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Sample records for high intensity led

  1. Inhibition of enteric pathogens using integrated high intensity 405 nm LED on the surface of almonds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The disinfecting properties of 405 nm light were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and their non-pathogenic surrogates inoculated onto the surface of almonds. High intensity monochromatic light was generated from an array of narrow-band 405 nm light emitting diodes (LED). Al...

  2. Clinical effect of reducing curing times with high-intensity LED lights

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Justin D.; Wolf, Bethany J.; Leite, Luis P.; Zhou, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical performance of brackets cured with a high-intensity, light-emitting diode (LED) with a shorter curing time. Materials and Methods Thirty-four patients and a total of 680 brackets were examined using a randomized split-mouth design. The maxillary right and mandibular left quadrants were cured for 6 seconds with a high-intensity LED light (3200 mW/cm2) and the maxillary left and mandibular right quadrants were cured for 20 seconds with a standard-intensity LED light (1200 mW/cm2). Alternating patients had the quadrants inverted for the curing protocol. The number and date of each first-time bracket failure was recorded from 199 to 585 days posttreatment. Results The bracket failure rate was 1.18% for both curing methods. The proportion of bracket failure was not significantly different between curing methods (P = 1.000), genders (P = 1.000), jaws (P = .725), sides (P = .725), or quadrants (P = .547). Posterior teeth exhibited a greater proportion of failures (2.21%) relative to anterior teeth (0.49%), although the difference was not statistically significant (P = .065). Conclusions No difference was found in bond failure rates between the two curing methods. Both methods showed bond failure rates low enough to be considered clinically sufficient. The high-intensity LED light used with a shorter curing time may be considered an advantage due to the reduced chair time. PMID:25760887

  3. New treatment of cellulite with infrared-LED illumination applied during high-intensity treadmill training.

    PubMed

    Paolillo, Fernanda Rossi; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2011-08-01

    Phototherapy improves cellular activation which is an important factor for the treatment of cellulite. The objective of this research was to develop and evaluate the effects of a new (noninvasive and nonpharmacological) clinical procedure to improve body aesthetics: infrared-LED (850 nm) plus treadmill training. Twenty women (25-55 years old) participated in this study. They were separated in two groups: the control group, which carried out only the treadmill training (n = 10), and the LED group, with phototherapy during the treadmill training (n = 10). The training was performed for 45 minutes twice a week over 3 months at intensities between 85% and 90% maximal heart rate (HR(max)). The irradiation parameters were 39 mW/cm(2) and a fluence of 106 J/cm(2). The treatment was evaluated by interpreting body composition parameters, photographs and thermography. This was primarily a treatment for cellulite with a reduction of saddlebag and thigh circumference. At the same time, the treadmill training prevented an increase of body fat, as well as the loss of lean mass. Moreover, thermal images of the temperature modification of the thighs are presented. These positive effects can result in a further improvement of body aesthetics using infrared-LED together with treadmill training.

  4. Efficiency of dual-cured resin cement polymerization induced by high-intensity LED curing units through ceramic material.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, H; Kazama, Re; Asai, T; Kanaya, F; Ishizaki, H; Fukushima, M; Okiji, T

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ability of high-intensity light-emitting diode (LED) and other curing units to cure dual-cured resin cement through ceramic material. A halogen curing unit (Jetlite 3000, Morita), a second-generation LED curing unit (Demi, Kerr), and two high-intensity LED curing units (PenCure 2000, Morita; Valo, Ultradent) were tested. Feldspathic ceramic plates (VITABLOCS Mark II, A3; Vita Zahnfabrik) with thicknesses of 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 mm were prepared. Dual-cured resin cement samples (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray Noritake Dental) were irradiated directly or through one of the ceramic plates for different periods (5, 10, 15, or 20 seconds for the high-intensity LED units and 20, 40, 60, or 80 seconds for the others). The Knoop hardness test was used to determine the level of photopolymerization that had been induced in the resin cement. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Dunnett's post-hoc test to identify test-control (maximum irradiation without a ceramic plate) differences for each curing unit (p<0.05). For all curing units, the curing conditions had a statistically significant effect on the Knoop hardness numbers (KHNs) of the irradiated cement samples (p<0.001). In general, the KHN decreased with increasing plate thickness and increased as the irradiation period was extended. Jetlite 3000 achieved control-level KHN values only when the plate thickness was 1.0 mm. At a plate thickness ≥2.0 mm, the LED units (except for PenCure 2000 at 3.0 mm) were able to achieve control-level KHN values when the irradiation time was extended. At a plate thickness of 3.0 mm, irradiation for 20 seconds with the Valo or for 80 seconds with the Demi were the only methods that produced KHN values equivalent to those produced by direct irradiation. Regardless of the type of curing unit used, indirect irradiation of dual-cured resin cement through a ceramic plate resulted in decreased KHN values compared with direct irradiation. When

  5. Comparison of Depth of Cure, Hardness and Heat Generation of LED and High Intensity QTH Light Sources.

    PubMed

    Mousavinasab, Sayed Mostafa; Meyers, Ian

    2011-07-01

    To compare curing performance of a second generation LED curing light with a high power tungsten quartz halogen (QTH). A hybrid composite resin (Filtek Z 250, 3M, USA) was used as test material and cured using a second generation LED light (Translux Power Blue™, Heraus Kulzer ,Germany) or a very high power QTH light unit (EMS, Switzerland). A two split aluminum mold was used to prepare ten samples with LED light source cured for forty seconds and ten samples prepared using high power QTH light unit, cured for four or six seconds recommended exposure time. Hardness, depth of cure (DOC) and thermal rise during exposure time by these light sources were measured. The data submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey's and student's t tests at 5% significance level. Significant differences were found in hardness, DOC of samples cured by above mentioned light sources and also in thermal rises during exposure time. The curing performance of the tested QTH was not as well as the LED light. TPB light source produced the maximum hardness (81.25, 73.29, 65.49,55.83 and 24.53 for 0 mm, 1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm and 4 mm intervals) and DOC (2.64 mm) values with forty seconds irradiation time and the high power (QTH) the least hardness (73.27, 61.51 and 31.59 for 0 mm, 1 mm and 2 mm, respectively) and DOC (2 mm) values with four seconds irradiation time. Thermal rises during 4 s and 6 s curing time using high power QTH and tested LED were 1.88°C, 3°C and 1.87°C, respectively. The used high power LED light produced greater hardness and depth of cure during forty seconds exposure time compared to high power QTH light with four or six seconds curing time. Thermal rise during 6 s curing time with QTH was greater compared to thermal changes occurred during 40 s curing time with tested LED light source. There was no difference seen in thermal changes caused by LED light with 40 s and QTH light with 4 s exposure time.

  6. Inhibition of enteric pathogens and surrogates using integrated, high intensity 405nm led light on the surface of almonds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The disinfecting properties of 405 nm light were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and their non-pathogenic surrogate bacteria on the surface of almonds. High intensity monochromatic blue light (MBL) was generated from an array of narrow-band 405 nm light-emitting diodes (LE...

  7. Thermal risks from LED- and high-intensity QTH-curing units during polymerization of dental resins.

    PubMed

    Bouillaguet, Serge; Caillot, Guillaume; Forchelet, Jacques; Cattani-Lorente, Maria; Wataha, John C; Krejci, Ivo

    2005-02-15

    The aim of this study was to test the ability of an infrared (IR) camera to assess temperature changes and distributions in teeth below restorations when quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) and light-emitting diode (LED) curing lights were used to photopolymerize the restorative material. Our hypothesis was that the higher power density and broader spectral distribution of the QTH source would cause greater increases in tooth temperature than the LED source, and that these differences would be best demonstrated with the IR camera. Cavities were prepared on human third molars and restored with a resin composite restorative material. The material was light-cured using three light-curing sources using several exposure times. The external (outside the tooth) and internal (inside the pulp chamber) temperature changes during polymerization of the composite material were recorded over 360 s with thermocouples and an IR camera. Using thermocouples the maximum increase in external temperature (+17.7 degrees C) was reported for the Swiss Master light after 20 s of curing time while the minimum temperature rise (+7.8 degrees C) was reported for the Freelight 2. Whereas a 2.6 degrees C increase in internal temperature was observed after curing 20 s with the Freelight 2, 7.1 degrees C was reported after 60 s of light exposure to Astralis 10. Infrared images showed similar trends in external-internal rises in temperature as the thermocouples, although temperatures measured by the IR were generally higher. These results indicate that the higher power density QTH sources caused greater increases in tooth temperatures than the LED source and that thermocouples may underestimate the heat applied to the tooth.

  8. Multicolor, High Efficiency, Nanotextured LEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Jung Han; Arto Nurmikko

    2011-09-30

    We report on research results in this project which synergize advanced material science approaches with fundamental optical physics concepts pertaining to light-matter interaction, with the goal of solving seminal problems for the development of very high performance light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the blue and green for Solid State Lighting applications. Accomplishments in the duration of the contract period include (i) heteroepitaxy of nitrogen-polar LEDs on sapphire, (ii) heteroepitaxy of semipolar (11{bar 2}2) green LEDs on sapphire, (iii) synthesis of quantum-dot loaded nanoporous GaN that emits white light without phosphor conversion, (iv) demonstration of the highest quality semipolar (11{bar 2}2) GaN on sapphire using orientation-controlled epitaxy, (v) synthesis of nanoscale GaN and InGaN medium, and (vi) development of a novel liftoff process for manufacturing GaN thin-film vertical LEDs. The body of results is presented in this report shows how a solid foundation has been laid, with several noticeable accomplishments, for innovative research, consistent with the stated milestones.

  9. LED headlight architecture that creates a high quality beam pattern independent of LED shortcomings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dross, Oliver; Cvetkovic, Aleksandra; Chaves, Julio; Benitez, Pablo; Minano, Juan C.

    2005-08-01

    One of the most challenging applications for high brightness LEDs is in automotive headlights. Optical designs for a low or high beam headlights are plagued by the low flux and luminance of LEDs compared to HID or incandescent sources, by mechanical chip placement tolerances and by color and flux variations between different LEDs. Furthermore the creation of a sharp cutoff is very difficult without baffles or other lossy devices. We present a novel LED headlight design that addresses all of the above problems by mixing the light of several LEDs first in a tailored light guide called LED combiner, thereby reducing color and flux variations between different LEDs and illuminance and color variations across the LED surfaces. The LED combiner forms a virtual source tailored to the application. The illuminance distribution of this virtual source facilitates the generation of the desired intensity pattern by projecting it into the far field. The projection is accomplished by one refractive and one reflective freeform surface calculated by the 3D SMS method. A high quality intensity pattern shape and a very sharp cutoff are created tolerant to LED to optics misalignment and illuminance variations across the LED surface. A low and high beam design with more than 75% total optical efficiency (without cover lens) and performance as latest HID headlights have been achieved. Furthermore it is shown that the architecture has similar tolerance requirements as conventional mass produced headlights.

  10. Intensity estimation method of LED array for visible light communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Takanori; Yendo, Tomohiro; Arai, Shintaro; Yamazato, Takaya; Okada, Hiraku; Fujii, Toshiaki

    2013-03-01

    This paper focuses on a road-to-vehicle visible light communication (VLC) system using LED traffic light as the transmitter and camera as the receiver. The traffic light is composed of a hundred of LEDs on two dimensional plain. In this system, data is sent as two dimensional brightness patterns by controlling each LED of the traffic light individually, and they are received as images by the camera. Here, there are problems that neighboring LEDs on the received image are merged due to less number of pixels in case that the receiver is distant from the transmitter, and/or due to blurring by defocus of the camera. Because of that, bit error rate (BER) increases due to recognition error of intensity of LEDs To solve the problem, we propose a method that estimates the intensity of LEDs by solving the inverse problem of communication channel characteristic from the transmitter to the receiver. The proposed method is evaluated by BER characteristics which are obtained by computer simulation and experiments. In the result, the proposed method can estimate with better accuracy than the conventional methods, especially in case that the received image is blurred a lot, and the number of pixels is small.

  11. Effects of various LED light wavelengths and light intensity supply strategies on synthetic high-strength wastewater purification by Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Yan, Cheng; Zhao, Yongjun; Zheng, Zheng; Luo, Xingzhang

    2013-09-01

    Chemical fertilizer agricultural wastewater is a typical high-strength wastewater that has dramatically triggered numerous environmental problems in China. The Chlorella vulgaris microalgae biological wastewater treatment system used in this study can effectively decontaminate the high-strength carbon and nitrogen wastewater under an optimum light wavelength and light intensity supply strategy. The descending order of both the dry weight for C. vulgaris reproduction and wastewater nutrient removal efficiency is red > white > yellow > purple > blue > green, which indicates that red light is the optimum light wavelength. Furthermore, rather than constant light, optimal light intensity is used for the incremental light intensity strategy. The phases for the optimal light intensity supply strategy are as follows: Phase 1 from 0 to 48 h at 800 μmol m(-2) s(-1); Phase 2 from 48 to 96 h at 1,200 μmol m(-2) s(-1); and Phase 3 from 96 to 144 h at 1,600 μmol m(-2) s(-1). Additionally, the optimal cultivation time is 144 h.

  12. High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

    2012-05-14

    UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

  13. Applying micro genetic algorithm to numerical model for luminous intensity distribution of planar prism LED luminaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yu-Sin; Choi, An-Seop; Jeong, Jae-Weon

    2013-04-01

    Several technological problems have to be resolved for LED to be used as a general purpose light source. For instance, LED luminaires have a property of high luminance due to a narrow beam angle and a small volume compared to general light sources. There are several differences between existing luminaires and the intensity distribution of an LED luminaire. An optical engineer has the challenging problem of designing a spatially extended and non-uniform light source. It is difficult for LED luminaires to obtain the target luminous intensity distribution required in a space, because the design process requires much trial and error. And the process also requires much design time. In this study, an optimization algorithm of a numerical model for luminous intensity distribution of planar LED luminaires was developed to find optimized prism angles. This algorithm would used the micro genetic algorithm technique which is the improved form of genetic algorithms. Also, this algorithm is capable of deriving the optimized angle of a prism to achieve the target luminous intensity distribution of planar prism LED luminaires. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to introduce a numerical model of a planar prism LED luminaire and to develop a optimization algorithm that is able to find an optimum luminaire optical design solution using the micro genetic algorithm.

  14. High-power LED package requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Frank; Martin, Paul S.; Harbers, Gerard

    2004-01-01

    Power LEDs have evolved from simple indicators into illumination devices. For general lighting applications, where the objective is to light up an area, white LED arrays have been utilized to serve that function. Cost constraints will soon drive the industry to provide a discrete lighting solution. Early on, that will mean increasing the power densities while quantum efficiencies are addressed. For applications such as automotive headlamps & projection, where light needs to be tightly collimated, or controlled, arrays of die or LEDs will not be able to satisfy the requirements & limitations defined by etendue. Ultimately, whether a luminaire requires a small source with high luminance, or light spread over a general area, economics will force the evolution of the illumination LED into a compact discrete high power package. How the customer interfaces with this new package should be an important element considered early on in the design cycle. If an LED footprint of adequate size is not provided, it may prove impossible for the customer, or end user, to get rid of the heat in a manner sufficient to prevent premature LED light output degradation. Therefore it is critical, for maintaining expected LED lifetime & light output, that thermal performance parameters be defined, by design, at the system level, which includes heat sinking methods & interface materials or methdology.

