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Sample records for high frequency pressure

  1. High frequency dynamic pressure calibration technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, P. A.; Zasimowich, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    A high frequency dynamic calibration technique for pressure transducers has been developed using a siren pressure generator (SPG). The SPG is an inlet-area-modulated device generating oscillating waveforms with dynamic pressure amplitudes up to 58.6 kPa (8.5 psi) in a frequency range of 1 to 10 kHz. A description of the generator, its operating characteristics and instrumentation used for pressure amplitude and frequency measurements is given. Waveform oscillographs and spectral analysis of the pressure transducers' output signals are presented.

  2. High frequency dynamic pressure calibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, P. A.; Zasimowich, R. F.

    A high frequency dynamic calibration technique for pressure transducers has been developed using a siren pressure generator (SPG). The SPG is an inlet-area-modulated device generating oscillating waveforms with dynamic pressure amplitudes up to 58.6 kPa (8.5 psi) in a frequency range of 1 to 10 kHz. A description of the generator, its operating characteristics and instrumentation used for pressure amplitude and frequency measurements is given. Waveform oscillographs and spectral analysis of the pressure transducers' output signals are presented.

  3. A high frequency silicon pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahng, S. K.; Gross, C.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical and design considerations as well as fabrication and experimental work involved in the development of high-frequency silicon pressure sensors with an ultra-small diaphragm are discussed. A sensor is presented with a rectangular diaphragm of 0.0127 cm x 0.0254 cm x 1.06 micron; the sensor has a natural frequency of 625 kHz and a sensitivity of 0.82 mv/v-psi. High-frequency results from shock tube testing and low-frequency (less than 50 kHz) comparison with microphones are given.

  4. Estimating high frequency ocean bottom pressure variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Katherine J.; Ponte, Rui M.

    2011-04-01

    Knowledge of variability in ocean bottom pressure (pb) at periods < 60 days is essential for minimizing aliasing in satellite gravity missions. We assess how well we know such rapid, non-tidal pb signals by analyzing in-situ bottom pressure recorder (BPR) data and available global estimates from two very different modeling approaches. Estimated pb variance is generally lower than that measured by the BPRs, implying the presence of correlated model errors. Deriving uncertainties from differencing the model estimates can thus severely underestimate the aliasing errors. Removing estimated series from BPR data tends to reduce the variance by up to ˜5 cm2 but residual variance is still ˜5-20 cm2 and not negligible relative to expected variance in climate pb signals. The residual pb variability can be correlated over hundreds of kilometers. Results indicate the need to improve estimates of rapid pb variability in order to minimize aliasing noise in current and future satellite-based pb observations.

  5. Pressure levels and pulsation frequencies can be varied on high pressure/frequency testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Routson, J. W.

    1967-01-01

    Hydraulic system components test device obtains a pulsating pressure from a hydraulic actuator that is being driven by a vibration exciter of sufficient force and displacement. Input to the exciter controls the frequency of pressure variation.

  6. High temperature pressurized high frequency testing rig and test method

    DOEpatents

    De La Cruz, Jose; Lacey, Paul

    2003-04-15

    An apparatus is described which permits the lubricity of fuel compositions at or near temperatures and pressures experienced by compression ignition fuel injector components during operation in a running engine. The apparatus consists of means to apply a measured force between two surfaces and oscillate them at high frequency while wetted with a sample of the fuel composition heated to an operator selected temperature. Provision is made to permit operation at or near the flash point of the fuel compositions. Additionally a method of using the subject apparatus to simulate ASTM Testing Method D6079 is disclosed, said method involving using the disclosed apparatus to contact the faces of prepared workpieces under a measured load, sealing the workface contact point into the disclosed apparatus while immersing said contact point between said workfaces in a lubricating media to be tested, pressurizing and heating the chamber and thereby the fluid and workfaces therewithin, using the disclosed apparatus to impart a differential linear motion between the workpieces at their contact point until a measurable scar is imparted to at least one workpiece workface, and then evaluating the workface scar.

  7. [High-frequency ventilation. I. Distribution of alveolar pressure amplitudes during high frequency oscillation in the lung model].

    PubMed

    Theissen, J; Lunkenheimer, P P; Niederer, P; Bush, E; Frieling, G; Lawin, P

    1987-09-01

    The pattern of intrapulmonary pressure distribution was studied during high-frequency ventilation in order to explain the inconsistent results reported in the literature. Methods. Pressure and flow velocity (hot-wire anemometry) were measured in different lung compartments: 1. In transalveolar chambers sealed to the perforated pleural surfaces of dried pig lungs; 2. In emphysema-simulating airbags sealed to the isolated bronchial trees of dried pig lungs; and 3. In transalveolar chambers sealed to the perforated pleural surfaces of freshly excised pig lungs. Results. 1. The pressure amplitudes change from one area to another and depending on the exciting frequency. 2. High-frequency oscillation is associated with an increase in pressure amplitude when the exciting frequency rises, whereas with conventional high-frequency jet ventilation the pressure amplitude is more likely to decrease with frequency. 3. During high-frequency jet ventilation the local pressure amplitude changes with the position of the tube in the trachea rather than with the exciting frequency. 4. When the volume of the measuring chamber is doubled the resulting pressure amplitude falls to half the control value. 5. The pressure amplitude and mean pressure measured in the transalveolar chamber vary more or less independently from the peak flow velocity. High-frequency ventilation is thus seen to be a frequency-dependant, inhomogeneous mode of ventilation that can essentially be homogenized by systematically changing the exciting frequency. The frequency-dependant response to different lung areas to excitation is likely to result from an intrabronchially-localized aerodynamic effect rather than the mechanical properties of the lung parenchyma.

  8. Deviation of tracheal pressure from airway opening pressure during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in a porcine lung model.

    PubMed

    Johannes, Amélie; Zollhoefer, Bernd; Eujen, Ulrike; Kredel, Markus; Rauch, Stefan; Roewer, Norbert; Muellenbach, Ralf M

    2013-04-01

    Oxygenation during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation is secured by a high level of mean airway pressure. Our objective was to identify a pressure difference between the airway opening of the respiratory circuit and the trachea during application of different oscillatory frequencies. Six female Pietrain pigs (57.1 ± 3.6 kg) were first ventilated in a conventional mechanical ventilation mode. Subsequently, the animals were switched to high-frequency oscillatory ventilation by setting mean airway opening pressure 5 cmH(2)O above the one measured during controlled mechanical ventilation. Measurements at the airway opening and at tracheal levels were performed in healthy lungs and after induction of acute lung injury by surfactant depletion. During high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, the airway opening pressure was set at a constant level. The pressure amplitude was fixed at 90 cmH(2)O. Starting from an oscillatory frequency of 3 Hz, the frequency was increased in steps of 3 Hz to 15 Hz and then decreased accordingly. At each frequency, measurements were performed in the trachea through a side-lumen of the endotracheal tube and the airway opening pressure was recorded. The pressure difference was calculated. At every oscillatory frequency, a pressure loss towards the trachea could be shown. This pressure difference increased with higher oscillatory frequencies (3 Hz 2.2 ± 2.1 cmH(2)O vs. 15 Hz 7.5 ± 1.8 cmH(2)O). The results for healthy and injured lungs were similar. Tracheal pressures decreased with higher oscillatory frequencies. This may lead to pulmonary derecruitment. This has to be taken into consideration when increasing oscillatory frequencies and differentiated pressure settings are mandatory.

  9. High-frequency and low-frequency chest compression: effects on lung water secretion, mucus transport, heart rate, and blood pressure using a trapezoidal source pressure waveform.

    PubMed

    O'Clock, George D; Lee, Yong Wan; Lee, Jongwong; Warwick, Warren J

    2012-01-01

    High-frequency chest compression (HFCC), using an appropriate source (pump) waveform for frequencies at or above 3 Hz, can enhance pulmonary clearance for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using a trapezoidal HFCC source pressure waveform, secretion of water from epithelial tissue and transport of mucus through lung airways can be enhanced for patients with CF and COPD. At frequencies below 3 Hz, low-frequency chest compression (LFCC) appears to have a significant impact on the cardiovascular system. For a trapezoidal source pressure waveform at frequencies close to 1 Hz, LFCC produces amplitude or intensity variations in various components of the electrocardiogram time-domain waveform, produces changes at very low frequencies associated with the electrocardiogram frequency spectra (indicating enhanced parasympathetic nervous system activity), and promotes a form of heart rate synchronization. It appears that LFCC can also provide additional cardiovascular benefits by reducing peak and average systolic and diastolic blood pressure for patients with hypertension.

  10. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2015-09-01

    Microwave breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps was studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  11. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-05-01

    Microwave (mw) breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current (dc) microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied.

  12. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-05-07

    Microwave (mw) breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current (dc) microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied.

  13. A parametric study of double-shell tank response to internal high-frequency pressure loading

    SciTech Connect

    Baliga, R.; Choi, K.; Shulman, J.S.; Strehlow, J.P.; Abatt, G.

    1995-02-01

    The double-shell waste tank 241SY101 (SY101) is a 3,785,400-liter tank used to store radioactive waste at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The tank waste has formed two layers of sludge in the tank; a convective and a nonconvective layer. Ongoing reactions in the waste cause a buildup of hydrogen molecules that become trapped within the nonconvective layer of the waste. Various means of preventing the buildup of hydrogen molecules in the nonconvective layer have been investigated, including the use of a sonic probe that would transmit high-frequency acoustic pressure waves into the nonconvective layer of the waste. During the operation of the sonic probe, the pressure waves transmitted from the probe induce pressure time history loading on the inside surface of the primary tank. For low-frequency fluid-structure interaction loads, such as those associated with seismic events, the convective and impulsive effects of the waste-filled tank are well documented. However, for high-frequency loading, such as that associated with acoustic pressure waves, interactions between the waste and the primary tank are not understood. The pressure time history is represented by a harmonic function with a frequency range between 30 and 100 Hz. Structural analyses of the double-shell tank have been performed that address the tank`s response to the sonic probe acoustic pressure loads. This paper addresses the variations in the tank response as a function of percent waste mass considered to be effective in the dynamic excitation of the tank. It also compares results predicted by analyses that discretely model the liquid waste and presents recommendations for the simplified effective mass approach. Also considered in the parametric study is the effect of damping on the tank response for the same pressure loading.

  14. Experimental observation of standing wave effect in low-pressure very-high-frequency capacitive discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong-Xin; Gao, Fei; Liu, Jia; Wang, You-Nian

    2014-07-28

    Radial uniformity measurements of plasma density were carried out by using a floating double probe in a cylindrical (21 cm in electrode diameter) capacitive discharge reactor driven over a wide range of frequencies (27–220 MHz). At low rf power, a multiple-node structure of standing wave effect was observed at 130 MHz. The secondary density peak caused by the standing wave effect became pronounced and shifts toward the axis as the driving frequency further to increase, indicative of a much more shortened standing-wave wavelength. With increasing rf power, the secondary density peak shift toward the radial edge, namely, the standing-wave wavelength was increased, in good qualitative agreement with the previous theory and simulation results. At higher pressures and high frequencies, the rf power was primarily deposited at the periphery of the electrode, due to the fact that the waves were strongly damped as they propagated from the discharge edge into the center.

  15. Effect of high-frequency positive-pressure ventilation on halothane ablation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Hall, S M; Chapleau, M; Cairo, J; Levitzky, M G

    1985-08-01

    High-frequency positive-pressure ventilation (HFPPV) was compared to intermittent positive-pressure ventilation (IPPV) during unilateral atelectasis with and without halothane anesthesia. Dogs with electromagnetic flow probes chronically implanted on their main (Qt) and left (Ql) pulmonary arteries were ventilated via Carlen's dual-lumen endotracheal tubes. In eight closed-chest dogs, about 43% of the cardiac output perfused the left lung during bilateral ventilation by either a Harvard animal respirator (IPPV) or a Health-dyne model 300 high-frequency ventilator (HFPPV). Unilateral atelectasis decreased blood flow (Ql/Qt) to that lung. Ql/Qt was 19 +/- 1% with HFPPV during left-lung atelectasis and right-lung ventilation, compared to 32 +/- 1% with unilateral IPPV. This suggests that HFPPV permits stronger hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Addition of 1% halothane increased blood flow to the atelectatic left lung during unilateral ventilation with IPPV but not with HFPPV. This suggests that halothane decreases the effects of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction during conventional ventilation but not during HFPPV.

  16. Focused excimer laser initiated, radio frequency sustained high pressure air plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Giar, Ryan; Scharer, John

    2011-11-15

    Measurements and analysis of air breakdown processes and plasma production by focusing 193 nm, 300 mJ, 15 MW high power laser radiation inside a 6 cm diameter helical radio frequency (RF) coil are presented. Quantum resonant multi-photon ionization (REMPI) and collisional cascade laser ionization processes are exploited that have been shown to produce high-density (n{sub e} {approx} 7 x 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 3}) cylindrical seed plasmas at 760 Torr. Air breakdown in lower pressures (from 7-22 Torr), where REMPI is the dominant laser ionization process, is investigated using an UV 18 cm focal length lens, resulting in a laser flux of 5.5 GW/cm{sup 2} at the focal spot. The focused laser power absorption and associated shock wave produce seed plasmas for sustainment by the RF (5 kW incident power, 1.5 s) pulse. Measurements of the helical RF antenna load impedance in the inductive and capacitive coupling regimes are obtained by measuring the loaded antenna reflection coefficient. A 105 GHz interferometer is used to measure the plasma electron density and collision frequency. Spectroscopic measurements of the plasma and comparison with the SPECAIR code are made to determine translational, rotational, and vibrational neutral temperatures and the associated neutral gas temperature. From this and the associated measurement of the gas pressure the electron temperature is obtained. Experiments show that the laser-formed seed plasma allows RF sustainment at higher initial air pressures (up to 22 Torr) than that obtained via RF-only initiation (<18 Torr) by means of a 0.3 J UV laser pulse.

  17. High-Temperature Annealing by Subatmospheric-Pressure Radio-Frequency Capacitively Coupled Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Masatoshi; Yokogawa, Ken'etsu

    2012-08-01

    High-temperature annealing was performed by a novel annealing system using subatmospheric-pressure radio-frequency capacitively coupled plasma (SAP-CCP). The heating characteristics and stability of discharge were studied. An electrode temperature of 1900 °C was obtained with a stable and uniform glow-like discharge. Also, the characteristics of annealing were investigated using silicon wafers implanted with boron ions accelerated by 5 kV at doses of 2.0×1015 cm-2. The sheet resistance decreased with increasing annealing temperature in the same manner as in conventional rapid thermal annealing. As a result, a sheet resistance of 86 Ω/sq was successfully achieved at an electrode temperature of 1080 °C without any surface roughness.

  18. Radio frequency energy coupling to high-pressure optically pumped nonequilibrium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plönjes, Elke; Palm, Peter; Lee, Wonchul; Lempert, Walter R.; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2001-06-01

    This article presents an experimental demonstration of a high-pressure unconditionally stable nonequilibrium molecular plasma sustained by a combination of a continuous wave CO laser and a sub-breakdown radio frequency (rf) electric field. The plasma is sustained in a CO/N2 mixture containing trace amounts of NO or O2 at pressures of P=0.4-1.2 atm. The initial ionization of the gases is produced by an associative ionization mechanism in collisions of two CO molecules excited to high vibrational levels by resonance absorption of the CO laser radiation with subsequent vibration-vibration (V-V) pumping. Further vibrational excitation of both CO and N2 is produced by free electrons heated by the applied rf field, which in turn produces additional ionization of these species by the associative ionization mechanism. In the present experiments, the reduced electric field, E/N, is sufficiently low to preclude field-induced electron impact ionization. Unconditional stability of the resultant cold molecular plasma is enabled by the negative feedback between gas heating and the associative ionization rate. Trace amounts of nitric oxide or oxygen added to the baseline CO/N2 gas mixture considerably reduce the electron-ion dissociative recombination rate and thereby significantly increase the initial electron density. This allows triggering of the rf power coupling to the vibrational energy modes of the gas mixture. Vibrational level populations of CO and N2 are monitored by infrared emission spectroscopy and spontaneous Raman spectroscopy. The experiments demonstrate that the use of a sub-breakdown rf field in addition to the CO laser allows an increase of the plasma volume by about an order of magnitude. Also, CO infrared emission spectra show that with the rf voltage turned on the number of vibrationally excited CO molecules along the line of sight increase by a factor of 3-7. Finally, spontaneous Raman spectra of N2 show that with the rf voltage the vibrational temperature

  19. Cryogenic Impinging Jets Subjected to High Frequency Transverse Acoustic Forcing in a High Pressure Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-27

    mode shape Properties of DMD • Isolates response of flow at forcing frequency and harmonics • Single modes can reconstruct convective processes (POD...impact wave detaches and convective velocity. 4822 Hz Distribution A: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited. PA# 16333 13 PAN Acoustic...amount of variability from the flow field ( convective velocity or ligament separation) to detect a single, strong natural frequency associated with

  20. A Mechanism for Seismically Induced Pore Pressure Changes Inferred from High Frequency Water Well Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Roeloffs, E.; Woodcock, D.; Gall, I.; Manga, M.

    2002-12-01

    Earthquakes can produce water level changes in certain distant wells orders of magnitude larger than can be explained by static stress changes. The redistribution of pore pressure can generate crustal deformation and perhaps even trigger seismicity. Some studies suggest that earthquakes induce permeability increases or other aquifer property changes. Standard hydrogeological methods do not continuously measure aquifer properties therefore it is difficult to monitor the inferred variations. We developed a new method to measure aquifer properties over short times by combining high-sample rate water level data (1 sps) and seismic data for a site near Grants Pass Oregon. The new method motivates a new model in which the seismic waves remove transient barriers of sediment in a fracture. Pumping test data for the site is well-modeled by a single, infinitesimally thin square planar fracture embedded in a unbounded, homogeneous and isotropic confined aquifer. For this geometry, the amplification factor χ, defined as the ratio of the water level amplitude to the ground velocity, as a function of frequency f is \\[ χ = A(\

  1. Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed Detonation Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, N.; Cutler, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation tube. The device utilized a mixture of H2 fuel and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at about 600 Hz, for the quarter wave mode of resonance. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to H2 flow based specific impulse of 2970 s. This value is comparable to measurements in H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs). The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the device and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 pounds per cubic inch, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume of order 0.01 pound per cubic inch. This much higher volumetric efficiency results in a potentially much more practical device than the typical PDE, for a wide range of potential applications, including high-speed boundary layer separation control, for example in hypersonic engine inlets, and propulsion for small aircraft and missiles.

  2. Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Namtran C.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation actuator. The device utilized a fuel mixture of H2 and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at approx.600 Hz, for the lambda/4 mode. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to specific impulse of 2611 s. This value is comparable to other H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs) experiments. The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was approx.600 Hz, and was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the model and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 lb/cu in, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume values of approximately 0.01 lb/cu in.

  3. Horizontal variability of high-frequency nonlinear internal waves in Massachusetts Bay detected by an array of seafloor pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J. A.; Lerczak, J. A.; Moum, J. N.

    2016-08-01

    A two-dimensional array of 14 seafloor pressure sensors was deployed to measure properties of tidally generated, nonlinear, high-frequency internal waves over a 14 km by 12 km area west of Stellwagen Bank in Massachusetts Bay during summer 2009. Thirteen high-frequency internal wave packets propagated through the region over 6.5 days (one packet every semidiurnal cycle). Propagation speed and direction of wave packets were determined by triangulation, using arrival times and distances between triads of sensor locations. Wavefront curvature ranged from straight to radially spreading, with wave speeds generally faster to the south. Waves propagated to the southwest, rotating to more westward with shoreward propagation. Linear theory predicts a relationship between kinetic energy and bottom pressure variance of internal waves that is sensitive to sheared background currents, water depth, and stratification. By comparison to seafloor acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements, observations nonetheless show a strong relationship between kinetic energy and bottom pressure variance. This is presumably due to phase-locking of the wave packets to the internal tide that dominates background currents and to horizontally uniform and relatively constant stratification throughout the study. This relationship was used to qualitatively describe variations in kinetic energy of the high-frequency wave packets. In general, high-frequency internal wave kinetic energy was greater near the southern extent of wavefronts and greatly decreased upon propagating shoreward of the 40 m isobath.

  4. High frequency jet ventilation and intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Effect of cerebral blood flow in patients after open heart surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Pittet, J.F.; Forster, A.; Suter, P.M. )

    1990-02-01

    Attenuation of ventilator-synchronous pressure fluctuations of intracranial pressure has been demonstrated during high frequency ventilation in animal and human studies, but the consequences of this effect on cerebral blood flow have not been investigated in man. We compared the effects of high frequency jet ventilation and intermittent positive pressure ventilation on CBF in 24 patients investigated three hours after completion of open-heart surgery. The patients were investigated during three consecutive periods with standard sedation (morphine, pancuronium): a. IPPV; b. HFJV; c. IPPV. Partial pressure of arterial CO{sub 2} (PaCO{sub 2}: 4.5-5.5 kPa) and rectal temperature (35.5 to 37.5{degree}C) were maintained constant during the study. The CBF was measured by intravenous {sup 133}Xe washout technique. The following variables were derived from the cerebral clearance of {sup 133}Xe: the rapid compartment flow, the initial slope index, ie, a combination of the rapid and the slow compartment flows, and the ratio of fast compartment flow over total CBF (FF). Compared to IPPV, HFJV applied to result in the same mean airway pressure did not produce any change in pulmonary gas exchange, mean systemic arterial pressure, and cardiac index. Similarly, CBF was not significantly altered by HFJV. However, important variations of CBF values were observed in three patients, although the classic main determinants of CBF (PaCO{sub 2}, cerebral perfusion pressure, Paw, temperature) remained unchanged. Our results suggest that in patients with normal systemic hemodynamics, the effects of HFJV and IPPV on CBF are comparable at identical levels of mean airway pressure.

  5. A study of the eigenvectors of the low-frequency vibrational modes in crystalline adenosine via high pressure Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Scott A; Pinnick, David A; Anderson, A

    2014-12-01

    High-pressure Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the vibrational modes of crystalline adenosine at 295 K by evaluating the logarithmic derivative of the vibrational frequency with respect to pressure: [Formula: see text]. Crystalline samples of molecular materials such as adenosine will have vibrational modes that are localized within a molecular unit ("internal" modes) as well as modes in which the molecular units vibrate against each other ("external" modes). The value of the logarithmic derivative is found to be a diagnostic probe of the nature of the eigenvector of the vibrational modes. Stretching modes which are predominantly internal to the molecule have low logarithmic derivatives while external modes have higher logarithmic derivatives. Particular interest is paid to the low-frequency (≤150 cm(-1)) modes. Based on the pressure dependence of its logarithmic derivative, a mode near 49 cm(-1) is identified as internal mode. The other modes below 400 cm(-1) have pressure dependences of their logarithmic derivatives consistent with being either (1) modes which are mainly external, meaning that the molecules of the unit cell vibrate against each other in translational or librational motions (or linear combinations thereof), or (2) torsional or bending modes involving a large number of atoms, mainly within a molecule. The modes above 400 cm(-1) all have pressure dependences of their logarithmic derivatives consistent with being mainly internal modes.

  6. Extracting long-term trends and high frequency pressure fluctuations from seafloor pressure records using Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villinger, H. W.; Gennerich, H.

    2009-12-01

    Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) is a well-established tool for exploratory data analysis of non-stationary and nonlinear data. It decomposes the data set into a series of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) which separate the analyzed data set into a set of functions with different characteristics, representing the underlying physical processes. Pressure sensors at the seafloor record a time-varying pressure signal which is a composition of periodic and aperiodic signal components such as (1) atmospheric and oceanic tides as well as solid earth tides, (2) water level changes due to dynamic effects of the ocean (3) internal density fluctuations in the water column caused by salinity and/or temperature variations, (4) atmospheric disturbances, (5) vertical motions of the ocean floor (subsidence/uplift), (6) settling of the instrument, (7) sensor drift, and (8) sensor noise. Our goal is to examine the signal components like long-period pressure changes associated with uplift or subsidence and on the other hand short-period fluctuations associated with earthquakes or tremor-like signals. The amplitude of these pressure signals are on the order of only 1 kPa and smaller and difficult to extract from a signal which is dominated by tidal and strong oceanographic components. A number of pressure time series from different sources (DART, CORK, OBP, PIES) is analyzed and results are presented. The EMD is very powerful in extracting the long-period changes but also allows to isolating short term pressure fluctuations related to earthquakes and periods with increased background pressure noise. The major difficulty is, however, still to associate the observed pressure changes with tectonic or magmatic events because a number of effects -in the subsurface as well as in the water column - may be the cause.

  7. Non-invasive assessment of negative pressure wound therapy using high frequency diagnostic ultrasound: oedema reduction and new tissue accumulation.

    PubMed

    Young, Stephen R; Hampton, Sylvie; Martin, Robin

    2013-08-01

    Tissue oedema plays an important role in the pathology of chronic and traumatic wounds. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is thought to contribute to active oedema reduction, yet few studies have showed this effect. In this study, high frequency diagnostic ultrasound at 20 MHz with an axial resolution of 60 µm was used to assess the effect of NPWT at - 80 mmHg on pressure ulcers and the surrounding tissue. Wounds were monitored in four patients over a 3-month period during which changes in oedema and wound bed thickness (granulation tissue) were measured non-invasively. The results showed a rapid reduction of periwound tissue oedema in all patients with levels falling by a mean of 43% after 4 days of therapy. A 20% increase in the thickness of the wound bed was observed after 7 days due to new granulation tissue formation. Ultrasound scans through the in situ gauze NPWT filler also revealed the existence of macrodeformation in the tissue produced by the negative pressure. These preliminary studies suggest that non-invasive assessment using high frequency diagnostic ultrasound could be a valuable tool in clinical studies of NPWT.

  8. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure What Is High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a common disease in ... at higher than normal pressures. What Is Blood Pressure? Click for more information Blood pressure is the ...

  9. High Frequency Nasal Ventilation for 21 Days Maintains Gas Exchange with Lower Respiratory Pressures and Promotes Alveolarization in Preterm Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Null, Donald M.; Alvord, Jeremy; Leavitt, Wendy; Wint, Albert; Dahl, Mar Janna; Presson, Angela P.; Lane, Robert H.; DiGeronimo, Robert J.; Yoder, Bradley A.; Albertine, Kurt H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Short-term high-frequency nasal ventilation (HFNV) of preterm neonates provides acceptable gas exchange compared to endotracheal intubation and intermittent mandatory ventilation (IMV). Whether long-term HFNV will provide acceptable gas exchange is unknown. We hypothesized that HFNV for up to 21d would lead to acceptable gas exchange at lower inspired oxygen (O2) levels and airway pressures compared to intubation and IMV. Methods Preterm lambs were exposed to antenatal steroids, and treated with perinatal surfactant and postnatal caffeine. Lambs were intubated and resuscitated by IMV. At ~3h of age, half of the lambs were switched to non-invasive HFNV. Support was for 3d or 21d. By design, PaO2 and PaCO2 were not different between groups. Results At 3d (n=5) and 21d (n=4) of HFNV, fractional inspired O2 (FiO2), peak inspiratory pressure, mean airway, intra-tracheal, and positive end-expiratory pressures, oxygenation index, and Alveolar-arterial gradient were significantly lower than matched periods of intubation and IMV. PaO2/FiO2 ratio was significantly higher at 3d and 21d of HFNV compared to matched intubation and IMV. HFNV led to better alveolarization at 3d and 21d. Conclusion Long-term HFNV provides acceptable gas exchange at lower inspired O2 levels and respiratory pressures compared to intubation and IMV. PMID:24378898

  10. Effects of short term high frequency negative pressure ventilation on gas exchange using the Hayek oscillator in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Hardinge, F. M.; Davies, R. J.; Stradling, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The Hayek oscillator is a negative pressure cuirass that can operate at a range of frequencies to provide ventilation, and is a technique which could potentially be used on a general ward. This study examined the effect of different frequencies and different ranges of inspiratory and expiratory pressures on gas exchange, respiratory rate, and blood pressure in normal subjects. METHODS--Eight normal subjects received five minute periods of ventilation using the Hayek oscillator at five different frequencies, and a combination of two spans of inspiratory and expiratory pressures and two mean chamber pressures. A "sham" or control period was also performed at each frequency. Measurements were made of changes in gas exchange, spontaneous respiratory rate, and blood pressure before and after ventilation. RESULTS--There was significant intersubject variation in all results, independent of their height and weight. "Sham" settings acted as true controls in terms of gas exchange, but produced a fall in respiratory rate at 30 oscillations/min. The lower oscillatory frequencies of 30 and 60 oscillations/min produced the greatest increase in oxygenation, decrease in end tidal carbon dioxide pressure, and decrease in spontaneous respiratory rate. These effects were most significant at higher spans of pressure and were different from "sham" settings. No adverse effects were observed on blood pressure. CONCLUSIONS--The Hayek oscillator can provide assisted ventilation for short periods in normal conscious subjects with no adverse side effects on blood pressure. Maximal changes in gas exchange and a significant reduction in the spontaneous respiratory rate are seen when a combination of lower frequencies (30 and 60 oscillations/min) and higher spans of pressure are used. PMID:7886648

  11. Apparatus and method for enhanced chemical processing in high pressure and atmospheric plasmas produced by high frequency electromagnetic waves

    DOEpatents

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Helfritch, Dennis J.

    1989-11-28

    An apparatus and method for creating high temperature plasmas for enhanced chemical processing of gaseous fluids, toxic chemicals, and the like, at a wide range of pressures, especially at atmospheric and high pressures includes an electro-magnetic resonator cavity, preferably a reentrant cavity, and a wave guiding structure which connects an electro-magnetic source to the cavity. The cavity includes an intake port and an exhaust port, each having apertures in the conductive walls of the cavity sufficient for the intake of the gaseous fluids and for the discharge of the processed gaseous fluids. The apertures are sufficiently small to prevent the leakage of the electro-magnetic radiation from the cavity. Gaseous fluid flowing from the direction of the electro-magnetic source through the guiding wave structure and into the cavity acts on the plasma to push it away from the guiding wave structure and the electro-magnetic source. The gaseous fluid flow confines the high temperature plasma inside the cavity and allows complete chemical processing of the gaseous fluids at a wide range of pressures.

  12. Attenuation of pressure swings along the endotracheal tube is indicative of optimal distending pressure during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in a model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    van Genderingen, Huibert R; van Vught, Adrianus J; Duval, Elisabeth L I M; Markhorst, Dick G; Jansen, Jos R C

    2002-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, the oscillatory pressure ratio (OPR) is minimal at the optimal mean airway pressure (Paw). OPR is defined as the ratio of pressure swings at the distal end and the proximal opening of the endotracheal tube. Optimal Paw was assumed to be the lowest Paw at which the physiological shunt fraction was below 0.1. Acute lung injury was produced by saline lung lavage of pigs who were then subjected to a stepwise increase of Paw to impose underinflation, optimal inflation, and overdistention (inflation phase), followed by a stepwise decrease of Paw (deflation phase). OPR reached a minimum of 0.10 +/- 0.01 at Paw = 31 +/- 4 cm H(2)O during the inflation phase and a minimum of 0.04 +/- 0.01 at Paw = 18 +/- 1 cm H(2)O during the deflation phase. Optimal Paw was 31 +/- 4 cm H(2)O on the inflation limb and 14 +/- 2 cm H(2)O on the deflation limb. Paw at the minimal OPR was not significantly different from the optimal Paw during the inflation phase, and slightly but significantly higher (4.1 +/- 1.6 cm H(2)O) during the deflation phase. In conclusion, a consistent relationship was found between OPR and Paw, with a minimum in all animals. The minimal OPR coincides fairly well with the Paw where oxygenation is optimal.

  13. Excitation of high frequency pressure driven modes by non-axisymmetric equilibrium at high {beta}{sub pol} in PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Sesnic, S.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Okabayashi, M.; Takahashi, H.; Bell, R.E.; Bernabei, S.; Chance, M.S.; Hatcher, R.E.; Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.E.; Kugel, H.W.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.; Ono, M.; Paul, S.F.; Sauthoff, N.R.; Holland, A.; Asakura, N.; Duperrex, P.A.; Fonck, R.J.; Gammel, G.M.; Greene, G.J.; Jiang, T.W.; Levinton, F.M.; Powell, E.T.; Roberts, D.W.; Qin, Y.

    1993-06-01

    High-frequency pressure-driven modes have been observed in high-poloidal-{beta} discharges in the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M). These modes are excited in a non-axisymmetric equilibrium characterized by a large, low frequency m{sub 1}=1/n{sub 1}=1 island, and they are capable of expelling fast ions. The modes reside on or very close to the q=1 surface, and have mode numbers with either m{sub h}=n{sub h} or (less probably) m{sub h}/n{sub h}=m{sub h}/(m{sub h}-1), with m{sub h} varying between 3 and 10. Occasionally, these modes are, simultaneously localized in the vicinity of the m{sub 1}=2/n{sub 1}=1 island. The high frequency modes near the q=1 surface also exhibit a ballooning character, being significantly stronger on the large major radius side of the plasma. When a large m{sub 1}=1/n{sub 1}=1 island is present the mode is poloidally localized in the immediate vicinity of the x-point of the island. The modes, which occur exclusively in high-{beta} discharges, appear to be driven by the plasma pressure or pressure gradient. They can thus be a manifestation of either a toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmode (TAE) at q=(2m{sub h}+ 1)/2n{sub h}, a kinetic ballooning mode (KBM), or some other type of pressure-driven mode. Theory predicts that the TAE mode is a gap mode, but the high frequency modes in PBX-M are found exclusively on or in the immediate neighborhood of magnetic surfaces with low rational numbers.

  14. A New Fast, Accurate and Non-Oscillatory Numerical Approach for Wave Propagation Problems in Solids Application to High-frequency Pulse Propagation in the Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-16

    frequency Pulse Propagation in the Hopkinson Pressure Bar Alexander ldesman TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY SYSTEM 09/ 16/2015 Final Report DISTRIBUTION A...5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY 2500 BROADWAY...Solids: Application to High-Frequency Pulse Propagation in the Hopkinson Pressure Bar Alexander Idesman Texas Tech University Final report The

  15. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Description of High Blood Pressure Español High blood pressure is a common disease ... arteries) at higher than normal pressures. Measuring Blood Pressure Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing ...

  16. Apparatus and method for enhanced chemical processing in high pressure and atmospheric plasmas produced by high frequency electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, P.C.; Helfritch, D.J.

    1989-11-28

    This paper describes an apparatus which creates a plasma for chemical processing of gaseous fluid. It comprises an electro-magnetic resonator cavity having first and second conductive walls and a resonant frequency; an electro-magnetic energy source which produces electro-magnetic energy having a frequency corresponding to the resonant frequency and a power level sufficient for breaking down the gaseous fluid and creating a plasma within the electro-magnetic resonator cavity; an electro-magnetic wave guiding structure connecting the electro-magnetic energy source to the first wall of the electro-magnetic cavity; the wave guiding structure having an intake port for introducing the gaseous fluid into the wave guiding structure; the second wall of the resonator cavity having an exhaust port for discharging processed gaseous fluid in the form of a plasma from the cavity; and plasma confinement means for causing the gaseous fluid to flow into the electro-magnetic resonator cavity through the aperture along with the electro-magnetic energy for confining and stabilizing the plasma within the electro-magnetic resonator cavity.

  17. Fatigue Crack Growth under High Pressure of Gaseous Hydrogen in a 15-5PH Martensitic Stainless Steel: Influence of Pressure and Loading Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.; Moriconi, C.; Benoit, G.; Halm, D.; Henaff, G.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the effect of gaseous hydrogen pressure in relation with the loading frequency on the fatigue crack growth behavior of a precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel is investigated. It is found that increasing the hydrogen pressure from 0.09 to 9 MPa induces an enhancement of the fatigue crack growth rates. This enhancement is pronounced particularly at higher stress intensity factor amplitudes at 9 MPa. Meanwhile, decreasing the frequency from 20 to 0.2 Hz under 0.9 MPa of hydrogen reveals a significant increase in the crack growth rates that tends to join the curve obtained under 9 MPa at 20 Hz, but with a different cracking mode. However, it is shown that the degradation in fatigue crack growth behavior derives from a complex interaction between the fatigue damage and the amount of hydrogen enriching the crack tip, which is dependent on the hydrogen pressure, loading frequency, and stress intensity factor level. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations of the fracture surfaces are used to support the explanations proposed to account for the observed phenomena.

  18. Pressure-induced emergence of unusually high-frequency transverse excitations in a liquid alkali metal: Evidence of two types of collective excitations contributing to the transverse dynamics at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bryk, Taras; Ruocco, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2015-09-14

    Unlike phonons in crystals, the collective excitations in liquids cannot be treated as propagation of harmonic displacements of atoms around stable local energy minima. The viscoelasticity of liquids, reflected in transition from the adiabatic to elastic high-frequency speed of sound and in absence of the long-wavelength transverse excitations, results in dispersions of longitudinal (L) and transverse (T) collective excitations essentially different from the typical phonon ones. Practically, nothing is known about the effect of high pressure on the dispersion of collective excitations in liquids, which causes strong changes in liquid structure. Here dispersions of L and T collective excitations in liquid Li in the range of pressures up to 186 GPa were studied by ab initio simulations. Two methodologies for dispersion calculations were used: direct estimation from the peak positions of the L/T current spectral functions and simulation-based calculations of wavenumber-dependent collective eigenmodes. It is found that at ambient pressure, the longitudinal and transverse dynamics are well separated, while at high pressures, the transverse current spectral functions, density of vibrational states, and dispersions of collective excitations yield evidence of two types of propagating modes that contribute strongly to transverse dynamics. Emergence of the unusually high-frequency transverse modes gives evidence of the breakdown of a regular viscoelastic theory of transverse dynamics, which is based on coupling of a single transverse propagating mode with shear relaxation. The explanation of the observed high-frequency shift above the viscoelastic value is given by the presence of another branch of collective excitations. With the pressure increasing, coupling between the two types of collective excitations is rationalized within a proposed extended viscoelastic model of transverse dynamics.

  19. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) A ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  20. High blood pressure medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertension - medicines ... blood vessel diseases. You may need to take medicines to lower your blood pressure if lifestyle changes ... blood pressure to the target level. WHEN ARE MEDICINES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE USED Most of the ...

  1. High Blood Pressure Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure Prevention Steps You Can Take You can take steps to prevent high blood pressure by adopting these healthy lifestyle habits. Follow a ...

  2. High blood pressure - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007329.htm High blood pressure - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure (hypertension) is an increase in the force of ...

  3. Treating High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    About High Blood Pressure Many people in the United States die from high blood pressure. This condition usually does not cause symptoms. Most ... until it is too late. A person has high blood pressure when the blood pushes against Visit your doctor ...

  4. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... En Español Who is at risk? How is high blood pressure treated? Understanding your blood pressure: What do the ...

  5. Effect of Pressure Controlled Waveforms on Flow Transport and Gas mixing in a Patient Specific Lung Model during Invasive High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzahrany, Mohammed; Banerjee, Arindam

    2012-11-01

    A computational fluid dynamic study is carried out to investigate gas transport in patient specific human lung models (based on CT scans) during high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). Different pressure-controlled waveforms and various ventilator frequencies are studied to understand the effect of flow transport and gas mixing during these processes. Three different pressure waveforms are created by solving the equation of motion subjected to constant lung wall compliance and flow resistance. Sinusoidal, exponential and constant waveforms shapes are considered with three different frequencies 6, 10 and 15 Hz and constant tidal volume 50 ml. The velocities are calculated from the obtained flow rate and imposed as inlet flow conditions to represent the mechanical ventilation waveforms. An endotracheal tube ETT is joined to the model to account for the effect of the invasive management device with the peak Reynolds number (Re) for all the cases ranging from 6960 to 24694. All simulations are performed using high order LES turbulent model. The gas transport near the flow reversal will be discussed at different cycle phases for all the cases and a comparison of the secondary flow structures between different cases will be presented.

  6. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  7. High-Pressure Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogson, Mark

    1987-09-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The study of solids at high pressure and variable temperature enables development of accurate interatomic potential functions over wide ranges of interatomic distances. A review of the main models used in the determination of these potentials is given in Chapter one. A discussion of phonon frequency as a variable physical parameter reflecting the interatomic potential is given. A high pressure Raman study of inorganic salts of the types MSCN, (M = K,Rb,Cs & NH_4^+ ) and MNO_2, (M = K,Na) has been completed. The studies have revealed two new phases in KNO_2 and one new phase in NaNO _2 at high pressure. The accurate phonon shift data have enabled the determination of the pure and biphasic stability regions of the phases of KNO _2. A discussion of the B1, B2 relationship of univalent nitrites is also given. In the series of thiocyanates studied new phases have been found in all four materials. In both the potassium and rubidium salts two new phases have been detected, and in the ceasium salt one new phase has been detected, all at high pressure, from accurate phonon shift data. These transitions are discussed in terms of second-order mechanisms with space groups suggested for all phases, based on Landau's theory of second-order phase transitions. In the ammonium salt one new phase has been detected. This new phase transition has been interpreted as a second-order transition. The series of molecular crystals CH_3 HgX, (X = Cl,Br & I) has been studied at high pressure and at variable temperature. In Chapter five, their phase behaviour at high pressure is detailed along with the pressure dependencies of their phonon frequencies. In the chloride and the bromide two new phases have been detected. In the bromide one has been detected at high temperature and one at high pressure, and latter being interpreted as the stopping of the methyl rotation. In the chloride one phase has been found at

  8. Identification of low and high frequency ranges for heart rate variability and blood pressure variability analyses using pharmacological autonomic blockade with atropine and propranolol in swine.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding autonomic nervous system functioning, which mediates behavioral and physiological responses to stress, offers great potential for evaluation of farm animal stress and welfare. Evaluation of heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV), using time and frequency doma...

  9. Airway Pressure Release Ventilation and High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation: Potential Strategies to Treat Severe Hypoxemia and Prevent Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Facchin, Francesca; Fan, Eddy

    2015-10-01

    Although lifesaving, mechanical ventilation can itself be responsible for damage to lung parenchyma. This ventilator-induced lung injury is especially observed in already injured lungs of patients with ARDS. New ventilatory approaches are needed to safely treat patients with ARDS, and recent studies have suggested the potential utility of open-lung strategies. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) are 2 different open-lung strategies that have been proposed to treat refractory hypoxemic respiratory failure while preventing ventilator-induced lung injury. APRV provides increased airway pressure as a potential recruitment mechanism and allows spontaneous breathing, with the potential benefits of decreased sedation, shorter duration of mechanical ventilation, and improvement in cardiac performance. HFOV delivers very small tidal volumes, to prevent volutrauma, at a constant (relatively high) mean airway pressure, thus avoiding atelectrauma. Despite their theoretical benefits, the utility of APRV and HFOV remains unproven and controversial for the routine treatment of ARDS in adult patients. This review is focused on the theoretical and practical aspects of APRV and HFOV, provides an overview of the current evidence, and addresses their possible use in the treatment of ARDS.

  10. [High Pressure Gas Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quintana, Rolando

    2002-01-01

    Four high-pressure gas tanks, the basis of this study, were especially made by a private contractor and tested before being delivered to NASA Kennedy Space Center. In order to insure 100% reliability of each individual tank the staff at KSC decided to again submit the four tanks under more rigorous tests. These tests were conducted during a period from April 10 through May 8 at KSC. This application further validates the predictive safety model for accident prevention and system failure in the testing of four high-pressure gas tanks at Kennedy Space Center, called Continuous Hazard Tracking and Failure Prediction Methodology (CHTFPM). It is apparent from the variety of barriers available for a hazard control that some barriers will be more successful than others in providing protection. In order to complete the Barrier Analysis of the system, a Task Analysis and a Biomechanical Study were performed to establish the relationship between the degree of biomechanical non-conformities and the anomalies found within the system on particular joints of the body. This relationship was possible to obtain by conducting a Regression Analysis to the previously generated data. From the information derived the body segment with the lowest percentage of non-conformities was the neck flexion with 46.7%. Intense analysis of the system was conducted including Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA), Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), and Barrier Analysis. These analyses resulted in the identification of occurrences of conditions, which may be becoming hazardous in the given system. These conditions, known as dendritics, may become hazards and could result in an accident, system malfunction, or unacceptable risk conditions. A total of 56 possible dendritics were identified. Work sampling was performed to observe the occurrence each dendritic. The out of control points generated from a Weighted c control chart along with a Pareto analysis indicate that the dendritics "Personnel not

  11. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  12. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  13. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique.

  14. High-pressure microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, K.

    2015-03-01

    When using appropriate materials and microfabrication techniques, with the small dimensions the mechanical stability of microstructured devices allows for processes at high pressures without loss in safety. The largest area of applications has been demonstrated in green chemistry and bioprocesses, where extraction, synthesis and analyses often excel at high densities and high temperatures. This is accessible through high pressures. Capillary chemistry has been used since long but, just like in low-pressure applications, there are several potential advantages in using microfluidic platforms, e.g., planar isothermal set-ups, large local variations in geometries, dense form factors, small dead volumes and precisely positioned microstructures for control of reactions, catalysis, mixing and separation. Other potential applications are in, e.g., microhydraulics, exploration, gas driven vehicles, and high-pressure science. From a review of the state-of-art and frontiers of high pressure microfluidics, the focus will be on different solutions demonstrated for microfluidic handling at high pressures and challenges that remain.

  15. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the results of observational studies further strengthened the causal relationship between high blood pressure and CVD, and ... disease, and those who have additional known risk factors for CVD. SPRINT will also provide information on ...

  16. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... already been diagnosed with high blood pressure. Try yoga and meditation. Yoga and meditation not only can strengthen your body ... Accessed Sept. 21, 2015. Hu B, et al. Effects of psychological stress on hypertension in middle-aged ...

  17. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Stroke Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome (HHNS) Gastroparesis Heart Disease Mental Health Pregnancy Related Conditions donate en -- Make Your Donation Count - ...

  18. Controlling your high blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000101.htm Controlling your high blood pressure To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood pressure goes up. When is Your Blood Pressure a Concern? If your blood pressure is high, ...

  19. An investigation on the effect of high partial pressure of hydrogen on the nanocrystalline structure of silicon carbide thin films prepared by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Daouahi, Mohsen; Omri, Mourad; Kerm, Abdul Ghani Yousseph; Al-Agel, Faisal Abdulaziz; Rekik, Najeh

    2015-02-05

    The aim of the study reported in this paper is to investigate the role of the high partial pressure of hydrogen introduced during the growth of nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films (nc-SiC:H). For this purpose, we report the preparation as well as spectroscopic studies of four series of nc-SiC:H obtained by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering at high partial pressure of hydrogen by varying the percentage of H2 in the gas mixture from 70% to 100% at common substrate temperature (TS=500°C). The effects of the dilution on the structural changes and the chemical bonding of the different series have been studied using Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. For this range of hydrogen dilution, two groups of films were obtained. The first group is characterized by the dominance of the crystalline phase and the second by a dominance of the amorphous phase. This result confirms the multiphase structure of the grown nc-SiC:H thin films by the coexistence of the SiC network, carbon-like and silicon-like clusters. Furthermore, infrared results show that the SiC bond is the dominant absorption peak and the carbon atom is preferentially bonded to silicon. The maximum value obtained of the crystalline fraction is about 77%, which is relatively important compared to other results obtained by other techniques. In addition, the concentration of CHn bonds was found to be lower than that of SiHn for all series. Raman measurements revealed that the crystallization occurs in all series even at 100% H2 dilution suggesting that high partial pressure of hydrogen favors the formation of silicon nanocrystallites (nc-Si). The absence of both the longitudinal acoustic band and the transverse optical band indicate that the crystalline phase is dominant.

