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Sample records for high fracture toughness

  1. Nanostructured diamond-TiC composites with high fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haikuo; He, Duanwei; Xu, Chao; Tang, Mingjun; Li, Yu; Dong, Haini; Meng, Chuanmin; Wang, Zhigang; Zhu, Wenjun

    2013-01-01

    We report the preparation of nanostructured diamond-TiC composites with high fracture toughness and high hardness starting from a ball-milled mixture of nano-sized Ti3SiC2 and submicron-sized diamond by simultaneously tuning the pressure-temperature conditions. The phase segregation of Ti3SiC2 at pressure of 5.5 GPa were investigated by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, we found that the Ti3SiC2 could decompose into nanosized TiC and amorphous Ti-Si at 600-700 °C. The subsequent reaction between diamond and Ti-Si led to an amorphous Ti-Si-C matrix in which diamond and TiC crystals are embedded. With a loading force of 98 N, the measured fracture toughness KIC and Vicker's hardness HV of the synthesized composites reach up to 14 MPa m1/2 and 45.5 GPa, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the nanocrystalline/amorphous bonding matrix could largely enhance the toughness of the brittle composites.

  2. Effect of high temperature fatigue on the fracture toughness of a nickel-base alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.K.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to investigate the effect of cyclic loading at high temperature on the fracture toughness of a precipitate hardened alloy. A ..gamma..' precipitate hardened Inconcel X-750 alloy was chosen because of its importance in practical applications as well as its relatively well defined microstructure compared to other superalloys. This paper presents a study of the variation of the relative fracture toughness of this alloy during continuous and hold-time fatigue at 973/sup 0/K.

  3. Fracture toughness of partially welded joints of SUS316 in high magnetic field at 4K

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, A.; Yamamoto, J.; Motojima, O.

    1997-06-01

    Two kinds of partially welded austenitic stainless steel joints were prepared using SUS 316, 75 mm thick. One joint was fabricated using tungsten inert gas welding and metal arc gas welding, and the other was electron beam welded. Compact tension specimens for fracture toughness tests were machined out from these welded plates in the thickness direction. The fracture toughness tests of these specimens with natural cracks were carried out in 0, 8, and 14 T fields at 4 K. The test results show that there is no strong effect of the high magnetic field on the fracture toughness of these joints, and the electron beam welded joints give a very low toughness in any case because of the complicated natural crack front shape.

  4. Process development for 9Cr nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) with high fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hoelzer, David T.; Lee, Yong Bok; Kang, Suk Hoon; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-06-01

    This article is to summarize the process development and key characterization results for the newly-developed Fe-9Cr based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) with high fracture toughness. One of the major drawbacks from pursuing ultra-high strength in the past development of NFAs is poor fracture toughness at high temperatures although a high fracture toughness is essential to prevent cracking during manufacturing and to mitigate or delay irradiation-induced embrittlement in irradiation environments. A study on fracture mechanism using the NFA 14YWT found that the low-energy grain boundary decohesion in fracture process at a high temperature (>200 °C) resulted in low fracture toughness. Lately, efforts have been devoted to explore an integrated process to enhance grain bonding. Two base materials were produced through mechanical milling and hot extrusion and designated as 9YWTV-PM1 and 9YWTV-PM2. Isothermal annealing (IA) and controlled rolling (CR) treatments in two phase region were used to enhance diffusion across the interfaces and boundaries. The PM2 alloy after CR treatments showed high fracture toughness (KJQ) at represented temperatures: 240-280 MPa √m at room temperature and 160-220 MPa √m at 500 °C, which indicates that the goal of 100 MPa √m over possible nuclear application temperature range has been well achieved. Furthermore, it is also confirmed by comparison that the CR treatments on 9YWTV-PM2 result in high fracture toughness similar to or higher than those of the conventional ferritic-martensitic steels such as HT9 and NF616.

  5. Tensile toughness test and high temperature fracture analysis of thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, G.; Nakamura, T.; Berndt, C.C.; Leigh, S.H.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper, an effective fracture toughness test which uses interface fracture mechanics theory is introduced. This method is ideally suited for determining fracture resistance of multilayered thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) consisting of ceramic and bond layers and, unlike other fracture experiments, requires minimal set-up over a simple tensile adhesion test. Furthermore, while other test methods usually use edge cracked specimens, the present test models a crack embedded within the coatings, which is more consistent with actual TBCs where failure initiates from internal voids or defects. The results of combined computational and experimental analysis show that any defects located within the ceramic coating can significantly weaken a TBC, whereas the debonding resistances of the bond coating and its interfaces are found to be much higher. In a separate analysis, the authors have studied fracture behavior of TBCs subjected to thermal loading in a high temperature environment. The computed fracture parameters reveal that when the embedded crack size is on order of the coating thickness, the fracture driving force is comparable to the fracture resistance of the coating found in the toughness test. In addition, the major driving force for fracture derives from the thermal insulating effect across the crack faces rather than the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion. The authors have also investigated the effects of functionally graded material (FGM) within TBCs and found its influences on the fracture parameters to be small. This result implies that the FGM may not contribute toward enhancing the fracture toughness of the TBCs considered here.

  6. Fracture toughness of graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Ma, Lulu; Fan, Feifei; Zeng, Zhi; Peng, Cheng; Loya, Phillip E; Liu, Zheng; Gong, Yongji; Zhang, Jiangnan; Zhang, Xingxiang; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Zhu, Ting; Lou, Jun

    2014-04-29

    Perfect graphene is believed to be the strongest material. However, the useful strength of large-area graphene with engineering relevance is usually determined by its fracture toughness, rather than the intrinsic strength that governs a uniform breaking of atomic bonds in perfect graphene. To date, the fracture toughness of graphene has not been measured. Here we report an in situ tensile testing of suspended graphene using a nanomechanical device in a scanning electron microscope. During tensile loading, the pre-cracked graphene sample fractures in a brittle manner with sharp edges, at a breaking stress substantially lower than the intrinsic strength of graphene. Our combined experiment and modelling verify the applicability of the classic Griffith theory of brittle fracture to graphene. The fracture toughness of graphene is measured as the critical stress intensity factor of and the equivalent critical strain energy release rate of 15.9 J m(-2). Our work quantifies the essential fracture properties of graphene and provides mechanistic insights into the mechanical failure of graphene.

  7. Fracture toughness measurements on a glass bonded sodalite high-level waste form.

    SciTech Connect

    DiSanto, T.; Goff, K. M.; Johnson, S. G.; O'Holleran, T. P.

    1999-05-19

    The electrometallurgical treatment of metallic spent nuclear fuel produces two high-level waste streams; cladding hulls and chloride salt. Argonne National Laboratory is developing a glass bonded sodalite waste form to immobilize the salt waste stream. The waste form consists of 75 Vol.% crystalline sodalite (containing the salt) with 25 Vol.% of an ''intergranular'' glassy phase. Microindentation fracture toughness measurements were performed on representative samples of this material using a Vickers indenter. Palmqvist cracking was confirmed by post-indentation polishing of a test sample. Young's modulus was measured by an acoustic technique. Fracture toughness, microhardness, and Young's modulus values are reported, along with results from scanning electron microscopy studies.

  8. High temperature fracture toughness of single crystal yttrium-aluminium garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, W.R.; Taylor, S.T.

    1997-07-01

    Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YAG) is the most creep-resistant single crystal oxide known and is therefore an attractive candidate for very high temperature applications. The fracture toughness, K{sub 1c}, was measured as a function of temperature using the single edge precracked beam (SEPB) method and was compared to notched beam method results in the literature. The fracture toughness of annealed SEPB specimens was found to be independent of both temperature from 20 C to at least 1,700 C and loading rate over two orders of magnitude. Thus the brittle-to-ductile transition does not occur before 1,700 C. Previous reports of remarkable increases in the fracture toughness below 1,700 C using notched beam methods are considered erroneous due to microcrack healing and crack blunting effects. The SEPB fracture toughness method avoids these problems since a long, sharp crack exists in the specimen prior to testing and can be effectively preserved at high temperatures using a preloading procedure.

  9. Hydrogen fracture toughness tester completion

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Michael J.

    2015-09-30

    The Hydrogen Fracture Toughness Tester (HFTT) is a mechanical testing machine designed for conducting fracture mechanics tests on materials in high-pressure hydrogen gas. The tester is needed for evaluating the effects of hydrogen on the cracking properties of tritium reservoir materials. It consists of an Instron Model 8862 Electromechanical Test Frame; an Autoclave Engineering Pressure Vessel, an Electric Potential Drop Crack Length Measurement System, associated computer control and data acquisition systems, and a high-pressure hydrogen gas manifold and handling system.

  10. Fracture toughness of anisotropic graphites

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.R.; Kehne, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    Fracture toughness measurements have been made at 0, 30, 45, 60, and 90/sup 0/ from the extrusion axis on a reasonably anisotropic graphite, grade AGOT. It was found that the fracture toughness did not vary appreciably with orientation. An observed variation in strength was found to be the result of defect orientation.

  11. Irradiation dose and temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high dose HT9 steel from the fuel duct of FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2013-01-14

    To expand the knowledge base for fast reactor core materials, fracture toughness has been evaluated for high dose HT9 steel using miniature disk compact tension (DCT) specimens. The HT9 steel DCT specimens were machined from the ACO-3 fuel duct of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), which achieved high doses in the range of 3–148 dpa at 378–504 C. The static fracture resistance (J-R) tests have been performed in a servohydraulic testing machine in vacuum at selected temperatures including room temperature, 200 C, and each irradiation temperature. Brittle fracture with a low toughness less than 50 MPa pm occurred in room temperature tests when irradiation temperature was below 400 C, while ductile fracture with stable crack growth was observed when irradiation temperature was higher. No fracture toughness less than 100 MPa pm was measured when the irradiation temperature was above 430 C. It was shown that the influence of irradiation temperature was dominant in fracture toughness while the irradiation dose has only limited influence over the wide dose range 3–148 dpa. A slow decrease of fracture toughness with test temperature above room temperature was observed for the nonirradiated and high temperature (>430 *C) irradiation cases, which indicates that the ductile–brittle transition temperatures (DBTTs) in those conditions are lower than room temperature. A comparison with the collection of existing data confirmed the dominance of irradiation temperature in the fracture toughness of HT9 steels.

  12. Thermal annealing recovery of fracture toughness in HT9 steel after irradation to high doses

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Anderoglu, Osman; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2013-08-03

    The HT9 ferritic/martensitic steel with a nominal chemistry of Fe(bal.)–12%Cr–1%MoVW has been used as a primary core material for fast fission reactors such as FFTF because of its high resistance to radiationinduced swelling and embrittlement. Both static and dynamic fracture test results have shown that the HT9 steel can become brittle when it is exposed to high dose irradiation at a relatively low temperature 430 °C). This article aims at a comprehensive discussion on the thermal annealing recovery of fracture toughness in the HT9 steel after irradiation up to 3–148 dpa at 378–504 °C. A specimen reuse technique has been established and applied to this study: the fracture specimens were tested Charpy specimens or broken halves of Charpy bars (13 3 4 mm). The post-anneal fracture test results indicated that much of the radiation-induced damage can be recovered by a simple thermal annealing schedule: the fracture toughness was incompletely recovered by 550 °C annealing, while nearly complete or complete recovery occurred after 650 °C annealing. This indicates that thermal annealing is a feasible damage mitigation technique for the reactor components made of HT9 steel. The partial recovery is probably due to the non-removable microstructural damages such as void or gas bubble formation, elemental segregation and precipitation.

  13. On the quantitative measurement of fracture toughness in high explosive and mock materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cheng; Cady, Carl M; Rae, Philip J; Lovato, Manuel L

    2010-01-01

    Two approaches in measuring the fracture toughness of heterogeneous high explosives and their mocks are explored in this investigation. One is the global measurement according to the ASTM E 1820-06 standard, which is primarily developed for metallic materials to obtain quantitative measurement of parameters such as the stress intensity factor, the J-integral, and the crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD). The second approach is based on local measurements using digital image correlation (DIC). Detailed results and comparisons of the two strategies will be presented for the Mock 900-21, a mechanical simulant of the PBX 9501 high explosive. Cracking is the most dominant mechanical failure mechanism in high explosives (HE) and a key parameter for describing and predicting crack initiation and extension is the fracture toughness. Quantitative measurement of such material property poses challenges, and this is mainly because that the material is highly heterogeneous with a very complicated microstructure and the contrast of the mechanical properties of the constituents is also remarkably high. In this investigation, we explore two strategies in measuring the fracture toughness of heterogeneous high explosives and their mocks. The first approach is based on the global measurement according to the ASTM E 1820-06 standard, which is primarily developed for metallic materials to obtain quantitative measurement of parameters such as the stress intensity factor, the J-integral, and the crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD). However, there are difficulties in applying the ASTM standard on energetic solids that include identifying the moment of crack initiation and pinpointing exact crack length at each instant of time. The second approach is based on local measurements. We developed a technique for quantitatively identifying the location and extent of macroscopic cracks in heterogeneous high explosive and mock material. By combining such a technique with the displacement field

  14. Test-Free Fracture Toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Computational simulation results can give the prediction of damage growth and progression and fracture toughness of composite structures. The experimental data from literature provide environmental effects on the fracture behavior of metallic or fiber composite structures. However, the traditional experimental methods to analyze the influence of the imposed conditions are expensive and time consuming. This research used the CODSTRAN code to model the temperature effects, scaling effects and the loading effects of fiberbraided composite specimens with and without fiber-optic sensors on the damage initiation and energy release rates. The load-displacement relationship and fracture toughness assessment approach is compared with the test results from literature and it is verified that the computational simulation, with the use of established material modeling and finite element modules, adequately tracks the changes of fracture toughness and subsequent fracture propagation for any fiberbraided composite structure due to the change of fiber orientations, presence of large diameter optical fibers, and any loading conditions.

  15. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3–145 dpa at 380–503 degrees*C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm *3mm* 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 *degreesC, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180—200 MPa*m^.5 at 350–450 degrees*C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature >430 degrees*C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 *degreesC and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  16. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, S; Toloczko, M

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3 145 dpa at 380 503 C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm 3mm 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180 200 MPa ffiffiffiffiffi m p at 350 450 C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperatureP430 C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 C and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  17. Observation of crack tip vicinity by the high-speed camera and research on dynamic fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinose, Kensuke; Moriwaki, Fumitaka; Gomi, Kenji

    2002-11-01

    In this paper, plastic region growing process which appeared in crack tip was visualized by stretcher strain, and it was observed using high-speed camera. Then, the fracture toughness value was calculated from the largest plastic region size. It was assumed that the relation equal to the case in which it is static under dynamic load was established, and we carried out dynamic experiment. The dynamic load was measured using piezo load-cell which is difficult to receive the effect of stress wave, the fracture toughness value was decided by the strain gauge method. For comparison, we also carried out static experiment comply ASTM E399-90. Then, the relationship between fracture toughness value calculated from the maximum load and it calculated from the largest plastic region size was investigated.

  18. On the fracture toughness of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-11-24

    Few engineering materials are limited by their strength; rather they are limited by their resistance to fracture or fracture toughness. It is not by accident that most critical structures, such as bridges, ships, nuclear pressure vessels and so forth, are manufactured from materials that are comparatively low in strength but high in toughness. Indeed, in many classes of materials, strength and toughness are almost mutually exclusive. In the first instance, such resistance to fracture is a function of bonding and crystal structure (or lack thereof), but can be developed through the design of appropriate nano/microstructures. However, the creation of tough microstructures in structural materials, i.e., metals, polymers, ceramics and their composites, is invariably a compromise between resistance to intrinsic damage mechanisms ahead of the tip of a crack (intrinsic toughening) and the formation of crack-tip shielding mechanisms which principally act behind the tip to reduce the effective 'crack-driving force' (extrinsic toughening). Intrinsic toughening is essentially an inherent property of a specific microstructure; it is the dominant form of toughening in ductile (e.g., metallic) materials. However, for most brittle (e.g., ceramic) solids, and this includes many biological materials, it is largely ineffective and toughening conversely must be developed extrinsically, by such shielding mechanisms as crack bridging. From a fracture mechanics perspective, this results in toughening in the form of rising resistance-curve behavior where the fracture resistance actually increases with crack extension. The implication of this is that in many biological and high-strength advanced materials, toughness is developed primarily during crack growth and not for crack initiation. This is an important realization yet is still rarely reflected in the way that toughness is measured, which is invariably involves the use of single-value (crack-initiation) parameters such as the

  19. Test-Free Fracture Toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Computational simulation results can give the prediction of damage growth and progression and fracture toughness of composite structures. The experimental data from literature provide environmental effects on the fracture behavior of metallic or fiber composite structures. However, the traditional experimental methods to analyze the influence of the imposed conditions are expensive and time consuming. This research used the CODSTRAN code to model the temperature effects, scaling effects and the loading effects of fiber/braided composite specimens with and without fiber-optic sensors on the damage initiation and energy release rates. The load-displacement relationship and fracture toughness assessment approach is compared with the test results from literature and it is verified that the computational simulation, with the use of established material modeling and finite element modules, adequately tracks the changes of fracture toughness and subsequent fracture propagation for any fiber/braided composite structure due to the change of fiber orientations, presence of large diameter optical fibers, and any loading conditions.

  20. Fracture toughness of Antrim shale

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Mubeen, A.

    1980-05-01

    Fracture toughness of Antrim shale cores from Dow Chemical's Sanilac County test site in Michigan were measured by the burst test method developed by Clifton et al. (1976). These tests were conducted to establish a preliminary data base to be used for the designing of a bed preparation method and prediction of rock fracture behavior under various loading conditions such as explosives and hydraulic fracturing for in-situ processing of oil shale. The test method was chosen because the thick-walled cylinder provides a loading and specimen configuration similar to in-situ hydraulic fracturing operations and the specimens can be conveniently prepared from diamond drill cores for laboratory tests. Further, the nature of variation of crack tip stress intensity in this specimen is such that K/sub IC/ does not depend on initial crack length, and crack propagation need not be monitored. The test results show that the fracture toughness of typical Antrim shale core range from 930 to 1080 psi ..sqrt..in. while the limestone specimens, a basement rock, range from 1240 to 1430 psi ..sqrt..in. These values are close to that of lean Western oil shale from Anvil point, Colorado (Schmidt, 1977), i.e., 980 psi ..sqrt..in.

  1. Fracture toughness shifts in high-copper weldments (series 5 and 6)

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.

    1995-10-01

    The specific activities to be performed in this task are the: (1) continuation of Phase 2 of the Fifth Irradiation Series, and (2) completion of the Sixth Irradiation Series, including testing nine irradiated Italian crack-arrest specimens. The test results of the Italian crack-arrest specimens are being analyzed, and full details will be published in a NUREG report currently in preparation. The crack-mouth opening displacement (CMOD) was measured at a distance greater than that prescribed in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) {open_quotes}Test for Determining Plane-Strain Crack-Arrest Fracture Toughness, K{sub la}, of Ferritic Steels{close_quotes} (E 1221-88). A method for adjusting the CMOD to account for this has been developed and is presented. The correction was {approximately}4% for small specimens and {approximately}2% for the larger ones. As part of this task, irradiation of HSSI weld 73W to a high fluence [5 x 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} ( > 1 MeV)] will be performed to determine whether the K{sub Jc} curve shape change observed in the Fifth HSSI Series is exacerbated. The design and fabrication of the temperature and dosimetry verification capsules are performed under this task, but for purposes of continuity, their progress will be reported under Task 6, where the design of the new irradiation facilities and capsules is performed.

  2. Fracture toughness testing of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    1992-01-01

    A review of the interlaminar fracture indicates that a standard specimen geometry is needed to obtain consistent fracture toughness measurements in polymer matrix composites. In general, the variability of measured toughness values increases as the toughness of the material increases. This variability could be caused by incorrect sizing of test specimens and/or inconsistent data reduction procedures. A standard data reduction procedure is therefore needed as well, particularly for the tougher materials. Little work has been reported on the effects of fiber orientation, fiber architecture, fiber surface treatment or interlaminar fracture toughness, and the mechanisms by which the fibers increase fracture toughness are not well understood. The little data that is available indicates that woven fiber reinforcement and fiber sizings can significantly increase interlaminar fracture toughness.

  3. Fracture toughness evaluation of high-strength cold-drawn eutectoid steel wires used in wire ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourladian, Bamdad

    High carbon (eutectoid) steel wires are used in many modern engineering applications which require high strength and durability. The most demanding applications are those for wire ropes, tire reinforcements, engine valve springs, and structural strands used for long span cable stayed bridges. In this study, a test method based on Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) was used to evaluate fracture toughness, KC, for various grades of wire which were of 0.072″ nominal diameter. An extensive review of literature on mechanical behavior of wire ropes is presented. Also a very thorough review of technical literature on the applications of LEFM in high strength rods and wires is provided. Various stress intensity factor solutions (K-solutions) are evaluated and compared. The most applicable K-solutions for application in KC determination in circular rods and wires with semi-elliptical surface cracks are recommended. Plane-stress K-solutions for straight-edge surface cracks in 0.072″ diameter steel wire were also developed by a 3D FEA model. An experimental fracture toughness test procedure based on principles of LEFM is described in detail. Experimental tensile fracture data is presented for 285 pre-cracked fracture samples. SEM fractographs documenting fracture surface topography of various fracture modes are described and characterized. For each wire grade and condition an average value of KC was determined. Statistical treatment of data and 90% confidence intervals are also provided. Average KC values ranged from 52Ksiin to 60Ksiin for wires ranging in tensile strength from 289 Ksi to 336 Ksi. Delamination toughening phenomenon was observed in some wire fracture samples and documented. As high as 60% increase in KC value was observed for some delaminated wires. The effect of crack aspect ratio in semi-elliptical cracks was considered and found to be very significant.

  4. Interlaminar fracture toughness of thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, J. A.; Johnston, N. J.; Obrien, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Edge delamination tension and double cantilever beam tests were used to characterize the interlaminar fracture toughness of continuous graphite-fiber composites made from experimental thermoplastic polyimides and a model thermoplastic. Residual thermal stresses, known to be significant in materials processed at high temperatures, were included in the edge delamination calculations. In the model thermoplastic system (polycarbonate matrix), surface properties of the graphite fiber were shown to be significant. Critical strain energy release rates for two different fibers having similar nominal tensile properties differed by 30 to 60 percent. The reason for the difference is not clear. Interlaminar toughness values for the thermoplastic polyimide composites (LARC-TPI and polyimidesulfone) were 3 to 4 in-lb/sq in. Scanning electron micrographs of the EDT fracture surfaces suggest poor fiber/matrix bonding. Residual thermal stresses account for up to 32 percent of the strain energy release in composites made from these high-temperature resins.

  5. Fracture toughness of hot-pressed beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemon, D. D.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the fracture toughness, sustained-load flaw growth, and fatigue-crack propagation resistance of S200E hot-pressed beryllium at room temperature. It also reviews the literature pertaining to the influence of various factors on the fracture toughness of hot-pressed beryllium determined using fatigue-cracked specimens.

  6. Veins Improve Fracture Toughness of Insect Wings

    PubMed Central

    Dirks, Jan-Henning; Taylor, David

    2012-01-01

    During the lifetime of a flying insect, its wings are subjected to mechanical forces and deformations for millions of cycles. Defects in the micrometre thin membranes or veins may reduce the insect’s flight performance. How do insects prevent crack related material failure in their wings and what role does the characteristic vein pattern play? Fracture toughness is a parameter, which characterises a material’s resistance to crack propagation. Our results show that, compared to other body parts, the hind wing membrane of the migratory locust S. gregaria itself is not exceptionally tough (1.04±0.25 MPa√m). However, the cross veins increase the wing’s toughness by 50% by acting as barriers to crack propagation. Using fracture mechanics, we show that the morphological spacing of most wing veins matches the critical crack length of the material (1132 µm). This finding directly demonstrates how the biomechanical properties and the morphology of locust wings are functionally correlated in locusts, providing a mechanically ‘optimal’ solution with high toughness and low weight. The vein pattern found in insect wings thus might inspire the design of more durable and lightweight artificial ‘venous’ wings for micro-air-vehicles. Using the vein spacing as indicator, our approach might also provide a basis to estimate the wing properties of endangered or extinct insect species. PMID:22927966

  7. Veins improve fracture toughness of insect wings.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Jan-Henning; Taylor, David

    2012-01-01

    During the lifetime of a flying insect, its wings are subjected to mechanical forces and deformations for millions of cycles. Defects in the micrometre thin membranes or veins may reduce the insect's flight performance. How do insects prevent crack related material failure in their wings and what role does the characteristic vein pattern play? Fracture toughness is a parameter, which characterises a material's resistance to crack propagation. Our results show that, compared to other body parts, the hind wing membrane of the migratory locust S. gregaria itself is not exceptionally tough (1.04±0.25 MPa√m). However, the cross veins increase the wing's toughness by 50% by acting as barriers to crack propagation. Using fracture mechanics, we show that the morphological spacing of most wing veins matches the critical crack length of the material (1132 µm). This finding directly demonstrates how the biomechanical properties and the morphology of locust wings are functionally correlated in locusts, providing a mechanically 'optimal' solution with high toughness and low weight. The vein pattern found in insect wings thus might inspire the design of more durable and lightweight artificial 'venous' wings for micro-air-vehicles. Using the vein spacing as indicator, our approach might also provide a basis to estimate the wing properties of endangered or extinct insect species.

  8. Fracture Toughness and Reliability in High-Temperature Structural Ceramics and Composites: Prospects and Challenges for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Sunil

    1999-01-01

    The importance of high fracture toughness and reliability in Si3N4, and SiC-based structural ceramics and ceramic matrix composites is reviewed. The potential of these ceramics and ceramic matrix composites for high temperature applications in defense and aerospace applications such as gas turbine engines, radomes, and other energy conversion hardware have been well recognized. Numerous investigations were pursued to improve fracture toughness and reliability by incorporating various reinforcements such as particulate-, whisker-, and continuous fiber into Si3N4 and SiC matrices. All toughening mechanisms, e.g. crack deflection, crack branching, crack bridging, etc., essentially redistribute stresses at the crack tip and increase the energy needed to propagate a crack through the composite material, thereby resulting in improved fracture toughness and reliability. Because of flaw insensitivity, continuous fiber reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) was found to have the highest potential for higher operating temperature and longer service conditions. However, the ceramic fibers should display sufficient high temperature strength and creep resistance at service temperatures above 1000 'C. The greatest challenge to date is the development of high quality ceramic fibers with associate coatings able to maintain their high strength in oxidizing environment at high temperature. In the area of processing, critical issues are, preparation of optimum matrix precursors, precursor infiltration into fiber array, and matrix densification at a temperature, where grain crystallization and fiber degradation do not occur. A broad scope of effort is required for improved processing and properties with a better understanding of all candidate composite systems.

  9. Fracture-tough, high hardness stainless steel and method of making same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A cryogenically-formed and tempered stainless steel is provided having improved fracture toughness and corrosion resistance at a given hardness level, such as, for example, of at least about Rc 60 for bearing applications. The steel consists essentially of, in weight %, about 21 to about 24% Co, about 11 to about 13% Cr, about 7 to about 9% Ni, about 0.1 to about 0.5% Mo, about 0.2 to about 0.3% V, about 0.28 to about 0.32% C, and the balance iron. The steel includes a cryogenically-formed martensitic microstructure tempered to include about 5 to about 10 volume % post-deformation retained austenite dispersed therein and M.sub.2 C-type carbides, where M is Cr, Mo, V, and/or Fe, dispersed in the microstructure.

  10. Tritium Effects on Fracture Toughness of Stainless Steel Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    MORGAN, MICHAEL; CHAPMAN, G. K.; TOSTEN, M. H.; WEST, S. L.

    2005-05-12

    The effects of tritium on the fracture toughness properties of Type 304L and Type 21-6-9 stainless steel weldments were measured. Weldments were tritium-charged-and-aged and then tested in order to measure the effect of the increasing decay helium content on toughness. The results were compared to uncharged and hydrogen-charged samples. For unexposed weldments having 8-12 volume percent retained delta ferrite, fracture toughness was higher than base metal toughness. At higher levels of weld ferrite, the fracture toughness decreased to values below that of the base metal. Hydrogen-charged and tritium-charged weldments had lower toughness values than similarly charged base metals and toughness decreased further with increasing weld ferrite content. The effect of decay helium content was inconclusive because of tritium off-gassing losses during handling, storage and testing. Fracture modes were dominated by the dimpled rupture process in unexposed weldments. In hydrogen and tritium-exposed weldments, the fracture modes depended on the weld ferrite content. At high ferrite contents, hydrogen-induced transgranular fracture of the weld ferrite phase was observed.

  11. Influence of gamma-irradiation sterilization and temperature on the fracture toughness of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Pascaud, R S; Evans, W T; McCullagh, P J; FitzPatrick, D P

    1997-05-01

    Surface damage of the tibial plateau components of knee prostheses made from medical grade ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) has been attributed to delamination wear caused by a fatigue fracture mechanism. It has been proposed that factors such as component design and method of sterilization contribute to such failure mechanisms. Understanding the fracture behaviour of UHMW-PE is therefore critical in optimizing the in vivo life-span of total joint components. The elastic-plastic fracture toughness parameter J was consequently determined for a commercial UHMW-PE at ambient and body temperatures, before and after gamma-irradiation sterilization in air at a minimum dose of 29 kGy. Both ductile stability theory and experimental data suggest that cracks propagate in a stable manner, although stability is affected by the sterilization process. Sterilization with gamma-irradiation results in a loss in fracture toughness JIc of 50% and a decrease in tearing modulus (Tm) of 30%. This dramatic reduction could result in a 50% decrease in the residual strength of the components, maximum permissible crack size under service loading and service life (assuming flaws such as fusion defects exist). The time required for a crack to grow from its original size to the maximum permissible size could be decreased by 30%, resulting in earlier failure. In terms of the design of joint replacement components the critical factor to envisage is the design stress level, which should be halved to account for the irradiation process. A scanning electron microscope study reveals that the material fails in layers parallel to the fracture surface. PMID:9158855

  12. Process for producing silicon nitride based articles of high fracture toughness and strength

    DOEpatents

    Huckabee, M.; Buljan, S.T.; Neil, J.T.

    1991-09-10

    A process for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength is disclosed. The process involves densifying to at least 98% of theoretical density a mixture including (a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 [mu]m and a surface area of about 8-12 m[sup 2]/g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 [mu]m and a surface area of about 2-4 m[sup 2]/g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified article an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. Optionally, the mixture may be blended with a binder and injection molded to form a green body, which then may be densified by, for example, hot isostatic pressing.

  13. Process for producing silicon nitride based articles of high fracture toughness and strength

    DOEpatents

    Huckabee, Marvin; Buljan, Sergej-Tomislav; Neil, Jeffrey T.

    1991-01-01

    A process for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength. The process involves densifying to at least 98% of theoretical density a mixture including (a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 .mu.m and a surface area of about 8-12 m.sup.2 /g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 .mu.m and a surface area of about 2-4 m.sup.2 /g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified article an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. Optionally, the mixture may be blended with a binder and injection molded to form a green body, which then may be densified by, for example, hot isostatic pressing.

  14. The effect of non-metallic inclusions on the fracture toughness master curve in high copper reactor pressure vessel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Yong-Jun; Lee, Bong-Sang; Hong, Jun-Hwa

    2002-03-01

    The fracture toughness of two high copper reactor pressure vessel welds having low upper shelf energy was evaluated in accordance with the master curve method of ASTM E1921. The resultant data were correlated to the metallurgical factors involved in the brittle fracture initiation to provide a metallurgical-based understanding of the master curve. The tests were performed using pre-cracked Charpy V-notched specimens and the master curve was made with an average of T0 values determined at different temperatures. In all specimens, the cleavage fracture initiated at non-metallic inclusion ranging from 0.7 to 3.5 μm in diameter showing a scatter with the specimens and testing temperatures. Temperature dependency of the triggering particle size was not found. The fracture toughness ( KJC) was inversely proportional to the square root of the triggering inclusion diameter ( di) at respective temperatures. From this relationship, we determined median KJC values which correspond to the average value of triggering inclusion diameter of all tested specimens and defined them as a modified median KJC ( K'JC(med) ). The obtained K'JC(med) values showed quite smaller deviation from the master curve at different temperatures than the experimental median KJC values. This suggests that the master curve is on the premise of a constant dimension of key microstructural factor in a material regardless of the testing temperature. But the inclusion size at trigger point played an important role in the absolute position of the master curve with temperature and the consequent T0 value.

  15. Fracture Toughness Properties of Gd123 Superconducting Bulks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, H.; Murakami, A.

    Fracture toughness properties of melt growth GdBa2Cu3Ox (Gd123) large single domain superconducting bulks with Ag2O of 10 wt% and Pt of 0.5 wt%; 45 mm in diameter and 25 mm in thickness with low void density were evaluated at 77 K through flexural tests of specimens cut from the bulks, and compared to those of a conventional Gd123 with voids. The densified Gd123 bulks were prepared with a seeding and temperature gradient method; first melt processed in oxygen, then crystal growth in air; two-step regulated atmosphere heat treatment. The plane strain fracture toughness, KIC was obtained by the three point flexure test of the specimens with through precrack, referring to the single edge pre-cracked beam (SEPB) method, according to the JIS-R-1607, Testing Methods for Fracture Toughness of High Performance Ceramics. The results show that the fracture toughness of the densified Gd123 bulk with low void density was higher than that of the standard Gd123 bulk with voids, as well as the flexural strength previously reported. We also compared the fracture toughness of as-grown bulks with that of annealed bulks. The relation between the microstructure and the fracture toughness of the Gd123 bulk was clearly shown.

  16. Fracture behavior of 9Cr nanostructured ferritic alloy with improved fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Wee, Sung Hun; Hoelzer, David T.; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-06-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) have been considered as primary candidate materials for both fission and fusion reactors because of their excellent creep and irradiation resistances. It has been shown that high temperature fracture toughness could be significantly improved by appropriate thermo-mechanical treatments (TMTs). This article focuses on the static fracture behaviors of newly developed 9Cr NFAs with improved toughness. Optimal TMTs resulted in high fracture toughness at room temperature (>250 MPa √m) and in retaining higher than 100 MPa √m over a wide temperature range of 22-700 °C. Significant differences were found in fracture surfaces and fracture resistance (J-R) curves after different TMTs. Unique fracture surface features such as shallow nanoscale facets decorated with shear lips and flake-like grains were observed in high toughness specimens.

  17. Dynamic fracture toughness evaluation by measurement of CTOD

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, W.N. Jr.; Douglas, A.S.; Shapiro, J.M.

    1988-02-01

    Quantification of the dynamic fracture toughness of structural materials is essential to a wide range of problems-from nuclear accidents to ordnance applications. However, the difficulties associated with accurate measurements of crack under dynamic loading are considerable. Thus there are no standardized procedures and few reliable results. A systematic study of the dynamic fracture toughness of SAE-01 tool steel, 4340 and HY100 steels, and a tungsten are described using the Interferometric Strain/Displacement Gage (ISDG) system which has very high frequency resolution. The ISDG system is used to measure the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) 100 microns behind a fatigue crack tip in a three-point bend specimen. Static measurements on similar specimens serve to calibrate the method and ensure consistency with the accepted procedures for static fracture toughness testing. Finite element analyses are used to obtain full field information at the point of initiation and to assess the material characteristics which lead to changes in toughness with loading rate. The major advantage of the method is that information is obtained very close to the crack tip, so that stress wave loading effects are accounted for. Results show that 4340 steel, which is strain-rate insensitive, has no significant change in toughness with loading rate. Measurable toughness dependence on loading rate is found for HY-100 and tungsten, which are approximately 15 percent tougher under dynamic conditions. The SAE-01 tool steel shows a significant increase (50 percent) in fracture toughness for dynamic over static loading.

  18. Dynamic fracture toughness determined using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Swadener, J. G.; Baskes, M. I.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,

    2004-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of fracture in crystalline silicon are conducted in order to determine the dynamic fracture toughness. The MD simulations show how the potential energy released during fracture is partitioned into surface energy, energy stored in defects and kinetic energy. First, the MD fracture simulations are shown to produce brittle fracture and be in reasonable agreement with experimental results. Then dynamic hcture toughness is calculated as the sum of the surface energy and the energy stored as defects directly from the MD models. Models oriented to produce fracture on either (111) or (101) planes are used. For the (101) fracture orientation, equilibrium crack speeds of greater than 80% of the Rayleigh wave speed are obtained. Crack speeds initially show a steep increase with increasing energy release rate followed by a much more gradual increase. No plateau in crack speed is observed for static energy release rates up to 20 J/m{sup 2}. At the point where the change in crack speed behavior occur, the dynamic fracture toughness (J{sub d}) is still within 10% of two times the surface energy (2{gamma}{sub 0}) and changing very slowly. From these MD simulations, it appears that the change in crack speed behavior is due to a change in the kinetic energy generation during dynamic fracture. In addition, MD simulations of facture in silicon with defects were conducted. The addition of defects increases the inelastic dissipation and the energy stored in defects.

  19. Fracture toughness testing data: A technology survey and bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhrke, W. F.; Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.; Mandel, G.

    1975-01-01

    Announced survey includes reports covering fracture toughness testing for various structural materials including information on plane strain and developing areas of mixed mode and plane strain test conditions. Bibliography references cite work and conclusions in fracture toughness testing and application of fracture toughness test data, and in fracture mechanics analysis.

  20. Enhancement of Impact Toughness by Delamination Fracture in a Low-Alloy High-Strength Steel with Al Alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junjie; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Hongji; Guo, Shengwu; Liu, Yongning

    2016-09-01

    The effect of delamination toughening of martensitic steel was investigated both at room and low temperatures [253 K and 233 K (-20 °C and -40 °C)]. Two low-alloy martensitic steels with and without Al alloying were both prepared. Layered structure with white band and black matrix was observed in Al alloyed steel, while a homogeneous microstructure was displayed in the steel without Al. Both steels achieved high strength (tensile strength over 1600 MPa) and good ductility (elongation over 11 pct), but they displayed stark contrasts on impact fracture mode and Charpy impact energy. Delamination fracture occurred in Al alloyed steel and the impact energies were significantly increased both at room temperature (from 75 to 138 J, i.e., nearly improved up to 2 times) and low temperatures [from 47.9 to 71.3 J at 233 K (-40 °C)] compared with the one without Al. Alloying with Al promotes the segregation of Cr, Mn, Si and C elements to form a network structure, which is martensite with higher carbon content and higher hardness than that of the matrix. And this network structure evolved into a band structure during the hot rolling process. The difference of yield stress between the band structure and the matrix gives rise to a delamination fracture during the impact test, which increases the toughness greatly.

  1. Fracture Toughness Prediction for MWCNT Reinforced Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the development of a micromechanics model to predict fracture toughness of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced ceramic composites to guide future experimental work for this project. The modeling work described in this report includes (i) prediction of elastic properties, (ii) development of a mechanistic damage model accounting for matrix cracking to predict the composite nonlinear stress/strain response to tensile loading to failure, and (iii) application of this damage model in a modified boundary layer (MBL) analysis using ABAQUS to predict fracture toughness and crack resistance behavior (R-curves) for ceramic materials containing MWCNTs at various volume fractions.

  2. Fracture toughness of polybutadiene at cryogenic temperatures. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Burford, R.P.

    1983-04-01

    An estimate of fracture toughness of crosslined polybutadiene rubber at -180 degrees C has been made using the double torsin method. By using suitable specimen dimensions and strain rates, controlled crack propagatin can be achieved, together with a constant compliance to crack length ratio. Strain energy release rated for this polymer, crosslinked with either dicumyl peroxide or sulphur, were found to be an order of magnitude higher than for linear, glassy thermoplastics. Crazing is considered to contribute to the high toughness observed.

  3. Fracture toughness of human bone under tension.

    PubMed

    Norman, T L; Vashishth, D; Burr, D B

    1995-03-01

    The longitudinal fracture toughnesses of human cortical bone were compared to those of bovine cortical bone to test the hypothesis that although human osteonal bone is significantly weaker and more compliant than primary (plexiform) bone, it is not less tough than primary bone. The fracture toughness indices, critical strain energy release rate (Gc) and critical stress intensity factor (Kc), were determined for human Haversian bone and bovine bone under tension (Mode I) loading using the compact tension method. The effects of thickness, crack growth range and anisotropy on fracture indices for slow stable crack growth in cortical bone were determined. Plane strain assumptions required for application of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) to bone were investigated. Longitudinal oriented fracture toughness tests were used to assess the crack inhibiting effect of human bone microstructure on fracture resistance. Human bone Kc calculated from the stress concentration formula for 2 and 3 mm thick specimens equaled 4.32 and 4.05 MN m-3/2, respectively. Human bone Gc calculated from the compliance method equaled 827 N m-1 for 2 mm thick specimens and 595 N m-1 for 3 mm thick specimens. It was found that crack growth range, thickness and material assumptions affect fracture toughness. Kc calculated from Gc using an anisotropic relation provided the lowest estimate of Kc and equaled 3.31 MN m-3/2 for 2 mm thick specimens and 2.81 MN m-3/2 for 3 mm thick specimens. Both Kc and Gc were significantly reduced after being adjusted to ASTM standard thickness using ratios determined from bovine bone. The fracture toughness of bovine bone relative to human bone ranged from 1.08 to 1.66. This was compared to the longitudinal strength of bovine bone relative to the longitudinal strength of human bone which is approximately equal to 1.5. We found that even though human bone is significantly weaker than bovine bone, relative to its strength, the toughness of human and bovine bone

  4. Fracture toughness testing data. A bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.; Stuhrke, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    This bibliography is comprised of approximately 800 reference citations related to the mechanics of failure in aerospace structures. Most of the references are for documents that include fracture toughness testing data and its application or documents on the availability and usefulness of fracture mechanics analysis methodology. The bibliography represents a search of the literature published in the period April 1962 through April 1974 and is largely limited to documents published in the United States.

  5. Fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, M.N.; Komatsu, S.

    1995-12-01

    The effect of austenitizing temperature, austempering temperature and austempering time on the fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron have been presented and discussed in this paper. Statistical design of experiments with a 2{sup 3} matrix was used to determine the effect of the individual variables and their interactions. The desirable combination of the three variables is suggested based on the analysis.

  6. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Tan, Ting; Liu, Ken C

    2014-01-01

    Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of great interest regarding reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks, however, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen, in addition to the inherited specimen size effect. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, a torsional fixture was developed to utilize an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.

  7. Fracture Behavior of High-Toughness, Ionically Cross-linked Triblock Copolymer Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Kevin; Otim, Kathryn; Shull, Kenneth

    2011-03-01

    Mechanisms for enhancing energy dissipation and hence toughness are important for the generation of robust synthetic soft materials for biomedical applications. Ionic cross-linking in particular has been explored in triblock copolymer hydrogels and affords a remarkable change in mechanical performance comparable to non-cross-linked analogs. Here we employ a physically associated base triblock copolymer network composed of hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) endblocks and a hydrophilic poly(methacrylic acid) midblock capable of complexing with divalent cations. Increases in stiffness and strength have previously been reported, with the extent dependent upon the identity, concentration, and pH of a cross-linking cation solution. We delineate the measured toughness in such systems using tensile tear tests and relate the mechanical performance to a damage zone model reminiscent of loading behavior observed in double network hydrogels.

  8. Effect of groove on bone fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Norman, T L; Vashishth, D; Burr, D B

    1992-12-01

    When testing for the effects of bone orientation on mode I fracture toughness, compact tension specimens are grooved with a V-notch to provide a crack guide. The effect of grooving on the expressions for the critical stress intensity factor (Kc) and the critical strain energy release rate (Gc) for mode I fracture toughness was investigated. Experiments were performed using grooved and ungrooved bovine compact tension specimens. The results indicate that the standard expression used to determine Kc for a compact tension specimen requires modification. The thickness (B) must be modified to account for the thickness between the grooves (Bn). The thickness used in the standard expression is replaced by an effective thickness written as (BBn)0.5. It was also found that the thickness between the grooves should be used in the standard formula for Gc. PMID:1491024

  9. Fracture toughness and crack growth of Zerodur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viens, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    The fracture toughness and crack growth parameters of Zerodur, a low expansion glass ceramic material, were determined. The fracture toughness was determined using indentation techniques and was found to be 0.9 MPa x m(sup 1/2). The crack growth parameters were determined using indented biaxial specimens subjected to static and dynamic loading in an aqueous environment. The crack growth parameters n and 1n(B) were found to be 30.7 and -6.837, respectively. The crack growth parameters were also determined using indented biaxial specimens subjected to dynamic loading in an ambient 50 percent relative humidity environment. The crack growth parameters n and 1n(B) at 50 percent relative humidity were found to be 59.3 and -17.51, respectively.

  10. Fracture toughness of Alloy 600 and EN82H weld in air and water

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.; Brown, C.M.

    1999-06-01

    The fracture toughness of Alloy 600 and its weld, EN82H, was characterized in 54 C to 338 C air and hydrogenated water. Elastic-plastic J{sub IC} testing was performed due to the inherent high toughness of these materials. Alloy 600 exhibited excellent fracture toughness under all test conditions. While EN82H welds displayed excellent toughness in air and high temperature water, a dramatic toughness degradation occurred in water at temperatures below 149 C. Comparison of the cracking response in low temperature water with that for hydrogen-precharged specimens tested in air demonstrated that the loss in toughness is due to a hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking mechanism. At loading rates about approx. 1000 MPa {radical}m/h, the toughness in low temperature water is improved because there is insufficient time for hydrogen to embrittle grain boundaries. Electron fractographic examinations were performed to correlate macroscopic properties with key microstructural features and operative fracture mechanisms.

  11. TRITIUM AGING EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF FORGED STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M

    2008-04-14

    The fracture toughness properties of Type 21-6-9 stainless steel were measured for forgings in the unexposed, hydrogen-exposed, and tritium-exposed-and-aged conditions. Fracture toughness samples were cut from conventionally-forged and high-energy-rate-forged forward-extruded cylinders and mechanically tested at room temperature using ASTM fracture-toughness testing procedures. Some of the samples were exposed to either hydrogen or tritium gas (340 MPa, 623 K) prior to testing. Tritium-exposed samples were aged for up to seven years and tested periodically in order to measure the effect on fracture toughness of {sup 3}He from radioactive tritium decay. The results show that hydrogen-exposed and tritium-exposed samples had lower fracture- toughness values than unexposed samples and that fracture toughness decreased with increasing decay {sup 3}He content. Forged steels were more resistant to the embrittling effects of tritium and decay {sup 3}He than annealed steels, although their fracture-toughness properties depended on the degree of sensitization that occurred during processing. The fracture process was dominated by microvoid nucleation, growth and coalescence; however, the size and spacing of microvoids on the fracture surfaces were affected by hydrogen and tritium with the lowest-toughness samples having the smallest microvoids and finest spacing.

  12. Determining Ductile Fracture Toughness in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Nanstad, Randy K; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Manneschmidt, Eric T

    2014-01-01

    Ductile fracture toughness determination, such as the J-integral versus crack growth resistance (J-R) curve, is a useful tool for evaluating material structural integrity in the presence of pre-existing defects. The J-R curve represents a way to calculate the work (energy) per unit fracture surface area needed to drive the crack growth. A typical J-R curve is shown in Fig. 1 from which the material fracture toughness near the initiation of stable crack growth (Jq) can be derived. In addition, tearing modulus (TR), representing the material resistance to stable crack growth, can be calculated based on the slope of the J-R curve between two exclusion lines (red dashed lines in Fig. 1). Since the introduction of the J-R curve, extensive efforts have been continuously devoted to develop simplified and reliable methods for determining the material J-R curve. This article briefly reviews three widely-used J-R curve test methods in metals, i.e. elastic unloading compliance (EUC), normalization, and direct current potential drop (DCPD). The main difference in these methods relates to the determination of the crack size. More details of performing the J-R curve determination can be found in ASTM standard E1820-11.

  13. Interphase effect on intralaminar fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Hrivnak, J.A.; Dagastine, R.R.; McCullough, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    In fiber reinforced thermoset composites there is a growing body of experimental evidence which has pointed to a region at the fiber/matrix boundary with properties that differ from the fiber or matrix. This region extends beyond the two dimensional interface at the fiber/matrix boundary to have a finite thickness with chemical and structural property gradients. This leads to the concept of an interphase region. The interphase has a large effect on the thermal and mechanical properties of the composite such as fracture toughness, glass transition temperature and the coefficient of thermal expansion. Understanding the interphase region becomes crucial to tailoring a composite to a desired set of properties.

  14. Fracture toughness testing data: A technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhrke, W. F.; Carpenter, J. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Technical abstracts for about 90 significant documents relating to fracture toughness testing for various structural materials including information on plane strain and the developing areas of mixed mode and plane stress test conditions are presented. An overview of the state-of-the-art represented in the documents that have been abstracted is included. The abstracts in the report are mostly for publications in the period April 1962 through April 1974. The purpose of this report is to provide, in quick reference form, a dependable source for current information in the subject field.

  15. Toughness-Dominated Regime of Hydraulic Fracturing in Cohesionless Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, L. N.; Hurt, R. S.; Ayoub, J.; Norman, W. D.

    2011-12-01

    experiments, there is a high pressure gradient in the leak-off zone in the direction normal to the fracture. Fluid pressure does not decrease considerably along the fracture, however, due to the relatively wide fracture aperture. This suggests that hydraulically induced fractures in unconsolidated materials may be considered to be within the toughness-dominated regime of hydraulic fracturing. Our results indicate that the primary influence on peak or initiation pressure comes from the remote stresses. However, fracture morphology changes significantly with other chosen parameters (stress, flow rate, rheology and permeability). Additionally, an important characteristic feature of fractures in our experiments is the frequent bluntness of the fracture tip, which suggests that plastic deformation at the fracture tip is important. Modeling shows that large openings at the fracture tip correspond to relatively large 'effective' fracture (surface) energy, which can be orders of magnitude greater than for typical (solid) rocks.

  16. Identifying novel clinical surrogates to assess human bone fracture toughness

    PubMed Central

    Granke, Mathilde; Makowski, Alexander J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Does, Mark D; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2015-01-01

    Fracture risk does not solely depend on strength but also on fracture toughness, i.e. the ability of bone material to resist crack initiation and propagation. Because resistance to crack growth largely depends on bone properties at the tissue level including collagen characteristics, current X-ray based assessment tools may not be suitable to identify age-, disease-, or treatment-related changes in fracture toughness. To identify useful clinical surrogates that could improve the assessment of fracture resistance, we investigated the potential of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and reference point indentation (RPI) to explain age-related variance in fracture toughness. Harvested from cadaveric femurs (62 human donors), single-edge notched beam (SENB) specimens of cortical bone underwent fracture toughness testing (R-curve method). NMR-derived bound water showed the strongest correlation with fracture toughness properties (r=0.63 for crack initiation, r=0.35 for crack growth, and r=0.45 for overall fracture toughness; p<0.01). Multivariate analyses indicated that the age-related decrease in different fracture toughness properties were best explained by a combination of NMR properties including pore water and RPI-derived tissue stiffness with age as a significant covariate (adjusted R2 = 53.3%, 23.9%, and 35.2% for crack initiation, crack growth, and overall toughness, respectively; p<0.001). These findings reflect the existence of many contributors to fracture toughness and emphasize the utility of a multimodal assessment of fracture resistance. Exploring the mechanistic origin of fracture toughness, glycation-mediated, non-enzymatic collagen crosslinks and intra-cortical porosity are possible determinants of bone fracture toughness and could explain the sensitivity of NMR to changes in fracture toughness. Assuming fracture toughness is clinically important to the ability of bone to resist fracture, our results suggest that improvements in fracture

  17. The effect of microstructure on the fracture toughness of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanstone, R. H.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The high-strength titanium alloys are widely used in aircraft and aerospace structures due to their high strength to density ratios. In such applications, the fracture toughness rather than the strength is often the factor which requires larger size sections and lower useful payloads. The response of the strength and toughness of titanium alloys was analyzed generally without regard to the fracture mode or the effect of microstructure on the fracture mechanisms. Research on the fracture mechanisms in aluminum alloys and steels showed that the toughness may be improved by decreasing the sizes of inclusions and sub-micron precipitates. An investigation was conducted to study the fracture mechanisms in titanium alloys which may lead to suggestions for the improvement of the fracture toughness without a corresponding loss in strength.

  18. Laser notching ceramics for reliable fracture toughness testing

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Holly D.; Elmer, John W.; Freeman, Dennis C.; Schaefer, Ronald D.; Derkach, Oleg; Gallegos, Gilbert F.

    2015-09-19

    A new method for notching ceramics was developed using a picosecond laser for fracture toughness testing of alumina samples. The test geometry incorporated a single-edge-V-notch that was notched using picosecond laser micromachining. This method has been used in the past for cutting ceramics, and is known to remove material with little to no thermal effect on the surrounding material matrix. This study showed that laser-assisted-machining for fracture toughness testing of ceramics was reliable, quick, and cost effective. In order to assess the laser notched single-edge-V-notch beam method, fracture toughness results were compared to results from other more traditional methods, specifically surface-crack in flexure and the chevron notch bend tests. Lastly, the results showed that picosecond laser notching produced precise notches in post-failure measurements, and that the measured fracture toughness results showed improved consistency compared to traditional fracture toughness methods.

  19. Laser notching ceramics for reliable fracture toughness testing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barth, Holly D.; Elmer, John W.; Freeman, Dennis C.; Schaefer, Ronald D.; Derkach, Oleg; Gallegos, Gilbert F.

    2015-09-19

    A new method for notching ceramics was developed using a picosecond laser for fracture toughness testing of alumina samples. The test geometry incorporated a single-edge-V-notch that was notched using picosecond laser micromachining. This method has been used in the past for cutting ceramics, and is known to remove material with little to no thermal effect on the surrounding material matrix. This study showed that laser-assisted-machining for fracture toughness testing of ceramics was reliable, quick, and cost effective. In order to assess the laser notched single-edge-V-notch beam method, fracture toughness results were compared to results from other more traditional methods, specificallymore » surface-crack in flexure and the chevron notch bend tests. Lastly, the results showed that picosecond laser notching produced precise notches in post-failure measurements, and that the measured fracture toughness results showed improved consistency compared to traditional fracture toughness methods.« less

  20. Fracture Toughness in Advanced Monolithic Ceramics - SEPB Versus SEVENB Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    Fracture toughness of a total of 13 advanced monolithic ceramics including silicon nitrides, silicon carbide, aluminas, and glass ceramic was determined at ambient temperature by using both single edge precracked beam (SEPB) and single edge v-notched beam (SEVNB) methods. Relatively good agreement in fracture toughness between the two methods was observed for advanced ceramics with flat R-curves; whereas, poor agreement in fracture toughness was seen for materials with rising R-curves. The discrepancy in fracture toughness between the two methods was due to stable crack growth with crack closure forces acting in the wake region of cracks even in SEVNB test specimens. The effect of discrepancy in fracture toughness was analyzed in terms of microstructural feature (grain size and shape), toughening exponent, and stable crack growth determined using back-face strain gaging.

  1. Cleavage oriented iron single crystal fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hribernik, Michael Louis

    Fundamental understanding of atomic level mechanisms controlling cleavage fracture in bcc metals, and the corresponding brittle to ductile transition (BDT) has been a long sought, 'grand challenge' of science. This is particularly true for the BDT in Fe, which is among vital elements that underpin our technological civilization. A key obstacle to developing an understanding of the BDT in Fe is the absence of a reliable database on the temperature dependence of toughness in Fe. In ferritic alloys, the micro-arrest toughness of ferrite, Kmu(T), is hypothesized to control macroscopic cleavage. As a surrogate for Kmu(T), special techniques were developed to measure the arrest toughness, Ka(T), for cleavage oriented, Fe single crystals. Further, the mechanisms controlling cleavage and the BDT should be reflected in the loading rate dependence of static-dynamic initiation toughness, K Ic and KId. Thus KIc/d(T) were also measured for K-rate from 10-1 to 104 MPa√m/s. These studies led to the following conclusions: (1) Ka is semi-brittle, increasing from an average of ≈ 3.5 MPa√m at -196°C to ≈ 9 MPa√m at 0°C. (2) The (100) Ka are similar in the [010] and [011] and orientations, but cleavage does not occur on (110) planes. (3) The Ka for unalloyed Fe is about 150°C lower than that for Fe-3wt%Si, suggesting that equivalent Ka may occur at equivalent lattice sigmay. (4) Higher K-rate shift K Ic/d(T) curves to higher T. (5) The shifts of the KIc/d(T) and Ka(T) curves can be understood and modeled based on dislocation dynamics concepts for the glide of screw dislocations with a stress (and T) controlled activation energy, Ea, with a maximum value of about ≈ 0.5 eV. (6) This Ea is consistent with a double kink nucleation mechanism. Etch pit, slip trace and ledge patterns on side, fracture and sectioned surfaces of the crystals were characterized to study dislocation activity associated with cleavage and the BDT. The results showed extensive dislocation activity on

  2. Fracture toughness evaluations of TP304 stainless steel pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.L.; Brust, F.W.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1997-02-01

    In the IPIRG-1 program, the J-R curve calculated for a 16-inch nominal diameter, Schedule 100 TP304 stainless steel (DP2-A8) surface-cracked pipe experiment (Experiment 1.3-3) was considerably lower than the quasi-static, monotonic J-R curve calculated from a C(T) specimen (A8-12a). The results from several related investigations conducted to determine the cause of the observed toughness difference are: (1) chemical analyses on sections of Pipe DP2-A8 from several surface-cracked pipe and material property specimen fracture surfaces indicate that there are two distinct heats of material within Pipe DP2-A8 that differ in chemical composition; (2) SEN(T) specimen experimental results indicate that the toughness of a surface-cracked specimen is highly dependent on the depth of the initial crack, in addition, the J-R curves from the SEN(T) specimens closely match the J-R curve from the surface-cracked pipe experiment; (3) C(T) experimental results suggest that there is a large difference in the quasi-static, monotonic toughness between the two heats of DP2-A8, as well as a toughness degradation in the lower toughness heat of material (DP2-A8II) when loaded with a dynamic, cyclic (R = {minus}0.3) loading history.

  3. The shear fracture toughness, KIIc, of graphite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Erdman, III, Donald L.

    2015-11-05

    In this study, the critical shear stress intensity factor, KIIc, here-in referred to as the shear fracture toughness, KIIc (MPa m), of two grades of graphite are reported. The range of specimen volumes was selected to elucidate any specimen size effect, but smaller volume specimen tests were largely unsuccessful, shear failure did not occur between the notches as expected. This was probably due to the specimen geometry causing the shear fracture stress to exceed the compressive failure stress. In subsequent testing the specimen geometry was altered to reduce the compressive footprint and the notches (slits) made deeper to reduce themore » specimen's ligament length. Additionally, we added the collection of Acoustic Emission (AE) during testing to assist with the identification of the shear fracture load. The means of KIIc from large specimens for PCEA and NBG-18 are 2.26 MPa m with an SD of 0.37 MPa m and 2.20 MPa m with an SD of 0.53 MPa m, respectively. The value of KIIc for both graphite grades was similar, although the scatter was large. In this work we found the ratio of KIIc/KIc ≈ 1.6. .« less

  4. Fracture toughness for copper oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Goretta, Kenneth C.; Kullberg, Marc L.

    1993-01-01

    An oxide-based strengthening and toughening agent, such as tetragonal Zro.sub.2 particles, has been added to copper oxide superconductors, such as superconducting YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x (123) to improve its fracture toughness (K.sub.IC). A sol-gel coating which is non-reactive with the superconductor, such as Y.sub.2 BaCuO.sub.5 (211) on the ZrO.sub.2 particles minimized the deleterious reactions between the superconductor and the toughening agent dispersed therethrough. Addition of 20 mole percent ZrO.sub.2 coated with 211 yielded a 123 composite with a K.sub.IC of 4.5 MPa(m).sup.0.5.

  5. Fracture toughness for copper oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Goretta, K.C.; Kullberg, M.L.

    1993-04-13

    An oxide-based strengthening and toughening agent, such as tetragonal ZrO[sub 2] particles, has been added to copper oxide superconductors, such as superconducting YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub x] (123) to improve its fracture toughness (K[sub IC]). A sol-gel coating which is non-reactive with the superconductor, such as Y[sub 2]BaCuO[sub 5] (211) on the ZrO[sub 2] particles minimized the deleterious reactions between the superconductor and the toughening agent dispersed therethrough. Addition of 20 mole percent ZrO[sub 2] coated with 211 yielded a 123 composite with a K[sub IC] of 4.5 MPa(m)[sup 0.5].

  6. Fracture toughness of advanced ceramics at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, George D.; Salem, Jonathan; Bar-On, Isa; Cho, Kyu; Foley, Michael; Fang, HO

    1992-01-01

    Results of round-robin fracture toughness tests on advanced ceramics are reported. A gas-pressure silicon nitride and a zirconia-toughened alumina were tested using three test methods: indentation fracture, indentation strength, and single-edge precracked beam. The latter two methods have produced consistent results. The interpretation of fracture toughness test results for the zirconia alumina composite is shown to be complicated by R-curve and environmentally assisted crack growth phenomena.

  7. Effects of irradiation to 4 dpa at 390 C on the fracture toughness of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, E.E.; Galvin, T.M.; Chopra, O.K.

    1998-09-01

    Fracture toughness J-R curve tests were conducted at room temperature on disk-shaped compact-tension DC(T) specimens of three vanadium alloys having a nominal composition of V-4Cr-4Ti. The alloys in the nonirradiated condition showed high fracture toughness; J{sub IC} could not be determined but is expected to be above 600 kJ/m{sup 2}. The alloys showed very poor fracture toughness after irradiation to 4 dpa at 390 C, e.g., J{sub IC} values of {approx}10 kJ/m{sup 2} or lower.

  8. Power mixture and green body for producing silicon nitride base & articles of high fracture toughness and strength

    DOEpatents

    Huckabee, Marvin L.; Buljan, Sergej-Tomislav; Neil, Jeffrey T.

    1991-01-01

    A powder mixture and a green body for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength. The powder mixture includes 9a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon mitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 .mu.m and a surface area of about 8-12m.sup.2 g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 .mu.m and a surface area of about 2-4 m.sup.2 /g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified articel an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. The green body is formed from the powder mixture, an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid, and an effective amount of a suitable organic binder.

  9. Power mixture and green body for producing silicon nitride base articles of high fracture toughness and strength

    DOEpatents

    Huckabee, M.L.; Buljan, S.T.; Neil, J.T.

    1991-09-17

    A powder mixture and a green body for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength are disclosed. The powder mixture includes (a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 [mu]m and a surface area of about 8-12m[sup 2]g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 [mu]m and a surface area of about 2-4 m[sup 2]/g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified article an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. The green body is formed from the powder mixture, an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid, and an effective amount of a suitable organic binder. No Drawings

  10. Predicting Fracture Toughness of TRIP 800 using Phase Properties Characterized by In-Situ High Energy X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Soulami, Ayoub; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Ren, Yang; Wang, Yan-Dong

    2010-05-01

    TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel is a typical representative of 1st generation advanced high strength steel (AHSS) which exhibits a combination of high strength and excellent ductility due to its multiphase microstructure. In this paper, we study the crack propagation behavior and fracture resistance of a TRIP 800 steel using a microstructure-based finite element method with the various phase properties characterized by in-situ high energy Xray diffraction (HEXRD) technique. Uniaxial tensile tests on the notched TRIP 800 sheet specimens were also conducted, and the experimentally measured tensile properties and R-curves (Resistance curves) were used to calibrate the modeling parameters and to validate the overall modeling results. The comparison between the simulated and experimentally measured results suggests that the micromechanics based modeling procedure can well capture the overall complex crack propagation behaviors and the fracture resistance of TRIP steels. The methodology adopted here may be used to estimate the fracture resistance of various multiphase materials.