  15. White LED with High Package Extraction Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Zheng; Matthew Stough

    2008-09-30

    The goal of this project is to develop a high efficiency phosphor converting (white) Light Emitting Diode (pcLED) 1-Watt package through an increase in package extraction efficiency. A transparent/translucent monolithic phosphor is proposed to replace the powdered phosphor to reduce the scattering caused by phosphor particles. Additionally, a multi-layer thin film selectively reflecting filter is proposed between blue LED die and phosphor layer to recover inward yellow emission. At the end of the project we expect to recycle approximately 50% of the unrecovered backward light in current package construction, and develop a pcLED device with 80 lm/W{sub e} using our technology improvements and commercially available chip/package source. The success of the project will benefit luminous efficacy of white LEDs by increasing package extraction efficiency. In most phosphor-converting white LEDs, the white color is obtained by combining a blue LED die (or chip) with a powdered phosphor layer. The phosphor partially absorbs the blue light from the LED die and converts it into a broad green-yellow emission. The mixture of the transmitted blue light and green-yellow light emerging gives white light. There are two major drawbacks for current pcLEDs in terms of package extraction efficiency. The first is light scattering caused by phosphor particles. When the blue photons from the chip strike the phosphor particles, some blue light will be scattered by phosphor particles. Converted yellow emission photons are also scattered. A portion of scattered light is in the backward direction toward the die. The amount of this backward light varies and depends in part on the particle size of phosphors. The other drawback is that yellow emission from phosphor powders is isotropic. Although some backward light can be recovered by the reflector in current LED packages, there is still a portion of backward light that will be absorbed inside the package and further converted to heat. Heat

  16. LED collimation using high-index glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biertümpfel, Ralf; Reichel, Steffen

    2011-10-01

    LEDs emit light over a broad range of angles. Additionally, a narrow collimation of LED light is difficult because of the broad emission area of the LED. In order to implement an efficient beam shaping with small optics we propose to use a glass lens design with a refractive index (nd) greater than 1.7. Our design is characterized by a very small size and a high efficiency. This enables us to design optical arrays with an extremely high packing density of LEDs. Additional advantages are the high temperature resistance, the climate resistance and the stability against solarization. For many applications the footprint of the light beam should not only be collimated but also formed into a specific shape. Design results for a rectangular or oval beam shaping using high refractive index glass are presented. The designs collimate the broad emitted LED light and are optimized to incorporate also the manufacturability of the lens. Our proposed lens designs can easily be manufactured by modern pressing techniques, thus, these solutions are suitable for mass production.

  17. Temperature measurements of high power LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalan (Draghici), Niculina; Svasta, Paul; Drumea, Andrei

    2016-12-01

    Measurement of a LED junction temperature is very important in designing a LED lighting system. Depending on the junction temperature we will be able to determine the type of cooling system and the size of the lighting system. There are several indirect methods for junction temperature measurement. The method used in this paper is based on the thermal resistance model. The aim of this study is to identify the best device that would allow measuring the solder point temperature and the temperature on the lens of power LEDs. For this purpose four devices for measuring temperature on a high-power LED are presented and compared according to the acquired measurements: an infrared thermal camera from FLIR Systems, a multimeter with K type thermocouple (Velleman DVM4200), an infrared-spot based noncontact thermometer (Raynger ST) and a measurement system based on a digital temperature sensor (DS1821 type) connected to a PC. The measurements were conducted on an 18W COB (chip-on-board) LED. The measurement points are the supply terminals and the lens of the LED.

  18. High-power LEDs for plant cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Duchovskis, Pavelas; Bliznikas, Zenius; Breive, Kestutis; Ulinskaite, Raimonda; Brazaityte, Ausra; Novickovas, Algirdas; Zukauskas, Arturas; Shur, Michael S.

    2004-10-01

    We report on high-power solid-state lighting facility for cultivation of greenhouse vegetables and on the results of the study of control of photosynthetic activity and growth morphology of radish and lettuce imposed by variation of the spectral composition of illumination. Experimental lighting modules (useful area of 0.22 m2) were designed based on 4 types of high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with emission peaked in red at the wavelengths of 660 nm and 640 nm (predominantly absorbed by chlorophyll a and b for photosynthesis, respectively), in blue at 455 nm (phototropic function), and in far-red at 735 nm (important for photomorphology). Morphological characteristics, chlorophyll and phytohormone concentrations in radish and lettuce grown in phytotron chambers under lighting with different spectral composition of the LED-based illuminator and under illumination by high pressure sodium lamps with an equivalent photosynthetic photon flux density were compared. A well-balanced solid-state lighting was found to enhance production of green mass and to ensure healthy morphogenesis of plants compared to those grown using conventional lighting. We observed that the plant morphology and concentrations of morphologically active phytohormones is strongly affected by the spectral composition of light in the red region. Commercial application of the LED-based illumination for large-scale plant cultivation is discussed. This technology is favorable from the point of view of energy consumption, controllable growth, and food safety but is hindered by high cost of the LEDs. Large scale manufacturing of high-power red AlInGaP-based LEDs emitting at 650 nm and a further decrease of the photon price for the LEDs emitting in the vicinity of the absorption peak of chlorophylls have to be achieved to promote horticulture applications.

  19. LED intense headband light source for fingerprint analysis

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    2005-03-08

    A portable, lightweight and high-intensity light source for detecting and analyzing fingerprints during field investigation. On-site field analysis requires long hours of mobile analysis. In one embodiment, the present invention comprises a plurality of light emitting diodes; a power source; and a personal attachment means; wherein the light emitting diodes are powered by the power source, and wherein the power source and the light emitting diodes are attached to the personal attachment means to produce a personal light source for on-site analysis of latent fingerprints. The present invention is available for other applications as well.

  20. Lifetime Estimation of High Power White LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizaki, Shinya; Kimura, Hideyoshi; Sugimoto, Masaru

    We have developed a high power and long lifetime white LED module which can be used in general lighting applications. Since the materials in the package are very robust at high temperatures, the device can be operated at junction temperatures (Tj) over 250°C. Moreover, the thermal resistance of the package is less than 20°C/W. Therefore the device can be operated at input power as high as 2.4 W, making it possible to shorten the duration of accelerated lifetime tests. An acceleration ratio greater than 100 has been achieved. Assuming a thermally activated degradation process and applying the Arrhenius model, the LED chip lifetime (defined as a 50% reduction in luminous flux) is determined to be 40,000 hours for a Tj of 130°C. The activation energy of the degradation process was determined to be 1.55 eV.

  1. A high efficiency LED driver based on optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti-Arbona, Edgar; Copani, Tino; Bakkaloglu, Bertan; Kiaei, Sayfe

    2014-09-01

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) offer durability, long life, and high efficiency that make them an excellent alternative for illumination applications. The efficiency of conventional drivers suffers from losses due to the current sensing method that they employ. In this paper, the LED array itself is used as an optical sensor by periodically measuring neighboring cells' light intensity, instead of employing the commonly used series current-sense resistor. The results of this approach show that it provides accurate compensation of the LED characteristics, with less than one lumen variation in illumination, stability in color (color shift over time as low as ΔE = 0.76), and efficiency of up to 98.66%. The proposed sensor compensates for actual optical performance of the LED array and reduces aging effects compared to the approaches based in current measurement and control. The optical current-sensing method is a closed-loop feedback alternative, which improves the power efficiency of the LED driver by 3%. It maintains constant output illumination of the LED over time, and it utilizes a reduced number of components, thus extending the effective lifetime of LED-based devices.

  2. The model about the package structure of LED and the light intensity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haojie; Li, Mengyuan; Zhuang, Jie; Zhang, Dawei

    2014-11-01

    Base on the principles of the LED package structure and the LED optical model, we use Tracepro to do the simulation of LED devices. By changing the parameters of LED model, such as the package structure, the size of reflective cup, the height of chip and the angle of the reflective bowl, etc. We simulate the light intensity distribution curve of LED in different structures and find different results. That is a bigger height, a lager angle and a smaller curvature will make a better condenser effect. Compare with measurement data which shows that intensity distribution abide by some laws. Those conclusions can be used in guiding the package structure design of LEDs.

  3. High intensity neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, A. K.

    2015-07-15

    High-intensity proton accelerator complex enabled long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments with a precisely controlled neutrino beam. The beam power so far achieved is a few hundred kW with enourmorous efforts of accelerator physicists and engineers. However, to fully understand the lepton mixing structure, MW-class accelerators are desired. We describe the current intensity-frontier high-energy proton accelerators, their plans to go beyond and technical challenges in the neutrino beamline facilities.

  4. High Performance Green LEDs by Homoepitaxial

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, Christian; Schubert, E Fred

    2009-11-22

    This work's objective was the development of processes to double or triple the light output power from green and deep green (525 - 555 nm) AlGaInN light emitting diode (LED) dies within 3 years in reference to the Lumileds Luxeon II. The project paid particular effort to all aspects of the internal generation efficiency of light. LEDs in this spectral region show the highest potential for significant performance boosts and enable the realization of phosphor-free white LEDs comprised by red-green-blue LED modules. Such modules will perform at and outperform the efficacy target projections for white-light LED systems in the Department of Energy's accelerated roadmap of the SSL initiative.

  5. High intensity hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-05-01

    This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics.

  6. LED module with high index lens

    SciTech Connect

    Bierhuizen, Serge J.; Wang, Nanze Patrick; Eng, Gregory W.; Sun, Decai; Wei, Yajun

    2016-07-05

    An array of housings with housing bodies and lenses is molded, or an array of housing bodies is molded and bonded with lenses to form an array of housings with housing bodies and lenses. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are attached to the housings in the array. An array of metal pads may be bonded to the back of the array or insert molded with the housing array to form bond pads on the back of the housings. The array is singulated to form individual LED modules.

  7. Multidie LED combined with homogenizing optics to improve frequency response and intensity for FLIM applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, H-T; Lin, W-L; Feng, Y-L; Lin, Y; Chen, Y-C

    2017-03-15

    Application of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has been limited by the trade-off between modulation frequency and illumination intensity of LEDs, which affects the signal-to-noise ratio in fluorescence lifetime measurements. To increase modulation frequency without sacrificing output power of LEDs, we propose to use LEDs with multiple dice connected in series. The LED capacitance was reduced with series connection; therefore, the frequency response of multidie LED was significantly increased. LEDs in visible light, including blue, green, amber and red, were all applicable in FLIM. We also present a homogenizing optics design, so that multidie LEDs produced uniform illumination on the same focal spot. When the homogenizing optics was combined with multicolour emitters, it provides multiple colour selection in a compact and convenient design.

  8. Phosphor-converted high power LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Mach, Regina; Mueller, Gerd O.; Krames, Michael R.

    2007-09-01

    Phosphor converted Light Emitting Diodes (pcLED) have undergone many changes of design over the last 11 years. For advanced applications, however, besides other binning criteria a closely binned color point appears to be a major issue. Manufacturing yield is closely related to this point. Philips Lumileds Lighting (PLL) introduced very recently a new compact solid state color converter - Lumiramic - which allows much closer color control by selecting perfect matches between blue pump LEDs and previously characterized converter tiles in a pick-and-place process. Lumiramic phosphor technology utilizes a ceramic phosphor plate and PLL's new Thin Film Flip Chip (TFFC) technology. A first application in Automotive Forward Lighting and some of the design considerations are outlined in the paper

  9. Design method for automotive high-beam LED optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byzov, Egor V.; Moiseev, Mikhail A.; Doskolovich, Leonid L.; Kazanskiy, Nikolay L.

    2015-09-01

    New analytical method for the calculation of the LED secondary optics for automotive high-beam lamps is presented. Automotive headlamps should illuminate the road and the curb at the distance of 100-150 meters and create a bright, flat, relatively powerful light beam. To generate intensity distribution of this kind we propose to use TIR optical element (collimator working on the total internal reflection principle) with array of microlenses (optical corrector) on the upper surface. TIR part of the optical element enables reflection of the side rays to the front direction and provides a collimated beam which incidents on the microrelief. Microrelief, in its turn, dissipates the light flux in horizontal direction to meet the requirements of the Regulations 112, 113 and to provide well-illuminated area across the road in the far field. As an example, we computed and simulated the optical element with the diameter of 33 millimeters and the height of 22 millimeters. Simulation data shows that three illuminating modules including Cree XP-G2 LED and lens allow generating an appropriate intensity distribution for the class D of UNECE Regulations.

  10. Lensless transport-of-intensity phase microscopy and tomography with a color LED matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Zhang, Jialin; Hu, Yan; Chen, Qian

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate lens-less quantitative phase microscopy and diffraction tomography based on a compact on-chip platform, using only a CMOS image sensor and a programmable color LED array. Based on multi-wavelength transport-of- intensity phase retrieval and multi-angle illumination diffraction tomography, this platform offers high quality, depth resolved images with a lateral resolution of ˜3.7μm and an axial resolution of ˜5μm, over wide large imaging FOV of 24mm2. The resolution and FOV can be further improved by using a larger image sensors with small pixels straightforwardly. This compact, low-cost, robust, portable platform with a decent imaging performance may offer a cost-effective tool for telemedicine needs, or for reducing health care costs for point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited environments.

  11. LED Unit of Compact, High Power and Long Lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Masaru; Urano, Yoji; Kuzuhara, Ikko; Hayashi, Takao; Masui, Mikiko; Tanaka, Ken-Ichi

    The encapsulation optical component shaped in an elliptical dome over the LED chip and the mixing of multiple types of fluorescent materials in an appropriate ratio improves colour rendering properties and distribution controllability while suppressing colour variation. The developed technologies can be applied to produce an LED luminaire that resembles a compact ceiling-light but can be used as a downlight with the light intensity equivalent to a 60W incandescent lamp and light quality comparable to a fluorescent lamp.

  12. White-light LED clusters with high color rendering.

    PubMed

    He, Guoxing; Zheng, Lihong

    2010-09-01

    We established a model for spectra of LEDs at different drive currents. The simulation program of color rendering of white-light LED clusters has been developed, according to the principle of additive color mixture. The experimental results show that white/red LED clusters can realize color temperature untunable white light with a high color rendering index and high luminous efficacy and that neutral-white/red/blue LED clusters can realize color temperature tunable white light with a high color rendering index and high luminous efficacy.

  13. High Efficiency Driving Electronics for General Illumination LED Luminaires

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Anand

    2012-10-31

    New generation of standalone LED driver platforms developed, which are more efficient These LED Drivers are more efficient (≥90%), smaller in size ( 0.15 in3/watt), lower in cost ( 12 cents/watt in high volumes in millions of units). And these products are very reliable having an operating life of over 50,000 hours. This technology will enable growth of LED light sources in the use. This will also help in energy saving and reducing total life cycle cost of LED units. Two topologies selected for next generation of LED drivers: 1) Value engineered single stage Flyback topology. This is suitable for low powered LED drivers up to 50W power. 2) Two stage boost power factor correction (PFC) plus LLC half bridge platform for higher powers. This topology is suitable for 40W to 300W LED drivers. Three new product platforms were developed to cover a wide range of LED drivers: 1) 120V 40W LED driver, 2) Intellivolt 75W LED driver, & 3) Intellivolt 150W LED driver. These are standalone LED drivers for rugged outdoor lighting applications. Based on these platforms number of products are developed and successfully introduced in the market place meeting key performance, size and cost goals.

  14. High solar intensity radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, J. R.; Spisz, E. W.

    1972-01-01

    Silicon solar cells are used to measure visible radiant energy and radiation intensities to 20 solar constants. Future investigations are planned for up to 100 solar constants. Radiometer is small, rugged, accurate and inexpensive.

  15. LED light engine concept with ultra-high scalable luminance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelen, Christoph; de Boer, Dick; Bruls, Dominique; van der Eyden, Joost; Koole, Rolf; Li, Yun; Mirsadeghi, Mo; Vanbroekhoven, Vincent; Van den Bergh, John-John; Van de Voorde, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Although LEDs have been introduced successfully in many general lighting applications during the past decade, high brightness light source applications are still suffering from the limited luminance of LEDs. High power LEDs are generally limited in luminance to ca 100 Mnit (108 lm/m2sr) or less, while dedicated devices for projection may achieve luminance values up to ca 300 Mnit with phosphor converted green. In particular for high luminous flux applications with limited étendue, like in front projection systems, only very modest luminous flux values in the beam can be achieved with LEDs compared to systems based on discharge lamps. In this paper we introduce a light engine concept based on a light converter rod pumped with blue LEDs that breaks through the étendue and brightness limits of LEDs, enabling LED light source luminance values that are more than 4 times higher than what can be achieved with LEDs so far. In LED front projection systems, green LEDs are the main limiting factor. With our green light emitting modules, peak luminance values well above 1.2 Gnit have been achieved, enabling doubling of the screen brightness of LED based DLP projection systems, and even more when this technology is applied to other colors as well. This light source concept, introduced as the ColorSpark High Lumen Density (HLD) LED technology, enables a breakthrough in the performance of LED-based light engines not only for projection, where >2700 ANSI lm was demonstrated, but for a wide variety of high brightness applications.

  16. High-Modulation-Speed LEDs Based on III-Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong

    III-nitride InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) enable wide range of applications in solid-state lighting, full-color displays, and high-speed visible-light communication. Conventional InGaN quantum well LEDs grown on polar c-plane substrate suffer from quantum confined Stark effect due to the large internal polarization-related fields, leading to a reduced radiative recombination rate and device efficiency, which limits the performance of InGaN LEDs in high-speed communication applications. To circumvent these negative effects, non-trivial-cavity designs such as flip-chip LEDs, metallic grating coated LEDs are proposed. This oral defense will show the works on the high-modulation-speed LEDs from basic ideas to applications. Fundamental principles such as rate equations for LEDs/laser diodes (LDs), plasmonic effects, Purcell effects will be briefly introduced. For applications, the modal properties of flip-chip LEDs are solved by implementing finite difference method in order to study the modulation response. The emission properties of highly polarized InGaN LEDs coated by metallic gratings are also investigated by finite difference time domain method.

