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Sample records for high frequency pulse

  1. Toward a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Drummond, J. Philip

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the continued development of an actuator, energized by pulsed detonations, that provides a pulsed jet suitable for flow control in high-speed applications. A high-speed valve, capable of delivering a pulsed stream of reactants a mixture of H2 and air at rates of up to 1500 pulses per second, has been constructed. The reactants burn in a resonant tube and the products exit the tube as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers have been used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device at various reactant injection frequencies, including both resonant and off-resonant conditions. Pulsed detonations have been demonstrated in the lambda/4 mode of an 8 inch long tube at approximately 600 Hz. The pulsed jet at the exit of the device has been observed using shadowgraph and an infrared camera.

  2. Toward a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Drummond, J. Philip

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the continued development of an actuator, energized by pulsed detonations, that provides a pulsed jet suitable for flow control in high-speed applications. A high-speed valve, capable of delivering a pulsed stream of reactants a mixture of H2 and air at rates of up to 1500 pulses per second, has been constructed. The reactants burn in a resonant tube and the products exit the tube as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers have been used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device at various reactant injection frequencies, including both resonant and off-resonant conditions. Pulsed detonations have been demonstrated in the lambda/4 mode of an 8 inch long tube at approx. 600 Hz. The pulsed jet at the exit of the device has been observed using shadowgraph and an infrared camera.

  3. Parametric Study of High Frequency Pulse Detonation Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Anderw D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes development of high frequency pulse detonation tubes similar to a small pulse detonation engine (PDE). A high-speed valve injects a charge of a mixture of fuel and air at rates of up to 1000 Hz into a constant area tube closed at one end. The reactants detonate in the tube and the products exit as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers are used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device and thrust is measured with a balance. The effects of injection frequency, fuel and air flow rates, tube length, and injection location are considered. Both H2 and C2H4 fuels are considered. Optimum (maximum specific thrust) fuel-air compositions and resonant frequencies are identified. Results are compared to PDE calculations. Design rules are postulated and applications to aerodynamic flow control and propulsion are discussed.

  4. Fast Rise Time and High Voltage Nanosecond Pulses at High Pulse Repetition Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth E.; Ziemba, Timothy; Prager, James; Picard, Julian; Hashim, Akel

    2015-09-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. is conducting research to decrease the rise time and increase the output voltage of the EHT Nanosecond Pulser product line, which allows for independently, user-adjustable output voltage (0 - 20 kV), pulse width (20 - 500 ns), and pulse repetition frequency (0 - 100 kHz). The goals are to develop higher voltage pulses (50 - 60 kV), decrease the rise time from 20 to below 10 ns, and maintain the high pulse repetition capabilities. These new capabilities have applications to pseudospark generation, corona production, liquid discharges, and nonlinear transmission line driving for microwave production. This work is supported in part by the US Navy SBIR program.

  5. Why high-frequency pulse tubes can be tipped

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, Gregory W092710; Backhaus, Scott N

    2010-01-01

    The typical low-frequency pulse-tube refrigerator loses significant cooling power when it is tipped with the pulse tube's cold end above its hot end, because natural convection in the pulse tube loads the cold heat exchanger. Yet most high-frequency pulse-tube refrigerators work well in any orientation with respect to gravity. In such a refrigerator, natural convection is suppressed by sufficiently fast velocity oscil1ations, via a nonlinear hydrodynamic effect that tends to align the density gradients in the pulse tube parallel to the oscillation direction. Since gravity's tendency to cause convection is only linear in the pulse tube's end-to-end temperature difference while the oscillation's tendency to align density gradients with oscillating velocity is nonlinear, it is easiest to suppress convection when the end-to-end temperature difference is largest. Simple experiments demonstrate this temperature dependence, the strong dependence on the oscillating velocity, and little dependence on the magnitude or phase of the oscillating pressure. In some circumstances in this apparatus, the suppression of convection is a hysteretic function of oscillating velocity. In some other circumstances, a time-dependent convective state seems more difficult to suppress.

  6. Low temperature high frequency coaxial pulse tube for space application

    SciTech Connect

    Charrier, Aurelia; Charles, Ivan; Rousset, Bernard; Duval, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-29

    The 4K stage is a critical step for space missions. The Hershel mission is using a helium bath, which is consumed day by day (after depletion, the space mission is over) while the Plank mission is equipped with one He4 Joule-Thomson cooler. Cryogenic chain without helium bath is a challenge for space missions and 4.2K Pulse-Tube working at high frequency (around 30Hz) is one option to take it up. A low temperature Pulse-Tube would be suitable for the ESA space mission EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory, expected launch in 2022), which requires around 30mW cooling power at 6K; and for the ESA space mission ATHENA (Advanced Telescope for High ENergy Astrophysics), to pre-cool the sub-kelvin cooler (few hundreds of mW at 15K). The test bench described in this paper combines a Gifford-McMahon with a coaxial Pulse-Tube. A thermal link is joining the intercept of the Pulse-Tube and the second stage of the Gifford-McMahon. This intercept is a separator between the hot and the cold regenerators of the Pulse-Tube. The work has been focused on the cold part of this cold finger. Coupled with an active phase shifter, this Pulse-Tube has been tested and optimized and temperatures as low as 6K have been obtained at 30Hz with an intercept temperature at 20K.

  7. Frequency conversion of high-intensity, femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P S

    1997-06-01

    Almost since the invention of the laser, frequency conversion of optical pulses via non- linear processes has been an area of active interest. However, third harmonic generation using ~(~1 (THG) in solids is an area that has not received much attention because of ma- terial damage limits. Recently, the short, high-intensity pulses possible with chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) laser systems allow the use of intensities on the order of 1 TW/cm2 in thin solids without damage. As a light source to examine single-crystal THG in solids and other high field inter- actions, the design and construction of a Ti:sapphire-based CPA laser system capable of ultimately producing peak powers of 100 TW is presented. Of special interest is a novel, all-reflective pulse stretcher design which can stretch a pulse temporally by a factor of 20,000. The stretcher design can also compensate for the added material dispersion due to propagation through the amplifier chain and produce transform-limited 45 fs pulses upon compression. A series of laser-pumped amplifiers brings the peak power up to the terawatt level at 10 Hz, and the design calls for additional amplifiers to bring the power level to the 100 TW level for single shot operation. The theory for frequency conversion of these short pulses is presented, focusing on conversion to the third harmonic in single crystals of BBO, KD*P, and d-LAP (deuterated I-arginine phosphate). Conversion efficiencies of up to 6% are obtained with 500 fs pulses at 1053 nm in a 3 mm thick BBO crystal at 200 GW/cm 2. Contributions to this process by unphasematched, cascaded second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are shown to be very significant. The angular relationship between the two orders is used to measure the tensor elements of C = xt3)/4 with Crs = -1.8 x 1O-23 m2/V2 and .15Cri + .54Crs = 4.0 x 1O-23 m2/V2. Conversion efficiency in d-LAP is about 20% that in BBO and conversion efficiency in KD*P is 1% that of BBO. It is calculated

  8. 10 K high frequency pulse tube cryocooler with precooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sixue; Chen, Liubiao; Wu, Xianlin; Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Junjie

    2016-07-01

    A high frequency pulse tube cryocooler with precooling (HPTCP) has been developed and tested to meet the requirement of weak magnetic signals measurement, and the performance characteristics are presented in this article. The HPTCP is a two-stage pulse tube cryocooler with the precooling-stage replaced by liquid nitrogen. Two regenerators completely filled with stainless steel (SS) meshes are used in the cooler. Together with cold inertance tubes and cold gas reservoir, a cold double-inlet configuration is used to control the phase relationship of the HPTCP. The experimental result shows that the cold double-inlet configuration has improved the performance of the cooler obviously. The effects of operation parameters on the performance of the cooler are also studied. With a precooling temperature of 78.5 K, the maximum refrigeration capacity is 0.26 W at 15 K and 0.92 W at 20 K when the input electric power are 174 W and 248 W respectively, and the minimum no-load temperature obtained is 10.3 K, which is a new record on refrigeration temperature for high frequency pulse tube cryocooler reported with SS completely used as regenerative matrix.

  9. Photodetachment of H- from intense, short, high-frequency pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Robicheaux, F.

    2016-05-01

    We study the photodetachment of an electron from the hydrogen anion due to short, high-frequency laser pulses by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Simulations are performed to investigate the dependence of the photoelectron spectra on the duration, chirp, and intensity of the pulses. Specifically, we concentrate on the low-energy distributions in the spectra that result from the Raman transitions of the broadband pulses. Contrary to the one-photon ionization, the low-energy distribution maintains a similar width as the laser bandwidth is expanded by chirping the pulses. In addition, we study the transitions of the ionization dynamics from the perturbative to strong-field regime. At high intensities, the positions of the net one- and two-photon absorption peaks in the spectrum shifts and the peaks split to multiple subpeaks because of the multiphoton effects. Moreover, although the one- and two-photon peaks and low-energy distribution exhibit saturation of the ionization yields, the latter shows relatively mild saturation. This work has been supported by DOE under Award No. DE-SC0012193.

  10. Optimization of electric pulse amplitude and frequency in vitro for low voltage and high frequency electrochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shankayi, Zeinab; Firoozabadi, S M P; Hassan, Zohair Saraf

    2014-02-01

    During standard electrochemotherapy (ECT), using a train of 1,000 V/cm amplitude rectangular pulses with 1 Hz frequency, patients experience an unpleasant sensation and slight edema. According to the patients, muscle contractions provoked by high amplitude (about 1,000 V/cm) and low repetition frequency (1 Hz) pulses are the most unpleasant and painful sensations. Recently, ECT using low voltage and higher repetition frequency (LVHF) has been shown to be an effective tool for inhibiting tumor growth. The aim of the present study was to optimize electric pulse amplitude and repetition frequency for LVHF ECT by sampling the different sets of pulse parameters on cell viability and permeabilization. In ECT, a reversible effect based on high permeabilization is desirable. For this purpose, we used bleomycin to evaluate the permeabilization of K562 and MIA-PACA2 cells caused by low voltage (50-150 V/cm) and higher repetition frequency (4-6 kHz) electric pulses. We show that the reversible effect with electropermeabilization of the cells caused by LVHF ECT is accessible; this interaction is more effective for electric pulses with 70 V/cm amplitude. PMID:24271721

  11. A high voltage nanosecond pulser with independently adjustable output voltage, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth; Carscadden, John; Slobodov, Ilia

    2014-10-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT) is developing a high voltage nanosecond pulser capable of generating microwaves and non-equilibrium plasmas for plasma medicine, material science, enhanced combustion, drag reduction, and other research applications. The EHT nanosecond pulser technology is capable of producing high voltage (up to 60 kV) pulses (width 20-500 ns) with fast rise times (<10 ns) at high pulse repetition frequency (adjustable up to 100 kHz) for CW operation. The pulser does not require the use of saturable core magnetics, which allows for the output voltage, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency to be fully adjustable, enabling researchers to explore non-equilibrium plasmas over a wide range of parameters. A magnetic compression stage can be added to improve the rise time and drive lower impedance loads without sacrificing high pulse repetition frequency operation. Work supported in part by the US Navy under Contract Number N00014-14-P-1055 and the US Air Force under Contract Number FA9550-14-C-0006.

  12. Ultrashort pulse Cr4+:YAG laser for high precision infrared frequency interval measurements

    PubMed Central

    Alcock, A. J.; Ma, P.; Poole, P. J.; Chepurov, S.; Czajkowski, A.; Bernard, J. E.; Madej, A. A.; Fraser, J. M.; Mitchell, I. V.; Sorokina, I. T.; Sorokin, E.

    2010-01-01

    A cavity stabilized, SESAM mode-locked Cr4+:YAG laser capable of generating sub-100 fs pulses has been developed. Locking the 130-MHz pulse repetition frequency to that of a hydrogen maser-referenced frequency synthesizer provides a 30-nm wide frequency comb for the 1530-nm wavelength region. In conjunction with a pair of acetylene stabilized, external cavity diode lasers, this laser provides a high precision measurement tool for the determination of acetylene transition frequencies. PMID:19498916

  13. A critical review of liquid helium temperature high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Gan, Z. H.

    2013-08-01

    The importance of liquid helium temperature cooling technology in the aerospace field is discussed, and the results indicate that improving the efficiency of liquid helium cooling technologies, especially the liquid helium high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers, is the principal difficulty to be solved. The state of the art and recent developments of liquid helium high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers are summarized. The main scientific challenges for high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers to efficiently reach liquid helium temperatures are outlined, and the research progress addressing those challenges are reviewed. Additionally some possible solutions to the challenges are pointed out and discussed.

  14. Advantages of high-frequency Pulse-tube technology and its applications in infrared sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arts, R.; Willems, D.; Mullié, J.; Benschop, T.

    2016-05-01

    The low-frequency pulse-tube cryocooler has been a workhorse for large heat lift applications. However, the highfrequency pulse tube has to date not seen the widespread use in tactical infrared applications that Stirling cryocoolers have had, despite significant advantages in terms of exported vibrations and lifetime. Thales Cryogenics has produced large series of high-frequency pulse-tube cryocoolers for non-infrared applications since 2005. However, the use of Thales pulse-tube cryocoolers for infrared sensing has to date largely been limited to high-end space applications. In this paper, the performances of existing available off-the-shelf pulse-tube cryocoolers are examined versus typical tactical infrared requirements. A comparison is made on efficiency, power density, reliability, and cost. An outlook is given on future developments that could bring the pulse-tube into the mainstream for tactical infrared applications.

  15. Laser-induced resonance states as dynamic suppressors of ionization in high-frequency short pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Barash, Danny; Orel, Ann E.; Baer, Roi

    2000-01-01

    An adiabatic-Floquet formalism is used to study the suppression of ionization in short laser pulses. In the high-frequency limit the adiabatic equations involve only the pulse envelope where transitions are purely ramp effects. For a short-ranged potential having a single-bound state we show that ionization suppression is caused by the appearance of a laser-induced resonance state, which is coupled by the pulse ramp to the ground state and acts to trap ionizing flux. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  16. Wafer-level pulsed-DC electromigration response at very high frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D.G.; Snyder, E.S.; Swanson, S.E.; Irwin, L.W.

    1994-03-01

    DC and pulsed-DC electromigration tests were performed at the Wafer-Level Pulsed-DC Electromigration Response and pulsed-DC electromigration tests were performed at the wafer level using standard and self-stressing test structures. DC characterization tests over a very large temperature range (180 to 560{degrees}C) were consistent with an interface diffusion mechanism in parallel with lattice diffusion. That data allowed for extraction of the respective activation energies and the diffusion coefficient of the rapid mechanism. The ability to extract simultaneously a defect-based diffusion coefficient and activation energy is significant given the extreme difficulty in making those measurements in aluminum. The pulsed-DC experiments were conducted over a range that includes the highest frequency to date, from DC to 500 MHz. Measurements were also made as a function of duty factor from 15% to 100% at selected frequencies. The data shows that the pulsed-DC lifetime is consistent with the average current density model at high (> 10 MHz) frequencies and showed no additional effects at the highest frequency tested (500 MHz). At low frequencies, we attribute the lessened enhancement to thermal effects rather than vacancy relaxation effects. Finally, the deviation in lifetime from the expected current density dependence, characterized over 1{1/2} orders of magnitude in current density, is explained in terms of a shift in the boundary condition for electromigration as the current density is decreased.

  17. Development of an Ultra High Frequency Gyrotron with a Pulsed Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Idehara, T.; Kamada, M.; Tsuchiya, H.; Hayashi, T.; Agusu, La; Mitsudo, S.; Ogawa, I.; Manuilov, V. N.; Naito, K.; Yuyama, T.; Jiang, W.; Yatsui, K.

    2006-01-03

    An ultra-high frequency gyrotron is being developed as a THz radiation source by using a pulsed magnet. We have achieved the highest field intensity of 20.2 T. High frequency operation at the second harmonic will achieve 1.01 THz; the corresponding cavity mode is TE6,11,1. On the other hand, an ultra-high power gyrotron with a pulsed magnet is also being developed as a millimeter to submillimeter wave radiation source. The gyrotron is a large orbit gyrotron (LOG) using an intense relativistic electron beam (IREB). A pulsed power generator 'ETIGO-IV' is applied for generation of the IREB. A prototype relativistic LOG was constructed for fundamental operation. The output of the LOG will achieve 144 GHz and 9 MW; the corresponding cavity mode is TE1,4,1. Cavities for 2nd and 4th harmonic operations were designed by numerical simulation for achievement of higher frequency. The progress of development for prototype high frequency gyrotrons with pulsed magnets is presented.

  18. Calcium homeostasis of isolated heart muscle cells exposed to pulsed high-frequency electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wolke, S.; Gollnick, F.; Meyer, R.; Neibig, U.; Elsner, R.

    1996-05-01

    The intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) of isolated ventricular cardiac myocytes of the guinea pig was measured during the application of pulsed high-frequency electromagnetic fields. The high-frequency fields were applied in a transverse electromagnetic cell designed to allow microscopic observation of the myocytes during the presence of the high-frequency fields. The [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was measured as fura-2 fluorescence by means of digital image analysis. Both the carrier frequency and the square-wave pulse-modulation pattern were varied during the experiments (carrier frequencies: 900, 1,300, and 1,800 MHz pulse modulated at 217 Hz with 14% duty cycle; pulsation pattern at 900 MHz; continuous wave, 16 Hz,and 50 Hz modulation with 50% duty cycle and 30 kHz modulation with 80% duty cycle). The mean specific absorption rate (SAR) values in the solution were within one order of magnitude of 1 mW/kg. They varied depending on the applied carrier frequency and pulse pattern. The experiments were designed in three phases: 500 s of sham exposure, followed by 500 s of field exposure, then chemical stimulation without field. The chemical stimulation (K{sup +}-depolarization) indicated the viability of the cells. The K{sup +} depolarization yielded a significant increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Significant differences between sham exposure and high-frequency field exposure were not found except when a very small but statistically significant difference was detected in the case of 900 MHz/50 Hz. However, this small difference was not regarded as a relevant effect of the exposure.

  19. Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed Detonation Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, N.; Cutler, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation tube. The device utilized a mixture of H2 fuel and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at about 600 Hz, for the quarter wave mode of resonance. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to H2 flow based specific impulse of 2970 s. This value is comparable to measurements in H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs). The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the device and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 pounds per cubic inch, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume of order 0.01 pound per cubic inch. This much higher volumetric efficiency results in a potentially much more practical device than the typical PDE, for a wide range of potential applications, including high-speed boundary layer separation control, for example in hypersonic engine inlets, and propulsion for small aircraft and missiles.

  20. Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Namtran C.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation actuator. The device utilized a fuel mixture of H2 and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at approx.600 Hz, for the lambda/4 mode. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to specific impulse of 2611 s. This value is comparable to other H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs) experiments. The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was approx.600 Hz, and was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the model and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 lb/cu in, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume values of approximately 0.01 lb/cu in.

  1. High frequency application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields alters cellular membrane disruption and fluorescent dye uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steelman, Zachary A.; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Beier, Hope T.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2016-03-01

    Cells exposed to nanosecond-pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) exhibit a wide variety of nonspecific effects, including blebbing, swelling, intracellular calcium bursts, apoptotic and necrotic cell death, formation of nanopores, and depletion of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) to induce activation of the inositol trisphosphate/diacylglycerol pathway. While several studies have taken place in which multiple pulses were delivered to cells, the effect of pulse repetition rate (PRR) is not well understood. To better understand the effects of PRR, a laser scanning confocal microscope was used to observe CHO-K1 cells exposed to ten 600ns, 200V pulses at varying repetition rates (5Hz up to 500KHz) in the presence of either FM 1-43, YO-PRO-1, or Propidium Iodide (PI) fluorescent dyes, probes frequently used to indicate nanoporation or permeabilization of the plasma membrane. Dye uptake was monitored for 30 seconds after pulse application at a rate of 1 image/second. In addition, a single long pulse of equivalent energy (200V, 6 μs duration) was applied to test the hypothesis that very fast PRR will approximate the biological effects of a single long pulse of equal energy. Upon examination of the data, we found strong variation in the relationship between PRR and uptake in each of the three dyes. In particular, PI uptake showed little frequency dependence, FM 1-43 showed a strong inverse relationship between frequency and internal cell fluorescence, and YO-PRO-1 exhibited a "threshold" point of around 50 KHz, after which the inverse trend observed in FM 1-43 was seen to reverse itself. Further, a very high PRR of 500 KHz only approximated the biological effects of a single 6 μs pulse in cells stained with YO-PRO-1, suggesting that uptake of different dyes may proceed by different physical mechanisms.

  2. Study on technology of high-frequency pulsed magnetic field strength measurement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Mei; Liu, Zhi-Peng; Yin, Tao

    2012-01-01

    High-frequency transient weak magnetic field is always involved in researches about biomedical engineering field while common magnetic-field sensors cannot work properly at frequencies as high as MHz. To measure the value of MHz-level weak pulsed magnetic-field strength accurately, this paper designs a measurement and calibration method for pulsed magnetic-field. In this paper, a device made of Nonferromagnetic material was independently designed and applied to pulsed magnetic field measurement. It held an accurately relative position between the magnetic field generating coil and the detecting coil. By applying a sinusoidal pulse to the generator, collecting the induced electromotive force of the detector, the final magnetic field strength was worked out through algorithms written in Matlab according to Faraday's Law. Experiments were carried out for measurement and calibration. Experiments showed that, under good stability and consistency, accurate measurement of magnetic-field strength of a sinepulse magnetic-field can be achieved, with frequency at 0.5, 1, 1.5 MHz and strength level at micro-Tesla. Calibration results carried out a measuring relative error about 2.5%.

  3. Mitigation of impedance changes due to electroporation therapy using bursts of high-frequency bipolar pulses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background For electroporation-based therapies, accurate modeling of the electric field distribution within the target tissue is important for predicting the treatment volume. In response to conventional, unipolar pulses, the electrical impedance of a tissue varies as a function of the local electric field, leading to a redistribution of the field. These dynamic impedance changes, which depend on the tissue type and the applied electric field, need to be quantified a priori, making mathematical modeling complicated. Here, it is shown that the impedance changes during high-frequency, bipolar electroporation therapy are reduced, and the electric field distribution can be approximated using the analytical solution to Laplace's equation that is valid for a homogeneous medium of constant conductivity. Methods Two methods were used to examine the agreement between the analytical solution to Laplace's equation and the electric fields generated by 100 µs unipolar pulses and bursts of 1 µs bipolar pulses. First, pulses were applied to potato tuber tissue while an infrared camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution in real-time as a corollary to the electric field distribution. The analytical solution was overlaid on the thermal images for a qualitative assessment of the electric fields. Second, potato ablations were performed and the lesion size was measured along the x- and y-axes. These values were compared to the analytical solution to quantify its ability to predict treatment outcomes. To analyze the dynamic impedance changes due to electroporation at different frequencies, electrical impedance measurements (1 Hz to 1 MHz) were made before and after the treatment of potato tissue. Results For high-frequency bipolar burst treatment, the thermal images closely mirrored the constant electric field contours. The potato tissue lesions differed from the analytical solution by 39.7 ± 1.3 % (x-axis) and 6.87 ± 6.26 % (y-axis) for conventional unipolar pulses

  4. High spatial frequency periodic structures induced on metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jian-Wu; Zhang, Cheng-Yun; Liu, Hai-Ying; Dai, Qiao-Feng; Wu, Li-Jun; Lan, Sheng; Gopal, Achanta Venu; Trofimov, Vyacheslav A; Lysak, Tatiana M

    2012-01-16

    The high spatial frequency periodic structures induced on metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses was investigated experimentally and numerically. It is suggested that the redistribution of the electric field on metal surface caused by the initially formed low spatial frequency periodic structures plays a crucial role in the creation of high spatial frequency periodic structures. The field intensity which is initially localized in the grooves becomes concentrated on the ridges in between the grooves when the depth of the grooves exceeds a critical value, leading to the ablation of the ridges in between the grooves and the formation of high spatial frequency periodic structures. The proposed formation process is supported by both the numerical simulations based on the finite-difference time-domain technique and the experimental results obtained on some metals such as stainless steel and nickel.

  5. LPS levels in root canals after the use of ozone gas and high frequency electrical pulses.

    PubMed

    Melo, Tiago André Fontoura de; Gründling, Grasiela Sabrina Longhi; Montagner, Francisco; Scur, Alcione Luiz; Steier, Liviu; Scarparo, Roberta Kochenborger; Figueiredo, José Antônio Poli de; Vier-Pelisser, Fabiana Vieira

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to verify the effect of ozone gas (OZY® System) and high frequency electric pulse (Endox® System) systems on human root canals previously contaminated with Escherichia colilipopolysaccharide (LPS). Fifty single-rooted teeth had their dental crowns removed and root lengths standardized to 16 mm. The root canals were prepared up to #60 hand K-files and sterilized using gamma radiation with cobalt 60. The specimens were divided into the following five groups (n = 10) based on the disinfection protocol used: OZY® System, one 120-second-pulse (OZY 1p); OZY® System, four 24-second-pulses (OZY 4p); and Endox® System (ENDOX). Contaminated and non-contaminated canals were exposed only to apyrogenic water and used as positive (C+) and negative (C-) controls, respectively. LPS (O55:B55) was administered in all root canals except those belonging to group C-. After performing disinfection, LPS samples were collected from the canals using apyrogenic paper tips. Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate (LAL) was used to quantify the LPS levels, and the data obtained was analyzed using one-way ANOVA. The disinfection protocols used were unable to reduce the LPS levels significantly (p = 0.019). The use of ozone gas and high frequency electric pulses was not effective in eliminating LPS from the root canals. PMID:26981752

  6. Identification of High Frequency Pulses from Earthquake Asperities Along Chilean Subduction Zone Using Strong Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, S.; Kausel, E.; Campos, J.; Saragoni, G. R.; Madariaga, R.

    2011-01-01

    The Chilean subduction zone is one of the most active of the world with M = 8 or larger interplate thrust earthquakes occurring every 10 years or so on the average. The identification and characterization of pulses propagated from dominant asperities that control the rupture of these earthquakes is an important problem for seismology and especially for seismic hazard assessment since it can reduce the earthquake destructiveness potential. A number of studies of large Chilean earthquakes have revealed that the source time functions of these events are composed of a number of distinct energy arrivals. In this paper, we identify and characterize the high frequency pulses of dominant asperities using near source strong motion records. Two very well recorded interplate earthquakes, the 1985 Central Chile (Ms = 7.8) and the 2007 Tocopilla (Mw = 7.7), are considered. In particular, the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake was recorded by a network with absolute time and continuos recording. From the study of these strong motion data it is possible to identify the arrival of large pulses coming from different dominant asperities. The recognition of the key role of dominant asperities in seismic hazard assessment can reduce overestimations due to scattering of attenuation formulas that consider epicentral distance or shortest distance to the fault rather than the asperity distance. The location and number of dominant asperities, their shape, the amplitude and arrival time of pulses can be one of the principal factors influencing Chilean seismic hazard assessment and seismic design. The high frequency pulses identified in this paper have permitted us to extend the range of frequency in which the 1985 Central Chile and 2007 Tocopilla earthquakes were studied. This should allow in the future the introduction of this seismological result in the seismic design of earthquake engineering.

  7. Detailed performance modeling of a pulsed high-power single-frequency Ti:sapphire laser.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gerd; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Behrendt, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is a unique technique for profiling water vapor from the ground up to the lower stratosphere. For accurate measurements, the DIAL laser transmitter has to meet stringent requirements. These include high average power (up to 10 W) and high single-shot pulse energy, a spectral purity >99.9%, a frequency instability <60 MHz rms, and narrow spectral bandwidth (single-mode, <160 MHz). We describe extensive modeling efforts to optimize the resonator design of a Ti:sapphire ring laser in these respects. The simulations were made for the wavelength range of 820 nm, which is optimum for ground-based observations, and for both stable and unstable resonator configurations. The simulator consists of four modules: (1) a thermal module for determining the thermal lensing of the Brewster-cut Ti:sapphire crystal collinear pumped from both ends with a high-power, frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser; (2) a module for calculating the in-cavity beam propagations for stable and unstable resonators; (3) a performance module for simulating the pumping efficiency and the laser pulse energy; and (4) a spectral module for simulating injection seeding and the spectral properties of the laser radiation including spectral impurity. Both a stable and an unstable Ti:sapphire laser resonator were designed for delivering an average power of 10 W at a pulse repetition frequency of 250 Hz with a pulse length of approximately 40 ns, satisfying all spectral requirements. Although the unstable resonator design is more complex to align and has a higher lasing threshold, it yields similar efficiency and higher spectral purity at higher overall mode volume, which is promising for long-term routine operations. PMID:22086016

  8. a Study of a High Frequency Miniature Reservoir-Less Pulse Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaway, I.; Grossman, G.

    2008-03-01

    A miniature high frequency reservoir-less pulse tube cryocooler has been designed and tested in our laboratory. The cryocooler having a regenerator length of 12.0 mm and an overall volume of 2.3cc (excluding the compressor) reached a low temperature of 146K and provided 100mW of cooling at 160K. This experimental study shows that it is possible to miniaturize a pulse tube cryocooler to very short regenerator lengths by implementing a few basic principles: Most importantly, high operating frequencies at small tidal displacements, a regenerator matrix with small hydraulic diameters, and increased helium fill pressures. This study also shows that as the operating frequency of a miniature cryocooler increases, the reservoir becomes less necessary as a phase shifting device. At higher frequencies and appropriate inertance tube geometries, the impedance and capacitance of the inertance tube itself takes over the phase shifting task. An outline of the design and modeling principles is presented along with some details of the experimental apparatus and testing procedures.

  9. Highly efficient mid-infrared difference-frequency generation using synchronously pulsed fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Murray, R T; Runcorn, T H; Kelleher, E J R; Taylor, J R

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of a high average power, picosecond-pulse, mid-infrared source based on difference-frequency generation (DFG) of two synchronous master oscillator power fiber amplifier systems. The generated idler can be tuned over the range 3.28-3.45 μm delivering greater than 3.4 W of average power, with a maximum pump to total DFG power conversion efficiency of 78%. The benefits of a synchronously pumped scheme, compared to CW seeding of DFG sources, are discussed. PMID:27244385

  10. Frequency doubled high-power disk lasers in pulsed and continuous-wave operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Sascha; Hangst, Alexander; Stolzenburg, Christian; Zawischa, Ivo; Sutter, Dirk; Killi, Alexander; Kalfhues, Steffen; Kriegshaeuser, Uwe; Holzer, Marco; Havrilla, David

    2012-03-01

    The disk laser with multi-kW output power in infrared cw operation is widely used in today's manufacturing, primarily in the automotive industry. The disk technology combines high power (average and/or peak power), excellent beam quality, high efficiency and high reliability with low investment and operating costs. Additionally, the disk laser is ideally suited for frequency conversion due to its polarized output with negligible depolarization losses. Laser light in the green spectral range (~515 nm) can be created with a nonlinear crystal. Pulsed disk lasers with green output of well above 50 W (extracavity doubling) in the ps regime and several hundreds of Watts in the ns regime with intracavity doubling are already commercially available whereas intracavity doubled disk lasers in continuous wave operation with greater than 250 W output are in test phase. In both operating modes (pulsed and cw) the frequency doubled disk laser offers advantages in existing and new applications. Copper welding for example is said to show much higher process reliability with green laser light due to its higher absorption in comparison to the infrared. This improvement has the potential to be very beneficial for the automotive industry's move to electrical vehicles which requires reliable high-volume welding of copper as a major task for electro motors, batteries, etc.

  11. Atomic fountain clock with very high frequency stability employing a pulse-tube-cryocooled sapphire oscillator.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Tanabe, Takehiko; Hagimoto, Ken; Hirano, Iku; Watabe, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Takeshi; Hartnett, John G

    2014-09-01

    The frequency stability of an atomic fountain clock was significantly improved by employing an ultra-stable local oscillator and increasing the number of atoms detected after the Ramsey interrogation, resulting in a measured Allan deviation of 8.3 × 10(-14)τ(-1/2)). A cryogenic sapphire oscillator using an ultra-low-vibration pulse-tube cryocooler and cryostat, without the need for refilling with liquid helium, was applied as a local oscillator and a frequency reference. High atom number was achieved by the high power of the cooling laser beams and optical pumping to the Zeeman sublevel m(F) = 0 employed for a frequency measurement, although vapor-loaded optical molasses with the simple (001) configuration was used for the atomic fountain clock. The resulting stability is not limited by the Dick effect as it is when a BVA quartz oscillator is used as the local oscillator. The stability reached the quantum projection noise limit to within 11%. Using a combination of a cryocooled sapphire oscillator and techniques to enhance the atom number, the frequency stability of any atomic fountain clock, already established as primary frequency standard, may be improved without opening its vacuum chamber. PMID:25167146

  12. Atomic fountain clock with very high frequency stability employing a pulse-tube-cryocooled sapphire oscillator.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Tanabe, Takehiko; Hagimoto, Ken; Hirano, Iku; Watabe, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Takeshi; Hartnett, John G

    2014-09-01

    The frequency stability of an atomic fountain clock was significantly improved by employing an ultra-stable local oscillator and increasing the number of atoms detected after the Ramsey interrogation, resulting in a measured Allan deviation of 8.3 × 10(-14)τ(-1/2)). A cryogenic sapphire oscillator using an ultra-low-vibration pulse-tube cryocooler and cryostat, without the need for refilling with liquid helium, was applied as a local oscillator and a frequency reference. High atom number was achieved by the high power of the cooling laser beams and optical pumping to the Zeeman sublevel m(F) = 0 employed for a frequency measurement, although vapor-loaded optical molasses with the simple (001) configuration was used for the atomic fountain clock. The resulting stability is not limited by the Dick effect as it is when a BVA quartz oscillator is used as the local oscillator. The stability reached the quantum projection noise limit to within 11%. Using a combination of a cryocooled sapphire oscillator and techniques to enhance the atom number, the frequency stability of any atomic fountain clock, already established as primary frequency standard, may be improved without opening its vacuum chamber.

  13. a High Frequency Thermoacoustically-Driven Pulse Tube Cryocooler with Coaxial Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, G. Y.; Wang, X. T.; Dai, W.; Luo, E. C.

    2010-04-01

    High frequency thermoacoustically-driven pulse tube cryocoolers are quite promising due to their compact size and high reliability, which can find applications in space use. With continuous effort, a lowest cold head temperature of 68.3 K has been obtained on a 300 Hz pulse tube cryocooler driven by a standing-wave thermoacoustic heat engine with 4.0 MPa helium gas and 750 W heat input. To further reduce the size of the system, a coaxial resonator was designed and the two sub-systems, i.e., the pulse tube cryocooler and the standing-wave thermoacoustic heat engine were properly coupled through an acoustic amplifier tube, which leads to a system axial length of only about 0.7 m. The performance of the system with the coaxial resonator was tested, and shows moderate degradation compared to that with the in-line resonator, which might be attributed to the large flow loss of the 180 degree corner.

  14. High Gain and Frequency Ultra-Stable Integrators for ICC and Long Pulse ITER Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth; Ziemba, Timothy; Prager, James

    2012-10-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies has developed a high gain and frequency ultra-stable integrator for small scale concept experiments and long pulse ITER applications. The Phase I integrator has a 10 μs RC time with a frequency response greater than 10 MHz. The device has been operated for the 3600 s with a drift error less than 600 μV, which exceeds the ITER specification. Longer period operation is also possible (> 30 hours). Additionally, this integrator has an extremely large dynamic range thereby increasing the effective bit depth of a digitizer. These integrators allow for both the fast and slow magnetic/plasma dynamics to be resolved with a single diagnostic. Data will be presented demonstrating the success of the Phase I program, and the Phase II work plan will be discussed. Work has begun to incorporate the integrators into legacy (CAMAC) and modern (National Instruments) DAQ systems.

  15. Diagnostics and Optimization of a Miniature High Frequency Pulse Tube Cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaway, I.; Veprik, A.; Radebaugh, R.

    2010-04-01

    A miniature, high energy density, pulse tube cryocooler with an inertance tube and reservoir has been developed, tested, diagnosed and optimized to provide appropriate cooling for size-limited cryogenic applications demanding fast cool down. This cryocooler, originally designed using REGEN 3.2 for 80 K, an operating frequency of 150 Hz and an average pressure of 5.0 MPa, has regenerator dimensions of 4.4 mm inside diameter and 27 mm length and is filled with ♯635 mesh stainless steel screen. Various design features, such as the use of compact heat exchangers and a miniature linear compressor, resulted in a remarkably compact pulse tube cryocooler. In this report, we present the preliminary test results and the subsequent diagnostic and optimization sequence performed to improve the overall design and operation of the complete cryocooler. These experimentally determined optimal parameters, though slightly different from those proposed in the initial numerical model, yielded 530 mW of gross cooling power at 120 K with an input electrical power of only 25 W. This study highlights the need to further establish our understanding of miniature, high frequency, regenerative cryocoolers, not only as a collection of independent subcomponents, but as one single working unit. It has also led to a list of additional improvements that may yet be made to even further improve the operating characteristics of such a complete miniature cryocooler.

  16. High pulse repetition frequency, multiple wavelength, pulsed CO2 lidar system for atmospheric transmission and target reflectance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-David, Avishai; Emery, Silvio L.; Gotoff, Steven W.; D'Amico, Francis M.

    1992-07-01

    A multiple wavelength, pulsed CO2 lidar system operating at a pulse repetition frequency of 200 Hz and permitting the random selection of CO2 laser wavelengths for each laser pulse is presented. This system was employed to measure target reflectance and atmospheric transmission by using laser pulse bursts consisting of groups with as many as 16 different wavelengths at a repetition rate of 12 Hz. The wavelength tuning mechanism of the transversely excited atmospheric laser consists of a stationary grating and a flat mirror controlled by a galvanometer. Multiple wavelength, differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements reduce the effects of differential target reflectance and molecular absorption interference. Examples of multiwavelength DIAL detection for ammonia and water vapor show the dynamic interaction between these two trace gases. Target reflectance measurements for maple trees in winter and autumn are presented.

  17. High pulse repetition frequency, multiple wavelength, pulsed CO(2) lidar system for atmospheric transmission and target reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, A; Emery, S L; Gotoff, S W; D'Amico, F M

    1992-07-20

    A multiple wavelength, pulsed CO(2) lidar system operating at a pulse repetition frequency of 200 Hz and permitting the random selection of CO(2) laser wavelengths for each laser pulse is presented. This system was employed to measure target reflectance and atmospheric transmission by using laser pulse bursts consisting of groups with as many as 16 different wavelengths at a repetition rate of 12 Hz. The wavelength tuning mechanism of the transversely excited atmospheric laser consists of a stationary grating and a flat mirror controlled by a galvanometer. Multiple wavelength, differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements reduce the effects of differential target reflectance and molecular absorption interference. Examples of multiwavelength DIAL detection for ammonia and water vapor show the dynamic interaction between these two trace gases. Target reflectance measurements for maple trees in winter and autumn are presented. PMID:20725406

  18. High-Frequency Pulsed-Electro-Acoustic (PEA) Measurements for Mapping Charge Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, Kristina; Pearson, Lee; Dennison, J. R.; Doyle, Timothy; Hartley, Kent

    2012-10-01

    High-frequency pulsed-electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements are a non-destructive method used to investigate internal charge distributions in dielectric materials. This presentation discusses the theory and signal processing of simple PEA experiments and shows results of PEA measurements. PEA experiments involve a thin dielectric positioned between two conducting electrodes. A voltage signal on the two electrodes generates an electric field across the dielectric, which stimulates embedded charge and creates a pressure wave that propagates within the capacitor. A coupled acoustic sensor then measures the ensuing pressure pulse response. Spatial distributions of the charge profile are obtained from the resultant pressure waveform. Gaussian filters and other signal processing methods are used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in this waveform. Estimates of the charge distribution inside the dielectric are extracted from this analysis. Our ultimate objective is to develop high resolution PEA methods to investigate in vacuo charge deposition in thin film polymeric, ceramic, or glass dielectric materials using medium to high energy (approximately 103 to 107 eV) electron beams.

  19. On the passage of high-level pulsed radio frequency interference through a nonlinear satellite transponder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, A.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the uncoded bit error rate (BER) performance of a satellite communications system whose modulation scheme is binary PSK and whose transponder contains an arbitrary amplitude nonlinearity, all in the presence of high level pulsed radio frequency interference (RFI). A general approach is presented for direct BER evaluations, in contrast to other approaches which may employ SNR suppression factors. The computed results are based on arbitrarily specified RFI scenarios, in the presence of hard limiter, clipper, or blanker amplitude nonlinearities. Performance curves demonstrate the superiority of an appropriately chosen blanker when the RFI environment is most severe. The results obtained also pertain to the sensitivity of performance to the information bit rate, signal power variations, and the ratio of CW to noise content. The CW effects are found to be the most severe.

  20. Fixed lag smoothing target tracking in clutter for a high pulse repetition frequency radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Uzair; Shi, Yi Fang; Song, Taek Lyul

    2015-12-01

    A new method to smooth the target hybrid state with Gaussian mixture measurement likelihood-integrated track splitting (GMM-ITS) in the presence of clutter for a high pulse repetition frequency (HPRF) radar is proposed. This method smooths the target state at fixed lag N and considers all feasible multi-scan target existence sequences in the temporal window of scans in order to smooth the target hybrid state. The smoothing window can be of any length N. The proposed method to smooth the target hybrid state at fixed lag is also applied to the enhanced multiple model (EMM) tracking algorithm. Simulation results indicate that the performance of fixed lag smoothing GMM-ITS significantly improves false track discrimination and root mean square errors (RMSEs).

  1. High efficiency, low frequency linear compressor proposed for Gifford-McMahon and pulse tube cryocoolers

    SciTech Connect

    Höhne, Jens

    2014-01-29

    In order to reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions, which are most likely the cause of substantial global warming, a reduction of overall energy consumption is crucial. Low frequency Gifford-McMahon and pulse tube cryocoolers are usually powered by a scroll compressor together with a rotary valve. It has been theoretically shown that the efficiency losses within the rotary valve can be close to 50%{sup 1}. In order to eliminate these losses we propose to use a low frequency linear compressor, which directly generates the pressure wave without using a rotary valve. First results of this development will be presented.

  2. 3-D Surface Depression Profiling Using High Frequency Focused Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Kautz, Harold E.; Abel, Phillip B.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Surface topography is an important variable in the performance of many industrial components and is normally measured with diamond-tip profilometry over a small area or using optical scattering methods for larger area measurement. This article shows quantitative surface topography profiles as obtained using only high-frequency focused air-coupled ultrasonic pulses. The profiles were obtained using a profiling system developed by NASA Glenn Research Center and Sonix, Inc (via a formal cooperative agreement). (The air transducers are available as off-the-shelf items from several companies.) The method is simple and reproducible because it relies mainly on knowledge and constancy of the sound velocity through the air. The air transducer is scanned across the surface and sends pulses to the sample surface where they are reflected back from the surface along the same path as the incident wave. Time-of-flight images of the sample surface are acquired and converted to depth/surface profile images using the simple relation (d = V*t/2) between distance (d), time-of-flight (t), and the velocity of sound in air (V). The system has the ability to resolve surface depression variations as small as 25 microns, is useable over a 1.4 mm vertical depth range, and can profile large areas only limited by the scan limits of the particular ultrasonic system. (Best-case depth resolution is 0.25 microns which may be achievable with improved isolation from vibration and air currents.) The method using an optimized configuration is reasonably rapid and has all quantitative analysis facilities on-line including 2-D and 3-D visualization capability, extreme value filtering (for faulty data), and leveling capability. Air-coupled surface profilometry is applicable to plate-like and curved samples. In this article, results are shown for several proof-of-concept samples, plastic samples burned in microgravity on the STS-54 space shuttle mission, and a partially-coated cylindrical ceramic

  3. A high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for multi-dimensional, multi-frequency, and multi-phase pulsed measurements.

    PubMed

    Cho, F H; Stepanov, V; Takahashi, S

    2014-07-01

    We describe instrumentation for a high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR) spectroscopy. The instrumentation is operated in the frequency range of 107-120 GHz and 215-240 GHz and in the magnetic field range of 0-12.1 T. The spectrometer consisting of a high-frequency high-power solid-state source, a quasioptical system, a phase-sensitive detection system, a cryogenic-free superconducting magnet, and a (4)He cryostat enables multi-frequency continuous-wave EPR spectroscopy as well as pulsed EPR measurements with a few hundred nanosecond pulses. Here we discuss the details of the design and the pulsed EPR sensitivity of the instrumentation. We also present performance of the instrumentation in unique experiments including PELDOR spectroscopy to probe correlations in an insulating electronic spin system and application of dynamical decoupling techniques to extend spin coherence of electron spins in an insulating solid-state system. PMID:25085176

  4. A high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for multi-dimensional, multi-frequency, and multi-phase pulsed measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, F. H.; Stepanov, V.; Takahashi, S.

    2014-07-15

    We describe instrumentation for a high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR) spectroscopy. The instrumentation is operated in the frequency range of 107−120 GHz and 215−240 GHz and in the magnetic field range of 0−12.1 T. The spectrometer consisting of a high-frequency high-power solid-state source, a quasioptical system, a phase-sensitive detection system, a cryogenic-free superconducting magnet, and a {sup 4}He cryostat enables multi-frequency continuous-wave EPR spectroscopy as well as pulsed EPR measurements with a few hundred nanosecond pulses. Here we discuss the details of the design and the pulsed EPR sensitivity of the instrumentation. We also present performance of the instrumentation in unique experiments including PELDOR spectroscopy to probe correlations in an insulating electronic spin system and application of dynamical decoupling techniques to extend spin coherence of electron spins in an insulating solid-state system.

  5. [Thermoelastic excitation of acoustic waves in biological models under the effect of the high peak-power pulsed electromagnetic radiation of extremely high frequency].

    PubMed

    Gapeev, A B; Rubanik, A V; Pashovkin, T N; Chemeris, N K

    2007-01-01

    The capability of high peak-power pulsed electromagnetic radiation of extremely high frequency (35,27 GHz, pulse widths of 100 and 600 ns, peak power of 20 kW) to excite acoustic waves in model water-containing objects and muscular tissue of animals has been experimentally shown for the first time. The amplitude and duration of excited acoustic pulses are within the limits of accuracy of theoretical assessments and have a complex nonlinear dependence on the energy input of electromagnetic radiation supplied. The velocity of propagation of acoustic pulses in water-containing models and isolated muscular tissue of animals was close to the reference data. The excitation of acoustic waves in biological systems under the action of high peak-power pulsed electromagnetic radiation of extremely high frequency is the important phenomenon, which essentially contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms of biological effects of these electromagnetic fields.

  6. High-voltage nanosecond pulses in a low-pressure radio-frequency discharge.

    PubMed

    Pustylnik, M Y; Hou, L; Ivlev, A V; Vasilyak, L M; Couëdel, L; Thomas, H M; Morfill, G E; Fortov, V E

    2013-06-01

    An influence of a high-voltage (3-17 kV) 20 ns pulse on a weakly-ionized low-pressure (0.1-10 Pa) capacitively coupled radiofrequency (RF) argon plasma is studied experimentally. The plasma evolution after pulse exhibits two characteristic regimes: a bright flash, occurring within 100 ns after the pulse (when the discharge emission increases by 2-3 orders of magnitude over the steady-state level), and a dark phase, lasting a few hundreds μs (when the intensity of the discharge emission drops significantly below the steady-state level). The electron density increases during the flash and remains very large at the dark phase. 1D3V particle-in-cell simulations qualitatively reproduce both regimes and allow for detailed analysis of the underlying mechanisms. It is found that the high-voltage nanosecond pulse is capable of removing a significant fraction of plasma electrons out of the discharge gap, and that the flash is the result of the excitation of gas atoms, triggered by residual electrons accelerated in the electric field of immobile bulk ions. The secondary emission from the electrodes due to vacuum UV radiation plays an important role at this stage. High-density plasma generated during the flash provides efficient screening of the RF field (which sustains the steady-state plasma). This leads to the electron cooling and, hence, onset of the dark phase.

  7. Development of a high-speed impedance measurement system for dual-frequency capacitive-coupled pulsed-plasma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hohyoung; Lee, Jeongbeom; Park, Gijung; Han, Yunseok; Lee, Youngwook; Cho, Gunhee; Kim, Hanam; Chang, Hongyoung; Min, Kyoungwook

    2015-08-01

    A high-speed impedance measurement system was developed, which enables the measurement of various characteristics of CW and pulsed plasmas with time resolution of less than a microsecond. For this system, a voltage and current sensor is implemented in a printed circuit board to sense the radio frequency signals. A digital board, which has a high-speed analog to digital converter and a field-programmable gate-array, is used to calculate the impedance of the signal. The final output of impedance is measured and stored with a maximum speed of 3 Msps. This sensor system was tested in a pulsed-plasma by applying it to the point between the matching box and the plasma chamber. The experimental equipment was constructed connecting the matching box, a 13.56 MHz generator, a 2 MHz generator that produced pulsed power, and a pulse-signal generator. From the temporal behavior of the measured impedance, we were able to determine the time intervals of transient states, especially of the initial active state. This information can be used to set the pulse frequency and duty for plasma processing. PMID:26329190

  8. Pulsed optically pumped frequency standard

    SciTech Connect

    Godone, Aldo; Micalizio, Salvatore; Levi, Filippo

    2004-08-01

    We reconsider the idea of a pulsed optically pumped frequency standard conceived in the early 1960s to eliminate the light-shift effect. The development of semiconductor lasers and of pulsed electronic techniques for atomic fountains and new theoretical findings allow an implementation of this idea which may lead to a frequency standard whose frequency stability is limited only by the thermal noise in the short term and by the temperature drift in the long term. We shall also show both theoretically and experimentally the possibility of doubling the atomic quality factor with respect to the classical Ramsey technique approach.

  9. Space-time resolved density of helium metastable atoms in a nanosecond pulsed plasma jet: influence of high voltage and pulse frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douat, Claire; Kacem, Issaad; Sadeghi, Nader; Bauville, Gérard; Fleury, Michel; Puech, Vincent

    2016-07-01

    Using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, the spatio-temporal distributions of the helium He(23S1) metastable atoms’ density were measured in a plasma jet propagating in ambient air. The plasma jet was produced by applying short duration high voltage pulses on the electrodes of a DBD-like structure, at a repetition rate in the range 1–30 kHz. In addition to the metastable density, the spatial distribution of helium 587 nm emission intensity was also investigated to give insight into the excitation mechanisms of the He(33D) excited state inside the dielectric tube, in which no laser measurement can be performed. It is demonstrated that the shape of the radial distribution of helium He(23S1) metastable atoms strongly depends on the polarity of the applied voltage and on the repetition frequency. For positive applied voltages, a dramatic constriction of the excited species production is observed whenever the pulse repetition frequency is higher than 6 kHz, and the voltage higher than 5 kV. This shrinking of the jet structure induces an increase by one order of magnitude of the metastable atoms’ density in the jet centre which reaches values as high as 1014 cm‑3. Beyond a critical distance, associated to a transition between a positive streamer and a negative one, the distribution of the excited atoms gets back to an annular structure. For the negative polarity, no shrinking effect correlated to the pulse repetition frequency was observed. The on-axis constriction of the excited species for the high repetition rate and positive polarity is attributed to a memory effect induced by the negative ions, having a lifetime of hundreds of microseconds, left between successive pulses at the periphery of the helium gas flow.

  10. Space-time resolved density of helium metastable atoms in a nanosecond pulsed plasma jet: influence of high voltage and pulse frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douat, Claire; Kacem, Issaad; Sadeghi, Nader; Bauville, Gérard; Fleury, Michel; Puech, Vincent

    2016-07-01

    Using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, the spatio-temporal distributions of the helium He(23S1) metastable atoms’ density were measured in a plasma jet propagating in ambient air. The plasma jet was produced by applying short duration high voltage pulses on the electrodes of a DBD-like structure, at a repetition rate in the range 1-30 kHz. In addition to the metastable density, the spatial distribution of helium 587 nm emission intensity was also investigated to give insight into the excitation mechanisms of the He(33D) excited state inside the dielectric tube, in which no laser measurement can be performed. It is demonstrated that the shape of the radial distribution of helium He(23S1) metastable atoms strongly depends on the polarity of the applied voltage and on the repetition frequency. For positive applied voltages, a dramatic constriction of the excited species production is observed whenever the pulse repetition frequency is higher than 6 kHz, and the voltage higher than 5 kV. This shrinking of the jet structure induces an increase by one order of magnitude of the metastable atoms’ density in the jet centre which reaches values as high as 1014 cm-3. Beyond a critical distance, associated to a transition between a positive streamer and a negative one, the distribution of the excited atoms gets back to an annular structure. For the negative polarity, no shrinking effect correlated to the pulse repetition frequency was observed. The on-axis constriction of the excited species for the high repetition rate and positive polarity is attributed to a memory effect induced by the negative ions, having a lifetime of hundreds of microseconds, left between successive pulses at the periphery of the helium gas flow.

  11. Detector response in time-of-flight mass spectrometry at high pulse repetition frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulcicek, Erol E.; Boyle, James G.

    1993-01-01

    Dead time effects in chevron configured dual microchannel plates (MCPs) are investigated. Response times are determined experimentally for one chevron-configured dual MCP-type detector and two discrete dynode-type electron multipliers with 16 and 23 resistively divided stages. All of these detectors are found to be suitable for time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS), yielding 3-6-ns (FWHM) response times triggered on a single ion pulse. It is concluded that, unless there are viable solutions to overcome dead time disadvantages for continuous dynode detectors, suitable discrete dynode detectors for TOF MS appear to have a significant advantage for high repetition rate operation.

  12. Pulse propagation and failure in the discrete FitzHugh-Nagumo model subject to high-frequency stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ratas, Irmantas; Pyragas, Kestutis

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the effect of a homogeneous high-frequency stimulation (HFS) on a one-dimensional chain of coupled excitable elements governed by the FitzHugh-Nagumo equations. We eliminate the high-frequency term by the method of averaging and show that the averaged dynamics depends on the parameter A=a/ω equal to the ratio of the amplitude a to the frequency ω of the stimulating signal, so that for large frequencies an appreciable effect from the HFS is attained only at sufficiently large amplitudes. The averaged equations are analyzed by an asymptotic theory based on the different time scales of the recovery and excitable variables. As a result, we obtain the main characteristics of a propagating pulse as functions of the parameter A and derive an analytical criterion for the propagation failure. We show that depending on the parameter A, the HFS can either enhance or suppress pulse propagation and reveal the mechanism underlying these effects. The theoretical results are confirmed by numerical simulations of the original system with and without noise.

  13. Distortion cancellation of frequency converted pulses with simple linear signal processing and application to frequency modulation to amplitude modulation conversion in high power lasers.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Sébastien; Luce, Jacques; Hocquet, Steve; Gouédard, Claude; Calvet, Pierre; Penninckx, Denis

    2012-08-20

    It is known that a linear filter may be easily compensated with its inverse transfer function. However, it was shown that this approach could also be valid even for such a complex nonlinear system as frequency conversion. As a matter of fact, it is possible to at least partly precompensate for distortions occurring within, or even downstream from, frequency conversion crystals with a simple linear optical filter set upstream. In this paper, we give the theoretical background and derive the optimum precompensation filter from simple analytical formulas even in the case of saturation. We first show the relevance of our approach for Gaussian pulses: the pulse may be short or not and chirped or not, and the same linear precompensation filter may be used as long as saturation is not reached. We then study the case of phase-modulated pulses, as can be found on high power lasers such as lasers for fusion. We show that previous experimental results are in perfect agreement with these calculations. Finally, justified by our simple analytical formulas, we present a rigorous parametrical study giving the distortion reduction for any second and third harmonic generation system in the case of phase-modulated pulses. PMID:22907009

  14. HIGH POWER PULSED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Singer, S.; Neher, L.K.

    1957-09-24

    A high powered, radio frequency pulse oscillator is described for generating trains of oscillations at the instant an input direct voltage is impressed, or immediately upon application of a light pulse. In one embodiment, the pulse oscillator comprises a photo-multiplier tube with the cathode connected to the first dynode by means of a resistor, and adjacent dynodes are connected to each other through adjustable resistors. The ohmage of the resistors progressively increases from a very low value for resistors adjacent the cathode to a high value adjacent the plate, the last dynode. Oscillation occurs with this circuit when a high negative voltage pulse is applied to the cathode and the photo cathode is bombarded. Another embodiment adds capacitors at the resistor connection points of the above circuit to increase the duration of the oscillator train.

  15. Stationary and high-frequency pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance of a calcified atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul'Yanov, V. A.; Galiullina, L. F.; Galyavich, A. S.; Izotov, V. G.; Mamin, G. V.; Orlinskii, S. B.; Rodionov, A. A.; Salakhov, M. Kh.; Silkin, N. I.; Sitdikova, L. M.; Khairullin, R. N.; Chelyshev, Yu. A.

    2008-09-01

    New possibilities of applying high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance in medicine are demonstrated on an example of the investigation of a calcified atherosclerotic plaque. After the irradiation of the atherosclerotic plaque by x rays, a new type of paramagnetic centers—organomineral radicals—is detected. The spectral and relaxation characteristics of these radicals depend on the calcification degree of the atherosclerotic plaque and can be used for diagnostics.

  16. Frequency independent quenching of pulsed emission

    SciTech Connect

    Gajjar, Vishal; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Kramer, Michael; Karuppusamy, Ramesh; Smits, Roy E-mail: bcj@ncra.tifr.res.in E-mail: ramesh@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de

    2014-12-10

    Simultaneous observations at four different frequencies, 313, 607, 1380, and 4850 MHz, for three pulsars, PSRs B0031–07, B0809+74, and B2319+60, are reported in this paper. Identified null and burst pulses are highly concurrent across more than a decade of frequency. A small fraction of non-concurrent pulses (≤3%) is observed, most of which occur at the transition instances. We report, with very high significance for the first time, the full broadband nature of the nulling phenomenon in these three pulsars. These results suggest that nulling invokes changes on the global magnetospheric scale.

  17. High-order harmonic generation by chirped and self-guided femtosecond laser pulses. II. Time-frequency analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tosa, V.; Kim, H.T.; Kim, I.J.; Nam, C.H.

    2005-06-15

    We present a time-dependent analysis of high-order harmonics generated by a self-guided femtosecond laser pulse propagating through a long gas jet. A three-dimensional model is used to calculate the harmonic fields generated by laser pulses, which only differ by the sign of their initial chirp. The time-frequency distributions of the single-atom dipole and harmonic field reveal the dynamics of harmonic generation in the cutoff. A time-dependent phase-matching calculation was performed, taking into account the self-phase modulation of the laser field. Good phase matching holds for only few optical cycles, being dependent on the electron trajectory. When the cutoff trajectory is phase matched, emitted harmonics are locked in phase and the emission intensity is maximized.

