wave (SDW) paramagnons, in the nearly antiferromagnetic alloy Cr + 5 at.%V are extended up in energy to about 80 MeV. These fluctuating spin-spin correlations occur at incommensurate positions, corresponding to the SDW wavevector Q. Their characteristic energy is at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the magnetic fluctuations seen in the paramagnetic phase of pure Cr, but their intensity is more than two orders of magnitude smaller. We find that the dynamic susceptibility decreases by about 50% between temperature T = 10K and 300K.

  7. Development of low-cost, compact, reliable, high energy density ceramic nanocomposite capacitors.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, Erika J.; Monson, Todd C.; DiAntonio, Christopher Brian; Huber, Dale L.; Fellows, Benjamin D.; Stevens, Tyler E.; Roesler, Alexander William; Chavez, Tom P.; Winter, Michael R.

    2010-05-01

    The ceramic nanocomposite capacitor goals are: (1) more than double energy density of ceramic capacitors (cutting size and weight by more than half); (2) potential cost reductino (factor of >4) due to decreased sintering temperature (allowing the use of lower cost electrode materials such as 70/30 Ag/Pd); and (3) lower sintering temperature will allow co-firing with other electrical components.

  8. Zoomed high-resolution simulations of Multi-coupled Dark Energy: cored galaxy density profiles at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Garaldi, Enrico; Baldi, Marco; Moscardini, Lauro E-mail: marco.baldi5@unibo.it

    2016-01-01

    We perform for the first time high-resolution zoom-in re-simulations of individual halos in the context of the Multi-coupled Dark Energy (McDE) scenario, which is characterised by the existence of two distinct Dark Matter particle species with opposite couplings to a Dark Energy scalar field. We compare the structural properties of the simulated halos to the standard ΛCDM results. The zoomed-in initial conditions are set up using a specifically designed code called ZInCo that we publicly release along with the present paper. Our numerical results allow to investigate in detail and with unprecedented resolution the halo segregation process that characterises McDE cosmologies from its very early stages. In particular, we find that in contrast to what could be inferred from previous numerical analysis at lower resolution, the segregation process is already in place at redshifts as high as z ∼ 7. Most remarkably, we find that the subsequent evolution of the segregation leads to the formation of cored total matter density profiles with a core size that progressively increases in time. The shape of the cored profiles can be accurately predicted as the superposition of two NFW profiles with an increasing offset, thereby confirming the interpretation of the simulations results in terms of the segregation of the two dark matter components of the halo as a consequence of their different coupling to the Dark Energy field.

  9. Activities on heavy ion inertial fusion and beam-driven high energy density science in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horioka, K.; Kawamura, T.; Nakajima, M.; Kondo, K.; Ogawa, M.; Oguri, Y.; Hasegawa, J.; Kawata, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Sasaki, T.; Murakami, M.; Takayama, K.

    2009-07-01

    Recent research activities in Japan relevant to heavy ion fusion (HIF) are presented. During the past two years, significant progress in HIF and high energy density (HED) physics research has been made by a number of research groups in universities and accelerator facilities. Evolutions in phase space during the longitudinal compression of intense beams were investigated at UU-NUT-TIT. Beam-plasma interaction experiments and related theoretical studies are in progress at RLNR-TIT. In the study, shock-heated hydrogen was used for the interaction experiments as a well-defined non-ideal-plasma target. In the beam-plasma interaction experiments, a special emphasis is placed on an evaluation of non-linear effects on the stopping power in a beam-heated plasma target. A direct-indirect hybrid scheme of a beam-driven ICF target has been proposed and discussed at UU. In the same group, a method for controlling the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in imploding fuel target has been proposed using oscillating heavy ion beams (HIBs). Core dynamics of the impact ignition has been investigated both experimentally and numerically at ILE—Osaka. Dense plasmas driven by intense ion beams and/or a pulse powered device, were evaluated by a group of DES-TIT, concerning the researches on HED and warm dense matter (WDM) physics. A quasi-statically tamped target was proposed to make a well-defined, warm dense state for equation-of-state (EOS) studies based on ion accelerators. The potentiality of the new facility planned at KEK was evaluated by a collaborating group of TIT-UU-KEK, which can extend the parameter regime for laboratory experiments to study the properties of matter under extreme conditions. A possible method to make a high-pressure condition for study of the planetary science was discussed as a short-term subject of intense HIBs.

  10. Density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, B.; Routray, T. R.; Tripathy, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    High density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy is studied on the basis of the stiffest density dependence of asymmetric contribution to energy per nucleon in charge neutral n + p + e + μ matter under beta equilibrium. The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy obtained in this way is neither very stiff nor soft at high densities and is found to be in conformity with recent observations of neutron stars.

  11. Weavable, Conductive Yarn-Based NiCo//Zn Textile Battery with High Energy Density and Rate Capability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Ip, Wing Shan; Lau, Yuen Ying; Sun, Jinfeng; Zeng, Jie; Yeung, Nga Sze Sea; Ng, Wing Sum; Li, Hongfei; Pei, Zengxia; Xue, Qi; Wang, Yukun; Yu, Jie; Hu, Hong; Zhi, Chunyi

    2017-09-26

    With intrinsic safety and much higher energy densities than supercapacitors, rechargeable nickel/cobalt-zinc-based textile batteries are promising power sources for next generation personalized wearable electronics. However, high-performance wearable nickel/cobalt-zinc-based batteries are rarely reported because there is a lack of industrially weavable and knittable highly conductive yarns. Here, we use scalably produced highly conductive yarns uniformly covered with zinc (as anode) and nickel cobalt hydroxide nanosheets (as cathode) to fabricate rechargeable yarn batteries. They possess a battery level capacity and energy density, as well as a supercapacitor level power density. They deliver high specific capacity of 5 mAh cm(-3) and energy densities of 0.12 mWh cm(-2) and 8 mWh cm(-3) (based on the whole solid battery). They exhibit ultrahigh rate capabilities of 232 C (liquid electrolyte) and 116 C (solid electrolyte), which endows the batteries excellent power densities of 32.8 mW cm(-2) and 2.2 W cm(-3) (based on the whole solid battery). These are among the highest values reported so far. A wrist band battery is further constructed by using a large conductive cloth woven from the conductive yarns by a commercial weaving machine. It powers various electronic devices successfully, enabling dual functions of wearability and energy storage.

  12. Controlled functionalization of carbonaceous fibers for asymmetric solid-state micro-supercapacitors with high volumetric energy density.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dingshan; Goh, Kunli; Zhang, Qiang; Wei, Li; Wang, Hong; Jiang, Wenchao; Chen, Yuan

    2014-10-22

    A 1.8 V asymmetric solid-state flexible micro-supercapacitor is designed with one MnO2 -coated reduced graphene oxide/single-walled carbon nanotube (rGO/SWCNT) composite fiber as positive electrode and one nitrogen-doped rGO/SWCNT fiber as negative electrode, which demonstrates ultrahigh volumetric energy density, comparable to some thin-film lithium batteries, along with high power density, long cycle life, and good flexibility.