  17. High-luminance LEDs replace incandescent lamps in new applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David L.

    1997-04-01

    The advent of high luminance AlInGaP and InGaN LED technologies has prompted the use of LED devices in new applications formally illuminated by incandescent lamps. The luminous efficiencies of these new LED technologies equals or exceeds that attainable with incandescent sources, with reliability factors that far exceed those of incandescent sources. The need for a highly efficient, dependable, and cost effective replacement for incandescent lamps is being fulfilled with high luminance LED lamps. This paper briefly described some of the new applications incorporating high luminance LED lamps, traffic signals and roadway signs for traffic management, automotive exterior lighting, active matrix and full color displays for commercial advertising, and commercial aircraft panel lighting and military aircraft NVG compatible lighting.

  18. Low Cost Lithography Tool for High Brightness LED Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Hawryluk; Emily True

    2012-06-30

    The objective of this activity was to address the need for improved manufacturing tools for LEDs. Improvements include lower cost (both capital equipment cost reductions and cost-ofownership reductions), better automation and better yields. To meet the DOE objective of $1- 2/kilolumen, it will be necessary to develop these highly automated manufacturing tools. Lithography is used extensively in the fabrication of high-brightness LEDs, but the tools used to date are not scalable to high-volume manufacturing. This activity addressed the LED lithography process. During R&D and low volume manufacturing, most LED companies use contact-printers. However, several industries have shown that these printers are incompatible with high volume manufacturing and the LED industry needs to evolve to projection steppers. The need for projection lithography tools for LED manufacturing is identified in the Solid State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap Draft, June 2009. The Roadmap states that Projection tools are needed by 2011. This work will modify a stepper, originally designed for semiconductor manufacturing, for use in LED manufacturing. This work addresses improvements to yield, material handling, automation and throughput for LED manufacturing while reducing the capital equipment cost.

  19. Acute LED irradiation does not change the anaerobic capacity and time to exhaustion during a high-intensity running effort: a double-blind, crossover, and placebo-controlled study : Effects of LED irradiation on anaerobic capacity and performance in running.

    PubMed

    Malta, Elvis De Souza; De Poli, Rodrigo Araujo Bonetti; Brisola, Gabriel Motta Pinheiro; Milioni, Fabio; Miyagi, Willian Eiji; Machado, Fabiana Andrade; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of photobiomodulation therapy using cluster light-emitting diodes (LEDT; 104 diodes) (wavelength 660 and 850 nm; energy density 1.5 and 4.5 J/cm(2); energy 60 J at each point; total energy delivered 600 J) on alternative maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAODALT) and time to exhaustion, during a high-intensity running effort. Fifteen moderately active and healthy males (age 25.1 ± 4.4 years) underwent a graded exercise test and two supramaximal exhaustive efforts at 115 % of the intensity associated with maximal oxygen uptake performed after acute LEDT or placebo irradiation in a double-blind, crossover, and placebo-controlled study design. The MAODALT was assumed as the sum of both oxygen equivalents estimated from the glycolytic and phosphagen metabolism pathways during each supramaximal effort. For the statistical analysis, a paired t test was used to determine differences between the treatments. The significance level was assumed as 95 %. In addition, a qualitative analysis was used to determine the magnitude of differences between groups. No significant differences were found for the values of oxygen equivalents from each energetic metabolism (P ≥ 0.28), for MAODALT values between the LEDT and placebo conditions (P ≥ 0.27), or for time to exhaustion (P = 0.80), except for the respiratory exchange ratio (P = 0.01). The magnitude-based inference of effect size reported only a possibly negative effect of photobiomodulation on MAODALT when expressed in units relative to body mass and on the glycolysis pathway (26 %). In summary, LEDT after a high-intensity running effort did not alter the MAODALT, metabolic energy pathways, or high-intensity running performance.

  20. Comparative study of laser and LED systems of low intensity applied to tendon healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, J. L. N.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Parizotto, N. A.

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of Low-intensity Laser Therapy (LILT) and Light Emitting Diode Therapy (LEDT) of low intensity on the treatment of lesioned Achilles tendon of rats. The experimental model consisted of a partial mechanical lesion on the right Achilles tendon deep portion of 90 rats. One hour after the lesion, the injured animals received applications of laser/LED (685, 830/630, 880 nm), and the same procedure was repeated at 24-h intervals, for 10 days. The healing process and deposition of collagen were evaluated based on a polarization microscopy analysis of the alignment and organization of collagen bundles, through the birefringence (optical retardation-OR). The results showed a real efficiency of treatments based on LEDT and confirmed that LILT seems to be effective on healing process. Although absence of coherence of LED light, tendon healing treatment with this feature was satisfactory and can certainly replace treatments based on laser light applications. Applications of infrared laser at 830 nm and LED 880 nm were more efficient when the aim is a good organization, aggregation, and alignment of the collagen bundles on tendon healing. However, more research is needed for a safety and more efficient determination of a protocol with LED.

  1. Implementation of a Nurse-Led Family Meeting in a Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huixin; Ren, Dianxu; Zinsmeister, Glenn R; Zewe, Gretchen E; Tuite, Patricia K

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop, implement, and evaluate the impact of early intensive care unit (ICU) nurse-led family meetings on nurse-family communication, family decision making, and satisfaction of family members. Intensive care unit nurses are in an ideal position to meet family needs, and family members may cope better with the crisis of an ICU admission if consistent honest information is provided by nurses; however, there are no early ICU family meetings led by bedside nurses. This quality improvement project was implemented in a 10-bed neuroscience ICU over a 3-month period. A convenience sample of 23 nurses participated in the project. Following development of a communication protocol to facilitate nurse-led meetings, the nurses received education and then implemented the protocol. Thirty-one family members participated in the project. Family members were surveyed before and after the meetings. Mean meeting time was 26 (SD, 14) minutes. Following implementation of the meetings, findings demonstrated that families felt that communication improved (P = .02 and P = .008), they had appropriate information for decision making allowing them to feel in control (P = .002), and there was an increase in family satisfaction (P = .001). Early ICU nurse-led family meetings were feasible, improved communication between ICU nurses and family members, facilitated decision making in ICU families, and increased satisfaction of family members.

  2. Final report of international comparison on averaged LED intensity: APMP.PR-S3a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Park, Seongchong; Park, Seung-Nam

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of the international comparison of LED measurements on the quantity of averaged LED intensity in condition B defined by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE). The comparison is conducted by circulating five different types of artefact LEDs (red, green, blue, white and diffuser-type green) to 15 National Metrology Institutes (NMIs). The artefact LEDs are prepared by functional seasoning to enable a temperature correction based on the junction voltage measurement. The comparison reference values and the unilateral degrees of equivalence (DoEs) of each participant are calculated for each type of LEDs from the reported measurement results. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by APMP, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  3. High intensity solar cell radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W.; Spisz, E. W.

    1972-01-01

    Device can be employed under high intensity illumination conditions such as would occur in a close-solar-approach space mission or in monitoring high intensity lamps. Radiometer consists of silicon solar cells with thin semi-transparent coatings of aluminum deposited on the front surfaces to permit transmission of small percentage of light and reflect the remainder.

  4. High Intensity Lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Xenon arc lamps developed during the Apollo program by Streamlight, Inc. are the basis for commercial flashlights and emergency handlights. These are some of the brightest portable lights made. They throw a light some 50 times brighter than automobile high beams and are primarily used by police and military. The light penetrates fog and smoke and returns less back-scatter light. They are operated on portable power packs as boat and auto batteries. An infrared model produces totally invisible light for covert surveillance.

  5. Constraint Induced Aphasia Therapy: Volunteer-led, unconstrained and less intense delivery can be effective.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Lyndsey; Osborne, Amanda

    2016-06-23

    Constraint Induced Aphasia Therapy (CIAT) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of aphasia, but clinicians have expressed concern regarding how far CIAT is practical to implement in clinical practice. To determine whether CIAT delivered in a less-intense, lower dose, reduced constraint and volunteer-led format could produce positive outcomes in people with chronic aphasia. Two groups were run, each with two people with chronic aphasia. Treatment involved a standard CIAT card-exchange game, supplemented by a home activity. Spoken language was required for responses but alternative modalities of communication were also permitted. Each group was led by a trained volunteer, lasted 90 minutes and was delivered twice a week for four weeks. Three of the four participants showed significant improvements in target word retrieval following treatment. No significant improvements were observed for untreated stimuli or language tasks. Two participants showed increases in the elaboration of their responses, and the same two showed an increase in the frequency with which they engaged in communication activities. Clear gains in performance were observed for the majority of people with aphasia who participated in a less intense format, considerably lower dose and less constrained form of CIAT led by trained volunteers. This suggests that this 'clinically realistic' service delivery model for CIAT could be added to the clinical repertoire of speech pathologists.

  6. Effect of blue LED light intensity on carotenoid accumulation in citrus juice sacs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lancui; Ma, Gang; Yamawaki, Kazuki; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Yoshioka, Terutaka; Ohta, Satoshi; Kato, Masaya

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the effects of blue LED light intensity on carotenoid accumulation and expression of genes related to carotenoid biosynthesis were investigated in the juice sacs of Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) and Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) in vitro. The results showed that 100 μmol m(-2)s(-1) blue LED light (100B) was effective for increasing carotenoid content, especially β-cryptoxanthin, in Satsuma mandarin after cultured in vitro for four weeks. In Valencia orange, in contrast, 50 μmol m(-2)s(-1) blue LED light (50B) treatment was effective for inducing carotenoid accumulation through increasing the contents of two major carotenoids, all-trans-violaxanthin and 9-cis-violaxanthin. In addition, gene expression results showed that the simultaneous increases in the expression of genes (CitPSY, CitPDS, CitZDS, CitLCYb2, and CitHYb) involved in producing β,β-xanthophylls were well consistent with the accumulation of β-cryptoxanthin in Satsuma mandarin under 100B, and violaxanthin in Valencia orange under 50B. The results presented herein contribute to further elucidating the regulatory mechanism of carotenoid accumulation by blue LED light.

  7. High-performance LED street lighting using microlens arrays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Xuan-Hao; Moreno, Ivan; Sun, Ching-Cherng

    2013-05-06

    An efficient LED lamp that illuminates the street with high quality is presented. The luminaire shows high optical efficiency, high optical utilization factor, low glare, and illuminates the street with high uniformity. The concept is simple but effective: a cluster of LEDs with TIR lenses are put inside a reflective box, which is covered with a microlens sheet; the reflective cavity improves efficiency by light recycling; each TIR lens collimates the LED light for the microlens array; and the microlens sheet uniformly distributes light only into the street. We verify its feasibility by Monte Carlo ray-tracing for the main types of road lighting arrangements: central, zigzag, and single-side pole positions.

  8. Thermophotonics for ultra-high efficiency visible LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Rajeev J.

    2017-02-01

    The wall-plug efficiency of modern light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has far surpassed all other forms of lighting and is expected to improve further as the lifetime cost of a luminaire is today dominated by the cost of energy. The drive towards higher efficiency inevitably opens the question about the limits of future enhancement. Here, we investigate thermoelectric pumping as a means for improving efficiency in wide-bandgap GaN based LEDs. A forward biased diode can work as a heat pump, which pumps lattice heat into the electrons injected into the active region via the Peltier effect. We experimentally demonstrate a thermally enhanced 450 nm GaN LED, in which nearly fourfold light output power is achieved at 615 K (compared to 295 K room temperature operation), with virtually no reduction in the wall-plug efficiency at bias V < ℏω/q. This result suggests the possibility of removing bulky heat sinks in high power LED products. A review of recent high-efficiency GaN LEDs suggests that Peltier thermal pumping plays a more important role in a wide range of modern LED structures that previously thought - opening a path to even higher efficiencies and lower lifetime costs for future lighting.

  9. Current State of the Art in High Brightness LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craford, George

    2007-03-01

    LED's have been commercially available since the 1960's. For many years they were used primarily for indicator applications. The remarkable increase in materials technology and efficiency that has been achieved since the early 1990's for AlInGaP red and amber LEDs, and InGaN green and blue LEDs, has enabled the penetration of markets such as outdoor display, signaling, and automotive brake light and turn signal applications. White LEDs, which are either blue LEDs combined with a phosphor, or a combination of red, green, and blue LEDs, are being used in emerging applications such as cell phone flash, television backlights, projection, and automotive headlights. In addition, to efficiency improvements these applications have required the development of higher power packages and, in some of these applications which are etendue limited, higher luminance devices. High power devices are commercially available which are capable of 140 lumens output and have an efficacy of around 70 lm/W for white emission. New package and chip technologies have been demonstrated which have a luminance of 38 mega nits (Mcd/m^2), approximately 50% more luminance than that of an automotive headlamp halogen bulb (˜25 mega nits). The recent progress in materials technology, packaging, and chip technology makes it clear that LED's will become important for general illumination applications. The rate of LED penetration of this market will depend upon continued increases in performance and lower costs as well as better control of the white spectral emission. Efficiency, current density, and costs are closely linked because the cost in dollars/lumen is inversely proportional to how many lumens can be realized from each unit of device area for a given device type. Performance as high as 138 lm/W, and over 40% wall plug efficiency, has been reported for low power research devices and over 90 lm/W for high power research devices. It is clear that high power commercial products with performance in

  10. A thermosyphon heat pipe cooler for high power LEDs cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ji; Tian, Wenkai; Lv, Lucang

    2016-08-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) cooling is facing the challenge of high heat flux more seriously with the increase of input power and diode density. The proposed unique thermosyphon heat pipe heat sink is particularly suitable for cooling of high power density LED chips and other electronics, which has a heat dissipation potential of up to 280 W within an area of 20 mm × 22 mm (>60 W/cm2) under natural air convection. Meanwhile, a thorough visualization investigation was carried out to explore the two phase flow characteristics in the proposed thermosyphon heat pipe. Implementing this novel thermosyphon heat pipe heat sink in the cooling of a commercial 100 W LED integrated chip, a very low apparent thermal resistance of 0.34 K/W was obtained under natural air convection with the aid of the enhanced boiling heat transfer at the evaporation side and the enhanced natural air convection at the condensation side.

  11. Testing a high-power LED based light source for hyperspectral imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klomkaew, Phiwat; Mayes, Sam A.; Rich, Thomas C.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2017-02-01

    Our lab has worked to develop high-speed hyperspectral imaging systems that scan the fluorescence excitation spectrum for biomedical imaging applications. Hyperspectral imaging can be used in remote sensing, medical imaging, reaction analysis, and other applications. Here, we describe the development of a hyperspectral imaging system that comprised an inverted Nikon Eclipse microscope, sCMOS camera, and a custom light source that utilized a series of high-power LEDs. LED selection was performed to achieve wavelengths of 350-590 nm. To reduce scattering, LEDs with low viewing angles were selected. LEDs were surface-mount soldered and powered by an RCD. We utilized 3D printed mounting brackets to assemble all circuit components. Spectraradiometric calibration was performed using a spectrometer (QE65000, Ocean Optics) and integrating sphere (FOIS-1, Ocean Optics). Optical output and LED driving current were measured over a range of illumination intensities. A normalization algorithm was used to calibrate and optimize the intensity of the light source. The highest illumination power was at 375 nm (3300 mW/cm2), while the lowest illumination power was at 515, 525, and 590 nm (5200 mW/cm2). Comparing the intensities supplied by each LED to the intensities measured at the microscope stage, we found there was a great loss in power output. Future work will focus on using two of the same LEDs to double the power and finding more LED and/or laser diodes and chips around the range. This custom hyperspectral imaging system could be used for the detection of cancer and the identification of biomolecules.

  12. Review of recent technological advances in high power LED packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panahi, Allen S.