  18. Generation of high-energy self-phase-stabilized pulses by difference-frequency generation followed by optical parametric amplification.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, C; Vozzi, C; Benedetti, E; Sansone, G; Stagira, S; Svelto, O; De Silvestri, S; Nisoli, M; Cerullo, G

    2006-04-01

    We produce ultrabroadband self-phase-stabilized near-IR pulses by a novel approach where a seed pulse, obtained by difference-frequency generation of a hollow-fiber broadened supercontinuum, is amplified by a two-stage optical parametric amplifier. Energies up to 20 microJ with a pulse spectrum extending from 1.2 to 1.6 microm are demonstrated, and a route for substantial energy scaling is indicated.

  19. Anomalous high-frequency oscillations in a field emission tube and their significance in pulsed field emission.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, M J; Christensen, D A; Mousa, M S; Baturin, A; Sheshin, E P

    2007-09-01

    Relaxation oscillations occur when a capacitor is inserted in series with a field emission tube, a DC high-voltage power supply, and a ballast resistor. The waveform of these oscillations is highly reproducible with a dominant frequency of 200 MHz and a decay time of 20 ns. The peak current as high as 320 mA has been observed although the tungsten emitter is only rated for 10 microA. We have shown that these oscillations are due to a displacement current, charging of the anode-tip capacitance, and are not of a field emission origin. We conclude that the effects of displacement current should be considered in measurements of field emission with microsecond pulses, where high-current densities can be observed. PMID:17485175

  20. A Power-Efficient Multichannel Neural Stimulator Using High-Frequency Pulsed Excitation From an Unfiltered Dynamic Supply.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Marijn N; Serdijn, Wouter A

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a neural stimulator system that employs a fundamentally different way of stimulating neural tissue compared to classical constant current stimulation. A stimulation pulse is composed of a sequence of current pulses injected at a frequency of 1 MHz for which the duty cycle is used to control the stimulation intensity. The system features 8 independent channels that connect to any of the 16 electrodes at the output. A sophisticated control system allows for individual control of each channel's stimulation and timing parameters. This flexibility makes the system suitable for complex electrode configurations and current steering applications. Simultaneous multichannel stimulation is implemented using a high frequency alternating technique, which reduces the amount of electrode switches by a factor 8. The system has the advantage of requiring a single inductor as its only external component. Furthermore it offers a high power efficiency, which is nearly independent on both the voltage over the load as well as on the number of simultaneously operated channels. Measurements confirm this: in multichannel mode the power efficiency can be increased for specific cases to 40% compared to 20% that is achieved by state-of-the-art classical constant current stimulators with adaptive power supply. PMID:25438324

  1. High-frequency acousto-optic mode locker for picosecond pulse generation

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, U.; Li, K.D.; Khuri-Yakub, P.T.; Bloom, D. ); Gerstenberger, D.C.; Weingarten, K.J. )

    1990-01-01

    We modeled, designed, and built a 500-MHz acousto-optic mode locker with a diffraction efficiency of 28% per 1 W drive power. The transducer is zinc oxide sputtered onto a sapphire substrate. A new figure of merit is defined for the mode-locker design, which indicates that sapphire is a good substrate material. Pulse widths of less than 10 psec with an average power of 150 mW were achieved from a 500-MHz pulse-rate, diode-pumped, cw mode-locked Nd:YLF laser using a pump power of 700 mW.

  2. Generation of high-quality parabolic pulses with optimized duration and energy by use of dispersive frequency-to-time mapping.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jeonghyun; Azaña, José

    2015-10-19

    We propose and demonstrate a novel linear-optics method for high-fidelity parabolic pulse generation with durations ranging from the picosecond to the sub-nanosecond range. This method is based on dispersion-induced frequency-to-time mapping combined with spectral shaping in order to overcome constraints of previous linear shaping approaches. Temporal waveform distortions associated with the need to satisfy a far-field condition are eliminated by use of a virtual time-lens process, which is directly implemented in the linear spectral shaping stage. Using this approach, the generated parabolic pulses are able to maintain most energy spectrum available from the input pulse frequency bandwidth, regardless of the target pulse duration, which is not anymore limited by the finest spectral resolution of the optical pulse spectrum shaper. High-quality parabolic pulses, with durations from 25ps to 400ps and output powers exceeding 4dBm before amplification, have been experimentally synthesized from a picosecond mode-locked optical source using a commercial optical pulse shaper with a frequency resolution >10GHz. In particular, we report the synthesis of full-duty cycle parabolic pulses that match up almost exactly with an ideal fitting over the entire pulse period.

  3. Effect of combined high-frequency and pulse-dynamic impact on adhesive-joint strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbushin, N. A.; Petrov, Yu. V.

    2016-08-01

    The problem on exfoliation of a string on an elastic foundation under the application of external force is considered. The dependence of amplitude of the forced load, which causes the exfoliation of the string, on its frequency and application time is investigated. The exfoliation criterion under use is based on the concept of incubation time. It should be noted that, at certain values of the forced-vibration frequency, it is possible to decrease considerably the threshold-amplitude value.

  4. Pulse shape measurements using single shot-frequency resolved optical gating for high energy (80 J) short pulse (600 fs) laser

    SciTech Connect

    Palaniyappan, S.; Johnson, R.; Shimada, T.; Gautier, D. C.; Letzring, S.; Offermann, D. T.; Fernandez, J. C.; Shah, R. C.; Jung, D.; Hegelich, B. M.; Hoerlein, R.

    2010-10-15

    Relevant to laser based electron/ion accelerations, a single shot second harmonic generation frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) system has been developed to characterize laser pulses (80 J, {approx}600 fs) incident on and transmitted through nanofoil targets, employing relay imaging, spatial filter, and partially coated glass substrates to reduce spatial nonuniformity and B-integral. The device can be completely aligned without using a pulsed laser source. Variations of incident pulse shape were measured from durations of 613 fs (nearly symmetric shape) to 571 fs (asymmetric shape with pre- or postpulse). The FROG measurements are consistent with independent spectral and autocorrelation measurements.

  5. Highly efficient, widely tunable, 10-Hz parametric amplifier pumped by frequency-doubled femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J Y; Xu, Z; Kong, Y; Yu, C; Wu, Y

    1998-05-20

    We report a 10-Hz, highly efficient, widely tunable (from the visible to the IR), broadband femtosecond optical parametric generator and optical parametric amplifier (OPA) in BBO, LBO, and CBO crystals pumped by the frequency-doubled output of a regeneratively amplified Ti:sapphire laser at 400 nm. The output of the system is continuously tunable from 440 nm to 2.5 microm with a maximum overall efficiency of approximately 25% at 670 nm and an optical conversion efficiency of more than 36% in the OPA stage. The effects of the seed beam energy, the type of the crystal and the crystal length, and the pumping energy of the output of the OPA, such as the optical efficiency, the bandwidth, the pulse duration, and the group velocity mismatch between the signal and the idler and between the seeder and the pump, are investigated. The results provide useful information for optimization of the design of the system.

  6. Highly efficient, widely tunable, 10-Hz parametric amplifier pumped by frequency-doubled femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J Y; Xu, Z; Kong, Y; Yu, C; Wu, Y

    1998-05-20

    We report a 10-Hz, highly efficient, widely tunable (from the visible to the IR), broadband femtosecond optical parametric generator and optical parametric amplifier (OPA) in BBO, LBO, and CBO crystals pumped by the frequency-doubled output of a regeneratively amplified Ti:sapphire laser at 400 nm. The output of the system is continuously tunable from 440 nm to 2.5 microm with a maximum overall efficiency of approximately 25% at 670 nm and an optical conversion efficiency of more than 36% in the OPA stage. The effects of the seed beam energy, the type of the crystal and the crystal length, and the pumping energy of the output of the OPA, such as the optical efficiency, the bandwidth, the pulse duration, and the group velocity mismatch between the signal and the idler and between the seeder and the pump, are investigated. The results provide useful information for optimization of the design of the system. PMID:18273287

  7. A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for the ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of crystalline lenses with laser-induced microbubbles interrogated by acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangpil; Aglyamov, Salavat; Karpiouk, Andrei; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-08-01

    A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for an ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of an animal crystalline lens was developed and validated. We measured the bulk displacement of laser-induced microbubbles created at different positions within the lens using nanosecond laser pulses. An impulsive acoustic radiation force was applied to the microbubble, and spatio-temporal measurements of the microbubble displacement were assessed using a custom-made high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system consisting of two 25 MHz focused ultrasound transducers. One of these transducers was used to emit a train of ultrasound pulses and another transducer was used to receive the ultrasound echoes reflected from the microbubble. The developed system was operating at 1 MHz pulse repetition frequency. Based on the measured motion of the microbubble, Young's moduli of surrounding tissue were reconstructed and the values were compared with those measured using the indentation test. Measured values of Young's moduli of four bovine lenses ranged from 2.6 ± 0.1 to 26 ± 1.4 kPa, and there was good agreement between the two methods. Therefore, our studies, utilizing the high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system, suggest that the developed approach can be used to assess the mechanical properties of ex vivo crystalline lenses. Furthermore, the potential of the presented approach for in vivo measurements is discussed.

  8. Modulation of the human vestibuloocular reflex during saccades: probing by high-frequency oscillation and torque pulses of the head.

    PubMed

    Tabak, S; Smeets, J B; Collewijn, H

    1996-11-01

    1. We probed the gain and phase of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) during the execution of voluntary gaze saccades, with continuous oscillation or acceleration pulses, applied through a torque helmet. 2. Small-amplitude (< 1 degree), high-frequency (10-14 Hz) head oscillations in the horizontal or vertical plane were superimposed on ongoing horizontal gaze saccades (40-100 degrees). Torque pulses to the head ("with" or "against" gaze) were superimposed on 40 degrees horizontal saccades. Eye and head movements were precisely measured with sensor coils in magnetic fields. 3. Techniques were developed to separate the oscillatory (horizontal or vertical) component from the gaze shift and obtain VOR gain and phase with Fourier techniques from the relation between eye-in-head and head oscillations. These involved either subtraction of exactly matching saccades with and without oscillation (drawback: low yield) or time shifting of successive trials to synchronize the oscillations (drawback: slight time blurring of saccades). 4. The results of these matching and synchronization methods were essentially identical and consistent. Presaccadic gain values of the horizontal VOR (typically about unity) were reduced by, on average, approximately 20 and 50% during horizontal saccades of 40 and 100 degrees, respectively. These percentages may be truncated because of methodological limitations, but even after taking these into account (on the basis of simulation experiments with 2 different, theoretical profiles of suppression) our results do not support a complete saccadic VOR suppression for any substantial fraction of saccadic duration. Qualitatively similar changes were found when the vertical VOR was probed during 100 degrees horizontal saccades. 5. Concomitantly with the reductions in gain, VOR phase was advanced by approximately 20 degrees during the saccade. 6. In the wake of gaze saccades, VOR gain was consistently elevated (to approximately 1.0) above the presaccadic

  9. High Frequency Sampling of TTL Pulses on a Raspberry Pi for Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy Applications.

    PubMed

    Tivnan, Matthew; Gurjar, Rajan; Wolf, David E; Vishwanath, Karthik

    2015-08-12

    Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS) is a well-established optical technique that has been used for non-invasive measurement of blood flow in tissues. Instrumentation for DCS includes a correlation device that computes the temporal intensity autocorrelation of a coherent laser source after it has undergone diffuse scattering through a turbid medium. Typically, the signal acquisition and its autocorrelation are performed by a correlation board. These boards have dedicated hardware to acquire and compute intensity autocorrelations of rapidly varying input signal and usually are quite expensive. Here we show that a Raspberry Pi minicomputer can acquire and store a rapidly varying time-signal with high fidelity. We show that this signal collected by a Raspberry Pi device can be processed numerically to yield intensity autocorrelations well suited for DCS applications. DCS measurements made using the Raspberry Pi device were compared to those acquired using a commercial hardware autocorrelation board to investigate the stability, performance, and accuracy of the data acquired in controlled experiments. This paper represents a first step toward lowering the instrumentation cost of a DCS system and may offer the potential to make DCS become more widely used in biomedical applications.

  10. High Frequency Sampling of TTL Pulses on a Raspberry Pi for Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy Applications.

    PubMed

    Tivnan, Matthew; Gurjar, Rajan; Wolf, David E; Vishwanath, Karthik

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS) is a well-established optical technique that has been used for non-invasive measurement of blood flow in tissues. Instrumentation for DCS includes a correlation device that computes the temporal intensity autocorrelation of a coherent laser source after it has undergone diffuse scattering through a turbid medium. Typically, the signal acquisition and its autocorrelation are performed by a correlation board. These boards have dedicated hardware to acquire and compute intensity autocorrelations of rapidly varying input signal and usually are quite expensive. Here we show that a Raspberry Pi minicomputer can acquire and store a rapidly varying time-signal with high fidelity. We show that this signal collected by a Raspberry Pi device can be processed numerically to yield intensity autocorrelations well suited for DCS applications. DCS measurements made using the Raspberry Pi device were compared to those acquired using a commercial hardware autocorrelation board to investigate the stability, performance, and accuracy of the data acquired in controlled experiments. This paper represents a first step toward lowering the instrumentation cost of a DCS system and may offer the potential to make DCS become more widely used in biomedical applications. PMID:26274961

  11. High Frequency Sampling of TTL Pulses on a Raspberry Pi for Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tivnan, Matthew; Gurjar, Rajan; Wolf, David E.; Vishwanath, Karthik

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS) is a well-established optical technique that has been used for non-invasive measurement of blood flow in tissues. Instrumentation for DCS includes a correlation device that computes the temporal intensity autocorrelation of a coherent laser source after it has undergone diffuse scattering through a turbid medium. Typically, the signal acquisition and its autocorrelation are performed by a correlation board. These boards have dedicated hardware to acquire and compute intensity autocorrelations of rapidly varying input signal and usually are quite expensive. Here we show that a Raspberry Pi minicomputer can acquire and store a rapidly varying time-signal with high fidelity. We show that this signal collected by a Raspberry Pi device can be processed numerically to yield intensity autocorrelations well suited for DCS applications. DCS measurements made using the Raspberry Pi device were compared to those acquired using a commercial hardware autocorrelation board to investigate the stability, performance, and accuracy of the data acquired in controlled experiments. This paper represents a first step toward lowering the instrumentation cost of a DCS system and may offer the potential to make DCS become more widely used in biomedical applications. PMID:26274961

  12. Pulsed addressing of a dual-frequency nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Mottram, N J; Brown, C V

    2006-09-01

    A continuum theory of dielectric relaxation within liquid crystal materials is described and used to model the response of dual frequency materials to single pulse voltage waveforms. The equations governing the anisotropic axis (director) angle, electric field, and induced polarizations are solved numerically to investigate pulsed addressing of a model zenithally bistable liquid crystal device. By suitably tailoring the voltage pulse, it is found to be possible to switch between both bistable states. For short pulses the high frequency components of the leading edge of the voltage pulse excites the perpendicular polarization and forces the director to lie parallel to the cell substrates. For longer voltage pulses the constant dc component of the voltage pulse excites the parallel polarization causing the director to lie perpendicular to the substrates. It is also found that reducing rotational viscosity and increasing the achievable dielectric anisotropies (particularly the high frequency value) can significantly reduce the operating voltages of such a device.

  13. Pulsed addressing of a dual-frequency nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottram, N. J.; Brown, C. V.

    2006-09-01

    A continuum theory of dielectric relaxation within liquid crystal materials is described and used to model the response of dual frequency materials to single pulse voltage waveforms. The equations governing the anisotropic axis (director) angle, electric field, and induced polarizations are solved numerically to investigate pulsed addressing of a model zenithally bistable liquid crystal device. By suitably tailoring the voltage pulse, it is found to be possible to switch between both bistable states. For short pulses the high frequency components of the leading edge of the voltage pulse excites the perpendicular polarization and forces the director to lie parallel to the cell substrates. For longer voltage pulses the constant dc component of the voltage pulse excites the parallel polarization causing the director to lie perpendicular to the substrates. It is also found that reducing rotational viscosity and increasing the achievable dielectric anisotropies (particularly the high frequency value) can significantly reduce the operating voltages of such a device.

  14. Pulsed addressing of a dual-frequency nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Mottram, N J; Brown, C V

    2006-09-01

    A continuum theory of dielectric relaxation within liquid crystal materials is described and used to model the response of dual frequency materials to single pulse voltage waveforms. The equations governing the anisotropic axis (director) angle, electric field, and induced polarizations are solved numerically to investigate pulsed addressing of a model zenithally bistable liquid crystal device. By suitably tailoring the voltage pulse, it is found to be possible to switch between both bistable states. For short pulses the high frequency components of the leading edge of the voltage pulse excites the perpendicular polarization and forces the director to lie parallel to the cell substrates. For longer voltage pulses the constant dc component of the voltage pulse excites the parallel polarization causing the director to lie perpendicular to the substrates. It is also found that reducing rotational viscosity and increasing the achievable dielectric anisotropies (particularly the high frequency value) can significantly reduce the operating voltages of such a device. PMID:17025650

  15. Characteristics of temperature rise in variable inductor employing magnetorheological fluid driven by a high-frequency pulsed voltage source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho-Young; Kang, In Man; Shon, Chae-Hwa; Lee, Se-Hee

    2015-05-01

    A variable inductor with magnetorheological (MR) fluid has been successfully applied to power electronics applications; however, its thermal characteristics have not been investigated. To evaluate the performance of the variable inductor with respect to temperature, we measured the characteristics of temperature rise and developed a numerical analysis technique. The characteristics of temperature rise were determined experimentally and verified numerically by adopting a multiphysics analysis technique. In order to accurately estimate the temperature distribution in a variable inductor with an MR fluid-gap, the thermal solver should import the heat source from the electromagnetic solver to solve the eddy current problem. To improve accuracy, the B-H curves of the MR fluid under operating temperature were obtained using the magnetic property measurement system. In addition, the Steinmetz equation was applied to evaluate the core loss in a ferrite core. The predicted temperature rise for a variable inductor showed good agreement with the experimental data and the developed numerical technique can be employed to design a variable inductor with a high-frequency pulsed voltage source.

  16. Geometry of hydrogen bonds formed by lipid bilayer nitroxide probes : A high frequency pulsed ENDOR/EPR study.

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnova, T. I.; Smirnov, A. I.; Pachtchenko, S.; Poluektov, O. G.; Chemistry; North Carolina State Univ.

    2007-01-01

    Solvent effects on magnetic parameters of nitroxide spin labels in combination with side-directed spin-labeling EPR methods provide very useful means for elucidating polarity profiles in lipid bilayers and mapping local electrostatic effects in complex biomolecular systems. One major contributor to these solvent effects is the hydrogen bonds that could be formed between the nitroxide moiety and water and/or the available hydroxyl groups. Here, formation of hydrogen bonds between a lipid bilayer spin probe 5-doxyl stearic acid, 5DSA and hydrogen-bond donors has been studied using high-frequency (HF) pulsed ENDOR and EPR. A hydrogen-bonded deuteron was directly detected in HF ENDOR (130 GHz) spectra of 5DSA dissolved in several deuterated alcohols, while the characteristic signal was absent in nonpolar toluene-d{sub 8}. The length of the hydrogen bond, 1.74 {+-} 0.06 {angstrom}, and its geometry were found to be essentially the same for all four alcohols studied, indicating that nearly identical hydrogen bonds have been formed regardless of the solvent dielectric constant. This strengthens a hypothesis that HF EPR spectra are exclusively sensitive to formation of hydrogen bonds and could be used for probing the hydrogen-bond network in complex biomolecular assemblies and lipid bilayers with site-directed spin-labeling methods.

  17. Characteristics of temperature rise in variable inductor employing magnetorheological fluid driven by a high-frequency pulsed voltage source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ho-Young; Kang, In Man; Shon, Chae-Hwa; Lee, Se-Hee

    2015-05-07

    A variable inductor with magnetorheological (MR) fluid has been successfully applied to power electronics applications; however, its thermal characteristics have not been investigated. To evaluate the performance of the variable inductor with respect to temperature, we measured the characteristics of temperature rise and developed a numerical analysis technique. The characteristics of temperature rise were determined experimentally and verified numerically by adopting a multiphysics analysis technique. In order to accurately estimate the temperature distribution in a variable inductor with an MR fluid-gap, the thermal solver should import the heat source from the electromagnetic solver to solve the eddy current problem. To improve accuracy, the B–H curves of the MR fluid under operating temperature were obtained using the magnetic property measurement system. In addition, the Steinmetz equation was applied to evaluate the core loss in a ferrite core. The predicted temperature rise for a variable inductor showed good agreement with the experimental data and the developed numerical technique can be employed to design a variable inductor with a high-frequency pulsed voltage source.

  18. [Pulse-modulated Electromagnetic Radiation of Extremely High Frequencies Protects Cellular DNA against Damaging Effect of Physico-Chemical Factors in vitro].

    PubMed

    Gapeyev, A B; Lukyanova, N A

    2015-01-01

    Using a comet assay technique, we investigated protective effects of. extremely high frequency electromagnetic radiation in combination with the damaging effect of X-ray irradiation, the effect of damaging agents hydrogen peroxide and methyl methanesulfonate on DNA in mouse whole blood leukocytes. It was shown that the preliminary exposure of the cells to low intensity pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation (42.2 GHz, 0.1 mW/cm2, 20-min exposure, modulation frequencies of 1 and 16 Hz) caused protective effects decreasing the DNA damage by 20-45%. The efficacy of pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation depended on the type of genotoxic agent and increased in a row methyl methanesulfonate--X-rays--hydrogen peroxide. Continuous electromagnetic radiation was ineffective. The mechanisms of protective effects may be connected with an induction of the adaptive response by nanomolar concentrations of reactive oxygen species formed by pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation.

  19. [Pulse-modulated Electromagnetic Radiation of Extremely High Frequencies Protects Cellular DNA against Damaging Effect of Physico-Chemical Factors in vitro].

    PubMed

    Gapeyev, A B; Lukyanova, N A

    2015-01-01

    Using a comet assay technique, we investigated protective effects of. extremely high frequency electromagnetic radiation in combination with the damaging effect of X-ray irradiation, the effect of damaging agents hydrogen peroxide and methyl methanesulfonate on DNA in mouse whole blood leukocytes. It was shown that the preliminary exposure of the cells to low intensity pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation (42.2 GHz, 0.1 mW/cm2, 20-min exposure, modulation frequencies of 1 and 16 Hz) caused protective effects decreasing the DNA damage by 20-45%. The efficacy of pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation depended on the type of genotoxic agent and increased in a row methyl methanesulfonate--X-rays--hydrogen peroxide. Continuous electromagnetic radiation was ineffective. The mechanisms of protective effects may be connected with an induction of the adaptive response by nanomolar concentrations of reactive oxygen species formed by pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation. PMID:26591599

  20. Dynamics of a one-dimensional model and a three-dimensional hydrogen atom in an intense high-frequency short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X. ); Basile, S. di Fisica Teorica dell'Universita, Casello Postale 50, 98166 Sant'Agata di Messina, Messina, Italy )

    1991-08-01

    We present nonperturbative calculations of ionizing and trapping probabilities for a one-dimensional model and a three-dimensional hydrogen atom in an intense high-frequency Gaussian-pulsed laser field. Investigating the dynamics of the ionization process (for one- and two-photon ionization), we find that only for extremely short pulses, especially for hydrogen, does the system have a significant probability of surviving at the end of the pulse, leading to the phenomenon of atomic stabilization with respect to ionization. We also find that a one-dimensional model has a higher survival probability at the end of a Gaussian pulse, as compared to the three-dimensional hydrogen atom.

  1. Assessment of pulse rate variability by the method of pulse frequency demodulation

    PubMed Central

    Hayano, Junichiro; Barros, Allan Kardec; Kamiya, Atsunori; Ohte, Nobuyuki; Yasuma, Fumihiko

    2005-01-01

    Background Due to its easy applicability, pulse wave has been proposed as a surrogate of electrocardiogram (ECG) for the analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). However, its smoother waveform precludes accurate measurement of pulse-to-pulse interval by fiducial-point algorithms. Here we report a pulse frequency demodulation (PFDM) technique as a method for extracting instantaneous pulse rate function directly from pulse wave signal and its usefulness for assessing pulse rate variability (PRV). Methods Simulated pulse wave signals with known pulse interval functions and actual pulse wave signals obtained from 30 subjects with a trans-dermal pulse wave device were analyzed by PFDM. The results were compared with heart rate and HRV assessed from simultaneously recorded ECG. Results Analysis of simulated data revealed that the PFDM faithfully demodulates source interval function with preserving the frequency characteristics of the function, even when the intervals fluctuate rapidly over a wide range and when the signals include fluctuations in pulse height and baseline. Analysis of actual data revealed that individual means of low and high frequency components of PRV showed good agreement with those of HRV (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.997 and 0.981, respectively). Conclusion The PFDM of pulse wave signal provides a reliable assessment of PRV. Given the popularity of pulse wave equipments, PFDM may open new ways to the studies of long-term assessment of cardiovascular variability and dynamics. PMID:16259639

  2. Dynamic interference in the photoionization of He by coherent intense high-frequency laser pulses: Direct propagation of the two-electron wave packets on large spatial grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, Anton N.; Müller, Anne D.; Hochstuhl, David; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Demekhin, Philipp V.

    2016-04-01

    The direct ionization of the helium atom by intense coherent high-frequency short laser pulses is investigated theoretically from first principles. To this end, we solve numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the two-electron wave packet and its interaction with the linearly polarized pulse by the efficient time-dependent restricted-active-space configuration-interaction method (TD-RASCI). In particular, we consider photon energies which are nearly resonant for the 1 s →2 p excitation in the He+ ion. Thereby, we investigate the dynamic interference of the photoelectrons of the same kinetic energy emitted at different times along the pulse in the two-electron system. In order to enable observation of the dynamic interference in the computed spectrum, the electron wave packets were propagated on large spatial grids over long times. The computed photoionization spectra of He exhibit pronounced interference patterns the complexity of which increases with the decrease of the photon energy detuning and with the increase of the pulse intensity. Our numerical results pave the way for experimental verification of the dynamic interference effect at presently available high-frequency laser pulse sources.

  3. High voltage pulse conditioning

    DOEpatents

    Springfield, Ray M.; Wheat, Jr., Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for conditioning high voltage pulses from particle accelerators in order to shorten the rise times of the pulses. Flashover switches in the cathode stalk of the transmission line hold off conduction for a determinable period of time, reflecting the early portion of the pulses. Diodes upstream of the switches divert energy into the magnetic and electrostatic storage of the capacitance and inductance inherent to the transmission line until the switches close.

  4. High-Frequency, Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Enhances Alveolar Bone Healing of Extraction Sockets in Rats: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung Lhi; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Park, Joon Bong; Heo, Jung Sun; Choi, Yumi

    2016-02-01

    Most studies of the beneficial effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on bone healing have used frequencies between 1.0 and 1.5 MHz. However, after consideration of ultrasound wave characteristics and depth of target tissue, higher-frequency LIPUS may have been more effective on superficially positioned alveolar bone. We investigated this hypothesis by applying LIPUS (frequency, 3.0 MHz; intensity, 30 mW/cm(2)) on shaved right cheeks over alveolar bones of tooth extraction sockets in rats for 10 min/d for 2 wk after tooth extraction; the control group (left cheek of the same rats) did not receive LIPUS treatment. Compared with the control group, the LIPUS group manifested more new bone growth inside the sockets on histomorphometric analysis (maximal difference = 2.5-fold on the seventh day after extraction) and higher expressions of osteogenesis-related mRNAs and proteins than the control group did. These findings indicate that 3.0-MHz LIPUS could enhance alveolar bone formation and calcification in rats.

  5. Adiabatic frequency conversion of ultrafast pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchowski, H.; Bruner, B. D.; Ganany-Padowicz, A.; Juwiler, I.; Arie, A.; Silberberg, Y.

    2011-12-01

    A new method for efficient, broadband sum and difference frequency generation of ultrafast pulses is demonstrated. The principles of the method follow from an analogy between frequency conversion and coherent optical excitation of a two-level system. For conversion of ultrafast pulses, the concepts of adiabatic conversion are developed further in order to account for dispersion and group velocity mismatch. The scheme was implemented using aperiodically poled nonlinear crystals and a single step nonlinear mixing process, leading to conversion of near-IR (˜790 nm) ultrafast pulses into the blue (˜450 nm) and mid-IR (˜3.15 μm) spectral regions. Conversion bandwidths up to 15 THz FWHM and efficiencies up to 50% are reported.

  6. High Power Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering based light sources. We demonstrate up to 36x average power enhancement of frequency doubled sub-millijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  7. High-power picosecond laser pulse recirculation.

    PubMed

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high-power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering-based light sources. We demonstrate up to 40x average power enhancement of frequency-doubled submillijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  8. High-power picosecond laser pulse recirculation.

    PubMed

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high-power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering-based light sources. We demonstrate up to 40x average power enhancement of frequency-doubled submillijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses. PMID:20596201

  9. Identification and Removal of High Frequency Temporal Noise in a Nd:YAG Macro-Pulse Laser Assisted with a Diagnostic Streak Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Kent Marlett, Bechtel Nevada; Ke-Xun Sun Bechtel Nevada

    2004-09-23

    This paper discusses the use of a reference streak camera (SC) to diagnose laser performance and guide modifications to remove high frequency noise from Bechtel Nevada's long-pulse laser. The upgraded laser exhibits less than 0.1% high frequency noise in cumulative spectra, exceeding National Ignition Facility (NIF) calibration specifications. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments require full characterization of streak cameras over a wide range of sweep speeds (10 ns to 480 ns). This paradigm of metrology poses stringent spectral requirements on the laser source for streak camera calibration. Recently, Bechtel Nevada worked with a laser vendor to develop a high performance, multi-wavelength Nd:YAG laser to meet NIF calibration requirements. For a typical NIF streak camera with a 4096 x 4096 pixel CCD, the flat field calibration at 30 ns requires a smooth laser spectrum over 33 MHz to 68 GHz. Streak cameras are the appropriate instrumentation for measuring laser amplitude noise at these very high frequencies since the upper end spectral content is beyond the frequency response of typical optoelectronic detectors for a single shot pulse. The SC was used to measure a similar laser at its second harmonic wavelength (532 nm), to establish baseline spectra for testing signal analysis algorithms. The SC was then used to measure the new custom calibration laser. In both spatial-temporal measurements and cumulative spectra, 6-8 GHz oscillations were identified. The oscillations were found to be caused by inter-surface reflections between amplifiers. Additional variations in the SC spectral data were found to result from temperature instabilities in the seeding laser. Based on these findings, laser upgrades were made to remove the high frequency noise from the laser output.

  10. High voltage pulse generator

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1977-03-08

    An improved high-voltage pulse generator has been provided which is especially useful in ultrasonic testing of rock core samples. An N number of capacitors are charged in parallel to V volts and at the proper instance are coupled in series to produce a high-voltage pulse of N times V volts. Rapid switching of the capacitors from the paralleled charging configuration to the series discharging configuration is accomplished by using silicon-controlled rectifiers which are chain self-triggered following the initial triggering of a first one of the rectifiers connected between the first and second of the plurality of charging capacitors. A timing and triggering circuit is provided to properly synchronize triggering pulses to the first SCR at a time when the charging voltage is not being applied to the parallel-connected charging capacitors. Alternate circuits are provided for controlling the application of the charging voltage from a charging circuit to be applied to the parallel capacitors which provides a selection of at least two different intervals in which the charging voltage is turned "off" to allow the SCR's connecting the capacitors in series to turn "off" before recharging begins. The high-voltage pulse-generating circuit including the N capacitors and corresponding SCR's which connect the capacitors in series when triggered "on" further includes diodes and series-connected inductors between the parallel-connected charging capacitors which allow sufficiently fast charging of the capacitors for a high pulse repetition rate and yet allow considerable control of the decay time of the high-voltage pulses from the pulse-generating circuit.

  11. Generation of high-energy sub-20 fs pulses tunable in the 250-310 nm region by frequency doubling of a high-power noncollinear optical parametric amplifier.

    PubMed

    Beutler, Marcus; Ghotbi, Masood; Noack, Frank; Brida, Daniele; Manzoni, Cristian; Cerullo, Giulio

    2009-03-15

    We report on the generation of powerful sub-20 fs deep UV pulses with 10 microJ level energy and broadly tunable in the 250-310 nm range. These pulses are produced by frequency doubling a high-power noncollinear optical parametric amplifier and compressed by a pair of MgF2 prisms to an almost transform-limited duration. Our results provide a power scaling by an order of magnitude with respect to previous works.

  12. Time dependent Doppler shifts in high-order harmonic generation in intense laser interactions with solid density plasma and frequency chirped pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, E. C.; Zhang, P.; He, Z.-H.; Dollar, F.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2015-05-15

    High order harmonic generation from solid targets is a compelling route to generating intense attosecond or even zeptosecond pulses. However, the effects of ion motion on the generation of harmonics have only recently started to be considered. Here, we study the effects of ion motion in harmonics production at ultrahigh laser intensities interacting with solid density plasma. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we find that there is an optimum density for harmonic production that depends on laser intensity, which scales linearly with a{sub 0} with no ion motion but with a reduced scaling if ion motion is included. We derive a scaling for this optimum density with ion motion and also find that the background ion motion induces Doppler red-shifts in the harmonic structures of the reflected pulse. The temporal structure of the Doppler shifts is correlated to the envelope of the incident laser pulse. We demonstrate that by introducing a frequency chirp in the incident pulse we are able to eliminate these Doppler shifts almost completely.

  13. Generation of Shear Alfvén Waves by Repetitive High Power Microwave Pulses Near the Electron Plasma Frequency - A laboratory study of a ``Virtual Antenna''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhou; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; van Compernolle, Bart; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-11-01

    ELF / ULF waves are important in terrestrial radio communications but difficult to launch using ground-based structures due to their enormous wavelengths. In spite of this generation of such waves by field-aligned ionospheric heating modulation was first demonstrated using the HAARP facility. In the future heaters near the equator will be constructed and laboratory experiments on cross-field wave propagation could be key to the program's success. Here we report a detailed laboratory study conducted on the Large Plasma Device (LaPD) at UCLA. In this experiment, ten rapid pulses of high power microwaves (250 kW X-band) near the plasma frequency were launched transverse to the background field, and were modulated at a variable fraction (0.1-1.0) of fci. Along with bulk electron heating and density modification, the microwave pulses generated a population of fast electrons. The field-aligned current carried by the fast electrons acted as an antenna that radiated shear Alfvén waves. It was demonstrated that a controllable arbitrary frequency (f frequency variation and power dependence of the virtual antenna is also presented. This work is supported by an AFOSR MURI award, and conducted at the Basic Plasma Science Facility at UCLA funded by DoE and NSF.

  14. Slip pulse characteristics, Kathmandu basin resonance and high-frequency waves radiation during unzipping of locked MHT by the 2015, Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake, Nepal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avouac, J. P.; Meng, L.; Melgar, D.; Wei, S.; Elliott, J. R.; Jolivet, R.; Wang, T.; Bock, Y.; Stevens, V.; Ampuero, J. P.; Galetzka, J.; Genrich, J. F.; Geng, J.; Owen, S. E.; Shrestha, P. L.; Moore, A. W.; Adhikari, L. B.; Hudnut, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    We use high-rate GPS, seismological and Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery (SAR) measurements to produce a detailed image of the seismic rupture during the 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake, Nepal. The earthquake ruptured a 150x50km elliptical patch striking parallel to the Himalayan front located north of Kathmandu. This asperity represents only a small fraction of the previous locked portion of the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT) along which the Himalaya is thrust over India. The earthquake initiated at western end of the ruptured patch, 75km northwest of Kathmandu. It produced a slip pulse of ~20 km width, ~6 s duration with peak sliding velocity of ~1 m/s which propagated eastwards at ~2.8 km/s. High frequency seismic waves (~ 1 Hz) were radiated continuously as the earthquake unzipped the northern edge of the locked portion of the of the MHT, a zone of presumably high and heterogeneous pre-seismic stress. Most of the moment was actually released south, hence, updip, of the sources of high frequency seismic waves. The slip pulse there shows a remarkable smooth onset indicating a large effective slip-weakening distance of several meters. This smooth onset can explain the moderate ground shaking at high frequencies (>1Hz) and the limited damage to regular few-storey high dwellings within Kathmandu basin. By contrast, the entire basin resonated at ~4-5 s for 30s resulting in the collapse of some tall buildings. The study suggests a deterministic control, of probably structural origin, of the source characteristics and induced ground shaking.

  15. Theory and computation of the attosecond dynamics of pairs of electrons excited by high-frequency short light pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mercouris, Th.; Komninos, Y.; Nicolaides, C.A.

    2004-03-01

    By defining and solving from first principles, using the state-specific expansion approach, a time-dependent pump-probe problem with real atomic states, we show computationally that, if time resolution reaches the attosecond regime, strongly correlated electronic ''motion'' can be probed and can manifest itself in terms of time-dependent mixing of symmetry-adapted configurations. For the system that was chosen in this study, these configurations, the He 2s2p,2p3d, and 3s3p P{sup o1}, whose radials are computed by solving multiconfigurational Hartree-Fock equations, label doubly excited states (DES) of He inside the 1s{epsilon}p P{sup o1} scattering continuum and act as nonstationary states that mix, and simultaneously decay exponentially to 1s{epsilon}p P{sup o1} via the atomic Hamiltonian, H{sub A}. The herein presented theory and analysis permitted the computation of attosecond snapshots of pairs of electrons in terms of time-dependent probability distributions of the angle between the position vectors of the two electrons. The physical processes were determined by solving ab initio the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, using as initial states either the He 1s{sup 2} or the 1s2s S{sup 1} discrete states and two femtosecond Gaussian pulses of 86 fs full width at half-maximum, having frequencies in resonance with the energies of the correlated states represented by the 2s2p and 2p3d configurations. We calculated the probability of photoabsorption and of two-photon resonance ionization and of the simultaneous oscillatory mixing of the configurations 2s2p,2p3d,3s3p, and 1s{epsilon}p P{sup o1}, within the attosecond scale, via the interactions present in H{sub A}. Among the possible channels for observing the attosecond oscillations of the occupation probabilities of the DES, is the de-excitation path of the transition to the He 1s3d D{sup 1} discrete state, which emits at 6680 A.

  16. High average power difference-frequency generation of picosecond mid-IR pulses at 80MHz using an Yb-fiber laser pumped optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Julia; Beutler, Marcus; Rimke, Ingo; Büttner, Edlef; Farinello, Paolo; Agnesi, Antonio; Petrov, Valentin P.

    2015-02-01

    We present an efficient coherent source widely tunable in the mid-infrared spectral range consisting of a commercial picosecond Yb-fiber laser operating at 80 MHz repetition rate, a synchronously-pumped OPO (SPOPO) and differencefrequency generation (DFG) in AgGaSe2. With an average input pump power of 7.8 W at 1032 nm and at 80 MHz, the SPOPO outputs are tunable from 1380 to 1980 nm (Signal) and from 2.1 to ~4 μm (Idler) with pulse durations between 2.1 and 2.6 ps over the entire tuning range. After temporally overlapping Signal and Idler through a delay line, the two beams are spatially recombined with a dichroic mirror (reflecting for the Signal in s-polarization and transmitting for the Idler in p-polarization), and focused by a 150 mm CaF2 lens to a common focus. For DFG we employ an AR-coated 10- mm thick AgGaSe2 nonlinear crystal cut for type-I interaction at θ =52°. The generated mid-infrared picosecond pulses are continuously tunable between 5 and 18 μm with average power up to 130 mW at 6 μm and more than 1 mW at 18 μm. Their spectra and autocorrelation traces are measured up to 15 μm and 11 μm, respectively, and indicate that the input spectral bandwidth and pulse duration are maintained to a great extent in the nonlinear frequency conversion processes. The pulse duration slightly decreases from 2.1 to 1.9 ps at 6.7 μm while the spectral bandwidth supports ~1.5 ps (~10 cm-1)durations across the entire mid-infrared tuning range. For the first time narrow-band mid-infrared pulses with energy exceeding 1 nJ are generated at such high repetition rates.

  17. Combined effect of constant high voltage electrostatic field and variable frequency pulsed electromagnetic field on the morphology of calcium carbonate scale in circulating cooling water systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ju-Dong; Liu, Zhi-An; Zhao, Er-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Research on scale inhibition is of importance to improve the heat transfer efficiency of heat exchangers. The combined effect of high voltage electrostatic and variable frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields on calcium carbonate precipitation was investigated, both theoretically and experimentally. Using energy dispersive spectrum analysis, the predominant phase was found to be CaCO(3). The formed crystal phases mainly consist of calcite and aragonite, which is, in part, verified by theory. The results indicate that the setting of water flow velocity, and high voltage electrostatic and variable frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields is very important. Favorable values of these parameters can have a significant anti-scaling effect, with 68.95% of anti-scaling ratio for scale sample 13, while unfavorable values do not affect scale inhibition, but rather promoted fouling, such as scale sample 6. By using scanning electron microscopy analysis, when the anti-scaling ratio is positive, the particle size of scale was found to become smaller than that of untreated sample and the morphology became loose. The X-ray diffraction results verify that the good combined effect favors the appearance and growth of aragonite and restrains its transition to calcite. The mechanism for scale reduction is discussed. PMID:25259497

  18. Combined effect of constant high voltage electrostatic field and variable frequency pulsed electromagnetic field on the morphology of calcium carbonate scale in circulating cooling water systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ju-Dong; Liu, Zhi-An; Zhao, Er-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Research on scale inhibition is of importance to improve the heat transfer efficiency of heat exchangers. The combined effect of high voltage electrostatic and variable frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields on calcium carbonate precipitation was investigated, both theoretically and experimentally. Using energy dispersive spectrum analysis, the predominant phase was found to be CaCO(3). The formed crystal phases mainly consist of calcite and aragonite, which is, in part, verified by theory. The results indicate that the setting of water flow velocity, and high voltage electrostatic and variable frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields is very important. Favorable values of these parameters can have a significant anti-scaling effect, with 68.95% of anti-scaling ratio for scale sample 13, while unfavorable values do not affect scale inhibition, but rather promoted fouling, such as scale sample 6. By using scanning electron microscopy analysis, when the anti-scaling ratio is positive, the particle size of scale was found to become smaller than that of untreated sample and the morphology became loose. The X-ray diffraction results verify that the good combined effect favors the appearance and growth of aragonite and restrains its transition to calcite. The mechanism for scale reduction is discussed.

  19. FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF PULSE WIDTH FOR 150 RADIO NORMAL PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. L.; Wang, H. G.

    2014-11-01

    The frequency dependence of the pulse width is studied for 150 normal pulsars, mostly selected from the European Pulsar Network, for which the 10% multifrequency pulse widths can be well fit with the Thorsett relationship W {sub 10} = Aν{sup μ} + W {sub 10,} {sub min}. The relative fraction of pulse width change between 0.4 GHz and 4.85 GHz, η = (W {sub 4.85} – W {sub 0.4})/W {sub 0.4}, is calculated in terms of the best-fit relationship for each pulsar. It is found that 81 pulsars (54%) have η < –10% (group A), showing considerable profile narrowing at high frequencies, 40 pulsars (27%) have –10% ≤η ≤ 10% (group B), meaning a marginal change in pulse width, and 29 pulsars (19%) have η > 10% (group C), showing a remarkable profile broadening at high frequencies. The fractions of the group-A and group-C pulsars suggest that the profile narrowing phenomenon at high frequencies is more common than the profile broadening phenomenon, but a large fraction of the group-B and group-C pulsars (a total of 46%) is also revealed. The group-C pulsars, together with a portion of group-B pulsars with slight pulse broadening, can hardly be explained using the conventional radius-to-frequency mapping, which only applies to the profile narrowing phenomenon. Based on a recent version of the fan beam model, a type of broadband emission model, we propose that the diverse frequency dependence of pulse width is a consequence of different types of distribution of emission spectra across the emission region. The geometrical effect predicting a link between the emission beam shrinkage and spectrum steepening is tested but disfavored.

  20. Frequency content of current pulses in slapper detonator bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, K H

    2006-12-18

    DFT amplitudes are obtained for digital current pulse files. The frequency content of slapper detonator bridge current pulses is obtained. The frequencies are confined well within the passband of the CVR used to sample them.

  1. High-power radio frequency pulse generation and extration based on wakefield excited by an intense charged particle beam in dielectric-loaded waveguides.

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; High Energy Physics; Illinois Inst. of Tech

    2009-07-24

    Power extraction using a dielectric-loaded (DL) waveguide is a way to generate high-power radio frequency (RF) waves for future particle accelerators, especially for two-beam-acceleration. In a two-beam-acceleration scheme, a low-energy, high-current particle beam is passed through a deceleration section of waveguide (decelerator), where the power from the beam is partially transferred to trailing electromagnetic waves (wakefields); then with a properly designed RF output coupler, the power generated in the decelerator is extracted to an output waveguide, where finally the power can be transmitted and used to accelerate another usually high-energy low-current beam. The decelerator, together with the RF output coupler, is called a power extractor. At Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA), we designed a 7.8GHz power extractor with a circular DL waveguide and tested it with single electron bunches and bunch trains. The output RF frequency (7.8GHz) is the sixth harmonic of the operational frequency (1.3GHz) of the electron gun and the linac at AWA. In single bunch excitation, a 1.7ns RF pulse with 30MW of power was generated by a single 66nC electron bunch passing through the decelerator. In subsequent experiments, by employing different splitting-recombining optics for the photoinjector laser, electron bunch trains were generated and thus longer RF pulses could be successfully generated and extracted. In 16-bunch experiments, 10ns and 22ns RF pulses have been generated and extracted; and in 4-bunch experiments, the maximum power generated was 44MW with 40MW extracted. A 26GHz DL power extractor has also been designed to test this technique in the millimeter-wave range. A power level of 148MW is expected to be generated by a bunch train with a bunch spacing of 769ps and bunch charges of 20nC each. The arrangement for the experiment is illustrated in a diagram. Higher-order-mode (HOM) power extraction has also been explored in a dual-frequency design. By using a bunch

  2. Thermal Spray Using a High-Frequency Pulse Detonation Combustor Operated in the Liquid-Purge Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, T.; Obayashi, R.; Tajiri, T.; Kimura, K.; Morohashi, Y.; Johzaki, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Hanafusa, T.; Mizunari, S.

    2016-02-01

    Experiments on thermal spray by pulsed detonations at 150 Hz were conducted. Two types of pulse detonation combustors were used, one operated in the inert gas purge (GAP) mode and the other in the liquid-purge (LIP) mode. In both modes, all gases were supplied in the valveless mode. The GAP mode is free of moving components, although the explosive mixture is unavoidably diluted with the inert gas used for the purge of the hot burned gas. In the LIP mode, pure fuel-oxygen combustion can be realized, although a liquid-droplet injector must be actuated cyclically. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a higher spraying temperature in the LIP mode. First, the temperature of CoNiCrAlY particles heated by pulsed detonations was measured. As a result, the spraying temperature in the LIP mode was higher than that in the GAP mode by about 1000 K. Second, the temperature of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) particles, whose melting point was almost 2800 °C, heated by pulsed detonations in the LIP mode was measured. As a result, the YSZ particles were heated up to about 2500 °C. Finally, a thermal spray experiment using YSZ particles was conducted, and a coating with low porosity was successfully deposited.

  3. Spin signatures of photogenerated radical anions in polymer-[70]fullerene bulk-heterojunctions : high-frequency pulsed EPR spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Poluektov, O. G.; Filippone, S.; Martin, N.; Sperlich, A.; Deibel, C.; Dyakonov, V.

    2010-04-14

    Charged polarons in thin films of polymer-fullerene composites are investigated by light-induced electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at 9.5 GHz (X-band) and 130 GHz (D-band). The materials studied were poly(3-hexylthiophene) (PHT), [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (C{sub 60}-PCBM), and two different soluble C{sub 70}-derivates: C{sub 70}-PCBM and diphenylmethano[70]fullerene oligoether (C{sub 70}-DPM-OE). The first experimental identification of the negative polaron localized on the C{sub 70}-cage in polymer-fullerene bulk heterojunctions has been obtained. When recorded at conventional X-band EPR, this signal is overlapping with the signal of the positive polaron, which does not allow for its direct experimental identification. Owing to the superior spectral resolution of the high frequency D-band EPR, we were able to separate light-induced signals from P{sup +} and P{sup -} in PHT-C{sub 70} bulk heterojunctions. Comparing signals from C{sub 70}-derivatives with different side-chains, we have obtained experimental proof that the polaron is localized on the cage of the C{sub 70} molecule.

  4. Spin signatures of photogenerated radical anions in polymer-[70]fullerene bulk heterojunctions: high frequency pulsed EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Poluektov, Oleg G; Filippone, Salvatore; Martín, Nazario; Sperlich, Andreas; Deibel, Carsten; Dyakonov, Vladimir

    2010-11-18

    Charged polarons in thin films of polymer-fullerene composites are investigated by light-induced electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at 9.5 GHz (X-band) and 130 GHz (D-band). The materials studied were poly(3-hexylthiophene) (PHT), [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (C(60)-PCBM), and two different soluble C(70)-derivates: C(70)-PCBM and diphenylmethano[70]fullerene oligoether (C(70)-DPM-OE). The first experimental identification of the negative polaron localized on the C(70)-cage in polymer-fullerene bulk heterojunctions has been obtained. When recorded at conventional X-band EPR, this signal is overlapping with the signal of the positive polaron, which does not allow for its direct experimental identification. Owing to the superior spectral resolution of the high frequency D-band EPR, we were able to separate light-induced signals from P(+) and P(-) in PHT-C(70) bulk heterojunctions. Comparing signals from C(70)-derivatives with different side-chains, we have obtained experimental proof that the polaron is localized on the cage of the C(70) molecule.

  5. Optical pulse compression reflectometry based on single-sideband modulator driven by electrical frequency-modulated pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Weiwen; Yu, Lei; Yang, Shuo; Chen, Jianping

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel scheme to generate a linear frequency-modulated optical pulse with high extinction ratio based on an electrical frequency-modulated pulse and optical single-sideband modulator. This scheme is proved to improve the stability and accuracy of optical pulse compression reflectometry (OPCR). In the experiment, a high spatial resolution of 10 cm and a long measurement range of 10.8 km using a laser source with 2-km coherence length are demonstrated.

  6. Measurement of coronary flow using high-frequency intravascular ultrasound imaging and pulsed Doppler velocimetry: in vitro feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Grayburn, P A; Willard, J E; Haagen, D R; Brickner, M E; Alvarez, L G; Eichhorn, E J

    1992-01-01

    The recent development of intravascular ultrasound imaging offers the potential to measure blood flow as the product of vessel cross-sectional area and mean velocity derived from pulsed Doppler velocimetry. To determine the feasibility of this approach for measuring coronary artery flow, we constructed a flow model of the coronary circulation that allowed flow to be varied by adjusting downstream resistance and aortic driving pressure. Assessment of intracoronary flow velocity was accomplished using a commercially available end-mounted pulsed Doppler catheter. Cross-sectional area of the coronary artery was measured using a 20 MHz mechanical imaging transducer mounted on a 4.8 F catheter. The product of mean velocity and cross-sectional area was compared with coronary flow measured by timed collection in a graduated cylinder by linear regression analysis. Excellent correlations were obtained between coronary flow calculated by the ultrasound method and measured coronary flow at both ostial (r = 0.99, standard error of the estimate [SEE] = 13.9 ml/min) and distal (r = 0.98, SEE = 23.0 ml/min) vessel locations under steady flow conditions. During pulsatile flow, calculated and measured coronary flow also correlated well for ostial (r = 0.98, SEE = 12.7 ml/min) and downstream (r = 0.99, SEE = 9.3 ml/min) locations. That the SEE was lower for pulsatile as compared with steady flow may be explained by the blunting of the flow profile across the vessel lumen by the acceleration phase of pulsatile flow. These data establish the feasibility of measuring coronary artery blood flow using intravascular ultrasound imaging and pulsed Doppler techniques. PMID:1531416

  7. Duration and frequency of a high temperature pulse affect survival of emergence-ready Megachile rotundata (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) during low-temperature incubation.

    PubMed

    Yocum, George D; Rinehart, Joseph P; Kemp, William P

    2012-02-01

    Synchronizing Megachile rotundata (F.) nesting activity with alfalfa bloom is essential for ensuring optimal pollination for alfalfa seed production. This is achieved by timing the initiation of spring bee incubation so that adults will emerge -2 wk before peak bloom. If weather conditions change so as to delay the bloom, bee managers will commonly expose the developing bees to a period of low-temperature incubation to slow their development. We have previously demonstrated survival during low-temperature incubation can be significantly increased by using a fluctuating thermal regime (FTR) where the bees receive a daily pulse at 20 degrees C. A FTR incubation protocol is composed of a number of different components, such as the base and pulse temperatures, and the duration and frequency of the pulse. In this investigation, the effect of the duration of the pulse (5-120 min) and the frequency of a pulse (twice daily to weekly) on the survival of developing M. rotundata was examined. A pulse as short as 5 min at 20 degrees C increased survival of the developing bees as compared with the constant 6 degrees C controls. Increasing the pulse duration induced a further increase in tolerance to 6 degrees C. As with the pulse duration, increasing the pulse frequency from once weekly to twice daily had a significant effect on improving the bees tolerance to low-temperature incubation. This investigation further strengthens the argument that a FTR protocol is superior to using a constant low-temperature exposure for interrupting the spring incubation of M. rotundata. PMID:22420249

  8. Duration and frequency of a high temperature pulse affect survival of emergence-ready Megachile rotundata (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) during low-temperature incubation.

    PubMed

    Yocum, George D; Rinehart, Joseph P; Kemp, William P

    2012-02-01

    Synchronizing Megachile rotundata (F.) nesting activity with alfalfa bloom is essential for ensuring optimal pollination for alfalfa seed production. This is achieved by timing the initiation of spring bee incubation so that adults will emerge -2 wk before peak bloom. If weather conditions change so as to delay the bloom, bee managers will commonly expose the developing bees to a period of low-temperature incubation to slow their development. We have previously demonstrated survival during low-temperature incubation can be significantly increased by using a fluctuating thermal regime (FTR) where the bees receive a daily pulse at 20 degrees C. A FTR incubation protocol is composed of a number of different components, such as the base and pulse temperatures, and the duration and frequency of the pulse. In this investigation, the effect of the duration of the pulse (5-120 min) and the frequency of a pulse (twice daily to weekly) on the survival of developing M. rotundata was examined. A pulse as short as 5 min at 20 degrees C increased survival of the developing bees as compared with the constant 6 degrees C controls. Increasing the pulse duration induced a further increase in tolerance to 6 degrees C. As with the pulse duration, increasing the pulse frequency from once weekly to twice daily had a significant effect on improving the bees tolerance to low-temperature incubation. This investigation further strengthens the argument that a FTR protocol is superior to using a constant low-temperature exposure for interrupting the spring incubation of M. rotundata.

  9. Missing pulse detector for a variable frequency source

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Charles B.; Lawhorn, John H.

    1979-01-01

    A missing pulse detector is provided which has the capability of monitoring a varying frequency pulse source to detect the loss of a single pulse or total loss of signal from the source. A frequency-to-current converter is used to program the output pulse width of a variable period retriggerable one-shot to maintain a pulse width slightly longer than one-half the present monitored pulse period. The retriggerable one-shot is triggered at twice the input pulse rate by employing a frequency doubler circuit connected between the one-shot input and the variable frequency source being monitored. The one-shot remains in the triggered or unstable state under normal conditions even though the source period is varying. A loss of an input pulse or single period of a fluctuating signal input will cause the one-shot to revert to its stable state, changing the output signal level to indicate a missing pulse or signal.

  10. Vacuum electron acceleration by using two variable frequency laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Saberi, H.; Maraghechi, B.

    2013-12-15

    A method is proposed for producing a relativistic electron bunch in vacuum via direct acceleration by using two frequency-chirped laser pulses. We consider the linearly polarized frequency-chiped Hermit-Gaussian 0, 0 mode lasers with linear chirp in which the local frequency varies linearly in time and space. Electron motion is investigated through a numerical simulation using a three-dimensional particle trajectory code in which the relativistic Newton's equations of motion with corresponding Lorentz force are solved. Two oblique laser pulses with proper chirp parameters and propagation angles are used for the electron acceleration along the z-axis. In this way, an electron initially at rest located at the origin could achieve high energy, γ=319 with the scattering angle of 1.02{sup ∘} with respect to the z-axis. Moreover, the acceleration of an electron in different initial positions on each coordinate axis is investigated. It was found that this mechanism has the capability of producing high energy electron microbunches with low scattering angles. The energy gain of an electron initially located at some regions on each axis could be greatly enhanced compared to the single pulse acceleration. Furthermore, the scattering angle will be lowered compared to the acceleration by using laser pulses propagating along the z-axis.

  11. Ultrasound vibrometry using orthogonal- frequency-based vibration pulses.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Yao, Aiping; Chen, Shigao; Urban, Matthew W; Lin, Haoming; Chen, Xin; Guo, Yanrong; Chen, Ke; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Siping

    2013-11-01

    New vibration pulses are developed for shear wave generation in a tissue region with preferred spectral distributions for ultrasound vibrometry applications. The primary objective of this work is to increase the frequency range of detectable harmonics of the shear wave. The secondary objective is to reduce the required peak intensity of transmitted pulses that induce the vibrations and shear waves. Unlike the periodic binary vibration pulses, the new vibration pulses have multiple pulses in one fundamental period of the vibration. The pulses are generated from an orthogonal-frequency wave composed of several sinusoidal signals, the amplitudes of which increase with frequency to compensate for higher loss at higher frequency in tissues. The new method has been evaluated by studying the shear wave propagation in in vitro chicken and swine liver. The experimental results show that the new vibration pulses significantly increase tissue vibration with a reduced peak ultrasound intensity, compared with the binary vibration pulses.

  12. Resonance ionization spectroscopy of sodium Rydberg levels using difference frequency generation of high-repetition-rate pulsed Ti:sapphire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naubereit, P.; Marín-Sáez, J.; Schneider, F.; Hakimi, A.; Franzmann, M.; Kron, T.; Richter, S.; Wendt, K.