  13. Bubbler: A Novel Ultra-High Power Density Energy Harvesting Method Based on Reverse Electrowetting.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tsung-Hsing; Manakasettharn, Supone; Taylor, J Ashley; Krupenkin, Tom

    2015-11-16

    We have proposed and successfully demonstrated a novel approach to direct conversion of mechanical energy into electrical energy using microfluidics. The method combines previously demonstrated reverse electrowetting on dielectric (REWOD) phenomenon with the fast self-oscillating process of bubble growth and collapse. Fast bubble dynamics, used in conjunction with REWOD, provides a possibility to increase the generated power density by over an order of magnitude, as compared to the REWOD alone. This energy conversion approach is particularly well suited for energy harvesting applications and can enable effective coupling to a broad array of mechanical systems including such ubiquitous but difficult to utilize low-frequency energy sources as human and machine motion. The method can be scaled from a single micro cell with 10(-6) W output to power cell arrays with a total power output in excess of 10 W. This makes the fabrication of small light-weight energy harvesting devices capable of producing a wide range of power outputs feasible.

  14. Bubbler: A Novel Ultra-High Power Density Energy Harvesting Method Based on Reverse Electrowetting

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Tsung-Hsing; Manakasettharn, Supone; Taylor, J. Ashley; Krupenkin, Tom

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed and successfully demonstrated a novel approach to direct conversion of mechanical energy into electrical energy using microfluidics. The method combines previously demonstrated reverse electrowetting on dielectric (REWOD) phenomenon with the fast self-oscillating process of bubble growth and collapse. Fast bubble dynamics, used in conjunction with REWOD, provides a possibility to increase the generated power density by over an order of magnitude, as compared to the REWOD alone. This energy conversion approach is particularly well suited for energy harvesting applications and can enable effective coupling to a broad array of mechanical systems including such ubiquitous but difficult to utilize low-frequency energy sources as human and machine motion. The method can be scaled from a single micro cell with 10−6 W output to power cell arrays with a total power output in excess of 10 W. This makes the fabrication of small light-weight energy harvesting devices capable of producing a wide range of power outputs feasible. PMID:26567850

  15. Enhanced Energy Density in Permanent Magnets using Controlled High Magnetic Field during Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, Orlando; Carter, Bill; Constantinides, Steve

    2016-05-05

    This ORNL Manufacturing Demonstraction Facility (MDF) technical collaboration focused on the use of high magnetic field processing (>2Tesla) using energy efficient large bore superconducting magnet technology and high frequency electromagnetics to improve magnet performance and reduce the energy budget associated with Alnico thermal processing. Alnico, alloys containing Al, Ni, Co and Fe, represent a class of functional nanostructured alloys, and show the greatest potential for supplementing or replacing commercial Nd-based rare-earth alloy magnets.

  16. Advanced Flywheel Composite Rotors: Low-Cost, High-Energy Density Flywheel Storage Grid Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    GRIDS Project: Boeing is developing a new material for use in the rotor of a low-cost, high-energy flywheel storage technology. Flywheels store energy by increasing the speed of an internal rotor —slowing the rotor releases the energy back to the grid when needed. The faster the rotor spins, the more energy it can store. Boeing’s new material could drastically improve the energy stored in the rotor. The team will work to improve the storage capacity of their flywheels and increase the duration over which they store energy. The ultimate goal of this project is to create a flywheel system that can be scaled up for use by electric utility companies and produce power for a full hour at a cost of $100 per kilowatt hour.

  17. Equation of state for hydrogen-like materials with high energy densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, Y. V.; Maslov, A. G.

    2016-07-01

    Solution of time-dependent Schrodinger equation for deuterium with high density and pulse impact on a system is described in the article. Result compared with experiments of shock compression of deuterium, made by RFNC-VNIIEF, Sandia and NOVA. The way of use of this solution in advanced railgun technologies is considered.

  18. Identifying high energy density stream-reaches through refined geospatial resolution in hydropower resource assessment

    DOE PAGES

    Pasha, M. Fayzul K.; Yang, Majntxov; Yeasmin, Dilruba; ...

    2016-01-07

    Benefited from the rapid development of multiple geospatial data sets on topography, hydrology, and existing energy-water infrastructures, the reconnaissance level hydropower resource assessment can now be conducted using geospatial models in all regions of the US. Furthermore, the updated techniques can be used to estimate the total undeveloped hydropower potential across all regions, and may eventually help identify further hydropower opportunities that were previously overlooked. To enhance the characterization of higher energy density stream-reaches, this paper explored the sensitivity of geospatial resolution on the identification of hydropower stream-reaches using the geospatial merit matrix based hydropower resource assessment (GMM-HRA) model. GMM-HRAmore » model simulation was conducted with eight different spatial resolutions on six U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 8-digit hydrologic units (HUC8) located at three different terrains; Flat, Mild, and Steep. The results showed that more hydropower potential from higher energy density stream-reaches can be identified with increasing spatial resolution. Both Flat and Mild terrains exhibited lower impacts compared to the Steep terrain. Consequently, greater attention should be applied when selecting the discretization resolution for hydropower resource assessments in the future study.« less

  19. Identifying high energy density stream-reaches through refined geospatial resolution in hydropower resource assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Pasha, M. Fayzul K.; Yang, Majntxov; Yeasmin, Dilruba; Saetern, Sen; Kao, Shih -Chieh; Smith, Brennan T.

    2016-01-07

    Benefited from the rapid development of multiple geospatial data sets on topography, hydrology, and existing energy-water infrastructures, the reconnaissance level hydropower resource assessment can now be conducted using geospatial models in all regions of the US. Furthermore, the updated techniques can be used to estimate the total undeveloped hydropower potential across all regions, and may eventually help identify further hydropower opportunities that were previously overlooked. To enhance the characterization of higher energy density stream-reaches, this paper explored the sensitivity of geospatial resolution on the identification of hydropower stream-reaches using the geospatial merit matrix based hydropower resource assessment (GMM-HRA) model. GMM-HRA model simulation was conducted with eight different spatial resolutions on six U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 8-digit hydrologic units (HUC8) located at three different terrains; Flat, Mild, and Steep. The results showed that more hydropower potential from higher energy density stream-reaches can be identified with increasing spatial resolution. Both Flat and Mild terrains exhibited lower impacts compared to the Steep terrain. Consequently, greater attention should be applied when selecting the discretization resolution for hydropower resource assessments in the future study.

  20. Design factors for a super high energy density Ni-MH battery for military uses

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.T.; Klein, M.G.

    1997-12-01

    The nickel-metal hydride battery is a relatively new commercial product which meets the needs for a more environmentally friendly battery than either the lead-acid or nickel-cadmium couples. While the presently available product also provides significantly improved performance over these other batteries, it is believed possible to develop a new generation of Ni-MH batteries with perhaps 80% greater density by using improved hydrogen storage alloys with the capability to store up to 2% by weight hydrogen, improved nickel electrodes which can stably cycle with an electron transfer of greater than 1.5 per nickel atom, and utilizing improved new cell and battery packaging designs which minimize inactive battery weight and volume. This could raise the energy density of today`s commercial product (55--70 Wh/kg) to greater than 120 Wh/kg.