    2012-06-01

    High Power LED is poised to replace traditional lighting sources such as Fluorescent, HID, Halogen and conventional incandescent bulbs in many applications. Due to the solid state compact nature of the light source it is inherently rugged and reliable and has been the favored lighting source for most indoor and outdoor applications including many hazardous locations that impact, and safety environments including mining, bridge, Aerospace, Automotive . In order to accelerate this transition many enhancements and advances are taking place to improve on the reliability, and thermal performance of these devices. This paper explores the various improvements and advances made in the packaging of LEDs to enhance their performance

  13. Highly Efficient Small Form Factor LED Retrofit Lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Allen; Fred Palmer; Ming Li

    2011-09-11

    This report summarizes work to develop a high efficiency LED-based MR16 lamp downlight at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-EE0000611. A new multichip LED package, electronic driver, and reflector optic were developed for these lamps. At steady-state, the lamp luminous flux was 409 lumens (lm), luminous efficacy of 87 lumens per watt (LPW), CRI (Ra) of 87, and R9 of 85 at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3285K. The LED alone achieved 120 lumens per watt efficacy and 600 lumen flux output at 25 C. The driver had 90% electrical conversion efficiency while maintaining excellent power quality with power factor >0.90 at a power of only 5 watts. Compared to similar existing MR16 lamps using LED sources, these lamps had much higher efficacy and color quality. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a LED-based MR16 retrofit lamp for replacement of 35W halogen MR16 lamps having (1) luminous flux of 500 lumens, (2) luminous efficacy of 100 lumens per watt, (3) beam angle less than 40{sup o} and center beam candlepower of at least 1000 candelas, and (4) excellent color quality.

  14. High-Voltage LED Light Engine with Integrated Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Soer, Wouter

    2016-02-29

    LED luminaires have seen dramatic changes in cost breakdown over the past few years. The LED component cost, which until recently was the dominant portion of luminaire cost, has fallen to a level of the same order as the other luminaire components, such as the driver, housing, optics etc. With the current state of the technology, further luminaire performance improvement and cost reduction is realized most effectively by optimization of the whole system, rather than a single component. This project focuses on improving the integration between LEDs and drivers. Lumileds has developed a light engine platform based on low-cost high-power LEDs and driver topologies optimized for integration with these LEDs on a single substrate. The integration of driver and LEDs enables an estimated luminaire cost reduction of about 25% for targeted applications, mostly due to significant reductions in driver and housing cost. The high-power LEDs are based on Lumileds’ patterned sapphire substrate flip-chip (PSS-FC) technology, affording reduced die fabrication and packaging cost compared to existing technology. Two general versions of PSS-FC die were developed in order to create the desired voltage and flux increments for driver integration: (i) small single-junction die (0.5 mm2), optimal for distributed lighting applications, and (ii) larger multi-junction die (2 mm2 and 4 mm2) for high-power directional applications. Two driver topologies were developed: a tapped linear driver topology and a single-stage switch-mode topology, taking advantage of the flexible voltage configurations of the new PSS-FC die and the simplification opportunities enabled by integration of LEDs and driver on the same board. A prototype light engine was developed for an outdoor “core module” application based on the multi-junction PSS-FC die and the single-stage switch-mode driver. The light engine meets the project efficacy target of 128 lm/W at a luminous flux

  15. Numerical simulation of high power LED heat-dissipating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shih-Jeh; Hsu, Hsiang-Chen; Fu, Shen-Li; Yeh, Jiam-Nan

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, thermal analysis of the heat dissipation under different heat sink for high-power white Light Emitting Diode (LED) is presented. Junction temperature of LED is elevated as the power of LED increases, which brings up deterioration of light efficiency and other side effects. Heat dissipation is another design concern other than material and illumination efficiency. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the cooling of high-power LED chips and modules for design of heat sinks. Three types of heat sinks are designed for a tandem 12-chip module and an extensive numerical investigation of the heat sink design performance is conducted by Computational Fluid Dynamics software Fluent. The effects of heat sink geometry and adhesive material are also investigated. Design variables are the thickness of sink base, number, thickness and length of fins. The total wetted area is the dominant factor to the junction temperature. The objective of design regarding the junction temperatures around 50°C is easily achieved. However, its effect is limited at high values of these parameters, furthermore an excessive number of fins incurs reverse consequence due to problem of ventilation also waste of material.

  16. Some quantitative aspects of temporary blinding from high brightness LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidenbach, Hans-Dieter

    2007-02-01

    According to the new European Directive on Artificial Optical Radiation (2006/25/EC) the employer has to determine the exposure and the assessment of risks, i.e. workers shall not be exposed above the exposure limit values, which are based on various ICNIRP guidelines. In addition, the employer shall give particular attention, when carrying out the risk assessment, to any indirect effects amongst others such as temporary blinding. Since up to now no quantitative values exist in order to rank or classify artificial optical sources and its associated capability of temporary blinding, we have investigated some aspects of glare and dazzling from a high-brightness LED (HB-LED). With such a single device and an array consisting of 80 HB-LEDs we have found in a previous investigation that the frequency of the blink reflex exceeds the one achieved with laser belonging to class 2 according to the international standard IEC 60825-1, however is less than about 50 %. The size of an after-image as a function of time and the visual acuity after an exposure from a white high-brightness LED has been investigated in detail with 3 test persons. The results have shown that the size of an after-image on the human retina remains nearly constant with a slight decrease over a time duration of about 12 minutes, whereas the initial visual acuity is recovered within 30 up to 60 seconds. Linear and exponential regression descriptions are given for both characteristics.

  17. High-Power 365 nm UV LED Mercury Arc Lamp Replacement for Photochemistry and Chemical Photolithography.

    PubMed

    Hölz, K; Lietard, J; Somoza, M M

    2017-01-03

    Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) have become widespread in chemical research as highly efficient light sources for photochemistry and photopolymerization. However, in more complex experimental setups requiring highly concentrated light and highly spatially resolved patterning of the light, high-pressure mercury arc lamps are still widely used because they emit intense UV light from a compact arc volume that can be efficiently coupled into optical systems. Advances in the deposition and p-type doping of gallium nitride have recently permitted the manufacture of UV LEDs capable of replacing mercury arc lamps also in these applications. These UV LEDs exceed the spectral radiance of mercury lamps even at the intense I-line at 365 nm. Here we present the successful exchange of a high-pressure mercury arc lamp for a new generation UV LED as a light source in photolithographic chemistry and its use in the fabrication of high-density DNA microarrays. We show that the improved light radiance and efficiency of these LEDs offer substantial practical, economic and ecological advantages, including faster synthesis, lower hardware costs, very long lifetime, an >85-fold reduction in electricity consumption and the elimination of mercury waste and contamination.

  18. High-Power 365 nm UV LED Mercury Arc Lamp Replacement for Photochemistry and Chemical Photolithography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) have become widespread in chemical research as highly efficient light sources for photochemistry and photopolymerization. However, in more complex experimental setups requiring highly concentrated light and highly spatially resolved patterning of the light, high-pressure mercury arc lamps are still widely used because they emit intense UV light from a compact arc volume that can be efficiently coupled into optical systems. Advances in the deposition and p-type doping of gallium nitride have recently permitted the manufacture of UV LEDs capable of replacing mercury arc lamps also in these applications. These UV LEDs exceed the spectral radiance of mercury lamps even at the intense I-line at 365 nm. Here we present the successful exchange of a high-pressure mercury arc lamp for a new generation UV LED as a light source in photolithographic chemistry and its use in the fabrication of high-density DNA microarrays. We show that the improved light radiance and efficiency of these LEDs offer substantial practical, economic and ecological advantages, including faster synthesis, lower hardware costs, very long lifetime, an >85-fold reduction in electricity consumption and the elimination of mercury waste and contamination. PMID:28066690

  19. Harmonic generation at high intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, K.J.; Krause, J.L.; Kulander, K.C.

    1993-06-01

    Atomic electrons subject to intense laser fields can absorb many photons, leading either to multiphoton ionization or the emission of a single, energetic photon which can be a high multiple of the laser frequency. The latter process, high-order harmonic generation, has been observed experimentally using a range of laser wavelengths and intensities over the past several years. Harmonic generation spectra have a generic form: a steep decline for the low order harmonics, followed by a plateau extending to high harmonic order, and finally an abrupt cutoff beyond which no harmonics are discernible. During the plateau the harmonic production is a very weak function of the process order. Harmonic generation is a promising source of coherent, tunable radiation in the XUV to soft X-ray range which could have a variety of scientific and possibly technological applications. Its conversion from an interesting multiphoton phenomenon to a useful laboratory radiation source requires a complete understanding of both its microscopic and macroscopic aspects. We present some recent results on the response of single atoms at intensities relevant to the short pulse experiments. The calculations employ time-dependent methods, which we briefly review in the next section. Following that we discuss the behavior of the harmonics as a function of laser intensity. Two features are notable: the slow scaling of the harmonic intensities with laser intensity, and the rapid variation in the phase of the individual harmonics with respect to harmonic order. We then give a simple empirical formula that predicts the extent of the plateau for a given ionization potential, wavelength and intensity.

  20. Digital controlling system to the set of high power LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilewski, Marian; Gryko, Lukasz; Zajac, Andrzej

    2013-07-01

    In the paper is described the concept and architecture of the multi-channel control system for set of high-power LEDs. The broadband source of radiation for prototype illuminator is dedicated to the investigation of Low Level Laser Therapy procedures. The general scheme of the system, detailed schemes, control algorithm and its implementation description in FPGA structure is presented. The temperature conditions and the opportunity to work with a microcomputer are characterized.

  1. Monolayer graphene dispersion and radiative cooling for high power LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Tun-Jen; Eyassu, Tsehaye; Henderson, Kimberly; Kim, Taesam; Lin, Chhiu-Tsu

    2013-10-01

    Molecular fan, a radiative cooling by thin film, has been developed and its application for compact electronic devices has been evaluated. The enhanced surface emissivity and heat dissipation efficiency of the molecular fan coating are shown to correlate with the quantization of lattice modes in active nanomaterials. The highly quantized G and 2D bands in graphene are achieved by our dispersion technique, and then incorporated in an organic-inorganic acrylate emulsion to form a coating assembly on heat sinks (for LED and CPU). This water-based dielectric layer coating has been formulated and applied on metal core printed circuit boards. The heat dissipation efficiency and breakdown voltage are evaluated by a temperature-monitoring system and a high-voltage breakdown tester. The molecular fan coating on heat dissipation units is able to decrease the equilibrium junction temperature by 29.1 ° C, while functioning as a dielectric layer with a high breakdown voltage (>5 kV). The heat dissipation performance of the molecular fan coating applied on LED devices shows that the coated 50 W LED gives an enhanced cooling of 20% at constant light brightness. The schematics of monolayer graphene dispersion, undispersed graphene platelet, and continuous graphene sheet are illustrated and discussed to explain the mechanisms of radiative cooling, radiative/non-radiative, and non-radiative heat re-accumulation.

  2. Etendue-preserving mixing and projection optics for high-luminance LEDs, applied to automotive headlamps.

    PubMed

    Cvetkovic, Aleksandra; Dross, Oliver; Chaves, Julio; Benitez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C; Mohedano, Rubén

    2006-12-25

    By having a single optical element combine the light of several high luminance LEDs, a high luminance light source can be formed, with shape and emission characteristics adaptable to nearly all illumination problems. The illuminance distribution of this virtual source facilitates the generation of the desired intensity pattern via its imaging-stye projection into the far field. This projection is achieved by one refractive and one reflective freeform surface, both calculated simultaneously by the 3D SMS method, which is herein demonstrated for an LED automotive headlamp.

  3. Study on heat pipe sink for cooling high power LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Yuebin; Wang, Zhongdong; Xie, Shasha; Hao, Yang

    2012-10-01

    Considering the characteristic of energy-saving about high power LED device, a method to decrease the junction temperature greatly under the natural convection condition is studied in this article. Using the heat pipe technology, a cooling system is designed in which the target heat source is the LED module (0.025m×0.025m×0.005m), with 30W input power. The mechanism and routes of heat transfer are analyzed in detail, the thermal network model is established to calculate the thermal resistance of each part in the cooling system, the total thermal resistance was calculated to be 0.8964°C /W and the junction temperature was 47.39°C . Meanwhile, the finite element method was used to simulate this cooling system, and got that the junction temperature was 47.54°C , and the error of the two means is only 0.15°C , it indicates that applying heat-pipe technology can solve the problem of high junction temperature in LED devices under the natural convection conditions, which can guide the actual project in the thermal design.

  4. High-power UV-B LEDs with long lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rass, Jens; Kolbe, Tim; Lobo-Ploch, Neysha; Wernicke, Tim; Mehnke, Frank; Kuhn, Christian; Enslin, Johannes; Guttmann, Martin; Reich, Christoph; Mogilatenko, Anna; Glaab, Johannes; Stoelmacker, Christoph; Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Weyers, Markus; Kneissl, Michael

    2015-03-01

    UV light emitters in the UV-B spectral range between 280 nm and 320 nm are of great interest for applications such as phototherapy, gas sensing, plant growth lighting, and UV curing. In this paper we present high power UV-B LEDs grown by MOVPE on sapphire substrates. By optimizing the heterostructure design, growth parameters and processing technologies, significant progress was achieved with respect to internal efficiency, injection efficiency and light extraction. LED chips emitting at 310 nm with maximum output powers of up to 18 mW have been realized. Lifetime measurements show approximately 20% decrease in emission power after 1,000 operating hours at 100 mA and 5 mW output power and less than 30% after 3,500 hours of operation, thus indicating an L50 lifetime beyond 10,000 hours.

  5. Intensity of blue LED light: a potential stimulus for biomass and lipid content in fresh water microalgae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Atta, Madiha; Idris, Ani; Bukhari, Ataullah; Wahidin, Suzana

    2013-11-01

    Light quality and the intensity are key factors which render microalgae as a potential source of biodiesel. In this study the effects of various intensities of blue light and its photoperiods on the growth and lipid content of Chlorella vulgaris were investigated by using LED (Light Emitting Diode) in batch culture. C. vulgaris was grown for 13 days at three different light intensities (100, 200 and 300 μmol m(-2)s(-1)). Effect of three different light and dark regimes (12:12, 16:08 and 24:00 h Light:Dark) were investigated for each light intensity at 25°C culture temperature. Maximum lipid content (23.5%) was obtained due to high efficiency and deep penetration of 200 μmol m(-2)s(-1) of blue light (12:12 L:D) with improved specific growth (1.26 d(-1)) within reduced cultivation time of 8 days. White light could produce 20.9% lipid content in 10 days at 16:08 h L:D.

  6. Establishing nurse-led ventilator-associated pneumonia surveillance in paediatric intensive care.

    PubMed

    Richardson, M; Hines, S; Dixon, G; Highe, L; Brierley, J

    2010-07-01

    Preventing ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is one of the Department of Health 'Saving Lives' initiatives. Whereas morbidity and mortality from VAP is well-documented in adults, it is poorly studied in children. We describe the establishment of a nurse-led VAP surveillance programme as part of an overall drive for patient safety and healthcare-associated infection reduction. All children admitted to a tertiary referral paediatric intensive care unit over a four-month period were studied. VAP was defined as pneumonia occurring >48 h post intubation. Diagnostic criteria were: (i) radiological: new/progressive infiltrates, consolidation or cavitation on chest X-ray; (ii) clinical: > or = 3 of new onset purulent bronchial secretions, leucopaenia or leucocytosis, core temperature > or = 38.5 degrees C or < or = 36 degrees C without other cause, significant positive respiratory culture or culture from another relevant site of infection. A flow diagram and teaching programme was developed for bedside nurses to facilitate investigations of suspected VAP. The nurse in charge collected data daily at midnight until 24h post extubation, discharge or death. Suspected cases of VAP were referred to infection control for secondary verification. A total of 158 intubated children were admitted over four months with 58 excluded (ventilated <24 h). Full data were obtained on all 100 children. VAP incidence was 5.6 per 1000 ventilator-days. We report successful introduction of a nurse-led VAP surveillance programme. Data acquisition in this study was dependent on nursing workload, however, and placed a significant time burden on the study leads. Although a relatively low VAP rate was demonstrated, VAP bundles with automated surveillance are being introduced.

  7. Megahertz rate Schlieren visualization of underexpanded, impinging jet using pulsed high power LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willert, Christian; Mitchell, Daniel; Soria, Julio

    2010-11-01

    Recent advances in light emitting diode (LED) technology has resulted in high power, single chip devices that provide luminous radiant fluxes exceeding several watts. Operated in pulsed current mode the instantaneous light emission of an LED can be further increased to levels comparable to that of photographic (xenon) flash units making it a suitable light source for Schlieren imaging. Compared to the commonly used xenon flash units an LED can be triggered within tens of nanoseconds at rise times on the order of 100 ns thereby enabling stroboscopic illumination at megahertz rates. In the present application the LED's driving electronics were synchronized to a high speed camera to provide time-resolved Schlieren images of an underexpanded free jet impinging on a flat plate (nozzle pressure ratio 2.0 to 5.2). The LED was pulsed in burst mode for 102 images at currents of up to 120 A at 500 ns per pulse. Compared to images obtained with a xenon white light flash the nearly monochromatic green light of the LED results in much crisper flow features with superior repeatability in intensity without any speckle artifacts commonly found with laser illumination.