  11. Fracture toughness of irradiated candidate materials for ITER first wall/blanket structures: Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Pawel, J.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1996-04-01

    Disk compact specimens of candidate materials for first wall/blanket structures in ITER have been irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at nominal irradiation temperatures of either 90 250{degrees}C. These specimens have been tested over a temperature range from 20 to 250{degrees}C to determine J-integral values and tearing moduli. The results show that irradiation at these temperatures reduces the fracture toughness of austenic stainless steels, but the toughness remains quite high. The toughness decreases as the temperature increases. Irradiation at 250{degrees}C is more damaging that at 90{degrees}C, causing larger decreases in the fracture toughness. The ferritic-martensitic steels HT-9 and F82H show significantly greater reductions in fracture toughness that the austenitic stainless steels.

  12. Critical Fracture Toughness Measurements of an Antarctic Ice Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christmann, Julia; Müller, Ralf; Webber, Kyle; Isaia, Daniel; Schader, Florian; Kippstuhl, Sepp; Freitag, Johannes; Humbert, Angelika

    2014-05-01

    Fracture toughness is a material parameter describing the resistance of a pre-existing defect in a body to further crack extension. The fracture toughness of glacial ice as a function of density is important for modeling efforts aspire to predict calving behavior. In the presented experiments this fracture toughness is measured using an ice core from Kohnen Station, Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. The samples were sawed in an ice lab at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven at -20°C and had the dimensions of standard test samples with thickness 14 mm, width 28 mm and length 126 mm. The samples originate from a depth of 94.6 m to 96 m. The grain size of the samples was also identified. The grain size was found to be rather uniform. The critical fracture toughness is determined in a four-point bending approach using single edge V-notch beam samples. The initial notch length was around 2.5 mm and was prepared using a drilling machine. The experimental setup was designed at the Institute of Materials Science at Darmstadt. In this setup the force increases linearly, until the maximum force is reached, where the specific sample fractures. This procedure was done in an ice lab with a temperature of -15°C. The equations to calculate the fracture toughness for pure bending are derived from an elastic stress analysis and are given as a standard test method to detect the fracture toughness. An X-ray computer tomography (CT scanner) was used to determine the ice core densities. The tests cover densities from 843 kg m-3 to 871 kg m-3. Thereby the influence of the fracture toughness on the density was analyzed and compared to previous investigations of this material parameter. Finally the dependence of the measured toughness on thickness, width, and position in the core cross-section was investigated.

  13. Correlations between ultrasonic and fracture toughness factors in metallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1978-01-01

    A heuristic mathematical basis was proposed for the experimental correlations found between ultrasonic propagation factors and fracture toughness factors in metallic materials. A crack extension model was developed wherein spontaneous stress (elastic) waves produced during microcracking are instrumental in promoting the onset of unstable crack extension. Material microstructural factors involved in the process are measurable by ultrasonic probing. Experimental results indicate that ultrasonic attenuation and velocity measurements will produce significant correlations with fracture toughness properties and also yield strength.

  14. Fracture toughness of oxide-dispersion strengthened copper

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.

    1996-10-01

    The fracture toughness of an oxide-dispersion strengthened copper alloy AL-15 has been examined at room temperature and 250{degrees}C, in air and in vacuum (< 10{sup {minus}6} torr). Increasing test temperature causes a significant decrease in the fracture toughness of this material, in either air or vacuum environments. In addition, specimens oriented in the T-L orientation (crack growth parallel to the extrusion direction) show significantly lower toughness than those in the L-T orientation (crack growth perpendicular to the extrusion direction).

  15. Interfacial fracture toughness of alumina/niobium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.G. ); O'Dowd, N.P.; Shih, C.F. . Div. of Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    The interfacial fracture toughness of an alumina/niobium composite has been measured as a function of phase angle. The interface was formed by solid-state bonding bulk Coor's AD-999 fine-grain alumina with a commercial purity niobium at 1600{degrees}C for 0.5 hr under a pressure of 10.5 MPa. The alumina/niobium system has a number of features which makes it ideal for an investigation of interfacial fracture toughness. From HREM data we estimate that the width of the interface is no more than 10 atomic planes. Furthermore the thermal expansion coefficients of the two materials differ by less than 5% so residual stresses due to the bonding process are small. Using symmetric and asymmetric four point bend specimens we have measured the fracture toughness of homogenous alumina and that of the alumina/niobium bimaterial in combinations of in-plane shear and tension. The fracture toughness of the homogenous alumina is relatively insensitive to the loading phase. The measured fracture toughness K{sub c} of the interface, however, depended strongly on phase angle. We were unable to obtain valid alumina/niobium interfacial toughness data at negative phase angles as the fracture initiates in the alumina and not at the interface. In symmetric bending at a phase angle {approx}5{degrees}, we measured a nominal interface toughness of 4.0 MPa{radical}m, comparable to the homogeneous alumina. We found that the toughness increased with loading phase angle to a value of K{sub c} {approx} 9 MPa{radical}m at a phase between 25{degrees} and 40{degrees}. Preliminary calculations and experiments suggest that this effect is due to an asymmetric stress distribution, with respect to the interface, and plastic deformation in the niobium. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Engineering approaches to the application of fracture toughness data in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Merkle, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    The procedures for measuring the plane strain fracture toughness, K{sub Ic}, of metals were originally developed for relatively high yield strength materials, the toughnesses of which were not affected by strain rate. The application of these procedures to lower yield strength and higher toughness structural and pressure vessel steels have since revealed a perplexing combination of problems involving the effects of geometry, stable crack growth and strain rate on the measured values of toughness. Only the geometric problems were encountered in the development of the procedures for measuring K{sub Ic}. For fracture in the linear elastic range of the load-displacement curve, these problems were overcome by specifying specimen dimensions sufficiently large with respect to the plastic zone size at fracture. However, in the case of structural and pressure vessel steels, it is not always possible to test specimens large enough for fracture to occur prior to general yielding. Therefore, in these cases, the effects of large-scale yielding prior to fracture cannot be avoided, but since they presently have no analytical explanation they are being treated empirically. The problems of geometry and strain rate effects on toughness discussed herein are complex and difficult to solve. However, taking advantage of the improvements that have recently been made in the hardware and software available for performing three-dimensional elastic-plastic and viscoplastic stress analysis, it should be possible to significantly improve the analysis of small-specimen, elastic-plastic fracture toughness data.

  17. Semi-interpenetrating polymer network's of polyimides: Fracture toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Marion Glenn

    1988-01-01

    The objective was to improve the fracture toughness of the PMR-15 thermosetting polyimide by co-disolving LaRC-TPI, a thermoplastic polyimide. The co-solvation of a thermoplastic into a thermoset produces an interpenetration of the thermoplastic polymer into the thermoset polyimide network. A second research program was planned around the concept that to improve the fracture toughness of a thermoset polyimide polymer, the molecular weight between crosslink points would be an important macromolecular topological parameter in producing a fracture toughened semi-IPN polyimide.

  18. Evaluation of apparent fracture toughness of articular cartilage and hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yinghua; Rennerfeldt, Deena A.; Friis, Elizabeth A.; Gehrke, Stevin H.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, biomaterials-based tissue-engineering strategies, including the use of hydrogels, have offered great promise for repairing articular cartilage. Mechanical failure testing in outcome analyses is of crucial clinical importance to the success of engineered constructs. Interpenetrating networks (IPNs) are gaining more attention, due to their superior mechanical integrity. This study provided a combination testing method of apparent fracture toughness, which was applied to both articular cartilage and hydrogels. The apparent fracture toughnesses of two groups, hydrogels and articular cartilage, were evaluated based on the modified single-edge notch test and ASTM standards on the single-edge notch test and compact tension test. The results demonstrated that the toughness for articular cartilage (348 ± 43 MPa/mm½) was much higher than that for hydrogels. With a toughness value of 10.8 ± 1.4 MPa/mm½, IPNs of agarose and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) looked promising. The IPNs were 1.4 times tougher than PEG-DA alone, although still over an order of magnitude less tough than cartilage. A new method was developed to evaluate hydrogels and cartilage in a manner that enabled a more relevant direct comparison for fracture testing of hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering. Moreover, a target toughness value for cartilage of using this direct comparison method has been identified (348 ± 43 MPa/mm½), and the toughness discrepancy to be overcome between hydrogels and cartilage has been quantified. PMID:24700577

  19. Variability and Anisotropy of Fracture Toughness of Cortical Bone Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Wahab, Adel; Nordin, Norhaziqah; Silberschmidt, Vadim

    2012-08-01

    Bones form protective and load-bearing framework of the body. Therefore, their structural integrity is vital for the quality of life. Unfortunately, bones can only sustain a load until a certain limit, beyond which they fail. Therefore, it is essential to study their mechanical and fracture behaviours in order to get an in-depth understanding of the origins of its fracture resistance that, in turn, can assist diagnosis and prevention of bone's trauma. This can be achieved by studying mechanical properties of bone, such as its fracture toughness. Generally, most of bone fractures occur for long bones that consist mostly of cortical bone. Therefore, in this study, only a cortical bone tissue was studied. Since this tissue has an anisotropic behaviour and possesses hierarchical and complex structure, in this paper, an experimental analysis for the fracture toughness of cortical bone tissue is presented in terms of J-integral. The data was obtained using single-edge-notch bending (SENB) cortical specimens of bone tested in a three-point bending setup. Variability of values of fracture toughness was investigated by testing specimens cut from different cortex positions of bovine femur called anterior, posterior, medial, and lateral. In addition, anisotropy ratios of fracture toughness were considered by examining specimens cut from three different orientations: longitudinal, transverse and radial. Moreover, in order to link cortical bone fracture mechanisms with its underlying microstructure, fracture surfaces of specimens from different cortices and along different orientations were studied. Experimental results of this study provide a clear understanding of both variability and anisotropy of cortical bone tissue with regard to its fracture toughness.

  20. Gas pressure sintering of silicon nitride to optimize fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Nunn, S.D.; Beavers, T.M.; Menchhofer, P.A.; Barker, D.L.; Coffey, D.W.

    1995-06-01

    Gas-pressure sintering (GPS) can be used to densify silicon nitride containing a wide variety of sintering additives. Parameters affecting the sintering behavior include densification temperature, densification time, grain growth temperature, grain growth time and heating rates. The Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-6% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-2% A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples sintered to high densities at all conditions used in the present study, whereas the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Sr{sub 2}La{sub 4}Yb{sub 4}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} samples required the highest temperatures and longest times to achieve densities {ge}98 % T. D. The main effect on the fracture toughness for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-6% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-2% A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples was the use of a lower densification temperature, which was 1900C in the present study. For the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Sr{sub 2}La{sub 4}Yb{sub 4}SiO4{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} composition, fracture toughness was sensitive to and improved by a slower heating rate (10c/min), a lower densification temperature (1900`), a higher grain growth temperature (2000C), and a longer grain growth time (2 h).

  1. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, John Jy-An; Ren, Fei; Tan, Tin; Liu, Ken

    2014-12-19

    Reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks is significantly influenced by the mechanical performance of the structural materials exposed in the hydrogen environment. Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of specific interest since they are relevant to many catastrophic failures. However, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, special testing apparatus were designed to facilitate in situ fracture testing in H2. A torsional fixture was developed to utilizemore » an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The design concepts will be discussed. Preliminary in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.« less

  2. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, John Jy-An; Ren, Fei; Tan, Tin; Liu, Ken

    2014-12-19

    Reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks is significantly influenced by the mechanical performance of the structural materials exposed in the hydrogen environment. Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of specific interest since they are relevant to many catastrophic failures. However, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, special testing apparatus were designed to facilitate in situ fracture testing in H2. A torsional fixture was developed to utilize an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The design concepts will be discussed. Preliminary in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.

  3. A joint fracture toughness evaluation of hot-pressed beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, H.; Sargent, G. A.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Fracture toughness tests at room temperature were made on three-point bend specimens cut from hot-pressed beryllium obtained from two suppliers. The test specimens had dimensions conforming to ASTM fracture toughness standard E399-72. A total of 42 specimens were machined from each batch of material. Six specimens from each batch were then distributed to seven independent laboratories for testing. The test data from the laboratories were collected and analyzed for differences between the laboratories and the two batches of material. It is concluded that ASTM 399-72 can be used as a valid test procedure for determining the fracture toughness of beryllium, providing that Kf(max) in fatigue cracking could be up to 80 percent of the K(0) value.

  4. Fiber reinforced solids possessing great fracture toughness: The role of interfacial strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, A. G.

    1974-01-01

    The high tensile strength characteristic of strong interfacial filament/matrix bonding can be combined with the high fracture toughness of weak interfacial bonding, when the filaments are arranged to have alternate sections of high and low shear stress (and low and high toughness). Such weak and strong areas can be achieved by appropriate intermittent coating of the fibers. An analysis is presented for toughness and strength which demonstrates, in broad terms, the effects of varying the coating parameters of concern. Results show that the toughness of interfaces is an important parameter, differences in which may not be shown up in terms of interfacial strength. Some observations are made upon methods of measuring the components of toughness in composites.

  5. Fracture toughness and strength of 96% alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.B.; Chinn, R.E.; McNerney, K.R.; Brog, T.K.; Kim, C.Y.; Krutyholowa, M.W.; Chen, N.W.; Haun, M.J.

    1997-05-01

    There exists a need to understand the controlling factors that simultaneously impact strength and toughness in 96% alumina. The enhancement of both strength and toughness enables designers to extend the use limits and reliability for structural ceramics. This article presents mechanical property results from a group study examining the use of different alkaline-earth aluminosilicate intergranular compositions containing magnesium, calcium and strontium oxides (RO) in 96% alumina. Principal results address trends in indentation strength toughness and modulus of rupture. Trends in the data are presented relative to existing theories of thermal expansion mismatch toughening, grain-bridging crack-wake effect and crack deflection mechanisms. Strength is addressed in terms of strength after indentation, crack growth of indentation flaws and Weibull characterization for the strength distribution.

  6. The interlaminar fracture toughness of woven graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Joan G.; Deaton, Jerry W.

    1989-01-01

    The interlaminar fracture toughness of 2-D graphite/epoxy woven composites was determined as a function of stacking sequence, thickness, and weave pattern. Plain, oxford, 5-harness satin, and 8-harness satin weaves of T300/934 material were evaluated by the double cantilever beam test. The fabric material had a G (sub Ic) ranging from 2 to 8 times greater than 0 degrees unidirectional T300/934 tape material. The interlaminar fracture toughness of a particular weave style was dependent on whether the stacking sequence was symmetric or asymmetric and, in some cases, on the fabric orientation.

  7. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part I. Ductility and fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, B.; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Minkin, A.; Potapova, V.; Smirnov, V.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation swelling effect on the fracture properties of irradiated austenitic steels under static loading has been studied and analyzed from the mechanical and physical viewpoints. Experimental data on the stress-strain curves, fracture strain, fracture toughness and fracture mechanisms have been represented for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various swelling. Some phenomena in mechanical behaviour of irradiated austenitic steels have been revealed and explained as follows: a sharp decrease of fracture toughness with swelling growth; untypical large increase of fracture toughness with decrease of the test temperature; some increase of fracture toughness after preliminary cyclic loading. Role of channel deformation and channel fracture has been clarified in the properties of irradiated austenitic steel and different tendencies to channel deformation have been shown and explained for the same austenitic steel irradiated at different temperatures and neutron doses.

  8. Dynamic fracture toughnesses of reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, A. S.; Emery, A. F.; Liaw, B. M.

    1983-01-01

    The room-temperature dynamic fracture response of reaction-bonded silicon nitride is investigated using a hybrid experimental-numerical procedure. In this procedure, experimentally determined crack velocities are utilized to drive a dynamic finite-element code or dynamic finite-difference code in its generation mode in order to extract numerically the dynamic stress intensity factor of the fracturing specimen. Results show that the dynamic fracture toughness vs crack velocity relations of the two reaction-bonded silicon nitrides do not follow the general trend in those relations of brittle polymers and steel. A definite slow crack velocity during the initial phase of dynamic crack propagation is observed in reaction-bonded silicon nitride, which results in a nonunique dynamic fracture toughness vs crack velocity relation. In addition, it is found that a propagating crack will continue to propagate under a static stress intensity factor substantially lower than K(IC).

  9. The importance of fracture toughness in ultrafine and nanocrystalline bulk materials

    PubMed Central

    Pippan, R.; Hohenwarter, A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The suitability of high-strength ultrafine and nanocrystalline materials processed by severe plastic deformation methods and aimed to be used for structural applications will strongly depend on their resistance against crack growth. In this contribution some general available findings on the damage tolerance of this material class will be summarized. Particularly, the occurrence of a pronounced fracture anisotropy will be in the center of discussion. In addition, the great potential of this generated anisotropy to obtain high-strength materials with exceptionally high fracture toughness in specific loading and crack growth directions will be enlightened. IMPACT STATEMENT Severely plastically deformed materials are reviewed in light of their damage tolerance. The frequently observed toughness anisotropy allows unprecedented fracture toughness – strength combinations. PMID:27570712

  10. Fracture toughness of hydroxyapatite/mica composite, packed hydroxyapatite, alumina ceramics, silicon nitride and -carbide.

    PubMed

    Nordström, E G; Yokobori, A T; Yokobori, T; Aizawa, Y

    1998-01-01

    By using the fracture toughness estimation method based on two-dimensional map, it was found that the ductility of the high porosity hydroxyapatite/mice composite was comparable with silicon carbide. It was measured to be higher than that of packed hydroxyapatite. Alumina ceramics with more than 96% aluminium oxide showed a higher fracture toughness than the composite material. When bending strength was compared, the strength of the composite was two or three times lower than that of packed hydroxyapatite and much lower than the other studied materials. The composite material showed high porosity, which in turn gives it a lower bending strength. However, the high porosity is more favourable for biocompatibility.

  11. Fracture toughness of mountain gorilla (Gorilla gorilla beringei) food plants.

    PubMed

    Elgart-Berry, Alison

    2004-04-01

    Mountain gorillas, the largest extant primates, subsist almost entirely on plant matter. Moreover, their diet includes a substantial amount of structural material, such as bark and stems, which other primates tend to avoid. Accordingly, the robust masticatory apparatus of gorillas may be adaptive to this presumably tough diet; however, quantitative information on this subject is lacking. In this study the fracture toughness of mountain gorilla foods was examined for the first time. Samples of 44 food plants from Bwindi-Impenetrable National Park (BINP) and Mgahinga Gorilla National Park (MGNP) were tested. These parks are inhabited by two gorilla populations that regarded by some as being distinct at the subspecific taxonomic level. Although food toughness did not differ between the two populations, both diets contained tough items. Tree barks were the toughest food items (varying from 0.23 to 8.2 kJ/m2), followed by shrub barks, pith, and stems. The toughness of leaves and fruit was negligible compared to that of bark. The toughness of bamboo was low in comparison to the toughest food items. Accordingly, the prominent toughness of bark, pith, and stems may be key factors in the evolution of orofacial robusticity in mountain gorillas.

  12. Toughness of carbon nanotubes conforms to classic fracture mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Greenfeld, Israel; Wagner, H. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Defects in crystalline structure are commonly believed to degrade the ideal strength of carbon nanotubes. However, the fracture mechanisms induced by such defects, as well as the validity of solid mechanics theories at the nanoscale, are still under debate. We show that the fracture toughness of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) conforms to the classic theory of fracture mechanics, even for the smallest possible vacancy defect (~2 Å). By simulating tension of SWNTs containing common types of defects, we demonstrate how stress concentration at the defect boundary leads to brittle (unstable) fracturing at a relatively low strain, degrading the ideal strength of SWNTs by up to 60%. We find that, owing to the SWNT’s truss-like structure, defects at this scale are not sharp and stress concentrations are finite and low. Moreover, stress concentration, a geometric property at the macroscale, is interrelated with the SWNT fracture toughness, a material property. The resulting SWNT fracture toughness is 2.7 MPa m0.5, typical of moderately brittle materials and applicable also to graphene. PMID:26989774

  13. Toughness of carbon nanotubes conforms to classic fracture mechanics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Greenfeld, Israel; Wagner, H Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Defects in crystalline structure are commonly believed to degrade the ideal strength of carbon nanotubes. However, the fracture mechanisms induced by such defects, as well as the validity of solid mechanics theories at the nanoscale, are still under debate. We show that the fracture toughness of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) conforms to the classic theory of fracture mechanics, even for the smallest possible vacancy defect (~2 Å). By simulating tension of SWNTs containing common types of defects, we demonstrate how stress concentration at the defect boundary leads to brittle (unstable) fracturing at a relatively low strain, degrading the ideal strength of SWNTs by up to 60%. We find that, owing to the SWNT's truss-like structure, defects at this scale are not sharp and stress concentrations are finite and low. Moreover, stress concentration, a geometric property at the macroscale, is interrelated with the SWNT fracture toughness, a material property. The resulting SWNT fracture toughness is 2.7 MPa m(0.5), typical of moderately brittle materials and applicable also to graphene.

  14. Numerical modeling of ductile tearing effects on cleavage fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, R.H. Jr.; Tang, M.; Anderson, T.L.

    1994-05-01

    Experimental studies demonstrate a significant effect of specimen size, a/W ratio and prior ductile tearing on cleavage fracture toughness values (J{sub c}) measured in the ductile-to-brittle transition region of ferritic materials. In the lower-transition region, cleavage fracture often occurs under conditions of large-scale yielding but without prior ductile crack extension. The increased toughness develops when plastic zones formed at the crack tip interact with nearby specimen surfaces which relaxes crack-tip constraint (stress triaxiality). In the mid-to-upper transition region, small amounts of ductile crack extension (often < 1-2 mm) routinely precede termination of the J-{Delta}a curve by brittle fracture. Large-scale yielding, coupled with small amounts of ductile tearing, magnifies the impact of small variations in microscale material properties on the macroscopic fracture toughness which contributes to the large amount scatter observed in measured J{sub c}-values. Previous work by the authors described a micromechanics fracture model to correct measured J{sub c}-values for the mechanistic effects of large-scale yielding. This new work extends the model to also include the influence of ductile crack extension prior to cleavage. The paper explores development of the new model, provides necessary graphs and procedures for its application and demonstrates the effects of the model on fracture data sets for two pressure vessel steels (A533B and A515).

  15. On the in vitro fracture toughness of human dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Imbeni, V.; Nalla, R.K.; Bosi, C.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2002-02-05

    The in vitro fracture toughness of human dention has been reported to be of the order of 3 MPa sqrt m. This result, however is based on a single study for a single orientation, and furthermore involves notched, rather than fatigue precracked, test samples.

  16. Effects of direct and indirect bleach on dentin fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Tam, L E; Noroozi, A

    2007-12-01

    There are concerns that tooth-whitening procedures irreversibly damage tooth structure. We investigated the hypothesis that dental bleaches significantly affect dentin structural integrity. The objective was to evaluate the effects of peroxide bleaches on dentin fracture toughness. Compact test specimens, composed of human dentin, were used (n = 10/group). Bleach (16% or 10% carbamide peroxide or 3% hydrogen peroxide) or control material, containing 0.1% sodium fluoride, was applied directly or indirectly to dentin through enamel (6 hrs/day) for 2 or 8 weeks. Fracture toughness results were analyzed by ANOVA and Fisher's LSD test (p < 0.05). There were significant decreases in mean fracture toughness after two- and eight-week direct (19-34% and 61-68%, respectively) and indirect (up to 17% and 37%, respectively) bleach application. The in vitro reduction in dentin fracture toughness caused by the application of peroxide bleaches was greater for the direct application method, longer application time, and higher bleach concentration.

  17. Dynamic fracture-toughness evaluation by measurement of CTOD (Crack Tip Opening Displacement). Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, W.N.; Douglas, A.S.; Shapiro, J.M.

    1988-03-15

    Quantification of the dynamic fracture toughness of structural materials is essential to a wide range of problems - from nuclear accidents to ordnance applications. However, the difficulties associated with accurate measurements of cracks under dynamic loading are considerable. Thus there are no standardized procedures and few reliable results. This work describes a systematic study of the dynamic fracture toughness of SAE-01 tool steel, 4340 and HY100 steels and a tungsten, using the ISDG (Interferometric Strain/Displacement Gage) system which has very-high-frequency resolution. The major advantage of the method is that information is obtained very close to the crack tip, so that stress wave loading effects are accounted for. A detailed error analysis gives an uncertainty of -10% to +20% in the determination of fracture toughness, which compares with + or - 20% for published work.

  18. Mixed-mode fracture toughness of ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, S.; Shih, C.F.; O'Dowd, N.P. . Div. of Engineering); Morrone, A. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-05-01

    An experimental technique whereby pure mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture toughness values of ceramic materials can be determined using four-point bend specimens containing sharp, through-thickness precracks is discussed. In this method, notched and fatigue-precracked specimens of brittle solids are subjected to combined mode I-mode II and pure mode II fracture under asymmetric four point bend loading and to pure mode I under symmetric bend loading. A detailed finite element analysis of the test specimen is performed to obtain stress intensity factor calibrations for a wide range of loading states. The effectiveness of this method to provide reproducible combined mode I- mode II fracture toughness values is demonstrated with experimental results obtained for a polycrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  19. The loss of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) reduces bone toughness and fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Alexander J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Wadeer, Sandra A; Whitehead, Jack M; Rowland, Barbara J; Granke, Mathilde; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Yang, Xiangli; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2014-05-01

    Even though age-related changes to bone tissue affecting fracture risk are well characterized, only a few matrix-related factors have been identified as important to maintaining fracture resistance. As a gene critical to osteoblast differentiation, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is possibly one of these important factors. To test the hypothesis that the loss of ATF4 affects the fracture resistance of bone beyond bone mass and structure, we harvested bones from Atf4+/+ and Atf4-/- littermates at 8 and 20 weeks of age (n≥9 per group) for bone assessment across several length scales. From whole bone mechanical tests in bending, femurs from Atf4-/- mice were found to be brittle with reduced toughness and fracture toughness compared to femurs from Atf4+/+ mice. However, there were no differences in material strength and in tissue hardness, as determined by nanoindentation, between the genotypes, irrespective of age. Tissue mineral density of the cortex at the point of loading as determined by micro-computed tomography was also not significantly different. However, by analyzing local composition by Raman Spectroscopy (RS), bone tissue of Atf4-/- mice was found to have higher mineral to collagen ratio compared to wild-type tissue, primarily at 20 weeks of age. From RS analysis of intact femurs at 2 orthogonal orientations relative to the polarization axis of the laser, we also found that the organizational-sensitive peak ratio, ν1Phosphate per Amide I, changed to a greater extent upon bone rotation for Atf4-deficient tissue, implying bone matrix organization may contribute to the brittleness phenotype. Target genes of ATF4 activity are not only important to osteoblast differentiation but also in maintaining bone toughness and fracture toughness.

  20. Crack growth rates and fracture toughness of irradiated austenitic stainless steels in BWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-01-21

    In light water reactors, austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in reactor core internal components because of their high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods degrades the fracture properties of these steels by changing the material microstructure (e.g., radiation hardening) and microchemistry (e.g., radiation-induced segregation). Experimental data are presented on the fracture toughness and crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast austenitic SSs, including weld heat-affected-zone materials, that were irradiated to fluence levels as high as {approx} 2x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 3 dpa) in a light water reactor at 288-300 C. The results are compared with the data available in the literature. The effects of material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on CGRs under cyclic and stress corrosion cracking conditions were determined. A superposition model was used to represent the cyclic CGRs of austenitic SSs. The effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness of these steels, as well as the effects of material and irradiation conditions and test temperature, have been evaluated. A fracture toughness trend curve that bounds the existing data has been defined. The synergistic effects of thermal and radiation embrittlement of cast austenitic SS internal components have also been evaluated.

  1. How tough is bone? Application of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics to bone.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiahau; Mecholsky, John J; Clifton, Kari B

    2007-02-01

    Bone, with a hierarchical structure that spans from the nano-scale to the macro-scale and a composite design composed of nano-sized mineral crystals embedded in an organic matrix, has been shown to have several toughening mechanisms that increases its toughness. These mechanisms can stop, slow, or deflect crack propagation and cause bone to have a moderate amount of apparent plastic deformation before fracture. In addition, bone contains a high volumetric percentage of organics and water that makes it behave nonlinearly before fracture. Many researchers used strength or critical stress intensity factor (fracture toughness) to characterize the mechanical property of bone. However, these parameters do not account for the energy spent in plastic deformation before bone fracture. To accurately describe the mechanical characteristics of bone, we applied elastic-plastic fracture mechanics to study bone's fracture toughness. The J integral, a parameter that estimates both the energies consumed in the elastic and plastic deformations, was used to quantify the total energy spent before bone fracture. Twenty cortical bone specimens were cut from the mid-diaphysis of bovine femurs. Ten of them were prepared to undergo transverse fracture and the other 10 were prepared to undergo longitudinal fracture. The specimens were prepared following the apparatus suggested in ASTM E1820 and tested in distilled water at 37 degrees C. The average J integral of the transverse-fractured specimens was found to be 6.6 kPa m, which is 187% greater than that of longitudinal-fractured specimens (2.3 kPa m). The energy spent in the plastic deformation of the longitudinal-fractured and transverse-fractured bovine specimens was found to be 3.6-4.1 times the energy spent in the elastic deformation. This study shows that the toughness of bone estimated using the J integral is much greater than the toughness measured using the critical stress intensity factor. We suggest that the J integral method is

  2. Fracture Toughness of Advanced Structural Ceramics: Applying ASTM C1421

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Swab, Jeffrey J.; Tice, Jason; Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Kraft, Reuben H.

    2014-11-03

    The three methods of determining the quasi-static Mode I fracture toughness (KIc) (surface crack in flexure – SC, single-edge precracked beam – PB, and chevron notched beam – VB) found in ASTM C1421 were applied to a variety of advanced ceramic materials. All three methods produced valid and comparable KIc values for the Al2O3, SiC, Si3N4 and SiAlON ceramics examined. However, not all methods could successfully be applied to B4C, ZrO2 and WC ceramics due to a variety of material factors. The coarse-grained microstructure of one B4C hindered the ability to observe and measure the precracks generated in the SCmore » and PB methods while the transformation toughening in the ZrO2 prevented the formation of the SC and PB precracks and thus made it impossible to use either method on this ceramic. The high strength and elastic modulus of the WC made it impossible to achieve stable crack growth using the VB method because the specimen stored a tremendous amount of energy prior to fracture. Even though these methods have passed the rigors of the standardization process there are still some issues to be resolved when the methods are applied to certain classes of ceramics. We recommend that at least two of these methods be employed to determine the KIc, especially when a new or unfamiliar ceramic is being evaluated.« less

  3. Fracture toughness of experimental dental composites aged in ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ferracane, J L; Berge, H X

    1995-07-01

    Fracture toughness (KIc) is an intrinsic property which may be related to the ability of a restorative material to resist fracture and abrasion. This property may change for a dental composite restorative due to the effects of various oral solvents. The hypothesis to be tested was that aging in ethanol would cause a reduction in the fracture toughness of dental composites, and that the extent of this reduction might be dependent upon certain compositional variables. The fracture toughnesses of three series of experimental composites with various degrees of conversion, filler volume, and percent of silane-treated fillers were compared after the composites were aged for periods of one month and six months in 75% ethanol/water, a solvent which serves as a food-simulating liquid. An unfilled Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin served as the control. All composites, with the exception of one subjected to a post-light-curing heat treatment, experienced a significant reduction (from 30 to 56%) in KIc after being aged in 75% ethanol for six months. A similar reduction in KIc of 58% for the unfilled resin suggested that the reduction for the composites was due to a weakening of the resin matrix, which facilitated crack propagation. A simultaneous reduction in microhardness was also demonstrated. One month of aging in ethanol also produced large reductions in KIc for specimens with insufficient cure and minimal filler volume, suggesting that the properties of the resin matrix predominated for these composites.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Evaluation of fracture toughness of human dentin using elastic-plastic fracture mechanics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiahau; Taskonak, Burak; Platt, Jeffrey A; Mecholsky, John J

    2008-01-01

    Dentin, the mineralized tissue forming the bulk of the tooth, lies between the enamel and the pulp chamber. It is a rich source of inspiration for designing novel synthetic materials due to its unique microstructure. Most of the previous studies investigating the fracture toughness of dentin have used linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) that ignores plastic deformation and could underestimate the toughness of dentin. With the presence of collagen (approximately 30% by volume) aiding the toughening mechanisms in dentin, we hypothesize that there is a significant difference between the fracture toughness estimated using LEFM (Kc) and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) (KJc). Single-edge notched beam specimens with in-plane (n=10) and anti-plane (n=10) parallel fractures were prepared following ASTM standard E1820 and tested in three-point flexure. KJc of the in-plane parallel and anti-plane parallel specimens were found to be 3.1 and 3.4 MPa m 1/2 and Kc were 2.4 and 2.5 MPa m 1/2, respectively. The fracture toughness estimated based on KJc is significantly greater than that estimated based on Kc (32.5% on average; p<0.001). In addition, KJc of anti-plane parallel specimens is significantly greater than that of in-plane parallel specimens. We suggest that, in order to critically evaluate the fracture toughness of human dentin, EPFM should be employed.

  5. High strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  6. Strength and Fracture Toughness of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrolyte Material Improved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.

    2002-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are being developed for various applications in the automobile, power-generation, and aeronautics industries. Recently, the NASA Glenn Research Center has been exploring the possibility of using SOFC's for aeropropulsion under its Zero Carbon Dioxide Emission Technology (ZCET) Program. 10-mol% yttriastabilized zirconia (10YSZ) is a very good anionic conductor at high temperatures and is, therefore, used as an oxygen solid electrolyte in SOFC. However, it has a high thermal expansion coefficient, low thermal shock resistance, low fracture toughness, and poor mechanical strength. For aeronautic applications, the thin ceramic electrolyte membrane of the SOFC needs to be strong and tough. Therefore, we have been investigating the possibility of enhancing the strength and fracture toughness of the 10YSZ electrolyte without degrading its electrical conductivity to an appreciable extent. We recently demonstrated that the addition of alumina to zirconia electrolyte increases its strength as well as its fracture toughness. Zirconia-alumina composites containing 0 to 30 mol% of alumina were fabricated by hot pressing. The hot pressing procedure was developed and various hot pressing parameters were optimized, resulting in dense, crackfree panels of composite materials. Cubic zirconia and a-alumina were the only phases detected, indicating that there was no chemical reaction between the constituents during hot pressing at elevated temperatures. Flexure strength sf and fracture toughness K(sub IC) of the various zirconia-alumina composites were measured at room temperature as well as at 1000 C in air. Both properties showed systematic improvement with increased alumina addition at room temperature and at 1000 C. Use of these modified electrolytes with improved strength and fracture toughness should prolong the life and enhance the performance of SOFC in aeronautics and other applications.

  7. Evidence concerning crack-tip constraint and strain-rate effects in fracture-toughness testing

    SciTech Connect

    Merkle, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The procedures for measuring the plane strain fracture toughness, K/sub Ic/, of metals were originally developed for relatively high yield strength materials, the toughnesses of which were not affected by stain rate. The application of these procedures to lower yield strength and higher toughness structural and pressure vessel steels have since revealed a perplexing combination of problems involving the effects of geometry, stable crack growth and strain rate on the measured values of toughness. Only the geometric problems were encountered in the development of the procedures for measuring K/sub Ic/. For fracture in the linear elastic range of the load-displacement curve, these problems were overcome by specifying specimen dimensions sufficiently large with respect of the plastic zone size at fracture. However, in the case of structural and pressure vessel steels, it is not always possible to test specimens large enough for fracture to occur prior to general yielding. Therefore, in these cases, the effects of large-scale yielding prior to fracture cannot be avoided, but since they presently have no analytical explanation they are being treated empirically.

  8. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF FORGED STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M

    2008-03-28

    The effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness properties of Types 304L, 316L and 21-6-9 forged stainless steels was investigated. Fracture toughness samples were fabricated from forward-extruded forgings. Samples were uniformly saturated with hydrogen after exposure to hydrogen gas at 34 MPa or 69 and 623 K prior to testing. The fracture toughness properties were characterized by measuring the J-R behavior at ambient temperature in air. The results show that the hydrogen-charged steels have fracture toughness values that were about 50-60% of the values measured for the unexposed steels. The reduction in fracture toughness was accompanied by a change in fracture appearance. Both uncharged and hydrogen-charged samples failed by microvoid nucleation and coalescence, but the fracture surfaces of the hydrogen-charged steels had smaller microvoids. Type 316L stainless steel had the highest fracture toughness properties and the greatest resistance to hydrogen degradation.

  9. Results of ASTM round robin testing for mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    The results are summarized of several interlaboratory 'round robin' test programs for measuring the mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of advanced fiber reinforced composite materials. Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests were conducted by participants in ASTM committee D30 on High Modulus Fibers and their Composites and by representatives of the European Group on Fracture (EGF) and the Japanese Industrial Standards Group (JIS). DCB tests were performed on three AS4 carbon fiber reinforced composite materials: AS4/3501-6 with a brittle epoxy matrix; AS4/BP907 with a tough epoxy matrix; and AS4/PEEK with a tough thermoplastic matrix. Difficulties encountered in manufacturing panels, as well as conducting the tests are discussed. Critical issues that developed during the course of the testing are highlighted. Results of the round robin testing used to determine the precision of the ASTM DCB test standard are summarized.

  10. Experimental investigation of CNT effect on curved beam strength and interlaminar fracture toughness of CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arca, M. A.; Coker, D.

    2014-06-01

    High mechanical properties and light weight structures of composite materials and advances in manufacturing processes have increased the use of composite materials in the aerospace and wind energy industries as a primary load carrying structures in complex shapes. However, use of composite materials in complex geometries such as L-shaped laminates creates weakness at the radius which causes delamination. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is preferred as a toughening materials in composite matrices due to their high mechanical properties and aspect ratios. However, effect of CNTs on curved beam strength (CBS) is not investigated in literature comprehensively. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of CNT on Mode I and Mode II fracture toughness and CBS. L-shaped beams are fabric carbon/epoxy composite laminates manufactured by hand layup technique. Curved beam composite laminates were subjected to four point bending loading according to ASTM D6415/D6415M-06a. Double cantilever beam (DCB) tests and end notch flexure (ENF) tests were conducted to determine mode-I and mode-II fracture toughness, respectively. Preliminary results show that 3% CNT addition to the resin increased the mode-I fracture toughness by %25 and mode-II fracture toughness by %10 compared to base laminates. In contrast, no effect on curved beam strength was found.

  11. On the study of crack-initiation fracture toughness of fiber glass asphalt shingles

    SciTech Connect

    Shiao, M.L.

    1999-07-01

    The fracture behavior of fiber glass asphalt shingles was examined by measuring their J-integral fracture toughness at crack initiation. The corresponding fracture mechanisms were also studied by in situ fracture observation and by scanning electron microscopy. The applicability of using J-integral fracture toughness to characterize asphalt shingles was discussed and its relationships to other mechanical properties was established. The results indicated that the fracture toughness at crack initiation can be accurately measured for fiber glass shingles and the values may be used to characterize their cracking resistance. Fracture toughness measured from various shingle samples was found to correlate to the shingle's tensile toughness and to its tear strength. Preliminary results on fracture mechanisms suggested that failure in the asphalt coatings by micro-cavitation may be the controlling event leading to crack advance. The importance of the glass fiber mat on a shingle's resistance to fracture was also discussed.

  12. Composite Fracture Toughness and Impact Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The basic threat to the more widespread use of composites in aircraft primary structure is the problem of residual strength in the presence of damage. Specific problem areas that need to be addressed include the following: (1) modeling/understanding composite failure (impact: relate strain energy release rate to strain-to-failure, open hole compression: relate shear crippling to strain-to-failure, and account for variables such as thickness and stacking sequence); (2) micromechanics models; (3) consider the use of hybrid combinations, both interply and intraply, using graphite, Kevlar, and glass; and (4) modeling/understanding the role of the interface. Solving these problems involves a multidisciplinary approach including dynamics, structural stability, composite mechanics, and fracture mechanics.

  13. Temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel neutron-irradiated up to 145 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, S; Toloczko, M

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to high doses was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. These specimens were from the ACO-3 fuel duct wall of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), in which irradiation doses were in the range of 3.2 144.8 dpa and irradiation temperatures in the range of 380.4 502.6 oC. A miniature specimen reuse technique has been established for this investigation: the specimens used were the tested halves of miniature Charpy impact specimens (~13 3 4 mm) with diamond-saw cut in the middle. The fatigue precracking for specimens and fracture resistance (J-R) tests were carried out in a MTS servo-hydraulic testing machine with a vacuum furnace following the standard procedure described in the ASTM Standard E 1820-09. For each of five irradiated and one archive conditions, 7 to 9 J-R tests were performed at selected temperatures ranging from 22 C to 600 C. The fracture toughness of the irradiated HT9 steel was strongly dependent on irradiation temperatures rather than irradiation dose. When the irradiation temperature was below about 430 C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180 200 MPa m at 350 450 C and then decreased with test temperature. When the irradiation temperature 430 C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged until about 450 C and decreased with test temperature in higher temperature range. Similar test temperature dependence was observed for the archive material although the highest toughness values are lower after irradiation. Ductile stable crack growth occurred except for a few cases where both the irradiation temperature and test temperature are relatively low.

  14. The effect of electric discharge machined notches on the fracture toughness of several structural alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, J.A.; Link, R.E.

    1993-09-01

    Recent computational studies of the stress and strain fields at the tip of very sharp notches have shown that the stress and strain fields are very weakly dependent on the initial geometry of the notch once the notch has been blunted to a radius that is 6 to 10 times the initial root radius. It follows that if the fracture toughness of a material is sufficiently high so that fracture initiation does not occur in a specimen until the crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) reaches a value from 6 to 10 times the size of the initial notch tip diameter, then the fracture toughness will be independent of whether a fatigue crack or a machined notch served as the initial crack. In this experimental program the fracture toughness (J{sub Ic} and J resistance (J-R) curve, and CTOD) for several structure alloys was measured using specimens with conventional fatigue cracks and with EDM machined notches. The results of this program have shown, in fact, that most structural materials do not achieve initiation CTOD values on the order of 6 to 10 times the radius of even the smallest EDM notch tip presently achievable. It is found furthermore that tougher materials do not seem to be less dependent on the type of notch tip present. Some materials are shown to be much more dependent on the type of notch tip used, but no simple pattern is found that relates this observed dependence to the material strength toughness, or strain hardening rate.

  15. Apparent interfacial fracture toughness of resin/ceramic systems.

    PubMed

    Della Bona, A; Anusavice, K J; Mecholsky, J J

    2006-11-01

    We suggest that the apparent interfacial fracture toughness (K(A)) may be estimated by fracture mechanics and fractography. This study tested the hypothesis that the K(A) of the adhesion zone of resin/ceramic systems is affected by the ceramic microstructure. Lithia disilicate-based (Empress2-E2) and leucite-based (Empress-E1) ceramics were surface-treated with hydrofluoric acid (HF) and/or silane (S), followed by an adhesive resin. Microtensile test specimens (n = 30; area of 1 +/- 0.01 mm(2)) were indented (9.8 N) at the interface and loaded to failure in tension. We used tensile strength (sigma) and the critical crack size (c) to calculate K(A) (K(A) = Ysigmac(1/2)) (Y = 1.65). ANOVA and Weibull analyses were used for statistical analyses. Mean K(A) (MPa.m(1/2)) values were: (E1HF) 0.26 +/- 0.06; (E1S) 0.23 +/- 0.06; (E1HFS) 0.30 +/- 0.06; (E2HF) 0.31 +/- 0.06; (E2S) 0.13 +/- 0.05; and (E2HFS) 0.41 +/- 0.07. All fractures originated from indentation sites. Estimation of interfacial toughness was feasible by fracture mechanics and fractography. The K(A) for the systems tested was affected by the ceramic microstructure and surface treatment. PMID:17062746

  16. Interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Murri, Gretchen B.; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1987-01-01

    Static and cyclic end notched flexure tests were conducted on a graphite epoxy, a glass epoxy, and graphite thermoplastic to determine their interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for delamination in terms of limiting values of the mode II strain energy release rate, G-II, for delamination growth. The influence of precracking and data reduction schemes are discussed. Finite element analysis indicated that the beam theory calculation for G-II with the transverse shear contribution included was reasonably accurate over the entire range of crack lengths. Cyclic loading significantly reduced the critical G-II for delamination. A threshold value of the maximum cyclic G-II below which no delamination occurred after one million cycles was identified for each material. Also, residual static toughness tests were conducted on glass epoxy specimens that had undergone one million cycles without delamination. A linear mixed-mode delamination criteria was used to characterize the static toughness of several composite materials; however, a total G threshold criterion appears to characterize the fatigue delamination durability of composite materials with a wide range of static toughness.

  17. Interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Murri, Gretchen B.; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1989-01-01

    Static and cyclic end notched flexure tests were conducted on a graphite epoxy, a glass epoxy, and graphite thermoplastic to determine their interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for delamination in terms of limiting values of the mode II strain energy release rate, G-II, for delamination growth. The influence of precracking and data reduction schemes are discussed. Finite element analysis indicated that the beam theory calculation for G-II with the transverse shear contribution included was reasonably accurate over the entire range of crack lengths. Cyclic loading significantly reduced the critical G-II for delamination. A threshold value of the maximum cyclic G-II below which no delamination occurred after one million cycles was identified for each material. Also, residual static toughness tests were conducted on glass epoxy specimens that had undergone one million cycles without delamination. A linear mixed-mode delamination criteria was used to characterize the static toughness of several composite materials; however, a total G threshold criterion appears to characterize the fatigue delamination durability of composite materials with a wide range of static toughness.

  18. Fracture Toughness of Advanced Structural Ceramics: Applying ASTM C1421

    SciTech Connect

    Swab, Jeffrey J.; Tice, Jason; Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Kraft, Reuben H.

    2014-11-03

    The three methods of determining the quasi-static Mode I fracture toughness (KIc) (surface crack in flexure – SC, single-edge precracked beam – PB, and chevron notched beam – VB) found in ASTM C1421 were applied to a variety of advanced ceramic materials. All three methods produced valid and comparable KIc values for the Al2O3, SiC, Si3N4 and SiAlON ceramics examined. However, not all methods could successfully be applied to B4C, ZrO2 and WC ceramics due to a variety of material factors. The coarse-grained microstructure of one B4C hindered the ability to observe and measure the precracks generated in the SC and PB methods while the transformation toughening in the ZrO2 prevented the formation of the SC and PB precracks and thus made it impossible to use either method on this ceramic. The high strength and elastic modulus of the WC made it impossible to achieve stable crack growth using the VB method because the specimen stored a tremendous amount of energy prior to fracture. Even though these methods have passed the rigors of the standardization process there are still some issues to be resolved when the methods are applied to certain classes of ceramics. We recommend that at least two of these methods be employed to determine the KIc, especially when a new or unfamiliar ceramic is being evaluated.

  19. Improved fracture toughness corrosion-resistant bearing material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamberger, E. N.; Nahm, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    A development program was performed to establish whether a corrosion-resistant bearing material, such as a 14Cr steel, could be modified to allow carburization, thereby providing the excellent fracture toughness characteristics feasible with this process. The alloy selected for investigation was AMS 5749. Several modifications were made including the addition of a small amount of nickel for austenite stabilization. While some promising results were achieved, the primary objective of an acceptable combination of case hardness and microstructure was not attained. Because the high chromium content presents a serious problem in achieving a viable carburizing cycle, a number of experimental steels having lower chromium contents (8 to 12%) were produced in laboratory quantities and evaluated. The results were basically the same as those initially obtained with the modified AMS 5749. Corrosion tests were performed on AMS 5749, AISI M50, and 52100 bearing steels as well as some of the lower chromium steels. These tests showed that a reduced chromium level (10 to 12%) provided essentially the same corrosion protection as the 14Cr steels.

  20. The effect of magnetic field intensity and treatment time on graphene / epoxy composites’ fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Z. Q.; Zhang, L.; Fu, S.; Yuan, R. H.; Dong, Z. W.; Ren, X. M.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the intensity of the magnetic field and the treatment time on the fracture toughness of graphene/epoxy composites is researched. Also, the mechanism of the effect of the magnetic field on the fracture toughness of graphene/epoxy composites and a method to improve the impact resistance is explored. Then, three-point bending tests are employed to characterize the fracture toughness of graphene/epoxy composite. The results show that the intervention of magnetic field could induce GNS to generated orientation arrangement, improving the fracture toughness of the graphene/epoxy composite. When the intensity of the magnetic field was increased, the growth rate of the fracture toughness slowed. However, when 2T magnetic was used to synthetically process the material, and when the processing time was less than 50 min, the fracture toughness of the composite material increased significantly.

  1. Dependence of Fracture Toughness on Crystallographic Orientation in Single-Crystalline Cubic (β) Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Pharr, M.; Katoh, Y.; Bei, H.

    2006-01-01

    Along with other desirable properties, the ability of silicon carbide (SiC) to retain high strength after elevated temperature exposures to neutron irradiation renders it potentially applicable in fusion and advanced fission reactors. However, properties of the material such as room temperature fracture toughness must be thoroughly characterized prior to such practical applications. The objective of this work is to investigate the dependence of fracture toughness on crystallographic orientation for single-crystalline β-SiC. X-ray diffraction was first performed on the samples to determine the orientation of the crystal. Nanoindentation was used to determine a hardness of 39.1 and 35.2 GPa and elastic modulus of 474 and 446 GPa for the single-crystalline and polycrystalline samples, respectively. Additionally, crack lengths and indentation diagonals were measured via a Vickers micro-hardness indenter under a load of 100 gf for different crystallographic orientations with indentation diagonals aligned along fundamental cleavage planes. Upon examination of propagation direction of cracks, the cracks usually did not initiate and propagate from the corners of the indentation where the stresses are concentrated but instead from the indentation sides. Such cracks clearly moved along the {1 1 0} family of planes (previously determined to be preferred cleavage plane), demonstrating that the fracture toughness of SiC is comparatively so much lower along this set of planes that the lower energy required to cleave along this plane overpowers the stress-concentration at indentation corners. Additionally, fracture toughness in the <1 1 0> direction was 1.84 MPa·m1/2, lower than the 3.46 MPa·m1/2 measured for polycrystalline SiC (which can serve as an average of a spectrum of orientations), further demonstrating that single-crystalline β-SiC has a strong fracture toughness anisotropy.

  2. Effect of environment on fracture toughness of 96 wt pct alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Tikare, Veena; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1993-01-01

    An effort is made to deepen understanding of environmental effects on the fracture toughness of an alumina composition that contains a residual glassy phase, by ascertaining the fracture toughness under atmospheric conditions in such varied environments as air distilled water, silicone oil, and liquid nitrogen. Fracture toughness was determined via the single-edge-precracked beam technique. Weibull strength parameters are compared for polished specimens tested both in air and silicone environments.

  3. Interrelation of material microstructure, ultrasonic factors, and fracture toughness of two phase titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The pivotal role of an alpha-beta phase microstructure in governing fracture toughness in a titanium alloy, Ti-662, is demonstrated. The interrelation of microstructure and fracture toughness is demonstrated using ultrasonic measurement techniques originally developed for nondestructive evaluation and material property characterization. It is shown that the findings determined from ultrasonic measurements agree with conclusions based on metallurgical, metallographic, and fractographic observations concerning the importance of alpha-beta morphology in controlling fracture toughness in two phase titanium alloys.

  4. The effects of neutron irradiation on fracture toughness of austenitic stainless steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.

    1999-05-21

    Austenitic stainless steels are used extensively as structural alloys in reactor pressure vessel internal components because of their superior fracture toughness properties. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods leads to significant reduction in the fracture resistance of these steels. This paper presents results of fracture toughness J-R curve tests on four heats of Type 304 stainless steel that were irradiated to fluence levels of {approx}0.3 and 0.9 x 10{sup 21} n cm{sup {minus}2} (E >1 MeV) at {approx}288 C in a helium environment in the Halden heavy water boiling reactor. The tests were performed on 1/4-T compact tension specimens in air at 288 C; crack extensions were determined by both DC potential and elastic unloading compliance techniques.

  5. Structural basis for the fracture toughness of the shell of the conch Strombus gigas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamat, S.; Su, X.; Ballarini, R.; Heuer, A. H.

    2000-06-01

    Natural composite materials are renowned for their mechanical strength and toughness: despite being highly mineralized, with the organic component constituting not more than a few per cent of the composite material, the fracture toughness exceeds that of single crystals of the pure mineral by two to three orders of magnitude. The judicious placement of the organic matrix, relative to the mineral phase, and the hierarchical structural architecture extending over several distinct length scales both play crucial roles in the mechanical response of natural composites to external loads. Here we use transmission electron microscopy studies and beam bending experiments to show that the resistance of the shell of the conch Strombus gigas to catastrophic fracture can be understood quantitatively by invoking two energy-dissipating mechanisms: multiple microcracking in the outer layers at low mechanical loads, and crack bridging in the shell's tougher middle layers at higher loads. Both mechanisms are intimately associated with the so-called crossed lamellar microarchitecture of the shell, which provides for `channel' cracking in the outer layers and uncracked structural features that bridge crack surfaces, thereby significantly increasing the work of fracture, and hence the toughness, of the material. Despite a high mineral content of about 99% (by volume) of aragonite, the shell of Strombus gigas can thus be considered a `ceramic plywood', and can guide the biomimetic design of tough, lightweight structures.

  6. Structural basis for the fracture toughness of the shell of the conch Strombus gigas.

    PubMed

    Kamat, S; Su, X; Ballarini, R; Heuer, A H

    2000-06-29

    Natural composite materials are renowned for their mechanical strength and toughness: despite being highly mineralized, with the organic component constituting not more than a few per cent of the composite material, the fracture toughness exceeds that of single crystals of the pure mineral by two to three orders of magnitude. The judicious placement of the organic matrix, relative to the mineral phase, and the hierarchical structural architecture extending over several distinct length scales both play crucial roles in the mechanical response of natural composites to external loads. Here we use transmission electron microscopy studies and beam bending experiments to show that the resistance of the shell of the conch Strombus gigas to catastrophic fracture can be understood quantitatively by invoking two energy-dissipating mechanisms: multiple microcracking in the outer layers at low mechanical loads, and crack bridging in the shell's tougher middle layers at higher loads. Both mechanisms are intimately associated with the so-called crossed lamellar microarchitecture of the shell, which provides for 'channel' cracking in the outer layers and uncracked structural features that bridge crack surfaces, thereby significantly increasing the work of fracture, and hence the toughness, of the material. Despite a high mineral content of about 99% (by volume) of aragonite, the shell of Strombus gigas can thus be considered a 'ceramic plywood' and can guide the biomimetic design of tough, lightweight structures.

  7. Structural basis for the fracture toughness of the shell of the conch Strombus gigas.

    PubMed

    Kamat, S; Su, X; Ballarini, R; Heuer, A H

    2000-06-29

    Natural composite materials are renowned for their mechanical strength and toughness: despite being highly mineralized, with the organic component constituting not more than a few per cent of the composite material, the fracture toughness exceeds that of single crystals of the pure mineral by two to three orders of magnitude. The judicious placement of the organic matrix, relative to the mineral phase, and the hierarchical structural architecture extending over several distinct length scales both play crucial roles in the mechanical response of natural composites to external loads. Here we use transmission electron microscopy studies and beam bending experiments to show that the resistance of the shell of the conch Strombus gigas to catastrophic fracture can be understood quantitatively by invoking two energy-dissipating mechanisms: multiple microcracking in the outer layers at low mechanical loads, and crack bridging in the shell's tougher middle layers at higher loads. Both mechanisms are intimately associated with the so-called crossed lamellar microarchitecture of the shell, which provides for 'channel' cracking in the outer layers and uncracked structural features that bridge crack surfaces, thereby significantly increasing the work of fracture, and hence the toughness, of the material. Despite a high mineral content of about 99% (by volume) of aragonite, the shell of Strombus gigas can thus be considered a 'ceramic plywood' and can guide the biomimetic design of tough, lightweight structures. PMID:10890440

  8. Experimental Determination of the Fracture Toughness and Brittleness of the Mancos Shale, Utah.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Mike; Meredith, Phil; Crawford, Brian

    2013-04-01

    The hydraulic fracturing of Gas-Shales has become a topic of interest since the US Shale Gas Revolution, and is increasingly being investigated across Europe. A significant issue during hydraulic fracturing is the risk of fractures propagating further than desired into aquifers or faults. This occured at Preese Hall, UK in April and May 2011 when hydraulic fractures propagated into an adjacent fault causing 2.3ML and 1.7ML earthquakes [1]. A rigorous understanding of how hydraulic fractures propagate under in-situ conditions is therefore important for treatment design, both to maximise gas accessed, and to minimise risks due to fracture overextension. Fractures will always propagate along the path of least resistance, but the direction and extent of this path is a complex relationship between the in-situ stress-field, the anisotropic mechanical properties of the rock, and the pore and fracturing pressures [2]. It is possible to estimate the anisotropic in-situ stress field using an isolated-section hydraulic fracture test, and the pore-pressure using well logs. However, the anisotropic mechanical properties of gas-shales remain poorly constrained, with a wide range of reported values. In particular, there is an extreme paucity of published data on the Fracture Toughness of soft sediments such as shales. Mode-I Fracture Toughness is a measure of a material's resistance to dynamic tensile fracture propagation. Defects such as pre-existing microcracks and pores in a material can induce high local stress concentrations, causing fracture propagation and material failure under substantially lower stress than its bulk strength. The mode-I stress intensity factor, KI, quantifies the concentration of stress at the crack tip. For linear elastic materials the Fracture Toughness is defined by the critical value of this stress intensity factor; KIc, beyond which rapid catastrophic crack growth occurs. However, rocks such as shales are relatively ductile and display significant

  9. In situ tensile fracture toughness of surficial cohesive marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Bruce D.; Barry, Mark A.; Boudreau, Bernard P.; Jumars, Peter A.; Dorgan, Kelly M.

    2012-02-01

    This study reports the first in situ measurements of tensile fracture toughness, K IC, of soft, surficial, cohesive marine sediments. A newly developed probe continuously measures the stress required to cause tensile failure in sediments to depths of up to 1 m. Probe measurements are in agreement with standard laboratory methods of K IC measurements in both potter's clay and natural sediments. The data comprise in situ depth profiles from three field sites in Nova Scotia, Canada. Measured K IC at two muddy sites (median grain size of 23-50 μm) range from near zero at the sediment surface to >1,800 Pa m1/2 at 0.2 m depth. These profiles also appear to identify the bioturbated/mixed depth. K IC for a sandy site (>90% sand) is an order of magnitude lower than for the muddy sediments, and reflects the lack of cohesion/adhesion. A comparison of K IC, median grain size, and porosity in muddy sediments indicates that consolidation increases fracture strength, whereas inclusion of sand causes weakening; thus, sand-bearing layers can be easily identified in K IC profiles. K IC and vane-measured shear strength correlate strongly, which suggests that the vane measurements should perhaps be interpreted as shear fracture toughness, rather than shear strength. Comparison of in situ probe-measured values with K IC of soils and gelatin shows that sediments have a K IC range intermediate between denser compacted soils and softer, elastic gelatin.

  10. Determination of dynamic fracture toughness using a new experimental technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady, Carl M.; Liu, Cheng; Lovato, Manuel L.

    2015-09-01

    In other studies dynamic fracture toughness has been measured using Charpy impact and modified Hopkinson Bar techniques. In this paper results will be shown for the measurement of fracture toughness using a new test geometry. The crack propagation velocities range from ˜0.15 mm/s to 2.5 m/s. Digital image correlation (DIC) will be the technique used to measure both the strain and the crack growth rates. The boundary of the crack is determined using the correlation coefficient generated during image analysis and with interframe timing the crack growth rate and crack opening can be determined. A comparison of static and dynamic loading experiments will be made for brittle polymeric materials. The analysis technique presented by Sammis et al. [1] is a semi-empirical solution, however, additional Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics analysis of the strain fields generated as part of the DIC analysis allow for the more commonly used method resembling the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) experiment. It should be noted that this technique was developed because limited amounts of material were available and crack growth rates were to fast for a standard CTOD method.

  11. Fracture-tough, corrosion-resistant bearing steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamental principles allowing design of stainless bearing steels with enhanced toughness and stress corrosion resistance has involved both investigation of basic phenomena in model alloys and evaluation of a prototype bearing steel based on a conceptual design exercise. Progress in model studies has included a scanning Auger microprobe (SAM) study of the kinetics of interfacial segregation of embrittling impurities which compete with the kinetics of alloy carbide precipitation in secondary hardening steels. These results can define minimum allowable carbide precipitation rates and/or maximum allowable free impurity contents in these ultrahigh strength steels. Characterization of the prototype bearing steel designed to combine precipitated austenite transformation toughening with secondary hardening shows good agreement between predicted and observed solution treatment response including the nature of the high temperature carbides. An approximate equilibrium constraint applied in the preliminary design calculations to maintain a high martensitic temperature proved inadequate, and the solution treated alloy remained fully austenitic down to liquid nitrogen temperature rather than transforming above 200 C. The alloy can be martensitically transformed by cryogenic deformation, and material so processed will be studied further to test predicted carbide and austenite precipitation behavior. A mechanistically-based martensitic kinetic model was developed and parameters are being evaluated from available kinetic data to allow precise control of martensitic temperatures of high alloy steels in future designs. Preliminary calculations incorporating the prototype stability results suggest that the transformation-toughened secondary-hardening martensitic-stainless design concept is still viable, but may require lowering Cr content to 9 wt. pct. and adding 0.5 to 1.0 wt. pct. Al. An alternative design approach based on strain-induced martensitic transformation during

  12. Fracture toughness studies of rubber-toughened polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.W.

    1993-01-01

    Polycarbonate was toughened with preformed core/shell particles. The fracture toughness at different toughener levels and temperatures was measured according to a J-integral procedure using compact tension test specimens. An extensive critique of the J-integral procedures was made and compared in this study. The fracture toughness J[sub IC] of unmodified polycarbonate in Mode I is 2.68 kJ/m[sup 2] at a crosshead speed of 5.08 mm/min with the specimen thickness ranging from 3.175 to 9.525 mm, at temperatures ranging from [minus]20 to 23[degrees]C. Under the same conditions, the J[sub IC] of rubber-toughened polycarbonates were 4.88, 5.68, 7.70, and 7.46 kJ/m[sup 2], at toughener levels of 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 parts, respectively, by weight per hundred parts (phr) of polycarbonate. The maximum toughness was realized at 7.5 phr of toughener and began to decrease at 10 phr. Tensile stress-strain curves indicated that the modulus is retained at all toughener levels. The ultimate stress and strain, however, steadily decreased. Fracture surfaces of test specimens were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and analyzed to elucidate the toughening mechanism. This indicated polycarbonate deforms through shear-yielding with or without the second phase. The fracture surface of broken tensile bars showed limited cavity volume compared to the compact tension specimens. The reason for this appears to be the higher crack speed accompanying fracture in the bars. The failure mechanism and the degree of toughening from the rubbery domains are different in the compact tension specimen and tensile bar specimen: with the compact tension specimens, dilatational deformation involving cavitation is dominant. The cavitation is initiated by interfacial debonding around the particles. In this, shear-yielding is limited. In the fracture of the tensile bar specimens, shear-yielding is dominant with limited dilatational deformation involving cavitation.