  1. Modeling Nuclear Fusion in High Energy Density Plasmas Using a Strongly Magnetized Non-neutral Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D. H. E.

    2005-10-01

    In the hot dense interiors of stars and giant planets, nuclear reactions are predicted to occur at rates that are greatly enhanced compared to those at low densities. The enhancement is caused by plasma screening of the reacting pairs, increasing the probability of close collisions. However, strongly enhanced nuclear reaction rates have never been observed in the laboratory. This poster discusses a method for observing the enhancement using an analogy between nuclear energy and cyclotron energy in a non-neutral plasma in a strong magnetic field. In such a plasma, cyclotron energy is an adiabatic invariant, and is released only through close collisions that break this invariant. It is shown that the rate of release of cyclotron energy is enhanced by precisely the same factor as that for the release of nuclear energy, because both processes rely on close collisions that are enhanced by plasma screening.ootnotetextD. Dubin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 025002 (2005). Simulations measuring the screening enhancement will be presented, and the possibility of exciting and studying burn fronts will be discussed.ootnotetextSee also adjacent poster by J. Bollinger.

  2. Core-satellite Ag@BaTiO3 nanoassemblies for fabrication of polymer nanocomposites with high discharged energy density, high breakdown strength and low dielectric loss.

    PubMed

    Xie, Liyuan; Huang, Xingyi; Li, Bao-Wen; Zhi, Chunyi; Tanaka, Toshikatsu; Jiang, Pingkai

    2013-10-28

    Dielectric polymer nanocomposites with high dielectric constant have wide applications in high energy density electronic devices. The introduction of high dielectric constant ceramic nanoparticles into a polymer represents an important route to fabricate nanocomposites with high dielectric constant. However, the nanocomposites prepared by this method generally suffer from relatively low breakdown strength and high dielectric loss, which limit the further increase of energy density and energy efficiency of the nanocomposites. In this contribution, by using core-satellite structured ultra-small silver (Ag) decorated barium titanate (BT) nanoassemblies, we successfully fabricated high dielectric constant polymer nanocomposites with enhanced breakdown strength and lower dielectric loss in comparison with conventional polymer-ceramic particulate nanocomposites. The discharged energy density and energy efficiency are derived from the dielectric displacement-electric field loops of the polymer nanocomposites. It is found that, by using the core-satellite structured Ag@BT nanoassemblies as fillers, the polymer nanocomposites can not only have higher discharged energy density but also have high energy efficiency. The mechanism behind the improved electrical properties was attributed to the Coulomb blockade effect and the quantum confinement effect of the introduced ultra-small Ag nanoparticles. This study could serve as an inspiration to enhance the energy storage densities of dielectric polymer nanocomposites.

  3. Bounds on the density of sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    We derive lower bounds on the density of sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from the lack of significant clustering in the arrival directions of the highest energy events detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory. The density of uniformly distributed sources of equal intrinsic intensity was found to be larger than ∼ (0.06−5) × 10{sup −4} Mpc{sup −3} at 95% CL, depending on the magnitude of the magnetic deflections. Similar bounds, in the range (0.2−7) × 10{sup −4} Mpc{sup −3}, were obtained for sources following the local matter distribution.

  4. Carbon nanofibers with radially grown graphene sheets derived from electrospinning for aqueous supercapacitors with high working voltage and energy density.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Qiu, Yejun; Yu, Jie; Deng, Xianyu; Dai, Chenglong; Bai, Xuedong

    2013-06-07

    Improvement of energy density is an urgent task for developing advanced supercapacitors. In this paper, aqueous supercapacitors with high voltage of 1.8 V and energy density of 29.1 W h kg(-1) were fabricated based on carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and Na2SO4 electrolyte. The CNFs with radially grown graphene sheets (GSs) and small average diameter down to 11 nm were prepared by electrospinning and carbonization in NH3. The radially grown GSs contain between 1 and a few atomic layers with their edges exposed on the surface. The CNFs are doped with nitrogen and oxygen with different concentrations depending on the carbonizing temperature. The supercapacitors exhibit excellent cycling performance with the capacity retention over 93.7% after 5000 charging-discharging cycles. The unique structure, possessing radially grown GSs, small diameter, and heteroatom doping of the CNFs, and application of neutral electrolyte account for the high voltage and energy density of the present supercapacitors. The present supercapacitors are of high promise for practical application due to the high energy density and the advantages of neutral electrolyte including low cost, safety, low corrosivity, and convenient assembly in air.

  5. High-Energy-Density Fuel Blending Strategies and Drop Dispersion for Fuel Cost Reduction and Soot Propensity Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Harstad, K.

    1998-01-01

    The idea that low soot propensity of high-energy-density (HED) liquid sooting fuels and cost reduction of a multicomponent energetic fuel can be achieved by doping a less expensive, less sooting liquid fuel with HED is tested through numerical simulations.

  6. Applications of Robust, Radiation Hard AlGaN Optoelectronic Devices in Space Exploration and High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, K.

    2011-05-04

    This slide show presents: space exploration applications; high energy density physics applications; UV LED and photodiode radiation hardness; UV LED and photodiode space qualification; UV LED AC charge management; and UV LED satellite payload instruments. A UV LED satellite will be launched 2nd half 2012.

  7. Long-Range Electric Vehicle Batteries: High Energy Density Lithium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: In a battery, metal ions move between the electrodes through the electrolyte in order to store energy. Envia Systems is developing new silicon-based negative electrode materials for Li-Ion batteries. Using this technology, Envia will be able to produce commercial EV batteries that outperform today’s technology by 2-3 times. Many other programs have attempted to make anode materials based on silicon, but have not been able to produce materials that can withstand charge/discharge cycles multiple times. Envia has been able to make this material which can successfully cycle hundreds of times, on a scale that is economically viable. Today, Envia’s batteries exhibit world-record energy densities.

  8. Talbot-Lau x-ray deflectometer electron density diagnostic for laser and pulsed power high energy density plasma experiments (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Theobald, W.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.; Klein, S. R.; Muñoz-Cordovez, G.; Vescovi, M.; Valenzuela-Villaseca, V.; Veloso, F.

    2016-11-01

    Talbot-Lau X-ray deflectometry (TXD) has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density (HED) plasmas. The technique can deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single Moiré image. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer was deployed using laser and x-pinch backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping were demonstrated for 25-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using copper foil targets. Moiré pattern formation and grating survival were also observed using a copper x-pinch driven at 400 kA, ˜1 kA/ns. These results demonstrate the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas.

  9. Talbot-Lau x-ray deflectometer electron density diagnostic for laser and pulsed power high energy density plasma experiments (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Valdivia, M. P. Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Theobald, W.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.; Klein, S. R.; Muñoz-Cordovez, G.; Vescovi, M.; Valenzuela-Villaseca, V.; Veloso, F.