  8. High Intensity Polarized Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Redwine, Robert P.

    2012-07-31

    The goal of the project was to investigate the possibility of building a very high intensity polarized electron gun for the Electron-Ion Collider. This development is crucial for the eRHIC project. The gun implements a large area cathode, ring-shaped laser beam and active cathode cooling. A polarized electron gun chamber with a large area cathode and active cathode cooling has been built and tested. A preparation chamber for cathode activation has been built and initial tests have been performed. Major parts for a load-lock chamber, where cathodes are loaded into the vacuum system, have been manufactured.

  9. Paediatric intensive care nurses' and doctors' perceptions on nurse-led protocol-directed ventilation weaning and extubation.

    PubMed

    Tume, Lyvonne N; Scally, Alison; Carter, Bernie

    2014-11-01

    Nurse-led (protocol-directed) ventilation weaning (NLVW) is utilized in adult intensive care and has shown to be safe and reduce ventilation times. Our paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) implemented a NLVW (and extubation) protocol in 2004, yet it was observed that some NLVW-trained nurses were not undertaking the role in practice. To explore PICU nurses' and doctors' perceptions of and barriers to NLVW on a UK PICU, with the aim of facilitating more NLVW on our PICU by reducing these barriers. A cross-sectional electronic survey was used to collect data from both nurse ventilation weaners and all medical staff and advanced nurse practitioners (ANPs) on one PICU. Our survey response rates were 90% (36/40) nursing and 54% (20/37) medical. The four top reasons cited for nurses not being able to wean by protocol were not being allocated to a 'weanable' patient, being in an in-charge or runner role, high clinical workload and a perceived lack of support from medical staff/ANPs. The restrictive nature of our protocol also emerged as a key issue by all staff. The medical survey revealed an overwhelming positive response to NLVW with 90% believing that experienced PICU nurses should be allowed to wean ventilation. In contrast to the nurses perceived lack of support or encouragement for NLVW, medical staff rated their encouragement for the nurses to undertake this role as high. NLVW is a complex process, and factors that impair or facilitate this process relate not only to the weaning protocol itself, but also organizational processes and structural factors in a PICU. This paper highlights the complexities involved in instituting and establishing a nurse-led, protocol-driven ventilation weaning process within a PICU. Further, in depth research is required to examine both PICU nurses and doctors attitudes to NLVW both in the UK and across Europe. © 2013 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  10. High performance, LED powered, waveguide based total internal reflection microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Cohen, Daniel A.; Quist, Arjan P.; Lal, Ratnesh

    2013-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a rapidly expanding optical technique with excellent surface sensitivity and limited background fluorescence. Commercially available TIRF systems are either objective based that employ expensive special high numerical aperture (NA) objectives or prism based that restrict integrating other modalities of investigation for structure-function analysis. Both techniques result in uneven illumination of the field of view and require training and experience in optics. Here we describe a novel, inexpensive, LED powered, waveguide based TIRF system that could be used as an add-on module to any standard fluorescence microscope even with low NA objectives. This system requires no alignment, illuminates the entire field evenly, and allows switching between epifluorescence/TIRF/bright field modes without adjustments or objective replacements. The simple design allows integration with other imaging systems, including atomic force microscopy (AFM), for probing complex biological systems at their native nanoscale regimes. PMID:23823601

  11. Intensity of an oxygen saturation image improved using scanning NIR-LED light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Ching-Ching; Hung, Min-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2014-09-01

    A near-infrared (940 nm) image of skin tissue can be substantially enhanced using optical scanning technology (OST) that can reduce the scattering effect and remove the wrinkles or fine hair in the image. Using OST to create the skin tissue image ensured that the contour of blood vessels became more clear than that obtained from the divergent light source. In addition, the oxygen saturation of the blood vessels and tissues obtained using OST were approximately 98.65 and 93.17%, respectively, exhibiting an increase of more than 20% compared with that obtained using divergent light, and approached the value when measured using commercial pulse oximetry. Because the proposed method has a deep light penetration depth and high image intensity and resolution for oxygen saturation analysis, it is highly appropriate to be applied to future studies on diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

  12. High intensity portable fluorescent light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, F. B.

    1972-01-01

    Eight high intensity portable fluorescent lights were produced. Three prototype lights were also produced, two of which were subsequently updated to the physical and operational configuration of the qualification and flight units. Positioning of lamp apertures and reflectors in these lights is such that the light is concentrated and intensified in a specific pattern rather than widely diffused. Indium amalgam control of mercury vapor pressure in the lamp gives high output at lamp ambient temperatures up to 105 C. A small amount of amalgam applied to each electrode stem helps to obtain fast warm-up. Shrinking a Teflon sleeve on the tube and potting metal caps on each end of the lamp minimizes dispersion of mercury vapor and glass particles in the event of accidental lamp breakage. Operation at 20 kHz allows the lamps to consume more power than at low frequency, thus increasing their light output and raising their efficiency. When used to expose color photographic film, light from the lamps produces results approximately equal to sunlight.

  13. Evaluation of a Peer-Led, Low-Intensity Physical Activity Program for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Danilea; Teufel, James; Brown, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physical inactivity is a primary contributor to decreasing functional physical fitness and increasing chronic disease in older adults. Purpose: This study assessed the health-related benefits of ExerStart for Lay Leaders, a 20-week, community based, peer-led, low-impact exercise program for older adults. ExerStart focuses on aerobic…

  14. Evaluation of a Peer-Led, Low-Intensity Physical Activity Program for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Danilea; Teufel, James; Brown, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physical inactivity is a primary contributor to decreasing functional physical fitness and increasing chronic disease in older adults. Purpose: This study assessed the health-related benefits of ExerStart for Lay Leaders, a 20-week, community based, peer-led, low-impact exercise program for older adults. ExerStart focuses on aerobic…

  15. High intensity protons in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Drees, K. A.; Fischer, W.; Huang, H.; Minty, M.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.

    2012-01-05

    During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

  16. High density GaN/AlN quantum dots for deep UV LED with high quantum efficiency and temperature stability

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weihuang; Li, Jinchai; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Po-Kai; Lu, Tien-Chang; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Li, Shuping; Yang, Xu; Chen, Hangyang; Liu, Dayi; Kang, Junyong

    2014-01-01

    High internal efficiency and high temperature stability ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at 308 nm were achieved using high density (2.5 × 109 cm−2) GaN/AlN quantum dots (QDs) grown by MOVPE. Photoluminescence shows the characteristic behaviors of QDs: nearly constant linewidth and emission energy, and linear dependence of the intensity with varying excitation power. More significantly, the radiative recombination was found to dominant from 15 to 300 K, with a high internal quantum efficiency of 62% even at room temperature. PMID:24898569

  17. High-output LED-based light engine for profile lighting fixtures with high color uniformity using freeform reflectors.

    PubMed

    Gadegaard, Jesper; Jensen, Thøger Kari; Jørgensen, Dennis Thykjær; Kristensen, Peter Kjær; Søndergaard, Thomas; Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2016-02-20

    In the stage lighting and entertainment market, light engines (LEs) for lighting fixtures are often based on high-intensity discharge (HID) bulbs. Switching to LED-based light engines gives possibilities for fast switching, additive color mixing, a longer lifetime, and potentially, more energy-efficient systems. The lumen output of a single LED is still not sufficient to replace an HID source in high-output profile fixtures, but combining multiple LEDs can create an LE with a similar output, but with added complexity. This paper presents the results of modeling and testing such a light engine. Custom ray-tracing software was used to design a high-output red, green and blue LED-based light engine with twelve CBT-90 LEDs using a dual-reflector principle. The simulated optical system efficiency was 0.626 with a perfect (R=1) reflector coating for light delivered on a target surface through the entire optical system. A profile lighting fixture prototype was created, and provided an output of 6744 lumen and an efficiency of 0.412. The lower efficiency was mainly due to a non-optimal reflector coating, and the optimized design is expected to reach a significantly higher efficiency.

  18. Freeform lens design for LED illumination with high uniformity and efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Lin, Hoang Yan

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we design a freeform lens according to the LED light distribution curve so that the light rays emitted from a LED through the lens can achieve high uniformity and efficiency on the prescribed target plane. Because the model is of rotational symmetry, we consider just a 2-D lens shape and then sweep to get the 3-D result. Here a procedure based on the Snell's law and edge-ray principle for designing the freeform lens is proposed. First of all, we analyze the LED intensity distribution and subdivide it into parts. Then we calculate the zones on the target plane where the subdivided light rays should be distributed to. Finally we use an approximate analytic method to construct the freeform lens. After constructing the freeform lens, we simulate for the optical model by using the ray-tracing software LightTools®. The simulation results show that the Cree XLamp XR-E LED light source through the freeform lens can achieve up to 94.8% uniformity and 89.1% efficiency including Fresnel losses for a 1 m distance away and 1 m radius of circular illumination plane.

  19. High-performance LED luminaire for sports hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Xuan-Hao; Yang, Jin-Tsung; Chien, Wei-Ting; Chang, Jung-Hsuan; Lo, Yi-Chien; Lin, Che-Chu; Sun, Ching-Cherng

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present a luminaire design with anti-glare and energy-saving effects for sports hall. Compared with traditional lamps using in a badminton court, the average illuminance on the ground of the proposed LED luminaire is enhanced about 300%. Besides, the uniformity is obviously enhanced and improved. The switch-on speed of lighting in sports hall is greatly reduced from 5-10 minutes to 1 second. The simulation analysis and the corresponding experiment results are demonstrated.

  20. High Efficacy Green LEDs by Polarization Controlled MOVPE

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, Christian

    2013-03-31

    Amazing performance in GaInN/GaN based LEDs has become possible by advanced epitaxial growth on a wide variety of substrates over the last decade. An immediate push towards product development and worldwide competition for market share have effectively reduced production cost and generated substantial primary energy savings on a worldwide scale. At all times of the development, this economic pressure forced very fundamental decisions that would shape huge industrial investment. One of those major aspects is the choice of epitaxial growth substrate. The natural questions are to what extend a decision for a certain substrate will limit the ultimate performance and to what extent, the choice of a currently more expensive substrate such as native GaN could overcome any of the remaining performance limitations. Therefore, this project has set out to explore what performance characteristic could be achieved under the utilization of bulk GaN substrate. Our work was guided by the hypotheses that line defects such as threading dislocations in the active region should be avoided and the huge piezoelectric polarization needs to be attenuated – if not turned off – for higher performing LEDs, particularly in the longer wavelength green and deep green portions of the visible spectrum. At their relatively lower performance level, deep green LEDs are a stronger indicator of relative performance improvements and seem particular sensitive to the challenges at hand.

  1. Design and measurement of TIR lens of MR16-compatible LED lamp without aspherical surface for high directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Wei-Che; Chen, Yi-Yung; Lee, Yu-Chi; Whang, Allen Jong-Woei

    2010-05-01

    In recently, many illuminance applications use LEDs to replace the traditional light source because they have many advantages, such as longer life time, lower power consumption, smaller size, and safer. Because the optical characteristics of LEDs and traditional sources are different, we need to do secondary optical design for LED applications, such as headlamp, street lamp, and MR16 lamp. For the better optical characteristic, the optical elements of the applications often include aspherical surface. However, it would generate higher cost and lower yield. In this paper, we design a TIR lens for MR16-Compatible LED Lamp without any aspherical surface. Base on the purpose of MR16, the design conditions are high directivity for higher illumination and flat top surface to simulate the traditional MR16. In this design, the TIR surface controls the edge intensity of LED and the central curve surface controls the center intensity of LED. According to the optical simulation, the view angle of the MR16-Compatible LED Lamp is +/-9.3° and the central illumination is 559 Lux in which the total flux of LED is 83 lm. Finally, we manufacture and measurement the designed TIR lens. The view angle of the manufactured MR16 is about +/-7.0° and the central illumination is 581 Lux in which the total flux is 52 lm.

  2. The use of high-intensity ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskar, A.

    Features of the application of high-intensity ultrasonics are related to intensity measurements of ultrasonic oscillation and high-intensity ultrasonic effects on the resonance system. High-intensity ultrasonics applications in various technologies are considered, taking into account filtration and catalysis, drying, aerosol and hydrosol coagulation, emulsification and dispersion, metal-powder production, ultrasonic liquid degassing, cavitation, ultrasonic cleaning, metallizing and soldering, welding in an ultrasonic field, and ultrasonics in material machining. Other topics considered are related to ultrasonics in the crystallization of metals and alloys, ultrasonics in heat and chemical-heat treatment, safety and hygiene of working with ultrasonic devices, the effect of high-intensity ultrasonics on solids, the properties of materials after prior action of high-intensity ultrasound, the fatigue of materials during high-frequency stressing, and ultrasonic oscillation and material deformation characteristics. The technological exploitation of ultrasound during material forming is also discussed.

  3. Nurse-led change: a statewide multidisciplinary collaboration targeting intensive care unit delirium.

    PubMed

    Dammeyer, Jennifer A; Mapili, Christina D; Palleschi, Maria Teresa; Eagle, Sommer; Browning, Linda; Heck, Kara; March, Adam; Clark, Patricia; George, Christine

    2012-01-01

    For more than a decade, research has demonstrated both the widespread prevalence and negative outcomes associated with intensive care unit delirium. Hospitals are, therefore, being called to institute evidence-based protocols to prevent and manage its occurrence. Integrating evidence-based practice into bedside care can be a challenge. Having information ready and accessible is essential to implementing successful change. The state of Michigan, through the Michigan Health and Hospital Association Keystone Center, has historically gathered evidence and formulated processes to facilitate evidence implementation in statewide intensive care units. Toolkits have been developed to facilitate the spread of information and are used as a starting point for sites. This approach has been proven successful in reduction of ventilator-associated pneumonias and catheter-related blood stream infections, while in partnership with Johns Hopkins University. The purpose of this article is to describe the creation of evidence-based toolkits used to facilitate successful statewide changes in practice using an interprofessional team including nurses, physicians, and pharmacists. The content reflects a step-wise approach to not only engage and educate staff, but also strategies to execute and evaluate the effectiveness.

  4. Light-Emitting Diodes (LED) for Primary Animal Habitat Lighting in Highly Controlled Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Syrkin, N.; Heeke, D.; Mele, G.; Holley, D. C.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Significant alterations in Biological Clock responses have been reported following sidereal time changes (e.g., Jet-lag), and exposure to microgravity (e.g., daytime sleepiness). Additionally, light reduces circulating melatonin (spectral specificity greatest between 450-500 nm). It was hypothesized that LEDs can replace the current light sources used in zero gravity and terrestrial research laboratories because of their small size, low mass, low energy consumption and long functional life. This report evaluates the capacity of LEDs to entrain the circadian system of rats as judged by measurement of overt behavioral circadian rhythms (activity, feeding, drinking). These data were collected in highly controlled environments similar to the shuttle Animal Enclosure Modules. Two groups were compared: control - animals exposed to standard cool-white fluorescent lights, and test - animals exposed to LEDs with a spectral power distribution matching the fluorescent lights. Gross locomotor activity, feeding and drinking frequencies were continuously monitored and stored at 10 minute intervals. Animals were exposed to the following photoperiods: 28 days of 12L:12D, 19 days of 24L:0D and 16 days of 12L:12D. Light intensities tested varied between 0.1 to 100 lux. Rats received food and water ad libitum, and temperature and humidity were controlled throughout the study. The general health status of all rats was acceptable for each day of this study. No incidents of aggressive behavior were observed. Growth, locomotor activity, food and water consumption were comparable for all groups of animals, i.e, the circadian characteristics of the animals under these conditions were comparable. These results indicate that LED arrays are as effective in maintaining circadian rhythm stability as the commonly used cool-white fluorescent light sources. LEDs with their flexible spectrum, low energy requirements and minimal heat production have advantages for some chronopharmacology studies and

  5. Light-Emitting Diodes (LED) for Primary Animal Habitat Lighting in Highly Controlled Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Syrkin, N.; Heeke, D.; Mele, G.; Holley, D. C.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Significant alterations in Biological Clock responses have been reported following sidereal time changes (e.g., Jet-lag), and exposure to microgravity (e.g., daytime sleepiness). Additionally, light reduces circulating melatonin (spectral specificity greatest between 450-500 nm). It was hypothesized that LEDs can replace the current light sources used in zero gravity and terrestrial research laboratories because of their small size, low mass, low energy consumption and long functional life. This report evaluates the capacity of LEDs to entrain the circadian system of rats as judged by measurement of overt behavioral circadian rhythms (activity, feeding, drinking). These data were collected in highly controlled environments similar to the shuttle Animal Enclosure Modules. Two groups were compared: control - animals exposed to standard cool-white fluorescent lights, and test - animals exposed to LEDs with a spectral power distribution matching the fluorescent lights. Gross locomotor activity, feeding and drinking frequencies were continuously monitored and stored at 10 minute intervals. Animals were exposed to the following photoperiods: 28 days of 12L:12D, 19 days of 24L:0D and 16 days of 12L:12D. Light intensities tested varied between 0.1 to 100 lux. Rats received food and water ad libitum, and temperature and humidity were controlled throughout the study. The general health status of all rats was acceptable for each day of this study. No incidents of aggressive behavior were observed. Growth, locomotor activity, food and water consumption were comparable for all groups of animals, i.e, the circadian characteristics of the animals under these conditions were comparable. These results indicate that LED arrays are as effective in maintaining circadian rhythm stability as the commonly used cool-white fluorescent light sources. LEDs with their flexible spectrum, low energy requirements and minimal heat production have advantages for some chronopharmacology studies and

  6. Characteristics of High-Efficient InGaN-Based White LED Lighting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADPO 11311 TITLE: Characteristics of High-Efficient InGaN -Based White LED ...thru ADP011332 UNCLASSIFIED Characteristics of high-efficient InGaN -based white LED lighting Yuji Uchida’, Tatsumi Setomoto’, Tsunemasa Taguchi...characteristics of an efficient white LEDs lighting source, which is composed of cannon-ball type 10 cd-class InGaN -based white LEDs , are described. It is

  7. High Intensity Radiation Laboratory Reverberation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This photo depicts the interior of the large Reverberation Chamber located in the High Intensity, Radiation Facility (HIRL). These chambers are used to test susceptibility of aircraft avionics systems responses to high intensity radiated fields. These resources include a Gigahertz Transverse Electromagnetic Cell (GTEM), which provides a uniform field of up to 1000V/m from 10 kHz to 18 Ghz.