  13. On the feasibility of quantitative ultrasonic determination of fracture toughness: A literature review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. S.

    1980-01-01

    The three main topics covered are: (1) fracture toughness and microstructure, (2) quantitative ultrasonic and microstructure; and (3) scattering and related mathematical methods. Literature in these areas is reviewed to give insight to the search of a theoretical foundation for quantitative ultrasonic measurement of fracture toughness. The literature review shows that fracture toughness is inherently related to the microstructure and in particular, it depends upon the spacing of inclusions or second particles and the aspect ratio of second phase particles. There are indications that ultrasonic velocity attenuation measurements can be used to determine fracture toughness. The leads to a review of the mathematical models available in solving boundary value problems related to microstructural factors that govern facture toughness and wave motion. A framework towards the theoretical study for the quantitative determination of fracture toughness is described and suggestions for future research are proposed.

  14. Monitoring crack extension in fracture toughness tests by ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, S. J.; Fisher, D. M.; Buzzard, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    An ultrasonic method was used to observe the onset of crack extension and to monitor continued crack growth in fracture toughness specimens during three point bend tests. A 20 MHz transducer was used with commercially available equipment to detect average crack extension less than 0.09 mm. The material tested was a 300-grade maraging steel in the annealed condition. A crack extension resistance curve was developed to demonstrate the usefulness of the ultrasonic method for minimizing the number of tests required to generate such curves.

  15. Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Several Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1992-01-01

    Double-cantilever beam fracture toughness tests were performed by the Composite Materials Research Group on several different unidirectional composite materials provided by NASA Langley Research Center. The composite materials consisted of Hercules IM-7 carbon fiber and various matrix resin formulations. Multiple formulations of four different families of matrix resins were tested: LaRC - ITPI, LaRC - IA, RPT46T, and RP67/RP55. Report presents the materials tested and pertinent details supplied by NASA. For each material, three replicate specimens were tested. Multiple crack extensions were performed on each replicate.

  16. High strength and high toughness steel

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Earl R.; Zackay, Victor F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural steel which possess both high strength and high toughness and has particular application of cryogenic uses. The steel is produced by the utilization of thermally induced phase transformation following heating in a three-phase field in iron-rich alloys of the Fe-Ni-Ti system, with a preferred composition of 12% nickel, 0.5% titanium, the remainder being iron.

  17. Processing and testing of high toughness silicon nitride ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tikare, Veena; Sanders, William A.; Choi, Sung R.

    1993-01-01

    High toughness silicon nitride ceramics were processed with the addition of small quantities of beta-Si3N4 whiskers in a commercially available alpha-Si3N4 powder. These whiskers grew preferentially during sintering resulting in large, elongated beta-grains, which acted to toughen the matrix by crack deflection and grain pullout. The fracture toughness of these samples seeded with beta-Si3N4 whiskers ranged from 8.7 to 9.5 MPa m(exp 0.5) depending on the sintering additives.

  18. Simplified method for determining fracture toughness of two dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Sinavarat, Potchaman; Anunmana, Chuchai; Muanjit, Thitima

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the fracture toughness values (KIC), which were derived from simplified techniques: the indentation fracture (IF), the indentation strength (IS), and fractographic approach to that from a standard testing using surface cracks in flexure (SCF). Forty bar specimens, twenty IPS Empress(®) Esthetic and twenty IPS e.max(®)Ceram were prepared. Ten specimens in each material were tested by IF technique, IS technique and fractographic approach, and additional 10 specimens were tested by the SCF technique. This study showed that the mean KIC derived from fractographic approach were not significantly different from that of the SCF in both materials (p>0.05) whereas the mean KIC from indentation techniques rarely agreed with those of the standard technique. The KIC determination is sensitive to the methods used that affect accuracy. Consequently, test selection should be based on a sound understanding and inherent limitations of each technique.

  19. Comparison of fracture toughness (KIC) and strain energy release rate (G) of selected nuclear graphites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Se-Hwan

    2016-08-01

    The fracture behaviors of six nuclear graphite grades for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which differed in coke particle size and forming method, were characterized based on the ASTM standard graphite fracture toughness test method (ASTM D 7779-11) at room temperature. The G appeared to show good correlation with the fracture surface roughness and the G-Δa curves appeared to describe the fracture process well from crack initiation to failure. Comparison of the local (KIC) and gross (GIC, G-Δa) fracture parameters showed that the resistance to crack initiation and propagation was higher in the extruded or vibration molded medium particle size grades (PCEA, NBG-17, NBG-18: EVM group) than in the iso-molded fine particle size grades (IG-110, IG-430, NBG-25: IMF group). The ASTM may need to provide a guideline for G-Δa curve analysis. The KIC appeared to increase with specimen thickness (size).

  20. Microstructural effects on the dynamic fracture toughness of cellulose-fiber-reinforced polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemons, Craig Merrill

    Natural fiber reinforced thermoplastics are a rapidly growing, commercially interesting area. Unlike their glass reinforced counterparts, microstructure and dynamic fracture behavior of natural fiber reinforced thermoplastics have hardly been investigated. We characterized the microstructure of cellulose fiber reinforced polypropylene and determined its effect on dynamic fracture toughness. Scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surfaces and x-ray diffraction were used to investigate fiber orientation in injection molded composites. The polypropylene matrix was removed by solvent extraction, and the lengths of the residual fibers were optically determined. Fiber lengths were reduced by one-half when compounded in a high-intensity thermokinetic mixer and then injection molded. At low fiber contents, there was little fiber orientation; at high fiber contents, a layered structure arose exhibiting differing fiber orientations through the thickness of the injection molded specimen. Scanning electron microscopy of acid etched specimens revealed spherulitic structure emanating from cellulose fibers (i.e. transcrystallinity) in injection molded composites containing less than 5% fibers. The etching procedure failed to provide any matrix surface relief in high fiber content composites. To better understand fracture under impact loading, dynamic fracture analysis was performed based on linear elastic fracture mechanics. Dynamic critical energy release rates and dynamic critical stress intensity factors were deduced from instrumented Charpy impact test measurements. Dynamic fracture toughness increased with cellulose content and with orientation of fibers perpendicular to the crack plane. To better control composite microstructure, model laminates of highly aligned plies were produced and tested. Dynamic fracture toughness decreased with fiber alignment angle. A simple model successfully related the microstructure to the dynamic fracture toughness. Increasing test

  1. Microscale resolution fracture toughness profiling at the zirconia-porcelain interface in dental prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, Alexander J. G.; Mohanty, Gaurav; Neo, Tee K.; Michler, Johann; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2015-12-01

    The high failure rate of the Yttria Partially Stabilized Zirconia (YPSZ)-porcelain interface in dental prostheses is influenced by the micro-scale mechanical property variation in this region. To improve the understanding of this behavior, micro-scale fracture toughness profiling by nanoindentation micropillar splitting is reported for the first time. Sixty 5 μm diameter micropillars were machined within the first 100 μm of the interface. Berkovich nanoindentation provided estimates of the bulk fracture toughness of YPSZ and porcelain that matched the literature values closely. However, the large included tip angle prevented precise alignment of indenter with the pillar center. Cube corner indentation was performed on the remainder of the pillars and calibration between nanoindentation using different tip shapes was used to determine the associated conversion factors. YPSZ micropillars failed by gradual crack propagation and bulk values persisted to within 15 μm from the interface, beyond which scatter increased and a 10% increase in fracture toughness was observed that may be associated with grain size variation at this location. Micropillars straddling the interface displayed preferential fracture within porcelain parallel to the interface at a location where nano-voiding has previously been observed and reported. Pure porcelain micropillars exhibited highly brittle failure and a large reduction of fracture toughness (by up to ~90%) within the first 50 μm of the interface. These new insights constitute a major advance in understanding the structure-property relationship of this important bi-material interface at the micro-scale, and will improve micromechanical modelling needed to optimize current manufacturing routes and reduce failure.

  2. Effects of tensile loading on upper shelf fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, J.A.; Link, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Constraint has been an important consideration in fracture mechanics from the earliest work that was done to develop the 1974 version of the ASTM Standard E399. O`Dowd and Shih (1991) have proposed that the difference in crack tip stress fields can be quantified in terms of a field quantity that they have call Q. The Q quantity is a function of J, the crack shape and size, the structural geometry, mode of loading and on the level of deformation and can only be calculated from a high resolution elastic-plastic computational analysis. A similar, simpler, but more controversial approach has been suggested by Betegon and Hancock (1991), who use the non-singular term of the elastic, crack singularity solution, called the T-Stress, as a measure of elastic-plastic crack tip constraint. The objective of this work is to develop some upper shelf, elastic-plastic experimental results to attempt to investigate the applicability of the Q and T stress parameters to the correlation of upper shelf initiation toughness and J resistance curves. The first objective was to obtain upper shelf J resistance curves, J{sub Ic}, and tearing resistance results for a range of applied constraint. The J-Q and J-T stress loci were developed and compared with the expectations of the O`Dowd and Shih and the Betegon and Hancock analyses. Constraint was varied by changing the crack length and also by changing the mode of loading from bending to predominantly tensile. The principle conclusions of this work are that J{sub Ic} does not appear to be dependent on T stress or Q while the material tearing resistance is dependent on T stress and Q, with the tearing modulus increasing as constraint decreases.

  3. Fracture toughness of copper-base alloys for ITER applications: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1997-04-01

    Oxide-dispersion strengthened copper alloys and a precipitation-hardened copper-nickel-beryllium alloy showed a significant reduction in toughness at elevated temperature (250{degrees}C). This decrease in toughness was much larger than would be expected from the relatively modest changes in the tensile properties over the same temperature range. However, a copper-chromium-zirconium alloy strengthened by precipitation showed only a small decrease in toughness at the higher temperatures. The embrittled alloys showed a transition in fracture mode, from transgranular microvoid coalescence at room temperature to intergranular with localized ductility at high temperatures. The Cu-Cr-Zr alloy maintained the ductile microvoid coalescence failure mode at all test temperatures.

  4. Spatial distribution of the human enamel fracture toughness with aging.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qinghua; Xu, Haiping; Song, Fan; Zhang, Lan; Zhou, Xuedong; Shao, Yingfeng; Huang, Dingming

    2013-10-01

    A better understanding of the fracture toughness (KIC) of human enamel and the changes induced by aging is important for the clinical treatment of teeth cracks and fractures. We conducted microindentation tests and chemical content measurements on molar teeth from "young" (18 ≤ age ≤ 25) and "old" (55 ≤ age) patients. The KIC and the mineral contents (calcium and phosphorus) in the outer, the middle, and the inner enamel layers within the cuspal and the intercuspal regions of the crown were measured through the Vickers toughness test and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. The elastic modulus used for the KIC calculation was measured through atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindentation tests. In the outer enamel layer, two direction-specific values of the KIC were calculated separately (direction I, crack running parallel to the occlusal surface; direction II, perpendicular to direction I). The mean KIC of the outer enamel layer was lower than that of the internal layers (p<0.05). No other region-related differences in the mechanical properties were found in both groups. In the outer enamel layer, old enamel has a lower KIC, II and higher mineral contents than young enamel (p<0.05). The enamel surface becomes more prone to cracks with aging partly due to the reduction in the interprismatic organic matrix observed with the maturation of enamel.

  5. Evaluating Fracture Toughness of Rolled Zircaloy-2 at Different Temperatures Using XFEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Sunkulp; Kumar, Nikhil; Fuloria, Devasri; Jayaganthan, R.; Singh, I. V.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G. K.; Saibaba, N.

    2016-09-01

    Fracture toughness and mechanical properties of the zircaloy-2 processed by rolling at different temperatures have been investigated, and simulations have been performed using extended finite element method (XFEM). The solutionized alloy was rolled at different temperatures for different thickness reductions (25-85%). Fracture toughness has been investigated by compact tension test. The improved fracture toughness of the rolled zircaloy-2 samples is due to high dislocation density. SEM image of the fractured surface shows the reduction in dimple sizes with the increase in dislocation density due to the formation of microvoids as a result of severe strain induced during rolling. Compact tension test, edge crack, center crack and three-point bend specimen simulations have been performed by XFEM. In XFEM, the cracks are not a part of finite element mesh and are modeled by adding enrichment function in the standard finite element displacement approximation. The XFEM results obtained for compact tension test have been found to be in good agreement with the experiment.

  6. Comparison of Intralaminar and Interlaminar Mode-I Fracture Toughness of Unidirectional IM7/8552 Graphite/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Ratcliffe, James

    2012-01-01

    The intralaminar and interlaminar mode-I fracture-toughness of a unidirectional IM7/8552 graphite/epoxy composite were measured using compact tension (CT) and double cantilever beam (DCB) test specimens, respectively. Two starter crack geometries were considered for both the CT and DCB specimen configurations. In the first case, starter cracks were produced by 12.5 micron thick, Teflon film inserts. In the second case, considerably sharper starter cracks were produced by fatigue precracking. For each specimen configuration, use of the Teflon film starter cracks resulted in initially unstable crack growth and artificially high initiation fracture-toughness values. Conversely, specimens with fatigue precracks exhibited stable growth onset and lower initiation fracture toughness. For CT and DCB specimens with fatigue precracks, the intralaminar and interlaminar initiation fracture toughnesses were approximately equal. However, during propagation, the CT specimens exhibited more extensive fiber bridging, and rapidly increasing R-curve behavior as compared to the DCB specimens. Observations of initiation and propagation of intralaminar and interlaminar fracture, and the measurements of fracture toughness, were supported by fractographic analysis using scanning electron microscopy.

  7. Fracture toughness testing of V-4Cr-4Ti at 25{degrees}C and -196{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.X.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    Measurements of the fracture toughness of the production-scale heat (832665) of V-4Cr-4Ti have been performed at 25{degrees}C and {minus}196{degrees}C using compact tension (CT) specimens. Test specimens were vacuum annealed at either 1000{degrees}C for 1 hour (HT1) or 1050{degrees}C for two hours (HT2). Specimens given the HT1 treatment were annealed after final machining, whereas the HT2 specimens received the 1050{degrees}C anneal at Teledyne Wah Chang prior to final machining. Following machining HT2 specimens were then vacuum annealed at 180{degrees}C for two hours to remove hydrogen. Specimens treated using HT1 had a partially recrystallized microstructure and those treated using HT2 had a fully recrystallized microstructure. The fracture toughness at 25{degrees}C was determined by J-integral tests and at {minus}196{degrees}C by ASTM E 399 type tests. Toughness values obtained at {minus}196{degrees}C were converted to J-integral values for comparison to the 25{degrees}C data. The 25{degrees}C fracture toughness was very high with none of the specimens giving valid results per ASTM criteria. Specimens fractured by microvoid coalescence. The fracture toughness at {minus}196{degrees}C was much lower than that at 25{degrees}C and the fracture surface showed predominantly cleavage features. The present results show a transition from ductile to brittle behavior with decreasing test temperature which is not observed from one-third scale Charpy impact tests. The fracture toughness at {minus}196{degrees}C was still quite high, however, at about 75 kJ/m{sup 2}. Delaminations in planes normal to the thickness direction were seen at both test temperatures. Fracture surfaces inside the delaminations exhibited nearly 100% cleavage facets. The cause of the brittle delaminations was not determined, but will be a subject for further investigation.

  8. Assessments of Fracture Toughness of Monolithic Ceramics-SEPB Versus SEVNB Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2006-01-01

    Fracture toughness of a total of 13 advanced monolithic ceramics including silicon nitrides, silicon carbide, aluminas, and glass ceramic was determined at ambient temperature by using both single edge precracked beam (SEPB) and single edge v-notched beam (SEVNB) methods. Relatively good agreement in fracture toughness between the two methods was observed for advanced ceramics with flat R-curves; whereas, poor agreement in fracture toughness was seen for materials with rising R-curves. The discrepancy in fracture toughness between the two methods was due to stable crack growth with crack closure forces acting in the wake region of cracks even in SEVNB test specimens. The effect of discrepancy in fracture toughness was analyzed in terms of microstructural feature (grain size and shape), toughening exponent in R-curve, and stable crack growth determined using back-face strain gaging.

  9. Fracture toughness of Alloy 690 and EN52 weld in air and water

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.M.; Mills, W.J.

    1999-06-01

    The effect of low and high temperature water with high hydrogen on the fracture toughness of Alloy 690 and its weld, EN52, was characterized using elastic-plastic J{sub IC} methodology. While both materials display excellent fracture resistance in air and elevated temperature (>93 C) water, a dramatic degradation in toughness is observed in 54 C water. The loss of toughness is associated with a hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking mechanism where hydrogen is picked up from the water. Comparison of the cracking behavior in low temperature water with that for hydrogen-precharged specimens tested in air indicates that the critical local hydrogen content required to cause low temperature embrittlement is on the order of 120 to 160 ppm. Loading rate studies show that the cracking resistance is significantly improved at rates above ca. 1000 MPa{radical}m/h because there is insufficient time to produce grain boundary embrittlement. Electron fractographic examinations were performed to correlate cracking behavior with microstructural features and operative fracture mechanics.

  10. Mode II Interlaminar Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Characterization of a Graphite Epoxy Composite Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Johnston, William M.; Toland, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness and delamination onset and growth characterization data were generated for IM7/8552 graphite epoxy composite materials from two suppliers for use in fracture mechanics analyses. Both the fracture toughness testing and the fatigue testing were conducted using the End-notched Flexure (ENF) test. The ENF test for mode II fracture toughness is currently under review by ASTM as a potential standard test method. This current draft ASTM protocol was used as a guide to conduct the tests on the IM7/8552 material. This report summarizes the test approach, methods, procedures and results of this characterization effort.

  11. Concepts for interrelating ultrasnic attenuation, microstrucutre and fracture toughness in polycrystalline solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1986-01-01

    Conceptual models are advanced for explaining and predicting empirical correlations found between ultrasonic measurements and fracture toughness of polycrystalline solids. The models lead to insights concerning microstructural factors governing fracture processes and associated stress wave interactions. Analysis of the empirical correlations suggested by the models indicate that, in addition to grain size and shape, grain boundary reflections, elastic anisotropy, and dislocation damping are factors that underly both fracture toughness and ultrasonic attenuation. One outcome is that ultrasonic attenuation can predict the size of crack blunting or process zones that develop in the vicinity active cracks in metals. This forms a basis for ultrasonic ranking according to variations in fracture toughness.

  12. Tough, High-Performance, Thermoplastic Addition Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Proctor, K. Mason; Gleason, John; Morgan, Cassandra; Partos, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Series of addition-type thermoplastics (ATT's) exhibit useful properties. Because of their addition curing and linear structure, ATT polymers have toughness, like thermoplastics, and easily processed, like thermosets. Work undertaken to develop chemical reaction forming stable aromatic rings in backbone of ATT polymer, combining high-temperature performance and thermo-oxidative stability with toughness and easy processibility, and minimizing or eliminating necessity for tradeoffs among properties often observed in conventional polymer syntheses.

  13. Effects of constraint on upper shelf fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, J.A.; Link, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    The upper shelf fracture toughness and tearing resistance of two structural steels, HY-100 and ASTM A533, Gr. B, were determined over a wide range of applied constraint. The constraint conditions were varied by changes in specimen geometry and loading mode. Bend specimens with shallow and deep cracks, compact specimens, and single and double edge notched tension specimens were used in this study. A rotation correction was developed for the single edge notch tension specimen which greatly improved the behavior of the J-R curves determined using this specimen. The experimental results were used to investigate the applicability of the Q and T stress parameters to the correlation of upper shelf initiation toughness, J{sub Ic}, and tearing resistance, T{sub mat}. The J-Q and J-T stress loci, and corresponding plots of material tearing resistance plotted against Q and T, were developed and compared with the expectations of the O`Dowd and Shih and the Betegon and Hancock analyses. The principle conclusions of this work are that J{sub Ic} does not appear to be dependent on T stress or Q while the material tearing resistance, T{sub mat}, is dependent on T stress and Q, with the tearing modulus increasing as constraint decreases.

  14. Fracture toughness of solid oxide fuel cell anode substrates determined by a double-torsion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pećanac, G.; Wei, J.; Malzbender, J.

    2016-09-01

    Planar solid oxide fuel cell anode substrates are exposed to high mechanical loads during assembly, start-up, steady-state operation and thermal cycling. Hence, characterization of mechanical stability of anode substrates under different oxidation states and at relevant temperatures is essential to warrant a reliable operation of solid oxide fuel cells. As a basis for mechanical assessment of brittle supports, two most common anode substrate material variants, NiO-3YSZ and NiO-8YSZ, were analyzed in this study with respect to their fracture toughness at room temperature and at a typical stack operation temperature of 800 °C. The study considered both, oxidized and reduced materials' states, where also an outlook is given on the behavior of the re-oxidized state that might be induced by malfunctions of sealants or other functional components. Aiming at the improvement of material's production, different types of warm pressed and tape cast NiO-8YSZ substrates were characterized in oxidized and reduced states. Overall, the results confirmed superior fracture toughness of 3YSZ compared to 8YSZ based composites in the oxidized state, whereas in the reduced state 3YSZ based composites showed similar fracture toughness at room temperature, but a higher value at 800 °C compared to 8YSZ based composites. Complementary microstructural analysis aided the interpretation of mechanical characterization.

  15. [Research on bending strength and fracture toughness of alumina-glass composite].

    PubMed

    Luo, X; Zhao, Y; Tian, J; Chao, Y; Zhang, S; Zhang, Y

    1998-12-01

    To develop a new ceramic material that can be machined and infiltrated with glass, a porous alumina blank sintered at 1350 degrees C was made of high purity, super fine alpha-alumina and then infiltrated with glass in this study. The density, bending strength and fracture toughness of the partially sintered alumina and alumina-glass composite were determined. The results indicated that the porous alumina density was 2.12 g/cm3, the three point bending strength 102 MPa, the fracture toughness 1.61 MPam1/2; that the alumina-glass composite density was 3.85 g/cm3, the three point bending strength 385 MPa, and the fracture toughness 4.05 MPam1/2. By SEM and EDXA analysis, lanthanum boroslicate glass was completely infiltrated into the 3 mm thick porous alumina blank for 6 h at 1150 degrees C. These suggest that the new developed alumina blank is suited for clinical use. PMID:10743233

  16. The Effect of Neutron Irradiation on the Fracture Toughness of Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Strizak, Joe P

    2012-01-01

    As part of our irradiated graphite recycle program a small quantity of PCEA grade graphite was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL. The graphite will provide the raw material for future recycle experiments. The geometry of the irradiated graphite allowed us to study the effects of neutron irradiation on the Critical Stress Intensity Factor, KIc, of graphite. The specimens where irradiated in two groups of 6 at an irradiation temperature of 900 C in rabbit capsules to doses of 6.6 and 10.2 DPA, respectively. Following a full suite of pre-and post-irradiation examination, which included dimensions, mass, electrical resistivity, elastic constants, and thermal expansion (to 800 C) the samples were notched and tested to determine their KIc using the newly approved ATSM test method for SENB fracture toughness of graphite. Here we report the irradiation induced changes in the dimensions, elastic constants, resistivity, and coefficient of thermal expansion of PCEA graphite. Moreover, irradiation induced changes in the Critical Stress Intensity Factor, KIc, or fracture toughness, are reported and discussed. Very little work on the effect of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness of graphite has previously be performed or reported.

  17. Fracture toughness and crack-resistance curve behavior in metallic glass-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Hofmann, Douglas C.; Suh, Jin-Yo; Kozachkov, Henry; Johnson, William L.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-05-26

    Nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics methods are used to assess the fracture toughness of bulk metallic glass (BMG) composites; results are compared with similar measurements for other monolithic and composite BMG alloys. Mechanistically, plastic shielding gives rise to characteristic resistance?curve behavior where the fracture resistance increases with crack extension. Specifically, confinement of damage by second?phase dendrites is shown to result in enhancement of the toughness by nearly an order of magnitude relative to unreinforced glass.

  18. Application of fracture toughness scaling models to the ductile-to- brittle transition

    SciTech Connect

    Link, R.E.; Joyce, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation of fracture toughness in the ductile-brittle transition range was conducted. A large number of ASTM A533, Grade B steel, bend and tension specimens with varying crack lengths were tested throughout the transition region. Cleavage fracture toughness scaling models were utilized to correct the data for the loss of constraint in short crack specimens and tension geometries. The toughness scaling models were effective in reducing the scatter in the data, but tended to over-correct the results for the short crack bend specimens. A proposed ASTM Test Practice for Fracture Toughness in the Transition Range, which employs a master curve concept, was applied to the results. The proposed master curve over predicted the fracture toughness in the mid-transition and a modified master curve was developed that more accurately modeled the transition behavior of the material. Finally, the modified master curve and the fracture toughness scaling models were combined to predict the as-measured fracture toughness of the short crack bend and the tension specimens. It was shown that when the scaling models over correct the data for loss of constraint, they can also lead to non-conservative estimates of the increase in toughness for low constraint geometries.

  19. Characterization of the fracture toughness of micro-sized tungsten single crystal notched specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, Stefan; Motz, Christian; Pippan, Reinhard

    2012-05-01

    Fracture experiments using micrometer-sized notched cantilevers were conducted to investigate the possibility of determining fracture mechanical parameters for the semi-brittle material tungsten. The experiments were also used to improve the understanding of semi-brittle fracture processes for which single crystalline tungsten serves as a model material. Due to the large plastic zone in relation to the micrometer sample size, linear elastic fracture mechanics is inapplicable and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics has to be applied. Conditional fracture toughness values J Q were calculated from corrected force vs. displacement diagrams. Crack growth was accessible by direct observation of in-situ experiments as well as with the help of unloading compliances. As a further tool, fracture toughness can be determined via crack tip opening displacement. The micro samples behave more ductile and exhibit higher fracture toughness values compared to macro-sized single crystals and fail by stable crack propagation.

  20. Dynamic Fracture Initiation Toughness of ASTM A533, Grade B Steel Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, S.M.; Link, R.E.

    1999-05-01

    The dynamic fracture toughness of an ASTM A533, Grade B steel plate was determined at several temperatures in the ductile-brittle transition region. Crack-tip loading rates ranged from approximately 10(sup3) to 10(sup5) MPa m/s. The fracture toughness was shown to decrease with increased loading rate. The dynamic fracture toughness was compared with results from previous investigations, and it was shown that the decrease in toughness due to increased loading rate at the highest test temperature was not as severe as reported in previous investigations. It was also shown that the reference temperature. T(sub0) was better index of the fracture toughness vs. temperature relationship than the nil-ductility temperature, RT(subNDT), for this material.

  1. Biaxial loading effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steel

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee, W.J.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W. Jr.; Pennell, W.E.

    1995-03-01

    The preliminary phases of a program to develop and evaluate fracture methodologies for assessing crack-tip constraint effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels have been completed by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. Objectives were to investigate effect of biaxial loading on fracture toughness, quantify this effect through existing stress-based, dual-parameter, fracture-toughness correlations, or propose and verify alternate correlations. A cruciform beam specimen with 2-D, shallow, through-thickness flaw and a special loading fixture was designed and fabricated. Tests were performed using biaxial loading ratios of 0:1 (uniaxial), 0.6:1, and 1:1 (equi-biaxial). Critical fracture-toughness values were calculated for each test. Biaxial loading of 0.6:1 resulted in a reduction in the lower bound fracture toughness of {approximately}12% as compared to that from the uniaxial tests. The biaxial loading of 1:1 yielded two subsets of toughness values; one agreed well with the uniaxial data, while one was reduced by {approximately}43% when compared to the uniaxial data. Results were evaluated using J-Q theory and Dodds-Anderson (D-A) micromechanical scaling model. The D-A model predicted no biaxial effect, while the J-Q method gave inconclusive results. When applied to the 1:1 biaxial data, these constraint methodologies failed to predict the observed reduction in fracture toughness obtained in one experiment. A strain-based constraint methodology that considers the relationship between applied biaxial load, the plastic zone width in the crack plane, and fracture toughness was formulated and applied successfully to the data. Evaluation of this dual-parameter strain-based model led to the conclusion that it has the capability of representing fracture behavior of RPV steels in the transition region, including the effects of out-of-plane loading on fracture toughness. This report is designated as HSST Report No. 150.

  2. Strength-toughness requirements for thick-walled high pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapp, Joseph A.

    1992-05-01

    The strength and toughness requirements of materials used in high pressure vessels has been the subject of some discussion in the meetings of the Materials Task Group of the Special Working Group - High Pressure Vessels. A fracture mechanics analysis has been performed to theoretically establish the required toughness for a high pressure vessel. The analysis is based on the validity requirement for plane-strain fracture of fracture toughness test specimens. This means that at fracture, the crack length, uncracked ligament, and vessel length must each be greater than fifty times the crack tip plastic zone since for brittle fracture to occur. For high pressure piping applications, the limiting physical dimension is the uncracked ligament, since it can be assumed that the other dimensions are always greater than fifty times the crack tip plastic zone. To perform the fracture mechanics analysis, several parameters must be known, including vessel dimensions, material strength, degree of autofrettage, and design pressure. Remarkably, the results of the analysis show that the effects of radius ratio, pressure, and degree of autofrettage can be ignored when establishing strength and toughness requirements for design code purposes. The only parameters that enter into the calculation are yield strength, toughness and vessel thickness. The final results can easily be represented as a graph of yield strength against toughness on which several curves, one for each vessel thickness, are plotted.

  3. Bending and fracture toughness of woven self-reinforced composite poly(methyl methacrylate).

    PubMed

    Wright, D D; Lautenschlager, E P; Gilbert, J L

    1997-09-15

    Loosening remains an impediment to the long-term success of total hip replacements despite numerous improvements in the materials used. In cemented prostheses, fatigue and fracture of bone cement have been implicated in the failure of these devices. A new material, self-reinforced composite poly(methyl methacrylate). (SRC-PMMA), has been developed. SRC-PMMA is formed by a novel processing method that will be described. The composite consists of high strength, highly oriented PMMA fibers embedded in a matrix of PMMA. Using a woven form of SRC-PMMA, an in vitro physical and mechanical evaluation was performed to assess the feasibility of its use in an orthopedic prosthesis. Three different weaves of SRC-PMMA were evaluated in bending and fracture toughness in air, after immersion for 30 days in 37 degrees C saline, and after gamma irradiation followed by immersion. Bending modulus and strength were decreased by gamma irradiation followed by saline immersion. The effect of saline immersion alone on bending strength and modulus was negligible. Saline immersion and gamma irradiation followed by saline immersion was shown to have little or no effect on the fracture toughness of woven SRC-PMMA. Differences in the fracture processes of the different weaves were found and can be related to the differing orientation of fibers to the fracture toughness pre-crack. Optimally incorporated SRC-PMMA absorbs the same amount of water as bone cement. Comparison to previous and current work with bone cement controls shows that SRC-PMMA is a material equal to or better than bone cement in all tests performed. It deserves further consideration as a candidate biomaterial. PMID:9294760

  4. Bending and fracture toughness of woven self-reinforced composite poly(methyl methacrylate).

    PubMed

    Wright, D D; Lautenschlager, E P; Gilbert, J L

    1997-09-15

    Loosening remains an impediment to the long-term success of total hip replacements despite numerous improvements in the materials used. In cemented prostheses, fatigue and fracture of bone cement have been implicated in the failure of these devices. A new material, self-reinforced composite poly(methyl methacrylate). (SRC-PMMA), has been developed. SRC-PMMA is formed by a novel processing method that will be described. The composite consists of high strength, highly oriented PMMA fibers embedded in a matrix of PMMA. Using a woven form of SRC-PMMA, an in vitro physical and mechanical evaluation was performed to assess the feasibility of its use in an orthopedic prosthesis. Three different weaves of SRC-PMMA were evaluated in bending and fracture toughness in air, after immersion for 30 days in 37 degrees C saline, and after gamma irradiation followed by immersion. Bending modulus and strength were decreased by gamma irradiation followed by saline immersion. The effect of saline immersion alone on bending strength and modulus was negligible. Saline immersion and gamma irradiation followed by saline immersion was shown to have little or no effect on the fracture toughness of woven SRC-PMMA. Differences in the fracture processes of the different weaves were found and can be related to the differing orientation of fibers to the fracture toughness pre-crack. Optimally incorporated SRC-PMMA absorbs the same amount of water as bone cement. Comparison to previous and current work with bone cement controls shows that SRC-PMMA is a material equal to or better than bone cement in all tests performed. It deserves further consideration as a candidate biomaterial.

  5. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K. )

    1991-06-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water rectors (LWRs) at 280--330{degrees}C (535--625{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known mineral in formation. Fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel is estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. The extent of thermal embrittlement is characterized by the room-temperature normalized'' Charpy-impact energy. A correlation for the extent of embrittlement at saturation,'' i.e., the minimum impact energy that would be achieved for the material after long-term aging, is given in terms of a material parameter, {Phi}, which is determined from the chemical composition. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained from correlations between room-temperature Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness parameters. Fracture toughness as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which is determined from chemical composition. A common lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels with unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given material specification, ferrite content, and temperature. Examples for estimating impact strength and fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are describes. 24 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels in LWR (light water reactor) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1990-10-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting fracture toughness J-R curves and impact strength of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The saturation'' fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum fracture toughness that would ever be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the degree of embrittlement at saturation. Degree of embrittlement is characterized in terms of room-temperature Charpy-impact energy. The variation of the impact energy at saturation for different materials is described in terms of a material parameter {Phi}, which is determined from the chemical composition and ferrite morphology. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained from correlations between room-temperature Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness. Fracture toughness as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of embrittlement, which is determined from the chemical composition. Examples for estimating impact strength and fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are described. A common lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels with unknown chemical composition is also defined. 15 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Biaxial loading and shallow-flaw effects on crack-tip constraint and fracture-toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; McAfee, W.J.; Theiss, T.J.; Rao, M.C.

    1993-12-01

    Uniaxial tests of single-edged notched bend (SENB) specimens with both deep- and shallow-flaws have shown elevated fracture-toughness for the shallow flaws. The elevation in fracture-toughness for shallow flaws has been shown to be the result of reduced constraint at the crack-tip. Biaxial loading has the potential to increase constraint at the crack-tip and thereby reduce some of the shallow-flaw, fracture-toughness elevation. Biaxial fracture-toughness tests have shown that the shallow-flaw, fracture-toughness elevation is reduced but not eliminated by biaxial loading. Dual-parameter, fracture-toughness correlations have been proposed to reflect the effect of crack-tip constraint on fracture-toughness. Test results from the uniaxial and biaxial tests were analyzed using the dual-parameter technology. Discrepancies between analysis results and cleavage initiation site data from fractographic examinations indicate that the analysis models are in need of further refinement. Addition of a precleavage, ductile-tearing element to the analysis model has the potential to resolve the noted discrepancies.

  8. Dynamic Fracture Initiation Toughness at Elevated Temperatures With Application to the New Generation of Titanium Aluminide Alloys. Chapter 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas; Draper, Susan; Shukla, Arun (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a new generation of titanium aluminide alloy, named Gamma-Met PX, has been developed with better rolling and post-rolling characteristics. I'revious work on this alloy has shown the material to have higher strengths at room and elevated temperatures when compared with other gamma titanium aluminides. In particular, this new alloy has shown increased ductility at elevated temperatures under both quasi-static and high strain rate uniaxial compressive loading. However, its high strain rate tensile ductility at room and elevated temperatures is limited to approx. 1%. In the present chapter, results of a study to investigate the effects of loading rate and test temperature on the dynamic fracture initiation toughness in Gamma-Met PX are presented. Modified split Hopkinson pressure bar was used along with high-speed photography to determine the crack initiation time. Three-point bend dynamic fracture experiments were conducted at impact speeds of approx. 1 m/s and tests temperatures of up-to 1200 C. The results show that thc dynamic fracture initiation toughness decreases with increasing test temperatures beyond 600 C. Furthermore, thc effect of long time high temperature air exposure on the fracture toughness was investigated. The dynamic fracture initiation toughness was found to decrease with increasing exposure time. The reasons behind this drop are analyzed and discussed.

  9. Fracture Toughness Round Robin Test International in pressure tube materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagarcia, M. P.; Liendo, M. F.

    Part of the pressure tubes surveillance program of CANDU type reactors is to determine the fracture toughness using a special fracture specimen and test procedure. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited decided to hold a Round Robin Test International and 9 laboratories participated worldwide in which several pressure tube materials were selected: Zircaloy-2, Zr-2.5%Nb cold worked and Zr-2.5%Nb heat treated. The small specimens used held back the thickness and curvature of the tube. J-R curves at room temperature were obtained and the crack extension values were determined by electrical potential drop techniques. These values were compared with results generated from other laboratories and a bid scatter was founded. It could be due to slight variations in the test method or inhomogeneity of the materials and a statistical study must be done to see if there is any pattern. The next step for the Round Robin Test would be to make some modifications in the test method in order to reduce the scatter.

  10. Effects of Heating Rate on Microstructure and Fracture Toughness of Railway Wheel Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xuechong; Qi, Ji; Gao, Jianyu; Wen, Lei; Jiang, Bo; Chen, Gang; Zhao, Hai

    2016-02-01

    The microstructure and fracture toughness K IC (or K Q) of railway wheel steel with 0.53 wt pct C were studied under various heating rates. The effects of the heating rate on the grain size and the relation between the grain size and the fracture toughness were discussed. The results show that rapid heating not only refines the grains but can also result in more homogeneous grains. The cleavage fracture toughness strongly relates to the grains with larger size. It can be observed that under different heating rates, the fracture toughness K Q increases with decreasing average diameter of the top 5 pct grains D 5. K Q (MPa m1/2) = 194.3-29.8 ln( D 5) when D 5 is in the range of 30 to 73 μm. This result can be interpreted by the cleavage fracture critical event, which is grain-sized crack propagation controlled.

  11. Fracture toughness testing of core from the Cambro-Ordovician Section on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Lemiszki, P.J.; Landes, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    The modified ring test was used to determine the mode I fracture toughness of bedrock cores from the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation in east Tennessee. Low porosity sandstones, limestones, and dolostones from the lower part of the Paleozoic section in Copper Creek and Whiteoak Mountain thrust sheets were sampled. In general, the average mode I fracture toughness decreases from sandstone, dolostone, and limestone. The fracture toughness of the limestones varies between rock units, which is related to different sedimentologic characteristics. Quality of results was evaluated by testing cores of Berea Sandstone and Indiana Limestone, which produced results similar to published results.

  12. The fracture toughness of borides formed on boronized cold work tool steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ugur; Sen, Saduman

    2003-06-15

    In this study, the fracture toughness of boride layers of two borided cold work tool steels have been investigated. Boriding was carried out in a salt bath consisting of borax, boric acid, ferro-silicon and aluminum. Boriding was performed at 850 and 950 deg. C for 2 to 7 h. The presence of boride phases were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Hardness and fracture toughness of borides were measured via Vickers indenter. Increasing of boriding time and temperature leads to reduction of fracture toughness of borides. Metallographic examination showed that boride layer formed on cold work tool steels was compact and smooth.

  13. Effect of microstructure and notch root radius on fracture toughness of an aluminum metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent results on the effects of matrix aging condition (matrix temper) and notch root radius on the measured fracture toughness of a SiC particulate reinforced aluminum alloy are reviewed. Stress intensity factors at catastrophic fracture were obtained for both underaged and overaged composites reveal. The linear relation found between apparent fracture toughness and the square root of the notch root radius implies a linear dependence of the crack opening displacement on the notch root radius. The results suggest a strain controlled fracture process, and indicate that there are differences in the fracture micromechanisms of the two aging conditions.

  14. Simplified data reduction methods for the ECT test for mode 3 interlaminar fracture toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian; Obrien, T. Kevin

    1995-01-01

    Simplified expressions for the parameter controlling the load point compliance and strain energy release rate were obtained for the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) specimen for mode 3 interlaminar fracture toughness. Data reduction methods for mode 3 toughness based on the present analysis are proposed. The effect of the transverse shear modulus, G(sub 23), on mode 3 interlaminar fracture toughness characterization was evaluated. Parameters influenced by the transverse shear modulus were identified. Analytical results indicate that a higher value of G(sub 23) results in a low load point compliance and lower mode 3 toughness estimation. The effect of G(sub 23) on the mode 3 toughness using the ECT specimen is negligible when an appropriate initial delamination length is chosen. A conservative estimation of mode 3 toughness can be obtained by assuming G(sub 23) = G(sub 12) for any initial delamination length.

  15. Indentation fracture toughness of sintered silicon carbide in the Palmqvist crack regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhuang; Ghosh, Asish; Kobayashi, Albert S.; Bradt, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The fracture toughness of a sintered dense alpha-SiC was estimated by the Vickers indentation microfracture method in the low-load Palmqvist crack regime. It was observed that the use of simultaneously obtained Vickers hardnesses does not yield reliable fracture toughness values, nor does application of the median-crack-derived equations. It is necessary to utilize a load-independent, crack-free hardness value with this toughness estimation method. Although several of the curve-fitting equations yield similar toughnesses, it is concluded for the Palmqvist crack system in this alpha-SiC that the Niihara-Morena-Hasselman (1982) equation is the only one which yields fracture toughness values in agreement with conventional measurement techniques.

  16. Fracture Toughness Determination of Cracked Chevron Notched Brazilian Disc Rock Specimen via Griffith Energy Criterion Incorporating Realistic Fracture Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuan; Dai, Feng; Zhao, Tao; Xu, Nu-wen; Liu, Yi

    2016-08-01

    The cracked chevron notched Brazilian disc (CCNBD) specimen has been suggested by the International Society for Rock Mechanics to measure the mode I fracture toughness of rocks, and has been widely adopted in laboratory tests. Nevertheless, a certain discrepancy has been observed in results when compared with those derived from methods using straight through cracked specimens, which might be due to the fact that the fracture profiles of rock specimens cannot match the straight through crack front as assumed in the measuring principle. In this study, the progressive fracturing of the CCNBD specimen is numerically investigated using the discrete element method (DEM), aiming to evaluate the impact of the realistic cracking profiles on the mode I fracture toughness measurements. The obtained results validate the curved fracture fronts throughout the fracture process, as reported in the literature. The fracture toughness is subsequently determined via the proposed G-method originated from Griffith's energy theory, in which the evolution of the realistic fracture profile as well as the accumulated fracture energy is quantified by DEM simulation. A comparison between the numerical tests and the experimental results derived from both the CCNBD and the semi-circular bend (SCB) specimens verifies that the G-method incorporating realistic fracture profiles can contribute to narrowing down the gap between the fracture toughness values measured via the CCNBD and the SCB method.

  17. Apparent fracture toughness of acrylic bone cement: effect of test specimen configuration and sterilization method.

    PubMed

    Lewis, G

    1999-01-01

    The plane strain fracture toughness of Palacos R bone cement was determined using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) principles and three different test specimen configurations: single edge notched three-point (SENB), rectangular compact tension (RCT), and chevron notched short rod (CNSR). Another aspect of the study was an investigation of the effect of three methods used to sterilize the powder constituents of the cement-none, gamma irradiation and ethylene oxide--on the fracture toughness of the fully polymerized material. A detailed justification is provided for using LEFM. The fracture toughness results obtained using the CNSR specimens were, on average, 14 and 16% higher than those obtained using the SENB and RCT types, respectively. These differences are accounted for in terms of differences in four aspects of these specimen configuration (namely, residual stress effects, loading rate, material inhomogeneity, and the nature of the test). For a given specimen configuration, gamma irradiation produced a statistically significant decrease in fracture toughness which, it is suggested, is due to the concomitant depreciation in molecular weight. For a given cement type, there is no statistically significant difference in fracture toughness results obtained using SENB and RCT specimens. It is thus suggested that either of these configurations can be used to determine the fracture toughness of acrylic bone cement.

  18. Effect of water and ice on strength and fracture toughness of intermittently bonded boron-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, A. G.; Mai, Y. W.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of water and ice on the strength and fracture toughness of boron-epoxy composites with polyurethane intermittent bonding have been investigated. Neither simple soaking in water nor soaking followed by freezing and thawing have marked effects on the strength of the fully-coated composites, but they have disastrous effects on the uncoated composites. Toughness is affected only marginally, with some small reductions in the fully-coated samples, and with essentially no effect on the uncoated composites. An analysis is presented which explains adequately the experimental strength and toughness results obtained, and which is based on an argument that water absorption reduces the interfacial shear strength only of the uncoated areas and not those regions coated by the polyurethane varnish. The results indicate that the advantages of appropriate intermittent bonding (i.e., high strength combined with high toughness) are retained in wet conditions so that such composites may be favorably used in such adverse environmental conditions.

  19. Cryogenic Fracture Toughness Evaluation of an Investment Cast Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy for Structural Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, Wayne; McGill, Preston

    2006-01-01

    This document is a viewgraph presentation that details the fracture toughness of Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy for use in structures at cryogenic temperatures. Graphs and charts are presented in the presentation

  20. Effect of Elevated Temperature and Loading Rate on Delamination Fracture Toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.; Allen, D. H.; Bradley, W. L.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of temperature and loading rate on delamination growth were studied. The delamination fracture toughness of IM7/K3B was measured at 149 C, 177 C, and 204 C. At each temperature the tests were performed with a variety of loading rates so that the delamination initiated over the range of time from 0.5 sec to 24 hrs. The double cantilever beam (DCB) test was used to measure fracture toughness. The results showed that the delamination resistance is a complicated function of both time and temperature with the effect of temperature either increasing or decreasing the fracture toughness depending on the time scale. The results also showed that the fracture toughness changed by as much as a factor of three as the time scale changed over the five orders of magnitude tested.

  1. The effect of environmental aging on the fracture toughness of dental composites.

    PubMed

    Pilliar, R M; Vowles, R; Williams, D F

    1987-03-01

    The effect of aging four commercially-available dental composites in water or ethanol at 37 degrees C for periods of up to 28 days was assessed by measuring changes in the materials' plane-strain fracture toughness (KIC). The results, obtained by means of a mini Short Rod Fracture Toughness Test specimen design, suggest that while water aging does not produce significant changes in KIC, aging in ethanol does cause significant increases in fracture toughness for three of the four dental composites studied. In view of previously-reported loss of wear resistance for dental composites aged in ethanol solutions, the present study emphasizes the difficulties in using fracture toughness to predict wear properties.

  2. Fracture toughness of human femoral neck: effect of microstructure, composition, and age.

    PubMed

    Yeni, Y N; Norman, T L

    2000-05-01

    The effects of porosity and pore size; osteonal area, size, and density; mineral content; water content; wet and dry apparent densities; and age on mode I (tensile) and mode II (shear) strain energy release rate were investigated for femoral neck cortical bone from human cadavers aged >/=50 years. The results suggest that porosity- and density-based parameters that are related to bone quantity are more consistently determinant for femoral neck fracture toughness than morphology-based parameters that are related to microstructural organization. Bone features examined here were more explanatory for shear than tension fracture toughness. Tension and shear fracture toughness did not change with age, unlike in previous reports investigating the femoral and tibial shaft. It was concluded that the femoral neck is different from the femoral and tibial shaft in terms of its microstructure and composition and in its relationship of fracture toughness to its constituents and age. PMID:10773590

  3. 75 FR 5495 - Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... Pressurized Thermal Shock Events; Correction AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Final rule... (75 FR 13), that amends the NRC's regulations to provide alternate fracture toughness requirements for protection against pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events for pressurized water reactor (PWR)...

  4. A comparison of several methods of calculating fracture toughness from composite laminate test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Morris, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Critical fracture toughness was determined by two different techniques for graphite/epoxy laminates of three stacking sequences and several thicknesses. Critical fracture toughness was determined by a finite element stress analysis of a center-cracked tension specimen which yielded the stress intensity factor as a function of specimen thickness and applied load. As an alternative approach the critical strain energy release rate was determined from the compliance calibration technique. Test results from both procedures are compared and discussed.

  5. Microstructural effects on fracture toughness of polycrystalline ceramics in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, D.; Shetty, D. K.

    1988-01-01

    Fracture toughness of polycrystalline alumina and ceria partially-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (CeO2-TZP) ceramics were assessed in combined mode I and mode II loading using precracked disk specimens in diametral compression. Stress states ranging from pure mode I, combined mode I and mode II, and pure mode II were obtained by aligning the center crack at specific angles relative to the loading diameter. The resulting mixed-mode fracture toughness envelope showed significant deviation to higher fracture toughness in mode II relative to the predictions of the linear elastic fracture mechanics theory. Critical comparison with corresponding results on soda-lime glass and fracture surface observations showed that crack surface resistance arising from grain interlocking and abrasion was the main source of the increased fracture toughness in mode II loading of the polycrystalline ceramics. The normalized fracture toughness for pure mode II loading, (KII/KIc), increased with increasing grain size for the CeO2-TZP ceramics. Quantitative fractography confirmed an increased percentage of transgranular fracture of the grains in mode II loading.

  6. Fracture toughness of brittle materials determined with chevron notch specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. L., Jr.; Bursey, R. T.; Munz, D.; Pierce, W. S.

    1980-01-01

    The use of chevron-notch specimens for determining the plane strain fracture toughness (K sub Ic) of brittle materials is discussed. Three chevron-notch specimens were investigated: short bar, short rod, and four-point-bend. The dimensionless stress intensity coefficient used in computing K sub Ic is derived for the short bar specimen from the superposition of ligament-dependent and ligament-independent solutions for the straight through crack, and also from experimental compliance calibrations. Coefficients for the four-point-bend specimen were developed by the same superposition procedure, and with additional refinement using the slice model of Bluhm. Short rod specimen stress intensity coefficients were determined only by experimental compliance calibration. Performance of the three chevron-notch specimens and their stress intensity factor relations were evaluated by tests on hot-pressed silicon nitride and sintered aluminum oxide. Results obtained with the short bar and the four-point-bend specimens on silicon nitride are in good agreement and relatively free of specimen geometry and size effects within the range investigated. Results on aluminum oxide were affected by specimen size and chevron-notch geometry, believed due to a rising crack growth resistance curve for the material. Only the results for the short bar specimen are presented in detail.

  7. Fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) data reduction program

    SciTech Connect

    Heiman, M.R.

    1998-09-01

    This report documents the development, verification, and use instructions for an automated K{sub IC} data reduction program written in the Hewlett Packard Visual Engineering Environment (HP VEE) programming language. Currently, when the standard test method Plane-Strain Fracture Toughness of Metallic materials (K{sub IC}), is performed, the data is reduced manually. Date reduction includes 15 detailed calculations required by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) E399 to determine the validity of the computed K{sub IC} value. Manual data reduction is both time consuming, tedious, and prone to errors. Since all K{sub IC} tests are completed using a data acquisition system to digitally record time, load, and crack opening displacement (COD); automation of K{sub IC} data reduction using a computer program to perform all calculations rapidly, enables processing of a large amount of data. The K{sub IC} data reduction program reduces any computer American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) data file. Thus, the K{sub IC} data reduction program is also used to over check tests performed at other facilities. The program was qualified based on mechanical properties of commercial alloy specimens.

  8. Fracture toughness of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier ceramics: Influence of processing, microstructure, and thermal aging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay; Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2014-06-09

    Fracture toughness has become one of the dominant design parameters that dictates the selection of materials and their microstructure to obtain durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Much progress has been made in characterizing the fracture toughness of relevant TBC compositions in bulk form, and it has become apparent that this property is significantly affected by process-induced microstructural defects. In this investigation, a systematic study of the influence of coating microstructure on the fracture toughness of atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) TBCs has been carried out. Yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings were fabricated under different spray process conditions inducing different levelsmore » of porosity and interfacial defects. Fracture toughness was measured on free standing coatings in as-processed and thermally aged conditions using the double torsion technique. Results indicate significant variance in fracture toughness among coatings with different microstructures including changes induced by thermal aging. Comparative studies were also conducted on an alternative TBC composition, Gd2Zr2O7 (GDZ), which as anticipated shows significantly lower fracture toughness compared to YSZ. Furthermore, the results from these studies not only point towards a need for process and microstructure optimization for enhanced TBC performance but also a framework for establishing performance metrics for promising new TBC compositions.« less

  9. Biaxial loading and shallow-flaw effects on crack-tip constraint and fracture-toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; McAfee, W.J.; Theiss, T.J.; Rao, M.C.

    1994-04-01

    Uniaxial tests of single-edged notched bend (SENB) specimens with both deep- and shallow-flaws have shown elevated fracturetoughness for the shallow flaws. The elevation in fracture-toughness for shallow flaws has been shown to be the result of reduced constraint at the crack-tip. Biaxial loading has the potential to increase constraint at the crack-tip and thereby reduce some of the shallow-flaw, fracture-toughness elevation. Biaxial fracture-toughness tests have shown that the shallow-flaw, fracture-toughness elevation is reduced but not eliminated by biaxial loading. Dual-parameter, fracture-toughness correlations have been proposed to reflect the effect of crack-tip constraint on fracture-toughness. Test results from the uniaxial and biaxial tests were analyzed using the dual-parameter technology. Discrepancies between analysis results and cleavage initiation site data from fractographic examinations indicate that the analysis models are in need of further refinement. Addition of a precleavage, ductile-tearing element to the analysis model has the potential to resolve the noted discrepancies.

  10. Fracture toughness of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier ceramics: Influence of processing, microstructure, and thermal aging

    SciTech Connect

    Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay; Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2014-06-09

    Fracture toughness has become one of the dominant design parameters that dictates the selection of materials and their microstructure to obtain durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Much progress has been made in characterizing the fracture toughness of relevant TBC compositions in bulk form, and it has become apparent that this property is significantly affected by process-induced microstructural defects. In this investigation, a systematic study of the influence of coating microstructure on the fracture toughness of atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) TBCs has been carried out. Yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings were fabricated under different spray process conditions inducing different levels of porosity and interfacial defects. Fracture toughness was measured on free standing coatings in as-processed and thermally aged conditions using the double torsion technique. Results indicate significant variance in fracture toughness among coatings with different microstructures including changes induced by thermal aging. Comparative studies were also conducted on an alternative TBC composition, Gd2Zr2O7 (GDZ), which as anticipated shows significantly lower fracture toughness compared to YSZ. Furthermore, the results from these studies not only point towards a need for process and microstructure optimization for enhanced TBC performance but also a framework for establishing performance metrics for promising new TBC compositions.

  11. Fracture toughness of esthetic dental coating systems by nanoindentation and FIB sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Pecnik, Christina Martina; Courty, Diana; Muff, Daniel; Spolenak, Ralph

    2015-07-01

    Improving the esthetics of Ti-based dental implants is the last challenge remaining in the optimization process. The optical issues were recently solved by the application of highly and selectively reflective coatings on Ti implants. This work focuses on the mechanical durability of these esthetic ceramic based coating systems (with and without adhesion layers). The coating systems (Ti-ZrO2, Ti-Al-ZrO2, Ti-Ti-Al-ZrO2, Ti-Ag-ZrO2, Ti-Ti-Ag-ZrO2, Ti-Bragg and Ti-TiO2-Bragg) were subjected to nanoindentation experiments and examined using scanning electron microscopy and focused ion beam cross sectional analysis. Three coating systems contained adhesion layers (10nm of Ti or 60nm of TiO2 layers). The fracture toughness of selected samples was assessed applying two different models from literature, a classical for bulk materials and an energy-based model, which was further developed and adjusted. The ZrO2 based coating systems (total film thickness<200nm) followed a circumferential cracking behavior in contrast to Bragg coated samples (total film thickness around 1.5μm), which showed radial cracking emanating from the indent corners. For Ti-ZrO2 samples, a fracture toughness between 2.70 and 3.70MPam(1/2) was calculated using an energy-based model. The classical model was applied to Bragg coated samples and their fracture toughness ranged between 0.70 and 0.80MPam(1/2). Furthermore, coating systems containing an additional layer (Ti-Ti-Al-ZrO2, Ti-Ti-Ag-ZrO2 and Ti-TiO2-Bragg) showed an improved adhesion between the substrate and the coating. The addition of a Ti or TiO2 layer improved the adhesion between substrate and coating. The validity of the models for the assessment of the fracture toughness depended on the layer structure and fracture profile of the samples investigated here (classical model for thick coatings and energy-based model for thin coatings). PMID:25837339

  12. Fracture toughness of esthetic dental coating systems by nanoindentation and FIB sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Pecnik, Christina Martina; Courty, Diana; Muff, Daniel; Spolenak, Ralph

    2015-07-01

    Improving the esthetics of Ti-based dental implants is the last challenge remaining in the optimization process. The optical issues were recently solved by the application of highly and selectively reflective coatings on Ti implants. This work focuses on the mechanical durability of these esthetic ceramic based coating systems (with and without adhesion layers). The coating systems (Ti-ZrO2, Ti-Al-ZrO2, Ti-Ti-Al-ZrO2, Ti-Ag-ZrO2, Ti-Ti-Ag-ZrO2, Ti-Bragg and Ti-TiO2-Bragg) were subjected to nanoindentation experiments and examined using scanning electron microscopy and focused ion beam cross sectional analysis. Three coating systems contained adhesion layers (10nm of Ti or 60nm of TiO2 layers). The fracture toughness of selected samples was assessed applying two different models from literature, a classical for bulk materials and an energy-based model, which was further developed and adjusted. The ZrO2 based coating systems (total film thickness<200nm) followed a circumferential cracking behavior in contrast to Bragg coated samples (total film thickness around 1.5μm), which showed radial cracking emanating from the indent corners. For Ti-ZrO2 samples, a fracture toughness between 2.70 and 3.70MPam(1/2) was calculated using an energy-based model. The classical model was applied to Bragg coated samples and their fracture toughness ranged between 0.70 and 0.80MPam(1/2). Furthermore, coating systems containing an additional layer (Ti-Ti-Al-ZrO2, Ti-Ti-Ag-ZrO2 and Ti-TiO2-Bragg) showed an improved adhesion between the substrate and the coating. The addition of a Ti or TiO2 layer improved the adhesion between substrate and coating. The validity of the models for the assessment of the fracture toughness depended on the layer structure and fracture profile of the samples investigated here (classical model for thick coatings and energy-based model for thin coatings).

  13. TRITIUM AGING EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF STAINLESS STEEL BASE METAL AND WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    2009-07-30

    Tritium reservoirs are constructed from welded stainless steel forgings. While these steels are highly resistant to the embrittling effects of hydrogen isotopes and helium from tritium decay; they are not immune. Tritium embrittlement is an enhanced form of hydrogen embrittlement because of the presence of helium-3 from tritium decay which nucleates as nanometer-sized bubbles on dislocations, grain boundaries, and other microstructural defects. Steels with decay helium bubble microstructures are hardened and less able to deform plastically and become more susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen and its isotopes. Ductility, elongation-to-failure, and fracture toughness are reduced by exposures to tritium and the reductions increase with time as helium-3 builds into the material from tritium permeation and radioactive decay. Material and forging specifications have been developed for optimal material compatibility with tritium. These specifications cover composition, mechanical properties, and select microstructural characteristics like grain size, flow-line orientation, inclusion content, and ferrite distribution. For many years, the forming process of choice for reservoir manufacturing was high-energy-rate forging (HERF), principally because the DOE forging facility owned only HERF hammers. Today, some reservoir forgings are being made that use a conventional, more common process known as press forging (PF or CF). One of the chief differences between the two forging processes is strain rate: Conventional hydraulic or mechanical forging presses deform the metal at 4-8 ft/s, about ten-fold slower than the HERF process. The material specifications continue to provide successful stockpile performance by ensuring that the two forging processes produce similar reservoir microstructures. While long-term life storage tests have demonstrated the general tritium compatibility of tritium reservoirs, fracture-toughness properties of both conventionally forged and high

  14. Factors influencing the Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of a rubber toughened thermoplastic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. S.; Yee, A. F.

    1989-01-01

    The use of a rubber modified thermoplastic resin has been investigated as a method to improve the Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of a unidirectional continuous carbon fiber composite. Test results show that the improvement in the fracture toughness is less than expected due to rubber particle agglomeration, solvent and molding induced crystallization of the matrix and poor fiber/matrix adhesion. The plastic zone in composites utilizing tough matrices can extend well beyond a single interfibrillar spacing. However, the development of the plastic zone is limited due to the failure of the fiber/matrix interface. In order to fully evaluate the potential of tough composites using toughened matrices, any improvement made in the matrix toughness must be coupled with improvements in the fiber/matrix adhesion.

  15. Improving the fracture toughness and the strength of epoxy using nanomaterials--a review of the current status.

    PubMed

    Domun, N; Hadavinia, H; Zhang, T; Sainsbury, T; Liaghat, G H; Vahid, S

    2015-06-21

    The incorporation of nanomaterials in the polymer matrix is considered to be a highly effective technique to improve the mechanical properties of resins. In this paper the effects of the addition of different nanoparticles such as single-walled CNT (SWCNT), double-walled CNT (DWCNT), multi-walled CNT (MWCNT), graphene, nanoclay and nanosilica on fracture toughness, strength and stiffness of the epoxy matrix have been reviewed. The Young's modulus (E), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), mode I (GIC) and mode II (GIIC) fracture toughness of the various nanocomposites at different nanoparticle loadings are compared. The review shows that, depending on the type of nanoparticles, the integration of the nanoparticles has a substantial effect on mode I and mode II fracture toughness, strength and stiffness. The critical factors such as maintaining a homogeneous dispersion and good adhesion between the matrix and the nanoparticles are highlighted. The effect of surface functionalization, its relevancy and toughening mechanism are also scrutinized and discussed. A large variety of data comprised of the mechanical properties of nanomaterial toughened composites reported to date has thus been compiled to facilitate the evolution of this emerging field, and the results are presented in maps showing the effect of nanoparticle loading on mode I fracture toughness, stiffness and strength. PMID:26006766

  16. Improving the fracture toughness and the strength of epoxy using nanomaterials - a review of the current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domun, N.; Hadavinia, H.; Zhang, T.; Sainsbury, T.; Liaghat, G. H.; Vahid, S.

    2015-06-01

    The incorporation of nanomaterials in the polymer matrix is considered to be a highly effective technique to improve the mechanical properties of resins. In this paper the effects of the addition of different nanoparticles such as single-walled CNT (SWCNT), double-walled CNT (DWCNT), multi-walled CNT (MWCNT), graphene, nanoclay and nanosilica on fracture toughness, strength and stiffness of the epoxy matrix have been reviewed. The Young's modulus (E), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), mode I (GIC) and mode II (GIIC) fracture toughness of the various nanocomposites at different nanoparticle loadings are compared. The review shows that, depending on the type of nanoparticles, the integration of the nanoparticles has a substantial effect on mode I and mode II fracture toughness, strength and stiffness. The critical factors such as maintaining a homogeneous dispersion and good adhesion between the matrix and the nanoparticles are highlighted. The effect of surface functionalization, its relevancy and toughening mechanism are also scrutinized and discussed. A large variety of data comprised of the mechanical properties of nanomaterial toughened composites reported to date has thus been compiled to facilitate the evolution of this emerging field, and the results are presented in maps showing the effect of nanoparticle loading on mode I fracture toughness, stiffness and strength.

  17. TRITIUM AND DECAY HELIUM EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF STAINLESS STEEL WELDMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Scott West, S; Michael Tosten, M

    2007-08-31

    J-Integral fracture toughness tests were conducted on tritium-exposed-and-aged Types 304L and 21-6-9 stainless steel weldments in order to measure the combined effects of tritium and its decay product, helium-3 on the fracture toughness properties. Initially, weldments have fracture toughness values about three times higher than base-metal values. Delta-ferrite phase in the weld microstructure improved toughness provided no tritium was present in the microstructure. After a tritium-exposure-and-aging treatment that resulted in {approx}1400 atomic parts per million (appm) dissolved tritium, both weldments and base metals had their fracture toughness values reduced to about the same level. The tritium effect was greater in weldments (67 % reduction vs. 37% reduction) largely because the ductile discontinuous delta-ferrite interfaces were embrittled by tritium and decay helium. Fracture toughness values decreased for both base metals and weldments with increasing decay helium content in the range tested (50-200 appm).