    2016-11-15

    Talbot-Lau X-ray deflectometry (TXD) has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density (HED) plasmas. The technique can deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single Moiré image. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer was deployed using laser and x-pinch backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping were demonstrated for 25–29 J, 8–30 ps laser pulses using copper foil targets. Moiré pattern formation and grating survival were also observed using a copper x-pinch driven at 400 kA, ∼1 kA/ns. These results demonstrate the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas.

  10. Talbot-Lau x-ray deflectometer electron density diagnostic for laser and pulsed power high energy density plasma experiments (invited).

    PubMed

    Valdivia, M P; Stutman, D; Stoeckl, C; Mileham, C; Begishev, I A; Theobald, W; Bromage, J; Regan, S P; Klein, S R; Muñoz-Cordovez, G; Vescovi, M; Valenzuela-Villaseca, V; Veloso, F

    2016-11-01

    Talbot-Lau X-ray deflectometry (TXD) has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density (HED) plasmas. The technique can deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single Moiré image. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer was deployed using laser and x-pinch backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping were demonstrated for 25-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using copper foil targets. Moiré pattern formation and grating survival were also observed using a copper x-pinch driven at 400 kA, ∼1 kA/ns. These results demonstrate the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas.

  11. Asymmetric supercapacitors based on functional electrospun carbon nanofiber/manganese oxide electrodes with high power density and energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Sheng-Chi; Lu, Yi-Ting; Chien, Yu-An; Wang, Jeng-An; You, Ting-Hsuan; Wang, Yu-Sheng; Lin, Chih-Wen; Ma, Chen-Chi M.; Hu, Chi-Chang

    2017-09-01

    Carbon nanofibers modified with carboxyl groups (CNF-COOH) possessing good wettability and high porosity are homogeneously deposited with amorphous manganese dioxide (amorphous MnO2) by potentiodynamic deposition for asymmetric super-capacitors (ASCs). The potential-cycling in 1 M H2SO4 successfully enhances the hydrophilicity of carbonized polymer nanofibers and facilitates the access of electrolytes within the CNF-COOH matrix. This modification favors the deposition of amorphous MnO2 and improves its electrochemical utilization. In this composite, MnO2 homogeneously dispersed onto CNF-COOH provides desirable pseudocapacitance and the CNF-COOH network works as the electron conductor. The composite of CNF-COOH@MnO2-20 shows a high specific capacitance of 415 F g-1 at 5 mV s-1. The capacitance retention of this composite is 94% in a 10,000-cycle test. An ASC cell consisting of this composite and activated carbon as positive and negative electrodes can be reversibly charged/discharged to a cell voltage of 2.0 V in 1 M Na2SO4 and 4 mM NaHCO3 with specific energy and power of 36.7 Wh kg-1 and 354.9 W kg-1, respectively. This ASC also shows excellent cell capacitance retention (8% decay) in the 2V, 10,000-cycle stability test, revealing superior performance.

  12. High energy density and extreme field physics in the transparent-overdense regime

    SciTech Connect

    Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel; Yin, Kin; Albright, Brian J; Bowers, Kevin J; Gautier, C; Huang, C; Jung, D; Letzring, S; Palaniyappan, S; Shah, R; Wu, H; Fernandez, J. C.; Dromey, B; Henig, A; Horlein, R; Kefer, D.; Tajima, T; Yan, X; Habs, D

    2011-01-31

    Conclusions of this report are: (1) high harmonics generated on solid surfaces are a very versatile source of intense coherent XUV radiation; (2) high harmonics can be used to probe and monitor the interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with nm-scale foil targets; (3) direct measurement of target density during relativistic interaction; (4) high harmonics generated with PW-scale short-pulse lasers could serve as unique backlighting sources for a wide range experiments; and (5) Trident can be a test bed to develop such experiments and the required instrumentation.

  13. Technological development of high energy density capacitors. [for spacecraft power supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    A study was conducted to develop cylindrical wound metallized film capacitors rated 2 micron F 500 VDC that had energy densities greater than 0.1J/g. Polysulfone (PS) and polyvinylidene (PVF2) were selected as dielectrics. Single film PS capacitors of 0.2J/g (uncased) were made of 3.75 micron material. Single film PVF2 capacitors of 0.19J/g (uncased) were made of 6.0 micron material. Corona measurements were made at room temperature, and capacitance and dissipation factor measurements were made over the ranges 25 C to 125 C and 120 Hz to 100 kHz. Nineteen of twenty PVF2 components survived a 2500 hour dc plus ac life test. Failure analyses revealed most failures occurred at wrinkles, but some edge failures were also seen. A 0.989g case was designed. When the case was combined with the PVF2 component, a finished energy density of 0.11J/g was achieved.

  14. Ground state structure of high-energy-density polymeric carbon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Kang; Sun, Jian; Pickard, Chris J.; Klug, Dennis D.; Needs, Richard J.

    2017-04-01

    Crystal structure prediction methods and first-principles calculations have been used to explore low-energy structures of carbon monoxide (CO). Contrary to the standard wisdom, the most stable structure of CO at ambient pressure was found to be a polymeric structure of P n a 21 symmetry rather than a molecular solid. This phase is formed from six-membered (four carbon + two oxygen) rings connected by C=C double bonds with two double-bonded oxygen atoms attached to each ring. Interestingly, the polymeric P n a 21 phase of CO has a much higher energy density than trinitrotoluene (TNT). On compression to about 7 GPa, P n a 21 is found to transform into another chainlike phase of C c symmetry which has similar ring units to P n a 21 . On compression to 12 GPa, it is energetically favorable for CO to polymerize into a purely single bonded C m c a phase, which is stable over a wide pressure range and transforms into the previously known C m c m phase at around 100 GPa. Thermodynamic stability of these structures was verified using calculations with different density functionals, including hybrid and van der Waals corrected functionals.

  15. Nanostructured Electrode Materials Derived from Metal-Organic Framework Xerogels for High-Energy-Density Asymmetric Supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Asif; Zou, Ruqiang; Wang, Qingfei; Xia, Wei; Tabassum, Hassina; Qiu, Bin; Zhao, Ruo

    2016-01-27

    This work successfully demonstrates metal-organic framework (MOF) derived strategy to prepare nanoporous carbon (NPC) with or without Fe3O4/Fe nanoparticles by the optimization of calcination temperature as highly active electrode materials for asymmetric supercapacitors (ASC). The nanostructured Fe3O4/Fe/C hybrid shows high specific capacitance of 600 F/g at a current density of 1 A/g and excellent capacitance retention up to 500 F/g at 8 A/g. Furthermore, hierarchically NPC with high surface area also obtained from MOF gels displays excellent electrochemical performance of 272 F/g at 2 mV/s. Considering practical applications, aqueous ASC (aASC) was also assembled, which shows high energy density of 17.496 Wh/kg at the power density of 388.8 W/kg. The high energy density and excellent capacity retention of the developed materials show great promise for the practical utilization of these energy storage devices.