  20. High-frequency ECG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The standard ECG is by convention limited to 0.05-150 Hz, but higher frequencies are also present in the ECG signal. With high-resolution technology, it is possible to record and analyze these higher frequencies. The highest amplitudes of the high-frequency components are found within the QRS complex. In past years, the term "high frequency", "high fidelity", and "wideband electrocardiography" have been used by several investigators to refer to the process of recording ECGs with an extended bandwidth of up to 1000 Hz. Several investigators have tried to analyze HF-QRS with the hope that additional features seen in the QRS complex would provide information enhancing the diagnostic value of the ECG. The development of computerized ECG-recording devices that made it possible to record ECG signals with high resolution in both time and amplitude, as well as better possibilities to store and process the signals digitally, offered new methods for analysis. Different techniques to extract the HF-QRS have been described. Several bandwidths and filter types have been applied for the extraction as well as different signal-averaging techniques for noise reduction. There is no standard method for acquiring and quantifying HF-QRS. The physiological mechanisms underlying HF-QRS are still not fully understood. One theory is that HF-QRS are related to the conduction velocity and the fragmentation of the depolarization wave in the myocardium. In a three-dimensional model of the ventricles with a fractal conduction system it was shown that high numbers of splitting branches are associated with HF-QRS. In this experiment, it was also shown that the changes seen in HF-QRS in patients with myocardial ischemia might be due to the slowing of the conduction velocity in the region of ischemia. This mechanism has been tested by Watanabe et al by infusing sodium channel blockers into the left anterior descending artery in dogs. In their study, 60 unipolar ECGs were recorded from the entire

  1. Prevention of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Prevention of High Blood Pressure Healthy lifestyle habits, proper use of medicines, and ... blood pressure or its complications. Preventing High Blood Pressure Onset Healthy lifestyle habits can help prevent high ...

  2. High Pressure Biomass Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Pradeep K

    2016-07-29

    According to the Billion Ton Report, the U.S. has a large supply of biomass available that can supplement fossil fuels for producing chemicals and transportation fuels. Agricultural waste, forest residue, and energy crops offer potential benefits: renewable feedstock, zero to low CO2 emissions depending on the specific source, and domestic supply availability. Biomass can be converted into chemicals and fuels using one of several approaches: (i) biological platform converts corn into ethanol by using depolymerization of cellulose to form sugars followed by fermentation, (ii) low-temperature pyrolysis to obtain bio-oils which must be treated to reduce oxygen content via HDO hydrodeoxygenation), and (iii) high temperature pyrolysis to produce syngas (CO + H2). This last approach consists of producing syngas using the thermal platform which can be used to produce a variety of chemicals and fuels. The goal of this project was to develop an improved understanding of the gasification of biomass at high pressure conditions and how various gasification parameters might affect the gasification behavior. Since most downstream applications of synags conversion (e.g., alcohol synthesis, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis etc) involve utilizing high pressure catalytic processes, there is an interest in carrying out the biomass gasification at high pressure which can potentially reduce the gasifier size and subsequent downstream cleaning processes. It is traditionally accepted that high pressure should increase the gasification rates (kinetic effect). There is also precedence from coal gasification literature from the 1970s that high pressure gasification would be a beneficial route to consider. Traditional approach of using thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) or high-pressure themogravimetric analyzer (PTGA) worked well in understanding the gasification kinetics of coal gasification which was useful in designing high pressure coal gasification processes. However

  3. Pressure-volume curves, static compliances and gas exchange in hyaline membrane disease during conventional mechanical and high-frequency ventilation.

    PubMed

    Pfenninger, J; Minder, C

    1988-01-01

    Eight premature infants with hyaline membrane disease needing artificial ventilation were studied at a mean age of 26.5 h. After a preparative phase they were randomly assigned either first to conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV; delivered by a Siemens Servo 900 C), followed by high-frequency ventilation (HFV; delivered by Percussionaire VDR 1 at 10 Hz) or vice versa, each period lasting 4 h. At the end of each period, arterial blood gases, lung volumes and alveolar pressures (Palv) during CMV or HFV and pressure-volume (P-V) curves of the total respiratory system were determined. Expiratory volumes were measured spirometrically, Palv by the clamping method, and the P-V curve was constructed by the syringe method. Single point static compliance at end-inspiration was higher during HFV (0.40 +/- 0.10 vs. 0.32 +/- 0.08 ml/cmH2O.kg-1; p = 0.02), whereas at end-expiration no difference was noted. Two points static compliances were also better during HFV than during CMV (0.32 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.24 +/- 0.06 ml/cmH2O.kg-1; p = 0.01). Static compliances derived from the steepest part of the inflation limb of the P-V curve were 0.55 +/- 0.12 after CMV and 0.50 +/- 0.12 ml/cmH2O.kg-1 after HFV (n.s.). Compared to CMV, HFV resulted in similar oxygenation and CO2-elimination at equal mean lung volumes, but at significantly lower mean Palv. It is concluded that recruitment of lung volume is achieved with less static recoil pressure by HFV. These findings are explained by differences in inspiration allowing more time for volume recruitment during HFV.

  4. High pressure furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, D.E.

    1993-09-14

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum)). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 19 figures.

  5. High pressure furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Donald E.

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  6. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Donald E.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  7. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, D.E.

    1992-07-14

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

  8. HIGH PRESSURE GAS REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Ramage, R.W.

    1962-05-01

    A gas regulator operating on the piston and feedback principle is described. The device is particularly suitable for the delicate regulation of high pressure, i.e., 10,000 psi and above, gas sources, as well as being perfectly adaptable for use on gas supplies as low as 50 psi. The piston is adjustably connected to a needle valve and the movement of the piston regulates the flow of gas from the needle valve. The gas output is obtained from the needle valve. Output pressure is sampled by a piston feedback means which, in turn, regulates the movement of the main piston. When the output is other than the desired value, the feedback system initiates movement of the main piston to allow the output pressure to be corrected or to remain constant. (AEC)

  9. Nonlinear frequency coupling in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Waskoenig, J.; Gans, T.

    2010-05-03

    Plasma ionization, and associated mode transitions, in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas are governed through nonlinear frequency coupling in the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. Ionization in low-power mode is determined by the nonlinear coupling of electron heating and the momentary local plasma density. Ionization in high-power mode is driven by electron avalanches during phases of transient high electric fields within the boundary sheath. The transition between these distinctly different modes is controlled by the total voltage of both frequency components.

  10. Cryogenic High Pressure Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  11. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  12. High-frequency data observations from space shuttle main engine low pressure fuel turbopump discharge duct flex joint tripod failure investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, T. F.; Farr, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Observations made by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engineers during their participation in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) low pressure fuel turbopump discharge duct flex joint tripod failure investigation are summarized. New signal processing techniques used by the Component Assessment Branch and the Induced Environments Branch during the failure investigation are described in detail. Moreover, nonlinear correlations between frequently encountered anomalous frequencies found in SSME dynamic data are discussed. A recommendation is made to continue low pressure fuel (LPF) duct testing through laboratory flow simulations and MSFC-managed technology test bed SSME testing.

  13. High-frequency broadband transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    London, S. E.; Tomashevich, S. V.

    1981-05-01

    A systematic review of the theory and design principles of high-frequency broadband transformers is presented. It is shown that the transformers of highest performance are those whose coils consist of strips of double-wire and multiwire transmission lines. Such devices are characterized by a wide operating frequency range, and make possible operation at microwave frequencies at high levels of transmitted power.

  14. Impact of Radio Frequency, Microwaving, and High Hydrostatic Pressure at Elevated Temperature on the Nutritional and Antinutritional Components in Black Soybeans.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yu; Wang, Zhuyi; Zhao, Yanyun

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) at elevated temperature (60 °C) and 2 dielectric heating (DH) methods (radio frequency [RF], and microwaving [MW]) on the nutritional compositions and removal of antinutritional factors in black soybeans were studied. Each treatment caused <2% reduction in protein, and 3.3% to 7.0% decline in total amino acid content. However, the proportion of essential amino acid slightly increased in DH treated samples. The treatment decreased fat content (14.0% to 35.7%), but had small influence on fatty acid proportion. Antinutritional factors including trypsin inhibitor, tannins, saponins, and phytic acid were all declined by the 3 treatments, and DH treatment was generally more efficient. The most abundant saponins was decreased >22% in DH treated samples. MW and HHP led to higher in vitro protein digestibility, RF and MW promoted protein aggregation from atomic force microscope topography, but HHP caused more damages on protein subunits as seen from SDS-PAGE image.

  15. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom

  16. HIGH PRESSURE DIES

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, W.B.

    1960-05-31

    A press was invented for subjecting specimens of bismuth, urania, yttria, or thoria to high pressures and temperatures. The press comprises die parts enclosing a space in which is placed an electric heater thermally insulated from the die parts so as not to damage them by heat. The die parts comprise two opposed inner frustoconical parts and an outer part having a double frustoconical recess receiving the inner parts. The die space decreases in size as the inner die parts move toward one another against the outer part and the inner parts, though very hard, do not fracture because of the mode of support provided by the outer part.

  17. Chromium at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Rafael

    2012-02-01

    Chromium has long served as the archetype of spin density wave magnetism. Recently, Jaramillo and collaborators have shown that Cr also serves as an archetype of magnetic quantum criticality. Using a combination of x-ray diffraction and electrical transport measurements at high pressures and cryogenic temperatures in a diamond anvil cell, they have demonstrated that the N'eel transition (TN) can be continuously suppressed to zero, with no sign of a concurrent structural transition. The order parameter undergoes a broad regime of exponential suppression, consistent with the weak coupling paradigm, before deviating from a BCS-like ground state within a narrow but accessible quantum critical regime. The quantum criticality is characterized by mean field scaling of TN and non mean field scaling of the transport coefficients, which points to a fluctuation-induced reconstruction of the critical Fermi surface. A comparison between pressure and chemical doping as means to suppress TN sheds light on different routes to the quantum critical point and the relevance of Fermi surface nesting and disorder at this quantum phase transition. The work by Jaramillo et al. is broadly relevant to the study of magnetic quantum criticality in a physically pure and theoretically tractable system that balances elements of weak and strong coupling. [4pt] [1] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. Wang & T. F. Rosenbaum. Signatures of quantum criticality in pure Cr at high pressure. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107, 13631 (2010). [0pt] [2] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. C. Lang, Z. Islam, G. Srajer, P. B. Littlewood, D. B. McWhan & T. F. Rosenbaum. Breakdown of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer ground state at a quantum phase transition. Nature 459, 405 (2009).

  18. Raman Study of SWNT Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswaran, U.; Rao, A. M.; Richter, E.; Eklund, P. C.; Smalley, R. E.

    1998-03-01

    A gasketed Merrill-Bassett-type diamond anvil cell was used for high pressure Raman measurements at room temperature. A 4:1 methanol-ethanol mixture served as the pressure transmitting medium. The radial mode (denoted as R, occuring at 186 cm-1 at 1 bar) and tangential modes (designated T_1, T_2, and T_3, located, respectively, at 1550, 1567, and 1593 cm-1 at 1 bar) were recorded for several representative pressures. With increasing pressure, both the R and T modes shift to higher frequencies with gradual weakening of intensity and broadening of linewidth. The radial mode disappears around ~ 2 GPa whereas the tangential modes, albeit weak in intensity, persist until 5.2 GPa. The decrease in Raman intensity under pressure can be attributed to a loss of resonance, since the strong Raman signals observed at ambient pressure have been interpreted as due a resonance with the electronic bands [1]. The R and T mode frequencies are fit to quadratic function of pressure i.e., ω=ω(0)+aP+bP^2 where `a' represents the linear pressure shift of the mode frequency which is proportional to the mode Gruneisen parameter. The linear pressure coefficient for the R mode is found to be nearly twice that of the high frequency T mode. A. M. Rao et al., Science 275, 187, 1997

  19. High frequency pulsed electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, David Wayne

    Electromigration life tests were performed on copper-alloyed aluminum test structures that were representative of modern CMOS metallization schemes, complete with Ti/TiN cladding layers and a tungsten-plug contact at the cathode. A total of 18 electrical stress treatments were applied. One was a DC current of 15 mA. The other 17 were pulsed currents, varied according to duty cycle and frequency. The pulse amplitude was 15 mA (˜2.7 × 10sp6 A/cmsp2) for all treatments. Duty cycles ranged from 33.3% to 80%, and frequencies fell into three rough ranges-100 KHz, 1 MHz, and 100 MHz. The ambient test temperature was 200sp°C in all experiments. Six to 9 samples were subjected to each treatment. Experimental data were gathered in the form of test stripe resistance versus time, R(t). For purposes of lifetime analysis, "failure" was defined by the criterion R(t)/R(0) = 1.10, and the median time to failure, tsb{50}, was used as the primary basis of comparison between test groups. It was found that the dependence of tsb{50} on pulse duty cycle conformed rather well to the so-called "average current density model" for duty cycles of 50% and higher. Lifetimes were less enhanced for a duty cycle of 33.3%, but they were still considerably longer than an "on-time" model would predict. No specific dependence of tsb{50} on pulse frequency was revealed by the data, that is, reasonably good predictions of tsb{50} could be made by recognizing the dominant influence of duty cycle. These findings confirm that IC miniaturization can be more aggressively pursued than an on-time prediction would allow. It is significant that this was found to be true for frequencies on the order of 100 MHz, where many present day digital applications operate. Post-test optical micrographs were obtained for each test subject in order to determine the location of electromigration damage. The pulse duty cycle was found to influence the location. Most damage occurred at the cathode contact, regardless of

  20. High pressure capillary connector

    DOEpatents

    Renzi, Ronald F.

    2005-08-09

    A high pressure connector capable of operating at pressures of 40,000 psi or higher is provided. This connector can be employed to position a first fluid-bearing conduit that has a proximal end and a distal end to a second fluid-bearing conduit thereby providing fluid communication between the first and second fluid-bearing conduits. The connector includes (a) an internal fitting assembly having a body cavity with (i) a lower segment that defines a lower segment aperture and (ii) an interiorly threaded upper segment, (b) a first member having a first member aperture that traverses its length wherein the first member aperture is configured to accommodate the first fluid-bearing conduit and wherein the first member is positioned in the lower segment of the internal fitting assembly, and (c) a second member having a second member aperture that traverses its length wherein the second member is positioned in the upper segment of the fitting assembly and wherein a lower surface of the second member is in contact with an upper surface of the first member to assert a compressive force onto the first member and wherein the first member aperture and the second member aperture are coaxial.

  1. Improved Oxygenation 24 Hours After Transition to Airway Pressure Release Ventilation or High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation Accurately Discriminates Survival in Immunocompromised Pediatric Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Yehya, Nadir; Topjian, Alexis A.; Thomas, Neal J.; Friess, Stuart H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Children with an immunocompromised condition and requiring invasive mechanical ventilation have high risk of death. Such patients are commonly transitioned to rescue modes of non-conventional ventilation, including airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, for acute respiratory distress syndrome refractory to conventional ventilation. Our aim was to describe our experience with airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in children with an immunocompromised condition and acute respiratory distress syndrome refractory to conventional ventilation and to identify factors associated with survival. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary care, university-affiliated PICU. Patients Sixty pediatric patients with an immunocompromised condition and acute respiratory distress syndrome refractory to conventional ventilation transitioned to either airway pressure release ventilation or high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Demographic data, ventilator settings, arterial blood gases, oxygenation index, and Pao2/Fio2 were recorded before transition to either mode of nonconventional ventilation and at predetermined intervals after transition for up to 5 days. Mortality in the entire cohort was 63% and did not differ between patients transitioned to airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. For both airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, improvements in oxygenation index and Pao2/Fio2 at 24 hours expressed as a fraction of pretransition values (oxygenation index24/oxygenation indexpre and Pao2/Fio224/Pao2/FIO2pre) reliably discriminated nonsurvivors from survivors, with receiver operating characteristic areas under the curves between 0.89 and 0.95 (p for all curves < 0.001). Sensitivity-specificity analysis suggested that less than 15% reduction in

  2. Comparison of high-frequency chest wall oscillation and oscillating positive expiratory pressure in the home management of cystic fibrosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Oermann, C M; Sockrider, M M; Giles, D; Sontag, M K; Accurso, F J; Castile, R G

    2001-11-01

    Enhanced airway clearance is thought to result in better-maintained pulmonary function in cystic fibrosis (CF). Postural drainage, percussion, and vibration (PDPV) have been the primary airway clearance technique (ACT) employed in CF for over 40 years. Two new airway clearance modalities are high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) and oscillating positive expiratory pressure (OPEP). This pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of these techniques during home use, assess patient satisfaction with them as compared to PDPV, and assess the feasibility of performing a definitive comparative trial. The prospective, randomized, multicenter crossover trial was conducted at three urban academic CF Care Centers. Twenty-nine CF patients, 9-39 years of age, participated. Subjects performed 4 weeks each of HFCWO and OPEP following 2-week lead-in/washout periods. Spirometry, lung volumes, National Institutes of Health and Petty Scores, and a satisfaction survey were performed at baseline and after each treatment period. An ACT preference survey was completed at the conclusion of the study. Twenty-four subjects completed both therapies. There were no statistically significant differences between therapies for spirometry, lung volumes, or clinical scores. No significant safety issues arose during the study period. Compliance between therapies was similar. Significant differences among therapies existed in patient satisfaction. Given a choice of therapy, 50% of subjects chose HFCWO, 37% OPEP, and 13% PDPV. This study suggests that HFCWO and OPEP are safe and as effective as patients' routine therapies when used for airway clearance in a home setting. Patient satisfaction and preference differ among ACTs and should be considered when prescribing home therapy. A definitive, multi-center, comparative study evaluating long-term efficacy of these techniques is feasible.

  3. What Causes High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Causes of High Blood Pressure Changes, either from genes or the environment, in ... vessel structure and function. Biology and High Blood Pressure Researchers continue to study how various changes in ...

  4. Stroke and High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More How High Blood Pressure Can Lead to Stroke Updated:Dec 2,2016 ... content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  5. Common High Blood Pressure Myths

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Common High Blood Pressure Myths Updated:Apr 7,2017 Knowing the facts ... content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  6. High Blood Pressure Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Web Sites with More Information About High Blood Pressure ...

  7. High pressure mechanical seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babel, Henry W. (Inventor); Anderson, Raymond H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A relatively impervious mechanical seal is formed between the outer surface of a tube and the inside surface of a mechanical fitting of a high pressure fluid or hydraulic system by applying a very thin soft metal layer onto the outer surface of the hard metal tube and/or inner surface of the hard metal fitting. The thickness of such thin metal layer is independent of the size of the tube and/or fittings. Many metals and alloys of those metals exhibit the requisite softness, including silver, gold, tin, platinum, indium, rhodium and cadmium. Suitably, the coating is about 0.0025 millimeters (0.10 mils) in thickness. After compression, the tube and fitting combination exhibits very low leak rates on the order or 10.sup.-8 cubic centimeters per second or less as measured using the Helium leak test.

  8. High pressure mechanical seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babel, Henry W. (Inventor); Fuson, Phillip L. (Inventor); Chickles, Colin D. (Inventor); Jones, Cherie A. (Inventor); Anderson, Raymond H. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A relatively impervious mechanical seal is formed between the outer surface of a tube and the inside surface of a mechanical fitting of a high pressure fluid or hydraulic system by applying a very thin soft metal layer onto the outer surface of the hard metal tube and/or inner surface of the hard metal fitting, prior to swaging the fitting onto the tube. The thickness of such thin metal layer is independent of the size of the tube and/or fittings. Many metals and alloys of those metals exhibit the requisite softness, including silver, gold, nickel, tin, platinum, indium, rhodium and cadmium. Suitably, the coating is about 0.0025 millimeters (0.10 mils) in thickness. After swaging, the tube and fitting combination exhibits very low leak rates on the order or 10.sup.-8 cubic centimeters per second or less as meaured using the Helium leak test.

  9. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing [Houston, TX; Zettl, Alexander K [Kensington, TX

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  10. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.

    2013-07-15

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.

  11. Binaural beats at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    McFadden, D; Pasanen, E G

    1975-10-24

    Binaural beats have long been believed to be audible only at low frequencies, but an interaction reminiscent of a binaural beat can sometimes be heard when different two-tone complexes of high frequency are presented to the two ears. The primary requirement is that the frequency separation in the complex at one ear be slightly different from that in the other--that is, that there be a small interaural difference in the envelope periodicities. This finding is in accord with other recent demonstrations that the auditory system is not deaf to interaural time differences at high frequencies.

  12. High-pressure neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongwu

    2011-01-10

    This lecture will cover progress and prospect of applications of high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques to Earth and materials sciences. I will first introduce general high-pressure research topics and available in-situ high-pressure techniques. Then I'll talk about high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques using two types of pressure cells: fluid-driven and anvil-type cells. Lastly, I will give several case studies using these techniques, particularly, those on hydrogen-bearing materials and magnetic transitions.

  13. High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the baby. Controlling your blood pressure during pregnancy and getting regular prenatal care are important for ... your baby. Treatments for high blood pressure in pregnancy may include close monitoring of the baby, lifestyle ...

  14. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... above. Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and painless and can be done ... provider’s office or clinic. To prepare for the test: Don’t drink coffee or smoke cigarettes for ...

  15. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy studies of adsorbates on Pt(111): Studies of CO at high pressures and temperatures, coadsorbed with olefins and its role as a poison in ethylene hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, Kyle Yi

    2000-12-01

    High pressure high temperature CO adsorption and coadsorption with ethylene and propylene on Pt(111) was monitored in situ with infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG). At high pressures and high temperatures, CO dissociates on a Pt(111) surface to form carbon. At 400 torr CO pressure and 673K, CO modifies the Pt(111) surface through a carbonyl intermediate, and dissociates to leave carbon on the surface. SFG was used to follow the CO peak evolution from monolayer adsorption in ultra high vacuum (UHV) to 400 torr CO pressure. At this high pressure, a temperature dependence study from room temperature to 823K was carried out. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to identify carbon on the surface CO coadsorption with ethylene and CO coadsorption with propylene studies were carried out with 2-IR 1-visible SFG. With this setup, two spectral ranges covering the C-H stretch range and the CO stretch range can be monitored simultaneously. The coadsorption study with ethylene reveals that after 5L ethylene exposure on a Pt(111) surface to form ethylidyne , CO at high pressures cannot completely displace the ethylidyne from the surface. Instead, CO first adsorbs on defect sites at low pressures and then competes with ethylidyne for terrace sites at high pressures. Propylene coadsorption with CO at similar conditions shows that propylidyne undergoes conformation changes with increased CO pressure and at 1 torr, is absent from the Pt(111) surface. Experiments on CO poisoning of ethylene hydrogenation was carried by 2-IR 1-visible SFG. At 1 torr CO,10 torr ethylene and 100 torr hydrogen, CO was found to block active sites necessary for ethylene hydrogenation, Above 425K, CO desorbs from the surface to allow ethylene hydrogenation to occur. The gas phase species were monitored by gas chromatography.

  16. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Practice healthy coping techniques, such as muscle relaxation, deep breathing or meditation. Getting regular physical activity and ... blood pressure at home. Practice relaxation or slow, deep breathing. Practice taking deep, slow breaths to help ...

  17. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    DOEpatents

    Piper, T.C.; Morgan, J.P.; Marchant, N.J.; Bolton, S.M.

    1994-04-26

    A high precision pressure transducer system is described for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in an battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum fluorescent display. 2 figures.

  18. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    DOEpatents

    Piper, Thomas C.; Morgan, John P.; Marchant, Norman J.; Bolton, Steven M.

    1994-01-01

    A high precision pressure transducer system for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in an battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum florescent display.

  19. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, T. C.; Morgan, J. P.; Marchant, N. J.; Bolton, S. M.

    A high precision pressure transducer system for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank is presented. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in a battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on-board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum fluorescent display.

  20. High power, high frequency component test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Krawczonek, Walter

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has available a high frequency, high power laboratory facility for testing various components of aerospace and/or terrestrial power systems. This facility is described here. All of its capabilities and potential applications are detailed.

  1. High Frequency Chandler Wobble Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, F.; Stuck, J.; Thomas, M.

    2003-04-01

    Variations of Earth rotation on sub-daily to secular timescales are caused by mass redistributions in the Earth system as a consequence of geophysical processes and gravitational influences. Forced oscillations of polar motion are superposed by free oscillations of the Earth, i.e. the Chandler wobble and the free core nutation. In order to study the interactions between externally induced polar motion and the Earth's free oscillations, a non-linear gyroscopic model has been developed. In most of the former investigations on polar motion, the Chandler wobble is introduced as a damped oscillation with predetermined frequency and amplitude. However, as the effect of rotational deformation is a backcoupling mechanism of polar motion on the Earth's rotational dynamics, both period and amplitude of the Chandler wobble are time-dependent when regarding additional excitations from, e.g., atmospheric or oceanic mass redistributions. The gyroscopic model is free of any explicit information concerning amplitude, phase, and period of free oscillations. The characteristics of the Earth's free oscillation is reproduced by the model from rheological and geometrical parameters and rotational deformation is taken into account. This enables to study the time variable Chandler oscillation when the gyro is forced with atmospheric and oceanic angular momentum from the global atmospheric ECHAM3-T21 general circulation model together with the ocean model for circulation and tides OMCT driven by ECHAM including surface pressure. Besides, mass redistributions in the Earth's body due to gravitational and loading deformations are regarded and external torques exerted by Moon and Sun are considered. The numerical results of the gyro are significantly related with the geodetically observed time series of polar motion published by the IERS. It is shown that the consistent excitation is capable to counteract the damping and thus to maintain the Chandler amplitude. Spectral analyses of the ECHAM

  2. High Pressure Atomization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    water and tetradecane (factor of 10 in viscosity, 4 in surface ten- sion, 1.5 in liquid density); Pentane, hexane, and ethanol (factor of 3 surface...be of the order of centimeters and sensitive to conditions. In particular it * decreases with increasing injection pressure, gas temperature, and gas...nozzle inlet and with decreasing smaller than the jet diameter are formed. The liquid viscosity and nozzle length; divergence mechanism of Atomization

  3. High Frequency Self-pulsing Microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassalle, John; Pollard, William; Staack, David

    2014-10-01

    Pulsing behavior in high-pressure microplasmas was studied. Microplasmas are of interest because of potential application in plasma switches for robust electronics. These devices require fast switching. Self-pulsing microplasmas were generated in a variable-length spark gap at pressures between 0 and 220 psig in Air, Ar, N2, H2, and He for spark gap lengths from 15 to 1810 μm. Resulting breakdown voltages varied between 90 and 1500 V. Voltage measurements show pulse frequencies as high as 8.9 MHz in argon at 100 psig. These findings demonstrate the potential for fast switching of plasma switches that incorporate high-pressure microplasmas. Work was supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant #1057175, and the Department of Defense, ARO Grant #W911NF1210007.

  4. Frequency Characteristics of Fluctuating Pressure on Rotor Blade in a Propeller Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Choon-Man; Furukawa, Masato; Inoue, Masahiro

    A wavelet transform is introduced to analyze frequency characteristics of the fluctuating pressure on rotor blade in a propeller fan. The fluctuating pressure on the rotor blade is obtained by using the results of a large eddy simulation. The frequencies having high spectral peaks of the fluctuating pressure are determined by taking the time average of the local absolute modulus of the wavelet. The dominant frequency of the real-time pressure selected at the high pressure fluctuation region corresponds well to that of the fluctuating rotor torque and the experimental result of fan noise. It is mainly generated due to the unsteady behavior of the vortical flow, such as the tip vortex and the leading edge separation vortex, in the propeller fan. A frequency in the separation bubble region on the suction surface is higher than that of the dominant frequency caused by the vortical flow.

  5. Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays

    DOEpatents

    Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Paul, Phillip H.; Schoeniger, Luke

    2005-11-01

    An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

  6. Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays

    DOEpatents

    Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Paul, Phillip H.; Schoeniger, Luke

    2002-01-01

    An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

  7. MRI acoustic noise: sound pressure and frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Counter, S A; Olofsson, A; Grahn, H F; Borg, E

    1997-01-01

    The large gradient coils used in MRI generate, simultaneously with the pulsed radiofrequency (RF) wave, acoustic noise of high intensity that has raised concern regarding hearing safety. The sound pressure levels (SPLs) and power spectra of MRI acoustic noise were measured at the position of the human head in the isocenter of five MRI systems and with 10 different pulse sequences used in clinical MR scanning. Each protocol, including magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MP-RAGE; 113 dB SPL linear), fast gradient echo turbo (114 dB SPL linear), and spin echo T1/2 mm (117 dB SPL linear), was found to have the high SPLs, rapid pulse rates, amplitude-modulated pulse envelopes, and multipeaked spectra. Since thickness and SPL were inversely related, the T1-weighted images generated more intense acoustic noise than the proton-dense T2-weighted measures. The unfiltered linear peak values provided more accurate measurements of the SPL and spectral content of the MRI acoustic noise than the commonly used dB A-weighted scale, which filters out the predominant low frequency components. Fourier analysis revealed predominantly low frequency energy peaks ranging from .05 to approximately 1 kHz, with a steep high frequency cutoff for each pulse sequence. Ear protectors of known attenuation ratings are recommended for all patients during MRI testing.

  8. High pressure ices

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Andreas; Ashcroft, N. W.; Hoffmann, Roald

    2012-01-01

    H2O will be more resistant to metallization than previously thought. From computational evolutionary structure searches, we find a sequence of new stable and meta-stable structures for the ground state of ice in the 1–5 TPa (10 to 50 Mbar) regime, in the static approximation. The previously proposed Pbcm structure is superseded by a Pmc21 phase at p = 930 GPa, followed by a predicted transition to a P21 crystal structure at p = 1.3 TPa. This phase, featuring higher coordination at O and H, is stable over a wide pressure range, reaching 4.8 TPa. We analyze carefully the geometrical changes in the calculated structures, especially the buckling at the H in O-H-O motifs. All structures are insulating—chemistry burns a deep and (with pressure increase) lasting hole in the density of states near the highest occupied electronic levels of what might be component metallic lattices. Metallization of ice in our calculations occurs only near 4.8 TPa, where the metallic C2/m phase becomes most stable. In this regime, zero-point energies much larger than typical enthalpy differences suggest possible melting of the H sublattice, or even the entire crystal. PMID:22207625

  9. Medications for High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Medications for High Blood Pressure Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... all their lives. back to top Types of Medications FDA has approved many medications to treat high ...

  10. Nanomaterials under high-pressure.

    PubMed

    San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2006-10-01

    The use of high-pressure for the study and elaboration of homogeneous nanostructures is critically reviewed. Size effects, the interaction between nanostructures and guest species or the interaction of the nanosystem with the pressure transmitting medium are emphasized. Phase diagrams and the possibilities opened by the combination of pressure and temperature for the elaboration of new nanomaterials is underlined through the examination of three different systems: nanocrystals, nano-cage materials which include fullerites and group-14 clathrates, and single wall nanotubes. This tutorial review is addressed to scientist seeking an introduction or a panoramic view of the study of nanomaterials under high-pressure.

  11. High pressure synthesis gas fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Construction of the high pressure gas phase fermentation system is nearing completion. All non-explosion proof components will be housed separately in a gas-monitored plexiglas cabinet. A gas-monitoring system has been designed to ensure the safety of the operations in case of small or large accidental gas releases. Preliminary experiments investigating the effects of high pressure on Clostridium 1jungdahlii have shown that growth and CO uptake are not negatively affected and CO uptake by an increased total pressure of 100 psig at a syngas partial pressure of 10 psig.

  12. Frequency characteristics of pressure transducer kits with inserted pressure-resistant extension tubes.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shigeki; Mori, Satoshi; Tachihara, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Yokoe, Chizuko; Imaizumi, Uno; Morimoto, Yoshinari; Miki, Yoichiro; Toyoguchi, Izumi; Yoshida, Kazu-Ichi; Yokoyama, Takeshi

    2017-04-01

    The accurate monitoring of arterial blood pressure is important for cardiovascular management. However, the frequency characteristics of pressure transducer kits are influenced by the length of the pressure-resistant tube. To date, there have been few studies addressing the frequency characteristics of pressure transducer kits with inserted pressure-resistant extension tubes (pressure-resistant extension tube (ET) circuits). In this study, we examine ET circuits from the viewpoint of the frequency characteristics of pressure transducer kits. DT4812J transducer kits (length 150 cm; Argon Medical Devices, TX, USA) were used. Three original ET circuits were prepared, with the pressure-resistant tube of the DT4812J being extended with a 30-cm length of pressure-resistant tube (180ET circuit), a 60-cm length of pressure-resistant tube (210ET circuit), and a 90-cm length of pressure-resistant tube (240ET circuit). Each of these circuits was evaluated as part of this study. The natural frequency of the original DT4812J circuit was 45.90 Hz while the damping coefficient was 0.160. For the 180 ET circuit, the natural frequency and damping coefficient were 36.4 Hz and 0.162, respectively. For the ET210 circuit, the natural frequency and damping coefficient were 30.3 Hz and 0.175, respectively. For the ET210 circuit, the natural frequency and damping coefficient were 25.3 Hz and 0.180, respectively. As a result of extending the circuit, it was found that the natural frequency decreased drastically, while the damping coefficient increased slightly. When the extension of a pressure transducer kit is required, we should pay careful attention to the major decrease in the natural frequency, which may influence the pressure monitoring.

  13. Quantification of peripheral and central blood pressure variability using a time-frequency method.

    PubMed

    Kouchaki, Z; Butlin, M; Qasem, A; Avolio, A P; Kouchaki, Z; Butlin, M; Qasem, A; Avolio, A P; Kouchaki, Z; Avolio, A P; Butlin, M; Qasem, A

    2016-08-01

    Systolic blood pressure variability (BPV) is associated with cardiovascular events. As the beat-to-beat variation of blood pressure is due to interaction of several cardiovascular control systems operating with different response times, assessment of BPV by spectral analysis using the continuous measurement of arterial pressure in the finger is used to differentiate the contribution of these systems in regulating blood pressure. However, as baroreceptors are centrally located, this study considered applying a continuous aortic pressure signal estimated noninvasively from finger pressure for assessment of systolic BPV by a time-frequency method using Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT). The average ratio of low frequency and high frequency power band (LFPB/HFPB) was computed by time-frequency decomposition of peripheral systolic pressure (pSBP) and derived central aortic systolic blood pressure (cSBP) in 30 healthy subjects (25-62 years) as a marker of balance between cardiovascular control systems contributing in low and high frequency blood pressure variability. The results showed that the BPV assessed from finger pressure (pBPV) overestimated the BPV values compared to that assessed from central aortic pressure (cBPV) for identical cardiac cycles (P<;0.001), with the overestimation being greater at higher power.

  14. Effect of Training Frequency on Maximum Expiratory Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anand, Supraja; El-Bashiti, Nour; Sapienza, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) frequency on maximum expiratory pressure (MEP). Method: We assigned 12 healthy participants to 2 groups of training frequency (3 days per week and 5 days per week). They completed a 4-week training program on an EMST trainer (Aspire Products, LLC). MEP was the primary…

  15. High Blood Pressure Increasing Worldwide

    MedlinePlus

    ... other ways to control blood pressure, including healthy lifestyle choices and maintaining a normal weight, Roth said. Murray said some of the factors responsible for the worldwide increase in high blood pressure are unhealthy diets and obesity. In addition, in developing countries, more people are ...

  16. Steam Oxidation at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Carney, Casey

    2013-07-19

    A first high pressure test was completed: 293 hr at 267 bar and 670{degrees}C; A parallel 1 bar test was done for comparison; Mass gains were higher for all alloys at 267 bar than at 1 bar; Longer term exposures, over a range of temperatures and pressures, are planned to provide information as to the commercial implications of pressure effects; The planned tests are at a higher combination of temperatures and pressures than in the existing literature. A comparison was made with longer-term literature data: The short term exposures are largely consistent with the longer-term corrosion literature; Ferritic steels--no consistent pressure effect; Austenitic steels--fine grain alloys less able to maintain protective chromia scale as pressure increases; Ni-base alloys--more mass gains above 105 bar than below. Not based on many data points.

  17. Pressure dependent resonant frequency of micromechanical drumhead resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, D. R.; Craighead, H. G.; Parpia, J. M.

    2009-05-25

    We examine the relationship between squeeze film effects and resonance frequency in drum-type resonators. We find that the resonance frequency increases linearly with pressure as a result of the additional restoring force contribution from compression of gas within the drum cavity. We demonstrate trapping of the gas by squeeze film effects and geometry. The pressure sensitivity is shown to scale inversely with cavity height and sound radiation is found to be the predominant loss mechanism near and above atmospheric pressure. Drum resonators exhibit linearity and sensitivity suitable to barometry from below 10 Torr up to several atmospheres.

  18. High-pressure optical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    High pressure experimentation may concern intrinsically high pressure phenomena, or it may be used to gain a better understanding of states or processes at one atmosphere. The latter application is probably more prevelant in condensed matter physics. Under this second rubric one may either use high pressure to perturb various electronic energy levels and from this pressure tuning characterize states or processes, or one can use pressure to change a macroscopic parameter in a controlled way, then measure the effect on some molecular property. In this paper, the pressure tuning aspect is emphasized, with a lesser discussion of macroscopic - molecular relationships. In rare earth chelates the efficiency of 4f-4f emission of the rare earth is controlled by the feeding from the singlet and triplet levels of the organic ligand. These ligand levels can be strongly shifted by pressure. A study of the effect of pressure on the emission efficiency permits one to understand the effect of ligand modification at one atmosphere. Photochromic crystals change color upon irradiation due to occupation of a metastable ground state. In thermochromic crystals, raising the temperature accomplishes the same results. For a group of molecular crystals (anils) at high pressure, the metastable state can be occupied at room temperature. The relative displacement of the energy levels at high pressure also inhibits the optical process. Effects on luminescence intensity are shown to be consistent. In the area of microscopic - molecular relationships, the effect of viscosity and dielectric properties on rates of non-radiative (thermal) and radiative emission, and on peak energy for luminescence is demonstrated. For systems which can emit from either of two excited states depending on the interaction with the environment, the effect of rigidity of the medium on the rate of rearrangement of the excited state is shown.

  19. High School Press Pressures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Luella P.

    History shows that the high school press suffers through cycles that reflect economic factors and cultural climates within communities, states, and the nation. The direction of that cycle in the 1960s and early 1970s was toward more open, free-flowing information by a vigorous student press, but those economic and cultural signs now are pointing…

  20. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  1. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

    1993-11-30

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

  2. Managing High Blood Pressure Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Managing High Blood Pressure Medications Updated:Jan 3,2017 When your doctor prescribes ... Download a printable medicine tracker . Quick Tips for Medication Use Understand your medication. Know what it's for, ...

  3. What Is High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... consistently too high. How your blood pressure and circulatory system work In order to survive and function properly, ... and organs need the oxygenated blood that your circulatory system carries throughout the body. When the heart beats, ...

  4. High Pressure Industrial Water Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In conjunction with Space Shuttle Main Engine testing at Stennis, the Nordberg Water Pumps at the High Pressure Industrial Water Facility provide water for cooling the flame deflectors at the test stands during test firings.

  5. High pressure synthesis gas fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The construction of the high pressure gas phase fermentation system has been completed. Photographs of the various components of the system are presented, along with an operating procedure for the equipment.

  6. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.

    2000-01-01

    A compact high pressure hydraulic pump having no moving mechanical parts for converting electric potential to hydraulic force. The electrokinetic pump, which can generate hydraulic pressures greater than 2500 psi, can be employed to compress a fluid, either liquid or gas, and manipulate fluid flow. The pump is particularly useful for capillary-base systems. By combining the electrokinetic pump with a housing having chambers separated by a flexible member, fluid flow, including high pressure fluids, is controlled by the application of an electric potential, that can vary with time.

  7. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.; Arnold, Don W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Neyer, David W.

    2003-06-03

    An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based system. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

  8. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.; Arnold, Don W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Neyer, David W.

    2001-01-01

    An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based systems. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (Microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

  9. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  10. High pressure turbomachinery ground test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, Patrick E.

    1992-01-01

    Turbomachinery test facilities are at present scarce to non-existent world-wide. The turbomachinery test facility at Stennis Space Center will provide for advanced development and research and development capabilities for liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen propellant rocket engine components. The facility will provide ultra-high pressure via gas generators to deliver the needed turbine drive on various turbomachinery. State of the art process control systems will provide the vital pressure, temperature and flow requirements during tests. These systems will better control adverse transient conditions during start-up and shutdown, and by using advanced control theory, as well as incorporate test article health monitoring. Also, digital data acquisition systems will obtain high frequency (up to 20 KHz) and low frequency (up to 1 KHz) data during the test. Pressures of up to 15,000 psi will be generated to pressurize high pressure tanks supplying cryogens to various test article inlets thus pushing turbopump materials and manufacturing processes to their limits. By planning for future projects the test facility will be easily adaptable to multi-program test configurations over a range of thermodynamic positions.

  11. Electrochemical studies at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cruanes, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    This research has dealt with the development and application of a methodology that permits electrochemical measurements at high pressure. The initial efforts focused on the design and construction of an electrochemical cell functional at hydrostatic pressures as high as 10 kbar. This cell was equipped with an Ag/AgCl/KCl (0.1M) reference electrode which provides reliable control of the potential at all pressures. The potential of this reference electrode can be considered to be constant with pressure. Measurements of formal potentials (E[degrees][prime]) of several transition-metal complexes vs the Ag/AgCl electrode rendered volumes of reactions whose magnitudes support the prediction of the negligible pressure dependence of the reference electrode. The main systems that have been investigated at high pressure are surface-modified electrodes. The author studied the effect of compression on the dynamics of charge transport in quaternized poly(4-vinylpyridine) (QPVP) films placed on gold electrodes, loaded with potassium ferricyanide, and equilibrated in potassium nitrate. Pressure accomplished the continuous change in the structure of the polymer network. This change causes a pronounced restriction in the propagation of charge and in the motion of mass. This high-pressure methodology has also allowed the spatial characterization of electron transfer events taking place between a gold electrode and ferrocene molecules covalently attached to the end of 1-undodecanethiol chains self-assembled on the electrode surface. The volumes of reaction and activation for the oxidation process are both positive, indicating that a volume expansion is associated with the formation of ferricinium. A model is proposed in which the creation of a vacancy in the self-assembled monolayer, for the accommodation of the ferricinium ion or a charge-compensating anion, is coupled with the electron transfer step.

  12. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-06-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  13. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  14. Electronic phenomena at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    High pressure research is undertaken either to investigate intrinsically high pressure phenomena or in order to get a better understanding of the effect of the chemical environment on properties or processes at one atmosphere. Studies of electronic properties which fall in each area are presented. Many molecules and complexes can assume in the excited state different molecular arrangements and intermolecular forces depending on the medium. Their luminescence emission is then very different in a rigid or a fluid medium. With pressure one can vary the viscosity of the medium by a factor of 10/sup 7/ and thus control the distribution and rate of crossing between the excited state conformations. In rare earth chelates the efficiency of 4f-4f emission of the rare earth is controlled by the feeding from the singlet and triplet levels of the organic ligand. These ligand levels can be strongly shifted by pressure. A study of the effect of pressure on the emission efficiency permits one to understand the effect of ligand chemistry at one atmosphere. At high pressure electronic states can be sufficiently perturbed to provide new ground states. In EDA complexes these new ground states exhibit unusual chemical reactivity and new products.

  15. Low-pressure hydrogen discharge maintenance in a large-size plasma source with localized high radio-frequency power deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, D.; Shivarova, A. Paunska, Ts.; Tarnev, Kh.

    2015-03-15

    The development of the two-dimensional fluid-plasma model of a low-pressure hydrogen discharge, presented in the study, is regarding description of the plasma maintenance in a discharge vessel with the configuration of the SPIDER source. The SPIDER source, planned for the neutral-beam-injection plasma-heating system of ITER, is with localized high RF power deposition to its eight drivers (cylindrical-coil inductive discharges) and a large-area second chamber, common for all the drivers. The continuity equations for the charged particles (electrons and the three types of positive ions) and for the neutral species (atoms and molecules), their momentum equations, the energy balance equations for electrons, atoms and molecules and the Poisson equations are involved in the discharge description. In addition to the local processes in the plasma volume, the surface processes of particle reflection and conversion on the walls as well as for a heat exchange with the walls are included in the model. The analysis of the results stresses on the role of the fluxes (particle and energy fluxes) in the formation of the discharge structure. The conclusion is that the discharge behavior is completely obeyed to non-locality. The latter is displayed by: (i) maximum values of plasma parameters (charged particle densities and temperatures of the neutral species) outside the region of the RF power deposition, (ii) shifted maxima of the electron density and temperature, of the plasma potential and of the electron production, (iii) an electron flux, with a vortex structure, strongly exceeding the total ion flux which gives evidence of a discharge regime of non-ambipolarity and (iv) a spatial distribution of the densities of the neutral species resulting from their fluxes.

  16. Low-pressure hydrogen discharge maintenance in a large-size plasma source with localized high radio-frequency power deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, D.; Shivarova, A.; Paunska, Ts.; Tarnev, Kh.

    2015-03-01

    The development of the two-dimensional fluid-plasma model of a low-pressure hydrogen discharge, presented in the study, is regarding description of the plasma maintenance in a discharge vessel with the configuration of the SPIDER source. The SPIDER source, planned for the neutral-beam-injection plasma-heating system of ITER, is with localized high RF power deposition to its eight drivers (cylindrical-coil inductive discharges) and a large-area second chamber, common for all the drivers. The continuity equations for the charged particles (electrons and the three types of positive ions) and for the neutral species (atoms and molecules), their momentum equations, the energy balance equations for electrons, atoms and molecules and the Poisson equations are involved in the discharge description. In addition to the local processes in the plasma volume, the surface processes of particle reflection and conversion on the walls as well as for a heat exchange with the walls are included in the model. The analysis of the results stresses on the role of the fluxes (particle and energy fluxes) in the formation of the discharge structure. The conclusion is that the discharge behavior is completely obeyed to non-locality. The latter is displayed by: (i) maximum values of plasma parameters (charged particle densities and temperatures of the neutral species) outside the region of the RF power deposition, (ii) shifted maxima of the electron density and temperature, of the plasma potential and of the electron production, (iii) an electron flux, with a vortex structure, strongly exceeding the total ion flux which gives evidence of a discharge regime of non-ambipolarity and (iv) a spatial distribution of the densities of the neutral species resulting from their fluxes.

  17. High pressure neon arc lamp

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  18. Nonlinear amplitude frequency characteristics of attenuation in rock under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashinskii, E. I.