  18. Fracture Toughness Measurements and Assessment of Thin Walled Conduit Alloys in a Cicc Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. P.; Han, K.; Toplosky, V. J.

    2008-03-01

    The Series-Connected Hybrid Magnets under construction at the NHMFL use Cable-in-Conduct-Conductor (CICC) technology. The 4 K mechanical properties of the conduit are extremely important to the performance and reliability of the magnets. We have measured tensile and fracture toughness of two candidate conduit alloys (Haynes 242 and modified 316LN) in various metallurgical states, with emphasis on the final state of production. To assess the material in its final production state, non-standard specimens are removed directly from the round-corner rectangular conduit and tested after exposure to a simulated Nb3Sn reaction heat treatment. Non-standard middle-tension (MT) fracture toughness specimens enable toughness evaluation of the base metal, welds and weld/base transitional region in the as-fabricated conduit with final dimensions not suitable for conventional fracture toughness specimens. Although fracture toughness tests of the thin walled conduit fail to meet ASTM test validity requirements they provide a qualitative evaluation and estimate of the fracture toughness of the conduit and the welds.

  19. FRACTURE TOUGHNESS MEASUREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THIN WALLED CONDUIT ALLOYS IN A CICC APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, R. P.; Han, K.; Toplosky, V. J.

    2008-03-03

    The Series-Connected Hybrid Magnets under construction at the NHMFL use Cable-in-Conduct-Conductor (CICC) technology. The 4 K mechanical properties of the conduit are extremely important to the performance and reliability of the magnets. We have measured tensile and fracture toughness of two candidate conduit alloys (Haynes 242 and modified 316LN) in various metallurgical states, with emphasis on the final state of production. To assess the material in its final production state, non-standard specimens are removed directly from the round-corner rectangular conduit and tested after exposure to a simulated Nb{sub 3}Sn reaction heat treatment. Non-standard middle-tension (MT) fracture toughness specimens enable toughness evaluation of the base metal, welds and weld/base transitional region in the as-fabricated conduit with final dimensions not suitable for conventional fracture toughness specimens. Although fracture toughness tests of the thin walled conduit fail to meet ASTM test validity requirements they provide a qualitative evaluation and estimate of the fracture toughness of the conduit and the welds.

  20. Fracture and fracture toughness of nanopolycrystalline metals produced by severe plastic deformation

    PubMed Central

    Hohenwarter, A.; Pippan, R.

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of the fracture of bulk metallic materials developed in the last 50 years is mostly based on materials having grain sizes, d, in the range of some micrometres up to several hundred micrometres regarding the possibilities of classical metallurgical methods. Nowadays, novel techniques provide access to much smaller grain sizes, where severe plastic deformation (SPD) is one of the most significant techniques. This opens the door to extend basic research in fracture mechanics to the nanocrystalline (NC) grain size regime. From the technological point of view, there is also the necessity to evaluate standard fracture mechanics data of these new materials, such as the fracture toughness, in order to allow their implementation in engineering applications. Here, an overview of recent results on the fracture behaviour of several different ultrafine-grained (d<1 μm) and NC (d<100 nm) metals and alloys covering examples of body- and face-centred cubic structures produced by SPD will be given. PMID:25713459

  1. Evaluation of brittleness of porcelain fused to pure titanium by fracture toughness, hardness and fracture energy.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Yoshifumi; Yamauchi, Mutsuo; Goto, Takayasu; Nagasawa, Toru

    2003-12-01

    To elucidate the cause of brittleness of porcelain fused to pure titanium (PFPT) which leads to chipping and cracking similar to that of conventional porcelain in clinical use, fracture toughness KIc, hardness (Hv and Hk) and fracture energy gamma reflecting the bonding energy of atoms were evaluated. In KIc there were no differences between PFPT and conventional porcelain, nor for Hv and Hk, but for the gamma of PFPT calculated from the KIc and the Young modulus measured by the resonance method there was less than that of conventional porcelain. These results indicate that mechanical properties such as KIc and hardness cannot always substantiate the brittleness of PFPT experienced in practical use. However, a comparatively small gamma of PFPT may suggest a fatigue crack growth as a more likely phenomenon as it occurs more easily than the conventional one in oral.

  2. Dependence of fracture toughness of molybdenum laser welds on processing parameters and in-situ oxygen gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, L.E.; Jellison, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Fracture toughness properties have been determined for laser welds in different grades of molybdenum. The fracture toughness of welds in sintered molybdenum was consistently less than the fracture toughness of welds in vacuum arc remelted molybdenum. These differences cannot be attributed to oxygen content, since the oxygen level was nominally the same for all grades of molybdenum examined in this program. Alloy additions of titanium by means of physically deposited coatings significantly improved the fracture toughness of welds in sintered molybdenum, whereas titanium additions to welds in vacuum arc remelted molybdenum decreased the fracture toughness slightly. Pulsed laser welds exhibited fine columnar structures and, in the case of sintered molybdenum, superior fracture toughness when compared with continuous wave laser welds. 6 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Electron radiation effects on Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness of GFRP and CFRP composites

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, N.; Tohdoh, M.; Takahashi, K.

    1989-01-01

    The degradation properties of epoxy-based fiber-reinforced-plastics (FRP) composites irradiated by high-energy electrons were studied using the Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness G/sub IIc/, measured by end-notched flexure tests. The radiation-induced degradation mechanisms were investigated through G/sub IIc/ and the scanning electron micrographs of fracture surfaces. For GFRP, the significant decrease in G/sub IIc/ was found. Debonding of glass fibers and epoxy matrix (or degradation of silane coupling agents) plays an important role in degradation in addition to resin degradation. Thus, the improvement of the radiation resistance of fiber-resin interfaces as well as matrix itself is of supreme importance in order to increase the radiation resistance of GFRP. For CFRP, on the other hand, no degradation in fiber-resin interfaces was found and the slight decrease in G/sub IIc/ seems to be due to the resin degradation. 18 references, 6 figures.

  4. Effects of Magnetic Field on Fracture Toughness of Manganese-Zinc Ferrite Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Y. P.; Fang, D. N.; Soh, A. K.

    Effects of magnetic field on the fracture toughness of magnetic ceramics were experimentally investigated by the use of the single-edge-notch-beam (SENB) specimens of three kinds of manganese-zinc ferrite ceramics with different permeability. Results indicate that there is no significant change in the measured fracture toughness of the Manganese-Zinc Ferrite ceramics in the presence of the magnetic field. Furthermore, the crack lengths caused by the Vickers' indentation on the manganese-zinc ferrite ceramics show that the fracture toughness in the magnetic field direction is almost identical to that in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. This reveals that the polycrystalline ceramic still exhibits isotropic fracture behavior after magnetization. Finally, a qualitative explanation is given in terms of a small-scale magnetic saturation model.

  5. Fracture toughness testing of Linde 1092 reactor vessel welds in the transition range using Charpy-sized specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Pavinich, W.A.; Yoon, K.K.; Hour, K.Y.; Hoffman, C.L.

    1999-10-01

    The present reference toughness method for predicting the change in fracture toughness can provide over estimates of these values because of uncertainties in initial RT{sub NDT} and shift correlations. It would be preferable to directly measure fracture toughness. However, until recently, no standard method was available to characterize fracture toughness in the transition range. ASTM E08 has developed a draft standard that shows promise for providing lower bound transition range fracture toughness using the master curve approach. This method has been successfully implemented using 1T compact fracture specimens. Combustion Engineering reactor vessel surveillance programs do not have compact fracture specimens. Therefore, the CE Owners Group developed a program to validate the master curve method for Charpy-sized and reconstituted Charpy-sized specimens for future application on irradiated specimens. This method was validated for Linde 1092 welds using unirradiated Charpy-sized and reconstituted Charpy-sized specimens by comparison of results with those from compact fracture specimens.

  6. Fracture Toughness Micromechanics by Energy Methods With a Photocure Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.; Lemons, Jack E.; McCracken, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    A fracture toughness analysis for discontinuous fiber reinforcement was evaluated as a function of fiber volume percent (Vf) using advanced flexural bend tests. Fully articulated fixtures with 40-mm spans were used to examine specimens (2 × 2 × 50 mm3) under conditions of Euler-type bending to reduce shearing effects. Testing for fracture toughness in standardized international units (kJ/m2) using fundamental mechanics-of-materials energy methods by strain energy was then applied for assessment of resilience and work of fracture (WOF). Fracture toughness was also measured as strain energy release (SERIC) for the condition of unstable fracture between peak load and 5% maximum deflection past peak load. Energies were calculated by numerical integration using the trapezoidal rule from the area under the load–deflection curve. Fracture depths were normalized using sample dimensions from microscopy imaging for a combined correlation matrix analysis of all mechanical test data. Vf significantly correlated with resilience, WOF, and SERIC, but negatively correlated with degree of crack depth with p < 0.0000005. All measured interrelated properties also significantly correlated with one another (p < 0.000001). Significant fracture toughness differences between particulate-filled and fiber-reinforced composites began when adding fiber reinforcement at 10.3 Vf for resilience, 5.4 Vf for WOF, and 5.4 Vf for SERIC (p < 0.05). PMID:25346562

  7. Fracture Toughness Micromechanics by Energy Methods With a Photocure Fiber-Reinforced Composite.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Richard C; Lemons, Jack E; McCracken, Michael S

    2007-06-01

    A fracture toughness analysis for discontinuous fiber reinforcement was evaluated as a function of fiber volume percent (Vf) using advanced flexural bend tests. Fully articulated fixtures with 40-mm spans were used to examine specimens (2 × 2 × 50 mm(3)) under conditions of Euler-type bending to reduce shearing effects. Testing for fracture toughness in standardized international units (kJ/m(2)) using fundamental mechanics-of-materials energy methods by strain energy was then applied for assessment of resilience and work of fracture (WOF). Fracture toughness was also measured as strain energy release (SERIC) for the condition of unstable fracture between peak load and 5% maximum deflection past peak load. Energies were calculated by numerical integration using the trapezoidal rule from the area under the load-deflection curve. Fracture depths were normalized using sample dimensions from microscopy imaging for a combined correlation matrix analysis of all mechanical test data. Vf significantly correlated with resilience, WOF, and SERIC, but negatively correlated with degree of crack depth with p < 0.0000005. All measured interrelated properties also significantly correlated with one another (p < 0.000001). Significant fracture toughness differences between particulate-filled and fiber-reinforced composites began when adding fiber reinforcement at 10.3 Vf for resilience, 5.4 Vf for WOF, and 5.4 Vf for SERIC (p < 0.05).

  8. Indentation Fracture Resistance Vs Conventional Fracture Toughness of Carbon Nanotube/Alumina Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Soumya; Das, Probal Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/alumina (Al2O3) nanocomposites were fabricated using two varieties of CNT to access the effect of morphological variation of the filler on fracture resistance ( K R)/toughness ( K IC) of studied specimens. Special attention was also given to compare K R and K IC values for tracing out the primary selection criterion of appropriate indentation fracture (IF) equation used in relatively faster and simpler `direct crack measurement' (DCM) technique to evaluate K R values close to stringent `single edge notched beam' (SENB) derived K IC data. While K IC was calculated using the unique expression suitable for specimens tested under four-point flexure, K R values were evaluated using a series of IF equations suitable for Palmqvist and/or median crack systems. As far as change in K R and/or K IC of nanocomposites was concerned, it was noticed that for longer/thicker CNTs having relatively higher internal bamboo structures, much lower amount (0.15 vol pct) was adequate to achieve the highest improvement in K R (~87 pct) or K IC (~50 pct) over pure Al2O3 (Laugier K R ≈ 3.83 MPa-m0.5; K IC ≈ 3.48 MPa-m0.5) than that required for smaller/thinner CNTs (≥0.3 vol pct). On contrary, resistance to fracture up to 1.2 vol pct CNT loading was much enhanced in specimens fabricated with smaller/thinner CNTs over those fabricated using longer/thicker CNTs. Comparatively better morphology, adequate CNT dispersion, and higher population of bridging elements in specimens containing smaller/thinner CNTs were the key factors behind such toughness retention.

  9. Elevated-temperature fracture toughness and fatigue testing of steels for geothermal applications. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, R.A.; Goodman, E.C.; Guest, R.V.; Hendrickson, R.R.; Leslie, W.C.

    1980-11-01

    Conventional drill bit steels exhibit increased wear and decreased toughness when run at elevated temperatures in geothermal wells. Bits are therefore run at lower speeds and lighter loads, resulting in lower penetration rates for geothermal wells than for conventional rock drilling. Carpenter EX-00053, Timken CBS 600, Timken CBS 1000M and Vasco X-2M, steels with improved hot hardness (improved wear resistance), were tested in conjunction with the steels used for cones (AISI 4820 and 9315) and lugs (AISI 8620 and 9315) in conventional roller cone rock bits. Shortrod fracture toughness measurements were made on each of these steels between room temperature and 400/sup 0/C. Fatigue crack resistance was determined at 300/sup 0/C for high-temperature steels and at room temperature for conventional steels. Scanning electron microscopy analyses of the fractured short-rod specimens were correlated with observed crack behavior from the test records. Test results are discussed, recommendations made for further testing and preliminary steel selections made for improved geothermal bits.

  10. Elevated Temperature Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Testing of Steels for Geothermal Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, R.A.; Goodman, E.C.; Hendrickson, R.R.

    1981-10-01

    Conventional drill bit steels exhibit increased wear and decreased toughness when run at elevated temperatures in geothermal wells. Bits are therefore run at lower speeds and lighter loads, resulting in lower penetration rates for geothermal drilling than for conventional rock drilling. Carpenter EX-00053, Timken CBS 600, Timken CBS 1000M and Vasco X-2M steels with improved hot hardness (improved wear resistance), were tested in conjunction with the steels used for cones (AISI 4829, 3915 and EX55) in conventional roller cones and lugs (AISI 8620, 9315 and EX55) in conventional roller cone rock bits. Short-rod fracture toughness measurements were made on each of these steels between room temperature and 400{degree}C. Fatigue crack resistance was determined at 300{degree}C for high-temperature steels and at room temperature for conventional steels. Scanning electron microscopy analyses of the fractured short-rod specimens were correlated with observed crack behavior from the test records. Materials testing results are discussed and steel selections made for improved geothermal bits. Carpenter EX-00053 and Timken CBS 1000M steels meet all design requirements for use in stabilizers, lugs and cones at temperatures to 400{degree}C. It is recommended that EX-00053 and CBS 1000M be manufactured for geothermal drilling at the Geysers site. [DJE 2005

  11. Crack resistance, fracture toughness and instability in damage tolerant Ai-Li alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanhill, R. J. H.; Schra, L.; Thart, W. G. J.

    1990-05-01

    A comparison of the crack resistance (R curve), fracture toughness and instability behavior of candidate damage tolerant aluminum lithium alloys, 2091 and 8090, and the widely used conventional 2024-T3 alloy is addressed. The 2091 alloy was in three heat treatment conditions, T8X, TX and TY, all artificially aged. The 8090 alloy was in the T81 condition. The crack resistances and fracture toughnesses of 2091-T8X and 8091-T81 were similar to those of 2024-T3, but at a 50 MPa lower strength level. The crack resistances and fracture toughnesses of 2091-TX and 2091-TY were much inferior. In all cases, stable (slow) crack growth was ductile, but unstable crack growth in 2091-TX and 2091-TY was 100 percent intergranular and macroscopically brittle. Unstable crack growth in 2091-T8X was 50 percent intergranular and macroscopically ductile. Fractographic analysis indicated the 2091-TX and 2091-TY alloys to be sensitive to dynamic effects, such that the dynamic fracture toughness could be significantly lower than the quasistatic fracture toughness. This may also be true of 2091-T8X. These results point out that fail safe crack arrest tests should be included in any evaluation of damage tolerant Al-Li sheet alloys for aircraft structures.

  12. A closer look at the fracture toughness of ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucon, Enrico

    2007-08-01

    SCK·CEN has characterized the mechanical properties of several ferritic/martensitic steels, both unirradiated and irradiated. Fracture toughness has been evaluated using Charpy impact and fracture mechanics tests. Two safety-related features have emerged: (a) the applicability of the master curve approach (ASTM E1921-05) appears questionable; and (b) irradiation embrittlement is systematically larger when quantified in terms of quasi-static fracture toughness than when measured from Charpy tests. Both issues are examined in detail and possible interpretations are proposed; potential improvements given by the application of more advanced fracture toughness analysis methodologies are discussed. In order to clarify whether the Charpy/fracture toughness difference in embrittlement is due to loading rate effects, dynamic toughness tests have been performed in the unirradiated condition and for two irradiation doses (0.3 and 1.6 dpa). The corresponding dynamic T0 shifts have been compared with the shifts of Charpy and master curve quasi-static transition temperatures. Other possible contributions are examined and discussed.

  13. Dependence of fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron on austempering temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, P. Prasad; Putatunda, Susil K.

    1998-12-01

    Ductile cast iron samples were austenitized at 927 °C and subsequently austempered for 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 2 hours at 260 °C, 288 °C, 316 °C, 343 °C, 371 °C, and 399 °C. These were subjected to a plane strain fracture toughness test. Fracture toughness was found to initially increase with austempering temperature, reach a maximum, and then decrease with further rise in temperature. The results of the fracture toughness study and fractographic examination were correlated with microstructural features such as bainite morphology, the volume fraction of retained austenite, and its carbon content. It was found that fracture toughness was maximized when the microstructure consisted of lower bainite with about 30 vol pct retained austenite containing more than 1.8 wt pct carbon. A theoretical model was developed, which could explain the observed variation in fracture toughness with austempering temperature in terms of microstructural features such as the width of the ferrite blades and retained austenite content. A plot of K {/IC 2} against σ y ( X γ, C γ)1/2 resulted in a straight line, as predicted by the model.

  14. Dependence of fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron on austempering temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, P.P.; Putatunda, S.K.

    1998-12-01

    Ductile cast iron samples were austenitized at 927 C and subsequently austempered for 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 2 hours at 260 C, 288 C, 316 C, 343 C, 371 C, and 399 C. These were subjected to a plane strain fracture toughness test. Fracture toughness was found to initially increase with austempering temperature, reach a maximum, and then decrease with further rise in temperature. The results of the fracture toughness study and fractographic examination were correlated with microstructural features such as bainite morphology, the volume fraction of retained austenite, and its carbon content. It was found that fracture toughness was maximized when the microstructure consisted of lower bainite with about 30 vol pct retained austenite containing more than 1.8 wt pct carbon. A theoretical model was developed, which could explain the observed variation in fracture toughness with austempering temperature in terms of microstructural features such as the width of the ferrite blades and retained austenite content. A plot of K{sub IC}{sup 2} against {sigma}, (X{sub {gamma}}C{sub {gamma}}){sup 1/2} resulted in a straight line, as predicted by the model.

  15. Effect of Retained Austenite on the Fracture Toughness of Quenching and Partitioning (Q&P)-Treated Sheet Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Riming; Li, Wei; Zhou, Shu; Zhong, Yong; Wang, Li; Jin, Xuejun

    2014-04-01

    Fracture toughness K IC was measured by double edge-notched tension (DENT) specimens with fatigue precracks on quenching and partitioning (Q&P)-treated high-strength (ultimate tensile strength [UTS] superior to 1200 MPa) sheet steels consisting of 4 to 10 vol pct of retained austenite. Crack extension force, G IC, evaluated from the measured K IC, is used to analyze the role of retained austenite in different fracture behavior. Meanwhile, G IC is deduced by a constructed model based on energy absorption by martensite transformation (MT) behavior of retained austenite in Q&P-treated steels. The tendency of the change of two results is in good agreement. The Q&P-treated steel, quenched at 573 K (300 °C), then partitioned at 573 K (300 °C), holding for 60 seconds, has a fracture toughness of 74.1 MPa·m1/2, which is 32 pct higher than quenching and tempering steel (55.9 MPa·m1/2), and 16 pct higher than quenching and austempering (QAT) steel (63.8 MPa·m1/2). MT is found to occur preferentially at the tips of extension cracks on less stable retained austenite, which further improves the toughness of Q&P steels; on the contrary, the MT that occurs at more stable retained austenite has a detrimental effect on toughness.

  16. Correlations among ultrasonic propagation factors and fracture toughness properties of metallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1976-01-01

    Empirical evidence was developed to show that a close relation exists among fracture toughness, yield strength, and ultrasonic attenuation properties of metallic materials. The evidence was obtained by ultrasonic probing of specimens of two maraging steels and a titanium alloy. It was concluded that nondestructive ultrasonic methods can be used to indirectly evaluate fracture-related material properties. The results suggest that these nondestructive ultrasonic measurements can also serve as an adjunct to destructive testing, measurement, and analysis of fracture properties.

  17. The relative contributions of non-enzymatic glycation and cortical porosity on the fracture toughness of aging bone

    PubMed Central

    Tang, S.Y.; Vashishth, D.

    2010-01-01

    The risk of fracture increases with age due to the decline of bone mass and bone quality. One of the age-related changes in bone quality occurs through the formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) due to non-enzymatic glycation (NEG). However as a number of other changes including increased porosity occur with age and affect bone fragility, the relative contribution of AGEs on the fracture resistance of aging bone is unknown. Using a high-resolution nonlinear finite element model that incorporate cohesive elements and micro-computed tomography-based 3d meshes, we investigated the contribution of AGEs and cortical porosity on the fracture toughness of human bone. The results show that NEG caused a 52% reduction in propagation fracture toughness (R-curve slope). The combined effects of porosity and AGEs resulted in an 88% reduction in propagation toughness. These findings are consistent with previous experimental results. The model captured the age-related changes in the R-curve toughening by incorporating bone quantity and bone quality changes, and these simulations demonstrate the ability of the cohesive models to account for the irreversible dynamic crack growth processes affected by the changes in post-yield material behavior. By decoupling the matrix-level effects due to NEG and intracortical porosity, we are able to directly determine the effects of NEG on fracture toughness. The outcome of this study suggests that it may be important to include the age-related changes in the material level properties by using finite element analysis towards the prediction of fracture risk. PMID:21056419

  18. Effects of electric field on the fracture toughness (KIc) of ceramic PZT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goljahi, Sam; Lynch, Christopher S.

    2013-09-01

    This work was motivated by the observation that a small percentage of the ceramic lead zirconate titanate (PZT) parts in a device application, one that requires an electrode pattern on the PZT surface, developed fatigue cracks at the edges of the electrodes; yet all of the parts were subjected to similar loading. To obtain additional information on the fracture behavior of this material, similar specimens were run at higher voltage in the laboratory under a microscope to observe the initiation and growth of the fatigue cracks. A sequence of experiments was next performed to determine whether there were fracture toughness variations that depended on material processing. Plates were cut from a single bar in different locations and the Vickers indentation technique was used to measure the relative fracture toughness as a function of position along the bar. Small variations in toughness were found, that may account for some of the devices developing fatigue cracks and not others. Fracture toughness was measured next as a function of electric field. The surface crack in flexure technique was modified to apply an electric field perpendicular to a crack. The results indicate that the fracture toughness drops under a positive electric field and increases under a negative electric field that is less than the coercive field, but as the negative coercive field is approached the fracture toughness drops. Examination of the fracture surfaces using an optical microscope and a surface profilometer reveal the initial indentation crack shape and (although less accurately) the crack shape and size at the transition from stable to unstable growth. These results are discussed in terms of a ferroelastic toughening mechanism that is dependent on electric field.

  19. Fractured toughness of Si3N4 measured with short bar chevron-notched specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, J. A.; Shannon, J. L., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The short bar chevron-notched specimen is used to measure the plane strain fracture toughness of hot pressed Si3N4. Specimen proportions and chevron-notch angle are varied, thereby varying the amount of crack extension to maximum load (upon which K sub IC is based). The measured toughness (4.68 + or - 0.19 MNm to the 3/2 power) is independent of these variations, inferring that the material has a flat crack growth resistance curve.

  20. High toughness-high strength iron alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An iron alloy is provided which exhibits strength and toughness characteristics at cryogenic temperatures. The alloy consists essentially of about 10 to 16 percent by weight nickel, about 0.1 to 1.0 percent by weight aluminum, and 0 to about 3 percent by weight copper, with the balance being essentially iron. The iron alloy is produced by a process which includes cold rolling at room temperature and subsequent heat treatment.

  1. Statistical distributions of toughness and fracture stress for homogeneous and inhomogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, D. J.; Knott, J. F.

    THE FIRST part of this paper deals with the fracture behaviour of material that is sensibly homogeneous. The statistical distributions of toughness and fracture stress for this case are determined, and the accuracies of the methods used of measuring toughness and fracture stress are assessed. Subsequently, the second part deals with the fracture of microstructurally inhomogeneous (two-phase) materials. The statistical distributions obtained for fracture stress, fracture toughness and critical crack opening displacement are assessed, and the relationships between them for inhomogeneous materials are discussed. A model is developed which explains the shapes of the distributions obtained in terms of a sampling argument. In Part III the model is applied to data for metallurgically inhomogeneous material. This is material which has a homogeneous microstructure but has chemical inhomogeneity due to segregation of alloy elements. These data are from the transition region and the lower shelf and the model predicts accurately the effect of specimen size. The model is also faithful to the change of distribution shape with proximity to the sharp transition in toughness and this too is explainable by the sampling argument.

  2. Effect of WC/Co coherency phase boundaries on Fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline cemented carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hongxian; Song, Xiaoyan; Yin, Fuxing; Zhang, Yongguang

    2016-08-01

    The effect of coherency WC/Co phase boundaries on the fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline WC-Co cemented carbides is studied by MD simulation method. The simulation results show that the nanocrystalline WC-Co cemented carbides with coherency WC/Co phase boundaries has higher fracture toughness than that without coherency WC/Co phase boundaries. Moreover, the mechanism of why coherency WC/Co phase boundaries can improve the fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline cemented carbides is also investigated. It is found the fact that the separation energy of the coherent WC/Co phase boundary is larger than that of the incoherent WC/Co phase boundaries is the main reason for this excellent mechanical property.

  3. Effect of WC/Co coherency phase boundaries on Fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline cemented carbides

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongxian; Song, Xiaoyan; Yin, Fuxing; Zhang, Yongguang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of coherency WC/Co phase boundaries on the fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline WC-Co cemented carbides is studied by MD simulation method. The simulation results show that the nanocrystalline WC-Co cemented carbides with coherency WC/Co phase boundaries has higher fracture toughness than that without coherency WC/Co phase boundaries. Moreover, the mechanism of why coherency WC/Co phase boundaries can improve the fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline cemented carbides is also investigated. It is found the fact that the separation energy of the coherent WC/Co phase boundary is larger than that of the incoherent WC/Co phase boundaries is the main reason for this excellent mechanical property. PMID:27485922

  4. The effects of radiation on the interlaminar fracture toughness of a graphite/epoxy composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. G.; Sykes, G. F.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study is made of the effect of electron irradiation (10 to the 10th rad), simulating a 30-year geosynchronous orbit exposure, on the fracture toughness of a graphite/epoxy composite, T300/934. The double cantilever beam (DBC) test is used to determine Mode I (peel) critical strain energy release rate and the edge delamination tension (EDT) test is used to determine mixed Mode I and II (peel and shear) critical strain energy release rate. It is found that the electron interaction of the epoxy matrix material enhances the fracture toughness properties of the composite and that the test temperature has a significant effect on the fracture toughness of both baseline and irradiated material.

  5. Strength, Fracture Toughness, Fatigue, and Standardization Issues of Free-standing Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Strength, fracture toughness and fatigue behavior of free-standing thick thermal barrier coatings of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8wt % Y2O3 were determined at ambient and elevated temperatures in an attempt to establish a database for design. Strength, in conjunction with deformation (stress-strain behavior), was evaluated in tension (uniaxial and trans-thickness), compression, and uniaxial and biaxial flexure; fracture toughness was determined in various load conditions including mode I, mode II, and mixed modes I and II; fatigue or slow crack growth behavior was estimated in cyclic tension and dynamic flexure loading. Effect of sintering was quantified through approaches using strength, fracture toughness, and modulus (constitutive relations) measurements. Standardization issues on test methodology also was presented with a special regard to material's unique constitutive relations.

  6. Moisture-heat effects on unidirectional composite laminates fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fusheng; Pzinz, R.; Zichy, J. H.

    1993-04-01

    The heat-moisture effect on interlaminar fracture toughness of T300/914C graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite laminates is investigated under mode I opening loading witb DCB specimen. The fracture toughness in moisture-heat conditioning increases, and the glass transition temperature decreases. SEM fractographs revealed no discernible difference in the fracture surface morphology of moisture-heat and dry conditioned specimens. No fiber bridging occurs in the testing. Delamination fatigue crack growth experiments are carried out on T300/914C graphite/epoxy unidirectional laminates. It is found that the mode I cyclic crack growth rate yields a power low relationship between da/dN and the maximum cyclic strain energy release rate. The crack growth rate of the moisture-heat conditioned specimen is lower than that of the dry conditioned. The environmental effects are explained on the basis of fractography and fracture mechanisms and fracture mechanics.

  7. Potential impact of enhanced fracture-toughness data on pressurized-thermal-shock analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, T.L.; Theiss, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program is involved with the generation of enhanced'' fracture-initiation toughness and fracture-arrest toughness data of prototypic nuclear reactor vessel steels. These two sets of data are enhanced because they have distinguishing characteristics that could potentially impact PWR pressure vessel integrity assessments for the pressurized-thermal shock (PTS) loading condition which is a major plant-life extension issue to be confronted in the 1990's. Currently, the HSST Program is planning experiments to verify and quantify, for A533B steel, the distinguishing characteristic of elevated initiation-fracture toughness for shallow flaws which has been observed for other steels. Deterministic and probabilistic fracture-mechanics analyses were performed to examine the influence of the enhanced initiation and arrest fracture-toughness data on the cleavage fracture response of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel subjected to PTS loading. The results of the analyses indicated that application of the enhanced K{sub Ia} data does reduce the conditional probability of failure P(F{vert bar}E); however, it does not appear to have the potential to significantly impact the results of PTS analyses. The application of enhanced fracture-initiation-toughness data for shallow flaws also reduces P(F{vert bar}E), but it does appear to have a potential for significantly affecting the results of PTS analyses. The effect of including Type I warm prestress in probabilistic fracture-mechanics analyses is beneficial. The benefit is transient dependent and, in some cases, can be quite significant. 19 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Slippery but Tough: The Rapid Fracture of Lubricated Frictional Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, E.; Svetlizky, I.; Fineberg, J.

    2016-05-01

    We study the onset of friction for rough contacting blocks whose interface is coated with a thin lubrication layer. High speed measurements of the real contact area and stress fields near the interface reveal that propagating shear cracks mediate lubricated frictional motion. While lubricants reduce interface resistances, surprisingly they significantly increase the energy dissipated Γ during rupture. Moreover, lubricant viscosity affects the onset of friction but has no effect on Γ . Fracture mechanics provide a new way to view the otherwise hidden complex dynamics of the lubrication layer.

  9. Identification of Fracture Toughness for Discrete Damage Mechanics Analysis of Glass-Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, E. J.; Cosso, F. A.; Martinez, X.

    2014-08-01

    A methodology for determination of the intralaminar fracture toughness is presented, based on fitting discrete damage mechanics (DDM) model predictions to available experimental data. DDM is constitutive model that, when incorporated into commercial finite element software via user material subroutines, is able to predict intralaminar transverse and shear damage initiation and evolution in terms of the fracture toughness of the composite. The applicability of the DDM model is studied by comparison to available experimental data for Glass-Epoxy laminates. Sensitivity of the DDM model to h- and p-refinement is studied. Also, the effect of in-situ correction of strength is highlighted.

  10. Effect of neutron irradiation on fracture toughness behaviour of copper alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tähtinen, S.; Pyykkönen, M.; Karjalainen-Roikonen, P.; Singh, B. N.; Toft, P.

    1998-10-01

    One of the most important factors in deciding about the applicability of materials in the structural components of ITER, is the effect of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness behaviour of these materials. In the present work, the fracture toughness properties of two candidate materials for the first wall and divertor components of ITER, namely precipitation hardened CuCrZr and dispersion hardened CuAl25 alloys, have been studied in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions. In parallel, tensile properties of these alloys have been also investigated in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions.

  11. Loading rate effect on interlaminar fracture toughness of a thermoplastic composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Law, G. E.; Katouzian, M.

    1986-01-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate the loading rate effect on delamination fracture initiation toughness of a thermoplastic composite. For this purpose, double cantilever beam specimens of graphite/PEEK were tested in a displacement controlled mode using an Instron tensile test machine. Specimens were loaded at various crosshead speeds ranging from 0.05 cm/min to 100 cm/min. The interlaminar fracture toughness was found to decrease with increasing loading rate, and this decrease was more than one hundred percent over the five decades of loading rate employed.

  12. Recommendations for the shallow-crack fracture toughness testing task within the HSST (Heavy-Section Steel Technology) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Theiss, T.J. )

    1990-09-01

    Recommendations for Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program's investigation into the influence of crack depth on the fracture toughness of a steel prototypic of those in a reactor pressure vessel are included in this report. The motivation for this investigation lies in the fact that probabilistic fracture mechanics evaluations show that shallow flaws play a dominant role in the likelihood of vessel failure, and shallow-flaw specimens have exhibited an elevated toughness compared with conventional deep-notch fracture toughness specimens. Accordingly, the actual margin of safety of vessels may be greater than that predicted using existing deep-notch fracture-toughness results. The primary goal of the shallow-crack project is to investigate the influence of crack depth on fracture toughness under conditions prototypic of a reactor vessel. A limited data base of fracture toughness values will be assembled using a beam specimen of prototypic reactor vessel material and with a depth of 100 mm (4 in.). This will permit comparison of fracture-toughness data from deep-cracked and shallow-crack specimens, and this will be done for several test temperatures. Fracture-toughness data will be expressed in terms of the stress-intensity factor and crack-tip-opening displacement. Results of this investigation are expected to improve the understanding of shallow-flaw behavior in pressure vessels, thereby providing more realistic information for application to the pressurized-thermal shock issues. 33 refs., 17 figs.

  13. The effect of surface morphology on Model-I fracture toughness of carbon fiber reinforced titanium laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z. M.; Pan, L.; Duan, L. X.; Shen, Y. Z.; Hu, Y. B.; Aamir, A.; Bhuwan, S.; Tao, J.

    2016-07-01

    The present study is focused on the relation between the microscopic sinusoidal surface morphology and model-1 fracture toughness of carbon reinforced titanium laminates, based on cohesive elements. The interface toughness was computed as a function of geometric parameters of the interface texture. The results suggest that the toughness is increased when wavelength (λ) increase, which provides the need to design fracture/failure resistance materials by carefully selecting the suitable parameters of the interface texture.

  14. Evaluation of Fracture Toughness of Tantalum Carbide Ceramic Layer: A Vickers Indentation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ke; Xu, Yunhua; Zhao, Nana; Zhong, Lisheng; Shang, Zhao; Shen, Liuliu; Wang, Juan

    2016-07-01

    A tantalum carbide (TaC) ceramic layer was produced on gray cast iron matrix by in situ technique comprising a casting process and a subsequent heat treatment at 1135 °C for 45 min. Indentation fracture toughness in TaC ceramic layer was determined by the Vickers indentation test for various loads. A Niihara approach was chosen to assess the fracture toughness of TaC ceramic layer under condition of the Palmqvist mode in the experiment. The results reveal that K IC evaluation of TaC ceramic layer by the Vickers indentation method strongly depends on the selection of crack system and K IC equations. The critical indentation load for Vickers crack initiation in TaC ceramic layer lies between 1 and 2 N and the cracks show typical intergranular fracture characteristics. Indentation fracture toughness calculated by the indentation method is independent of the indentation load on the specimen. The fracture toughness of TaC ceramic layer is 6.63 ± 0.34 MPa m1/2, and the toughening mechanism is mainly crack deflection.

  15. Fast reactor irradiation effects on fracture toughness of Si3N4 in comparison with MgAl2O4 and yttria stabilized ZrO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, K.; Watanabe, M.; Tachi, Y.; Kurishita, H.; Nagata, S.; Shikama, T.

    2016-04-01

    Fracture toughness of silicon nitride (Si3N4), magnesia-alumina spinel (MgAl2O4) and yttria stabilized zirconia (8 mol%Y2O3-ZrO2) was evaluated by the Vickers-indentation technique after the fast reactor irradiation up to 55 dpa (displacement per atom) at about 700 °C in the Joyo. The change of the fracture toughness by the irradiation was correlated with nanostructural evolution by the irradiation, which was examined by transmission electron microscopy. The observed degradation of fracture toughness in Si3N4 is thought to be due to the relatively high density of small-sized of the irradiation induced defects, which should be resulted from a large amount of transmutation gases of hydrogen and helium. Observed improvement of fracture toughness in MgAl2O4 was due to the blocking of crack propagation by the antiphase boundaries. The radiation effects affected the fracture toughness of yttria stabilized zirconia at 55 dpa, suggesting that the generated high density voids would affect the propagation of cracks.

  16. Fracture toughness measurement of dental ceramics using the indentation fracture method with different formulas.

    PubMed

    Maehara, Satoshi; Fujishima, Akihiro; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2005-09-01

    This study examined fracture toughness (KIC) measurements obtained using the indentation fracture (IF) method with a view to improving their reliability. The KIC values of five dental ceramics were measured using the IF method with five different formulas, and the single-edge precracked beam (SEPB) method was used as a control. The elastic moduli of the dental ceramics were evaluated by dynamic hardness test. Load conditions of the dental ceramics that produced a median/radial crack for the IF method formulas were investigated. Based on the resultant c/a and P/c1.5 values, the indentation load (P) required for median/radial crack occurrence varied greatly from 29.4 to 196 N depending on the ceramic used. Among the five formulas, none of the KIC values obtained by the IF method with Miyoshi's formula differed significantly (p > 0.05) from the values obtained using SEPB method. These results suggested that, after an appropriate indentation load is determined, reliable KIC values for small dental ceramic specimens can be easily obtained using the IF method if Miyoshi's formula is used in combination with the dynamic hardness test.

  17. Notch Fracture Toughness of Glasses: Dependence on Rate, Age, and Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasoya, Manish; Rycroft, Chris H.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the fracture toughness (resistance) of glasses is a fundamental problem of prime theoretical and practical importance. Here we theoretically study its dependence on the loading rate, the age (history) of the glass, and the notch radius ρ . Reduced-dimensionality analysis suggests that the notch fracture toughness results from a competition between the initial, age- and history-dependent, plastic relaxation time scale τ0pl and an effective loading time scale τext(K˙ I,ρ ) , where K˙ I is the tensile stress-intensity-factor rate. The toughness is predicted to scale with √{ρ } independently of ξ ≡τext/τ0pl for ξ ≪1 , to scale as T √{ρ }log (ξ ) for ξ ≫1 (related to thermal activation, where T is the temperature), and to feature a nonmonotonic behavior in the crossover region ξ ˜O (1 ) (related to plastic yielding dynamics). These predictions are verified using 2D computations, providing a unified picture of the notch fracture toughness of glasses. The theory highlights the importance of time-scale competition and far-from-steady-state elasto-viscoplastic dynamics for understanding the toughness and shows that the latter varies quite significantly with the glass age (history) and applied loading rate. Experimental support for bulk metallic glasses is presented, and possible implications for applications are discussed.

  18. Fracture toughness of Kevlar 29/poly(methyl methacrylate) composite materials for surgical implantations.

    PubMed

    Pourdeyhimi, B; Robinson, H H; Schwartz, P; Wagner, H D

    1986-01-01

    A study of the fracture behaviour of Kevlar 29 reinforced dental cement is undertaken using both linear elastic and nonlinear elastic fracture mechanics techniques. Results from both approaches--of which the nonlinear elastic is believed to be more appropriate--indicate that a reinforcing effect is obtained for the fracture toughness even at very low fibre content. The flexural strength and modulus are apparently not improved, however, by the incorporation of Kevlar 29 fibres in the PMMA cement, probably because of the presence of voids, the poor fibre/matrix interfacial bonding and unsatisfying cement mixing practice. When compared to other PMMA composite cements, the present system appears to be probably more effective than carbon/PMMA, for example, in terms of fracture toughness. More experimental and analytical work is needed so as to optimize the mechanical properties with respect to structural parameters and cement preparation technique.

  19. The effect of mixed mode precracking on the mode 1 fracture toughness of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, Prashanth; Bascom, Williard D.; Nairn, John A.

    1993-01-01

    We subjected double cantilever beam specimens from four different composite materials to mixed-mode precracking. Three different precracking mode 1 to mode 2 ratios were used--1 to 4, 1 to 1, and 4 to 1. Following precracking the specimens were tested for mode I fracture toughness. The mixed-mode precracking often influenced the mode 1 toughness and its influence persisted for as much as 60 mm of mode 1 crack growth. We tested composites with untoughened matrices, composites with rubber-toughened matrices, and composites with interlayer toughening. Depending on material type and precracking mode ratio, the precracking could cause either a significant increase or a significant decrease in the mode 1 fracture toughness.

  20. Fracture toughness master-curve analysis of the tempered martensitic steel Eurofer97

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Pablo; Spätig, P.; Bonadé, R.; Odette, G. R.; Gragg, D.

    2009-04-01

    We report fracture toughness data for the reduced activation tempered martensitic steel Eurofer97 in the lower to middle transition region. The fracture toughness was measured from tests carried out on 0.35 T and 0.87 T pre-cracked compact tension specimens. The data were first analyzed using the ASTM E1921 standard. The toughness-temperature behavior and scatter were shown to deviate from the ASTM E1921 standard predictions near the lower shelf. Using the method of maximum likelihood, the athermal component of the master-curve was calculated to better fit the data from the lower to the middle transition region. We showed that these master-curve adjustments are necessary to make the To values obtained near the lower shelf with 0.35 TC( T) specimens consistent with those obtained in the middle transition region with 0.87 TC( T) specimens.

  1. Effect of Powder Injection on the Interfacial Fracture Toughness of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okajima, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Toshio; Sampath, Sanjay

    2013-03-01

    Adhesive strength of the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating is one of the most important parameters which influence their durability and reliability during service. While many methods exist to measure the adhesive strength, in general, they require cumbersome and time-consuming specimen preparation. Furthermore, considerations of the adhesion strength from the point-of-view of fracture toughness or for that matter, their systematic correlation to both processing variances are limited. Consequently, there is an opportunity to both simplify the measurement procedure and establish correlations among methods and linkages between processing parameters and interfacial fracture toughness. In this paper, we report results on adhesion strength of plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating on aluminum substrates based on both interfacial indentation test (to measure interfacial fracture toughness) and the modified tensile adhesive test. Carrier gas flow for powder injection into the plasma torch was systematically varied to introduce variances in particle melting with concomitant impact on the measured adhesive strength. The results indicate the correlation between the particle melting index and the measured interfacial fracture toughness.

  2. 75 FR 10410 - Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 5495). The February 3, 2010 document corrected a final rule published on January 4, 2010 (75 FR 13), that amends the NRC's regulations to provide alternate fracture toughness requirements for... document published on February 3, 2010 (75 FR 5495). Therefore, the NRC finds that notice and...

  3. Microstructure and Fracture Toughness of FeNiCr-TiC Composite Produced by Thermite Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Wenjun; Shi, Chaoliang

    The microstructures of the FeNiCr-TiC composite produced by the rapid solidification thermite process were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The effects of aging treatment on the microstructure and fracture toughness of the composite were examined. Results showed that the FeNiCr-TiC composite was composed of ferrite (α-FeNiCr), TiC and NiAl (β phase). TiC particles in the matrix were in the shape of polygon and uniformly distributed, and their size was less than 3 µm. The β phase was coherent with the ferrite matrix, and its average size was about 50 nm. The fracture toughness of composite was 22 MPa·m1/2 without aging. When the aging temperature was below 600°C, the fracture toughness of the composite had higher plateau values and reached the maximum of 32 MPa·m1/2 at aging temperature 500°C due to the precipitation of NiAl phase on the nanometer scale. The fracture toughness decreased rapidly aged at 650°C, and then kept homology value in the range of 700 to 900°C, which was attributed to the precipitation of needle-shaped carbide (Cr/Fe)7C3 at the grain boundaries.

  4. THE IMPORTANCE OF MICROSTRUCTURAL VARIATIONS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF HUMAN DENTIN

    PubMed Central

    Ivancik, J.; Arola, D.

    2012-01-01

    The crack growth resistance of human dentin was characterized as a function of relative distance from the DEJ and the corresponding microstructure. Compact tension specimens were prepared from the coronal dentin of caries-free 3rd molars. The specimens were sectioned from either the outer, middle or inner dentin. Stable crack extension was achieved under Mode I quasi-static loading, with the crack oriented in-plane with the tubules, and the crack growth resistance was characterized in terms of the initiation (Ko), growth (Kg) and plateau (Kp) toughness. A hybrid approach was also used to quantify the contribution of dominant mechanisms to the overall toughness. Results showed that human dentin exhibits increasing crack growth resistance with crack extension in all regions, and that the fracture toughness of inner dentin (2.2±0.5 MPa•m0.5) was significantly lower than that of middle (2.7±0.2 MPa•m0.5) and outer regions (3.4±0.3 MPa•m0.5). Extrinsic toughening, composed mostly of crack bridging, was estimated to cause an average increase in the fracture energy of 26% in all three regions. Based on these findings, dental restorations extended into deep dentin are much more likely to cause tooth fracture due to the greater potential for introduction of flaws and decrease in fracture toughness with depth. PMID:23131531

  5. 10 CFR 50.61 - Fracture toughness requirements for protection against pressurized thermal shock events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... pressurized thermal shock events. 50.61 Section 50.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING... Construction Permits § 50.61 Fracture toughness requirements for protection against pressurized thermal shock... specified in § 50.55a. (2) Pressurized Thermal Shock Event means an event or transient in pressurized...

  6. 10 CFR 50.61 - Fracture toughness requirements for protection against pressurized thermal shock events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... pressurized thermal shock events. 50.61 Section 50.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING... Construction Permits § 50.61 Fracture toughness requirements for protection against pressurized thermal shock... specified in § 50.55a. (2) Pressurized Thermal Shock Event means an event or transient in pressurized...

  7. 10 CFR 50.61 - Fracture toughness requirements for protection against pressurized thermal shock events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... pressurized thermal shock events. 50.61 Section 50.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING... Construction Permits § 50.61 Fracture toughness requirements for protection against pressurized thermal shock... specified in § 50.55a. (2) Pressurized Thermal Shock Event means an event or transient in pressurized...

  8. Relationship between the fracture toughness of bulk polymer and fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bhawesh

    Improving the fracture toughness of the polymer matrix has been a concentration of research effort for several years. However, improving the toughness of polymers is not sufficient to translate it into a greater toughness of their composites, because there is no linear relationship between the fracture toughness of polymer matrix and that of the composites. Failures in fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are often found to occur in the polymer matrix. This matrix-dominated fracture of FRP composites is controlled by the mechanics of crack growth in the matrix. Therefore, it is of great interest to establish a relationship between the fracture toughness of the bulk polymer matrix and the FRP composites. The presence of fibers affects the near tip stress field and governs the instability of the crack. The constraining due to fiber changes the K-dominance at the vicinity of the crack tip. In the present work, a brittle polymer was considered for a series of fracture experiments to study the effect of K-dominance. The critical stress intensity factor was found to be a function of the loading and specimen configurations. Therefore, the common notion of assuming that only critical stress intensity factor is necessary to predict the fracture behavior of brittle materials is questionable. Loading or specimen configurations changes the level of K-dominance. A detailed K-dominance zone analysis shows that singular stress field is not dominant for most cases, and consequently, the stress intensity factor alone cannot explain the fracture behavior. A two-parameter model, based on the both singular and nonsingular stress fields, was proposed and validated with the experiments. Further experiments were performed on the bulk polymer matrix and layered specimens of composites and polymer matrix. A two-parameter fracture model was proposed for the bulk polymer matrix, which follows the same trend as the FRP composites analyzed using layered local model. The adequacy of the

  9. Impact of surface finishes on the flexural strength and fracture toughness of In-Ceram Zirconia.

    PubMed

    Manawi, Manal; Ozcan, Mutlu; Madina, Manal; Cura, Cenk; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Dental restorations made of zirconia are usually selectively adjusted chairside to eliminate occlusal or internal interferences that can impair the mechanical properties of ceramic framework material. Effects of polishing procedures on zirconia after chipping or simply glazing the monolithic zirconia restorations are not known. This study evaluated the effects of different surface treatment procedures--namely, glazing or grinding, finishing, and polishing regimens--on the flexural strength and fracture toughness of a zirconia core material. Forty zirconia specimens were prepared and divided into two main groups (n = 20) according to the type of surface treatment (glazed or ground, finished, and polished). Each group was further divided into two subgroups (n = 10) according to type of mechanical test (flexural strength and fracture toughness). The roughness measurements were performed before mechanical testing. Qualitative evaluation of representative specimens of each subgroup was performed using SEM. The surface roughness mean (μm; ± standard deviations) recorded for the glazed specimens (0.94 ± 0.2) was significantly lower than that of the finished and polished group (3.01 ± 0.1) (P < 0.05). The glazed zirconia showed significantly higher flexural strength (385.4 ± 45.4 MPa) and fracture toughness (6.07 ± 1 MPa.m½) values than the ground, finished, polished zirconia (302.4 ± 47.6 MPa and 2.14 ± 0.5 MPa.m½) (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001 for flexural strength and fracture toughness, respectively). A smooth topographic pattern after glazing could not be obtained after finishing and polishing. Grinding, finishing, and polishing markedly decreased the flexural strength and fracture toughness of zirconia compared to the glazed groups. PMID:22414507

  10. A novel pillar indentation splitting test for measuring fracture toughness of thin ceramic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastiani, M.; Johanns, K. E.; Herbert, E. G.; Carassiti, F.; Pharr, G. M.

    2015-06-01

    The fracture toughness of thin ceramic films is an important material property that plays a role in determining the in-service mechanical performance and adhesion of this important class of engineering materials. Unfortunately, measurement of thin film fracture toughness is affected by influences from the substrate and the large residual stresses that can exist in the films. In this paper, we explore a promising new technique that potentially overcomes these issues based on nanoindentation testing of micro-pillars produced by focused ion beam milling of the films. By making the pillar diameter approximately equal to its length, the residual stress in the upper portion of the pillar is almost fully relaxed, and when indented with a sharp Berkovich indenter, the pillars fracture by splitting at reproducible loads that are readily quantified by a sudden displacement excursion in the load displacement behaviour. Cohesive finite element simulations are used for analysis and development of a simple relationship between the critical load at failure, pillar radius and fracture toughness for a given material. The main novel aspect of this work is that neither crack geometries nor crack sizes need to be measured post test. In addition, the residual stress can be measured at the same time with toughness, by comparison of the indentation results obtained on the stress-free pillars and the as-deposited film. The method is tested on three different hard coatings created by physical vapour deposition, namely titanium nitride, chromium nitride and a CrAlN/Si3N4 nanocomposite. Results compare well to independently measured values of fracture toughness for the three brittle films. The technique offers several benefits over existing methods.

  11. A novel pillar indentation splitting test for measuring fracture toughness of thin ceramic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastiani, Marco; Johanns, K. E.; Herbert, Erik G.; Carassiti, Fabio; Pharr, George Mathews

    2014-05-16

    Fracture toughness is an important material property that plays a role in determining the in-service mechanical performance and adhesion of thin ceramic films. Unfortunately, measuring thin film fracture toughness is affected by influences from the substrate and the large residual stresses that can exist in the films. In this paper, we explore a promising new technique that potentially overcomes these problems based on nanoindentation testing of micro-pillars produced by focused ion beam milling of the films. By making the pillar diameter approximately equal to its length, the residual stress in the pillar’s upper portion is almost fully relaxed, and when indented with a sharp Berkovich indenter, the pillars fracture by splitting at reproducible loads that are readily quantified by a sudden displacement excursion in the load displacement behavior. Cohesive finite element simulations are used to analyze and develop, for a given material, a simple relation between the critical load at failure, pillar radius, and fracture toughness. The main novel aspect of this work is that neither crack geometries nor crack sizes need to be measured post test. Furthermore, the residual stress can be measured at the same time with toughness, by comparing the indentation results from the stress-free pillars and the as-deposited film. The method is tested on three different hard coatings formed by physical vapor deposition: titanium nitride, chromium nitride, and a CrAlN/Si3N4 nanocomposite. Results compare well to independently measured values of fracture toughness for the three brittle films. The technique offers several benefits over existing methods.

  12. A novel pillar indentation splitting test for measuring fracture toughness of thin ceramic coatings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sebastiani, Marco; Johanns, K. E.; Herbert, Erik G.; Carassiti, Fabio; Pharr, George Mathews

    2014-05-16

    Fracture toughness is an important material property that plays a role in determining the in-service mechanical performance and adhesion of thin ceramic films. Unfortunately, measuring thin film fracture toughness is affected by influences from the substrate and the large residual stresses that can exist in the films. In this paper, we explore a promising new technique that potentially overcomes these problems based on nanoindentation testing of micro-pillars produced by focused ion beam milling of the films. By making the pillar diameter approximately equal to its length, the residual stress in the pillar’s upper portion is almost fully relaxed, and whenmore » indented with a sharp Berkovich indenter, the pillars fracture by splitting at reproducible loads that are readily quantified by a sudden displacement excursion in the load displacement behavior. Cohesive finite element simulations are used to analyze and develop, for a given material, a simple relation between the critical load at failure, pillar radius, and fracture toughness. The main novel aspect of this work is that neither crack geometries nor crack sizes need to be measured post test. Furthermore, the residual stress can be measured at the same time with toughness, by comparing the indentation results from the stress-free pillars and the as-deposited film. The method is tested on three different hard coatings formed by physical vapor deposition: titanium nitride, chromium nitride, and a CrAlN/Si3N4 nanocomposite. Results compare well to independently measured values of fracture toughness for the three brittle films. The technique offers several benefits over existing methods.« less

  13. Fracture toughness/Young's modulus correlation for low-density fibrous silica bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Fracture toughness and static Young's modulus were measured for the low-density silic fiber materials used as tiles in the thermal protection system of the Space Shuttle. The fracture behavior was found to be in excellent agreement with a previously formulated micromechanical model and allowed both (density) classes of tile material to be correlated to a single function. A similar correlation was also found between strength and Young's modulus, which is the basis of a nondestructive evaluation test for these materials. It was shown that the value of Young's modulus determined from a dynamic test can be substantially greater than that determined in a static mechanical test. This effect must be taken into account in the correlation. Finally, it was also determined that these materials have significant variations in Kc, both within and between production units, so that the strength variability in these materials is dependent on both fracture toughness and flaw-size variations.

  14. Experiments on fracture toughness of thick-wall cylinder for modes I, II, III

    SciTech Connect

    Saegusa, T.; Urabe, N.; Ito, C.; Shirai, K.; Kosaki, A.

    1999-07-01

    There have been few data on fracture toughness for Mode 2 and 3 as compared with those for Mode 1. Experimental data on fracture toughness of plates made of ductile cast iron (ASTM A874-89) and forged steel (ASME SA350 LF5 C1.1) were obtained at a temperature range from 77K to 293K for Mode 1, 2 and 3. The results showed: J{sub IC} < J{sub IIC} < J{sub IIIC}, and K{sub IC} < K{sub IIC} K{sub IIIC}. Integrity of a thick-wall cylinder with artificial flaw was demonstrated against brittle fracture at 233K for Mode 1, 2 and 3, which is one of the design requirements of containers shipping radioactive materials.

  15. Fracture toughness of the sidewall fluorinated carbon nanotube-epoxy interface

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesan, Yogeeswaran; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Jiangnan; Cate, Avery; Lou, Jun E-mail: jlou@rice.edu; Salahshoor, Hossein; Rahbar, Nima E-mail: jlou@rice.edu; Khabashesku, Valery

    2014-06-14

    The effects of carbon nanotube (CNT) sidewall fluorination on the interface toughness of the CNT epoxy interface have been comprehensively investigated. Nanoscale quantitative single-CNT pull-out experiments have been conducted on individual fluorinated CNTs embedded in an epoxy matrix, in situ, within a scanning electron microscope (SEM) using an InSEM{sup ®} nanoindenter assisted micro-device. Equations that were derived using a continuum fracture mechanics model have been applied to compute the interfacial fracture energy values for the system. The interfacial fracture energy values have also been independently computed by modeling the fluorinated graphene-epoxy interface using molecular dynamics simulations and adhesion mechanisms have been proposed.

  16. Delamination toughness of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, A.; Tellez, J.; Casas-Rodriguez, J. P.

    2012-08-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibre reinforced composites are an important group of material for armours solutions, where their unique combination of properties could be utilized. A commonly observed failure mode in this kind of unidirectional laminated composites under impact ballistic is delamination between the composite layers. In the present study, an investigation on the delamination toughness behaviour exhibited by UHMWPE composites laminated was made. The interlaminar Mode II critical strain energy release rates of (UHMWPE) fibre reinforced composites were characterized using the End Notch Flexural (ENF) test. Critical strain energy release rate was obtained from the load - deflection test data using the beam theory expression. It was found that the energy release rate of the composite exhibited a very low value of around 60J/m2 using a moulding pressure of approximately 1200 psi. In order to analyse the delamination resistance of composite, the effects of changing the manufacture process variables and the use of a thermoplastic adhesive film in the composites were investigated. The composite laminates were produced by hot compressing moulding using a film-stacking procedure. It was found that the damage resistance of the UHMWPE composite was influenced by the manufacture method, which affects the Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness and the ballistic response of composites.

  17. Fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth of oxide dispersion strengthened copper

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Gieseke, B.G.

    1996-04-01

    The fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth behavior of copper dispersion strengthened with aluminum oxide (0.15 wt % Al) was examined. In the unirradiated condition, the fracture toughness was about 45 kJ/m{sup 2} (73 MPa{radical}m) at room temperature, but decreased significantly to only 3 Kj/m{sup 2} (20 MPa{radical}m), at 250{degrees}C. After irradiation at approximately 250{degrees}C to about 2.5 displacements per atom (dpa), the toughness was very low, about 1 kJ/m{sup 2} (48 MOa{radical}m), and at 250{degrees}C the toughness was very low, about 1kJ/m{sup 2} (12 mPa{radical}m). The fatigue crack growth rate of unirradiated material at room temperature is similiar to other candidate structural alloys such as V-4Cr-4Ti and 316L stainless steel. The fracture properties of this material at higher temperatures and in controlled environments need further investigation, in both irradiated and unirradiated conditions.

  18. Effect of si on Microstructure and Fracture Toughness of Directionally Solidified nb Silicide Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meiling; Wang, Yuye; Li, Shusuo; Jiang, Liwu; Han, Yafang

    Nb-xSi(x=3,9,16)-22Ti-3Cr-3Al-2Hf (at.%) have been successfully prepared by directional solidification in an optical floating zone furnace. Microstructure analysis and phases identification of the alloys were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Electro Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) and Energy Disperse Spectroscopy (EDS). Fracture toughness specimens without pre-crack were prepared, room temperature fracture toughness of alloys was tested by three-point bending method, and fracture mechanism was studied. The results showed that with increasing Si content, Nb5Si3 phase gradually increased and the phase transformed from γ-Nb5Si3 to the stable α-Nb5Si3 phase and β-Nb5Si3 phase. There appeared the Ti-rich Nb5Si3 phase when the Si content is 16 at%. In addition, more micro-cracks generated in the Ti-rich Nb5Si3 phase, which seriously affected room temperature fracture toughness of the alloys.

  19. Effects of Cryogenic Temperature on Fracture Toughness of Core-Shell Rubber (CSR) Toughened Epoxy Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Cannon, S. A.; Magee, D.; Schneider, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of core-shell rubber (CSR) nanoparticles on the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of an epoxy resin at ambient and liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperatures. Varying amounts of Kane Ace MX130 toughening agent were added to a commercially available EPON 862/Epikure W epoxy resin. Elastic modulus was calculated using quasi-static tensile data. Fracture toughness was evaluated by the resulting breaking energy measured in Charpy impact tests conducted on an instrumented drop tower. The size and distribution of the CSR nanoparticles were characterized using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to study the fracture surface morphology. The addition of the CSR nanoparticles increased the breaking energy with negligible change in elastic modulus and ultimate tensile stress (UTS). At ambient temperature the breaking energy increased with increasing additions of the CSR nanoparticles, while at LN2 temperatures, it reached a maximum at 5 wt% CSR concentration. KEY WORDS: liquid nitrogen (LN2) properties, fracture toughness, core-shell rubber (CSR).

  20. Comparisons of various configurations of the edge delamination test for interlaminar fracture toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.; Johnston, N. J.; Raju, I. S.; Morris, D. H.; Simonds, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Various configurations of Edge Delamination Tension (EDT) test specimens, of both brittle (T300/5208) and toughened-matrix (T300/BP907) graphite reinforced composite laminates, were manufactured and tested. The mixed-mode interlaminar fracture toughness, G sub C, was measured using (30/30 sub 2/30/90 sub N)sub s, n=1 or 2, (35/-35/0/90) sub s and (35/0/-35/90) sub s layups designed to delaminate at low tensile strains. Laminates were made without inserts so that delaminations would form naturally between the central 90 deg plies and the adjacent angle plies. Laminates were also made with Teflon inserts implanted between the 90 deg plies and the adjacent angle (theta) plies at the straight edge to obtain a planar fracture surface. In addition, interlaminar tension fracture toughness, GIc, was measured from laminates with the same layup but with inserts in the midplane, between the central 90 deg plies, at the straight edge. All of the EDT configurations were useful for ranking the delamination resistance of composites with different matrix resins. Furthermore, the variety of layups and configurations available yield interlaminar fracture toughness measurements needed to generate delamination failure criteria. The influence of insert thickness and location, and coupon size on G sub c values were evaluated.

  1. Effect of inclusion density on ductile fracture toughness and roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A.; Ponson, L.; Osovski, S.; Bouchaud, E.; Tvergaard, V.; Needleman, A.

    2014-02-01

    Three dimensional calculations of ductile fracture under mode I plane strain, small scale yielding conditions are carried out using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a progressively cavitating solid with two populations of void nucleating second phase particles. Larger inclusions that result in void nucleation at an early stage are modeled discretely while smaller particles that require large strains to nucleate voids are homogeneously distributed. Full field solutions are obtained for eight volume fractions, ranging from 1% to 19%, of randomly distributed larger inclusions. For each volume fraction calculations are carried out for seven random distributions of inclusion centers. Crack growth resistance curves and fracture surface roughness statistics are calculated using standard procedures. The crack growth resistance is characterized in terms of both JIC and the tearing modulus TR. For all volume fractions considered, the computed fracture surfaces are self-affine over a size range of nearly two orders of magnitude with a microstructure independent roughness exponent of 0.53 with a standard error of 0.0023. The cut-off length of the scale invariant regime is found to depend on the inclusion volume fraction. Consideration of the full statistics of the fracture surface roughness revealed other parameters that vary with inclusion volume fraction. For smaller values of the discretely modeled inclusion volume fraction (≤7%), there is a linear correlation between several measures of fracture surface roughness and both JIC and TR. In this regime crack growth is dominated by a void-by-void process. For greater values of the discretely modeled inclusion volume fraction, crack growth mainly involves multiple void interactions and no such correlation is found.