  16. Understanding limiting factors in thick electrode performance as applied to high energy density Li-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Du, Zhijia; Wood, David L.; Daniel, Claus; ...

    2017-02-09

    We present that increasing electrode thickness, thus increasing the volume ratio of active materials, is one effective method to enable the development of high energy density Li-ion batteries. In this study, an energy density versus power density optimization of LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA)/graphite cell stack was conducted via mathematical modeling. The energy density was found to have a maximum point versus electrode thickness (critical thickness) at given discharging C rates. The physics-based factors that limit the energy/power density of thick electrodes were found to be increased cell polarization and underutilization of active materials. The latter is affected by Li-ion diffusion in activemore » materials and Li-ion depletion in the electrolyte phase. Based on those findings, possible approaches were derived to surmount the limiting factors. Finally, the improvement of the energy–power relationship in an 18,650 cell was used to demonstrate how to optimize the thick electrode parameters in cell engineering.« less

  17. Sandwich-structured polymer nanocomposites with high energy density and great charge–discharge efficiency at elevated temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Liu, Feihua; Yang, Tiannan; Gadinski, Matthew R.; Zhang, Guangzu; Chen, Long-Qing; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The demand for a new generation of high-temperature dielectric materials toward capacitive energy storage has been driven by the rise of high-power applications such as electric vehicles, aircraft, and pulsed power systems where the power electronics are exposed to elevated temperatures. Polymer dielectrics are characterized by being lightweight, and their scalability, mechanical flexibility, high dielectric strength, and great reliability, but they are limited to relatively low operating temperatures. The existing polymer nanocomposite-based dielectrics with a limited energy density at high temperatures also present a major barrier to achieving significant reductions in size and weight of energy devices. Here we report the sandwich structures as an efficient route to high-temperature dielectric polymer nanocomposites that simultaneously possess high dielectric constant and low dielectric loss. In contrast to the conventional single-layer configuration, the rationally designed sandwich-structured polymer nanocomposites are capable of integrating the complementary properties of spatially organized multicomponents in a synergistic fashion to raise dielectric constant, and subsequently greatly improve discharged energy densities while retaining low loss and high charge–discharge efficiency at elevated temperatures. At 150 °C and 200 MV m−1, an operating condition toward electric vehicle applications, the sandwich-structured polymer nanocomposites outperform the state-of-the-art polymer-based dielectrics in terms of energy density, power density, charge–discharge efficiency, and cyclability. The excellent dielectric and capacitive properties of the polymer nanocomposites may pave a way for widespread applications in modern electronics and power modules where harsh operating conditions are present. PMID:27551101

  18. Sandwich-structured polymer nanocomposites with high energy density and great charge-discharge efficiency at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Liu, Feihua; Yang, Tiannan; Gadinski, Matthew R; Zhang, Guangzu; Chen, Long-Qing; Wang, Qing

    2016-09-06

    The demand for a new generation of high-temperature dielectric materials toward capacitive energy storage has been driven by the rise of high-power applications such as electric vehicles, aircraft, and pulsed power systems where the power electronics are exposed to elevated temperatures. Polymer dielectrics are characterized by being lightweight, and their scalability, mechanical flexibility, high dielectric strength, and great reliability, but they are limited to relatively low operating temperatures. The existing polymer nanocomposite-based dielectrics with a limited energy density at high temperatures also present a major barrier to achieving significant reductions in size and weight of energy devices. Here we report the sandwich structures as an efficient route to high-temperature dielectric polymer nanocomposites that simultaneously possess high dielectric constant and low dielectric loss. In contrast to the conventional single-layer configuration, the rationally designed sandwich-structured polymer nanocomposites are capable of integrating the complementary properties of spatially organized multicomponents in a synergistic fashion to raise dielectric constant, and subsequently greatly improve discharged energy densities while retaining low loss and high charge-discharge efficiency at elevated temperatures. At 150 °C and 200 MV m(-1), an operating condition toward electric vehicle applications, the sandwich-structured polymer nanocomposites outperform the state-of-the-art polymer-based dielectrics in terms of energy density, power density, charge-discharge efficiency, and cyclability. The excellent dielectric and capacitive properties of the polymer nanocomposites may pave a way for widespread applications in modern electronics and power modules where harsh operating conditions are present.

  19. Validating density-functional theory simulations at high energy-density conditions with liquid krypton shock experiments to 850 GPa on Sandia's Z machine

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Thomas R.; Root, Seth; Mattsson, Ann E.; Shulenburger, Luke; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Flicker, Dawn G.

    2014-11-11

    We use Sandia's Z machine and magnetically accelerated flyer plates to shock compress liquid krypton to 850 GPa and compare with results from density-functional theory (DFT) based simulations using the AM05 functional. We also employ quantum Monte Carlo calculations to motivate the choice of AM05. We conclude that the DFT results are sensitive to the quality of the pseudopotential in terms of scattering properties at high energy/temperature. A new Kr projector augmented wave potential was constructed with improved scattering properties which resulted in excellent agreement with the experimental results to 850 GPa and temperatures above 10 eV (110 kK). In conclusion, we present comparisons of our data from the Z experiments and DFT calculations to current equation of state models of krypton to determine the best model for high energy-density applications.

  20. Validating density-functional theory simulations at high energy-density conditions with liquid krypton shock experiments to 850 GPa on Sandia's Z machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Thomas R.; Root, Seth; Mattsson, Ann E.; Shulenburger, Luke; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Flicker, Dawn G.

    2014-11-01

    We use Sandia's Z machine and magnetically accelerated flyer plates to shock compress liquid krypton to 850 GPa and compare with results from density-functional theory (DFT) based simulations using the AM05 functional. We also employ quantum Monte Carlo calculations to motivate the choice of AM05. We conclude that the DFT results are sensitive to the quality of the pseudopotential in terms of scattering properties at high energy/temperature. A new Kr projector augmented wave potential was constructed with improved scattering properties which resulted in excellent agreement with the experimental results to 850 GPa and temperatures above 10 eV (110 kK). Finally, we present comparisons of our data from the Z experiments and DFT calculations to current equation of state models of krypton to determine the best model for high energy-density applications.

  1. Validating density-functional theory simulations at high energy-density conditions with liquid krypton shock experiments to 850 GPa on Sandia's Z machine

    DOE PAGES

    Mattsson, Thomas R.; Root, Seth; Mattsson, Ann E.; ...

    2014-11-11

    We use Sandia's Z machine and magnetically accelerated flyer plates to shock compress liquid krypton to 850 GPa and compare with results from density-functional theory (DFT) based simulations using the AM05 functional. We also employ quantum Monte Carlo calculations to motivate the choice of AM05. We conclude that the DFT results are sensitive to the quality of the pseudopotential in terms of scattering properties at high energy/temperature. A new Kr projector augmented wave potential was constructed with improved scattering properties which resulted in excellent agreement with the experimental results to 850 GPa and temperatures above 10 eV (110 kK). Inmore » conclusion, we present comparisons of our data from the Z experiments and DFT calculations to current equation of state models of krypton to determine the best model for high energy-density applications.« less

  2. Characterization of high density SiPM non-linearity and energy resolution for prompt gamma imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regazzoni, V.; Acerbi, F.; Cozzi, G.; Ferri, A.; Fiorini, C.; Paternoster, G.; Piemonte, C.; Rucatti, D.; Zappalà, G.; Zorzi, N.; Gola, A.