    2006-12-01

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out to investigate the influence of change in strain amplitude on the frequency dependence of attenuation in samples of sandstone, smoky quartz and duralumin. The measurements were performed using the reflection method on pulse frequency of 1 MHz in the strain range ~(0.3-2.0) × 10-6 under a confining pressure of 20 MPa. The attenuation in rocks is nonlinearly dependent on frequency and strain amplitude. In sandstone for P-waves and in smoky quartz for P- and S-waves, the dependences Q-1p(f) and Q-1s(f) have the attenuation peak. With increasing amplitude, the peak frequency can shift towards both the lower and the higher frequencies. It depends on the location of the frequency of an incident (input) pulse with respect to the peak frequency on the frequency axis. For sandstone the peak frequency of P-waves shifts towards the higher frequencies. For smoky quartz the shift of peak frequency is absent in P-waves, and S-waves shift towards the lower frequencies. The attenuation at the incident frequency always monotonically decreases with amplitude, and the other frequency components have complex or monotonic characters depending on the location of the incident frequency in the relaxation spectrum. Q-1p(f) in duralumin has monotonic character, i.e. a relaxation peak in the measurement frequency band is absent. Attenuation strongly decreases with increasing frequency and weakly depends on strain amplitude. The curve Q-1s(f) has an attenuation peak, and its character essentially depends on strain amplitude. With increasing amplitude, the peak frequency shifts towards the lower frequencies. The unusual increase of peak frequency of the P-wave spectrum in the bottom reflection in comparison with peak frequency in spectrum of the initial reflection is detected. The unusual behaviour of attenuation is explained by features of the joint action of viscoelastic and microplastic mechanisms. These results can be used for improving methods

  19. Digital pressure transducer for use at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, H.H.B.

    A digital pressure sensor for measuring fluid pressures at relatively high temperatures includes an electrically conducting fiber coupled to the fluid by a force disc that causes tension in the fiber to be a function of fluid pressure. The tension causes changes in the mechanical resonant frequency of the fiber, which is caused to vibrate in a magnetic field to produce an electrical signal from a positive-feedback amplifier at the resonant frequency. A count of this frequency provides a measure of the fluid pressure.

  20. Digital pressure transducer for use at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.

    1981-01-01

    A digital pressure sensor for measuring fluid pressures at relatively high temperatures includes an electrically conducting fiber coupled to the fluid by a force disc that causes tension in the fiber to be a function of fluid pressure. The tension causes changes in the mechanical resonant frequency of the fiber, which is caused to vibrate in a magnetic field to produce an electrical signal from a positive-feedback amplifier at the resonant frequency. A count of this frequency provides a measure of the fluid pressure.

  1. High Frequency Stable Oscillate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2015-11-01

    We present an unexpected regime of resonant bubble oscillations on a thin metal film submerged in water, which is continuously heated with a focused CW laser. The oscillatory bubble dynamics reveals a remarkably stable frequency of several 100 kHz and is resolved from the side using video recordings at 1 million frames per second. The emitted sound is measured simultaneously and shows higher harmonics. Once the laser is switched on the water in contact with the metal layer is superheated and an explosively expanding cavitation bubble is generated. However, after the collapse a microbubble is nucleated from the bubble remains which displays long lasting oscillations. Generally, pinch-off from of the upper part of the microbubble is observed generating a continuous stream of small gas bubbles rising upwards. The cavitation expansion, collapse, and the jetting of gas bubbles are detected by the hydrophone and are correlated to the high speed video. We find the bubble oscillation frequency is dependent on the bubble size and surface tension. A preliminary model based on Marangoni flow and heat transfer can explain the high flow velocities observed, yet the origin of bubble oscillation is currently not well understood.

  2. Anxiety: A Cause of High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions High blood pressure (hypertension) Can anxiety cause high blood pressure? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Anxiety doesn't cause long-term high blood pressure (hypertension). But episodes of anxiety can cause dramatic, ...

  3. High-power femtosecond Raman frequency shifter.

    PubMed

    Vicario, Carlo; Shalaby, Mostafa; Konyashchenko, Aleksandr; Losev, Leonid; Hauri, Christoph P

    2016-10-15

    We report on the generation of broadband, high-energy femtosecond pulses centered at 1.28 μm by stimulated Raman scattering in a pressurized hydrogen cell. Stimulated Raman scattering is performed by two chirped and delayed pulses originating from a multi-mJ Ti:sapphire amplifier. The Stokes pulse carries record-high energy of 4.4 mJ and is recompressed down to 66 fs by a reflective grating pair. We characterized the short-wavelength mid-infrared source in view of energy stability, beam profile, and conversion efficiency at repetition rates of 100 and 10 Hz. The demonstrated high-energy frequency shifter will benefit intense THz sources based on highly nonlinear organic crystals.

  4. High pressure paint gun injuries.

    PubMed

    Booth, C M

    1977-11-19

    Despite their use for the past 20 years the dangers of injuries from high pressure paint guns are not widely known. Two cases treated incorrectly through ignorance in our casualty department resulted in amputation of digits. Paint solvents are far moe damaging than paint of grease injection. All cases should be treated urgently by an experienced surgeon as fairly extensive surgery may be needed.

  5. High-pressure water facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA Test Operations Group employees, from left, Todd Pearson, Tim Delcuze and Rodney Wilkinson maintain a water pump in Stennis Space Center's high-pressure water facility. The three were part of a group of employees who rode out Hurricane Katrina at the facility and helped protect NASA's rocket engine test complex.

  6. Frequency response calibration of recess-mounted pressure transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolini, M. A.; Lorber, P. F.; Miller, W. T., Jr.; Covino, A. F., Jr.

    1991-03-01

    A technique is described for measuring the frequency response of pressure transducers mounted inside a model, where a narrow pipette leads to an orifice at the surface. An acoustic driver is mounted to a small chamber which has an opening at the opposite end with an O-ring seal to place over the orifice. A 3.18 mm (1/8 inch) reference microphone is mounted to one side of the chamber. The acoustic driver receives an input of white noise, and the transducer and reference microphone outputs are compared to obtain the frequency response of the pressure transducer. Selected results are presented in the form of power spectra for both the transducer and the reference, as well as the amplitude variation and phase shift between the two signals as a function of frequency. The effect of pipette length and the use of this technique for identifying both blocked orifices and faulty transducers are described.

  7. Frequency response calibration of recess-mounted pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcolini, M. A.; Lorber, P. F.; Miller, W. T., Jr.; Covino, A. F., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is described for measuring the frequency response of pressure transducers mounted inside a model, where a narrow pipette leads to an orifice at the surface. An acoustic driver is mounted to a small chamber which has an opening at the opposite end with an O-ring seal to place over the orifice. A 3.18 mm (1/8 inch) reference microphone is mounted to one side of the chamber. The acoustic driver receives an input of white noise, and the transducer and reference microphone outputs are compared to obtain the frequency response of the pressure transducer. Selected results are presented in the form of power spectra for both the transducer and the reference, as well as the amplitude variation and phase shift between the two signals as a function of frequency. The effect of pipette length and the use of this technique for identifying both blocked orifices and faulty transducers are described.

  8. High Pressure Treatment in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Torres Bello, Edwin Fabian; González Martínez, Gerardo; Klotz Ceberio, Bernadette F.; Rodrigo, Dolores; Martínez López, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP), a non-thermal technology, which typically uses water as a pressure transfer medium, is characterized by a minimal impact on food characteristics (sensory, nutritional, and functional). Today, this technology, present in many food companies, can effectively inactivate bacterial cells and many enzymes. All this makes HHP very attractive, with very good acceptance by consumers, who value the organoleptic characteristics of products processed by this non-thermal food preservation technology because they associate these products with fresh-like. On the other hand, this technology reduces the need for non-natural synthetic additives of low consumer acceptance. PMID:28234332

  9. High Pressure Treatment in Foods.

    PubMed

    Bello, Edwin Fabian Torres; Martínez, Gerardo González; Ceberio, Bernadette F Klotz; Rodrigo, Dolores; López, Antonio Martínez

    2014-08-19

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP), a non-thermal technology, which typically uses water as a pressure transfer medium, is characterized by a minimal impact on food characteristics (sensory, nutritional, and functional). Today, this technology, present in many food companies, can effectively inactivate bacterial cells and many enzymes. All this makes HHP very attractive, with very good acceptance by consumers, who value the organoleptic characteristics of products processed by this non-thermal food preservation technology because they associate these products with fresh-like. On the other hand, this technology reduces the need for non-natural synthetic additives of low consumer acceptance.

  10. High pressure rinsing system comparison

    SciTech Connect

    D. Sertore; M. Fusetti; P. Michelato; Carlo Pagani; Toshiyasu Higo; Jin-Seok Hong; K. Saito; G. Ciovati; T. Rothgeb

    2007-06-01

    High pressure rinsing (HPR) is a key process for the surface preparation of high field superconducting cavities. A portable apparatus for the water jet characterization, based on the transferred momentum between the water jet and a load cell, has been used in different laboratories. This apparatus allows to collected quantitative parameters that characterize the HPR water jet. In this paper, we present a quantitative comparison of the different water jet produced by various nozzles routinely used in different laboratories for the HPR process

  11. High-speed pressure clamp.

    PubMed

    Besch, Stephen R; Suchyna, Thomas; Sachs, Frederick

    2002-10-01

    We built a high-speed, pneumatic pressure clamp to stimulate patch-clamped membranes mechanically. The key control element is a newly designed differential valve that uses a single, nickel-plated piezoelectric bending element to control both pressure and vacuum. To minimize response time, the valve body was designed with minimum dead volume. The result is improved response time and stability with a threefold decrease in actuation latency. Tight valve clearances minimize the steady-state air flow, permitting us to use small resonant-piston pumps to supply pressure and vacuum. To protect the valve from water contamination in the event of a broken pipette, an optical sensor detects water entering the valve and increases pressure rapidly to clear the system. The open-loop time constant for pressure is 2.5 ms for a 100-mmHg step, and the closed-loop settling time is 500-600 micros. Valve actuation latency is 120 micros. The system performance is illustrated for mechanically induced changes in patch capacitance.

  12. High Frequency Linacs for Hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaldi, Ugo; Braccini, Saverio; Puggioni, Paolo

    The use of radiofrequency linacs for hadrontherapy was proposed about 20 years ago, but only recently has it been understood that the high repetition rate together with the possibility of very rapid energy variations offers an optimal solution to the present challenge of hadrontherapy: "paint" a moving tumor target in three dimensions with a pencil beam. Moreover, the fact that the energy, and thus the particle range, can be electronically adjusted implies that no absorber-based energy selection system is needed, which, in the case of cyclotron-based centers, is the cause of material activation. On the other side, a linac consumes less power than a synchrotron. The first part of this article describes the main advantages of high frequency linacs in hadrontherapy, the early design studies, and the construction and test of the first high-gradient prototype which accelerated protons. The second part illustrates some technical issues relevant to the design of copper standing wave accelerators, the present developments, and two designs of linac-based proton and carbon ion facilities. Superconductive linacs are not discussed, since nanoampere currents are sufficient for therapy. In the last two sections, a comparison with circular accelerators and an overview of future projects are presented.

  13. High Temperature Dynamic Pressure Measurements Using Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Meredith, Roger D.; Chang, Clarence T.; Savrun, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Un-cooled, MEMS-based silicon carbide (SiC) static pressure sensors were used for the first time to measure pressure perturbations at temperatures as high as 600 C during laboratory characterization, and subsequently evaluated in a combustor rig operated under various engine conditions to extract the frequencies that are associated with thermoacoustic instabilities. One SiC sensor was placed directly in the flow stream of the combustor rig while a benchmark commercial water-cooled piezoceramic dynamic pressure transducer was co-located axially but kept some distance away from the hot flow stream. In the combustor rig test, the SiC sensor detected thermoacoustic instabilities across a range of engine operating conditions, amplitude magnitude as low as 0.5 psi at 585 C, in good agreement with the benchmark piezoceramic sensor. The SiC sensor experienced low signal to noise ratio at higher temperature, primarily due to the fact that it was a static sensor with low sensitivity.

  14. High pressure and high temperature apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Voronov, Oleg A.

    2005-09-13

    A design for high pressure/high temperature apparatus and reaction cell to achieve .about.30 GPa pressure in .about.1 cm volume and .about.100 GPa pressure in .about.1 mm volumes and 20-5000.degree. C. temperatures in a static regime. The device includes profiled anvils (28) action on a reaction cell (14, 16) containing the material (26) to be processed. The reaction cell includes a heater (18) surrounded by insulating layers and screens. Surrounding the anvils are cylindrical inserts and supporting rings (30-48) whose hardness increases towards the reaction cell. These volumes may be increased considerably if applications require it, making use of presses that have larger loading force capability, larger frames and using larger anvils.

  15. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-03-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  16. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  17. High-pressure injection injuries.

    PubMed

    Neal, N C; Burke, F D

    1991-11-01

    A retrospective review of the 11 patients attending the Hand Unit at the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary over the last 5 years with high-pressure injection injuries is presented. The machines and materials that cause these injuries are outlined and the methods of treatment and rehabilitation are described in detail. The study demonstrates the morbidity of high-pressure injection injuries, particularly those inflicted by paint spray guns, and highlights a frequent delay between injury and decompression of the injured part. We wish to emphasize the importance of early diagnosis, referral, exploration and rehabilitation to ensure an optimal outcome, and to point out that failure to refer early is becoming an increasing focus of negligence claims.

  18. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) KidsHealth > For Parents > High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) A ... posture, and medications. continue Long-Term Effects of High Blood Pressure When someone has high blood pressure, the heart ...

  19. Atomic frequency standards for ultra-high-frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.; Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the Hg-199(+) trapped-ion frequency standard are outlined and compared to other atomic frequency standards, especially the hydrogen maser. The points discussed are those which make the trapped Hg-199(+) standard attractive: high line Q, reduced sensitivity to external magnetic fields, and simplicity of state selection, among others.

  20. High frequency-heated air turbojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miron, J. H. D.

    1986-01-01

    A description is given of a method to heat air coming from a turbojet compressor to a temperature necessary to produce required expansion without requiring fuel. This is done by high frequency heating, which heats the walls corresponding to the combustion chamber in existing jets, by mounting high frequency coils in them. The current transformer and high frequency generator to be used are discussed.

  1. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, J.K.

    1989-11-14

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0 to 30 C. 2 figs.

  2. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, John K.

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0.degree. to 30.degree. C.

  3. High pressure synthesis gas fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to build and test a pressure fermentation system for the production of ethanol from synthesis gas. The fermenters, pumps, controls, and analytical system will be procured or fabricated and assembled in our laboratory. This system will then be used to determine the effects of high pressure on growth and ethanol production by clostridium ljungdahlii. The limits of cell concentration and mass transport relationships will be found in continuous stirred tank reactor and immobilized cell reactors. The minimum retention times and reactor volumes will be found for ethanol production in these reactors. Retention times of a few seconds are expected to result from these experiments. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. High frequency testing of rubber mounts.

    PubMed

    Vahdati, Nader; Saunders, L Ken Lauderbaugh

    2002-04-01

    Rubber and fluid-filled rubber engine mounts are commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications to provide reduced cabin noise and vibration, and/or motion accommodations. In certain applications, the rubber mount may operate at frequencies as high as 5000 Hz. Therefore, dynamic stiffness of the mount needs to be known in this frequency range. Commercial high frequency test machines are practically nonexistent, and the best high frequency test machine on the market is only capable of frequencies as high as 1000 Hz. In this paper, a high frequency test machine is described that allows test engineers to study the high frequency performance of rubber mounts at frequencies up to 5000 Hz.

  5. High Frequency Electronic Packaging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, M.; Lowry, L.; Lee, K.; Kolawa, E.; Tulintseff, A.; Shalkhauser, K.; Whitaker, J.; Piket-May, M.

    1994-01-01

    Commercial and government communication, radar, and information systems face the challenge of cost and mass reduction via the application of advanced packaging technology. A majority of both government and industry support has been focused on low frequency digital electronics.

  6. A preliminary analysis of low frequency pressure oscillations in hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Rhonald M.

    1994-10-01

    Past research with hybrid rockets has suggested that certain motor operating conditions are conducive to the formation of pressure oscillations, or flow instabilities, within the motor combustion chamber. These combustion-related vibrations or pressure oscillations may be encountered in virtually any type of rocket motor and typically fall into three frequency ranges: low frequency oscillations (0-300 Hz); intermediate frequency oscillations (400-1000 Hz); and high frequency oscillations (greater than 1000 Hz). In general, combustion instability is characterized by organized pressure oscillations occurring at well-defined intervals with pressure peaks that may maintain themselves, grow, or die out. Usually, such peaks exceed +/- 5% of the mean chamber pressure. For hybrid motors, these oscillations have been observed to grow to a limiting amplitude which may be dependent on factors such as fuel characteristics, oxidizer injector characteristics, average chamber pressure, oxidizer mass flux, combustion chamber length, and grain geometry. The approach taken in the present analysis is to develop a modified chamber length, L, instability theory which accounts for the relationship between pressure and oxidizer to fuel concentration ratio in the motor.

  7. A preliminary analysis of low frequency pressure oscillations in hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Rhonald M.

    1994-01-01

    Past research with hybrid rockets has suggested that certain motor operating conditions are conducive to the formation of pressure oscillations, or flow instabilities, within the motor combustion chamber. These combustion-related vibrations or pressure oscillations may be encountered in virtually any type of rocket motor and typically fall into three frequency ranges: low frequency oscillations (0-300 Hz); intermediate frequency oscillations (400-1000 Hz); and high frequency oscillations (greater than 1000 Hz). In general, combustion instability is characterized by organized pressure oscillations occurring at well-defined intervals with pressure peaks that may maintain themselves, grow, or die out. Usually, such peaks exceed +/- 5% of the mean chamber pressure. For hybrid motors, these oscillations have been observed to grow to a limiting amplitude which may be dependent on factors such as fuel characteristics, oxidizer injector characteristics, average chamber pressure, oxidizer mass flux, combustion chamber length, and grain geometry. The approach taken in the present analysis is to develop a modified chamber length, L, instability theory which accounts for the relationship between pressure and oxidizer to fuel concentration ratio in the motor.

  8. High Pressure Electrolyzer System Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, Kevin; Coloza, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    This report documents the continuing efforts to evaluate the operational state of a high pressure PEM based electrolyzer located at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This electrolyzer is a prototype system built by General Electric and refurbished by Hamilton Standard (now named Hamilton Sunstrand). It is capable of producing hydrogen and oxygen at an output pressure of 3000 psi. The electrolyzer has been in storage for a number of years. Evaluation and testing was performed to determine the state of the electrolyzer and provide an estimate of the cost for refurbishment. Pressure testing was performed using nitrogen gas through the oxygen ports to ascertain the status of the internal membranes and seals. It was determined that the integrity of the electrolyzer stack was good as there were no appreciable leaks in the membranes or seals within the stack. In addition to the integrity testing, an itemized list and part cost estimate was produced for the components of the electrolyzer system. An evaluation of the system s present state and an estimate of the cost to bring it back to operational status was also produced.

  9. High-pressure Raman study of Terephthalonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, DongFei; Zhang, KeWei; Song, MingXing; Zhai, NaiCui; Sun, ChengLin; Li, HaiBo

    2017-02-01

    The in situ high-pressure Raman spectra of Terephthalonitrile (TPN) have been investigated from ambient to 12.6 GPa at room temperature. All the fundamental vibrational modes of TPN at ambient were assigned based on the first-principle calculations. A detailed Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that TPN underwent a phase transition at 5.3 GPa. The frequencies of the TPN Raman peaks increase with increasing the pressure which can be attributed to the reduction in the interatomic distances and the escalation of effective force constants. The intensity of the C-C-C ring-out-plane deformation mode increases gradually as the frequency remains almost constant during the compression which can be explained by the existence of π-π interactions in TPN molecules. Additionally, the pressure-induced structural changes of TPN on the Fermi resonance between the C ≡ N out-of-plane vibration mode and the C - CN out-of-plane vibration mode have been analyzed.

  10. Improved high pressure turbine shroud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bessen, I. I.; Rigney, D. V.; Schwab, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A new high pressure turbine shroud material has been developed from the consolidation of prealloyed powders of Ni, Cr, Al and Y. The new material, a filler for cast turbine shroud body segments, is called Genaseal. The development followed the identification of oxidation resistance as the primary cause of prior shroud deterioration, since conversion to oxides reduces erosion resistance and increases spalling under thermal cycled engine conditions. The NICrAlY composition was selected in preference to NIAL and FeCRALY alloys, and was formulated to a prescribed density range that offers suitable erosion resistance, thermal conductivity and elastic modulus for improved behavior as a shroud.

  11. Electokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.

    2000-01-01

    A compact high pressure hydraulic system having no moving parts for converting electric potential to hydraulic force and for manipulating fluids. Electro-osmotic flow is used to provide a valve and means to compress a fluid or gas in a capillary-based system. By electro-osmotically moving an electrolyte between a first position opening communication between a fluid inlet and outlet and a second position closing communication between the fluid inlet and outlet the system can be configured as a valve. The system can also be used to generate forces as large as 2500 psi that can be used to compress a fluid, either a liquid or a gas.

  12. Topaz and Kyanite Luminescence Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bannon, E. F., III; Williams, Q. C.

    2014-12-01

    The luminescence spectra of Cr3+ in heat-treated topaz Al2SiO4(OH,F)2 and natural kyanite Al2SiO5 were measured from 650 - 800 nm in a hydrostatic environment up to pressures of 15 GPa. The R1 and R2 peaks of topaz shift at average rates of 0.30 nm/GPa and 0.22 nm/GPa, respectively, implying that the deformation of the Cr3+ octahedra increases with pressure. Three peaks are fit under each R line of topaz at both room and high pressure, and these peaks are associated with different Al sites into which the Cr substitutes. The shift of the R lines in topaz under pressure is remarkably linear, which appears to be a general feature of many Cr3+-bearing oxides: the underlying cause of this linearity may lie in anharmonic coupling with lattice vibrations. In this context, we also characterize the frequency shifts of two vibronic peaks within topaz. The R1 and R2 peaks of kyanite shift at 0.37 nm/GPa and 0.88 nm/GPa respectively. Two peaks are fit under R1 and three peaks are fit under R2 of kyanite at both room and high pressure; this result is also consistent with three different Cr3+ sites in this material. The R lines in kyanite are notably optically anisotropic, depending strongly on crystallographic orientation: this is most strongly manifested in the R2 peak. The Cr3+ luminescence in these materials provides a sensitive probe of pressure-dependent shifts in the local geometry of the Al-sites in these materials, which are analyzed in the context of previous single-crystal x-ray diffraction measurements.

  13. Wavenumber-frequency Spectra of Pressure Fluctuations Measured via Fast Response Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Roozeboom, N. H.; Ross, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement in fast-response Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) allows time-resolved measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuations from a dense grid of spatial points on a wind tunnel model. This capability allows for direct calculations of the wavenumber-frequency (k-?) spectrum of pressure fluctuations. Such data, useful for the vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, are difficult to obtain otherwise. For the present work, time histories of pressure fluctuations on a flat plate subjected to vortex shedding from a rectangular bluff-body were measured using PSP. The light intensity levels in the photographic images were then converted to instantaneous pressure histories by applying calibration constants, which were calculated from a few dynamic pressure sensors placed at selective points on the plate. Fourier transform of the time-histories from a large number of spatial points provided k-? spectra for pressure fluctuations. The data provides first glimpse into the possibility of creating detailed forcing functions for vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, albeit for a limited frequency range.

  14. Parametric Study of High Frequency Pulse Detonation Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Anderw D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes development of high frequency pulse detonation tubes similar to a small pulse detonation engine (PDE). A high-speed valve injects a charge of a mixture of fuel and air at rates of up to 1000 Hz into a constant area tube closed at one end. The reactants detonate in the tube and the products exit as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers are used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device and thrust is measured with a balance. The effects of injection frequency, fuel and air flow rates, tube length, and injection location are considered. Both H2 and C2H4 fuels are considered. Optimum (maximum specific thrust) fuel-air compositions and resonant frequencies are identified. Results are compared to PDE calculations. Design rules are postulated and applications to aerodynamic flow control and propulsion are discussed.

  15. Method of producing a high pressure gas

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.

    2006-07-18

    A method of producing a high pressure gas is disclosed and which includes providing a container; supplying the container with a liquid such as water; increasing the pressure of the liquid within the container; supplying a reactant composition such as a chemical hydride to the liquid under pressure in the container and which chemically reacts with the liquid to produce a resulting high pressure gas such as hydrogen at a pressure of greater than about 100 pounds per square inch of pressure; and drawing the resulting high pressure gas from the container.

  16. Optical calibration of pressure sensors for high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A F; Gregoryanz, E; Zaug, J M; Crowhurst, J C

    2004-10-04

    We present the results of Raman scattering measurements of diamond ({sup 12}C) and of cubic boron nitride (cBN), and fluorescence measurements of ruby, Sm:YAG, and SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Sm{sup 2+} in the diamond anvil cell (DAC) at high pressures and temperatures. These measurements were accompanied by synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements on gold. We have extended the room-temperature calibration of Sm:YAG in a quasihydrostatic regime up to 100 GPa. The ruby scale is shown to systematically underestimate pressure at high pressures and temperatures compared with all other sensors. On this basis, we propose a new high-temperature ruby pressure scale that should be valid to at least 100 GPa and 850 K. Historically, the accurate determination of pressure at high temperature and ultrahigh pressure has been extremely difficult. In fact, the lack of a general pressure scale nullifies, to a significant extent, the great innovations that have been made in recent years in DAC experimental techniques [1]. Now, more than ever a scale is required whose accuracy is comparable with that of the experimental data. Since pressure in the DAC is dependent on temperature (due to thermal pressure and also to changes in the properties of the materials that constitute the DAC) such a scale requires quantitative, and separate measurements of pressure and temperature.

  17. High-pressure microhydraulic actuator

    DOEpatents

    Mosier, Bruce P [San Francisco, CA; Crocker, Robert W [Fremont, CA; Patel, Kamlesh D [Dublin, CA

    2008-06-10

    Electrokinetic ("EK") pumps convert electric to mechanical work when an electric field exerts a body force on ions in the Debye layer of a fluid in a packed bed, which then viscously drags the fluid. Porous silica and polymer monoliths (2.5-mm O.D., and 6-mm to 10-mm length) having a narrow pore size distribution have been developed that are capable of large pressure gradients (250-500 psi/mm) when large electric fields (1000-1500 V/cm) are applied. Flowrates up to 200 .mu.L/min and delivery pressures up to 1200 psi have been demonstrated. Forces up to 5 lb-force at 0.5 mm/s (12 mW) have been demonstrated with a battery-powered DC-DC converter. Hydraulic power of 17 mW (900 psi@ 180 uL/min) has been demonstrated with wall-powered high voltage supplies. The force and stroke delivered by an actuator utilizing an EK pump are shown to exceed the output of solenoids, stepper motors, and DC motors of similar size, despite the low thermodynamic efficiency.

  18. Electrical Transport Experiments at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S

    2009-02-11

    High-pressure electrical measurements have a long history of use in the study of materials under ultra-high pressures. In recent years, electrical transport experiments have played a key role in the study of many interesting high pressure phenomena including pressure-induced superconductivity, insulator-to-metal transitions, and quantum critical behavior. High-pressure electrical transport experiments also play an important function in geophysics and the study of the Earth's interior. Besides electrical conductivity measurements, electrical transport experiments also encompass techniques for the study of the optoelectronic and thermoelectric properties of materials under high pressures. In addition, electrical transport techniques, i.e., the ability to extend electrically conductive wires from outside instrumentation into the high pressure sample chamber have been utilized to perform other types of experiments as well, such as high-pressure magnetic susceptibility and de Haas-van Alphen Fermi surface experiments. Finally, electrical transport techniques have also been utilized for delivering significant amounts of electrical power to high pressure samples, for the purpose of performing high-pressure and -temperature experiments. Thus, not only do high-pressure electrical transport experiments provide much interesting and valuable data on the physical properties of materials extreme compression, but the underlying high-pressure electrical transport techniques can be used in a number of ways to develop additional diagnostic techniques and to advance high pressure capabilities.

  19. High-pressure cryogenic seals for pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buggele, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    This investigation of the problems associated with reliably containing gaseous helium pressurized to 1530 bars (22 500 psi) between 4.2 K and 150 K led to the following conclusions: (1) common seal designs used in existing elevated-temperature pressure vessels are unsuitable for high-pressure cryogenic operation, (2) extrusion seal-ring materials such as Teflon, tin, and lead are not good seal materials for cryogenic high-pressure operation; and (3) several high-pressure cryogenic seal systems suitable for large-pressure vessel applications were developed; two seals required prepressurization, and one seal functioned repeatedly without any prepressurization. These designs used indium seal rings, brass or 304 stainless-steel anvil rings, and two O-rings of silicone rubber or Kel-F.

  20. Landau damping with high frequency impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz,M.

    2009-05-04

    Coupled bunch longitudinal stability in the presence of high frequency impedances is considered. A frequency domain technique is developed and compared with simulations. The frequency domain technique allows for absolute stability tests and is applied to the problem of longitudinal stability in RHIC with the new 56 MHz RF system.

  1. Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aneurysm More Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure Infographic Updated:Oct 31,2016 View a downloadable version of this infographic High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  2. Managing Stress to Control High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aneurysm More Managing Stress to Control High Blood Pressure Updated:Jan 10,2017 The importance of stress ... content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  3. High blood pressure and eye disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000999.htm High blood pressure and eye disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure can damage blood vessels in the retina . The ...

  4. Feedthrough Seal For High-Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R.; Mullins, O.; Smith, D.; Teasley, G.

    1984-01-01

    Combination of ceramic and plastic withstands many depressurizations. Stack of washers surrounds leadthrough electrode. Under pressure washers expand to fill leadthrough hole in high-pressure vessel. Seal thus formed withstands 20 or more pressurization/depressurization cycles. Seal composed of neoprene, polytetrafluoroethylene, nylon and high-purity, high-density commercial alumina ceramic.

  5. Lightweight, high-frequency transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    The 25-kVA space transformer was developed under contract by Thermal Technology Laboratory, Buffalo, N. Y. The NASA Lewis transformer technology program attempted to develop the baseline technology. For the 25-kVA transformer the input voltage was chosen as 200 V, the output voltage as 1500 V, the input voltage waveform as square wave, the duty cycle as continuous, the frequency range (within certain constraints) as 10 to 40 kHz, the operating temperatures as 85 deg. and 130 C, the baseplate temperature as 50 C, the equivalent leakage inductance as less than 10 micro-h, the operating environment as space, and the life expectancy as 10 years. Such a transformer can also be used for aircraft, ship and terrestrial applications.

  6. Frequency of diarrhoea as a predictor of elevated blood pressure in children

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Juan Jaime; Davies, Alisha R.; Smith, George Davey; Smeeth, Liam; Cabrera, Lilia; Gilman, Robert H.; García, Héctor H.; Ortega, Ynes R.; Cama, Vitaliano A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Diarrhoeal illness is a major public health problem for children worldwide, particularly among developing countries, and is a proxy condition for severe dehydration. It has been hypothesized that severe dehydration in the first 6 months of life could be associated with increased blood pressure later in life. This study aimed to explore whether frequency of diarrhoea is associated with elevated blood pressure in children in a setting with a high incidence of diarrhoeal disease. Methods The present study is a cross-sectional study of blood pressure among children from a longitudinal child diarrhoeal disease cohort in Lima, Peru. From 2001 to 2006, daily diarrhoeal surveillance was made. Children were revisited in 2006 and blood pressure was measured. Diarrhoeal exposures were evaluated in terms of total number of diarrhoea days, number of episodes of diarrhoea, persistent diarrhoeal episodes and by the quartiles of daily incidence and episode incidence of diarrhoea. Results The overall incidence of diarrhoeal episodes at age under 1 year was 4.35 (95% confidence interval: 3.79-4.98) and under 5 years was 2.80 (95% confidence interval: 2.69-2.92). No association was observed between the total number of diarrhoeal days, diarrhoeal episodes or diarrhoeal incidence rates with childhood blood pressure. There was weak evidence that hospital admission due to severe dehydration in the first year of life showed a gradient towards an increase in both, systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Conclusion In the first study to date to examine the association in a setting with a high incidence of diarrhoeal disease, diarrhoeal frequency did not show an association with increased blood pressure. Our observations of elevated levels of blood pressure among those admitted into hospitals in the first year of life are in line with the original hypothesis of dehydration in early infancy and high blood pressure. However, the effect of episodes of severe dehydration on later blood

  7. HIGH CURRENT RADIO FREQUENCY ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    1963-04-01

    This patent relates to a high current radio frequency ion source. A cylindrical plasma container has a coil disposed around the exterior surface thereof along the longitudinal axis. Means are provided for the injection of an unionized gas into the container and for applying a radio frequency signal to the coil whereby a radio frequency field is generated within the container parallel to the longitudinal axis thereof to ionize the injected gas. Cathode and anode means are provided for extracting transverse to the radio frequency field from an area midway between the ends of the container along the longitudinal axis thereof the ions created by said radio frequency field. (AEC)

  8. High-Pressure Lightweight Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; McKechnie, Timothy; Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy; Smirnov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Returning samples of Martian soil and rock to Earth is of great interest to scientists. There were numerous studies to evaluate Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission architectures, technology needs, development plans, and requirements. The largest propulsion risk element of the MSR mission is the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). Along with the baseline solid-propellant vehicle, liquid propellants have been considered. Similar requirements apply to other lander ascent engines and reaction control systems. The performance of current state-ofthe- art liquid propellant engines can be significantly improved by increasing both combustion temperature and pressure. Pump-fed propulsion is suggested for a single-stage bipropellant MAV. Achieving a 90-percent stage propellant fraction is thought to be possible on a 100-kg scale, including sufficient thrust for lifting off Mars. To increase the performance of storable bipropellant rocket engines, a high-pressure, lightweight combustion chamber was designed. Iridium liner electrodeposition was investigated on complex-shaped thrust chamber mandrels. Dense, uniform iridium liners were produced on chamber and cylindrical mandrels. Carbon/carbon composite (C/C) structures were braided over iridium-lined mandrels and densified by chemical vapor infiltration. Niobium deposition was evaluated for forming a metallic attachment flange on the carbon/ carbon structure. The new thrust chamber was designed to exceed state-of-the-art performance, and was manufactured with an 83-percent weight savings. High-performance C/Cs possess a unique set of properties that make them desirable materials for high-temperature structures used in rocket propulsion components, hypersonic vehicles, and aircraft brakes. In particular, more attention is focused on 3D braided C/Cs due to their mesh-work structure. Research on the properties of C/Cs has shown that the strength of composites is strongly affected by the fiber-matrix interfacial bonding, and that weakening

  9. Nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet using a combination of 50 kHz/2 MHz dual-frequency power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yong-Jie; Yuan, Qiang-Hua; Li, Fei; Wang, Xiao-Min; Yin, Gui-Qin; Dong, Chen-Zhong

    2013-11-15

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet is generated by dual sinusoidal wave (50 kHz and 2 MHz). The dual-frequency plasma jet exhibits the advantages of both low frequency and radio frequency plasmas, namely, the long plasma plume and the high electron density. The radio frequency ignition voltage can be reduced significantly by using dual-frequency excitation compared to the conventional radio frequency without the aid of the low frequency excitation source. A larger operating range of α mode discharge can be obtained using dual-frequency excitation which is important to obtain homogeneous and low-temperature plasma. A larger controllable range of the gas temperature of atmospheric pressure plasma could also be obtained using dual-frequency excitation.

  10. Psychophysical tuning curves at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Ifat; Plack, Christopher J.

    2005-10-01

    For most normal-hearing listeners, absolute thresholds increase rapidly above about 16 kHz. One hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of the hearing-threshold curve is imposed by the transmission characteristics of the middle ear, which attenuates the sound input [Masterton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 45, 966-985 (1969)]. An alternative hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of hearing is imposed by the tonotopicity of the cochlea [Ruggero and Temchin, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 13206-13210 (2002)]. The aim of this study was to test these hypotheses. Forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) were derived for signal frequencies of 12-17.5 kHz. For the highest signal frequencies, the high-frequency slopes of some PTCs were steeper than the slope of the hearing-threshold curve. The results also show that the human auditory system displays frequency selectivity for characteristic frequencies (CFs) as high as 17 kHz, above the frequency at which absolute thresholds begin to increase rapidly. The findings suggest that, for CFs up to 17 kHz, the high-frequency limitation in humans is imposed in part by the middle-ear attenuation, and not by the tonotopicity of the cochlea.

  11. Manufacturing Diamond Under Very High Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    A process for manufacturing bulk diamond has been made practical by the invention of the High Pressure and Temperature Apparatus capable of applying the combination of very high temperature and high pressure needed to melt carbon in a sufficiently large volume. The apparatus includes a reaction cell wherein a controlled static pressure as high as 20 GPa and a controlled temperature as high as 5,000 C can be maintained.

  12. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to achieve target blood pressure goals with treatment. Overweight You are more likely to develop prehypertension or high blood pressure if you’re overweight or obese . The terms “overweight” and “obese” refer ...

  13. High Blood Pressure: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... below to read more. High Blood Pressure and Edema : You may notice swelling in some parts of ... blood pressure. This buildup of fluids, called peripheral edema, usually occurs in your ankles, feet, lower legs, ...

  14. High blood pressure in women.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, D A; Oparil, S

    1997-01-01

    There is a sexual dimorphism in blood pressure of humans and experimental animals: males tend to have higher blood pressure than females with functional ovaries, while ovariectomy or menopause tends to abolish the sexual dimorphism and cause females to develop a "male" pattern of blood pressure. Hypertensive male laboratory animals tend to have NaCl-sensitive blood pressure, while females are NaCl resistant unless their ovaries are removed, in which case NaCl sensitivity appears. The hormonal basis of NaCl sensitivity of blood pressure and of the sexual dimorphism of hypertension remains to be defined. Synthetic estrogens and progestins, as found in oral contraceptives, tend to elevate blood pressure, while naturally occurring estrogens lower it, or have no effect. Hypertension increases cardiovascular risk in women, as well as men, although the benefits of antihypertensive treatment have been more difficult to demonstrate in women. In the population of the United States, women are more aware of their hypertension, more likely to be treated medically, and more likely to have their blood pressure controlled.

  15. High pressure pulsed capillary viscometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.; Walowitt, J. A.; Pan, C. H. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted in order to establish the feasibility of a multichamber pulsed-capillary viscometer. The initial design incorporated a piston, ram, and seals which produced measured pulses up to 30,000 psi in the closed chamber system. Pressure pulses from one to ten milliseconds were investigated in a system volume of 1 cuin. Four test fluids: a MIL-L-7808, a 5P4E polyphenyl ether, a MIL-L-23699A, and a synthetic hydrocarbon were examined in the test pressure assembly. The pressure-viscosity coefficient and viscosity delay time were determined for the MIL-L-7808 lubricant tested.

  16. Frequency response of the pore pressure wells - from tidal to seismic frequency -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagidani, T.; Kano, Y.; Yamashita, F.

    2002-12-01

    Poroelastic theory states that when a porous aquifer is under complete undrained conditions, i.e. a porous medium is compressed or extended without allowing fluid to flow, the applied stress is always borne by pore fluid and skeletal framework of the rock. Thus the pore pressure must be a direct sensor of the crustal stress change. However, this has never been clearly observed, because the pore pressure of aquifer would often measure through the water level in an open well under the assumption that it is in equilibrium with the pore pressure. In open wells, changes in pore pressure must be accompanied with flow into or out of the wall, which definitely prevents the well from being a gage of pore pressure in an aquifer. Limited hydraulic communication between well and aquifer causes the delay and attenuation in frequency response. And the dimension and geometry of well also greatly affect the performance. We could overcome these shortcomings by stopping up a flowing well bore and directly measuring the fluid (pore) pressure, p within it, and we found that the fluid pressure of such closed wells show the first-order response from tidal to seismic frequencies. A site-investigation tunnel was excavated at 350 m depth from the gallery of the Kamioka mine across the Mozumi fault, a part of the Atotsugawa fault system in central Japan. We have monitored the fluid pressure using pressures gage (full scale is 2.069 MPa, resolution is 16 bit, and sampling rate is 20 Hz) at two well bores on both sides of the fault; C-well, the diameter is 140 mm, the length is 600 m, the inclination is -70°, and the flowing rate is 375 l/min; A-well, the diameter is 76 mm, the length is 15 m, the inclination is -5°, and the flowing rate is 25 l/min. We have also observed the barometric pressure, b in the tunnel. On stopping up a well bore, the pore pressure have gradually built up and attained the stable state in a half year (C-well; 1.43MPa, A-well; 0.99MPa). Tiny but clear fluctuations

  17. Apparatus for measuring high frequency currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagmann, Mark J. (Inventor); Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring high frequency currents includes a non-ferrous core current probe that is coupled to a wide-band transimpedance amplifier. The current probe has a secondary winding with a winding resistance that is substantially smaller than the reactance of the winding. The sensitivity of the current probe is substantially flat over a wide band of frequencies. The apparatus is particularly useful for measuring exposure of humans to radio frequency currents.

  18. Living with High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... closely and work with your health care team. Healthy Lifestyle Changes You can help control your blood pressure by making these healthy lifestyle changes: Follow a healthy diet. Be physically active. ...

  19. IMPACT OF VENTILATION FREQUENCY AND PARENCHYMAL STIFFNESS ON FLOW AND PRESSURE DISTRIBUTION IN A CANINE LUNG MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Reza; Kaczka, David W.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the impact of ventilation frequency, lung volume, and parenchymal stiffness on ventilation distribution, we developed an anatomically-based computational model of the canine lung. Each lobe of the model consists of an asymmetric branching airway network subtended by terminal, viscoelastic acinar units. The model allows for empiric dependencies of airway segment dimensions and parenchymal stiffness on transpulmonary pressure. We simulated the effects of lung volume and parenchymal recoil on global lung impedance and ventilation distribution from 0.1 to 100 Hz, with mean transpulmonary pressures from 5 to 25 cmH2O. With increasing lung volume, the distribution of acinar flows narrowed and became more synchronous for frequencies below resonance. At higher frequencies, large variations in acinar flow were observed. Maximum acinar flow occurred at first antiresonance frequency, where lung impedance achieved a local maximum. The distribution of acinar pressures became very heterogeneous and amplified relative to tracheal pressure at the resonant frequency. These data demonstrate the important interaction between frequency and lung tissue stiffness on the distribution of acinar flows and pressures. These simulations provide useful information for the optimization of frequency, lung volume, and mean airway pressure during conventional ventilation or high frequency oscillation (HFOV). Moreover our model indicates that an optimal HFOV bandwidth exists between the resonant and antiresonant frequencies, for which interregional gas mixing is maximized. PMID:23872936

  20. High pressure synthesis gas conversion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this research project is to build and test a high pressure fermentation system for the production of ethanol from synthesis gas. The fermenters, pumps, controls, and analytical system were procured or fabricated and assembled in our laboratory. This system was then used to determine the effects of high pressure on growth and ethanol production by Clostridium ljungdahlii. The limits of cell concentration and mass transport relationships were found in CSTR and immobilized cell reactors (ICR). The minimum retention times and reactor volumes were found for ethanol production in these reactors. A maximum operating pressure of 150 psig has been shown to be possible for C. ljungdahlli with the medium of Phillips et al. This medium was developed for atmospheric pressure operation in the CSTR to yield maximum ethanol concentrations and thus is not best for operation at elevated pressures. It is recommended that a medium development study be performed for C. ljungdahlii at increased pressure. Cell concentration, gas conversion and product concentration profiles were presented for C. ljungdahlii as a function of gas flow rate, the variable which affects bacterium performance the most. This pressure was chosen as a representative pressure over the 0--150 psig operating pressure range for the bacterium. Increased pressure negatively affected ethanol productivity probably due to the fact that medium composition was designed for atmospheric pressure operation. Medium development at increased pressure is necessary for high pressure development of the system.

  1. High Precision Pressure Measurement with a Funnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Arias, T.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2008-01-01

    A simple experimental device for high precision differential pressure measurements is presented. Its working mechanism recalls that of a hydraulic press, where pressure is supplied by insufflating air under a funnel. As an application, we measure air pressure inside a soap bubble. The soap bubble is inflated and connected to a funnel which is…

  2. Turbulence in unsteady flow at high frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Turbulent flows subjected to oscillations of the mean flow were simulated using a large-eddy simulation computer code for flow in a channel. The objective of the simulations was to provide better understanding of the effects of time-dependent disturbances on the turbulence of a boundary layer and of the underlying physical phenomena regarding the basic interaction between the turbulence and external disturbances. The results confirmed that turbulence is sensitive to certain ranges of frequencies of disturbances. However, no direct connection was found between the frequency of imposed disturbances and the characteristic 'burst' frequency of turbulence. New insight into the nature of turbulence at high frequencies was found. Viscous phenomena near solid walls were found to be the dominant influence for high-frequency perturbations.

  3. An introduction to high frequency radioteletype systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnau, Roger R.

    1989-10-01

    A basic introductory guide is provided to modern High Frequency (HF) data communications systems. Described are modern commercial radioteletype systems, data communication protocols, and various secrets of the trade.

  4. Real-time, high frequency QRS electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T. (Inventor); DePalma, Jude L. (Inventor); Moradi, Saeed (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Real time cardiac electrical data are received from a patient, manipulated to determine various useful aspects of the ECG signal, and displayed in real time in a useful form on a computer screen or monitor. The monitor displays the high frequency data from the QRS complex in units of microvolts, juxtaposed with a display of conventional ECG data in units of millivolts or microvolts. The high frequency data are analyzed for their root mean square (RMS) voltage values and the discrete RMS values and related parameters are displayed in real time. The high frequency data from the QRS complex are analyzed with imbedded algorithms to determine the presence or absence of reduced amplitude zones, referred to herein as RAZs. RAZs are displayed as go, no-go signals on the computer monitor. The RMS and related values of the high frequency components are displayed as time varying signals, and the presence or absence of RAZs may be similarly displayed over time.

  5. Overview of the Advanced High Frequency Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the competencies, selected areas of research and technology development activities, and current external collaborative efforts of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced High Frequency Branch.

  6. Neural coding of high-frequency tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    Available evidence was presented indicating that neural discharges in the auditory nerve display characteristic periodicities in response to any tonal stimulus including high-frequency stimuli, and that this periodicity corresponds to the subjective pitch.

  7. NETL- High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Facility is a unique resource within the National Laboratories system. It provides the test capabilities needed to evaluate new combustion concepts for high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen and natural gas turbines. These concepts will be critical for the next generation of ultra clean, ultra efficient power systems.

  8. NETL- High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-08

    NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Facility is a unique resource within the National Laboratories system. It provides the test capabilities needed to evaluate new combustion concepts for high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen and natural gas turbines. These concepts will be critical for the next generation of ultra clean, ultra efficient power systems.

  9. Study of radio frequency breakdown in pressurized L-band waveguide for the International Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Faya; Adolphsen, Chris; Nantista, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    An L-band (1.3 GHz) radio frequency (rf) waveguide system was assembled at SLAC to test components of a high power distribution scheme proposed for the International Linear Collider (ILC). All parts were made of aluminum and pressurized with dry nitrogen. The rf breakdown rate measured in this resonantly powered system is presented as a function of field level at different gas pressures and rf pulse widths (typically, only breakdown thresholds are reported.). The data are compared to predictions of a simple model which relates the breakdown phenomenon to the rate at which the free electron density builds in the gas.