  2. Bone tissue heterogeneity is associated with fracture toughness: a polarization Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, Alexander J.; Granke, Mathilde; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Nyman, Jeffry S.

    2015-02-01

    Polarization Raman Spectroscopy has been used to demonstrate microstructural features and collagen fiber orientation in human and mouse bone, concurrently measuring both organization and composition; however, it is unclear as to what extent these measurements explain the mechanical quality of bone. In a cohort of age and gender matched cadaveric cortical bone samples (23-101 yr.), we show homogeneity of both composition and structure are associated with the age related decrease in fracture toughness. 64 samples were machined into uniform specimens and notched for mechanical fracture toughness testing and polished for Raman Spectroscopy. Fingerprint region spectra were acquired on wet bone prior to mechanical testing by sampling nine different microstructural features spaced in a 750x750 μm grid in the region of intended crack propagation. After ASTM E1820 single edge notched beam fracture toughness tests, the sample was dried in ethanol and the osteonal-interstitial border of one osteon was samples in a 32x32 grid of 2μm2 pixels for two orthogonal orientations relative to the long bone axis. Standard peak ratios from the 9 separate microstructures show heterogeneity between structures but do not sufficiently explain fracture toughness; however, peak ratios from mapping highlight both lamellar contrast (ν1Phos/Amide I) and osteon-interstitial contrast (ν1Phos/Proline). Combining registered orthogonal maps allowed for multivariate analysis of underlying biochemical signatures. Image entropy and homogeneity metrics of single principal components significantly explain resistance to crack initiation and propagation. Ultimately, a combination of polarization content and multivariate Raman signatures allowed for the association of microstructural tissue heterogeneity with fracture resistance.

  3. The effect of microstructure and strength on the fracture toughness of an 18 Ni, 300 grade maraging steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Psioda, J. A.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A 300 grade maraging steel was chosen as a vehicle by which to understand the inverse relationship between strength and toughness in high strength alloys such as the 18 Ni maraging steels. The 18 Ni, 300 grade maraging material was a commercial grade consumable-electrode, vacuum arc remelted heat obtained in the form of forged and annealed plate. The matrix contained a population of second-phase impurity inclusions which was a product of the casting and hot working processes. These inclusions did not change with subsequent precipitation hardening. Changes in microstructure resulting in strength increases were brought about by variations in aging temperature and time. Maximum strength was attained in the 300 grade maraging steel by aging at 427 C (800 F) for 100 hours. Tensile, fatigue precracked Charpy impact, and plane-strain fracture toughness tests were performed at room temperature, 20 C (68 F). With increasing strength the fracture toughness decreases as smaller and smaller inclusions act as sites for void initiation.

  4. High-toughness graphite/epoxy composite material experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felbeck, David K.

    1993-01-01

    This experiment was designed to measure the effect of near-earth space exposure on three mechanical properties of specially toughened 5208/T300 graphite/epoxy composite materials. The properties measured are elastic modulus, strength, and fracture toughness. Six toughness specimens and nine tensile specimens were mounted on an external frame during the 5.8-year orbit of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Three identical sets of specimens were manufactured at the outset: the flight set, a zero-time non-flight set, and a total-time non-flight set.

  5. Some observations of the influence of δ-ferrite content on the hardness, galling resistance, and fracture toughness of selected commercially available iron-based hardfacing alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockeram, B. V.

    2002-11-01

    Iron-based weld hardfacing deposits are used to provide a wear-resistant surface for a structural base material. Iron-based hardfacing alloys that are resistant to corrosion in oxygenated aqueous environments contain high levels of chromium and carbon, which results in a dendritic microstructure with a high volume fraction of interdendrite carbides which provide the needed wear resistance. The ferrite content of the dendrites depends on the nickel content and base composition of the iron-based hardfacing alloy. The amount of ferrite in the dendrites is shown to have a significant influence on the hardness and galling wear resistance, as determined using ASTM G98 methods. Fracture-toughness ( K IC) testing in accordance with ASTM E399 methods was used to quantify the damage tolerance of various iron-based hardfacing alloys. Fractographic and microstructure examinations were used to determine the influence of microstructure on the wear resistance and fracture toughness of the iron-based hardfacing alloys. A crack-bridging toughening model was shown to describe the influence of ferrite content on the fracture toughness. A higher ferrite content in the dendrites of an iron-based hardfacing alloy reduces the tendency for plastic stretching and necking of the dendrites, which results in improved wear resistance, high hardness, and lower fracture-toughness values. A NOREM 02 hardfacing alloy has the most-optimum ferrite content, which results in the most-desired balance of galling resistance and high K IC values.

  6. Aging effects on the fracture toughness of SiC whisker reinforced 2XXX aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnaparkhi, P. L.; Rack, H. J.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of aging (at 150 C) time on the fracture toughness behavior of a 2XXX alloy (Al-3.55Cu-1.29Mg-0.01Fe-trace Mn) reinforced with 5 vol pct F-8 SiC whiskers was investigated by measuring hardness and electrical conductivity followed by fracture toughness tests on center-cracked specimens. The ageing time-hardening response plots showed that, independent of whisker orientation, the initial rapid increase in hardness was followed by a more gradual increase, with a broad hardness peak between 32 and 128 hrs of aging. Coincident with the hardness changes, the electrical conductivity initially decreased, reached a minimum, and then increased at aging times beyond 32 hrs. Examination by SEM indicated that the initial increase in hardness and decrease in conductivity was due to the GPB zone formation, while the subsequent increase in electrical conductivity and decrease in hardness (overaging) was due to S nucleation and growth.

  7. A Practical Test Method for Mode I Fracture Toughness of Adhesive Joints with Dissimilar Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Boeman, R.G.; Erdman, D.L.; Klett, L.B.; Lomax, R.D.

    1999-09-27

    A practical test method for determining the mode I fracture toughness of adhesive joints with dissimilar substrates will be discussed. The test method is based on the familiar Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen geometry, but overcomes limitations in existing techniques that preclude their use when testing joints with dissimilar substrates. The test method is applicable to adhesive joints where the two bonded substrates have different flexural rigidities due to geometric and/or material considerations. Two specific features discussed are the use of backing beams to prevent substrate damage and a compliance matching scheme to achieve symmetric loading conditions. The procedure is demonstrated on a modified DCB specimen comprised of SRIM composite and thin-section, e-coat steel substrates bonded with an epoxy adhesive. Results indicate that the test method provides a practical means of characterizing the mode I fracture toughness of joints with dissimilar substrates.

  8. Translaminar Fracture Toughness of a Composite Wing Skin Made of Stitched Warp-knit Fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, John E.

    1997-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to measure the fracture toughness of carbon/epoxy composites. The composites were made from warp-knit carbon fabric and infiltrated with epoxy using a resin-film-infusion process. The fabric, which was designed by McDonnell Douglas for the skin of an all-composite subsonic transport wing, contained fibers in the 0 deg, +/-45 deg, and 90 deg directions. Layers of fabric were stacked and stitched together with Kevlar yarn to form a 3-dimensional preform. Three types of test specimens were evaluated: compact tension, center notch tension, and edge notch tension. The effects of specimen size and crack length on fracture toughness were measured for each specimen type. These data provide information on the effectiveness of the test methods and on general trends in the material response. The scope of the investigation was limited by the material that was available.

  9. Interpretation of warm prestress-induced fracture toughness based on crack-tip constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Shum, D.K.M.

    1993-06-01

    This study explores the possibility of using J-Q-related crack-tip constraint concepts to provide a basis for both the interpretation of warm prestress (WPS)-induced fracture toughness and their transferability to structural applications. A finite-element boundary-layer formulation based on small-scale yielding (SSY), remote mode I K-dominant assumptions is adopted. Effects of WPS-induced crack-tip constraint are quantified in terms of deviation in either the opening-mode or the mean stress component of the WPS crack-tip fields relative to the reference K-dominant SSY state associated with monotonic-loading conditions. Over the range of WPS load-paths considered the WPS-induced crack-tip constraint closely resembles a spatially varying hydrostatic stress field. Interpretation and transferability of WPS fracture toughness under SSY conditions are specified in terms of the unload and reload ratio.

  10. Influence of casting size and graphite nodule refinement on fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.C.; Hsu, C.H.; Chang, C.C.; Feng, H.P.

    1998-10-01

    Casting size affects the solidification cooling rate and microstructure of casting materials. Graphite nodules existing in the structure of ductile iron are an inherent and inert second phase that cannot be modified in subsequent heat-treatment processing. The matrix and the fineness of the second phase undoubtedly have some impact on the fracture toughness of the as-cast material, as does the subsequent heat treatment, as it alters the microstructure. This research applied austempering heat treatment to ductile iron of different section sizes and graphite nodule finenesses. The influence of these variables on the plane strain fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) of the castings so treated was compared to that of the as-cast state. Metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed to correlate the properties attained to the microstructural observation.

  11. Development of high strength high toughness third generation advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martis, Codrick John

    Third generation advanced high strength steels (AHSS's) are emerging as very important engineering materials for structural applications. These steels have high specific strength and thus will contribute significantly to weight reduction in automotive and other structural component. In this investigation two such low carbon low alloy steels (LCLA) with high silicon content (1.6-2wt %) has been developed. These two steel alloys were subjected to single step and two step austempering in the temperature range of 260-399°C to obtain desired microstructures and mechanical properties. Austempering heat treatment was carried out for 2 hours in a molten salt bath. The microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and optical metallography. Quantitative analysis was carried out by image analysis technique. The effect of austempering temperature on the mechanical properties of these two alloys was examined. The influence of microstructures on the mechanical properties of alloys was also studied. Austempering heat treatment resulted in fine carbide free bainitic ferrite and high carbon austenite microstructure in the samples austempered above Ms temperature, whereas tempered martensite and austenite microstructure was obtained in samples austempered below Ms temperature. Yield strength, tensile strength and fracture toughness were found to increase as the austempering temperature decreases, whereas ductility increases as the austempering temperature increases. Tensile strength in the range of 1276MPa -1658 MPa and the fracture toughness in the range of 80-141MPa√m were obtained in these two steels. Volume fractions of different phases present and their lath sizes are related to the mechanical properties. Austempered samples consisting of mixed microstructure of bainitic ferrite and tempered martensite phases resulted in the exceptional combination of strength and toughness.

  12. Strength and fracture toughness of heterogeneous blocks with joint lognormal modulus and failure strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimas, Leon S.; Veneziano, Daniele; Buehler, Markus J.

    2016-07-01

    We obtain analytical approximations to the probability distribution of the fracture strengths of notched one-dimensional rods and two-dimensional plates in which the stiffness (Young's modulus) and strength (failure strain) of the material vary as jointly lognormal random fields. The fracture strength of the specimen is measured by the elongation, load, and toughness at two critical stages: when fracture initiates at the notch tip and, in the 2D case, when fracture propagates through the entire specimen. This is an extension of a previous study on the elastic and fracture properties of systems with random Young's modulus and deterministic material strength (Dimas et al., 2015a). For 1D rods our approach is analytical and builds upon the ANOVA decomposition technique of (Dimas et al., 2015b). In 2D we use a semi-analytical model to derive the fracture initiation strengths and regressions fitted to simulation data for the effect of crack arrest during fracture propagation. Results are validated through Monte Carlo simulation. Randomness of the material strength affects in various ways the mean and median values of the initial strengths, their log-variances, and log-correlations. Under low spatial correlation, material strength variability can significantly increase the effect of crack arrest, causing ultimate failure to be a more predictable and less brittle failure mode than fracture initiation. These insights could be used to guide design of more fracture resistant composites, and add to the design features that enhance material performance.

  13. Effects of stitching on fracture toughness of uniweave textile graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, Bhavani V.; Sharma, Suresh

    1995-01-01

    The effects of through-the-thickness stitching on impact damage resistance, impact damage tolerance, and Mode 1 and Mode 2 fracture toughness of textile graphite/epoxy laminates were studied experimentally. Graphite/epoxy laminates were fabricated from AS4 graphite uniweave textiles and 3501-6 epoxy using Resin Transfer Molding. The cloths were stitched with Kevlar(tm) and glass yarns before resin infusion. Delamination was implanted during processing to simulate impact damage. Sublaminate buckling tests were performed in a novel fixture to measure Compression After Impact (CAI) strength of stitched laminates. The results show that CAI strength can be improved up to 400% by through-the-thickness stitching. Double Cantilever Beam tests were performed to study the effect of stitching on Mode 1 fracture toughness G(sub 1c). It was found that G(sub 1c) increased 30 times for a low stitching density of 16 stitches/sq in. Mode 2 fracture toughness was measured by testing the stitched beams in End Notch Flexure tests. Unlike in the unstitiched beams, crack propagation in the stitched beams was steady. The current formulas for ENF tests were not found suitable for determining G(sub 2C) for stitched beams. Hence two new methods were developed - one based on crack area measured from ultrasonic C-scanning and the other based on equivalent crack area measured from the residual stiffness of the specimen. The G(sub 2c) was found to be at least 5-15 times higher for the stitched laminates. The mechanisms by which stitching increases the CAI strength and fracture toughness are discussed.

  14. Effects of Thermal Aging on Material Properties, Stress Corrosion Cracking, and Fracture Toughness of AISI 316L Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Timothy; Forsström, Antti; Saukkonen, Tapio; Ballinger, Ronald; Hänninen, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels, as well as duplex, and high-Cr ferritic stainless steels. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well-known "748 K (475 °C) embrittlement" that results in drastic reductions in ductility and toughness in these materials. This process is also operative in welds of either cast or wrought stainless steels where δ-ferrite is present. While the embrittlement can occur after several hundred hours of aging at 748 K (475 °C), the process is also operative at lower temperatures, at the 561 K (288 °C) operating temperature of a boiling water reactor (BWR), for example, where ductility reductions have been observed after several tens of thousands of hours of exposure. An experimental program was carried out in order to understand how spinodal decomposition may affect changes in material properties in Type 316L BWR piping weld metals. The study included material characterization, nanoindentation hardness, double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR), Charpy-V, tensile, SCC crack growth, and in situ fracture toughness testing as a function of δ-ferrite content, aging time, and temperature. SCC crack growth rates of Type 316L stainless steel weld metal under simulated BWR conditions showed an approximate 2 times increase in crack growth rate over that of the unaged as-welded material. In situ fracture toughness measurements indicate that environmental exposure can result in a reduction of toughness by up to 40 pct over the corresponding at-temperature air-tested values. Material characterization results suggest that spinodal decomposition is responsible for the degradation of material properties measured in air, and that degradation of the in situ properties may be a result of hydrogen absorbed during exposure to the high-temperature water environment.

  15. High Temperature Fracture Characteristics of a Nanostructured Ferritic Alloy (NFA)

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Kim, Jeoung H; Ji Hyun, Yoon; Hoelzer, David T

    2010-01-01

    High temperature fracture behavior has been investigated for the nanostructured ferritic alloy 14YWT (SM10). The fracture toughness of the alloy was above 140 MPa m at low temperatures, room temperature (RT) and 200 C, but decreased to a low fracture toughness range of 52 82 MPa m at higher temperatures up to 700 C. This behavior was explained by the fractography results indicating that the unique nanostructure of 14YWT alloy produced shallow plasticity layers at high temperatures and a low-ductility grain boundary debonding occurred at 700 C.

  16. The effects of tritium and decay helium on the fracture toughness properties of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    J-integral fracture mechanics techniques and scanning electron microscopy observations were used to investigate the effects of tritium and its decay product, helium-3, on Types 304L, 316L, 21-6-9, A286, and JBK-75 (Modified A286) stainless steels. Tritium-exposed samples of each steel had lower fracture toughness values and less resistance to stable crack growth than control samples. Type 316L stainless steel was more resistant to the embrittling effects of tritium and decay helium than the other steels.

  17. The effects of tritium and decay helium on the fracture toughness properties of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.J.

    1991-12-31

    J-integral fracture mechanics techniques and scanning electron microscopy observations were used to investigate the effects of tritium and its decay product, helium-3, on Types 304L, 316L, 21-6-9, A286, and JBK-75 (Modified A286) stainless steels. Tritium-exposed samples of each steel had lower fracture toughness values and less resistance to stable crack growth than control samples. Type 316L stainless steel was more resistant to the embrittling effects of tritium and decay helium than the other steels.

  18. The effect of microstructure on the fracture toughness of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanstone, R. H.; Low, J. R., Jr.; Shannon, J. L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The microstructure of the alpha titanium alloy Ti-5Al-2.5Sn and the metastable beta titanium alloy Beta 3 was examined. The material was from normal and extra low interstitial grade plates which were either air-cooled or furnace-cooled from an annealing treatment. Beta 3 was studied in alpha-aged and omega-aged plates which were heat treated to similar strength levels. Tensile and plane strain fracture toughness tests were conducted at room temperature on the alpha-aged material. The microstructure and fracture mechanisms of alloys were studied using optical metallography, electron microscopy, microprobe analyses, and texture pole figures. Future experiments are described.

  19. Effect of specimen size on the fracture toughness of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, R.J.; Jones, R.H.; Li, Huaxin

    1996-04-01

    J-R curves were generated using the single specimen unload-compliance technique on four specimens of V-4Cr-4Ti to determine the effect of specimen dimensions on the fracture behavior. Ductile crack initiation and growth was observed in the 6.35 mm thick specimens but not in the 12.70 mm thick specimens. The J-R curves determined from these tests were not valid per ASTM validity criteria so quantitative measures of the resistance to ductile crack initiation and growth were not obtained. These data suggests that standard fracture toughness tests were performed with small-scale DCT specimens may also not be valid.

  20. Determination of Interfacial Fracture Toughness of Thermal Spray Coatings by Indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Arai, Masayuki; Miyashita, Yukio; Waki, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Masato

    2013-12-01

    Adhesion is an important and basic property for thermal spray coatings. The standard tensile test method "ISO 14916" is usually used to evaluate the adhesive strength of coatings. On the other hand, the indentation test method has some advantages to evaluate the interfacial fracture toughness as the adhesive strength, arising from the following reasons: the test procedure and the specimen preparation are easy in comparison with the typical testing method. Collaborative research has been conducted by "Committee on Standard Development" in the Japan Thermal Spray Society to establish a standard test method for evaluating interfacial fracture toughness of thermal spray coatings using a conventional Vickers indenter. This article reports the differences among collaborators in round-robin tests performed in this committee and discusses the validity of the test method and test conditions with respect to the test results and finite element analyses. Comparison among collaborators reveals that interfacial fracture toughness can be obtained with a small scattering from the indentation test under constraints found on the basis of the results.

  1. Measurement of the fracture toughness of polycrystalline bubbly ice from an Antarctic ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christmann, J.; Muller, R.; Webber, K. G.; Isaia, D.; Schader, F. H.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Freitag, J.; Humbert, A.

    2015-05-01

    The critical fracture toughness is a material parameter describing the resistance of a cracked body to further crack extension. It is an important parameter for simulating and predicting the breakup behavior of ice shelves from the calving of single icebergs to the disintegration of entire ice shelves over a wide range of length scales. The fracture toughness values are calculated with equations that are derived from an elastic stress analysis. Additionally, an X-ray computer tomography (CT scanner) was used to identify the density as a function of depth. The critical fracture toughness of 91 Antarctic bubbly ice samples with densities between 840 and 870 kg m-3 has been determined by applying a four-point bending technique on single-edge v-notched beam samples. The examined ice core was drilled 70 m north of Kohnen Station, Dronnning Maud Land (75°00' S, 00°04' E; 2882 m). Supplementary data are available at Deterioration in Fracture Toughness of 304LN Austenitic Stainless Steel Due to Sensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Swati; Kain, V.; Ray, A.; Roy, H.; Sivaprasad, S.; Tarafder, S.; Ray, K. K.

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this report is to examine the influence of sensitization on the mechanical properties of AISI grade 304LN stainless steel with special emphasis on its fracture toughness. A series of stainless steel samples has been sensitized by holding at 1023 K for different time periods ranging from 1 to 100 hours followed by water quenching. The degree of sensitization (DOS) for each type of the varyingly heat-treated samples has been measured by an electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation (EPR) test. The microstructures of these samples have been characterized by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, together with measurements of their hardness and tensile properties. The fracture toughness of the samples has been measured by the ball indentation (BI) technique and the results are validated by conducting conventional J-integral tests. It is revealed for the first time that the fracture toughness and ductility of AISI 304LN stainless steel deteriorate significantly with increased DOS, while the tensile strength (TS) values remain almost unaltered. The results have been critically discussed in terms of the depletion of solid solution strengtheners, the nature of the grain boundary precipitations, and the strain-induced martensite formation with the increasing DOS of the 304LN stainless steel.

  2. Evaluating the fracture toughness and flexural strength of pressable dental ceramics: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gurram, Ravi; Krishna, C H Vamsi; Reddy, K Mahendranadh; Reddy, G V K Mohan; Shastry, Y Mahadev

    2014-12-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the biaxial flexural strength, biaxial flexural strength after etching with 9 % HF acid and fracture toughness of three commonly used pressable all ceramic core materials. Ninety glass ceramic specimens were fabricated from three commercially available leucite based core ceramic material (1) Esthetic Empress, (2) Cergo, and (3) Performance Plus. Thirty discs of each material were divided into three groups of 10 discs each. Biaxial flexural strength (30 discs,) Biaxial flexural strength for samples treated with 9 % HF acid (30 discs) and fracture toughness (30 discs) were evaluated. Core material Performance Plus had the lowest biaxial strength of 124.89 MPa, Cergo had strength of 152.22 MPa and the highest value of 163.95 was reported for Esthetic Empress. For samples treated 9 % HF, Performance Plus had the lowest biaxial strength of 98.37 MPa, Cergo had strength of 117.42 MPa and the highest value of 143.74 was reported for Esthetic Empress. Core material Performance Plus had the lowest fracture toughness of 1.063 MPa, Cergo had strength of 1.112 MPa and the highest value of 1.225 was reported for Esthetic Empress. The results shows that Esthetic Empress had better mechanical properties compared to Cergo had Performance Plus in relation to the parameters tested.

  3. Strength, Fracture Toughness, and Slow Crack Growth of Zirconia/alumina Composites at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2003-01-01

    Various electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells were fabricated by hot pressing 10 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (10-YSZ) reinforced with two different forms of alumina particulates and platelets each containing 0 to 30 mol% alumina. Flexure strength and fracture toughness of platelet composites were determined as a function of alumina content at 1000 C in air and compared with those of particulate composites determined previously. In general, elevated-temperature strength and fracture toughness of both composite systems increased with increasing alumina content. For a given alumina content, flexure strength of particulate composites was greater than that of platelet composites at higher alumina contents (greater than or equal to 20 mol%), whereas, fracture toughness was greater in platelet composites than in particulate composites, regardless of alumina content. The results of slow crack growth (SCG) testing, determined at 1000 C via dynamic fatigue testing for three different composites including 0 mol% (10-YSZ matrix), 30 mol % particulate and 30 mol% platelet composites, showed that susceptibility to SCG was greatest with SCG parameter n = 6 to 8 for both 0 and 30 mol% particulate composites and was least with n = 33 for the 30 mol% platelet composite.

  4. The Effect of Curing Temperature on the Fracture Toughness of Fiberglass Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas J.

    The curing reaction in a thermoset polymer matrix composite is often accelerated by the addition of heat in an oven or autoclave. The heat added increases the rate of the polymerization reaction and cross-linking in the material. The cure cycle used (temperature, pressure and time) can therefore alter the final material properties. This research focuses on how the curing temperature (250, 275, 300 °F) affects the yield strength and the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness, GI, of a unidirectional S-2 glass epoxy composite. The test method that was used for the tension test was ASTM D3039 and the test method for the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness, the double cantilever beam (DCB) test, was ASTM D5528. The DCB specimens were fabricated with a non-adhesive insert at the midplane of the composite that serves as the initiatior of the delamination. Opening forces were then applied to the specimen, causing the crack propagation. The results show that increasing the cure temperature by 50 °F increased the tensile strength by 10% (86.54 - 94.73 ksi) and decreased the fracture toughness 20% (506.23 - 381.31 J/m 2). Thus, the curing temperature can cause a trade-off between these two properties, which means that the curing cycle will need to be altered based on the intended use and the required material properties.

  5. Fracture toughness testing and toughening mechanisms of some commercial cobalt-free hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1998-04-27

    Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited to provide a wear resistant surface for structural base materials. Commercial low cobalt hardfacing alloys are being evaluated to reduce plant activation levels. Since hardfacing alloys typically must be resistant to cracking to assure adequate in service performance, fracture toughness is a critical material property. Fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) measurements of Fe base, Ni-base, and Co-base hardfacing were performed in accordance with ASTM E399-90 procedure in an effort to identify a tough cobalt-free alternative. Reduced scatter in K{sub IC} data was observed for the Fe base hardfacing, and the 95% lower bound K{sub IC} values were generally higher than the Ni-base Hardfacing alloys. Preliminary crack growth data obtained during precracking indicate that the Ni-base hardfacing possess better fatigue crack growth resistance. However, none of the Fe-base or Ni-base hardfacing have K{sub IC} values that are comparable to the reference Co-base hard facing. The test specimens were machined from thick (0.5 inches) weld deposits, and the microstructures of the test specimens are compared with the more prototypic, thinner deposits. Microstructural and fractographic examinations are used to characterize the fracture mechanisms and delineate the operative toughening mechanisms. Crack deflection and crack bridging toughening mechanisms are shown to be relevant for most of the commercial hardfacing.

  6. Master curve characterization of the fracture toughness behavior in SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki-Hyoung; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Bong-Sang; Wee, Dang-Moon

    2010-08-01

    The fracture toughness properties of the tempered martensitic SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Mo-Cr low alloy steel for reactor pressure vessels were investigated by using the master curve concept. These results were compared to those of the bainitic SA508 Gr.3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel, which is a commercial RPV material. The fracture toughness tests were conducted by 3-point bending with pre-cracked charpy (PCVN) specimens according to the ASTM E1921-09c standard method. The temperature dependency of the fracture toughness was steeper than those predicted by the standard master curve, while the bainitic SA508 Gr.3 steel fitted well with the standard prediction. In order to properly evaluate the fracture toughness of the Gr.4N steels, the exponential coefficient of the master curve equation was changed and the modified curve was applied to the fracture toughness test results of model alloys that have various chemical compositions. It was found that the modified curve provided a better description for the overall fracture toughness behavior and adequate T0 determination for the tempered martensitic SA508 Gr.4N steels.

  7. Cleavage fracture and irradiation embrittlement of fusion reactor alloys: mechanisms, multiscale models, toughness measurements and implications to structural integrity assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Rathbun, H. J.; He, M. Y.; Hribernik, M. L.; Rensman, J. W.

    2003-12-01

    We describe the highly efficient master curves-shifts (MC-Δ T) method to measure and apply cleavage fracture toughness, KJc ( T), data and show that it is applicable to 9Cr martensitic steels. A reference temperature, T0, indexes the invariant MC shape on an absolute temperature scale. Then, T0 shifts (Δ T) are used to account for various effects of size and geometry, loading rate and irradiation embrittlement (Δ Ti). The paper outlines a multiscale model, relating atomic to structural scale fracture processes, that underpins the MC-Δ T method. At the atomic scale, we propose that the intrinsic microarrest toughness, Kμ( T), of the body-centered cubic ferrite lattice dictates an invariant shape of the macroscopic KJc ( T) curve. KJc ( T) can be modeled in terms of the true stress-strain ( σ- ɛ) constitutive law, σ ( T, ɛ), combined with a temperature-dependent critical local stress, σ*( T) and stressed volume, V*. The local fracture properties, σ*( T)- V*, are governed by coarse-scale brittle trigger particles and Kμ( T). Irradiation (and high strain rate) induced increases in the yield stress, Δ σy, lead to Δ Ti, with typical Δ Ti/Δ σy≈0.6±0.15 °C/MPa. However, Δ Ti associated with decreases in σ* and V* can result from a number of potential non-hardening embrittlement (NHE) mechanisms, including a large amount of He on grain boundaries. Estimates based on available data suggest that this occurs at >500-700 appm bulk He. Hardening and NHE are synergistic, and can lead to very large Δ Ti. NHE is signaled by large (>1 °C/MPa), or even negative, values of Δ Ti/Δ σy (for Δ σy<0), and is often coupled with increasing amounts of intergranular fracture. The measured and effective fracture toughness pertinent to structures almost always depends on the size and geometry of the cracked body, and is typically significantly greater than KJc . Size and geometry effects arise from both weakest link statistics, related to the volume under high

  8. Height-tapered double cantilever beam specimen for study of rate effects on fracture toughness of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaniv, Gershon; Daniel, Isaac M.

    1988-01-01

    Loading rate effects on the mode I delamination fracture toughness of AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy are presently studied by means of a height-tapered double-cantilever beam specimen whose height contour is designed to furnish a slightly decreasing compliance with increasing crack length, in order to yield a stable and smooth crack propagation at high loading rates. This specimen geometry also allows much higher crack propagation velocities to be obtained with either uniform or width-tapered double cantilever beam specimens.

  9. Effect of initial delamination on Mode 1 and Mode 2 interlaminar fracture toughness and fatigue fracture threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen Bostaph; Martin, Roderick H.

    1991-01-01

    Static and fatigue double-cantilever beam (DCB) and end-notch flexure (ENF) tests were conducted to determine the effect of the simulated initial delamination in interlaminar fracture toughness, G(sub c), and fatigue fracture threshold, G(sub th). Unidirectional, 24-ply specimens of S2/SP250 glass/epoxy were tested using Kapton inserts of four different thickness - 13, 25, 75, and 130 microns, at the midplane at one end, or with tension or shear precracks, to simulate an initial delamination. To determine G(sub c), the fatigue fracture threshold below which no delamination growth would occur in less than 1 x 10(exp 6) cycles, fatigue tests were conducted by cyclically loading specimens until delamination growth was detected. Consistent values of model 1 fracture toughness, G(sub Ic), were measured from DCB specimens with inserts of thickness 75 microns or thinner, or with shear precracks. The fatigue DCB tests gave similar values of G(sub Ith) for the 13, 25, and 75 microns specimens. Results for the shear precracked specimens were significantly lower that for specimens without precracks. Results for both the static and fatigue ENF tests showed that measured G(IIc) and G(IIth) values decreased with decreasing insert thickness, so that no limiting thickness could be determined. Results for specimens with inserts of 75 microns or thicker were significantly higher than the results for precracked specimens or specimens with 13 or 25 microns inserts.

  10. Effect of initial delamination on Mode 1 and Mode 2 interlaminar fracture toughness and fatigue fracture threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Murri, G.B.; Martin, R.H.

    1991-05-01

    Static and fatigue double-cantilever beam (DCB) and end-notch flexure (ENF) tests were conducted to determine the effect of the simulated initial delamination in interlaminar fracture toughness, G(sub c), and fatigue fracture threshold, G(sub th). Unidirectional, 24-ply specimens of S2/SP250 glass/epoxy were tested using Kapton inserts of four different thickness - 13, 25, 75, and 130 microns, at the midplane at one end, or with tension or shear precracks, to simulate an initial delamination. To determine G(sub c), the fatigue fracture threshold below which no delamination growth would occur in less than 1 x 10(exp 6) cycles, fatigue tests were conducted by cyclically loading specimens until delamination growth was detected. Consistent values of model 1 fracture toughness, G(sub Ic), were measured from DCB specimens with inserts of thickness 75 microns or thinner, or with shear precracks. The fatigue DCB tests gave similar values of G(sub Ith) for the 13, 25, and 75 microns specimens. Results for the shear precracked specimens were significantly lower that for specimens without precracks. Results for both the static and fatigue ENF tests showed that measured G(IIc) and G(IIth) values decreased with decreasing insert thickness, so that no limiting thickness could be determined. Results for specimens with inserts of 75 microns or thicker were significantly higher than the results for precracked specimens or specimens with 13 or 25 microns inserts.

  11. Fatigue crack propagation and cryogenic fracture toughness behavior in powder metallurgy aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswara Rao, K. T.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation and cryogenic fracture toughness properties of powder metallurgy (P/M) aluminum-lithium alloys have been examined by studying the behavior in mechanically alloyed (MA) Al-4.0Mg-1.5Li-1.1C-0.8O2 (IN-905XL) and rapid solidification processed (RSP) Al-2.6Li-1.0Cu-0.5Mg-0.5Zr (Allied 644-B) extrusions. Results are presented as a function of microstructure, mean stress, and specimen orientation and are compared with previous data on equivalent high-strength aluminum alloys fabricated by both ingot metallurgy (I/M) and P/M methods. It is found that the fatigue crack propagation resistance of the RSP Al-Li alloy is superior to traditional RSP aluminum alloys without lithium and even comparable to I/M Al-Li alloys, particularly at near-threshold and intermediate stress intensity levels. In contrast, crack growth rates in MA 905XL P/M extrusions are nearly three orders of magnitude faster and do not show benefits of alloying with lithium. Growth rate behavior in both alloys, however, is anisotropic; for example, crack growth rates in RSP 644-B alloy are up to three orders of magnitude faster in the T-L, compared to L-T, orientation. However, when characterized in terms of a closure-corrected near-tip "driving force," Δ K ff such differences are reduced. With respect to toughness, plane strain K Ic values ( L-T orientation) in the RSP alloy are observed to increase with decrease in temperature from 298 to 77 K; conversely, the MA alloy shows a small decrease in K Ic at 77 K. Such results are interpreted in terms of the micromechanisms influencing fatigue and fracture behavior in Al-Li alloys, specifically involving the microstructural role of hardening mechanism, slip mode, grain structure, and texture on the development of crack tip shielding (crack path deflection and crack closure) and short-transverse delamination cracking.

  12. Experimental analysis of quasi-static and dynamic fracture initiation toughness of gy4 armor steel material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Peng; Guo, Zitao

    Quasi-static and dynamic fracture initiation toughness of gy4 armour steel material are investigated using three point bend specimen. The modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus with digital image correlation (DIC) system is applied to dynamic loading experiments. Full-field deformation measurements are obtained by using DIC to elucidate on the strain fields associated with the mechanical response. A series of experiments are conducted at different strain rate ranging from 10-3 s-1 to 103 s-1, and the loading rate on the fracture initiation toughness is investigated. Specially, the scanning electron microscope imaging technique is used to investigate the fracture failure micromechanism of fracture surfaces. The gy4 armour steel material fracture toughness is found to be sensitive to strain rate and higher for dynamic loading as compared to quasi-static loading. This work is supported by National Nature Science Foundation under Grant 51509115.

  13. Results of fracture mechanics analyses of the ederer cranes in the device assembly facility using reduced static fracture-toughness values

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E. N. C.

    1996-11-01

    The effects of a decreased static fracture-toughness value from that used in the previous fracture-mechanics analyses of the Ederer cranes in the Device Assembly Facility were examined to see what effects, if any, would be exerted on the fatigue crack growth and fracture behavior of the cranes. In particular, the behavior of the same 3 critical locations on the lower flanges of the load beams of the Ederer 5 ton and 4 ton cranes, were examined, with the reduced static fracture-toughness value.

  14. Measurement of fracture toughness by nanoindentation methods: Recent advances and future challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastiani, Marco; Johanns, K. E.; Herbert, Erik G.; Pharr, George M.

    2015-04-30

    In this study, we describe recent advances and developments for the measurement of fracture toughness at small scales by the use of nanoindentation-based methods including techniques based on micro-cantilever beam bending and micro-pillar splitting. A critical comparison of the techniques is made by testing a selected group of bulk and thin film materials. For pillar splitting, cohesive zone finite element simulations are used to validate a simple relationship between the critical load at failure, the pillar radius, and the fracture toughness for a range of material properties and coating/substrate combinations. The minimum pillar diameter required for nucleation and growth of a crack during indentation is also estimated. An analysis of pillar splitting for a film on a dissimilar substrate material shows that the critical load for splitting is relatively insensitive to the substrate compliance for a large range of material properties. Experimental results from a selected group of materials show good agreement between single cantilever and pillar splitting methods, while a discrepancy of ~25% is found between the pillar splitting technique and double-cantilever testing. It is concluded that both the micro-cantilever and pillar splitting techniques are valuable methods for micro-scale assessment of fracture toughness of brittle ceramics, provided the underlying assumptions can be validated. Although the pillar splitting method has some advantages because of the simplicity of sample preparation and testing, it is not applicable to most metals because their higher toughness prevents splitting, and in this case, micro-cantilever bend testing is preferred.

  15. Measurement of fracture toughness by nanoindentation methods: Recent advances and future challenges

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sebastiani, Marco; Johanns, K. E.; Herbert, Erik G.; Pharr, George M.

    2015-04-30

    In this study, we describe recent advances and developments for the measurement of fracture toughness at small scales by the use of nanoindentation-based methods including techniques based on micro-cantilever beam bending and micro-pillar splitting. A critical comparison of the techniques is made by testing a selected group of bulk and thin film materials. For pillar splitting, cohesive zone finite element simulations are used to validate a simple relationship between the critical load at failure, the pillar radius, and the fracture toughness for a range of material properties and coating/substrate combinations. The minimum pillar diameter required for nucleation and growth ofmore » a crack during indentation is also estimated. An analysis of pillar splitting for a film on a dissimilar substrate material shows that the critical load for splitting is relatively insensitive to the substrate compliance for a large range of material properties. Experimental results from a selected group of materials show good agreement between single cantilever and pillar splitting methods, while a discrepancy of ~25% is found between the pillar splitting technique and double-cantilever testing. It is concluded that both the micro-cantilever and pillar splitting techniques are valuable methods for micro-scale assessment of fracture toughness of brittle ceramics, provided the underlying assumptions can be validated. Although the pillar splitting method has some advantages because of the simplicity of sample preparation and testing, it is not applicable to most metals because their higher toughness prevents splitting, and in this case, micro-cantilever bend testing is preferred.« less

  16. Fracture Toughness and Strength in a New Class of Bainitic Chromium-Tungsten Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S. X.; Sikka, V. K.

    2006-06-01

    This project dealt with developing an understanding of the toughening and stengthening mechanisms for a new class of Fe-3Cr-W(V) steels developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in collaboration with Nooter Corporation and other industrial partners. The new steele had 50% higher tensile strength up to 650 degrees Celsius than currently used steels and the potential for not requiring any postweld heat treatment (PWHT) and for reducing equipment weight by 25%. This project was closely related to the Nooter project described in the report Development of a New Class of Fe-3Cr-W(V) Ferritic steels for Industrial Process Applications (ORNL/TM-2005/82). The project was carried out jointly by the University of Pittsburgh and ORNL. The University of Pittsburgh carried out fracture toughness measurements and microstructural analysis on base metal and welded plates prepared at ORNL. The project focused on three areas. The first dealt with detailed microstructural analysis of base compositions of 3Cr-3WV and 3Cr-3WBV(Ta) in both normalized (N) and normalized and tempered (NT) conditions. The second aspect of the prject dealt with determining tensile properties and fracture toughness values of K{subIC} at room temperature for both 3Cr-3Wv and 3Cr-3WV(Ta) compositions. The third focus of the project was to measure the fracture toughness values of the base metal and the heat-affectged zone (HAZ) of a plate of Fe-3Cr-W(Mo)V steel plate welded by the gas tungsten are (GTA) process. The HAZ toughness was measured in both the as-welded and the PWHT condition.

  17. Correlation of fracture toughness with impurity components. Final contract report

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K.; Smith, F.W.

    1992-03-23

    This investigation was sponsored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory in an effort to understand better the phenomenon of stress assisted diffusion in cracked structures operating in corrosive environments. Work done on the extension of the existing ``Coupled Thermomechanical Diffusion`` theory to enable the prediction of diffusion of a solute species in stressed solids in the presence of cracks is presented here. Mathematical formalism is provided to support the intuitive notion that a singular solution for the concentration field can exist in crack tip neighborhoods driven by singular solutions for stresses that have been obtained within the framework of classical Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics. It has been shown that under certain limiting assumptions, a singular solution for the concentration profile of the kind 1/{radical}r emerges from the governing equations. Both steady state and transient solutions were obtained. A numerical simulation using quarter point finite elements was carried out and the results obtained also indicated the presence of this singularity. A singular solution for the concentration profiles of diffusing species in crack tip neighborhoods was obtained by Gdoutos and Aifantis. The order of the singularity obtained in their investigation was different from that discovered in the present work as were the governing differential equations and the underlying assumptions of their model. In order to determine the reasons for the differences, a detailed study was undertaken comparing the two theories and their underlying assumptions, methodology and results. These comparisons also form part of the present work.

  18. Rolling contact fatigue and fracture toughness of rolling element bearing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsushima, Noriyuki

    1993-03-01

    To clarify rolling contact fatigue strength in terms of fracture mechanics, various flaking modes in practical rolling bearings, the relationship between rolling contact fatigue life and fracture toughness in Mode I, and recent studies on crack initiation and propagation through fracture mechanics are reviewed. Surface-origin-type flaking is becoming more important than the traditional subsurface-origin type as nonmetallic inclusion in steels is reduced. A new flaking mechanism wherein tensile residual stress in the radial direction in the subsurface initiates cracking has emerged and was verified by an experiment. Another new type of flaking, referred to as brittle flaking, was reported; here cracks are remarkably numerous, large and deep, accompanied by a new type of microstructural change. The cause of the brittle flaking was assumed to be tribological reaction on the raceway which decomposes the lubricant to cause hydrogen embrittlement. To establish a new bearing life calculation equation, it is necessary to create proper models for the various failure modes and to measure fracture toughness in Mode II.

  19. Composite Interlaminar Shear Fracture Toughness, G(sub 2c): Shear Measurement of Sheer Myth?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin

    1997-01-01

    The concept of G2c as a measure of the interlaminar shear fracture toughness of a composite material is critically examined. In particular, it is argued that the apparent G2c as typically measured is inconsistent with the original definition of shear fracture. It is shown that interlaminar shear failure actually consists of tension failures in the resin rich layers between plies followed by the coalescence of ligaments created by these failures and not the sliding of two planes relative to one another that is assumed in fracture mechanics theory. Several strain energy release rate solutions are reviewed for delamination in composite laminates and structural components where failures have been experimentally documented. Failures typically occur at a location where the mode 1 component accounts for at least one half of the total G at failure. Hence, it is the mode I and mixed-mode interlaminar fracture toughness data that will be most useful in predicting delamination failure in composite components in service. Although apparent G2c measurements may prove useful for completeness of generating mixed-mode criteria, the accuracy of these measurements may have very little influence on the prediction of mixed-mode failures in most structural components.

  1. Mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness of a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaxin; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1993-10-01

    The critical J-integrals of mode I (J{sub IC}), mixed-mode I/III (J{sub MC}), and mode III (J{sub IIIC}) were examined for a ferritic stainless steel (F-82H) at ambient temperature. A determination of J{sub MC} was made using modified compact-tension specimens. Different ratios of tension/shear stress were achieved by varying the principal axis of the crack plane between 0 and 55 degrees from the load line. Results showed that J{sub MC} and tearing modulus (T{sub M}) values varied with the crack angles and were lower than their mode I and mode III counterparts. Both the minimum J{sub MC} and T{sub M} values occurred at a crack angle between 40 and 50 degrees, where the load ratio of {sigma}{sub i}/{sigma}{sub iii} was 1.2 to 0.84. The J{sub min} was 240 Kj/M{sup 2}, and ratios of J{sub IC}/J{sub min} and J{sub IIIC}/J{sub min} were 2.1 and 1.9, respectively. The morphology of fracture surfaces was consistent with the change of J{sub MC} and T{sub M} values. While the upper shelf-fracture toughness of F-82H depends on loading mode, the J{sub min} remains very high. Other important considerations include the effect of mixed-mode loading on the DBT temperature, and effects of hydrogen and irradiation on J{sub min}.

  2. Improving the toughness of ultrahigh strength steel

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Koji

    2002-08-15

    The ideal structural steel combines high strength with high fracture toughness. This dissertation discusses the toughening mechanism of the Fe/Co/Ni/Cr/Mo/C steel, AerMet 100, which has the highest toughness/strength combination among all commercial ultrahigh strength steels. The possibility of improving the toughness of this steel was examined by considering several relevant factors.

  3. Flexural strength and fracture toughness of Dicor glass-ceramic after embedment modification.

    PubMed

    Denry, I L; Rosenstiel, S F

    1993-03-01

    Previous studies on the surface properties of Dicor castable glass-ceramic have shown the formation of a specific crystalline phase at the glass-ceramic/embedment interface. If this phase is not removed by grinding, it leads to an undesirable strength decrease. The aims of this study were: (1) to determine the nature of this surface layer, (2) to promote the formation of a different crystalline phase at the surface with the intention of improving the properties of the glass-ceramic, by modification of the composition of the Dicor ceramming embedment, and (3) to evaluate the fracture toughness and flexural strength of Dicor glass-ceramic after embedment modification. Modifications were made to the embedment by incorporation of 2.5 wt% of lithium fluoride and ceramming at various temperatures. X-ray diffraction was used to determine the crystalline nature of the surface layer. Fracture toughness was investigated by the indentation technique. The maximum bi-axial stresses were calculated after the samples were fractured in water on a ball-on-ring fixture at 0.5 mm/min. With the recommended embedment and ceramming cycle, the crystalline phase constituting the ceram layer was a calcium magnesium silicate CaMg(SiO3)2 (diopside). The crystalline composition of the ceram layer was successfully modified by addition of 2.5 wt% lithium fluoride to the embedment. This promoted the crystallization of mica in the ceram layer and increased the fracture toughness of the glass-ceramic when the ceramming temperature was 950 or 975 degrees C. The flexural strength was significantly increased when the ceramming temperature was 1000 degrees C.

  4. Impact Toughness Properties of Nickel- and Manganese-Free High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Mohammadzadeh, Mina

    2016-10-01

    A large amount of manganese (>10 wt pct) in nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels (Ni-free HNASSs) can induce toxicity. In order to develop Ni-free HNASSs with low or no manganese, it is necessary to investigate their mechanical properties for biomedical applications. This work aims to study the Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact toughness properties of a Ni- and Mn-free Fe-22.7Cr-2.4Mo-1.2N HNASS plate in the temperature range of 103 K to 423 K (-170 °C to 150 °C). The results show that unlike conventional AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel, the Ni- and Mn-free HNASS exhibits a sharp ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT). The intergranular brittle fracture associated with some plasticity and deformation bands is observed on the fracture surface at 298 K (25 °C). Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis of the impact-tested sample in the longitudinal direction indicates that deformation bands are parallel to {111} slip planes. By decreasing the temperature to 273 K, 263 K, and 103 K (0 °C, -10 °C, and -70 °C), entirely intergranular brittle fracture occurs on the fracture surface. The fracture mode changes from brittle fracture to ductile as the temperature increases to 423 K (150 °C). The decrease in impact toughness is discussed on the basis of temperature sensitivity of plastic flow and planarity of deformation mechanism.

  5. Fatigue crack growth rate of Ti-6Al-4V considering the effects of fracture toughness and crack closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junhong; Yang, Shuo; Lin, Jiewei

    2015-03-01

    Fatigue fracture is one of the main failure modes of Ti-6Al-4V alloy, fracture toughness and crack closure have strong effects on the fatigue crack growth(FCG) rate of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The FCG rate of Ti-6Al-4V is investigated by using experimental and analytical methods. The effects of stress ratio, crack closure and fracture toughness on the FCG rate are studied and discussed. A modified prediction model of the FCG rate is proposed, and the relationship between the fracture toughness and the stress intensity factor(SIF) range is redefined by introducing a correcting coefficient. Notched plate fatigue tests (including the fracture toughness test and the FCG rate test) are conducted to investigate the influence of affecting factors on the FCG rate. Comparisons between the predicted results of the proposed model, the Paris model, the Walker model, the Sadananda model, and the experimental data show that the proposed model gives the best agreement with the test data particularly in the near-threshold region and the Paris region, and the corresponding calculated fatigue life is also accurate in the same regions. By considering the effects of fracture toughness and crack closure, the novel FCG rate prediction model not only improves the estimating accuracy, but also extends the adaptability of the FCG rate prediction model in engineering.

  6. J-integral fracture toughness, Tearing modulus and tensile properties of Vitamin E stabilized radiation crosslinked UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Bellare, Anuj; Dorfman, Robert; Samuel, Ashwanth; Thornhill, Thomas S

    2016-08-01

    Radiation crosslinking of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) increases its wear resistance in total joint replacement prostheses. Unfortunately, it is accompanied by a dose-dependent decrease in several mechanical properties. In this study, the tensile properties and fracture behavior of radiation crosslinked, Vitamin E stabilized UHMWPE was studied as a function of radiation dose. The Rice and Sorensen model, applicable to elastic-plastic materials, was utilized to obtain the initial crack driving force, J1c, steady state J-integral fracture toughness, Jss and the Tearing modulus. Tensile tests showed the dependence of tensile properties on radiation dose. Jss of non-crosslinked UHMWPE was higher than for crosslinked UHMWPE׳s but there was no dose dependent change in Jss whereas there was almost no change in J1c over the entire dose range. Finally, a monotonic decrease in Tearing modulus was observed with radiation dose. PMID:27128734

  7. J-integral fracture toughness, Tearing modulus and tensile properties of Vitamin E stabilized radiation crosslinked UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Bellare, Anuj; Dorfman, Robert; Samuel, Ashwanth; Thornhill, Thomas S

    2016-08-01

    Radiation crosslinking of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) increases its wear resistance in total joint replacement prostheses. Unfortunately, it is accompanied by a dose-dependent decrease in several mechanical properties. In this study, the tensile properties and fracture behavior of radiation crosslinked, Vitamin E stabilized UHMWPE was studied as a function of radiation dose. The Rice and Sorensen model, applicable to elastic-plastic materials, was utilized to obtain the initial crack driving force, J1c, steady state J-integral fracture toughness, Jss and the Tearing modulus. Tensile tests showed the dependence of tensile properties on radiation dose. Jss of non-crosslinked UHMWPE was higher than for crosslinked UHMWPE׳s but there was no dose dependent change in Jss whereas there was almost no change in J1c over the entire dose range. Finally, a monotonic decrease in Tearing modulus was observed with radiation dose.

  8. Effects of toughness anisotropy and combined tension, torsion, and bending loads on fracture behavior of ferritic nuclear pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, R.; Marshall, C.; Ghadiali, N.; Wilkowski, G.

    1997-04-01

    This paper summarizes work on angled through-wall-crack initiation and combined loading effects on ferritic nuclear pipe performed as part of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s research program entitled {open_quotes}Short Cracks In Piping an Piping Welds{close_quotes}. The reader is referred to Reference 1 for details of the experiments and analyses conducted as part of this program. The major impetus for this work stemmed from the observation that initially circumferentially oriented cracks in carbon steel pipes exhibited a high tendency to grow at a different angle when the cracked pipes were subjected to bending or bending plus pressure loads. This failure mode was little understood, and the effect of angled crack grown from an initially circumferential crack raised questions about how cracks in a piping system subjected to combined loading with torsional stresses would behave. There were three major efforts undertaken in this study. The first involved a literature review to assess the causes of toughness anisotropy in ferritic pipes and to develop strength and toughness data as a function of angle from the circumferential plane. The second effort was an attempt to develop a screening criterion based on toughness anisotropy and to compare this screening criterion with experimental pipe fracture data. The third and more significant effort involved finite element analyses to examine why cracks grow at an angle and what is the effect of combined loads with torsional stresses on a circumferentially cracked pipe. These three efforts are summarized.

  9. Fracture Toughness and Slow Crack Growth Behavior of Ni-YSZ and YSZ as a Function of Porosity and Temperature.

    SciTech Connect

    Radovic, Miladin; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Nelson, George

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we report on the fracture toughness of YSZ and Ni-YSZ and slow-crack growth behavior of Ni-YSZ at 20C and 800C. Results are presented for tests carried out in air for YSZ and in a gas mixture of 4%H2 and 96%Ar for Ni-YSZ containing various levels of porosity. The double-torsion test method was utilized to determine the fracture toughness from the peak load obtained during fast loading test specimens that had been precracked, while crack velocity versus stress intensity curves were obtained in the double torsion using hte load relaxation method. It was found that fracture toughness of these materials decreases with temperature and int he case of Ni-YSZ it also decreases with increasing porosity. The effect of temperature and microstructure, which was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, on the fracture behavior of these materials, is discussed.

  10. The significance of crack-resistance curves to the mixed-mode fracture toughness of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2010-03-25

    The majority of fracture mechanics studies on the toughness of bone have been performed under tensile loading. However, it has recently been shown that the toughness of human cortical bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation is actually much lower in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I); a fact that is physiologically relevant as in vivo bone is invariably loaded multiaxially. Since bone is a material that derives its fracture resistance primarily during crack growth through extrinsic toughening mechanisms, such as crack deflection and bridging, evaluation of its toughness is best achieved through measurements of the crack-resistance or R-curve, which describes the fracture toughness as a function of crack extension. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to measure for the first time the R-curve fracture toughness of human cortical bone under physiologically relevant mixed-mode loading conditions. We show that the resulting mixed-mode (mode I + II) toughness depends strongly on the crack trajectory and is the result of the competition between the paths of maximum mechanical driving force and 'weakest' microstructural resistance.

  11. Mode I Fracture Toughness Prediction for Multiwalled-Carbon-Nanotube Reinforced Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Henager, Charles H.

    2015-08-27

    This article develops a multiscale model to predict fracture toughness of multiwalled-carbon-nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced ceramics. The model bridges different scales from the scale of a MWCNT to that of a composite domain containing a macroscopic crack. From the nano, micro to meso scales, Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka models combined with a continuum damage mechanics approach are explored to predict the elastic damage behavior of the composite as a function of MWCNT volume fraction. MWCNTs are assumed to be randomly dispersed in a ceramic matrix subject to cracking under loading. A damage variable is used to describe matrix cracking that causes reduction of the elastic modulus of the matrix. This damage model is introduced in a modified boundary layer modeling approach to capture damage initiation and development at a tip of a pre-existing crack. Damage and fracture are captured only in a process window containing the crack tip under plane strain Mode I loading. The model is validated against the published experimental fracture toughness data for a MWCNT 3 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia composite system. In addition, crack resistance curves as a function of MWCNT content are predicted and fitted by a power law as observed in the experiments on zirconia.

  12. Inverse measurement of stiffness by the normalization technique for J-integral fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric

    2012-06-07

    The single specimen normalization technique for J-integral fracture toughness has been successfully employed by several researchers to study the strongly non-linear fracture response of ductile semicrystalline polymers. As part of the normalization technique the load and the plastic component of displacement are normalized. The normalized data is then fit with a normalization function that approximates a power law for small displacements that are dominated by blunting and smoothly transitions to a linear relationship for large displacements that are dominated by stable crack extension. Particularly for very ductile polymers the compliance term used to determine the plastic displacement can dominate the solution and small errors in determining the elastic modulus can lead to large errors in the normalization or even make it ill-posed. This can be further complicated for polymers where the elastic modulus is strong strain rate dependent and simply using a 'quasistatic' modulus from a dogbone measurement may not equate to the dominant strain rate in the compact tension specimen. The current work proposes directly measuring the compliance of the compact tension specimen in the solution of J-integral fracture toughness and then solving for the elastic modulus. By comparison with a range of strain rate data the dominant strain rate can then be determined.

  13. Fracture toughness determination using spiral-grooved cylindrical specimen and pure torsional loading

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jy-An; Liu, Kenneth C.

    2003-07-08

    A method for determining fracture toughness K.sub.IC of materials ranging from metallic alloys, brittle ceramics and their composites, and weldments. A cylindrical specimen having a helical V-groove with a 45.degree. pitch is subjected to pure torsion. This loading configuration creates a uniform tensile-stress crack-opening mode, and a transverse plane-strain state along the helical groove. The full length of the spiral groove is equivalent to the thickness of a conventional compact-type specimen. K.sub.IC values are determined from the fracture torque and crack length measured from the test specimen using a 3-D finite element program (TOR3D-KIC) developed for the purpose. In addition, a mixed mode (combined tensile and shear stress mode) fracture toughness value can be determined by varying the pitch of the helical groove. Since the key information needed for determining the K.sub.IC value is condensed in the vicinity of the crack tip, the specimen can be significantly miniaturized without the loss of generality.

  14. THE EFFECTS OF HYDROGEN, TRITIUM, AND HEAT TREATMENT ON THE DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.; Tosten, M.; Chapman, G.

    2013-09-06

    The deformation and fracture toughness properties of forged stainless steels pre-charged with tritium were compared to the deformation and fracture toughness properties of the same steels heat treated at 773 K or 873 K and precharged with hydrogen. Forged stainless steels pre-charged with tritium exhibit an aging effect: Fracture toughness values decrease with aging time after precharging because of the increase in concentration of helium from tritium decay. This study shows that forged stainless steels given a prior heat treatment and then pre-charged with hydrogen also exhibit an aging effect: Fracture toughness values decrease with increasing time at temperature. A microstructural analysis showed that the fracture toughness reduction in the heat-treated steels was due to patches of recrystallized grains that form within the forged matrix during the heat treatment. The combination of hydrogen and the patches of recrystallized grains resulted in more deformation twinning. Heavy deformation twinning on multiple slip planes was typical for the hydrogen-charged samples; whereas, in the non-charged samples, less twinning was observed and was generally limited to one slip plane. Similar effects occur in tritium pre-charged steels, but the deformation twinning is brought on by the hardening associated with decay helium bubbles in the microstructure.

  15. Analytical solution to a fracture problem in a tough layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yukari; Okumura, Ko

    2008-08-01

    Nacre causes the shining beauty of pearl due to its remarkable layered structure, which is also strong. We reconsider a simplified layered model of nacre proposed previously [Okumura and de Gennes, Eur. Phys. J. E 4, 121 (2001)] and obtain an analytical solution to a fundamental crack problem. The result asserts that the fracture toughness is enhanced due to a large displacement around the crack tip (even if the crack-tip stress is not reduced). The derivation offers ideas for solving a number of boundary problems for partial differential equations important in many fields.

  16. Martensitic stainless steel AISI 420—mechanical properties, creep and fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brnic, J.; Turkalj, G.; Canadija, M.; Lanc, D.; Krscanski, S.

    2011-11-01

    In this paper some experimental results and analyses regarding the behavior of AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel under different environmental conditions are presented. That way, mechanical properties like ultimate tensile strength and 0.2 percent offset yield strength at lowered and elevated temperatures as well as short-time creep behavior for selected stress levels at selected elevated temperatures of mentioned material are shown. The temperature effect on mentioned mechanical properties is also presented. Fracture toughness was calculated on the basis of Charpy impact energy. Experimentally obtained results can be of importance for structure designers.

  17. Dynamic delamination fracture toughness of a graphite/epoxy laminate under impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Grady, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    Dynamic delamination fracture toughness in a (90/0)5s T300/934 graphite/epoxy laminate was investigated using impact loading. Delamination cracks of three different sizes were embedded at the midplane of the composite specimen. The threshold impact velocity that causes propagation of the delamination crack was used in the dynamic analysis with the finite element method. From the finite element solution, the time-history of the strain energy release rate was calculated. The critical strain energy release rate was taken to equal the maximum value of the response history.

  18. Revision of Standard Method of Test for Plane Strain Fracture Toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, John L., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this grant is to revise ASTM Standard Method of Test E-399 for Plane Strain Fracture Toughness of Metallic Materials based on users' experience, and to harmonize the Method with international standards in the interest of U. S. competitive participation in the global marketplace. Rewriting and reformatting the Method are well along. Research laboratories here and abroad have been engaged in developing technical bases for the Method's novel revision items. Close liaison is being maintained with experts in the field here and abroad to ensure consensus agreement on all substantive matters in anticipation of an eventual circulation of the document for ASTM worldwide approval.

  19. Fracture toughness of titanium–cement interfaces: effects of fibers and loading angles

    PubMed Central

    Khandaker, Morshed; Utsaha, Khatri Chhetri; Morris, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Ideal implant–cement or implant–bone interfaces are required for implant fixation and the filling of tissue defects created by disease. Micron- to nanosize osseointegrated features, such as surface roughness, fibers, porosity, and particles, have been fused with implants for improving the osseointegration of an implant with the host tissue in orthopedics and dentistry. The effects of fibers and loading angles on the interface fracture toughness of implant–cement specimens with and without fibers at the interface are not yet known. Such studies are important for the design of a long-lasting implant for orthopedic applications. The goal of this study was to improve the fracture toughness of an implant–cement interface by deposition of micron- to nanosize fibers on an implant surface. There were two objectives in the study: 1) to evaluate the influence of fibers on the fracture toughness of implant–cement interfaces with and without fibers at the interfaces, and 2) to evaluate the influence of loading angles on implant–cement interfaces with and without fibers at the interfaces. This study used titanium as the implant, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as cement, and polycaprolactone (PCL) as fiber materials. An electrospinning unit was fabricated for the deposition of PCL unidirectional fibers on titanium (Ti) plates. The Evex tensile test stage was used to determine the interface fracture toughness (KC) of Ti–PMMA with and without PCL fibers at 0°, 45°, and 90° loading angles, referred to in this article as tension, mixed, and shear tests. The study did not find any significant interaction between fiber and loading angles (P>0.05), although there was a significant difference in the KC means of Ti–PMMA samples for the loading angles (P<0.05). The study also found a significant difference in the KC means of Ti–PMMA samples with and without fibers (P<0.05). The results showed that the addition of the micron- to nanosize PCL fibers on Ti improved the

  20. High toughness carbon cloth composites for low temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronca, Sara; Forte, Giuseppe; Mascia, Leno; Rastogi, Sanjay

    2016-05-01

    Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers based on a thermoplastic, high performance matrix such as Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene have been produced using two different routes and it was found that in-situ polymerization of the matrix is a possible way forward to achieve a combination of high strength and high toughness in composites.

  1. Nanoindentation Fracture Behaviors of Diamond-Like Carbon Film on Aluminum Alloy with Different Interface Toughnesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nose, Kenji; Sasaki, Yuto; Kamiko, Masao; Mitsuda, Yoshitaka

    2012-09-01

    Fracture behaviors of a diamond-like carbon (DLC) film on an aluminum alloy (AA2017) were analyzed by a nanoindentation test under conditions of deep and full penetrations of an indenter tip through the DLC film. The interface structure between the DLC and AA2017 was modified by using the substrate sputtering and redeposition (SSRD) method. The films deposited with a shorter (30 min) SSRD duration showed weak adhesion to the substrate and often resulted in wide delamination from the impressions. At the same time, films deposited with a longer (120 min) SSRD duration showed no such delamination. Obvious brittle fractures were detected in the load-displacement curves mainly in the film with the short SSRD duration. These results suggest that a long SSRD inhibited the delamination of the DLC film from AA2017 under local and strong stress conditions because of the improved interface toughness.

  2. Interlaminar Fracture toughness in Glass-Cellulose Reinforced Epoxy hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uppin, Vinayak S.; Ashok; AnanthJoshi; Sridhar, I.; Shivakumar Gouda, P. S.

    2016-09-01

    Laminates of fibre reinforced compositesare weak in through thicknessbut strong in fibre direction, this lead to development of hybridizationconcept in polymer composites. In this work a new method of disperssing cellulose micro particleson unidirectional (UD) Glass fibre epoxy composite using semi-automated draw down coating technique was adopted to enhance fracture toughness.Test results show that by adding cellulose increases the load carrying competency by 32% in mode-I as compare to Glass- Epoxy composite samples. Imrovement in interlaminar critical energy release rates (GiC and GnC) up to 55% in Mode -I and 19 %in Mode -II respectively was also observed. This enahancement in fracture toughnees is due to the amount of fiber bridging seen during crack initiation and propagation.