    2017-07-01

    Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) (Trento, Italy) has recently introduced High Density (HD) and Ultra High-Density (UHD) SiPMs, featuring very small micro-cell pitch. The high cell density is a very important factor to improve the linearity of the SiPM in high-dynamic-range applications, such as the scintillation light readout in high-energy gamma-ray spectroscopy and in prompt gamma imaging for proton therapy. The energy resolution at high energies is a trade-off between the excess noise factor caused by the non-linearity of the SiPM and the photon detection efficiency of the detector. To study these effects, we developed a new setup that simulates the LYSO light emission in response to gamma photons up to 30 MeV, using a pulsed light source. We measured the non-linearity and energy resolution vs. energy of the FBK RGB-HD e RGB-UHD SiPM technologies. We considered five different cell sizes, ranging from 10 μm up to 25 μm. With the UHD technology we were able to observe a remarkable reduction of the SiPM non-linearity, less than 5% at 5 MeV with 10 μm cells, which should be compared to a non-linearity of 50% with 25 μm-cell HD-SiPMs. With the same setup, we also measured the different components of the energy resolution (intrinsic, statistical, detector and electronic noise) vs. cell size, over-voltage and energy and we separated the different sources of excess noise factor.

  3. Regenerative Polysulfide-Scavenging Layers Enabling Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with High Energy Density and Prolonged Cycling Life.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Wu, Hao Bin; Sun, Fei; Liu, Xiaoyan; Li, Fan; Le, Zaiyuan; Shen, Li; Wang, Ge; Cai, Mei; Lu, Yunfeng

    2017-03-28

    Lithium-sulfur batteries, notable for high theoretical energy density, environmental benignity, and low cost, hold great potential for next-generation energy storage. Polysulfides, the intermediates generated during cycling, may shuttle between electrodes, compromising the energy density and cycling life. We report herein a class of regenerative polysulfide-scavenging layers (RSL), which effectively immobilize and regenerate polysulfides, especially for electrodes with high sulfur loadings (e.g., 6 mg cm(-2)). The resulting cells exhibit high gravimetric energy density of 365 Wh kg(-1), initial areal capacity of 7.94 mAh cm(-2), low self-discharge rate of 2.45% after resting for 3 days, and dramatically prolonged cycling life. Such blocking effects have been thoroughly investigated and correlated with the work functions of the oxides as well as their bond energies with polysulfides. This work offers not only a class of RSL to mitigate shuttling effect but also a quantified design framework for advanced lithium-sulfur batteries.

  4. SC-CO2 assisted process for high energy density aerogel supercapacitor: the effect of GO loading.

    PubMed

    Sarno, Maria; Baldino, Lucia; Scudieri, Carmela; Cardea, Stefano; Ciambelli, Paolo; Reverchon, Ernesto

    2017-03-20

    Energy density, safety, simple and environmentally friendly preparation methods are very significant aspects in the realization of a compact supercapacitor. Herein we report the use of a supercritical CO2 assisted gel drying process (SC-CO2) for the preparation of porous electrodes containing dispersed graphene in a Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) binder membrane to sandwich in a new portable supercapacitor based on graphene oxide (GO). A GO loading of 60 wt.% has been found to give the better combination of factors (porosity, wettability, mechanical and electrochemical properties,..). Cycling voltammetry and charge/discharge studies showed an excellent capacitance behaviour and stability in a ionic liquid electrolyte, suggesting SC-CO2 processing as promising platform to produce highly bulky and porous films for supercapacitors. The supercapacitor device delivers a very high energy density of 79.2 Wh/Kg at a power density of 0.23 KW/kg (current density 0.5 A/g, specific capacitance 36.2 F/g) that steel remains 50.3 Wh/kg at a power density of 2.8 KW/kg (current density 6 A/g, specific capacitance 23.5 F/g).

  5. SC-CO2-assisted process for a high energy density aerogel supercapacitor: the effect of GO loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarno, Maria; Baldino, Lucia; Scudieri, Carmela; Cardea, Stefano; Ciambelli, Paolo; Reverchon, Ernesto

    2017-05-01

    Energy density, safety, and simple and environmentally friendly preparation methods are very significant aspects in the realization of a compact supercapacitor. Herein we report the use of a supercritical CO2-assisted gel drying process (SC-CO2) for the preparation of porous electrodes containing dispersed graphene in a poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) binder membrane to sandwich in a new portable supercapacitor based on graphene oxide (GO). A GO loading of 60 wt.% was found to give the best combination of factors (porosity, wettability, mechanical and electrochemical properties). Cycling voltammetry and charge/discharge studies showed an excellent capacitance behaviour and stability in an ionic liquid electrolyte, suggesting SC-CO2 processing as a promising platform to produce highly bulky and porous films for supercapacitors. The supercapacitor device delivers a very high energy density of 79.2 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 0.23 KW kg-1 (current density 0.5 A g-1, specific capacitance 36.2 F g-1) while that of steel remains at 50.3 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 2.8 KW kg-1 (current density 6 A g-1, specific capacitance 23.5 F g-1).

  6. Ultrathin, Lightweight, and Wearable Li-O2 Battery with High Robustness and Gravimetric/Volumetric Energy Density.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Xu, Ji-Jing; Liu, Qing-Chao; Chang, Zhi-Wen; Yin, Yan-Bin; Yang, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Xin-Bo

    2017-02-01

    An ultrathin, lightweight, and wearable Li-O2 battery with a novel segmented structure is first fabricated by employing a "break up the whole into parts" strategy. Superior battery performance including low overpotential, high specific capacity, good rate capability, excellent cycle stability, and high gravimetric/volumetric energy density (294.68 Wh kg(-1) /274.06 Wh L(-1) ) is successfully achieved even under repeatedly various deformation.