  10. CHRONOBIOLOGY OF HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

    PubMed Central

    Cornélissen, G.; Halberg, F.; Bakken, E. E.; Wang, Z.; Tarquini, R.; Perfetto, F.; Laffi, G.; Maggioni, C.; Kumagai, Y.; Homolka, P.; Havelková, A.; Dušek, J.; Svačinová, H.; Siegelová, J.; Fišer, B.

    2008-01-01

    BIOCOS, the project aimed at studying BIOlogical systems in their COSmos, has obtained a great deal of expertise in the fields of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) monitoring and of marker rhythmometry for the purposes of screening, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. Prolonging the monitoring reduces the uncertainty in the estimation of circadian parameters; the current recommendation of BIOCOS requires monitoring for at least 7 days. The BIOCOS approach consists of a parametric and a non-parametric analysis of the data, in which the results from the individual subject are being compared with gender- and age-specified reference values in health. Chronobiological designs can offer important new information regarding the optimization of treatment by timing its administration as a function of circadian and other rhythms. New technological developments are needed to close the loop between the monitoring of blood pressure and the administration of antihypertensive drugs. PMID:19122770

  11. Toward a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Drummond, J. Philip

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the continued development of an actuator, energized by pulsed detonations, that provides a pulsed jet suitable for flow control in high-speed applications. A high-speed valve, capable of delivering a pulsed stream of reactants a mixture of H2 and air at rates of up to 1500 pulses per second, has been constructed. The reactants burn in a resonant tube and the products exit the tube as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers have been used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device at various reactant injection frequencies, including both resonant and off-resonant conditions. Pulsed detonations have been demonstrated in the lambda/4 mode of an 8 inch long tube at approx. 600 Hz. The pulsed jet at the exit of the device has been observed using shadowgraph and an infrared camera.

  12. Toward a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Drummond, J. Philip

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the continued development of an actuator, energized by pulsed detonations, that provides a pulsed jet suitable for flow control in high-speed applications. A high-speed valve, capable of delivering a pulsed stream of reactants a mixture of H2 and air at rates of up to 1500 pulses per second, has been constructed. The reactants burn in a resonant tube and the products exit the tube as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers have been used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device at various reactant injection frequencies, including both resonant and off-resonant conditions. Pulsed detonations have been demonstrated in the lambda/4 mode of an 8 inch long tube at approximately 600 Hz. The pulsed jet at the exit of the device has been observed using shadowgraph and an infrared camera.

  13. Multicomponent fuel vaporization at high pressures.

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, D. J.; O'Rourke, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    We extend our multicomponent fuel model to high pressures using a Peng-Robinson equation of state, and implement the model into KIVA-3V. Phase equilibrium is achieved by equating liquid and vapor fugacities. The latent heat of vaporization and fuel enthalpies are also corrected for at high pressures. Numerical simulations of multicomponent evaporation are performed for single droplets for a diesel fuel surrogate at different pressures.

  14. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  15. Elastomers Compatible With High-Pressure Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jon W.

    1987-01-01

    Compatibility increased by fluorination. Report describes experiments aimed at improving compatibility of some fluorinated elastomers with high-pressure oxygen. Such elastomers needed for seals, gaskets, and positive-expulsion devices used with high-pressure oxygen. Oxygen - compatibility tests carried out on five elastomers chosen on the basis of literature survey.

  16. High Blood Pressure Often Undiagnosed, Untreated

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. More Health News on: Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Stroke Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Stroke ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated ...

  17. Laser techniques in high-pressure geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Bell, P. M.; Mao, H. K.

    1987-01-01

    Laser techniques in conjunction with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study high-pressure properties of materials important to a wide range of problems in earth and planetary science. Spontaneous Raman scattering of crystalline and amorphous solids at high pressure demonstrates that dramatic changes in structure and bonding occur on compression. High-pressure Brillouin scattering is sensitive to the pressure variations of single-crystal elastic moduli and acoustic velocities. Laser heating techniques with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study phase transitions, including melting, under deep-earth conditions. Finally, laser-induced ruby fluorescence has been essential for the development of techniques for generating the maximum pressures now possible with the diamond-anvil cell, and currently provides a calibrated in situ measure of pressure well above 100 gigapascals.

  18. High power radio frequency attenuation device

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Quentin A.; Miller, Harold W.

    1984-01-01

    A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

  19. Tellurium Hydrides at High Pressures: High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xin; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Shoutao; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2016-02-01

    Observation of high-temperature superconductivity in compressed sulfur hydrides has generated an irresistible wave of searches for new hydrogen-containing superconductors. We herein report the prediction of high-Tc superconductivity in tellurium hydrides stabilized at megabar pressures identified by first-principles calculations in combination with a swarm structure search. Although tellurium is isoelectronic to sulfur or selenium, its heavier atomic mass and weaker electronegativity makes tellurium hydrides fundamentally distinct from sulfur or selenium hydrides in stoichiometries, structures, and chemical bondings. We identify three metallic stoichiometries of H4Te , H5Te2 , and HTe3 , which are not predicted or known stable structures for sulfur or selenium hydrides. The two hydrogen-rich H4Te and H5Te2 phases are primarily ionic and contain exotic quasimolecular H2 and linear H3 units, respectively. Their high-Tc (e.g., 104 K for H4Te at 170 GPa) superconductivity originates from the strong electron-phonon couplings associated with intermediate-frequency H-derived wagging and bending modes, a superconducting mechanism which differs substantially with those in sulfur or selenium hydrides where the high-frequency H-stretching vibrations make considerable contributions.

  20. Spectroscopic measurements of high frequency plasma in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Maehara, T.; Mukasa, S.; Takemori, T.; Watanabe, T.; Kurokawa, K.; Toyota, H.; Nomura, S.; Kawashima, A.; Iwamae, A.

    2009-03-15

    Spectroscopic measurements of high frequency (hf) plasma were performed under high pressure conditions (5 and 7 MPa) and supercritical (sc) CO{sub 2} conditions (8-20 MPa). Temperature evaluated from C{sub 2} Swan bands (d {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}{yields}a {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) increased from 3600 to 4600 K with an increase in pressure. The first observation of broadening and shifting of the O I line profile (3p {sup 5} P{sub 3,2,1}{yields}3s {sup 5} S{sub 2}{sup 0}) of hf plasma under sc CO{sub 2} conditions was carried out. However, the origin of broadening and the shifting cannot be understood because the present theory explaining them is not valid for such high pressure conditions.

  1. High-pressure study of tetramethylsilane by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhen-Xing; Zhang, Jian-Bo; Troyan, Ivan; Palasyuk, Taras; Eremets, Mikhail; Chen, Xiao-Jia

    2012-01-01

    High-pressure behavior of tetramethylsilane, one of the Group IVa hydrides, was investigated by Raman scattering measurements at pressures up to 142 GPa and room temperature. Our results revealed the phase transitions at 0.6, 9, and 16 GPa from both the mode frequency shifts with pressure and the changes of the full width half maxima of these modes. These transitions were suggested to result from the changes in the inter- and intra-molecular bonding of this material. We also observed two other possible phase transitions at 49-69 GPa and 96 GPa. No indication of metallization in tetramethylsilane was found with stepwise compression to 142 GPa.

  2. High-pressure study of tetramethylsilane by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhen-Xing; Zhang, Jian-Bo; Troyan, Ivan; Palasyuk, Taras; Eremets, Mikhail; Chen, Xiao-Jia

    2012-01-14

    High-pressure behavior of tetramethylsilane, one of the Group IVa hydrides, was investigated by Raman scattering measurements at pressures up to 142 GPa and room temperature. Our results revealed the phase transitions at 0.6, 9, and 16 GPa from both the mode frequency shifts with pressure and the changes of the full width half maxima of these modes. These transitions were suggested to result from the changes in the inter- and intra-molecular bonding of this material. We also observed two other possible phase transitions at 49-69 GPa and 96 GPa. No indication of metallization in tetramethylsilane was found with stepwise compression to 142 GPa.

  3. Investigation of effect of excitation frequency on electron energy distribution functions in low pressure radio frequency bounded plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2011-07-15

    Particle in cell (PIC) simulations are employed to investigate the effect of excitation frequency {omega} on electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) in a low pressure radio frequency (rf) discharge. The discharge is maintained over a length of 0.10 m, bounded by two infinite parallel plates, with the coherent heating field localized at the center of the discharge over a distance of 0.05 m and applied perpendicularly along the y and z directions. On varying the excitation frequency f (={omega}/2{pi}) in the range 0.01-50 MHz, it is observed that for f {<=} 5 MHz the EEDF shows a trend toward a convex (Druyvesteyn-like) distribution. For f > 5 MHz, the distribution resembles more like a Maxwellian with the familiar break energy visible in most of the distributions. A prominent ''hot tail'' is observed at f{>=} 20 MHz and the temperature of the tail is seen to decrease with further increase in frequency (e.g., at 30 MHz and 50 MHz). The mechanism for the generation of the ''hot tail'' is considered to be due to preferential transit time heating of energetic electrons as a function of {omega}, in the antenna heating field. There exists an optimum frequency for which high energy electrons are maximally heated. The occurrence of the Druyvesteyn-like distributions at lower {omega} may be explained by a balance between the heating of the electrons in the effective electric field and elastic cooling due to electron neutral collision frequency {nu}{sub en}; the transition being dictated by {omega} {approx} 2{pi}{nu}{sub en}.

  4. Real-Life Stories about High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: High Blood Pressure Real-life Stories About High Blood Pressure Past Issues / Fall ... High Blood Pressure / Keep the Beat Recipes / Real-life Stories About High Blood Pressure / Treatment: Types of ...

  5. Status asthmaticus treated by high-frequency oscillatory ventilation.

    PubMed

    Duval, E L; van Vught, A J

    2000-10-01

    We present a 2.5-year-old girl in severe asthma crisis who clinically deteriorated on conventional mechanical ventilation, but was successfully ventilated with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). Although HFOV is accepted as a technique for managing pediatric respiratory failure, its use in obstructive airway disease is generally thought to be contraindicated because of the risk of dynamic air-trapping. However, we suggest that obstructive airway disease can safely be managed with HFOV, provided certain conditions are met. These include the application of sufficiently high mean airway pressures to open and stent the airways ("an open airway strategy"), lower frequencies to overcome the greater attenuation of the oscillatory waves in the narrowed airways, permissive hypercapnia to enable reducing pressure swings as much as possible, longer expiratory times, and muscle paralysis to avoid spontaneous breathing.

  6. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  7. High-resolution, high-pressure NMR studies of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, J; Ballard, L; Nash, D

    1998-01-01

    Advanced high-resolution NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional NMR techniques, combined with high pressure capability, represents a powerful new tool in the study of proteins. This contribution is organized in the following way. First, the specialized instrumentation needed for high-pressure NMR experiments is discussed, with specific emphasis on the design features and performance characteristics of a high-sensitivity, high-resolution, variable-temperature NMR probe operating at 500 MHz and at pressures of up to 500 MPa. An overview of several recent studies using 1D and 2D high-resolution, high-pressure NMR spectroscopy to investigate the pressure-induced reversible unfolding and pressure-assisted cold denaturation of lysozyme, ribonuclease A, and ubiquitin is presented. Specifically, the relationship between the residual secondary structure of pressure-assisted, cold-denatured states and the structure of early folding intermediates is discussed. PMID:9649405

  8. Combustion of liquid sprays at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, A. J.; Faeth, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    The combustion of pressure atomized fuel sprays in high pressure stagnant air was studied. Measurements were made of flame and spray boundaries at pressures in the range 0.1-9 MPa for methanol and n-pentane. At the higher test pressure levels, critical phenomena are important. The experiments are compared with theoretical predictions based on a locally homogeneous two-phase flow model. The theory correctly predicted the trends of the data, but underestimates flame and spray boundaries by 30-50 percent, indicating that slip is still important for the present experiments (Sauter mean diameters of 30 microns at atmospheric pressure under cold flow conditions). Since the sprays are shorter at high pressures, slip effects are still important even though the density ratio of the phases approach one another as the droplets heat up. The model indicates the presence of a region where condensed water is present within the spray and provides a convenient means of treating supercritical phenomena.

  9. Degradation of PAHs by high frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Manariotis, Ioannis D; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2011-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are persistent organic compounds, which have been reported in the literature to efficiently degrade at low (e.g. 20 kHz) and moderate (e.g. 506 kHz) ultrasound frequencies. The present study focuses on degradation of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene by ultrasound at three different relatively high frequencies (i.e. 582, 862, and 1142 kHz). The experimental results indicate that for all three frequencies and power inputs ≥ 133 W phenanthrene degrades to concentrations lower than our experimental detection limit (<1 μg/L). Phenanthrene degrades significantly faster at 582 kHz than at 862 and 1142 kHz. For all three frequencies, the degradation rates per unit mass are similar for naphthalene and phenanthrene and lower for pyrene. Furthermore, naphthalene degradation requires less energy than phenanthrene, which requires less energy than pyrene under the same conditions. No hexane-extractable metabolites were identified in the solutions.

  10. High-pressure cryogenic seals for pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buggle, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    Problems associated with maintaining high pressures at cryogenic temperatures in pressure vessels are investigated. The goals were to identify the appropriate materials and design for a seal intended for cryogenic applications at pressures up to 4,080 bars (60,000 psi), and to examine the factors affecting the seal performance. The method employed and the apparatus used in a series of experimental seal system tests, and the test results are described in detail. It is concluded that the common seal designs and extrusion seal-ring materials such as Teflon, tin, and lead are not suitable. However, new seal systems developed using indium seal rings, brass or 304 stainless steel anvil rings, and two 0-rings of silicone rubber or Kel-F did prove suitable.

  11. Electrical Resistivity and Thermodynamic Properties of Iron Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieu, Ho Khac; Hai, Tran Thi; Hong, Nguyen Thi; Sang, Ngo Dinh; Tuyen, Nguyen Viet

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the electrical resistivity and thermodynamic properties of iron under high pressure have been investigated by using the semi-empirical approach. The recently well-established Grüneisen parameter expressions have been applied to derive the Debye frequency and temperature under compression. Using these results combined with the Bloch-Grüneisen law, the resistivity of iron has also been determined up to Earth's core pressures. We show that the electrical resistivity diminished gradually with pressure and saturates at high pressure. Our model gives low electrical resistivity values which are in agreement with the recent experimental measurements. The low resistivity may be attributed to the well-known resistivity saturation effect at high temperature, which was not considered in earlier models of core conductivity.

  12. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert J.; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reports on the development of a high power 780 nm laser suitable for space applications of laser cooling. A possible solution is to use frequency doubling of high power 1560 nm telecom lasers. The presentation shows a diagram of the frequency conversion, and a graph of the second harmonic generation in one crystal, and the use of the cascading crystals. Graphs show the second harmonic power as a function of distance between crystals, second harmonic power vs. pump power, tunability of laser systems.

  13. Metrology For High-Frequency Nanoelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, T. Mitch; Imtiaz, Atif; Nembach, Hans T.; Rice, Paul; Kabos, Pavel

    2007-09-26

    Two metrological tools for high-frequency measurements of nanoscale systems are described: (i) two/N-port analysis of nanoscale devices as well as (ii) near-field scanning microwave microscopy (NSMM) for materials characterization. Calibrated two/N-port measurements were made on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) welded to a coplanar waveguide. Significant changes in the extracted high-frequency electrical response of the welded MWNT were measured when the contacts to the MWNT were modified. Additionally, NSMM was used to characterize films of nanotube soot deposited on copper and sapphire substrates. The material properties of the films showed a strong dependence on the substrate material.

  14. RF Breakdown in High Frequency Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Doebert, S

    2004-05-27

    RF breakdown in high-frequency accelerators appears to limit the maximum achievable gradient as well as the reliability of such devices. Experimental results from high power tests, obtained mostly in the framework of the NLC/GLC project at 11 GHz and from the CLIC study at 30 GHz, will be used to illustrate the important issues. The dependence of the breakdown phenomena on rf pulse length, operating frequency and fabrication material will be described. Since reliability is extremely important for large scale accelerators such as a linear collider, the measurements of breakdown rate as a function of the operating gradient will be highlighted.

  15. Effect of oxygen at high pressure on spontaneous transmitter release.

    PubMed

    Colton, J S; Colton, C A

    1978-11-01

    The effect of oxygen at high pressure (OHP) on resting membrane properties (effective membrane resistance (Reff) and membrane potential (Vm)) and the spontaneous release of excitatory transmitter were examined at the lobster neuromuscular junction. Pressurization with 100% oxygen to 150 pounds per square inch gauge pressure (psig) or with nitrogen to 150 psig (7,000 mmHg nitrogen and 135 mmHg oxygen) produced a decrease in Reff associated with a hyperpolarization of Vm. These changes, however, returned to control values within 20--30 min after completion of pressurization. Spontaneous release of excitatory transmitter was shown to increase dramatically in the presence of 100% oxygen at 150 psig. The increase in miniature end-plate potential (MEPP) frequency persisted beyond the transient changes seen with Reff and Vm. This effect was selective to oxygen, as pressurization with nitrogen did not produce an increase in MEPP frequency. No change in average MEPP amplitude was seen with either OHP or pressure alone. An OHP-induced increase in MEPP frequency was also seen at the frog neuromuscular junction. The results indicate that both glutamate-mediated and acetylcholine-mediated synaptic transmission are altered by OHP.

  16. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Dymond, Jr., Lauren E.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Grimm, William G.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Ola, Samuel A.; Simpson, James E.; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  17. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Dolan, James T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang

    2000-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  18. EDITORIAL: High performance under pressure High performance under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2011-11-01

    The accumulation of charge in certain materials in response to an applied mechanical stress was first discovered in 1880 by Pierre Curie and his brother Paul-Jacques. The effect, piezoelectricity, forms the basis of today's microphones, quartz watches, and electronic components and constitutes an awesome scientific legacy. Research continues to develop further applications in a range of fields including imaging [1, 2], sensing [3] and, as reported in this issue of Nanotechnology, energy harvesting [4]. Piezoelectricity in biological tissue was first reported in 1941 [5]. More recently Majid Minary-Jolandan and Min-Feng Yu at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the USA have studied the piezoelectric properties of collagen I [1]. Their observations support the nanoscale origin of piezoelectricity in bone and tendons and also imply the potential importance of the shear load transfer mechanism in mechanoelectric transduction in bone. Shear load transfer has been the principle basis of the nanoscale mechanics model of collagen. The piezoelectric effect in quartz causes a shift in the resonant frequency in response to a force gradient. This has been exploited for sensing forces in scanning probe microscopes that do not need optical readout. Recently researchers in Spain explored the dynamics of a double-pronged quartz tuning fork [2]. They observed thermal noise spectra in agreement with a coupled-oscillators model, providing important insights into the system's behaviour. Nano-electromechanical systems are increasingly exploiting piezoresistivity for motion detection. Observations of the change in a material's resistance in response to the applied stress pre-date the discovery of piezoelectric effect and were first reported in 1856 by Lord Kelvin. Researchers at Caltech recently demonstrated that a bridge configuration of piezoresistive nanowires can be used to detect in-plane CMOS-based and fully compatible with future very-large scale integration of

  19. High gas pressure effects on yeast.

    PubMed

    Espinasse, V; Perrier-Cornet, J-M; Marecat, A; Gervais, P

    2008-11-01

    Dried microorganisms are particularly resistant to high hydrostatic pressure effects. However, exposure to high pressures of nitrogen proved to be effective in inactivating dried yeasts. In this study, we tried to elucidate this mechanism on Saccharomyces cerevisiae. High-pressure treatments were performed using different inert gases at 150 MPa and 25 degrees C with holding time values up to 12 months. The influence of cell hydration was also investigated. For fully hydrated cells, pressurized gases had little specific effect: cell inactivation was mainly due to compression effects. However, dried cells were sensitive to high pressure of gases. In this latter case, two inactivation kinetics were observed. For holding time up to 1 h, the inactivation rate increased to 4 log and was linked to a loss of membrane integrity and the presence of damage on the cell wall. In such case cell inactivation would be due to gas sorption and desorption phenomena which would rupture dried cells during a fast pressure release. Gas sorption would occur in cell lipid phases. For longer holding times, the inactivation rate increased more slightly due to compression effects and/or to a slower gas sorption. Water therefore played a key role in cell sensitivity to fast gas pressure release. Two hypotheses were proposed to explain this phenomenon: the rigidity of vitrified dried cells and the presence of glassy solid phases which would favor intracellular gas expansion. Our results showed that dried microorganisms can be ruptured and inactivated by a fast pressure release with gases.

  20. High Pressure Solution Kinetics of Metal Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suvachittanont, Surapong

    1983-01-01

    Describes use of activation volumes derived from the effect of pressure reaction rates in aiding the understanding of reaction mechanism. Topics discussed include determination and interpretation of activation volumes, high pressure equipment/techniques, and application of activation volumes in mechanistic elucidation of several inorganic…

  1. Small, high-pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.; Sutton, R.

    1977-01-01

    A high pressure, liquid hydrogen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested to a maximum speed of 9739 rad/s and a maximum pump discharge pressure of 2861 N/sq. cm. The approaches used in the analysis and design of the turbopump are described, and fabrication methods are discussed. Data obtained from gas generator tests, turbine performance calibration, and turbopump testing are presented.

  2. High pressure study of acetophenone azine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X. D.; Ding, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. M.

    2009-02-01

    High pressure Raman spectra of acetophenone azine (APA) have been measured up to 17.7 GPa with a diamond anvil cell. Two crystalline-to-crystalline phase transformations are found at pressures about 3.6 and 5.8 GPa. A disappearance of external modes and the C-H vibration at pressures higher than 8.7 GPa suggests that the sample undergoes a phase transition to amorphous or orientationally disordered (plastic) state, and the amorphization was completed at about 12.1 GPa. The disordered state is unstable and, then, a polymerization transformation reaction occurs with a further pressure increase. After the pressure has been released, the polymerization state can remain at the ambient condition, indicating that the virgin crystalline state is not recovered. The results show that the phenomenon underlying the pressure induced phase transition of APA may involve profound changes in the coordination environments of the symmetric aromatic azine.

  3. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.

    2015-03-24

    The work concentrates on few important tasks in enabling techniques for search of superconducting compressed hydrogen compounds and pure hydrogen, investigation of mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity, and exploring new superconducting materials. Along that route we performed several challenging tasks, including discovery of new forms of polyhydrides of alkali metal Na at very high pressures. These experiments help us to establish the experimental environment that will provide important information on the high-pressure properties of hydrogen-rich compounds. Our recent progress in RIXS measurements opens a whole field of strongly correlated 3d materials. We have developed a systematic approach to measure major electronic parameters, like Hubbard energy U, and charge transfer energy Δ, as function of pressure. This technique will enable also RIXS studies of magnetic excitations in iridates and other 5d materials at the L edge, which attract a lot of interest recently. We have developed new magnetic sensing technique based on optically detected magnetic resonance from NV centers in diamond. The technique can be applied to study superconductivity in high-TC materials, to search for magnetic transitions in strongly correlated and itinerant magnetic materials under pressure. Summary of Project Activities; development of high-pressure experimentation platform for exploration of new potential superconductors, metal polyhydrides (including newly discovered alkali metal polyhydrides), and already known superconductors at the limit of static high-pressure techniques; investigation of special classes of superconducting compounds (high-Tc superconductors, new superconducting materials), that may provide new fundamental knowledge and may prove important for application as high-temperature/high-critical parameter superconductors; investigation of the pressure dependence of superconductivity and magnetic/phase transformations in 3d transition metal compounds, including

  4. Raman spectroscopy of triolein under high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tefelski, D. B.; Jastrzębski, C.; Wierzbicki, M.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Rostocki, A. J.; Wieja, K.; Kościesza, R.

    2010-03-01

    This article presents results of the high pressure Raman spectroscopy of triolein. Triolein, a triacylglyceride (TAG) of oleic acid, is an unsaturated fat, present in natural oils such as olive oil. As a basic food component and an energy storage molecule, it has considerable importance for food and fuel industries. To generate pressure in the experiment, we used a high-pressure cylindrical chamber with sapphire windows, presented in (R.M. Siegoczyński, R. Kościesza, D.B. Tefelski, and A. Kos, Molecular collapse - modification of the liquid structure induced by pressure in oleic acid, High Press. Res. 29 (2009), pp. 61-66). Pressure up to 750 MPa was applied. A Raman spectrometer in "macro"-configuration was employed. Raman spectroscopy provides information on changes of vibrational modes related to structural changes of triolein under pressure. Interesting changes in the triglyceride C‒H stretching region at 2650-3100 cm-1 were observed under high-pressures. Changes were also observed in the ester carbonyl (C˭ O) stretching region 1700-1780 cm-1 and the C‒C stretching region at 1050-1150 cm-1. The overall luminescence of the sample decreased under pressure, making it possible to set longer spectrum acquisition time and obtain more details of the spectrum. The registered changes suggest that the high-pressure solid phase of triolein is organized as β-polymorphic, as was reported in (C. Akita, T. Kawaguchi, and F. Kaneko, Structural study on polymorphism of cis-unsaturated triacylglycerol: Triolein, J. Phys. Chem. B 110 (2006), pp. 4346-4353; E. Da Silva and D. Rousseau, Molecular order and thermodynamics of the solid-liquid transition in triglycerides via Raman spectroscopy, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10 (2008), pp. 4606-4613) (with temperature-induced phase transitions). The research has shown that Raman spectroscopy in TAGs under pressure reveals useful information about its structural changes.

  5. High resolution low frequency ultrasonic tomography.

    PubMed

    Lasaygues, P; Lefebvre, J P; Mensah, S

    1997-10-01

    Ultrasonic reflection tomography results from a linearization of the inverse acoustic scattering problem, named the inverse Born approximation. The goal of ultrasonic reflection tomography is to obtain reflectivity images from backscattered measurements. This is a Fourier synthesis problem and the first step is to correctly cover the frequency space of the object. For this inverse problem, we use the classical algorithm of tomographic reconstruction by summation of filtered backprojections. In practice, only a limited number of views are available with our mechanical rig, typically 180, and the frequency bandwidth of the pulses is very limited, typically one octave. The resolving power of the system is them limited by the bandwidth of the pulse. Low and high frequencies can be restored by use of a deconvolution algorithm that enhances resolution. We used a deconvolution technique based on the Papoulis method. The advantage of this technique is conservation of the overall frequency information content of the signals. The enhancement procedure was tested by imaging a square aluminium rod with a cross-section less than the wavelength. In this application, the central frequency of the transducer was 250 kHz so that the central wavelength was 6 mm whereas the cross-section of the rod was 4 mm. Although the Born approximation was not theoretically valid in this case (high contrast), a good reconstruction was obtained.

  6. Advanced Extremely High Frequency Satellite (AEHF)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-261 Advanced Extremely High Frequency Satellite (AEHF) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget...Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be

  7. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Liang, W; Eliyahu, D; Ilchenko, V S; Savchenkov, A A; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2015-08-11

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz(-1) at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10(-10) at 1-100 s integration time-orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption.

  8. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than −60 dBc Hz−1 at 10 Hz, −90 dBc Hz−1 at 100 Hz and −170 dBc Hz−1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10−10 at 1–100 s integration time—orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  9. High Blood Pressure: Medicines to Help You

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of High Blood Pressure Medicines ACE Inhibitors Beta Blockers Calcium Channel Blockers Peripherally Acting Alpha-Adrenergic Blockers ... side effects for each drug, check Drugs@FDA . Beta Blockers Brand Name Generic Name Bystolic Nebivolol Timolol Coreg ...

  10. Calculation and analysis of the harmonic vibrational frequencies in molecules at extreme pressure: methodology and diborane as a test case.

    PubMed

    Cammi, R; Cappelli, C; Mennucci, B; Tomasi, J

    2012-10-21

    We present a new quantum chemical method for the calculation of the equilibrium geometry and the harmonic vibrational frequencies of molecular systems in dense medium at high pressures (of the order of GPa). The new computational method, named PCM-XP, is based on the polarizable continuum model (PCM), amply used for the study of the solvent effects at standard condition of pressure, and it is accompanied by a new method of analysis for the interpretation of the mechanisms underpinning the effects of pressure on the molecular geometries and the harmonic vibrational frequencies. The PCM-XP has been applied at the density functional theory level to diborane as a molecular system under high pressure. The computed harmonic vibrational frequencies as a function of the pressure have shown a satisfactory agreement with the corresponding experimental results, and the parallel application of the method of analysis has reveled that the effects of the pressure on the equilibrium geometry can be interpreted in terms of direct effects on the electronic charge distribution of the molecular solutes, and that the effects on the harmonic vibrational frequencies can be described in terms of two physically distinct effects of the pressure (curvature and relaxation) on the potential energy for the motion of the nuclei.

  11. [High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in neonates].

    PubMed

    2002-09-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may be considered as an alternative in the management of severe neonatal respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. In patients with diffuse pulmonary disease, HFOV can applied as a rescue therapy with a high lung volume strategy to obtain adequate alveolar recruitment. We review the mechanisms of gas exchange, as well as the indications, monitoring and special features of the use HVOF in the neonatal period.

  12. Fuzzy and conventional control of high-frequency ventilation.

    PubMed

    Noshiro, M; Matsunami, T; Takakuda, K; Ryumae, S; Kagawa, T; Shimizu, M; Fujino, T

    1994-07-01

    A high-frequency ventilator was developed, consisting of a single-phase induction motor, an unbalanced mass and a mechanical vibration system. Intermittent positive pressure respiration was combined with high-frequency ventilation to measure end-tidal pCO2. Hysteresis was observed between the rotational frequency of the high-frequency ventilator and end-tidal pCO2. A fuzzy proportional plus integral control system, designed on the basis of the static characteristics of the controlled system and a knowledge of respiratory physiology, successfully regulated end-tidal pCO2. The characteristics of gas exchange under high-frequency ventilation was approximated by a first-order linear model. A conventional PI control system, designed on the basis of the approximated model, regulated end-tidal pCO2 with a performance similar to that of the fuzzy PI control system. The design of the fuzzy control system required less knowledge about the controlled system than that of the conventional control system.

  13. CARS Diagnostics of High Pressure Combustion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    e) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(e) J. H. Stufflebeam t JDAAG29- 79-C-0008J %A,, Shirley R,,. Hall 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10...also the work in N2 at elevated tem- perature up to 30 atmospheres. John H. Stufflebeam continued the high pressure CARS work under the contract...Spectroscopy, Bordeaux, France, September 1982. 12. J. H. Stufflebeam , J. F. Verdieck, and R. J. Hall: CARS Diagnostics of High Pressure and

  14. Ultra High Pressure (UHP) Technology (BRIEFING SLIDES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-25

    AFRL-RX-TY-TP-2008-4600 POSTPRINT ULTRA HIGH PRESSURE ( UHP ) TECHNOLOGY (BRIEFING SLIDES) Patrick D. Sullivan Air Force Research...Since the discovery of the unprecedented effectiveness of 1500 psi Ultra High Pressure ( UHP ) technology in September of 2002 , AFRL scientists and... engineers have sought to increase Aircraft Rescue Fire Fighting (ARFF) performance by moving to higher flow rates to obtain greater throw distance and

  15. High efficiency quantum cascade laser frequency comb

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Quanyong; Wu, Donghai; Slivken, Steven; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2017-01-01

    An efficient mid-infrared frequency comb source is of great interest to high speed, high resolution spectroscopy and metrology. Here we demonstrate a mid-IR quantum cascade laser frequency comb with a high power output and narrow beatnote linewidth at room temperature. The active region was designed with a strong-coupling between the injector and the upper lasing level for high internal quantum efficiency and a broadband gain. The group velocity dispersion was engineered for efficient, broadband mode-locking via four wave mixing. The comb device exhibits a narrow intermode beatnote linewidth of 50.5 Hz and a maximum wall-plug efficiency of 6.5% covering a spectral coverage of 110 cm−1 at λ ~ 8 μm. The efficiency is improved by a factor of 6 compared with previous demonstrations. The high power efficiency and narrow beatnote linewidth will greatly expand the applications of quantum cascade laser frequency combs including high-precision remote sensing and spectroscopy. PMID:28262834

  16. High efficiency quantum cascade laser frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Lu, Quanyong; Wu, Donghai; Slivken, Steven; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2017-03-06

    An efficient mid-infrared frequency comb source is of great interest to high speed, high resolution spectroscopy and metrology. Here we demonstrate a mid-IR quantum cascade laser frequency comb with a high power output and narrow beatnote linewidth at room temperature. The active region was designed with a strong-coupling between the injector and the upper lasing level for high internal quantum efficiency and a broadband gain. The group velocity dispersion was engineered for efficient, broadband mode-locking via four wave mixing. The comb device exhibits a narrow intermode beatnote linewidth of 50.5 Hz and a maximum wall-plug efficiency of 6.5% covering a spectral coverage of 110 cm(-1) at λ ~ 8 μm. The efficiency is improved by a factor of 6 compared with previous demonstrations. The high power efficiency and narrow beatnote linewidth will greatly expand the applications of quantum cascade laser frequency combs including high-precision remote sensing and spectroscopy.

  17. High efficiency quantum cascade laser frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Quanyong; Wu, Donghai; Slivken, Steven; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2017-03-01

    An efficient mid-infrared frequency comb source is of great interest to high speed, high resolution spectroscopy and metrology. Here we demonstrate a mid-IR quantum cascade laser frequency comb with a high power output and narrow beatnote linewidth at room temperature. The active region was designed with a strong-coupling between the injector and the upper lasing level for high internal quantum efficiency and a broadband gain. The group velocity dispersion was engineered for efficient, broadband mode-locking via four wave mixing. The comb device exhibits a narrow intermode beatnote linewidth of 50.5 Hz and a maximum wall-plug efficiency of 6.5% covering a spectral coverage of 110 cm‑1 at λ ~ 8 μm. The efficiency is improved by a factor of 6 compared with previous demonstrations. The high power efficiency and narrow beatnote linewidth will greatly expand the applications of quantum cascade laser frequency combs including high-precision remote sensing and spectroscopy.

  18. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Harkins, Bruce D.; Ward, Michael E.

    1998-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  19. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Harkins, Bruce D.; Ward, Michael E.

    1999-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the reinforcing member and having a strengthening member wrapped around the refractory material. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  20. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Harkins, B.D.; Ward, M.E.

    1998-09-22

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 5 figs.

  1. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-01-15

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  2. Vibrational properties of cagelike diamondoid nitrogen at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui

    2013-08-01

    Under high pressure, a cagelike diamondoid nitrogen structure was lately discovered by first-principles structure researches. This newly proposed structure is very unique and has not been observed in any other element. Using density-functional calculations, we study the pressure effect on its vibrational properties. The Born effective charges are calculated, and the resulting LO—TO splittings of certain infrared active modes are beyond 20 cm-1. We depict the Γ-point vibrational modes and find the breathing mode, rotational mode, and shearing mode. Frequencies of all the optical modes increase with pressure increasing. Moreover, the relation between the breathing mode frequency and the nitrogen cage diameter is discussed in detail. Our calculation results give a deeper insight into the vibrational properties of the cagelike diamondoid nitrogen.

  3. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  4. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  5. High Frequency Laser-Based Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, R; Chinn, D; Balogun, O; Murray, T

    2005-09-12

    To obtain micrometer resolution of materials using acoustics requires frequencies around 1 GHz. Attenuation of such frequencies is high, limiting the thickness of the parts that can be characterized. Although acoustic microscopes can operate up to several GHz in frequency, they are used primarily as a surface characterization tool. The use of a pulsed laser for acoustic generation allows generation directly in the part, eliminating the loss of energy associated with coupling the energy from a piezoelectric transducer to the part of interest. The use of pulsed laser acoustic generation in combination with optical detection is investigated for the non-contact characterization of materials with features that must be characterized to micrometer resolution.

  6. Elasticity of orthoenstatite at high-pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Chen, B.; Zhao, J.; Yan, J.

    2011-12-01

    Orthoenstatite is an abundant yet complex mineral in Earth's upper mantle. Despite its abundance, the properties of orthopyroxene at high pressure remain ambiguous (e.g., Zhang et al. 2011; Jahn 2008; Kung et al. 2004). We explored select properties of a synthetic powdered orthoenstatite (Mg0.8757Fe0.13)2Si2O6 sample by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nuclear resonance inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) as a function of pressure in a neon pressure medium at 300 K. The XRD measurements were carried out at beamline 12.2.2 of the Advanced Light Source (Berkeley, CA), and the sample was studied up to 34 GPa. NRIXS measurements were carried out at sector 3ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source (Chicago, IL) in the pressure range of 3 to 17 GPa. From the raw NRIXS data, the partial phonon density of states (DOS) was derived (e.g., Sturhahn 2004). The volume (or pressure) dependence of several properties, such as the Lamb-Mössbauer factor, mean force constant, specific heat, vibrational entropy, and vibrational kinetic energy were determined from the DOS. We will discuss our results from these combined studies and the implications for Earth's upper mantle. References Zhang, D., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and Y. Xiao (2011): Local structure variations observed in orthoenstatite at high-pressures. American Mineralogist, in press. Jahn, S. (2008) High-pressure phase transitions in MgSiO3 orthoenstatite studied by atomistic computer simulation. American Mineralogist, 93(4), 528-532. Kung, J., Li, B., Uchida, T., Wang, Y., Neuville, D., and Liebermann, R. (2004) In situ measurements of sound velocities and densities across the orthopyroxene high-pressure clinopyroxene transition in MgSiO3 at high pressure. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 147(1), 27-44. Sturhahn, W. (2004): Nuclear Resonant Spectroscopy. J. Phys. Condens. Matter, 16, S497-S530.

  7. High pressure optical combustion probe

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, S.D.; Richards, G.A.

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center has developed a combustion probe for monitoring flame presence and heat release. The technology involved is a compact optical detector of the OH radical`s UV fluorescence. The OH Monitor/Probe is designed to determine the flame presence and provide a qualitative signal proportional to the flame intensity. The probe can be adjusted to monitor a specific volume in the combustion zone to track spatial fluctuations in the flame. The probe is capable of nanosecond time response and is usually slowed electronically to fit the flame characteristics. The probe is a sapphire rod in a stainless steel tube which may be inserted into the combustion chamber and pointed at the flame zone. The end of the sapphire rod is retracted into the SS tube to define a narrow optical collection cone. The collection cone may be adjusted to fit the experiment. The fluorescence signal is collected by the sapphire rod and transmitted through a UV transmitting, fused silica, fiber optic to the detector assembly. The detector is a side window photomultiplier (PMT) with a 310 run line filter. A Hamamatsu photomultiplier base combined with a integral high voltage power supply permits this to be a low voltage device. Electronic connections include: a power lead from a modular DC power supply for 15 VDC; a control lead for 0-1 volts to control the high voltage level (and therefore gain); and a lead out for the actual signal. All low voltage connections make this a safe and easy to use device while still delivering the sensitivity required.

  8. Frequency dependent polarization analysis of high-frequency seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeffrey; Vernon, Frank L., III; Lindberg, Craig R.

    1987-11-01

    We present a multitaper algorithm to estimate the polarization of particle motion as a function of frequency from three-component seismic data. This algorithm is based on a singular value decomposition of a matrix of eigenspectra at a given frequency. The right complex eigenvector zˆ corresonding to the largest singular value of the matrix has the same direction as the dominant polarization of seismic motion at that frequency. The elements of the polarization vector zˆ specify the relative amplitudes and phases of motion measured along the recorded components within a chosen frequency band. The width of this frequency band is determined by the time-bandwidth product of the prolate spheroidal tapers used in the analysis. We manipulate the components of zˆ to determine the apparent azimuth and angle of incidence of seismic motion as a function of frequency. The orthogonality of the eigentapers allows one to calculate easily uncertainties in the estimated azimuth and angle of incidence. We apply this algorithm to data from the Anza Seismic Telemetered Array in the frequency band 0 ≤ ƒ ≤ 30 Hz. The polarization is not always a smooth function of frequency and can exhibit sharp jumps, suggesting the existence of scattered modes within the crustal waveguide and/or receiver site resonances.

  9. Effects of gas pressure on 60/13.56 MHz dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Q. H.; Yin, G. Q.; Xin, Y.; Ning, Z. Y.

    2011-05-15

    The electron energy probability functions (EEPFs) were measured with increasing gas pressure in 60/13.56 MHz dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasma (DF-CCP) using compensated Langmiur electrostatic probe. The transition pressure of heating mode from collisionless to collisional heating in 60/13.56 MHz DF-CCP is found to be significantly lower than that in 13.56 MHz single-frequency CCP. As the pressure increases, the EEPFs change from bi-Maxwellian to Druyvesteyn type which is similar with that in 60 MHz single-frequency CCP. The pressure dependence of electron densities, effective electron temperatures, floating potentials, and plasma potentials in 60/13.56 MHz DF-CCP were measured and were compared with that in 60 MHz single-frequency CCP. The pressure dependence of these plasma parameters in 60/13.56 MHz DF-CCP is similar with that in 60 MHz single-frequency CCP.

  10. Pressure oscillation induced by composite fluid flow - Physical picture generating low frequency earthquake -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, S.; Kurita, K.

    2006-12-01

    variation of the pressure as a function of time, the oscillation peak becomes evident with the time scale of 1000 seconds. This means the flow system evolves from initial homogeneous flow to an oscillation state. This oscillation has characteristic frequency of about 0.1 to 0.01 Hz and it depends on the fluid pressure and viscosity. When the viscosity decreases and the pressure increases, the frequency increases. As a physical model of the pressure oscillation, two basic models can be considered. One is caused by spontaneous formation of variation in volume fraction of particles. Similar phenomena are realized as an intermittent flow behavior in air and particle flow through long tube (Bertho et al., Physics of Fluids 2003). Intermittent formation of high voidage fraction causes the oscillation of pressure. Second model is associated with stick &slip flow behavior of the Bingham fluid. Fluid and particle mixture is characterized by existence of the yield strength, which causes intermittent slip (above the yield stress) and stick (below the yield stress) with hysteresis. In the presentation we summarize characteristics of both models and possible link to the physical model of the LF earthquakes.

  11. Structural behaviour of YGa under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Sekar, M. Shekar, N. V. Chandra Sahu, P. Ch.; Babu, R.

    2014-04-24

    High pressure X-ray diffraction studies on rare-earth gallide YGa was carried up to a pressure of ∼ 33 GPa using rotating anode x-ray source in an angle dispersive mode. YGa exhibits CrB (B33) type orthorhombic structure (space group Cmcm) at ambient pressure. It undergoes a reversible structural phase transition from orthorhombic to tetragonal structure at ∼ 8.8 GPa. Both the phases coexist up to the highest pressure studied. The zero pressure bulk modulus and its derivative for parent phase have been estimated to be B{sub o} = 60 ± 3 GPa, B{sub o}' = 4.6 ± 1.5.

  12. Pressure sensor for high-temperature liquids

    DOEpatents

    Forster, George A.

    1978-01-01

    A pressure sensor for use in measuring pressures in liquid at high temperatures, especially such as liquid sodium or liquid potassium, comprises a soft diaphragm in contact with the liquid. The soft diaphragm is coupled mechanically to a stiff diaphragm. Pressure is measured by measuring the displacment of both diaphragms, typically by measuring the capacitance between the stiff diaphragm and a fixed plate when the stiff diaphragm is deflected in response to the measured pressure through mechanical coupling from the soft diaphragm. Absolute calibration is achieved by admitting gas under pressure to the region between diaphragms and to the region between the stiff diaphragm and the fixed plate, breaking the coupling between the soft and stiff diaphragms. The apparatus can be calibrated rapidly and absolutely.

  13. Noise temperature in graphene at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengel, Raúl; Iglesias, José M.; Pascual, Elena; Martín, María J.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical method for obtaining the frequency-dependent noise temperature in monolayer graphene is presented. From the mobility and diffusion coefficient values provided by Monte Carlo simulation, the noise temperature in graphene is studied up to the THz range, considering also the influence of different substrate types. The influence of the applied electric field is investigated: the noise temperature is found to increase with the applied field, dropping down at high frequencies (in the sub-THz range). The results show that the low-frequency value of the noise temperature in graphene on a substrate tends to be reduced as compared to the case of suspended graphene due to the important effect of remote polar phonon interactions, thus indicating a reduced emitted noise power; however, at very high frequencies the influence of the substrate tends to be significantly reduced, and the differences between the suspended and on-substrate cases tend to be minimized. The values obtained are comparable to those observed in GaAs and semiconductor nitrides.

  14. High Frequency Plasma Generators for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divergilio, W. F.; Goede, H.; Fosnight, V. V.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a one year program to experimentally adapt two new types of high frequency plasma generators to Argon ion thrusters and to analytically study a third high frequency source concept are presented. Conventional 30 cm two grid ion extraction was utilized or proposed for all three sources. The two plasma generating methods selected for experimental study were a radio frequency induction (RFI) source, operating at about 1 MHz, and an electron cyclotron heated (ECH) plasma source operating at about 5 GHz. Both sources utilize multi-linecusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement. The plasma characteristics, plasma loading of the rf antenna, and the rf frequency dependence of source efficiency and antenna circuit efficiency are described for the RFI Multi-cusp source. In a series of tests of this source at Lewis Research Center, minimum discharge losses of 220+/-10 eV/ion were obtained with propellant utilization of .45 at a beam current of 3 amperes. Possible improvement modifications are discussed.

  15. High-frequency Rayleigh-wave method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Chen, C.; Liu, J.; Ivanov, J.; Zeng, C.

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency (???2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave data acquired with a multichannel recording system have been utilized to determine shear (S)-wave velocities in near-surface geophysics since the early 1980s. This overview article discusses the main research results of high-frequency surface-wave techniques achieved by research groups at the Kansas Geological Survey and China University of Geosciences in the last 15 years. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is a non-invasive acoustic approach to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that simultaneous inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. The other important seismic property, quality factor (Q), can also be estimated with the MASW method by inverting attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh waves. An inverted model (S-wave velocity or Q) obtained using a damped least-squares method can be assessed by an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of the inverted model determined by an objective function, which is the trace of a weighted sum of model-resolution and model-covariance matrices. Current developments include modeling high-frequency Rayleigh-waves in near-surface media, which builds a foundation for shallow seismic or Rayleigh-wave inversion in the time-offset domain; imaging dispersive energy with high resolution in the frequency-velocity domain and possibly with data in an arbitrary acquisition geometry, which opens a door for 3D surface-wave techniques; and successfully separating surface-wave modes, which provides a valuable tool to perform S-wave velocity profiling with high-horizontal resolution. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  16. Radio frequency breakdown between structured parallel plate electrodes with a millimetric gap in low pressure gases

    SciTech Connect

    Legradic, B.; Howling, A. A.; Hollenstein, C.

    2010-10-15

    This paper presents an investigation into radio frequency (rf) breakdown for electrodes with holes or protrusions, approximating the situation in real reactors and providing a benchmark for fluid simulations. rf breakdown curves (voltage versus pressure) generally show a steep left-hand branch at low pressures and a flatter right-hand branch at higher pressures. Introducing protrusions or holes in parallel plate electrodes will lower the breakdown voltage in certain conditions. Yet experiments show that the breakdown curves are not perceptibly influenced by the increased electric field at sharp edges or ridges. Instead, both experiments and simulation show that breakdown at high pressure will occur at the protrusion providing the smallest gap, while breakdown at low pressure will occur in the aperture providing the largest gap. This holds true as long as the feature in question is wide enough. Features that are too narrow will lose too many electrons due to diffusion, either to the walls of the apertures or to the surroundings of the protrusion, which negates the effect on the breakdown voltage. The simulation developed presents a tool to aid the design of complex rf parts for dark-space shielding.