    2016-05-01

    The generation of tunable laser light in the green to orange spectral range has generally been a deficiency of solid-state lasers. Hence, the formalisms of difference frequency generation (DFG) and optical parametric processes are well known, but the DFG of pulsed solid-state lasers was rarely efficient enough for its use in resonance ionization spectroscopy. Difference frequency generation of high-repetition-rate Ti:sapphire lasers was demonstrated for resonance ionization of sodium by efficiently exciting the well-known D1 and D2 lines in the orange spectral range (both ≈589 nm). In order to prove the applicability of the laser system for its use at resonance ionization laser ion sources of radioactive ion beam facilities, the first ionization potential of Na was remeasured by three-step resonance ionization into Rydberg levels and investigating Rydberg convergences. A result of EIP=41449.455 (6) stat(7) syscm-1 was obtained, which is in perfect agreement with the literature value of EIPlit =41449.451(2)cm-1 . A total of 41 level positions for the odd-parity Rydberg series n f 2F5/2,7/2o for principal quantum numbers of 10 ≤n ≤60 were determined experimentally.

  13. Low Frequency Electromagnetic Pulse and Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J J

    2011-02-01

    This paper reviews and summarizes prior work related to low frequency (< 100 Hz) EMP (ElectroMagnetic Pulse) observed from explosions. It focuses on how EMP signals might, or might not, be useful in monitoring underground nuclear tests, based on the limits of detection, and physical understanding of these signals. In summary: (1) Both chemical and nuclear explosions produce an EMP. (2) The amplitude of the EMP from underground explosions is at least two orders of magnitude lower than from above ground explosions and higher frequency components of the signal are rapidly attenuated due to ground conductivity. (3) In general, in the near field, that is distances (r) of less than 10s of kilometers from the source, the amplitude of the EMP decays approximately as 1/r{sup 3}, which practically limits EMP applications to very close (<{approx}1km) distances. (4) One computational model suggests that the EMP from a decoupled nuclear explosion may be enhanced over the fully coupled case. This has not been validated with laboratory or field data. (5) The magnitude of the EMP from an underground nuclear explosion is about two orders of magnitude larger than that from a chemical explosion, and has a larger component of higher frequencies. In principle these differences might be used to discriminate a nuclear from a chemical explosion using sensors at very close (<{approx}1 km) distances. (6) Arming and firing systems (e.g. detonators, exploding bridge wires) can also produce an EMP from any type of explosion. (7) To develop the understanding needed to apply low frequency EMP to nuclear explosion monitoring, it is recommended to carry out a series of controlled underground chemical explosions with a variety of sizes, emplacements (e.g. fully coupled and decoupled), and arming and firing systems.

  14. Repetitively rated plasma relativistic microwave oscillator with a controllable frequency in every pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdankevich, I. L.; Grishin, D. M.; Gunin, A. V.; Ivanov, I. E.; Korovin, S. D.; Loza, O. T.; Mesyats, G. A.; Pavlov, D. A.; Rostov, V. V.; Strelkov, P. S.; Ul'yanov, D. K.

    2008-10-15

    A repetitively rated microwave oscillator whose frequency can be varied electronically from pulse to pulse in a predetermined manner is created for the first time. The microwave oscillator has a power on the order of 10{sup 8} W and is based on the Cherenkov interaction of a high-current relativistic electron beam with a plasma preformed before each pulse. Electronic control over the plasma properties allows one to arbitrarily vary the microwave frequency from pulse to pulse at a pulse repetition rate of up to 50 Hz.

  15. Analysis of a modular generator for high-voltage, high-frequency pulsed applications, using low voltage semiconductors (<1 kV) and series connected step-up (1:10) transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, L. M.; Fernando Silva, J.; Margato, E.

    2007-03-01

    This article discusses the operation of a modular generator topology, which has been developed for high-frequency (kHz), high-voltage (kV) pulsed applications. The proposed generator uses individual modules, each one consisting of a pulse circuit based on a modified forward converter, which takes advantage of the required low duty cycle to operate with a low voltage clamp reset circuit for the step-up transformer. This reduces the maximum voltage on the semiconductor devices of both primary and secondary transformer sides. The secondary winding of each step-up transformer is series connected, delivering a fraction of the total voltage. Each individual pulsed module is supplied via an isolation transformer. The assembled modular laboratorial prototype, with three 5kV modules, 800V semiconductor switches, and 1:10 step-up transformers, has 80% efficiency, and is capable of delivering, into resistive loads, -15kV/1A pulses with 5μs width, 10kHz repetition rate, with less than 1μs pulse rise time. Experimental results for resistive loads are presented and discussed.

  16. Responders to Wide-Pulse, High-Frequency Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Show Reduced Metabolic Demand: A 31P-MRS Study in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Wegrzyk, Jennifer; Fouré, Alexandre; Le Fur, Yann; Maffiuletti, Nicola A.; Vilmen, Christophe; Guye, Maxime; Mattei, Jean-Pierre; Place, Nicolas; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Conventional (CONV) neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) (i.e., short pulse duration, low frequencies) induces a higher energetic response as compared to voluntary contractions (VOL). In contrast, wide-pulse, high-frequency (WPHF) NMES might elicit–at least in some subjects (i.e., responders)–a different motor unit recruitment compared to CONV that resembles the physiological muscle activation pattern of VOL. We therefore hypothesized that for these responder subjects, the metabolic demand of WPHF would be lower than CONV and comparable to VOL. 18 healthy subjects performed isometric plantar flexions at 10% of their maximal voluntary contraction force for CONV (25 Hz, 0.05 ms), WPHF (100 Hz, 1 ms) and VOL protocols. For each protocol, force time integral (FTI) was quantified and subjects were classified as responders and non-responders to WPHF based on k-means clustering analysis. Furthermore, a fatigue index based on FTI loss at the end of each protocol compared with the beginning of the protocol was calculated. Phosphocreatine depletion (ΔPCr) was assessed using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Responders developed four times higher FTI’s during WPHF (99 ± 37 ×103 N.s) than non-responders (26 ± 12 ×103 N.s). For both responders and non-responders, CONV was metabolically more demanding than VOL when ΔPCr was expressed relative to the FTI. Only for the responder group, the ∆PCr/FTI ratio of WPHF (0.74 ± 0.19 M/N.s) was significantly lower compared to CONV (1.48 ± 0.46 M/N.s) but similar to VOL (0.65 ± 0.21 M/N.s). Moreover, the fatigue index was not different between WPHF (-16%) and CONV (-25%) for the responders. WPHF could therefore be considered as the less demanding NMES modality–at least in this subgroup of subjects–by possibly exhibiting a muscle activation pattern similar to VOL contractions. PMID:26619330

  17. Radio-Frequency Pulse Compression for Linear Accelerators.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantista, Christopher Dennis

    Recent efforts to develop plans for an electron -positron linear collider with center-of-mass energy approaching a TeV have highlighted the need for sources capable of delivering hundreds of megawatts of peak rf drive power at X-band frequencies. This need has driven work in the area of rf pulse compression, which enhances the peak power available from pulsed rf tubes by compressing their output pulses in time, accumulating the available energy into shorter pulses. The classic means of rf pulse compression for linear accelerators is SLED. This technique is described, and the problem it presents for multibunch acceleration explained. Other pulse compression schemes, capable of producing suitable output pulses are explored, both theoretically and experimentally, in particular Binary Pulse Compression and SLED-II. The merits of each are considered with regard to gain, efficiency, complexity, size and cost. The development of some novel system components, along with the theory behind their design, is also discussed. The need to minimize copper losses in long waveguide runs led to the use of the circular TE_{01} propagation mode in over-moded guide, requiring much attention to mechanisms of coupling power between modes. The construction and commissioning of complete, high-power pulse compression systems is reported on, as well as their use in the testing of X-band accelerating structures, which, along with the X-band klystrons used, were developed at SLAC in parallel with the pulse compression work. The focus of the dissertation is on SLED-II, the favored scheme in some current linear accelerator designs. In addition to our experimental results, practical implementation considerations and design improvements are presented. The work to date has led to detailed plans for SLED-II systems to be used in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator, now under construction at SLAC. The prototype of the upgraded system is near completion. Descriptions of various rf pulse

  18. High-speed pulse camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, J. R.

    1968-01-01

    Miniaturized, 16 mm high speed pulse camera takes spectral photometric photographs upon instantaneous command. The design includes a low-friction, low-inertia film transport, a very thin beryllium shutter driven by a low-inertia stepper motor for minimum actuation time after a pulse command, and a binary encoder.

  19. Development of A Pulse Radio-Frequency Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shou-Guo; Zhao, Ling-Li; Yang, Jing-Hua

    2013-09-01

    A small pulse plasma jet was driven by new developed radio-frequency (RF) power supply of 6.78 MHz. In contrast to the conventional RF 13.56 MHz atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), the power supply was highly simplified by eliminating the matching unit of the RF power supply and using a new circuit, moreover, a pulse controller was added to the circuit to produce the pulse discharge. The plasma jet was operated in a capacitively coupled manner and exhibited low power requirement of 5 W at atmospheric pressure using argon as a carrier gas. The pulse plasma plume temperature remained at less than 45 °C for an extended period of operation without using water to cool the electrodes. Optical emission spectrum measured at a wide range of 200-1000 nm indicated various excited species which were helpful in applying the plasma jet for surface sterilization to human skin or other sensitive materials. Institude of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, China.

  20. Single pulse frequency compounding protocol for superharmonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilouchkine, M. G.; van Neer, P. L. M. J.; Verweij, M. D.; Matte, G. M.; Vletter, W. B.; van der Steen, A. F. W.; de Jong, N.

    2013-07-01

    Second harmonic imaging is currently accepted as the standard in commercial echographic systems. A new imaging technique, coined as superharmonic imaging (SHI), combines the third till the fifth harmonics, arising during nonlinear sound propagation. It could further enhance the resolution and quality of echographic images. To meet the bandwidth requirement for SHI a dedicated phased array has been developed: a low frequency subarray, intended for transmission, interleaved with a high frequency subarray, used in reception. As the bandwidth of the elements is limited, the spectral gaps in between the harmonics cause multiple (ghost) reflection artifacts. A dual-pulse frequency compounding method aims at suppressing those artifacts at a price of a reduced frame rate. In this study we explore a possibility of performing frequency compounding within a single transmission. The traditional frequency compounding method suppresses the ripples by consecutively emitting two short Gaussian bursts with a slightly different center frequency. In the newly proposed method, the transmit aperture is divided into two parts: the first half is used to send a pulse at the lower center frequency, while the other half simultaneously transmits at a slightly higher center frequency. The suitability of the protocol for medical imaging applications in terms of the steering capabilities was performed in a simulation study with INCS and the hydrophone measurements. Moreover, an experimental study was carried out to find the optimal parameters for the clinical imaging protocol. The latter was subsequently used to obtain the images of a tissue mimicking phantom containing strongly reflecting wires. Additionally, the images of a human heart in the parasternal projection were acquired. The scanning aperture with the developed protocol amounts to approximately 90°, which is sufficient to capture the cardiac structures in the standard anatomical projections. The theoretically estimated and

  1. High current high accuracy IGBT pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterov, V.V.; Donaldson, A.R.

    1995-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current triangular or trapezoidal pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in a capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBT). The circuit can then recover the remaining energy and transfer it back to the capacitor bank without reversing the capacitor voltage. A third IGBT device is employed to control the initial charge to the capacitor bank, a command charging technique, and to compensate for pulse to pulse power losses. The rack mounted pulse generator contains a 525 {mu}F capacitor bank. It can deliver 500 A at 900V into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled to 0.02% accuracy by a precision controller through the SLAC central computer system. This pulse generator drives a series pair of extraction dipoles.

  2. Pulsed high-power beams

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, L.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1988-06-01

    The marriage of induction linac technology with nonlinear magnetic modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It is now possible to produce short-pulse electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients approaching 1-MeV/m, and with power efficiencies exceeding 50%. A 70-Mev, 3-kA induction accelerator (ETA II) constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory incorporates the pulse technology concepts that have evolved over the past several years. The ETA II is a linear induction accelerator and provides a test facility for demonstration of the high-average-power components and high-brightness sources used in such accelerators. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak-power capability, repetition rates exceeding 1 kHz, and excellent reliability. 6 figs.

  3. Frequency stabilization in injection controlled pulsed CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Ancellet, Gerard M.

    1987-01-01

    Longitudinal mode selection by injection has been demonstrated as a viable technique for tailoring a TEA-CO2 laser with pulse energies of a Joule or greater to fit the requirements of a coherent lidar transmitter. Once reliable generation of single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) pulses is obtained, one can study the intrapulse frequency variation and attempt to determine the sources of frequency sweeping, or chirp. These sources include the effect of the decaying plasma, the thermal gradient due to the energy dissipation associated with the laser mechanism itself, and the pressure shift of the center frequency of the laser transition. The use of the positive-branch unstable resonator as an efficient means of coupling a discharge with transverse spatial dimensions of the order of centimeters to an optical cavity mode introduces another concern: namely, what can be done to emphasize transverse mode discrimination in an unstable resonator cavity while maintaining high coupling efficiency. These issues are briefly discussed in the paper, and representative experimental examples are included.

  4. Giant Crab pulses at low frequency: statistics, scattering, polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnova, T. V.

    2010-01-01

    We carried out observations of Crab giant pulses at frequency 112 MHz from 2005 till 2008 on the Large Phased Array of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory. The scattering of pulses observed in various series varies by a factor of 3: from 11 ms in November 2005 till 34 ms in September 2008. The cumulative probability distribution for the peak intensities of the giant pulses for each of these series shows that the distribution is stable and is a power law with a single slope (n = -2.3). This testifies to stability of the mechanism generating the giant pulses. The energy in the pulses is conserved; i.e., the increase in the pulse intensity is proportional to the decrease in the scattering. Refractive scintillations at low frequencies in measurements with large time separation lead to variations in the relative number of giant pulses exceeding a given amplitude, proportional to the ratio of the mean flux densities of the pulsar in the corresponding observational series. The maximum energy of the recorded giant pulses is 2.5x10{sup 7} Jy mus. Analysis of the giant pulses observed at other frequencies shows that the frequency dependence of the maximum energy of the giant pulses in the range of 23 MHz-9 GHz is a power-law with index -2.2+-0.2. We measured the rotation measure using GP which is RM (-47.5+-0.4) rad/m{sup 2}, and the degree of linear polarization for pulses with measured frequency modulation was 9% divide 17% for November 2005.

  5. Ultrasonic spectrum analysis using frequency-tracked gated RF pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, J. H., Jr.; Heyman, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of ultrasonic frequency analysis is introduced which employs frequency-tracked gated RF drive pulses rather than shock-excited broadband spikes to generate the ultrasonic waveform. The new technique, a variation of the sampled-continuous wave technique, eliminates problems associated with finite pulse widths of conventional methods. It is shown to yield correct ultrasonic wave velocity measurements of the sample irrespective of receiver gate width or position provided any portions of two successive echoes are gated simultaneously into the spectrum analyzer. The experimental observations are substantiated by a theoretical model based on the time-frequency domain formulation of ultrasonic frequency analysis.

  6. High frequency pressure oscillator for microcryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, S.; ter Brake, H. J. M.; Jansen, H. V.; Zhao, Y.; Holland, H. J.; Burger, J. F.; Elwenspoek, M. C.

    2008-04-01

    Microminiature pulse tube cryocoolers should operate at a frequency of an order higher than the conventional macro ones because the pulse tube cryocooler operating frequency scales inversely with the square of the pulse tube diameter. In this paper, the design and experiments of a high frequency pressure oscillator is presented with the aim to power a micropulse tube cryocooler operating between 300 and 80K, delivering a cooling power of 10mW. Piezoelectric actuators operate efficiently at high frequencies and have high power density making them good candidates as drivers for high frequency pressure oscillator. The pressure oscillator described in this work consists of a membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator. A pressure ratio of about 1.11 was achieved with a filling pressure of 2.5MPa and compression volume of about 22.6mm3 when operating the actuator with a peak-to-peak sinusoidal voltage of 100V at a frequency of 1kHz. The electrical power input was 2.73W. The high pressure ratio and low electrical input power at high frequencies would herald development of microminiature cryocoolers.

  7. High frequency pressure oscillator for microcryocoolers.

    PubMed

    Vanapalli, S; ter Brake, H J M; Jansen, H V; Zhao, Y; Holland, H J; Burger, J F; Elwenspoek, M C

    2008-04-01

    Microminiature pulse tube cryocoolers should operate at a frequency of an order higher than the conventional macro ones because the pulse tube cryocooler operating frequency scales inversely with the square of the pulse tube diameter. In this paper, the design and experiments of a high frequency pressure oscillator is presented with the aim to power a micropulse tube cryocooler operating between 300 and 80 K, delivering a cooling power of 10 mW. Piezoelectric actuators operate efficiently at high frequencies and have high power density making them good candidates as drivers for high frequency pressure oscillator. The pressure oscillator described in this work consists of a membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator. A pressure ratio of about 1.11 was achieved with a filling pressure of 2.5 MPa and compression volume of about 22.6 mm(3) when operating the actuator with a peak-to-peak sinusoidal voltage of 100 V at a frequency of 1 kHz. The electrical power input was 2.73 W. The high pressure ratio and low electrical input power at high frequencies would herald development of microminiature cryocoolers.

  8. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique. PMID:25636803

  9. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  10. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  11. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique.

  12. Generation of frequency-chirped optical pulses with felix

    SciTech Connect

    Knippels, G.M.H.; Meer, A.F.G. van der; Mols, R.F.X.A.M.

    1995-12-31

    Frequency-chirped optical pulses have been produced in the picosecond regime by varying the energy of the electron beam on a microsecond time scale. These pulses were then compressed close to their bandwidth limit by an external pulse compressor. The amount of chirp can be controlled by varying the sweep rate on the electron beam energy and by cavity desynchronisation. To examine the generated chirp we used the following diagnostics: a pulse compressor, a crossed beam autocorrelator, a multichannel electron spectrometer and multichannel optical spectrometer. The compressor is build entirely using reflective optics to permit broad band operation. The autocorrelator is currently operating from 6 {mu}m to 30 {mu}m with one single crystal. It has been used to measure pulses as short as 500 fs. All diagnostics are evacuated to prevent pulse shape distortion or pulse lengthening caused by absorption in ambient water vapour. Pulse length measurements and optical spectra will be presented for different electron beam sweep rates, showing the presence of a frequency chirp. Results on the compression of the optical pulses to their bandwidth limit are given for different electron sweep rates. More experimental results showing the dependence of the amount of chirp on cavity desynchronisation will be presented.

  13. High efficiency production of germ-line transgenic Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) by electroporation with direct current-shifted radio frequency pulses.

    PubMed

    Hostetler, Heather A; Peck, Stephanie L; Muir, William M

    2003-08-01

    Although there have been several studies showing the production of transgenic fish through electroporation techniques, success rates have been low and few studies show germ-line integration and expression. When electroporation has been successful, the device used is no longer commercially available. The goal of this experiment was to find an alternative efficient method of generating transgenic Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) using a commercially available electroporation device. The Gene Pulser II and RF module (Bio-Rad Laboratories, USA), along with two reporter gene constructs, were used. In contrast to other electroporation devices, which are based on a single pulse with exponential decay or square wave technology, the Gene Pulser II incorporates a direct current (DC)-shifted radio frequency (RF) signal. With this technique, over 1000 embryos can be electroporated in less than 30 min. The plasmid pCMV-SPORT-beta-gal (Invitrogen, USA) was used in the supercoiled form to optimize parameters for gene transfer into single-celled embryos, and resulted in up to 100% somatic gene transfer. Similar conditions were used to generate fish transgenic for both the pCMV-EGFP plasmid (Clontech, USA) and a cytomegalovirus (CMV) driven phytase-EGFP construct. The conditions used were a voltage of 25 V, a percent modulation of 100%, a radio frequency of 35 kHz, a burst duration of 10 ms, 3 bursts, and a burst interval of 1.0 s. Seventy percent of the embryos electroporated with the pCMV-EGFP construct survived to sexual maturity, and of those, 85% were capable of passing the transgene on to their offspring. Transgenic second generation back-crossed (BC2) fry were subjected to Southern blot analysis, which confirmed germ-line integration, and observation for green fluorescence protein, which confirmed protein expression. DC-shifted RF pulses are effective and efficient in the production of transgenic medaka, and germ-line integration and expression can be achieved without

  14. Broadband finite-pulse radio-frequency-driven recoupling (fp-RFDR) with (XY8)4(1) super-cycling for homo-nuclear correlations in very high magnetic fields at fast and ultra-fast MAS frequencies.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ming; Hu, Bingwen; Lafon, Oliver; Trébosc, Julien; Chen, Qun; Amoureux, Jean-Paul

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate that inter-residue (13)C-(13)C proximities (of about 380 pm) in uniformly (13)C-labeled proteins can be probed by applying robust first-order recoupling during several milliseconds in single-quantum single-quantum dipolar homo-nuclear correlation (SQ-SQ D-HOMCOR) 2D experiments. We show that the intensity of medium-range homo-nuclear correlations in these experiments is enhanced using broadband first-order finite-pulse radio-frequency-driven recoupling (fp-RFDR) NMR sequence with a nested (XY8)4(1) super-cycling. The robustness and the efficiency of the fp-RFDR-(XY8)4(1) method is demonstrated at high magnetic field (21.1T) and high Magic-Angle Spinning (MAS) speeds (up to 60 kHz). The introduced super-cycling, formed by combining phase inversion and a global four-quantum phase cycle, improves the robustness of fp-RFDR to (i) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), (ii) spread in isotropic chemical shifts, (iii) rf-inhomogeneity and (iv) hetero-nuclear dipolar couplings for long recoupling times. We show that fp-RFDR-(XY8)4(1) is efficient sans (1)H decoupling, which is beneficial for temperature-sensitive biomolecules. The efficiency and the robustness of fp-RFDR-(XY8)4(1) is investigated by spin dynamics numerical simulations as well as solid-state NMR experiments on [U-(13)C]-L-histidine·HCl, a tetra-peptide (Fmoc-[U-(13)C,(15)N]-Val-[U-(13)C,(15)N]-Ala-[U-(13)C,(15)N]-Phe-Gly-t-Boc) and Al(PO(3))(3).

  15. Linearly frequency-modulated pulsed single-frequency fiber laser at 1083 nm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanfei; Yang, Changsheng; Li, Can; Feng, Zhouming; Xu, Shanhui; Deng, Huaqiu; Yang, Zhongmin

    2016-02-22

    A linearly frequency-modulated, actively Q-switched, single-frequency ring fiber laser based on injection seeding from an ultra-short cavity is demonstrated at 1083 nm. A piezoelectric transducer is employed to obtain linearly frequency-modulating performance and over 1.05 GHz frequency-tuning range is achieved with a modulating frequency reaching tens of kilohertz. A maximum peak power of the stable output pulse is over 3.83 W during frequency-modulating process. This type of pulsed fiber laser provides a promising candidate for coherent LIDAR in the measurement of thermosphere.

  16. Single-pass, efficient type-I phase-matched frequency doubling of high-power ultrashort-pulse Yb-fiber laser using LiB_3O_5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Mukesh Kumar; Kumar, Samir; Das, Ritwick

    2016-05-01

    We report 48 % efficient single-pass second harmonic generation of high-power ultrashort-pulse ({≈ }250 fs) Yb-fiber laser by utilizing type-I phase matching in LiB_3O_5 (LBO) crystal. The choice of LBO among other borate crystals for high-power frequency doubling is essentially motivated by large thermal conductivity, low birefringence and weak group velocity dispersion. By optimally focussing the beam in a 4-mm-long LBO crystal, we have generated about 2.3 W of average power at 532 nm using 4.8 W of available pump power at 1064 nm. The ultrashort green pulses were found out to be near-transform limited sech^2 pulses with a pulse width of Δ τ ≈ 150 fs and being delivered at 78 MHz repetition rate. Due to appreciably low spatial walk-off angle for LBO ({≈ }0.4°), we obtain M^2<1.26 for the SH beam which signifies marginal distortion in comparison with the pump beam (M^2<1.15). We also discuss the impact of third-order optical nonlinearity of the LBO crystal on the generated ultrashort SH pulses.

  17. High power ultrashort pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.

    1994-10-07

    Small scale terawatt and soon even petawatt (1000 terawatt) class laser systems are made possible by application of the chirped-pulse amplification technique to solid-state lasers combined with the availability of broad bandwidth materials. These lasers make possible a new class of high gradient accelerators based on the large electric fields associated with intense laser-plasma interactions or from the intense laser field directly. Here, we concentrate on the laser technology to produce these intense pulses. Application of the smallest of these systems to the production of high brightness electron sources is also introduced.

  18. Light pressure acceleration with frequency-tripled laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Shen, Baifei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Ji, Liangliang; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhao, Xueyan; Xu, Jiancai; Yu, Yahong; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin; Xu, Tongjun; Zhang, Lingang

    2014-08-15

    Light pressure acceleration of ions in the interaction of the frequency-tripled (3ω) laser pulse and foil target is studied, and a promising method to increase accelerated ion energy is shown. Results show that at a constant laser energy, much higher ion energy peak value is obtained for 3ω laser compared with that using the fundamental frequency laser. The effect of energy loss during frequency conversion on ion acceleration is considered, which may slightly decrease the acceleration effect.

  19. Single pulse frequency compounding protocol for superharmonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilouchkine, Mikhail G.; van Neer, Paul L. M. J.; Matte, Guillaume M.; Verweij, Martin D.; de Jong, Nico

    2011-03-01

    Second harmonic imaging is currently adopted as standard in commercial echographic systems. A new imaging technique, coined as superharmonic imaging (SHI), combines the 3rd till the 5th harmonics, arising during nonlinear sound propagation. It could further enhance resolution and quality of echographic images. To meet the bandwidth requirement for SHI a dedicated phased array has been developed: a low frequency subarray, intended for transmission, interleaved with a high frequency subarray, used in reception. As the bandwidth of the elements is limited, the spectral gaps in between the harmonics cause multiple reflection artifacts. Recently, we introduce a dual-pulse frequency compounding (DPFC) method to suppress those artifacts at price of a reduced frame rate. In this study we investigate the feasibility of performing the frequency compounding protocol within a single transmission. The traditional DPFC method constructs each trace in a post-processing stage by summing echoes from two emitted pulses, the second slightly frequency-shifted compared to the first. In the newly proposed method, the transmit aperture is divided into two parts: the first half is used to send a pulse at the lower center frequency, while the other half simultaneously transmits at the higher center frequency. The suitability of the protocol for medical imaging applications in terms of the steering capabilities was performed in a simulation study using the FIELD II toolkit. Moreover, an experimental study was performed to deduce the optimal parametric set for implementation of the clinical imaging protocol. The latter was subsequently used to obtain the images of a tissue mimicking phantom containing strongly reflecting wires. For in-vitro acquisitions the SHI probe with interleaved phased array (44 odd elements at 1MHz and 44 even elements at 3.7MHz elements, optimized for echocardiography) was connected to a fully programmable ultrasound system. The results of the Field II simulations

  20. High-frequency ECG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The standard ECG is by convention limited to 0.05-150 Hz, but higher frequencies are also present in the ECG signal. With high-resolution technology, it is possible to record and analyze these higher frequencies. The highest amplitudes of the high-frequency components are found within the QRS complex. In past years, the term "high frequency", "high fidelity", and "wideband electrocardiography" have been used by several investigators to refer to the process of recording ECGs with an extended bandwidth of up to 1000 Hz. Several investigators have tried to analyze HF-QRS with the hope that additional features seen in the QRS complex would provide information enhancing the diagnostic value of the ECG. The development of computerized ECG-recording devices that made it possible to record ECG signals with high resolution in both time and amplitude, as well as better possibilities to store and process the signals digitally, offered new methods for analysis. Different techniques to extract the HF-QRS have been described. Several bandwidths and filter types have been applied for the extraction as well as different signal-averaging techniques for noise reduction. There is no standard method for acquiring and quantifying HF-QRS. The physiological mechanisms underlying HF-QRS are still not fully understood. One theory is that HF-QRS are related to the conduction velocity and the fragmentation of the depolarization wave in the myocardium. In a three-dimensional model of the ventricles with a fractal conduction system it was shown that high numbers of splitting branches are associated with HF-QRS. In this experiment, it was also shown that the changes seen in HF-QRS in patients with myocardial ischemia might be due to the slowing of the conduction velocity in the region of ischemia. This mechanism has been tested by Watanabe et al by infusing sodium channel blockers into the left anterior descending artery in dogs. In their study, 60 unipolar ECGs were recorded from the entire

  1. Diversified pulse generation from frequency shifted feedback Tm-doped fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Jiang, Zong-Fu; Hou, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Pulsed fibre lasers operating in the eye-safe 2 μm spectral region have numerous potential applications in areas such as remote sensing, medicine, mid-infrared frequency conversion, and free-space communication. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate versatile 2 μm ps-ns pulses generation from Tm-based fibre lasers based on frequency shifted feedback and provide a comprehensive report of their special behaviors. The lasers are featured with elegant construction and the unparalleled capacity of generating versatile pulses. The self-starting mode-locking is initiated by an intra-cavity acousto-optical frequency shifter. Diversified mode-locked pulse dynamics were observed by altering the pump power, intra-cavity polarization state and cavity structure, including as short as 8 ps single pulse sequence, pulse bundle state and up to 12 nJ, 3 ns nanosecond rectangular pulse. A reflective nonlinear optical loop mirror was introduced to successfully shorten the pulses from 24 ps to 8 ps. Beside the mode-locking operation, flexible Q-switching and Q-switched mode-locking operation can also be readily achieved in the same cavity. Up to 78 μJ high energy nanosecond pulse can be generated in this regime. Several intriguing pulse dynamics are characterized and discussed.

  2. Diversified pulse generation from frequency shifted feedback Tm-doped fibre lasers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Jiang, Zong-Fu; Hou, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed fibre lasers operating in the eye-safe 2 μm spectral region have numerous potential applications in areas such as remote sensing, medicine, mid-infrared frequency conversion, and free-space communication. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate versatile 2 μm ps-ns pulses generation from Tm-based fibre lasers based on frequency shifted feedback and provide a comprehensive report of their special behaviors. The lasers are featured with elegant construction and the unparalleled capacity of generating versatile pulses. The self-starting mode-locking is initiated by an intra-cavity acousto-optical frequency shifter. Diversified mode-locked pulse dynamics were observed by altering the pump power, intra-cavity polarization state and cavity structure, including as short as 8 ps single pulse sequence, pulse bundle state and up to 12 nJ, 3 ns nanosecond rectangular pulse. A reflective nonlinear optical loop mirror was introduced to successfully shorten the pulses from 24 ps to 8 ps. Beside the mode-locking operation, flexible Q-switching and Q-switched mode-locking operation can also be readily achieved in the same cavity. Up to 78 μJ high energy nanosecond pulse can be generated in this regime. Several intriguing pulse dynamics are characterized and discussed. PMID:27193213

  3. Diversified pulse generation from frequency shifted feedback Tm-doped fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Jiang, Zong-Fu; Hou, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed fibre lasers operating in the eye-safe 2 μm spectral region have numerous potential applications in areas such as remote sensing, medicine, mid-infrared frequency conversion, and free-space communication. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate versatile 2 μm ps-ns pulses generation from Tm-based fibre lasers based on frequency shifted feedback and provide a comprehensive report of their special behaviors. The lasers are featured with elegant construction and the unparalleled capacity of generating versatile pulses. The self-starting mode-locking is initiated by an intra-cavity acousto-optical frequency shifter. Diversified mode-locked pulse dynamics were observed by altering the pump power, intra-cavity polarization state and cavity structure, including as short as 8 ps single pulse sequence, pulse bundle state and up to 12 nJ, 3 ns nanosecond rectangular pulse. A reflective nonlinear optical loop mirror was introduced to successfully shorten the pulses from 24 ps to 8 ps. Beside the mode-locking operation, flexible Q-switching and Q-switched mode-locking operation can also be readily achieved in the same cavity. Up to 78 μJ high energy nanosecond pulse can be generated in this regime. Several intriguing pulse dynamics are characterized and discussed. PMID:27193213

  4. Condition for short pulse generation in ultrahigh frequency mode-locking of semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, K. Y.; Paslaski, J.

    1991-11-01

    It is shown that although it is possible to obtain mode-locking without self-pulsation when certain criteria are satisfied, the shortest pulses are almost always generated at or close to the onset of self-pulsation. Thus, the amplitude of the optical pulse train is modulated by the (relatively) low-frequency envelop of a few gigahertz under this condition. This observation was obtained by simultaneously measuring the pulsewidth using an autocorrelator and monitoring the optical intensity using a high-speed photodiode and a microwave spectrum analyzer. It is concluded that while it is possible to generate picosecond optical pulses in ultrahigh-frequency mode-locking of quantum-well lasers, very short pulses (approaching 1 ps) are almost always accompanied by self-pulsation which is manifested as low-frequency (gigahertz) envelope modulation of the optical pulse train.

  5. Experimental studies of the overshoot and undershoot in pulse-modulated radio-frequency atmospheric discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, W. G.; Li, R. M.; Shi, J. J.; Ding, Z. F.

    2016-08-01

    The overshoot and undershoot of the applied voltage on the electrodes, the discharge current, and radio frequency (RF) power were observed at the initial phase of pulse-modulated (PM) RF atmospheric pressure discharges, but factors influencing the overshoot and undershoot have not been fully elucidated. In this paper, the experimental studies were performed to seek the reasons for the overshoot and undershoot. The experimental results show that the overshoot and undershoot are associated with the pulse frequency, the rise time of pulse signal, and the series capacitor Cs in the inversely L-shaped matching network. In the case of a high RF power discharge, these overshoot and undershoot become serious when shortening the rise time of a pulse signal (5 ns) or operating at a moderate pulse frequency (500 Hz or 1 kHz).

  6. Low frequency acoustic pulse propagation in temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Albert, Donald G; Swearingen, Michelle E; Perron, Frank E; Carbee, David L

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of acoustic pulse propagation for a 30-m path were conducted in an open field and in seven different forest stands in the northeastern United States consisting of deciduous, evergreen, or mixed tree species. The waveforms recorded in forest generally show the pulse elongation characteristic of propagation over a highly porous ground surface, with high frequency scattered arrivals superimposed on the basic waveform shape. Waveform analysis conducted to determine ground properties resulted in acoustically determined layer thicknesses of 4-8 cm in summer, within 2 cm of the directly measured thickness of the litter layers. In winter the acoustic thicknesses correlated with the site-specific snow cover depths. Effective flow resistivity values of 50-88 kN s m(-4) were derived for the forest sites in summer, while lower values typical for snow were found in winter. Reverberation times (T60) were typically around 2 s, but two stands (deciduous and pruned spruce planted on a square grid) had lower values of about 1.2 s. One site with a very rough ground surface had very low summer flow resistivity value and also had the longest reverberation time of about 3 s. These measurements can provide parameters useful for theoretical predictions of acoustic propagation within forests. PMID:26328690

  7. Low frequency acoustic pulse propagation in temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Albert, Donald G; Swearingen, Michelle E; Perron, Frank E; Carbee, David L

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of acoustic pulse propagation for a 30-m path were conducted in an open field and in seven different forest stands in the northeastern United States consisting of deciduous, evergreen, or mixed tree species. The waveforms recorded in forest generally show the pulse elongation characteristic of propagation over a highly porous ground surface, with high frequency scattered arrivals superimposed on the basic waveform shape. Waveform analysis conducted to determine ground properties resulted in acoustically determined layer thicknesses of 4-8 cm in summer, within 2 cm of the directly measured thickness of the litter layers. In winter the acoustic thicknesses correlated with the site-specific snow cover depths. Effective flow resistivity values of 50-88 kN s m(-4) were derived for the forest sites in summer, while lower values typical for snow were found in winter. Reverberation times (T60) were typically around 2 s, but two stands (deciduous and pruned spruce planted on a square grid) had lower values of about 1.2 s. One site with a very rough ground surface had very low summer flow resistivity value and also had the longest reverberation time of about 3 s. These measurements can provide parameters useful for theoretical predictions of acoustic propagation within forests.

  8. Interaction between pulsed discharge and radio frequency discharge burst at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Ying; Shi, Yuncheng; Zhang, Jing; Shi, J. J.

    2015-08-15

    The atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APGD) with dual excitations in terms of pulsed voltage and pulse-modulation radio frequency (rf) power are studied experimentally between two parallel plates electrodes. Pulse-modulation applied in rf APGD temporally separates the discharge into repetitive discharge bursts, between which the high voltage pulses are introduced to ignite sub-microsecond pulsed discharge. The discharge characteristics and spatio-temporal evolution are investigated by means of current voltage characteristics and time resolved imaging, which suggests that the introduced pulsed discharge assists the ignition of rf discharge burst and reduces the maintain voltage of rf discharge burst. Furtherly, the time instant of pulsed discharge between rf discharge bursts is manipulated to study the ignition dynamics of rf discharge burst.

  9. Generation of high-quality petawatt pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mourou, G; Bado, Philippe

    1991-01-01

    CPA sources need a front-end capable of generating very short seed pulses. To meet this requirement, present CPA sources rely on actively modelocked solid-state oscillators used in conjunction with non-linear fiber stages. This approach generates pulses with a residual frequency chirp, resulting in a limited peak-to-background intensity contrast ratio. The availability of an oscillator capable of producing directly (i.e. without fiber stage) picosecond or sub-picosecond pulses would significantly improve the quality of CPA sources. We have pursued different approaches to replace the standard modelocked oscillator front-end. In an initial phase, we investigated the possible use of Additive Pulse Modelocking (APM) color-center lasers as oscillators for CPA Nd:glass sources. Lately we have developed a Ti:Sapphire modelocked oscillator operating in the one-micron range. In order to generate pulses with very high peak to background contrast ratio, we have built a non-linear coupled-cavity oscillator generating 200-fs pulses. This color-center laser operates in the 1.5--1.6 micron range. A diagram of the oscillator is shown in Fig. 1. The laser is pumped with a modelocked Nd:YAG source. Both KCl and NaCl crystals were tested as gain media. NaCl was found to have a larger tuning range and to generate a higher average power (up to 150 mW). When synchronously mode-locked, the color-center generates pulses in the 10--20 ps range. Once interferometrically coupled to non-linear external-cavity, this oscillator produces very short pulses (85 to 260 fs). This oscillator was first operated with a 2 mm birefringent plate. 85 fs, near transform-limited pulses were generated at 1.54 micron. As the laser was tuned to longer wavelength, the pulse duration increased, as well as the bandwidth-duration product. With a 4 mm birefringent plate, 125 fs, transform-limited pulses were generated over the full tuning range.

  10. High gain broadband amplification of ultraviolet pulses in optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier.

    PubMed

    Wnuk, Paweł; Stepanenko, Yuriy; Radzewicz, Czesław

    2010-04-12

    We report on a high gain amplification of broadband ultraviolet femtosecond pulses in an optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier. Broadband ultraviolet seed pulses were obtained by an achromatic frequency doubling of the output from a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire oscillator. Stretched seed pulses were amplified in a multipass parametric amplifier with a single BBO crystal pumped by a ns frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser. A noncollinear configuration was used for a broadband amplification. The total (after compression) amplification of 2.510(5) was achieved, with compressed pulse energy of 30 microJ and pulse duration of 24 fs. We found that the measured gain was limited by thermal effects induced by the absorption of the pump laser by color centers created in the BBO crystal.

  11. High-speed pulse-shape generator, pulse multiplexer

    DOEpatents

    Burkhart, Scott C.

    2002-01-01

    The invention combines arbitrary amplitude high-speed pulses for precision pulse shaping for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The circuitry combines arbitrary height pulses which are generated by replicating scaled versions of a trigger pulse and summing them delayed in time on a pulse line. The combined electrical pulses are connected to an electro-optic modulator which modulates a laser beam. The circuit can also be adapted to combine multiple channels of high speed data into a single train of electrical pulses which generates the optical pulses for very high speed optical communication. The invention has application in laser pulse shaping for inertial confinement fusion, in optical data links for computers, telecommunications, and in laser pulse shaping for atomic excitation studies. The invention can be used to effect at least a 10.times. increase in all fiber communication lines. It allows a greatly increased data transfer rate between high-performance computers. The invention is inexpensive enough to bring high-speed video and data services to homes through a super modem.

  12. Investigation of the input signal frequency effect on the formed pulse of the hydraulic-powered pulse machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoseltseva, M. V.; Masson, I. A.

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, a special emphasis is placed on an output signal curve during the analysis of well drilling machines since these machines should have as high energy efficiency as it is possible. This work proposes factors that have an impact of input signal frequency on the formed pulse that are used to find the most efficient frequency for its further applying in the machine. Results of the conducted experiment are obtained by using a mathematical model that is created in Simulink Matlab.

  13. Absolute frequency synthesis of pulsed coherent light waves through phase-modulation active optical feedback.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, K; Horiguchi, T; Koyamada, Y

    1996-11-15

    A novel method for the broadband absolute frequency synthesis of pulsed coherent lightwaves is demonstrated. It is based on pulse recirculation around an active optical feedback ring containing a delay-line fiber, an external phase modulator, an acousto-optic frequency shifter (AOFS), and a high-finesse Fabry-Perot étalon. The modulation frequency F(M) and the frequency shift F(AO) that are due to AOFS are designed so that their sum or difference equals the free-spectral range of the étalon and F(AO) is set at larger than the half-width at full maximum of its resonant peaks. If one of the peak frequencies is tuned to the frequency of the initial pulse, the frequency of the recirculating pulse jumps to the next peak for each round trip. In the experiment the absolute frequency is synthesized over a frequency span of 700 GHz around the initial stabilized frequency of the master laser.

  14. Frequency-Domain Methods for Characterization of Pulsed Power Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    White, A D; Anderson, R A; Ferriera, T J; Goerz, D A

    2009-07-27

    This paper discusses methods of frequency-domain characterization of pulsed power sensors using vector network analyzer and spectrum analyzer techniques that offer significant simplification over time-domain methods, while mitigating or minimizing the effect of the difficulties present in time domain characterization. These methods are applicable to characterization of a wide variety of sensors.

  15. Nonselective excitation of pulsed ELDOR using multi-frequency microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, Yuki; Mutoh, Risa; Ishiura, Masahiro; Mino, Hiroyuki

    2011-12-01

    The use of a polychromatic microwave pulse to expand the pumping bandwidth in pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR) was investigated. The pumping pulse was applied in resonance with the broad (˜100 mT) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal of the manganese cluster of photosystem II in the S 2 state. The observation pulses were in resonance with the narrow EPR signal of the tyrosine radical, YDrad . It was found that in the case of the polychromatic pumping pulse containing five harmonics with the microwave frequencies between 8.5 and 10.5 GHz the PELDOR effect corresponding to the dipole interaction between the Mn cluster and YDrad was about 2.9 times larger than that achieved with a monochromatic pulse. In addition to the dipolar modulation, the nuclear modulation effects were observed. The effects could be suppressed by averaging the PELDOR trace over the time interval between the observation microwave pulses. The polychromatic excitation technique described will be useful for improving the PELDOR sensitivity in the measurements of long distances in biological samples, where the pair consists of a radical with a narrow EPR spectrum and slow phase relaxation, and a metal center that has a broad EPR spectrum and a short phase relaxation time.

  16. Nonselective excitation of pulsed ELDOR using multi-frequency microwaves.

    PubMed

    Asada, Yuki; Mutoh, Risa; Ishiura, Masahiro; Mino, Hiroyuki

    2011-12-01

    The use of a polychromatic microwave pulse to expand the pumping bandwidth in pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR) was investigated. The pumping pulse was applied in resonance with the broad (∼100 mT) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal of the manganese cluster of photosystem II in the S2 state. The observation pulses were in resonance with the narrow EPR signal of the tyrosine radical, YD·. It was found that in the case of the polychromatic pumping pulse containing five harmonics with the microwave frequencies between 8.5 and 10.5 GHz the PELDOR effect corresponding to the dipole interaction between the Mn cluster and YD· was about 2.9 times larger than that achieved with a monochromatic pulse. In addition to the dipolar modulation, the nuclear modulation effects were observed. The effects could be suppressed by averaging the PELDOR trace over the time interval between the observation microwave pulses. The polychromatic excitation technique described will be useful for improving the PELDOR sensitivity in the measurements of long distances in biological samples, where the pair consists of a radical with a narrow EPR spectrum and slow phase relaxation, and a metal center that has a broad EPR spectrum and a short phase relaxation time.

  17. High energy femtosecond pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassonde, Philippe; Mironov, Sergey; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Payeur, Stéphane; Khazanov, Efim; Sergeev, Alexander; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Mourou, Gerard

    2016-07-01

    An original method for retrieving the Kerr nonlinear index was proposed and implemented for TF12 heavy flint glass. Then, a defocusing lens made of this highly nonlinear glass was used to generate an almost constant spectral broadening across a Gaussian beam profile. The lens was designed with spherical curvatures chosen in order to match the laser beam profile, such that the product of the thickness with intensity is constant. This solid-state optics in combination with chirped mirrors was used to decrease the pulse duration at the output of a terawatt-class femtosecond laser. We demonstrated compression of a 33 fs pulse to 16 fs with 170 mJ energy.

  18. Pulsed radio frequency energy (PRFE) use in human medical applications.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lifei; Kubat, Nicole J; Isenberg, Richard A

    2011-03-01

    A number of electromagnetic field-based technologies are available for therapeutic medical applications. These therapies can be broken down into different categories based on technical parameters employed and type of clinical application. Pulsed radio frequency energy (PRFE) therapy is a non invasive, electromagnetic field-based therapeutic that is based on delivery of pulsed, shortwave radio frequency energy in the 13-27.12 MHz carrier frequency range, and designed for local application to a target tissue without the intended generation of deep heat. It has been studied for use in a number of clinical applications, including as a palliative treatment for both postoperative and non postoperative pain and edema, as well as in wound healing applications. This review provides an introduction to the therapy, a summary of clinical efficacy studies using the therapy in specific applications, and an overview of treatment-related safety. PMID:21554100

  19. High Frequency Laser-Based Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, R; Chinn, D; Balogun, O; Murray, T

    2005-09-12

    To obtain micrometer resolution of materials using acoustics requires frequencies around 1 GHz. Attenuation of such frequencies is high, limiting the thickness of the parts that can be characterized. Although acoustic microscopes can operate up to several GHz in frequency, they are used primarily as a surface characterization tool. The use of a pulsed laser for acoustic generation allows generation directly in the part, eliminating the loss of energy associated with coupling the energy from a piezoelectric transducer to the part of interest. The use of pulsed laser acoustic generation in combination with optical detection is investigated for the non-contact characterization of materials with features that must be characterized to micrometer resolution.

  20. High frequency stimulation can block axonal conduction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Alicia L; Durand, Dominique M

    2009-11-01

    High frequency stimulation (HFS) is used to control abnormal neuronal activity associated with movement, seizure, and psychiatric disorders. Yet, the mechanisms of its therapeutic action are not known. Although experimental results have shown that HFS suppresses somatic activity, other data has suggested that HFS could generate excitation of axons. Moreover it is unclear what effect the stimulation has on tissue surrounding the stimulation electrode. Electrophysiological and computational modeling literature suggests that HFS can drive axons at the stimulus frequency. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that unlike cell bodies, axons are driven by pulse train HFS. This hypothesis was tested in fibers of the hippocampus both in-vivo and in-vitro. Our results indicate that although electrical stimulation could activate and drive axons at low frequencies (0.5-25 Hz), as the stimulus frequency increased, electrical stimulation failed to continuously excite axonal activity. Fiber tracts were unable to follow extracellular pulse trains above 50 Hz in-vitro and above 125 Hz in-vivo. The number of cycles required for failure was frequency dependent but independent of stimulus amplitude. A novel in-vitro preparation was developed, in which, the alveus was isolated from the remainder of the hippocampus slice. The isolated fiber tract was unable to follow pulse trains above 75 Hz. Reversible conduction block occurred at much higher stimulus amplitudes, with pulse train HFS (>150 Hz) preventing propagation through the site of stimulation. This study shows that pulse train HFS affects axonal activity by: (1) disrupting HFS evoked excitation leading to partial conduction block of activity through the site of HFS; and (2) generating complete conduction block of secondary evoked activity, as HFS amplitude is increased. These results are relevant for the interpretation of the effects of HFS for the control of abnormal neural activity such as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease. PMID

  1. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-04-02

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization.

  2. Ultrahigh contrast from a frequency-doubled chirped-pulse-amplification beamline.

    PubMed

    Hillier, David; Danson, Colin; Duffield, Stuart; Egan, David; Elsmere, Stephen; Girling, Mark; Harvey, Ewan; Hopps, Nicholas; Norman, Michael; Parker, Stefan; Treadwell, Paul; Winter, David; Bett, Thomas

    2013-06-20

    This paper describes frequency-doubled operation of a high-energy chirped-pulse-amplification beamline. Efficient type-I second-harmonic generation was achieved using a 3 mm thick 320 mm aperture KDP crystal. Shots were fired at a range of energies achieving more than 100 J in a subpicosecond, 527 nm laser pulse with a power contrast of 10(14). PMID:23842168

  3. High-order pulse front tilt caused by high-order angular dispersion.

    PubMed

    Nabekawa, Yasuo; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2003-12-15

    We have found general expressions relating the high-order pulse front tilt and the high-order angular dispersion in an ultrashort pulse, for the first time to our knowledge. The general formulae based on Fermat's principle are applicable for any ultrashort pulse with angular dispersion in the limit of geometrical optics. By virtue of these formulae, we can calculate the high-order pulse front tilt in the sub-20-fs UV pulse generated in a novel scheme of sum-frequency mixing in a nonlinear crystal accompanied by angular dispersion. It is also demonstrated how the high-order angular dispersion can be eliminated in the calculation. PMID:19471467

  4. Terahertz metrology on power, frequency, spectroscopy, and pulse parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin; Ying, Cheng Ping; Wang, Heng Fei; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hong Yuan; Jiang, Bin

    2015-11-01

    Terahertz metrology is becoming more and more important along with the fast development of terahertz technology. This paper reviews the research works of the groups from the physikalisch-technische bundesanstalt (PTB), National institute of standards and technology (NIST), National physical laboratory (NPL), National institute of metrology (NIM) and some other research institutes. The contents mainly focus on the metrology of parameters of power, frequency, spectrum and pulse. At the end of the paper, the prospect of terahertz metrology is predicted.

  5. Method and means for generating a synchronizing pulse from a repetitive wave of varying frequency

    DOEpatents

    DeVolpi, Alexander; Pecina, Ronald J.; Travis, Dale J.

    1976-01-01

    An event that occurs repetitively at continuously changing frequencies can be used to generate a triggering pulse which is used to synchronize or control. The triggering pulse is generated at a predetermined percentage of the period of the repetitive waveform without regard to frequency. Counts are accumulated in two counters, the first counting during the "on" fraction of the period, and the second counting during the "off" fraction. The counts accumulated during each cycle are compared. On equality the trigger pulse is generated. Count input rates to each counter are determined by the ratio of the on-off fractions of the event waveform and the desired phase relationship. This invention is of particular utility in providing a trigger or synchronizing pulse during the open period of the shutter of a high-speed framing camera during its acceleration as well as its period of substantially constant speed.

  6. Blind frequency-resolved optical-gating pulse characterization for quantitative differential multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Field, Jeffrey J; Durfee, Charles G; Squier, Jeff A

    2010-10-15

    We use a unique multifocal multiphoton microscope to directly characterize the pulse in the focal plane of a high-NA objective using second-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG). Because of the nature of the optical setup, femtosecond laser pulses of orthogonal polarization states are generated in the focal plane, each acquiring a different spectral dispersion. By applying an additional constraint on the phase extraction algorithm, we simultaneously extract both the gate and probe pulses from a single spectrogram with a FROG error of 0.016. PMID:20967069

  7. Measurement of electron density transients in pulsed RF discharges using a frequency boxcar hairpin probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David; Coumou, David; Shannon, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Time resolved electron density measurements in pulsed RF discharges are shown using a hairpin resonance probe using low cost electronics, on par with normal Langmuir probe boxcar mode operation. Time resolution of 10 microseconds has been demonstrated. A signal generator produces the applied microwave frequency; the reflected waveform is passed through a directional coupler and filtered to remove the RF component. The signal is heterodyned with a frequency mixer and rectified to produce a DC signal read by an oscilloscope. At certain points during the pulse, the plasma density is such that the applied frequency is the same as the resonance frequency of the probe/plasma system, creating reflected signal dips. The applied microwave frequency is shifted in small increments in a frequency boxcar routine to determine the density as a function of time. A dc sheath correction is applied for the grounded probe, producing low cost, high fidelity, and highly reproducible electron density measurements. The measurements are made in both inductively and capacitively coupled systems, the latter driven by multiple frequencies where a subset of these frequencies are pulsed. Measurements are compared to previous published results, time resolved OES, and in-line measurement of plasma impedance. This work is supported by the NSF DOE partnership on plasma science, the NSF GOALI program, and MKS Instruments.

  8. Autonomous portable pulsed-periodical generator of high-power radiofrequency-pulses based on gas discharge with hollow cathode.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Sergey V; Dubinov, Alexander E; L'vov, Igor L; Popolev, Vyacheslav L; Sadovoy, Sergey A; Sadchikov, Eugeny A; Selemir, Victor D; Valiulina, Valeria K; Vyalykh, Dmitry V; Zhdanov, Victor S

    2016-05-01

    Portable autonomous generator of high-power RF-pulses based on the gas discharge with hollow cathode has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Input and output characteristics are the following: discharge current amplitude is 800 A, duration of generated RF-pulses is 350 ns, carrier frequency is ∼90 MHz, power in RF-pulse is 0.5 MW, pulse repetition rate is 0.5 kHz, and device efficiency is ∼25%.

  9. Autonomous portable pulsed-periodical generator of high-power radiofrequency-pulses based on gas discharge with hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulychev, Sergey V.; Dubinov, Alexander E.; L'vov, Igor L.; Popolev, Vyacheslav L.; Sadovoy, Sergey A.; Sadchikov, Eugeny A.; Selemir, Victor D.; Valiulina, Valeria K.; Vyalykh, Dmitry V.; Zhdanov, Victor S.

    2016-05-01

    Portable autonomous generator of high-power RF-pulses based on the gas discharge with hollow cathode has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Input and output characteristics are the following: discharge current amplitude is 800 A, duration of generated RF-pulses is 350 ns, carrier frequency is ˜90 MHz, power in RF-pulse is 0.5 MW, pulse repetition rate is 0.5 kHz, and device efficiency is ˜25%.

  10. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  11. Pulsed radio frequency interference effects on data communications via satellite transponder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, A.; Hong, Y.

    1979-01-01

    Power-limited communication links may be susceptible to significant degradation if intentional or unintentional pulsed high level radio frequency interference (RFI) is present. Pulsed RFI is, in fact, of current interest to NASA in studies relating to its Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The present paper examines the impact of pulsed RFI on the error probability performance of a power-limited satellite communication link: the assumed modulation scheme is PN coded binary PSK. The composite effects of thermal noise, pulsed CW and pulsed Gaussian noise are analyzed, where RFI arrivals are assumed to follow Poisson statistics. Under the assumption that the satellite repeater is ideal and that integrate and dump filtering is employed at the ground receiver, an exact error probability expression and associated approximations are derived. Computed results are generated using an arbitrarily specified RFI model.

  12. Investigation of pulsed mode operation with the frequency tuned CAPRICE ECRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maimone, F.; Tinschert, K.; Endermann, M.; Hollinger, R.; Kondrashev, S.; Lang, R.; Mäder, J.; Patchakui, P. T.; Spädtke, P.

    2016-02-01

    In order to increase the intensity of the highly charged ions produced by the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs), techniques like the frequency tuning and the afterglow mode have been developed and in this paper the effect on the ion production is shown for the first time when combining both techniques. Recent experimental results proved that the tuning of the operating frequency of the ECRIS is a promising technique to achieve higher ion currents of higher charge states. On the other hand, it is well known that the afterglow mode of the ECRIS operation can provide more intense pulsed ion beams in comparison with the continuous wave (cw) operation. These two techniques can be combined by pulsing the variable frequency signal driving the traveling wave tube amplifier which provides the high microwave power to the ECRIS. In order to analyze the effect of these two combined techniques on the ion source performance, several experiments were carried out on the pulsed frequency tuned CAPRICE (Compacte source A Plusiers Résonances Ionisantes Cyclotron Electroniques)-type ECRIS. Different waveforms and pulse lengths have been investigated under different settings of the ion source. The results of the pulsed mode have been compared with those of cw operation.

  13. Effect of pulse frequency on the ion fluxes during pulsed dc magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Rahamathunnisa, M.; Cameron, D. C.

    2009-03-15

    The ion fluxes and energies which impinge on the substrate during the deposition of chromium nitride by asymmetric bipolar pulsed dc reactive magnetron sputtering have been analyzed using energy resolved mass spectrometry. It has been found that there is a remarkable increase in ion flux at higher pulse frequencies and that the peak ion energy is directly related to the positive voltage overshoot of the target voltage. The magnitude of the metal flux depositing on the substrate is consistent with a 'dead time' of {approx}0.7 {mu}s at the start of the on period. The variation of the ion flux with pulse frequency has been explained by a simple model in which the ion density during the on period has a large peak which is slightly delayed from the large negative voltage overshoot which occurs at the start of the on pulse due to increased ionization at that time. This is consistent with the previously observed phenomena in pulsed sputtering.

  14. Acousto-optic pulse picking scheme with carrier-frequency-to-pulse-repetition-rate synchronization.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Oliver; Saule, Tobias; Plötner, Marco; Lücking, Fabian; Eidam, Tino; Hoffmann, Armin; Klenke, Arno; Hädrich, Steffen; Limpert, Jens; Holzberger, Simon; Schreiber, Thomas; Eberhardt, Ramona; Pupeza, Ioachim; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-07-27

    We introduce and experimentally validate a pulse picking technique based on a travelling-wave-type acousto-optic modulator (AOM) having the AOM carrier frequency synchronized to the repetition rate of the original pulse train. As a consequence, the phase noise characteristic of the original pulse train is largely preserved, rendering this technique suitable for applications requiring carrier-envelope phase stabilization. In a proof-of-principle experiment, the 1030-nm spectral part of an 74-MHz, carrier-envelope phase stable Ti:sapphire oscillator is amplified and reduced in pulse repetition frequency by a factor of two, maintaining an unprecedentedly low carrier-envelope phase noise spectral density of below 68 mrad. Furthermore, a comparative analysis reveals that the pulse-picking-induced additional amplitude noise is minimized, when the AOM is operated under synchronicity. The proposed scheme is particularly suitable when the down-picked repetition rate is still in the multi-MHz-range, where Pockels cells cannot be applied due to piezoelectric ringing. PMID:26367616

  15. Influences of impedance matching network on pulse-modulated radio frequency atmospheric pressure glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, W. G.; Xu, K.; Sun, B.; Ding, Z. F.