  3. Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Space Shuttle External Tank Thermal Protection System Polyurethane Foam Insulation Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston; Wells, Doug; Morgan, Kristin

    2006-01-01

    Experimental evaluation of the basic fracture properties of Thermal Protection System (TPS) polyurethane foam insulation materials was conducted to validate the methodology used in estimating critical defect sizes in TPS applications on the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank. The polyurethane foam found on the External Tank (ET) is manufactured by mixing liquid constituents and allowing them to react and expand upwards - a process which creates component cells that are generally elongated in the foam rise direction and gives rise to mechanical anisotropy. Similarly, the application of successive foam layers to the ET produces cohesive foam interfaces (knitlines) which may lead to local variations in mechanical properties. This study reports the fracture toughness of BX-265, NCFI 24-124, and PDL-1034 closed-cell polyurethane foam as a function of ambient and cryogenic temperatures and knitline/cellular orientation at ambient pressure.

  4. Measurement of ultra thin film fracture toughness by nano-indentation: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Benjamin

    As the individual layers of interconnect structures decrease in size, it becomes increasingly difficult to determine the fracture toughness, and hence the reliability, of these layers. After a layer is thinner than ˜500nm, it becomes difficult to determine the fracture toughness directly with traditional methods. Using nano-indentation, it is possible to extract the cohesive and adhesive fracture energies of these films without elaborate experimental setups. There are, however, several issues with this approach. Nano-indentation creates cracks both within the film (the cohesive cracks) and between the film and the substrate (the adhesive cracks) as well as significant plastic deformation of the film and substrate. Using SIMULA Abaqus Standard, a commercial finite element analysis tool, 2D and 3D models were created to examine the deformation characteristics associated with the nano-indentation process. The models either have pre-existing stationary cracks, or simulated by cohesive zone surfaces to account for crack nucleation and growth. The 2D model is axi-symmetric and only accounts for the adhesive crack. It is used primarily as a test the cohesive zone model and to begin to determine experimental testing limits. The 3D model is a one sixth slice of the area indented. Both cohesive and adhesive cracks are modeled and the interaction between the two cracks is investigated. While there are many parameters controlling the crack initiation and propagation process, several trends were identified. The domain of practical testing should be between one and three film thickness, so as to avoid the confluence of the indenter plastic process zone on the propagating crack front. When excursion on the load-indentation depth happens, the fracture energy is about 20% of the associated work done by the indenter (or the area under the excursion segment). The FEM simulation showed the general role of film thickness, toughness and modulus on the initiation and propagation of both

  5. Influence of loading rate and hydrogen content on fracture toughness of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bind, A. K.; Singh, R. N.; Khandelwal, H. K.; Sunil, S.; Avinash, G.; Chakravartty, J. K.; Ståhle, P.

    2015-10-01

    For the safety assessment of PHWR, it is required to study the flaw tolerance capacity of the pressure tubes as a function of the loading rate. In this work, the effect of loading rate and hydrogen content on the fracture behaviour of a Zr-2.5Nb alloy pressure tube was investigated between 25 and 300 °C. For the as received material, the pulling rate only had an effect on fracture toughness at 25 °C whereas for hydrided material the pulling rate affected fracture toughness in the transition regime. For all pulling rates, hydrided materials showed typical S curve behavior with an increase in lower shelf, upper shelf and transition temperature with pulling rate. The number of axial splits on fracture surfaces increased with an increase in the pulling rate and a decrease in temperature and fracture toughness was found to decrease with an increase in the number of axial splits. The reduction in fracture toughness is attributed to a localised deformation between axial splits.

  6. Effects of dentin surface treatments on the fracture toughness and tensile bond strength of a dentin-composite adhesive interface.

    PubMed

    Tam, L E; Pilliar, R M

    1994-09-01

    It has been proposed that the fracture toughness test provides an appropriate method for assessing the fracture resistance of the dentin-composite interface. The plane-strain fracture toughness test was therefore applied to a dentin-composite interface, with use of a specific dentinal adhesive, so that the effects of various dentin surface treatments on dentin-bond integrity could be studied. Interfacial fracture toughness (KIC) values were determined following 24h and 180 days of specimen aging in distilled water at 37 degrees C. Tensile bond strength (TBS) results following 24-hour aging were also obtained for comparison with the 24-hour KIC results. In general, the fracture resistance of the dentin-composite interface was highest when the dentin surface was conditioned with acid but not air-dried, intermediate when the dentin surface was conditioned with acid and subsequently air-dried, and lowest when the dentin was not conditioned with acid. The tensile bond strength results differed from the fracture toughness results in indicating differences in surface preparation effects and the type of interfacial failure observed.

  7. Compressive fatigue and fracture toughness behavior of injectable, settable bone cements.

    PubMed

    Harmata, Andrew J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Granke, Mathilde; Guelcher, Scott A; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2015-11-01

    Bone grafts used to repair weight-bearing tibial plateau fractures often experience cyclic loading, and there is a need for bone graft substitutes that prevent failure of fixation and subsequent morbidity. However, the specific mechanical properties required for resorbable grafts to optimize structural compatibility with native bone have yet to be established. While quasi-static tests are utilized to assess weight-bearing ability, compressive strength alone is a poor indicator of in vivo performance. In the present study, we investigated the effects of interfacial bonding on material properties under conditions that re-capitulate the cyclic loading associated with weight-bearing fractures. Dynamic compressive fatigue properties of polyurethane (PUR) composites made with either unmodified (U-) or polycaprolactone surface-modified (PCL-) 45S5 bioactive glass (BG) particles were compared to a commercially available calcium sulfate and phosphate-based (CaS/P) bone cement at physiologically relevant stresses (5-30 MPa). Fatigue resistance of PCL-BG/polymer composite was superior to that of the U-BG/polymer composite and the CaS/P cement at higher stress levels for each of the fatigue failure criteria, related to modulus, creep, and maximum displacement, and was comparable to human trabecular bone. Steady state creep and damage accumulation occurred during the fatigue life of the PCL-BG/polymer and CaS/P cement, whereas creep of U-BG/polymer primarily occurred at a low number of loading cycles. From crack propagation testing, fracture toughness or resistance to crack growth was significantly higher for the PCL-BG composite than for the other materials. Finally, the fatigue and fracture toughness properties were intermediate between those of trabecular and cortical bone. These findings highlight the potential of PCL-BG/polyurethane composites as weight-bearing bone grafts. PMID:26282077

  8. Fracture toughness of quaternary Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloy under mode I, mode II, and mode III loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, N.E.; Kamat, S.V.; Malakondaiah, G. ); Kutumbarao, V.V. . Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    The fracture toughness under mode I, mode II, and mode III loading conditions was evaluated for a quaternary 8090 Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloy in underaged and peak-aged conditions. The effect of aging was found to be significantly different for different loading conditions. The alloy in the underaged (T3) condition exhibited minimum fracture toughness under mode II loading, whereas mode I fracture toughness was the lowest in the case of the peak-aged (T8E51) condition. Significant anisotropy in the fracture resistance is observed only in case of the peak-aged alloy under mode I loading, whereas in all other cases, the fracture resistance is found to be isotropic. The fracture mode was transgranular shear in all three modes of loading in the underaged condition as well as under mode II and mode III loading in the peak-aged condition. The alloy exhibited ductile intergranular fracture under mode I loading in the peak-aged condition. The results obtained are explained on the basis of these dominant fracture mechanisms prevalent under different loading conditions.

  9. Cryogenic Fracture Toughness Improvement for the Super Lightweight Tank's Main Structural Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, P. S.; Stanton, W. P.

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a two-step (TS) artificial aging technique that can significantly enhance cryogenic fracture toughness and resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in aluminum-copper-lithium alloy 2195. The new TS aging treatment consists of exposures at 132 C (270 F)/20 hr + 138 C (280 F)/42 hr, which can be readily applied to flight hardware production. TS aging achieves the same yield strength levels as conventional aging, while providing much improved ductility in the short transverse direction. After TS aging, five previously rejected lots of alloy 2195 (lots 950M029B, 960M030F, 960M030J, 960M030K, and 960M030L) passed simulated service testing for use in the super lightweight tank program. Each lot exhibited higher fracture toughness at cryogenic temperature than at ambient temperature. Their SCC resistance was also enhanced. All SCC specimens passed the minimum 10-day requirement in 3.5-percent sodium chloride alternate immersion at a stress of 45 ksi. The SCC lives ranged from 57 to 83 days, with an average of 70 days.

  10. Developing an Innovative Field Expedient Fracture Toughness Testing Protocol for Concrete Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Liu, Ken C; Naus, Dan J

    2008-09-01

    The Spiral Notch Torsion Fracture Toughness Test (SNTT) was developed recently to determine the intrinsic fracture toughness (KIC) of structural materials. The SNTT system operates by applying pure torsion to uniform cylindrical specimens with a notch line that spirals around the specimen at a 45 pitch. KIC values are obtained with the aid of a three-dimensional finite-element computer code, TOR3D-KIC. The SNTT method is uniquely suitable for testing a wide variety of materials used extensively in pressure vessel and piping structural components and weldments. Application of the method to metallic, ceramic, and graphite materials has been demonstrated. One important characteristic of SNTT is that neither a fatigue precrack or a deep notch are required for the evaluation of brittle materials, which significantly reduces the sample size requirement. In this paper we report results for a Portland cement-based mortar to demonstrate applicability of the SNTT method to cementitious materials. The estimated KIC of the tested mortar samples with compressive strength of 34.45 MPa was found to be 0.19 MPa m.

  11. Evaluation of the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) Test for Mode 3 Interlaminar Fracture Toughness of Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian; Lee, Edward W.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Lee, Shaw Ming

    1996-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was carried out on G40-800/R6376 graphite epoxy laminates to evaluate the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) test as a candidate for a standard Mode 3 interlaminar fracture toughness test for laminated composites. The ECT test consists of a (90/(+/- 45)(sub 3)/(+/- 45)(sub 3)/90))(sub s) laminate with a delamination introduced by a non-adhesive film at the mid-plane along one edge and loaded in a special fixture to create torsion along the length of the laminate. Dye penetrate enhanced X-radiograph of failed specimens revealed that the delamination initiated at the middle of the specimen length and propagated in a self similar manner along the laminate mid-plane. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed that indicated that a pure Mode 3 delamination exists at the middle of specimen length away from both ends. At the ends near the loading point a small Mode 2 component exists. However, the magnitude of this Mode 2 strain energy release rate at the loading point is small compared to the magnitude of Mode 3 component in the mid-section of the specimen. Hence, the ECT test yielded the desired Mode 3 delamination. The Mode 3 fracture toughness was obtained from a compliance calibration method and was in good agreement with the finite element results. Mode 2 End-Notched Flexure (ENF) tests and Mode 1 Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests were also performed for the same composite material. The Mode 1 fracture toughness was much smaller than both the Mode 2 and Mode 3 fracture toughness. The Mode 2 fracture toughness was found to be 75% of the Mode 3 fracture toughness.

  12. The effect of microstructure and strength on the fracture toughness of an 18 ni, 300 grade maraging steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Psioda, J. A.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Methods for increasing the strength of maraging steels are discussed. An investigation was conducted to systematically vary the strength of 18 weight percent nickel, 300 grade maraging steel, to isolate any attending microstructural changes, and to study the effects of these changes on the fracture toughness of the alloy. A study aimed at determining the aging behavior of the program alloy was carried out to provide data by which to estimate yield strength. The effects of various alloying materials on the strength of the maraging steel are examined. The mechanical properties of the 300 grade maraging steel were determined by tension tests, fatigue precracked Charpy impact tests, and plane strain fracture toughness tests.

  13. Leaf cellulose density as the key determinant of inter- and intra-specific variation in leaf fracture toughness in a species-rich tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Kaoru; Wright, S Joseph; Westbrook, Jared W

    2016-06-01

    Leaves as the main photosynthetic organ of plants must be well protected against various hazards to achieve their optimal lifespans. Yet, within-species variation and the material basis of leaf strength have been explored for very few species. Here, we present a large dataset of leaf fracture toughness from a species-rich humid tropical forest on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, reporting both among- and within-species variation in relation to light environment (sun-lit canopy versus shaded understorey) and ontogeny (seedlings versus adults). In this dataset encompassing 281 free-standing woody species and 428 species-light combinations, lamina fracture toughness varied ca 10 times. A central objective of our study was to identify generalizable patterns in the structural and material basis for interspecific variation in leaf lamina fracture toughness. The leaf lamina is a heterogeneous structure in which strong materials in cell walls, such as cellulose and lignin, contribute disproportionately to fracture toughness. We found significant increases in leaf fracture toughness from shade to sun and from seedling leaves to adult leaves. Both within and across species, leaf fracture toughness increased with total bulk density (dry biomass per unit volume) and cellulose mass concentration, but decreased with mass concentrations of lignin and hemicelluose. These bivariate relationships shift between light environments, but leaf cellulose density (cellulose mass per unit leaf volume) exhibits a common relationship with lamina fracture toughness between light environments and through ontogeny. Hence, leaf cellulose density is probably a universal predictor of leaf fracture toughness. PMID:27274796

  14. Evaluation of the Fracture Toughness of a SMSS Subjected to Common Heat Treatment Cycles in an Aggressive Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieta, G.; Leite, R.; Kwietniewski, C.; Clarke, T.; Strohaecker, T.

    2010-12-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels (SMSS) are an alternative to corrosion-prone carbon steels and expensive duplex stainless steels in offshore tubing applications for the oil and gas industry. Due to their differentiated alloying, SMSS exhibit superior toughness, corrosion resistance, and weldability properties when compared with another viable option, conventional martensitic stainless steels. However, when cathodically protected in a seawater environment they can be susceptible to embrittlement due to hydrogen charging. In the present study, SMSS samples were removed from deep water pipelines and their fracture toughness in the as-received condition and with different heat treatments was evaluated. Tests were carried out in air and in harsh environmental and loading conditions, which were ensured by subjecting specimens to cathodic overprotection, simulating effects seen in structures with complex geometries, and to incremental step loads in a synthetic seawater environment, thus favoring hydrogen diffusion to the precrack tip. The fracture surfaces of the specimens were analyzed in order to identify hydrogen-induced embrittlement and fracture toughness values of specimens tested in air were compared to values obtained in environment-assisted experiments. The influence of microstructure was evaluated by control of the retained austenite and δ-ferrite contents of the specimens. The results show a significant drop in the fracture toughness of steel in the studied environment, with a fracture mode which is clearly more brittle and dependent on microstructural characteristics of the samples.

  15. Effects of thermal aging on fracture toughness and Charpy-impact strength of stainless steel pipe welds

    SciTech Connect

    Gavenda, D.J.; Michaud, W.F.; Galvin, T.M.; Burke, W.F.; Chopra, O.K.

    1996-05-01

    Degradation of fracture toughness, tensile, and Charpy-impact properties of Type 304 and 304/308 SS pipe welds due to thermal aging was studied at room temperature and 290 C. Thermal aging of SS welds results in moderate decreases in charpy-impact strength and fracture toughness. Upper-shelf energy decreased by 50-80 J/cm{sup 2}. Decrease in fracture toughness J-R curve or J{sub IC} is relatively small. Thermal aging had no or little effect on tensile strength of the welds. Fracture properties of SS welds are controlled by the distribution and morphology of second-phase particles. Failure occurs by formation and growth of microvoids near hard inclusions; such processes are relatively insensitive to thermal aging. The ferrite phase has little or no effect on fracture properties of the welds. Differences in fracture resistance of the welds arise from differences in the density and size of inclusions. Mechanical-property data from the present study are consistent with results from other investigations. The existing data have been used to establish minimum expected fracture properties for SS welds.

  16. Effects of thermal aging on fracture toughness and charpy-impact strength of stainless steel pipe welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Gavenda, D. J.; Michaud, W. F.; Galvin, T. M.; Burke, W. F.; Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

    1996-06-05

    The degradation of fracture toughness, tensile, and Charpy-impact properties of Type 308 stainless steel (SS) pipe welds due to thermal aging has been characterized at room temperature and 290 C. Thermal aging of SS welds results in moderate decreases in Charpy-impact strength and fracture toughness. For the various welds in this study, upper-shelf energy decreased by 50-80 J/cm{sup 2}. The decrease in fracture toughness J-R curve or JIC is relatively small. Thermal aging had little or no effect on the tensile strength of the welds. Fracture properties of SS welds are controlled by the distribution and morphology of second-phase particles. Failure occurs by the formation and growth of microvoids near hard inclusions; such processes are relatively insensitive to thermal aging. The ferrite phase has little or no effect on the fracture properties of the welds. Differences in fracture resistance of the welds arise from differences in the density and size of inclusions. Mechanical-property data from the present study are consistent with results from other investigations. The existing data have been used to establish minimum expected fracture properties for SS welds.

  17. Analysis of fracture toughness in the transition-temperature region of an Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangho; Hwang, Byoungchul; Lee, Sunghak; Lee, Sunghak

    2003-06-01

    This study is concerned with the analysis of fracture toughness in the transition region of an Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steel, in accordance with the ASTM E1921 standard test method. Elastic-plastic cleavage fracture toughness ( K Jc ) was determined by three-point bend tests, using precracked Charpy V-notch (PCVN) specimens, and relationships between K Jc , the critical component of J ( J c ), critical distance ( X c ), stretch-zone width (SZW), local fracture stress, and plane-strain fracture toughness ( K Ic were discussed on the basis of the cleavage fracture behavior in the transition region. The master curve and the 95 pct confidence curves well explained the variation in the measured K Jc , and the Weibull slope measured on the Weibull plots was consistent with the theoretical slope of 4. Fractographic observation indicated that X c linearly increased with increasing J c , and that the SZW had a good correlation with K Jc , irrespective of the test temperature. In addition, the local fracture stress was independent of the test temperature, because the tempered bainitic steel used in this study showed a propagation-controlled cleavage fracture behavior.

  18. Role of matrix/reinforcement interfaces in the fracture toughness of brittle materials toughened by ductile reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, L.; Abbaschian, R.

    1992-10-01

    Crack interactions with ductile reinforcements, especially behavior of a crack tip at the interface, have been studied using MoSi2 composites reinforced with Nb foils. Effects of fracture energy of interfaces on toughness of the composites have also been investigated. Variation of interfacial bonding was achieved by depositing an oxide coating or by the development of a reaction prod- uct layer between the reinforcement and matrix. Toughness was measured using bend tests on chevron-notched specimens. It has been established that as a crack interacts with a ductile re- inforcement, three mechanisms compcte: interfacial debonding, multiple matrix fracture, and direct crack propagation through the reinforcement. Decohesion length at the matrix/reinforcement interface depends on the predominant mechanism. Furthermore, the results add to the evidence that the extent to which interfacial bonding is conducive to toughness of the composites depends on the criterion used to describe the toughness and that ductility of the ductile reinforcement is also an important factor in controlling toughness of the composites. Loss of ductility of the ductile reinforcement due to inappropriate processing could result in little improvement in tough- ness of the composites.

  19. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure and fracture toughness of a V-5Cr-5Ti alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Hamilton, M.L.; Jones, R.H.

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of heat treatment on microstructure and fracture toughness in the range of {minus}50 to 100{degrees}C for a V-5Cr-5Ti alloy. Fracture toughness and impact tests were performed on a V-5Cr-5Ti alloy. Specimens annealed at 1125{degree}C for 1 h and furnace cooled in a vacuum of 1.33 x 10{sup {minus}5} Pa were brittle at room temperature and experienced a mixture of intergranular and cleavage fracture. The ductile to brittle transition temperature was estimated to be about 20{degree}C. When some specimens were given an additional annealing at 890{degree}C for 24 h, they became very ductile at room temperature and fractured by microvoid coalescence.

  20. Processing and properties of ceramic nanocomposites designed for improved fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.

    2005-11-01

    Nanocrystalline-matrix ceramic composites specifically designed for applications requiring improved fracture toughness were investigated. While the models and theory of toughening mechanisms for microcrystalline composites are well developed, the same cannot be said for their nanocrystalline counterparts. The mechanisms of ductile-phase toughening, fiber toughening, transformation toughening, and microcrack toughening have been fully investigated in microcrystalline-matrix ceramics. Both ductile-phase toughening and fiber toughening are theoretically viable as toughening mechanisms in nanocrystalline ceramics. The experimental demonstration of these mechanisms has been investigated through alumina-matrix nanocomposites with second phases of niobium (ductile-phase toughening) and carbon nanotubes (fiber toughening). The difficulty in producing fully consolidated ceramic composites that retain a nanocrystalline structure is the main hurdle to thorough investigations in this area. Thus, much of the research currently in the literature on so-called "nanocomposites" has been on materials with microcrystalline matrices and nanometric second phases. Using novel processing techniques, fully dense composites with nanocrystalline matrices were produced from commercially available starting powders. The consolidation technique, which allowed the retention of the nanocrystalline grain size, was spark plasma sintering (SPS). SPS is a moderate-pressure sintering method based on the theory of plasma momentarily generated in the gaps between powder materials by electrical discharge during DC pulsing. It has been proposed that the on--off DC pulse energizing method could generate (1) spark plasma, (2) spark impact pressure, (3) Joule heating, and (4) an electrical-field diffusion effect. SPS can rapidly consolidate powders to full density through the combined actions of rapid heating, applying pressure, and proposed powder surface cleaning. Al2O3-10 vol.% Nb ductile-phase toughened

  1. Loading rate effects on strength and fracture toughness of pipe steels used in Task 1 of the IPIRG program

    SciTech Connect

    Marschall, C.W.; Landow, M.P.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1993-10-01

    Material characterization tests were conducted on laboratory specimens machined from pipes to determine the effect of dynamic loading (i.e., rates comparable to those for high amplitude seismic events) on tensile properties and fracture resistance at 288 C (550 F). Specimens were fabricated from seven different pipes, including carbon steels and stainless steels (both base metal and weld metal), which were to be subjected to full-scale pipe tests in IPIRG Task 1.0. For the stainless steels tested at 288 C (550 F), tensile strength was unchanged, while yield strength and fracture resistance were increased. The increase in fracture resistance was modest for the wrought base metals and substantial for the weld metal and the cast base metal. The carbon steels tested were sensitive to dynamic strain aging, and hence the strength and toughness was affected by both temperature and strain rate effects. The carbon steel base metal and welds exhibited ultimate tensile strength values at 288 C (550 F) that were greater than at room temperature. Furthermore, the ultimate tensile strength at 288 C (550 F) was lowered significantly by increased strain rate and, in the carbon steel base metals, increased strain rate also lowered the fracture resistance, substantially in the base metal of one pipe. In comparing these results to the IPIRG pipe test results to date, it was found that the trends of these tests agree well with the Subtask 1.2 quasi-static and dynamic pipe fracture experiments. Loads measured in the Subtask 1.1 pipe experiments were, however, somewhat higher than would have been expected by the trends observed in the laboratory tests.

  2. Fracture Toughness, Mechanical Property, And Chemical Characterization Of A Critical Modification To The NASA SLS Solid Booster Internal Material System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pancoast, Justin; Garrett, William; Moe, Gulia

    2015-01-01

    A modified propellant-liner-insulation (PLI) bondline in the Space Launch System (SLS) solid rocket booster required characterization for flight certification. The chemical changes to the PLI bondline and the required additional processing have been correlated to mechanical responses of the materials across the bondline. Mechanical properties testing and analyses included fracture toughness, tensile, and shear tests. Chemical properties testing and analyses included Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, cross-link density, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and wave dispersion X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF). The testing identified the presence of the expected new materials and found the functional bondline performance of the new PLI system was not significantly changed from the old system.

  3. Fracture toughness of 2-D woven SiC/SiC CVI-composites with multilayered interphases

    SciTech Connect

    Droillard, C.; Lamon, J.

    1996-04-01

    Relations between fracture toughness and fiber/matrix interphases were examined on various SiC/SiC composites made by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and reinforced with woven fiber bundles. Strong and weak fiber/matrix bondings were obtained using multilayered interphases consisting of various combinations of carbon and SiC layers of different thickness and using fibers which had been previously treated. Fracture toughness was estimated using the J-integral and using strain energy release rate computed with a model taking into account the presence of a process zone of matrix microcracks. Both approaches evidenced similar trends. It appeared that higher toughness was obtained with those composites possessing strong interphases and subject to dense matrix microcracking.

  4. Biaxial loading and shallow-flaw effects on crack-tip constraint and fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; Theiss, T.J.; Rao, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    A program to develop and evaluate fracture methodologies for the assessment of crack-tip constraint effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels has been initiated in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. Crack-tip constraint is an issue that significantly impacts fracture mechanics technologies employed in safety assessment procedures for commercially licensed nuclear RPVs. The focus of studies described herein is on the evaluation of two stressed-based methodologies for quantifying crack-tip constraint (i.e., J-Q theory and a micromechanical scaling model based on critical stressed volumes) through applications to experimental and fractographic data. Data were utilized from single-edge notch bend (SENB) specimens and HSST-developed cruciform beam specimens that were tested in HSST shallow-crack and biaxial testing programs. Results from applications indicate that both the J-Q methodology and the micromechanical scaling model can be used successfully to interpret experimental data from the shallow- and deep-crack SENB specimen tests. When applied to the uniaxially and biaxially loaded cruciform specimens, the two methodologies showed some promising features, but also raised several questions concerning the interpretation of constraint conditions in the specimen based on near-tip stress fields. Fractographic data taken from the fracture surfaces of the SENB and cruciform specimens are used to assess the relevance of stress-based fracture characterizations to conditions at cleavage initiation sites. Unresolved issues identified from these analyses require resolution as part of a validation process for biaxial loading applications. This report is designated as HSST Report No. 142.

  5. The shear fracture toughness, KIIc, of graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Erdman, III, Donald L.

    2015-11-05

    In this study, the critical shear stress intensity factor, KIIc, here-in referred to as the shear fracture toughness, KIIc (MPa m), of two grades of graphite are reported. The range of specimen volumes was selected to elucidate any specimen size effect, but smaller volume specimen tests were largely unsuccessful, shear failure did not occur between the notches as expected. This was probably due to the specimen geometry causing the shear fracture stress to exceed the compressive failure stress. In subsequent testing the specimen geometry was altered to reduce the compressive footprint and the notches (slits) made deeper to reduce the specimen's ligament length. Additionally, we added the collection of Acoustic Emission (AE) during testing to assist with the identification of the shear fracture load. The means of KIIc from large specimens for PCEA and NBG-18 are 2.26 MPa m with an SD of 0.37 MPa m and 2.20 MPa m with an SD of 0.53 MPa m, respectively. The value of KIIc for both graphite grades was similar, although the scatter was large. In this work we found the ratio of KIIc/KIc ≈ 1.6. .

  6. Microstructural analysis of fracture toughness variation in 2XXX-series aluminum alloy composites reinforced with SiC whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Tae Hyung; Kwon, Dongil

    1994-10-01

    The effects of local microstructure on fracture properties in powder-metallurgy (P/M)-processed 2124/SiC/15w and 2009/SiC/15w composites are analyzed in this study. Ductility and fracture toughness of the 2009/SiC/15w, in which dispersoid-forming elements such as manganese and iron were nearly absent, were greater than in the 2124/SiC/15w, while its tensile and yield strengths were somewhat less. Microstructural examination and fracture parameter analysis revealed that the improved fracture toughness of the 2009/SiC/15w compared to the 2124/SiC/15w was due to the increase in the critical microstructural distance, l* when manganese-containing particles are absent. 2009/SiC/15w was also heat-treated in T4P and overaged (OA) conditions. The OA 2009 composite showed lower fracture toughness than the 2009-T4P composite and the critical fracture strain of the OA condition was much lower, too. Detailed fractographic analyses indicated that interface precipitates facilitate premature SiC whisker failure in the OA condition.

  7. Crystal-Structure-Based Modeling Study of Temperature-Dependent Fracture Toughness for Brittle Coating Deposited on Ductile Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yichen; Chen, Kuiying; Liu, Rong; Yao, Matthew X.; Collier, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    The temperature-dependent fracture toughness of a brittle coating/ductile substrate system, WC-10Co4Cr deposited on 1018 low carbon steel, is evaluated at microscopic level using an indentation-based model in terms of the Arrhenius-type equation and rate-controlling theory. The formulation of the model utilizes the parameters of crystal structures of each phase in the coating material. The slip systems of hard hexagonal δ -WC phase and soft FCC α -Co phase are analyzed. The fracture toughness of the two-phase coating is obtained by integrating the fracture toughness of single δ -WC phase coating and that of single α -Co phase coating using either the basic mixture method or the unconstrained mixture method. The results suggest that the fracture toughness of WC-10Co4Cr coating/1018 low carbon steel substrate system may remain constant until the temperature reaches a critical value, about 200 K, and ranges from 2.16 to 10.82 MPa m^{1/2}, with temperature increasing from room temperature (298 K) to 1000 K.

  8. Simultaneous enhancement of toughness, ductility, and strength of nanocrystalline ceramics at high strain-rates

    SciTech Connect

    Mo Yifei; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2007-04-30

    Molecular dynamics simulations of tensile testing have been performed on nc-SiC. Reduction of grain size promotes simultaneous enhancement of ductility, toughness, and strength. nc-SiC fails by intergranular fracture preceded by atomic level necking. Conventionally, high strain-rate deformations of ceramics are limited by diffusion time scales, since diffusion prevents premature cavitation and failure. The authors report a nondiffusional mechanism for suppressing premature cavitation, which is based on unconstrained plastic flow at grain boundaries. Based on the composite's rule of mixture, they estimate Young's modulus of random high-angle grain boundaries in nc-SiC to be about 130 GPa.

  9. An ORMOSIL-containing orthodontic acrylic resin with concomitant improvements in antimicrobial and fracture toughness properties.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shi-qiang; Epasinghe, Jeevani; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Niu, Li-na; Mettenberg, Donald; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Blizzard, John D; Wu, Christine D; Mao, Jing; Drisko, Connie L; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2012-01-01

    Global increase in patients seeking orthodontic treatment creates a demand for the use of acrylic resins in removable appliances and retainers. Orthodontic removable appliance wearers have a higher risk of oral infections that are caused by the formation of bacterial and fungal biofilms on the appliance surface. Here, we present the synthetic route for an antibacterial and antifungal organically-modified silicate (ORMOSIL) that has multiple methacryloloxy functionalities attached to a siloxane backbone (quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate, or QAMS). By dissolving the water-insoluble, rubbery ORMOSIL in methyl methacrylate, QAMS may be copolymerized with polymethyl methacrylate, and covalently incorporated in the pressure-processed acrylic resin. The latter demonstrated a predominantly contact-killing effect on Streptococcus mutans ATCC 36558 and Actinomyces naselundii ATCC 12104 biofilms, while inhibiting adhesion of Candida albicans ATCC 90028 on the acrylic surface. Apart from its favorable antimicrobial activities, QAMS-containing acrylic resins exhibited decreased water wettability and improved toughness, without adversely affecting the flexural strength and modulus, water sorption and solubility, when compared with QAMS-free acrylic resin. The covalently bound, antimicrobial orthodontic acrylic resin with improved toughness represents advancement over other experimental antimicrobial acrylic resin formulations, in its potential to simultaneously prevent oral infections during appliance wear, and improve the fracture resistance of those appliances.

  10. An ORMOSIL-Containing Orthodontic Acrylic Resin with Concomitant Improvements in Antimicrobial and Fracture Toughness Properties

    PubMed Central

    Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Niu, Li-na; Mettenberg, Donald; Yiu, Cynthia K. Y.; Blizzard, John D.; Wu, Christine D.; Mao, Jing; Drisko, Connie L.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2012-01-01

    Global increase in patients seeking orthodontic treatment creates a demand for the use of acrylic resins in removable appliances and retainers. Orthodontic removable appliance wearers have a higher risk of oral infections that are caused by the formation of bacterial and fungal biofilms on the appliance surface. Here, we present the synthetic route for an antibacterial and antifungal organically-modified silicate (ORMOSIL) that has multiple methacryloloxy functionalities attached to a siloxane backbone (quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate, or QAMS). By dissolving the water-insoluble, rubbery ORMOSIL in methyl methacrylate, QAMS may be copolymerized with polymethyl methacrylate, and covalently incorporated in the pressure-processed acrylic resin. The latter demonstrated a predominantly contact-killing effect on Streptococcus mutans ATCC 36558 and Actinomyces naselundii ATCC 12104 biofilms, while inhibiting adhesion of Candida albicans ATCC 90028 on the acrylic surface. Apart from its favorable antimicrobial activities, QAMS-containing acrylic resins exhibited decreased water wettability and improved toughness, without adversely affecting the flexural strength and modulus, water sorption and solubility, when compared with QAMS-free acrylic resin. The covalently bound, antimicrobial orthodontic acrylic resin with improved toughness represents advancement over other experimental antimicrobial acrylic resin formulations, in its potential to simultaneously prevent oral infections during appliance wear, and improve the fracture resistance of those appliances. PMID:22870322

  11. Failure modes and fracture toughness in partially torn ligaments and tendons.

    PubMed

    Von Forell, Gregory A; Hyoung, Peter S; Bowden, Anton E

    2014-07-01

    Ligaments and tendons are commonly torn during injury, yet the likelihood that untreated initial tears could lead to further tearing or even full rupture has proven challenging to predict. In this work, porcine Achilles tendon and human anterior longitudinal ligament samples were tested using both standard fracture toughness methods and complex loading conditions. Failure modes for each of 14 distinct testing cases were evaluated using a total of 131 soft tissue tests. Results showed that these soft tissues were able to completely resist any further crack propagation of an initial tear, regardless of fiber orientation or applied loading condition. Consequently, the major concern for patients with tendon or ligament tears is likely not reduction in ultimate tissue strength due to stress risers at the tip of the tear, but rather a question of whether or not the remaining cross-section is large enough to support the anticipated loading.

  12. Analysis of precracking parameters and fracture toughness for ceramic single-edge-precracked-beam specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Chulya, Abhisak; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1992-01-01

    The single-edge-precracked-beam (SEPB) method involves creation of a straight-through crack from an indentation crack. The straight-through crack is developed by applying a controlled bending load to a specimen via a precracking fixture. The fixture induces the following sequence: (1) stable growth of the indentation crack; (2) pop-in; and finally, (3) arrest-thereby forming a straight-through precrack. The effects of indentation load on precracking load as well as precrack size were studied for experimental variables such as specimen width, fixture span, and material. Finite element analysis was used to obtain the stress distribution and stress intensity factor, thus providing a quantitative prediction of the precracking load and precrack size for silicon nitride, alumina, silicon cabide, and two SiC whisker-reinforced silicon nitrides. Fracture toughness values obtained from the SEPB method were compared with those obtained from other methods.

  13. Fracture Toughness of Thin Plates by the Double-Torsion Test Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Radovic, Miladin; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Nelson, George

    2006-01-01

    Double torsion testing can produce fracture toughness values without crack length measurement that are comparable to those measured via standardized techniques such as the chevron-notch, surface-crack-in-flexure and precracked beam if the appropriate geometry is employed, and the material does not exhibit increasing crack growth resistance. Results to date indicate that 8 < W/d < 80 and L/W > 2 are required if crack length is not considered in stress intensity calculations. At L/W = 2, the normalized crack length should be 0.35 < a/L < 0.65; whereas for L/W = 3, 0.2 < a/L < 0.75 is acceptable. In addition, the load-points need to roll to reduce friction. For an alumina exhibiting increasing crack growth resistance, values corresponding to the plateau of the R-curve were measured. For very thin plates (W/d > 80) nonlinear effects were encountered.

  14. Crack diffusion coefficient - A candidate fracture toughness parameter for short fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mull, M. A.; Chudnovsky, A.; Moet, A.

    1987-01-01

    In brittle matrix composites, crack propagation occurs along random trajectories reflecting the heterogeneous nature of the strength field. Considering the crack trajectory as a diffusive process, the 'crack diffusion coefficient' is introduced. From fatigue crack propagation experiments on a set of identical SEN polyester composite specimens, the variance of the crack tip position along the loading axis is found to be a linear function of the effective 'time'. The latter is taken as the effective crack length. The coefficient of proportionality between variance of the crack trajectory and the effective crack length defines the crack diffusion coefficient D which is found in the present study to be 0.165 mm. This parameter reflects the ability of the composite to deviate the crack from the energetically most efficient path and thus links fracture toughness to the microstructure.

  15. The effect of loading rate on ductile fracture toughness and fracture surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osovski, S.; Srivastava, A.; Ponson, L.; Bouchaud, E.; Tvergaard, V.; Ravi-Chandar, K.; Needleman, A.

    2015-03-01

    The variation of ductile crack growth resistance and fracture surface roughness with loading rate is modeled under mode I plane strain, small scale yielding conditions. Three-dimensional calculations are carried out using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a progressively cavitating solid with two populations of void nucleating second phase particles. Larger inclusions that result in void nucleation at an early stage are modeled as discrete void nucleation sites while smaller particles that require large strains to nucleate voids are homogeneously distributed. The calculations are carried out for two values of density of the larger inclusions, 3.6% and 7.1%, and for prescribed loading rates K˙˙I ranging from 1 ×105 MPa√{ m }s-1 to 5 ×107 MPa√{ m }s-1. The ductile fracture mode is found to undergo a transition from one that can be regarded as growth of a dominant main crack at the lower loading rates to one dominated by damage nucleation and micro-cracking ahead of the main crack at the higher loading rates. The values of JIC, the tearing modulus, TR, the total plastic dissipation and the plastic dissipation in the fracture process region are all found to increase with increasing loading rate. However, the ratio of plastic dissipation in the fracture process region to total plastic dissipation decreases with increasing prescribed loading rate. The fracture surfaces are found to display two self-affine regimes, with a Hurst exponent β ≈ 0.60 at small length scales and with β ≈ 0.45 at larger length scales. The multi-fractal spectra indicate multi-affine behavior in most cases but a range of loading rates and length scales exhibiting mono-affine behavior is also found. Parameters characterizing the fracture surface statistics, including the length scale at which a transition from a power law tail to an exponential tail occurs, are related to the mode of crack growth/damage accumulation. A linear relation is found between the values of JIC

  16. Designing metallic glass matrix composites with high toughness and tensile ductility.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Douglas C; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Wiest, Aaron; Duan, Gang; Lind, Mary-Laura; Demetriou, Marios D; Johnson, William L

    2008-02-28

    The selection and design of modern high-performance structural engineering materials is driven by optimizing combinations of mechanical properties such as strength, ductility, toughness, elasticity and requirements for predictable and graceful (non-catastrophic) failure in service. Highly processable bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are a new class of engineering materials and have attracted significant technological interest. Although many BMGs exhibit high strength and show substantial fracture toughness, they lack ductility and fail in an apparently brittle manner in unconstrained loading geometries. For instance, some BMGs exhibit significant plastic deformation in compression or bending tests, but all exhibit negligible plasticity (<0.5% strain) in uniaxial tension. To overcome brittle failure in tension, BMG-matrix composites have been introduced. The inhomogeneous microstructure with isolated dendrites in a BMG matrix stabilizes the glass against the catastrophic failure associated with unlimited extension of a shear band and results in enhanced global plasticity and more graceful failure. Tensile strengths of approximately 1 GPa, tensile ductility of approximately 2-3 per cent, and an enhanced mode I fracture toughness of K(1C) approximately 40 MPa m(1/2) were reported. Building on this approach, we have developed 'designed composites' by matching fundamental mechanical and microstructural length scales. Here, we report titanium-zirconium-based BMG composites with room-temperature tensile ductility exceeding 10 per cent, yield strengths of 1.2-1.5 GPa, K(1C) up to approximately 170 MPa m(1/2), and fracture energies for crack propagation as high as G(1C) approximately 340 kJ m(-2). The K(1C) and G(1C) values equal or surpass those achievable in the toughest titanium or steel alloys, placing BMG composites among the toughest known materials. PMID:18305540

  17. Fracture toughness curve shift in low upper-shelf welds (series 8)

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Nanstad, R.K.; Manneschmidt, E.T.

    1995-10-01

    This task examines the fracture toughness curve shifts and changes in shape for irradiated welds with low CVN upper-shelf energy (USE). The information developed under this task will augment information obtained from other HSSI tasks performed on two high-USE weldments under the Fifth and Sixth Irradiation Series and on a commercial, low USE under the Tenth Irradiation Series. The results will provide an expanded basis for accounting for irradiation-induced embrittlement in RPV materials. Three low-USE welds have been ordered from ABB-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE), Chattanooga, Tennessee, and two of them have been delivered to ORNL. ABB-CE fabricated the welds for the Fifth and Sixth Series. Preliminary results of mechanical and chemical tests from these two welds are presented below. The Linde 80 flux was used for all three welds. One weld, Weld 1, was made with the 73W weld wire. Weld wire 73W had copper added to the melt to reduce the variations that are associated with copper-coated weld wire. The other two welds were fabricated with a commercially available copper-coated weld wire, L-TEC 44 heat 44112. One of these two welds, Weld 2, has a target copper level of 0.31 %. This copper level could not be attained using the copper-coated wire, and the coating will be stripped from the wire, which contains 0.07 % Cu. To attain the target copper level, supplemental copper will be added to the weld puddle using an ABB-CE proprietary process. This will slightly delay the delivery of weld 2, the expected delivery date is now the end of April 1995. Weld 3 was fabricated with the same heat of the L-TEC 44 copper-coated weld wire as weld 2, but with supplemental copper added to the weld puddle, which resulted in a weldment containing an average of 0.424 % Cu. The semiannual report for October 1993 through March 1994 discusses the reasons for the above choices of copper content and welding wire.

  18. The effects of heat treatment on fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth Rates in 440C and BG42 steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Bingzhe; Averbach, B. L.

    1983-09-01

    The fatigue crack growth rates, da/dN, and the fracture toughness, KIc have been measured in two high-carbon martensitic stainless steels, 440C and BG42. Variations in the retained austenite contents were achieved by using combinations of austenitizing temperatures, refrigeration cycles, and tempering temperatures. In nonrefrigerated 440C tempered at 150 °C, about 10 vol pct retained austenite was transformed to martensite at the fracture surfaces during K Ic testing, and this strain-induced transformation contributed significantly to the fracture toughness. The strain-induced transformation was progressively less as the tempering temperature was raised to 450 °C, and at the secondary hardening peak, 500 °C, strain-induced transformation was not observed. In nonrefrigerated 440C austenitized at 1065 °C, K Ic had a peak value of 30 MPa m1/2 on tempering at 150 °C and a minimum of 18 MPa m1/2 on tempering at 500 °C. Refrigerated 440C retained about 5 pct austenite, and did not exhibit strain-induced transformation at the fracture surfaces for any tempering temperature. The K Ic values for corresponding tempering temperatures up to the secondary peak in refrigerated steels were consistently lower than in nonrefrigerated steels. All of the BG42 specimens were refrigerated and double or quadruple tempered in the secondary hardening region; the K Ic values were 16 to 18 MPa m1/2 at the secondary peak. Tempered martensite embrittlement (TME) was observed in both refrigerated and nonrefrigerated 440C, and it was shown that austenite transformation does not play a role in the TME mechanism in this steel. Fatigue crack propagation rates in 440C in the power law regime were the same for refrigerated and nonrefrigerated steels and were relatively insensitive to tempering temperatures up to 500 °C. Above the secondary peak, however, the fatigue crack growth rates exhibited consistently lower values, and this was a consequence of the tempering of the martensite and the

  19. Numerical Investigation of Dynamic Rock Fracture Toughness Determination Using a Semi-Circular Bend Specimen in Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Dai, F.; Xu, N. W.; Zhao, T.

    2016-03-01

    The International Society for Rock Mechanics (ISRM) has suggested a notched semi-circular bend technique in split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) testing to determine the dynamic mode I fracture toughness of rock. Due to the transient nature of dynamic loading and limited experimental techniques, the dynamic fracture process associated with energy partitions remains far from being fully understood. In this study, the dynamic fracturing of the notched semi-circular bend rock specimen in SHPB testing is numerically simulated for the first time by the discrete element method (DEM) and evaluated in both microlevel and energy points of view. The results confirm the validity of this DEM model to reproduce the dynamic fracturing and the feasibility to simultaneously measure key dynamic rock fracture parameters, including initiation fracture toughness, fracture energy, and propagation fracture toughness. In particular, the force equilibrium of the specimen can be effectively achieved by virtue of a ramped incident pulse, and the fracture onset in the vicinity of the crack tip is found to synchronize with the peak force, both of which guarantee the quasistatic data reduction method employed to determine the dynamic fracture toughness. Moreover, the energy partition analysis indicates that simplifications, including friction energy neglect, can cause an overestimation of the propagation fracture toughness, especially under a higher loading rate.

  20. Effect of processing on fracture toughness of silicon carbide as determined by Vickers indentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannels, Christine M.; Dutta, Sunil

    1989-01-01

    Several alpha-SiC materials were processed by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) and by sintering an alpha-SiC powder containing boron and carbon. Several beta-SiC materials were processed by HIPing a beta-SiC powder with boron and carbon additions. The fracture toughnesses K(sub 1c) of these beta- and alpha-SiC materials were estimated from measurements of Vickers indentations. The three formulas used to estimate K(sub 1c) from the indentation fracture patterns resulted in three ranges of K(sub 1c) estimates. Furthermore, each formula measured the effects of processing differently. All three estimates indicated that fine-grained HIPed alpha-SiC has a higher K(sub 1c) than coarsed-grained sintered alpha-SiC. Hot isostatically pressed beta-SiC, which had an ultrafine grain structure, exhibited a K(sub 1c) comparable to that of HIPed alpha-SiC.

  1. Effects of strain rate on delamination fracture toughness of graphite/epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Aliyu, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate various experimental techniques and analysis methods for the characterization of interlaminar fracture toughness, and to determine the effects of strain rate on that property for a graphite/epoxy composite. Mode I interlaminar fracture was investigated by means of a double-cantilever beam (DCB) specimen for AS-4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy. Hinged tabs were used to insure unrestrained rotation at the free ends. Specimens were loaded at quasi-static deflection rates of up to 8.5 mm/s corresponding to crack extension rates of over 51 mm/s. Crack extension was monitored by means of strain gages mounted on the surface of the specimen, or a conductive-paint circuit attached to the edge of the DCB specimen. Continuous records were obtained of load, deflection, and crack extension for determination of the strain energy release rate. The latter was expressed as a power law of the crack extension velocity. Results indicate that the strain energy release rate increases with crack velocity by up to 28 percent for the range of rates considered.

  2. Rate effects on delamiantion fracture toughness of a toughened graphite/epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, Isaac M.; Shareef, Igbal; Aliyu, Abdu A.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of loading rate on interlaminar fracture toughness of T300/F-185 graphite/epoxy composite, having an elastomer-modified epoxy resin matrix. Mode I interlaminar fracture was investigated by means of uniform width and width-tapered double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens. Hinged tabs were used to insure unrestrained rotation at the free ends. Specimens were loaded at quasi-static deflection rates of up to 8.5 mm/s corresponding to crack extension rates of up to 21 mm/s. Crack extension was monitored by means of strain gages mounted on the surface of the specimen. Continuous records were obtained of load, deflection, and crack extension for determination of the strain energy release rate. The latter was calculated by means of the area method and beam analysis method, and expressed as a power law of the crack extension velocity. Results indicate that the strain energy release rate decreases with crack velocity by over 20 percent over three decades of crack velocity.

  3. Fracture Mechanism and Toughness Optimization of Macroscopic Thick Graphene Oxide Film

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Shibing; Chen, Bin; Feng, Jiachun

    2015-01-01

    Combined high strength and toughness of film materials are rather important for their industrial applications. As a new class of films, graphene oxide films (GOFs) attract intense attention in many applications but are frequently divergent, inconsistent, and poorly reproducible in their mechanical properties. In this study, we first demonstrate that different chemical compositions and assembly structures probably are responsible for the difference in elongations between cast GOFs and filtration GOFs. Comprehensive analysis of the morphologies and mechanical properties indicates that the enhanced elongation of the thick cast GOFs is mainly attributed to the presence of a unique skin-wrinkles-skin structure, which more easily forms in cast GOFs than in filtration counterparts. On the basis of this finding, we attempt to optimize the strength-toughness performance of the cast GOFs by adjusting their structures. With an appropriate thickness of 12.5 μm, the GOFs can achieve an ultrahigh toughness up to 4.37 MJ m−3, which is even comparable to the polymer-toughening graphene/GO-based paper-like materials. Such an optimization of the mechanical properties from the perspective of skin-wrinkles-skin structure appears to be a universal approach that could be extended to a variety of other film materials. PMID:26310835

  4. Ductile fracture toughness of modified A 302 Grade B Plate materials, data analysis. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D.E.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Swain, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop ductile fracture toughness data in the form of J-R curves for modified A302 grade B plate materials typical of those used in reactor pressure vessels. A previous experimental study on one heat of A302 grade B plate showed decreasing J-R curves with increased specimen thickness. This characteristic has not been observed in tests made on recent production materials of A533 grade B and A508 class 2 pressure vessel steels. It was unknown if the departure from norm for the material was a generic characteristic for all heats of A302 grade B steels or unique to that particular plate. Seven heats of modified A302 grade B steel and one heat of vintage A533 grade B steel were tested for chemical content, tensile properties, Charpy transition temperature curves, drop-weight nil-ductility transition (NDT) temperature, and J-R curves. Tensile tests were made in the three principal orientations and at four temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 550F. Charpy V-notch transition temperature curves were obtained in longitudinal, transverse, and short transverse orientations. J-R curves were made using four specimen sizes (1/2T, 1T, 2T, and 4T). The fracture mechanics-based evaluation method covered three test orientations and three test temperatures (80, 400, and 550F). However, the coverage of these variables was contingent upon the amount of material provided. Drop-weight NDT temperature was determined for the T-L orientation only. None of the heats of modified A302 grade B showed size effects of any consequence on the J-R curve behavior. Crack orientation effects were present, but none were severe enough to be reported as atypical. A test temperature increase from 180 to 550F produced the usual loss in J-R curve fracture toughness. Generic J-R curves and curve fits were generated to represent each heat of material. This volume deals with the evaluation of data and the discussion of technical findings. 8 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. The limit of strength and toughness of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zhen

    2001-12-17

    The ideal structural steel combines high strength with high fracture toughness. This dissertation discusses the governing principles of strength and toughness, along with the approaches that can be used to improve these properties and the inherent limits to how strong and tough a steel can be.

  6. 2015 Accomplishments-Tritium aging studies on stainless steel. Effects of hydrogen isotopes, crack orientation, and specimen geometry on fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the effects of hydrogen isotopes, crack orientation, and specimen geometry on the fracture toughness of stainless steels. Fracture toughness variability was investigated for Type 21-6-9 stainless steel using the 7K0004 forging. Fracture toughness specimens were cut from the forging in two different geometric configurations: arc shape and disc shape. The fracture toughness properties were measured at ambient temperature before and after exposure to hydrogen gas and compared to prior studies. There are three main conclusions that can be drawn from the results. First, the fracture toughness properties of actual reservoir forgings and contemporary heats of steel are much higher than those measured in earlier studies that used heats of steel from the 1980s and 1990s and forward extruded forgings which were designed to simulate reservoir microstructures. This is true for as-forged heats as well as forged heats exposed to hydrogen gas. Secondly, the study confirms the well-known observation that cracks oriented parallel to the forging grain flow will propagate easier than those oriented perpendicular to the grain flow. However, what was not known, but is shown here, is that this effect is more pronounced, particularly after hydrogen exposures, when the forging is given a larger upset. In brick forgings, which have a relatively low amount of upset, the fracture toughness variation with specimen orientation is less than 5%; whereas, in cup forgings, the fracture toughness is about 20% lower than that forging to show how specimen geometry affects fracture toughness values. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) specifies minimum specimen section sizes for valid fracture toughness values. However, sub-size specimens have long been used to study tritium effects because of the physical limitation of diffusing hydrogen isotopes into stainless steel at mild temperatures so as to not disturb the underlying forged microstructure. This study shows

  7. 3D Printing: 3D Printing of Highly Stretchable and Tough Hydrogels into Complex, Cellularized Structures.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungmin; Sycks, Dalton; Chan, Hon Fai; Lin, Shaoting; Lopez, Gabriel P; Guilak, Farshid; Leong, Kam W; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2015-07-15

    X. Zhao and co-workers develop on page 4035 a new biocompatible hydrogel system that is extremely tough and stretchable and can be 3D printed into complex structures, such as the multilayer mesh shown. Cells encapsulated in the tough and printable hydrogel maintain high viability. 3D-printed structures of the tough hydrogel can sustain high mechanical loads and deformations.

  8. Development of high toughness, high strength aluminide-bonded carbide ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, P.F.; Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1997-04-01

    Cemented carbides are widely used in applications where resistance to abrasion and wear are important, particularly in combination with high strength and stiffness. In the present case, ductile aluminides have been used as a binder phase to fabricate dense carbide cermets by either sintering of mixed powders or a melt-infiltration sintering process. The choice of an aluminide binder was based on the exceptional high temperature strength and chemical stability exhibited by these alloys. For example, TiC-based composites with a Ni{sub 3}Al binder phase exhibit improved oxidation resistance, Young`s moduli > 375 GPa, high fracture strengths (> 1 GPa) that are retained to {ge} 900{degrees}C, and fracture toughness values of 10 to 15 MPa{radical}m, identical to that measured in commercial cobalt-bonded WC with the same test method. The thermal diffusivity values at 200{degrees}C for these composites are {approximately} 0.070 to 0.075 cm{sup 2}/s while the thermal expansion coefficients rise with Ni3Al content from {approximately} 8 to {approximately}11 x 10{sup {minus}6}/{degrees}C over the range of 8 to 40 vol. % Ni{sub 3}Al. The oxidation and acidic corrosion resistances are quite promising as well. Finally, these materials also exhibit good electrical conductivity allowing them to be sectioned and shaped by electrical discharge machining (EDM) processes.

  9. Effect of Li level, artificial aging, and TiB2 reinforcement on the fracture toughness of Weldalite (tm) 049-type alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Plane strain fracture toughness (K sub IC) was evaluated for Weldalite (tm) 049 with and without TiB2 reinforcement. For the nonreinforced variant, changes in toughness were measured for various aging conditions and lithium levels. Toughness testing was carried out on fatigue precracked compact tension (CT) specimens at 24 C, as per ASTM standard E-399. Toughness was measured as a function of aging time at 160 C for the two Weldalite 049(1.3) heats. The composition of these heats differed only in that 0.03 wt pct. Ti was added to one as an additional grain refiner. Both heats showed a decrease in toughness with increasing aging time, although toughness values for one were significantly higher than for the other. This greater toughness may be due to a subtle change in the grain size resulting for the presence of Ti or, alternatively, to differences in texture or substructure formed during extrusion.

  10. Abrasion and fracture testing in a high-pressure hydrogen environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sneesby, G. V.; Walker, R. J.

    1969-01-01

    Two devices are necessary for abrasion and fracture testing of materials evaluated for storage of hydrogen at high pressure for long periods. The first device abrades tensile specimens. The second device tests for fracture toughness of metals. Both devices permit testing in both yield and failure modes in high pressure hydrogen.

  11. Dentin Bonding Testing Using a Mini-interfacial Fracture Toughness Approach.

    PubMed

    Pongprueksa, P; De Munck, J; Karunratanakul, K; Barreto, B C; Van Ende, A; Senawongse, P; Van Meerbeek, B

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of interfacial fracture toughness (iFT) is considered a more valid method to assess bonding effectiveness as compared with conventional bond strength testing. Common fracture toughness tests are, however, laborious and require a relatively bulky specimen size. This study aimed to evaluate a new simplified and miniaturized iFT (mini-iFT) test. Four dentin adhesives, representing the main adhesive classes, and 1 glass ionomer cement were applied onto flat dentin. Mini-iFT (1.5 × 2.0 × 16 to 18 mm) and microtensile bond strength (µTBS; 1.5 × 1.5 × 16 to 18 mm) specimens were prepared from the same tooth. For the mini-iFT specimens, a single notch was cut at the adhesive-dentin interface with a 150-µm diamond blade under water cooling; the specimens were loaded until failure in a 4-point bending test setup. Finite element analysis was used to analyze stress distribution during mini-iFT testing. The correlation between the mean mini-iFT and µTBS was examined and found to be significant; a strong positive correlation was found (r(2) = 0.94, P = 0.004). Weibull data analysis suggested the mini-iFT to vary less than the µTBS. Both the mini-iFT and the µTBS revealed the same performance order, with the 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive outperforming the 2-step self-etch and 2-step etch-and-rinse adhesive, followed by the 1-step SE adhesive and, finally, the glass ionomer cement. Scanning electron microscopy failure analysis revealed the adhesive-dentin interface to fail more at the actual interface with the mini-iFT test, while µTBS specimens failed more within dentin and composite. This finding was corroborated by finite element analysis showing stress to concentrate at the interface during mini-iFT loading and crack propagation. In conclusion, the new mini-iFT test appeared more discriminative and valid than the µTBS to assess bonding effectiveness; the latter test nevertheless remains more versatile. Specimen size and workload were alike, making the

  12. Ductile fracture toughness of modified A 302 grade B plate materials. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D.E.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Swain, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this work was to develop ductile fracture toughness data in the form of J-R curves for modified A 302 grade B plate materials typical of those used in fabricating reactor pressure vessels. A previous experimental study at Materials Engineering Associates (MEA) on one particular heat of A 302 grade B plate showed decreasing J-R curves with increased specimen thickness. This characteristic has not been observed in numerous tests made on the more recent production materials of A 533 grade B and A 508 class 2 pressure vessel steels. It was unknown if the departure from norm for the MEA material was a generic characteristic for all heats of A 302 grade B steels or just unique to that one particular plate. Seven heats of modified A 302 grade B steel and one heat of vintage A 533 grade B steel were provided to this project by the General Electric Company of San Jose, California. All plates were tested for chemical content, tensile properties, Charpy transition temperature curves, drop-weight nil-ductility transition (NDT) temperature, and J-R curves. Tensile tests were made in the three principal orientations and at four temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 550{degrees}F (288{degrees}C). Charpy V-notch transition temperature curves were obtained in longitudinal, transverse, and short transverse orientations. J-R curves were made using four specimen sizes (1/2T, IT, 2T, and 4T). None of the seven heats of modified A 302 grade showed size effects of any consequence on the J-R curve behavior. Crack orientation effects were present, but none were severe enough to be reported as atypical. A test temperature increase from 180 to 550{degrees}F (82 to 288{degrees}C) produced the usual loss in J-R curve fracture toughness. Generic J-R curves and mathematical curve fits to the same were generated to represent each heat of material. This volume is a compilation of all data developed.

  13. Influence of specimen size/type on the fracture toughness of five irradiated RPV materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Mikhail A; Lucon, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program had previously irradiated five reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels/welds at fast neutron fluxes of about 4 to 8 x 1011 n/cm2/s (>1 MeV) to fluences from 0.5 to 3.4 1019 n/cm2 and at 288 °C. The unirradiated fracture toughness tests were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory with 12.7-mm and 25.4-mm thick (0.5T and 1T) compact specimens, while the HSSI Program provided tensile and 5 x 10-mm three-point bend specimens to SCK-CEN for irradiation in the in-pile section of the Belgian Reactor BR2 at fluxes > 1013 n/cm2/s and subsequent testing by SCK-CEN. The BR2 irradiations were conducted at about 2 and 4 x 1013 n/cm2/s with irradiation temperature between 295 °C and 300 °C (water temperature), and to fluences between 6 and 10 x 1019n/cm2. The irradiation-induced shifts of the Master Curve reference temperatures, ΔT0, for most of the materials deviated from the embrittlement correlations much more than expected, motivating the testing of 5 x 10-mm three-point bend specimens of all five materials in the unirradiated condition to eliminate specimen size and geometry as a variable. Tests of the unirradiated small bend specimens resulted in Master Curve reference temperatures, T0, 25 °C to 53 °C lower than those from the larger compact specimens, meaning that the irradiation-induced reference temperature shifts, ΔT0, were larger than the initial measurements, resulting in much improved agreement between the measured and predicted fracture toughness shifts.

  14. Tough, high performance, addition-type thermoplastic polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A tough, high performance polyimide is provided by reacting a triple bond conjugated with an aromatic ring in a bisethynyl compound with the active double bond in a compound containing a double bond activated toward the formation of a Diels-Adler type adduct, especially a bismaleimide, a biscitraconimide, or a benzoquinone, or mixtures thereof. Addition curing of this product produces a high linear polymeric structure and heat treating the highly linear polymeric structure produces a thermally stable aromatic addition-type thermoplastic polyimide, which finds utility in the preparation of molding compounds, adhesive compositions, and polymer matrix composites.

  15. Improvement of the fracture toughness of hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporation of carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and nylon.

    PubMed

    Khanal, S P; Mahfuz, H; Rondinone, A J; Leventouri, Th

    2016-03-01

    The potential of improving the fracture toughness of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporating carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and polymerized ε-caprolactam (nylon) was studied. A series of HAp samples with CfSWCNTs concentrations varying from 0 to 1.5 wt.%, without, and with nylon addition was prepared. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the samples. The three point bending test was applied to measure the fracture toughness of the composites. A reproducible value of 3.6±0.3 MPa.√m was found for samples containing 1 wt.% CfSWCNTs and nylon. This value is in the range of the cortical bone fracture toughness. Increase of the CfSWCNTs content results to decrease of the fracture toughness, and formation of secondary phases.

  16. Improvement of the fracture toughness of hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporation of carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and nylon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khanal, Suraj P.; Mahfuz, Hassan; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Leventouri, Th.

    2015-11-12

    The potential of improving the fracture toughness of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporating carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and polymerized ε-caprolactam (nylon) was researched. A series of HAp samples with CfSWCNTs concentrations varying from 0 to 1.5 wt.%, without, and with nylon addition was prepared. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the samples. The three point bending test was applied to measure the fracture toughness of the composites. A reproducible value of 3.6 ± 0.3 MPa.√m was found for samples containing 1 wt.% CfSWCNTs and nylon. This valuemore » is in the range of the cortical bone fracture toughness. Lastly, the increase of the CfSWCNTs content results to decrease of the fracture toughness, and formation of secondary phases.« less

  17. Improvement of the fracture toughness of hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporation of carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and nylon

    SciTech Connect

    Khanal, Suraj P.; Mahfuz, Hassan; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Leventouri, Th.

    2015-11-12

    The potential of improving the fracture toughness of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporating carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and polymerized ε-caprolactam (nylon) was researched. A series of HAp samples with CfSWCNTs concentrations varying from 0 to 1.5 wt.%, without, and with nylon addition was prepared. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the samples. The three point bending test was applied to measure the fracture toughness of the composites. A reproducible value of 3.6 ± 0.3 MPa.√m was found for samples containing 1 wt.% CfSWCNTs and nylon. This value is in the range of the cortical bone fracture toughness. Lastly, the increase of the CfSWCNTs content results to decrease of the fracture toughness, and formation of secondary phases.

  18. Effects of Core-Shell Rubber (CSR) Nanoparticles on the Fracture Toughness of an Epoxy Resin at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Cannon, S. A.; Schneider, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of core-shell rubber (CSR) nanoparticles on the fracture toughness of an epoxy resin at liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperatures. Varying amounts of Kane Ace (Registered TradeMark) MX130 toughening agent were added to a commercially available EPON 862/W epoxy resin. Resulting fracture toughness was evaluated by the use of Charpy impact tests conducted on an instrumented drop tower. The size and distribution of the CSR nanoparticles were characterized using Transmission Electric Microscopy (TEM) and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Up to nominal 4.6% addition of the CSR nanoparticles, resulted in a nearly 5 times increase in the measured breaking energy. However, further increases in the amount of CSR nanoparticles had no appreciable affect on the breaking energy.