  8. Comparative Evaluation of the Effects of Light Intensities and Curing Cycles of QTH, and LED Lights on Microleakage of Class V Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Chandurkar, Anshu M; Metgud, Sandeep S; Yakub, Shaikh Shoeb; Kalburge, Vaishali J; Biradar, Basawaraj C

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of light intensity and curing cycles of QTH and LED lights on the microleakage of Class V composite restorations. Materials and Methods:Eighty freshly extracted human maxillary premolars were used for this study. Standardized Class V cavities were prepared and they were restored with microhybrid resin composite. According to the curing protocol, the teeth were then divided into 4 groups (n=20): QTH curing (standard and soft start modes), and LED (standard and soft start modes) irradiations. Microleakage was evaluated by immersion of the samples in 50% silver nitrate solution. The samples were then sectioned, evaluated under a stereomicroscope, and scored for microleakage. Results: The results of the present in-vitro study showed mean dye leakage scores of 1.9, 1.2, 1.45 and 0.90 for Group I (QTH-Standard mode), Group II (QTH-Soft Start mode), Group III (LED-Standard mode) and Group IV (LED-Soft Start mode) respectively. Conclusion: It was thus concluded that the soft start polymerization showed a highly significant difference as compared to the standard curing modes of QTH and LED lights, respectively. PMID:24783142

  9. High Intensity Polarized Electron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelker, M.; Adderley, P.; Brittian, J.; Clark, J.; Grames, J.; Hansknecht, J.; McCarter, J.; Stutzman, M. L.; Suleiman, R.; Surles-Law, K.

    2008-02-01

    During the 1990s, at numerous facilities world wide, extensive R&D devoted to constructing reliable GaAs photoguns helped ensure successful accelerator-based nuclear and high-energy physics programs using spin polarized electron beams. Today, polarized electron source technology is considered mature, with most GaAs photoguns meeting accelerator and experiment beam specifications in a relatively trouble-free manner. Proposals for new collider facilities however, require electron beams with parameters beyond today's state-of-the-art and serve to renew interest in conducting polarized electron source R&D. And at CEBAF/Jefferson Lab, there is an immediate pressing need to prepare for new experiments that require considerably more beam current than before. One experiment in particular—Q-weak, a parity violation experiment that will look for physics beyond the Standard Model—requires 180 uA average current at polarization >80% for a duration of one year, with run-averaged helicity correlated current asymmetry less than 0.1 ppm. Neighboring halls will continue taking beam during Q-weak, pushing the total average beam current from the gun beyond 300 uA. This workshop contribution describes R&D at Jefferson Lab, dedicated toward extending the operating current of polarized electron sources to meet the requirements of high current experiments at CEBAF and to better appreciate the technological challenges of new accelerators, particularly high average current machines like eRHIC that require at least 25 mA at high polarization.

  10. High Intensity Polarized Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Poelker, M.; Adderley, P.; Brittian, J.; Clark, J.; Grames, J.; Hansknecht, J.; McCarter, J.; Stutzman, M. L.; Suleiman, R.; Surles-Law, K.

    2008-02-06

    During the 1990s, at numerous facilities world wide, extensive R and D devoted to constructing reliable GaAs photoguns helped ensure successful accelerator-based nuclear and high-energy physics programs using spin polarized electron beams. Today, polarized electron source technology is considered mature, with most GaAs photoguns meeting accelerator and experiment beam specifications in a relatively trouble-free manner. Proposals for new collider facilities however, require electron beams with parameters beyond today's state-of-the-art and serve to renew interest in conducting polarized electron source R and D. And at CEBAF/Jefferson Lab, there is an immediate pressing need to prepare for new experiments that require considerably more beam current than before. One experiment in particular - Q-weak, a parity violation experiment that will look for physics beyond the Standard Model--requires 180 uA average current at polarization >80% for a duration of one year, with run-averaged helicity correlated current asymmetry less than 0.1 ppm. Neighboring halls will continue taking beam during Q-weak, pushing the total average beam current from the gun beyond 300 uA. This workshop contribution describes R and D at Jefferson Lab, dedicated toward extending the operating current of polarized electron sources to meet the requirements of high current experiments at CEBAF and to better appreciate the technological challenges of new accelerators, particularly high average current machines like eRHIC that require at least 25 mA at high polarization.

  11. Highly-efficient, tunable green, phosphor-converted LEDs using a long-pass dichroic filter and a series of orthosilicate phosphors for tri-color white LEDs.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Hye; Oh, Jeong Rok; Park, Hoo Keun; Sung, Yeon-Goog; Do, Young Rag

    2012-01-02

    This study introduces a long-pass dichroic filter (LPDF) on top of a phosphor-converted LED (pc-LED) packing associated with each corresponding tunable orthosilicate ((Ba,Sr)2SiO4:Eu) phosphor in order to fabricate tunable green pc-LEDs. These LPDF-capped green pc-LEDs provide luminous efficacies between 143–173 lm/W at 60 mA in a wavelength range between 515 and 560 nm. These tunable green pc-LEDs can replace green semiconductor-type III-V LEDs, which present challenges with respect to generating high luminous efficacy. We also introduce the highly-efficient tunable green pc-LEDs into tri-color white LED systems that combine an InGaN blue LED and green/red full down-converted pc-LEDs. The effect of peak wavelength in the tunable green pc-LEDs on the optical properties of a tri-color package white LED is analyzed to determine the proper wavelength of green color for tri-color white LEDs. The tri-color white LED provides excellent luminous efficacy (81.5–109 lm/W) and a good color rendering index (64–87) at 6500 K of correlated color temperature (CCT) with the peak wavelength of green pc-LEDs. The luminous efficacy of the LPDF-capped green monochromatic pc-LED and tri-color package with tunable green pc-LEDs can be increased by improving the external quantum efficiency of blue LEDs and the conversion efficiency of green pc-LEDs.

  12. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  13. High Intensity Polarized Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Poelker, Benard; Adderley, Philip; Brittian, Joshua; Clark, J.; Grames, Joseph; Hansknecht, John; McCarter, James; Stutzman, Marcy; Suleiman, Riad; Surles-law, Kenneth

    2008-02-01

    During the 1990s, at numerous facilities world wide, extensive R&D devoted to constructing reliable GaAs photoguns helped ensure successful accelerator-based nuclear and high-energy physics programs using spin polarized electron beams. Today, polarized electron source technology is considered mature, with most GaAs photoguns meeting accelerator and experiment beam specifications in a relatively trouble-free manner. Proposals for new collider facilities however, require electron beams with parameters beyond today's state-of-the-art and serve to renew interest in conducting polarized electron source R&D. And at CEBAF/Jefferson Lab, there is an immediate pressing need to prepare for new experiments that require considerably more beam current than before. One experiment in particular?Q-weak, a parity violation experiment that will look for physics beyond the Standard Model?requires 180 uA average current at polarization >80% for a duration of one year, with run-averaged helicity correlate

  14. High Density, High Radiance $\\mu$ LED Matrix for Optogenetic Retinal Prostheses and Planar Neural Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Soltan, Ahmed; McGovern, Brian; Drakakis, Emmanuel; Neil, Mark; Maaskant, Pleun; Akhter, Mahbub; Lee, Jun Su; Degenaar, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Optical neuron stimulation arrays are important for both in-vitro biology and retinal prosthetic biomedical applications. Hence, in this work, we present an 8100 pixel high radiance photonic stimulator. The chip module vertically combines custom made gallium nitride μ LEDs with a CMOS application specific integrated circuit. This is designed with active pixels to ensure random access and to allow continuous illumination of all required pixels. The μLEDs have been assembled on the chip using a solder ball flip-chip bonding technique which has allowed for reliable and repeatable manufacture. We have evaluated the performance of the matrix by measuring the different factors including the static, dynamic power consumption, the illumination, and the current consumption by each LED. We show that the power consumption is within a range suitable for portable use. Finally, the thermal behavior of the matrix is monitored and the matrix proved to be thermally stable.

  15. High-intensity source of extreme ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paresce, E.; Kumar, S.; Bowyer, S.

    1972-01-01

    High intensity ultraviolet radiation source was developed which is suitable for emission below 500 A. Source, useful for 100 to 1000 A range, is simple and inexpensive to construct, easy to operate, and very stable. Because of sufficiently intense output spectrum, source can be used with monochromator at wavelengths as low as 160 A.

  16. High Efficiency LED Lamp for Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    James Ibbetson

    2006-12-31

    This report contains a summary of technical achievements during a three-year project to demonstrate high efficiency, solid-state lamps based on gallium nitride/silicon carbide light-emitting diodes. Novel chip designs and fabrication processes are described for a new type of nitride light-emitting diode with the potential for very high efficiency. This work resulted in the demonstration of blue light-emitting diodes in the one watt class that achieved up to 495 mW of light output at 350 mA drive current, corresponding to quantum and wall plug efficiencies of 51% and 45%, respectively. When combined with a phosphor in Cree's 7090 XLamp package, these advanced blue-emitting devices resulted in white light-emitting diodes whose efficacy exceeded 85 lumens per watt. In addition, up to 1040 lumens at greater than 85 lumens per watt was achieved by combining multiple devices to make a compact white lamp module with high optical efficiency.

  17. Hazards from High Intensity Lamps and Arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    The principal occupational health problem generally associated with high intensity arc lamps results from exposure of the eye and skin to ultraviolet radiation. Occasionally, the chorioretinal burns are of concern. The eye is generally more susceptible than the skin to injury from high intensity optical radiation sources whether ultraviolet, visible or infrared. Recent developments in technology have shown that some high intensity optical radiation sources which have output parameters greatly different from those encountered in the natural environment present a serious chorioretinal burn hazard.

  18. Hazards from High Intensity Lamps and Arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    The principal occupational health problem generally associated with high intensity arc lamps results from exposure of the eye and skin to ultraviolet radiation. Occasionally, the chorioretinal burns are of concern. The eye is generally more susceptible than the skin to injury from high intensity optical radiation sources whether ultraviolet, visible or infrared. Recent developments in technology have shown that some high intensity optical radiation sources which have output parameters greatly different from those encountered in the natural environment present a serious chorioretinal burn hazard.

  19. High-intensity training in football.

    PubMed

    Iaia, F Marcello; Rampinini, Ermanno; Bangsbo, Jens

    2009-09-01

    This article reviews the major physiological and performance effects of aerobic high-intensity and speed-endurance training in football, and provides insight on implementation of individual game-related physical training. Analysis and physiological measurements have revealed that modern football is highly energetically demanding, and the ability to perform repeated high-intensity work is of importance for the players. Furthermore, the most successful teams perform more high-intensity activities during a game when in possession of the ball. Hence, footballers need a high fitness level to cope with the physical demands of the game. Studies on football players have shown that 8 to 12 wk of aerobic high-intensity running training (> 85% HR(max)) leads to VO2(max) enhancement (5% to 11%), increased running economy (3% to 7%), and lower blood lactate accumulation during submaximal exercise, as well as improvements in the yo-yo intermittent recovery (YYIR) test performance (13%). Similar adaptations are observed when performing aerobic high-intensity training with small-sided games. Speed-endurance training has a positive effect on football-specific endurance, as shown by the marked improvements in the YYIR test (22% to 28%) and the ability to perform repeated sprints (approximately 2%). In conclusion, both aerobic and speed-endurance training can be used during the season to improve high-intensity intermittent exercise performance. The type and amount of training should be game related and specific to the technical, tactical, and physical demands imposed on each player.

  20. Arrays of microscopic organic LEDs for high-resolution optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Steude, Anja; Witts, Emily C.; Miles, Gareth B.; Gather, Malte C.

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics is a paradigm-changing new method to study and manipulate the behavior of cells with light. Following major advances of the used genetic constructs over the last decade, the light sources required for optogenetic control are now receiving increased attention. We report a novel optogenetic illumination platform based on high-density arrays of microscopic organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Because of the small dimensions of each array element (6 × 9 μm2) and the use of ultrathin device encapsulation, these arrays enable illumination of cells with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution. We show that adherent eukaryotic cells readily proliferate on these arrays, and we demonstrate specific light-induced control of the ionic current across the membrane of individual live cells expressing different optogenetic constructs. Our work paves the way for the use of OLEDs for cell-specific optogenetic control in cultured neuronal networks and for acute brain slices, or as implants in vivo. PMID:27386540

  1. Arrays of microscopic organic LEDs for high-resolution optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Steude, Anja; Witts, Emily C; Miles, Gareth B; Gather, Malte C

    2016-05-01

    Optogenetics is a paradigm-changing new method to study and manipulate the behavior of cells with light. Following major advances of the used genetic constructs over the last decade, the light sources required for optogenetic control are now receiving increased attention. We report a novel optogenetic illumination platform based on high-density arrays of microscopic organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Because of the small dimensions of each array element (6 × 9 μm(2)) and the use of ultrathin device encapsulation, these arrays enable illumination of cells with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution. We show that adherent eukaryotic cells readily proliferate on these arrays, and we demonstrate specific light-induced control of the ionic current across the membrane of individual live cells expressing different optogenetic constructs. Our work paves the way for the use of OLEDs for cell-specific optogenetic control in cultured neuronal networks and for acute brain slices, or as implants in vivo.

  2. THE HIGH INTENSITY SOLAR ENVIRONMENT TEST SYSTEM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-01-15

    TODD SCHNEIDER LOOKS UP FROM WORK AT THE DOOR OF T HE HIGH INTENSITY SOLAR ENVIRONMENT TEST SYSTEM IN BUILDING 4605. SCHNEIDER IS A PHYSICIST IN THE MATERIALS AND PROCESSES DEPARTMENT AT MSFC AND IS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR FOR HISET.

  3. High-Intensity Plasma Glass Melter

    SciTech Connect

    2004-01-01

    Modular high-intensity plasma melter promises improved performance, reduced energy use, and lower emissions. The glass industry has used the same basic equipment for melting glass for the past 100 years.