    2012-08-15

    Pulse-modulated RF atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APDGs) were investigated in recent years to reduce the thermal accumulation and extend the operation region of the stable alpha glow mode. Different pulse-modulated voltage and current waveforms were acquired in previous experiments, but no attention was paid to the interpretation. We investigated this issue and associated phenomenon via positive and negative feedback effects derived from varying the series capacitor in the inversely L-shaped matching network used in our pulse-modulated RF APGD source. The evolutions of pulse-modulated RF waveforms were found to be associated with the feedback region and the pulsed plasma absorbed RF power. In the positive feedback region, pulse-modulated RF APGDs are relatively stable. In the negative feedback region, wide spikes as well as undershoots occur in RF voltage and current waveforms and the plasma absorbed RF power. In case of a high RF power discharge with a low modulation frequency, the pulse-modulated RF APGD is extinguished and re-ignited due to the enhanced undershoot during the initial pulse phase. The pulse-modulated RF APGD can transit from positive to negative feedback region in a range of series capacitance. Experimental results are discussed by the aid of equivalent circuit, negative and positive feedback effects.

  16. Investigating Sonothrombolysis with High Frequency Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Cameron; Hynynen, Kullervo; Goertz, David

    2009-04-01

    Despite a significant body of work establishing the feasibility of ultrasound mediated thrombolysis in vitro, in vivo, and in clinical settings, there remains considerable uncertainty about the specific mechanisms involved in this process. This motivates further work to elucidate these mechanisms, which will be central to optimizing safe and effective operating conditions, and to guide the development of novel approaches and instrumentation. In this study, we investigate the use of high frequency ultrasound as a means of gaining mechanistic insight into sonothrombolysis. A high frequency ultrasound (20-50 MHz) instrument is employed which provides the ability to conduct volumetric clot imaging as well as pulsed-wave Doppler to monitor hemodynamics within vessels and clots. With modifications, it is enabled to perform the acquisition of RF data to assess the displacement of clots and vessel walls subjected to therapeutic pulses. Additional modifications were made to perform nonlinear imaging of micron to submicron sized bubbles, which are of interest in enhancing clot lysis. Experiments were performed on in vitro clots, and in vivo using a rabbit femoral artery clot model initiated by the injection of thrombin. Therapeutic pulses are provided by a single element spherically focused air backed transducer with transmit frequencies of 1.68 MHz. Clear visualization of the clots, displacements, and presence or absence of flow within these vessels is shown to be feasible, indicating the potential of this approach as a tool for providing insight into sonothrombolysis.

  17. High-intensity terahertz pulses and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiarto, Edward Wibowo

    1997-09-01

    A large aperture transmitter based on an electrically biased photoconductor has been constructed, which is capable of generating ultrashort high-intensity pulses operating in the far-infrared (terahertz) frequency regime. The terahertz pulse is a single-cycle freely propagating electrical pulse with a 600 femtosecond pulse duration and a pulse energy close to 200 nanojoules. A complete characterization of the transmitter and its output pulse has been conducted, resulting in new understandings of the pulse generation mechanism and propagation behavior. More specifically, it was revealed for the first time that near-field diffraction plays a significant role in the propagation behavior of the terahertz pulse from the large aperture transmitter. The pulse alters its temporal shape significantly as it travels away from the transmitter, especially when it is focused by a parabolic mirror. The high-intensity pulse is intended to be utilized as a probe of high-field transport properties of free carriers in semiconductors and superconductors. The transient dynamics of hot-electrons in silicon and gallium arsenide are of particular interest, as they relate to current issues in modern electronic devices. A simulation model has been developed which predicts a nonlinear absorption of the terahertz pulses by free-electrons in the semiconductors due to velocity saturation effects. The high-intensity terahertz pulse has also been used to probe the nonlinear electrodynamics of high-T c superconductors. The results confirm the ability of the pulse to break pairs of superconducting electrons and convert them to normal state electrons. This will allow further studies to be conducted to resolve the exact pair-breaking mechanism, which is ultimately linked to a better understanding of some of the failure mechanisms in today's superconducting microwave devices.

  18. Role of PTHrP(1-34) Pulse Frequency Versus Pulse Duration to Enhance Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jennifer; Ortel, Marlen; Hagmann, Sebastien; Hoeflich, Andreas; Richter, Wiltrud

    2016-12-01

    Generation of phenotypically stable, articular chondrocytes from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is still an unaccomplished task, with formation of abundant, hyaline extracellular matrix, and avoidance of hypertrophy being prime challenges. We recently demonstrated that parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a promising factor to direct chondrogenesis of MSCs towards an articular phenotype, since intermittent PTHrP application stimulated cartilage matrix production and reduced undesired hypertrophy. We here investigated the role of frequency, pulse duration, total exposure time, and underlying mechanisms in order to unlock the full potential of PTHrP actions. Human MSC subjected to in vitro chondrogenesis for six weeks were exposed to 2.5 nM PTHrP(1-34) pulses from days 7 to 42. Application frequency was increased from three times weekly (3 × 6 h/week) to daily maintaining either the duration of individual pulses (6 h/day) or total exposure time (18 h/week; 2.6 h/day). Daily PTHrP treatment significantly increased extracellular matrix deposition regardless of pulse duration and suppressed alkaline-phosphatase activity by 87%. High total exposure time significantly reduced cell proliferation at day 14. Pulse duration was critically important to significantly reduce IHH expression, but irrelevant for PTHrP-induced suppression of the hypertrophic markers MEF2C and IBSP. COL10A1, RUNX2, and MMP13 expression remained unaltered. Decreased IGFBP-2, -3, and -6 expression suggested modulated IGF-I availability in PTHrP groups, while drop of SOX9 protein levels during the PTHrP-pulse may delay chondroblast formation and hypertrophy. Overall, the significantly optimized timing of PTHrP-pulses demonstrated a vast potential to enhance chondrogenesis of MSC and suppress hypertrophy possibly via superior balancing of IGF- and SOX9-related mechanisms. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2673-2681, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27548511

  19. Optical generation of narrowband high frequency ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Shi-Yao; Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Li, Pai-Chi

    2014-03-01

    We propose a multilayer film structure to generate high frequency and narrowband ultrasound. It consists of three light-absorbing layers and two light-transmittance layers. The amplitude is tunable by adjusting the optical absorption coefficient of light-absorbing layers. The delay can be adjusted by changing thicknesses of light-transmittance layers. In one example, the generated high frequency narrowband ultrasound signal has a center frequency of 18.4MHz and 32.6% fractional bandwidth using the proposed multilayer structure. Compared with this result, the single layer structure produces a center frequency of 20.2MHz and 125.7% fractional bandwidth. In addition, a single laser pulse was employed to generate US on the multilayer film as an US source and PA signals of the high optical absorption region of the phantom at the same time. Because the spectral characteristics of the ultrasound signals generated by the multi-layer film are tunable, it can be designed such that the US echo and PA echo are spectrally separable, thus enabling simultaneous US/PA imaging using only a single laser pulse. Feasibility of this proposed method was demonstrated by imaging of a cyst-like phantom.

  20. Pulse-to-pulse Diagnostics at High Reprate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Bertram; Kovalev, Sergey; Golz, Torsten; Stojanovich, Nikola; Fisher, Alan; Kampfrath, Tobias; Gensch, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Femtosecond level diagnostic and control of sub-picosecond electron bunches is an important topic in modern accelerator research. At the same time new linear electron accelerators based on quasi-CW SRF technology will be the drivers of many future 4th Generation lightsources such as X-ray free electron lasers. A high duty cycle, high stability and online pulse to pulse diagnostic at these new accelerators are crucial ingredients to the success of these large scale facilities. A novel THz based online monitor concept is presented that has the potential to give access to pulse to pulse information on bunch form, arrival time and energy at high repetition rate and down to sub pC charges. We furthermore show experimentally that pulse to pulse arrival time measurements can be used to perform pump-probe experiments with a temporal resolution in the few-fs regime and an exceptional dynamic range. Our scheme has been tested at the superradiant test facility TELBE, but can be readily transferred to other SRF accelerator driven photon sources, such as X-FELs.

  1. Transient plasma potential in pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasmas and effect of substrate biasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Anurag; Yeom, Geun Young

    2016-09-01

    An electron emitting probe in saturated floating potential mode has been used to investigate the temporal evolution of plasma potential and the effect of substrate RF biasing on it for pulsed dual frequency (2 MHz/13.56 MHz) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The low frequency power (P2MHz) has been pulsed at 1 KHz and a duty ratio of 50%, while high frequency power (P13.56MHz) has been used in continuous mode. The substrate has been biased with a separate bias power at (P12.56MHz) Argon has been used as a discharge gas. During the ICP power pulsing, three distinct regions in a typical plasma potential profile, have been identified as `initial overshoot', pulse `on-phase' and pulse `off-phase'. It has been found out that the RF biasing of the substrate significantly modulates the temporal evolution of the plasma potential. During the initial overshoot, plasma potential decreases with increasing RF biasing of the substrate, however it increases with increasing substrate biasing for pulse `on-phase' and `off-phase'. An interesting structure in plasma potential profile has also been observed when the substrate bias is applied and its evolution depends upon the magnitude of bias power. The reason of the evolution of this structure may be the ambipolar diffusion of electron and its dependence on bias power.

  2. Electron heating enhancement by frequency-chirped laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdani, E.; Afarideh, H.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.; Riazi, Z.; Hora, H.

    2014-09-14

    Propagation of a chirped laser pulse with a circular polarization through an uprising plasma density profile is studied by using 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulation. The laser penetration depth is increased in an overdense plasma compared to an unchirped pulse. The induced transparency due to the laser frequency chirp results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum longitudinal electrostatic field at the back side of the solid target, which is very essential in target normal sheath acceleration regime of proton acceleration. For an applied chirp parameter between 0.008 and 0.01, the maximum amount of the electrostatic field is improved by a factor of 2. Furthermore, it is noticed that for a chirped laser pulse with a₀=5, because of increasing the plasma transparency length, the laser pulse can penetrate up to about n{sub e}≈6n{sub c}, where n{sub c} is plasma critical density. It shows 63% increase in the effective critical density compared to the relativistic induced transparency regime for an unchirped condition.

  3. Phase and intensity characterization of femtosecond pulses from a chirped-pulse amplifier by frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, B.; Yakovlev, V.V.; Wilson, K.R.; Squier, J.; DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R.

    1995-03-01

    Frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) measurements were made to characterize pulses from a Ti:sapphire chirped-pulse amplified laser system. By characterizing both the pulse intensity and the phase, the FROG data provided the first direct observation to our knowledge of residual phase distortion in a chirped-pulse amplifier. The FROG technique was also used to measure the regenerative amplifier dispersion and to characterize an amplitude-shaped pulse. The data provide an experimental demonstration of the value of FROG for characterizing complex pulses, including tailored femtosecond pulses for quantum control.

  4. Multi-pulse frequency shifted (MPFS) multiple access modulation for ultra wideband

    DOEpatents

    Nekoogar, Faranak; Dowla, Farid U.

    2012-01-24

    The multi-pulse frequency shifted technique uses mutually orthogonal short duration pulses o transmit and receive information in a UWB multiuser communication system. The multiuser system uses the same pulse shape with different frequencies for the reference and data for each user. Different users have a different pulse shape (mutually orthogonal to each other) and different transmit and reference frequencies. At the receiver, the reference pulse is frequency shifted to match the data pulse and a correlation scheme followed by a hard decision block detects the data.

  5. Frequency doubling of ultrashort laser pulses in biological tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Beop-Min; Eichler, Juergen; Da Silva, Luiz B.

    1999-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of second-harmonic generation (SHG) in biological tissues was performed by use of ultrashort laser pulses (<1 ps). A simplified one-dimensional model for the generation and the propagation of frequency-doubled light inside tissue was developed. This model was tested in vitro against measurements of pig and chicken tissue and human tooth. The experimental results indicate that the intensity of SHG varies significantly among tissues types and between test sites in individual tissue. Possibilities of using this nonlinear tissue property in imaging and diagnostics are discussed. (c) 1999 Optical Society of America.

  6. High pressure pulsed capillary viscometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.; Walowitt, J. A.; Pan, C. H. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted in order to establish the feasibility of a multichamber pulsed-capillary viscometer. The initial design incorporated a piston, ram, and seals which produced measured pulses up to 30,000 psi in the closed chamber system. Pressure pulses from one to ten milliseconds were investigated in a system volume of 1 cuin. Four test fluids: a MIL-L-7808, a 5P4E polyphenyl ether, a MIL-L-23699A, and a synthetic hydrocarbon were examined in the test pressure assembly. The pressure-viscosity coefficient and viscosity delay time were determined for the MIL-L-7808 lubricant tested.

  7. On-clip high frequency reliability and failure test structures

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Eric S.; Campbell, David V.

    1997-01-01

    Self-stressing test structures for realistic high frequency reliability characterizations. An on-chip high frequency oscillator, controlled by DC signals from off-chip, provides a range of high frequency pulses to test structures. The test structures provide information with regard to a variety of reliability failure mechanisms, including hot-carriers, electromigration, and oxide breakdown. The system is normally integrated at the wafer level to predict the failure mechanisms of the production integrated circuits on the same wafer.

  8. On-clip high frequency reliability and failure test structures

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, E.S.; Campbell, D.V.

    1997-04-29

    Self-stressing test structures for realistic high frequency reliability characterizations. An on-chip high frequency oscillator, controlled by DC signals from off-chip, provides a range of high frequency pulses to test structures. The test structures provide information with regard to a variety of reliability failure mechanisms, including hot-carriers, electromigration, and oxide breakdown. The system is normally integrated at the wafer level to predict the failure mechanisms of the production integrated circuits on the same wafer. 22 figs.

  9. Pulse swallowing frequency divider with low power and compact structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haijun, Gao; Lingling, Sun; Chaobo, Cai; Haiting, Zhan

    2012-11-01

    A pulse swallowing frequency divider with low power and compact structure is presented. One of the DFFs in the divided by 2/3 prescaler is controlled by the modulus control signal, and automatically powered off when it has no contribution to the operation of the prescaler. The DFFs in the program counter and the swallow counter are shared to compose a compact structure, which reduces the power consumption further. The proposed multi-modulus frequency divider was implemented in a standard 65 nm CMOS process with an area of 28 × 22 μm2. The power consumption of the divider is 0.6 mW under 1.2 V supply voltage when operating at 988 MHz.

  10. Frequency-modulation spectroscopy with transform-limited nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Eyler, E E; Gangopadhyay, S; Melikechi, N; Bloch, J C; Field, R W

    1996-02-01

    We demonstrate high-quality FM spectra with nanosecond laser pulses. Transform-limited pulses with FM sidebands are produced by pulsed amplification of a phase-modulated cw laser. The pulses can be shifted to the UV by nonlinear mixing. We report both initial experiments on I(2) and what is to our knowledge the first observation of a far-UV transition by FM spectroscopy, at 214.5 nm. Major advantages of this method include (1) spectral resolution of the order of 0.001 cm(-1), (2) better-defined optical phase, and (3) a much smaller and more easily detected modulation frequency, ~500 MHz. The absorption sensitivity is ~10(-4), and considerable further improvement is expected.

  11. High power, high frequency component test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Krawczonek, Walter

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has available a high frequency, high power laboratory facility for testing various components of aerospace and/or terrestrial power systems. This facility is described here. All of its capabilities and potential applications are detailed.

  12. Frequency-resolved optical gating measurement of ultrashort pulses by using single nanowire.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiaxin; Liao, Feng; Gu, Fuxing; Zeng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    The use of ultrashort pulses for fundamental studies and applications has been increasing rapidly in the past decades. Along with the development of ultrashort lasers, exploring new pulse diagnositic approaches with higher signal-to-noise ratio have attracted great scientific and technological interests. In this work, we demonstrate a simple technique of ultrashort pulses characterization with a single semiconductor nanowire. By performing a frequency-resolved optical gating method with a ZnO nanowire coupled to tapered optical microfibers, the phase and amplitude of a pulse series are extracted. The generated signals from the transverse frequency conversion process can be spatially distinguished from the input, so the signal-to-noise ratio is improved and permits lower energy pulses to be identified. Besides, since the nanometer scale of the nonlinear medium provides relaxed phase-matching constraints, a measurement of 300-nm-wide supercontinuum pulses is achieved. This system is highly compatible with standard optical fiber systems, and shows a great potential for applications such as on-chip optical communication. PMID:27609521

  13. Frequency-resolved optical gating measurement of ultrashort pulses by using single nanowire.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiaxin; Liao, Feng; Gu, Fuxing; Zeng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    The use of ultrashort pulses for fundamental studies and applications has been increasing rapidly in the past decades. Along with the development of ultrashort lasers, exploring new pulse diagnositic approaches with higher signal-to-noise ratio have attracted great scientific and technological interests. In this work, we demonstrate a simple technique of ultrashort pulses characterization with a single semiconductor nanowire. By performing a frequency-resolved optical gating method with a ZnO nanowire coupled to tapered optical microfibers, the phase and amplitude of a pulse series are extracted. The generated signals from the transverse frequency conversion process can be spatially distinguished from the input, so the signal-to-noise ratio is improved and permits lower energy pulses to be identified. Besides, since the nanometer scale of the nonlinear medium provides relaxed phase-matching constraints, a measurement of 300-nm-wide supercontinuum pulses is achieved. This system is highly compatible with standard optical fiber systems, and shows a great potential for applications such as on-chip optical communication.

  14. Frequency-resolved optical gating measurement of ultrashort pulses by using single nanowire

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jiaxin; Liao, Feng; Gu, Fuxing; Zeng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    The use of ultrashort pulses for fundamental studies and applications has been increasing rapidly in the past decades. Along with the development of ultrashort lasers, exploring new pulse diagnositic approaches with higher signal-to-noise ratio have attracted great scientific and technological interests. In this work, we demonstrate a simple technique of ultrashort pulses characterization with a single semiconductor nanowire. By performing a frequency-resolved optical gating method with a ZnO nanowire coupled to tapered optical microfibers, the phase and amplitude of a pulse series are extracted. The generated signals from the transverse frequency conversion process can be spatially distinguished from the input, so the signal-to-noise ratio is improved and permits lower energy pulses to be identified. Besides, since the nanometer scale of the nonlinear medium provides relaxed phase-matching constraints, a measurement of 300-nm-wide supercontinuum pulses is achieved. This system is highly compatible with standard optical fiber systems, and shows a great potential for applications such as on-chip optical communication. PMID:27609521

  15. Frequency-resolved optical gating measurement of ultrashort pulses by using single nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiaxin; Liao, Feng; Gu, Fuxing; Zeng, Heping

    2016-09-01

    The use of ultrashort pulses for fundamental studies and applications has been increasing rapidly in the past decades. Along with the development of ultrashort lasers, exploring new pulse diagnositic approaches with higher signal-to-noise ratio have attracted great scientific and technological interests. In this work, we demonstrate a simple technique of ultrashort pulses characterization with a single semiconductor nanowire. By performing a frequency-resolved optical gating method with a ZnO nanowire coupled to tapered optical microfibers, the phase and amplitude of a pulse series are extracted. The generated signals from the transverse frequency conversion process can be spatially distinguished from the input, so the signal-to-noise ratio is improved and permits lower energy pulses to be identified. Besides, since the nanometer scale of the nonlinear medium provides relaxed phase-matching constraints, a measurement of 300-nm-wide supercontinuum pulses is achieved. This system is highly compatible with standard optical fiber systems, and shows a great potential for applications such as on-chip optical communication.

  16. BANSHEE: High-voltage repetitively pulsed electron-beam driver

    SciTech Connect

    VanHaaften, F.

    1992-01-01

    BANSHEE (Beam Accelerator for a New Source of High-Energy Electrons) this is a high-voltage modulator is used to produce a high-current relativistic electron beam for high-power microwave tube development. The goal of the BANSHEE research is first to achieve a voltage pulse of 700--750 kV with a 1-{mu}s pulse width driving a load of {approximately}100 {Omega}, the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of a few hertz. The ensuing goal is to increase the pulse amplitude to a level approaching 1 MV. We conducted tests using half the modulator with an output load of 200 {Omega}, up to a level of {approximately}650 kV at a PRF of 1 Hz and 525 kV at a PRF of 5 Hz. We then conducted additional testing using the complete system driving a load of {approximately}100 {Omega}.

  17. BANSHEE: High-voltage repetitively pulsed electron-beam driver

    SciTech Connect

    VanHaaften, F.

    1992-08-01

    BANSHEE (Beam Accelerator for a New Source of High-Energy Electrons) this is a high-voltage modulator is used to produce a high-current relativistic electron beam for high-power microwave tube development. The goal of the BANSHEE research is first to achieve a voltage pulse of 700--750 kV with a 1-{mu}s pulse width driving a load of {approximately}100 {Omega}, the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of a few hertz. The ensuing goal is to increase the pulse amplitude to a level approaching 1 MV. We conducted tests using half the modulator with an output load of 200 {Omega}, up to a level of {approximately}650 kV at a PRF of 1 Hz and 525 kV at a PRF of 5 Hz. We then conducted additional testing using the complete system driving a load of {approximately}100 {Omega}.

  18. SAR imagery using chaotic carrier frequency agility pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaojian; Feng, Xiangzhi

    2011-06-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems are getting more and more applications in both civilian and military remote sensing missions. With the increasing deployment of electronic countermeasures (ECM) on modern battlefields, SAR encounters more and more interference jamming signals. The ECM jamming signals cause the SAR system to receive and process erroneous information which results in severe degradations in the output SAR images and/or formation of phony images of nonexistent targets. As a consequence, development of the electronic counter-countermeasures (ECCM) capability becomes one of the key problems in SAR system design. This paper develops radar signaling strategies and algorithms that enhance the ability of synthetic aperture radar to image targets under conditions of electronic jamming. The concept of SAR using chaotic carrier frequency agility pulses (CCFAP-SAR) is first proposed. Then the imaging procedure for CCFAP-SAR is discussed in detail. The ECCM performance of CCFAP-SAR for both depressive noise jamming and deceptive repeat jamming is analyzed. The impact of the carrier frequency agility range on the image quality of CCFAP-SAR is also studied. Simulation results demonstrate that, with adequate agility range of the carrier frequency, the proposed CCFAP-SAR performs as well as conventional radar with linear frequency modulation (LFM) waveform in image quality and slightly better in anti-noise depressive jamming; while performs very well in anti-deception jamming which cannot be rejected by LFM-SAR.

  19. Review of High Power Pulse Transformer Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Tan, Xiaohua

    Vacuum devices generally work under high power pulse voltage of order 103 V to 106 V, and this pulse voltage could be generated by high power pulse transformer. Relatively, pulse transformer has the advantages of compact structure and excellent repetitiveness. It is expected of short rise-time, wide pulse-width and high energy transferring efficiency in most applications. Aiming at this purpose, it is feasible to select magnetic core with high permeability and high saturation magnetic flux density, use closed core and take some special measures to diminish leakage inductance in the making-process. This paper is a brief summary of high power pulse transformer design. In this paper, the principle, types and characteristics specification of high power pulse transformer are presented, and the design methods of electrical, magnetic and structure parameters are summarized. The methods of shortening rise time, diminishing droop and expanding output pulse-width (electrical parameter design), testing magnetic core materials (magnetic parameter design) and minimizing leakage inductance (structure parameter design) are emphasized.

  20. Sub-15fs ultraviolet pulses generated by achromatic phase-matching sum-frequency mixing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baozhen; Jiang, Yongliang; Sueda, Keiich; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2009-09-28

    A broadband ultraviolet pulse with a spectral width of 44 nm was generated by achromatic sum-frequency mixing of an 805-nm pulse and ultrabroadband visible pulse. Angular dispersion was introduced to achieve broadband phase matching by a prism pair. The UV pulse was compressed to 13.2 fs with another prism pair, with energy of 600 nJ. PMID:19907556

  1. Thomson scattering in high-intensity chirped laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Holkundkar, Amol R.; Harvey, Chris Marklund, Mattias

    2015-10-15

    We consider the Thomson scattering of an electron in an ultra-intense laser pulse. It is well known that at high laser intensities, the frequency and brilliance of the emitted radiation will be greatly reduced due to the electron losing energy before it reaches the peak field. In this work, we investigate the use of a small frequency chirp in the laser pulse in order to mitigate this effect of radiation reaction. It is found that the introduction of a negative chirp means the electron enters a high frequency region of the field while it still has a large proportion of its original energy. This results in a significant enhancement of the frequency and intensity of the emitted radiation as compared to the case without chirping.

  2. State dependent model predictive control for orbital rendezvous using pulse-width pulse-frequency modulated thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhu, Zheng H.; Meguid, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation based trajectory planning for orbital rendezvous and proximity maneuvering near a non-cooperative spacecraft in an elliptical orbit. The problem is formulated by converting the continuous control input, output from the state dependent model predictive control, into a sequence of pulses of constant magnitude by controlling firing frequency and duration of constant-magnitude thrusters. The state dependent model predictive control is derived by minimizing the control error of states and control roughness of control input for a safe, smooth and fuel efficient approaching trajectory. The resulting nonlinear programming problem is converted into a series of quadratic programming problem and solved by numerical iteration using the receding horizon strategy. The numerical results show that the proposed state dependent model predictive control with the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation is able to effectively generate optimized trajectories using equivalent control pulses for the proximity maneuvering with less energy consumption.

  3. Influence of phase mismatching on temporal waveform of pulse in the process of frequency conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zijian; Liu, Dean; Liu, Yaqun; Miao, Jie; Zhou, Shenlei; Zhu, Baoqiang; Zhu, Jianqiang

    2015-08-01

    The influence of phase mismatching on output pulse temporal waveform in the process of second and third harmonic generation at various power densities with different detuning angles is studied based on nonlinear coupled-wave equations. The rules of different frequencies pulse width vary with the detuning angle have been analyzed quantitatively in potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals. The results of numerical simulation show that in high power laser frequency conversion system, the changes of fundamental pulse width are more sensitive to the detuning angle than second harmonic in the process of doubling, and the maximum variation of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of fundamental at different detuning angles is about 19.0%. For tripling, the output pulse width changes of fundamental and second harmonic are sensitive to the detuning angle at high power density, and the maximum variation of their FWHM at different detuning angles are about 19.0% and 19.2%, respectively. However, the SH pulse width almost unchanged at low power density. The results of this study may provide a promising route to determine the best angle for phase matching in the angle adjusting process of experiment.

  4. Different pulse pattern generation by frequency detuning in pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Si, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Zong-Fu

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of our recent experimental investigation of the modulation frequency detuning effect on the output pulse dynamics in a pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser. The experimental study shows the existence of five different mode-locking states that mainly depend on the modulation frequency detuning, which are: (a) amplitude-even harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (b) Q-switched harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (c) sinusoidal wave modulation mode, (d) pulses bundle state, and (e) noise-like state. A detailed experimental characterization of the output pulses dynamics in each operating mode is presented.

  5. High-gradient, pulsed operation of superconducting niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1984-02-01

    Tests performed on several Niobium TM/sub 010/ cavities at frequencies of about 2856 MHz using a high-power, pulsed method indicate that, at the end of the charging pulse, peak surface magnetic fields of up to approx. 1300 Oe, corresponding to a peak surface electric field of approx. 68 MV/m, can be reached at 4.2/sup 0/K without appreciable average losses. Further studies of the properties of superconductors under pulsed operation might shed light on fundamental properties of rf superconductivity, as well as lead to the possibility of applying the pulse method to the operation of high-gradient linear colliders. 7 references, 30 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Plasma dynamics in a discharge produced by a pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Anurag; Lee, Sehan; Yeom, Geun Y.

    2014-11-01

    Using a Langmuir probe, time resolved measurements of plasma parameters were carried out in a discharge produced by a pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasma source. The discharge was sustained in an argon gas environment at a pressure of 10 mTorr. The low frequency (P{sub 2} {sub MHz}) was pulsed at 1 kHz and a duty ratio of 50%, while high frequency (P{sub 13.56} {sub MHz}) was maintained in the CW mode. All measurements were carried out at the center of the discharge and 20 mm above the substrate. The results show that, at a particular condition (P{sub 2} {sub MHz} = 200 W and P{sub 13.56} {sub MHz }= 600 W), plasma density increases with time and stabilizes at up to ∼200 μs after the initiation of P{sub 2} {sub MHz} pulse at a plasma density of (2 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3}) for the remaining duration of pulse “on.” This stabilization time for plasma density increases with increasing P{sub 2} {sub MHz} and becomes ∼300 μs when P{sub 2} {sub MHz} is 600 W; however, the growth rate of plasma density is almost independent of P{sub 2} {sub MHz}. Interestingly, the plasma density sharply increases as the pulse is switched off and reaches a peak value in ∼10 μs, then decreases for the remaining pulse “off-time.” This phenomenon is thought to be due to the sheath modulation during the transition from “pulse on” to “pulse off” and partly due to RF noise during the transition period. The magnitude of peak plasma density in off time increases with increasing P{sub 2} {sub MHz}. The plasma potential and electron temperature decrease as the pulse develops and shows similar behavior to that of the plasma density when the pulse is switched off.

  7. High frequency integrated MOS filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, C.

    1990-01-01

    Several techniques exist for implementing integrated MOS filters. These techniques fit into the general categories of sampled and tuned continuous-time filters. Advantages and limitations of each approach are discussed. This paper focuses primarily on the high frequency capabilities of MOS integrated filters.

  8. Shifts in frequency-modulated pulses recorded during an encounter with Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris).

    PubMed

    Keating, Jennifer L; Barlow, Jay; Rankin, Shannon

    2016-08-01

    Echolocation signals produced by beaked whales (family: Ziphiidae) include frequency-modulated (FM) pulses that appear to have species-specific characteristics. To date there has been no established evidence that a single species of beaked whale might produce more than one type of FM pulse. In 2014 a group of Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) were sighted off of Southern California; recordings included FM pulses with significant increases in peak frequency, center frequency, and -10 dB bandwidth relative to FM pulses previously attributed to this species. This research suggests there may be greater variation in received beaked whale FM pulses than previously understood. PMID:27586775

  9. High-Precision Pulse Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Kleyner, Igor

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a pulse generator with subnanosecond resolution implemented with a low-cost field-programmable gate array (FPGA) at low power levels. The method used exploits the fast carry chains of certain FPGAs. Prototypes have been built and tested in both Actel AX and Xilinx Virtex 4 technologies. In-flight calibration or control can be performed by using a similar and related technique as a time interval measurement circuit by measuring a period of the stable oscillator, as the delays through the fast carry chains will vary as a result of manufacturing variances as well as the result of environmental conditions (voltage, aging, temperature, and radiation).

  10. Dual-Beam Histotripsy: A Low-Frequency Pump Enabling a High-Frequency Probe for Precise Lesion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Duryea, Alexander P.; Kim, Yohan; Hall, Timothy L.; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy produces tissue fractionation through dense energetic bubble clouds generated by short, high-pressure, ultrasound pulses. When using pulses shorter than 2 cycles, the generation of these energetic bubble clouds only depends on where the peak negative pressure (P–) exceeds an intrinsic threshold of a medium (26 – 30 MPa in soft tissue with high water content). This paper investigates a strategic method for precise lesion generation in which a low-frequency pump pulse is applied to enable a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse to exceed the intrinsic threshold. This pump-probe method of controlling a supra-threshold volume can be called “dual-beam histotripsy.” A 20-element dual-frequency (500 kHz and 3 MHz elements confocally aligned) array transducer was used to generate dual-beam histotripsy pulses in RBC phantoms and porcine hepatic tissue specimens. The results showed that, when sub-intrinsic-threshold pump (500 kHz) and probe (3 MHz) pulses were applied together, dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were only generated when their peak negative pressures combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The smallest reproducible lesion varied with the relative amplitude between the pump and probe pulses, and, with a higher proportion of the probe pulse, smaller lesions could be generated. When the propagation direction of the probe pulse relative to the pump pulse was altered, the shape of the produced lesion changed based on the region that exceeded intrinsic threshold. Since the low-frequency pump pulse is more immune to attenuation and aberrations, and the high-frequency probe pulse can provide precision in lesion formation, this dual-beam histotripsy approach would be very useful in situations where precise lesion formation is required through a highly attenuative and aberrative medium, such as transcranial therapy. This is particularly true if a small low-attenuation acoustic window is available for the high-frequency

  11. Dual-beam histotripsy: a low-frequency pump enabling a high-frequency probe for precise lesion formation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Duryea, Alexander P; Kim, Yohan; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2014-02-01

    Histotripsy produces tissue fractionation through dense energetic bubble clouds generated by short, high-pressure, ultrasound pulses. When using pulses shorter than 2 cycles, the generation of these energetic bubble clouds only depends on where the peak negative pressure (P-) exceeds the intrinsic threshold of the medium (26 to 30 MPa in soft tissue with high water content). This paper investigates a strategic method for precise lesion generation in which a low-frequency pump pulse is applied to enable a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse to exceed the intrinsic threshold. This pump-probe method of controlling a supra-threshold volume can be called dual-beam histotripsy. A 20-element dual-frequency (500-kHz and 3-MHz elements confocally aligned) array transducer was used to generate dual-beam histotripsy pulses in red blood cell phantoms and porcine hepatic tissue specimens. The results showed that when sub-intrinsic-threshold pump (500-kHz) and probe (3-MHz) pulses were applied together, dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were only generated when their peak negative pressures combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The smallest reproducible lesion varied with the relative amplitude between the pump and probe pulses, and, with a higher proportion of the probe pulse, smaller lesions could be generated. When the propagation direction of the probe pulse relative to the pump pulse was altered, the shape of the produced lesion changed based on the region that exceeded intrinsic threshold. Because the low-frequency pump pulse is more immune to attenuation and aberrations, and the high-frequency probe pulse can provide precision in lesion formation, this dual-beam histotripsy approach would be very useful in situations in which precise lesion formation is required through a highly attenuative and aberrative medium, such as transcranial therapy. This is particularly true if a small low-attenuation acoustic window is available for the high-frequency

  12. Dual-beam histotripsy: a low-frequency pump enabling a high-frequency probe for precise lesion formation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Duryea, Alexander P; Kim, Yohan; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2014-02-01

    Histotripsy produces tissue fractionation through dense energetic bubble clouds generated by short, high-pressure, ultrasound pulses. When using pulses shorter than 2 cycles, the generation of these energetic bubble clouds only depends on where the peak negative pressure (P-) exceeds the intrinsic threshold of the medium (26 to 30 MPa in soft tissue with high water content). This paper investigates a strategic method for precise lesion generation in which a low-frequency pump pulse is applied to enable a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse to exceed the intrinsic threshold. This pump-probe method of controlling a supra-threshold volume can be called dual-beam histotripsy. A 20-element dual-frequency (500-kHz and 3-MHz elements confocally aligned) array transducer was used to generate dual-beam histotripsy pulses in red blood cell phantoms and porcine hepatic tissue specimens. The results showed that when sub-intrinsic-threshold pump (500-kHz) and probe (3-MHz) pulses were applied together, dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were only generated when their peak negative pressures combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The smallest reproducible lesion varied with the relative amplitude between the pump and probe pulses, and, with a higher proportion of the probe pulse, smaller lesions could be generated. When the propagation direction of the probe pulse relative to the pump pulse was altered, the shape of the produced lesion changed based on the region that exceeded intrinsic threshold. Because the low-frequency pump pulse is more immune to attenuation and aberrations, and the high-frequency probe pulse can provide precision in lesion formation, this dual-beam histotripsy approach would be very useful in situations in which precise lesion formation is required through a highly attenuative and aberrative medium, such as transcranial therapy. This is particularly true if a small low-attenuation acoustic window is available for the high-frequency

  13. Laser pulse shaping for high gradient accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, F.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Bisesto, F.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Galletti, M.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Moreno, M.; Petrarca, M.; Pompili, R.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2016-09-01

    In many high gradient accelerator schemes, i.e. with plasma or dielectric wakefield induced by particles, many electron pulses are required to drive the acceleration of one of them. Those electron bunches, that generally should have very short duration and low emittance, can be generated in photoinjectors driven by a train of laser pulses coming inside the same RF bucket. We present the system used to shape and characterize the laser pulses used in multibunch operations at Sparc_lab. Our system gives us control over the main parameter useful to produce a train of up to five high brightness bunches with tailored intensity and time distribution.

  14. Rarefied flow diagnostics using pulsed high-current electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojcik, Radoslaw M.; Schilling, John H.; Erwin, Daniel A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of high-current short-pulse electron beams in low-density gas flow diagnostics is introduced. Efficient beam propagation is demonstrated for pressure up to 300 microns. The beams, generated by low-pressure pseudospark discharges in helium, provide extremely high fluorescence levels, allowing time-resolved visualization in high-background environments. The fluorescence signal frequency is species-dependent, allowing instantaneous visualization of mixing flowfields.

  15. High time resolution laser induced fluorescence in pulsed argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Biloiu, Ioana A.; Sun Xuan; Scime, Earl E.

    2006-10-15

    A submillisecond time resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF) method for obtaining the temporal evolution of the ion velocity distribution function in pulsed argon plasma is presented. A basic LIF system that employs a continuous laser wave pumping and lock-in aided detection of the subsequent fluorescence radiation is modified by addition of a high frequency acousto-optic modulator to provide measurements of the ion flow velocity and ion temperature in a helicon generated pulsed argon plasma with temporal resolutions as high as 30 {mu}s.

  16. Increased efficiency of ion acceleration by using femtosecond laser pulses at higher harmonic frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Psikal, J.; Klimo, O.; Weber, S.; Margarone, D.

    2014-07-15

    The influence of laser frequency on laser-driven ion acceleration is investigated by means of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. When ultrashort intense laser pulse at higher harmonic frequency irradiates a thin solid foil, the target may become re lativistically transparent for significantly lower laser pulse intensity compared with irradiation at fundamental laser frequency. The relativistically induced transparency results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum energies of accelerated ions and their numbers. Our simulation results have shown the increase in maximum proton energy and increase in the number of high-energy protons by a factor of 2 after the interaction of an ultrashort laser pulse of maximum intensity 7 × 10{sup 21 }W/cm{sup 2} with a fully ionized plastic foil of realistic density and of optimal thickness between 100 nm and 200 nm when switching from the fundamental frequency to the third harmonics.

  17. An overview of DREV's activities on pulsed CO2 laser transmitters: Frequency stability and lifetime aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruickshank, James; Pace, Paul; Mathieu, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    After introducing the desired features in a transmitter for laser radar applications, the output characteristics of several configurations of frequency-stable TEA-CO2 lasers are reviewed. Based on work carried out at the Defence Research Establishment Valcartier (DREV), output pulses are examined from short cavity lasers, CW-TEA hybrid lasers, and amplifiers for low power pulses. It is concluded that the technique of injecting a low-power laser beam into a TEA laser resonator with Gaussian reflectivity mirrors should be investigated because it appears well adapted to producing high energy, single mode, low chirp pulses. Finally, a brief report on tests carried out on catalysts composed of stannic oxide and noble metals demonstrates the potential of these catalysts, operating at close to room temperature, to provide complete closed-cycle laser operation.

  18. Ultrashort-pulse measurement using noninstantaneous nonlinearities: Raman effects in frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.; Kohler, B.; Wilson, K.R.

    1995-03-01

    Ultrashort-pulse-characterization techniques generally require instantaneously responding media. We show that this is not the case for frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG). We include, as an example, the noninstantaneous Raman response of fused silica, which can cause errors in the retrieved pulse width of as much as 8% for a 25-fs pulse in polarization-gate FROG. We present a modified pulse-retrieval algorithm that deconvolves such slow effects and use it to retrieve pulses of any width. In experiments with 45-fs pulses this algorithm achieved better convergence and yielded a shorter pulse than previous FROG algorithms.

  19. High velocity pulsed wire-arc spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas (Inventor); Massey, Dennis W. (Inventor); Kincaid, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Wire arc spraying using repetitively pulsed, high temperature gas jets, usually referred to as plasma jets, and generated by capillary discharges, substantially increases the velocity of atomized and entrained molten droplets. The quality of coatings produced is improved by increasing the velocity with which coating particles impact the coated surface. The effectiveness of wire-arc spraying is improved by replacing the usual atomizing air stream with a rapidly pulsed high velocity plasma jet. Pulsed power provides higher coating particle velocities leading to improved coatings. 50 micron aluminum droplets with velocities of 1500 m/s are produced. Pulsed plasma jet spraying provides the means to coat the insides of pipes, tubes, and engine block cylinders with very high velocity droplet impact.

  20. Noise sensitivity in frequency-resolved optical-gating measurements of ultrashort pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Fittinghoff, D.N.; DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R.; Ladera, C.L.

    1995-10-01

    Frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), a technique for measuring ultrashort laser pulses, involves producing a spectrogram of the pulse and then retrieving the pulse intensity and phase with an iterative algorithm. We study how several types of noise---multiplicative, additive, and quantization---affect pulse retrieval. We define a convergence criterion and find that the algorithm converges to a reasonable pulse field, even in the presence of 10% noise. Specifically, with appropriate filtering, 1% rms retrieval error is achieved for 10% multiplicative noise, 10% additive noise, and as few as 8 bits of resolution. For additive and multiplicative noise the retrieval errors decrease roughly as the square root of the amount of noise. In addition, the background induced in the wings of the pulse by additive noise is equal to the amount of additive noise on the trace. Thus the dynamic range of the measured intensity and phase is limited by a noise floor equal to the amount of additive noise on the trace. We also find that, for best results, a region of zero intensity should surround the nonzero region of the trace. Consequently, in the presence of additive noise, baseline subtraction is important. We also find that Fourier low-pass filtering improves pulse retrieval without introducing significant distortion, especially in high-noise cases. We show that the field errors in the temporal and the spectral domains are equal. Overall, the algorithm performs well because the measured trace contains {ital N}{sup 2} data points for a pulse that has only 2{ital N} degrees of freedom; FROG has built in redundancy. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital Optical} {ital Society} {ital of} {ital America}.

  1. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  2. Wide-band, low-frequency pulse profiles of 100 radio pulsars with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilia, M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Stappers, B. W.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Weltevrede, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Zagkouris, K.; Hassall, T. E.; Bilous, A. V.; Breton, R. P.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Keane, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Noutsos, A.; Osłowski, S.; Serylak, M.; Sobey, C.; ter Veen, S.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Bîrzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brüggen, M.; Ciardi, B.; Corbel, S.; de Geus, E.; de Jong, A.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fallows, R. A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Gunst, A. W.; Hamaker, J. P.; Heald, G.; Horneffer, A.; Jonker, P.; Juette, E.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Nelles, A.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pietka, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Schwarz, D.; Smirnov, O.; Steinmetz, M.; Stewart, A.; Swinbank, J. D.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2016-02-01

    Context. LOFAR offers the unique capability of observing pulsars across the 10-240 MHz frequency range with a fractional bandwidth of roughly 50%. This spectral range is well suited for studying the frequency evolution of pulse profile morphology caused by both intrinsic and extrinsic effects such as changing emission altitude in the pulsar magnetosphere or scatter broadening by the interstellar medium, respectively. Aims: The magnitude of most of these effects increases rapidly towards low frequencies. LOFAR can thus address a number of open questions about the nature of radio pulsar emission and its propagation through the interstellar medium. Methods: We present the average pulse profiles of 100 pulsars observed in the two LOFAR frequency bands: high band (120-167 MHz, 100 profiles) and low band (15-62 MHz, 26 profiles). We compare them with Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and Lovell Telescope observations at higher frequencies (350 and 1400 MHz) to study the profile evolution. The profiles were aligned in absolute phase by folding with a new set of timing solutions from the Lovell Telescope, which we present along with precise dispersion measures obtained with LOFAR. Results: We find that the profile evolution with decreasing radio frequency does not follow a specific trend; depending on the geometry of the pulsar, new components can enter into or be hidden from view. Nonetheless, in general our observations confirm the widening of pulsar profiles at low frequencies, as expected from radius-to-frequency mapping or birefringence theories. We offer this catalogue of low-frequency pulsar profiles in a user friendly way via the EPN Database of Pulsar Profiles, http://www.epta.eu.org/epndb/

  3. Cellular response to high pulse repetition rate nanosecond pulses varies with fluorescent marker identity.

    PubMed

    Steelman, Zachary A; Tolstykh, Gleb P; Beier, Hope T; Ibey, Bennett L

    2016-09-23

    Nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP's) are a well-studied phenomena in biophysics that cause substantial alterations to cellular membrane dynamics, internal biochemistry, and cytoskeletal structure, and induce apoptotic and necrotic cell death. While several studies have attempted to measure the effects of multiple nanosecond pulses, the effect of pulse repetition rate (PRR) has received little attention, especially at frequencies greater than 100 Hz. In this study, uptake of Propidium Iodide, FM 1-43, and YO-PRO-1 fluorescent dyes in CHO-K1 cells was monitored across a wide range of PRRs (5 Hz-500 KHz) using a laser-scanning confocal microscope in order to better understand how high frequency repetition rates impact induced biophysical changes. We show that frequency trends depend on the identity of the dye under study, which could implicate transmembrane protein channels in the uptake response due to their chemical selectivity. Finally, YO-PRO-1 fluorescence was monitored in the presence of Gadolinium (Gd(3+)), Ruthenium Red, and in calcium-free solution to elucidate a mechanism for its unique frequency trend. PMID:27553279

  4. Multiple-circuit pulse generator for high repetition rate rare gas halide lasers.

    PubMed

    Wang, C P

    1978-10-01

    A multiple-circuit high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) pulse generator for the pumping of rare gas halide lasers is reported. With this multiple-circuit design, high PRF can be achieved by the use of existing low PRF thyratron switches and capacitors. A two-circuit pulse generator was constructed, and its performance is described. By means of this pulse generator and a blowdown-type fast transverse-flow system, high PRF laser action in XeF was obtained, typically, 6 mJ/pulse at 1 kHz or 6 W average power. High PRF laser action in N(2) was also observed.

  5. Robust Short-Pulse, High-Peak-Power Laser Transmitter for Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Malcolm W.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a pulsed fiber based master oscillator power amplifier laser at 1550 nm to support moderate data rates with high peak powers in a compact package suitable for interplanetary optical communications. To accommodate pulse position modulation, the polarization maintaining laser transmitter generates pulses from 0.1 to 1 ns with variable duty cycle over a pulse repetition frequency range of 10 to 100 MHz.

  6. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  7. Experimental research on pulse forming based on high-temperature SMES applied in pulsed power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yusheng; Kuang, Jianghua; Tang, Yuejin; Song, Meng; Wei, Bin; Cheng, Shijie; Pan, Yuan

    2009-03-01

    To research the key problems of storage energy and pulse forming in pulsed power, a pulse magnet made of Bi2223/Ag high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes applied in pulsed power experiment was developed. After determining electromagnetic characteristics of the magnet, a pulse forming network was designed. HTS magnet was immersed in liquid nitrogen bath, experiments were carried out about discharging pulse current to resistance load based on HTS magnet energy storage (SMES). The results show that pulse current waves were obtained through adjusted circuit construction and magnet parameters by acting delay of switches in the pulse forming network. The technical schemes about pulse forming based on SMES were presented.

  8. Effect of master oscillator stability over pulse repetition frequency on hybrid semiconductor mode-locked laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Alves, D.; Abreu, Manuel; Cabral, Alexandre; Rebordão, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Semiconductor mode-locked lasers are a very attractive laser pulse source for high accuracy length metrology. However, for some applications, this kind of device does not have the required frequency stability. Operating the laser in hybrid mode will increase the laser pulse repetition frequency (PRF) stability. In this study it is showed that the laser PRF is not only locked to the master oscillator but also maintains the same level of stability of the master oscillator. The device used in this work is a 10 mm long mode-locked asymmetrical cladding single section InAs/InP quantum dash diode laser emitting at 1580 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of ≈4.37 GHz. The laser nominal stability in passive mode (no external oscillator) shows direct dependence with the gain current and the stability range goes from 10-4 to 10-7. Several oscillators with different stabilities were used for the hybrid-mode operation (with external oscillator) and the resulting mode-locked laser stability compared. For low cost oscillators with low stability, the laser PRF stability achieves a value of 10-7 and for higher stable oscillation source (such as oven controlled quartz oscillators (OXCO)) the stability can reach values up to 10-12 (τ =1 s).

  9. Compact frequency-quadrupled pulsed 1030nm fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Chris; Goldberg, Lew; Cole, Brian; DiLazaro, Tom; Hays, Alan D.

    2016-03-01

    A compact 1030nm fiber laser for ultraviolet generation at 257.5nm is presented. The laser employs a short length of highly-doped, large core (20μm), coiled polarization-maintaining ytterbium-doped double-clad fiber pumped by a wavelength-stabilized 975nm diode. It is passively Q-switched via a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber and generates 2.4W at 1030nm in a 110μJ pulse train. Lithium triborate (LBO) and beta-barium borate (BBO) are used to achieve 325mW average power at the fourth harmonic. The laser's small form factor, narrow linewidth and modest power consumption are suitable for use in a man-portable ultraviolet Raman explosives detection system.

  10. Investigation of bed load sediment pulse sources and frequencies using spectral and wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, J. S.; Yager, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    analysis on the bedload transport data to determine if there are dominant frequencies in sediment pulses through space and time. Further spectral and wavelet analysis will reveal whether flow turbulence pulses correlate to instantaneous transport rates, rates shifted in time, or if no correlation exists. Preliminary results show little change in the power of transport from low to high sampling frequencies despite a decline in velocity power spectra with increasing sampling frequency. This decline is due to change in turbulent eddy size and strength at higher frequencies. The lack of change in the power of transport suggests that the more numerous small scale eddies provide nearly equal contribution to the overall bedload transport as less frequent, large scale eddies. Transport equality at all frequencies may also be due to the domino/cluster disintegration effect masking the changes in bedload transport power by frequency.

  11. Pulsed radio frequency therapy of experimentally induced arthritis in ponies.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, W H; Houge, J C; Neirby, D T; Di Mino, A; Di Mino, A A

    1991-01-01

    The effect of pulsed radio frequency therapy (PRFT) was evaluated on seven ponies with no arthritis and in 28 ponies in which arthritis was created using intra-articular amphotericin B to induce synovitis in the right middle carpal joint. The ponies were divided into five treatment and two control groups. Two levels of arthritis were created and two dosage levels of PRFT were evaluated. The effect of PRFT on arthritic and nonarthritic joints was measured by comparing synovial fluid parameters, the degree and duration of lameness, the range of carpal motion, and carpus circumference, for treated and untreated groups. Lesions seen radiographically, at gross pathology, and by histopathology were also compared between the treated and control groups. In the ponies with a mild form of induced arthritis, PRFT significantly (p less than 0.05) reduced the severity and duration of lameness, swelling of the carpus, and the severity of gross pathological and radiographic changes. In these ponies the synovial acid phosphatase levels were lower, the mucin clot quality was superior, and the synovial protein levels were lower for the ponies receiving PRFT as compared to the arthritic ponies receiving no treatment. A dose response effect was evident. In ponies with a slightly more severe form of arthritis, PRFT was evaluated at one dosage level. The treated ponies were significantly improved over the untreated ponies with respect to carpal range of motion, degree of lameness, carpus swelling, and radiographic lesions. No deleterious effects were noted when normal, PRFT treated, middle carpal joints were compared to contralateral untreated, normal joints. It was concluded that significant beneficial effects resulted when affected ponies were treated with PRFT. PMID:1884288

  12. High Frequency Stable Oscillate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2015-11-01

    We present an unexpected regime of resonant bubble oscillations on a thin metal film submerged in water, which is continuously heated with a focused CW laser. The oscillatory bubble dynamics reveals a remarkably stable frequency of several 100 kHz and is resolved from the side using video recordings at 1 million frames per second. The emitted sound is measured simultaneously and shows higher harmonics. Once the laser is switched on the water in contact with the metal layer is superheated and an explosively expanding cavitation bubble is generated. However, after the collapse a microbubble is nucleated from the bubble remains which displays long lasting oscillations. Generally, pinch-off from of the upper part of the microbubble is observed generating a continuous stream of small gas bubbles rising upwards. The cavitation expansion, collapse, and the jetting of gas bubbles are detected by the hydrophone and are correlated to the high speed video. We find the bubble oscillation frequency is dependent on the bubble size and surface tension. A preliminary model based on Marangoni flow and heat transfer can explain the high flow velocities observed, yet the origin of bubble oscillation is currently not well understood.

  13. Radiobiological influence of megavoltage electron pulses of ultra-high pulse dose rate on normal tissue cells.

    PubMed

    Laschinsky, Lydia; Karsch, Leonhard; Leßmann, Elisabeth; Oppelt, Melanie; Pawelke, Jörg; Richter, Christian; Schürer, Michael; Beyreuther, Elke

    2016-08-01

    Regarding the long-term goal to develop and establish laser-based particle accelerators for a future radiotherapeutic treatment of cancer, the radiobiological consequences of the characteristic short intense particle pulses with ultra-high peak dose rate, but low repetition rate of laser-driven beams have to be investigated. This work presents in vitro experiments performed at the radiation source ELBE (Electron Linac for beams with high Brilliance and low Emittance). This accelerator delivered 20-MeV electron pulses with ultra-high pulse dose rate of 10(10) Gy/min either at the low pulse frequency analogue to previous cell experiments with laser-driven electrons or at high frequency for minimizing the prolonged dose delivery and to perform comparison irradiation with a quasi-continuous electron beam analogue to a clinically used linear accelerator. The influence of the different electron beam pulse structures on the radiobiological response of the normal tissue cell line 184A1 and two primary fibroblasts was investigated regarding clonogenic survival and the number of DNA double-strand breaks that remain 24 h after irradiation. Thereby, no considerable differences in radiation response were revealed both for biological endpoints and for all probed cell cultures. These results provide evidence that the radiobiological effectiveness of the pulsed electron beams is not affected by the ultra-high pulse dose rates alone. PMID:27193178

  14. Intracavity frequency doubling of {mu}s alexandrite laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkmann, R.; Schoof, K.

    1994-12-31

    Intracavity second harmonic generation (SHG) with a three mirror folded cavity configuration was investigated with a flashlamp pumped, Q-switched Alexandrite laser. The authors therefore used different nonlinear optical crystals to convert the fundamental 750 nm radiation into the near UV spectral ,range (3 75 nm). The laser pulses were stretched into the {mu}s time domain by an electronic feedback system regulating the losses of the resonator. They investigated the conversion efficiency for different pulse lengths as well as the effect of pulse-lengthening due to the nonlinearity of the intracavity losses introduced by the optical crystal used. Working with BBO-crystals, they were able to achieve a second harmonic output of 25 mJ per pulse at 375 mn with a temporal rectangular pulse of 1 {mu}s in length and a stable nearly gaussian shaped beam profile.

  15. Nonlinear-optical frequency-doubling metareflector: pulsed regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. K.; Myslivets, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of backward-wave second-harmonic metareflector operating in pulse regime are investigated. It is made of metamaterial which enables phase matching of contra-propagating fundamental and second-harmonic waves. References are given to the works that prove such a possibility. Physical principles underlying differences in the proposed and standard settings as well as between continuous-wave and pulsed regimes are discussed. Pulsed regime is more practicable and has a broader scope of applications. A set of partial differential equations which describe such a reflector with the account for losses are solved numerically. It is shown that unlike second-harmonic generation in standard settings, contra-propagating pulse of second harmonic may become much longer than the incident fundamental one and the difference grows with decrease in the input pulse length as compared to thickness of the metaslab. The revealed properties are important for applications and may manifest themselves beyond the optical wavelength range.

  16. Difference-frequency generation of optical radiation from two-color x-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Shwartz, E; Shwartz, S

    2015-03-23

    We describe the process of difference-frequency generation of short optical pulses from two-color X-ray pulses. By assuming 10¹¹ photons per X-ray pulse, we predict that the optical count rate can exceed 10⁷ photons per pulse. Similar to other effects involving nonlinear interactions of X-rays and optical radiation, the effect we describe can be used for microscopic studies of chemical bonds and as a probe for light-matter interactions on the atomic scale. Since the X-ray damage threshold is much higher than the optical damage threshold, the efficiency of difference-frequency generation from two X-ray pulses is expected to be orders of magnitude higher than the efficiency of effects such as sum/difference-frequency mixing between X-rays and optical intense short-pulse sources. PMID:25837087

  17. A Low frequency Survey of Giant Pulses from the Crab Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekhari, T.; Stovall, K.; Dowell, J.; Schinzel, F. K.; Taylor, G. B.

    2016-10-01

    We present a large survey of giant pulses from the Crab Pulsar as observed with the first station of the Long Wavelength Array. Automated methods for detecting giant pulses at low frequencies where scattering becomes prevalent are also explored. More than 1400 pulses were detected across four frequency bands between 20 and 84 MHz over a seven-month period beginning in 2013, with additional followup observations in late 2014 and early 2015. A handful of these pulses were detected simultaneously across all four frequency bands. We examine pulse characteristics, including pulse broadening and power law indices for amplitude distributions. We find that the flux density increases toward shorter wavelengths, consistent with a spectral turnover at 100 MHz. Our observations uniquely span multiple scattering epochs, manifesting as a notable trend in the number of detections per observation. These results are characteristic of the variable interface between the synchrotron nebula and the surrounding interstellar medium.

  18. Synthesis of Optical Frequencies and Ultrastable Femtosecond Pulse Trains from an Optical Reference Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, A.; Ramond, T. M.; Diddams, S. A.; Hollberg, L.

    Recently, atomic clocks based on optical frequency standards have been demonstrated [1,2]. A key element in these clocks is a femtosecond laser that downconverts the petahertz oscillation rate into countable ticks at 1 GHz. When compared to current microwave standards, these new optical clocks are expected to yield an improvement in stability and accuracy by roughly a factor of 1000. Furthermore, it is possible that the lowest noise microwave sources will soon be based on atomically-stabilized optical oscillators that have their frequency converted to the microwave domain via a femtosecond laser. Here, we present tests of the ability of femtosecond lasers to transfer stability from an optical oscillator to their repetition rates as well as to the associated broadband frequency comb. In a first experiment, we phase-lock two lasers to a stabilized laser diode and find that the relative timing jitter in their pulse trains can be on the order of 1 femtosecond in a 100 kHz bandwidth. It is important to distinguish this technique from previous work where a femtosecond laser has been stabilized to a microwave standard [3,4] or another femtosecond laser [5]. Furthermore, we extract highly stable microwave signals with a fractional frequency instability of 2×10-14 in 1 s by photodetection of the laser pulse trains. In a second experiment, we similarly phase-lock the femtosecond laser to an optical oscillator with linewidth less than 1 Hz [6]. The precision with which we can make the femtosecond frequency comb track this reference oscillator is then tested by a heterodyne measurement between a second stable optical oscillator and a mode of the frequency comb that is displaced 76 THz from the 1 Hz-wide reference. From this heterodyne signal we place an upper limit of 150 Hz on the linewidth of the elements of the frequency comb, limited by the noise in the measurement itself.