  19. Fracture toughness of the IEA heat of F82H ferritic/martensitic stainless steel as a function of loading mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaxin; Gelles, D.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1997-04-01

    Mode I and mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness tests were performed for the IEA heat of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel F82H at ambient temperature in order to provide comparison with previous measurements on a small heat given a different heat treatment. The results showed that heat to heat variations and heat treatment had negligible consequences on Mode I fracture toughness, but behavior during mixed-mode testing showed unexpected instabilities.

  20. TOUGH2 software qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Simmons, A.; Wu, Y.S.; Moridis, G.

    1996-02-01

    TOUGH2 is a numerical simulation code for multi-dimensional coupled fluid and heat flow of multiphase, multicomponent fluid mixtures in porous and fractured media. It belongs to the MULKOM ({open_quotes}MULti-KOMponent{close_quotes}) family of codes and is a more general version of the TOUGH simulator. The MULKOM family of codes was originally developed with a focus on geothermal reservoir simulation. They are suited to modeling systems which contain different fluid mixtures, with applications to flow problems arising in the context of high-level nuclear waste isolation, oil and gas recovery and storage, and groundwater resource protection. TOUGH2 is essentially a subset of MULKOM, consisting of a selection of the better tested and documented MULKOM program modules. The purpose of this package of reports is to provide all software baseline documents necessary for the software qualification of TOUGH2.

  1. Tensile properties and translaminar fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced unsaturated polyester resin composites aged in distilled and salt water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiman, Gozali, M. Hulaifi; Setyawan, Paryanto Dwi

    2016-03-01

    Glass fiber reinforced polymer has been widely used in chemical industry and transportation due to lightweight and cost effective manufacturing. However due to the ability to absorb water from the environment, the durability issue is of interest for up to days. This paper investigated the water uptake and the effect of absorbed water on the tensile properties and the translaminar fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced unsaturated polyester composites (GFRP) aged in distilled and salt water up to 30 days at a temperature of 50°C. It has been shown that GFRP absorbed more water in distilled water than in salt water. In distilled water, the tensile strength of GFRP tends to decrease steeply at 7 days and then slightly recovered for further immersion time. In salt water, the tensile strength tends to decrease continually up to 30 days immersion. The translaminar fracture toughness of GFRP aged in both distilled and salt-water shows the similar behavior. The translaminar fracture toughness increases after 7 days immersion and then tends to decrease beyond that immersion time. In the existence of ionics content in salt water, it causes more detrimental effect on the mechanical properties of fiberglass/unsaturated polyester composites compared to that of distilled water.

  2. Tritium and decay helium effects on the fracture toughness properties of types 316L, 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.J.; Tosten, M.H

    1994-10-01

    J-integral fracture mechanics techniques and electron microscopy observations were used to investigate the effects of tritium and its radioactive decay product, {sup 3}He, on Types 316L, 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steels. Tritium-exposed-and-aged steels had lower fracture-toughness values and shallower sloped crack-growth-resistance curves than unexposed steels. Both fracture-toughness parameters decreased with increasing concentrations of {sup 3}He. The fracture-toughness reductions were accompanied by a change in fracture mode from microvoid-nucleation-and-growth processes in control samples to grain-and-twin-boundary fracture in tritium-charged-and-aged samples. Type 316L stainless steel had the highest fracture-toughness values and Type 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn had the lowest. Samples containing {sup 3}He but degassed of tritium had fracture toughness properties that were similar to uncharged samples. The results indicate that helium bubbles enhance the embrittlement effects of hydrogen by affecting the deformation properties and by increasing localized hydrogen concentrations through trapping effects.

  3. Fracture toughness characterization of nanoreinforced carbon-fiber composite materials for damage mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderVennet, Jennifer A.; Duenas, Terrisa; Dzenis, Yuris; Peterson, Chad T.; Bakis, Charles E.; Carter, Daniel; Roberts, J. Keith

    2011-04-01

    Continuous polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers fabricated via the electrospinning process and commercially available silica nanoparticles were investigated and compared for their impact mitigating effects when incorporated into composite materials. The nanofibers were introduced at ply interfaces using two different approaches while the nanoparticles were mixed into the matrix material. Behavior was experimentally characterized by determining the fracture toughness of flat carbon-fiber composite coupons using the double cantilever beam (DCB) test according to ASTM D5528. The nanofibers were introduced to the composite coupons by directly electrospinning the fibers onto the ply surfaces or transferring the fibers from an interim substrate, or "nanomat", while the nanosilica particles were mixed into the resin system during vacuum bagging hand layup. Testing facilitated the calculation of Mode I strain energy release rates. Preliminary results show that when compared to a baseline coupon without nanoreinforcement, there is a 54.5%, 43.1%, and 26.9% reduction in Gavg for the nanomat, nanosilica, and directly deposited nanomaterial coupons, respectively. Directly deposited nanofibers outperformed the nanosilica reinforcement by 16.2% and the nanomat approach by 27.6%. Basic materials (carbon-fiber ply material and matrix system) and incomplete composite consolidation were cited as contributors to poor test coupon quality and detrimental to Mode I performance.

  4. Wide range stress intensity factor expressions for ASTM E 399 standard fracture toughness specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srawley, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    For each of the two types of specimens, bend and compact, described previously for plane strain fracture toughness of materials, E 399, a polynominal expression is given for calculation of the stress intensity factor, K, from the applied force, P, and the specimen dimensions. It is explicitly stated, however, that these expressions should not be used outside the range of relative crack length, a/W, from 0.45 to 0.55. While this range is sufficient for the purpose of E 399, the same specimen types are often used for other purposes over a much wider range of a/W; for example, in the study of fatigue crack growth. Expressions are presented which are at least as accurate as those in E 399-74, and which cover much wider ranges of a/W: for the three-point bend specimen from 0 to 1; and for the compact specimen from 0.2 to 1. The range has to be restricted for the compact specimen because of the proximity of the loading pin holes to the crackline, which causes the stress intensity factor to be sensitive to small variations in dimensions when a/W is small. This is a penalty inherently associated with the compactness of the specimen.

  5. Pulsed holographic microscopy as a measurement method of dynamic fracture toughness for fast propagating cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shinichi; Homma, Hiroomi; Kusaka, Riichiro

    A METHOD OF pulsed holographic microscopy is applied to take instantaneous microscopic photographs of the neighborhoods of crack tips propagating through PMMA or through AISI 4340 steel specimens at a speed of several hundred meters per second. The cracks are in the opening mode. A fast propagating crack is recorded as a hologram at an instant during its propagation. A microscopic photograph of the crack is taken with a conventional microscope to magnify the reconstructed image from the hologram. From the microscopic photograph, crack opening displacement (COD) is measured along the crack in the vicinity of the crack tip. The COD is of the order often to one hundred microns, and in proportion to the square root of the distance from the crack tip. The dynamic fracture toughness KID is obtained using the formula for COD in the singular stress field of a fast propagating crack. Simultaneous KID measurement both through pulsed holographic microscopy and through the caustic method is furthermore carried out with PMMA specimens. The values of KID obtained through pulsed holographic microscopy are in agreement with those through the caustic method. Microcracks accompanied by a main crack are also photographed with the method of pulsed holographic microscopy.

  6. Baseline Fracture Toughness and CGR testing of alloys X-750 and XM-19 (EPRI Phase I)

    SciTech Connect

    J. H. Jackson; S. P. Teysseyre

    2012-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed an agreement to test representative alloys used as reactor structural materials as a pilot program toward establishing guidelines for future ATR NSUF research programs. This report contains results from the portion of this program established as Phase I (of three phases) that entails baseline fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and tensile testing of selected materials for comparison to similar tests conducted at GE Global Research. The intent of this Phase I research program is to determine baseline properties for the materials of interest prior to irradiation, and to ensure comparability between laboratories using similar testing techniques, prior to applying these techniques to the same materials after having been irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The materials chosen for this research are the nickel based super alloy X-750, and nitrogen strengthened austenitic stainless steel XM-19. A spare core shroud upper support bracket of alloy X-750 was purchased by EPRI from Southern Co. and a section of XM-19 plate was purchased by EPRI from GE-Hitachi. These materials were sectioned at GE Global Research and provided to INL.

  7. Baseline Fracture Toughness and CGR testing of alloys X-750 and XM-19 (EPRI Phase I)

    SciTech Connect

    J. H. Jackson; S. P. Teysseyre

    2012-02-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed an agreement to test representative alloys used as reactor structural materials as a pilot program toward establishing guidelines for future ATR NSUF research programs. This report contains results from the portion of this program established as Phase I (of three phases) that entails baseline fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and tensile testing of selected materials for comparison to similar tests conducted at GE Global Research. The intent of this Phase I research program is to determine baseline properties for the materials of interest prior to irradiation, and to ensure comparability between laboratories using similar testing techniques, prior to applying these techniques to the same materials after having been irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The materials chosen for this research are the nickel based super alloy X-750, and nitrogen strengthened austenitic stainless steel XM-19. A spare core shroud upper support bracket of alloy X-750 was purchased by EPRI from Southern Co. and a section of XM-19 plate was purchased by EPRI from GE-Hitachi. These materials were sectioned at GE Global Research and provided to INL.

  8. Characterization of the Fracture Toughness of TRIP 800 Sheet Steels Using Microstructure-Based Finite Element Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Soulami, Ayoub; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-04-01

    Recently, several studies conducted by automotive industry revealed the tremendous advantages of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS). TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel is one of the typical representative of AHSS. This kind of materials exhibits high strength as well as high formability. Analyzing the crack behaviour in TRIP steels is a challenging task due to the microstructure level inhomogeneities between the different phases (Ferrite, Bainite, Austenite, Martensite) that constitute these materials. This paper aims at investigating the fracture resistance of TRIP steels. For this purpose, a micromechanical finite element model is developed based on the actual microstructure of a TRIP 800 steel. Uniaxial tensile tests on TRIP 800 sheet notched specimens were also conducted and tensile properties and R-curves (Resistance curves) were determined. The comparison between simulation and experimental results leads us to the conclusion that the method using microstructure-based representative volume element (RVE) captures well enough the complex behavior of TRIP steels. The effect of phase transformation, which occurs during the deformation process, on the toughness is observed and discussed.

  9. Effect of minor reactive metal additions on fracture toughness of iron: 12-percent nickel alloy at-196 deg and 25 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzke, W. R.; Stephens, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The slow bend precracked Charpy fracture toughness and tensile behavior of arc-melted and hot-rolled Fe-12Ni alloys containing up to 4 atomic percent reactive metal additions were determined at -196 C and 25 C after water quenching from three annealing temperatures. The fracture toughness of Fe-12Ni at -196 C was improved by small amounts of Al, Ce, Hf, La, Nb, Ta, Ti, V, Y, and Zr, but not by Si. Cryogenic toughness was improved up to 7.5 times that of binary Fe-12Ni and varied with the reactive metal, its concentration, and the annealing temperature.

  10. Analysis of a New High-Toughness Ultra-high-Strength Martensitic Steel by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartshorne, Matthew I.; McCormick, Caroline; Schmidt, Michael; Novotny, Paul; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.; Taheri, Mitra L.

    2016-04-01

    The microstructure of a new martensitic high-strength steel (Fe-0.40C-3.81Ni-1.31Cr-1.50Si-0.75Mn-0.52Mo-0.51Cu-0.30V) with high fracture toughness is characterized by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography (APT). MC, M6C, and M23C6 precipitates form inside the martensitic lath matrix. The fracture toughness is insensitive to the dissolution of M23C6 precipitates at austenitizing temperatures above 1164 K (891 °C). APT reveals that solute segregation at the prior austenite grain boundaries (PAGB) is not uniform, with C, Mo, Si, Ni, and/or P enrichment varying at different areas of the PAGB. Si depletion is detected in the same area as the highest C enrichment. Carbon also segregates at lath boundaries. Segregation of C indicates the presence of retained austenite films at both PAGB and lath boundaries. Regions enriched in C up to 10 pct were found within the laths; however, no regions were enriched to the level expected of cementite or ɛ-carbide. The observed C distribution and high fracture toughness indicates that the tempering behavior is significantly different than that observed in 300M steel. The effect of Si, Ni, and Cu on the formation and stabilization of the regions of C enrichment and retained austenite require further study, as it may be key to the increased toughness.

  11. Processing and characterization of zeta-Ta4C 3-x: A high toughness tantalum carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sygnatowicz, Michael M.

    Tantalum carbides are commonly processed by hot-pressing, canned hot-isostatic-pressing, or spark-plasma sintering because of their high melting temperatures and low diffusivities. This study reports processing of dense ζ-Ta4C 3-x by reaction sintering of a Ta and TaC powder mixture (C/Ta atomic ratio = 0.66). ζ-Ta4C3-x is of interest due to its rhombohedral (trigonal) crystal structure that may be characterized as a polytype with both face-centered-cubic (fcc) and hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) Ta stacking sequences interrupted by stacking faults and missing carbon layers. This structure leads to easy cleaving on the basal planes and high fracture toughness. A key step in processing is the hydrogenation of the Ta powder to produce beta-TaH x, a hard and brittle phase that enables efficient comminution during milling and production of small, equiaxed Ta particles that can be packed to high green density with the TaC powder. Studies of phase evolution by quantitative X-ray diffraction during sintering revealed several intermediate reactions: (a) decomposition of beta-TaHx to Ta, (b) diffusion of C from gamma-TaC to Ta leading to the formation of α-Ta2Cy' with the kinetics described by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) equation with an exponent, n = 0.5, and an activation energy of 221 kJ/mole, (c) equilibration of α-Ta2Cy' and gamma-TaC 0.78 phases, and (d) formation of ζ-Ta4C2.56 from the equilibrated α-Ta2C and gamma-TaC0.78 phases with the kinetics characterized by a higher JMAK exponent ( n ≈ 3) and higher activation energy (1089 kJ/mole). The microstructure showed evidence of nucleation and growth of the ζ-Ta4C 2.56 phase in both the α-Ta2C and gamma-TaC0.78 parent phases with distinct difference in the morphology due to the different number of variants of the habit plane. A hot-pressed and hot-isostatic-pressed (HIPed) material (C/Ta atomic ratio = 0.66), having formed 95 w% ζ-phase, attained a fracture toughness of 15.6 +/- 0.5 MPa√m and a

  12. An Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Vacuum Environment on the Fatigue Life, Fatigue-Crack-Growth Behavior, and Fracture Toughness of 7075-T6 Aluminum Alloy. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    Axial load fatigue life, fatigue-crack propagation, and fracture toughness tests were conducted on 0.090-inch thick specimens made of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy. The fatigue life and fatigue-crack propagation experiments were conducted at a stress ratio of 0.02. Maximum stresses ranged from 33 to 60 ksi in the fatigue life experiments, and from 10 to 40 ksi in the fatigue-crack propagation experiments, and fatigue life experiments were conducted at gas pressures of 760, 0.5, 0.05, and 0.00000005 torr. Fatigue-crack-growth and fracture toughness experiments were conducted at gas pressures of 760 and 5 x 10 to the minus 8th power torr. Residual stress measurements were made on selected fatigue life specimens to determine the effect of such stresses on fatigue life. Analysis of the results from the fatigue life experiments indicated that fatigue life progressively increased as the gas pressure decreased. Analysis of the results from the fatigue-crack-growth experiments indicates that at low values of stress-intensity range, the fatigue crack growth rates were approximately twice as high in air as in vacuum. Fracture toughness data showed there was essentially no difference in the fracture toughness of 7075-T6 in vacuum and in air.

  13. In vitro degradation and fracture toughness of multilayered porous poly(propylene fumarate)/beta-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Michael S; Dean, David; Chen, Jeffrey E; Fisher, John P; Han, Seungho; Rimnac, Clare M; Mikos, Antonios G

    2002-07-01

    This study investigated the in vitro degradation of poly(propylene fumarate)/beta-tricalcium phosphate (PPF/beta-TCP) scaffolds in pH 7.4 phosphate-buffered saline at 37 degrees C. Scaffold design consisted of three layers: two solid layers about a central layer of porous PPF foam. Solid PPF with molecular weights of 810 and 1450 Da was crosslinked under UV light. PPF foam was prepared by a photocrosslinking, porogen-leaching method with an initial porogen content of 80 wt % and two sizes, 150-300 and 300-500 microm. Comparison of initial and residual weights demonstrated a 14.3 +/- 2.0% loss of mass at 3 weeks and a 16.6 +/- 1.8% loss of mass at 6 weeks. Observed pH values for all constructs remained stable (7.15-7.40) throughout the 3 to 6 weeks. Scanning electron micrographs of these scaffolds revealed some loss of foam material between 3 and 6 weeks; however, foam microarchitecture was intact. Solid PPF fracture toughness was tested for high and low molecular weight PPF, 0.376 +/- 0.004 and 0.134 +/- 0.015 MPa(m)1/2, respectively. These values are roughly one magnitude less than human cortical bone.

  14. Double Cantilever Beam and End Notched Flexure Fracture Toughness Testing of Two Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1993-01-01

    Two different unidirectional composite materials were provided by NASA Langley Research Center and tested by the Composite Materials Research Group within the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Wyoming. Double cantilever beam and end notched flexure tests were performed to measure the mode I (crack opening) and mode II (sliding or shear) interlaminar fracture toughness of the two materials. The two composites consisted of IM7 carbon fiber combined with either RP46 resin toughened with special formulation of LaRC IA resin, known as JJS1356; or PES chain extended thermoplastic resin known as JJS1361. Double Cantilever Beam Specimen Configuration and Test Methods As received from NASA, the test specimens were nominally 0.5 inch wide, 6 inches long, and 0.2 inch thick. A 1 inch long Kapton insert at the midplane of one end of the specimen (placed during laminate fabrication) facilitated crack initiation and extension. It was noted that the specimens provided were smaller than the nominal 1.5 inch wide, 9.0 inch long configuration specified. Similarly, the Kapton inserts were of greater length than those in the present specimens. Hence, the data below should not be compared directly to those generated with the referenced methods. No preconditioning was performed on the specimens prior to testing. In general, the methodology was used for the present work. Crack opening loads were introduced to the specimens via piano hinges attached to the main specimen faces at a single end of each specimen. Hinges were bolted to the specimens using the technique presented. The cracks were extended a small distance from the end of the Kapton insert prior to testing. Just before precracking, the sides of the specimens were coated with water-soluble typewriter correction fluid to aid in crack visualization. Scribe marks were then made in the coating at half-inch intervals.

  15. Fracture toughness of bleached enamel: Effect of applying three different nanobiomaterials by nanoindentation test

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mazaheri, Hamid; Saneie, Tahere; Samimi, Pouran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the absence of dispute about the efficacy of bleaching agents, a prime concern is about their compromising effect on the enamel structure. This in vitro study investigated whether the addition of three different biomaterials, including nano-bioactive glass (n-BG)/nano-hydroxy apetite (n-HA)/nano-amorphous calcium phosphate (n-ACP), to bleaching agents can affect the fracture toughness (FT) and vickers hardness number (VHN) of bovine enamel. Materials and Methods: The crowns of the newly extracted permanent bovine incisors teeth were separated from the root and sectioned along their central line; one half serving as the control specimen and the other half as the test specimen. After mounting and polishing procedure, all the control specimens (C) were subjected to nano-indentation test to obtain the baseline values of FT. Then, the control specimens were exposed to a 38% hydrogen peroxide for four times, each time for 10 min. The test specimens were divided into three groups and treated as follows, with the same protocol used for the control specimens: Group 1; ACP + hydrogen peroxide (HP) mixed gel; Group 2 BG + HP mixed gel; and Group 3 HA + HP mixed gel. FT measurements with nano-indentation were carried out subsequent to bleaching experiments. Data were analyzed using SPSS and Kruskal–Wallis test (α = 0.05). Results: A significant difference in young's modulus (YM), VHN, and FT at baseline and subsequent to bleaching in control group was observed. However, no significant differences were found in YM, VHN, and FT between the test groups, compared to the respective baseline values. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the n-HA, n-ACP, and n-BG could be potential biomaterials used to reduce the adverse effects of tooth bleaching. PMID:27307669

  16. [Effects of load and loading time on fracture toughness with indentation method].

    PubMed

    Okada, T; Shinya, A; Yokozuka, S

    1990-10-01

    For clinical application of ceramics such as porcelains that are frequently used as crown restoration materials, it is important to quantitatively evaluate and determine brittleness. This quality is expressed as a fracture toughness value, KIC, but no distinct method for its determination has yet been established. In order to standardize conditions for the determination of KIC by the indentation method, effects of indentation load and loading time on KIC of calcium phosphate crystalline ceramics (CP) were studied at various Vickers indentation loads and various loading times in CP plate-like segments. Furthermore, plate-like segments of each of CP, apatite (AP), mica-beta-spodumene (MIS) and mica (MIC) groups were subjected to experiment at various indentation loads at a fixed loading time to study the effects of indentation load on KIC in four kinds of Castable Ceramics. The results are summarized as follows: 1) The Vickers hardness degree of CP was decreased with an increase in indentation load and loading time, reaching the maximum value (499Hv) at 1kgf of indentation load and 5s of loading time. 2) The value of half of the crack length of CP was increased with an increase in indentation load and loading time, reaching a maximum (530 microns) at 20kgf of indentation load and 30s of loading time. 3) KIC of CP reached the maximum value (2.78MNm-3/2) at 5kgf of indentation load and 5s of loading time, and the minimum (1.52MNm-3/2) at 20kgf of indentation load and 30s of loading time. 4) Optimal experimental conditions for KIC of CP determined by indentation method were 5kgf or 10kgf of indentation load and 15s of loading time. 5) KIC values (MNm-3/2) determined at 5kgf of indentation load and 15s of loading time for CP, AP, MIS and MI were 2.27, 0.95, 1.82 and 1.81, respectively. 6) The course of cracks due to indentation force showed a linear pattern of intra-granular fracture. 7) The cracks were revealed to show median cracks by fractography.

  17. Fracture-Toughness Analysis in Transition-Temperature Region of Three American Petroleum Institute X70 and X80 Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sang Yong; Woo, Kuk Je; Hwang, Byoungchul; Kim, Sangho; Lee, Sunghak

    2009-04-01

    The fracture toughness in the transition-temperature region of three American Petroleum Institute (API) X70 and X80 pipeline steels was analyzed in accordance with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) E1921-05 standard test method. The elastic-plastic cleavage fracture toughness ( K Jc ) was determined by three-point bend tests, using precracked Charpy V-notch (PCVN) specimens; the measured K Jc values were then interpreted by the three-parameter Weibull distribution. The fracture-toughness test results indicated that the master curve and the 98 pct confidence curves explained the variation in the measured fracture toughness well. The reference temperatures obtained from the fracture-toughness test and index temperatures obtained from the Charpy impact test were lowest in the X70 steel rolled in the two-phase region, because this steel had smaller effective grains and the lowest volume fraction of hard phases. In this steel, few hard phases led to a higher resistance to cleavage crack initiation, and the smaller effective grain size led to a higher possibility of crack arrest, thereby resulting in the best overall fracture properties. Measured reference temperatures were then comparatively analyzed with the index temperatures obtained from the Charpy impact test, and the effects of microstructures on these temperatures were discussed.

  18. Comparative fatigue behavior and toughness of remelted and annealed highly crosslinked polyethylenes.

    PubMed

    Medel, Francisco J; Peña, P; Cegoñino, José; Gómez-Barrena, E; Puértolas, J A

    2007-11-01

    Highly cross-linked polyethylenes (HXLPEs) have been incorporated into the hip replacement armamentarium based on their improved wear resistance. However, two different methods of thermal treatment separate the orthopedic community as strategies to control potential long-term oxidation, and controversy remains with problems in the long-term use of acetabular liners (long-term oxidation, rim fracture after impingement, etc.). Meanwhile, the mechanical properties of HXLPEs that may alleviate these problems are still unclear. On the other hand, HXLPEs are scarcely used in knee replacements, as there exists concern about the probably reduced fatigue and fracture performances of these materials. Thus, our aim was to compare the effects of both thermal treatment regimes on mechanical properties and to associate these findings with the material microstructure. The fatigue behavior of annealed and remelted HXLPEs was characterized using short-term cyclic stress-strain, long-term fatigue, and fatigue crack propagation tests. On the other hand, impact tests, tensile experiments, and the J-integral multispecimen method allowed us to assess toughness. Microstructure features such as crosslink density, crystallinity percentage, and lamellar thickness were investigated by swelling measurements, differential scanning calorimetry, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. This study confirms that annealing preserves mechanical properties better than remelting from both fatigue and fracture resistance points of view, and it remarks that a suitable selection of irradiation and stabilization conditions is needed to achieve optimal mechanical performances of ultra high molecular weight polyethylenes for each specific total joint replacement.

  19. 3D Printing: 3D Printing of Highly Stretchable and Tough Hydrogels into Complex, Cellularized Structures.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungmin; Sycks, Dalton; Chan, Hon Fai; Lin, Shaoting; Lopez, Gabriel P; Guilak, Farshid; Leong, Kam W; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2015-07-15

    X. Zhao and co-workers develop on page 4035 a new biocompatible hydrogel system that is extremely tough and stretchable and can be 3D printed into complex structures, such as the multilayer mesh shown. Cells encapsulated in the tough and printable hydrogel maintain high viability. 3D-printed structures of the tough hydrogel can sustain high mechanical loads and deformations. PMID:26172844

  20. Bone fracture toughness and strength correlate with collagen cross-link maturity in a dose-controlled lathyrism mouse model

    PubMed Central

    McNerny, Erin M. B.; Gong, Bo; Morris, Michael D.; Kohn, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen cross-linking is altered in many diseases of bone, and enzymatic collagen cross-links are important to bone quality as evidenced by losses of strength following lysyl oxidase inhibition (lathyrism). We hypothesized that cross-links also contribute directly to bone fracture toughness. A mouse model of lathyrism using subcutaneous injection of up to 500mg/kg β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) was developed and characterized (60 animals across 4 dosage groups). Three weeks of 150 or 350 mg/kg BAPN treatment in young growing mice significantly reduced cortical bone fracture toughness, strength, and pyridinoline cross-link content. Ratios reflecting relative cross-link maturity were positive regressors of fracture toughness (HP/[DHLNL+HLNL] r2=0.208, p<0.05; [HP+LP]/[DHNL+HLNL] r2=0.196, p<0.1), whereas quantities of mature pyridinoline cross-links were significant positive regressors of tissue strength (lysyl pyridinoline r2=0.159, p=0.014; hydroxylysyl pyridinoline r2=0.112, p<0.05). Immature and pyrrole cross-links, which were not significantly reduced by BAPN, did not correlate with mechanical properties. The effect of BAPN treatment on mechanical properties was dose specific, with the greatest impact found at the intermediate (350mg/kg) dose. Calcein labeling was used to define locations of new bone formation, allowing for the identification of regions of normally cross-linked (preexisting) and BAPN treated (newly formed, cross-link-deficient) bone. Raman spectroscopy revealed spatial differences due to relative tissue age and effects of cross-link inhibition. Newly deposited tissues had lower mineral/matrix, carbonate/phosphate and Amide I cross-link (matrix maturity) ratios compared to preexisting tissues. BAPN treatment did not affect mineral measures, but significantly increased the cross-link (matrix maturity) ratio compared to newly formed control tissue. Our study reveals that spatially localized effects of short term BAPN cross-link inhibition can alter

  1. Grain refinement of high strength steels to improve cryogenic toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    Grain-refining techniques using multistep heat treatments to reduce the grain size of five commercial high-strength steels were investigated. The goal of this investigation was to improve the low-temperature toughness as measured by Charpy V-notch impact test without a significant loss in tensile strength. The grain size of four of five alloys investigated was successfully reduced up to 1/10 of original size or smaller with increases in Charpy impact energy of 50 to 180 percent at -320 F. Tensile properties were reduced from 0 to 25 percent for the various alloys tested. An unexpected but highly beneficial side effect from grain refining was improved machinability.

  2. Effect of Embedded Piezoelectric Sensors on Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Resistance of Composite Laminates Under Mode I Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.

    2006-01-01

    Double-cantilevered beam (DCB) specimens of a glass/epoxy composite material with embedded piezoelectric sensors were tested both statically and under fatigue loading to determine the effect of the embedded material on the Mode I fracture toughness and fatigue resistance compared to baseline data without the embedded elements. A material known as LaRC-Macrofiber Composite (LaRC-MFC (TradeMark)), or MFC, was embedded at the midplane of the specimen during the layup. Specimens were manufactured with the embedded MFC material either at the loaded end of the specimen to simulate an initial delamination; or with the MFC material located at the delaminating interface, with a Teflon film at the loaded end to simulate an initial delamination. There were three types of specimens with the embedded material at the delaminating interface: co-cured with no added adhesive; cured with a paste adhesive applied to the embedded element; or cured with a film adhesive added to the embedded material. Tests were conducted with the sensors in both the passive and active states. Results were compared to baseline data for the same material without embedded elements. Interlaminar fracture toughness values (G(sub Ic)) for the passive condition showed little change when the MFC was at the insert end. Passive results varied when the MFC was at the delaminating interface. For the co-cured case and with the paste adhesive, G(sub Ic) decreased compared to the baseline toughness, whereas, for the film adhesive case, G(sub Ic) was significantly greater than the baseline toughness, but the failure was always catastrophic. When the MFC was in the active state, G(sub Ic) was generally lower compared to the passive results. Fatigue tests showed little effect of the embedded material whether it was active or passive compared to baseline values.

  3. The strain-rate sensitivity of high-strength high-toughness steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmore, M.F.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Boyce, Brad Lee

    2006-01-01

    The present study examines the strain-rate sensitivity of four high strength, high-toughness alloys at strain rates ranging from 0.0002 s-1 to 200 s-1: Aermet 100, a modified 4340, modified HP9-4-20, and a recently developed Eglin AFB steel alloy, ES-1c. A refined dynamic servohydraulic method was used to perform tensile tests over this entire range. Each of these alloys exhibit only modest strain-rate sensitivity. Specifically, the strain-rate sensitivity exponent m, is found to be in the range of 0.004-0.007 depending on the alloy. This corresponds to a {approx}10% increase in the yield strength over the 7-orders of magnitude change in strain-rate. Interestingly, while three of the alloys showed a concominant {approx}3-10% drop in their ductility with increasing strain-rate, the ES1-c alloy actually exhibited a 25% increase in ductility with increasing strain-rate. Fractography suggests the possibility that at higher strain-rates ES-1c evolves towards a more ductile dimple fracture mode associated with microvoid coalescence.

  4. A nondestructive method for estimation of the fracture toughness of CrMoV rotor steels based on ultrasonic nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Nahm, Seung-Hoon; Jhang, Kyung-Young; Nam, Young-Hyun

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a nondestructive method for estimating the fracture toughness (K(IC)) of CrMoV steels used as the rotor material of steam turbines in power plants. To achieve this objective, a number of CrMoV steel samples were heat-treated, and the fracture appearance transition temperature (FATT) was determined as a function of aging time. Nonlinear ultrasonics was employed as the theoretical basis to explain the harmonic generation in a damaged material, and the nonlinearity parameter of the second harmonic wave was the experimental measure used to be correlated to the fracture toughness of the rotor steel. The nondestructive procedure for estimating the K(IC) consists of two steps. First, the correlations between the nonlinearity parameter and the FATT are sought. The FATT values are then used to estimate K(IC) using the K(IC) versus excess temperature (i.e., T-FATT) correlation that is available in the literature for CrMoV rotor steel. PMID:12919690

  5. Effects of Core-Shell Rubber (CSR) Nanoparticles on the Cryogenic Fracture Toughness of CSR Modified Epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jun; Magee, Daniel; Schneider, Judy; Cannon, Seth

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of core-shell rubber (CSR) nanoparticles on the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of an epoxy resin at ambient and liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperatures. Varying amounts of Kane Ace(Registered TradeMark) MX130 and Kane Ace(Registered TradeMark) MX960 toughening agent were added to a commercially available EPON 862/Epikure W epoxy resin. Elastic modulus was calculated using quasi-static tensile data. Fracture toughness was evaluated by the resulting breaking energy measured in Charpy impact tests conducted on an instrumented drop tower. The size and distribution of the CSR nanoparticles were characterized using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to study the fracture surface morphology. The addition of the CSR nanoparticles increased the breaking energy with negligible change in elastic modulus and ultimate tensile stress (UTS). At ambient temperature the breaking energy increased with increasing additions of the CSR nanoparticles up to 13.8wt%, while at LN2 temperatures, it reached a plateau at much lower CSR concentration.

  6. Highly tough and transparent layered composites of nanocellulose and synthetic silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chun-Nan; Yang, Quanling; Takeuchi, Miyuki; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2013-12-01

    A highly tough and transparent film material was prepared from synthetic saponite (SPN) nanoplatelets of low aspect ratios and nanofibrillar cellulose. The nanofibrillar cellulose was chemically modified by topological surface oxidation using 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxyl (TEMPO) as a catalyst. Both synthetic SPN nanoplatelets and TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCNs) have abundant negative charges in high densities on their surfaces and are dispersed in water at the individual nanoelement level. Layered nanocomposite structures of the SPN nanoplatelets and TOCNs were formed through a simple cast-drying process of the mixed aqueous dispersions. The TOCN/SPN composites with 0-50% w/w SPN content were optically transparent. Mechanical properties of the TOCN/SPN composites varied depending on the SPN content. The composite with 10% w/w SPN content (5.6% volume fraction) exhibited characteristic mechanical properties: Young's modulus of 14 GPa, tensile strength of 420 MPa, and strain-to-failure of 10%. The work of fracture of the composites increased from 4 to 30 MJ m-3 - or by more than 700% - as the SPN content was increased from 0 to 10% w/w. This surprising improvement in toughness was interpreted based on a model for fracture of polymer composites reinforced with low-aspect-ratio platelets.A highly tough and transparent film material was prepared from synthetic saponite (SPN) nanoplatelets of low aspect ratios and nanofibrillar cellulose. The nanofibrillar cellulose was chemically modified by topological surface oxidation using 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxyl (TEMPO) as a catalyst. Both synthetic SPN nanoplatelets and TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCNs) have abundant negative charges in high densities on their surfaces and are dispersed in water at the individual nanoelement level. Layered nanocomposite structures of the SPN nanoplatelets and TOCNs were formed through a simple cast-drying process of the mixed aqueous dispersions. The

  7. Method of making high strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel, particularly suitable for the mining industry, is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other subsitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  8. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems-revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K

    1994-08-01

    This report presents a revision of the procedure and correlations presented earlier in NUREG/CR-4513, ANL-90/42 (June 1991) for predicting the change in mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water reactors at 280-330{degrees}C (535-625{degrees}F). The correlations presented in this report are based on an expanded data base and have been optimized with mechanical-property data on cast stainless steels aged up to {approx}58,000 h at 290-350{degrees}C (554-633{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve, tensile stress, and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known material information. Mechanical properties of a specific cast stainless steel are estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. Embrittlement of cast stainless steels is characterized in terms of room-temperature Charpy-impact energy. Charpy-impact energy as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which are also determined from the chemical composition. The initial impact energy of the unaged steel is required for these estimations. Initial tensile flow stress is needed for estimating the flow stress of the aged material. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained by correlating room-temperature Charpy-impact energy with fracture toughness parameters. The values of J{sub IC} are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. A common {open_quotes}predicted lower-bound{close_quotes} J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, range of ferrite content, and temperature. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented.

  9. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Cracked Chevron Notched Semi-Circular Bend Method for Characterizing the Mode I Fracture Toughness of Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ming-Dong; Dai, Feng; Xu, Nu-Wen; Liu, Jian-Feng; Xu, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    The cracked chevron notched semi-circular bending (CCNSCB) method for measuring the mode I fracture toughness of rocks combines the merits (e.g., avoidance of tedious pre-cracking of notch tips, ease of sample preparation and loading accommodation) of both methods suggested by the International Society for Rock Mechanics, which are the cracked chevron notched Brazilian disc (CCNBD) method and the notched semi-circular bend (NSCB) method. However, the limited availability of the critical dimensionless stress intensity factor (SIF) values severely hinders the widespread usage of the CCNSCB method. In this study, the critical SIFs are determined for a wide range of CCNSCB specimen geometries via three-dimensional finite element analysis. A relatively large support span in the three point bending configuration was considered because the fracture of the CCNSCB specimen in that situation is finely restricted in the notch ligament, which has been commonly assumed for mode I fracture toughness measurements using chevron notched rock specimens. Both CCNSCB and NSCB tests were conducted to measure the fracture toughness of two different rock types; for each rock type, the two methods produce similar toughness values. Given the reported experimental results, the CCNSCB method can be reliable for characterizing the mode I fracture toughness of rocks.

  10. Estimation of Fracture Toughness of Small-Sized Ultrafine-Grained Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deryugin, E. E.; Suvorov, B. I.

    2015-10-01

    The results obtained from measurements of the crack resistance of a VT6 alloy (Ti-6.46Al-3.84V in wt.%) produced by refining coarse-crystalline structure down to an ultrafine-grained state, using a triaxial forging technique, are presented. The specific fracture energy γc is calculated by means of a new procedure developed for small-sized chevron-notched specimens. Severe plastic deformation is shown to cause a substantial reduction in γc at room temperature. Fracture surface structure found in the ultrafine-grained alloy under study contains local zones of a severely deformed material characterized by high pore concentration. This type of structure cannot be formed solely by crystallographic shearing along densely packed lattice planes. This is evidence for a significant role of rotation deformation modes in crack nucleation and growth on different structural scales of the material.

  11. `Mathematical' Cracks Versus Artificial Slits: Implications in the Determination of Fracture Toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markides, Ch. F.; Kourkoulis, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    An analytic solution is introduced for the stress field developed in a circular finite disc weakened by a central slit of arbitrary ratio of its edges and slightly rounded corners. The disc is loaded by radial pressure applied along two finite arcs of its periphery, anti-symmetric with respect to the disc's center. The motive of the study is to consider the stress field in a disc with a mechanically machined slit (finite distance between the two lips) in juxtaposition to the respective field in the same disc with a `mathematical' crack (zero distance between lips), which is the configuration adopted in case the fracture toughness of brittle materials is determined according to the standardized cracked Brazilian-disc test. The solution is obtained using Muskhelishvili's complex potentials' technique adopting a suitable conformal mapping function found, also, in Savin's milestone book. For the task to be accomplished, an auxiliary problem is first solved, namely, the infinite plate with a rectangular slit (in case the resultant force on the slit is zero and also the stresses and rotations at infinity are zero), by mapping conformally the area outside the slit onto the mathematical plane with a unit hole. The formulae obtained for the complex potentials permit the analytic exploration of the stress field along some loci of crucial practical importance. The influence of the slit's width on the local stress amplification and also on the stress concentration around the crown of the slit is quantitatively described. In addition, the role of the load-application mode (compression along the slit's longitudinal symmetry axis and tension normal to it) is explored. Results indicate that the two configurations are not equivalent in terms of the stress concentration factor. In addition, depending on the combination of the slit's width and the load-application mode, the point where the normal stress along the slit's boundary is maximized `oscillates' between the central point of

  12. Effects of Oxides on Tensile and Charpy Impact Properties and Fracture Toughness in Heat Affected Zones of Oxide-Containing API X80 Linepipe Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Sohn, Seok Su; Shin, Sang Yong; Oh, Kyung Shik; Lee, Sunghak

    2014-06-01

    This study is concerned with effects of complex oxides on acicular ferrite (AF) formation, tensile and Charpy impact properties, and fracture toughness in heat affected zones (HAZs) of oxide-containing API X80 linepipe steels. Three steels were fabricated by adding Mg and O2 to form oxides, and various HAZ microstructures were obtained by conducting HAZ simulation tests under different heat inputs. The no. of oxides increased with increasing amount of Mg and O2, while the volume fraction of AF present in the steel HAZs increased with increasing the no. of oxides. The strengths of the HAZ specimens were generally higher than those of the base metals because of the formation of hard microstructures of bainitic ferrite and granular bainite. When the total Charpy absorbed energy was divided into the fracture initiation and propagation energies, the fracture initiation energy was maintained constant at about 75 J at room temperature, irrespective of volume fraction of AF. The fracture propagation energy rapidly increased from 75 to 150 J and saturated when the volume fraction of AF exceeded 30 pct. At 253 K (-20 °C), the total absorbed energy increased with increasing volume fraction of AF, as the cleavage fracture was changed to the ductile fracture when the volume fraction of AF exceeded 45 pct. Thus, 45 vol pct of AF at least was needed to improve the Charpy impact energy, which could be achieved by forming a no. of oxides. The fracture toughness increased with increasing the no. of oxides because of the increased volume fraction of AF formed around oxides. The fracture toughness did not show a visible correlation with the Charpy absorbed energy at room temperature, because toughness properties obtained from these two toughness testing methods had different significations in view of fracture mechanics.

  13. The effect of microstructure and strength on the fracture toughness of an 18 Ni, 300 grade maraging steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Psioda, J. A.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Fractography and metallographic sectioning were used to investigate the influence of microstructure and strength on the fracture toughness (KIc) and fracture mechanism of an 18 Ni, 300 grade maraging steel. Increased yield strength from 1442 to 2070 MN/m squared through precipitation hardening results in a KIc loss from 143 to 55 MN/m superscript 3/2. Ti (C,N) Ti2S, and TiC inclusions in sizes from 1 to 8, 1 to 15, and 0.1 to 2 microns respectively serve as sites for void nucleation and lead to fracture by the dimpled rupture process in all strength levels considered. TiC nucleated dimples occupy more than half the fracture in all conditions. Void nucleation rate and resultant number of dimples per unit area of fracture increase with increasing yield strength. Average dimple size decreases with increasing strength and/or overaging which follows from the decreasing amount of stable void growth measured by sectioning tensile specimens. Void growth is assisted by crack branching along a path of TiC inclusions. Coalescence occurs in the highest strength materials by a combination of TiC void nucleation and premature separation at strengthening precipitates.

  14. Are adolescents with high mental toughness levels more resilient against stress?

    PubMed

    Gerber, Markus; Kalak, Nadeem; Lemola, Sakari; Clough, Peter J; Perry, John L; Pühse, Uwe; Elliot, Catherine; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Brand, Serge

    2013-04-01

    Mental toughness has been explored predominantly within sport contexts. Nevertheless, it is difficult to conceive mental toughness as only applicable to athletes. This study examines whether mentally tough participants exhibit resilience against stress. This is a cross-sectional study based on two different samples: Sample 1 consisted of 284 high school students (99 males, 185 females, M = 18.3 years). Sample 2 consisted of 140 first through fifth semester undergraduate students (53 males, 87 females, M = 20.0 years). Participants provided information about their level of perceived stress (10-item Perceived Stress Scale), mental toughness (48-item Mental Toughness Questionnaire) and depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory). Consistent across the two samples, mental toughness mitigated the relationship between high stress and depressive symptoms. The interaction between stress and mental toughness explained 2% of variance in the adolescent sample and 10% of variance among young adults. The promotion of protective factors that foster resilient adaptation is a relevant issue. Mental toughness may appeal to individuals that are typically difficult to be reached with health interventions. Because mental toughness is part of young people's daily speech, it may serve as a less academic resource than other health psychology concepts.

  15. A micromechanistic interpretation of the influence of undissolved carbides on the fracture toughness of a low alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, W.M. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    The author has recently proposed an approach to ductile fracture. This approach suggests the same dependence of delta/sub IC/ on X/sub o/ as the Rice and Johnson model, but incorporates a measure of local ductility, (R/sub V//R/sub I/)/R/sub O/. For steels of having the same value of (R/sub V//R/sub I/)/R/sub O/, delta/sub IC/ should scale with X/sub O/. Experimental studies suggest, for steels of similar microstructure and yield strength, the toughness is indeed determined by the sulfide spacing. Microstructure and yield strength should influence toughness by changing (R/sub V//R/sub I/)/R/sub O/. The purpose of this work was to determine, for a fixed sulfide spacing, whether a simple microstuctural change change believed to degrade toughness resulted in an appropriate change in (R/sub V//R/sub I/)/R/sub O/. Two low alloy steels were selected for this work. One (base+Ni+Si) contained no strong carbide forming elements, while the other was the base+Ni+Si steel modified by additions of 0.3 wt% molybdenum and 0.2 wt% vanadium.

  16. What makes a leaf tough? Patterns of correlated evolution between leaf toughness traits and demographic rates among 197 shade-tolerant woody species in a neotropical forest.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Jared W; Kitajima, Kaoru; Burleigh, J Gordon; Kress, W John; Erickson, David L; Wright, S Joseph

    2011-06-01

    Slow-growing juveniles of shade-tolerant plant species are predicted to have tough leaves because of the high cost of leaf replacement in shade relative to potential carbon gain. We assessed the degree of correlated evolution among eight traits associated with leaf toughness and the relationships of those traits with the growth and mortality rates of 197 tree and shrub species from the understory of the 50-ha forest dynamics plot on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Path analysis with phylogenetically independent contrasts revealed that leaves attained material toughness (resistance to fracture per unit fracture area) through increases in tissue density, percent cellulose per unit dry mass, and vein fracture toughness. Lamina density and cellulose content evolved independently and thus represent different paths to material toughness. Structural toughness (resistance to fracture per unit fracture length) depended on material toughness and lamina thickness. Mortality rates of individuals 1-10 cm in stem diameter were negatively correlated with material toughness and lamina density but were independent of structural toughness and cell wall fiber contents. Leaf toughness traits were uncorrelated with relative growth rates. Results imply that material toughness enhances resistance to natural enemies, which increases survival and offsets the biomass allocation cost of producing tough leaves in the shaded understory.

  17. Process for making a high toughness-high strength iron alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A steel alloy is produced by a process which includes using cold rolling at room temperature and subsequent heat treatment at temperatures ranging from 500 C to 650 C. The resulting alloys exhibits excellent strength and toughness characteristics at cryogenic temperatures. This alloy consists essentially of about 10 to 16 percent by weight nickel, to about 1.0 percent by weight aluminum, and 0 to about 3 percent by weight of at least one of the following additional elements: copper, lanthanum, niobium, tantalum, titanium, vanadium, yttrium, zirconium and the rare earth metals, with the balance being essentially iron. The improved alloy possesses a fracture toughness ranging from 200 to 230 ksi sq in. and yield strengths up to 230 ksi.

  18. FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF 6.4 MM (0.25 INCH) ARC-CAST MOLOBDENUM AND MOLYBDENUM-TZM PLATE AT ROOM TEMPERATURE AND 300 DEGREES C

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. SHIELDS, JR.; P. LIPETZKY; A. J. MUELLER

    2001-04-11

    THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF 6.4 mm (0.25 INCH) LOW CARBON ARC-CAST (LCAC) MOLYBDENUM AND ARC-CAST MOLYBDENUM-TZM ALLOY PLATE WERE MEASURED AT ROOM TEMPERATURE AND 300 DEGREES C USING COMPACT TNESION SPECIMENTS. THE EFFECT OF CRACK PLANE ORIENTATION (LONGITUDINAL VS. TRANSVERSE) AND ANNEALING PRACTICE (STRESS-RELIEVED VS. RECRYSTALLIZED) WERE EVALUATED. DEPENDING UPON THE TEST TEMPERATURE EITHER A STANDARD K[SUB]IC OR A J-INTEGRAL ANALYSIS WAS USED TO OBTAIN THE TOUGHNESS VALUE. AT ROOM TEMPERATURE, REGARDLESS OF ALLOY, ORIENTATION, OR MICROSTURECTURE, FRACTURE TOUGHNESS VALUES BETWEEN 15 AND 22 MPa m{sup 1/2} (14 AND 20 KSI IN{sup 1/2}) WERE MEASURED. THESE K[SUB]IC VALUES WERE CONSISTENT WITH MEASUREMENTS BY THE AUTHORS. INCREASING TEMPERATURE IMPROVES THE TOUGHNESS, DUE TO THE FACT THAT ONE TAKES ADVANTAGE OF THE DUCTIVE-BRITTLE TRANSITION BEHAVIOR OF MOLYBDENUM. AT 300 DEGREES C, THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF RECRYSTALLIZED LCAC AND ARC-CAST TZM MOLYBDENUM WERE ALSO SIMILAR AT APPROXI MATELY 64 MPa m{sup 1/2} (58 KSI IN{sup 1/2}). IN THE STRESS-RELIEVED CONDITION, HOWEVER, THE TOUGHNESS OF ARC-CAST TZM (91 MPa m{sup 1/2}/83 KSI IN{sup 1/2}) WAS HIGHER THAN THAT OF THE LCAC MOLYBDENUM (74 MPa m{sup 1/2}/67 KSI IN{sup 1/2}).

  19. An evaluation of the fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness properties of beryllium-copper alloy CDA172

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Henkener, Julie A.

    1990-01-01

    A series of fracture mechanics tests, using the Be-Cu alloy CDA172 in the round rod product form, was conducted in a lab air environment at room temperature. Tensile data is presented in both the L and C directions and K sub Ic data in both the C-R and C-L orientations. Fracture toughness values were derived from M(T) (center cracked), PS(T) (surface cracked) and CC01 (corner cracked) specimens of varying thickness. Fatigue crack growth data were obtained for the C-R orientation at stress ratio of 0.1, 0.4, and 0.7 and for the C-L orientation at stress ratios of 0.1, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.7.

  20. Weldability of high-toughness iron - 12 percent-nickel alloys with reactive metal additions of titanium, aluminum, or niobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delvetian, J. H.; Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    Three exceptionally high toughness Fe-12Ni alloys designed for cryogenic service were welded by using the gas tungsten arc welding process. Evaluation of their weldability included equivalent energy fracture toughness tests, transverse weld tensile tests at -196 and 25 C, and weld crack sensitivity tests. The Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti alloy proved extremely weldable for cryogenic applications, having weld and heat affected zone properties comparable to those of the wrought base alloy. The Fe-12Ni-0.5Al alloy had good weld properties only after the weld joint was heat treated. The Fe-12Ni-0.25Nb alloy was not considered weldable for cryogenic use because of its poor weld joint properties at -196 C and its susceptibility to hot cracking.

  1. Physical hydrogels composed of polyampholytes demonstrate high toughness and viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao Lin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Kuroda, Shinya; Ihsan, Abu Bin; Akasaki, Taigo; Sato, Koshiro; Haque, Md. Anamul; Nakajima, Tasuku; Gong, Jian Ping

    2013-10-01

    Hydrogels attract great attention as biomaterials as a result of their soft and wet nature, similar to that of biological tissues. Recent inventions of several tough hydrogels show their potential as structural biomaterials, such as cartilage. Any given application, however, requires a combination of mechanical properties including stiffness, strength, toughness, damping, fatigue resistance and self-healing, along with biocompatibility. This combination is rarely realized. Here, we report that polyampholytes, polymers bearing randomly dispersed cationic and anionic repeat groups, form tough and viscoelastic hydrogels with multiple mechanical properties. The randomness makes ionic bonds of a wide distribution of strength. The strong bonds serve as permanent crosslinks, imparting elasticity, whereas the weak bonds reversibly break and re-form, dissipating energy. These physical hydrogels of supramolecular structure can be tuned to change multiple mechanical properties over wide ranges by using diverse ionic combinations. This polyampholyte approach is synthetically simple and dramatically increases the choice of tough hydrogels for applications.

  2. Physical hydrogels composed of polyampholytes demonstrate high toughness and viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao Lin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Kuroda, Shinya; Ihsan, Abu Bin; Akasaki, Taigo; Sato, Koshiro; Haque, Md Anamul; Nakajima, Tasuku; Gong, Jian Ping

    2013-10-01

    Hydrogels attract great attention as biomaterials as a result of their soft and wet nature, similar to that of biological tissues. Recent inventions of several tough hydrogels show their potential as structural biomaterials, such as cartilage. Any given application, however, requires a combination of mechanical properties including stiffness, strength, toughness, damping, fatigue resistance and self-healing, along with biocompatibility. This combination is rarely realized. Here, we report that polyampholytes, polymers bearing randomly dispersed cationic and anionic repeat groups, form tough and viscoelastic hydrogels with multiple mechanical properties. The randomness makes ionic bonds of a wide distribution of strength. The strong bonds serve as permanent crosslinks, imparting elasticity, whereas the weak bonds reversibly break and re-form, dissipating energy. These physical hydrogels of supramolecular structure can be tuned to change multiple mechanical properties over wide ranges by using diverse ionic combinations. This polyampholyte approach is synthetically simple and dramatically increases the choice of tough hydrogels for applications.

  3. Artificial Aging Effects on Cryogenic Fracture Toughness of the Main Structural Alloy for the Super Lightweight Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, P. S.; Stanton, W. P.

    2002-01-01

    In 1996, Marshall Space Flight Center developed a multistep heating rate-controlled (MSRC) aging technique that significantly enhanced cryogenic fracture toughness (CFT) and reduced the statistical spread of fracture toughness values in alloy 2195 by controlling the location and size of strengthening precipitate T1. However, it could not be readily applied to flight-related hardware production, primarily because large-scale production furnaces are unable to maintain a heating rate of 0.6 C (1 F)/hr. In August 1996, a new program was initiated to determine whether the MSRC aging treatment could be further modified to facilitate its implementation to flight hardware production. It was successfully redesigned into a simplified two-step aging treatment consisting of 132 C (270 F)/20 hr + 138 C (280 F)/40 hr. Results indicated that two-step aging can achieve the same yield strength levels as those produced by conventional aging while providing greatly improved ductility. Two-step aging proved to be very effective at enhancing CFT, enabling previously rejected materials to meet simulated service requirements. Cryogenic properties are improved by controlling T1 nucleation and growth so that they are promoted in the matrix and suppressed in the subgrain boundaries.

  4. Post-Irradiation Fracture Toughness of Unalloyed Molybdenum, ODS molybdenum, and TZM molybdenum following irradiation at 244C to 507C

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, Brian V; Byun, Thak Sang; Leonard, Keith J; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Commercially available unalloyed molybdenum (Low Carbon Arc Cast (LCAC)), Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) molybdenum, and TZM molybdenum were neutron irradiated at temperatures of nominally 244 C, 407 C, and 509 C to neutron fluences between 1.0 to 4.6x1025 n/m2 (E>0.1 MeV). Post-irradiation fracture toughness testing was performed. All alloys exhibited a Ductile to Brittle Transition Temperature that was defined to occur at 30 4 MPa-m1/2. The highest post-irradiated fracture toughness values (26-107 MPa-m1/2) and lowest DBTT (100-150 C) was observed for ODS molybdenum in the L-T orientation. The finer grain size for ODS molybdenum results in fine laminates that improve the ductile laminate toughening. The results for ODS molybdenum are anisotropic with lower post-irradiated toughness values (20-30 MPa-m1/2) and higher DBTT (450-600 C) in the T-L orientation. The results for T-L ODS molybdenum are consistent or slightly better than those for LCAC molybdenum (21-71 MPa-m1/2 and 450-800 C DBTT). The fracture toughness values measured for LCAC and T-L ODS molybdenum at temperatures below the DBTT were determined to be 8-18 MPa-m1/2. Lower non-irradiated fracture toughness values were measured for TZM molybdenum that are attributed to the large carbide precipitates serving as preferential fracture initiation sites. The role of microstructure and grain size on post-irradiated fracture toughness was evaluated by comparing the results for LCAC molybdenum and ODS molybdenum.

  5. Static and dynamic fracture toughness of 25mm thick single edge notch bend (SENB) specimen of C-Mn pressure vessel submerged arc weld metal and flaw assessment under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Wiesner, C. S.

    2003-09-01

    Although there are well established procedures for assessing the significance of defects in welded structures in a number of countries, such as BS7910 and R6 procedures in the UK, the Japanese WES 2807 procedure, the API and MPC procedures in the USA and the recently completed SINT AP procedure resulting from European collaboration, there are no clear guidelines for assessment of the effects of dynamic loading. In principle, the standard procedure can be applied for any rate of loading but there is little or no experience of how to allow for the effects of dynamic loading on load magnitude and material properties. Submerge arc weldments of 100mm thick have been manufactured. The effect of loading rate was investigated by testing 25mm thick SENB specimens. The fracture toughness of the weld metal exhibited marked loading rate sensitivity; shift in fracture toughness transition temperature for high loading rate tests of up to 115^{circ}C for 25mm specimens. Finite element (FE) analyses have been carried out to obtain plastic collapse load solutions for SENB fracture mechanics test piece. A simple equation for estimate of dynamic plastic yielding load has been suggested. Flaw assessment under dynamic loading has been demonstrated using the results of dynamic fracture toughness and plastic yiending load. The general methods of assessment of the significance of defects in BS7910 is shown to be applicable to assessments under dynamic loading up to impact.

  6. An investigation of fracture toughness, fatigue-crack growth, sustained-load flaw growth, and impact properties of three pressure vessel steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. M.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Lewis, P. E.

    1975-01-01

    The elastic fracture toughness of the three steels is shown to not decrease significantly with decreasing temperature from room temperature to about 244 K (-20 F.). The elastic fracture toughness of the three steels increased with increasing specimen width and thickness. The fatigue-crack-growth data for all three steels fall into relatively narrow scatter bands on plots of rate against stress-intensity range. An equation is shown to predict the upper bounds of the scatter bands reasonably well. Charpy impact energies decreased with decreasing temperature in the nominal temperature range from room temperature to 244 K (-20 F). The nil-ductility temperatures of the steels are discussed.

  7. Improvement of the mode II interface fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced plastics/aluminum laminates through vapor grown carbon fiber interleaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Huiming; Li, Yuan; Hu, Ning; Cao, Yanping; Yan, Cheng; Azuma, Takesi; Peng, Xianghe; Wu, Liangke; Li, Jinhua; Li, Leilei

    2014-06-01

    The effects of acid treatment, vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) interlayer and the angle, i.e., 0° and 90°, between the rolling stripes of an aluminum (Al) plate and the fiber direction of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) on the mode II interlaminar mechanical properties of GFRP/Al laminates were investigated. The experimental results of an end notched flexure test demonstrate that the acid treatment and the proper addition of VGCF can effectively improve the critical load and mode II fracture toughness of GFRP/Al laminates. The specimens with acid treatment and 10 g m-2 VGCF addition possess the highest mode II fracture toughness, i.e., 269% and 385% increases in the 0° and 90° specimens, respectively compared to those corresponding pristine ones. Due to the induced anisotropy by the rolling stripes on the aluminum plate, the 90° specimens possess 15.3%-73.6% higher mode II fracture toughness compared to the 0° specimens. The improvement mechanisms were explored by the observation of crack propagation path and fracture surface with optical, laser scanning and scanning electron microscopies. Moreover, finite element analyses were carried out based on the cohesive zone model to verify the experimental fracture toughness and to predict the interface shear strength between the aluminum plates and GFRP laminates.

  8. Fracture toughness and compressive properties of cancellous bone at the head of the femur and relationships to non-invasive skeletal assessment measurements.

    PubMed

    Cook, R B; Curwen, C; Tasker, T; Zioupos, P

    2010-11-01

    Osteoporosis defines a causal relationship between reduced bone density, reduced mechanical competence of the bone tissue of the sufferers and concomitantly an increased risk of fracture in life. The aims of the present study is: (1) to provide further evidence to support the use of Quantitative Ultrasound (QUS) results from peripheral sites to provide a prediction of the density of the proximal femur; and (2) to provide rational evidence for the well-proven ability of QUS to predict directly 'risk of fracture'. 20 femoral heads were obtained from 15 Caucasian females and 5 Caucasian males undergoing emergency surgery for a fractured neck of femur. QUS investigations of the calcaneus, proximal phalanx, distal radius and mid-shaft tibia were undertaken on the donors with 72h of surgery. 128 fracture toughness samples and 20 compression cores were manufactured and tested. Significant relationships were found between QUS parameters determined in vivo and the apparent density (g/cm(3)) of the tissue at the proximal femur and both the fracture toughness and strength determined in vitro from the same donor individual. In this study we relate QUS results obtained in vivo to the actual apparent density of bone tissue from the proximal femur, donated by the same individual, and the fracture toughness and compressive strength. The study demonstrates the ability of QUS investigations at peripheral sites to accurately predict the density of bone from the proximal femur and provides evidence to support the use of QUS to predict the 'risk of fracture' directly.

  9. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of alumina trihydrate filled epoxy resins

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, G.; Wainwright, R.

    1993-12-31

    Certain non-halogen fire retardants such as alumina trihydrate (ATH) are effective in organic matrix composite materials only when they constitute a very high volume fraction of the total material and therefore have major effects on mechanical properties. ATH particles have weak cleavage planes and are easily fractured; their effects are rather different from those of stronger fillers. This paper is concerned with the importance of various particle characteristics, especially size distribution, in ATH filled epoxy resin castings. Tensile strength, modulus, and elongation were measured, and fracture parameters were also determined as a function of filler volume fraction for various grades. Surface treatment reduced the modulus of filled resins, except for ATH particles produced by a precipitation process. The changes were nevertheless broadly consistent with those predicted by published equations such as the Nielsen equation. The size of the largest particles had a major effect on strength and elongation. The strength typically fell to 35% of the strength of the unfilled epoxy resin, for volume fractions of 0.45 approximately, as predicted by Nicolais and Schrager equations.

  10. Approximate techniques for predicting size effects on cleavage fracture toughness (J{sub c})

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, M.T.; Dodds, R.H. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    This investigation examines the ability of an elastic T-stress analysis coupled with modified boundary layer (MBL) solution to predict stresses ahead of a crack tip in a variety of planar geometries. The approximate stresses are used as input to estimate the effective driving force for cleavage fracture (J{sub 0}) using the micromechanically based approach introduced by Dodds and Anderson. Finite element analyses for a wide variety of planar cracked geometries are conducted which have elastic biaxiality parameters ({beta}) ranging from {minus}0.99 (very low constraint) to +2.96 (very high constraint). The magnitude and sign of {beta} indicate the rate at which crack-tip constraint changes with increasing applied load. All results pertain to a moderately strain hardening material (strain hardening exponent ({eta}) of 10). These analyses suggest that {beta} is an effective indicator of both the accuracy of T-MBL estimates of J{sub 0} and of applicability limits on evolving fracture analysis methodologies (i.e. T-MBL, J-Q, and J/J{sub 0}). Specifically, when 1{beta}1>0.4 these analyses show that the T-MBL approximation of J{sub 0} is accurate to within 20% of a detailed finite-element analysis. As ``structural type`` configurations, i.e. shallow cracks in tension, generally have 1{beta}1>0.4, it appears that only an elastic analysis may be needed to determine reasonably accurate J{sub 0} values for structural conditions.

  11. Cryogenic Fracture Toughness Evaluation of an Investment Cast Al-Be Alloy for Structural Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, W. R.; McGill, P. B.

    2006-01-01

    Aluminum-Beryllium metal matrix composite materials are useful due to their desirable performance characteristics for aerospace applications. Desirable characteristics of this material includes light-weight, dimensional stability, stiffness, good vibration damping characteristics, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and workability, This material is 3.5 times stiffer and 22% lighter than conventional aluminum alloys. electro-optical systems, advanced sensor and guidance components for flight and satellite systems, components for light-weight high-performance aircraft engines, and structural components for helicopters. Aluminum-beryllium materials are now available in the form of near net shape investment castings. In this materials properties characterization study, the cryogenic tensile and fracture properties of an investment casting alloy, Beralcast 363, were determined. Tensile testing was performed at 21 C (70 F), -73.3 C (-100 F), -195.5 C (-320 F) and -252.8 C (-423 F), and fracture (K(sub lc) and da/dN) testing was performed at -73.3 C (-100 F), -195.5 C (-320 F) and -252.8 C (-423 F). Their use is attractive for weight critical structural applications such as advanced

  12. Improving processing and toughness of a high performance composite matrix through an interpenetrating polymer network. VI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.