  17. High pressure studies of potassium perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Wang, Yonggang; Sneed, Daniel; Reiser, Sharissa; White, Melanie

    2016-07-29

    Two experiments are reported on KClO4 at extreme conditions. A static high pressure Raman study was first conducted to 18.9 GPa. Evidence for at least two new phases was observed: one between 2.4 and 7.7 GPa (possibly sluggish), and the second near 11.7 GPa. Then, the X-ray induced decomposition rate of potassium perchlorate (KClO4 hv→ KCl + 2O2) was studied up to 15.2 GPa. The time-dependent growth of KCl and O2 was monitored. The decomposition rate slowed at higher pressures. As a result, we present the first direct evidence for O2 crystallization at higher pressures, demonstrating that O2 molecules aggregate at high pressure.

  18. Sample injector for high pressure liquid chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.; Neyer, David W.

    2001-01-01

    Apparatus and method for driving a sample, having a well-defined volume, under pressure into a chromatography column. A conventional high pressure sampling valve is replaced by a sample injector composed of a pair of injector components connected in series to a common junction. The injector components are containers of porous dielectric material constructed so as to provide for electroosmotic flow of a sample into the junction. At an appropriate time, a pressure pulse from a high pressure source, that can be an electrokinetic pump, connected to the common junction, drives a portion of the sample, whose size is determined by the dead volume of the common junction, into the chromatographic column for subsequent separation and analysis. The apparatus can be fabricated on a substrate for microanalytical applications.

  19. High pressure studies of potassium perchlorate

    DOE PAGES

    Pravica, Michael; Wang, Yonggang; Sneed, Daniel; ...

    2016-07-29

    Two experiments are reported on KClO4 at extreme conditions. A static high pressure Raman study was first conducted to 18.9 GPa. Evidence for at least two new phases was observed: one between 2.4 and 7.7 GPa (possibly sluggish), and the second near 11.7 GPa. Then, the X-ray induced decomposition rate of potassium perchlorate (KClO4 hv→ KCl + 2O2) was studied up to 15.2 GPa. The time-dependent growth of KCl and O2 was monitored. The decomposition rate slowed at higher pressures. As a result, we present the first direct evidence for O2 crystallization at higher pressures, demonstrating that O2 molecules aggregatemore » at high pressure.« less

  20. Deformation behavior of titanate nanotubes subjected to high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda-Galván, H. J.; Rodríguez, A. G.; Santos-López, I. A.; Mendoza-Cruz, R.; Yacamán, M. J.; Handy, B. E.

    2017-01-01

    Nano-sized titania (anatase) and sodium and potassium titanate nanotubes were studied via in situ Raman spectroscopy at hydrostatic pressures up to 6 GPa. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy shows a uniform dispersion of sodium and potassium cations in the nanotubes. The effect of the pressure was observed by significant shifts in the Raman band structure of nano-sized anatase crystals and nanotube titanate. In nano-particulate anatase, the phonon frequencies (143, 395, 517, and 639 cm-1) increase linearly with pressure. In contrast, the upward frequency shifts in the sodium titanate nanotubes (NaTNT) and potassium-modified nanotubes (NaTNT+K) occur in a stepwise fashion. These stepwise changes occur in the nanotube samples between 2 and 4 GPa (ambient pressure phonon bands in NaTNT at 274, 444, 650, and 906 cm-1) and between 4.5 and 5.5 GPa, (phonons 273 cm-1 and 436 cm-1 in NaTNT+K at an ambient pressure). Post-pressure high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis shows evidence of nanotube distortions and a 5% contraction in the interlaminar spacing of both NaTNT and NaTNT+K.

  1. High Frequency Guided Wave Virtual Array SAFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R.; Pardini, A.; Diaz, A.

    2003-03-01

    The principles of the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) are generalized for application to high frequency plate wave signals. It is shown that a flaw signal received in long-range plate wave propagation can be analyzed as if the signals were measured by an infinite array of transducers in an unbounded medium. It is shown that SAFT-based flaw sizing can be performed with as few as three or less actual measurement positions.

  2. High-frequency audiometric assessment of a young adult population.

    PubMed

    Green, D M; Kidd, G; Stevens, K N

    1987-02-01

    The hearing thresholds of 37 young adults (18-26 years) were measured at 13 frequencies (8, 9,10,...,20 kHz) using a newly developed high-frequency audiometer. All subjects were screened at 15 dB HL at the low audiometric frequencies, had tympanometry within normal limits, and had no history of significant hearing problems. The audiometer delivers sound from a driver unit to the ear canal through a lossy tube and earpiece providing a source impedance essentially equal to the characteristic impedance of the tube. A small microphone located within the earpiece is used to measure the response of the ear canal when an impulse is applied at the driver unit. From this response, a gain function is calculated relating the equivalent sound-pressure level of the source to the SPL at the medial end of the ear canal. For the subjects tested, this gain function showed a gradual increase from 2 to 12 dB over the frequency range. The standard deviation of the gain function was about 2.5 dB across subjects in the lower frequency region (8-14 kHz) and about 4 dB at the higher frequencies. Cross modes and poor fit of the earpiece to the ear canal prevented accurate calibration for some subjects at the highest frequencies. The average SPL at threshold was 23 dB at 8 kHz, 30 dB at 12 kHz, and 87 dB at 18 kHz. Despite the homogeneous nature of the sample, the younger subjects in the sample had reliably better thresholds than the older subjects. Repeated measurements of threshold over an interval as long as 1 month showed a standard deviation of 2.5 dB at the lower frequencies (8-14 kHz) and 4.5 dB at the higher frequencies.

  3. High-pressure Raman spectroscopy of phase change materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin Mao, Wendy L.; Zalden, Peter; Wuttig, Matthias; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2013-11-04

    We used high-pressure Raman spectroscopy to study the evolution of vibrational frequencies of the phase change materials (PCMs) Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, GeSb{sub 2}Te{sub 4}, and SnSb{sub 2}Te{sub 4}. We found that the critical pressure for triggering amorphization in the PCMs decreases with increasing vacancy concentration, demonstrating that the presence of vacancies, rather than differences in the atomic covalent radii, is crucial for pressure-induced amorphization in PCMs. Compared to the as-deposited amorphous phase, the pressure-induced amorphous phase has a similar vibrational spectrum but requires much lower laser power to transform into the crystalline phase, suggesting different kinetics of crystallization, which may have implications for applications of PCMs in non-volatile data storage.

  4. Acoustic properties of pistonphones at low frequencies in the presence of pressure leakage and heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; He, Wen; He, Longbiao; Rong, Zuochao

    2015-12-01

    The wide concern on absolute pressure calibration of acoustic transducers at low frequencies prompts the development of the pistonphone method. At low frequencies, the acoustic properties of pistonphones are governed by the pressure leakage and the heat conduction effects. However, the traditional theory for these two effects applies a linear superposition of two independent correction models, which differs somewhat from their coupled effect at low frequencies. In this paper, acoustic properties of pistonphones at low frequencies in full consideration of the pressure leakage and heat conduction effects have been quantitatively studied, and the explicit expression for the generated sound pressure has been derived. With more practical significance, a coupled correction expression for these two effects of pistonphones has been derived. In allusion to two typical pistonphones, the NPL pistonphone and our developed infrasonic pistonphone, comparisons were done for the coupled correction expression and the traditional one, whose results reveal that the traditional one produces maximum insufficient errors of about 0.1 dB above the lower limiting frequencies of two pistonphones, while at lower frequencies, excessive correction errors with an explicit limit of about 3 dB are produced by the traditional expression. The coupled correction expression should be adopted in the absolute pressure calibration of acoustic transducers at low frequencies. Furthermore, it is found that the heat conduction effect takes a limiting deviation of about 3 dB for the pressure amplitude and a small phase difference as frequency decreases, while the pressure leakage effect remarkably drives the pressure amplitude to attenuate and the phase difference tends to be 90° as the frequency decreases. The pressure leakage effect plays a more important role on the low frequency property of pistonphones.

  5. (High-pressure structural studies of promethium)

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, R.G.

    1988-11-15

    The primary object of the foreign travel was to carry out collaborative high-pressure structural studies at the European Institute for Transuranium Elements (EITU), Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany. These studies reestablished previous collaborative investigations by ORNL and EITU that have been very productive scientifically during the past few years. The study during the present travel period was limited to a structural study of promethium metal under pressure.

  6. Efficient High-Pressure State Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, Kenneth G.; Miller, Richard S.; Bellan, Josette

    1997-01-01

    A method is presented for a relatively accurate, noniterative, computationally efficient calculation of high-pressure fluid-mixture equations of state, especially targeted to gas turbines and rocket engines. Pressures above I bar and temperatures above 100 K are addressed The method is based on curve fitting an effective reference state relative to departure functions formed using the Peng-Robinson cubic state equation Fit parameters for H2, O2, N2, propane, methane, n-heptane, and methanol are given.

  7. High pressure oxygen utilization by NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belles, F. E.

    1973-01-01

    Although NASA is not one of the country's major oxygen consumers, it uses oxygen under severe conditions including very high flow rates and pressure. Materials for such applications must be carefully selected for compatibility, because susceptibility to ignition increases as operating pressure is raised. Much work is needed, however to define the selection criteria. Some of the work in this area that is being performed under sponsorship of NASA's Aerospace Safety Research and Data Institute (ASRDI) is described.

  8. Thermal Transport at Static High-Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pangilinan, G. I.; Ladouceur, H. D.; Russell, T. P.

    2000-03-01

    Static properties and dynamic processes at high pressures and high temperatures are critically dependent on thermal properties of materials. Measurements of thermal properties at high pressures have only slowly developed through the years. Here we present a novel method, utilizing gem anvil cells, to measure specific heat, thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity. The method involves launching a thermal wave in a sample. Subsequently, a localized sensor measures the temporal behavior of the temperature at a fixed point downstream in the material. A pulsed laser is used to deliver the heating pulse, while time-resolved fluorescence from a ruby sphere is used to measure the temperature. The thermal properties are inferred from the temporal behavior of the temperature and the heat conduction equations with appropriate boundary conditions. The thermal properties of table salt (NaCl) are obtained using this method. Impact to current and future high-pressure research, including materials science and geophysics will be addressed.

  9. Single Molecule Raman Spectroscopy Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuanxi; Dlott, Dana

    2014-06-01

    Pressure effects on surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra of Rhdoamine 6G adsorbed on silver nanoparticle surfaces was studied using a confocal Raman microscope. Colloidal silver nanoparticles were treated with Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and its isotopically substituted partner, R6G-d4. Mixed isotopomers let us identify single-molecule spectra, since multiple-molecule spectra would show vibrational transitions from both species. The nanoparticles were embedded into a poly vinyl alcohol film, and loaded into a diamond anvil cell for the high-pressure Raman scattering measurement. Argon was the pressure medium. Ambient pressure Raman scattering spectra showed few single-molecule spectra. At moderately high pressure ( 1GPa), a surprising effect was observed. The number of sites with observable spectra decreased dramatically, and most of the spectra that could be observed were due to single molecules. The effects of high pressure suppressed the multiple-molecule Raman sites, leaving only the single-molecule sites to be observed.

  10. A high-temperature wideband pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Progress in the development of a pressure transducer for measurement of the pressure fluctuations in the high temperature environment of a jet exhaust is reported. A condenser microphone carrier system was adapted to meet the specifications. A theoretical analysis is presented which describes the operation of the condenser microphone in terms of geometry, materials, and other physical properties. The analysis was used as the basis for design of a prototype high temperature microphone. The feasibility of connecting the microphone to a converter over a high temperature cable operating as a half-wavelength transmission line was also examined.

  11. Crystal structures at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Wendel Alexander

    2000-10-01

    The diamond anvil cell (DAC) is a unique instrument that can generate pressures equivalent to those inside planetary interiors (pressures on the order of 1 million atmospheres) under sustained conditions. When combined with a bright source of collimated x-rays, the DAC can be used to probe the structure of materials in-situ at ultra-high pressures. An understanding of the high-pressure structure of materials is important in determining what types of processes may take place in the Earth at great depths. Motivated by previous studies showing that xenon becomes metallic at pressures above ˜1 megabar (100 GPa), we examined the stable structures and reactivity of xenon at pressures approaching that of the core-mantle boundary in the Earth. Our findings indicate the transformation of xenon from face-centered cubic (fcc) to hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structures is kinetically hindered at room temperature, with the equilibrium fcc--hcp phase boundary at 21 (+/-3) gigapascals, a pressure lower than was previously thought. Additionally, we find no tendency on the part of xenon to form a metal alloy with iron or platinum to at least 100 to 150 gigapascals, making it unlikely that the Earth's core serves as a reservoir for primordial xenon. Measurements of the compressibility of natural (Mg.75,Fe .25)2SiO4 gamma-spinel at pressures of the Earth's transition zone yield a pressure derivative of the bulk modulus K0 ' = 6.3 (+/-0.3). As gamma-spinel is considered to be a dominant mineral phase of the transition-zone of the Earth's mantle (400--670 km depth), the relatively high value of K0' for gamma-spinel may help explain the rapid increase with depth of seismic velocities through the transition zone. The thermodynamics, mechanisms and kinetics of pressure-induced amorphization are not well understood. We report here new studies indicating little or no entropy difference between the crystalline and glassy states of Ca(OH) 2 (portlandite). Additional work on the pressure

  12. High to very high frequency metal/anomaly detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Daniel C.; Brennan, Michael L.; Steer, Michael B.; Melber, Adam W.; Cua, John T.

    2014-05-01

    Typical metal detectors work at very low to low frequencies. In this paper, a metal/anomaly detector design that operates in the high to very high frequency range is presented. This design uses a high-Q tuned loop antenna for metal/anomaly detection. By measuring the return loss or voltage standing wave ratio a frequency notch can be detected. Tuning to the optimal location of the notch can be accomplished by monitoring the phase response. This phase monitoring technique can be used to ground balance the detector. As a metal object is moved along the longitudinal axis of the loop antenna a substantial shift in the frequency of the notch is detected. For metal targets, the frequency shift is positive, and for ferrite and other targets, the frequency shift is negative. This frequency shift is created by the proximity of the target causing a change in the impedance of the antenna. Experiments with a prototype antenna show long-range detection with low power requirements. The detector requires only one loop with one winding which is used for both transmit and receive. This allows for a metal/anomaly detector with a very simple design. The design is lightweight and, depending on loop size, significantly increases detection depth performance. In the full paper, modeling and further experimental results will be presented. Performance results for various types of soil and for different types of targets are presented.

  13. High pressure system for 3-D study of elastic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokajicek, T.; Pros, Z.; Klima, K.

    2003-04-01

    New high pressure system was designed for the study of elastic anisotropy of condensed matter under high confining pressure up to 700 MPa. Simultaneously could be measured dynamic and static parameters: a) dynamic parameters by ultrasonic sounding, b) static parameters by measuring of spherical sample deformation. The measurement is carried out on spherical samples diameter 50 +/- 0.01 mm. Higher value of confining pressure was reached due to the new construction of sample positioning unit. The positioning unit is equipped with two Portecap step motors, which are located inside the vessel and make possible to rotate with the sphere and couple of piezoceramic transducers. Sample deformation is measured in the same direction as ultrasonic signal travel time. Only electric leads connects inner part of high pressure vessel with surrounding environment. Experimental set up enables: - simultaneous P-wave ultrasonic sounding, - measurement of current sample deformation at sounding points, - measurement of current value of confining pressure and - measurement of current stress media temperature. Air driven high pressure pump Haskel is used to produce high value of confining pressure up to 700 MPa. Ultrasonic signals are recorded by digital scope Agilent 54562 with sampling frequency 100 MHz. Control and measuring software was developed under Agilent VEE software environment working under MS Win 2000 operating system. Measuring set up was tested by measurement of monomineral spherical samples of quartz and corundum. Both of them have trigonal symmetry. The measurement showed that the P-wave velocity range of quartz was between 5.7-7.0 km/sec. and velocity range of corundum was between 9.7-10.9 km/sec. High pressure resistant LVDT transducers Mesing together with Intronix electronic unit were used to monitor sample deformation. Sample deformation is monitored with the accuracy of 0.1 micron. All test measurements proved the good accuracy of the whole measuring set up. This

  14. Patterns of Low-Frequency Monthly Sea Level Pressure Variability (1899-1986) and Associated Wave Cyclone Frequencies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Jeffery C.

    1990-12-01

    Spatial patterns of low-frequency sea level pressure (SLP) variability are identified by performing rotated principal component analysis (RPCA) on a long-term (1899-1986) Northern Hemisphere gridded dataset. The analysis is limited to the region 160°E eastward to 40°E due to missing data early in the century. The objective is to identify a comprehensive set of highly recurrent SLP teleconnection patterns; to examine some aspects of their seasonality; and to identify the associated mean winter pressure fields and cyclone frequencies occurring at times of opposite eigenvector polarity. The results are further described in the context of the Southern Oscillation and known midtropospheric teleconnection patterns.Four low-frequency variability patterns are identified over the Atlantic-European sector, including (i) the North Atlantic 0scillation (NAO), and spatial patterns with SLP variability centers over (ii) the eastern Atlantic (EATL), (iii) southern Europe and the northern Mediterranean basin (SENA). and (iv) Scandinavia (SCAN). The Pacific sector low-frequency variability patterns include the (v) North Pacific Oscillation (NPO), and patterns with centers over (vi) the north-central Pacific (PAC) and (vii) the Bering Sea (BER). The EATL, SENA, SCAN and BER patterns have not been identified in previous SLP RPCA studies. Seasonal variations take place in the location of the primary and secondary centre of SLP variability in each teleconnection.Each of the Atlantic teleconnections have at least one polarity mode in which cyclones migrate toward Greenland and Iceland. However, the opposite modes in the NAO and EATL are associated with distinct zonally oriented cyclone tracks along latitudes 40°-45°N. One mode of each Pacific pattern is characterized by a zonally oriented cyclone track but the opposite modes are characterized by cyclone maxima in the eastern Pacific (NPO), the western Bering Sea (PAC) and another track that turns northward toward the Bering Sea

  15. Inverter design for high frequency power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A class of simple resonantly commutated inverters are investigated for use in a high power (100 KW - 1000 KW) high frequency (10 KHz - 20 KHz) AC power distribution system. The Mapham inverter is found to provide a unique combination of large thyristor turn-off angle and good utilization factor, much better than an alternate 'current-fed' inverter. The effects of loading the Mapham inverter entirely with rectifier loads are investigated by simulation and with an experimental 3 KW 20 KHz inverter. This inverter is found to be well suited to a power system with heavy rectifier loading.

  16. High pressure, high current, low inductance, high reliability sealed terminals

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN; McKeever, John W [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-03-23

    The invention is a terminal assembly having a casing with at least one delivery tapered-cone conductor and at least one return tapered-cone conductor routed there-through. The delivery and return tapered-cone conductors are electrically isolated from each other and positioned in the annuluses of ordered concentric cones at an off-normal angle. The tapered cone conductor service can be AC phase conductors and DC link conductors. The center core has at least one service conduit of gate signal leads, diagnostic signal wires, and refrigerant tubing routed there-through. A seal material is in direct contact with the casing inner surface, the tapered-cone conductors, and the service conduits thereby hermetically filling the interstitial space in the casing interior core and center core. The assembly provides simultaneous high-current, high-pressure, low-inductance, and high-reliability service.

  17. High-frequency plasma-heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brambilla, Marco; Lallia, Pascal

    1978-01-01

    An array of adjacent wave guides feed high-frequency energy into a vacuum chamber in which a toroidal plasma is confined by a magnetic field, the wave guide array being located between two toroidal current windings. Waves are excited in the wave guide at a frequency substantially equal to the lower frequency hybrid wave of the plasma and a substantially equal phase shift is provided from one guide to the next between the waves therein. For plasmas of low peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TE.sub.01 mode and the output electric field is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. For exciting waves in plasmas of high peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TM.sub.01 mode and the magnetic field at the wave guide outlets is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. The wave excited at the outlet of the wave guide array is a progressive wave propagating in the direction opposite to that of the toroidal current and is, therefore, not absorbed by so-called "runaway" electrons.

  18. Active Control of High-Frequency Combustor Instability Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2003-01-01

    To reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems, extensive research is being done in the development of lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle. However, these lean-burning combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities-high-pressure oscillations much like sound waves that can cause severe high-frequency vibrations in the combustor. These pressure waves can fatigue the combustor components and even the downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the combustor and turbine safe operating life. Thus, suppression of the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for lean, low-emissions combustors. Under the Propulsion and Power Program, the NASA Glenn Research Center in partnership with Pratt & Whitney, United Technologies Research Center, and Georgia Institute of Technology is developing technologies for the active control of combustion instabilities.

  19. High pressure and high temperature behaviour of ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Thakar, Nilesh A.; Bhatt, Apoorva D.; Pandya, Tushar C.

    2014-04-24

    The thermodynamic properties with the wurtzite (B4) and rocksalt (B1) phases of ZnO under high pressures and high temperatures have been investigated using Tait's Equation of state (EOS). The effects of pressures and temperatures on thermodynamic properties such as bulk modulus, thermal expansivity and thermal pressure are explored for both two structures. It is found that ZnO material gradually softens with increase of temperature while it hardens with the increment of the pressure. Our predicted results of thermodynamics properties for both the phases of ZnO are in overall agreement with the available data in the literature.

  20. Computer modeling of tactical high frequency antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Bobby G., Jr.

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to compare the performance of three tactical high frequency antennas to be used as possible replacement for the Tactical Data Communications Central (TDCC) antennas. The antennas were modeled using the Numerical Electromagnetics Code, Version 3 (NEC3), and the Eyring Low Profile and Buried Antenna Modeling Program (PAT7) for several different frequencies and ground conditions. The performance was evaluated by comparing gain at the desired takeoff angles, the voltage standing wave ratio of each antenna, and its omni-directional capability. The buried antenna models, the ELPA-302 and horizontal dipole, were most effective when employed over poor ground conditions. The best performance under all conditions tested was demonstrated by the HT-20T. Each of these antennas have tactical advantages and disadvantages and can optimize communications under certain conditions. The selection of the best antenna is situation dependent. An experimental test of these models is recommended to verify the modeling results.

  1. Parametric nanomechanical amplification at very high frequency.

    PubMed

    Karabalin, R B; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L

    2009-09-01

    Parametric resonance and amplification are important in both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here we report very high frequency (VHF) parametric resonators and mechanical-domain amplifiers based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Compound mechanical nanostructures patterned by multilayer, top-down nanofabrication are read out by a novel scheme that parametrically modulates longitudinal stress in doubly clamped beam NEMS resonators. Parametric pumping and signal amplification are demonstrated for VHF resonators up to approximately 130 MHz and provide useful enhancement of both resonance signal amplitude and quality factor. We find that Joule heating and reduced thermal conductance in these nanostructures ultimately impose an upper limit to device performance. We develop a theoretical model to account for both the parametric response and nonequilibrium thermal transport in these composite nanostructures. The results closely conform to our experimental observations, elucidate the frequency and threshold-voltage scaling in parametric VHF NEMS resonators and sensors, and establish the ultimate sensitivity limits of this approach.

  2. High-frequency ultrasonic wire bonding systems

    PubMed

    Tsujino; Yoshihara; Sano; Ihara

    2000-03-01

    The vibration characteristics of longitudinal-complex transverse vibration systems with multiple resonance frequencies of 350-980 kHz for ultrasonic wire bonding of IC, LSI or electronic devices were studied. The complex vibration systems can be applied for direct welding of semiconductor tips (face-down bonding, flip-chip bonding) and packaging of electronic devices. A longitudinal-complex transverse vibration bonding system consists of a complex transverse vibration rod, two driving longitudinal transducers 7.0 mm in diameter and a transverse vibration welding tip. The vibration distributions along ceramic and stainless-steel welding tips were measured at up to 980 kHz. A high-frequency vibration system with a height of 20.7 mm and a weight of less than 15 g was obtained.

  3. Fluid hydrogen at high density - Pressure dissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, Didier; Chabrier, Gilles

    1991-01-01

    A model for the Helmholtz free energy of fluid hydrogen at high density and high temperature is developed. This model aims at describing both pressure and temperature dissociation and ionization and bears directly on equations of state of partially ionized plasmas, as encountered in astrophysical situations and high-pressure experiments. This paper focuses on a mixture of hydrogen atoms and molecules and is devoted to the study of the phenomenon of pressure dissociation at finite temperatures. In the present model, the strong interactions are described with realistic potentials and are computed with a modified Weeks-Chandler-Andersen fluid perturbation theory that reproduces Monte Carlo simulations to better than 3 percent. Theoretical Hugoniot curves derived from the model are in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  4. High pressure electrical insulated feed thru connector

    DOEpatents

    Oeschger, Joseph E.; Berkeland, James E.

    1979-11-13

    A feed-thru type hermetic electrical connector including at least one connector pin feeding through an insulator block within the metallic body of the connector shell. A compression stop arrangement coaxially disposed about the insulator body is brazed to the shell, and the shoulder on the insulator block bears against this top in a compression mode, the high pressure or internal connector being at the opposite end of the shell. Seals between the pin and an internal bore at the high pressure end of the insulator block and between the insulator block and the metallic shell at the high pressure end are hermetically brazed in place, the first of these also functioning to transfer the axial compressive load without permitting appreciable shear action between the pin and insulator block.

  5. Curved and conformal high-pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, Paul F.; Kuczek, Andrzej E.; Zhao, Wenping

    2016-10-25

    A high-pressure vessel is provided. The high-pressure vessel may comprise a first chamber defined at least partially by a first wall, and a second chamber defined at least partially by the first wall. The first chamber and the second chamber may form a curved contour of the high-pressure vessel. A modular tank assembly is also provided, and may comprise a first mid tube having a convex geometry. The first mid tube may be defined by a first inner wall, a curved wall extending from the first inner wall, and a second inner wall extending from the curved wall. The first inner wall may be disposed at an angle relative to the second inner wall. The first mid tube may further be defined by a short curved wall opposite the curved wall and extending from the second inner wall to the first inner wall.

  6. High pressure chemistry of substituted acetylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Chellappa, Raja; Dattelbaum, Dana; Sheffield, Stephen; Robbins, David

    2011-01-25

    High pressure in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments were performed on substituted polyacetylenes: tert-butyl acetylene [TBA: (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}-C{triple_bond}CH] and ethynyl trimethylsilane [ETMS: (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}-Si{triple_bond}CH] to investigate pressure-induced chemical reactions. The starting samples were the low temperature crystalline phases which persisted metastably at room temperature and polymerized beyond 11 GPa and 26 GPa for TBA and ETMS respectively. These reaction onset pressures are considerably higher than what we observed in the shockwave studies (6.1 GPa for TBA and 6.6 GPa for ETMS). Interestingly, in the case of ETMS, it was observed with fluid ETMS as starting sample, reacts to form a semi-crystalline polymer (crystalline domains corresponding to the low-T phase) at pressures less than {approx}2 GPa. Further characterization using vibrational spectroscopy is in progress.

  7. An expert system to analyze high frequency dependent data for the space shuttle main engine turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Raul C., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The prototype expert system ADDAMX identifies selected sinusoid frequencies from spectral data graphs as speed frequencies and harmonics from each turbopump, frequency feed through from one turbopump to another, frequencies generated by turbopump bearings, pseudo 3N for the phase 2 high pressure fuel turbopump, and electrical noise. ADDAMX does the analysis in an interactive or batch mode and the results can be displayed on the screen or hardcopy.

  8. A high frequency electromagnetic impedance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex

    2003-01-15

    Non-invasive, high resolution geophysical mapping of the shallow subsurface is necessary for delineation of buried hazardous wastes, detecting unexploded ordinance, verifying and monitoring of containment or moisture contents, and other environmental applications. Electromagnetic (EM) techniques can be used for this purpose since electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity are representative of the subsurface media. Measurements in the EM frequency band between 1 and 100 MHz are very important for such applications, because the induction number of many targets is small and the ability to determine the subsurface distribution of both electrical properties is required. Earlier workers were successful in developing systems for detecting anomalous areas, but quantitative interpretation of the data was difficult. Accurate measurements are necessary, but difficult to achieve for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface. We are developing a broadband non-invasive method for accurately mapping the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of the shallow subsurface using an EM impedance approach similar to the MT exploration technique. Electric and magnetic sensors were tested to ensure that stray EM scattering is minimized and the quality of the data collected with the high-frequency impedance (HFI) system is good enough to allow high-resolution, multi-dimensional imaging of hidden targets. Additional efforts are being made to modify and further develop existing sensors and transmitters to improve the imaging capability and data acquisition efficiency.

  9. Exotic stable cesium polynitrides at high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Feng; Han, Yunxia; Liu, Hanyu; Yao, Yansun

    2015-01-01

    New polynitrides containing metastable forms of nitrogen are actively investigated as potential high-energy-density materials. Using a structure search method based on the CALYPSO methodology, we investigated the stable stoichiometries and structures of cesium polynitrides at high pressures. Along with the CsN3, we identified five new stoichiometric compounds (Cs3N, Cs2N, CsN, CsN2, and CsN5) with interesting structures that may be experimentally synthesizable at modest pressures (i.e., less than 50 GPa). Nitrogen species in the predicted structures have various structural forms ranging from single atom (N) to highly endothermic molecules (N2, N3, N4, N5, N6) and chains (N∞). Polymeric chains of nitrogen were found in the high-pressure C2/c phase of CsN2. This structure contains a substantially high content of single N-N bonds that exceeds the previously known nitrogen chains in pure forms, and also exhibit metastability at ambient conditions. We also identified a very interesting CsN crystal that contains novel N44− anion. To our best knowledge, this is the first time a charged N4 species being reported. Results of the present study suggest that it is possible to obtain energetic polynitrogens in main-group nitrides under high pressure. PMID:26581175

  10. Exotic stable cesium polynitrides at high pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Peng, Feng; Han, Yunxia; Liu, Hanyu; ...

    2015-11-19

    New polynitrides containing metastable forms of nitrogen are actively investigated as potential high energy-density materials. Using a structure search method based on the CALYPSO methodology, we investigated the stable stoichiometries and structures of cesium polynitrides at high pressures. Along with the CsN3, we identified five new stoichiometric compounds (Cs3N, Cs2N, CsN, CsN2, and CsN5) with interesting structures that may be experimentally synthesizable at modest pressures (i.e., less than 50 GPa). Nitrogen species in the predicted structures have various structural forms ranging from single atom (N) to highly endothermic molecules (N2, N3 , N4, N5, N6) and chains (N∞). Polymeric chainsmore » of nitrogen were found in the high-pressure C2/c phase of CsN2. This structure contains a substantially high content of single N-N bonds that exceeds the previously known nitrogen chains in pure forms, and also exhibit metastability at ambient conditions. We also identified a very interesting CsN crystal that contains novel N44- anion. In conclusion, to our best knowledge, this is the first time a charged N4 species being reported. Results of the present study suggest that it is possible to obtain energetic polynitrogens in main-group nitrides under high pressure.« less

  11. Hydrogen at high pressure and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W J

    1999-09-30

    Hydrogen at high pressures and temperatures is challenging scientifically and has many real and potential applications. Minimum metallic conductivity of fluid hydrogen is observed at 140 GPa and 2600 K, based on electrical conductivity measurements to 180 GPa (1.8 Mbar), tenfold compression, and 3000 K obtained dynamically with a two-stage light-gas gun. Conditions up to 300 GPa, sixfold compression, and 30,000 K have been achieved in laser-driven Hugoniot experiments. Implications of these results for the interior of Jupiter, inertial confinement fusion, and possible uses of metastable solid hydrogen, if the metallic fluid could be quenched from high pressure, are discussed.

  12. High pressure water jet cutting and stripping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David T.; Babai, Majid K.

    1991-01-01

    High pressure water cutting techniques have a wide range of applications to the American space effort. Hydroblasting techniques are commonly used during the refurbishment of the reusable solid rocket motors. The process can be controlled to strip a thermal protective ablator without incurring any damage to the painted surface underneath by using a variation of possible parameters. Hydroblasting is a technique which is easily automated. Automation removes personnel from the hostile environment of the high pressure water. Computer controlled robots can perform the same task in a fraction of the time that would be required by manual operation.

  13. Superelastic carbon spheres under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meifen; Guo, Junjie; Xu, Bingshe

    2013-03-01

    We report a superelastic deformation behavior of carbon spheres by the in situ Raman spectroscopy in a high-pressure diamond anvil cell. The carbon spheres produced by arc discharging in toluene have a mean diameter of 200 nm and an onion-like multilayer graphitic structure. We find that the elastic coefficients, during both the compression and decompression processes, remain a constant up to 10 GPa, indicating a superior high-pressure structural stability. Such superelastic behavior is related to the isotropic and concentric configuration of carbon spheres and provides additional insight into improving the microscopic mechanical properties of small-scale particles.

  14. High pressure water jet mining machine

    DOEpatents

    Barker, Clark R.

    1981-05-05

    A high pressure water jet mining machine for the longwall mining of coal is described. The machine is generally in the shape of a plowshare and is advanced in the direction in which the coal is cut. The machine has mounted thereon a plurality of nozzle modules each containing a high pressure water jet nozzle disposed to oscillate in a particular plane. The nozzle modules are oriented to cut in vertical and horizontal planes on the leading edge of the machine and the coal so cut is cleaved off by the wedge-shaped body.

  15. Raman study of opal at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, G.; Wang, S.; Mao, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    More commonly known for their beauty and lore as gemstones, opals are also intriguing geological materials which may have potential for materials science applications. Opal lacks a definite crystalline structure, and is composed of an amorphous packing of hydrated silica (SiO2) spheroids, which provides us with a unique nano-scaled mineraloid with properties unlike those of other amorphous materials like glass. Opals from different localities were studied at high pressure using a diamond anvil cell to apply pressure and Raman spectroscopy to look at changes in bonding as pressure was increased. We first tested different samples from Virgin Valley, NV, Spencer, ID, Juniper Ridge, OR, and Australia, which contain varying amounts of water at ambient conditions, using Raman spectroscopy to determine if they were opal-CT (semicrystalline cristobalite-trydimite volcanic origin) or opal-A (amorphous sedimentary origin). We then used x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell to see how their bonding and structure changed under compression and to determine what effect water content had on their high pressure behavior. Comparison of our results on opal to other high pressure studies of amorphous materials like glass has implications from a geological and materials science standpoint.

  16. Introduction to High-Pressure Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dera, Przemyslaw

    To a common person pressure is just one of the parameters that describe a thermodynamic state. We all hear about it in everyday weather forecasts, and most of us do not associate it with anything particularly unique. Probably the most intuitive idea of the effect of high-pressure comes from movies, where submarine sinking to the bottom of the ocean is gradually crushed by the surrounding water, until its hull implodes. Why, then hundreds of scientists throughout the world spent their lifelong careers studying high-pressure phenomena? Despite all the developments in experimental technologies and instrumentation, modern scientist has very few tools that allow him or her to "grab" two atoms and bring them, in a very controllable way, closer together. Being able to achieve this task means the ability to directly probe interatomic interaction potentials and can cause transformations as dramatic as turning of a common gas into solid metal. Before the reader delves into more advanced topics described later in this book, this introductory chapter aims to explain several elementary, but extremely important concepts in high-pressure science. We will start with a brief discussion of laboratory devices used to produce pressure, address the issue of hydrostaticity, elastic and plastic compression, and will conclude with a short discussion of unique effects of anisotropic stress.

  17. High pressure effects in anaesthesia and narcosis.

    PubMed

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; McMillan, Paul F; Greenfield, Susan A

    2006-10-01

    There is growing interest in determining the effects of high pressure on biological functions. Studies of brain processes under hyperbaric conditions can give a unique insight into phenomena such as nitrogen narcosis, inert gas anaesthesia, and pressure reversal of the effects of anaesthetic and narcotic agents. Such research may shed light on the action of anaesthetics, which remains poorly understood, and on the nature of consciousness itself. Various studies have established the behavioural response of organisms to hyperbaric conditions, in the presence or absence of anaesthetic agents. At the molecular level, X-ray crystallography has been used to investigate the incorporation of species like Xe in hydrophobic pockets within model ion channels that may account for pressure effects on neuronal transmission. New magnetic resonance imaging techniques are providing tomographic three-dimensional images that detail brain structure and function, and that can be correlated with behavioural studies and psychological test results. Such whole organ techniques are linked to the molecular scale via voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging studies on brain slices that provide time-resolved images of the dynamic formation and interconnection of inter-neuronal complexes. The VSD experiments are readily adapted to in situ studies under high pressure conditions. In this tutorial review we review the current state of knowledge of hyperbaric effects on brain processes: anaesthesia and narcosis, recent studies at the molecular level via protein crystallography at high pressure in a Xe atmosphere, and we also present some preliminary results of VSD imaging of brain slices under hyperbaric conditions.

  18. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTON KINETICS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano Orsino

    2005-03-30

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) initiative to improve the efficiency of coal-fired power plants and reduce the pollution generated by these facilities, DOE has funded the High-Pressure Coal Combustion Kinetics (HPCCK) Projects. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted on selected pulverized coals at elevated pressures with the specific goals to provide new data for pressurized coal combustion that will help extend to high pressure and validate models for burnout, pollutant formation, and generate samples of solid combustion products for analyses to fill crucial gaps in knowledge of char morphology and fly ash formation. Two series of high-pressure coal combustion experiments were performed using SRI's pressurized radiant coal flow reactor. The first series of tests characterized the near burner flame zone (NBFZ). Three coals were tested, two high volatile bituminous (Pittsburgh No.8 and Illinois No.6), and one sub-bituminous (Powder River Basin), at pressures of 1, 2, and 3 MPa (10, 20, and 30 atm). The second series of experiments, which covered high-pressure burnout (HPBO) conditions, utilized a range of substantially longer combustion residence times to produce char burnout levels from 50% to 100%. The same three coals were tested at 1, 2, and 3 MPa, as well as at 0.2 MPa. Tests were also conducted on Pittsburgh No.8 coal in CO2 entrainment gas at 0.2, 1, and 2 MPa to begin establishing a database of experiments relevant to carbon sequestration techniques. The HPBO test series included use of an impactor-type particle sampler to measure the particle size distribution of fly ash produced under complete burnout conditions. The collected data have been interpreted with the help of CFD and detailed kinetics simulation to extend and validate devolatilization, char combustion and pollutant model at elevated pressure. A global NOX production sub-model has been proposed. The submodel reproduces the performance of the detailed chemical reaction

  19. Material considerations for high frequency, high power capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W.; Galperin, I.

    1983-01-01

    Dielectric materials chosen for use in this high frequency, high power capacitor must endure hard vacuum conditions, high currents (up to 125 A rms), and frequencies up to 40 kHz. Temperature requirements for this type of capacitor are that capacitor operation must be efficient up to 125 C. A more stringent requirement for the sold dielectric is that the temperature coefficient of dissipation factor should indicate self stabilization well below 125 C. In addition, the dielectric temperature coefficient of capacitance should be negative.

  20. Material considerations for high frequency, high power capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, W.; Galperin, I.

    1983-10-01

    Dielectric materials chosen for use in this high frequency, high power capacitor must endure hard vacuum conditions, high currents (up to 125 A rms), and frequencies up to 40 kHz. Temperature requirements for this type of capacitor are that capacitor operation must be efficient up to 125 C. A more stringent requirement for the sold dielectric is that the temperature coefficient of dissipation factor should indicate self stabilization well below 125 C. In addition, the dielectric temperature coefficient of capacitance should be negative.

  1. Unsteady pressure loads in a generic high speed engine model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Jones, Michael G.; Thurlow, Ernie M.

    1992-01-01

    Unsteady pressure loads were measured along the top interior wall of a generic high-speed engine (GHSE) model undergoing performance tests in the combustion-Heated Scramjet Test Facility at the Langley Research Center. Flow to the model inlet was simulated at 72000 ft and a flight Mach number of 4. The inlet Mach number was 3.5 with a total temperature and pressure of 1640 R and 92 psia. The unsteady pressure loads were measured with 5 piezoresistive gages, recessed into the wall 4 to 12 gage diameters to reduce incident heat flux to the diaphragms, and distributed from the inlet to the combustor. Contributors to the unsteady pressure loads included boundary layer turbulence, combustion noise, and transients generated by unstart loads. Typical turbulent boundary layer rms pressures in the inlet ranged from 133 dB in the inlet to 181 dB in the combustor over the frequency range from 0 to 5 kHz. Downstream of the inlet exist, combustion noise was shown to dominate boundary layer turbulence noise at increased heat release rates. Noise levels in the isolator section increased by 15 dB when the fuel-air ratio was increased from 0.37 to 0.57 of the stoichiometric ratio. Transient pressure disturbances associated with engine unstarts were measured in the inlet and have an upstream propagation speed of about 7 ft/sec and pressure jumps of at least 3 psia.

  2. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  3. High frequency plasma generator for ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goede, H.; Divergilio, W. F.; Fosnight, V. V.; Komatsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program to experimentally develop two new types of plasma generators for 30 cm electrostatic argon ion thrusters are presented. The two plasma generating methods selected for this study were by radio frequency induction (RFI), operating at an input power frequency of 1 MHz, and by electron cyclotron heating (ECH) at an operating frequency of 5.0 GHz. Both of these generators utilize multiline cusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement and beam profile optimization. The program goals were to develop a plasma generator possessing the characteristics of high electrical efficiency (low eV/ion) and simplicity of operation while maintaining the reliability and durability of the conventional hollow cathode plasma sources. The RFI plasma generator has achieved minimum discharge losses of 120 eV/ion while the ECH generator has obtained 145 eV/ion, assuming a 90% ion optical transparency of the electrostatic acceleration system. Details of experimental tests with a variety of magnet configurations are presented.

  4. Effect of hydrostatic pressure and magnetic field on electromagnetically induced transparency based nonlinear frequency conversion in quantum ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumber, Sukirti; Gambhir, Monica; Jha, Pradip Kumar; Mohan, Man

    2016-10-01

    We study the combined effect of hydrostatic pressure and magnetic field on electromagnetically induced transparency in quantum ring. The high flexibility in size and shape of ring makes it possible to fabricate a nearly perfect two-dimensional quantum structure. We also explore the dependence of frequency conversion, measured in terms of third order nonlinear susceptibility χ(3) , on coupling field, hydrostatic pressure and magnetic field. Although, a dip in χ(3) is observed with the introduction of strong coupling field, it renders the ring structure transparent to generated wave thus effectively enhancing the output of nonlinear frequency conversion process. At a fixed coupling strength, the output can be further enhanced by increasing the magnetic field while it shows an inverse relationship with pressure. These parameters, being externally controlled, provide an easy handle to control the output of quantum ring which can be used as frequency converter in communication networks.

  5. Too Many Americans Have High Blood Pressure, Doctors Warn

    MedlinePlus

    ... 163468.html Too Many Americans Have High Blood Pressure, Doctors Warn With February designated National Heart Month, ... that too many Americans struggle with high blood pressure. High blood pressure is a major risk factor ...

  6. What about African Americans and High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Lifestyle + Risk Reduction High Blood Pressure What About African Americans and High Blood Pressure? The prevalence of high blood pressure in African Americans is among the highest in ...

  7. Design guide for high pressure oxygen systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C.; Pohl, H. O.; Chaffee, N. H.; Guy, W. W.; Allton, C. S.; Johnston, R. L.; Castner, W. L.; Stradling, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    A repository for critical and important detailed design data and information, hitherto unpublished, along with significant data on oxygen reactivity phenomena with metallic and nonmetallic materials in moderate to very high pressure environments is documented. This data and information provide a ready and easy to use reference for the guidance of designers of propulsion, power, and life support systems for use in space flight. The document is also applicable to designs for industrial and civilian uses of high pressure oxygen systems. The information presented herein are derived from data and design practices involving oxygen usage at pressures ranging from about 20 psia to 8000 psia equal with thermal conditions ranging from room temperatures up to 500 F.

  8. Advanced Diagnostics for High Pressure Spray Combustion.

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, Scott A.; Manin, Julien Luc; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2014-06-01

    The development of accurate predictive engine simulations requires experimental data to both inform and validate the models, but very limited information is presently available about the chemical structure of high pressure spray flames under engine- relevant conditions. Probing such flames for chemical information using non- intrusive optical methods or intrusive sampling techniques, however, is challenging because of the physical and optical harshness of the environment. This work details two new diagnostics that have been developed and deployed to obtain quantitative species concentrations and soot volume fractions from a high-pressure combusting spray. A high-speed, high-pressure sampling system was developed to extract gaseous species (including soot precursor species) from within the flame for offline analysis by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A high-speed multi-wavelength optical extinction diagnostic was also developed to quantify transient and quasi-steady soot processes. High-pressure sampling and offline characterization of gas-phase species formed following the pre-burn event was accomplished as well as characterization of gas-phase species present in the lift-off region of a high-pressure n-dodecane spray flame. For the initial samples discussed in this work several species were identified, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); however, quantitative mole fractions were not determined. Nevertheless, the diagnostic developed here does have this capability. Quantitative, time-resolved measurements of soot extinction were also accomplished and the novel use of multiple incident wavelengths proved valuable toward characterizing changes in soot optical properties within different regions of the spray flame.

  9. Calibration of High Frequency MEMS Microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Humphreys, William M.; Bartram, Scott M.; Zuckewar, Allan J.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding and controlling aircraft noise is one of the major research topics of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program. One of the measurement technologies used to acquire noise data is the microphone directional array (DA). Traditional direction array hardware, consisting of commercially available condenser microphones and preamplifiers can be too expensive and their installation in hard-walled wind tunnel test sections too complicated. An emerging micro-machining technology coupled with the latest cutting edge technologies for smaller and faster systems have opened the way for development of MEMS microphones. The MEMS microphone devices are available in the market but suffer from certain important shortcomings. Based on early experiments with array prototypes, it has been found that both the bandwidth and the sound pressure level dynamic range of the microphones should be increased significantly to improve the performance and flexibility of the overall array. Thus, in collaboration with an outside MEMS design vendor, NASA Langley modified commercially available MEMS microphone as shown in Figure 1 to meet the new requirements. Coupled with the design of the enhanced MEMS microphones was the development of a new calibration method for simultaneously obtaining the sensitivity and phase response of the devices over their entire broadband frequency range. Over the years, several methods have been used for microphone calibration. Some of the common methods of microphone calibration are Coupler (Reciprocity, Substitution, and Simultaneous), Pistonphone, Electrostatic actuator, and Free-field calibration (Reciprocity, Substitution, and Simultaneous). Traditionally, electrostatic actuators (EA) have been used to characterize air-condenser microphones for wideband frequency ranges; however, MEMS microphones are not adaptable to the EA method due to their construction and very small diaphragm size. Hence a substitution-based, free-field method was developed to

  10. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V.; Errandonea, D.

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  11. Wavemeter measurements of frequency stability of an injection seeded alexandrite laser for pressure and temperature lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, C. R.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Korb, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    The GSFC pressure-temperature lidar is a differential absorption lidar operating in the oxygen A band absorption region (760 to 770 nm), and utilizes two tunable pulsed alexandrite lasers. For obtaining temperature measurements with an accuracy of less than or = 1 K, it has been determined that the stability of the online laser frequency over a period of time corresponding to a set of measurements, 0.1 to 30 min, has to be better than +/- 0.002/cm. In addition, the requirements on laser spectral bandwidth and spectral purity are less than or = 0.02/cm and greater than or = 99.9 percent, respectively. Injection seeding with a stabilized AlGaAs diode laser was used to achieve the required frequency stability and spectral bandwidth. A high resolution Fizeau wavemeter was employed to determine the frequency stability of the pulsed alexandrite laser and determine its bandwidth, mode structure. We present the results of measurements of the frequency stability and the spectrum of the injection seeded alexandrite laser.