  19. Characterization of Ultrafast Laser Pulses using a Low-dispersion Frequency Resolved Optical Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitelock, Hope; Bishop, Michael; Khosravi, Soroush; Obaid, Razib; Berrah, Nora

    2016-05-01

    A low dispersion frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) spectrometer was designed to characterize ultrashort (<50 femtosecond) laser pulses from a commercial regenerative amplifier, optical parametric amplifier, and a home-built non-colinear optical parametric amplifier. This instrument splits a laser pulse into two replicas with a 90:10 intensity ratio using a thin pellicle beam-splitter and then recombines the pulses in a birefringent medium. The instrument detects a wavelength-sensitive change in polarization of the weak probe pulse in the presence of the stronger pump pulse inside the birefringent medium. Scanning the time delay between the two pulses and acquiring spectra allows for characterization of the frequency and time content of ultrafast laser pulses, that is needed for interpretation of experimental results obtained from these ultrafast laser systems. Funded by the DoE-BES, Grant No. DE-SC0012376.

  20. The comparison of three high-frequency chest compression devices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong W; Lee, Jongwon; Warwick, Warren J

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency chest compression (HFCC) is shown to enhance clearance of pulmonary airway secretions. Several HFCC devices have been designed to provide this therapy. Standard equipment consists of an air pulse generator attached by lengths of tubing to an adjustable, inflatable vest/jacket (V/J) garment. In this study, the V/Js were fitted over a mannequin. The three device air pulse generators produced characteristic waveform patterns. The variations in the frequency and pressure setting of devices were consistent with specific device design features. These studies suggest that a better understanding of the effects of different waveform, frequency, and pressure combinations may improve HFCC therapeutic efficacy of three different HFCC machines. The V/J component of HFCC devices delivers the compressive pulses to the chest wall to produce both airflow through and oscillatory effects in the airways. The V/J pressures of three HFCC machines were measured and analyzed to characterize the frequency, pressure, and waveform patterns generated by each of three device models. The dimensions of all V/Js were adjusted to a circumference of approximately 110% of the chest circumference. The V/J pressures were measured, and maximum, minimum, and mean pressure, pulse pressure, and root mean square of three pulse generators were calculated. Jacket pressures ranged between 2 and 34 mmHg. The 103 and 104 models' pulse pressures increased with the increase in HFCC frequency at constant dial pressure. With the ICS the pulse pressure decreased when the frequency increased. The waveforms of models 103 and 104 were symmetric sine wave and asymmetric sine wave patterns, respectively. The ICS had a triangular waveform. At 20 Hz, both the 103 and 104 were symmetric sine waveform but the ICS remained triangular. Maximum crest factors emerged in low-frequency and high-pressure settings for the ICS and in the high-frequency and low-pressure settings for models 103 and 104. Recognizing the

  1. Rapidly pulsed, high intensity, incoherent light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A rapid pulsing, high intensity, incoherent light is produced by selectively energizing a plurality of discharge lamps with a triggering circuit. Each lamp is connected to a capacitor, and a power supply is electrically connected to all but one of the capacitors. This last named capacitor is electrically connected to a discharge lamp which is connected to the triggering circuit.

  2. High intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1973-12-11

    This invention relates to a high intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source comprising a neutron-producing source which emits pulses of fast neutrons, a moderator block adjacent to the last neutron source, a reflector block which encases the fast neutron source and the moderator block and has a thermal neutron exit port extending therethrough from the moderator block, and a neutron energy- dependent decoupling reflector liner covering the interior surfaces of the thermal neutron exit port and surrounding all surfaces of the moderator block except the surface viewed by the thermal neutron exit port. (Official Gazette)

  3. Amplification of frequency-modulated soliton-like pulses in inhomogeneous optical waveguides with normal dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotovskii, I. O.; Novikov, S. G.; Okhotnikov, O. G.; Sementsov, D. I.; Yavtushenko, I. O.; Yavtushenko, M. S.

    2012-06-01

    The possibility of effective amplification of self-similar frequency-modulated pulses (FMPs) in longitudinally inhomogeneous active optical waveguides is studied. Peculiarities of the dynamics of parabolic pulses with a constant frequency modulation rate are considered. An optimal profile of variation of the group velocity dispersion was obtained in correspondence with optimal amplification of a similariton-like pulse. The use of FMPs in amplifying and longitudinally inhomogeneous optical waveguides with a correspondingly matched profile of normal dispersion of group velocities is shown to be capable of providing for an amplification of subpicosecond pulses up to energies above 1 nJ.

  4. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic field frequencies on the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fei; Hou, Tianyong; Zhang, Zehua; Xie, Zhao; Wu, Xuehui; Xu, Jianzhong

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different frequencies of pulsed electromagnetic fields on the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Third-generation human mesenchymal stem cells were irradiated with different frequencies of pulsed electromagnetic fields, including 5, 25, 50, 75, 100, and 150 Hz, with a field intensity of 1.1 mT, for 30 minutes per day for 21 days. Changes in human mesenchymal stem cell morphology were observed using phase contrast microscopy. Alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin expression were also determined to evaluate human mesenchymal stem cell osteogenic differentiation.Different effects were observed on human mesenchymal stem cell osteoblast induction following exposure to different pulsed electromagnetic field frequencies. Levels of human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation increased when the pulsed electromagnetic field frequency was increased from 5 hz to 50 hz, but the effect was weaker when the pulsed electromagnetic field frequency was increased from 50 Hz to 150 hz. The most significant effect on human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation was observed at of 50 hz.The results of the current study show that pulsed electromagnetic field frequency is an important factor with regard to the induction of human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. Furthermore, a pulsed electromagnetic field frequency of 50 Hz was the most effective at inducing human mesenchymal stem cell osteoblast differentiation in vitro.

  5. High Rate Pulse Processing Algorithms for Microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hui; Breus, Dimitry; Hennig, Wolfgang; Sabourov, Konstantin; Collins, Jeffrey W.; Warburton, William K.; Bertrand Doriese, W.; Ullom, Joel N.; Bacrania, Minesh K.; Hoover, Andrew S.; Rabin, Michael W.

    2009-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that microcalorimeter spectrometers based on superconducting transition-edge-sensors can readily achieve sub-100 eV energy resolution near 100 keV. However, the active volume of a single microcalorimeter has to be small in order to maintain good energy resolution, and pulse decay times are normally on the order of milliseconds due to slow thermal relaxation. Therefore, spectrometers are typically built with an array of microcalorimeters to increase detection efficiency and count rate. For large arrays, however, as much pulse processing as possible must be performed at the front end of readout electronics to avoid transferring large amounts of waveform data to a host computer for post-processing. In this paper, we present digital filtering algorithms for processing microcalorimeter pulses in real time at high count rates. The goal for these algorithms, which are being implemented in readout electronics that we are also currently developing, is to achieve sufficiently good energy resolution for most applications while being: a) simple enough to be implemented in the readout electronics; and, b) capable of processing overlapping pulses, and thus achieving much higher output count rates than those achieved by existing algorithms. Details of our algorithms are presented, and their performance is compared to that of the "optimal filter" that is currently the predominantly used pulse processing algorithm in the cryogenic-detector community.

  6. Highly Efficient Vector-Inversion Pulse Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Franklin

    2004-01-01

    Improved transmission-line pulse generators of the vector-inversion type are being developed as lightweight sources of pulsed high voltage for diverse applications, including spacecraft thrusters, portable x-ray imaging systems, impulse radar systems, and corona-discharge systems for sterilizing gases. In this development, more than the customary attention is paid to principles of operation and details of construction so as to the maximize the efficiency of the pulse-generation process while minimizing the sizes of components. An important element of this approach is segmenting a pulse generator in such a manner that the electric field in each segment is always below the threshold for electrical breakdown. One design of particular interest, a complete description of which was not available at the time of writing this article, involves two parallel-plate transmission lines that are wound on a mandrel, share a common conductor, and are switched in such a manner that the pulse generator is divided into a "fast" and a "slow" section. A major innovation in this design is the addition of ferrite to the "slow" section to reduce the size of the mandrel needed for a given efficiency.

  7. High reflection mirrors for pulse compression gratings.

    PubMed

    Palmier, S; Neauport, J; Baclet, N; Lavastre, E; Dupuy, G

    2009-10-26

    We report an experimental investigation of high reflection mirrors used to fabricate gratings for pulse compression application at the wavelength of 1.053microm. Two kinds of mirrors are studied: the mixed Metal MultiLayer Dielectric (MMLD) mirrors which combine a gold metal layer with some e-beam evaporated dielectric bilayers on the top and the standard e-beam evaporated MultiLayer Dielectric (MLD) mirrors. Various samples were manufactured, damage tested at a pulse duration of 500fs. Damage sites were subsequently observed by means of Nomarski microscopy and white light interferometer microscopy. The comparison of the results evidences that if MMLD design can offer damage performances rather similar to MLD design, it also exhibits lower stresses; being thus an optimal mirror substrate for a pulse compression grating operating under vacuum.

  8. Songbirds use pulse tone register in two voices to generate low-frequency sound.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kenneth K; Cooper, Brenton G; Larsen, Ole N; Goller, Franz

    2007-11-01

    The principal physical mechanism of sound generation is similar in songbirds and humans, despite large differences in their vocal organs. Whereas vocal fold dynamics in the human larynx are well characterized, the vibratory behaviour of the sound-generating labia in the songbird vocal organ, the syrinx, is unknown. We present the first high-speed video records of the intact syrinx during induced phonation. The syrinx of anaesthetized crows shows a vibration pattern of the labia similar to that of the human vocal fry register. Acoustic pulses result from short opening of the labia, and pulse generation alternates between the left and right sound sources. Spontaneously calling crows can also generate similar pulse characteristics with only one sound generator. Airflow recordings in zebra finches and starlings show that pulse tone sounds can be generated unilaterally, synchronously or by alternating between the two sides. Vocal fry-like dynamics therefore represent a common production mechanism for low-frequency sounds in songbirds. These results also illustrate that complex vibration patterns can emerge from the mechanical properties of the coupled sound generators in the syrinx. The use of vocal fry-like dynamics in the songbird syrinx extends the similarity to this unusual vocal register with mammalian sound production mechanisms.

  9. Electron acceleration in relativistic plasma waves generated by a single frequency short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Coverdale, C.A.; Darrow, C.B.; Decker, C.D.; Mori, W.B.; Tzeng, K.C., Clayton, C.E.; Marsh, K.A.; Joshi, C.

    1995-04-27

    Experimental evidence for the acceleration of electrons in a relativistic plasma wave generated by Raman forward scattering (SRS-F) of a single-frequency short pulse laser are presented. A 1.053 {mu}m, 600 fsec, 5 TW laser was focused into a gas jet with a peak intensity of 8{times}10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. At a plasma density of 2{times}10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3}, 2 MeV electrons were detected and their appearance was correlated with the anti-Stokes laser sideband generated by SRS-F. The results are in good agreement with 2-D PIC simulations. The use of short pulse lasers for making ultra-high gradient accelerators is explored.

  10. Innovation on high-power long-pulse gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, Alexander; Sakamoto, Keishi; Thumm, Manfred

    2011-12-01

    Progress in the worldwide development of high-power gyrotrons for magnetic confinement fusion plasma applications is described. After technology breakthroughs in research on gyrotron components in the 1990s, significant progress has been achieved in the last decade, in particular, in the field of long-pulse and continuous wave (CW) gyrotrons for a wide range of frequencies. At present, the development of 1 MW-class CW gyrotrons has been very successful; these are applicable for self-ignition experiments on fusion plasmas and their confinement in the tokamak ITER, for long-pulse confinement experiments in the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) and for EC H&CD in the future tokamak JT-60SA. For this progress in the field of high-power long-pulse gyrotrons, innovations such as the realization of high-efficiency stable oscillation in very high order cavity modes, the use of single-stage depressed collectors for energy recovery, highly efficient internal quasi-optical mode converters and synthetic diamond windows have essentially contributed. The total tube efficiencies are around 50% and the purity of the fundamental Gaussian output mode is 97% and higher. In addition, activities for advanced gyrotrons, e.g. a 2 MW gyrotron using a coaxial cavity, multi-frequency 1 MW gyrotrons and power modulation technology, have made progress.

  11. Frequency-encoded multiplexed CARS microscopy by rapid pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Jonathan M.; Katz, Ori; Silberberg, Yaron

    2014-06-01

    A new coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) technique is reported for real-time detection and classification of several chemical constituents, utilizing a single detector and a single beam of shaped femtosecond pulses. The technique is based on rapidly switching between differently shaped pulses that either maximize or minimize the targeted vibrational lines excitation, thus creating temporally modulated 'bright' and 'dark' profiles in the total CARS signal that are measured by a single photomultiplier tube and demodulated by a multi-channel lock-in amplifier. Using a two-dimensional spatial light modulator displaying 24 different pulse shapes, we demonstrate pulse shaping at 80 kHz and chemically specific microscopy with pixel dwell times of less than 0.5 ms.

  12. The repetitive high energy pulsed power module

    SciTech Connect

    Harjes, H.C.; Reed, K.W.; Buttram, M.T.; Turman, B.N.; Neau, E.L.; Martinez, L.; Adcock, J.; Weinbrecht, E.A.; Mann, G.A.; Morgan, F.A.; Laderach, G.E.; Pena, G.; Butler, M.; Schneider, L.X.; Wavrik, R.W.; Penn, K.J.; Weber, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    High average power magnetic pulse compression systems are being considered for use in several applications. One of the key issues in the design of a pulsed power driver for these applications is component reliability, efficiency, and lifetime. In the Repetitive High Energy Pulsed Power (RHEPP) module, pulse compression is done exclusively with magnetic switches (saturable reactors) because such switches have the potential of performing efficiently and reliably for >10{sup 10} shots. The objective of the RHEPP project is to explore the feasibility of using magnetic pulse compression technology in continuous high average power applications. The RHEPP system consists of a compressor which drives a linear induction voltage adder with a diode load. Prime power for the module is supplied by a 600 kW, 120 Hz, alternator (furnished by Westinghouse Electric Corporation). At present, construction and initial testing in a bipolar mode of the first two stages of the compressor has been completed. This system has operated for a total of 332 minutes (4.8 {times} 10{sup 6} pulses) at full power (600 kW) with an efficiency of 94+/{minus}3%. The first stage magnetic switch (MS1) has a pulse compression factor of 8.4 (4.2 ms to 500 {mu}s time to peak). It has two, parallel connected, 67 turn copper coils and a 760 kg core of 2 mil silicon steel with a magnetic cross sectional area of 0. 065 m{sup 2}. The second stage magnetic switch (MS2) has a pulse compression factor of 3 (500 {mu}s to 170 {mu}s). It has two, parallel connected, 36 turn copper coils and a 361 kg core of field annealed 2605CO Metglas with a magnetic area of 0.019 m{sup 2}. A discussion of RHEPP compressor design effort and its baseline design is given. In addition, initial results from the operation of the first two stages are presented. 11 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. ADRF experiments using near n.pi pulse strings. [Adiabatic Demagnetization due to Radio Frequency pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Burum, D. P.; Elleman, D. D.

    1977-01-01

    Adiabatic demagnetization (ADRF) can be achieved in a dipolar coupled nuclear spin system in solids by applying a string of short RF pulses and gradually modulating the pulse amplitudes or pulse angles. This letter reports an adiabatic inverse polarization effect in solids and a rotary spin echo phenomenon observed in liquids when the pulse angle is gradually changed across integral multiples of pi during a string of RF pulses. The RF pulse sequence used is illustrated along with the NMR signal from a CaF2 single crystal as observed between the RF pulses and the rotary spin echo signal observed in liquid C6F6 for n = 2. The observed effects are explained qualitatively on the basis of average Hamiltonian theory.

  14. [Evaluation of the Effect of Adiabatic Pulse and B1 Shim to the Radio Frequency Homogeneity in Chemical Shift Imaging].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Chie; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Okawa, Kohei; Taguchi, Jyunichi; Hirota, Yoshifumi; Yanagiya, Yohei

    2016-04-01

    It is considered that the enhancement of chemical shift and the elevation of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) induced by high magnetic fields are useful for the evaluation of metabolism using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). However, the reduction of the localization in MRS seems to be caused by the decreased homogeneity of radio frequency (RF) pulses, especially in chemical shift imaging (CSI). To search the influence of B1 shim mode and the significance of adiabatic pulses, we have examined the changes of RF homogeneity using 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the water phantom and the metabolites phantom (containing acetate and lactate) in CSI. The RF homogeneity and chemical shift artifact were obviously improved using the adiabatic pulses. Improvement of the homogeneity of RF pulses was observed when B1 shim was used. These results suggest the usefulness of CSI using adiabatic pulses and B1 shim when small amount of metabolites of target is measured in MRS. PMID:27097994

  15. Pulsed infrared difference frequency generation in CdGeAs/sub 2/

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, M.S.; Rink, J.P.; Tallman, C.R.

    1975-11-26

    A laser apparatus for generating a line-tunable pulsed infrared difference frequency output is described. The apparatus comprises a CO/sub 2/ laser which produces a first frequency, a CO laser which produces a second frequency, and a mixer for combining the output of the CO/sub 2/ and CO lasers so as to produce a final output comprising a difference frequency from the first and second frequency outputs.

  16. Pulsed infrared difference frequency generation in CdGeAs.sub.2

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.; Rink, John P.; Tallman, Charles R.

    1977-03-08

    The disclosure relates to a laser apparatus for generating a line-tunable pulsed infrared difference frequency output. The apparatus comprises a CO.sub.2 laser which produces a first frequency, a CO laser which produces a second frequency and a mixer for combining the output of the CO.sub.2 and CO lasers so as to produce a final output comprising a difference frequency from the first and second frequency outputs.

  17. Correlation of hemodynamically significant internal carotid stenosis with pulsed Doppler frequency analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Blackshear, W M; Lamb, S L; Kollipara, V S; Anderson, J D; Murtagh, F R; Shah, C P; Farber, M S

    1984-01-01

    Systolic and mean pressure gradients across internal carotid stenoses were measured at the time of carotid endarterectomy in the arteries of 90 patients, all of whom underwent angiography. Eighty-two of these patients also had pulsed Doppler ultrasonic arteriography with real-time spectrum analysis. There were 71 (79%) high grade stenoses of greater than 50% diameter reduction by angiography. Significant systolic pressure gradients (greater than or equal to 10 mmHg) were identified in 41 patients (46%), 38 (46%) of whom underwent ultrasonic evaluation. A pulsed Doppler frequency measured within the stenosis equal to or greater than 6.5 kiloHertz had a sensitivity of 94.7% (36/38) in identifying pressure reducing lesions with a specificity of 47.7% (21/44). Positive predictive value was 61% (36/59). Angiographic criteria (50% diameter reduction) exhibited a sensitivity of 97.6% (40/41), a specificity of 36.7% (18/49) and a positive predictive value of 56.3% (40/71). Negative predictive value was 94.7% for angiography and 91.3% for ultrasonic arteriography. A pulsed Doppler frequency equal to or greater than 6.5 kiloHertz appears to accurately identify lesions that are at risk to reduce distal internal carotid pressure under operative conditions with a sensitivity similar to angiography. This criterion has a positive predictive value and specificity that is slightly superior to angiography and a high negative predictive value. Pulsed Doppler spectrum analysis provides physiologic information relative to blood flow velocity that is complimentary to the anatomic data provided by angiography for assessing the potential for hemodynamic significance of internal carotid stenoses. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6712324

  18. Copper bromide vapor brightness amplifiers with 100 kHz pulse repetition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigub, M. V.; Evtushenko, G. S.; Torgaev, S. N.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Evtushenko, T. G.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents a laser monitor with 10 μs time-resolution based on a high-frequency copper bromide vapor brightness amplifier. A sync circuit has been designed for single-pulse imaging. The analysis of amplifying characteristics of the active elements and active optical system (laser monitor) parameters allowed to determine the optimal concentration of HBr at which the images can be obtained with minimum distortions. For the active element operating at high frequencies (more than 50 kHz) as a brightness amplifier, the concentration of HBr must be lower than that needed for obtaining the maximum output power. The limiting brightness temperature of the background radiation which does not affect the image quality is determined. The potential feasibility of using a proposed brightness amplifier for visualizing processes blocked from viewing by the background radiation with the brightness temperature up to 8000 K is demonstrated.

  19. Development of a Pulsed Combustion Actuator For High-Speed Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Beck, B. Terry; Wilkes, Jennifer A.; Drummond, J. Philip; Alderfer, David W.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the flow within a prototype actuator, energized by pulsed combustion or detonations, that provides a pulsed jet suitable for flow control in high-speed applications. A high-speed valve, capable of delivering a pulsed stream of reactants a mixture of H2 and air at rates of up to 1500 pulses per second, has been constructed. The reactants burn in a resonant chamber, and the products exit the device as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers have been used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device at various reactant injection frequencies, including both resonant and off-resonant conditions. The combustion chamber has been constructed with windows, and the flow inside it has been visualized using Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF). The pulsed jet at the exit of the device has been observed using schlieren.

  20. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  1. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-03-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  2. Special Aspects in Designing High - Frequency Betatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, A. A.; Kasyanov, S. V.; Kasyanov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to designing the high - frequency betatron. In high - frequency betatron most important problem is overheating of the elements of the body radiator unit. In an article some directions of solving this problem are shown.

  3. Efficient circuit triggers high-current, high-voltage pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, E. D.

    1964-01-01

    Modified circuit uses diodes to effectively disconnect the charging resistors from the circuit during the discharge cycle. Result is an efficient parallel charging, high voltage pulse modulator with low voltage rating of components.

  4. Pulse switching for high energy lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.; Pacala, T. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A saturable inductor switch for compressing the width and sharpening the rise time of high voltage pulses from a relatively slow rise time, high voltage generator to an electric discharge gas laser (EDGL) also provides a capability for efficient energy transfer from a high impedance primary source to an intermediate low impedance laser discharge network. The switch is positioned with respect to a capacitive storage device, such as a coaxial cable, so that when a charge build-up in the storage device reaches a predetermined level, saturation of the switch inductor releases or switches energy stored in the capactive storage device to the EDGL. Cascaded saturable inductor switches for providing output pulses having rise times of less than ten nanoseconds and a technique for magnetically biasing the saturable inductor switch are disclosed.

  5. Atomic frequency standards for ultra-high-frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.; Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the Hg-199(+) trapped-ion frequency standard are outlined and compared to other atomic frequency standards, especially the hydrogen maser. The points discussed are those which make the trapped Hg-199(+) standard attractive: high line Q, reduced sensitivity to external magnetic fields, and simplicity of state selection, among others.

  6. High-throughput machining using high average power ultrashort pulse lasers and ultrafast polygon scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schille, Joerg; Schneider, Lutz; Streek, André; Kloetzer, Sascha; Loeschner, Udo

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, high-throughput ultrashort pulse laser machining is investigated on various industrial grade metals (Aluminium, Copper, Stainless steel) and Al2O3 ceramic at unprecedented processing speeds. This is achieved by using a high pulse repetition frequency picosecond laser with maximum average output power of 270 W in conjunction with a unique, in-house developed two-axis polygon scanner. Initially, different concepts of polygon scanners are engineered and tested to find out the optimal architecture for ultrafast and precision laser beam scanning. Remarkable 1,000 m/s scan speed is achieved on the substrate, and thanks to the resulting low pulse overlap, thermal accumulation and plasma absorption effects are avoided at up to 20 MHz pulse repetition frequencies. In order to identify optimum processing conditions for efficient high-average power laser machining, the depths of cavities produced under varied parameter settings are analyzed and, from the results obtained, the characteristic removal values are specified. The maximum removal rate is achieved as high as 27.8 mm3/min for Aluminium, 21.4 mm3/min for Copper, 15.3 mm3/min for Stainless steel and 129.1 mm3/min for Al2O3 when full available laser power is irradiated at optimum pulse repetition frequency.

  7. Spatially resolved frequency-dependent elasticity measured with pulsed force microscopy and nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Sweers, Kim K M; van der Werf, Kees O; Bennink, Martin L; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2012-03-21

    Recently several atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based surface property mapping techniques like pulsed force microscopy (PFM), harmonic force microscopy or Peakforce QNM® have been introduced to measure the nano- and micro-mechanical properties of materials. These modes all work at different operating frequencies. However, complex materials are known to display viscoelastic behavior, a combination of solid and fluid-like responses, depending on the frequency at which the sample is probed. In this report, we show that the frequency-dependent mechanical behavior of complex materials, such as polymer blends that are frequently used as calibration samples, is clearly measurable with AFM. Although this frequency-dependent mechanical behavior is an established observation, we demonstrate that the new high frequency mapping techniques enable AFM-based rheology with nanoscale spatial resolution over a much broader frequency range compared to previous AFM-based studies. We further highlight that it is essential to account for the frequency-dependent variation in mechanical properties when using these thin polymer samples as calibration materials for elasticity measurements by high-frequency surface property mapping techniques. These results have significant implications for the accurate interpretation of the nanomechanical properties of polymers or complex biological samples. The calibration sample is composed of a blend of soft and hard polymers, consisting of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) islands in a polystyrene (PS) surrounding, with a stiffness of 0.2 GPa and 2 GPa respectively. The spring constant of the AFM cantilever was selected to match the stiffness of LDPE. From 260 Hz to 1100 Hz the sample was imaged with the PFM method. At low frequencies (0.5-35 Hz), single-point nanoindentation was performed. In addition to the material's stiffness, the relative heights of the LDPE islands (with respect to the PS) were determined as a function of the frequency. At the lower

  8. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  9. Highly polarized components of integrated pulse profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. F.; Han, J. L.

    2016-11-01

    Highly polarized components of pulse profiles are investigated by analysing observational data and simulating the emission processes. The highly polarized components appear at the leading or trailing part of a pulse profile, which preferably have a flat spectrum and a flat polarization angle curve compared with the low polarized components. By considering the emission processes and propagation effects, we simulate the distributions of wave modes and fractional linear polarization within the entire pulsar emission beam. We show that the highly polarized components can appear at the leading, central, and/or trailing parts of pulse profiles in the models, depending on pulsar geometry. The depolarization is caused by orthogonal modes or scattering. When a sight line cuts across pulsar emission beam with a small impact angle, the detected highly polarized component will be of the O mode, and have a flat polarization angle curve and/or a flat spectrum as observed. Otherwise, the highly polarized component will be of the X mode and have a steep polarization angle curve.

  10. Measuring ultrashort pulses using frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Trebino, R.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this program is the development of techniques for the measurement of ultrafast events important in gas-phase combustion chemistry. Specifically, goals of this program include the development of fundamental concepts and spectroscopic techniques that will augment the information currently available with ultrafast laser techniques. Of equal importance is the development of technology for ultrafast spectroscopy. For example, methods for the production and measurement of ultrashort pulses at wavelengths important for these studies is an important goal. Because the specific vibrational motion excited in a molecule depends sensitively on the intensity, I(t), and the phase, {psi}(t), of the ultrashort pulse used to excite the motion, it is critical to measure both of these quantities for an individual pulse. Unfortunately, this has remained an unsolved problem for many years. Fortunately, this year, the authors present a technique that achieves this goal.

  11. High frequency-heated air turbojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miron, J. H. D.

    1986-01-01

    A description is given of a method to heat air coming from a turbojet compressor to a temperature necessary to produce required expansion without requiring fuel. This is done by high frequency heating, which heats the walls corresponding to the combustion chamber in existing jets, by mounting high frequency coils in them. The current transformer and high frequency generator to be used are discussed.

  12. The effect of applied electric field on pulsed radio frequency and pulsed direct current plasma jet array

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J. T.; Liu, X. Y.; Liu, J. H.; Xiong, Z. L.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G.

    2012-06-15

    Here we compare the plasma plume propagation characteristics of a 3-channel pulsed RF plasma jet array and those of the same device operated by a pulsed dc source. For the pulsed-RF jet array, numerous long life time ions and metastables accumulated in the plasma channel make the plasma plume respond quickly to applied electric field. Its structure similar as 'plasma bullet' is an anode glow indeed. For the pulsed dc plasma jet array, the strong electric field in the vicinity of the tube is the reason for the growing plasma bullet in the launching period. The repulsive forces between the growing plasma bullets result in the divergence of the pulsed dc plasma jet array. Finally, the comparison of 309 nm and 777 nm emissions between these two jet arrays suggests the high chemical activity of pulsed RF plasma jet array.

  13. Characteristics of pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jin Seok; Kim, Kyoung Nam; Kim, Ki Seok; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young

    2015-01-01

    To control the plasma characteristics more efficiently, a dual antenna inductively coupled plasma (DF-ICP) source composed of a 12-turn inner antenna operated at 2 MHz and a 3-turn outer antenna at 13.56 MHz was pulsed. The effects of pulsing to each antenna on the change of plasma characteristics and SiO2 etch characteristics using Ar/C4F8 gas mixtures were investigated. When the duty percentage was decreased from continuous wave (CW) mode to 30% for the inner or outer ICP antenna, decrease of the average electron temperature was observed for the pulsing of each antenna. Increase of the CF2/F ratio was also observed with decreasing duty percentage of each antenna, indicating decreased dissociation of the C4F8 gas due to the decreased average electron temperature. When SiO2 etching was investigated as a function of pulse duty percentage, increase of the etch selectivity of SiO2 over amorphous carbon layer (ACL) was observed while decreasing the SiO2 etch rate. The increase of etch selectivity was related to the change of gas dissociation characteristics, as observed by the decrease of average electron temperature and consequent increase of the CF2/F ratio. The decrease of the SiO2 etch rate could be compensated for by using the rf power compensated mode, that is, by maintaining the same time-average rf power during pulsing, instead of using the conventional pulsing mode. Through use of the power compensated mode, increased etch selectivity of SiO2/ACL similar to the conventional pulsing mode could be observed without significant decrease of the SiO2 etch rate. Finally, by using the rf power compensated mode while pulsing rf powers to both antennas, the plasma uniformity over the 300 mm diameter substrate could be improved from 7% for the CW conditions to about around 3.3% with the duty percentage of 30%.

  14. External high-frequency control of combustion instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V. M.; Mitrofanov, G. A.; Kozar, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies of combustion instability in the pulse combustor. Propane-air mixture is burned in the chamber with the flame holder. It was experimentally found that feeding high-frequency sound vibrations into the combustion chamber causes the suppression of pulsating combustion. The oscillation frequency ranges in 870 to 1400 Hz. This corresponds to 9-12 resonance frequencies of oscillations in the combustor. The physical mechanism of the observed phenomenon consists in changing the conditions of formation and destruction of fuel jets in the vortex zone behind the flame holder.

  15. Effect of noise on Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Fittinghoff, D.N.; DeLong, K.W.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    We study the effects of noise in Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses. We quantify the measurement accuracy in the presence of additive, muliplicative, and quantization noise, and discuss filtering and pre-processing of the data.

  16. A single-frequency double-pulse Ho:YLF laser for CO2-lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucirek, P.; Meissner, A.; Eiselt, P.; Höfer, M.; Hoffmann, D.

    2016-03-01

    A single-frequency q-switched Ho:YLF laser oscillator with a bow-tie ring resonator, specifically designed for highspectral stability, is reported. It is pumped with a dedicated Tm:YLF laser at 1.9 μm. The ramp-and-fire method with a DFB-diode laser as a reference is employed for generating single-frequency emission at 2051 nm. The laser is tested with different operating modes, including cw-pumping at different pulse repetition frequencies and gain-switched pumping. The standard deviation of the emission wavelength of the laser pulses is measured with the heterodyne technique at the different operating modes. Its dependence on the single-pass gain in the crystal and on the cavity finesse is investigated. At specific operating points the spectral stability of the laser pulses is 1.5 MHz (rms over 10 s). Under gain-switched pumping with 20% duty cycle and 2 W of average pump power, stable single-frequency pulse pairs with a temporal separation of 580 μs are produced at a repetition rate of 50 Hz. The measured pulse energy is 2 mJ (<2 % rms error on the pulse energy over 10 s) and the measured pulse duration is approx. 20 ns for each of the two pulses in the burst.

  17. Effect of laser pulse repetition frequency on the optical breakdown threshold of quartz glass

    SciTech Connect

    Kononenko, T V; Konov, V I; Schöneseiffen, S; Dausinger, F

    2013-08-31

    The thresholds of optical breakdown in the volume of quartz glass were measured in relation to the number of pulses under irradiation by ultrashort laser pulses with different pulse repetition frequencies (1 – 400 kHz). Increasing this frequency from 10 to 400 kHz was found to substantially lower the breakdown threshold for 500-fs long pulses (at a wavelength of 1030 nm) and to lower to a smaller degree for 5-ps long pulses (515 nm). A strong frequency dependence of the breakdown threshold is observed under the same conditions as a manifold decrease of the breakdown threshold with increase in the number of pulses in a pulse train. The dependence of the optical breakdown on the number of pulses is attributable to the accumulation of point defects under multiple subthreshold irradiation, which affects the mechanism of collisional ionisation. In this case, the frequency dependence of the breakdown threshold of quartz glass is determined by the engagement of shortlived defects in the ionisation mechanism. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  18. High Frequency Chandler Wobble Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, F.; Stuck, J.; Thomas, M.

    2003-04-01

    and OMCT forcing fields give no hint for increased excitation power in the Chandler band. Thus it is assumed, that continuous high frequency excitation due to stochastic weather phenomena is responsible for the perpetuation of the Chandler wobble.

  19. A Novel Soft Switching PWM Power Frequency Converter with Non DC Smoothing Filter Link for Consumer High Frequency Induction Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimura, Hisayuki; Muraoka, Hidekazu; Hiraki, Eiji; Hirota, Izuo; Yasui, Kenji; Omori, Hideki; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    In this paper, high frequency power converter without DC smoothing electrolytic capacitor filter link which convert the 100V/200Vrms and 60Hz single phase utility frequency AC power into a high frequency AC. This proposed high frequency AC power converter without electrolytic capacitor filter can operate under a principle of soft switching PWM based on a lossless capacitor snubber is proposed and demonstrated for consumer high frequency induction heating (IH). In particular, this high frequency power converter capable of producing a high frequency AC more than 20kHz is developed for consumer IH applications as hot water producer and steamer based on the specially designed spiral type IH-Dual Packs Heater (DPH), which includes the dual mode pulse modulation control scheme based on soft switching PWM for high output power setting and commercial frequency AC zero voltage soft switching pulse density modulation (PDM) for low output power settings. This developed high frequency power frequency converter using trench gate IGBTs is clarified on the basis of experimental and simulation results for its circuit operation of the utility frequency AC to high frequency AC frequency PWM power converter without the electrolytic capacitor bank DC filter link for the IH hot water and IH steamer. These IH appliances are based upon an innovative electromagnetic IH-DPH for fluid heating as heat exchanger in consumer pipeline. Finally, its power regulation characteristics, power conversion efficiency and harmonic current components characteristics including power factor in utility AC grid side are evaluated and discussed from an experimental point of view. The practical effectiveness of this utility frequency AC to high frequency AC soft switching high power frequency converter defined conveniently as high frequency soft switching cyclo-inverter is proved as one of the important products effective for next generation IH application all electricity power utilizations.

  20. Strain sensors for high field pulse magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Christian; Zheng, Yan; Easton, Daniel; Farinholt, Kevin M; Park, Gyuhae

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an investigation into several strain sensing technologies that are being considered to monitor mechanical deformation within the steel reinforcement shells used in high field pulsed magnets. Such systems generally operate at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate heating issues that are inherent in the coils of nondestructive, high field pulsed magnets. The objective of this preliminary study is to characterize the performance of various strain sensing technologies at liquid nitrogen temperatures (-196 C). Four sensor types are considered in this investigation: fiber Bragg gratings (FBG), resistive foil strain gauges (RFSG), piezoelectric polymers (PVDF), and piezoceramics (PZT). Three operational conditions are considered for each sensor: bond integrity, sensitivity as a function of temperature, and thermal cycling effects. Several experiments were conducted as part of this study, investigating adhesion with various substrate materials (stainless steel, aluminum, and carbon fiber), sensitivity to static (FBG and RFSG) and dynamic (RFSG, PVDF and PZT) load conditions, and sensor diagnostics using PZT sensors. This work has been conducted in collaboration with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), and the results of this study will be used to identify the set of sensing technologies that would be best suited for integration within high field pulsed magnets at the NHMFL facility.

  1. Pulse Detonation Engines for High Speed Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2002-01-01

    Revolutionary concepts in propulsion are required in order to achieve high-speed cruise capability in the atmosphere and for low cost reliable systems for earth to orbit missions. One of the advanced concepts under study is the air-breathing pulse detonation engine. Additional work remains in order to establish the role and performance of a PDE in flight applications, either as a stand-alone device or as part of a combined cycle system. In this paper, we shall offer a few remarks on some of these remaining issues, i.e., combined cycle systems, nozzles and exhaust systems and thrust per unit frontal area limitations. Currently, an intensive experimental and numerical effort is underway in order to quantify the propulsion performance characteristics of this device. In this paper, we shall highlight our recent efforts to elucidate the propulsion potential of pulse detonation engines and their possible application to high-speed or hypersonic systems.

  2. Experimental observation of short-pulse upshifted frequency microwaves from a laser-created overdense plasma.

    PubMed

    Yugami, Noboru; Niiyama, Toshihiko; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Gao, Hong; Sasaki, Shigeo; Ito, Hiroaki; Nishida, Yasushi

    2002-03-01

    A short and frequency upshifted from a source microwave pulse is experimentally generated by the overdense plasma that is rapidly created by a laser. The source wave, whose frequency is 9 GHz, is propagating in the waveguide filled with tetrakis-dimethyl-amino-ethylene gas, which is to be converted to the overdense plasma by the laser. The detected frequency of the pulse is over 31.4 GHz and its duration is 10 ns. This technique has the potential for the generation of a tunable frequency source.

  3. High Field Pulse Magnets with New Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Lesch, B.; Cochran, V. G.; Eyssa, Y.; Tozer, S.; Mielke, C. H.; Rickel, D.; van Sciver, S. W.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

    2004-11-01

    High performance pulse magnets using the combination of CuNb conductor and Zylon fiber composite reinforcement with bore sizes of 24, 15 and 10 mm have been designed, manufactured and tested to destruction. The magnets successfully reached the peak fields of 64, 70 and 77.8 T respectively with no destruction. Failures occurred near the end flanges at the layer. The magnet design, manufacturing and testing, and the mode of the failure are described and analyzed.

  4. High density terahertz frequency comb produced by coherent synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, S; Pirali, O; Roy, P; Lampin, J-F; Ducournau, G; Cuisset, A; Hindle, F; Mouret, G

    2015-07-20

    Frequency combs have enabled significant progress in frequency metrology and high-resolution spectroscopy extending the achievable resolution while increasing the signal-to-noise ratio. In its coherent mode, synchrotron radiation is accepted to provide an intense terahertz continuum covering a wide spectral range from about 0.1 to 1 THz. Using a dedicated heterodyne receiver, we reveal the purely discrete nature of this emission. A phase relationship between the light pulses leads to a powerful frequency comb spanning over one decade in frequency. The comb has a mode spacing of 846 kHz, a linewidth of about 200 Hz, a fractional precision of about 2 × 10(-10) and no frequency offset. The unprecedented potential of the comb for high-resolution spectroscopy is demonstrated by the accurate determination of pure rotation transitions of acetonitrile.

  5. High density terahertz frequency comb produced by coherent synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Tammaro, S.; Pirali, O.; Roy, P.; Lampin, J.-F.; Ducournau, G.; Cuisset, A.; Hindle, F.; Mouret, G.

    2015-01-01

    Frequency combs have enabled significant progress in frequency metrology and high-resolution spectroscopy extending the achievable resolution while increasing the signal-to-noise ratio. In its coherent mode, synchrotron radiation is accepted to provide an intense terahertz continuum covering a wide spectral range from about 0.1 to 1 THz. Using a dedicated heterodyne receiver, we reveal the purely discrete nature of this emission. A phase relationship between the light pulses leads to a powerful frequency comb spanning over one decade in frequency. The comb has a mode spacing of 846 kHz, a linewidth of about 200 Hz, a fractional precision of about 2 × 10−10 and no frequency offset. The unprecedented potential of the comb for high-resolution spectroscopy is demonstrated by the accurate determination of pure rotation transitions of acetonitrile. PMID:26190043

  6. Pulsating fireballs with high-frequency sheath-plasma instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Gruenwald, J.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2011-08-01

    High-frequency instabilities are observed in connection with unstable fireballs. Fireballs are discharge phenomena near positively biased electrodes in discharge plasmas. They are bounded by a double layer whose potential is of order of the ionization potential. Fireballs become unstable when plasma losses and plasma production are not in balance, resulting in periodic fireball pulses. High-frequency instabilities in the range of the electron plasma frequency have been observed. These occur between fireball pulses, hence are not due to electron beam-plasma instabilities since there are no beams without double layers. The instability has been identified as a sheath-plasma instability. Electron inertia creates a phase shift between high-frequency current and electric fields which destabilizes the sheath-plasma resonance. High-frequency signals are observed in the current to the electrode and on probes near the sheath of the electrode. Waveforms and spectra are presented, showing bursty emissions, phase shifts, frequency jumps, beat phenomena between two sheaths, and nonlinear effects such as amplitude clipping. These reveal many interesting properties of sheaths with periodic ionization phenomena.

  7. High Frequency Electronic Packaging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, M.; Lowry, L.; Lee, K.; Kolawa, E.; Tulintseff, A.; Shalkhauser, K.; Whitaker, J.; Piket-May, M.

    1994-01-01

    Commercial and government communication, radar, and information systems face the challenge of cost and mass reduction via the application of advanced packaging technology. A majority of both government and industry support has been focused on low frequency digital electronics.

  8. Effects of pulse frequency of input power on the physical and chemical properties of pulsed streamer discharge plasmas in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruma; Lukes, P.; Aoki, N.; Spetlikova, E.; Hosseini, S. H. R.; Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H.

    2013-03-01

    A repetitive pulsed-power modulator, which employs a magnetic pulse compression circuit with a high-speed thyristor switch, was used to study the effects of the pulse repetition rate of input power on the physical and chemical properties of pulsed discharges in water. Positive high-voltage pulses of 20 kV with repetition rates of up to 1 kHz were used to generate a discharge in water using the point-to-plane electrode geometry. By varying the pulse repetition rate, two distinct modes of the discharge plasma were formed in water. The first mode was characterized by the formation of a corona-like discharge propagating through water in the form of streamer channels. The second mode was formed typically above 500 Hz, when the formation of streamer channels in water was suppressed and all plasmas occurred inside a spheroidal aggregate of very fine gas bubbles surrounding the tip of the high-voltage electrode. The production of hydrogen peroxide, degradation of organic dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and inactivation of bacteria Escherichia coli by the discharge in water were studied under different discharge plasma modes in dependence on the pulse repetition rate of input power. The efficiency of both chemical and biocidal processes induced by the plasma in water decreased significantly with pulse repetition rates above 500 Hz.

  9. Plasma relaxation mechanics of pulsed high power microwave surface flashover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeson, S.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A.

    2013-09-01

    Microwave transmission and reflection characteristics of pulsed radio frequency field generated plasmas are elucidated for air, N2, and He environments under pressure conditions ranging from 10 to 600 torr. The pulsed, low temperature plasma is generated along the atmospheric side of the dielectric boundary between the source (under vacuum) and the radiating environment with a thickness on the order of 5 mm and a cross sectional area just smaller than that of the waveguide. Utilizing custom multi-standard waveguide couplers and a continuous low power probing source, the scattering parameters were measured before, during, and after the high power microwave pulse with emphasis on the latter. From these scattering parameters, temporal electron density estimations (specifically the longitudinal integral of the density) were calculated using a 1D plane wave-excited model for analysis of the relaxation processes associated. These relaxation characteristics ultimately determine the maximum repetition rate for many pulsed electric field applications and thus are applicable to a much larger scope in the plasma community than just those related to high power microwaves. This manuscript discusses the diagnostic setup for acquiring the power measurements along with a detailed description of the kinematic and chemical behavior of the plasma as it decays down to its undisturbed state under various gas type and pressure conditions.

  10. Plasma relaxation mechanics of pulsed high power microwave surface flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, S.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A.

    2013-09-15

    Microwave transmission and reflection characteristics of pulsed radio frequency field generated plasmas are elucidated for air, N{sub 2}, and He environments under pressure conditions ranging from 10 to 600 torr. The pulsed, low temperature plasma is generated along the atmospheric side of the dielectric boundary between the source (under vacuum) and the radiating environment with a thickness on the order of 5 mm and a cross sectional area just smaller than that of the waveguide. Utilizing custom multi-standard waveguide couplers and a continuous low power probing source, the scattering parameters were measured before, during, and after the high power microwave pulse with emphasis on the latter. From these scattering parameters, temporal electron density estimations (specifically the longitudinal integral of the density) were calculated using a 1D plane wave-excited model for analysis of the relaxation processes associated. These relaxation characteristics ultimately determine the maximum repetition rate for many pulsed electric field applications and thus are applicable to a much larger scope in the plasma community than just those related to high power microwaves. This manuscript discusses the diagnostic setup for acquiring the power measurements along with a detailed description of the kinematic and chemical behavior of the plasma as it decays down to its undisturbed state under various gas type and pressure conditions.

  11. Pulse dynamics in a mode-locked fiber laser and its quantum limited comb frequency uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chengying; Funk, Andrew C; Yang, Changxi; Cundiff, Steven T

    2014-06-01

    We present an experimental study of pulse dynamics in a mode-locked Er:fiber laser. By injecting a continuous wave laser with sinusoidal intensity modulation into the fiber laser, we are able to modulate the gain. Measuring the response of the pulse energy, central frequency, central pulse time, and phase to the gain modulation allows determination of the parameters that describe their coupling. Based on the experimentally derived parameters, we evaluate the free running comb linewidth and frequency uncertainty with feedback included, assuming quantum noise is the limiting factor. Optimization of fiber lasers is also discussed.

  12. High voltage pulse generator. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, G.E.

    1975-06-12

    An improved high-voltage pulse generator is described which is especially useful in ultrasonic testing of rock core samples. An N number of capacitors are charged in parallel to V volts and at the proper instance are coupled in series to produce a high-voltage pulse of N times V volts. Rapid switching of the capacitors from the paralleled charging configuration to the series discharging configuration is accomplished by using silicon-controlled rectifiers which are chain self-triggered following the initial triggering of the first rectifier connected between the first and second capacitors. A timing and triggering circuit is provided to properly synchronize triggering pulses to the first SCR at a time when the charging voltage is not being applied to the parallel-connected charging capacitors. The output voltage can be readily increased by adding additional charging networks. The circuit allows the peak level of the output to be easily varied over a wide range by using a variable autotransformer in the charging circuit.

  13. A Low Frequency Survey of Giant Pulses from the Crab Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekhari, Tarraneh; Taylor, Gregory B.; Stovall, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    We present a low frequency survey of giant pulses from the Crab Pulsar as observed with the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1). Over 2000 pulses have been detected between 20 - 84 MHz over a period of seven months. This is currently the largest sample of giant pulses below 100 MHz. We examine pulse characteristics, including width distributions, pulse shapes, and power law indices for amplitude distributions. These properties are compared to those derived at higher frequencies in an attempt to constrain emission mechanisms. Since low frequency pulses are particularly susceptible to pulse broadening, an analysis of the scattering tail probes the electron density of the interstellar medium, including line-of-sight crossings by ionized clouds and filaments within the nebula itself. We also discuss potential correlations with the gamma-ray emission during what appears to be a substantial increase in the occurrence of pulses over the seven month period. Construction of the LWA has been supported by the Office of Naval Research under Contract N00014-07-C-0147. Support for operations and continuing development of the LWA1 is provided by the National Science Foundation under grants AST-1139963 and AST-1139974 of the University Radio Observatory program.

  14. Characterization of arbitrary femtosecond pulses using frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, D.J. ); Trebino, R. )

    1993-02-01

    The authors introduce a new technique, which they call frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), for characterizing and displaying arbitrary femtosecond pulses. The method is simple, general, broad-band, and does not require a reference pulse. Using virtually any instantaneous nonlinear-optical effect, FROG involves measuring the spectrum of the signal pulse as a function of the delay between two input pulses. The resulting trace of intensity versus frequency and delay is related to the pulse's spectrogram, a visually intuitive transform containing both time and frequency information. They prove, using phase retrieval concepts, that the FROG trace yields the full intensity l(t) and phase [var phi](t) of an arbitrary ultrashort pulse with no physically significant ambiguities. They argue, in analogy with acoustics problems, that the FROG trace is in many ways as useful a representation of the pulse as the field itself. FROG appears to have temporal resolution limited only by the response of the nonlinear medium. They demonstrate the method using self-diffraction via the electronic Kerr effect in BK-7 glass and few [mu]J, 620 nm, linearly chirped, [approximately]200 fs pulses.

  15. Practical issues in ultrashort-laser-pulse measurement using frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Trebino, R.

    1996-07-01

    The authors explore several practical experimental issues in measuring ultrashort laser pulses using the technique of frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG). They present a simple method for checking the consistency of experimentally measured FROG data with the independently measured spectrum and autocorrelation of the pulse. This method is a powerful way of discovering systematic errors in FROG experiments. They show how to determine the optimum sampling rate for FROG and show that this satisfies the Nyquist criterion for the laser pulse. They explore the low- and high-power limits to FROG and determine that femtojoule operation should be possible, while the effects of self-phase modulation limit the highest signal efficiency in FROG to 1%. They also show quantitatively that the temporal blurring due to a finite-thickness medium in single-shot geometries does not strongly limit the FROG technique. They explore the limiting time-bandwidth values that can be represented on a FROG trace of a given size. Finally, they report on a new measure of the FROG error that improves convergence in the presence of noise.

  16. Phase retrieval and time-frequency methods in the measurement of ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    Recently several techniques have become available to measure the time- (or frequency-) dependent intensity and phase of ultrashort laser pulses. One of these, Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG), is rigorous and has achieved single-laser-shot operation. FROG combines the concepts of time-frequency analysis in the form of spectrogram generation (in order to create a two-dimensional problem), and uses a phase-retrieval-based algorithm to invert the experimental data to yield the intensity and phase of the laboratory laser pulse. In FROG it is easy to generate a spectrogram of the unknown signal, and inversion of the spectrogram to recover the signal is the main goal. Because the temporal width of a femtosecond laser pulse is much shorter than anything achievable by electronics, FROG uses the pulse to measure itself. In FROG, the laser pulse is split into two replicas of itself by a partially reflecting beamsplitter, and the two replicas interact with each other in a medium with an instantaneous nonlinear-optical response. This interaction generates a signal field that is then frequency-resolved using a spectrometer. The spectrum of the signal field is measured for all relevant values of the temporal delay between the two pulses. Here, the authors employ FROG and FROG related techniques to measure the time-dependent intensity and phase of an ultrashort laser pulse.

  17. High field rf superconductivity: to pulse or not to pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.

    1984-10-01

    Experimental data on the behavior of superconductors under the application of rf fields of amplitude comparable to their critical fields are sporadic and not always consistent. In many cases the field level at which breakdown in superconducting rf cavities should be expected has not been clearly established. Tests conducted with very short (approx. 1 ..mu..s) rf pulses indicate that in this mode of operation fields close to the critical values can be consistently reached in superconducting cavities without breakdown. The advantages and disadvantages of the pulsed method are discussed compared to those of the more standard continuous wave (cw) systems. 60 references.

  18. Excitation of low-frequency residual currents at combination frequencies of an ionising two-colour laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vvedenskii, N. V.; Kostin, V. A.; Laryushin, I. D.; Silaev, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the processes of excitation of low-frequency residual currents in a plasma produced through ionisation of gases by two-colour laser pulses in laser-plasma schemes for THz generation. We have developed an analytical approach that allows one to find residual currents in the case when one of the components of a two-colour pulse is weak enough. The derived analytical expressions show that the effective generation of the residual current (and hence the effective THz generation) is possible if the ratio of the frequencies in the two-colour laser pulse is close to a rational fraction with a not very big odd sum of the numerator and denominator. The results of numerical calculations (including those based on the solution of the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation) agree well with the analytical results.

  19. Collisionless expansion of pulsed radio frequency plasmas. I. Front formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, T.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.; Boswell, R. W.; Charles, C.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics during plasma expansion are studied with the use of a versatile particle-in-cell simulation with a variable neutral gas density profile. The simulation is tailored to a radio frequency plasma expansion experiment [Schröder et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 47(5), 055207 (2014)]. The experiment has shown the existence of a propagating ion front. The ion front features a strong electric field and features a sharp plasma potential drop similar to a double layer. However, the presented results of a first principle simulation show that, in general, the ion front does not have to be entangled with an electric field. The propagating electric field reflects the downstream ions, which stream with velocities up to twice as high as that of the ion front propagation. The observed ion density peak forms due to the accumulation of the reflected ions. The simulation shows that the ion front formation strongly depends on the initial ion density profile and is subject to a wave-breaking phenomenon. Virtual diagnostics in the code allow for a direct comparison with experimental results. Using this technique, the plateau forming in the wake of the plasma front could be indirectly verified in the expansion experiment. Although the simulation considers profiles only in one spatial dimensional, its results are qualitatively in a very good agreement with the laboratory experiment. It can successfully reproduce findings obtained by independent numerical models and simulations. This indicates that the effects of magnetic field structures and tangential inhomogeneities are not essential for the general expansion dynamic. The presented simulation will be used for a detailed parameter study dealt with in Paper II [Schröder et al., Phys. Plasma 23, 013512 (2016)] of this series.

  20. 75 FR 81284 - Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology... of High Frequency (HF) and Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Sound Navigation and Ranging (SONAR) Technology... in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Background and Purpose...

  1. High-voltage pulsed generator for dynamic fragmentation of rocks.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, B M; Kharlov, A V; Vizir, V A; Kumpyak, V V; Zorin, V B; Kiselev, V N

    2010-10-01

    A portable high-voltage (HV) pulsed generator has been designed for rock fragmentation experiments. The generator can be used also for other technological applications. The installation consists of low voltage block, HV block, coaxial transmission line, fragmentation chamber, and control system block. Low voltage block of the generator, consisting of a primary capacitor bank (300 μF) and a thyristor switch, stores pulse energy and transfers it to the HV block. The primary capacitor bank stores energy of 600 J at the maximum charging voltage of 2 kV. HV block includes HV pulsed step up transformer, HV capacitive storage, and two electrode gas switch. The following technical parameters of the generator were achieved: output voltage up to 300 kV, voltage rise time of ∼50 ns, current amplitude of ∼6 kA with the 40 Ω active load, and ∼20 kA in a rock fragmentation regime (with discharge in a rock-water mixture). Typical operation regime is a burst of 1000 pulses with a frequency of 10 Hz. The operation process can be controlled within a wide range of parameters. The entire installation (generator, transmission line, treatment chamber, and measuring probes) is designed like a continuous Faraday's cage (complete shielding) to exclude external electromagnetic perturbations.

  2. High-voltage pulsed generator for dynamic fragmentation of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalchuk, B. M.; Kharlov, A. V.; Vizir, V. A.; Kumpyak, V. V.; Zorin, V. B.; Kiselev, V. N.

    2010-10-01

    A portable high-voltage (HV) pulsed generator has been designed for rock fragmentation experiments. The generator can be used also for other technological applications. The installation consists of low voltage block, HV block, coaxial transmission line, fragmentation chamber, and control system block. Low voltage block of the generator, consisting of a primary capacitor bank (300 μF) and a thyristor switch, stores pulse energy and transfers it to the HV block. The primary capacitor bank stores energy of 600 J at the maximum charging voltage of 2 kV. HV block includes HV pulsed step up transformer, HV capacitive storage, and two electrode gas switch. The following technical parameters of the generator were achieved: output voltage up to 300 kV, voltage rise time of ˜50 ns, current amplitude of ˜6 kA with the 40 Ω active load, and ˜20 kA in a rock fragmentation regime (with discharge in a rock-water mixture). Typical operation regime is a burst of 1000 pulses with a frequency of 10 Hz. The operation process can be controlled within a wide range of parameters. The entire installation (generator, transmission line, treatment chamber, and measuring probes) is designed like a continuous Faraday's cage (complete shielding) to exclude external electromagnetic perturbations.

  3. High-voltage pulsed generator for dynamic fragmentation of rocks.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, B M; Kharlov, A V; Vizir, V A; Kumpyak, V V; Zorin, V B; Kiselev, V N

    2010-10-01

    A portable high-voltage (HV) pulsed generator has been designed for rock fragmentation experiments. The generator can be used also for other technological applications. The installation consists of low voltage block, HV block, coaxial transmission line, fragmentation chamber, and control system block. Low voltage block of the generator, consisting of a primary capacitor bank (300 μF) and a thyristor switch, stores pulse energy and transfers it to the HV block. The primary capacitor bank stores energy of 600 J at the maximum charging voltage of 2 kV. HV block includes HV pulsed step up transformer, HV capacitive storage, and two electrode gas switch. The following technical parameters of the generator were achieved: output voltage up to 300 kV, voltage rise time of ∼50 ns, current amplitude of ∼6 kA with the 40 Ω active load, and ∼20 kA in a rock fragmentation regime (with discharge in a rock-water mixture). Typical operation regime is a burst of 1000 pulses with a frequency of 10 Hz. The operation process can be controlled within a wide range of parameters. The entire installation (generator, transmission line, treatment chamber, and measuring probes) is designed like a continuous Faraday's cage (complete shielding) to exclude external electromagnetic perturbations. PMID:21034090

  4. Studies of Operating Frequency Effects On Ejector-based Thrust Augmentation in a Pulse Detonation Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landry, K.

    2005-01-01

    Studies were performed in order to characterize the thrust augmentation potential of an ejector in a Pulse Detonation Engine application. A 49-mm diameter tube of 0.914-m length was constructed with one open end and one closed end. Ethylene, oxygen, and nitrogen were introduced into the tube at the closed end through the implementation of a fast mixing injector. The tube was completely filled with a stoichiometric mixture containing a one to one molar ratio of nitrogen to oxygen. Ethylene was selected as the fuel due to its detonation sensitivity and the molar ratio of the oxidizer was chosen for heat transfer purposes. Detonations were initiated in the tube through the use of a spark ignition system. The PDE was operated in a multi-cycle mode at frequencies ranging from 20-Hz to 50-Hz. Baseline thrust measurements with no ejector present were performed while operating the engine at various frequencies and compared to theoretical estimates. The baseline values were observed to agree with the theoretical model at low operating frequencies and proved to be increasingly lower than the predicted values as the operating frequency was increased. The baseline thrust measurements were observed to agree within 15 percent of the model for all operating frequencies. A straight 152-mm diameter ejector was installed and thrust augmentation percentages were measured. The length of the ejector was varied while the overlap percentage (percent of the ejector length which overlapped the tube) was maintained at 25 percent for all tests. In addition, the effect of ejector inlet geometry was investigated by comparing results with a straight inlet to those of a 38-mm inlet diameter. The thrust augmentation of the straight inlet ejector proved to be independent of engine operating frequency, augmenting thrust by 40 percent for the 0.914-m length ejector. In contrast, the rounded lip ejector of the same length seemed to be highly dependent on the engine operating frequency. An optimum

  5. Effect of saturated frequency chirping on mode-locked laser pulses.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, D. M.; Tittel, F. K.; Rabson, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    A dye-induced nonlinear frequency chirping is analytically shown to have significant modifications on the nature of the output mode-locked lasers. It is shown that the saturated frequency sweeping is responsible for substantial pulse broadening as well as substructures.