    1990-01-01

    A simultaneous semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) concept is presented which combines easy-to-process, but brittle, thermosetting polyimides with tough, but difficult to process, linear thermoplastic polyimides. The combination results in a semi-IPN with the easy processability of a thermoset and good toughness of a thermoplastic. Four simultaneous semi-IPN systems were developed from commercially available NR-150B2 combined with each of the four Thermid materials (LR-600, AL-600, MC-600, and FA-700). It is concluded that there is a significant improvement in resin fracture toughness of Thermid-polyimide-based semi-IPN systems and some improvement in composite microcracking resistance compared to Thermid LR-600. Excellent composite mechanical properties have been achieved. These new semi-IPN materials have the potential to be used as composite matrices, adhesives, and molding materials.

  13. Treadmill Exercise Improves Fracture Toughness and Indentation Modulus without Altering the Nanoscale Morphology of Collagen in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Max A.; Laine, Tyler J.; Berman, Alycia G.

    2016-01-01

    The specifics of how the nanoscale properties of collagen (e.g., the crosslinking profile) affect the mechanical integrity of bone at larger length scales is poorly understood despite growing evidence that collagen’s nanoscale properties are altered with disease. Additionally, mass independent increases in postyield displacement due to exercise suggest loading-induced improvements in bone quality associated with collagen. To test whether disease-induced reductions in bone quality driven by alterations in collagen can be rescued or prevented via exercise-mediated changes to collagen’s nanoscale morphology and mechanical properties, the effects of treadmill exercise and β-aminopropionitrile treatment were investigated. Eight week old female C57BL/6 mice were given a daily subcutaneous injection of either 164 mg/kg β-aminopropionitrile or phosphate buffered saline while experiencing either normal cage activity or 30 min of treadmill exercise for 21 consecutive days. Despite differences in D-spacing distribution (P = 0.003) and increased cortical area (tibial: P = 0.005 and femoral: P = 0.015) due to β-aminopropionitrile treatment, an overt mechanical disease state was not achieved as there were no differences in fracture toughness or 4 point bending due to β-aminopropionitrile treatment. While exercise did not alter (P = 0.058) the D-spacing distribution of collagen or prevent (P < 0.001) the β-aminopropionitrile-induced changes present in the unexercised animals, there were differential effects in the distribution of the reduced elastic modulus due to exercise between control and β-aminopropionitrile-treated animals (P < 0.001). Fracture toughness was increased (P = 0.043) as a main effect of exercise, but no significant differences due to exercise were observed using 4 point bending. Future studies should examine the potential for sex specific differences in the dose of β-aminopropionitrile required to induce mechanical effects in mice and the

  14. Slow Crack Growth and Fracture Toughness of Sapphire for the International Space Station Fluids and Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.

    2006-01-01

    The fracture toughness, inert flexural strength, and slow crack growth parameters of the r- and a-planes of sapphire grown by the Heat Exchange Method were measured to qualify sapphire for structural use in the International Space Station. The fracture toughness in dry nitrogen, K(sub Ipb), was 2.31 +/- 0.12 MPa(square root of)m and 2.47 +/- 0.15 MPa(squre root of)m for the a- and r-planes, respectively. Fracture toughness measured in water via the operational procedure in ASTM C1421 was significantly lower, K(sub Ivb) = 1.95+/- 0.03 MPa(square root of)m, 1.94 +/- 0.07 and 1.77 +/- 0.13 MPa(square root of)m for the a- , m- and r-planes, respectively. The mean inert flexural strength in dry nitrogen was 1085 +/- 127 MPa for the r-plane and 1255 +/- 547 MPa for the a-plane. The power law slow crack growth exponent for testing in water was n = 21 +/- 4 for the r-plane and n (greater than or equal to) 31 for the a-plane. The power law slow crack growth coefficient was A = 2.81 x 10(exp -14) m/s x (MPa(squre root of)m)/n for the r-plane and A (approx. equals)2.06 x 10(exp -15) m/s x (MPa(square root of)m)/n for the a-plane. The r- and a-planes of sapphire are relatively susceptible to stress corrosion induced slow crack growth in water. However, failure occurs by competing modes of slow crack growth at long failure times and twinning for short failure time and inert environments. Slow crack growth testing needs to be performed at low failure stress levels and long failure times so that twinning does not affect the results. Some difficulty was encountered in measuring the slow crack growth parameters for the a-plane due to a short finish (i.e., insufficient material removal for elimination of the damage generated in the early grinding stages). A consistent preparation method that increases the Weibull modulus of sapphire test specimens and components is needed. This would impart higher component reliability, even if higher Weibull modulus is gained at the sacrifice of

  15. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of the nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselt, Ch. Ch.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.; Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Gragg, D.

    2011-10-01

    The realization of fusion power as an attractive energy source requires advanced structural materials that can cope with ultra-severe thermo-mechanical loads and high neutron fluxes experienced by fusion power plant components, such as the first wall, divertor and blanket structures. Towards this end, two variants of a 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 reduced activation ferritic (RAF-) ODS steel were produced by ball milling phase blended Fe-13Cr-1W, 0.3Y 20 3 and 0.3Ti powders in both argon and hydrogen atmospheres. The milled powders were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The as-HIPed alloys were then hot rolled into 6 mm plates. Microstructural, tensile and fracture toughness characterization of the hot rolled alloys are summarized here and compared to results previously reported for the as-HIPed condition.

  16. Fiber reinforced solids possessing great fracture toughness: The role of interfacial strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, A. G.

    1975-01-01

    The results of angle-ply investigations for strength and toughness of brittle fiber/brittle filament composites are presented. General results are discussed for both unidirectional and angle-ply intermittently bonded boron/epoxy composites as affected by soaking and freezing water environments. A description of and the operating instructions are included for the modified 230 mm (9 inch) wide intermittent coating tape making apparatus.

  17. Dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature for a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to investigate the dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature in the range of {minus}95{degrees}C to 25{degrees}C for a low activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel (F82-H). Mode I and mixed Mode I/III fracture toughnesses were investigated in the range of {minus}95 to 25{degree}C for a F82-H steel heat-treated in the following way; 1000{degree}C/20 h/air-cooled (AC), 1100{degree}C/7 min/AC, and 700{degree}C/2 h/AC. The results indicate that crack tip plasticity was increased by mixed mode loading, and suggest that at low temperature, mode I fracture toughness is the critical design parameter, but at temperatures above room temperature, expecially concerning fatigure and creep-fatigue crack growth rate, a mixed mode loading may be more harmful than a mode I loading for this steel because a mixed mode loading results in lower fracture toughness and higher crack tip plasticity (or dislocation activity).

  18. 3D Printing of Highly Stretchable and Tough Hydrogels into Complex, Cellularized Structures.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungmin; Sycks, Dalton; Chan, Hon Fai; Lin, Shaoting; Lopez, Gabriel P; Guilak, Farshid; Leong, Kam W; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2015-07-15

    A 3D printable and highly stretchable tough hydrogel is developed by combining poly(ethylene glycol) and sodium alginate, which synergize to form a hydrogel tougher than natural cartilage. Encapsulated cells maintain high viability over a 7 d culture period and are highly deformed together with the hydrogel. By adding biocompatible nanoclay, the tough hydrogel is 3D printed in various shapes without requiring support material. PMID:26033288

  19. 3D Printing of Highly Stretchable and Tough Hydrogels into Complex, Cellularized Structures.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungmin; Sycks, Dalton; Chan, Hon Fai; Lin, Shaoting; Lopez, Gabriel P; Guilak, Farshid; Leong, Kam W; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2015-07-15

    A 3D printable and highly stretchable tough hydrogel is developed by combining poly(ethylene glycol) and sodium alginate, which synergize to form a hydrogel tougher than natural cartilage. Encapsulated cells maintain high viability over a 7 d culture period and are highly deformed together with the hydrogel. By adding biocompatible nanoclay, the tough hydrogel is 3D printed in various shapes without requiring support material.

  20. Recent developments in high-toughness welding for the construction of offshore production platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.S.; Garland, J.G.; Yates, D.

    1983-05-01

    Research work into the fundamental aspects of the design of high toughness welding consumables is outlined with particular emphasis on the role of changing steel technology. The benefits of the work to date are described including the development of a new range of SMA and submerged arc consumable combinations capable of producing high toughness, high productivity joints at the levels of moisture resistance required for fabricating thick steel sections for critical offshore applications.

  1. Developing Fatigue Pre-crack Procedure to Evaluate Fracture Toughness of Pipeline Steels Using Spiral Notch Torsion Test

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Tan, Ting; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2012-10-01

    The spiral notch torsion test (SNTT) has been utilized to investigate the crack growth behavior of X52 steel base and welded materials used for hydrogen infrastructures. The X52 steel materials are received from a welded pipe using friction stir welding techniques. Finite element models were established to study the crack growth behavior of steel SNTT steel samples, which were assumed to be isotropic material. A series SNTT models were set up to cover various crack penetration cases, of which the ratios between crack depth to diameter (a/D ratio) ranging from 0.10 to 0.45. The evolution of compliance and energy release rates in the SNTT method have been investigated with different cases, including different geometries and materials. Indices of characteristic compliance and energy release rates have been proposed. Good agreement has been achieved between predictions from different cases in the same trend. These work shed lights on a successful protocol for SNTT application in wide range of structural materials. The further effort needed for compliance function development is to extend the current developed compliance function to the deep crack penetration arena, in the range of 0.55 to 0.85 to effectively determine fracture toughness for extremely tough materials.

  2. Influence of ageing on the quasistatic fracture toughness of an SS 316(N) weld at ambient and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikala, G.; Ray, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    The leak before break analysis of SS 316L(N) components of the prototype fast breeder reactor requires the elastic plastic fracture toughness parameter J for 0.2 mm crack extension, J0.2, especially for the welds, at the operating temperatures. The J- R curves for the welds produced using the consumable developed by Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, were determined in the as-welded condition as well as after thermal ageing (923 K/4200 h) conditions at 298 K and 643 K, using unloading compliance method for 298 K and normalization method for 643 K. The aged material exhibited pop-in crack extensions of magnitudes that, according to ASTM E1820 standard, could be ignored for multi-specimen data analysis for determining J0.2. Therefore, for this condition, J nom- Δ a curves were established using the multiple specimen method and also single specimen normalization method; for the latter, a modification earlier developed by the authors for accounting for small pop-in crack extensions was used. The value of J0.2 from both methods showed excellent reproducibility. Ageing is seen to reduce the toughness of this material considerably at both the testing temperatures.

  3. Effects of subcritical crack growth on fracture toughness of ceramics assessed in chevron-notched three-point bend tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, L. Y.; Singh, D.; Shetty, D. K.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical computational study was carried out to assess the effects of subcritical crack growth on crack stability in the chevron-notched three-point bend specimens. A power-law relationship between the subcritical crack velocity and the applied stress intensity were used along with compliance and stress-intensity relationships for the chevron-notched bend specimen to calculate the load response under fixed deflection rate and a machine compliance. The results indicate that the maximum load during the test occurs at the same crack length for all the deflection rates; the maximum load, however, is dependent on the deflection rate for rates below the critical rate. The resulting dependence of the apparent fracture toughness on the deflection rate is compared to experimental results on soda-lime glass and polycrystalline alumina.

  4. Selective Reinforcement to Improve Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Crack Growth Resistance in Metallic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Newman, John A.; James, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and analytical investigations of the fatigue crack growth and fracture response of aluminum selectively reinforced compact tension specimens were performed. It was shown that selective reinforcement significantly improved these responses primarily through load sharing by the reinforcement. With the appropriate combination of reinforcement architecture and mechanical properties, as well as reinforcement to base aluminum interface properties, fatigue cracks can be arrested using selective reinforcement. Maximum load associated with fracture increased up to 20 percent for the cases investigated and crack growth at maximum load increased as much as 150 percent. For both fatigue crack growth and fracture, the three most influential properties identified within the bounds of this investigation that influence this response are reinforcement width, reinforcement stiffness and interface stiffness. Considerable coupling occurs between the different fiber architecture and material properties and how they influence fatigue crack growth and fracture responses.

  5. 75 FR 13 - Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Pressurized Thermal Shock Events AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is amending its regulations to provide alternate fracture...

  6. Improving the toughness of ultrahigh strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Koji

    2002-01-01

    The ideal structural steel combines high strength with high fracture toughness. This dissertation discusses the toughening mechanism of the Fe/Co/Ni/Cr/Mo/C steel, AerMet 100, which has the highest toughness/strength combination among all commercial ultrahigh strength steels. The possibility of improving the toughness of this steel was examined by considering several relevant factors. Chapter 1 reviews the mechanical properties of ultrahigh strength steels and the physical metallurgy of AerMet 100. It also describes the fracture mechanisms of steel, i.e. ductile microvoid coalescence, brittle transgranular cleavage, and intergranular separation. Chapter 2 examines the strength-toughness relationship for three heats of AerMet 100. A wide variation of toughness is obtained at the same strength level. The toughness varies despite the fact that all heat fracture in the ductile fracture mode. The difference originates from the inclusion content. Lower inclusion volume fraction and larger inclusion spacing gives rise to a greater void growth factor and subsequently a higher fracture toughness. The fracture toughness value, JIc, is proportional to the particle spacing of the large non-metallic inclusions. Chapter 3 examines the ductile-brittle transition of AerMet 100 and the effect of a higher austenitization temperature, using the Charpy V-notch test. The standard heat treatment condition of AerMet 100 shows a gradual ductile-brittle transition due to its fine effective grain size. Austenitization at higher temperature increases the prior austenite grain size and packet size, leading to a steeper transition at a higher temperature. Both transgranular cleavage and intergranular separation are observed in the brittle fracture mode. Chapter 4 examines the effect of inclusion content, prior austenite grain size, and the amount of austenite on the strength-toughness relationship. The highest toughness is achieved by low inclusion content, small prior austenite grain size

  7. Ambient and high-temperature stable fracture tests in ceramics: Applications to yttria-partially-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Pastor, J.Y.; Planas, J.; Elices, M. . Dept. de Ciencia de Materiales Ciudad Univ., Madrid . ETS de Ingenieros de Caminos)

    1993-11-01

    A new technique that provides stable fracture tests in brittle ceramic materials at room and at high temperature is presented. This technique uses the crack mouth opening displacement signal from a laser extensometer to feed the servo control of a hydraulic testing machine. In this way it is possible to obtain--in addition to the fracture toughness--the fracture energy and the R-curve, in a single test.

  8. Tough poly(arylene ether) thermoplastics as modifiers for bismaleimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzenberger, H. D.; Roemer, W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J.

    1989-01-01

    Several aspects of research on thermoplastics as toughness modifiers are discussed, including the contribution of the backbone chemistry and the concentration of the poly(arylene ether) thermoplastic to fracture toughness, influence of the molecular weight of the poly(arylene ether) thermoplastic on neat resin fracture toughness, and the morphology of the thermoplastic modified networks. The results show that fracture toughness of brittle bismaleimide resins can be improved significantly with poly(arylene ether) thermoplastic levels of 20 percent by weight, and that high molecular weight poly(arylene ether) based on bisphenol A provides the highest degree of toughening. Preliminary composite evaluation shows that improvements in neat resin toughness translate into carbon fabric composite.

  9. Sliding wear, toughness and microstructural relationships in high strength Fe/Cr/C experimental steels

    SciTech Connect

    Salesky, W.J.

    1980-06-01

    Hardness has been believed to be the major parameter influencing wear resistance of materials. Recently, it was suggested that combinations of high strength and toughness may lead to optimum wear resistance. It is known that the martensite transformation can be exploited to provide a variety of strength-toughness combinations. Small additions of Mn or Ni to the Fe/4Cr/.3C martensitic alloys have been shown to increase toughness while maintaining strength via increasing the volume fraction of retained austenite. An investigation of the relationships between microstructure, toughness, and sliding wear resistance for these experimental alloys is reported. Comparative studies were performed on several industrial alloys to provide a practical basis for comparison of these medium carbon experimental steels.

  10. Effect of orientation on the in vitro fracture toughness ofdentin: The role of toughening mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, R.K.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2003-01-28

    A micro-mechanistic understanding of bone fracture thatencompasses how cracks interact with the underlying microstructure anddefines their local failure mode is lacking, despite extensive research nthe response of bone to a variety of factors like aging, loading, and/ordisease.

  11. Development of high toughness in austempered type ductile cast iron and evaluation of its properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Toshiro; Yamamoto, Hironobu

    1988-02-01

    In order to increase the toughness of austempered ductile cast irons, we attempted to strengthen the fracture initiation sites such as graphite-matrix interfaces and eutectic cell boundaries in a way of the microsegregation of alloying elements. For instance, the retained austenite which is stable under external stresses may be introduced preferentially into these sites by the addition of Ni, which segregates to a graphite periphery and of Mn, which partitions mainly to eutectic cell boundaries. Following this concept, the effects of various austempering processes on toughness are also in-vestigated. The cast iron alloying with Ni and Mn shows the best fracture toughness when it is heat-treated by either QB' or B' process; here, the QB' means the oil-quenching from an austenite γ phase range followed by austempering from a ferrite α plus γ range and the B' means austempering from a (α + γ) range. In the newly developed iron, there is a mixed microstructure composed of the ferrite, bainitic ferrite, and austenite. Abnormal elongation due to the TRIP effect in the austenite phase is found to have occurred at about 198 K. Moreover, it is shown that this TRIP effect may be caused by the formation of deformation twins.

  12. Fracture toughness of fiber-reinforced glass ceramic and ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stull, Kevin R.; Parvizi-Majidi, A.

    1991-01-01

    A fracture mechanics investigation of 2D woven Nicalon SiC/SiC and Nicalon SiC/LAS has been undertaken. An energy approach has been adopted to characterize and quantify the fracture properties of these materials. Chevron-notched bend specimens were tested in an edgewise configuration in which the crack propagated perpendicular to the ply direction. R-curves were obtained from repeated loading and unloading of specimens using several methods of data reduction. Values correconding to the plateau regions of the R-curves were taken as steady-state crack-growth resistance. These ranged from 37 to 63 kJ/sq m for 2D-SiC/LAS and 2.6 to 2.8 kJ/sq m for 2D-SiC/SiC composites.

  13. Tough Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vosteen, L. F. (Compiler); Johnson, N. J. (Compiler); Teichman, L. A. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Papers and working group summaries are presented which address composite material behavior and performance improvement. Topic areas include composite fracture toughness and impact characterization, constituent properties and interrelationships, and matrix synthesis and characterization.

  14. Effect of Growth Rate on Elevated Temperature Plastic Flow and Room Temperature Fracture Toughness of Directionally Solidified NiAl-31Cr-3Mo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Raj, S. V.; Locci, I. E.; Salem, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    The eutectic system Ni-33Al-31Cr-3Mo was directionally solidified at rates ranging from 7.6 to 508 mm/h. Samples were examined for microstructure and alloy chemistry, compression tested at 1200 and 1300 K, and subjected to room temperature fracture toughness measurements. Lamellar eutectic grains were formed at 12.7 mm/h; however cellular structures with a radial eutectic pattern developed at faster growth rates. Elevated temperature compression testing between 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -7)/s did not reveal an optimum growth condition, nor did any single growth condition result in a significant fracture toughness advantage. The mechanical behavior, taken together, suggests that Ni-33Al-31Cr-3Mo grown at rates from 25.4 to 254 mm/h will have nominally equivalent properties.

  15. Analytical modeling of the effect of crack depth, specimen size, and biaxial stress on the fracture toughness of reactor vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yuh-Jin; Lam, Poh-Sang

    1995-02-01

    Fracture, toughness values for A533-B reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel obtained from test programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and University of Kansas (KU) are interpreted using the J-A(sub 2) analytical model. The analytical model is based on the critical stress concept and takes into consideration the constraint effect using the second parameter A(sub 2) in addition to the generally accepted first parameter J which represents the loading level. It is demonstrated that with the constraint level included in the model effects of crack depth (shallow vs deep), specimen size (small vs. large), and loading type (uniaxial vs biaxial) on the fracture toughness from the test programs can be interpreted and predicted.

  16. Comparison of the fracture toughness and wear resistance of indirect composites cured by conventional post curing methods and electron beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Vaishnavi, C; Kavitha, S; Narayanan, L Lakshmi

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To compare the fracture toughness and wear resistance of indirect composites cured by conventional post curing methods and electron beam irradiation. Materials and Methods: Forty specimens were randomly assigned into four groups of ten each and were subjected to various post curing methods. Fracture toughness and wear resistance tests were performed and the results were tabulated and analyzed statistically using Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Results: It was found that Inlay system showed higher values followed by electron beam irradiation. Conclusion: Electron beam irradiation of dental composites gives comparable mechanical properties to other post curing systems. It can be concluded that further studies with increased radiation dose should be performed to improve the mechanical properties of indirect composites. PMID:21116390

  17. Analytical modeling of the effect of crack depth, specimen size, and biaxial stress on the fracture toughness of reactor vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Yuh-Jin; Lam, Poh-Sang

    1995-02-01

    Fracture, toughness values for A533-B reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel obtained from test programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and University of Kansas (KU) are interpreted using the J-A{sub 2} analytical model. The analytical model is based on the critical stress concept and takes into consideration the constraint effect using the second parameter A{sub 2} in addition to the generally accepted first parameter J which represents the loading level. It is demonstrated that with the constraint level included in the model effects of crack depth (shallow vs deep), specimen size (small vs. large), and loading type (uniaxial vs biaxial) on the fracture toughness from the test programs can be interpreted and predicted.

  18. Correlation of shape and size of methane bubbles in fine-grained muddy aquatic sediments with sediment fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsman, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Gassy sediments contribute to destabilization of aquatic infrastructure, air pollution, and global warming. In the current study a precise shape and size of the buoyant mature methane bubble in fine-grained muddy aquatic sediment is defined by numerical and analytical modeling, their results are in a good agreement. A closed-form analytical solution defining the bubble parameters is developed. It is found that the buoyant mature bubble is elliptical in its front view and resembles an inverted tear drop in its cross-section. The size and shape of the mature bubble strongly correlate with sediment fracture toughness. Bubbles formed in the weaker sediments are smaller and characterized by a larger surface-to-volume ratio that induces their faster growth and may lead to their faster dissolution below the sediment-water interface. This may prevent their release to the water column and to the atmosphere. Shapes of the bubbles in the weaker sediments deviate further from the spherical configuration, than those in the stronger sediments. Modeled bubble characteristics, important for the acoustic applications, are in a good agreement with field observations and lab experiments.

  19. A Modified Edge Crack Torsion Test for Measurement of Mode III Fracture Toughness of Laminated Tape Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Davidson, Barry D.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Modifications to the edge crack torsion (ECT) test are studied to improve the reliability of this test for measuring the mode-III fracture toughness, G (sub IIIc), of laminated tape fiber-reinforced polymeric (FRP) composites. First, the data reduction methods currently used in the ECT test are evaluated and deficiencies in their accuracy are discussed. An alternative data reduction technique, which uses a polynomial form to represent ECT specimen compliance solution, is evaluated and compared to FEA (finite element analysis) results. Second, seven batches of ECT specimens are tested, each batch containing specimens with a preimplanted midplane edge delamination and midplane plies with orientations of plus theta divided by minus theta, with theta ranging from 0 degrees to 90 degrees in 15-degree increments. Tests on these specimens show that intralaminar cracking occurs in specimens from all batches except for which theta = 15 degrees and 30 degrees. Tests on specimens of these two batches are shown to result in mode-III delamination growth at the intended ply interface. The findings from this study are encouraging steps towards the use of the ECT test as a standardized method for measuring G (sub IIIc), although further modification to the data reduction method is required to make it suitable for use as part of a standardized test method.

  20. Fracture Toughness of Carbon Fiber Composites Containing Various Fiber Sizings and a Puncture Self-Healing Thermoplastic Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Gordon, Keith L.; Smith, Joseph G.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing efforts at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have resulted in the identification of several commercially available thermoplastic resin systems which self-heal after ballistic impact and through penetration. One of these resins, polybutylene graft copolymer (PBg), was selected as a matrix for processing with unsized carbon fibers to fabricate reinforced composites for further evaluation. During process development, data from thermo-physical analyses was utilized to determine a processing cycle to fabricate laminate panels, which were analyzed by photo microscopy and acid digestion. The process cycle was further optimized based on these results to fabricate panels for mechanical property characterization. The results of the processing development effort of this composite material, as well as the results of the mechanical property characterization, indicated that bonding between the fiber and PBg was not adequate. Therefore, three sizings were investigated in this work to assess their potential to improve fiber/matrix bonding compared to previously tested unsized IM7 fiber. Unidirectional prepreg was made at NASA LaRC from three sized carbon fibers and utilized to fabricate test coupons that were tested in double cantilever beam configurations to determine GIc fracture toughness.

  1. Strength, Fatigue, and Fracture Toughness of Ti-6Al-4V Liner from a Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Lerch, Brad; Thesken, John C.; Sutter, Jim; Russell, Richard

    2008-01-01

    It was demonstrated by way of experiment that Composite Over-wrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Ti-6Al-4V liner material can sustain the expected service loads and cycles. The experiments were performed as part of investigations on the residual life of COPV tanks being used in Space Shuttle Orbiters. Measured properties included tensile strength, compressive strength, reversed loading cycles to simulate liner proof strains, and cyclic fatigue loading to demonstrate the ability to sustain 1000 cycles after liner buckling. The liner material came from a salvaged 40 in. Columbia (orbiter 102) tank (SN029), and tensile strength measurements were made on both boss-transition (thick) and membrane regions (thin). The average measured yield strength was 131 ksi in the boss-transition and membrane regions, in good agreement with measurements made on 1970 s vintage forged plate stock. However, Young s modulus was 17.4+/-0.3 Msi, somewhat higher than typical handbook values (approx.16 Msi). The fracture toughness, as estimated from a failed fatigue specimen, was 74 ksi/sq in, in reasonable agreement with standardized measurements made on 1970 s vintage forged plate stock. Low cycle fatigue of a buckled test specimen implied that as-imprinted liners can sustain over 4000 load cycles.

  2. Aqueous stress-corrosion cracking of high-toughness D6AC steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history, and test technique, under sustained load in filtered natural seawater, 3.3 per cent sodium chloride solution, and distilled water, was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered in terms of the present study with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, and threshold. Both threshold and growth kinetics were found to be relatively insensitive to these test parameters. The apparent incubation period was dependent on technique, both detection sensitivity and precracking stress intensity level.

  3. Tough Questions for Tough Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrett, William; Budge, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Six high-performing/high-poverty schools provide insights into what it takes to make a dramatic turnaround. School leaders had to make tough calls--and many of those decisions were about how to use resources. The budget in a high-performing, high-poverty school is a moral document, reflective of the school's beliefs about the conditions necessary…

  4. High Energy Gas Fracturing Test

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, R.

    2001-02-27

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed two tests of a high-energy gas fracturing system being developed by Western Technologies of Crossville, Tennessee. The tests involved the use of two active wells located at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), thirty-five miles north of Casper, Wyoming (See Figure 1). During the testing process the delivery and operational system was enhanced by RMOTC, Western Technologies, and commercial wireline subcontractors. RMOTC has assisted an industrial client in developing their technology for high energy gas fracturing to a commercial level. The modifications and improvements implemented during the technology testing process are instrumental in all field testing efforts at RMOTC. The importance of well selection can also be critical in demonstrating the success of the technology. To date, significant increases in well productivity have been clearly proven in well 63-TPX-10. Gross fluid production was initially raised by a factor of three. Final production rates increased by a factor of six with the use of a larger submersible pump. Well productivity (bbls of fluid per foot of drawdown) increased by a factor of 15 to 20. The above results assume that no mechanical damage has occurred to the casing or cast iron bridge plug which could allow well production from the Tensleep ''B'' sand. In the case of well 61-A-3, a six-fold increase in total fluid production was seen. Unfortunately, the increase is clouded by the water injection into the well that was necessary to have a positive fluid head on the propellant tool. No significant increase in oil production was seen. The tools which were retrieved from both 63-TPX-10 and 61-A-3 indicated a large amount of energy, similar to high gram perforating, had been expended downhole upon the formation face.

  5. Effects of alloying elements on fracture toughness in the transition temperature region of base metals and simulated heat-affected zones of Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangho; Im, Young-Roc; Lee, Sunghak; Lee, Hu-Chul; Kim, Sung-Joon; Hong, Jun Hwa

    2004-07-01

    This study is concerned with the effects of alloying elements on fracture toughness in the transition temperature region of base metals and heat-affected zones (HAZs) of Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steels. Three kinds of steels whose compositions were varied from the composition specification of SA 508 steel (grade 3) were fabricated by vacuum-induction melting and heat treatment, and their fracture toughness was examined using an ASTM E1921 standard test method. In the steels that have decreased C and increased Mo and Ni content, the number of fine M2C carbides was greatly increased and the number of coarse M3C carbides was decreased, thereby leading to the simultaneous improvement of tensile properties and fracture toughness. Brittle martensite-austenite (M-A) constituents were also formed in these steels during cooling, but did not deteriorate fracture toughness because they were decomposed to ferrite and fine carbides after tempering. Their simulated HAZs also had sufficient impact toughness after postweld heat treatment. These findings indicated that the reduction in C content to inhibit the formation of coarse cementite and to improve toughness and the increase in Mo and Ni to prevent the reduction in hardenability and to precipitate fine M2C carbides were useful ways to improve simultaneously the tensile and fracture properties of the HAZs as well as the base metals.

  6. Silicone-based tough hydrogels with high resilience, fast self-recovery, and self-healing properties.

    PubMed

    Si, Liqi; Zheng, Xiaowen; Nie, Jun; Yin, Ruixue; Hua, Yujie; Zhu, Xiaoqun

    2016-06-28

    Tough hydrogels are prepared from two monomers via photopolymerization of hydroxyethyl acrylate and sol-gel of methyltrimethoxysilane. Constitution and water content could be tuned easily because of the good water solubility of both monomers and two non-interfering polymerization processes. The hydrogels exhibit excellent integrated performance with toughness, high resilience, fast self-recovery, and self-healing. PMID:27257636

  7. Tough, bio-inspired hybrid materials

    SciTech Connect

    Munch, Etienne; Launey, Maximimilan E.; Alsem, Daan H.; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-10-06

    The notion of mimicking natural structures in the synthesis of new structural materials has generated enormous interest but has yielded few practical advances. Natural composites achieve strength and toughness through complex hierarchical designs extremely difficult to replicate synthetically. Here we emulate Nature's toughening mechanisms through the combination of two ordinary compounds, aluminum oxide and polymethylmethacrylate, into ice-templated structures whose toughness can be over 300 times (in energy terms) that of their constituents. The final product is a bulk hybrid ceramic material whose high yield strength and fracture toughness ({approx}200 MPa and {approx}30 MPa{radical}m) provide specific properties comparable to aluminum alloys. These model materials can be used to identify the key microstructural features that should guide the synthesis of bio-inspired ceramic-based composites with unique strength and toughness.

  8. Room temperature crack growth rates and -20 deg F fracture toughness of welded 1 1/4 inch A-285 steel plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. L., Jr.; Rzasnicki, W.

    1977-01-01

    Data are presented which were developed in support of a structural assessment of NASA-LEWIS' 10-foot by 10-foot supersonic wind tunnel, critical portions of which are fabricated from rolled and welded 1 1/4 inch thick A-285 steel plate. Test material was flame cut from the tunnel wall and included longitudinal and circumferential weld joints. Parent metal, welds, and weld heat affected zone were tested. Tensile strength and fracture toughness were determined at -20 F, the estimated lowest tunnel operating temperature. Crack growth rates were measured at room temperature, where growth rates in service are expected to be highest.

  9. Tensile, Compression, Open-Hole Compression and Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Multiple NASA Langley Research Center Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    The attached data summarizes the work performed by the Composite Materials Research Group at the University of Wyoming funded by the NASA LaRC Research Grant NAG-1-1294. The work consisted primarily of tension, compression, open-hole compression and double cantilever beam fracture toughness testing performed an a variety of NASA LaRC composite materials. Tests were performed at various environmental conditions and pre-conditioning requirements. The primary purpose of this work was to support the LaRC material development efforts. The data summaries are arranged in chronological order from oldest to newest.

  10. The influence of composition, annealing treatment, and texture on the fracture toughness of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn plate at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanstone, R. H.; Shannon, J. L., Jr.; Pierce, W. S.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The plane strain fracture toughness K sub Ic and conventional tensile properties of two commercially produced one-inch thick Ti-5Al-2.5Sn plates were determined at cryogenic temperatures. One plate was extra-low interstitial (ELI) grade, the other normal interstitial. Portions of each plate were mill annealed at 1088 K (1500 F) followed by either air cooling or furnace cooling. The tensile properties, flow curves, and K sub Ic of these plates were determined at 295 K (room temperature), 77 K (liquid nitrogen temperature), and 20 K (liquid hydrogen temperature).

  11. Grain-refining heat treatments to improve cryogenic toughness of high-strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, H. F.

    1984-01-01

    The development of two high Reynolds number wind tunnels at NASA Langley Research Center which operate at cryogenic temperatures with high dynamic pressures has imposed severe requirements on materials for model construction. Existing commercial high strength steels lack sufficient toughness to permit their safe use at temperatures approaching that of liquid nitrogen (-320 F). Therefore, a program to improve the cryogenic toughness of commercial high strength steels was conducted. Significant improvement in the cryogenic toughness of commercial high strength martensitic and maraging steels was demonstrated through the use of grain refining heat treatments. Charpy impact strength at -320 F was increased by 50 to 180 percent for the various alloys without significant loss in tensile strength. The grain sizes of the 9 percent Ni-Co alloys and 200 grade maraging steels were reduced to 1/10 of the original size or smaller, with the added benefit of improved machinability. This grain refining technique should permit these alloys with ultimate strengths of 220 to 270 ksi to receive consideration for cryogenic service.

  12. Influence of van der Waals forces on increasing the strength and toughness in dynamic fracture of nanofibre networks: a peridynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobaru, F.

    2007-07-01

    The peridynamic method is used here to analyse the effect of van der Waals forces on the mechanical behaviour and strength and toughness properties of three-dimensional nanofibre networks under imposed stretch deformation. The peridynamic formulation allows for a natural inclusion of long-range forces (such as van der Waals forces) by considering all interactions as 'long-range'. We use van der Waals interactions only between different fibres and do not need to model individual atoms. Fracture is introduced at the microstructural (peridynamic bond) level for the microelastic type bonds, while van der Waals bonds can reform at any time. We conduct statistical studies to determine a certain volume element for which the network of randomly oriented fibres becomes quasi-isotropic and insensitive to statistical variations. This qualitative study shows that the presence of van der Waals interactions and of heterogeneities (sacrificial bonds) in the strength of the bonds at the crosslinks between fibres can help in increasing the strength and toughness of the nanofibre network. Two main mechanisms appear to control the deformation of nanofibre networks: fibre reorientation (caused by deformation and breakage) and fibre accretion (due to van der Waals interaction). Similarities to the observed toughness of polymer adhesive in the abalone shell composition are explained. The author would like to dedicate this work to the 60th anniversary of Professor Subrata Mukherjee.

  13. Keeping Overage Students in High School Proves Tough

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Hanging onto kids who might otherwise leave school is the mission of the Options Complex at Margaret A. Ireland School in Cleveland. Options Complex is a program for students in grades 6-12 who are behind in school by two or more years. Much of the concern about dropout rates has focused on improving high schools. Experts say that struggling…

  14. LaRC-RP41: A Tough, High-Performance Composite Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Johnston, Norman J.; Smith, Ricky E.; Snoha, John J.; Gautreaux, Carol R.; Reddy, Rakasi M.

    1991-01-01

    New polymer exhibits increased toughness and resistance to microcracking. Cross-linking PMR-15 and linear LaRC-TPI combined to provide sequential semi-2-IPN designated as LaRC-RP41. Synthesized from PMR-15 imide prepolymer undergoing cross-linking in immediate presence of LaRC-TPI polyamic acid, also undergoing simultaneous imidization and linear chain extension. Potentially high-temperature matrix resin, adhesive, and molding resin. Applications include automobiles, electronics, aircraft, and aerospace structures.

  15. Forced Protein Unfolding Leads to Highly Elastic and Tough Protein Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jie; Mehlich, Alexander; Koga, Nobuyasu; Huang, Jiqing; Koga, Rie; Gao, Xiaoye; Hu, Chunguang; Jin, Chi; Rief, Matthias; Kast, Juergen; Baker, David; Li, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    Protein-based hydrogels usually do not exhibit high stretchability or toughness, significantly limiting the scope of their potential biomedical applications. Here we report the engineering of a chemically crosslinked, highly elastic and tough protein hydrogel using a mechanically extremely labile, de novo designed protein that assumes the classical ferredoxin-like fold structure. Due to the low mechanical stability of the ferredoxin-like fold structure, swelling of hydrogels causes a significant fraction of the fold structure domains to unfold. Subsequent collapse and aggregation of unfolded ferredoxin-like fold structure domains leads to intertwining of physically and chemically crosslinked networks, entailing hydrogels with unusual physical and mechanical properties: a negative swelling ratio, high stretchability and toughness. These hydrogels can withstand an average strain of 450% before breaking and show massive energy dissipation. Upon relaxation, refolding of the ferredoxin-like fold structure domains enables the hydrogel to recover its massive hysteresis. This novel biomaterial may expand the scope of hydrogel applications in tissue engineering. PMID:24352111

  16. Evaluation of crack arrest fracture toughness of parent plate, weld metal and heat affected zone of BIS 812 EMA ship plate steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, I. A.

    1993-10-01

    The steel chosen for the pressure hull of the Collins class submarine has undergone evaluation to compare the crack arrest fracture toughness, K(Ia), of the parent plate with that of weld metal and heat affected zone. The tests were conducted over a range of subzero temperatures on specimens slightly outside the ASTM standard test method specimen configuration. Shallow face grooved specimens were used to vary the propagating crack velocity from that of non face grooved specimens and determine if K(Ia), is sensitive to changes in crack velocity. The weld metal, heat affected zone (HAZ), and parent plate were assessed to determine if the welding process had a deleterious effect on the crack arrest properties of this particular steel. Tests on each of these regions revealed that, for the combination of parent plate, welding procedure and consumables, no adverse effect on crack arrest properties was encountered. Crack arrest fracture toughness of the weld metal and HAZ was superior to that of the parent plate at comparable temperatures.

  17. Flexural toughness of steel fiber reinforced high performance concrete containing nano-SiO2 and fly ash.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Ya-Nan; Li, Qing-Fu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Tian-Hang

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to clarify the effect of steel fiber on the flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2. The flexural toughness was evaluated by two methods, which are based on ASTM C1018 and DBV-1998, respectively. By means of three-point bending method, the flexural toughness indices, variation coefficients of bearing capacity, deformation energy, and equivalent flexural strength of the specimen were measured, respectively, and the relational curves between the vertical load and the midspan deflection (P(V)-δ) were obtained. The results indicate that steel fiber has great effect on the flexural toughness parameters and relational curves (P(V)-δ) of the three-point bending beam specimen. When the content of steel fiber increases from 0.5% to 2%, the flexural toughness parameters increase gradually and the curves are becoming plumper and plumper with the increase of steel fiber content, respectively. However these flexural toughness parameters begin to decrease and the curves become thinner and thinner after the steel fiber content exceeds 2%. It seems that the contribution of steel fiber to the improvement of flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2 is well performed only when the steel fiber content is less than 2%.

  18. Flexural Toughness of Steel Fiber Reinforced High Performance Concrete Containing Nano-SiO2 and Fly Ash

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ya-Nan; Li, Qing-Fu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Tian-Hang

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to clarify the effect of steel fiber on the flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2. The flexural toughness was evaluated by two methods, which are based on ASTM C1018 and DBV-1998, respectively. By means of three-point bending method, the flexural toughness indices, variation coefficients of bearing capacity, deformation energy, and equivalent flexural strength of the specimen were measured, respectively, and the relational curves between the vertical load and the midspan deflection (PV-δ) were obtained. The results indicate that steel fiber has great effect on the flexural toughness parameters and relational curves (PV-δ) of the three-point bending beam specimen. When the content of steel fiber increases from 0.5% to 2%, the flexural toughness parameters increase gradually and the curves are becoming plumper and plumper with the increase of steel fiber content, respectively. However these flexural toughness parameters begin to decrease and the curves become thinner and thinner after the steel fiber content exceeds 2%. It seems that the contribution of steel fiber to the improvement of flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2 is well performed only when the steel fiber content is less than 2%. PMID:24883395

  19. An Investigation on the Use of a Laser Ablation Treatment on Metallic Surfaces and the Influence of Temperature on Fracture Toughness of Hybrid Co-Cured Metal-PMC Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John; Palmieri, Frank; Truong, Hieu; Ochoa, Ozden; Lagoudas, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid composite laminates that contain alternating layers of titanium alloys and carbon fabric reinforced polyimide matrix composites (PMC) are excellent candidates for light-weight, high-temperature structural materials for high-speed aerospace vehicles. The delamination resistance of the hybrid titanium-PMC interface is of crucial consideration for structural integrity during service. Here, we report the first investigations on the use of laser ablation in combination with sol-gel treatment technique on Ti/NiTi foil surfaces in co-cured hybrid polyimide matrix composite laminates. Mode-I and mode-II fracture toughness of the hybrid Ti/NiTi-PMC interface as a function of temperature were determined via experimental testing and finite element analysis.

  20. Optimisation of toughness and strength properties in fibre composites with controlled interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.K.; Mai, Y.W.

    1993-12-31

    A novel method is presented to achieve both high strength and high fracture toughness of fiber composites by means of a microductile interlayer between fiber and matrix. Experiments conducted on epoxy matrix composites reinforced with unidirectional Kevlar and carbon fibers (KFRP and CFRP) with a thin layer of thermoplastic coating, e.g. polyvinyl alcohol (PVAL), on the fiber show promising results for transverse fracture toughness without any significant loss in strength properties. Variation of fracture toughness with temperature is a direct manifestation of the dependence of the interface properties on the parameter studied. Interlaminar fracture toughness determined in mode 1 and mixed mode 1/2 delamination is also shown to be encouraging. Surface analysis of the fiber and composite interfaces confirms the distinctive failure mechanisms between the composites with and without the PVAL coating. A micromechanics analysis of the total fracture toughness arising from major failure mechanisms gives good agreement with experimental results. Characterization of the interface properties, including interfacial fracture toughness, residual clamping stress and coefficient of friction, using a fiber pull-out model based on a shear-lag analysis is discussed and applied to evaluate experimental data obtained in these composites.

  1. iTOUGH2 Command Reference

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, Stefan

    2002-06-18

    iTOUGH2 is a program for parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty propagation analysis. It is based on the TOUGH2 simulator for non-isothermal multiphase flow in fractured and porous media. This report contains a detailed description of all iTOUGH2 commands.

  2. iTOUGH2 Sample Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, Stefan

    2002-06-18

    iTOUGH2 is a program for parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty propagation analysis. It is based on the TOUGH2 simulator for non-isothermal multiphase flow in fractured and porous media. This report contains a collection of iTOUGH2 sample problems.

  3. Interpretation of Fracture Toughness and R-Curve Behavior by Direct Observation of Microfracture Process in Ti-Based Dendrite-Containing Amorphous Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Changwoo; Kim, Choongnyun Paul; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2015-04-01

    Fracture properties of Ti-based amorphous alloys containing ductile β dendrites were explained by directly observing microfracture processes. Three Ti-based amorphous alloys were fabricated by adding Ti, Zr, V, Ni, Al, and Be into a Ti-6Al-4V alloy by a vacuum arc melting method. The effective sizes of dendrites varied from 63 to 104 μm, while their volume fractions were almost constant within the range from 74 to 76 pct. The observation of the microfracture of the alloy containing coarse dendrites revealed that a microcrack initiated at the amorphous matrix of the notch tip and propagated along the amorphous matrix. In the alloy containing fine dendrites, the crack propagation was frequently blocked by dendrites, and many deformation bands were formed near or in front of the propagating crack, thereby resulting in a zig-zag fracture path. Crack initiation toughness was almost the same at 35 to 36 MPa√m within error ranges in the three alloys because it was heavily affected by the stress applied to the specimen at the time of crack initiation at the crack tip as well as strength levels of the alloys. According to the R-curve behavior, however, the best overall fracture properties in the alloy containing fine dendrites were explained by mechanisms of blocking of the crack growth and crack blunting and deformation band formation at dendrites.

  4. Nondestructive and Localized Measurements of Stress-Strain Curves and Fracture Toughness of Ferritic Steels at Various Temperatures Using Innovative Stress-Strain Microprobe Technology. Final Report for Period 8/13/1996--06/16/1999

    SciTech Connect

    Fahmy M. Haggag

    1999-10-29

    The results presented in this report demonstrate the capabilities of Advanced Technology Corporation's patented Portable/In Situ Stress-Strain Microprobe (TM) (SSM) System and its Automated Ball Indentation (ABI) test techniques to nondestructively measure the yield strength, the stress-strain curve, and the fracture toughness of ferritic steel samples and components in a reliable and accurate manner.

  5. Crack tip fracture toughness of base glasses for dental restoration glass-ceramics using crack opening displacements.

    PubMed

    Deubener, J; Höland, M; Höland, W; Janakiraman, N; Rheinberger, V M

    2011-10-01

    The critical stress intensity factor, also known as the crack tip toughness K(tip), was determined for three base glasses, which are used in the manufacture of glass-ceramics. The glasses included the base glass for a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, the base glass for a fluoroapatite glass-ceramic and the base glass for a leucite glass-ceramic. These glass-ceramic are extensively used in the form of biomaterials in restorative dental medicine. The crack tip toughness was established by using crack opening displacement profiles under experimental conditions. The crack was produced by Vickers indentation. The crack tip toughness parameters determined for the three glass-ceramics differed quite significantly. The crack tip parameters of the lithium disilicate base glass and the leucite base glass were higher than that of the fluoroapatite base glass. This last material showed glass-in-glass phase separation. The discussion of the results clearly shows that the droplet glass phase is softer than the glass matrix. Therefore, the authors conclude that a direct relationship exists between the chemical nature of the glasses and the crack tip parameter.

  6. Geothermal well stimulated using High Energy Gas Fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.; Jacobson, R.D.; Warpinski, N.; Mohaupt, H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports the result of an experimental study of the High Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF) technique for geothermal well stimulation. These experiments demonstrated that multiple fractures could be created to link a water-filled borehole with other fractures. The resulting fracture network and fracture interconnections were characterized by flow tests as well as mine back. Commercial oil field fracturing tools were used successfully in these experiments.

  7. Geothermal Well Stimulated Using High Energy Gas Fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.; Jacobson, R.D.; Warpinski, N.; Mohaupt, Henry

    1987-01-20

    This paper reports the result of an experimental study of the High Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF) technique for geothermal well stimulation. These experiments demonstrated that multiple fractures could be created to link a water-filled borehole with other fractures. The resulting fracture network and fracture interconnections were characterized by flow tests as well as mine back. Commercial oil field fracturing tools were used successfully in these experiments. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  8. The influence of high performance matrices on fracture behavior of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lertwattanaruk, Pusit

    Modification of cement matrices by the addition of micro particle pozzolanic materials such as silica fume and fly ash is known to improve the strength of concrete, but its contributions to fracture behavior remains unclear. In this study, the influence of replacing cement by silica fume and fly ash on the cement matrix-coarse aggregate interfacial bond, compressive stress-strain behavior and fracture behavior of concrete is investigated. While the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) concept is not appropriate for concrete, a non-linear fracture model based on the load vs. load-line deflection and the load vs. crack-mouth-opening displacement (CMOD) responses of the three-point bend tests on notched beams is proposed and validated. Instead of using the LEFM based Two-Parameter Fracture Model that cannot adequately describes fracture processes in concrete, the proposed model is capable of generating the load vs. crack growth curve and the fracture resistance curve, and seems to be more appropriate for studying fracture behavior of concrete. Incorporating silica fume in concrete mixture is found to have many beneficial effects on cement matrix-coarse aggregate interface, but less likely to improve the toughness of the cement matrix itself. The enhanced interfacial bond due to silica fume produces a more homogeneous concrete, which is responsible for the high strength, but more brittle concrete. It is shown that improving interfacial bond has positive effect on the pre-peak fracture behavior of concrete (e.g. the critical energy release rate, GC), but does not necessarily improve the overall fracture behavior (e.g. the fracture energy, GF, and the brittleness). In this study, coal fly ashes were fractionated into various size ranges by the air classifier method. It is found that replacing cement by very fine fly ash (with average particle size less than 3 microns) can enhance both the toughness of cement matrix and the interfacial bond, which results in high

  9. TOUGH User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1987-08-01

    This document contains a technical description of the TOUGH computer program, which was developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for simulating the coupled transport of water, vapor, air and heat in porous and fractured media. The physical processes taken into account in TOUGH are discussed, and the governing equations actually solved by the simulator are stated in full detail. A brief overview is given of the mathematical and numerical methods, and the code architecture. The report provides detailed instructions for preparing input decks. Code applications are illustrated by means of six sample problems.

  10. The Use of Doublers in Delamination Toughness Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.; Demarco, Kevin; Whitley, Karen S.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the data reduction equations for common delamination toughness tests are rederived for use with specimens which have bonded doublers. The common toughness tests considered here are the double cantilever beam (DCB) for mode I toughness; the end notch flexure (3ENF) and 4 point ENF (4ENF) for mode II toughness; and the mixed mode bending (MMB) test for testing under combined mode I and mode II loading. Because the addition of the doublers changes the bending stiffness of the specimens, these data reduction equations may need to be corrected. Doublers were added to the delamination test specimens to solve a premature failure problem. Delamination toughness is normally tested using a beam with an imbedded insert so that one end of the specimen is split into two arms. If the specimen is too thin, or if the toughness of the material is too high, an arm of the specimen may fail in bending before the delamination grows. When this occurs, the toughness of the material cannot be determined. To delay the bending failure so that delamination growth occurs, doubler plates were bonded to both top and bottom surfaces of the specimen. A doubler parameter, beta, which describes how much the use of doubler plates changed the ratio of full thickness to delaminated bending stiffnesses, was defined. When changes to the data reduction equations were required, the changes were minor when written in terms of the beta parameter. The doubler plate technique was demonstrated by measuring the mixed-mode fracture toughness of a carbon-carbon composite using test specimens which would otherwise have failed before delamination growth occurred. The doubler plate technique may solve several problems that can be encountered when testing delamination fracture toughness.

  11. Damage mechanisms and fracture toughness of GlidCop ® CuAl25 IG0 copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tähtinen, S.; Laukkanen, A.; Singh, B. N.

    2000-12-01

    Crack nucleation and growth behaviour are important parameters in deciding about the applicability of the dispersion strengthened copper alloy CuAl25 in components such as the first wall and divertor in ITER. The effective strain to fracture of notched tensile specimens decreased with increasing stress state triaxiality and with increasing temperature at constant constraint level following the Rice and Tracey model for void growth. In three point bend tests, the strain for stable crack initiation decreased significantly with increasing temperature. The CuAl25 alloy failed by a ductile microvoid mechanism where extensive void nucleation occurred at very low strains at grain boundaries with increasing stress state triaxiality. At elevated temperatures the fracture surface morphology changed from microvoid to intergranular fracture in three-point bend tests.

  12. User's Guide for TOUGH2-MP - A Massively Parallel Version of the TOUGH2 Code

    SciTech Connect

    Earth Sciences Division; Zhang, Keni; Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Pruess, Karsten

    2008-05-27

    TOUGH2-MP is a massively parallel (MP) version of the TOUGH2 code, designed for computationally efficient parallel simulation of isothermal and nonisothermal flows of multicomponent, multiphase fluids in one, two, and three-dimensional porous and fractured media. In recent years, computational requirements have become increasingly intensive in large or highly nonlinear problems for applications in areas such as radioactive waste disposal, CO2 geological sequestration, environmental assessment and remediation, reservoir engineering, and groundwater hydrology. The primary objective of developing the parallel-simulation capability is to significantly improve the computational performance of the TOUGH2 family of codes. The particular goal for the parallel simulator is to achieve orders-of-magnitude improvement in computational time for models with ever-increasing complexity. TOUGH2-MP is designed to perform parallel simulation on multi-CPU computational platforms. An earlier version of TOUGH2-MP (V1.0) was based on the TOUGH2 Version 1.4 with EOS3, EOS9, and T2R3D modules, a software previously qualified for applications in the Yucca Mountain project, and was designed for execution on CRAY T3E and IBM SP supercomputers. The current version of TOUGH2-MP (V2.0) includes all fluid property modules of the standard version TOUGH2 V2.0. It provides computationally efficient capabilities using supercomputers, Linux clusters, or multi-core PCs, and also offers many user-friendly features. The parallel simulator inherits all process capabilities from V2.0 together with additional capabilities for handling fractured media from V1.4. This report provides a quick starting guide on how to set up and run the TOUGH2-MP program for users with a basic knowledge of running the (standard) version TOUGH2 code, The report also gives a brief technical description of the code, including a discussion of parallel methodology, code structure, as well as mathematical and numerical methods used

  13. Comparison of Mental Toughness and Power Test Performances in High-Level Kickboxers by Competitive Success

    PubMed Central

    Slimani, Maamer; Miarka, Bianca; Briki, Walid; Cheour, Foued

    2016-01-01

    Background Kickboxing is a high-intensity intermittent striking combat sport, which is characterized by complex skills and tactical key actions with short duration. Objectives The present study compared and verified the relationship between mental toughness (MT), countermovement jump (CMJ) and medicine ball throw (MBT) power tests by outcomes of high-level kickboxers during National Championship. Materials and Methods Thirty two high-level male kickboxers (winner = 16 and loser = 16: 21.2 ± 3.1 years, 1.73 ± 0.07 m, and 70.2 ± 9.4 kg) were analyzed using the CMJ, MBT tests and sports mental toughness questionnaire (SMTQ; based in confidence, constancy and control subscales), before the fights of the 2015 national championship (16 bouts). In statistical analysis, Mann-Withney test and a multiple linear regression were used to compare groups and to observe relationships, respectively, P ≤ 0.05. Results The present results showed significant differences between losers vs. winners, respectively, of total MT (7(7;8) vs. 11(10.2;11), confidence (3(3;3) vs. 4(4;4)), constancy (2(2;2) vs. 3(3;3)), control (2(2;3) vs. 4(4;4)) subscales and MBT (4.1(4;4.3) vs. 4.6(4.4;4.8)). The multiple linear regression showed a strong associations between MT results and outcome (r = 0.89), MBT (r = 0.84) and CMJ (r = 0.73). Conclusions The findings suggest that MT will be more predictive of performance in those sports and in the outcome of competition. PMID:27625755

  14. Comparison of Mental Toughness and Power Test Performances in High-Level Kickboxers by Competitive Success

    PubMed Central

    Slimani, Maamer; Miarka, Bianca; Briki, Walid; Cheour, Foued

    2016-01-01

    Background Kickboxing is a high-intensity intermittent striking combat sport, which is characterized by complex skills and tactical key actions with short duration. Objectives The present study compared and verified the relationship between mental toughness (MT), countermovement jump (CMJ) and medicine ball throw (MBT) power tests by outcomes of high-level kickboxers during National Championship. Materials and Methods Thirty two high-level male kickboxers (winner = 16 and loser = 16: 21.2 ± 3.1 years, 1.73 ± 0.07 m, and 70.2 ± 9.4 kg) were analyzed using the CMJ, MBT tests and sports mental toughness questionnaire (SMTQ; based in confidence, constancy and control subscales), before the fights of the 2015 national championship (16 bouts). In statistical analysis, Mann-Withney test and a multiple linear regression were used to compare groups and to observe relationships, respectively, P ≤ 0.05. Results The present results showed significant differences between losers vs. winners, respectively, of total MT (7(7;8) vs. 11(10.2;11), confidence (3(3;3) vs. 4(4;4)), constancy (2(2;2) vs. 3(3;3)), control (2(2;3) vs. 4(4;4)) subscales and MBT (4.1(4;4.3) vs. 4.6(4.4;4.8)). The multiple linear regression showed a strong associations between MT results and outcome (r = 0.89), MBT (r = 0.84) and CMJ (r = 0.73). Conclusions The findings suggest that MT will be more predictive of performance in those sports and in the outcome of competition.

  15. The effects of residual stress, viscoelastic and thermodynamic parameters on apparent fracture toughness of dental bilayer ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskonak, Burak

    Bilayer dental ceramic composites used for fixed partial dentures are becoming more widely used in dental practices because of their biocompatibility, aesthetic properties, and chemical durability. However, large statistical variations in the strength of ceramics are associated with the structural flaws as a result of processing and complex stress states within the surfaces of the materials because of thermal properties of each layer. In addition, partial delaminations of the veneer layer and connector fractures of bilayer ceramic fixed partial dentures (FPDs) have been observed in a clinical study which is a part of this dissertation. Analysis of fracture surfaces of failed FPDs reveals that such fractures of the veneering ceramic are most likely caused by lateral crack growth. Global residual stresses associated with the coefficient of thermal expansion differences between core and veneering ceramics can cause lateral crack initiation. Also, rapid cooling of bilayer ceramics from the sintering temperature of the glass veneer may not allow the interfacial stresses in the viscoelastic glass to relax to equilibrium values. This can further contribute to the propagation of lateral cracks. Furthermore, local residual stresses that develop in the plastic deformation zone below sharp contact areas on the occlusal surface are another contributor to lateral crack growth. Superposition of global residual stresses and a Boussinesq stress field can incrementally increase the possibility of lateral crack growth. The long-range goals of this study are to critically analyze the lateral crack growth mechanisms associated with residual stresses, to modify residual tensile stress distributions by controlled heat treatment, and to minimize the probability of veneering ceramic fractures. Four approaches were used to accomplish these goals: (1) clinical evaluation of a bilayer ceramic fixed partial denture system; (2) fracture surface analysis of clinically failed FPDs; (3

  16. Ultrasonic ranking of toughness of tungsten carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation measurements to rank tungsten carbide alloys according to their fracture toughness was demonstrated. Six samples of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) were examined. These varied in cobalt content from approximately 2 to 16 weight percent. The toughness generally increased with increasing cobalt content. Toughness was first determined by the Palmqvist and short rod fracture toughness tests. Subsequently, ultrasonic attenuation measurements were correlated with both these mechanical test methods. It is shown that there is a strong increase in ultrasonic attenuation corresponding to increased toughness of the WC-Co alloys. A correlation between attenuation and toughness exists for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies. However, the best correlation for the WC-Co alloys occurs when the attenuation coefficient measured in the vicinity of 100 megahertz is compared with toughness as determined by the Palmqvist technique.

  17. IAEA Coordinated Research Project on Master Curve Approach to Monitor Fracture Toughness of RPV Steels: Final Results of the Experimental Exercise to Support Constraint Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K

    2009-01-01

    The precracked Charpy single-edge notched bend, SE(B), specimen (PCC) is the most likely specimen type to be used for determination of the reference temperature, T0, with reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surveillance specimens. Unfortunately, for many RPV steels, significant differences have been observed between the T0 temperature for the PCC specimen and that obtained from the 25-mm thick compact specimen [1TC(T)], generally considered the standard reference specimen for T0. This difference in T0 has often been designated a specimen bias effect, and the primary focus for explaining this effect is loss of constraint in the PCC specimen. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has developed a coordinated research project (CRP) to evaluate various issues associated with the fracture toughness Master Curve for application to light-water RPVs. Topic Area 1 of the CRP is focused on the issue of test specimen geometry effects, with emphasis on determination of T0 with the PCC specimen and the bias effect. Topic Area 1 has an experimental part and an analytical part. Participating organizations for the experimental part of the CRP performed fracture toughness testing of various steels, including the reference steel JRQ (A533-B-1) often used for IAEA studies, with various types of specimens under various conditions. Additionally, many of the participants took part in a round robin exercise on finite element modeling of the PCVN specimen, discussed in a separate paper. Results from fracture toughness tests are compared with regard to effects of specimen size and type on the reference temperature T0. It is apparent from the results presented that the bias observed between the PCC specimen and larger specimens for Plate JRQ is not nearly as large as that obtained for Plate 13B (-11 C vs -37 C) and for some of the results in the literature (bias values as much as -45 C). This observation is consistent with observations in the literature that show significant variations in

  18. Efficient high-permeability fracturing offshore

    SciTech Connect

    Phillipi, M.; Farabee, M.

    1996-12-31

    Offshore operators can more efficiently and effectively perform high-permeability and conventional hydraulic fracture treatments by blending treatment slurries under microprocessor control, adding undiluted acid on-the-fly, and altering sand concentrations and other slurry properties instantaneously. A two-skid system has been designed with these considerations in mind. The system, which can be shipped efficiently in ISO containers, has been tested on fluids up to 210-cp viscosity and can step or ramp sand concentrations up to a maximum of 20 lb/gal. All additives, including acid treatments, are added on-the-fly; leftover additives and acids may be stored for future jobs. The system may be applied in most conditions, including offshore wells requiring conventional or high-permeability fracture treatments and certain land-based wells in remote areas where a compact skid is needed. Three significant benefits have resulted from using the compact-skid system: offshore operators have been able to ship the skid system at 20% of shipping costs of non-ISO equipment; on-the-fly mixing has prevented material waste associated with batch-mixing; and volumes pumped on actual jobs have closely matched job designs. Data have been collected from several Gulf of Mexico jobs run with the two-part skid system that has been designed for conducting hydraulic fracture treatments from offshore rigs.

  19. TQM and Tough Love: At Inner-City Applegate Elementary, There Are High Expectations and No Excuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Maya

    2002-01-01

    A Portland (Oregon) elementary school, formerly designated a local "crisis school," has improved academic achievement through a combination of Total Quality Management, high expectations, and tough love. Quarterly assessments enable staff to keep track of each student and guide instructional decisions. Small classes, on-site professional…

  20. Electrostatic Assembly Preparation of High-Toughness Zirconium Diboride-Based Ceramic Composites with Enhanced Thermal Shock Resistance Performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baoxi; Zhang, Xinghong; Hong, Changqing; Qiu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Jia; Han, Jiecai; Hu, PingAn

    2016-05-11

    The central problem of using ceramic as a structural material is its brittleness, which associated with rigid covalent or ionic bonds. Whiskers or fibers of strong ceramics such as silicon carbide (SiC) or silicon nitride (Si3N4) are widely embedded in a ceramic matrix to improve the strength and toughness. The incorporation of these insulating fillers can impede the thermal flow in ceramic matrix, thus decrease its thermal shock resistance that is required in some practical applications. Here we demonstrate that the toughness and thermal shock resistance of zirconium diboride (ZrB2)/SiC composites can be improved simultaneously by introducing graphene into composites via electrostatic assembly and subsequent sintering treatment. The incorporated graphene creates weak interfaces of grain boundaries (GBs) and optimal thermal conductance paths inside composites. In comparison to pristine ZrB2-SiC composites, the toughness of (2.0%) ZrB2-SiC/graphene composites exhibited a 61% increasing (from 4.3 to 6.93 MPa·m(1/2)) after spark plasma sintering (SPS); the retained strength after thermal shock increased as high as 74.8% at 400 °C and 304.4% at 500 °C. Present work presents an important guideline for producing high-toughness ceramic-based composites with enhanced thermal shock properties.