  7. Nano-sized structured layered positive electrode materials to enable high energy density and high rate capability lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Haixia; Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

    2012-10-02

    Nano-sized structured dense and spherical layered positive active materials provide high energy density and high rate capability electrodes in lithium-ion batteries. Such materials are spherical second particles made from agglomerated primary particles that are Li.sub.1+.alpha.(Ni.sub.xCo.sub.yMn.sub.z).sub.1-tM.sub.tO.sub.2-dR.sub.d- , where M is selected from can be Al, Mg, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cr, Ag, Ca, Na, K, In, Ga, Ge, V, Mo, Nb, Si, Ti, Zr, or a mixture of any two or more thereof, R is selected from F, Cl, Br, I, H, S, N, or a mixture of any two or more thereof, and 0.ltoreq..alpha..ltoreq.0.50; 0

  8. High-energy density experiments on planetary materials using high-power lasers and X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Norimasa

    2015-06-01

    Laser-driven dynamic compression allows us to investigate the behavior of planetary and exoplanetary materials at extreme conditions. Our high-energy density (HED) experiments for applications to planetary sciences began over five years ago. We measured the equation-of-state of cryogenic liquid hydrogen under laser-shock compression up to 55 GPa. Since then, various materials constituting the icy giant planets and the Earth-like planets have been studied using laser-driven dynamic compression techniques. Pressure-volume-temperature EOS data and optical property data of water and molecular mixtures were obtained at the planetary/exoplanetary interior conditions. Silicates and oxides data show interesting behaviors in the warm-dense matter regime due to their phase transformations. Most recently the structural changes of iron were observed for understanding the kinetics under the bcc-hcp transformation phenomena on a new HED science platform coupling power-lasers and the X-ray free electron laser (SACLA). This work was performed under the joint research project at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. It was partially supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Nos. 20654042, 22224012, 23540556, and 24103507) and also by grants from the Core-to-Core Program of JSPS on International Alliance for Material Science in Extreme States with High Power Laser and XFEL, and the X-ray Free Electron Laser Priority Strategy Program of MEXT.

  9. Promise and reality of post-lithium-ion batteries with high energy densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jang Wook; Aurbach, Doron

    2016-04-01

    Energy density is the main property of rechargeable batteries that has driven the entire technology forward in past decades. Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) now surpass other, previously competitive battery types (for example, lead-acid and nickel metal hydride) but still require extensive further improvement to, in particular, extend the operation hours of mobile IT devices and the driving mileages of all-electric vehicles. In this Review, we present a critical overview of a wide range of post-LIB materials and systems that could have a pivotal role in meeting such demands. We divide battery systems into two categories: near-term and long-term technologies. To provide a realistic and balanced perspective, we describe the operating principles and remaining issues of each post-LIB technology, and also evaluate these materials under commercial cell configurations.

  10. Fabrication of bulk nanostructured permanent magnets with high energy density: challenges and approaches.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ming; Zhang, Xiangyi; Liu, J Ping

    2017-03-17

    Nanostructured permanent magnetic materials, including exchange-coupled nanocomposite permanent magnets, are considered as the next generation of high-strength magnets for future applications in energy-saving and renewable energy technologies. However, fabrication of bulk nanostructured magnets remains very challenging because conventional compaction and sintering techniques cannot be used for nanostructured bulk material processing. In this paper we review recent efforts at producing bulk nanostructured single-phase and composite magnetic materials with emphasis on grain size control, anisotropy generation and interface modification.

  11. Flexible Aqueous Lithium-Ion Battery with High Safety and Large Volumetric Energy Density.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoli; Chen, Long; Su, Xiuli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-06-20

    A flexible and wearable aqueous lithium-ion battery is introduced based on spinel Li1.1 Mn2 O4 cathode and a carbon-coated NASICON-type LiTi2 (PO4 )3 anode (NASICON=sodium-ion super ionic conductor). Energy densities of 63 Wh kg(-1) or 124 mWh cm(-3) and power densities of 3 275 W kg(-1) or 11.1 W cm(-3) can be obtained, which are seven times larger than the largest reported till now. The full cell can keep its capacity without significant loss under different bending states, which shows excellent flexibility. Furthermore, two such flexible cells in series with an operation voltage of 4 V can be compatible with current nonaqueous Li-ion batteries. Therefore, such a flexible cell can potentially be put into practical applications for wearable electronics. In addition, a self-chargeable unit is realized by integrating a single flexible aqueous Li-ion battery with a commercial flexible solar cell, which may facilitate the long-time outdoor operation of flexible and wearable electronic devices.

  12. Improvement of vibration energy harvesters mechanical Q-factor through high density proof mass integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dompierre, A.; Fréchette, L. G.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports on improvement of the mechanical Q-factor of resonant energy harvesters at ambient pressure via the use of tungsten proof masses by evaluating the impact of the mass size and density on the squeeze film damping. To this end, a simplified model is first proposed to evaluate cantilever beams deflection and the resulting fluid pressure build up between the mass and a near surface. The model, which accounts for simultaneous transverse and rotational motion of very long tip masses as well as for 2D fluid flow in the gap, is used to extract a scaling law for the device fluidic Q-factor Qf. This law states that Qf can be improved by either increasing the linear mass density of the tip mass or by reducing the side lengths compared to the gap height. The first approach is validated experimentally by adding a tungsten proof mass on a silicon based device and observing an improvement of the Q-factor by 103%, going from 430 to 871, while the resonance frequency drops from 457 to 127 Hz. In terms of fluidic Q-factor, this represents an increase from 562 to 1673. These results successfully demonstrate the benefits of integrating a tungsten mass to reduce the fluid losses while potentially reducing the device footprint.

  13. High Energy Density Lithium-Sulfur Batteries: Challenges of Thick Sulfur Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Dongping; Zheng, Jianming; Li, Qiuyan; Xie, Xi; Ferrara, Seth A.; Nie, Zimin; Mehdi, Beata L.; Browning, Nigel D.; Zhang, Jiguang; Graff, Gordon L.; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-08-19

    High energy and cost-effective lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery technology has been vigorously revisited in recent years due to the urgent need of advanced energy storage technologies for transportation and large-scale energy storage applications. However, the market penetration of Li-S batteries has been plagued due to the gap in scientific knowledge between the fundamental research and the real application need. Herein, we focus on the cathode part of the Li-S system and discuss 1) the progress and issues of literature-reported sulfur cathode; 2) how to employ materials chemistry/science to address the challenges to thicken sulfur cathode; 3) the factors that affect the electrochemical performances of Li-S cells constructed at a relevant scale. This progress report attempts to tie the fundamental understanding closely to the practical application of Li-S batteries so that it may provide new insights for the research efforts of Li-S battery technology.

  14. Chemical mechanistic approaches for the suppression of soot formation in the combustion of high energy density fuels. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.J.

    1996-09-01

    Significant advantages can be gained by the use of high energy density fuels in volume limited applications. However, excessive soot formation that accompanies the combustion of these fuels presently limits their application. Fuel additive approaches prove attractive as they require minimal modifications to already existing equipment. In the present study, a variety of flame configurations were used to study the additive effects on soot formation. Through tests conducted on laminar diffusion flames carbon disulfide (CS2) and methanol (CH3OH) were found to be the most effective soot suppressants. Chemical interaction by either additive was found to far surpass the physical influences. However, the exact nature of the chemical action could not be established with the current set of experiments. Additionally, both of these additives were found to reduce soot formation in at least one high energy density fuel - quadricyclane (C7H8). To further validate this approach, studies were conducted using droplet flames and high-pressure spray flames.

  15. High energy density and breakdown strength from β and γ phases in poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-bromotrifluoroethylene) copolymers.