  6. Spectral Fraunhofer regime: time-to-frequency conversion by the action of a single time lens on an optical pulse.

    PubMed

    Azaña, José; Berger, Naum K; Levit, Boris; Fischer, Baruch

    2004-01-10

    We analyze a new regime in the interaction between an optical pulse and a time lens (spectral Fraunhofer regime), where the input pulse amplitude is mapped from the time domain into the frequency domain (time-to-frequency conversion). Here we derive in detail the conditions for achieving time-to-frequency conversion with a single time lens (i.e., for entering the spectral Fraunhofer regime) as well as the expressions governing this operation. Our theoretical findings are demonstrated both numerically and experimentally. A comparative study between the proposed single-time-lens configuration and the conventional dispersion + time-lens configuration for time-to-frequency conversion is also conducted. Time-to-frequency conversion with a single time lens can be used for applications similar to those previously proposed for the conventional time-to-frequency converters, e.g., high-resolution measurement of fast optical temporal waveforms. Moreover, our results also indicate that the spectral Fraunhofer regime provides additional capabilities for controlling and processing optical pulses.

  7. Experiment and theoretical study of the propagation of high power microwave pulse in air breakdown environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Ren, A.; Zhang, Y. S.

    1991-01-01

    In the study of the propagation of high power microwave pulse, one of the main concerns is how to minimize the energy loss of the pulse before reaching the destination. In the very high power region, one has to prevent the cutoff reflection caused by the excessive ionization in the background air. A frequency auto-conversion process which can lead to reflectionless propagation of powerful EM pulses in self-generated plasmas is studied. The theory shows that under the proper conditions the carrier frequency, omega, of the pulse will indeed shift upward with the growth of plasma frequency, omega(sub pe). Thus, the plasma during breakdown will always remain transparent to the pulse (i.e., omega greater than omega(sub pe)). A chamber experiment to demonstrate the frequency auto-conversion during the pulse propagation through the self-generated plasma is then conducted in a chamber. The detected frequency shift is compared with the theoretical result calculated y using the measured electron density distribution along the propagation path of the pulse. Good agreement between the theory and the experiment results is obtained.

  8. 486nm blue laser operating at 500 kHz pulse repetition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creeden, Daniel; Blanchard, Jon; Pretorius, Herman; Limongelli, Julia; Setzler, Scott D.

    2016-03-01

    Compact, high power blue light in the 470-490nm region is difficult to generate due to the lack of laser sources which are easily convertible (through parametric processes) to those wavelengths. By using a pulsed Tm-doped fiber laser as a pump source for a 2-stage second harmonic generation (SHG) scheme, we have generated ~2W of 486.5nm light at 500kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF). To our knowledge, this is the highest PRF and output power achieved in the blue region based on a frequency converted, monolithic fiber laser. This pump laser is a pulsed Tm-doped fiber laser/amplifier which generates 12.8W of 1946nm power at 500kHz PRF with diffraction-limited output from a purely single-mode fiber. The output from this laser is converted to 973nm through second harmonic generation (SHG). The 973nm is then converted to 486.5nm via another SHG stage. This architecture operates with very low peak power, which can be challenging from a nonlinear conversion standpoint. However, the low peak power enables the use of a single-mode monolithic fiber amplifier without undergoing nonlinear effects in the fiber. This also eliminates the need for novel fiber designs, large-mode area fiber, or free-space coupling to rod-type amplifiers, improving reliability and robustness of the laser source. Higher power and conversion efficiency are possible through the addition of Tm-doped fiber amplification stages as well as optimization of the nonlinear conversion process and nonlinear materials. In this paper, we discuss the laser layout, results, and challenges with generating blue light using a low peak power approach.

  9. Comparison of ultrashort-pulse frequency-resolved-optical-gating traces for three common beam geometries

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R. ); Kane, D.J. )

    1994-09-01

    We recently introduced frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), a technique for measuring the intensity and phase of an individual, arbitrary, ultrashort laser pulse. FROG can use almost any instantaneous optical nonlinearity, with the most common geometries being polarization gate, self-diffraction, and second-harmonic generation. The experimentally generated FROG trace is intuitive, visually appealing, and can yield quantitative information about the pulse parameters (such as temporal and spectral width and chirp). However, the qualitative and the quantitative features of the FROG trace depend strongly on the geometry used. We compare the FROG traces for several common ultrashort pulses for these three common geometries and, where possible, develop scaling rules that allow one to obtain quantitative information about the pulse directly from the experimental FROG trace. We illuminate the important features of the various FROG traces for transform-limited, linearly chirped, self-phase modulated, and nonlinearly chirped pulses, pulses with simultaneous linear chirp and self-phase modulation, and pulses with simultaneous linear chirp and cubic phase distortion, as well as double pulses, pulses with phase jumps, and pulses with complex intensity and phase substructure.

  10. Transponder System for High-Frequency Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, C. L.; Shores, P. W.; Kobayashi, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    Transponder system uses phase difference between transmitted and reflected high-frequency radio waves to measure distance to target. To suppress spurious measurements of reflections from objects near target at transmitted frequency and its harmonics, transponder at target generates return signal at half transmitted frequency. System useful in such applications as surveying, docking of ships, and short-range navigation.

  11. Pulsed laser triggered high speed microfluidic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Gao, Lanyu; Chen, Yue; Wei, Kenneth; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2008-10-01

    We report a high-speed microfluidic switch capable of achieving a switching time of 10 μs. The switching mechanism is realized by exciting dynamic vapor bubbles with focused laser pulses in a microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel. The bubble expansion deforms the elastic PDMS channel wall and squeezes the adjacent sample channel to control its fluid and particle flows as captured by the time-resolved imaging system. A switching of polystyrene microspheres in a Y-shaped channel has also been demonstrated. This ultrafast laser triggered switching mechanism has the potential to advance the sorting speed of state-of-the-art microscale fluorescence activated cell sorting devices.

  12. Narrow high power microwave pulses from a free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.C.; Zhang, T.B.

    1995-11-01

    The authors have explored high power microwave ({lambda} = 1.5mm) pulse amplification along a tapered undulator FEL using the 1D Compton FEL equations with slippage. For an appropriate taper, sideband instabilities are suppressed and a short ({approximately}50psec) Gaussian pulse will propagate in a nearly self-similar way as it grows in power, slipping through a much longer electron pulse (beam energy, 750kV; current, 100A; radius = 2mm; length = 200 radiation periods). This is in contrast to the example of pulse propagation in a constant parameter undulator, where the Gaussian pulse breaks up into irregularities identified with sidebanding. Variation of initial pulse width shows convergence to a 50psec wide output pulse. Because of the slippage of the radiation pulse through the electron pulse, the peak microwave pulse intensity, {approximately}3GW/cm2, is about three times the kinetic energy density of the electron beam.

  13. Constant frequency pulsed phase-locked loop measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Kushnick, Peter W. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A measuring apparatus is presented that uses a fixed frequency oscillator to measure small changes in the phase velocity ultrasonic sound when a sample is exposed to environmental changes such as changes in pressure, temperature, etc. The invention automatically balances electrical phase shifts against the acoustical phase shifts in order to obtain an accurate measurement of electrical phase shifts.

  14. Green pulsed lidar-radar emitter based on a multipass frequency-shifting external cavity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyang; Brunel, Marc; Romanelli, Marco; Vallet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the radio frequency (RF) up-conversion properties of a frequency-shifting external cavity on a laser beam. We consider an infrared passively Q-switched pulsed laser whose intensity modulation results from the multiple round-trips in the external cavity, which contains a frequency shifter. The output beam undergoes optical second-harmonic generation necessary to reach the green wavelength. We model the pulse train using a rate-equation model to simulate the laser pulses, together with a time-delayed interference calculation taking both the diffraction efficiency and the Gaussian beam propagation into account. The predictions are verified experimentally using a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser passively Q-switched by Cr4+:YAG whose pulse train makes multiple round-trips in a mode-matched external cavity containing an acousto-optic frequency shifter driven at 85 MHz. Second-harmonic generation is realized in a KTP crystal, yielding RF-modulated pulses at 532 nm with a modulation contrast of almost 100%. RF harmonics up to the 6th order (1.020 GHz) are observed in the green output pulses. Such a RF-modulated green laser may find applications in underwater detection and ranging.

  15. Green pulsed lidar-radar emitter based on a multipass frequency-shifting external cavity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyang; Brunel, Marc; Romanelli, Marco; Vallet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the radio frequency (RF) up-conversion properties of a frequency-shifting external cavity on a laser beam. We consider an infrared passively Q-switched pulsed laser whose intensity modulation results from the multiple round-trips in the external cavity, which contains a frequency shifter. The output beam undergoes optical second-harmonic generation necessary to reach the green wavelength. We model the pulse train using a rate-equation model to simulate the laser pulses, together with a time-delayed interference calculation taking both the diffraction efficiency and the Gaussian beam propagation into account. The predictions are verified experimentally using a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser passively Q-switched by Cr4+:YAG whose pulse train makes multiple round-trips in a mode-matched external cavity containing an acousto-optic frequency shifter driven at 85 MHz. Second-harmonic generation is realized in a KTP crystal, yielding RF-modulated pulses at 532 nm with a modulation contrast of almost 100%. RF harmonics up to the 6th order (1.020 GHz) are observed in the green output pulses. Such a RF-modulated green laser may find applications in underwater detection and ranging. PMID:27139644

  16. Short-pulse high intensity laser thin foil interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audebert, Patrick

    2003-10-01

    The technology of ultrashort pulse laser generation has progressed to the point that optical pulses larger than 10 J, 300 fs duration or shorter are routinely produced. Such pulses can be focused to intensities exceeding 10^18 W/cm^2. With high contrast pulses, these focused intensities can be used to heat solid matter to high temperatures with minimal hydrodynamic expansion, producing an extremely high energy-density state of matter for a short period of time. This high density, high temperature plasma can be studied by x-ray spectroscopy. We have performed experiments on thin foils of different elements under well controlled conditions at the 100 Terawatt laser at LULI to study the characteristics X-ray emission of laser heated solids. To suppress the ASE effect, the laser was frequency doubled. S-polarized light with a peak intensity of 10^19W/cm^2 was used to minimize resonance absorption. To decrease the effect of longitudinal temperature gradients very thin (800 μ) aluminum foil targets were used. We have also studied the effect of radial gradient by limiting the measured x-ray emission zone using 50μ or 100μ pinhole on target. The spectra, in the range 7-8Å, were recorded using a conical crystal spectrometer coupled to a 800 fs resolution streak camera. A Fourier Domain Interferometry (FDI) of the back of the foil was also performed providing a measurement of the hydrodynamic expansion as function of time for each shot. To simulate the experiment, we used the 1D hydrodynamic code FILM with a given set of plasma parameter (ρ, Te) as initial conditions. The X-ray emission was calculated by post processing hydrodynamic results with a collisional-radiative model which uses super-configuration average atomic data. The simulation reproduces the main features of the experimental time resolved spectrum.

  17. High-Frequency Dynamics of Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yang; Kruse, Dustin E.; Dayton, Paul A.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents enhance echoes from the microvasculature and enable the visualization of flow in smaller vessels. Here, we optically and acoustically investigate microbubble oscillation and echoes following insonation with a 10 MHz center frequency pulse. A high-speed camera system with a temporal resolution of 10 ns, which provides two-dimensional (2-D) frame images and streak images, is used in optical experiments. Two confocally aligned transducers, transmitting at 10 MHz and receiving at 5 MHz, are used in acoustical experiments in order to detect subharmonic components. Results of a numerical evaluation of the modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation are used to predict the dynamics of a microbubble and are compared to results of in vitro experiments. From the optical observations of a single microbubble, nonlinear oscillation, destruction, and radiation force are observed. The maximum bubble expansion, resulting from insonation with a 20-cycle, 10-MHz linear chirp with a peak negative pressure of 3.5 MPa, has been evaluated. For an initial diameter ranging from 1.5 to 5 μm, a maximum diameter less than 8 μm is produced during insonation. Optical and acoustical experiments provide insight into the mechanisms of destruction, including fragmentation and active diffusion. High-frequency pulse transmission may provide the opportunity to detect contrast echoes resulting from a single pulse, may be robust in the presence of tissue motion, and may provide the opportunity to incorporate high-frequency ultrasound into destruction-replenishment techniques. PMID:16422410

  18. SONOTECH, INC. FREQUENCY-TUNABLE PULSE COMBUSTION SYSTEM (CELLO PULSE BURNER) - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sonotech, Inc. (Sonotech) of Atlanta, Georgia, has developed a pulse combustion burner technology that claims to offer benefits when applied in a variety of combustion processes. The technology incorporates a combustor that can be tuned to induce large-amplitude acoustic or soni...

  19. System for adjusting frequency of electrical output pulses derived from an oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Bartholomew, David B.

    2006-11-14

    A system for setting and adjusting a frequency of electrical output pulses derived from an oscillator in a network is disclosed. The system comprises an accumulator module configured to receive pulses from an oscillator and to output an accumulated value. An adjustor module is configured to store an adjustor value used to correct local oscillator drift. A digital adder adds values from the accumulator module to values stored in the adjustor module and outputs their sums to the accumulator module, where they are stored. The digital adder also outputs an electrical pulse to a logic module. The logic module is in electrical communication with the adjustor module and the network. The logic module may change the value stored in the adjustor module to compensate for local oscillator drift or change the frequency of output pulses. The logic module may also keep time and calculate drift.

  20. Propagation of high frequencies in Scandinavia

    SciTech Connect

    Bame, D.

    1989-04-01

    To determine if seismic signals at frequencies up to 50 Hz are useful for detecting events and discriminating between earthquakes and explosions, approximately 180 events from the three-component high-frequency seismic element (HFSE) installed at the center of the Norwegian Regional Seismic Array (NRSA) have been analyzed. The attenuation of high-frequency signals in Scandinavia varies with distance, azimuth, magnitude, and source effects. Most of the events were detected with HFSE, although detections were better on the NRSA where signal processing techniques were used. Based on a preliminary analysis, high-frequency data do not appear to be a useful discriminant in Scandinavia. 21 refs., 29 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Coherent propagation effects and pulse self-compression under the conditions of two-photon resonant difference-frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarkin, A.; Korn, G.

    1997-12-01

    We predict the possibility of using two-photon coherent propagation effects for generating pulses at the difference frequency with duration significantly shorter and intensity higher than those of the input pump and injection pulse.

  2. Shaping pulses using frequency conversion with a modulated picosecond free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, B.A.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Computer simulations and experiments indicate that we can shape the infrared picosecond pulses of the Mark III FEL in amplitude, frequency, and phase. Strongly modulated fundamental and second harmonic pulses have been generated by operating the Mark III FEL in the regime of strong sideband growth. In this paper, we present the results of simulations and experiments for second harmonic generation with fundamental inputs from 2 to 3 {mu}m.

  3. Variable pulse repetition frequency output from an optically injected solid state laser.

    PubMed

    Kane, D M; Toomey, J P

    2011-02-28

    An optically injected solid state laser (OISSL) system is known to generate complex nonlinear dynamics within the parameter space of varying the injection strength of the master laser and the frequency detuning between the master and slave lasers. Here we show that within these complex nonlinear dynamics, a system which can be operated as a source of laser pulses with a pulse repetition frequency (prf) that can be continuously varied by a single control, is embedded. Generation of pulse repetition frequencies ranging from 200 kHz up to 4 MHz is shown to be achievable for an optically injected Nd:YVO4 solid state laser system from analysis of prior experimental and simulation results. Generalizing this to other optically injected solid state laser systems, the upper bound on the repetition frequency is of order the relaxation oscillation frequency for the lasers. The system is discussed in the context of prf versatile laser systems more generally. Proposals are made for the next generation of OISSLs that will increase understanding of the variable pulse repetition frequency operation, and determine its practical limitations. Such variable prf laser systems; both low powered, and, higher powered systems achieved using one or more optical power amplifier stages; have many potential applications from interrogating resonance behaviors in microscale structures, through sensing and diagnostics, to laser processing.

  4. A digital multigate Doppler method for high frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Ye, Zongying; Yu, Yanyan; Chen, Yan; Chi, Liyang; Mu, Peitian; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Congzhi; Xiao, Yang; Dai, Jiyan; Sun, Lei; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive visualization of blood flow with high frequency Doppler ultrasound has been extensively used to assess the morphology and hemodynamics of the microcirculation. A completely digital implementation of multigate pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler method was proposed in this paper for high frequency ultrasound applications. Analog mixer was eliminated by a digital demodulator and the same data acquisition path was shared with traditional B-mode imaging which made the design compact and flexible. Hilbert transform based quadrature demodulation scheme was employed to achieve the multigate Doppler acquisition. A programmable high frequency ultrasound platform was also proposed to facilitate the multigate flow visualization. Experimental results showed good performance of the proposed method. Parabolic velocity gradient inside the vessel and velocity profile with different time slots were acquired to demonstrate the functionality of the multigate Doppler. Slow wall motion was also recorded by the proposed method.

  5. High Frequency Amplitude Detector for GMI Magnetic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Asfour, Aktham; Zidi, Manel; Yonnet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    A new concept of a high-frequency amplitude detector and demodulator for Giant-Magneto-Impedance (GMI) sensors is presented. This concept combines a half wave rectifier, with outstanding capabilities and high speed, and a feedback approach that ensures the amplitude detection with easily adjustable gain. The developed detector is capable of measuring high-frequency and very low amplitude signals without the use of diode-based active rectifiers or analog multipliers. The performances of this detector are addressed throughout the paper. The full circuitry of the design is given, together with a comprehensive theoretical study of the concept and experimental validation. The detector has been used for the amplitude measurement of both single frequency and pulsed signals and for the demodulation of amplitude-modulated signals. It has also been successfully integrated in a GMI sensor prototype. Magnetic field and electrical current measurements in open- and closed-loop of this sensor have also been conducted. PMID:25536003

  6. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Pulsed Optically Pumped Rubidium Frequency Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Z. J.

    2013-09-01

    Atomic clocks have been recognized as the critical equipments for the global navigation satellite systems, and their performances determine the positioning accuracies and lifetimes of the satellite navigation systems. In order to ensure the reliability and technological diversity, it is of great importance to study new type atomic clocks with high precision. The advantages such as simple operation, compactness, and small size, make the Rb frequency standard preferred for satellite navigation systems. In order to reduce the light shift and cavity pulling shift, the Pulsed Optically Pumped (POP) Rb frequency standard has been theoretically and experimentally studied in this thesis, in which the pumping, interrogation, and detection phases are separated in time to avoid coupling between the microwave and optical field coherences. A laboratory POP ^{87}Rb frequency standard prototype has been realized. Meanwhile, the Autler-Townes splitting in electromagnetic induced transparency (EIT), which is induced by microwave, has been studied theoretically and experimentally. The main works and results are as follows: (1) In the formalism of the ensemble-averaged density matrix and in the rotating-wave approximation, a set of equations describing the POP clock dynamics with a three-level model has been obtained, and the optimum physical parameters are derived. When atoms are submitted to π/2 Ramsey pulses, it is indicated that: (a) With microwave detection, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) is 1/(4T) (T represents the Ramsey time), and the quality factor of the atomic line is increased by a factor of 2 with respect to the traditional approaches. (b) The light shift effect may be canceled, and cavity pulling effect may be strongly reduced. A better medium-, and long-term frequency stability is obtained. (2) The required characteristics of optics and physics packages have been analyzed. The instruments such as the laser system, microwave cavity, Rb vapor cell, quantization

  7. HIGH CURRENT RADIO FREQUENCY ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    1963-04-01

    This patent relates to a high current radio frequency ion source. A cylindrical plasma container has a coil disposed around the exterior surface thereof along the longitudinal axis. Means are provided for the injection of an unionized gas into the container and for applying a radio frequency signal to the coil whereby a radio frequency field is generated within the container parallel to the longitudinal axis thereof to ionize the injected gas. Cathode and anode means are provided for extracting transverse to the radio frequency field from an area midway between the ends of the container along the longitudinal axis thereof the ions created by said radio frequency field. (AEC)

  8. Lightning protection devices for high frequencies equipments

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, J.

    1983-01-01

    Contents: Mechanism of a Lightning Stroke from Antenna to Ground; Principles of Protection Devices for Feeders; Electrical Characteristics of H.F. Protection Devices; Calculation of H.F. Protection Devices; Catalogue Devices for High Frequency Protection; Some Measurement Results for Tees; Measurement Results for Decoupling Line Devices; Installation of High Frequency Devices.

  9. Odors Pulsed at Wing Beat Frequencies are Tracked by Primary Olfactory Networks and Enhance Odor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Shreejoy J.; Peters, Oakland J.; Staudacher, Erich M.; Kalwar, Faizan R.; Hatfield, Mandy N.; Daly, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    Each down stroke of an insect's wings accelerates axial airflow over the antennae. Modeling studies suggest that this can greatly enhance penetration of air and air-born odorants through the antennal sensilla thereby periodically increasing odorant-receptor interactions. Do these periodic changes result in entrainment of neural responses in the antenna and antennal lobe (AL)? Does this entrainment affect olfactory acuity? To address these questions, we monitored antennal and AL responses in the moth Manduca sexta while odorants were pulsed at frequencies from 10–72 Hz, encompassing the natural wingbeat frequency. Power spectral density (PSD) analysis was used to identify entrainment of neural activity. Statistical analysis of PSDs indicates that the antennal nerve tracked pulsed odor up to 30 Hz. Furthermore, at least 50% of AL local field potentials (LFPs) and between 7–25% of unitary spiking responses also tracked pulsed odor up to 30 Hz in a frequency-locked manner. Application of bicuculline (200 μM) abolished pulse tracking in both LFP and unitary responses suggesting that GABAA receptor activation is necessary for pulse tracking within the AL. Finally, psychophysical measures of odor detection establish that detection thresholds are lowered when odor is pulsed at 20 Hz. These results suggest that AL networks can respond to the oscillatory dynamics of stimuli such as those imposed by the wing beat in a manner analogous to mammalian sniffing. PMID:20407584

  10. High-Voltage Pulsed Current Electrical Stimulation in Wound Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Polak, Anna; Franek, Andrzej; Taradaj, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Significance: A range of studies point to the efficacy of electrical stimulation (ES) in wound treatment, but the methodology of its application has not been determined to date. This article provides a critical review of the results of clinical trials published by researchers using high-voltage pulsed current (HVPC) to treat chronic wounds. In describing the methodology of the trials, the article gives special attention to electric stimulus parameters, the frequency of procedures and total treatment duration. Recent Advances: HVPC is a monophasic pulsed electric current that consists of double-peaked impulses (5–200 μs), at very high peak-current amplitude (2–2.5 A), and high voltage (up to 500 V), at a frequency of 1–125 pulses per second. HVPC can activate “skin battery” and cellular galvanotaxis, and improves blood flow and capillary density. Critical Issues: HVPC efficacy was evaluated in conservatively treated patients with diabetic foot, venous leg and pressure ulcers (PUs), and in some patients with surgically treated venous insufficiency. Future Directions: The efficacy of HVPC as one of several biophysical energies promoting venous leg ulcer (VLU) and PU healing has been confirmed. Additional studies are needed to investigate its effect on the healing of other types of soft tissue defects. Other areas that require more research include the identification of the therapeutic effect of HVPC on infected wounds, the determination of the efficacy of cathodal versus anodal stimulation, and the minimal daily/weekly duration of HVPC required to ensure optimal promotion of wound healing. PMID:24761351

  11. Effect of Finite Pulse Length and Laser Frequency Chirp on HGHG and EEHG Seeding

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2011-11-18

    Theoretical studies of high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) often start from a simplified model in which the beam is assumed infinitely long and longitudinally uniform and the laser induced energy modulation is perfectly sinusoidal and of infinite duration. In such a model the resulting seed has a spectrum consisting of a collection of delta-functions (of zero width) located at the harmonics of the laser frequency. Being a useful tool for study of the seed bunching amplitudes, such a model cannot be used for realistic analysis the spectral properties of the seed. In this paper we take into account the finite duration of the laser pulse as well as some possible laser phase errors to study their effect on the spectrum of the seed.

  12. Visualization and analysis of modulated pulses in magnetic resonance by joint time-frequency representations.

    PubMed

    Köcher, S S; Heydenreich, T; Glaser, S J

    2014-10-17

    We study the utility of joint time-frequency representations for the analysis of shaped or composite pulses for magnetic resonance. Such spectrograms are commonly used for the visualization of shaped laser pulses in optical spectroscopy. This intuitive representation provides additional insight compared to conventional approaches, which exclusively show either temporal or spectral information. We focus on the short-time Fourier transform, which provides not only amplitude but also phase information. The approach is illustrated for broadband inversion pulses, multiple quantum excitation and broadband heteronuclear decoupling. The physical interpretation and validity of the approach is discussed.

  13. Ionization-Induced Multiwave Mixing: Terahertz Generation with Two-Color Laser Pulses of Various Frequency Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostin, V. A.; Laryushin, I. D.; Silaev, A. A.; Vvedenskii, N. V.

    2016-07-01

    Ultrafast strong-field ionization is shown to be accompanied by atypical multiwave mixing with the number of mixed waves defined by the dependence of the ionization rate on the field strength. For two-color laser pulses of various frequency ratios, this results in the excitation of a free-electron current at laser combination frequencies and possibly in the excitation of the zero-frequency (residual) current responsible for terahertz (THz) generation in a formed plasma. The high-order nature of ionization-induced wave mixing may cause THz generation with uncommon laser frequency ratios (such as 2 : 3 and 3 : 4 ) to be virtually as effective as that with the commonly used frequency ratio of 1 : 2 .

  14. Psychophysical tuning curves at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Ifat; Plack, Christopher J.

    2005-10-01

    For most normal-hearing listeners, absolute thresholds increase rapidly above about 16 kHz. One hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of the hearing-threshold curve is imposed by the transmission characteristics of the middle ear, which attenuates the sound input [Masterton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 45, 966-985 (1969)]. An alternative hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of hearing is imposed by the tonotopicity of the cochlea [Ruggero and Temchin, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 13206-13210 (2002)]. The aim of this study was to test these hypotheses. Forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) were derived for signal frequencies of 12-17.5 kHz. For the highest signal frequencies, the high-frequency slopes of some PTCs were steeper than the slope of the hearing-threshold curve. The results also show that the human auditory system displays frequency selectivity for characteristic frequencies (CFs) as high as 17 kHz, above the frequency at which absolute thresholds begin to increase rapidly. The findings suggest that, for CFs up to 17 kHz, the high-frequency limitation in humans is imposed in part by the middle-ear attenuation, and not by the tonotopicity of the cochlea.

  15. A novel, high gradient, laser modulated, pulsed electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.; Dudnikov, V.; Farrell, J.P.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Smedley, J.

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes a high current, fast pulsed, laser excited, electron gun to operate at energies between 1 and 5 MeV. The authors present the design of the high voltage pulse generator, and the laser system, the experimental results obtained with copper cathode in fields > 1 GV/m and diode geometry optimized for the highest brightness using computer simulations. This electron source will generate an electron beam of brightness approaching 10{sup 16} A/m{sup 2} rad{sup 2}, which is 2 orders of magnitude greater than the present level of 10{sup 14} A/m{sup 2} rad{sup 2}, a parameter highly sought after for future linear colliders and short wavelength FELs. It will also be used to study properties of materials in the presence of high fields such as dark current emission and high voltage breakdown characteristics that will provide information critical to the development of high frequency accelerating structures. In addition, Bremsstrahlung radiation from these ultra short relativistic electrons, is expected to be an efficient source of x-ray photons for imaging transient effects in biological samples, microlithography and micromachining. These excellent beam qualities will be augmented for the first time by the simplicity and compactness of the device resulting in an efficient, affordable product with superior performance and unique capabilities.

  16. Ultrabroadband 50-130 THz pulses generated via phase-matcheddifference frequency mixing in LiIO3

    SciTech Connect

    Zentgraf, Thomas; Huber, Rupert; Nielsen, Nils C.; Chemla, DanielS.; Kaindl, Robert A.

    2006-10-10

    We report the generation of ultrabroadband pulses spanningthe 50-130 THz frequency range via phase-matched difference frequencymixing within the broad spectrum of sub-10 fs pulses in LiIO_3. Modelcalculations reproduce the octave-spanning spectra and predict few-cycleTHz pulse durations less than 20~;fs. The applicability of this scheme isdemonstrated with 9-fs pulses from a Ti:sapphire oscillator and with 7-fsamplified pulses from a hollow fiber compressor as pumpsources.

  17. A high frequency resonance gravity gradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bagaev, S. N.; Kvashnin, N. L.; Skvortsov, M. N.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Krysanov, V. A.; Oreshkin, S. I.; Motylev, A. M.; Popov, S. M.; Samoilenko, A. A.; Yudin, I. S.; Rudenko, V. N.

    2014-06-15

    A new setup OGRAN—the large scale opto-acoustical gravitational detector is described. As distinguished from known gravitational bar detectors it uses the optical interferometrical readout for registering weak variations of gravity gradient at the kilohetz frequency region. At room temperature, its sensitivity is limited only by the bar Brownian noise at the bandwidth close to 100 Hz. It is destined for a search for rare events—gravitational pulses coincident with signals of neutrino scintillator (BUST) in the deep underground of Baksan Neutrino Observatory of INR RAS.

  18. A high frequency resonance gravity gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagaev, S. N.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Kvashnin, N. L.; Krysanov, V. A.; Oreshkin, S. I.; Motylev, A. M.; Popov, S. M.; Rudenko, V. N.; Samoilenko, A. A.; Skvortsov, M. N.; Yudin, I. S.

    2014-06-01

    A new setup OGRAN—the large scale opto-acoustical gravitational detector is described. As distinguished from known gravitational bar detectors it uses the optical interferometrical readout for registering weak variations of gravity gradient at the kilohetz frequency region. At room temperature, its sensitivity is limited only by the bar Brownian noise at the bandwidth close to 100 Hz. It is destined for a search for rare events—gravitational pulses coincident with signals of neutrino scintillator (BUST) in the deep underground of Baksan Neutrino Observatory of INR RAS.

  19. Intense, carrier frequency and bandwidth tunable quasi single-cycle pulses from an organic emitter covering the Terahertz frequency gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicario, C.; Monoszlai, B.; Jazbinsek, M.; Lee, S.-H.; Kwon, O.-P.; Hauri, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    In Terahertz (THz) science, one of the long-standing challenges has been the formation of spectrally dense, single-cycle pulses with tunable duration and spectrum across the frequency range of 0.1-15 THz (THz gap). This frequency band, lying between the electronically and optically accessible spectra hosts important molecular fingerprints and collective modes which cannot be fully controlled by present strong-field THz sources. We present a method that provides powerful single-cycle THz pulses in the THz gap with a stable absolute phase whose duration can be continuously selected between 68 fs and 1100 fs. The loss-free and chirp-free technique is based on optical rectification of a wavelength-tunable pump pulse in the organic emitter HMQ-TMS that allows for tuning of the spectral bandwidth from 1 to more than 7 octaves over the entire THz gap. The presented source tunability of the temporal carrier frequency and spectrum expands the scope of spectrally dense THz sources to time-resolved nonlinear THz spectroscopy in the entire THz gap. This opens new opportunities towards ultrafast coherent control over matter and light.

  20. Intense, carrier frequency and bandwidth tunable quasi single-cycle pulses from an organic emitter covering the Terahertz frequency gap

    PubMed Central

    Vicario, C.; Monoszlai, B.; Jazbinsek, M.; Lee, S. -H.; Kwon, O. -P.; Hauri, C. P.

    2015-01-01

    In Terahertz (THz) science, one of the long-standing challenges has been the formation of spectrally dense, single-cycle pulses with tunable duration and spectrum across the frequency range of 0.1–15 THz (THz gap). This frequency band, lying between the electronically and optically accessible spectra hosts important molecular fingerprints and collective modes which cannot be fully controlled by present strong-field THz sources. We present a method that provides powerful single-cycle THz pulses in the THz gap with a stable absolute phase whose duration can be continuously selected between 68 fs and 1100 fs. The loss-free and chirp-free technique is based on optical rectification of a wavelength-tunable pump pulse in the organic emitter HMQ-TMS that allows for tuning of the spectral bandwidth from 1 to more than 7 octaves over the entire THz gap. The presented source tunability of the temporal carrier frequency and spectrum expands the scope of spectrally dense THz sources to time-resolved nonlinear THz spectroscopy in the entire THz gap. This opens new opportunities towards ultrafast coherent control over matter and light. PMID:26400005

  1. Clustered Desynchronization from High-Frequency Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2015-12-01

    While high-frequency deep brain stimulation is a well established treatment for Parkinson's disease, its underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that two competing hypotheses, desynchronization and entrainment in a population of model neurons, may not be mutually exclusive. We find that in a noisy group of phase oscillators, high frequency perturbations can separate the population into multiple clusters, each with a nearly identical proportion of the overall population. This phenomenon can be understood by studying maps of the underlying deterministic system and is guaranteed to be observed for small noise strengths. When we apply this framework to populations of Type I and Type II neurons, we observe clustered desynchronization at many pulsing frequencies. PMID:26713619

  2. Clustered Desynchronization from High-Frequency Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    While high-frequency deep brain stimulation is a well established treatment for Parkinson’s disease, its underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that two competing hypotheses, desynchronization and entrainment in a population of model neurons, may not be mutually exclusive. We find that in a noisy group of phase oscillators, high frequency perturbations can separate the population into multiple clusters, each with a nearly identical proportion of the overall population. This phenomenon can be understood by studying maps of the underlying deterministic system and is guaranteed to be observed for small noise strengths. When we apply this framework to populations of Type I and Type II neurons, we observe clustered desynchronization at many pulsing frequencies. PMID:26713619

  3. Apparatus for measuring high frequency currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagmann, Mark J. (Inventor); Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring high frequency currents includes a non-ferrous core current probe that is coupled to a wide-band transimpedance amplifier. The current probe has a secondary winding with a winding resistance that is substantially smaller than the reactance of the winding. The sensitivity of the current probe is substantially flat over a wide band of frequencies. The apparatus is particularly useful for measuring exposure of humans to radio frequency currents.

  4. Ultra-High-Frequency Capacitive Displacement Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, Thomas R.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Kaiser, William J.

    1994-01-01

    Improved class of compact, high-resolution capacitive displacement sensors operates at excitation frequency of 915 MHz and measures about 7.5 by 4 by 2 centimeters. Contains commercially available 915-MHz oscillator and transmission-line resonator. Resonator contains stripline inductor in addition to variable capacitor. Ultrahigh excitation frequency offers advantages of resolution and frequency response. Not deleteriously affected by mechanical overdriving, or contact between electrodes.

  5. 4.8GHz CMOS Frequency Multiplier Using Subharmonic Pulse-Injection Locking for Spurious Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Kyoya; Motoyoshi, Mizuki; Fujishima, Minoru

    To realize low-power wireless transceivers, it is necessary to improve the performance of frequency synthesizers, which are typically frequency multipliers composed of a phase-locked loop (PLL). However, PLLs generally consume a large amount of power and occupy a large area. To improve the frequency multiplier, we propose a pulse-injection-locked frequency multiplier (PILFM), where a spurious signal is suppressed using a pulse input signal. An injection-locked oscillator (ILO) in a PILFM was fabricated by a 0.18µm 1P5M CMOS process. The core size is 10.8µm × 10.5µm. The power consumption of the ILO is 9.6µW at 250MHz, 255µW at 2.4GHz and 1.47mW at 4.8GHz. The phase noise is -105dBc/Hz at a 1MHz offset.

  6. 78 FR 70567 - Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology...) and Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Sound Navigation and Ranging (SONAR) Technology and Finding of No... less than two weeks; however, for environmental disasters such as the Deepwater Horizon oil...

  7. Pulsed Discharge Effects on Bacteria Inactivation in Low-Pressure Radio-Frequency Oxygen Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicoveanu, Dragos; Ohtsu, Yasunori; Fujita, Hiroharu

    2008-02-01

    The sporicidal effects of low-pressure radio frequency (RF) discharges in oxygen, produced by the application of continuous and pulsed RF power, were evaluated. For all cases, the survival curves showed a biphasic evolution. The maximum efficiency for bacteria sterilization was obtained when the RF power was injected in the continuous wave mode, while in the pulsed mode the lowest treatment temperature was ensured. The inactivation rates were calculated from the microorganism survival curves and their dependencies on the pulse characteristics (i.e., pulse frequency and duty cycle) were compared with those of the plasma parameters. The results indicated that the inactivation rate corresponding to the first phase of the survival curves is related to the time-averaged intensity of the light emission by the excited neutral atoms in the pulsed plasma, whereas the inactivation rate calculated from the second slope of the survival curves and the time-averaged plasma density have similar behaviors, when the pulse parameters were modified.

  8. Three-dimensional time and frequency-domain theory of femtosecond x-ray pulse generation through Thomson Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W J; Hartemann, F V

    2004-01-27

    The generation of high intensity, ultra-short x-ray pulses enables exciting new experimental capabilities, such as femtosecond pump-probe experiments used to temporally resolve material structural dynamics on atomic time scales. Thomson backscattering of a high intensity laser pulse with a bright relativistic electron bunch is a promising method for producing such high brightness x-ray pulses in the 10-100 keV range within a compact facility. While a variety of methods for producing sub-picosecond x-ray bursts by Thomson scattering exist, including compression of the electron bunch to sub-picosecond bunch lengths and/or colliding a sub-picosecond laser pulse in a side-on geometry to minimize the interaction time, a promising alternative approach to achieving this goal while maintaining ultra-high brightness is the production of a time correlated (or chirped) x-ray pulse in conjunction with pulse slicing or compression. We present the results of a complete analysis of this process using a recently developed 3-D time and frequency-domain code for analyzing the spatial, temporal, and spectral properties an x-ray beam produced by relativistic Thomson scattering. Based on the relativistic differential cross section, this code has the capability to calculate time and space dependent spectra of the x-ray photons produced from linear Thomson scattering for both bandwidth-limited and chirped incident laser pulses. Spectral broadening of the scattered x-ray pulse resulting from the incident laser bandwidth, laser focus, and the transverse and longitudinal phase space of the electron beam were examined. Simulations of chirped x-ray pulse production using both a chirped electron beam and a chirped laser pulse are presented. Required electron beam and laser parameters are summarized by investigating the effects of beam emittance, energy spread, and laser bandwidth on the scattered x-ray spectrum. It is shown that sufficient temporal correlation in the scattered x-ray spectrum

  9. High-voltage air-core pulse transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G.J.

    1981-08-01

    High voltage air core pulse transformers are best suited to applications outside the normal ranges of conventional magnetic core transformers. In general these include charge transfer at high power levels and fast pulse generation with comparatively low energy. When properly designed and constructed, they are capable of delivering high energy transfer efficiency and have demonstrated superior high voltage endurance. The general types designed for high voltage pulse generation and energy transfer applications are described. Special emphasis is given to pulse charging systems which operate up to the multi-megavolt range. (WHK)

  10. Operation Mode on Pulse Modulation in Atmospheric Radio Frequency Glow Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Ying; Huang, Xiaojiang; Zhang, Jing; Shi, Jianjun

    2016-10-01

    The discharge operation regime of pulse modulated atmospheric radio frequency (RF) glow discharge in helium is investigated on the duty cycle and frequency of modulation pulses. The characteristics of radio frequency discharge burst in terms of breakdown voltage, alpha(α)-gamma(γ) mode transition voltage and current are demonstrated by the discharge current voltage characteristics. The minimum breakdown voltage of RF discharge burst was obtained at the duty cycle of 20% and frequency of 400 kHz, respectively. The α-γ mode transition of RF discharge burst occurs at higher voltage and current by reducing the duty cycle and elevating the modulation frequency before the RF discharge burst evolving into the ignition phase, in which the RF discharge burst can operate stably in the γ mode. It proposes that the intensity and stability of RF discharge burst can be improved by manipulating the duty cycle and modulation frequency in pulse modulated atmospheric RF glow discharge. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475043 and 11375042)

  11. Optimized trigger for ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray and neutrino observations with the low frequency radio array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K.; Mevius, M.; Scholten, O.; Anderson, J. M.; van Ardenne, A.; Arts, M.; Avruch, M.; Asgekar, A.; Bell, M.; Bennema, P.; Bentum, M.; Bernadi, G.; Best, P.; Boonstra, A.-J.; Bregman, J.; van de Brink, R.; Broekema, C.; Brouw, W.; Brueggen, M.; Buitink, S.; Butcher, H.; van Cappellen, W.; Ciardi, B.; Coolen, A.; Damstra, S.; Dettmar, R.; van Diepen, G.; Dijkstra, K.; Donker, P.; Doorduin, A.; Drost, M.; van Duin, A.; Eisloeffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Garrett, M.; Gerbers, M.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Grit, T.; Gruppen, P.; Gunst, A.; van Haarlem, M.; Hoeft, M.; Holties, H.; Hörandel, J.; Horneffer, L. A.; Huijgen, A.; James, C.; de Jong, A.; Kant, D.; Kooistra, E.; Koopman, Y.; Koopmans, L.; Kuper, G.; Lambropoulos, P.; van Leeuwen, J.; Loose, M.; Maat, P.; Mallary, C.; McFadden, R.; Meulman, H.; Mol, J.-D.; Morawietz, J.; Mulder, E.; Munk, H.; Nieuwenhuis, L.; Nijboer, R.; Norden, M. J.; Noordam, J.; Overeem, R.; Paas, H.; Pandey, V. N.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A.; Reich, W.; de Reijer, J.; Renting, A.; Riemers, P.; Roettgering, H.; Romein, J.; Roosjen, J.; Ruiter, M.; Schoenmakers, A.; Schoonderbeek, G.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Stappers, B.; Steinmetz, M.; Stiepel, H.; Stuurwold, K.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Ter Veen, S.; Vermeulen, R.; de Vos, M.; Vogt, C.; van der Wal, E.; Weggemans, H.; Wijnholds, S.; Wise, M.; Wucknitz, O.; Yattawatta, S.; van Zwieten, J.

    2012-02-01

    When an ultra-high energy neutrino or cosmic-ray strikes the Lunar surface a radio-frequency pulse is emitted. We plan to use the LOFAR radio telescope to detect these pulses. In this work we propose an efficient trigger implementation for LOFAR optimized for the observation of short radio pulses.

  12. Control of Analyte Electrolysis in Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Repetitively Pulsed High Voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    Analyte electrolysis using a repetitively pulsed high voltage ion source was investigated and compared to that using a regular, continuously operating direct current high voltage ion source in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The extent of analyte electrolysis was explored as a function of the length and frequency of the high voltage pulse using the model compound reserpine in positive ion mode. Using +5 kV as the maximum high voltage amplitude, reserpine was oxidized to its 2, 4, 6 and 8-electron oxidation products when direct current high voltage was employed. In contrast, when using a pulsed high voltage, oxidation of reserpine was eliminated by employing the appropriate high voltage pulse length and frequency. This effect was caused by inefficient mass transport of the analyte to the electrode surface during the duration of the high voltage pulse and the subsequent relaxation of the emitter electrode/ electrolyte interface during the time period when the high voltage was turned off. This mode of ESI source operation allows for analyte electrolysis to be quickly and simply switched on or off electronically via a change in voltage pulse variables.

  13. Dose rate dependence of the PTW 60019 microDiamond detector in high dose-per-pulse pulsed beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brualla-González, Luis; Gómez, Faustino; Pombar, Miguel; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Recombination effects can affect the detectors used for the dosimetry of radiotherapy fields. They are important when using ionization chambers, especially in liquid-filled ionization chambers, and should be corrected for. The introduction of flattening-filter-free accelerators increases the typical dose-per-pulse used in radiotherapy beams, which leads to more important recombination effects. Diamond detectors provide a good solution for the dosimetry and quality assurance of small radiotherapy fields, due to their low energy dependence and small volume. The group of Università di Roma Tor Vergata has developed a synthetic diamond detector, which is commercialized by PTW as microDiamond detector type 60019. In this work we present an experimental characterization of the collection efficiency of the microDiamond detector, focusing on high dose-per-pulse FFF beams. The collection efficiency decreases with dose-per-pulse, down to 0.978 at 2.2 mGy/pulse, following a Fowler-Attix-like curve. On the other hand, we have found no significant dependence of the collection efficiency on the pulse repetition frequency (or pulse period).

  14. Multiple-frequency injection-seeded nanosecond pulsed laser without parasitic intensity modulation.

    PubMed

    Penninckx, D; Luce, J; Diaz, R; Bonville, O; Courchinoux, R; Lamaignère, L

    2016-07-15

    Thanks to a phase-modulated injection seeder, we report the operation of a nanosecond Nd:YAG Q-switched laser with pulses having both a large spectral bandwidth and a smooth temporal waveform. Because of the smooth temporal waveform, such pulses allow, for instance, reducing the impact of the Kerr effect and, because of the large spectral bandwidth, suppressing stimulated Brillouin scattering. We conducted a parametric study of the features of the generated pulses versus the injection conditions. We show that, as opposed to the central frequency (wavelength) of the seeder, the phase modulation frequency has to be carefully chosen, but it is not a critical parameter and does not require any particular feedback. PMID:27420504

  15. Single Frequency, Pulsed Laser Diode Transmitter for Dial Water Vapor Measurements at 935nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switzer, Gregg W.; Cornwell, Donald M., Jr.; Krainak, Michael A.; Abshire, James B.; Rall, Johnathan A. R.

    1998-01-01

    We report a tunable, single frequency, narrow linewidth, pulsed laser diode transmitter at 935.68nm for remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor. The transmitter consists of a CW, tunable, external cavity diode laser whose output is amplified 2OdB using a tapered diode amplifier. The output is pulsed for range resolved DIAL lidar by pulsing the drive current to the diode amplifier at 4kHz with a .5% duty cycle. The output from the transmitter is 36OnJ/pulse and is single spatial mode. It maintains a linewidth of less than 25MHz as its wavelength is tuned across the water vapor absorption line at 935.68nm. The transmitter design and its use in a water vapor measurement will be discussed.

  16. Compact gas sensor using a pulsed difference-frequency laser spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Seiter, M; Sigrist, M W

    1999-01-15

    We present a novel compact pulsed laser spectrometer based on difference-frequency mixing of a cw tunable external-cavity diode laser (795-825 nm) and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) in bulk LiNbO(3) . The pulsed mid-IR source is continuously tunable from 3.16 to 3.67microm and exhibits a linewidth of only 154 MHz, a peak power of approximately 50microW , and a pulse duration of 6 ns at a 6.5-kHz repetition rate. Spectra of methane in room air and formaldehyde have been recorded at room-temperature operation in a multipass cell with deduced detection limits of 10 and 40 parts in 10(9) , respectively. PMID:18071424

  17. Mode selection and frequency tuning by injection in pulsed TEA-CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamant, P. H.; Menzies, R. T.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical model characterizing pulsed-TEA-CO2-laser injection locking by tunable CW-laser radiation is presented and used to explore the requirements for SLM pulse generation. Photon-density-rate equations describing the laser mechanism are analyzed in terms of the mode competition between photon densities emitted at two frequencies. The expression derived for pulsed dye lasers is extended to homogeneously broadened CO2 lasers, and locking time is defined as a function of laser parameters. The extent to which injected radiation can be detuned from the CO2 line center and continue to produce SLM pulses is investigated experimentally in terms of the analytical framework. The dependence of locking time on the detuning/pressure-broadened-halfwidth ratio is seen as important for spectroscopic applications requiring tuning within the TEA-laser line-gain bandwidth.

  18. Hairpin resonator probes with frequency domain boxcar operation for time resolved density measurements in pulsed RF discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David; Kummerer, Theresa; Coumou, David; Shannon, Steven

    2014-10-01

    In this work, microsecond time resolved electron density measurements in pulsed RF discharges are shown using an automated hairpin resonance probe using relatively low cost electronics, on par with normal Langmuir probe boxcar mode operation. A low cost signal generator is used to produce the applied microwave frequency and the reflected waveform is filtered to remove the RF component. The signal is then heterodyned with a simple frequency mixer to produce a dc signal read by an oscilloscope to determine the electron density. The applied microwave frequency is automatically shifted in small increments in a frequency boxcar routine through a Labview™program to determine the resonant frequency. A simple dc sheath correction is then easily applied since the probe is fully floating, producing low cost, high fidelity, and highly reproducible electron density measurements. The measurements are made in a capacitively coupled, parallel plate configuration in a 13.56 MHz, 50--200 W RF discharge pulsed at 500 Hz, 200 W, 50% duty cycle. The gas input ranged from 50--100 mTorr pure Ar or with 5--10% O/He mixtures.

  19. High reliability low jitter pulse generator

    DOEpatents

    Savage, Mark E.; Stoltzfus, Brian S.

    2013-01-01

    A method and concomitant apparatus for generating pulses comprising providing a laser light source, disposing a voltage electrode between ground electrodes, generating laser sparks using the laser light source via laser spark gaps between the voltage electrode and the ground electrodes, and outputting pulses via one or more insulated ground connectors connected to the voltage electrode.

  20. Variation in Cardiac Pulse Frequencies Modulates vSMC Phenotype Switching During Vascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Zehra; McFetridge, Peter S

    2015-03-01

    In vitro perfusion systems have exposed vascular constructs to mechanical conditions that emulate physiological pulse pressure and found significant improvements in graft development. However, current models maintain constant, or set pulse/shear mechanics that do not account for the natural temporal variation in frequency. With an aim to develop clinically relevant small diameter vascular grafts, these investigations detail a perfusion culture model that incorporates temporal pulse pressure variation. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that short-term variation in heart rate, such as changes in respiratory activity, plays a significant role in vascular remodeling and graft development. The pulse rate of a healthy volunteer was logged to model the effect of daily activities on heart rate. Vascular bioreactors were used to deliver perfusion conditions based on modeled frequencies of temporal pulse variability, termed Physiologically Modeled Pulse Dynamics (PMPD). Acellular scaffolds derived from the human umbilical vein were seeded with human vascular smooth muscle cells and perfused under defined pulsatile conditions. vSMC exposed to constant pulse frequencies expressed a contractile phenotype, while exposure to PMPD drove cells to a synthetic state with continued cell proliferation, increased tensile strength and stiffness as well as diminished vasoactivity. Results show the temporal variation associated with normal heart physiology to have a profound effect on vascular remodeling and vasoactive function. While these models are representative of vascular regeneration further investigation is required to understanding these and other key regulators in vSMC phenotype switching in non-pathological or wound healing states. This understanding has important clinical implications that may lead to improved treatments that enhance vessel regeneration. PMID:26577103

  1. High-voltage portable pulsed power supply fed by low voltage source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanejad, Mohammad; Sheikholeslami, Abdolreza; Adabi, Jafar; Valinejad, Mohammadreza

    2016-05-01

    This article proposes a new structure of voltage multiplier for portable pulsed power applications. In this configuration, which is based on capacitor-diode voltage multiplier, the capacitors are charged by low AC input voltage and discharge through the load in series during pulse generation mode. The proposed topology is achieved by integrating of solid-state switches with conventional voltage multiplier, which can increase the low input voltage step by step and generate high-voltage high-frequency pulsed power across the load. After some discussion, simulations and experimental results are provided to verify the effectiveness of the proposed topology.

  2. Measurement of complex ultrashort laser pulses using frequency-resolved optical gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lina

    This thesis contains three components of research: a detailed study of the performance of Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) for measuring complex ultrashort laser pulses, a new method for measuring the arbitrary polarization state of an ultrashort laser pulse using Tomographic Ultrafast Retrieval of Transverse Light E-fields (TURTLE) technique, and new approach for measuring two complex pulses simultaneously using PG blind FROG. In recent decades, many techniques for measuring the full intensity and phase of ultrashort laser pulses have been proposed. These techniques include: Spectral Interferometry (SI)[1], Temporal Analysis by Dispersing a Pair of Light E-Field (TADPOLE)[2], Spectral Phase Interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction (SPIDER)[3], and Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG)[4]. Each technique is actually a class of techniques that includes different variations on the original idea, such as SEA-SPIDER[5], ZAP SPIDER[6] are two variations of SPIDER. But most of these techniques for measuring ultrashort laser pulses either do not yield the complete time-dependent intensity and phase (e.g., autocorrelation), can at best only measure simple pulses (e.g., SPIDER), or need well characterized reference pulse. In this thesis, we compare the performance of three versions of FROG: second-harmonic-generation (SHG) FROG, polarization-gate (PG) FROG, and cross-correlation FROG (XFROG), the last of which requires a well-characterized reference pulse. We found that the XFROG algorithm converged in all cases and required only one initial guess. The PG FROG algorithm converged for 99% of the moderately complex pulses that we tried, and for over 95% of the most complex pulses (TBP ˜ 100). And the SHG FROG algorithm converged for 95% of the pulses that we tried and for over 80% of the most complex pulses. After some analysis, we found that noise filtering and adding more sampling points to the FROG trace solved the non-converging problems and we

  3. Time and Frequency Domain Analysis of Thunderstorm - Narrow Bipolar Electromagnetic Pulses and Cloud To-Ground Lightning Fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medelius, Pedro Javier

    Single-station electric field (E) and electric field derivative (dE/dt) waveforms were recorded at digitization rates up to 400 MS/s during 1989 and 1990 at the Kennedy Space Center. Narrow bipolar pulses (NBP's) were found to occur separate from typical lightning events, but to be thunderstorm related. Frequency spectra for E obtained from NBP's dropped at a rate of close to 1/f up to 125 MHz. In comparison, the frequency spectra reported by Willett et al. (1989) for similar pulses dropped as 1/f up to about 20 MHz and became flat afterwards up to their 50 MHz Nyquist frequency. NBP's contained higher energy than return strokes above 10-20 MHz. NBP Spectra found from the output of digitally simulated narrowband receivers tended to underestimate the wideband frequency spectra by as much as 10 dB, indicating that the spectra obtained using narrowband receivers are unreliable. Initial E-field peaks of NBP's had a mean rise time of 1.38 mus. Large positive dE/dt pulses had a mean half width of 7 ns, much shorter than the 49 ns reported by Willett et al. (1989). The existence of a single process responsible for VHF radiation from lightning, such as that proposed by Labaune et al. (1990), was tested using deconvolution methods on the NBP waveforms. Our analysis failed to identify a single basic component in these pulses. Electric fields from lightning strikes at distances within 1-2 km consistently exhibited a chaotic behavior during the stepped leader, whereas distant stepped leaders did not. This "chaos" ranged from pulses occurring at rates close to one pulse per mus to a continuous noise-like high frequency signal with frequency components extending beyond 120 MHz. In agreement with other reports in the literature, we found that HF radiation following return strokes peaked 20-30 mus after the onset of the return stroke, and persisted for several tens of microseconds after the peak. However, the short propagation path (less than 7.5 km) over salt water does not

  4. Neural coding of high-frequency tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    Available evidence was presented indicating that neural discharges in the auditory nerve display characteristic periodicities in response to any tonal stimulus including high-frequency stimuli, and that this periodicity corresponds to the subjective pitch.

  5. Overview of the Advanced High Frequency Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the competencies, selected areas of research and technology development activities, and current external collaborative efforts of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced High Frequency Branch.

  6. Real-time, high frequency QRS electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T. (Inventor); DePalma, Jude L. (Inventor); Moradi, Saeed (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Real time cardiac electrical data are received from a patient, manipulated to determine various useful aspects of the ECG signal, and displayed in real time in a useful form on a computer screen or monitor. The monitor displays the high frequency data from the QRS complex in units of microvolts, juxtaposed with a display of conventional ECG data in units of millivolts or microvolts. The high frequency data are analyzed for their root mean square (RMS) voltage values and the discrete RMS values and related parameters are displayed in real time. The high frequency data from the QRS complex are analyzed with imbedded algorithms to determine the presence or absence of reduced amplitude zones, referred to herein as RAZs. RAZs are displayed as go, no-go signals on the computer monitor. The RMS and related values of the high frequency components are displayed as time varying signals, and the presence or absence of RAZs may be similarly displayed over time.

  7. DynPeak: An Algorithm for Pulse Detection and Frequency Analysis in Hormonal Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Alexandre; Zhang, Qinghua; Médigue, Claire; Fabre, Stéphane; Clément, Frédérique

    2012-01-01

    The endocrine control of the reproductive function is often studied from the analysis of luteinizing hormone (LH) pulsatile secretion by the pituitary gland. Whereas measurements in the cavernous sinus cumulate anatomical and technical difficulties, LH levels can be easily assessed from jugular blood. However, plasma levels result from a convolution process due to clearance effects when LH enters the general circulation. Simultaneous measurements comparing LH levels in the cavernous sinus and jugular blood have revealed clear differences in the pulse shape, the amplitude and the baseline. Besides, experimental sampling occurs at a relatively low frequency (typically every 10 min) with respect to LH highest frequency release (one pulse per hour) and the resulting LH measurements are noised by both experimental and assay errors. As a result, the pattern of plasma LH may be not so clearly pulsatile. Yet, reliable information on the InterPulse Intervals (IPI) is a prerequisite to study precisely the steroid feedback exerted on the pituitary level. Hence, there is a real need for robust IPI detection algorithms. In this article, we present an algorithm for the monitoring of LH pulse frequency, basing ourselves both on the available endocrinological knowledge on LH pulse (shape and duration with respect to the frequency regime) and synthetic LH data generated by a simple model. We make use of synthetic data to make clear some basic notions underlying our algorithmic choices. We focus on explaining how the process of sampling affects drastically the original pattern of secretion, and especially the amplitude of the detectable pulses. We then describe the algorithm in details and perform it on different sets of both synthetic and experimental LH time series. We further comment on how to diagnose possible outliers from the series of IPIs which is the main output of the algorithm. PMID:22802933

  8. Genetic algorithm based optimization of pulse profile for MOPA based high power fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Tang, Ming; Shi, Jun; Fu, Songnian; Li, Lihua; Liu, Ying; Cheng, Xueping; Liu, Jian; Shum, Ping

    2015-03-01

    Although the Master Oscillator Power-Amplifier (MOPA) based fiber laser has received much attention for laser marking process due to its large tunabilty of pulse duration (from 10ns to 1ms), repetition rate (100Hz to 500kHz), high peak power and extraordinary heat dissipating capability, the output pulse deformation due to the saturation effect of fiber amplifier is detrimental for many applications. We proposed and demonstrated that, by utilizing Genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization technique, the input pulse profile from the master oscillator (current-driven laser diode) could be conveniently optimized to achieve targeted output pulse shape according to real parameters' constraints. In this work, an Yb-doped high power fiber amplifier is considered and a 200ns square shaped pulse profile is the optimization target. Since the input pulse with longer leading edge and shorter trailing edge can compensate the saturation effect, linear, quadratic and cubic polynomial functions are used to describe the input pulse with limited number of unknowns(<5). Coefficients of the polynomial functions are the optimization objects. With reasonable cost and hardware limitations, the cubic input pulse with 4 coefficients is found to be the best as the output amplified pulse can achieve excellent flatness within the square shape. Considering the bandwidth constraint of practical electronics, we examined high-frequency component cut-off effect of input pulses and found that the optimized cubic input pulses with 300MHz bandwidth is still quite acceptable to satisfy the requirement for the amplified output pulse and it is feasible to establish such a pulse generator in real applications.