  12. Material Composite Behavior Under High-Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conil, N.; Kavner, A.

    2004-12-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction techniques under relevant pressure and temperature conditions provide unique information about phase stability, elasticity and deformation behavior of Earth materials. Often samples consist of a calibrated standard intermixed with the material of interest. Accurate measurements of equation of state are based on two assumptions: that the equation of state of the calibrant is known precisely, and that the pressures of these two materials are the same. However, except under strict conditions of hydrostaticity, pressures are not necessary equal. To provide a detailed examination of the pressure relationship in the diamond anvil cell sample chamber, we analyzed two standard materials mixed together in a controlled geometry. Our samples consisted of unidirectional Al2O3 ceramic fibers ( ˜ 1μ m diameter) distributed in an Al metal matrix. This was ideal because both materials are existing high-pressure standards and the oxide/metal mixture is similar to many experiments. We conducted room temperature radial x-ray diffraction experiments using a diamond anvil cell at the X17C beamline at National Synchrotron Light Source. We studied two different fiber orientations with respect to the diamond anvil cell compression axis: one with fibers oriented vertically and the second, horizontally. In each case we measured the d-spacing of lattice planes as a function of rotation angle between principle stress axes and diffraction geometry. From these data, we calculated pressure and supported differential stress of both Al and Al2O3. We found that geometry plays an important role in determining the relative pressure and strength behavior of the two materials. At comparable pressures, in the vertical fibers case, PAl ˜ 8.7 GPa, PAl2O3 ˜ 10.2 GPa and in the horizontal fibers case, PAl ˜ 9.6 GPa when PAl2O3 ˜ 10.2 GPa. Thus, when the fibers are oriented vertically, aluminum pressure is always smaller than alumina pressure; whereas in the horizontal case

  13. Stability of xenon oxides at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiang; Jung, Daniel Y; Oganov, Artem R; Glass, Colin W; Gatti, Carlo; Lyakhov, Andriy O

    2013-01-01

    Xenon, which is quite inert under ambient conditions, may become reactive under pressure. The possibility of the formation of stable xenon oxides and silicates in the interior of the Earth could explain the atmospheric missing xenon paradox. Using an ab initio evolutionary algorithm, we predict the existence of thermodynamically stable Xe-O compounds at high pressures (XeO, XeO(2) and XeO(3) become stable at pressures above 83, 102 and 114 GPa, respectively). Our calculations indicate large charge transfer in these oxides, suggesting that large electronegativity difference and high pressure are the key factors favouring the formation of xenon compounds. However, xenon compounds cannot exist in the Earth's mantle: xenon oxides are unstable in equilibrium with the metallic iron occurring in the lower mantle, and xenon silicates are predicted to decompose spontaneously at all mantle pressures (<136 GPa). However, it is possible that xenon atoms may be retained at defects in mantle silicates and oxides.

  14. Excitation and Ionisation dynamics in high-frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, D.

    2008-07-01

    Non-thermal low temperature plasmas are widely used for technological applications. Increased demands on plasma technology have resulted in the development of various discharge concepts based on different power coupling mechanisms. Despite this, power dissipation mechanisms in these discharges are not yet fully understood. Of particular interest are low pressure radio-frequency (rf) discharges. The limited understanding of these discharges is predominantly due to the complexity of the underlying mechanisms and difficult diagnostic access to important parameters. Optical measurements are a powerful diagnostic tool offering high spatial and temporal resolution. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) provides non-intrusive access, to the physics of the plasma, with comparatively simple experimental requirements. Improved advances in technology and modern diagnostics now allow deeper insight into fundamental mechanisms. In low pressure rf discharges insight into the electron dynamics within the rf cycle can yield vital information. This requires high temporal resolution on a nano-second time scale. The optical emission from rf discharges exhibits temporal variations within the rf cycle. These variations are particularly strong, in for example capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs), but also easily observable in inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), and can be exploited for insight into power dissipation. Interesting kinetic and non-linear coupling effects are revealed in capacitive systems. The electron dynamics exhibits a complex spatio-temporal structure. Excitation and ionisation, and, therefore, plasma sustainment is dominated through directed energetic electrons created through the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. In the relatively simple case of an asymmetric capacitively coupled rf plasma the complexity of the power dissipation is exposed and various mode transitions can be clearly observed and investigated. At higher pressure secondary electrons dominate the

  15. High temperature pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Caines, Michael J.

    1983-01-01

    A pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide is provided to which one end may be attached a transducer and at the other end a high temperature material for continuous ultrasonic testing of the material. The ultrasonic signal is coupled from the waveguide into the material through a thin, dry copper foil.

  16. High Pressure Inactivation of HAV within Mussels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential of hepatitis A virus (HAV) to be inactivated within Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) by high pressure processing was evaluated. HAV was bioaccumulated within mussels to approximately 6-log10 PFU by exposure of mussels to HAV-contamina...

  17. Hurricane risk mitigation - High Pressure Gas Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A worker pours concrete as part of a nitrogen risk mitigation project at the High Pressure Gas Facility at Stennis Space Center. The concrete slab will provide the foundation needed to place new pumps at the site and is part of ongoing hurricane-related mitigation work at Stennis.

  18. Particle modelling of magnetically confined oxygen plasma in low pressure radio frequency discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Benyoucef, Djilali; Yousfi, Mohammed

    2015-01-15

    The main objective of this paper is the modelling and simulation of a radio frequency (RF) discharge in oxygen at low pressure and at room temperature, including the effect of crossed electric and magnetic fields for generation and confinement of oxygen plasma. The particle model takes into account one axial dimension along the electric field axis and three velocity components during the Monte Carlo treatment of the collisions between charged particles and background gas. The simulation by this developed code allows us not only to determine the electrodynamics characteristics of the RF discharge, but also to obtain kinetics and energetic description of reactive oxygen plasma at low pressure. These information are very important for the control of the deep reactive-ion etching technology of the silicon to manufacture capacitors with high density and for the deposition thick insulating films or thick metal to manufacture micro-coils. The simulation conditions are as follows: RF peak voltage of 200 V, frequency of 13.56 MHz, crossed magnetic field varying from 0 to 50 Gauss, and oxygen pressure of 13.8 Pa. In the presence of magnetic field, the results show an increase of the plasma density, a decrease of the electron mean energy, and also a reduction of the ratio between electron density and positive ion density. Finally in order to validate, the results are successfully compared with measurements already carried out in the literature. The conditions of comparison are from 100 to 300 V of the peak voltage at 13.56 MHz under a pressure of 13.8 Pa and a gap distance of 2.5 cm.

  19. Terahertz Frequency-Domain Spectroscopy of Low-Pressure Acetonitrile Gas by a Photomixing Terahertz Synthesizer Referenced to Dual Optical Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Kimura, Hiroto; Hayashi, Kenta; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Inaba, Hajime; Minoshima, Kaoru; Hindle, Francis; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    A terahertz (THz) frequency synthesizer based on photomixing of two near-infrared lasers with a sub-THz to THz frequency offset is a powerful tool for spectroscopy of polar gas molecules due to its broad spectral coverage; however, its frequency accuracy and resolution are relatively low. To tune the output frequency continuously and widely while maintaining its traceability to a frequency standard, we developed a photomixing THz synthesizer phase-locked to dual optical frequency combs (OFCs). While the phase-locking to dual OFCs ensured continuous tuning within a spectral range of 120 GHz, in addition to the traceability to the frequency standard, use of a broadband uni-traveling carrier photodiode for photomixing enabled the generation of CW-THz radiation within a frequency range from 0.2 to 1.5 THz. We demonstrated THz frequency-domain spectroscopy of gas-phase acetonitrile CH3CN and its isotope CH3 13CN in the frequency range of 0.600-0.720 THz using this THz synthesizer. Their rotational transitions were assigned with a frequency accuracy of 8.42 × 10-8 and a frequency resolution of 520 kHz. Furthermore, the concentration of the CH3CN gas at 20 Pa was determined to be (5.41 ± 0.05) × 1014 molecules/cm3 by curve fitting analysis of the measured absorbance spectrum, and the mixture ratio of the mixed CH3CN/CH3 13CN gas was determined to be 1:2.26 with a gas concentration of 1014-1015 molecules/cm3. The developed THz synthesizer is highly promising for high-precision THz-FDS of low-pressure molecular gases and will enable the qualitative and quantitative analyses of multiple gases.

  20. Development and optimization of acoustic bubble structures at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Judy; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Yasui, Kyuichi; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Towata, Atsuya; Iida, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    At high ultrasound frequencies, active bubble structures are difficult to capture due to the decrease in timescale per acoustic cycle and size of bubbles with increasing frequencies. However the current study demonstrates an association between the spatial distribution of visible bubbles and that of the active bubble structure established in the path of the propagating acoustic wave. By monitoring the occurrence of these visible bubbles, the development of active bubbles can be inferred for high frequencies. A series of still images depicting the formation of visible bubble structures suggest that a strong standing wave field exists at early stages of wave propagation and weakens by the increase in the attenuation of the acoustic wave, caused by the formation of large coalesced bubbles. This attenuation is clearly demonstrated by the occurrence of a force which causes bubbles to be driven toward the liquid surface and limit standing wave fields to near the surface. This force is explained in terms of the acoustic streaming and traveling wave force. It is found that a strong standing wave field is established at 168 kHz. At 448 kHz, large coalesced bubbles can significantly attenuate the acoustic pressure amplitude and weaken the standing wave field. When the frequency is increased to 726 kHz, acoustic streaming becomes significant and is the dominant force behind the disruption of the standing wave structure. The disruption of the standing wave structure can be minimized under certain pulse ON and OFF ratios.

  1. Novel pressure sensor by diode-pumped birefringent Nd:YAG dual-frequency laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chunning; Li, Yan; Zhang, Shulian; Guo, Hui

    2002-09-01

    The prototype of a novel sensor based on laser frequency splitting technology is presented in this paper and the results of a series of experiments are reported. A scheme of the novel pressure sensor by diode-pumped birefringent Nd:YAG dual-frequency laser is brought forward. As a result of the stress birefringence the laser's longitudinal mode is split to two with frequency difference. Both the theoretical analysis and the experiments indicate that there is a direct ratio relation between the frequency difference and the pressure imposed on the Nd:YAG crystal. Therefore when the external pressure is sensed by the Nd:YAG dual-frequency laser and the beat frequency is measured by the frequency counter, the pressure value can be obtained from the magnitude of the beat frequency. The laser can operate under single mode or complex modes with little error to the experiment results. Some research work under different pumping ways is finished and it indicates that the beat frequency has little relation with pumping ways. The experiment has a good linearity (R greater than 0.999) with satisfied precision, sensitivity (5.27 MHz/kPa) and stability, which provides a good academic and experimental foundation for further research.

  2. High-Frequency Fluctuations During Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara-Almonte, J.; Ji, H.; Daughton, W. S.; Roytershteyn, V.; Yamada, M.; Yoo, J.; Fox, W. R., II

    2014-12-01

    During collisionless reconnection, the decoupling of the field from the plasma is known to occur only within the localized ion and electron diffusion regions, however predictions from fully kinetic simulations do not agree with experimental observations on the size of the electron diffusion region, implying differing reconnection mechanisms. Previous experiments, along with 2D and 3D simulations, have conclusively shown that this discrepancy cannot be explained by either classical collisions or Lower-Hybrid Drift Instability (Roytershtyn 2010, 2013). Due to computational limitations, however, previous simulations were constrained to have minimal scale separation between the electron skin depth and the Debye length (de/λD ~ 10), much smaller than in experiments (de/λD ~ 300). This lack of scale-separation can drastically modify the electrostatic microphysics within the diffusion layer. Using 3D, fully explicit kinetic simulations with a realistic and unprecedentedly large separation between the Debye length and the electron skin depth, de/λD = 64, we show that high frequency electrostatic waves (ω >> ωLH) can exist within the electron diffusion region. These waves generate small-scale turbulence within the electron diffusion region which acts to broaden the layer. Anomalous resistivity is also generated by the turbulence and significantly modifies the force balance. In addition to simulation results, initial experimental measurements of high frequency fluctuations (electrostatic and electromagnetic, f ≤ 1 GHz) in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) will be presented.

  3. Efficient High Pressure MixtureState Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K. G.; Miller, R. S.; Bellan, J.

    1996-01-01

    A method is presented for an accurate noniterative, computationally efficient calculation of high pressure fluid mixture equations of state, especially targeted to gas turbines and rocket engines. Pressures above 1 bar and temperatures above 100 K are addressed. The method is based on curve fitting an effective reference state relative to departure funcitons formed using the Peng-Robinson cubic state equation. Fit parameters for H(sub 2), O(sub 2), N(sub 2), propane, n-heptane and methanol are given.

  4. High pressure luminescence probes in polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    High pressure luminescence has proved to be a very powerful tool for characterizing crystalline solids and liquids. Two problems involving glassy polymers are analyzed. In the first problem the excited states of azulene and its derivatives are used to probe intermolecular interactions in PMMA and PS. In the second problem the change in emission intensity with pressure from two excimer states of polyvinylcarbazole as a pure polymer and in dilute solution in polystyrene (PS), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyisoliutylene (PIB) is studied. The relative emission from the two states depends strongly on the possibility for motion of polymer segments. The observations are related to the proximity to the glass transition.

  5. Submarine High Pressure Dehydrator Performance Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-07

    Hatala of September 1985. Prepared for NAVSEA 05N under contract number N00024-33-C-2111. 13. General Dynamics Corporation, High Pressure Air Filtration...Cooling Water Pump Gear Ratio ............... 4:1 Cooling Water Pump Full Load Speed .......... 3500 rpm Water Pump TDH @ 3400 RPM & 15 GPM...Temperature Monitor Thomas A. Edison, Inc. 12-1/2" x 7-1/4" x 9" 25 lbs. Motor Electro Dynamic 2𔄁-1/16" x 2𔃾-1/4" x 2𔃻-1/4" 1150 lbs. S Pressure

  6. Fundamentals of bipolar high-frequency surgery.

    PubMed

    Reidenbach, H D

    1993-04-01

    In endoscopic surgery a very precise surgical dissection technique and an efficient hemostasis are of decisive importance. The bipolar technique may be regarded as a method which satisfies both requirements, especially regarding a high safety standard in application. In this context the biophysical and technical fundamentals of this method, which have been known in principle for a long time, are described with regard to the special demands of a newly developed field of modern surgery. After classification of this method into a general and a quasi-bipolar mode, various technological solutions of specific bipolar probes, in a strict and in a generalized sense, are characterized in terms of indication. Experimental results obtained with different bipolar instruments and probes are given. The application of modern microprocessor-controlled high-frequency surgery equipment and, wherever necessary, the integration of additional ancillary technology into the specialized bipolar instruments may result in most useful and efficient tools of a key technology in endoscopic surgery.

  7. (Ultra) High Pressure Homogenization for Continuous High Pressure Sterilization of Pumpable Foods – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Georget, Erika; Miller, Brittany; Callanan, Michael; Heinz, Volker; Mathys, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial spores have a strong resistance to both chemical and physical hurdles and create a risk for the food industry, which has been tackled by applying high thermal intensity treatments to sterilize food. These strong thermal treatments lead to a reduction of the organoleptic and nutritional properties of food and alternatives are actively searched for. Innovative hurdles offer an alternative to inactivate bacterial spores. In particular, recent technological developments have enabled a new generation of high pressure homogenizer working at pressures up to 400 MPa and thus, opening new opportunities for high pressure sterilization of foods. In this short review, we summarize the work conducted on (ultra) high pressure homogenization (U)HPH to inactivate endospores in model and food systems. Specific attention is given to process parameters (pressure, inlet, and valve temperatures). This review gathers the current state of the art and underlines the potential of UHPH sterilization of pumpable foods while highlighting the needs for future work. PMID:25988118

  8. (Ultra) high pressure homogenization for continuous high pressure sterilization of pumpable foods - a review.

    PubMed

    Georget, Erika; Miller, Brittany; Callanan, Michael; Heinz, Volker; Mathys, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial spores have a strong resistance to both chemical and physical hurdles and create a risk for the food industry, which has been tackled by applying high thermal intensity treatments to sterilize food. These strong thermal treatments lead to a reduction of the organoleptic and nutritional properties of food and alternatives are actively searched for. Innovative hurdles offer an alternative to inactivate bacterial spores. In particular, recent technological developments have enabled a new generation of high pressure homogenizer working at pressures up to 400 MPa and thus, opening new opportunities for high pressure sterilization of foods. In this short review, we summarize the work conducted on (ultra) high pressure homogenization (U)HPH to inactivate endospores in model and food systems. Specific attention is given to process parameters (pressure, inlet, and valve temperatures). This review gathers the current state of the art and underlines the potential of UHPH sterilization of pumpable foods while highlighting the needs for future work.

  9. Amorphous boron nitride at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durandurdu, Murat

    2016-06-01

    The pressure-induced phase transformation in hexagonal boron nitrite and amorphous boron nitrite is studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The hexagonal-to-wurtzite phase transformation is successfully reproduced in the simulation with a transformation mechanism similar to one suggested in experiment. Amorphous boron nitrite, on the other hand, gradually transforms to a high-density amorphous phase with the application of pressure. This phase transformation is irreversible because a densified amorphous state having both sp3 and sp2 bonds is recovered upon pressure release. The high-density amorphous state mainly consists of sp3 bonds and its local structure is quite similar to recently proposed intermediate boron nitrite phases, in particular tetragonal structure (P42/mnm), rather than the known the wurtzite or cubic boron nitrite due to the existence of four membered rings and edge sharing connectivity. On the basis of this finding we propose that amorphous boron nitrite might be best candidate as a starting structure to synthesize the intermediate phase(s) at high pressure and temperature (probably below 800 °C) conditions.

  10. Apparatus for testing high pressure injector elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, William Neill (Inventor); Scott, Ewell M. (Inventor); Forbes, John C. (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for testing and evaluating the spray pattern of high pressure fuel injector elements for use in supplying fuel to combustion engines is presented. Prior art fuel injector elements were normally tested by use of low pressure apparatuses which did not provide a purge to prevent mist from obscuring the injector element or to prevent frosting of the view windows; could utilize only one fluid during each test; and had their viewing ports positioned one hundred eighty (180 deg) apart, thus preventing optimum use of laser diagnostics. The high pressure fluid injector test apparatus includes an upper hub, an upper weldment or housing, a first clamp and stud/nut assembly for securing the upper hub to the upper weldment, a standoff assembly within the upper weldment, a pair of window housings having view glasses within the upper weldment, an injector block assembly and purge plate within the upper weldment for holding an injector element to be tested and evaluated, a lower weldment or housing, a second clamp and stud/nut assembly for securing the lower weldment to the upper weldment, a lower hub, a third clamp and stud/nut assembly for securing the lower hub to the lower weldment, mechanisms for introducing fluid under high pressure for testing an injector element, and mechanisms for purging the apparatus to prevent frosting of view glasses within the window housings and to permit unobstructed viewing of the injector element.

  11. Small, high-pressure, liquid oxygen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.

    1978-01-01

    A small, high-pressure, LOX turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested. The pump was of a single-stage, centrifugal type; power to the pump was supplied by a single-stage, partial-admission, axial-impulse turbine. Design conditions included an operating speed of 7330 rad/sec (70,000 rpm) pump discharge pressure of 2977 N/sq cm (4318 psia), and a pump flowrate of 16.4 kg/s (36.21 lb/sec). The turbine was propelled by LOX/LH2 combustion products at 1041 K (1874 R) inlet temperature, and at a design pressure ratio of 1.424. Test data obtained with the turbopump are presented and mechanical performance is discussed.

  12. Small, high-pressure liquid oxygen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.; Sutton, R.

    1977-01-01

    A small, high-pressure, liquid oxygen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested. The pump was of a single-stage, centrifugal type; power to the pump was supplied by a single-stage, partial emission, axial-impulse turbine. Design conditions included an operating speed of 70,000 rpm, pump discharge pressure of 2977 N/sq cm (4318 psia), and a pump flowrate of 16.4 kg/s (36.21 lb/sec). The turbine was propelled by LO2/LH2 combustion products at 1041 K (1874 R) inlet temperature, and at a design pressure ratio of 1.424. The approaches used in the detail analysis and design of the turbopump are described, and fabrication methods are discussed. Data obtained from gas generator tests, turbine performance calibration, and turbopump testing are presented.

  13. Pressure and high-Tc superconductivity in sulfur hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Gor’kov, Lev P.; Kresin, Vladimir Z.

    2016-01-01

    The paper discusses fundamentals of record-TC superconductivity discovered under high pressure in sulfur hydride. The rapid increase of TC with pressure in the vicinity of Pcr ≈ 123GPa is interpreted as the fingerprint of a first-order structural transition. Based on the cubic symmetry of the high-TC phase, it is argued that the lower-TC phase has a different periodicity, possibly related to an instability with a commensurate structural vector. In addition to the acoustic branches, the phonon spectrum of H3S contains hydrogen modes with much higher frequencies. Because of the complex spectrum, usual methods of calculating TC are here inapplicable. A modified approach is formulated and shown to provide realistic values for TC and to determine the relative contributions of optical and acoustic branches. The isotope effect (change of TC upon Deuterium for Hydrogen substitution) originates from high frequency phonons and differs in the two phases. The decrease of TC following its maximum in the high-TC phase is a sign of intermixing with pairing at hole-like pockets which arise in the energy spectrum of the cubic phase at the structural transition. On-pockets pairing leads to the appearance of a second gap and is remarkable for its non-adiabatic regime: hydrogen mode frequencies are comparable to the Fermi energy. PMID:27167334

  14. Exotic stable cesium polynitrides at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Feng; Han, Yunxia; Liu, Hanyu; Yao, Yansun

    2015-11-19

    New polynitrides containing metastable forms of nitrogen are actively investigated as potential high energy-density materials. Using a structure search method based on the CALYPSO methodology, we investigated the stable stoichiometries and structures of cesium polynitrides at high pressures. Along with the CsN3, we identified five new stoichiometric compounds (Cs3N, Cs2N, CsN, CsN2, and CsN5) with interesting structures that may be experimentally synthesizable at modest pressures (i.e., less than 50 GPa). Nitrogen species in the predicted structures have various structural forms ranging from single atom (N) to highly endothermic molecules (N2, N3 , N4, N5, N6) and chains (N). Polymeric chains of nitrogen were found in the high-pressure C2/c phase of CsN2. This structure contains a substantially high content of single N-N bonds that exceeds the previously known nitrogen chains in pure forms, and also exhibit metastability at ambient conditions. We also identified a very interesting CsN crystal that contains novel N44- anion. In conclusion, to our best knowledge, this is the first time a charged N4 species being reported. Results of the present study suggest that it is possible to obtain energetic polynitrogens in main-group nitrides under high pressure.

  15. High Blood Pressure: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... and taking medicines , if needed. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Start Here Blood Pressure Matters: Keep Hypertension ... Institutes of Health) High Blood Pressure (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) Also in Spanish High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) ( ...

  16. Is sodium a superconductor under high pressure?

    PubMed

    Tutchton, Roxanne; Chen, Xiaojia; Wu, Zhigang

    2017-01-07

    Superconductivity has been predicted or measured for most alkali metals under high pressure, but the computed critical temperature (Tc) of sodium (Na) at the face-centered cubic (fcc) phase is vanishingly low. Here we report a thorough, first-principles investigation of superconductivity in Na under pressures up to 260 GPa, where the metal-to-insulator transition occurs. Linear-response calculations and density functional perturbation theory were employed to evaluate phonon distributions and the electron-phonon coupling for bcc, fcc, cI16, and tI19 Na. Our results indicate that the maximum electron-phonon coupling parameter, λ, is 0.5 for the cI16 phase, corresponding to a theoretical peak in the critical temperature at Tc≈1.2 K. When pressure decreases or increases from 130 GPa, Tc drops quickly. This is mainly due to the lack of p-d hybridization in Na even at 260 GPa. Since current methods based on the Eliashberg and McMillian formalisms tend to overestimate the Tc (especially the peak values) of alkali metals, we conclude that under high pressure-before the metal-to-insulator transition at 260 GPa-superconductivity in Na is very weak, if it is measurable at all.

  17. Picosecond High Pressure Gas Switch experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cravey, W.R.; Freytag, E.K.; Goerz, D.A.; Poulsen, P.; Pincosy, P.A.

    1993-08-01

    A high Pressure Gas Switch has been developed and tested at LLNL. Risetimes on the order of 200 picoseconds have been observed at 1 kHz prf and 1 atmosphere pressures. Calculations show that switching closure times on the order of tens of picoseconds can be achieved at higher pressures and electric fields. A voltage hold-off of 1 MV/cm has been measured at 10 atmospheres and several MV/cm appears possible with the HPGS. With such high electric field levels, energy storage of tens of Joules in a reasonably sized package is achievable. Initial HPGS performance has been characterized using the WASP pulse generator at LLNL. A detailed description of the switch used for initial testing is given. Switch recovery times of 1-ms have been measured at 1 atmosphere. Data on the switching uniformity, voltage hold-off recovery, and pulse repeatability, is presented. In addition, a physics switch model is described and results are compared with experimental data. Modifications made to the WASP HV pulser in order to drive the HPGS will also be discussed. Recovery times of less than 1 ms were recorded without gas flow in the switch chambers. Low pressure synthetic air was used as the switch dielectric. Longer recovery times were required when it was necessary to over-voltage the switch.

  18. Nucleation and droplet growth at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luijten, Carlo Cornelis Maria

    Homogeneous nucleation, the first stage of droplet formation in the absence of foreign particles, usually takes place in the presence of one or more supercritical carrier gases. The present work aimed at a systematic investigation of the effects of carrier gas pressure on nucleation and droplet growth. Using the so-called nucleation pulse method, nucleation and droplet growth can be separated in time, which facilitates quantitative study of these processes using Constant Angle Mie Scattering and light extinction. The method was implemented in a modified shock tube, using gas dynamic principles to create the pulse. In this way, nucleation and growth rates were measured as a function of temperature, pressure, and composition. Composition measurement at high pressure was achieved along two different routes. Water vapour concentrations were determined using a commercial humidity sensor, after calibration with total pressure as an independent parameter. Gas chromatography was used to determine hydrocarbon concentrations, after pressure reduction of the mixture over a thermostatic capillary tube. Using the above analysis techniques, nucleation and droplet growth experiments were performed for several vapour-gas mixtures, at pressures between 1 and 40 bar. Mixtures with a varying degree of interaction were selected, to allow for a systematic investigation of carrier gas influence. Besides these binary mixtures, the first quantitative nucleation and growth rates for- multicomponent-natural gas were obtained. Theoretical models for both nucleation and droplet growth were adapted to take into account the presence of a carrier gas, under condition of small carrier gas solubility. The main effects involved are the increase of saturated vapour density and decrease of surface tension with pressure. On the basis of our experiments, these effects were demonstrated to play important and counteracting roles in high pressure nucleation. Using Density Functional Theory, both effects

  19. Collisionless electron heating by radio frequency bias in low gas pressure inductive discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2012-12-10

    We show experimental observations of collisionless electron heating by the combinations of the capacitive radio frequency (RF) bias power and the inductive power in low argon gas pressure RF biased inductively coupled plasma (ICP). With small RF bias powers in the ICP, the electron energy distribution (EED) evolved from bi-Maxwellian distribution to Maxwellian distribution by enhanced plasma bulk heating and the collisionless sheath heating was weak. In the capacitive RF bias dominant regime, however, high energy electrons by the RF bias were heated on the EEDs in the presence of the ICP. The collisionless heating mechanism of the high energy electrons transited from collisionless inductive heating to capacitive coupled collisionless heating by the electron bounce resonance in the RF biased ICP.

  20. Frequency stable high power lasers in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of a laser heterodyne gravity wave antenna that would operate in solar orbit with a one million kilometer path length is discussed. Laser technology that would be appropriate for operation of this space-based gravity wave detector is also discussed. The rapid progress in diode laser coupled with the energy storage and potentially sub-Hertz linewidths of solid state lasers, and the possibility of efficient frequency conversion by nonlinear optical techniques defines a technology that is appropriate for laser interferometry in space. The present status of diode-laser-pumped, solid state lasers is summarized and future progress is projected in areas of linewidth control, high average power, operating efficiency, and operational lifetimes that are essential for space-based applications.

  1. High frequency oscillators for chaotic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beal, A. N.; Blakely, J. N.; Corron, N. J.; Dean, R. N.

    2016-05-01

    This work focuses on implementing a class of exactly solvable chaotic oscillators at speeds that allow real world radar applications. The implementation of a chaotic radar using a solvable system has many advantages due to the generation of aperiodic, random-like waveforms with an analytic representation. These advantages include high range resolution, no range ambiguity, and spread spectrum characteristics. These systems allow for optimal detection of a noise-like signal by the means of a linear matched filter using simple and inexpensive methods. This paper outlines the use of exactly solvable chaos in ranging systems, while addressing electronic design issues related to the frequency dependence of the system's stretching function introduced by the use of negative impedance converters (NICs).

  2. High-Frequency Mechanostimulation of Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kadem, Laith F; Suana, K Grace; Holz, Michelle; Wang, Wei; Westerhaus, Hannes; Herges, Rainer; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2017-01-02

    Cell adhesion is regulated by molecularly defined protein interactions and by mechanical forces, which can activate a dynamic restructuring of adhesion sites. Previous attempts to explore the response of cell adhesion to forces have been limited to applying mechanical stimuli that involve the cytoskeleton. In contrast, we here apply a new, oscillatory type of stimulus through push-pull azobenzenes. Push-pull azobenzenes perform a high-frequency, molecular oscillation upon irradiation with visible light that has frequently been applied in polymer surface relief grating. We here use these oscillations to address single adhesion receptors. The effect of molecular oscillatory forces on cell adhesion has been analyzed using single-cell force spectroscopy and gene expression studies. Our experiments demonstrate a reinforcement of cell adhesion as well as upregulated expression levels of adhesion-associated genes as a result of the nanoscale "tickling" of integrins. This novel type of mechanical stimulus provides a previously unprecedented molecular control of cellular mechanosensing.

  3. High pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, Christian G.; Sakaji, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    A gradient mixer which effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum "band-broadening".

  4. High-pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, C.G.; Sakaji, R.H.

    1982-09-08

    A gradient mixer effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum band-broadening.

  5. Heart Instantaneous Frequency Based Estimation of HRV from Blood Pressure Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucena, Fausto; Barros, Allan Kardec; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Ohnishi, Noboru

    The heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure based on the time position of the electrocardiogram (ECG) R-waves. There is a discussion whether or not we can obtain the HRV pattern from blood pressure (BP). In this paper, we propose a method for estimating HRV from a BP signal based on a HIF algorithm and carrying out experiments to compare BP as an alternative measurement of ECG to calculate HRV. Based on the hypotheses that ECG and BP have the same harmonic behavior, we model an alternative HRV signal using a nonlinear algorithm, called heart instantaneous frequency (HIF). It tracks the instantaneous frequency through a rough fundamental frequency using power spectral density (PSD). A novelty in this work is to use fundamental frequency instead of wave-peaks as a parameter to estimate and quantify beat-to-beat heart rate variability from BP waveforms. To verify how the estimate HRV signals derived from BP using HIF correlates to the standard gold measures, i.e. HRV derived from ECG, we use a traditional algorithm based on QRS detectors followed by thresholding to localize the R-wave time peak. The results show the following: 1) The spectral error caused by misestimation of time by R-peak detectors is demonstrated by an increase in high-frequency bands followed by the loss of time domain pattern. 2) The HIF was shown to be robust against noise and nuisances. 3) By using statistical methods and nonlinear analysis no difference between HIF derived from BP and HRV derived from ECG was observed.

  6. Water solubility in pyrope at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookherjee, M.; Karato, S.-

    2006-12-01

    To address how much water is stored within the Earth's mantle, we need to understand the water solubility in the nominally anhydrous minerals. Much is known about olivine and pyroxene. Garnet is another important component, approaching 40% by volume in the transition zone. Only two studies on water solubility in pyrope at high-pressures exist which contradict each other. Lu and Keppler (1997) observed increase in water solubility in a natural pyrope up to 200 ppm wt of water, till 10 GPa. They concluded that the proton is located in the interstitial site. Withers et al. (1998) on the contrary, observed increasing water content in Mg-rich pyrope till 6 GPa, then sudden decrease of water, beyond detection, at 7 GPa. Based on infrared spectra, Withers et al. (1998), concluded hydrogarnet (Si^{4+} replaced by 4H+ to form O4H4) substitution in synthetic magnesium rich pyrope. They argued that at high pressure owing to larger volume, hydrogarnet substitution is unstable and water is expelled out of garnet. In transition zone conditions, however, majorite garnet seems to contain around 600-700 ppm wt of water (Bolfan-Casanova et al. 2000; Katayama et al. 2003). The cause for such discrepancy is not clear and whether garnet could store a significant amount of water at mantle condition is unconstrained. In order to understand the solubility mechanism of water in pyrope at high-pressure, we have conducted high- pressure experiments on naturally occurring single crystals of pyrope garnet (from Arizona, Aines and Rossman, 1984). To ascertain water-saturated conditions, we use olivine single-crystal as an internal standard. Preliminary results indicate that natural pyrope is capable of dissolving water at high-pressures, however, water preferentially enters olivine than in pyrope. We are undertaking systematic study to estimate the solubility of water in pyrope as a function of pressure. This will enable us to develop solubility models to understand the defect mechanisms

  7. Modulating action of low frequency oscillations on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Liqiu, Wei E-mail: weiliqiu@hit.edu.cn; Liang, Han; Ziyi, Yang; Jing, Li; Yong, Cao; Daren, Yu; Jianhua, Du

    2015-02-07

    It is found that the low frequency oscillations have modulating action on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters. The physical mechanism of this modulation is discussed and verified by numerical simulations. Theoretical analyses indicate that the wide-range fluctuations of plasma density and electric field associated with the low frequency oscillations affect the electron drift velocity and anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field. The amplitude and frequency of high frequency oscillations are modulated by low frequency oscillations, which show the periodic variation in the time scale of low frequency oscillations.

  8. Measured wavenumber: frequency spectrum associated with acoustic and aerodynamic wall pressure fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Arguillat, Blandine; Ricot, Denis; Bailly, Christophe; Robert, Gilles

    2010-10-01

    Direct measurements of the wavenumber-frequency spectrum of wall pressure fluctuations beneath a turbulent plane channel flow have been performed in an anechoic wind tunnel. A rotative array has been designed that allows the measurement of a complete map, 63×63 measuring points, of cross-power spectral densities over a large area. An original post-processing has been developed to separate the acoustic and the aerodynamic exciting loadings by transforming space-frequency data into wavenumber-frequency spectra. The acoustic part has also been estimated from a simple Corcos-like model including the contribution of a diffuse sound field. The measured acoustic contribution to the surface pressure fluctuations is 5% of the measured aerodynamic surface pressure fluctuations for a velocity and boundary layer thickness relevant for automotive interior noise applications. This shows that for aerodynamically induced car interior noise, both contributions to the surface pressure fluctuations on car windows have to be taken into account.

  9. High pressure injection injuries: an overview.

    PubMed

    Fialkov, J A; Freiberg, A

    1991-01-01

    Injuries resulting from the use of high pressure injectors and spray guns are relatively rare; however, the potential tissue damage caused by the injury as well as the extent of the injury itself may go unrecognized by the primary physician. The purpose of this paper is to inform the emergency physician of the nature and standard management of this type of injury. A basic understanding of the pathophysiology of the high pressure injection injury (HPII) is essential in avoiding the mistakes in management that have been reported in the literature. The emergency management of the HPII includes: evaluation and immobilization, tetanus and antimicrobial prophylaxis, supportive and resuscitative measures, analgesia, and minimizing the time to definitive surgical treatment.

  10. Novel chemistry of matter under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Maosheng

    2015-03-01

    The periodicity of the elements and the non-reactivity of the inner-shell electrons are two related principles of chemistry, rooted in the atomic shell structure. Within compounds, Group I elements, for example, invariably assume the +1 oxidation state, and their chemical properties differ completely from those of the p-block elements. These general rules govern our understanding of chemical structures and reactions. Using first principles calculations, we demonstrate that under high pressure, the above doctrines can be broken. We show that both the inner shell electrons and the outer shell empty orbitals of Cs and other elements can involve in chemical reactions. Furthermore, we show that the quantized orbitals of the enclosed interstitial space may play the same role as atomic orbitals, an unprecedented view that led us to a unified theory for the recently observed high-pressure electride phenomenon.

  11. Cavity closure arrangement for high pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Amtmann, Hans H.

    1981-01-01

    A closure arrangement for a pressure vessel such as the pressure vessel of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor wherein a liner is disposed within a cavity penetration in the reactor vessel and defines an access opening therein. A closure is adapted for sealing relation with an annular mounting flange formed on the penetration liner and has a plurality of radially movable locking blocks thereon having outer serrations adapted for releasable interlocking engagement with serrations formed internally of the upper end of the penetration liner so as to effect high strength closure hold-down. In one embodiment, ramping surfaces are formed on the locking block serrations to bias the closure into sealed relation with the mounting flange when the locking blocks are actuated to locking positions.

  12. Determination of pressure from measured Raman frequency shifts of anhydrite and its application in fluid inclusions and HDAC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xueyin; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Zheng, Haifei

    2016-12-01

    A new geobarometry was derived from the quantified relationships among Raman vibrational frequencies of anhydrite, pressure and temperature, as determined from in-situ micro-Raman spectroscopy of natural anhydrite crystals measured at p-T conditions up to 560 °C and 1400 MPa by using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC). With this geobarometry, the pressure in HDAC experiments and in anhydrite-bearing fluid inclusions can be determined directly from the ν1, 1016, ν3, 1128 and ν3, 1160 Raman frequency shifts of anhydrite at high p-T conditions relative to their values measured at ambient conditions. The pressure can be determined to an accuracy of better than 30 MPa based on the attainable accuracy of ±0.1 cm-1 for the fitted ν1 Raman peak positions, provided the measured spectra are calibrated using the emission peak of an external fluorescent light source. The feasibility and reliability of this geobarometry were verified by rebuilding the p-T history of two fluid inclusions from the ν1 frequency shifts of anhydrite daughter minerals from room to high temperatures, and by measuring the phase-transition pressures of calcite-CaCO3(II)-CaCO3(III) sequence at ambient temperature in a HDAC experiment using anhydrite as a Raman pressure sensor.

  13. Modeling High Pressure Micro Hollow Cathode Discharges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    calculations in glow discharge in argon and neon . A Monte Carlo simulation of the ions and Grant 033083 – Final report 7 the fast neutrals generated...in high pressure xenon or in rare gas mixtures containing xenon are of interest in the context of UV and VUV generation. Numerical experiments on...The shape of the calculated characteristic is similar to those measured by Schoenbach et al1 in argon and by Moselhy and Schoenbach9 in xenon . There

  14. Small, high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.; Warren, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    A high pressure, low capacity, liquid hydrogen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested. The design configuration of the turbopump is summarized and the results of the analytical and test efforts are presented. Approaches used to pin point the cause of poor suction performance with the original design are described and performance data are included with an axial inlet design which results in excellent suction capability.

  15. Frequency components of systolic blood pressure variability reflect vasomotor and cardiac sympathetic functions in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Takahiko; Eguchi, Kunihiro; Sakurai, Hiroki; Ohmichi, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Tatsuyuki; Ohmichi, Mika; Morimoto, Atsuko; Yamaguchi, Yoshiko; Ushida, Takahiro; Iwase, Satoshi; Sugenoya, Junichi; Kumazawa, Takao

    2011-09-01

    In this study, after confirming the suppression of autonomic nervous function by isoflurane anesthesia using autonomic antagonists, we pharmacologically investigated the involvement of vasomotor and cardiac sympathetic functions in systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) frequency components in conscious rats at rest and during exposure to low-ambient temperature (LT-exposure, 9°C for 90 min). Under unanesthesia, phentolamine administration (α-adrenoceptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg) decreased the mid-frequency component (MF 0.33-0.73 Hz) and inversely increased the high-frequency component (HF 1.3-2.5 Hz). The increased HF was suppressed by subsequent treatment with atenolol (β-adrenoceptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg), but not with atropine (muscarinic receptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg). Moreover, phentolamine administration after atenolol decreased MF, but did not increase HF. LT-exposure increased MF and HF; however, phentolamine pretreatment suppressed the increased MF during LT-exposure, and atenolol pretreatment dose-dependently decreased the increased HF. These results suggest that MF and HF of SBPV may reflect α-adrenoceptor-mediated vasomotor function and β-adrenoceptor-mediated cardiac sympathetic function, respectively, in the conscious state.

  16. Analytical model of atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive Penning discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric and near-atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive discharges have wide applications. An analytic equilibrium solution is developed based on a homogeneous, current-driven discharge model that includes sheath and electron multiplication effects and contains two electron populations. A simplified chemistry is used with four unknown densities: hot electrons, warm electrons, positive ions and metastables. The dominant electron-ion pair production is Penning ionization, and the dominant ion losses are to the walls. The equilibrium particle balances are used to determine a single ionization balance equation for the warm electron temperature, which is solved, both approximately within the α- and γ-modes, and exactly by conventional root-finding techniques. All other discharge parameters are found, the extinction and α-γ transitions are determined, and a similarity law is given, in which the equilibrium for a short gap at high pressure can be rescaled to a longer gap at lower pressure. Within the α-mode, we find the scaling of the discharge parameters with current density, frequency, gas density and gap width. The analytic results are compared to hybrid and particle-in-cell (PIC) results for He/0.1%N2, and to hybrid results for He/0.1%H2O. For nitrogen, a full reaction set is used for the hybrid calculations and a simplified reaction set for the PIC simulations. For the chemically complex water trace gas, a set of 209 reactions among 43 species is used. The analytic results are found to be in reasonably good agreement with the more elaborate hybrid and PIC calculations.

  17. 7 CFR 58.219 - High pressure pumps and lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High pressure pumps and lines. 58.219 Section 58.219....219 High pressure pumps and lines. High pressure lines may be cleaned-in-place and shall be of such construction that dead ends, valves and the high pressure pumps can be disassembled for hand cleaning. The...

  18. 7 CFR 58.219 - High pressure pumps and lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High pressure pumps and lines. 58.219 Section 58.219....219 High pressure pumps and lines. High pressure lines may be cleaned-in-place and shall be of such construction that dead ends, valves and the high pressure pumps can be disassembled for hand cleaning. The...

  19. Engine having a high pressure hydraulic system and low pressure lubricating system

    DOEpatents

    Bartley, Bradley E.; Blass, James R.; Gibson, Dennis H.

    2000-01-01

    An engine includes a high pressure hydraulic system having a high pressure pump and at least one hydraulically-actuated device attached to an engine housing. A low pressure engine lubricating system is attached to the engine housing and includes a circulation conduit fluidly connected to an outlet from the high pressure pump.

  20. Structures of xenon oxides at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worth, Nicholas; Pickard, Chris; Needs, Richard; Dewaele, Agnes; Loubeyre, Paul; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-03-01

    For many years, it was believed that noble gases such as xenon were entirely inert. It was only in 1962 that Bartlett first synthesized a compound of xenon. Since then, a number of other xenon compounds, including oxides, have been synthesized. Xenon oxides are unstable under ambient conditions but have been predicted to stabilize under high pressure. Here we present the results of a combined theoretical and experimental study of xenon oxides at pressures of 80-100 GPa. We have synthesized new xenon oxides at these pressures and they have been characterized with X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Calculations were performed with a density-functional theory framework. We have used the ab-initio random structure searching (AIRSS) method together with a data-mining technique to determine the stable compounds in the xenon-oxygen system in this pressure range. We have calculated structural and optical properties of these phases, and a good match between theoretical and experimental results has been obtained. Funding for computational research provided by the engineering and physical sciences research council (EPSRC; UK). Computing resources provided by Cambridge HPC and HECToR. X-ray diffraction experiments performed at ESRF.

  1. Amorphization of Serpentine at High Pressure and High Temperature

    PubMed

    Irifune; Kuroda; Funamori; Uchida; Yagi; Inoue; Miyajima

    1996-06-07

    Pressure-induced amorphization of serpentine was observed at temperatures of 200° to 300°C and pressures of 14 to 27 gigapascals with a combination of a multianvil apparatus and synchrotron radiation. High-pressure phases then crystallized rapidly when the temperature was increased to 400°C. These results suggest that amorphization of serpentine is an unlikely mechanism for generating deep-focus earthquakes, as the temperatures of subducting slabs are significantly higher than those of the rapid crystallization regime.

  2. Dual-beam histotripsy: a low-frequency pump enabling a high-frequency probe for precise lesion formation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Duryea, Alexander P; Kim, Yohan; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2014-02-01

    Histotripsy produces tissue fractionation through dense energetic bubble clouds generated by short, high-pressure, ultrasound pulses. When using pulses shorter than 2 cycles, the generation of these energetic bubble clouds only depends on where the peak negative pressure (P-) exceeds the intrinsic threshold of the medium (26 to 30 MPa in soft tissue with high water content). This paper investigates a strategic method for precise lesion generation in which a low-frequency pump pulse is applied to enable a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse to exceed the intrinsic threshold. This pump-probe method of controlling a supra-threshold volume can be called dual-beam histotripsy. A 20-element dual-frequency (500-kHz and 3-MHz elements confocally aligned) array transducer was used to generate dual-beam histotripsy pulses in red blood cell phantoms and porcine hepatic tissue specimens. The results showed that when sub-intrinsic-threshold pump (500-kHz) and probe (3-MHz) pulses were applied together, dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were only generated when their peak negative pressures combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The smallest reproducible lesion varied with the relative amplitude between the pump and probe pulses, and, with a higher proportion of the probe pulse, smaller lesions could be generated. When the propagation direction of the probe pulse relative to the pump pulse was altered, the shape of the produced lesion changed based on the region that exceeded intrinsic threshold. Because the low-frequency pump pulse is more immune to attenuation and aberrations, and the high-frequency probe pulse can provide precision in lesion formation, this dual-beam histotripsy approach would be very useful in situations in which precise lesion formation is required through a highly attenuative and aberrative medium, such as transcranial therapy. This is particularly true if a small low-attenuation acoustic window is available for the high-frequency

  3. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Vian, Alain; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio) optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber) and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc.) are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor), and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight) after low power (i.e., nonthermal) HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism. PMID:26981524

  4. Very high-pressure orogenic garnet peridotites

    PubMed Central

    Liou, J. G.; Zhang, R. Y.; Ernst, W. G.

    2007-01-01

    Mantle-derived garnet peridotites are a minor component in many very high-pressure metamorphic terranes that formed during continental subduction and collision. Some of these mantle rocks contain trace amounts of zircon and micrometer-sized inclusions. The constituent minerals exhibit pre- and postsubduction microstructures, including polymorphic transformation and mineral exsolution. Experimental, mineralogical, petrochemical, and geochronological characterizations using novel techniques with high spatial, temporal, and energy resolutions are resulting in unexpected discoveries of new phases, providing better constraints on deep mantle processes. PMID:17519341

  5. Sulfidation kinetics of dolomite at high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Misro, S.K.; Jadhav, R.; Gupta, H.; Agnihotri, R.; Chauk, S.; Fan, L.S.