    PubMed

    Gadinski, Matthew R; Han, Kuo; Li, Qi; Zhang, Guangzu; Reainthippayasakul, Wuttiichai; Wang, Qing

    2014-11-12

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) PVDF-based copolymers represent the state of the art dielectric polymers for high energy density capacitors. Past work on these copolymers has been done with limited emphasis on the effects of copolymer composition and with a limited range of defect monomers, focusing primarily on the commercially available poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene), P(VDF-CTFE), and poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene), P(VDF-HFP), and the processing thereof. To expand on this area of research, copolymers of VDF and bromotrifluoroethylene (BTFE) were synthesized examining the composition range where uniaxial stretching was possible. It is found that P(VDF-BTFE) copolymers with small BTFE contents (< 2 mol %) stabilize the γ phase, compared to P(VDF-CTFE)s and P(VDF-HFP)s that are largely α phase in composition. Furthermore, different from P(VDF-CTFE)s and P(VDF-HFP)s, whose energy storage capabilities depend on the reversibility of the α to β phases transformation, high discharged energy densities (i.e., 20.8 J/cm(3) at 716 MV/m) are also achievable through the β and γ phases in P(VDF-BTFE)s without significantly reducing crystallinity and breakdown strength. This study demonstrates new avenues to the development of high energy density ferroelectric copolymers via manipulation of the γ phase through variation of the structure and content of comonomers.

  16. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and High Energy Density Science Research at LLNL (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-21

    enable exciting new opportunities for scientific discovery 2 • “Science on (NIF, Omega, Jupiter , Z,…) science is more than HED science” 1492...Japan) UFL-2M (Russia) NIF Laser 1494 The NIF and Jupiter lasers are the primary HED facilities at LLNL 5 NIF Large-scale facility for high energy...applications Jupiter “Intermediate scale” facility ideal for student training 1495 6 1496 Jupiter has operated as a user facility since 2008

  17. A chemistry and material perspective on lithium redox flow batteries towards high-density electrical energy storage.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Ding, Yu; Li, Yutao; Peng, Lele; Byon, Hye Ryung; Goodenough, John B; Yu, Guihua

    2015-11-21

    Electrical energy storage system such as secondary batteries is the principle power source for portable electronics, electric vehicles and stationary energy storage. As an emerging battery technology, Li-redox flow batteries inherit the advantageous features of modular design of conventional redox flow batteries and high voltage and energy efficiency of Li-ion batteries, showing great promise as efficient electrical energy storage system in transportation, commercial, and residential applications. The chemistry of lithium redox flow batteries with aqueous or non-aqueous electrolyte enables widened electrochemical potential window thus may provide much greater energy density and efficiency than conventional redox flow batteries based on proton chemistry. This Review summarizes the design rationale, fundamentals and characterization of Li-redox flow batteries from a chemistry and material perspective, with particular emphasis on the new chemistries and materials. The latest advances and associated challenges/opportunities are comprehensively discussed.

  18. Biredox ionic liquids with solid-like redox density in the liquid state for high-energy supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourad, Eléonore; Coustan, Laura; Lannelongue, Pierre; Zigah, Dodzi; Mehdi, Ahmad; Vioux, André; Freunberger, Stefan A.; Favier, Frédéric; Fontaine, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Kinetics of electrochemical reactions are several orders of magnitude slower in solids than in liquids as a result of the much lower ion diffusivity. Yet, the solid state maximizes the density of redox species, which is at least two orders of magnitude lower in liquids because of solubility limitations. With regard to electrochemical energy storage devices, this leads to high-energy batteries with limited power and high-power supercapacitors with a well-known energy deficiency. For such devices the ideal system should endow the liquid state with a density of redox species close to the solid state. Here we report an approach based on biredox ionic liquids to achieve bulk-like redox density at liquid-like fast kinetics. The cation and anion of these biredox ionic liquids bear moieties that undergo very fast reversible redox reactions. As a first demonstration of their potential for high-capacity/high-rate charge storage, we used them in redox supercapacitors. These ionic liquids are able to decouple charge storage from an ion-accessible electrode surface, by storing significant charge in the pores of the electrodes, to minimize self-discharge and leakage current as a result of retaining the redox species in the pores, and to raise working voltage due to their wide electrochemical window.

  19. Infrared-actuated recovery of polyurethane filled by reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotube hybrids with high energy density.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yiyu; Qin, Mengmeng; Guo, Haiqiang; Yoshino, Katsumi; Feng, Wei

    2013-11-13

    Optically actuated shape recovery materials receive much interest because of their great ability to control the creation of mechanical motion remotely and precisely. An infrared (IR) triggered actuator based on shape recovery was fabricated using polyurethane (TPU) incorporated by sulfonated reduced graphene oxide (SRGO)/sulfonated carbon nanotube (SCNT) hybrid nanofillers. Interconnected SRGO/SCNT hybrid nanofillers at a low weight loading of 1% dispersed in TPU showed good IR absorption and improved the crystallization of soft segments for a large shape deformation. The output force, energy density and recovery time of IR-triggered actuators were dependent on weight ratios of SRGO to SCNT (SRGO:SCNT). TPU nanocomposites filled by a hybrid nanofiller with SRGO:SCNT of 3:1 showed the maximum IR-actuated stress recovery of lifting a 107.6 g weight up 4.7 cm in 18 s. The stress recovery delivered a high energy density of 0.63 J/g and shape recovery force up to 1.2 MPa due to high thermal conductivity (1.473 W/mK) and Young's modulus of 23.4 MPa. Results indicate that a trade-off between the stiffness and efficient heat transfer controlled by synergistic effect between SRGO and SCNT is critical for high mechanical power output of IR-triggered actuators. IR-actuated shape recovery of SRGO/SCNT/TPU nanocomposites combining high energy density and output forces can be further developed for advanced optomechanical systems.

  20. Biredox ionic liquids with solid-like redox density in the liquid state for high-energy supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Eléonore; Coustan, Laura; Lannelongue, Pierre; Zigah, Dodzi; Mehdi, Ahmad; Vioux, André; Freunberger, Stefan A; Favier, Frédéric; Fontaine, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Kinetics of electrochemical reactions are several orders of magnitude slower in solids than in liquids as a result of the much lower ion diffusivity. Yet, the solid state maximizes the density of redox species, which is at least two orders of magnitude lower in liquids because of solubility limitations. With regard to electrochemical energy storage devices, this leads to high-energy batteries with limited power and high-power supercapacitors with a well-known energy deficiency. For such devices the ideal system should endow the liquid state with a density of redox species close to the solid state. Here we report an approach based on biredox ionic liquids to achieve bulk-like redox density at liquid-like fast kinetics. The cation and anion of these biredox ionic liquids bear moieties that undergo very fast reversible redox reactions. As a first demonstration of their potential for high-capacity/high-rate charge storage, we used them in redox supercapacitors. These ionic liquids are able to decouple charge storage from an ion-accessible electrode surface, by storing significant charge in the pores of the electrodes, to minimize self-discharge and leakage current as a result of retaining the redox species in the pores, and to raise working voltage due to their wide electrochemical window.