  9. Elimination of the light shift in rubidium gas cell frequency standards using pulsed optical pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, T. C.; Jechart, E.; Kwon, T. M.

    1978-01-01

    Changes in the intensity of the light source in an optically pumped, rubidium, gas cell frequency standard can produce corresponding frequency shifts, with possible adverse effects on the long-term frequency stability. A pulsed optical pumping apparatus was constructed with the intent of investigating the frequency stability in the absence of light shifts. Contrary to original expectations, a small residual frequency shift due to changes in light intensity was experimentally observed. Evidence is given which indicates that this is not a true light-shift effect. Preliminary measurements of the frequency stability of this apparatus, with this small residual pseudo light shift present, are presented. It is shown that this pseudo light shift can be eliminated by using a more homogeneous C-field. This is consistent with the idea that the pseudo light shift is due to inhomogeneity in the physics package (position-shift effect).

  10. Adjustable, High Voltage Pulse Generator with Isolated Output for Plasma Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth E.; Prager, James; Slobodov, Ilia

    2015-09-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. has developed a high voltage pulse generator with isolated output for etch, sputtering, and ion implantation applications within the materials science and semiconductor processing communities. The output parameters are independently user adjustable: output voltage (0 - 2.5 kV), pulse repetition frequency (0 - 100 kHz), and duty cycle (0 - 100%). The pulser can drive loads down to 200 Ω. Higher voltage pulsers have also been tested. The isolated output allows the pulse generator to be connected to loads that need to be biased. These pulser generators take advantage modern silicon carbide (SiC) MOSFETs. These new solid-state switches decrease the switching and conduction losses while allowing for higher switching frequency capabilities. This pulse generator has applications for RF plasma heating; inductive and arc plasma sources; magnetron driving; and generation of arbitrary pulses at high voltage, high current, and high pulse repetition frequency. This work was supported in part by a DOE SBIR.

  11. High power linear pulsed beam annealer

    DOEpatents

    Strathman, Michael D.; Sadana, Devendra K.; True, Richard B.

    1983-01-01

    A high power pulsed electron beam is produced in a system comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid, focus ring, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube is maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring and to thereby eliminate space charge. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube and imparts motion on electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. The curvature of the tube is selected so there is no line of sight between the cathode and a target holder positioned within a second drift tube spaced coaxially from the curved tube. The second tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage that decelerates the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube and compresses the electron beam to the area of the target. The target holder can be adjusted to position the target where the cross section of the beam matches the area of the target.

  12. Nonlocal theory for heat transport at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Yee Kan; Cahill, David G.; Sun, Bo

    2014-11-01

    We develop a nonlocal theory for heat conduction under high-frequency temperature fields and apply the theory to explain reductions of the apparent thermal conductivity observed in recent experiments. Our nonlocal theory is an analytical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation for phonons in a semi-infinite solid, similar to a prior nonlocal theory for heat conduction under a high-temperature gradient but subjected to periodic heating at the surface. The boundary condition of periodic heating, as opposed to prior calculations of heating by a single laser pulse, better mimics time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) and broadband frequency-domain thermoreflectance (BB-FDTR) measurements. We find that, except for pure crystals at high frequencies, the effective thermal conductivity derived using the nonlocal theory compares well with calculations of a modified Callaway model that includes an upper limit on the phonon mean-free path at twice the thermal penetration depth. For pure crystals, however, the effective thermal conductivity derived from the out-of-phase calculations are independent of frequency, in agreement with prior TDTR measurements, due to the countereffect of reduced heat flux and diminished relative phase between the heat flux and temperature oscillations at high frequencies. Our results suggest that empirical interpretation of ballistic phonons not contributing to heat conduction is not general and can only be applied to measurements on alloys and not pure crystals, even when a large laser spot size is used in the experiments and the interfacial thermal resistance is negligible.

  13. A compact repetitive high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator for the application of gas discharge.

    PubMed

    Pang, Lei; Zhang, Qiaogen; Ren, Baozhong; He, Kun

    2011-04-01

    Uniform and stable discharge plasma requires very short duration pulses with fast rise times. A repetitive high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator for the application of gas discharge is presented in this paper. It is constructed with all solid-state components. Two-stage magnetic compression is used to generate a short duration pulse. Unlike in some reported studies, common commercial fast recovery diodes instead of a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) are used in our experiment that plays the role of SOS. The SOS-like effects of four different kinds of diodes are studied experimentally to optimize the output performance. It is found that the output pulse voltage is higher with a shorter reverse recovery time, and the rise time of pulse becomes faster when the falling time of reverse recovery current is shorter. The SOS-like effect of the diodes can be adjusted by changing the external circuit parameters. Through optimization the pulse generator can provide a pulsed voltage of 40 kV with a 40 ns duration, 10 ns rise time, and pulse repetition frequency of up to 5 kHz. Diffuse plasma can be formed in air at standard atmospheric pressure using the developed pulse generator. With a light weight and small packaging the pulse generator is suitable for gas discharge application.

  14. Dynamics of frequency-modulated soliton-like pulses in a longitudinally inhomogeneous, anomalous group velocity dispersion fibre amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotovskii, Igor' O; Korobko, D A; Okhotnikov, Oleg G; Sysolyatin, A A; Fotiadi, A A

    2012-09-30

    We examine conditions for the formation and amplification of frequency-modulated soliton-like pulses in longitudinally inhomogeneous, anomalous group velocity dispersion fibres. The group velocity dispersion profiles necessary for the existence and amplification of such pulses in active fibres are identified and the pulse duration and chirp are determined as functions of propagation distance. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

  15. Band-selective shaped pulse for high fidelity quantum control in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yan-Chun; Xing, Jian; Liu, Gang-Qin; Jiang, Qian-Qing; Li, Wu-Xia; Zhang, Fei-Hao; Gu, Chang-Zhi; Pan, Xin-Yu; Long, Gui-Lu

    2014-06-30

    High fidelity quantum control of qubits is crucially important for realistic quantum computing, and it becomes more challenging when there are inevitable interactions between qubits. We introduce a band-selective shaped pulse, refocusing BURP (REBURP) pulse, to cope with the problems. The electron spin of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond is flipped with high fidelity by the REBURP pulse. In contrast with traditional rectangular pulses, the shaped pulse has almost equal excitation effect in a sharply edged region (in frequency domain). So the three sublevels of host {sup 14}N nuclear spin can be flipped accurately simultaneously, while unwanted excitations of other sublevels (e.g., of a nearby {sup 13}C nuclear spin) is well suppressed. Our scheme can be used for various applications such as quantum metrology, quantum sensing, and quantum information process.

  16. Radio-Frequency Pulses Emitted by Intracloud Lightning, as Observed From Space by the FORTE Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, A. R.

    2002-12-01

    The FORTE satellite has been used to trigger upon, and record, radio-frequency signals and optical signals from lightning. This talk will present recent results on the pulse characteristics, remote-sensing utility, and meteorological setting of two distinct types of radio-frequency impulses usually accompanying intracloud discharges. Emphasis will be given to implications of our recent FORTE results for future global lightning and severe-convective-storm monitoring, being proposed for the radio-frequency sensors on the Global Positioning System satellites.

  17. Enhanced multi-colour gating for the generation of high-power isolated attosecond pulses

    PubMed Central

    Haessler, S.; Balčiūnas, T.; Fan, G.; Chipperfield, L. E.; Baltuška, A.

    2015-01-01

    Isolated attosecond pulses (IAP) generated by high-order harmonic generation are valuable tools that enable dynamics to be studied on the attosecond time scale. The applicability of these IAP would be widened drastically by increasing their energy. Here we analyze the potential of using multi-colour driving pulses for temporally gating the attosecond pulse generation process. We devise how this approach can enable the generation of IAP with the available high-energy kHz-repetition-rate Ytterbium-based laser amplifiers (delivering 180-fs, 1030-nm pulses). We show theoretically that this requires a three-colour field composed of the fundamental and its second harmonic as well as a lower-frequency auxiliary component. We present pulse characterization measurements of such auxiliary pulses generated directly by white-light seeded OPA with the required significantly shorter pulse duration than that of the fundamental. This, combined with our recent experimental results on three-colour waveform synthesis, proves that the theoretically considered multi-colour drivers for IAP generation can be realized with existing high-power laser technology. The high-energy driver pulses, combined with the strongly enhanced single-atom-level conversion efficiency we observe in our calculations, thus make multi-colour drivers prime candidates for the development of unprecedented high-energy IAP sources in the near future. PMID:25997917

  18. Transportation decreases the pulse frequency of growth hormone in the blood of prepubertal male calves.

    PubMed

    Kadokawa, Hiroya; Noguchi, Koutarou; Hajiri, Yuuki; Takeshita, Kazuhisa; Fujii, Youichi

    2013-01-01

    Both the mean concentration and the pulse pattern of growth hormone (GH) in the blood are important for the metabolism and body growth of calves. Transportation is reported to decrease blood GH concentrations in prepubertal male calves. However, the effect of transportation on GH pulsatility remains unknown. Because transportation is important in moving these calves from calf-production farms to markets or fattening farms, we tested whether transportation decreases their GH pulse frequency. Five calves were subjected to transportation by trucking (transport group), while five were left in their shed (non-transport group). Both groups were subsequently subjected to frequent blood sampling at 15-min intervals for 5 h. In the transport group, the cortisol concentrations increased in the first hour (P < 0.05) but significantly decreased thereafter (P < 0.05) to lower than those of the non-transport group. During the 5-hour study period, the transport group displayed a similar mean GH concentration relative to the non-transport group, but displayed a delayed first GH pulse, and a lower number of GH pulses than the non-transport group (P < 0.05). Hence, transportation is suggested to decrease GH pulse frequency under abnormal cortisol states, presumably suppressing metabolism and body growth in prepubertal male calves.

  19. Treatment of Wastewater with High Conductivity by Pulsed Discharge Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaojun; Jiang, Song; Liu, Kefu

    2014-07-01

    A wastewater treatment system was established by means of pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The main advantage of this system is that the wastewater is employed as one of the electrodes for the degradation of rhodamine B, which makes use of the high conductivity and lessenes its negative influence on the discharge process. At the same time, the reactive species like ozone and ultraviolet (UV) light generated by the DBD can be utilized for the treatment of wastewater. The effects of some factors like conductivity, peak pulse voltage, discharge frequency and pH values were investigated. The results show that the combination of these reactive species could enhance the degradation of the dye while the ozone played the most important role in the process. The degradation efficiency was enhanced with the increase of energy supplied. The reduction in the concentration of rhodamine B was much more effective with high solution conductivity; under the highest conductivity condition, the degradation rate could rise to 99%.

  20. High-frequency synthetic ultrasound array incorporating an actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Timothy A.; Shrout, Thomas R.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2001-05-01

    Ultrasound imaging at frequencies above 20 MHz relies almost exclusively on single-element transducers. IN order to apply array technology at these frequencies, several practical problems must be solved, including spatial scale and fabrication limitations, low device capacitance, and lack of a hardware beamformer. One method of circumventing these problems is to combine an array, an actuator, and a synthetic aperture software beamformer. The array can use relatively wide elements spaced on a coarse pitch. The actuator is used to move the array in short steps (less than the element pitch), and pulse-echo data is acquired at intermediate sample positions. The synthetic aperture beamformer reconstructs the image from the pulse-echo data. A 50 MHz example is analyzed in detail. Estimates of signal-to-noise reveal performance comparable to a standard phased array; furthermore, the actuated array requires half the number of elements, the elements are 8x wider, and only one channel is required. Simulated three-dimensional point spread functions demonstrate side lobe levels approaching - 40dB and main beam widths of 50 to 100 microns. A 50 MHz piezo-composite array design has been tested which displays experimental bandwidth of 70% while maintaining high sensitivity. Individual composite sub-elements are 18 microns wide. Once this array is integrated with a suitable actuator, it is anticipated that a tractable method of imaging with high frequency arrays will result.

  1. Phase and frequency structure of superradiance pulses generated by relativistic Ka-band backward-wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Elchaninov, A. A.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'masculov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    Phase and frequency stability of electromagnetic oscillations in sub-gigawatt superradiance (SR) pulses generated by an extensive slow-wave structure of a relativistic Ka-band backward-wave oscillator were experimentally investigated. Data on the frequency tuning and radiation phase stability of SR pulses with a variation of the energy and current of electron beam were obtained.

  2. In-vitro suppression of metabolic activity in malignant human glioblastomas due to pulsed - low frequency electric potential exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Abby; Waynant, Ronald W.; Tata, Darrell B.

    2010-02-01

    The role of pulsed - low repetition frequency electric potential was investigated in suppressing the metabolic activities of aggressive human brain cancer cells. Twenty four hours post exposure the glioblastomas were found to be significantly inhibited in their metabolic activity. The findings herein reveal a near complete inhibition of glioblastoma's metabolic activity through selective applications of low frequency pulsed electric potentials.

  3. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  4. Note: radio frequency inductance-capacitance band-stop filter circuit to perform contactless conductivity measurements in pulsed magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Altarawneh, M M

    2012-09-01

    We present a new technique to perform radio frequency (rf) contactless conductivity measurements in pulsed magnetic fields to probe different ground states in condensed matter physics. The new method utilizes a simple analog band-stop filter circuit implemented in a radio frequency transmission setup to perform contactless conductivity measurements. The new method is more sensitive than the other methods (e.g., the tunnel diode oscillator and the proximity detector oscillator) due to more sensitive dependence of the circuit resonance frequency on the tank circuit inductance (not the transmission line). More important, the new method is more robust than other methods when used to perform measurements in very high magnetic fields, works for a wide range of temperatures (i.e., 300 K-1.4 K) and is less sensitive to noise and mechanical vibrations during pulse magnet operation. The new technique was successfully applied to measure the Shubnikov-de Haas effect in Bi(2)Se(3) in pulsed magnetic fields of up to 60 T.

  5. Sampling modulation technique in radio-frequency helium glow discharge emission source by use of pulsed laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Tariq Mahmood; Matsuta, Hideyuki; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2004-05-01

    An emission excitation source comprising a high-frequency diode-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and a radio-frequency powered glow discharge lamp is proposed. In this system sample atoms ablated by the laser irradiation are introduced into the lamp chamber and subsequently excited by the helium glow discharge plasma. The pulsed operation of the laser can produce a cyclic variation in the emission intensities of the sample atoms whereas the plasma gas species emit the radiation continuously. The salient feature of the proposed technique is the selective detection of the laser modulation signal from the rest of the continuous background emissions, which can be achieved with the phase sensitive detection of the lock-in amplifier. The arrangement may be used to estimate the emission intensity of the laser ablated atom, free from the interference of other species present in the plasma. The experiments were conducted with a 13.56 MHz radio-frequency (rf) generator operated at 80 W power to produce plasma and the laser at a wavelength of 1064 nm (pulse duration:34 ns, repetition rate:7 kHz and average pulse energy of about 0.36 mJ) was employed for sample ablation. The measurements resulted in almost complete removal of nitrogen molecular bands (N(2)(+) 391.44 nm). Considerable reduction (about 75%) in the emission intensity of a carbon atomic line (C I 193.03 nm) was also observed. PMID:15034707

  6. High energy protons generation by two sequential laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Shen, Baifei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Wang, Wenpeng; Xu, Jiancai; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin

    2015-04-15

    The sequential proton acceleration by two laser pulses of relativistic intensity is proposed to produce high energy protons. In the scheme, a relativistic super-Gaussian (SG) laser pulse followed by a Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) pulse irradiates dense plasma attached by underdense plasma. A proton beam is produced from the target and accelerated in the radiation pressure regime by the short SG pulse and then trapped and re-accelerated in a special bubble driven by the LG pulse in the underdense plasma. The advantages of radiation pressure acceleration and LG transverse structure are combined to achieve the effective trapping and acceleration of protons. In a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, protons of 6.7 GeV are obtained from a 2 × 10{sup 22 }W/cm{sup 2} SG laser pulse and a LG pulse at a lower peak intensity.

  7. A HIGH CURRENT, HIGH VOLTAGE SOLID-STATE PULSE GENERATOR FOR THE NIF PLASMA ELECTRODE POCKELS CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P A; Barbosa, F; Cook, E G; Hickman, B C; Akana, G L; Brooksby, C A

    2007-07-27

    A high current, high voltage, all solid-state pulse modulator has been developed for use in the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) subsystem in the National Ignition Facility. The MOSFET-switched pulse generator, designed to be a more capable plug-in replacement for the thyratron-switched units currently deployed in NIF, offers unprecedented capabilities including burst-mode operation, pulse width agility and a steady-state pulse repetition frequency exceeding 1 Hz. Capable of delivering requisite fast risetime, 17 kV flattop pulses into a 6 {Omega} load, the pulser employs a modular architecture characteristic of the inductive adder technology, pioneered at LLNL for use in acceleration applications, which keeps primary voltages low (and well within the capabilities of existing FET technology), reduces fabrication costs and is amenable to rapid assembly and quick field repairs.

  8. Influence of driving frequency on discharge modes in a dielectric-barrier discharge with multiple current pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2013-07-15

    A one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model was employed to investigate the effect of the driving frequency on the discharge modes in atmospheric-pressure argon discharge with multiple current pulses. The discharge mode was discussed in detail not only at current peaks but also between two adjacent peaks. The simulation results show that different transitions between the Townsend and glow modes during the discharge take place with the driving frequency increased. A complicated transition from the Townsend mode, through glow, Townsend, and glow, and finally back to the Townsend one is found in the discharge with the driving frequency of 8 kHz. There is a tendency of transition from the Townsend to glow mode for the discharge both at the current peaks and troughs with the increasing frequency. The discharge in the half period can all along operate in the glow mode with the driving frequency high enough. This is resulted from the preservation of more electrons in the gas gap and acquisition of more electron energy from the swiftly varying electric field with the increase in driving frequency. Comparison of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the electron density at different driving frequencies indicates that the increment of the driving frequency allows the plasma chemistry to be enhanced. This electrical characteristic is important for the applications, such as surface treatment and biomedical sterilization.

  9. High power radio frequency attenuation device

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Quentin A.; Miller, Harold W.

    1984-01-01

    A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

  10. Spectrographic phase-retrieval algorithm for femtosecond and attosecond pulses with frequency gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, B.; Wallentowitz, S.; Volkmann, U.; Hause, A.; Sperlich, K.; Stolz, H.

    2014-10-01

    We present a phase-reconstruction algorithm for a self-referenced spectrographic pulse characterization technique called “very advanced method for phase and intensity retrieval of e-fields” (VAMPIRE). This technique permits a spectral phase reconstruction of pulses with separated frequency components. The algorithm uses the particular characteristics of VAMPIRE spectrograms. It is a locally structured algorithm which is fast, robust, and it allows us to master stagnation problems. The algorithm is tested by use of both simulated and measured data.

  11. Chirped pulse reflectivity and frequency domain interferometry in laser driven shock experiments.

    PubMed

    Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Koenig, M; Boudenne, J M; Hall, T A; Batani, D; Scianitti, F; Masini, A; Di Santo, D

    1999-09-01

    We show the simultaneous applicability of the frequency domain interferometry and the chirped pulse reflectometry techniques to measure shock parameters. The experiment has been realized with the laser at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI) with a 550-ps pulse duration and an intensity on target approximately 5 x 10(13) W/cm(2) to produce a shock in a layered aluminum-fused silica target. A second low energy, partially compressed chirped probe beam was used to irradiate the target rear side and the reflected light has been analyzed with a spectrometer, achieving a temporal resolution of the order of 1 ps. PMID:11970183

  12. Chirped pulse reflectivity and frequency domain interferometry in laser driven shock experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Koenig, M.; Boudenne, J. M.; Hall, T. A.; Batani, D.; Scianitti, F.; Masini, A.; di Santo, D.

    1999-09-01

    We show the simultaneous applicability of the frequency domain interferometry and the chirped pulse reflectometry techniques to measure shock parameters. The experiment has been realized with the laser at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI) with a 550-ps pulse duration and an intensity on target ~5×1013 W/cm2 to produce a shock in a layered aluminum-fused silica target. A second low energy, partially compressed chirped probe beam was used to irradiate the target rear side and the reflected light has been analyzed with a spectrometer, achieving a temporal resolution of the order of 1 ps.

  13. Building a Pulse Detector using the Frequency Resolved Optical Gating Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Vallin, J

    2004-02-05

    We show how to construct a diagnostic optical layout known as Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) for an ir mode-locked laser by using the nonlinear effect known as second harmonic generation (SHG). In this paper, we explain the principle of operation and the theory upon which this diagnostic is based. Moreover, we described the procedure used to measure the duration and frequency components of a pulse. This process consists of calibrating the scales of a two-dimensional image, time delay vs. frequency, known as FROG spectrogram or FROG trace. This calibration of the time delay scale yields the correspondence between a pixel and time delay. Similarly, the calibration of the frequency scale yields the correspondence between a pixel, and frequency.

  14. A compact, high-voltage pulsed charging system based on an air-core pulse transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianyang; Chen, Dongqun; Liu, Jinliang; Liu, Chebo; Yin, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Charging systems of pulsed power generators on mobile platforms are expected to be compact and provide high pulsed power, high voltage output, and high repetition rate. In this paper, a high-voltage pulsed charging system with the aforementioned characteristics is introduced, which can be applied to charge a high-voltage load capacitor. The operating principle of the system and the technical details of the components in the system are described in this paper. The experimental results show that a 600 nF load capacitor can be charged to 60 kV at 10 Hz by the high-voltage pulsed charging system for a burst of 0.5 s. The weight and volume of the system are 60 kg and 600 × 500 × 380 mm3, respectively.

  15. A compact, high-voltage pulsed charging system based on an air-core pulse transformer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianyang; Chen, Dongqun; Liu, Jinliang; Liu, Chebo; Yin, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Charging systems of pulsed power generators on mobile platforms are expected to be compact and provide high pulsed power, high voltage output, and high repetition rate. In this paper, a high-voltage pulsed charging system with the aforementioned characteristics is introduced, which can be applied to charge a high-voltage load capacitor. The operating principle of the system and the technical details of the components in the system are described in this paper. The experimental results show that a 600 nF load capacitor can be charged to 60 kV at 10 Hz by the high-voltage pulsed charging system for a burst of 0.5 s. The weight and volume of the system are 60 kg and 600 × 500 × 380 mm(3), respectively. PMID:26429466

  16. A compact, high-voltage pulsed charging system based on an air-core pulse transformer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianyang; Chen, Dongqun; Liu, Jinliang; Liu, Chebo; Yin, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Charging systems of pulsed power generators on mobile platforms are expected to be compact and provide high pulsed power, high voltage output, and high repetition rate. In this paper, a high-voltage pulsed charging system with the aforementioned characteristics is introduced, which can be applied to charge a high-voltage load capacitor. The operating principle of the system and the technical details of the components in the system are described in this paper. The experimental results show that a 600 nF load capacitor can be charged to 60 kV at 10 Hz by the high-voltage pulsed charging system for a burst of 0.5 s. The weight and volume of the system are 60 kg and 600 × 500 × 380 mm(3), respectively.

  17. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, B.; McDaniel, M.R.

    1993-03-23

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counter bores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counter bores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  18. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, Brian; McDaniel, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counterbores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counterbores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  19. Navy Applications of High-Frequency Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Henry

    2004-11-01

    Although the emphasis in underwater acoustics for the last few decades has been in low-frequency acoustics, motivated by long range detection of submarines, there has been a continuing use of high-frequency acoustics in traditional specialized applications such as bottom mapping, mine hunting, torpedo homing and under ice navigation. The attractive characteristics of high-frequency sonar, high spatial resolution, wide bandwidth, small size and relatively low cost must be balanced against the severe range limitation imposed by attenuation that increases approximately as frequency-squared. Many commercial applications of acoustics are ideally served by high-frequency active systems. The small size and low cost, coupled with the revolution in small powerful signal processing hardware has led to the consideration of more sophisticated systems. Driven by commercial applications, there are currently available several commercial-off-the-shelf products including acoustic modems for underwater communication, multi-beam fathometers, side scan sonars for bottom mapping, and even synthetic aperture side scan sonar. Much of the work in high frequency sonar today continues to be focused on specialized applications in which the application is emphasized over the underlying acoustics. Today's vision for the Navy of the future involves Autonomous Undersea Vehicles (AUVs) and off-board ASW sensors. High-frequency acoustics will play a central role in the fulfillment of this vision as a means of communication and as a sensor. The acoustic communication problems for moving AUVs and deep sensors are discussed. Explicit relationships are derived between the communication theoretic description of channel parameters in terms of time and Doppler spreads and ocean acoustic parameters, group velocities, phase velocities and horizontal wavenumbers. Finally the application of synthetic aperture sonar to the mine hunting problems is described.

  20. Electro-optical microwave signal processor for high-frequency wideband frequency channelization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawber, William N.; Webster, Ken

    1998-08-01

    An electro-optic microwave signal processor for activity monitoring in an electronic warfare receiver, offering wideband operation, parallel output in real time and 100 percent probability of intercept is presented, along with results from a prototype system. Requirements on electronic warfare receiver system are demanding, because they have to defect and identify potential threats across a large frequency bandwidth and in the high pulse density expected of the battlefield environment. A technique of processing signals across a wide bandwidth is to use a channelizer in the receiver front-end, in order to produce a number of narrow band outputs that can be individually processed. In the presented signal processor, received microwave signals ar unconverted onto an optical carrier using an electro- optic modulator and then spatially separated into a series of spots. The position and intensity of the spots is determined by the received signal(s) frequency and strength. Finally a photodiode array can be used for fast parallel data readout. Thus the signal processor output is fully channelized according to frequency. A prototype signal processor has been constructed, which can process microwave frequencies from 500MHz to 8GHz. A standard telecommunications electro-optic intensity modulator with a 3dB bandwidth of approximately 2.5GHz provides frequency upconversion. Readout is achieved using either a near IR camera or a 16 element linear photodiode array.

  1. An optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for seeding high repetition rate free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Höppner, H.; Tanikawa, T.; Schulz, M.; Riedel, R.; Teubner, U.; Faatz, B.; Tavella, F.

    2015-05-15

    High repetition rate free-electron lasers (FEL), producing highly intense extreme ultraviolet and x-ray pulses, require new high power tunable femtosecond lasers for FEL seeding and FEL pump-probe experiments. A tunable, 112 W (burst mode) optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) is demonstrated with center frequencies ranging from 720–900 nm, pulse energies up to 1.12 mJ and a pulse duration of 30 fs at a repetition rate of 100 kHz. Since the power scalability of this OPCPA is limited by the OPCPA-pump amplifier, we also demonstrate a 6.7–13.7 kW (burst mode) thin-disk OPCPA-pump amplifier, increasing the possible OPCPA output power to many hundreds of watts. Furthermore, third and fourth harmonic generation experiments are performed and the results are used to simulate a seeded FEL with high-gain harmonic generation.

  2. High-Power Multimode X-Band RF Pulse Compression System for Future Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Pearson, C.; Nelson, J.; Jobe, K.; Chan, J.; Fant, K.; Frisch, J.; Atkinson, D.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2005-08-10

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II) pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  3. High-power multimode X-band rf pulse compression system for future linear colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Nantista, Christopher D.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Pearson, Chris; Nelson, Janice; Jobe, Keith; Chan, Jose; Fant, Karen; Frisch, Josef; Atkinson, Dennis

    2005-04-01

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II) pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  4. High frequency III–V nanowire MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Erik

    2016-09-01

    III–V nanowire transistors are promising candidates for very high frequency electronics applications. The improved electrostatics originating from the gate-all-around geometry allow for more aggressive scaling as compared with planar field-effect transistors, and this can lead to device operation at very high frequencies. The very high mobility possible with In-rich devices can allow very high device performance at low operating voltages. GaN nanowires can take advantage of the large band gap for high voltage operation. In this paper, we review the basic physics and device performance of nanowire field- effect transistors relevant for high frequency performance. First, the geometry of lateral and vertical nanowire field-effect transistors is introduced, with special emphasis on the parasitic capacitances important for nanowire geometries. The basic important high frequency transistor metrics are introduced. Secondly, the scaling properties of gate-all-around nanowire transistors are introduced, based on geometric length scales, demonstrating the scaling possibilities of nanowire transistors. Thirdly, to model nanowire transistor performance, a two-band non-parabolic ballistic transistor model is used to efficiently calculate the current and transconductance as a function of band gap and nanowire size. The intrinsic RF metrics are also estimated. Finally, experimental state-of-the-art nanowire field-effect transistors are reviewed and benchmarked, lateral and vertical transistor geometries are explored, and different fabrication routes are highlighted. Lateral devices have demonstrated operation up to 350 GHz, and vertical devices up to 155 GHz.

  5. High frequency III-V nanowire MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Erik

    2016-09-01

    III-V nanowire transistors are promising candidates for very high frequency electronics applications. The improved electrostatics originating from the gate-all-around geometry allow for more aggressive scaling as compared with planar field-effect transistors, and this can lead to device operation at very high frequencies. The very high mobility possible with In-rich devices can allow very high device performance at low operating voltages. GaN nanowires can take advantage of the large band gap for high voltage operation. In this paper, we review the basic physics and device performance of nanowire field- effect transistors relevant for high frequency performance. First, the geometry of lateral and vertical nanowire field-effect transistors is introduced, with special emphasis on the parasitic capacitances important for nanowire geometries. The basic important high frequency transistor metrics are introduced. Secondly, the scaling properties of gate-all-around nanowire transistors are introduced, based on geometric length scales, demonstrating the scaling possibilities of nanowire transistors. Thirdly, to model nanowire transistor performance, a two-band non-parabolic ballistic transistor model is used to efficiently calculate the current and transconductance as a function of band gap and nanowire size. The intrinsic RF metrics are also estimated. Finally, experimental state-of-the-art nanowire field-effect transistors are reviewed and benchmarked, lateral and vertical transistor geometries are explored, and different fabrication routes are highlighted. Lateral devices have demonstrated operation up to 350 GHz, and vertical devices up to 155 GHz.

  6. Influence of pulse duration on the plasma characteristics in high-power pulsed magnetron discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinidis, S.; Dauchot, J.P.; Ganciu, M.; Ricard, A.; Hecq, M.

    2006-01-01

    High-power pulsed magnetron discharges have drawn an increasing interest as an approach to produce highly ionized metallic vapor. In this paper we propose to study how the plasma composition and the deposition rate are influenced by the pulse duration. The plasma is studied by time-resolved optical emission and absorption spectroscopies and the deposition rate is controlled thanks to a quartz microbalance. The pulse length is varied between 2.5 and 20 {mu}s at 2 and 10 mTorr in pure argon. The sputtered material is titanium. For a constant discharge power, the deposition rate increases as the pulse length decreases. With 5 {mu}s pulse, for an average power of 300 W, the deposition rate is {approx}70% of the deposition rate obtained in direct current magnetron sputtering at the same power. The increase of deposition rate can be related to the sputtering regime. For long pulses, self-sputtering seems to occur as demonstrated by time-resolved optical emission diagnostic of the discharge. In contrary, the metallic vapor ionization rate, as determined by absorption measurements, diminishes as the pulses are shortened. Nevertheless, the ionization rate is in the range of 50% for 5 {mu}s pulses while it lies below 10% in the case of a classical continuous magnetron discharge.

  7. A Cerenkov source of high-power picosecond pulsed microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.B.; Marshall, T.C.; Hirshfield, J.L. |

    1998-06-01

    One or more electron bunches passing along the axis of a dielectric-lined cylindrical waveguide are shown to emit picosecond pulses of high-power broad-band microwave radiation. The bunches can be generated by an S-band RF gun, and thus spaced from one another by 10.5 cm in a macropulse sequence, or a single more intense bunch can be generated using a laser-illuminated photocathode in the RF gun. Theory is developed for the excitation of TM{sub 0m} modes of this waveguide which propagate at the bunch velocity from Cerenkov radiation emitted by a single intense bunch. A train of picosecond coherent wakefield pulses is shown to follow the bunch, when the waveguide modes have nearly constant spacing in frequency. An example is shown for an alumina-lined waveguide with 10-nC 3--15-ps bunches having an initial energy of 6 MeV. Computations are presented of the mode spectrum of the radiation and its time structure. It is also shown that measurements of the mode spectrum, or of the energy loss of the bunch, can be used to infer the axial density profile of the bunch. Certain features of the theory are compared with the results of a preliminary experiment.

  8. High frequency ultrasonic scattering by biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shung, K. Kirk; Maruvada, Subha

    2002-05-01

    High frequency (HF) diagnostic ultrasonic imaging devices at frequencies higher than 20 MHz have found applications in ophthalmology, dermatology, and vascular surgery. To be able to interpret these images and to further the development of these devices, a better understanding of ultrasonic scattering in biological tissues such as blood, liver, myocardium in the high frequency range is crucial. This work has previously been hampered by the lack of suitable transducers. With the availability of HF transducers going to 90 MHz, HF attenuation and backscatter experiments have been made on porcine red blood cell (RBC) suspensions, for which much data on attenuation and backscatter can be found in the literature in the lower frequency range for frequencies, from 30 to 90 MHz and on bovine tissues for frequencies from 10 to 30 MHz using a modified substitution method that allow the utilization of focused transducers. These results will be reviewed in this talk along with relevant theoretical models that could be applied to interpreting them. The relevance of the parameter that has been frequently used in the biomedical ultrasound literature to describe backscattering, the backscattering coefficient, will be critically examined.

  9. Wave-breaking-extended fiber supercontinuum generation for high compression ratio transform-limited pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Tu, Haohua; Boppart, Stephen A

    2012-06-15

    Wave-breaking often occurs when a short intense optical pulse propagates in a long normally dispersive optical fiber. This effect has conventionally been avoided in fiber (super-)continuum-based pulse compression because the accumulated frequency chirp of the output pulse cannot be fully compensated by a standard prism (or grating) pair. Thus, the spectral extending capability of the wave-breaking has not been utilized to shorten the compressed pulse. We demonstrate that wave-breaking-free operation is not necessary if a 4f pulse shaper-based compressor is employed to remove both the linear and nonlinear chirp of the output pulse. By propagating a 180 fs (FWHM) input pulse in a nonlinear photonic crystal fiber beyond the wave-breaking limit, we compress the wave-breaking-extended supercontinuum output pulse to the bandwidth-limited duration of 6.4 fs (FWHM). The combination of high compression ratio (28×) and short pulse width represents a significant improvement over that attained in the wave-breaking-free regime.

  10. 1540-nm single frequency single-mode pulsed all fiber laser for coherent Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Diao, Weifeng; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Jiqiao; Hou, Xia; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-02-01

    A single-mode single frequency eye-safe pulsed all fiber laser based on master oscillator power amplification structure is presented. This laser is composed of a narrow linewidth distributed laser diode seed laser and two-stage cascade amplifiers. 0.8 m longitudinally gradient strained erbium/ytterbium co-doped polarization-maintaining fiber with a core diameter of 10 μm is used as the gain fiber and two acoustic-optics modulators are adopted to enhance pulse extinction ratio. A peak power of 160 W and a pulse width of 200 ns at 10 kHz repetition rate are achieved with transform-limited linewidth and diffraction-limited beam quality. This laser will be employed in a compact short range coherent Doppler wind lidar.

  11. Efficient frequency doubling of femtosecond pulses with BIBO in an external synchronized cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanseri, Bhaskar; Bouillard, Martin; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the second harmonic generation (SHG) of infrared femtosecond pulses using a BIBO crystal placed in an external ring cavity, synchronized with an input mode-locked laser at 78 MHz. A frequency doubling efficiency of 53% is achieved which is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest value ever reported for a low energy input beam of 1.4 nJ/pulse. Theoretical analysis of cavity related issues such as design, fundamental mode characteristics and fidelity against misalignments are also presented. The modeling of SHG cavity enables us to estimate the cavity losses and the mode matching visibility. Such synchronized SHG cavities in pulse domain, having higher SHG conversion efficiencies compared to their continuous wave counterparts, may find potential applications in scientific areas such as in photonics, and in quantum optics.

  12. Holographic frequency resolved optical gating for spatio-temporal characterization of ultrashort optical pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Nikhil; Yang, Chuan; Xu, Yong; Liu, Zhiwen

    2014-09-01

    We introduce a novel method for characterizing the spatio-temporal evolution of ultrashort optical field by recording the spectral hologram of frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) trace. We show that FROG holography enables the measurement of phase (up to an overall constant) and group delay of the pulse which cannot be measured by conventional FROG method. To illustrate our method, we perform numerical simulation to generate holographic collinear FROG (cFROG) trace of a chirped optical pulse and retrieve its complex profile at multiple locations as it propagates through a hypothetical dispersive medium. Further, we experimentally demonstrate our method by retrieving a 67 fs pulse at three axial locations in the vicinity of focus of an objective lens and compute its group delay.

  13. PULSED POWER APPLICATIONS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    Pulsed power technology has been applied in particle accelerators and storage rings for over four decades. It is most commonly used in injection, extraction, beam manipulation, source, and focusing systems. These systems belong to the class of repetitive pulsed power. In this presentation, we review and discuss the history, present status, and future challenge of pulsed power applications in high intensity proton accelerators and storage rings.

  14. High-frequency micromechanical columnar resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehrbusch, Jenny; Ilin, Elena A.; Bozek, Peter; Radzio, Bernhard; Oesterschulze, Egbert

    2009-06-01

    High-frequency silicon columnar microresonators are fabricated using a simple but effective technological scheme. An optimized fabrication scheme was invented to obtain mechanically protected microcolumns with lateral dimensions controlled on a scale of at least 1 μm. In this paper, we investigate the influence of the environmental conditions on the mechanical resonator properties. At ambient conditions, we observed a frequency stability δf/f of less than 10-6 during 5 h of operation at almost constant temperature. However, varying the temperature shifts the frequency by approximately -173 Hz °C- 1. In accordance with a viscous damping model of the ambient gas, we perceived that the quality factor of the first flexural mode decreased with the inverse of the square root of pressure. However, in the low-pressure regime, a linear dependence was observed. We also investigated the influence of the type of the immersing gas on the resonant frequency.

  15. High-resolution emission spectra of pulsed terahertz quantum-cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ikonnikov, A. V. Antonov, A. V.; Lastovkin, A. A.; Gavrilenko, V. I.; Sadof'ev, Yu. G.; Samal, N.

    2010-11-15

    The spectra of pulsed terahertz quantum-cascade lasers were measured with high spectral resolution. The characteristic line width at half maximum was 0.01 cm{sup -1}; it is controlled by laser temperature variations during the supply voltage pulse. It was shown that an increase in the laser temperature leads to a decrease in the emission frequency, which is caused by an increase in the effective refractive index of the active region. It was also found that a decrease in the supply voltage results in a decrease in the emission frequency, which is caused by a change in the energy of diagonal transitions between lasing levels.

  16. Frequency divide-and-conquer approach to producing octave-wide frequency combs and few-cycle pulses in the mid-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodopyanov, Konstantin

    2014-05-01

    I will present a new technique for extending frequency combs to the highly desirable yet difficult-to-achieve mid-IR spectral range. The technique is based on subharmonic optical parametric oscillation (OPO) that can be considered as a reverse of the second harmonic generation process. The frequency comb of a pump laser is transposed to half of its central frequency and simultaneously spectrally augmented, thanks to an enormous gain bandwidth of the OPO near degeneracy, as well as due to massive cross-coupling between the laser and the OPO frequency comb components. Using ultrafast erbium (1.56 microns) or thulium (2 microns)-based fiber lasers as a pump and using thin, sub-mm-long, quasi phase-matched lithium niobate or gallium arsenide crystals, we produce frequency combs centered correspondingly at 3.1 or 4 micron subharmonic of the pump frequency. With the properly managed OPO cavity group velocity dispersion, octave-wide frequency combs spanning 2.5 - 6 micron range were achieved. Due to the doubly-resonant operation, the threshold of such a system is low (typically 10 mW) and by several experiments including measuring frequency beats between the OPO comb teeth and a narrow-linewidth CW laser and by interfering the outputs of two identical but distinct OPOs pumped by the same laser, we established that the frequency comb from a subharmonic OPO is phase-locked to that of the pump laser. Pulse duration measurements show that for the optimal intracavity dispersion conditions, we generate sub 5-cycle pulses at the subharmonic of the pump. I will also talk about applications of our mid-IR frequency combs to trace gas detection, where part-per-billion sensitivity of molecular detection is achieved as well as about Fourier spectroscopy using a dual-comb system consisting of two phase-locked lasers. I thank NASA, Office of Naval Research, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Agilent Technologies, Sanofi- Aventis, Stanford University Bio-X, Stanford Medical School

  17. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert J.; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reports on the development of a high power 780 nm laser suitable for space applications of laser cooling. A possible solution is to use frequency doubling of high power 1560 nm telecom lasers. The presentation shows a diagram of the frequency conversion, and a graph of the second harmonic generation in one crystal, and the use of the cascading crystals. Graphs show the second harmonic power as a function of distance between crystals, second harmonic power vs. pump power, tunability of laser systems.

  18. Metrology For High-Frequency Nanoelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, T. Mitch; Imtiaz, Atif; Nembach, Hans T.; Rice, Paul; Kabos, Pavel

    2007-09-26

    Two metrological tools for high-frequency measurements of nanoscale systems are described: (i) two/N-port analysis of nanoscale devices as well as (ii) near-field scanning microwave microscopy (NSMM) for materials characterization. Calibrated two/N-port measurements were made on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) welded to a coplanar waveguide. Significant changes in the extracted high-frequency electrical response of the welded MWNT were measured when the contacts to the MWNT were modified. Additionally, NSMM was used to characterize films of nanotube soot deposited on copper and sapphire substrates. The material properties of the films showed a strong dependence on the substrate material.

  19. An analysis of short pulse and dual frequency radar techniques for measuring ocean wave spectra from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning beam microwave radars were used to measure ocean wave directional spectra from satellites. In principle, surface wave spectral resolution in wave number can be obtained using either short pulse (SP) or dual frequency (DF) techniques; in either case, directional resolution obtains naturally as a consequence of a Bragg-like wave front matching. A four frequency moment characterization of backscatter from the near vertical using physical optics in the high frequency limit was applied to an analysis of the SP and DF measurement techniques. The intrinsic electromagnetic modulation spectrum was to the first order in wave steepness proportional to the large wave directional slope spectrum. Harmonic distortion was small and was a minimum near 10 deg incidence. NonGaussian wave statistics can have an effect comparable to that in the second order of scattering from a normally distributed sea surface. The SP technique is superior to the DF technique in terms of measurement signal to noise ratio and contrast ratio.

  20. HIGH LIFE: High altitude fatalities led to pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Severinghaus, John W

    2016-01-15

    In 1875, Paul Bert linked high altitude danger to the low partial pressure of oxygen when 2 of 3 French balloonists died euphorically at about 8,600 m altitude. World War I fatal crashes of high altitude fighter pilots led to a century of efforts to use oximetry to warn pilots. The carotid body, discovered in 1932 to be the hypoxia detector, led to most current physiologic understanding of the body's respiratory responses to hypoxia and CO2. The author describes some of his UCSF group's work: In 1963, we reported both the brain's ventral medullary near-surface CO2 (and pH) chemosensors and the role of cerebrospinal fluid in acclimatization to altitude. In 1966, we reported the effect of altitude on cerebral blood flow and later the changes of carotid body sensitivity at altitude and the differences in natives of high altitude. In 1973, pulse oximetry was invented when Japanese biophysicist Takuo Aoyagi read and applied to pulses a largely forgotten 35-year-old discovery by English medical student J. R. Squire of a method of computing oxygen saturation from red and infrared light passing through both perfused and blanched tissue.

  1. Luteinizing hormone pulse frequency and in vitro bioactivity in male idiopathic infertility.

    PubMed

    Bennet, A; Bujan, L; Plantavid, M; Barbe, P; Caron, P; Louvet, J P

    1991-03-01

    We investigated 51 patients with idiopathic oligospermia and 10 control subjects. Blood samples were collected every 20 minutes from 10 P.M. to 10 A.M. and luteinizing hormone (LH) pulsatility was analyzed. A pool of all samples obtained from each subject was used to measure bioactive LH in an in vitro mouse Leydig cell bioassay and immunoactive LH in an immunoradiometric assay. Mean immunoactive LH pulse frequency was higher and mean bioactive to immunoactive LH ratio was lower in infertile men than in controls. There was a significant negative correlation between bioactive LH to immunoreactive LH ratio and LH pulse frequency. These data indicate that the defect in the gonadal axis in oligospermic men resides not in the hypothalamic-pituitary function but rather in the testis itself.

  2. The influence of flight speed on the ranging performance of bats using frequency modulated echolocation pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonman, Arjan M.; Parsons, Stuart; Jones, Gareth

    2003-01-01

    Many species of bat use ultrasonic frequency modulated (FM) pulses to measure the distance to objects by timing the emission and reception of each pulse. Echolocation is mainly used in flight. Since the flight speed of bats often exceeds 1% of the speed of sound, Doppler effects will lead to compression of the time between emission and reception as well as an elevation of the echo frequencies, resulting in a distortion of the perceived range. This paper describes the consequences of these Doppler effects on the ranging performance of bats using different pulse designs. The consequences of Doppler effects on ranging performance described in this paper assume bats to have a very accurate ranging resolution, which is feasible with a filterbank receiver. By modeling two receiver types, it was first established that the effects of Doppler compression are virtually independent of the receiver type. Then, used a cross-correlation model was used to investigate the effect of flight speed on Doppler tolerance and range-Doppler coupling separately. This paper further shows how pulse duration, bandwidth, function type, and harmonics influence Doppler tolerance and range-Doppler coupling. The influence of each signal parameter is illustrated using calls of several bat species. It is argued that range-Doppler coupling is a significant source of error in bat echolocation, and various strategies bats could employ to deal with this problem, including the use of range rate information are discussed.

  3. Broadband short pulse measurement by autocorrelation with a sum-frequency generation set-up

    SciTech Connect

    Glotin, F.; Jaroszynski, D.; Marcouille, O.

    1995-12-31

    Previous spectral and laser pulse length measurements carried out on the CLIO FEL at wavelength {lambda}=8.5 {mu}m suggested that very short light pulses could be generated, about 500 fs wide (FWHM). For these measurements a Michelson interferometer with a Te crystal, as a non-linear detector, was used as a second order autocorrelation device. More recent measurements in similar conditions have confirmed that the laser pulses observed are indeed single: they are not followed by other pulses distant by the slippage length N{lambda}. As the single micropulse length is likely to depend on the slippage, more measurements at different wavelengths would be useful. This is not directly possible with our actual interferometer set-up, based on a phase-matched non-linear crystal. However, we can use the broadband non-linear medium provided by one of our users` experiments: Sum-Frequency Generation over surfaces. With such autocorrelation set-up, interference fringes are no more visible, but this is largely compensated by the frequency range provided. First tests at 8 {mu}m have already been performed to validate the technic, leading to results similar to those obtained with our previous Michelson set-up.

  4. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Dolan, James T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang

    2000-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  5. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Dymond, Jr., Lauren E.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Grimm, William G.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Ola, Samuel A.; Simpson, James E.; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  6. Laser High-Cycle Thermal Fatigue of Pulse Detonation Engine Combustor Materials Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDE's) have received increasing attention for future aerospace propulsion applications. Because the PDE is designed for a high-frequency, intermittent detonation combustion process, extremely high gas temperatures and pressures can be realized under the nearly constant-volume combustion environment. The PDE's can potentially achieve higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency and thrust density in comparison to traditional constant-pressure combustion gas turbine engines (ref. 1). However, the development of these engines requires robust design of the engine components that must endure harsh detonation environments. In particular, the detonation combustor chamber, which is designed to sustain and confine the detonation combustion process, will experience high pressure and temperature pulses with very short durations (refs. 2 and 3). Therefore, it is of great importance to evaluate PDE combustor materials and components under simulated engine temperatures and stress conditions in the laboratory. In this study, a high-cycle thermal fatigue test rig was established at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a 1.5-kW CO2 laser. The high-power laser, operating in the pulsed mode, can be controlled at various pulse energy levels and waveform distributions. The enhanced laser pulses can be used to mimic the time-dependent temperature and pressure waves encountered in a pulsed detonation engine. Under the enhanced laser pulse condition, a maximum 7.5-kW peak power with a duration of approximately 0.1 to 0.2 msec (a spike) can be achieved, followed by a plateau region that has about one-fifth of the maximum power level with several milliseconds duration. The laser thermal fatigue rig has also been developed to adopt flat and rotating tubular specimen configurations for the simulated engine tests. More sophisticated laser optic systems can be used to simulate the spatial distributions of the temperature and shock waves in the engine. Pulse laser high

  7. High efficiency single frequency 355 nm all-solid-state UV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaobing; Wei, Daikang; Ma, Xiuhua; Li, Shiguang; Liu, Jiqiao; Zhu, Xiaolei; Chen, Weibiao

    2016-05-01

    A novel conductively cooled high energy single-frequency 355 nm all-solid-state UV laser is presented based on sum-frequency mixing technique. In this system, a pulsed seeder laser at 1064 nm wavelength, modulated by an AOM, is directly amplified by the cascaded multi-stage hybrid laser amplifiers, and two LBO crystals are used for the SHG and SFG, finally a maximum UV pulse energy of 226 mJ at 355 nm wavelength is achieved with frequency-tripled conversion efficiency as high as 55%, the pulse width is around 12.2 ns at the repetition frequency of 30 Hz. The beam quality factor M 2 of the output UV laser is measured to be 2.54 and 2.98 respectively in two orthogonal directions.

  8. Excited states of the high-frequency vibrational modes and kinetics of ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barykov, V. Yu.; Ivanov, A. I.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the carrier frequency of the exciting laser pulse on the kinetics of intramolecular photoinduced charge transfer in the multi-channel stochastic model is studied. It is shown that the population of different states of high-frequency intramolecular modes upon varying the frequency of the excitation pulse can considerably alter the rate constant of ultrafast charge transfer. It is found that a negative vibrational spectral effect is expected in the vicinity of a barrier-free area (the rate constant of photoinduced charge transfer decreases along with the carrier frequency of the excitation pulse), while a positive effect is predicted in areas of high and low exergonicity (an inverse dependence). It is concluded that the value of the spectral effect falls along with the time of vibrational relaxation. For ultrafast photo-induced charge transfer, however, it remains considerable up to relaxation times of 100 fs.

  9. Generation of optical frequency combs in fibres: an optical pulse analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajnulina, Marina; Böhm, Michael; Blow, Keith; Chavez Boggio, José M.; Rieznik, Andres A.; Haynes, Roger; Roth, Martin M.

    2014-07-01

    The innovation of optical frequency combs (OFCs) generated in passive mode-locked lasers has provided astronomy with unprecedented accuracy for wavelength calibration in high-resolution spectroscopy in research areas such as the discovery of exoplanets or the measurement of fundamental constants. The unique properties of OCFs, namely a highly dense spectrum of uniformly spaced emission lines of nearly equal intensity over the nominal wavelength range, is not only beneficial for high-resolution spectroscopy. Also in the low- to medium-resolution domain, the OFCs hold the promise to revolutionise the calibration techniques. Here, we present a novel method for generation of OFCs. As opposed to the mode-locked laser-based approach that can be complex, costly, and difficult to stabilise, we propose an all optical fibre-based system that is simple, compact, stable, and low-cost. Our system consists of three optical fibres where the first one is a conventional single-mode fibre, the second one is an erbium-doped fibre and the third one is a highly nonlinear low-dispersion fibre. The system is pumped by two equally intense continuous-wave (CW) lasers. To be able to control the quality and the bandwidth of the OFCs, it is crucial to understand how optical solitons arise out of the initial modulated CW field in the first fibre. Here, we numerically investigate the pulse evolution in the first fibre using the technique of the solitons radiation beat analysis. Having applied this technique, we realised that formation of higherorder solitons is supported in the low-energy region, whereas, in the high-energy region, Kuznetsov-Ma solitons appear.

  10. Pulsing frequency induced change in optical constants and dispersion energy parameters of WO3 films grown by pulsed direct current magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punitha, K.; Sivakumar, R.; Sanjeeviraja, C.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we present the pulsing frequency induced change in the structural, optical, vibrational, and luminescence properties of tungsten oxide (WO3) thin films deposited on microscopic glass and fluorine doped tin oxide (SnO2:F) coated glass substrates by pulsed dc magnetron sputtering technique. The WO3 films deposited on SnO2:F substrate belongs to monoclinic phase. The pulsing frequency has a significant influence on the preferred orientation and crystallinity of WO3 film. The maximum optical transmittance of 85% was observed for the film and the slight shift in transmission threshold towards higher wavelength region with increasing pulsing frequency revealed the systematic reduction in optical energy band gap (3.78 to 3.13 eV) of the films. The refractive index (n) of films are found to decrease (1.832 to 1.333 at 550 nm) with increasing pulsing frequency and the average value of extinction coefficient (k) is in the order of 10-3. It was observed that the dispersion data obeyed the single oscillator of the Wemple-Didomenico model, from which the dispersion energy (Ed) parameters, dielectric constants, plasma frequency, oscillator strength, and oscillator energy (Eo) of WO3 films were calculated and reported for the first time due to variation in pulsing frequency during deposition by pulsed dc magnetron sputtering. The Eo is change between 6.30 and 3.88 eV, while the Ed varies from 25.81 to 7.88 eV, with pulsing frequency. The Raman peak observed at 1095 cm-1 attributes the presence of W-O symmetric stretching vibration. The slight shift in photoluminescence band is attributed to the difference in excitons transition. We have made an attempt to discuss and correlate these results with the light of possible mechanisms underlying the phenomena.

  11. Frequency-resolved optical-gating measurements of ultrashort pulses using surface third-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T.; Krumbuegel, M.A.; DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Trebino, R.

    1996-09-01

    We demonstrate what is to our knowledge the first frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) technique to measure ultrashort pulses from an unamplified Ti:sapphire laser oscillator without direction-of-time ambiguity. This technique utilizes surface third-harmonic generation as the nonlinear-optical effect and, surprisingly, is the most sensitive third-order FROG geometry yet. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  12. COMPARISON OF RADIO-FREQUENCY INTERFERENCE MITIGATION STRATEGIES FOR DISPERSED PULSE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hogden, John; Vander Wiel, Scott; Michalak, Sarah; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Siemion, Andrew; Werthimer, Daniel

    2012-03-10

    Impulsive radio-frequency signals from astronomical sources are dispersed by the frequency-dependent index of refraction of the interstellar media and so appear as chirped signals when they reach Earth. Searches for dispersed impulses have been limited by false detections due to radio-frequency interference (RFI) and, in some cases, artifacts of the instrumentation. Many authors have discussed techniques to excise or mitigate RFI in searches for fast transients, but comparisons between different approaches are lacking. This work develops RFI mitigation techniques for use in searches for dispersed pulses, employing data recorded in a 'Fly's Eye' mode of the Allen Telescope Array as a test case. We gauge the performance of several RFI mitigation techniques by adding dispersed signals to data containing RFI and comparing false alarm rates at the observed signal-to-noise ratios of the added signals. We find that Huber filtering is most effective at removing broadband interferers, while frequency centering is most effective at removing narrow frequency interferers. Neither of these methods is effective over a broad range of interferers. A method that combines Huber filtering and adaptive interference cancelation provides the lowest number of false positives over the interferers considered here. The methods developed here have application to other searches for dispersed pulses in incoherent spectra, especially those involving multiple beam systems.

  13. A micropower supervisor for wireless nodes with a digital pulse frequency modulator battery monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carloni, Mirko; d'Aparo, Rocco; Scorrano, Pierpaolo; Naticchia, Berardo; Conti, Massimo

    2013-05-01

    In the last few years the increased development of wireless technologies led to the development of micropower devices with power management and real time power control, aimed to maximize the battery life time.1 The main and simplest method to estimate residual battery life time is by voltage measurement. This kind of measurement is simple but is useless in many cases, especially when long term Lithium-Thionyl chloride batteries are used, since its voltage is flat for more than 90% of the battery discharge. In this case, a current control should be used. However, these kinds of devices have various problems as a limited range of measurement and not negligible quiescent current that may distort the measurements. In this work we developed a micropower supervisor for wireless sensor nodes with a charge battery monitor, whose features are aimed at solving the problems just described. The current measured by a sense resistor, is filtered by a super-capacitor, amplified by a current sense amplifier and then fed to a voltage to pulse frequency modulator. In this way, the charge consumption can be estimated without the saturation of the current sense amplifier, even if the wireless node consumes time limited high current spikes, for example during transmission.

  14. A 0.9-V pulse frequency modulation photosensor based on capacitive feedback reset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, Koutaro; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Ohta, Jun; Nunoshita, Masahiro

    2005-03-01

    We are developing a retinal prosthesis vision chip based on a pulse-frequency-modulation (PFM) photosensor. Because the device is implanted in the eye ball and is powered by RF coil coupling with limited energy, low voltage and small current operation is required to achieve low power dissipation. We propose a capacitive-feedback-reset method for the PFM vision chip. The proposed method uses capacitive feed back through the junction capacitance of the photodiode and gate-source overlap capacitance of the reset transistor. In the proposed PFM circuit, the feed-through effect in resetting contributes to avoid current competition, so that the high dynamic range can be achieved even at the low voltage operation. We have fabricated a pixel TEG circuit in a 0.35-μm CMOS technology. The PFM photosensor circuit is composed of a four-stage inverter-chain. Dynamic range of 136dB has been achieved with 0.8-V power supply.