    1999-07-01

    Kinetic studies of the dolomite sulfidation reaction are carried out at high pressure (15 atm) and high temperature (600--900 C) in a differential bed flow-through reactor. The dolomite particles are exposed to simulated coal gas environments and the extent of conversion determined. Experiments are carried out to determine the influence of total pressure, reaction temperature and partial pressure of H{sub 2}S on the extent of fully calcined dolomite (FCD) sulfidation. Based on the grain theory it is found that towards the later stages of the reaction the FCD sulfidation is product layer diffusion controlled. The reaction is found to be first order with respect to H{sub 2}S partial pressure. A low apparent activation energy of 4.6 kcal/gmol for the product layer diffusion controlled reaction is attributed to the presence of porous MgO along with the low porosity CaS product layer. A comparison of the performance of dolomite and limestone as sorbents for desulfurization shows that dolomite is a better sorbent with higher conversions even at higher CO{sub 2} partial pressures. The high pressure sulfidation kinetic data obtained in this study would be useful in understanding and optimizing the in-gasifier H{sub 2}S capture using dolomite sorbents.

  6. The Generation of Pressure Waves by the Implosion of Light Bulbs in a High-Pressure Water Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, C.; Czechanowski, M.; Duncan, J. H.

    2007-11-01

    The implosion of light bulbs in a high-pressure water environment was studied experimentally in a nearly spherical implosion tank with a nominal internal diameter of 1.77 m. During an experimental run, the light bulb was tethered in the center of the tank which was then filled with water and slowly pressurized by adding nitrogen gas into a small ullage above the water. The gas pressure in the ullage was measured with a slow response transducer and the high-frequency pressure waves in the water were recorded at 14 positions in the tank with underwater blast sensors. The motion of the light bulb was recorded with a high-speed digital movie camera. The implosions occurred at ambient pressures (Pa) ranging from 6.1 bar to 11.6 bar. The collapse times of the light bulbs were found to be about 1.3 times the theoretical collapse time of a spherical bubble at the same ambient pressure and with the same radius as the light bulb. The ratio of the peak pressure increase due to the pressure wave at a fixed distance (r) from the bubble to the ambient pressure at implosion ((P(r)-Pa)/Pa) increased from about 0.5 to 2.7 as the ambient pressure increased over the above-mentioned range.

  7. Dietary spermidine for lowering high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Abdellatif, Mahmoud; Zimmermann, Andreas; Schroeder, Sabrina; Pendl, Tobias; Harger, Alexandra; Stekovic, Slaven; Schipke, Julia; Magnes, Christoph; Schmidt, Albrecht; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Dammbrueck, Christopher; Gross, Angelina S; Herbst, Viktoria; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Pietrocola, Federico; Pieber, Thomas R; Sigrist, Stephan J; Linke, Wolfgang A; Mühlfeld, Christian; Sadoshima, Junichi; Dengjel, Joern; Kiechl, Stefan; Kroemer, Guido; Sedej, Simon; Madeo, Frank

    2017-01-24

    Loss of cardiac macroautophagy/autophagy impairs heart function, and evidence accumulates that an increased autophagic flux may protect against cardiovascular disease. We therefore tested the protective capacity of the natural autophagy inducer spermidine in animal models of aging and hypertension, which both represent major risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease. Dietary spermidine elicits cardioprotective effects in aged mice through enhancing cardiac autophagy and mitophagy. In salt-sensitive rats, spermidine supplementation also delays the development of hypertensive heart disease, coinciding with reduced arterial blood pressure. The high blood pressure-lowering effect likely results from improved global arginine bioavailability and protection from hypertension-associated renal damage. The polyamine spermidine is naturally present in human diets, though to a varying amount depending on food type and preparation. In humans, high dietary spermidine intake correlates with reduced blood pressure and decreased risk of cardiovascular disease and related death. Altogether, spermidine represents a cardio- and vascular-protective autophagy inducer that can be readily integrated in common diets.

  8. Dissociation of methane under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guoying; Oganov, Artem R; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Hui; Li, Peifang; Li, Yinwei; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Zou, Guangtian

    2010-10-14

    Methane is an extremely important energy source with a great abundance in nature and plays a significant role in planetary physics, being one of the major constituents of giant planets Uranus and Neptune. The stable crystal forms of methane under extreme conditions are of great fundamental interest. Using the ab initio evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction, we found three novel insulating molecular structures with P2(1)2(1)2(1), Pnma, and Cmcm space groups. Remarkably, under high pressure, methane becomes unstable and dissociates into ethane (C(2)H(6)) at 95 GPa, butane (C(4)H(10)) at 158 GPa, and further, carbon (diamond) and hydrogen above 287 GPa at zero temperature. We have computed the pressure-temperature phase diagram, which sheds light into the seemingly conflicting observations of the unusually low formation pressure of diamond at high temperature and the failure of experimental observation of dissociation at room temperature. Our results support the idea of diamond formation in the interiors of giant planets such as Neptune.

  9. Dietary spermidine for lowering high blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Andreas; Schroeder, Sabrina; Pendl, Tobias; Harger, Alexandra; Stekovic, Slaven; Schipke, Julia; Magnes, Christoph; Schmidt, Albrecht; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Dammbrueck, Christopher; Gross, Angelina S; Herbst, Viktoria; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Pietrocola, Federico; Pieber, Thomas R; Sigrist, Stephan J; Linke, Wolfgang A; Mühlfeld, Christian; Sadoshima, Junichi; Dengjel, Joern; Kiechl, Stefan; Kroemer, Guido; Sedej, Simon; Madeo, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Loss of cardiac macroautophagy/autophagy impairs heart function, and evidence accumulates that an increased autophagic flux may protect against cardiovascular disease. We therefore tested the protective capacity of the natural autophagy inducer spermidine in animal models of aging and hypertension, which both represent major risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease. Dietary spermidine elicits cardioprotective effects in aged mice through enhancing cardiac autophagy and mitophagy. In salt-sensitive rats, spermidine supplementation also delays the development of hypertensive heart disease, coinciding with reduced arterial blood pressure. The high blood pressure-lowering effect likely results from improved global arginine bioavailability and protection from hypertension-associated renal damage. The polyamine spermidine is naturally present in human diets, though to a varying amount depending on food type and preparation. In humans, high dietary spermidine intake correlates with reduced blood pressure and decreased risk of cardiovascular disease and related death. Altogether, spermidine represents a cardio- and vascular-protective autophagy inducer that can be readily integrated in common diets. PMID:28118075

  10. Filament wound pressure vessels - Effects of using liner tooling of low pressure vessels for high pressure vessels development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Krishna M.

    High performance pressure vessels have been recently demanded for aerospace and defense applications. Filament wound pressure vessels consist of a metallic thin liner, which also acts as a mandrel, and composite/epoxy overwrap. Graphite/epoxy overwrapped vessels have been developed to obtain the performance ratio, PV/W, as high as one million inches. Under very high pressure the isotropic metallic liner deforms elasto-plastically, and orthotropic composite fibers deform elastically. Sometimes, for the development of ultra high pressure vessels, composite pressure vessels industry uses the existing liner tooling developed for low burst pressure capacity composite vessels. This work presents the effects of various design variables including the low pressure liner tooling for the development of the high burst pressure capacity Brilliant Pebbles helium tanks. Advance stress analysis and development of an ultra high pressure helium tank.

  11. Interaction between pulsed discharge and radio frequency discharge burst at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Ying; Shi, Yuncheng; Zhang, Jing; Shi, J. J.

    2015-08-15

    The atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APGD) with dual excitations in terms of pulsed voltage and pulse-modulation radio frequency (rf) power are studied experimentally between two parallel plates electrodes. Pulse-modulation applied in rf APGD temporally separates the discharge into repetitive discharge bursts, between which the high voltage pulses are introduced to ignite sub-microsecond pulsed discharge. The discharge characteristics and spatio-temporal evolution are investigated by means of current voltage characteristics and time resolved imaging, which suggests that the introduced pulsed discharge assists the ignition of rf discharge burst and reduces the maintain voltage of rf discharge burst. Furtherly, the time instant of pulsed discharge between rf discharge bursts is manipulated to study the ignition dynamics of rf discharge burst.

  12. Effect of water vapor on sound absorption in nitrogen at low frequency/pressure ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Griffin, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    Sound absorption measurements were made in N2-H2O binary mixtures at 297 K over the frequency/pressure range f/P of 0.1-2500 Hz/atm to investigate the vibrational relaxation peak of N2 and its location on f/P axis as a function of humidity. At low humidities the best fit to a linear relationship between the f/P(max) and humidity yields an intercept of 0.013 Hz/atm and a slope of 20,000 Hz/atm-mole fraction. The reaction rate constants derived from this model are lower than those obtained from the extrapolation of previous high-temperature data.

  13. The electron heating mode transition by the change of driving frequency in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung Yeol; Verboncoeur, John; Lee, Hae June

    2016-09-01

    Over the past twenty years, micro plasma technology including dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) brought great enhancement of stable and high density plasma sources in atmospheric pressure environment. However, the experimental diagnostics are difficult to use in atmospheric pressure micro plasmas, and thus the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation is a good tool to investigate the nonlinear and kinetic effects of the plasma dynamics. In this study, PIC simulation results show that time-dependent parameters compare well with theoretical estimates like energy diffusion theory in the RF frequency ranges up to 500 MHz in atmospheric pressure plasmas for a set of controllable input parameters. Here, alpha-gamma heating mode transition is observed when the driving frequency matches the maximum of energy relaxation frequency by electron impact excitation. The inflection point in a semi-log scaled electron energy probability function (EEPF) is also explained by energy diffusion theory, which corresponds to a transition point of heating mode. Moreover, it was found that extra results in low gas pressure have the same solution at lower input frequency. For this reason, temporal differential term generates non-stationary EEPF in a specific energy range in Boltzmann kinetics.

  14. Continuous-wave far-infrared ESR spectrometer for high-pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Náfrádi, Bálint; Gaál, Richárd; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Fehér, Titusz; Forró, László

    2008-12-01

    We present a newly-developed microwave probe for performing sensitive high-field/multi-frequency electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements under high hydrostatic pressures. The system consists of a BeCu-made pressure-resistant vessel, which accommodates the investigated sample and a diamond microwave coupling window. The probe's interior is completely filled with a pressure-transmitting fluid. The setup operates in reflection mode and can easily be assembled with a standard oversized microwave circuitry. The probe-head withstands hydrostatic pressures up to 1.6 GPa and interfaces with our home-built quasi-optical high-field ESR facility, operating in a millimeter/submillimeter frequency range of 105-420 GHz and in magnetic fields up to 16 T. The overall performance of the probe was tested, while studying the pressure-induced changes in the spin-relaxation mechanisms of a quasi-1D conducting polymer, KC(60). The preliminary measurements revealed that the probe yields similar signal-to-noise ratio to that of commercially available low-frequency ESR spectrometers. Moreover, by observing the conduction electron spin resonance (CESR) linewidth broadening for KC(60) in an unprecedented microwave frequency range of 210-420 GHz and in the pressure range of up to 1.6 GPa, we demonstrate that a combination of high-pressure ESR probe and high-field/multi-frequency spectrometer allows us to measure the spin relaxation rates in conducting spin systems, like the quasi-1D conductor, KC(60).

  15. High stored energy of metallic glasses induced by high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Yang, Z. Z.; Ma, T.; Sun, Y. T.; Yin, Y. Y.; Gong, Y.; Gu, L.; Wen, P.; Zhu, P. W.; Long, Y. W.; Yu, X. H.; Jin, C. Q.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2017-03-01

    Modulating energy states of metallic glasses (MGs) is significant in understanding the nature of glasses and controlling their properties. In this study, we show that high stored energy can be achieved and preserved in bulk MGs by high pressure (HP) annealing, which is a controllable method to continuously alter the energy states of MGs. Contrary to the decrease in enthalpy by conventional annealing at ambient pressure, high stored energy can occur and be enhanced by increasing both annealing temperature and pressure. By using double aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, it is revealed that the preserved high energy, which is attributed to the coupling effect of high pressure and high temperature, originates from the microstructural change that involves "negative flow units" with a higher atomic packing density compared to that of the elastic matrix of MGs. The results demonstrate that HP-annealing is an effective way to activate MGs into higher energy states, and it may assist in understanding the microstructural origin of high energy states in MGs.

  16. Effects of tissue stiffness, ultrasound frequency, and pressure on histotripsy-induced cavitation bubble behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew T.; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-03-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50 µm. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness cause a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest.

  17. High Frequency Monitoring System of Groundwater Level in Sheliao

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Chia, Y.; Chuang, P.

    2012-12-01

    Long-term groundwater monitoring had been executed since 1950s in Taiwan. In 1980s, with improving technology, various types of automatic reorders of groundwater level had become the most widely used equipment in groundwater monitoring. Among these devices, submersible pressure transducer is frequently selected to monitor groundwater level for its high frequency and high resolution. In this study, it is chosen to monitor groundwater level change in Sheliao well. On the other hand, factors which might influence the performance of recorded data were excluded in the early stage of establishment as well. And the final approach is to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the minor groundwater level change of Sheliao well, and specify its connection between precipitation, atmosphere, earth tide and earthquake. The Shelia well is located in central Taiwan, constructed in an unconfined aquifer, recorded hourly groundwater level change since 1997. We tried to establish a 1 Hz sampling rate pressure-sensing system in 2011 June. The groundwater level was monitored in a resolution of 2-mm. According to the records, several small-scale of fluctuations were observed and were all correlate well to the earthquakes. However, during the time that no earthquake occurred, some short-term fluctuations were still occurred, performed in a different pattern to those induced by earthquakes. After further investigation, those anomalous fluctuations of groundwater level were found corresponded to precipitation quite well. The fluctuations were observed under some specific condition, which involving different range of accumulated precipitation, rainfall intensity, and rainfall duration. The result implied groundwater level in Sheliao well changes with loading effect result from runoff on the ground surface and infiltration. And the earth tide lead to regularly change was also observed. We conclude that Sheliao can be characterized as a partial-confined aquifer with high frequency and high

  18. 30 CFR 57.13021 - High-pressure hose connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false High-pressure hose connections. 57.13021... Air and Boilers § 57.13021 High-pressure hose connections. Except where automatic shutoff valves are...-pressure hose lines of 3/4-inch inside diameter or larger, and between high-pressure hose lines of...

  19. 30 CFR 57.13021 - High-pressure hose connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false High-pressure hose connections. 57.13021... Air and Boilers § 57.13021 High-pressure hose connections. Except where automatic shutoff valves are...-pressure hose lines of 3/4-inch inside diameter or larger, and between high-pressure hose lines of...

  20. 30 CFR 57.13021 - High-pressure hose connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false High-pressure hose connections. 57.13021... Air and Boilers § 57.13021 High-pressure hose connections. Except where automatic shutoff valves are...-pressure hose lines of 3/4-inch inside diameter or larger, and between high-pressure hose lines of...

  1. 30 CFR 57.13021 - High-pressure hose connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false High-pressure hose connections. 57.13021... Air and Boilers § 57.13021 High-pressure hose connections. Except where automatic shutoff valves are...-pressure hose lines of 3/4-inch inside diameter or larger, and between high-pressure hose lines of...

  2. 30 CFR 57.13021 - High-pressure hose connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High-pressure hose connections. 57.13021... Air and Boilers § 57.13021 High-pressure hose connections. Except where automatic shutoff valves are...-pressure hose lines of 3/4-inch inside diameter or larger, and between high-pressure hose lines of...

  3. 7 CFR 58.219 - High pressure pumps and lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... pressure pump shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standard for Homogenizers and Pumps of the Plunger Type. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High pressure pumps and lines. 58.219 Section 58.219....219 High pressure pumps and lines. High pressure lines may be cleaned-in-place and shall be of...

  4. 7 CFR 58.219 - High pressure pumps and lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... pressure pump shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standard for Homogenizers and Pumps of the Plunger Type. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High pressure pumps and lines. 58.219 Section 58.219....219 High pressure pumps and lines. High pressure lines may be cleaned-in-place and shall be of...

  5. 7 CFR 58.219 - High pressure pumps and lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... pressure pump shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standard for Homogenizers and Pumps of the Plunger Type. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High pressure pumps and lines. 58.219 Section 58.219....219 High pressure pumps and lines. High pressure lines may be cleaned-in-place and shall be of...

  6. High Resolution and Large Dynamic Range Resonant Pressure Sensor Based on Q-Factor Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor); Stell, Christopher B. (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor); Vorperian, Vatche (Inventor); Wilcox, Jaroslava (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A pressure sensor has a high degree of accuracy over a wide range of pressures. Using a pressure sensor relying upon resonant oscillations to determine pressure, a driving circuit drives such a pressure sensor at resonance and tracks resonant frequency and amplitude shifts with changes in pressure. Pressure changes affect the Q-factor of the resonating portion of the pressure sensor. Such Q-factor changes are detected by the driving/sensing circuit which in turn tracks the changes in resonant frequency to maintain the pressure sensor at resonance. Changes in the Q-factor are reflected in changes of amplitude of the resonating pressure sensor. In response, upon sensing the changes in the amplitude, the driving circuit changes the force or strength of the electrostatic driving signal to maintain the resonator at constant amplitude. The amplitude of the driving signals become a direct measure of the changes in pressure as the operating characteristics of the resonator give rise to a linear response curve for the amplitude of the driving signal. Pressure change resolution is on the order of 10(exp -6) torr over a range spanning from 7,600 torr to 10(exp -6) torr. No temperature compensation for the pressure sensor of the present invention is foreseen. Power requirements for the pressure sensor are generally minimal due to the low-loss mechanical design of the resonating pressure sensor and the simple control electronics.

  7. Clinical Utilisation of High-frequency DPOAEs.

    PubMed

    Poling, Gayla; Lee, Jungmee; Siegel, Jonathan; Dhar, Sumitrajit

    2012-01-01

    The value of assessing auditory function at frequencies above 8kHz to detect age-related changes and ototoxic damage in the cochlea is well established but not commonplace. Physiological changes in the auditory periphery due to age and ototoxicity are initially evident, and most prominent, at frequencies above 8kHz [1]. The most well investigated use of hearing thresholds and otoacoustic emissions above 8kHz is in monitoring auditory function in patients undergoing chemotherapy [2]. Ototoxic changes in hearing thresholds at frequencies between 10-14kHz prior to the manifestation of any changes at lower frequencies have been consistently documented in these patients. Age-related changes in hearing also appear at frequencies above 8kHz prior to any observable changes at regular audiometric frequencies [3]. The value of using hearing thresholds at frequencies above 8kHz to detect noise-induced hearing loss is debated in the literature with some reports of hearing thresholds at frequencies above 8kHz demonstrating more sensitivity to noise-induced damage than others [4].

  8. High Frequency Electromagnetic Propagation/Scattering Codes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications , 77...Frequency Limiting, Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications , 77, 469-481 (1980). [12] Y.T. Lo, S.W. Lee, editors, Antenna Handbook, Theory...Widom, Eigenvalue Distribution of Time and Frequency Limiting, Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications , 77, 469-481 (1980). [20] D.

  9. High Pressure Microwave Powered UV Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekic, M.; Frank, J. D.; Popovic, S.; Wood, C. H.

    1997-10-01

    Industrial microwave powered (*electrodeless*) light sources have been limited to quiescent pressures of 300 Torr of buffer gas and metal- halide fills. Recently developed multi-atmospheric electronegative bu lb fills (noble gas-halide excimers, metal halide) require electric field s for ionization that are often large multiples of the breakdown voltage for air. For these fills an auxiliary ignition system is necessary. The most successful scheme utilizes a high voltage pulse power supply and a novel field emission source. Acting together they create localized condition of pressure reduction and high free electron density. This allows the normal microwave fields to drive this small region into avalanche, ignite the bulb, and heat the plasma to it's operating poin t Standard diagnostic techniques of high density discharges are inapplicable to the excimer bulbs, because of the ionic molecular exci ted state structure and absence of self-absorption. The method for temperature determination is based on the equilibrium population of certain vibrational levels of excimer ionic excited states. Electron d ensity was determined from the measurements of Stark profiles of H_β radiation from a small amount of hydrogen mixed with noble gas and halogens. At the present time, high pressure (Te 0.5eV, ne 3 x 10^17 cm-3) production bulbs produce over 900W of radiation in a 30nm band, centered at 30nm. Similarly, these prototypes when loaded with metal-halide bulb fills produce 1 kW of radiation in 30nm wide bands, centered about the wavelength of interest.

  10. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma-ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997.6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma-ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 deg of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 deg of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma-ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  11. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997-6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 degrees of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 degrees of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  12. A High Frequency Model of Cascade Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    1998-01-01

    Closed form asymptotic expressions for computing high frequency noise generated by an annular cascade in an infinite duct containing a uniform flow are presented. There are two new elements in this work. First, the annular duct mode representation does not rely on the often-used Bessel function expansion resulting in simpler expressions for both the radial eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the duct. In particular, the new representation provides an explicit approximate formula for the radial eigenvalues obviating the need for solutions of the transcendental annular duct eigenvalue equation. Also, the radial eigenfunctions are represented in terms of exponentials eliminating the numerical problems associated with generating the Bessel functions on a computer. The second new element is the construction of an unsteady response model for an annular cascade. The new construction satisfies the boundary conditions on both the cascade and duct walls simultaneously adding a new level of realism to the noise calculations. Preliminary results which demonstrate the effectiveness of the new elements are presented. A discussion of the utility of the asymptotic formulas for calculating cascade discrete tone as well as broadband noise is also included.

  13. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Mansfield, D.K.; Vocaturo, M.; Guttadora, L.J.

    1991-07-23

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH[sub 3]OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth. 10 figures.

  14. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Mansfield, Dennis K.; Vocaturo, Michael; Guttadora, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH.sub.3 OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth.

  15. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Operations § 192.621 Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems. (a) No person may operate a segment of a high pressure distribution system at a pressure that exceeds the... segment of a distribution system otherwise designed to operate at over 60 p.s.i. (414 kPa) gage,...

  16. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems. 192.621 Section 192.621 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... STANDARDS Operations § 192.621 Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems....

  17. High pressure phase transitions in lawsonite at simultaneous high pressure and temperature: A single crystal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bannon, E. F., III; Vennari, C.; Beavers, C. C. G.; Williams, Q. C.

    2015-12-01

    Lawsonite (CaAl2Si2O7(OH)2.H2O) is a hydrous mineral with a high overall water content of ~11.5 wt.%. It is a significant carrier of water in subduction zones to depths greater than ~150 km. The structure of lawsonite has been extensively studied under room temperature, high-pressure conditions. However, simultaneous high-pressure and high-temperature experiments are scarce. We have conducted synchrotron-based simultaneous high-pressure and temperature single crystal experiments on lawsonite up to a maximum pressure of 8.4 GPa at ambient and high temperatures. We used a natural sample of lawsonite from Valley Ford, California (Sonoma County). At room pressure and temperature lawsonite crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with Cmcm symmetry. Room temperature compression indicates that lawsonite remains in the orthorhombic Cmcm space group up to ~9.0 GPa. Our 5.0 GPa crystal structure is similar to the room pressure structure, and shows almost isotropic compression of the crystallographic axes. Unit cell parameters at 5.0 GPa are a- 5.7835(10), b- 8.694(2), and c- 13.009(3). Single-crystal measurements at simultaneous high-pressure and temperature (e.g., >8.0 GPa and ~100 oC) can be indexed to a monoclinic P-centered unit cell. Interestingly, a modest temperature increase of ~100 oC appears to initiate the orthorhombic to monoclinic phase transition at ~0.6-2.4 GPa lower than room temperature compression studies have shown. There is no evidence of dehydration or H atom disorder under these conditions. This suggests that the orthorhombic to monoclinic transition could be kinetically impeded at 298 K, and that monoclinic lawsonite could be the dominant water carrier through much of the depth range of upper mantle subduction processes.

  18. LHDAC setup for high temperature and high pressure studies

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Nishant N. Meenakshi, S. Sharma, Surinder M.

    2014-04-24

    A ytterbium fibre laser (λ = 1.07 μm) based laser heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) facility has been recently set up at HP and SRPD, BARC for simultaneous high temperature and high pressure investigation of material properties. Synthesis of GaN was carried out at pressure of ∼9 GPa and temperature of ∼1925 K in a Mao-Bell type diamond anvil cell (DAC) using the LHDAC facility. The retrieved sample has been characterized using our laboratory based micro Raman setup.

  19. High-pressure promoted combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor); Stoltzfus, Joel M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    In the preferred embodiment of the promoted combusiton chamber disclosed herein, a thick-walled tubular body that is capable of withstanding extreme pressures is arranged with removable upper and lower end closures to provide access to the chamber for dependently supporting a test sample of a material being evaluated in the chamber. To facilitate the real-time analysis of a test sample, several pressure-tight viewing ports capable of withstanding the simulated environmental conditions are arranged in the walls of the tubular body for observing the test sample during the course of the test. A replaceable heat-resistant tubular member and replaceable flame-resistant internal liners are arranged to be fitted inside of the chamber for protecting the interior wall surfaces of the combustion chamber during the evaluation tests. Inlet and outlet ports are provided for admitting high-pressure gases into the chamber as needed for performing dynamic analyses of the test sample during the course of an evaluation test.

  20. High-pressure transformations in xenon hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Sanloup, Chrystèle; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2002-01-01

    A high-pressure investigation of the Xe⋅H2O chemical system was conducted by using diamond-anvil cell techniques combined with in situ Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron x-ray diffraction, and laser heating. Structure I xenon clathrate was observed to be stable up to 1.8 GPa, at which pressure it transforms to a new Xe clathrate phase stable up to 2.5 GPa before breaking down to ice VII plus solid xenon. The bulk modulus and structure of both phases were determined: 9 ± 1 GPa for Xe clathrate A with structure I (cubic, a = 11.595 ± 0.003 Å, V = 1,558.9 ± 1.2 Å3 at 1.1 GPa) and 45 ± 5 GPa for Xe clathrate B (tetragonal, a = 8.320 ± 0.004 Å, c = 10.287 ± 0.007 Å, V = 712.1 ± 1.2 Å3 at 2.2 GPa). The extended pressure stability field of Xe clathrate structure I (A) and the discovery of a second Xe clathrate (B) above 1.8 GPa have implications for xenon in terrestrial and planetary interiors. PMID:11756690

  1. Conformable pressure vessel for high pressure gas storage

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Lavender, Curt A.; Newhouse, Norman L.; Yeggy, Brian C.

    2016-01-12

    A non-cylindrical pressure vessel storage tank is disclosed. The storage tank includes an internal structure. The internal structure is coupled to at least one wall of the storage tank. The internal structure shapes and internally supports the storage tank. The pressure vessel storage tank has a conformability of about 0.8 to about 1.0. The internal structure can be, but is not limited to, a Schwarz-P structure, an egg-crate shaped structure, or carbon fiber ligament structure.

  2. High blood pressure in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Riley, Margaret; Bluhm, Brian

    2012-04-01

    High blood pressure in children and adolescents is a growing health problem that is often overlooked by physicians. Normal blood pressure values for children and adolescents are based on age, sex, and height, and are available in standardized tables. Prehypertension is defined as a blood pressure in at least the 90th percentile, but less than the 95th percentile, for age, sex, and height, or a measurement of 120/80 mm Hg or greater. Hypertension is defined as blood pressure in the 95th percentile or greater. A secondary etiology of hypertension is much more likely in children than in adults, with renal parenchymal disease and renovascular disease being the most common. Overweight and obesity are strongly correlated with primary hypertension in children. A history and physical examination are needed for all children with newly diagnosed hypertension to help rule out underlying medical disorders. Children with hypertension should also be screened for other risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia, and should be evaluated for target organ damage with a retinal examination and echocardiography. Hypertension in children is treated with lifestyle changes, including weight loss for those who are overweight or obese; a healthy, low-sodium diet; regular physical activity; and avoidance of tobacco and alcohol. Children with symptomatic hypertension, secondary hypertension, target organ damage, diabetes, or persistent hypertension despite nonpharmacologic measures should be treated with antihypertensive medications. Thiazide diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta blockers, and calcium channel blockers are safe, effective, and well tolerated in children.

  3. Fibre Bragg gratings subject to high strain at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, D. A.

    2011-05-01

    A simple optical interrogation scheme based on an erbium doped fibre super-fluorescent source and a high Finesse Fabry Perot driven at effective frequencies of 20 kHz over ~ 60nm range is used to recover the output signals from Fibre Bragg Gratings (FBG) that can be deployed in a serial array. The FBG were modulated at frequencies up to 10 kHz and strains up to ~4000μstrain. These signals were recovered in the time domain with a very high bandwidth digital scope using a two dimensional waterfall display consisting of a number of segments where the time between segments is equal to the inverse of the system scanning frequency; essentially the sequential 'x' axis tick markers in a conventional x-y graph format. The amplitude induced changes in the wavelength of the FBG are converted to different times and observed as sequential horizontal scans along the time axis of the waterfall, correspond to the variations in the wavelength of the FBG (y axis). Signals from serial FBG arrays appear at different time slices on the time axis enabling near simultaneous determination of the induced strain of each grating.

  4. A picosecond high pressure gas switch

    SciTech Connect

    Cravey, W.R.; Poulsen, P.P.; Pincosy, P.A.

    1992-06-01

    Work is being done to develop a high pressure gas switch (HPGS) with picosecond risetimes for UWB applications. Pulse risetimes on the order of 200 picoseconds have been observed at 1 kHz prf and 1 atmosphere. Calculations show that switching closure times on the order of tens of picoseconds can be achieved at high pressures and higher electric fields. A voltage hold-off of 1 MV/cm has been measured at 10 atmospheres and several MV/cm appears possible with the HPGS. With these high electric field levels, energy storage of tens of Joules in a reasonably sized package is achievable. Initial HPGS performance has been characterized on the WASP pulse generator at LLNL. A detailed description of the switch used for initial testing is given. Switch recovery times of 1-ms have been measured at 1 atmosphere. Data on the switching uniformity, voltage hold-off recovery, and pulse repeatability, is presented. In addition, a physics switch model is described and results are compared with lab data.

  5. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTION KINETICS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Guenther, Ph.D.

    2003-01-28

    SRI has completed the NBFZ test program, made modification to the experimental furnace for the HPBO test. The NBFZ datasets provide the information NEA needs to simulate the combustion and fuel-N conversion with detailed chemical reaction mechanisms. BU has determined a linear swell of 1.55 corresponding to a volumetric increase of a factor of 3.7 and a decrease in char density by the same factor. These results are highly significant, and indicate significantly faster burnout at elevated pressure due to the low char density and large diameter.

  6. High-Pressure Oxygen Test Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.; Key, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    The relevance of impact sensitivity testing to the development of the space shuttle main engine is discussed in the light of the special requirements for the engine. The background and history of the evolution of liquid and gaseous oxygen testing techniques and philosophy is discussed also. The parameters critical to reliable testing are treated in considerable detail, and test apparatus and procedures are described and discussed. Materials threshold sensitivity determination procedures are considered and a decision logic diagram for sensitivity threshold determination was plotted. Finally, high-pressure materials sensitivity test data are given for selected metallic and nonmetallic materials.

  7. [Hypertensive urgency or high blood pressure variability?

    PubMed

    Rodionov, A V

    2017-01-01

    Hypertensive urgency (HU) is a common reason particularly for elderly patients to seek medical advice. Severe asymptomatic hypertension and situational high blood pressure (BP) in patients with its high variability is frequently taken as HU. The use of short-acting antihypertensive drugs is not only indicated in these situations, but it may also increase the risk of cardiovascular events (CVE). Over the past decade, increased BP variability is an independent predictor for a higher risk of CVE. Among the major groups of antihypertensive drugs, there are calcium antagonists, mainly amlodipine, which has the greatest potential to reduce BP variability. Thus, calcium antagonists can be considered as first-line drugs for patients with high BP variability.

  8. CDC Vital Signs: High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... the MMWR Science Clips High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Out of Control Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... cdc.gov/GISCVH2/ High Blood Pressure and High Cholesterol Among US Adults SOURCES: National Health and Nutrition ...

  9. Energy-Based Tetrahedron Sensor for High-Temperature, High-Pressure Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Kent L.; Sommerfeldt, Scott D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    An acoustic energy-based probe has been developed that incorporates multiple acoustic sensing elements in order to obtain the acoustic pressure and three-dimensional acoustic particle velocity. With these quantities, the user can obtain various energy-based quantities, including acoustic energy density, acoustic intensity, and acoustic impedance. In this specific development, the probe has been designed to operate in an environment characterized by high temperatures and high pressures as is found in the close vicinity of rocket plumes. Given these capabilities, the probe is designed to be used to investigate the acoustic conditions within the plume of a rocket engine or jet engine to facilitate greater understanding of the noise generation mechanisms in those plumes. The probe features sensors mounted inside a solid sphere. The associated electronics for the probe are contained within the sphere and the associated handle for the probe. More importantly, the design of the probe has desirable properties that reduce the bias errors associated with determining the acoustic pressure and velocity using finite sum and difference techniques. The diameter of the probe dictates the lower and upper operating frequencies for the probe, where accurate measurements can be acquired. The current probe design implements a sphere diameter of 1 in. (2.5 cm), which limits the upper operating frequency to about 4.5 kHz. The sensors are operational up to much higher frequencies, and could be used to acquire pressure data at higher frequencies, but the energy-based measurements are limited to that upper frequency. Larger or smaller spherical probes could be designed to go to lower or higher frequency range

  10. Frequency, pressure and strain dependence of nonlinear elasticity in Berea Sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Riviere, Jacques; Johnson, Paul Allan; Marone, Chris; Pimienta, Lucas; Scuderi, Marco; Candela, Thibault; Shokouhi, Parisa; Schubnel, Alexandre; Fortin, Jerome

    2016-04-14

    Acoustoelasticity measurements in a sample of room dry Berea sandstone are conducted at various loading frequencies to explore the transition between the quasi-static ( f → 0) and dynamic (few kilohertz) nonlinear elastic response. We carry out these measurements at multiple confining pressures and perform a multivariate regression analysis to quantify the dependence of the harmonic content on strain amplitude, frequency, and pressure. The modulus softening (equivalent to the harmonic at 0f) increases by a factor 2–3 over 3 orders of magnitude increase in frequency. Harmonics at 2f, 4f, and 6f exhibit similar behaviors. In contrast, the harmonic at 1f appears frequency independent. This result corroborates previous studies showing that the nonlinear elasticity of rocks can be described with a minimum of two physical mechanisms. This study provides quantitative data that describes the rate dependency of nonlinear elasticity. Furthermore, these findings can be used to improve theories relating the macroscopic elastic response to microstructural features.

  11. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Rob; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the power frequencies for the doubled fiber laser. It includes information on the 780 nm laser, second harmonic generation in one crystal, cascading crystals, the tenability of laser systems, laser cooling, and directions for future work.

  12. Method transfer from high-pressure liquid chromatography to ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography. II. Temperature and pressure effects.

    PubMed

    Åsberg, Dennis; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Leśko, Marek; Cavazzini, Alberto; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2015-07-03

    The importance of the generated temperature and pressure gradients in ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) are investigated and compared to high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The drug Omeprazole, together with three other model compounds (with different chemical characteristics, namely uncharged, positively and negatively charged) were used. Calculations of the complete temperature profile in the column at UHPLC conditions showed, in our experiments, a temperature difference between the inlet and outlet of 16 °C and a difference of 2 °C between the column center and the wall. Through van't Hoff plots, this information was used to single out the decrease in retention factor (k) solely due to the temperature gradient. The uncharged solute was least affected by temperature with a decrease in k of about 5% while for charged solutes the effect was more pronounced, with k decreases up to 14%. A pressure increase of 500 bar gave roughly 5% increase in k for the uncharged solute, while omeprazole and the other two charged solutes gave about 25, 20 and 15% increases in k, respectively. The stochastic model of chromatography was applied to estimate the dependence of the average number of adsorption/desorption events (n) and the average time spent by a molecule in the stationary phase (τs) on temperature and pressure on peak shape for the tailing, basic solute. Increasing the temperature yielded an increase in n and decrease in τs which resulted in less skew at high temperatures. With increasing pressure, the stochastic modeling gave interesting results for the basic solute showing that the skew of the peak increased with pressure. The conclusion is that pressure effects are more pronounced for both retention and peak shape than the temperature effects for the polar or charged compounds in our study.

  13. High-Frequency and Very-high-Frequency (HF&VHF) above-groundelectromagnetic impedance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frangos, William; Becker, Alex; Lee, K.H.

    2002-09-20

    We have field-tested an apparatus for measuring the electromagnetic impedance above the ground at a plurality of frequencies in the 0.3 - 30 MHz range. This window in the frequency spectrum, which lies between frequencies used for GPR and those used for conventional loop-loop EM soundings, has not been used because of difficulties in fielding equipment for making absolute and accurate measurements. Model and physical parameter studies however confirm that data in this frequency band can be used to construct high-resolution maps of electrical conductivity and permittivity of near-surface material. Our equipment was assembled using commercial electric and magnetic antennas. The magnetic loop source is excited by a conventional signal generator - power amplifier assembly. Signal detection is accomplished using RF lock-in amplifiers. All system elements are appropriately isolated by optic - fiber links. We estimate a measurement accuracy of about {+-} 10% for an 8-m separation between source and detector. Field tests were done at the University of California Richmond Field Station where the near surface electrical structure is well known. The experimental data at this site are mainly a function of electrical conductivity. In this context, we have obtained good agreement with the known local variations in resistivity both with depth and with position along a 35-m traverse. Additional tests in more resistive regimes where dielectric permittivity is not negligible yield spectral data compatible with the less well known near-surface electrical properties.

  14. High-pressure coal fuel processor development

    SciTech Connect

    Greenhalgh, M.L.

    1992-11-01

    The objective of Subtask 1.1 Engine Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of ignition and stable combustion of directly injected, 3,000 psi, low-Btu gas with glow plug ignition assist at diesel engine compression ratios. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the combustion performance of synthesized low-Btu coal gas in a single-cylinder test engine combustion rig located at the Caterpillar Technical Center engine lab in Mossville, Illinois. The objective of Subtask 1.2 Fuel Processor Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of air-blown, fixed-bed, high-pressure coal fuel processing at up to 3,000 psi operating pressure, incorporating in-bed sulfur and particulate capture. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the performance of bench-scale processors located at Coal Technology Corporation (subcontractor) facilities in Bristol, Virginia. These two subtasks were carried out at widely separated locations and will be discussed in separate sections of this report. They were, however, independent in that the composition of the synthetic coal gas used to fuel the combustion rig was adjusted to reflect the range of exit gas compositions being produced on the fuel processor rig. Two major conclusions resulted from this task. First, direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize these low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risks associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept.

  15. High blood pressure and visual sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, Alvin; Samples, John R.

    2003-09-01

    The study had two main purposes: (1) to determine whether the foveal visual sensitivities of people treated for high blood pressure (vascular hypertension) differ from the sensitivities of people who have not been diagnosed with high blood pressure and (2) to understand how visual adaptation is related to standard measures of systemic cardiovascular function. Two groups of middle-aged subjects-hypertensive and normotensive-were examined with a series of test/background stimulus combinations. All subjects met rigorous inclusion criteria for excellent ocular health. Although the visual sensitivities of the two subject groups overlapped extensively, the age-related rate of sensitivity loss was, for some measures, greater for the hypertensive subjects, possibly because of adaptation differences between the two groups. Overall, the degree of steady-state sensitivity loss resulting from an increase of background illuminance (for 580-nm backgrounds) was slightly less for the hypertensive subjects. Among normotensive subjects, the ability of a bright (3.8-log-td), long-wavelength (640-nm) adapting background to selectively suppress the flicker response of long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cones was related inversely to the ratio of mean arterial blood pressure to heart rate. The degree of selective suppression was also related to heart rate alone, and there was evidence that short-term changes of cardiovascular response were important. The results suggest that (1) vascular hypertension, or possibly its treatment, subtly affects visual function even in the absence of eye disease and (2) changes in blood flow affect retinal light-adaptation processes involved in the selective suppression of the flicker response from LWS cones caused by bright, long-wavelength backgrounds.

  16. Direct frequency comb spectroscopy and high-resolution coherent control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stowe, Matthew C.

    We present the first experiments demonstrating absolute frequency measurements of one- and two-photon transitions using direct frequency comb spectroscopy (DFCS). In particular we phase stabilized the inter-pulse period and optical phases of the pulses emitted from a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser, creating a broad-bandwidth optical frequency comb. By referencing the optical comb directly to the cesium microwave frequency standard, we were able to measure absolute transition frequencies over greater than a 50 nm bandwidth, utilizing the phase coherence between wavelengths spanning from 741 nm to 795 nm. As an initial demonstration of DFCS we studied transitions from the 5S to 5P, 5D, and 7S states in Rb. To reduce Doppler broadening the atoms were laser cooled in a magneto-optical trap. We present an overview of several systematic error sources that perturb the natural transition frequencies, magnitudes, and linewidths. These include radiation pressure from the probe beam, AC-Stark shifts, Zeeman shifts, power-broadening, and incoherent optical pumping. After careful study and suppression of these systematic error sources, we measured transition linewidths as narrow as 1.1 MHz FWHM and 10 kHz linecenter uncertainties. Our measurements of the 5S to 7S two-photon transition frequency demonstrated the ability to determine the comb mode order numbers when the initial transition frequency is not known to better than the comb mode frequency spacing. By modifying the spectral phase of the pulses we demonstrated high-resolution coherent control. Our first coherent control experiment utilized a grating based pulse stretcher/compressor to apply a large chirp to the pulses. We measured the two-photon transition rate as a function of linear frequency chirp. The results illustrate the differences between similar classic coherent experiments done with a single femtosecond pulse and ours conducted with multiple pulses. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to reduce the two

  17. Simulation study of high-frequency energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao Ido, Takeshi; Osakabe, Masaki; Todo, Yasushi

    2015-09-15

    High-frequency energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAM) observed in the large helical device plasmas are investigated using a hybrid simulation code for energetic particles and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Energetic particle inertia is incorporated in the MHD momentum equation for the simulation where the beam ion density is comparable to the bulk plasma density. Bump-on-tail type beam ion velocity distribution created by slowing down and charge exchange is considered. It is demonstrated that EGAMs have frequencies higher than the geodesic acoustic modes and the dependence on bulk plasma temperature is weak if (1) energetic particle density is comparable to the bulk plasma density and (2) charge exchange time (τ{sub cx}) is sufficiently shorter than the slowing down time (τ{sub s}) to create a bump-on-tail type distribution. The frequency of high-frequency EGAM rises as the energetic particle pressure increases under the condition of high energetic particle pressure. The frequency also increases as the energetic particle pitch angle distribution shifts to higher transit frequency. It is found that there are two kinds of particles resonant with EGAM: (1) trapped particles and (2) passing particles with transit frequency close to the mode frequency. The EGAMs investigated in this work are destabilized primarily by the passing particles whose transit frequencies are close to the EGAM frequency.

  18. High Pressure Hydrogen from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Typical approximations employed in first-principles simulations of high-pressure hydrogen involve the neglect of nuclear quantum effects (NQE) and the approximate treatment of electronic exchange and correlation, typically through a density functional theory (DFT) formulation. In this talk I'll present a detailed analysis of the influence of these approximations on the phase diagram of high-pressure hydrogen, with the goal of identifying the predictive capabilities of current methods and, at the same time, making accurate predictions in this important regime. We use a path integral formulation combined with density functional theory, which allows us to incorporate NQEs in a direct and controllable way. In addition, we use state-of-the-art quantum Monte Carlo calculations to benchmark the accuracy of more approximate mean-field electronic structure calculations based on DFT, and we use GW and hybrid DFT to calculate the optical properties of the solid and liquid phases near metallization. We present accurate predictions of the metal-insulator transition on the solid, including structural and optical properties of the molecular phase. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by LDRD Grant No. 13-LW-004.

  19. Pressure Distribution Over Airfoils at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, L J; Dryden, H L

    1927-01-01

    This report deals with the pressure distribution over airfoils at high speeds, and describes an extension of an investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of certain airfoils which was presented in NACA Technical Report no. 207. The results presented in report no. 207 have been confirmed and extended to higher speeds through a more extensive and systematic series of tests. Observations were also made of the air flow near the surface of the airfoils, and the large changes in lift coefficients were shown to be associated with a sudden breaking away of the flow from the upper surface. The tests were made on models of 1-inch chord and comparison with the earlier measurements on models of 3-inch chord shows that the sudden change in the lift coefficient is due to compressibility and not to a change in the Reynolds number. The Reynolds number still has a large effect, however, on the drag coefficient. The pressure distribution observations furnish the propeller designer with data on the load distribution at high speeds, and also give a better picture of the air-flow changes.

  20. High pressure-resistant nonincendive emulsion explosive

    DOEpatents

    Ruhe, Thomas C.; Rao, Pilaka P.

    1994-01-01

    An improved emulsion explosive composition including hollow microspheres/bulking agents having high density and high strength. The hollow microspheres/bulking agents have true particle densities of about 0.2 grams per cubic centimeter or greater and include glass, siliceous, ceramic and synthetic resin microspheres, expanded minerals, and mixtures thereof. The preferred weight percentage of hollow microspheres/bulking agents in the composition ranges from 3.0 to 10.0 A chlorinated paraffin oil, also present in the improved emulsion explosive composition, imparts a higher film strength to the oil phase in the emulsion. The emulsion is rendered nonincendive by the production of sodium chloride in situ via the decomposition of sodium nitrate, a chlorinated paraffin oil, and sodium perchlorate. The air-gap sensitivity is improved by the in situ formation of monomethylamine perchlorate from dissolved monomethylamine nitrate and sodium perchlorate. The emulsion explosive composition can withstand static pressures to 139 bars and dynamic pressure loads on the order of 567 bars.

  1. Stable magnesium peroxide at high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Lobanov, Sergey S.; Zhu, Qiang; Holtgrewe, Nicholas; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Oganov, Artem R.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    Rocky planets are thought to comprise compounds of Mg and O as these are among the most abundant elements, but knowledge of their stable phases may be incomplete. MgO is known to be remarkably stable to very high pressure and chemically inert under reduced condition of the Earth’s lower mantle. However, in exoplanets oxygen may be a more abundant constituent. Here, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction in laser-heated diamond anvil cells, we show that MgO and oxygen react at pressures above 96 GPa and T = 2150 K with the formation of I4/mcm MgO2. Raman spectroscopy detects the presence of a peroxide ion (O22−) in the synthesized material as well as in the recovered specimen. Likewise, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy confirms that the recovered sample has higher oxygen content than pure MgO. Our finding suggests that MgO2 may be present together or instead of MgO in rocky mantles and rocky planetary cores under highly oxidized conditions. PMID:26323635

  2. Stable Lithium Argon compounds under high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofeng; Hermann, Andreas; Peng, Feng; Lv, Jian; Wang, Yanchao; Wang, Hui; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    High pressure can fundamentally alter the bonding patterns of chemical elements. Its effects include stimulating elements thought to be “inactive” to form unexpectedly stable compounds with unusual chemical and physical properties. Here, using an unbiased structure search method based on CALYPSO methodology and density functional total energy calculations, the phase stabilities and crystal structures of Li−Ar compounds are systematically investigated at high pressure up to 300 GPa. Two unexpected LimArn compounds (LiAr and Li3Ar) are predicted to be stable above 112 GPa and 119 GPa, respectively. A detailed analysis of the electronic structure of LiAr and Li3Ar shows that Ar in these compounds attracts electrons and thus behaves as an oxidizing agent. This is markedly different from the hitherto established chemical reactivity of Ar. Moreover, we predict that the P4/mmm phase of Li3Ar has a superconducting transition temperature of 17.6 K at 120 GPa. PMID:26582083

  3. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  4. Synthesis of sodium polyhydrides at high pressures

    DOE PAGES

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kim, Duck Young; Stavrou, Elissaios; ...