  4. High dynamic grayscale lithography with an LED-based micro-image stepper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Hans-Christoph; Zeitner, Uwe D.; Leitel, Robert; Stumpf, Marko; Schleicher, Philipp; Bräuer, Andreas; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    We developed a novel LED projection based direct write grayscale lithography system for the generation of optical surface profiles such as micro-lenses, diffractive elements, diffusors, and micro freeforms. The image formation is realized by a LCoS micro-display which is illuminated by a 405 nm UV High Power LED. The image on the display can be demagnified from factors 5x to 100x with an exchangeable lens. By controlling exposure time and LED power, the presented technique enables a highly dynamic dosage control for the exposure of h-line sensitive photo resist. In addition, the LCoS micro-display allows for an intensity control within the micro-image which is particularly advantageous to eliminate surface profile errors from stitching and limited homogeneity from LED illumination. Together with an accurate calibration of the resist response this leads to a superior low surface error of realized profiles below <0.2% RMS. The micro-display is mounted on a 3-axis (XYθ) stage for precise alignment. The substrate is brought into position with an air bearing stage which addresses an area of 500 × 500 mm2 with a positioning accuracy of <100 nm. As the exposure setup performs controlled motion in the z-direction the system to maintain the focal distance and lithographic patterning on non-planar surfaces to some extent. The exposure concept allows a high structure depth of more than 100 μm and a spatial resolution below 1 μm as well as the possibility of very steep sidewalls with angles larger than >80°. Another benefit of the approach is a patterning speed up to 100 cm2/h, which allows fabricating large-scale optics and microstructures in an acceptable time. We present the setup and show examples of micro-structures to demonstrate the performance of the system, namely a refractive freeform array, where the RMS surface deviation does not exceed 0.2% of the total structure depth of 75 μm. Furthermore, we show that this exposure tool is suitable to generate diffractive

  5. A Psychologist-Led Educational Intervention Results in a Sustained Reduction in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Infections

    PubMed Central

    Van Rostenberghe, Hans; Short, Jacki; Ramli, Noraida; Geok, Tan Beng; Subramaniam, Sivasangari; Che Yaakob, Che Anuar; Othman, Azizah; Ibrahim, Nor Rosidah; Ho, Jacqueline; Mohamed, Zeehaida; Hasan, Habsah

    2014-01-01

    Even though in the corporate world psychological science has been widely used, the formal use of evidence-based psychology in important areas of clinical medicine has been scanty at best. It was the aim of this study to determine the efficacy of a psychologist-led 2-week nurse educator training on the infection rate in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Materials and methods: In 2007, six senior neonatal nurses underwent a training course focusing on the retrieval of evidence and knowledge of psychological principles that would allow them to share the evidence in such a way that evidence is effectively brought into practice. The course was led by a psychologist. The nurses created and delivered their own teaching modules, all focused on infection control. The rates of bacteremia, 2 years prior to intervention were analyzed and compared with the rate following the intervention for 3 years. Results: The immediate output of the course included three teaching modules: hand washing, sterile procedures, and general measures to control infection. These modules were subsequently administered to the NICU nurses in regular structured continuous nursing education sessions. The psychological techniques taught in the course were applied. Bacteremia in the NICU significantly decreased in the year of the course and the subsequent years when compared to previous years (from more than 17 in 2005 and 2006 to less than 10 per 100 admissions to the NICU in 2008 and 2009). Conclusion: This study suggests that a psychologist-led course, followed by a structured CNE can lead to a sustainable reduction in infection rates in a NICU. PMID:25478550

  6. High-power LEDs influence on germination rate of tomato seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudora, Cătălina; Ristici, M.; Ristici, Esofina

    2007-08-01

    Artificial lighting for plants cultivation is an important factor that can determine the nutritional quality of vegetables. The improvement of quality is determined by the emission spectrum of LED, suitable for vegetables. This spectrum values must be inside the solar ones. So, by using red high-power LEDs we can supplement the conventional lighting (ex. HPS) and we can enrich the red light from the emission light. We have used a special device that has 200 high-power red LEDs, having emission wavelength in 640-670 nm range, which is presented below. Using red LEDs on tomato seeds, we can observe that the germination rate significantly increased.

  7. Progress toward achieving high power and high efficiency semipolar LEDs and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hong

    Performance of current commercially available wurtzite nitride based light-emitting diodes (LEDs), grown along the polar (0001) c-plane orientation, is limited by the presence of polarization-related electric fields inside multi-quantum wells (MQWs). The discontinuities in both spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization at the heterointerfaces result in internal electric fields in the quantum wells. These electric fields cause carrier separation [quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE)] and reduce the radiative recombination rate within the quantum wells. One approach to reduce and possibly eliminate the polarization-related effects is to grow III-nitride devices on crystal planes that are inclined with respect to the c-axis, i.e., on semipolar planes. In this dissertation, metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) has been employed for the homoepitaxial growth of GaN based LEDs on semipolar orientations. As a consequence of growing on high-quality bulk GaN substrates, the LEDs have significantly reduced threading dislocation and stacking fault densities, resulting in remarkable improvements in EQE and output power. High efficiency semipolar (1011) violet-blue and blue LEDs have been demonstrated without any intentional effort to enhance the light extraction from those devices. Optimizations of epitaxial structures have led to increased output power and external quantum efficiency. A silicone encapsulated single quantum well blue LED with peak wavelength of 444 nm with output power of 24.3 mW, external quantum efficiency of 43% and luminous efficacy of 75 lm/W (with phosphorescent coating) at 20 mA has been demonstrated. Polarization fields in strained (1011) and (112¯2) InGaN quantum wells have been experimentally determined through bias-dependent optical studies. Our results show that the polarization field flips its direction in semipolar InGaN quantum wells with large inclination angles (i.e. around 60°). This suggests that there exists a polarization

  8. Design of high-efficient freeform LED lens for road illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, Mikhail A.; Doskolovich, Leonid L.; Kazanskiy, Nikolay L.

    2011-10-01

    The evolution of lighting devices based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) leads to increase of energy efficiency of such devices and, as a partial case, increase of light efficiency of LED optics. The conventional LED optics with the only freeform refractive surface cannot provide high light efficiency for street- and road-illumination applications. The reason is the performance limitations of the refractive surface in terms of ray rotation. Exploiting the total internal reflection effect, we devised a novel design of LED optics allowing to reach the value of light efficiency up to 80%-90%. This paper details the work principle of our LED optics design and the methods of its surfaces computation. The simulation results show that the proposed LED secondary optics design provides light efficiency by 15.5% more than the conventional LED optics in the case of uniformly illuminated region with size of 40 meters by 8 meters. The usage of the proposed novel LED optics design makes possible to reduce the number of LED chips that are used in modern road lamps and, as a consequence, to reduce the power consumption of road lamps. Still, such optical elements have to be made and tested with real LED sources.

  9. High-power InGaN LEDs: present status and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, B.; Weimar, A.; Peter, M.; Baur, J.

    2008-02-01

    The ThinGaN ® technology of OSRAM Opto semiconductors enables high power LEDs with wall plug efficiencies of currently up to 50%, enabling efficacies of > 100lm/W for white and green LEDs. The good scalability of the technology enables devices which deliver high luminous flux. The future limitations regarding efficacy of white LED can be estimated to be 150lm/W for high color rendering. Besides efficiency long term stability and high temperature capability are requirements for market adoption

  10. Development of high-frame-rate LED panel and its applications for stereoscopic 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, H.; Tsutsumi, M.; Yamamoto, R.; Kajimoto, K.; Suyama, S.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we report development of a high-frame-rate LED display. Full-color images are refreshed at 480 frames per second. In order to transmit such a high frame-rate signal via conventional 120-Hz DVI, we have introduced a spatiotemporal mapping of image signal. A processor of LED image signal and FPGAs in LED modules have been reprogrammed so that four adjacent pixels in the input image are converted into successive four fields. The pitch of LED panel is 20 mm. The developed 480-fps LED display is utilized for stereoscopic 3D display by use of parallax barrier. The horizontal resolution of a viewed image decreases to one-half by the parallax barrier. This degradation is critical for LED because the pitch of LED displays is as large as tens of times of other flat panel displays. We have conducted experiments to improve quality of the viewed image through the parallax barrier. The improvement is based on interpolation by afterimages. It is shown that the HFR LED provides detailed afterimages. Furthermore, the HFR LED has been utilized for unconscious imaging, which provide a sensation of discovery of conscious visual information from unconscious images.

  11. Training for intense exercise performance: high-intensity or high-volume training?

    PubMed

    Laursen, P B

    2010-10-01

    Performance in intense exercise events, such as Olympic rowing, swimming, kayak, track running and track cycling events, involves energy contribution from aerobic and anaerobic sources. As aerobic energy supply dominates the total energy requirements after ∼75s of near maximal effort, and has the greatest potential for improvement with training, the majority of training for these events is generally aimed at increasing aerobic metabolic capacity. A short-term period (six to eight sessions over 2-4 weeks) of high-intensity interval training (consisting of repeated exercise bouts performed close to or well above the maximal oxygen uptake intensity, interspersed with low-intensity exercise or complete rest) can elicit increases in intense exercise performance of 2-4% in well-trained athletes. The influence of high-volume training is less discussed, but its importance should not be downplayed, as high-volume training also induces important metabolic adaptations. While the metabolic adaptations that occur with high-volume training and high-intensity training show considerable overlap, the molecular events that signal for these adaptations may be different. A polarized approach to training, whereby ∼75% of total training volume is performed at low intensities, and 10-15% is performed at very high intensities, has been suggested as an optimal training intensity distribution for elite athletes who perform intense exercise events.

  12. Advanced modeling of high intensity accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Habib, S.; Wangler, T.P.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goals of this project were three-fold: (1) to develop a new capability, based on high performance (parallel) computers, to perform large scale simulations of high intensity accelerators; (2) to apply this capability to modeling high intensity accelerators under design at LANL; and (3) to use this new capability to improve the understanding of the physics of intense charge particle beams, especially in regard to the issue of beam halo formation. All of these goals were met. In particular, the authors introduced split-operator methods as a powerful and efficient means to simulate intense beams in the presence of rapidly varying accelerating and focusing fields. They then applied these methods to develop scaleable, parallel beam dynamics codes for modeling intense beams in linacs, and in the process they implemented a new three-dimensional space charge algorithm. They also used the codes to study a number of beam dynamics issues related to the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, and in the process performed the largest simulations to date for any accelerator design project. Finally, they used the new modeling capability to provide direction and validation to beam physics studies, helping to identify beam mismatch as a major source of halo formation in high intensity accelerators. This LDRD project ultimately benefited not only LANL but also the US accelerator community since, by promoting expertise in high performance computing and advancing the state-of-the-art in accelerator simulation, its accomplishments helped lead to approval of a new DOE Grand Challenge in Computational Accelerator Physics.

  13. Peer-led versus teacher-led AIDS education for female high-school students in Yazd, Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Baghianimoghadam, M H; Forghani, H; Zolghadr, R; Rahaei, Z; Khani, P

    2012-04-01

    Peer-led programmes on AIDS prevention have shown a good level of effectiveness when tested among high-risk populations. This study compared peer-led and teacher-led methods of education about HIV/AIDS among female high-school students in Yazd city, Islamic Republic of Iran. In 2009 students in 3 high schools were trained by their classmates (peer-led), by the research team (teacher-led) or had no education (controls); 180 students completed a specially designed questionnaire based on the health belief model, before and after the intervention. Post-intervention mean knowledge scores increased 2-fold in the peer-led group, and this was significantly higher than the increase in the teacher-led group scores (1.5-fold). Control group scores were unchanged. In the peer-led programme all of the components of the model were significantly improved whereas in the teacher-led programme, only perceived severity and perceived barriers scored significantly higher after the intervention.

  14. Broadband white emitting amorphous yttrium-aluminum-borate phosphors for high CRI w-LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sontakke, Atul D.; Salaün, M.; Guimarães, V. F.; Ferrier, A.; Maia, L.; Gautier-Luneau, I.; Viana, B.; Ibanez, A.

    2017-02-01

    Majority of w-LEDs (white light emitting diodes) are based on InGaN blue-LED associated with phosphors exhibiting complementary color emissions to generate required white light output. However, such complementary color mixing with the lack of violet and mainly orange-red color results in poor color-rendering index (CRI). To achieve better resolution of natural white color, recent trends on w-LEDs are focused on broadband visible emitting phosphors excitable with near UV or violet LEDs. Here, we present novel amorphous yttrium-aluminum-borate (g-YAB) phosphors exhibiting broad visible emission under UV-violet excitations. These g-YAB phosphors show high internal quantum yields ( 90 %) under 365 nm excitation, possess good thermal stability over 200°C and maintains the performance for continuous and repeated operations that are ideal for the development of near UV-violet excitable w-LEDs with high color rendering ability.

  15. Phosphor-in-glass for high-powered remote-type white AC-LED.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hang; Wang, Bo; Xu, Ju; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Yu, Yunlong; Wang, Yuansheng

    2014-12-10

    The high-powered alternating current (AC) light-emitting diode (LED) (AC-LED), featuring low cost, high energy utilization efficiency, and long service life, will become a new economic growth point in the field of semiconductor lighting. However, flicker of AC-LED in the AC cycles is not healthy for human eyes, and therefore need to be restrained. Herein we report an innovation of persistent "phosphor-in-glass" (PiG) for the remote-type AC-LED, whose afterglow can be efficiently activated by the blue light. It is experimentally demonstrated that the afterglow decay of PiG in the microsecond range can partly compensate the AC time gap. Moreover, the substitution of inorganic glass for organic resins or silicones as the encapsulants would bring out several technological benefits to AC-LED, such as good heat-dissipation, low glare, and excellent physical/chemical stability.

  16. Using Artificial Neural Networks Approach for the Color Enhance of High Power LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsi-Chao; Wu, Guo-Yang; Yang, Chi-Hao; Chen, Peng-Ying; Lai, Mei-Jyun; Huang, Kuo-Ting

    2012-10-01

    High power light-emitting diodes (HP-LEDs) always are applied for energy-saving to replace the traditional light sources. HP-LEDs lighting has been regarded in the next generation lighting. In this study, the RGY colors enhance of whit LED lighting was researched and modulated by artificial neural network (ANN). An ANN model was used to investigate the correlated color temperature (CCT) and luminous flux (Lux) for the white LED enhanced with different power of single RYG LEDs. The starting color temperature of the white LED will be set at 7500K (D75 white light standard), then changed the voltage of the single LED of the red, green or yellow, respectively, to find the best tuning function for the color temperature and luminous efficiency. These results exhibited that changing the voltage of red LED had the broader color temperature from 7500 K to 1500 K than the range of green and yellow LEDs from 7500K to 8200K and 7500K to 4700K, respectively. Then, these experimental results were used as input data for the training model. After the learning model was completed, an analysis was used to obtain the internal representation of the color information by the responses of the individual chips of the three hidden units in the middle layer. Identification rate of data would be achieved to 100% by the neural network pattern-recognition tool. Anyway, the correlation coefficient could reach to 99% by the ANN fitting tool for the color enhancement.

  17. Rapidly pulsed, high intensity, incoherent light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A rapid pulsing, high intensity, incoherent light is produced by selectively energizing a plurality of discharge lamps with a triggering circuit. Each lamp is connected to a capacitor, and a power supply is electrically connected to all but one of the capacitors. This last named capacitor is electrically connected to a discharge lamp which is connected to the triggering circuit.

  18. Psychological recovery after intensive care: Outcomes of a long-term quasi-experimental study of structured nurse-led follow-up.

    PubMed

    Jónasdóttir, Rannveig J; Jónsdóttir, Helga; Gudmundsdottir, Berglind; Sigurdsson, Gisli H

    2017-07-21

    To compare psychological recovery of patients receiving structured nurse-led follow-up and patients receiving usual care after intensive care discharge. Quasi-experimental study. Single centre, university hospital, mixed intensive care patient population. Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression measured three and four times over 12 months after intensive care discharge. Disturbing memories of the intensive care stay and psychological reactions (that one's life was in danger, threat to physical integrity, intense fear, helplessness, horror) three months after intensive care. A mixed effect model tested differences between the groups over time and regression model predicted post-traumatic stress at three months. The experimental group had significantly more symptoms of post-traumatic stress and anxiety than the control group over the 12 months. Patients from both groups had severe symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Patients with post-traumatic stress at three months had disturbing memories and psychological reactions. The structured nurse-led follow-up did not improve patients' measured outcomes of psychological recovery after intensive care. Patients with severe symptoms of post-traumatic stress are of concern. Emphasis needs to be placed on disturbing memories of the intensive care stay and psychological reactions when constructing intensive care nurse-led follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The NASA High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Reuben A.

    1997-01-01

    High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) are the result of a multitude of intentional and nonintentional electromagnetic sources that currently exists in the world. Many of today's digital systems are susceptible to electronic upset if subjected to certain electromagnetic environments (EME). Modern aerospace designers and manufacturers increasingly rely on sophisticated digital electronic systems to provide critical flight control in both military, commercial, and general aviation aircraft. In an effort to understand and emulate the undesired environment that high energy RF provides modern electronics, the Electromagnetics Research Branch (ERB) of the Flight Electronics and Technology Division (FETD) conducts research on RF and microwave measurement methods related to the understanding of HIRF. In the High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory, the effects of high energy radiating electromagnetic fields on avionics and electronic systems are tested and studied.