  15. 1KHz high average power single-frequency Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Ma, Xiuhua; Li, Shiguang; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-02-01

    A laser-diode-pumped master oscillator and power amplifier was developed with high efficiency, high average power and high beam quality. The oscillator is an injection-seeding, fiber coupled diode-end-pumped E-O Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, producing single frequency pulse laser output with pulse energy of 8mJ and pulse width of 11ns at a pulse repetition rate of 1KHz,The 1KHz was divided into four chains with frequency of 250Hz, through E-O modulation technology, The power amplifier utilizes conductively-cooling Nd:YAG zigzag slab with two sides' pump architecture at bounce point. Pulse energy of more than 800mJ with pulse widths of 12.6ns was obtained at repetition rate of 250Hz in every amplifier chain, the frequency-doubled pulse energy of 360mJ when KTP crystal was used was obtained at a repetition of 250Hz.

  16. A New Possibility for Production of Sub-picosecond X-ray Pulses using a Time Dependent Radio Frequency Orbit Deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    It is shown that two radio frequency deflecting cavities with slightly different frequencies can be used to produce time-dependent orbit deflection to a few special electron bunches while keeping the majority of the electron bunches unaffected. These special bunches produce an x-ray pulse in which transverse position or angle, or both, are correlated with time. The x-ray pulses are then shortened, either with an asymmetrically cut crystal that acts as a pulse compressor, or with an angular aperture such as a narrow slit positioned downstream. The implementation of this technique creates a highly flexible environment for synchrotrons in which users of most beamlines will be able to easily select between the x-rays originated by the standard electron bunches and the short x-ray pulses originated by the special electron bunches carrying a time-dependent transverse correlation.

  17. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than −60 dBc Hz−1 at 10 Hz, −90 dBc Hz−1 at 100 Hz and −170 dBc Hz−1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10−10 at 1–100 s integration time—orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  18. Burst train generator of high energy femtosecond laser pulses for driving heat accumulation effect during micromachining.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Saeid; Li, Jianzhao; Herman, Peter R

    2015-05-01

    A new method for generating high-repetition-rate (12.7-38.2 MHz) burst trains of femtosecond laser pulses has been demonstrated for the purpose of tailoring ultrashort laser interactions in material processing that can harness the heat accumulation effect among pulses separated by a short interval (i.e., 26 ns). Computer-controlled time delays were applied to synchronously trigger the high frequency switching of a high voltage Pockels cell to specify distinctive values of polarization rotation for each round-trip of a laser pulse cycling within a passive resonator. Polarization dependent output coupling facilitated the flexible shaping of the burst envelope profile to provide burst trains of up to ∼1  mJ of burst energy divided over a selectable number (1 to 25) of pulses. Individual pulses of variable energy up to 150 μJ and with pulse duration tunable over 70 fs to 2 ps, were applied in burst trains to generate deep and high aspect ratio holes that could not form with low-repetition-rate laser pulses. PMID:25927785

  19. The Influence of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves Upon Muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, Lawrence S.; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr

    2007-01-30

    The objective of this paper is to present a theory for the possible influence of high-frequency gravitational waves or HFGWs and pulsed micro-current electromagnetic waves or EMs on biological matter specifically on muscle cells and myofibroblasts. The theory involves consideration of the natural frequency of contractions and relaxations of muscles, especially underlying facial skin, and the possible influence of HFGWs on that process. GWs pass without attenuation through all material thus conventional wisdom would dictate that GWs would have no influence on biological matter. On the other hand, GWs can temporarily modify a gravitational field in some locality if they are of high frequency and such a modification might have an influence in changing the skin muscles' natural frequency. Prior to the actual laboratory generation of HFGWs their influence can be emulated by micro-current EM pulses to the skin and some evidence presented here on that effect may predict the influence of HFGWs. We believe that the HFGW pulsations lead to increased muscle activity and may serve to reverse the aging process. A novel theoretical framework concerning these relaxation phenomena is one result of the paper. Another result is the analysis of the possible delivery system of the FBAR-generated HFGWs, the actual power of the generated HFGWs, and the system's application to nanostructural modification of the skin or muscle cells. It is concluded that a series of non-evasive experiments, which are identified, will have the potential to test theory by detecting and analyzing the possible HFGWs change in polarization, refraction, etc. after their interaction with the muscle cells.

  20. A compact high-voltage pulse generator based on pulse transformer with closed magnetic core.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Jinliang; Cheng, Xinbing; Bai, Guoqiang; Zhang, Hongbo; Feng, Jiahuai; Liang, Bo

    2010-03-01

    A compact high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator, based on a pulse transformer with a closed magnetic core, is presented in this paper. The pulse generator consists of a miniaturized pulse transformer, a curled parallel strip pulse forming line (PFL), a spark gap, and a matched load. The innovative design is characterized by the compact structure of the transformer and the curled strip PFL. A new structure of transformer windings was designed to keep good insulation and decrease distributed capacitance between turns of windings. A three-copper-strip structure was adopted to avoid asymmetric coupling of the curled strip PFL. When the 31 microF primary capacitor is charged to 2 kV, the pulse transformer can charge the PFL to 165 kV, and the 3.5 ohm matched load can deliver a high-voltage pulse with a duration of 9 ns, amplitude of 84 kV, and rise time of 5.1 ns. When the load is changed to 50 ohms, the output peak voltage of the generator can be 165 kV, the full width at half maximum is 68 ns, and the rise time is 6.5 ns.

  1. Numerical solution to the Bloch equations: paramagnetic solutions under wideband continuous radio frequency irradiation in a pulsed magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Jun; Ma, Hong; Yu, De; Zeng, Xiao-Hu

    2016-08-01

    A novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experimental scheme, called wideband continuous wave NMR (WB-CW-NMR), is presented in this article. This experimental scheme has promising applications in pulsed magnetic fields, and can dramatically improve the utilization of the pulsed field. The feasibility of WB-CW-NMR scheme is verified by numerically solving modified Bloch equations. In the numerical simulation, the applied magnetic field is a pulsed magnetic field up to 80 T, and the wideband continuous radio frequency (RF) excitation is a band-limited (0.68–3.40 GHz) white noise. Furthermore, the influences of some experimental parameters, such as relaxation time, applied magnetic field strength and wideband continuous RF power, on the WB-CW-NMR signal are analyzed briefly. Finally, a multi-channel system framework for transmitting and receiving ultra wideband signals is proposed, and the basic requirements of this experimental system are discussed. Meanwhile, the amplitude of the NMR signal, the level of noise and RF interference in WB-CW-NMR experiments are estimated, and a preliminary adaptive cancellation plan is given for detecting WB-CW-NMR signal from large background interference. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475067), the Innovative Research Foundation of Huazhong University of Science and Technology (2015 ZDTD017) and the Experimental Apparatus Research Project of Wuhan Pulsed High Magnetic Field Center (2015KF17)

  2. Numerical solution to the Bloch equations: paramagnetic solutions under wideband continuous radio frequency irradiation in a pulsed magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Jun; Ma, Hong; Yu, De; Zeng, Xiao-Hu

    2016-08-01

    A novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experimental scheme, called wideband continuous wave NMR (WB-CW-NMR), is presented in this article. This experimental scheme has promising applications in pulsed magnetic fields, and can dramatically improve the utilization of the pulsed field. The feasibility of WB-CW-NMR scheme is verified by numerically solving modified Bloch equations. In the numerical simulation, the applied magnetic field is a pulsed magnetic field up to 80 T, and the wideband continuous radio frequency (RF) excitation is a band-limited (0.68-3.40 GHz) white noise. Furthermore, the influences of some experimental parameters, such as relaxation time, applied magnetic field strength and wideband continuous RF power, on the WB-CW-NMR signal are analyzed briefly. Finally, a multi-channel system framework for transmitting and receiving ultra wideband signals is proposed, and the basic requirements of this experimental system are discussed. Meanwhile, the amplitude of the NMR signal, the level of noise and RF interference in WB-CW-NMR experiments are estimated, and a preliminary adaptive cancellation plan is given for detecting WB-CW-NMR signal from large background interference. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475067), the Innovative Research Foundation of Huazhong University of Science and Technology (2015 ZDTD017) and the Experimental Apparatus Research Project of Wuhan Pulsed High Magnetic Field Center (2015KF17)

  3. Effect of Embedded RF Pulsing for Selective Etching of SiO2 in the Dual-Frequency Capacitive Coupled Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Hun; Jeon, Min Hwan; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young

    2015-11-01

    The characteristics of embedded pulse plasma using 60 MHz radio frequency as the source power and 2 MHz radio frequency as the bias power were investigated for the etching of SiO2 masked with an amorphous carbon layer (ACL) using an Ar/C4F8/O2 gas mixture. Especially, the effects of the different pulse duty ratio of the embedded dual-frequency pulsing between source power and bias power on the characteristics on the plasma and SiO2 etching were investigated. The experiment was conducted by varying the source duty percentage from 90 to 30% while bias duty percentage was fixed at 50%. Among the different duty ratios, the source duty percentage of 60% with the bias duty percentage of 50% exhibited the best results in terms of etch profile and etch selectivity. The change of the etch characteristics by varying the duty ratios between the source power and bias power was believed to be related to the different characteristics of gas dissociation, fluorocarbon passivation, and ion bombardment observed during the different source/bias pulse on/off combinations. In addition, the instantaneous high electron temperature peak observed during each initiation of the source pulse-on period appeared to affect the etch characteristics by significant gas dissociation. The optimum point for the SiO2 etching with the source/bias pulsed dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasma system was obtained by avoiding this instant high electron temperature peak while both the source power and bias power were pulsed almost together, therefore, by an embedded RF pulsing. PMID:26726572

  4. Phase matching of high order harmonic generation using dynamic phase modulation caused by a non-collinear modulation pulse

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Oren; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Mumane, Margaret M.

    2010-02-16

    Phase matching high harmonic generation (HHG) uses a single, long duration non-collinear modulating pulse intersecting the driving pulse. A femtosecond driving pulse is focused into an HHG medium (such as a noble gas) to cause high-harmonic generation (HHG), for example in the X-ray region of the spectrum, via electrons separating from and recombining with gas atoms. A non-collinear pulse intersects the driving pulse within the gas, and modulates the field seen by the electrons while separated from their atoms. The modulating pulse is low power and long duration, and its frequency and amplitude is chosen to improve HHG phase matching by increasing the areas of constructive interference between the driving pulse and the HHG, relative to the areas of destructive interference.

  5. High power UV and VUV pulsed excilamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V.; Erofeev, M.; Lomaev, M.; Rybka, D.

    2008-07-01

    Emission characteristics of a nanosecond discharge in inert gases and its halogenides without preionization of the gap from an auxiliary source have been investigated. A volume discharge, initiated by an avalanche electron beam (VDIAEB) was realized at pressures up to 12 atm. In xenon at pressure of 1.2 atm, the energy of spontaneous radiation in the full solid angle was sim 45 mJ/cm^3, and the FWHM of a radiation pulse was sim 110 ns. The spontaneous radiation power rise in xenon was observed at pressures up to 12 atm. Pulsed radiant exitance of inert gases halogenides excited by VDIAEB was sim 4.5 kW/cm^2 at efficiency up to 5.5 %.

  6. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-01-15

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  7. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  8. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  9. High-frequency resonant-tunneling oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. R.; Parker, C. D.; Calawa, A. R.; Manfra, M. J.; Chen, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in high-frequency resonant-tunneling-diode (RTD) oscillators are described. Oscillations up to a frequency of 420 GHz have been achieved in the GaAs/AlAs system. Recent results obtained with In0.53Ga0.47As/AlAs and InAs/AlSb RTDs show a greatly increased power density and indicate the potential for fundamental oscillations up to about 1 THz. These results are consistent with a lumped-element equivalent circuit model of the RTD. The model shows that the maximum oscillation frequency of the GaAs/AlAs RTDs is limited primarily by series resistance, and that the power density is limited by low peak-to-valley current ratio.

  10. Compact field programmable gate array-based pulse-sequencer and radio-frequency generator for experiments with trapped atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-11-15

    We present a compact field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based pulse sequencer and radio-frequency (RF) generator suitable for experiments with cold trapped ions and atoms. The unit is capable of outputting a pulse sequence with at least 32 transistor-transistor logic (TTL) channels with a timing resolution of 40 ns and contains a built-in 100 MHz frequency counter for counting electrical pulses from a photo-multiplier tube. There are 16 independent direct-digital-synthesizers RF sources with fast (rise-time of ∼60 ns) amplitude switching and sub-mHz frequency tuning from 0 to 800 MHz.

  11. Compact field programmable gate array-based pulse-sequencer and radio-frequency generator for experiments with trapped atoms.

    PubMed

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-11-01

    We present a compact field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based pulse sequencer and radio-frequency (RF) generator suitable for experiments with cold trapped ions and atoms. The unit is capable of outputting a pulse sequence with at least 32 transistor-transistor logic (TTL) channels with a timing resolution of 40 ns and contains a built-in 100 MHz frequency counter for counting electrical pulses from a photo-multiplier tube. There are 16 independent direct-digital-synthesizers RF sources with fast (rise-time of ∼60 ns) amplitude switching and sub-mHz frequency tuning from 0 to 800 MHz. PMID:26628171

  12. High frequency chest compression effects heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongwon; Lee, Yong W; Warwick, Warren J

    2007-01-01

    High frequency chest compression (HFCC) supplies a sequence of air pulses through a jacket worn by a patient to remove excessive mucus for the treatment or prevention of lung disease patients. The air pulses produced from the pulse generator propagates over the thorax delivering the vibration and compression energy. A number of studies have demonstrated that the HFCC system increases the ability to clear mucus and improves lung function. Few studies have examined the change in instantaneous heart rate (iHR) and heart rate variability (HRV) during the HFCC therapy. The purpose of this study is to measure the change of HRV with four experimental protocols: (a) without HFCC, (b) during Inflated, (c)HFCC at 6Hz, and (d) HFCC at 21Hz. The nonlinearity and regularity of HRV was assessed by approximate entropy (ApEn), a method used to quantify the complexities and randomness. To compute the ApEn, we sectioned with a total of eight epochs and displayed the ApEn over the each epoch. Our results show significant differences in the both the iHR and HRV between the experimental protocols. The iHR was elevated at both the (c) 6Hz and (d) 21Hz condition from without HFCC (10%, 16%, respectively). We also found that the HFCC system tends to increase the HRV. Our study suggests that monitoring iHR and HRV are very important physiological indexes during HFCC therapy.

  13. Thermal Acoustic Sensor for High Pulse Energy X-ray FEL Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.J.; Frisch, J.C.; Kraft, E.M.; Loos, J.; Bentsen, G.S.; /Rochester U.

    2011-12-13

    The pulse energy density of X-ray FELs will saturate or destroy conventional X-ray diagnostics, and the use of large beam attenuation will result in a beam that is dominated by harmonics. We present preliminary results at the LCLS from a pulse energy detector based on the thermal acoustic effect. In this type of detector an X-ray resistant material (boron carbide in this system) intercepts the beam. The pulse heating of the target material produces an acoustic pulse that can be detected with high frequency microphones to produce a signal that is linear in the absorbed energy. The thermal acoustic detector is designed to provide first- and second-order calorimetric measurement of X-ray FEL pulse energy. The first-order calorimetry is a direct temperature measurement of a target designed to absorb all or most of the FEL pulse power with minimal heat leak. The second-order measurement detects the vibration caused by the rapid thermoelastic expansion of the target material each time it absorbs a photon pulse. Both the temperature change and the amplitude of the acoustic signal are directly related to the photon pulse energy.

  14. Echo frequency selectivity of duration-tuned inferior collicular neurons of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, determined with pulse-echo pairs.

    PubMed

    Wu, C H; Jen, P H-S

    2008-10-28

    During hunting, insectivorous bats such as Eptesicus fuscus progressively vary the repetition rate, duration, frequency and amplitude of emitted pulses such that analysis of an echo parameter by bats would be inevitably affected by other co-varying echo parameters. The present study is to determine the variation of echo frequency selectivity of duration-tuned inferior collicular neurons during different phases of hunting using pulse-echo (P-E) pairs as stimuli. All collicular neurons discharge maximally to a tone at a particular frequency which is defined as the best frequency (BF). Most collicular neurons also discharge maximally to a BF pulse at a particular duration which is defined as the best duration (BD). A family of echo iso-level frequency tuning curves (iso-level FTC) of these duration-tuned collicular neurons is measured with the number of impulses in response to the echo pulse at selected frequencies when the P-E pairs are presented at varied P-E duration and gap. Our data show that these duration-tuned collicular neurons have narrower echo iso-level FTC when measured with BD than with non-BD echo pulses. Also, IC neurons with low BF and short BD have narrower echo iso-level FTC than IC neurons with high BF and long BD have. The bandwidth of echo iso-level FTC significantly decreases with shortening of P-E duration and P-E gap. These data suggest that duration-tuned collicular neurons not only can facilitate bat's echo recognition but also can enhance echo frequency selectivity for prey feature analysis throughout a target approaching sequence during hunting. These data also support previous behavior studies showing that bats prepare their auditory system to analyze expected returning echoes within a time window to extract target features after pulse emission.

  15. Generation of Intense Narrow-Band Tunable Terahertz Radiation from Highly Bunched Electron Pulse Train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Heting; Lu, Yalin; He, Zhigang; Jia, Qika; Wang, Lin

    2016-07-01

    We present the analysis and start-to-end simulation of an intense narrow-band terahertz (THz) source with a broad tuning range of radiation frequency, using a single-pass free electron laser (FEL) driven by a THz-pulse-train photoinjector. The fundamental radiation frequency, corresponding to the spacing between the electron microbunches, can be easily tuned by varying the spacing time between the laser micropulses. Since the prebunched electron beam is highly bunched at the first several harmonics, with the harmonic generation technique, the radiation frequency range can be further enlarged by several times. The start-to-end simulation results show that this FEL is capable of generating a few tens megawatts power, several tens micro-joules pulse energy, and a few percent bandwidth at the frequencies of 0.5-5 THz. In addition, several practical issues are considered.

  16. High Frequency Plasma Generators for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divergilio, W. F.; Goede, H.; Fosnight, V. V.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a one year program to experimentally adapt two new types of high frequency plasma generators to Argon ion thrusters and to analytically study a third high frequency source concept are presented. Conventional 30 cm two grid ion extraction was utilized or proposed for all three sources. The two plasma generating methods selected for experimental study were a radio frequency induction (RFI) source, operating at about 1 MHz, and an electron cyclotron heated (ECH) plasma source operating at about 5 GHz. Both sources utilize multi-linecusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement. The plasma characteristics, plasma loading of the rf antenna, and the rf frequency dependence of source efficiency and antenna circuit efficiency are described for the RFI Multi-cusp source. In a series of tests of this source at Lewis Research Center, minimum discharge losses of 220+/-10 eV/ion were obtained with propellant utilization of .45 at a beam current of 3 amperes. Possible improvement modifications are discussed.

  17. Noise temperature in graphene at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengel, Raúl; Iglesias, José M.; Pascual, Elena; Martín, María J.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical method for obtaining the frequency-dependent noise temperature in monolayer graphene is presented. From the mobility and diffusion coefficient values provided by Monte Carlo simulation, the noise temperature in graphene is studied up to the THz range, considering also the influence of different substrate types. The influence of the applied electric field is investigated: the noise temperature is found to increase with the applied field, dropping down at high frequencies (in the sub-THz range). The results show that the low-frequency value of the noise temperature in graphene on a substrate tends to be reduced as compared to the case of suspended graphene due to the important effect of remote polar phonon interactions, thus indicating a reduced emitted noise power; however, at very high frequencies the influence of the substrate tends to be significantly reduced, and the differences between the suspended and on-substrate cases tend to be minimized. The values obtained are comparable to those observed in GaAs and semiconductor nitrides.

  18. Constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop instrument for measurement of ultrasonic velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, William T; Cantrell, John H; Kushnick, Peter W

    1991-10-01

    A new instrument based on a constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop (CFPPLL) concept has been developed to accurately measure the ultrasonicwavevelocity in liquids and changes in ultrasonicwavevelocity in solids and liquids. An analysis of the system shows that it is immune to many of the frequency-dependent effects that plague other techniques including the constant phase shifts of reflectors placed in the path of the ultrasonicwave.Measurements of the sound velocity in ultrapure water are used to confirm the analysis. The results are in excellent agreement with values from the literature, and establish that the CFPPLL provides a reliable, accurate way to measurevelocities, as well as for monitoring small changes in velocity without the sensitivity to frequency-dependent phase shifts common to other measurement systems. The estimated sensitivity to phase changes is better than a few parts in 10{sup 7}.

  19. Constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop instrument for measurement of ultrasonic velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Kushnick, Peter W.

    1991-01-01

    A new instrument based on a constant-frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop (CFPPLL) concept has been developed to accurately measure the ultrasonic wave velocity in liquids and changes in ultrasonic wave velocity in solids and liquids. An analysis of the system shows that it is immune to many of the frequency-dependent effects that plague other techniques. Measurements of the sound velocity in ultrapure water are used to confirm the analysis. The results are in excellent agreement with values from the literature, and establish that the CFPPLL provides a reliable, accurate way to measure velocities, as well as for monitoring small changes in velocity without the sensitivity to frequency-dependent phase shifts common to other measurement systems. The estimated sensitivity to phase changes is better than a few parts in 10 to the 7th.

  20. Frequency dependent FMR studies on pulsed laser ablated YIG films deposited on (111) GGG substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhoi, B.; Venkataramani, N.; Aiyar, R. P. R. C.; Prasad, Shiva; Kostylev, Mikhail; Stamps, R. L.

    2013-02-01

    Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) studies were carried out as a function of frequency on ex-situ post-annealed (Ta: 700 °C and 850 °C) YIG films. The films were deposited at TS: 750 °C on polished single crystal (111) GGG substrate using pulsed laser deposition. Both the films (Ta: 700 °C, 850 °C) shows a in-plane FMR line-width (ΔH) of 40 Oe and 50 Oe respectively which remains constant over a broad frequency range (8 GHz-20 GHz). On the other hand, a linear increment in in-plane resonance field (HR) has been observed with the increase in frequency of RF signal. The effective saturation magnetization (4πMeff) has been estimated for both the films using Kittel's equations and is found as 90% of the bulk value for the film deposited at 750 °C, annealed at 700 °C.

  1. Effect of source frequency and pulsing on the SiO2 etching characteristics of dual-frequency capacitive coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hoe Jun; Jeon, Min Hwan; Mishra, Anurag Kumar; Kim, In Jun; Sin, Tae Ho; Yeom, Geun Young

    2015-01-01

    A SiO2 layer masked with an amorphous carbon layer (ACL) has been etched in an Ar/C4F8 gas mixture with dual frequency capacitively coupled plasmas under variable frequency (13.56-60 MHz)/pulsed rf source power and 2 MHz continuous wave (CW) rf bias power, the effects of the frequency and pulsing of the source rf power on the SiO2 etch characteristics were investigated. By pulsing the rf power, an increased SiO2 etch selectivity was observed with decreasing SiO2 etch rate. However, when the rf power frequency was increased, not only a higher SiO2 etch rate but also higher SiO2 etch selectivity was observed for both CW and pulse modes. A higher CF2/F ratio and lower electron temperature were observed for both a higher source frequency mode and a pulsed plasma mode. Therefore, when the C 1s binding states of the etched SiO2 surfaces were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the increase of C-Fx bonding on the SiO2 surface was observed for a higher source frequency operation similar to a pulsed plasma condition indicating the increase of SiO2 etch selectivity over the ACL. The increase of the SiO2 etch rate with increasing etch selectivity for the higher source frequency operation appears to be related to the increase of the total plasma density with increasing CF2/F ratio in the plasma. The SiO2 etch profile was also improved not only by using the pulsed plasma but also by increasing the source frequency.

  2. 140 GHz pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Kolbe, W.F.; Leskovar, B.

    1985-07-29

    A high frequency energy pulsing system suitable for use in a pulsed microwave spectrometer, including means for generating a high frequency carrier signal, and means for generating a low frequency modulating signal. The carrier signal is continuously fed to a modulator and the modulating signal is fed through a pulse switch to the modulator. When the pulse switch is on, the modulator will produce sideband signals above and below the carrier signal frequency. A frequency-responsive device is tuned to one of the sideband signals and sway from the carrier frequency so that the high frequency energization of the frequency-responsive device is controlled by the pulse switch.

  3. High-frequency Rayleigh-wave method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Chen, C.; Liu, J.; Ivanov, J.; Zeng, C.

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency (???2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave data acquired with a multichannel recording system have been utilized to determine shear (S)-wave velocities in near-surface geophysics since the early 1980s. This overview article discusses the main research results of high-frequency surface-wave techniques achieved by research groups at the Kansas Geological Survey and China University of Geosciences in the last 15 years. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is a non-invasive acoustic approach to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that simultaneous inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. The other important seismic property, quality factor (Q), can also be estimated with the MASW method by inverting attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh waves. An inverted model (S-wave velocity or Q) obtained using a damped least-squares method can be assessed by an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of the inverted model determined by an objective function, which is the trace of a weighted sum of model-resolution and model-covariance matrices. Current developments include modeling high-frequency Rayleigh-waves in near-surface media, which builds a foundation for shallow seismic or Rayleigh-wave inversion in the time-offset domain; imaging dispersive energy with high resolution in the frequency-velocity domain and possibly with data in an arbitrary acquisition geometry, which opens a door for 3D surface-wave techniques; and successfully separating surface-wave modes, which provides a valuable tool to perform S-wave velocity profiling with high-horizontal resolution. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  4. Time resolved dosimetry of human brain exposed to low frequency pulsed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paffi, Alessandra; Camera, Francesca; Lucano, Elena; Apollonio, Francesca; Liberti, Micaela

    2016-06-01

    An accurate dosimetry is a key issue to understanding brain stimulation and related interaction mechanisms with neuronal tissues at the basis of the increasing amount of literature revealing the effects on human brain induced by low-level, low frequency pulsed magnetic fields (PMFs). Most literature on brain dosimetry estimates the maximum E field value reached inside the tissue without considering its time pattern or tissue dispersivity. Nevertheless a time-resolved dosimetry, accounting for dispersive tissues behavior, becomes necessary considering that the threshold for an effect onset may vary depending on the pulse waveform and that tissues may filter the applied stimulatory fields altering the predicted stimulatory waveform’s size and shape. In this paper a time-resolved dosimetry has been applied on a realistic brain model exposed to the signal presented in Capone et al (2009 J. Neural Transm. 116 257-65), accounting for the broadband dispersivity of brain tissues up to several kHz, to accurately reconstruct electric field and current density waveforms inside different brain tissues. The results obtained by exposing the Duke’s brain model to this PMF signal show that the E peak in the brain is considerably underestimated if a simple monochromatic dosimetry is carried out at the pulse repetition frequency of 75 Hz.

  5. Time resolved dosimetry of human brain exposed to low frequency pulsed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paffi, Alessandra; Camera, Francesca; Lucano, Elena; Apollonio, Francesca; Liberti, Micaela

    2016-06-01

    An accurate dosimetry is a key issue to understanding brain stimulation and related interaction mechanisms with neuronal tissues at the basis of the increasing amount of literature revealing the effects on human brain induced by low-level, low frequency pulsed magnetic fields (PMFs). Most literature on brain dosimetry estimates the maximum E field value reached inside the tissue without considering its time pattern or tissue dispersivity. Nevertheless a time-resolved dosimetry, accounting for dispersive tissues behavior, becomes necessary considering that the threshold for an effect onset may vary depending on the pulse waveform and that tissues may filter the applied stimulatory fields altering the predicted stimulatory waveform’s size and shape. In this paper a time-resolved dosimetry has been applied on a realistic brain model exposed to the signal presented in Capone et al (2009 J. Neural Transm. 116 257–65), accounting for the broadband dispersivity of brain tissues up to several kHz, to accurately reconstruct electric field and current density waveforms inside different brain tissues. The results obtained by exposing the Duke’s brain model to this PMF signal show that the E peak in the brain is considerably underestimated if a simple monochromatic dosimetry is carried out at the pulse repetition frequency of 75 Hz.

  6. Detection and Characterization of Flaws in Sprayed on Foam Insulation with Pulsed Terahertz Frequency Electromagnetic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2005-01-01

    The detection and repair of flaws such as voids and delaminations in the sprayed on foam insulation of the external tank reduces the probability of foam debris during shuttle ascent. The low density of sprayed on foam insulation along with it other physical properties makes detection of flaws difficult with conventional techniques. An emerging technology that has application for quantitative evaluation of flaws in the foam is pulsed electromagnetic waves at terahertz frequencies. The short wavelengths of these terahertz pulses make them ideal for imaging flaws in the foam. This paper examines the application of terahertz pulses for flaw detection in foam characteristic of the foam insulation of the external tank. Of particular interest is the detection of voids and delaminations, encapsulated in the foam or at the interface between the foam and a metal backing. The technique is shown to be capable of imaging small voids and delaminations through as much as 20 cm of foam. Methods for reducing the temporal responses of the terahertz pulses to improve flaw detection and yield quantitative characterizations of the size and location of the flaws are discussed.

  7. Investigation of the lasing characteristics of a barium vapor laser with pulse repetition frequencies up to 320 kHz for navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Polunin, Yu. P.

    2015-11-01

    Results of experimental investigations into the characteristics of a laser on self-terminating transitions of the barium atom with λ = 1499 nm are presented for high pulse repetition frequencies (PRF). The frequency-energy characteristics are investigated in the self-heating mode of laser operation. Record values of PRF for the barium vapor laser, equal to ~320 kHz, have been attained.

  8. Low-dispersion, high-gain femtosecond optical pulse amplifier.

    PubMed

    Rodenberger, D C; Grossman, C H; Garito, A F

    1990-05-01

    We demonstrate a novel amplifier for femtosecond optical pulses. The output of a colliding-pulse mode-locked laser is amplified to 0.3 microJ per pulse at a repetition rate of 8 kHz by using 1 W of pump power from a copper-vapor laser. Our high-efficiency amplifier focuses the beam for four gain passes through a thin dye stream that uses a Z configuration with matched focusing. Because of low group-velocity dispersion, the output pulses are only slightly broadened, from 63 to 73 fsec, and may be used directly to generate a white-light continuum without pulse compression after amplification. PMID:19767988

  9. Plasma Switch for High-Power Active Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-04

    Results are presented from experiments carried out at the Naval Research Laboratory X-band magnicon facility on a two-channel X-band active RF pulse compressor that employed plasma switches. Experimental evidence is shown to validate the basic goals of the project, which include: simultaneous firing of plasma switches in both channels of the RF circuit, operation of quasi-optical 3-dB hybrid directional coupler coherent superposition of RF compressed pulses from both channels, and operation of the X-band magnicon directly in the RF pulse compressor. For incident 1.2 ?s pulses in the range 0.63 ? 1.35 MW, compressed pulses of peak powers 5.7 ? 11.3 MW were obtained, corresponding to peak power gain ratios of 8.3 ? 9.3. Insufficient bakeout and conditioning of the high-power RF circuit prevented experiments from being conducted at higher RF input power levels.

  10. Precipitation pulse size and frequency controls on dryland litter decomposition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurupas, K. L.; Throop, H.

    2014-12-01

    Drylands are an important component of the global carbon (C) cycle, accounting for 40% of the land area and 20% of the soil organic C globally. Litter decomposition is a key biogeochemical process, controlling C and nutrient cycling. While simple decomposition models successfully predict decomposition rates in many systems based on climate variables, there is a disconnect between the modeled and measured rates decomposition in drylands. This disconnect may stem from abiotic factors of importance in drylands, such as photodegradation and soil-litter mixing, not being taken into account. Soil-litter mixing can accelerate decomposition, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Potential mechanisms include microclimate buffering, physical abrasion, and enhanced microbial colonization. Recent work suggests that litter decomposition is remarkably insensitive to climate variables, at least when variables are presented as long temporal-scale values (e.g., annual precipitation). We hypothesized that decomposition would be more strongly affected by litter moisture content than total precipitation (PPT) alone. Thus, frequent, small PPT pulses would accelerate decomposition more than larger, but infrequent pulses. Furthermore, soil-litter mixing would enhance decomposition by buffering litter moisture content. To test the combined influence of soil-litter mixing and PPT pulses on decomposition, we incubated litter and soil in a semi-controlled greenhouse which simulated dryland summer temperatures. Two litter types (grass and shrub) were incubated under two levels of soil-litter mixing (no mixing and complete soil-litter mixing) and with 16 different PPT treatments (a factorial combination of four PPT pulses sizes and four PPT frequencies). We measured instantaneous CO2 flux throughout the 30 day incubation and mass loss at the end of the incubation. Shrub litter decomposed faster than grass litter. Flux rates generally peaked at day 8 and declined thereafter. CO2

  11. Radome structures for high frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, W.

    The optimization of radome structures for high-frequency applications is examined for the cases of thin-walled radomes, thick-walled radomes, sandwich radomes, and multilayer radomes. Examples of applications are briefly described, including radomes in an ECM-pod of a Tornado aircraft, a radome for a mobile two-dimensional radar installation, and a radome for a millimeter wave search radar.

  12. Pulsed radio-frequency discharge inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for oxide analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weifeng; Yin, Zhibin; Hang, Wei; Li, Bin; Huang, Benli

    2016-08-01

    A direct solid sampling technique has been developed based on a pulsed radio-frequency discharge (RFD) in mixture of N2 and Ar environment at atmospheric pressure. With an averaged input power of 65 W, a crater with the diameter of 80 μm and depth of 50 μm can be formed on sample surface after discharge for 1 min, suggesting the feasibility of the pulsed RFD for sampling nonconductive solids. Combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), this technique allows to measure elemental composition of solids directly with relative standard deviation (RSD) of ~ 20%. Capability of quantitative analysis was demonstrated by the use of soil standards and artificial standards. Good calibration linearity and limits of detection (LODs) in range of 10- 8-10- 9 g/g were achieved for most elements.

  13. Assessment of non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Hannah

    2007-06-01

    The correct assessment of non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields already is a key issue in the occupational environment while becoming more and more important in the domain of the general public. The method presented provides a simple and safe solution for the assessment of arbitrary field types--including sinusoidal and continuous-wave signals--with frequencies up to several 100 kHz and has already proven its practicability and usefulness for more than 5 years. The concept is based on fundamental laws of physics and electrostimulation and well-established physiological data. It allows for a seamless and easy integration in any standard or guideline dealing with human safety in electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic fields. A very simple-to-use graphical version allows an easy and fast assessment of the exposure to non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent low-frequency magnetic fields without introducing a large overestimation of the exposure situation. A computer-based version makes a much more detailed signal analysis possible and can provide useful information for exposure reduction using modifications of the magnetic field's time parameters (e.g., rise/fall times). PMID:17495654

  14. Assessment of non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Hannah

    2007-06-01

    The correct assessment of non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields already is a key issue in the occupational environment while becoming more and more important in the domain of the general public. The method presented provides a simple and safe solution for the assessment of arbitrary field types--including sinusoidal and continuous-wave signals--with frequencies up to several 100 kHz and has already proven its practicability and usefulness for more than 5 years. The concept is based on fundamental laws of physics and electrostimulation and well-established physiological data. It allows for a seamless and easy integration in any standard or guideline dealing with human safety in electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic fields. A very simple-to-use graphical version allows an easy and fast assessment of the exposure to non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent low-frequency magnetic fields without introducing a large overestimation of the exposure situation. A computer-based version makes a much more detailed signal analysis possible and can provide useful information for exposure reduction using modifications of the magnetic field's time parameters (e.g., rise/fall times).

  15. Performance of annular high frequency thermoacoustic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Ivan A.

    This thesis presents studies of the behavior of miniature annular thermoacoustic prime movers and the imaging of the complex sound fields using PIV inside the small acoustic wave guides when driven by a temperature gradient. Thermoacoustic engines operating in the standing wave mode are limited in their acoustic efficiency by a high degree of irreversibility that is inherent in how they work. Better performance can be achieved by using traveling waves in the thermoacoustic devices. This has led to the development of an annular high frequency thermoacoustic prime mover consisting of a regenerator, which is a random stack in-between a hot and cold heat exchanger, inside an annular waveguide. Miniature devices were developed and studied with operating frequencies in the range of 2-4 kHz. This corresponds to an average ring circumference of 11 cm for the 3 kHz device, the resonator bore being 6 mm. A similar device of 11 mm bore, length of 18 cm was also investigated; its resonant frequency was 2 kHz. Sound intensities as high as 166.8 dB were generated with limited heat input. Sound power was extracted from the annular structure by an impedance-matching side arm. The nature of the acoustic wave generated by heat was investigated using a high speed PIV instrument. Although the acoustic device appears symmetric, its performance is characterized by a broken symmetry and by perturbations that exist in its structure. Effects of these are observed in the PIV imaging; images show axial and radial components. Moreover, PIV studies show effects of streaming and instabilities which affect the devices' acoustic efficiency. The acoustic efficiency is high, being of 40% of Carnot. This type of device shows much promise as a high efficiency energy converter; it can be reduced in size for microcircuit applications.

  16. Finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling with phase cycling for 2D 1H/1H correlation at ultrafast MAS frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Yusuke; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-06-01

    The first-order recoupling sequence radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR) is commonly used in single-quantum/single-quantum homonuclear correlation 2D experiments under magic angle spinning (MAS) to determine homonuclear proximities. From previously reported analysis of the use of XY-based super-cycling schemes to enhance the efficiency of the finite-pulse-RFDR (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence, XY814 phase cycling was found to provide the optimum performance for 2D correlation experiments on low-γ nuclei. In this study, we analyze the efficiency of different phase cycling schemes for proton-based fp-RFDR experiments. We demonstrate the advantages of using a short phase cycle, XY4, and its super-cycle XY414 that only recouples the zero-quantum homonuclear dipolar coupling, for the fp-RFDR sequence in 2D 1H/1H correlation experiments at ultrafast MAS frequencies. The dipolar recoupling efficiencies of XY4, XY414 and XY814 phase cycling schemes are compared based on results obtained from 2D 1H/1H correlation experiments, utilizing the fp-RFDR pulse sequence, on powder samples of U-13C,15N-L-alanine, N-acetyl-15N-L-valyl-15N-L-leucine, and glycine. Experimental results and spin dynamics simulations show that XY414 performs the best when a high RF power is used for the 180° pulse, whereas XY4 renders the best performance when a low RF power is used. The effects of RF field inhomogeneity and chemical shift offsets are also examined. Overall, our results suggest that a combination of fp-RFDR-XY414 employed in the recycle delay with a large RF-field to decrease the recycle delay, and fp-RFDR-XY4 in the mixing period with a moderate RF-field, is a robust and efficient method for 2D single-quantum/single-quantum 1H/1H correlation experiments at ultrafast MAS frequencies.

  17. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung

    1992-12-31

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  18. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung.

    1992-01-01

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  19. Using phase retrieval to measure the intensity and phase of ultrashort pulses: Frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Trebino, R. ); Kane, D.J. )

    1993-05-01

    The authors recently introduced a new technique, frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG). For directly determining the full intensity I(t) and phase [var phi](t) of a single femtosecond pulse. By using almost any instantaneous nonlinear-optical interaction of two replicas of the ultrashort pulse to be measured, FROG involves measuring the spectrum of the signal pulse as a function of the delay between the replicas. The resulting trace of intensity versus frequency and delay yields an intuitive display of the pulse that is similar to the pulse spectrogram, except that the gate is a function of the pulse to be measured. The problem of inverting the FROG trace to obtain the pulse intensity and phase can also be considered a complex two-dimensional phase-retrieval problem. As a result, the FROG trace yields, in principle, an essentially unique pulse intensity and phase. It is shown that this is also the case in practice. An iterative-Fourier-transform algorithm is presented for inverting the FROG trace. The algorithm is unusual in its use of a novel constraint: the mathematical form of the signal field. Without the use of a support constraint, the algorithm performs quite well in practice, even for pulses with serious phase distortions and for experimental data with noise, although it occasionally stagnates when pulses with large intensity fluctuations are used. 49 refs., 15 figs.

  20. A novel non-linear recursive filter design for extracting high rate pulse features in nuclear medicine imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sajedi, Salar; Kamal Asl, Alireza; Ay, Mohammad R; Farahani, Mohammad H; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-06-01

    Applications in imaging and spectroscopy rely on pulse processing methods for appropriate data generation. Often, the particular method utilized does not highly impact data quality, whereas in some scenarios, such as in the presence of high count rates or high frequency pulses, this issue merits extra consideration. In the present study, a new approach for pulse processing in nuclear medicine imaging and spectroscopy is introduced and evaluated. The new non-linear recursive filter (NLRF) performs nonlinear processing of the input signal and extracts the main pulse characteristics, having the powerful ability to recover pulses that would ordinarily result in pulse pile-up. The filter design defines sampling frequencies lower than the Nyquist frequency. In the literature, for systems involving NaI(Tl) detectors and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), with a signal bandwidth considered as 15 MHz, the sampling frequency should be at least 30 MHz (the Nyquist rate), whereas in the present work, a sampling rate of 3.3 MHz was shown to yield very promising results. This was obtained by exploiting the known shape feature instead of utilizing a general sampling algorithm. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed filter enhances count rates in spectroscopy. With this filter, the system behaves almost identically as a general pulse detection system with a dead time considerably reduced to the new sampling time (300 ns). Furthermore, because of its unique feature for determining exact event times, the method could prove very useful in time-of-flight PET imaging.

  1. Numerical Simulations of High Enthalpy Pulse Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory J.; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Axisymmetric flows within shock tubes and expansion tubes are simulated including the effects of finite rate chemistry and both laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The simulations demonstrate the usefulness of computational fluid dynamics for characterizing the flows in high enthalpy pulse facilities. The modeling and numerical requirements necessary to simulate these flows accurately are also discussed. Although there is a large body of analysis which explains and quantifies the boundary layer growth between the shock and the interface in a shock tube, there is a need for more detailed solutions. Phenomena such as thermochemical nonequilibrium. or turbulent transition behind the shock are excluded in the assumptions of Mirels' analysis. Additionally there is inadequate capability to predict the influence of the boundary layer on the expanded gas behind the interface. Quantifying the gas in this region is particularly important in expansion tubes because it is the location of the test gas. Unsteady simulations of the viscous flow in shock tubes are computationally expensive because they must follow features such as a shock wave over the length of the facility and simultaneously resolve the small length scales within the boundary layer. As a result, efficient numerical algorithms are required. The numerical approach of the present work is to solve the axisymmetric gas dynamic equations using an finite-volume formulation where the inviscid fluxes are computed with a upwind TVD scheme. Multiple species equations are included in the formulation so that finite-rate chemistry can be modeled. The simulations cluster grid points at the shock and interface and translate this clustered grid with these features to minimize numerical errors. The solutions are advanced at a CFL number of less than one based on the inviscid gas dynamics. To avoid limitations on the time step due to the viscous terms, these terms are treated implicitly. This requires a block tri

  2. Pulsed high energy synthesis of fine metal powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas (Inventor); Massey, Dennis W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Repetitively pulsed plasma jets generated by a capillary arc discharge at high stagnation pressure (>15,000 psi) and high temperature (>10,000 K) are utilized to produce 0.1-10 .mu.m sized metal powders and decrease cost of production. The plasma jets impact and atomize melt materials to form the fine powders. The melt can originate from a conventional melt stream or from a pulsed arc between two electrodes. Gas streams used in conventional gas atomization are replaced with much higher momentum flux plasma jets. Delivering strong incident shocks aids in primary disintegration of the molten material. A series of short duration, high pressure plasma pulses fragment the molten material. The pulses introduce sharp velocity gradients in the molten material which disintegrates into fine particles. The plasma pulses have peak pressures of approximately one kilobar. The high pressures improve the efficiency of disintegration. High gas flow velocities and pressures are achieved without reduction in gas density. Repetitively pulsed plasma jets will produce powders with lower mean size and narrower size distribution than conventional atomization techniques.

  3. High-frequency plasma-heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brambilla, Marco; Lallia, Pascal

    1978-01-01

    An array of adjacent wave guides feed high-frequency energy into a vacuum chamber in which a toroidal plasma is confined by a magnetic field, the wave guide array being located between two toroidal current windings. Waves are excited in the wave guide at a frequency substantially equal to the lower frequency hybrid wave of the plasma and a substantially equal phase shift is provided from one guide to the next between the waves therein. For plasmas of low peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TE.sub.01 mode and the output electric field is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. For exciting waves in plasmas of high peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TM.sub.01 mode and the magnetic field at the wave guide outlets is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. The wave excited at the outlet of the wave guide array is a progressive wave propagating in the direction opposite to that of the toroidal current and is, therefore, not absorbed by so-called "runaway" electrons.

  4. Pulse shortening in high-peak-power Reltron tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. Bruce

    1996-10-01

    Most high-peak-power (>= 100 MW) microwave tubes are seemingly limited to an output RF energy per pulse of about 100 J. While Titan's L-band Reltron tubes have achieved 250 J/pulse, we have also observed pulse-shortening phenomena in both the modulating cavity and output cavity regions. We have examined the effects of construction materials, fabrication techniques, vacuum pressure, and conditioning. We will present data from these experiments and discuss a plausible pulse-shortening hypothesis involving electric- field-induced gas evolution and subsequent ionization. We believe that our energy-per-pulse limitations are the result of our current tube construction approach which uses explosive emission cathodes, plastic insulators, and grids to define cavity boundaries. While some simple extensions of this approach offers some hope for increasing the energy per pulse to perhaps 500 joules in L-band, we believe that achieving >= 1 kJ/pulse will require the use of conventional microwave tube construction techniques, including thermionic cathodes, ceramic insulators, and brazed joining with high-temperature bakeout. We will present the design of an L-band Reltron tube having these features.

  5. Lightweight, broadband, pulsed, frequency agile, self-screening jammer for airborne deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, Richard P.

    1989-12-01

    A broadband RF microwave source is used to generate a high-energy, narrow pulse which is used to provide the illuminating signal for an active radar system while simultaneously jamming other active radar systems. The generation of the RF microwave energy utilizes a spark gap generation systems. Jamming is accomplished by overload ringing of the receiver portion of the other radar system.

  6. Experimental validation of a high voltage pulse measurement method.

    SciTech Connect

    Cular, Stefan; Patel, Nishant Bhupendra; Branch, Darren W.

    2013-09-01

    This report describes X-cut lithium niobates (LiNbO3) utilization for voltage sensing by monitoring the acoustic wave propagation changes through LiNbO3 resulting from applied voltage. Direct current (DC), alternating current (AC) and pulsed voltage signals were applied to the crystal. Voltage induced shift in acoustic wave propagation time scaled quadratically for DC and AC voltages and linearly for pulsed voltages. The measured values ranged from 10 - 273 ps and 189 ps 2 ns for DC and non-DC voltages, respectively. Data suggests LiNbO3 has a frequency sensitive response to voltage. If voltage source error is eliminated through physical modeling from the uncertainty budget, the sensors U95 estimated combined uncertainty could decrease to ~0.025% for DC, AC, and pulsed voltage measurements.

  7. High power and high SFDR frequency conversion using sum frequency generation in KTP waveguides.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Russell J; Brewer, Tyler; Barber, Zeb W

    2016-08-01

    We characterize the intermodulation distortion of high power and efficient frequency conversion of modulated optical signals based on sum frequency generation (SFG) in a periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) waveguide. Unwanted frequency two-tone spurs are generated near the converted signal via a three-step cascaded three-wave mixing process. Computer simulations describing the process are presented along with the experimental measurements. High-conversion efficiencies and large spur-free dynamic range of the converted optical signal are demonstrated. PMID:27472638

  8. Parametric nanomechanical amplification at very high frequency.

    PubMed

    Karabalin, R B; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L

    2009-09-01

    Parametric resonance and amplification are important in both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here we report very high frequency (VHF) parametric resonators and mechanical-domain amplifiers based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Compound mechanical nanostructures patterned by multilayer, top-down nanofabrication are read out by a novel scheme that parametrically modulates longitudinal stress in doubly clamped beam NEMS resonators. Parametric pumping and signal amplification are demonstrated for VHF resonators up to approximately 130 MHz and provide useful enhancement of both resonance signal amplitude and quality factor. We find that Joule heating and reduced thermal conductance in these nanostructures ultimately impose an upper limit to device performance. We develop a theoretical model to account for both the parametric response and nonequilibrium thermal transport in these composite nanostructures. The results closely conform to our experimental observations, elucidate the frequency and threshold-voltage scaling in parametric VHF NEMS resonators and sensors, and establish the ultimate sensitivity limits of this approach. PMID:19736969

  9. High-frequency ultrasonic wire bonding systems

    PubMed

    Tsujino; Yoshihara; Sano; Ihara

    2000-03-01

    The vibration characteristics of longitudinal-complex transverse vibration systems with multiple resonance frequencies of 350-980 kHz for ultrasonic wire bonding of IC, LSI or electronic devices were studied. The complex vibration systems can be applied for direct welding of semiconductor tips (face-down bonding, flip-chip bonding) and packaging of electronic devices. A longitudinal-complex transverse vibration bonding system consists of a complex transverse vibration rod, two driving longitudinal transducers 7.0 mm in diameter and a transverse vibration welding tip. The vibration distributions along ceramic and stainless-steel welding tips were measured at up to 980 kHz. A high-frequency vibration system with a height of 20.7 mm and a weight of less than 15 g was obtained.

  10. Parametric nanomechanical amplification at very high frequency.

    PubMed

    Karabalin, R B; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L

    2009-09-01

    Parametric resonance and amplification are important in both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here we report very high frequency (VHF) parametric resonators and mechanical-domain amplifiers based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Compound mechanical nanostructures patterned by multilayer, top-down nanofabrication are read out by a novel scheme that parametrically modulates longitudinal stress in doubly clamped beam NEMS resonators. Parametric pumping and signal amplification are demonstrated for VHF resonators up to approximately 130 MHz and provide useful enhancement of both resonance signal amplitude and quality factor. We find that Joule heating and reduced thermal conductance in these nanostructures ultimately impose an upper limit to device performance. We develop a theoretical model to account for both the parametric response and nonequilibrium thermal transport in these composite nanostructures. The results closely conform to our experimental observations, elucidate the frequency and threshold-voltage scaling in parametric VHF NEMS resonators and sensors, and establish the ultimate sensitivity limits of this approach.

  11. Nonlinear frequency up-conversion of femtosecond pulses from an erbium fibre laser to the range of 0.8 - 1 {mu}m in silica fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Anashkina, E A; Andrianov, A V; Kim, A V

    2013-03-31

    We consider different mechanisms of nonlinear frequency up-conversion of femtosecond pulses emitted by an erbium fibre system ({lambda} = 1.5 {mu}m) to the range of 0.8 - 1.2 {mu}m in nonlinear silica fibres. The generation efficiency and the centre frequencies of dispersive waves are found as functions of the parameters of the fibre and the input pulse. Simple analytical estimates are obtained for the spectral distribution of the intensity and the frequency shift of a wave packet in the region of normal dispersion during the emission of a high-order soliton under phase matching conditions. In the geometrical optics approximation the frequency shifts are estimated in the interaction of dispersive waves with solitons in various regimes. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  12. Impedance matching network for high frequency ultrasonic transducer for cellular applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Gon; Yoon, Sangpil; Kim, Hyung Ham; Shung, K Kirk

    2016-02-01

    An approach for the design of an impedance matching network (IMN) for high frequency ultrasonic transducers with large apertures based on impedance analysis for cellular applications is presented in this paper. The main objectives were to maximize energy transmission from the excitation source to the ultrasonic transducers for cell manipulation and to achieve low input parameters for the safe operation of an ultrasonic transducer because the piezoelectric material in high frequency ultrasonic transducers is prone to breakage due to its being extremely thin. Two ultrasonic transducers, which were made of lithium niobate single crystal with the thickness of 15 μm, having apertures of 4.3 mm (fnumber=1.23) and 2.6mm (fnumber=0.75) were tested. L-type IMN was selected for high sensitivity and compact design of the ultrasonic transducers. The target center frequency was chosen as the frequency where the electrical admittance (|Y|) and phase angle (θz) from impedance analysis was maximal and zero, respectively. The reference center frequency and reference echo magnitude were selected as the center frequency and echo magnitude, measured by pulse-echo testing, of the ultrasonic transducer without IMN. Initial component values and topology of IMN were determined using the Smith chart, and pulse-echo testing was analyzed to verify the performance of the ultrasonic transducers with and without IMN. After several iterations between changing component values and topology of IMN, and pulse-echo measurement of the ultrasonic transducer with IMN, optimized component values and topology of IMN were chosen when the measured center frequency from pulse-echo testing was comparable to the target frequency, and the measured echo magnitude was at least 30% larger than the reference echo magnitude. Performance of an ultrasonic transducer with and without IMN was tested by observing a tangible dent on the surface of a plastic petridish and single cell response after an acoustic pulse was

  13. Effects of low frequency pulsed electrical current on keratinocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Hinsenkamp, M.; Jercinovic, A.

    1997-05-01

    The effects of low frequency pulsed electrical current on epidermal repair in vitro were examined. Charge-balanced current stimuli proposed for chronic wound treatment were tested on skin keratinocytes cultured at an air-liquid interface on dead human dermis. Results imply that the balance between proliferation and differentiation in electrically treated samples is significantly modified in favor of differentiation. More advanced differentiation, shown through epidermal histology, was obtained in cultures exposed to electrical current, whereas the culture growth, the result of keratinocyte migration and proliferation, was greater in control samples.

  14. Self-focusing and frequency broadening of laser pulse in water

    SciTech Connect

    Sati, Priti; Tripathi, V. K.; Verma, Updesh

    2014-11-15

    An analytical model for the avalanche breakdown of water by an intense short laser pulse of finite spot size is developed. Initially, the laser undergoes self-focusing due to Kerr nonlinearity. As it acquires large intensity, it causes heating and avalanche breakdown of water. The plasma thus created on the laser axis causes nonlinear refraction induced defocusing of the laser. Thermal conduction tends to flatten the temperature profile and reduce the nonlinear refraction. The plasma density modification leads to frequency broadening of the laser.

  15. Dual Frequency Band Annular Probe for Volumetric Pulse-echo Optoacoustic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkhoran, Mohammad Azizian; Varray, François; Vray, Didier

    Optoacoustic (OA) pulse echo (PE) imaging is a hybridized modality that is capable of providing physiological information on the basis of anatomical structure. In this work, we propose a dual frequency band annular probe for backward mode volumetric PE/OA imaging. The performance of this design is evaluated based on the spatio-temporal impulse response, three dimensional steerability of the transducer and point spread function. Optimum settings for number of elements in each ring and maximum steering are suggested. The transducer design and synthetic array beamforming simulation are presented. The resolution performance and reconstruction capabilities are shown with the in-silico measurements.

  16. Watermarking of linear frequency modulated pulses using chirplet graphs and stretch processing.

    PubMed

    Mobasseri, Bijan G; Nimbagal, Anirudh

    2015-12-01

    In many underwater acoustics problems such as search and rescue, it is desirable to establish the source of the sonar pings. In this paper a methodology is proposed to watermark sonar pulses prior to transmission by embedding them with a chain of low power chirplets represented by a graph. Watermark detection is formulated using stretch processing where chirplet energies are focused on a single beat frequency only if the graph is traversed along the same path used at the source. The algorithm is tested by simulation in shallow water at varying ranges.

  17. Watermarking of linear frequency modulated pulses using chirplet graphs and stretch processing.

    PubMed

    Mobasseri, Bijan G; Nimbagal, Anirudh

    2015-12-01

    In many underwater acoustics problems such as search and rescue, it is desirable to establish the source of the sonar pings. In this paper a methodology is proposed to watermark sonar pulses prior to transmission by embedding them with a chain of low power chirplets represented by a graph. Watermark detection is formulated using stretch processing where chirplet energies are focused on a single beat frequency only if the graph is traversed along the same path used at the source. The algorithm is tested by simulation in shallow water at varying ranges. PMID:26723363

  18. Pulse retrieval in frequency-resolved optical gating based on the method of generalized projections

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Trebino, R. ); Kohler, B.; Wilson, K. )

    1994-12-15

    We use the algorithmic method of generalized projections (GP's) to retrieve the intensity and phase of an ultrashort laser pulse from the experimental trace in frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG). Using simulations, we show that the use of GP's improves significantly the convergence properties of the algorithm over the basic FROG algorithm. In experimental measurements, the GP-based algorithm achieves significantly lower errors than previous algorithms. The use of GP's also permits the inclusion of an arbitrary material response function in the FROG problem.

  19. Study of switching transients in high frequency converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinger, Donald S.; Elbuluk, Malik E.; Lee, Tony

    1993-01-01

    As the semiconductor technologies progress rapidly, the power densities and switching frequencies of many power devices are improved. With the existing technology, high frequency power systems become possible. Use of such a system is advantageous in many aspects. A high frequency ac source is used as the direct input to an ac/ac pulse-density-modulation (PDM) converter. This converter is a new concept which employs zero voltage switching techniques. However, the development of this converter is still in its infancy stage. There are problems associated with this converter such as a high on-voltage drop, switching transients, and zero-crossing detecting. Considering these problems, the switching speed and power handling capabilities of the MOS-Controlled Thyristor (MCT) makes the device the most promising candidate for this application. A complete insight of component considerations for building an ac/ac PDM converter for a high frequency power system is addressed. A power device review is first presented. The ac/ac PDM converter requires switches that can conduct bi-directional current and block bi-directional voltage. These bi-directional switches can be constructed using existing power devices. Different bi-directional switches for the converter are investigated. Detailed experimental studies of the characteristics of the MCT under hard switching and zero-voltage switching are also presented. One disadvantage of an ac/ac converter is that turn-on and turn-off of the switches has to be completed instantaneously when the ac source is at zero voltage. Otherwise shoot-through current or voltage spikes can occur which can be hazardous to the devices. In order for the devices to switch softly in the safe operating area even under non-ideal cases, a unique snubber circuit is used in each bi-directional switch. Detailed theory and experimental results for circuits using these snubbers are presented. A current regulated ac/ac PDM converter built using MCT's and IGBT's is

  20. Phase calibration of sonar systems using standard targets and dual-frequency transmission pulses.

    PubMed

    Islas-Cital, Alan; Atkins, Philip R; Foo, Kae Y; Picó, Ruben

    2011-10-01

    The phase angle component of the complex frequency response of a sonar system operating near transducer resonance is usually distorted. Interpretation and classification of the received sonar signal benefits from the preservation of waveform fidelity over the full bandwidth. A calibration process that measures the phase response in addition to the amplitude response is thus required. This paper describes an extension to the standard-target calibration method to include phase angle, without affecting the experimental apparatus, by using dual-frequency transmission pulses and frequency-domain data processing. This approach reduces the impact of unknown range and sound speed parameters upon phase calibration accuracy, as target phase is determined from the relationship of the two frequency components instead of relying on a local phase reference. Tungsten carbide spheres of various sizes were used to simultaneously calibrate the amplitude and phase response of an active sonar system in a laboratory tank. Experimental measurements of target phase spectra are in good agreement with values predicted from a theoretical model based upon full-wave analysis, over an operating frequency of 50-125 kHz.