    2016-07-28

    Archetypal ionic NaH is the only known compound of sodium and hydrogen. Application of high pressure is known to promote states with higher atomic coordination, but extensive searches for polyhydrides with unusual stoichiometry have had only limited success in spite of several theoretical predictions. Here we report the first observation of the formation of polyhydrides of Na (NaH3 and NaH7) above 40 GPa and 2,000 K. Moreover, we combine synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and theoretical random structure searching, which both agree on the stable structures and compositions. Our results support the formationmore » of multicenter bonding in a material with unusual stoichiometry. These results are applicable to the design of new energetic solids and high-temperature superconductors based on hydrogen-rich materials.« less

  5. Synthesis of sodium polyhydrides at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kim, Duck Young; Stavrou, Elissaios; Muramatsu, Takaki; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Pickard, Chris J.; Needs, Richard J.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-07-01

    The only known compound of sodium and hydrogen is archetypal ionic NaH. Application of high pressure is known to promote states with higher atomic coordination, but extensive searches for polyhydrides with unusual stoichiometry have had only limited success in spite of several theoretical predictions. Here we report the first observation of the formation of polyhydrides of Na (NaH3 and NaH7) above 40 GPa and 2,000 K. We combine synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and theoretical random structure searching, which both agree on the stable structures and compositions. Our results support the formation of multicenter bonding in a material with unusual stoichiometry. These results are applicable to the design of new energetic solids and high-temperature superconductors based on hydrogen-rich materials.

  6. Model of current enhancement at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.S.; Melendez, R.E.

    1983-04-05

    A model is proposed to account for the phenomenon of net current enhancement at high pressures recently observed on the Experimental Test Accelerator. The proposed mechanism involves energetic secondary electrons (delta rays) which are pushed forward by the self-magnetic field of the electron beam. For high current beams, the forward delta ray current can build up to a significant fraction of the beam current. Analytic calculations of the steady-state solution as well as the rate of buildup of the delta ray current are presented in this paper. In addition, numerical results from a nonlocal Boltzmann code, NUTS, are presented. The analytic and numerical results have many features which are in qualitative agreement with the experiments, but quantitative discrepancies still exist.

  7. Food processing by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazutaka

    2017-04-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) process, as a nonthermal process, can be used to inactivate microbes while minimizing chemical reactions in food. In this regard, a HHP level of 100 MPa (986.9 atm/1019.7 kgf/cm(2)) and more is applied to food. Conventional thermal process damages food components relating color, flavor, and nutrition via enhanced chemical reactions. However, HHP process minimizes the damages and inactivates microbes toward processing high quality safe foods. The first commercial HHP-processed foods were launched in 1990 as fruit products such as jams, and then some other products have been commercialized: retort rice products (enhanced water impregnation), cooked hams and sausages (shelf life extension), soy sauce with minimized salt (short-time fermentation owing to enhanced enzymatic reactions), and beverages (shelf life extension). The characteristics of HHP food processing are reviewed from viewpoints of nonthermal process, history, research and development, physical and biochemical changes, and processing equipment.

  8. Synthesis of sodium polyhydrides at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kim, Duck Young; Stavrou, Elissaios; Muramatsu, Takaki; Mao, Ho-kwang; Pickard, Chris J.; Needs, Richard J.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-07-28

    Archetypal ionic NaH is the only known compound of sodium and hydrogen. Application of high pressure is known to promote states with higher atomic coordination, but extensive searches for polyhydrides with unusual stoichiometry have had only limited success in spite of several theoretical predictions. Here we report the first observation of the formation of polyhydrides of Na (NaH3 and NaH7) above 40 GPa and 2,000 K. Moreover, we combine synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and theoretical random structure searching, which both agree on the stable structures and compositions. Our results support the formation of multicenter bonding in a material with unusual stoichiometry. These results are applicable to the design of new energetic solids and high-temperature superconductors based on hydrogen-rich materials.

  9. Synthesis of sodium polyhydrides at high pressures

    PubMed Central

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kim, Duck Young; Stavrou, Elissaios; Muramatsu, Takaki; Mao, Ho-kwang; Pickard, Chris J.; Needs, Richard J.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-01-01

    The only known compound of sodium and hydrogen is archetypal ionic NaH. Application of high pressure is known to promote states with higher atomic coordination, but extensive searches for polyhydrides with unusual stoichiometry have had only limited success in spite of several theoretical predictions. Here we report the first observation of the formation of polyhydrides of Na (NaH3 and NaH7) above 40 GPa and 2,000 K. We combine synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and theoretical random structure searching, which both agree on the stable structures and compositions. Our results support the formation of multicenter bonding in a material with unusual stoichiometry. These results are applicable to the design of new energetic solids and high-temperature superconductors based on hydrogen-rich materials. PMID:27464650

  10. Toroid cavities as NMR detectors in high pressure probes

    SciTech Connect

    Woelk, K.; Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

    1993-03-01

    A cylindrical toroid cavity has been developed for application as an NMR detector for high sensitivity and high resolution spectroscopy in metal vessel probes. Those probes are used for in situ investigations at high temperature and pressure. Since the transmitted r.f. field is completely confined within the torus, the cavity can be placed inside the pressurized system without magnetic coupling to the metal vessel. Resonance frequencies up to 400 MHz make the toroid cavity detector especially suited for use in {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F spectroscopy. Typically achieved static {sup 1}H linewidths, measured on CHCl{sub 3} using cavities in Be-Cu pressure vessels, are 2.0 Hz. On the basis of theoretical considerations that include the radial dependence of the r.f. field within cylindrical or circular toroid detectors, equations were evolved to predict the signal intensity as a function of the pulse width. The equations precisely describe the deviations from the sinusoidal approximation, which is generally used for signal intensities derived from Helmholtz or solenoid coils.

  11. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-01

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  12. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Kye-Si Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-15

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  13. Effect of planecta and ROSE™ on the frequency characteristics of blood pressure-transducer kits.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shigeki; Kawakubo, Yoshifumi; Mori, Satoshi; Tachihara, Keiichi; Toyoguchi, Izumi; Yokoyama, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    Pressure-transducer kits have frequency characteristics such as natural frequency and damping coefficient, which affect the monitoring accuracy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of planecta ports and a damping device (ROSE™, Argon Medical Devices, TX, USA) on the frequency characteristics of pressure-transducer kits. The FloTrac sensor kit (Edwards Lifesciences, CA, USA) and the DTXplus transducer kit (Argon Medical Devices) were prepared with planecta ports, and their frequency characteristics were tested with or without ROSE™. The natural frequency and damping coefficient of each kit were obtained using frequency characteristics analysis software and evaluated by plotting them on the Gardner's chart. By inserting a planecta port, the natural frequency markedly decreased in both the FloTrac sensor kit (from 40 to 22 Hz) and the DTXplus transducer kit (from 35 to 22 Hz). In both kits with one planecta port, the damping coefficient markedly increased by insertion of ROSE™ from 0.2 to 0.5, optimising frequency characteristics. In both kits with two planecta ports, however, the natural frequency decreased from 22 to 12 Hz. The damping coefficient increased from 0.2 to 0.8 by insertion of ROSE™; however, optimisation was not achieved even by ROSE™ insertion. Planecta ports decrease the natural frequency of the kit. ROSE™ is useful to optimise the frequency characteristics in the kits without or with one planecta port. However, optimisation is difficult with two or more planecta ports, even with the ROSE™ device.

  14. Flutter of High-Speed Civil Transport Flexible Semispan Model: Time-Frequency Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chabalko, Christopher C.; Hajj, Muhammad R.; Silva, Walter A.

    2006-01-01

    Time/frequency analysis of fluctuations measured by pressure taps and strain gauges in the experimental studies of the flexible semispan model of a high-speed civil transport wing configuration is performed. The interest is in determining the coupling between the aerodynamic loads and structural motions that led to the hard flutter conditions and loss of the model. The results show that, away from the hard flutter point, the aerodynamic loads at all pressure taps near the wing tip and the structural motions contained the same frequency components. On the other hand, in the flow conditions leading to the hard flutter, the frequency content of the pressure fluctuations near the leading and trailing edges varied significantly. This led to contribution to the structural motions over two frequency ranges. The ratio of these ranges was near 2:1, which suggests the possibility of nonlinear structural coupling.

  15. High-performance iodine fiber frequency standard.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Anna; Baynes, Fred N; Anstie, James D; Light, Philip S; Benabid, Fetah; Stace, Thomas M; Luiten, Andre N

    2011-12-15

    We have constructed a compact and robust optical frequency standard based around iodine vapor loaded into the core of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). A 532 nm laser was frequency locked to one hyperfine component of the R(56) 32-0 (127)I(2) transition using modulation transfer spectroscopy. The stabilized laser demonstrated a frequency stability of 2.3×10(-12) at 1 s, almost an order of magnitude better than previously reported for a laser stabilized to a gas-filled HC-PCF. This limit is set by the shot noise in the detection system. We present a discussion of the current limitations to the performance and a route to improve the performance by more than an order of magnitude.

  16. New developments in high pressure x-ray spectroscopy beamline at High Pressure Collaborative Access Team

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y. M. Chow, P.; Boman, G.; Bai, L. G.; Rod, E.; Bommannavar, A.; Kenney-Benson, C.; Sinogeikin, S.; Shen, G. Y.

    2015-07-15

    The 16 ID-D (Insertion Device - D station) beamline of the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source is dedicated to high pressure research using X-ray spectroscopy techniques typically integrated with diamond anvil cells. The beamline provides X-rays of 4.5-37 keV, and current available techniques include X-ray emission spectroscopy, inelastic X-ray scattering, and nuclear resonant scattering. The recent developments include a canted undulator upgrade, 17-element analyzer array for inelastic X-ray scattering, and an emission spectrometer using a polycapillary half-lens. Recent development projects and future prospects are also discussed.

  17. Rheological assessment of nanofluids at high pressure high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjirakat, Anoop; Sadr, Reza

    2013-11-01

    High pressure high temperature (HPHT) fluids are commonly encountered in industry, for example in cooling and/or lubrications applications. Nanofluids, engineered suspensions of nano-sized particles dispersed in a base fluid, have shown prospective as industrial cooling fluids due to their enhanced rheological and heat transfer properties. Nanofluids can be potentially utilized in oil industry for drilling fluids and for high pressure water jet cooling/lubrication in machining. In present work rheological characteristics of oil based nanofluids are investigated at HPHT condition. Nanofluids used in this study are prepared by dispersing commercially available SiO2 nanoparticles (~20 nm) in a mineral oil. The basefluid and nanofluids with two concentrations, namely 1%, and 2%, by volume, are considered in this investigation. The rheological characteristics of base fluid and the nanofluids are measured using an industrial HPHT viscometer. Viscosity values of the nanofluids are measured at pressures of 100 kPa to 42 MPa and temperatures ranging from 25°C to 140°C. The viscosity values of both nanofluids as well as basefluid are observed to have increased with the increase in pressure. Funded by Qatar National Research Fund (NPRP 08-574-2-239).

  18. Stable xenon nitride at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Feng; Wang, Yanchao; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Yunwei; Ma, Yanming

    2015-09-01

    Nitrides in many ways are fascinating since they often appear as superconductors, high-energy density, and hard materials. Though there exist a large variety of nitrides, noble gas nitrides are missing in nature. Pursuit of noble gas nitrides has therefore become the subject of topical interests, but remains as a great challenge since molecular nitrogen (N2, a major form of nitrogen) and noble gases are both inert systems and do not interact at normal conditions. We show through a first-principles swarm-structure search that high pressure enables a direct interaction of N2 and xenon (Xe) above 146 GPa. The resultant Xe nitride has a peculiar stoichiometry of XeN6, possessing a high-energy density of approximately 2.4 kJg -1, rivaling that of the modern explosives. Structurally, XeN6 is intriguing with the appearance of chaired N6 hexagons and unusually high 12-coordination of Xe bonded with N. Our work opens up the possibility of achieving Xe nitride with superior high-energy density whose formation is long sought as impossible.

  19. Frequency of slow oscillations in arterial pressure and R-R intervals during muscle metaboreflex activation.

    PubMed

    Kiviniemi, Antti M; Tiinanen, Suvi; Hautala, Arto J; Seppänen, Tapio; Mäkikallio, Timo H; Huikuri, Heikki V; Tulppo, Mikko P

    2010-01-15

    Altered frequency of slow (0.04-0.15Hz) arterial pressure and R-R interval oscillations has been observed in various diseases but the mechanisms for this frequency shift are unclear. The median (Med) frequencies of slow R-R interval and blood pressure (BP) oscillations were recorded in 11 healthy subjects with paced breathing (0.25Hz) during muscle metaboreflex and baroreflex mediated sympathetic stimuli: 1) handgrip exercise (HG) followed by post-exercise circulatory occlusion (PECO), 2) handgrip exercise during ischemia by circulatory occlusion (IHG) and 3) passive head-up tilt (TILT). Med(BP) shifted to the higher frequency during HG, PECO and IHG (from 0.070+/-0.009Hz to 0.088+/-0.013, 0.085+/-0.015 and 0.099+/-0.013Hz, respectively, p<0.01 for all) but not during TILT (0.078+/-0.012Hz). Similarly, Med(R-R) shifted to the higher frequency during HG, PECO and IHG (from 0.072+/-0.009Hz to 0.085+/-0.014, 0.085+/-0.016 and 0.095+/-0.015Hz, respectively, p<0.01 for all) but not during TILT (0.075+/-0.012Hz). Med(BP) and Med(R-R) were higher during IHG compared to HG and lower during TILT compared to both HG and IHG (p<0.01 for all). We conclude that the sympathetic stimulus induced by muscle metaboreflex is an important mechanism increasing the frequency of slow oscillations in arterial pressure and R-R intervals. The present results give new insight to understand the physiology underlying the frequency of slow arterial pressure and R-R interval oscillations.

  20. High pressure Raman spectroscopy of H2O-CH3OH mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin; Chien, Yu-Hsiang

    2015-02-23

    Complex intra-molecular interactions and the hydrogen-bonding network in H2O-volatile mixtures play critical roles in many dynamics processes in physical chemistry, biology, and Earth and planetary sciences. We used high pressure Raman spectroscopy to study the pressure evolution of vibrational frequencies and bonding behavior in H2O-CH3OH mixtures. We found that the presence of low CH3OH content in H2O increases the transition pressure where water crystallizes to ice VI, but does not significantly change the pressure where ice VI transforms to ice VII. Furthermore, the stiffening rates of C-H stretching frequencies dω/dP in CH3OH significantly decrease upon the crystallization of water, and the softening rates of the O-H stretching frequencies of ice VII are suppressed over a narrow pressure range, after which the frequencies of these modes shift with pressure in ways similar to pure CH3OH and ice VII, respectively. Such complex pressure evolution of Raman frequencies along with pronounced variations in Raman intensities of CH3OH within the sample, and the hysteresis of the water-ice VI phase transition suggest pressure-induced segregation of low content CH3OH from ice VII. These findings indicate the significant influence of volatiles on the crystallization of sub-surface ocean and thermal evolution within large icy planets and satellites.

  1. [High blood pressure and physical exercise].

    PubMed

    Sosner, P; Gremeaux, V; Bosquet, L; Herpin, D

    2014-06-01

    High blood pressure is a frequent pathology with many cardiovascular complications. As highlighted in guidelines, the therapeutic management of hypertension relies on non-pharmacological measures, which are diet and regular physical activity, but both patients and physicians are reluctant to physical activity prescription. To acquire the conviction that physical activity is beneficial, necessary and possible, we can take into account some fundamental and clinical studies, as well as the feedback of our clinical practice. Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and hypertension contributes to increase this risk. Conversely, regular practice of physical activity decreases very significantly the risk by up to 60%. The acute blood pressure changes during exercise and post-exercise hypotension differs according to the dynamic component (endurance or aerobic and/or strength exercises), but the repetition of the sessions leads to the chronic hypotensive benefit of physical activity. Moreover, physical activity prescription must take into account the assessment of global cardiovascular risk, the control of the hypertension, and the opportunities and desires of the patient in order to promote good adherence and beneficial lifestyle change.

  2. High pressure FAST of nanocrystalline barium titanate

    DOE PAGES

    Fraga, Martin B.; Delplanque, Jean -Pierre; Yang, Nancy; ...

    2016-06-01

    Here, this work studies the microstructural evolution of nanocrystalline (<1 µm) barium titanate (BaTiO3), and presents high pressure in field-assisted sintering (FAST) as a robust methodology to obtain >100 nm BaTiO3 compacts. Using FAST, two commercial ~50 nm powders were consolidated into compacts of varying densities and grain sizes. Microstructural inhomogeneities were investigated for each case, and an interpretation is developed using a modified Monte Carlo Potts (MCP) simulation. Two recurrent microstructural inhomogeneities are highlighted, heterogeneous grain growth and low-density regions, both ubiqutously present in all samples to varying degrees. In the worst cases, HGG presents an area coverage ofmore » 52%. Because HGG is sporadic but homogenous throughout a sample, the catalyst (e.g., the local segregation of species) must be, correspondingly, distributed in a homogenous manner. MCP demonstrates that in such a case, a large distance between nucleating abnormal grains is required—otherwise abnormal grains prematurely impinge on each other, and their size is not distinguishable from that of normal grains. Compacts sintered with a pressure of 300 MPa and temperatures of 900 °C, were 99.5% dense and had a grain size of 90±24 nm. These are unprecedented results for commercial BaTiO3 powders or any starting powder of 50 nm particle size—other authors have used 16 nm lab-produced powder to obtain similar results.« less

  3. High pressure FAST of nanocrystalline barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Fraga, Martin B.; Delplanque, Jean -Pierre; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Monson, Todd C.

    2016-06-01

    Here, this work studies the microstructural evolution of nanocrystalline (<1 µm) barium titanate (BaTiO3), and presents high pressure in field-assisted sintering (FAST) as a robust methodology to obtain >100 nm BaTiO3 compacts. Using FAST, two commercial ~50 nm powders were consolidated into compacts of varying densities and grain sizes. Microstructural inhomogeneities were investigated for each case, and an interpretation is developed using a modified Monte Carlo Potts (MCP) simulation. Two recurrent microstructural inhomogeneities are highlighted, heterogeneous grain growth and low-density regions, both ubiqutously present in all samples to varying degrees. In the worst cases, HGG presents an area coverage of 52%. Because HGG is sporadic but homogenous throughout a sample, the catalyst (e.g., the local segregation of species) must be, correspondingly, distributed in a homogenous manner. MCP demonstrates that in such a case, a large distance between nucleating abnormal grains is required—otherwise abnormal grains prematurely impinge on each other, and their size is not distinguishable from that of normal grains. Compacts sintered with a pressure of 300 MPa and temperatures of 900 °C, were 99.5% dense and had a grain size of 90±24 nm. These are unprecedented results for commercial BaTiO3 powders or any starting powder of 50 nm particle size—other authors have used 16 nm lab-produced powder to obtain similar results.

  4. The effect of adjunctive noncontact low frequency ultrasound on deep tissue pressure injury.

    PubMed

    Honaker, Jeremy S; Forston, Michael R; Davis, Emily A; Weisner, Michelle M; Morgan, Jennifer A; Sacca, Emily

    2016-11-01

    The optimal treatment for deep tissue pressure injuries has not been determined. Deep tissue pressure injuries represent a more ominous early stage pressure injury that may evolve into full thickness ulceration despite implementing the standard of care for pressure injury. A longitudinal prospective historical case control study design was used to determine the effectiveness of noncontact low frequency ultrasound plus standard of care (treatment group) in comparison to standard of care (control group) in reducing deep tissue pressure injury severity, total surface area, and final pressure injury stage. The Honaker Suspected Deep Tissue Injury Severity Scale (range 3-18[more severe]) was used to determine deep tissue pressure injury severity at enrollment (Time 1) and discharge (Time 2). A total of 60 subjects (Treatment = 30; Control= 30) were enrolled in the study. In comparison to the control group mean deep tissue pressure injury total surface area change at Time 2 (0.3 cm(2) ), the treatment group had a greater decrease (8.8 cm(2) ) that was significant (t = 2.41, p = 0.014, r(2)  = 0.10). In regards to the Honaker Suspected Deep Tissue Injury Severity Scale scores, the treatment group had a significantly lower score (7.6) in comparison to the control group (11.9) at time 2, with a mean difference of 4.6 (t = 6.146, p = 0.0001, r(2)  = 0.39). When considering the final pressure ulcer stage at Time 2, the control group were mostly composed of unstageable pressure ulcer (57%) and deep tissue pressure injury severity (27%). In contrast, the treatment group final pressure ulcer stages were less severe and were mostly composed of stage 2 pressure injury (50%) and deep tissue pressure injury severity (23%) were the most common at time 2. The results of this study have shown that deep tissue pressure injury severity treated with noncontact low frequency ultrasound within 5 days of onset and in conjunction with standard of care may improve

  5. How to Prevent High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider will use a gauge, a stethoscope or electronic sensor, and a blood pressure cuff. For most ... pressure. Stress management techniques include exercising, listening to music, focusing on something calm or peaceful, and meditating. ...

  6. Estimation of turbine blade natural frequencies from casing pressure and vibration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Gareth L.; Randall, Robert B.

    2013-04-01

    Non-contact measurement of gas turbine rotor blade vibration is a non-trivial task, with no method available which achieves this aim without some significant draw-backs . This paper presents a truly non-contact method to estimate rotor blade natural frequencies from casing vibration measurements at a single engine operating speed. An analytical model is derived to simulate the internal casing pressure in a turbine engine including the effects of blade vibration on this pressure signal. It is shown that the internal pressure inside a turbine contains measureable information about the rotor blade natural frequencies and in-turn the casing vibration response also contains this information. The results presented herein show the residual, pressure and casing vibration, spectrum can be used to determine the rotor blade natural frequencies with validation provided for the analytical model by experimental measurements on a simplified test rig. A simulated blade fault in one of the rotor blades is introduced with successful estimation of the simulated faulty blade natural frequency.

  7. Pressure dependence of intramolecular mode frequencies in solid N2, O2, and CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Helmy, A.

    1983-01-01

    A microscopic description of the pressure dependence of intramolecular vibrational modes in simple molecular crystals has been formulated using a classical perturbation theory. Quantitative agreement with experiment is demonstrated and it is shown that frequency changes at phase transitions are large enough to be observed optically.

  8. Relatively high plasma density in low pressure inductive discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-09-15

    Electron energy probability functions (EEPFs) were measured in a low pressure argon inductive discharge. As radio frequency (RF) power increases, discharge mode is changed from E-mode (capacitively coupled) to H-mode (inductively coupled) and the EEPFs evolve from a bi-Maxwellian distribution to a Maxwellian distribution. It is found that the plasma densities at low RF powers (<30 W) are much higher than the density predicted from the slope of the densities at high powers. Because high portion of high energy electrons of the bi-Maxwellian distribution lowers the collisional energy loss and low electron temperature of low energy electrons reduces particle loss rate at low powers. Therefore, the energy loss of plasma decreases and electron densities become higher at low powers.

  9. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  10. Feasibility of High Frequency Acoustic Imaging for Inspection of Containments

    SciTech Connect

    C.N. Corrado; J.E. Bondaryk; V. Godino

    1998-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has a program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide assistance in their assessment of the effects of potential degradation on the structural integrity and Ieaktightness of metal containment vessels and steel liners of concrete containment in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to identify a technique(s) for inspection of inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary. Acoustic imaging has been identified as one of these potential techniques. A numerical feasibility study investigated the use of high-frequency bistatic acoustic imaging techniques for inspection of inaccessible portions of the metallic pressure boundary of nuclear power plant containment. The range-dependent version of the OASES Code developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was utilized to perform a series of numerical simulations. OASES is a well developed and extensively tested code for evaluation of the acoustic field in a system of stratified fluid and/or elastic layers. Using the code, an arbitrary number of fluid or solid elastic layers are interleaved, with the outer layers modeled as halfspaces. High frequency vibrational sources were modeled to simulate elastic waves in the steel. The received field due to an arbitrary source array can be calculated at arbitrary depth and range positions. In this numerical study, waves that reflect and scatter from surface roughness caused by modeled degradations (e.g., corrosion) are detected and used to identify and map the steel degradation. Variables in the numerical study included frequency, flaw size, interrogation distance, and sensor incident angle.Based on these analytical simulations, it is considered unlikely that acoustic imaging technology can be used to investigate embedded steel liners of reinforced concrete containment. The thin steel liner and high signal losses to the concrete make this application difficult. Results for portions of steel containment

  11. Sleep Deprivation: A Cause of High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... High blood pressure (hypertension) Is it true that sleep deprivation can cause high blood pressure? Answers from Sheldon ... Cirelli C, et al. Definition and consequences of sleep deprivation. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 24, ...

  12. High blood pressure - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about high blood pressure; Hypertension - what to ask your doctor ... problems? What medicines am I taking to treat high blood pressure? Do they have any side effects? What should ...

  13. Changes You Can Make to Manage High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Changes You Can Make to Manage High Blood Pressure Updated:Mar 10,2017 Fighting back against the “ ... on Twitter Follow us on Facebook High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  14. Heart and Artery Damage and High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More How High Blood Pressure Can Lead to a Heart Attack Updated:Dec ... content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  15. What You Should Know About High Blood Pressure and Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... More What You Should Know About High Blood Pressure and Medications Updated:Jan 18,2017 Is medication ... content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  16. How Potassium Can Help Control High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... More How Potassium Can Help Control High Blood Pressure Updated:Dec 13,2016 Understanding the heart-healthy ... content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  17. A Nutritional Strategy for the Treatment of High Blood Pressure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podell, Richard N.

    1984-01-01

    Some physicians wonder if high blood pressure can be controlled without the use of drugs and their potential side effects. Current findings concerning nutrition and high blood pressure are presented. (RM)

  18. Very high temperature silicon on silicon pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Anthony D.; Nunn, Timothy A.; Briggs, Stephen A.; Ned, Alexander

    1992-01-01

    A silicon on silicon pressure sensor has been developed for use at very high temperatures (1000 F). The design principles used to fabricate the pressure sensor are outlined and results are presented of its high temperature performance.

  19. Fine structure of the low-frequency spectra of heart rate and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kuusela, Tom A; Kaila, Timo J; Kähönen, Mika

    2003-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the principal frequency components of the heart rate and blood pressure variability in the low frequency (LF) and very low frequency (VLF) band. The spectral composition of the R–R interval (RRI) and systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) in the frequency range below 0.15 Hz were carefully analyzed using three different spectral methods: Fast Fourier transform (FFT), Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD), and autoregression (AR). All spectral methods were used to create time–frequency plots to uncover the principal spectral components that are least dependent on time. The accurate frequencies of these components were calculated from the pole decomposition of the AR spectral density after determining the optimal model order – the most crucial factor when using this method – with the help of FFT and WVD methods. Results Spectral analysis of the RRI and SAP of 12 healthy subjects revealed that there are always at least three spectral components below 0.15 Hz. The three principal frequency components are 0.026 ± 0.003 (mean ± SD) Hz, 0.076 ± 0.012 Hz, and 0.117 ± 0.016 Hz. These principal components vary only slightly over time. FFT-based coherence and phase-function analysis suggests that the second and third components are related to the baroreflex control of blood pressure, since the phase difference between SAP and RRI was negative and almost constant, whereas the origin of the first component is different since no clear SAP–RRI phase relationship was found. Conclusion The above data indicate that spontaneous fluctuations in heart rate and blood pressure within the standard low-frequency range of 0.04–0.15 Hz typically occur at two frequency components rather than only at one as widely believed, and these components are not harmonically related. This new observation in humans can help explain divergent results in the literature concerning spontaneous low-frequency oscillations. It also raises methodological

  20. High-Frequency, High-Temperature Fretting Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matlik, J. F.; Farris, T. N.; Haake, F. K.; Swanson, G. R.; Duke, G. C.

    2005-01-01

    Fretting is a structural damage mechanism observed when two nominally clamped surfaces are subjected to an oscillatory loading. A critical location for fretting induced damage has been identified at the blade/disk and blade/damper interfaces of gas turbine engine turbomachinery and space propulsion components. The high-temperature, high-frequency loading environment seen by these components lead to severe stress gradients at the edge-of-contact. These contact stresses drive crack nucleation and propagation in fretting and are very sensitive to the geometry of the contacting bodies, the contact loads, materials, temperature, and contact surface tribology (friction). To diagnose the threat that small and relatively undetectable fretting cracks pose to damage tolerance and structural integrity of in-service components, the objective of this work is to develop a well-characterized experimental fretting rig capable of investigating fretting behavior of advanced aerospace alloys subjected to load and temperature conditions representative of such turbomachinery components.

  1. Urea and deuterium mixtures at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M. Husband, R. J.; Frantzana, A. D.; Loveday, J. S.; Bull, C. L.; Klotz, S.

    2015-03-28

    Urea, like many network forming compounds, has long been known to form inclusion (guest-host) compounds. Unlike other network formers like water, urea is not known to form such inclusion compounds with simple molecules like hydrogen. Such compounds if they existed would be of interest both for the fundamental insight they provide into molecular bonding and as potential gas storage systems. Urea has been proposed as a potential hydrogen storage material [T. A. Strobel et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 478, 97 (2009)]. Here, we report the results of high-pressure neutron diffraction studies of urea and D{sub 2} mixtures that indicate no inclusion compound forms up to 3.7 GPa.

  2. Ceramic high pressure gas path seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liotta, G. C.

    1987-01-01

    Stage 1 ceramic shrouds (high pressure turbine gas path seal) were developed for the GE T700 turbine helicopter engine under the Army/NASA Contract NAS3-23174. This contract successfully proved the viability and benefits of a Stage 1 ceramic shroud for production application. Stage 1 ceramic shrouds were proven by extensive component and engine testing. This Stage 1 ceramic shroud, plasma sprayed ceramic (ZrOs-BY2O3) and bond coating (NiCrAlY) onto a cast metal backing, offers significant engine performance improvement. Due to the ceramic coating, the amount of cooling air required is reduced 20% resulting in a 0.5% increase in horsepower and a 0.3% decrease in specific fuel consumption. This is accomplished with a component which is lower in cost than the current production shroud. Stage 1 ceramic shrouds will be introduced into field service in late 1987.

  3. DNS of High Pressure Supercritical Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Shao Teng; Raman, Venkatramanan

    2016-11-01

    Supercritical flows have always been important to rocket motors, and more recently to aircraft engines and stationary gas turbines. The purpose of the present study is to understand effects of differential diffusion on reacting scalars using supercritical isotropic turbulence. Focus is on fuel and oxidant reacting in the transcritical region where density, heat capacity and transport properties are highly sensitive to variations in temperature and pressure. Reynolds and Damkohler number vary as a result and although it is common to neglect differential diffusion effects if Re is sufficiently large, this large variation in temperature with heat release can accentuate molecular transport differences. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) for one step chemistry reaction between fuel and oxidizer are used to examine the differential diffusion effects. A key issue investigated in this paper is if the flamelet progress variable approach, where the Lewis number is usually assumed to be unity and constant for all species, can be accurately applied to simulate supercritical combustion.

  4. High Pressure Quick Disconnect Particle Impact Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) performed particle impact testing to determine whether there is a particle impact ignition hazard in the quick disconnects (QDs) in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) on the International Space Station (ISS). Testing included standard supersonic and subsonic particle impact tests on 15-5 PH stainless steel, as well as tests performed on a QD simulator. This paper summarizes the particle impact tests completed at WSTF. Although there was an ignition in Test Series 4, it was determined the ignition was caused by the presence of a machining imperfection. The sum of all the test results indicates that there is no particle impact ignition hazard in the ISS ECLSS QDs. KEYWORDS: quick disconnect, high pressure, particle impact testing, stainless steel

  5. Safety improvements in high pressure thermal machines

    SciTech Connect

    Otters, J.L.

    1988-02-09

    In a thermal machine of the type including a machine body having a main axis extending between a thermal end and a work end, a working fluid at relatively high pressure in a working fluid chamber defined in the body and a displacer element reciprocable within the chamber for subjecting the fluid to a thermodynamic cycle in cooperation with a reciprocable work piston, the improvement is described comprising outer shell means enclosing the machine body for maintaining a substantially sealed atmosphere about the machine body, and diffuser means arranged between the machine body and the outer shell means for diffusing a shock wave traveling towards the outer shell means resulting from explosive failure of the machine body and for shielding the outer shell means against fragments projected upon such failure.

  6. New chemical reactions in methane at high temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Culler, T.S.; Schiferl, D. )

    1993-01-21

    The authors have used a Merrill-Bassett diamond anvil cell and Raman spectroscopy to study methane at high pressures (up to 13 GPa) and high temperatures (up to 912 K). At 2.5-5.0 GPa and 912 K, methane photoreacts with the laser light used for Raman spectroscopy and forms a graphitelike soot compound. At room temperature and pressure the Raman spectrum of the new material has an intense peak with a frequency of 1597 cm[sup [minus]1]. At higher pressures and temperatures (10-13 GPa and 948 K) a sample of [sup 13]CD[sub 4] methane photoreacted with the laser light and formed a hard, clear, solid film. At 0.34 GPa and 300 K, this film had Raman peaks at 541 and 1605 cm[sup [minus]1]. The 541-cm[sup [minus]1] peak may correspond to the 550-cm[sup [minus]1] peak found in some diamondlike carbon (DLC) films formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), but the 1605-cm[sup [minus]1] peak does not appear to have any such counterpart. Other possible Raman peaks were masked by interference from the diamond anvils. Thus, while the hard, clear film has some similarities to CVD DLC films, some important differences and questions remain. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Feasibility of controlling speed-dependent low-frequency brake vibration amplification by modulating actuation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Osman Taha; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2014-12-01

    In this article, a feasibility study of controlling the low frequency torque response of a disc brake system with modulated actuation pressure (in the open loop mode) is conducted. First, a quasi-linear model of the torsional system is introduced, and analytical solutions are proposed to incorporate the modulation effect. Tractable expressions for three different modulation schemes are obtained, and conditions that would lead to a reduction in the oscillatory amplitudes are identified. Second, these conditions are evaluated with a numerical model of the torsional system with clearance nonlinearity, and analytical solutions are verified in terms of the trends observed. Finally, a laboratory experiment with a solenoid valve is built to modulate actuation pressure with a constant duty cycle, and time-frequency domain data are acquired. Measurements are utilized to assess analytical observations, and all methods show that the speed-dependent brake torque amplitudes can be altered with an appropriate modulation of actuation pressure.

  8. Electronic system for monitoring the frequency and pressure of mastication: study and approach for its design.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Orlando K; Garcia, Daniel O; Villavicencio, Emilio A; Navarro, Luis A; Torres, Miguel A; Huamani, Robinson; Yabar, Leopoldo F

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study and design a portable non invasive prototype which allows us to supervise the mastication frequency and pressure for specific meals, performing an analysis of sounds and pressures generated by facial muscles when they are chewing. These variables have a direct influence on people nutritious and dietary habits; also, a quickly eating makes people ingest a lot of food instead he needs generating overweight on him. On the other hand, there is no so much study for upheaval of temporal-mandible joints (TMJ) in Peru, keeping as reference that unilateral mastication is one of the principal causes on myofacial pains but, as obesity, there are no studies in Peru about how to prevent these pathologies. In consequence, we propose the development of this prototype which, additional to supervise variables such as mastication frequency and pressure, will allow to the patient an self-correction of his habits.

  9. High rate internal pressurization of the human eye to determine dynamic rupture pressure.

    PubMed

    Bisplinghoff, Jill A; McNally, Craig; Yang, Siyang; Herring, Ian P; Brozoski, Fred T; Duma, Stefan M

    2008-01-01

    Over 1.9 million people suffer from eye injuries in the United States, occurring from automobile accidents, sports related impacts, and military combat. The purpose of the current study is to analyze the rupture pressure of human eyes using a high rate pressurization system. Internal pressure was dynamically induced into the eye with a drop tower pressurization system. The rupture pressure was measured with a small pressure sensor inserted into the optic nerve. A total of 10 human eye dynamic pressure tests were performed to determine rupture pressure and to compare the results with previous data. It was found that the average high rate rupture pressure of human eyes is 0.89+/- 0.25 MPa. In comparing these data with previous studies, it is concluded that as the loading rate increases the rupture pressure also increases.

  10. Resonant tube for measurement of sound absorption in gases at low frequency/pressure ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Griffin, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes a resonant tube for measuring sound absorption in gases, with specific emphasis on the vibrational relaxation peak of N2, over a range of frequency/pressure ratios from 0.1 to 2500 Hz/atm. The experimental background losses measured in argon agree with the theoretical wall losses except at few isolated frequencies. Rigid cavity terminations, external excitation, and a differential technique of background evaluation were used to minimize spurious contributions to the background losses. Room temperature measurements of sound absorption in binary mixtures of N2-CO2 in which both components are excitable resulted in the maximum frequency/pressure ratio in Hz/atm of 0.063 + 123m for the N2 vibrational relaxation peak, where m is mole percent of added CO2; the maximum ratio for the CO2 peak was 34,500 268m where m is mole percent of added N2.

  11. Alumina ceramic based high-temperature performance of wireless passive pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Wu, Guozhu; Guo, Tao; Tan, Qiulin

    2016-12-01

    A wireless passive pressure sensor equivalent to inductive-capacitive (LC) resonance circuit and based on alumina ceramic is fabricated by using high temperature sintering ceramic and post-fire metallization processes. Cylindrical copper spiral reader antenna and insulation layer are designed to realize the wireless measurement for the sensor in high temperature environment. The high temperature performance of the sensor is analyzed and discussed by studying the phase-frequency and amplitude-frequency characteristics of reader antenna. The average frequency change of sensor is 0.68 kHz/°C when the temperature changes from 27°C to 700°C and the relative change of twice measurements is 2.12%, with high characteristic of repeatability. The study of temperature-drift characteristic of pressure sensor in high temperature environment lays a good basis for the temperature compensation methods and insures the pressure signal readout accurately.

  12. Effect of high pressure on mesophilic lactic fermentation streptococci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reps, A.; Kuźmicka, M.; Wiśniewska, K.

    2008-07-01

    The research concerned the effect of high pressure on mesophilic lactic fermentation streptococci, present in two cheese-making commercial inocula produced by Christian-Hansen. Water solutions of inocula were pressurized at 50-800 MPa, at room temperature, for 30-120 min. Pressurization at 50-100 MPa slightly increased or reduced the number of lactic streptococci, depending on the inoculum and pressurization time. Pressurization at 200 MPa caused a reduction in the number of streptococci by over 99.9%, whereas the pressure of 400 MPa and above almost completely inactivated streptococci. Pressurization also reduced the dynamics of microorganism growth and acidification, to the degree depending on the pressure.

  13. Measurement of viscosity and elasticity of lubricants at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rein, R. G., Jr.; Charng, T. T.; Sliepcevich, C. M.; Ewbank, W. J.

    1975-01-01

    The oscillating quartz crystal viscometer has been used to investigate possible viscoelastic behavior in synthetic lubricating fluids and to obtain viscosity-pressure-temperature data for these fluids at temperatures to 300 F and pressures to 40,000 psig. The effect of pressure and temperature on the density of the test fluids was measured concurrently with the viscosity measurements. Viscoelastic behavior of one fluid, di-(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate, was observed over a range of pressures. These data were used to compute the reduced shear elastic (storage) modulus and reduced loss modulus for this fluid at atmospheric pressure and 100 F as functions of reduced frequency.

  14. Digital valve for high pressure high flow applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Lewis, Derek; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Hall, Jeffery L.

    2016-04-01

    To address the challenges, which are involved with the development of flow control valves that can meet high demand requirements such as high pressure, high flow rate, limited power and limited space, the authors have conceived a novel design configuration. This design consists of a digitalized flow control valve with multipath and multistage pressure reduction structures. Specifically, the valve is configured as a set of parallel flow paths from the inlet to the outlet. A choke valve controls the total flow rate by digitally opening different paths or different combination of the paths. Each path is controlled by a poppet cap valve basically operated in on-off states. The number of flow states is 2N where N is the number of flow paths. To avoid erosion from sand in the fluid and high speed flow, the seal area of the poppet cap valve is located at a distance from the flow inlet away from the high speed flow and the speed is controlled to stay below a predefined erosion safe limit. The path is a multistage structure composed of a set of serial nozzles-expansion chambers that equally distribute the total pressure drop to each stage. The pressure drop of each stage and, therefore, the flow speed at the nozzles and expansion chambers is controlled by the number of stages. The paths have relatively small cross section and could be relatively long for large number of stages and still fit in a strict annular space limit. The paper will present the design configuration, analysis and preliminary test results.

  15. System design for buried high-pressure/high-temperature pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    A pipeline expands or contracts when temperatures or pressures vary from the conditions at the time the pipeline was installed. Buried pipelines operating at high temperatures and pressures experience extreme compressive loads. Because radial expansion is limited by soil restraint, buried pipelines expand axially. High axial forces combined with imperfections in the seabed may overstress the pipeline or result in upheaval buckling. Methods to control expansion and upheaval buckling were investigated for the design of a buried high-pressure/high temperature (HP/HT) sour-gas flowline in Mobile Bay, Alabama. After investigating conventional and unconventional methods, the decision was made to use expansion loops over the length of the pipeline to protect the risers and reduce axial force in the middle of the pipeline. Expansion loops and doglegs act as springs to absorb pipeline expansion. Methods were investigated to prevent soil from accumulating around the buried expansion loops. Commercially available concrete dog houses used to protect pipelines and expansion loops from dropped objects were not suitable for burial, and fabrication of custom concrete housing was expensive. Fabrication of a steel enclosure was the solution chosen. A mathematical model based on internal-design guidelines and ultimate soil friction was used to determine placement and size of the expansion loops.

  16. High frequency model of stacked film capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbert, T.; Joubert, C.; Daude, N.; Glaize, C.

    2001-11-01

    Polypropylene metallized capacitors are of general use in power electronics because of their reliability, their self-healing capabilities, and their low price. Though the behavior of metallized coiled capacitors has been discussed, no work has been carried out on stacked and flattened metallized capacitors. The purpose of this article is to suggest an analytical model of resonance frequency, stray inductance and impedance of stacked capacitors. We first solve the equation of propagation of the magnetic potential vector (A) in the dielectric of an homogeneous material. Then, we suggest an original method of resolution, like the one used for resonant cavities, in order to present an analytical solution of the problem. Finally, we give some experimental results proving that the physical knowledge of the parameters of the capacitor (dimension of the component, and material constants), enables us to calculate an analytical model of resonance frequency, stray inductance and impedance of stacked capacitors.

  17. Why high-frequency pulse tubes can be tipped

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, Gregory W092710; Backhaus, Scott N

    2010-01-01

    The typical low-frequency pulse-tube refrigerator loses significant cooling power when it is tipped with the pulse tube's cold end above its hot end, because natural convection in the pulse tube loads the cold heat exchanger. Yet most high-frequency pulse-tube refrigerators work well in any orientation with respect to gravity. In such a refrigerator, natural convection is suppressed by sufficiently fast velocity oscil1ations, via a nonlinear hydrodynamic effect that tends to align the density gradients in the pulse tube parallel to the oscillation direction. Since gravity's tendency to cause convection is only linear in the pulse tube's end-to-end temperature difference while the oscillation's tendency to align density gradients with oscillating velocity is nonlinear, it is easiest to suppress convection when the end-to-end temperature difference is largest. Simple experiments demonstrate this temperature dependence, the strong dependence on the oscillating velocity, and little dependence on the magnitude or phase of the oscillating pressure. In some circumstances in this apparatus, the suppression of convection is a hysteretic function of oscillating velocity. In some other circumstances, a time-dependent convective state seems more difficult to suppress.

  18. Quartz Tuning Fork Pressure Gauge for High-Pressure Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botimer, J.; Velasco, A.; Taborek, P.

    2017-01-01

    We have measured the quality factor Q and the frequency f of a 32-kHz quartz tuning fork immersed in liquid ^4He between 0.9 and 3.0 K, over pressures ranging from the saturated vapor pressure to ≈ 25 atm. At constant pressure, as a function of temperature, the quality factor and frequency have strong features related to the temperature dependence of the superfluid fraction. At constant temperature, Q depends on the superfluid fraction, while the frequency is a smooth function of pressure. The behavior is explained using a simple hydrodynamic model. The liquid helium viscosity is obtained from measured values of Q, and together with tabulated values of the helium density as a function of pressure and temperature, the frequency shift can be parameterized as a function of temperature and pressure. The observed sensitivity is ≈ 7.8 Hz/atm. The quartz tuning fork provides a compact low power method of measuring the pressure in the bulk liquid.

  19. 77 FR 37712 - High Pressure Steel Cylinders From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... COMMISSION High Pressure Steel Cylinders From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed... imports of high pressure steel cylinders from China, provided for in subheading 7311.00.00 of the... following notification of preliminary determinations by Commerce that imports of high pressure...

  20. Metabolic Activity of Bacteria at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2008-12-01

    Over the last 20 years, there has been increasing evidence for the presence of a large number of microbes in the oceanic subsurface. Such a habitat has a very low energy input because it is deprived of light. A few meters below the sediment surface, conditions are already anoxic in most cases, sulfate reduction and/or methanogenesis becoming thus the primary respiratory reactions of organic matter. Neither the fate of methanogenesis, nor the fate of Dissimilatory Metal-Reduction (DMR) has been investigated so far as a function of pressure. For this reason, we measured experimentally the pressure limits of microbial anaerobic energetic metabolism. In practice, we measured in situ the kinetics of selenite respiration by the bacterial model Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) between 0 and 150 MPa at 30°C. MR-1 stationary-phase cells were used in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium amended with lactate as an additional electron donor and sodium selenite as an electron acceptor. In situ measurements were performed by X- ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy in both a diamond-anvil cell and an autoclave. A red precipitate of amorphous Se(0) was virtually observed at any pressure to 150 MPa. A progressive reduction of selenite Se(IV) into selenium Se(0) was also observed in the evolution of XANES spectra with time. All kinetics between 0.1 and 150 MPa can be adjusted to a first order kinetic law. MR-1 respires all available selenite up to 60 MPa. Above 60 MPa, the respiration yield decreases linearly as a function of pressure and reaches 0 at 155 ±5 MPa. This indicates that selenite respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 stops at about 155 MPa, whereas its growth is arrested at 50 MPa. Hence, the present results show that the respiration of selenium by the strain MR-1 occurs efficiently up to 60 MPa and 30°C, i.e. from the surface of a continental sediment to an equivalent depth of about 2 km, or beneath a 5-km water column and