  20. High-power UV InGaN/AlGaN double-heterostructure LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Takashi; Morita, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shuji

    1998-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) InGaN/AlGaN double-heterostructure (DH) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with an external quantum efficiency of 7.5%, an output power of 5 mW and an emission wavelength of 371 nm were developed. High-power UV LEDs are obtained using an InGaN active layer with a thickness of 400 Å instead of a GaN active layer. The localized energy states caused by In composition fluctuation in the InGaN active layer are related to the high efficiency of the InGaN-based LEDs.

  1. Novel high refractive index, thermally conductive additives for high brightness white LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Richard Stephen

    In prior works the inclusion of nanoparticle fillers has typically been shown to increase the thermal conductivity or refractive index of polymer nanocomposites separately. High refractive index zirconia nanoparticles have already proved their merit in increasing the optical efficiency of encapsulated light emitting diodes. However, the thermal properties of zirconia-silicone nanocomposites have yet to be investigated. While phosphor-converted light emitting diodes are at the forefront of solid-state lighting technologies for producing white light, they are plagued by efficiency losses due to excessive heating at the semiconductor die and in and around the phosphor particles, as well as photon scattering losses in the phosphor layer. It would then be of great interest if the high refractive index nanoparticles were found to both be capable of increasing the refractive index, thus reducing the optical scattering, and also the thermal conductivity, channeling more heat away from the LED die and phosphors, mitigating efficiency losses from heat. Thermal conductance measurements on unfilled and nanoparticle loaded silicone samples were conducted to quantify the effect of the zirconia nanoparticle loading on silicone nanocomposite thermal conductivity. An increase in thermal conductivity from 0.27 W/mK to 0.49 W/mK from base silicone to silicone with 33.5 wt% zirconia nanoparticles was observed. This trend closely mirrored a basic rule of mixtures prediction, implying a further enhancement in thermal conductivity could be achieved at higher nanoparticle loadings. The optical properties of transparency and light extraction efficiency of these composites were also investigated. While overall the zirconia nanocomposite showed good transparency, there was a slight decrease at the shorter wavelengths with increasing zirconia content. For longer wavelength LEDs, such as green or red, this might not matter, but phosphor-converted white LEDs use a blue LED as the photon source

  2. High Efficiency m-plane LEDs on Low Defect Density Bulk GaN Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    David, Aurelien

    2012-10-15

    Solid-state lighting is a key technology for reduction of energy consumption in the US and worldwide. In principle, by replacing standard incandescent bulbs and other light sources with sources based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs), ultimate energy efficiency can be achieved. The efficiency of LEDs has improved tremendously over the past two decades, however further progress is required for solid- state lighting to reach its full potential. The ability of an LED at converting electricity to light is quantified by its internal quantum efficiency (IQE). The material of choice for visible LEDs is Gallium Nitride (GaN), which is at the basis of blue-emitting LEDs. A key factor limiting the performance of GaN LEDs is the so-called efficiency droop, whereby the IQE of the LED decreases significantly at high current density. Despite decades of research, efficiency droop remains a major issue. Since high-current operation is necessary for practical lighting applications, reducing droop is a major challenge for the scientific community and the LED industry. Our approach to solving the droop issue is the use of newly available low-defect-density bulk GaN non-polar substrates. In contrast to the standard foreign substrates (sapphire, silicon carbide, silicon) used in the industry, we have employed native bulk GaN substrates with very low defect density, thus ensuring exquisite material quality and high IQE. Whereas all commercial LEDs are grown along the c-plane crystal direction of GaN, we have used m-plane non-polar substrates; these drastically modify the physical properties of the LED and enable a reduction of droop. With this approach, we have demonstrated very high IQE performance and low droop. Our results focused on violet and blue LEDs. For these, we have demonstrated very high peak IQEs and current droops of 6% and 10% respectively (up to a high current density of 200A.cm-2). All these results were obtained under electrical operation. These high IQE and low droop

  3. Spectral and luminous efficacy change of high-power LEDs under different dimming methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yimin; Narendran, Nadarajah; Dong, Tianming; Wu, Huiying

    2006-08-01

    Dimming is an important and necessary feature for light sources used in general lighting applications. An experimental study was conducted to quantify the spectral and luminous efficacy change of high-power colored and pc-white LEDs under continuous current reduction (CCR) and pulse-width modulation (PWM) dimming schemes. For InGaN-based blue, green, and pc-white LEDs, the peak wavelength shifts were in opposite directions for the two dimming schemes. The peak wavelength showed a blue shift with increased current, most likely due to band filling and QCSE dominated effects. InGaN LEDs exhibited red shifts with increased duty cycle, which is dominated by junction heat. AlInGaP red LEDs show mainly thermal-induced red shift with increased current or duty cycle. In addition, the luminous efficacy was always higher for the CCR dimming scheme at dimmed levels, irrespective of the LED type. Keywords: Light-emitting diodes (LEDs), white LEDs, mixed-color white LEDs, pulse-width modulation (PWM), continuous current reduction (CCR), peak wavelength shift, luminous efficacy

  4. Intense red photoluminescence from Mn2+-doped (Na+; Zn2+) sulfophosphate glasses and glass ceramics as LED converters.

    PubMed

    Da, Ning; Peng, Mingying; Krolikowski, Sebastian; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2010-02-01

    We report on intense red fluorescence from Mn(2+)-doped sulfophosphate glasses and glass ceramics of the type ZnO-Na(2)O-SO(3)-P(2)O(5). As a hypothesis, controlled internal crystallization of as-melted glasses is achieved on the basis of thermally-induced bimodal separation of an SO(3)-rich phase. Crystal formation is then confined to the relict structure of phase separation. The whole synthesis procedure is performed in air at intensity are observed for relatively high dopant concentration of up to 3 mol.%. Recrystallization of the glass results in strongly increasing emission intensity. Dynamic emission spectroscopy reveals only on type of emission centers in the glassy material, whereas three different centers are observed in the glass ceramic. These are attributed to octahedrally coordinated Mn(2+) in the residual glass phase and in crystalline phosphate and sulfate lattices, respectively. Relatively low crystal field strength results in almost ideal red emission, peaking around 625 nm. Excitation bands lie in the blue-to-green spectral range and exhibit strong overlap. The optimum excitation range matches the emission properties of GaN- and InGaN-based light emitting devices.

  5. Radiation reaction in high-intensity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Keita

    2015-10-01

    Since the development of a radiating electron model by Dirac in 1938 [P. A. M. Dirac, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 167, 148 (1938)], many authors have tried to reformulate this model of the so-called "radiation reaction". Recently, this effect has become important in ultra-intense laser-electron (plasma) interactions. In our recent research, we found a way of stabilizing the radiation reaction by quantum electrodynamics (QED) vacuum fluctuation [K Seto et al., Prog. Theor. Exp. Phys. 2014, 043A01 (2014); K. Seto, Prog. Theor. Exp. Phys. 2015, 023A01 (2015)]. On the other hand, the modification of the radiated field by highly intense incoming laser fields should be taken into account when the laser intensity is higher than 10^{22} W/cm2, which could be achieved by next-generation ultra-short-pulse 10 PW lasers, like the ones under construction for the ELI-NP facility. In this paper, I propose a running charge-mass method for the description of the QED-based synchrotron radiation by high-intensity external fields with stabilization by the QED vacuum fluctuation as an extension from the model by Dirac.

  6. High intensity laser interactions with atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ditmire, T

    2000-08-07

    The development of ultrashort pulse table top lasers with peak pulse powers in excess of 1 TW has permitted an access to studies of matter subject to unprecedented light intensities. Such interactions have accessed exotic regimes of multiphoton atomic and high energy-density plasma physics. Very recently, the nature of the interactions between these very high intensity laser pulses and atomic clusters of a few hundred to a few thousand atoms has come under study. Such studies have found some rather unexpected results, including the striking finding that these interactions appear to be more energetic than interactions with either single atoms or solid density plasmas. Recent experiments have shown that the explosion of such clusters upon intense irradiation can expel ions from the cluster with energies from a few keV to nearly 1 MeV. This phenomenon has recently been exploited to produce DD fusion neutrons in a gas of exploding deuterium clusters. Under this project, we have undertaken a general study of the intense femtosecond laser cluster interaction. Our goal is to understand the macroscopic and microscopic coupling between the laser and the clusters with the aim of optimizing high flux fusion neutron production from the exploding deuterium clusters or the x-ray yield in the hot plasmas that are produced in this interaction. In particular, we are studying the physics governing the cluster explosions. The interplay between a traditional Coulomb explosion description of the cluster disassembly and a plasma-like hydrodynamic explosion is not entirely understood, particularly for small to medium sized clusters (<1000 atoms) and clusters composed of low-Z atoms. We are focusing on experimental studies of the ion and electron energies resulting from such explosions through various experimental techniques. We are also examining how an intense laser pulse propagates through a dense medium containing these clusters.

  7. High-power LED light sources for optical measurement systems operated in continuous and overdriven pulsed modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasicki, Bolesław; Schröder, Andreas; Boden, Fritz; Ludwikowski, Krzysztof

    2017-06-01

    The rapid progress of light emitting diode (LED) technology has recently resulted in the availability of high power devices with unprecedented light emission intensities comparable to those of visible laser light sources. On this basis two versatile devices have been developed, constructed and tested. The first one is a high-power, single-LED illuminator equipped with exchangeable projection lenses providing a homogenous light spot of defined diameter. The second device is a multi-LED illuminator array consisting of a number of high-power LEDs, each integrated with a separate collimating lens. These devices can emit R, G, CG, B, UV or white light and can be operated in pulsed or continuous wave (CW) mode. Using an external trigger signal they can be easily synchronized with cameras or other devices. The mode of operation and all parameters can be controlled by software. Various experiments have shown that these devices have become a versatile and competitive alternative to laser and xenon lamp based light sources. The principle, design, achieved performances and application examples are given in this paper.

  8. Ultrabroad linewidth orange-emitting nanowires LED for high CRI laser-based white lighting and gigahertz communications.

    PubMed

    Janjua, Bilal; Ng, Tien Khee; Zhao, Chao; Oubei, Hassan Makine; Shen, Chao; Prabaswara, Aditya; Alias, Mohd Sharizal; Alhamoud, Abdullah Ali; Alatawi, Abdullah Awaad; Albadri, Abdulrahman M; Alyamani, Ahmed Y; El-Desouki, Munir M; Ooi, Boon S

    2016-08-22

    Group-III-nitride laser diode (LD)-based solid-state lighting device has been demonstrated to be droop-free compared to light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and highly energy-efficient compared to that of the traditional incandescent and fluorescent white light systems. The YAG:Ce3+ phosphor used in LD-based solid-state lighting, however, is associated with rapid degradation issue. An alternate phosphor/LD architecture, which is capable of sustaining high temperature, high power density, while still intensity- and bandwidth-tunable for high color-quality remained unexplored. In this paper, we present for the first time, the proof-of-concept of the generation of high-quality white light using an InGaN-based orange nanowires (NWs) LED grown on silicon, in conjunction with a blue LD, and in place of the compound-phosphor. By changing the relative intensities of the ultrabroad linewidth orange and narrow-linewidth blue components, our LED/LD device architecture achieved correlated color temperature (CCT) ranging from 3000 K to above 6000K with color rendering index (CRI) values reaching 83.1, a value unsurpassed by the YAG-phosphor/blue-LD counterpart. The white-light wireless communications was implemented using the blue LD through on-off keying (OOK) modulation to obtain a data rate of 1.06 Gbps. We therefore achieved the best of both worlds when orange-emitting NWs LED are utilized as "active-phosphor", while blue LD is used for both color mixing and optical wireless communications.

  9. Current development and patents on high-brightness white LED for illumination.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wen-Yuan; Lo, Ikai; Hsieh, Chia-Ho; Hsu, Yu-Chi; Chou, Ming-Chi; Shih, Cheng-Hung

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we reviewed the current development and patents for the application of high-brightness and high-efficiency white light-emitting diode (LED). The high-efficiency GaN nanostructures, such as disk, pyramid, and rod were grown on LiAlO(2) substrate by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy, and a model was developed to demonstrate the growth of the GaN nanostructures. Based on the results, the GaN disk p-n junction was designed for the application of high brightness and high efficiency white LED.

  10. High intensity 30 femtosecond laser pulse interaction with thin foils

    SciTech Connect

    Giulietti, A.; Barbini, A.; Gizzi, L. A.; Chessa, P.; Giulietti, D.; Teychenne, D.

    1998-02-20

    An experimental investigation on the interaction of 30 femtosecond laser pulses with 0.1 and 1.0 {mu}m thick plastic foils has been performed at intensities from 5x10{sup 16} to 5x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. The interaction physics was found to be definitely different whether the nanosecond low intensity prepulses led to an early plasma formation or not. In the first case high reflectivity and very low transmittivity were observed, together with second and three-half harmonic generation. In absence of precursor plasma, with increasing intensity, reflectivity dropped to low values, while transmittivity increased up to an almost complete transparency. No harmonic generation was observed in this latter condition, while ultra-fast ionisation was inferred by the blue-shift of the transmitted pulse. Finally, intense hard X-ray emission was detected at the maximum laser intensity level. Current theories or numerical simulations cannot explain the observed transparency. A new model of magnetically induced optical transparency (MIOT) is briefly introduced.

  11. Measuring the temperature of high-luminous exitance surfaces with infrared thermography in LED applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Indika U.; Narendran, Nadarajah

    2016-09-01

    Recently, light-emitting diode (LED) lighting systems have become popular due to their increased system performance. LED lighting system performance is affected by heat; therefore, it is important to know the temperature of a target surface or bulk medium in the LED system. In-situ temperature measurements of a surface or bulk medium using intrusive methods cause measurement errors. Typically, thermocouples are used in these applications to measure the temperatures of the various components in an LED system. This practice leads to significant errors, specifically when measuring surfaces with high-luminous exitance. In the experimental study presented in this paper, an infrared camera was used as an alternative to temperature probes in measuring LED surfaces with high-luminous exitance. Infrared thermography is a promising method because it does not respond to the visible radiation spectrum in the range of 0.38 to 0.78 micrometers. Usually, infrared thermography equipment is designed to operate either in the 3 to 5 micrometer or the 7 to 14 micrometer wavelength bands. To characterize the LED primary lens, the surface emissivity of the LED phosphor surface, the temperature dependence of the surface emissivity, the temperature of the target surface compared to the surrounding temperature, the field of view of the target, and the aim angle to the target surface need to be investigated, because these factors could contribute towards experimental errors. In this study, the effects of the above-stated parameters on the accuracy of the measured surface temperature were analyzed and reported.

  12. Patient and Family Member-Led Research in the Intensive Care Unit: A Novel Approach to Patient-Centered Research

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Marlyn; Bagshaw, Sean M.; McKenzie, Emily; Oxland, Peter; Oswell, Donna; Boulton, Debbie; Niven, Daniel J.; Potestio, Melissa L.; Shklarov, Svetlana; Marlett, Nancy; Stelfox, Henry T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Engaging patients and family members as partners in research increases the relevance of study results and enhances patient-centered care; how to best engage patients and families in research is unknown. Methods We tested a novel research approach that engages and trains patients and family members as researchers to see if we could understand and describe the experiences of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and their families. Former patients and family members conducted focus groups and interviews with patients (n = 11) and families of surviving (n = 14) and deceased (n = 7) patients from 13 ICUs in Alberta Canada, and analyzed data using conventional content analysis. Separate blinded qualitative researchers conducted an independent analysis. Results Participants described three phases in the patient/family “ICU journey”; admission to ICU, daily care in ICU, and post-ICU experience. Admission to ICU was characterized by family shock and disorientation with families needing the presence and support of a provider. Participants described five important elements of daily care: honoring the patient’s voice, the need to know, decision-making, medical care, and culture in ICU. The post-ICU experience was characterized by the challenges of the transition from ICU to a hospital ward and long-term effects of critical illness. These “ICU journey” experiences were described as integral to appropriate interactions with the care team and comfort and trust in the ICU, which were perceived as essential for a community of caring. Participants provided suggestions for improvement: 1) provide a dedicated family navigator, 2) increase provider awareness of the fragility of family trust, 3) improve provider communication skills, 4) improve the transition from ICU to hospital ward, and 5) inform patients about the long-term effects of critical illness. Analyses by independent qualitative researchers identified similar themes. Conclusions Patient

  13. Spectral spatial coherence of high-power multi-chip LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang-ming; Tao, Hua; Lin, Hui-chuan; Chen, Zi-yang; Pu, Ji-xiong

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the spatial coherence of the light generated from high-power multi-chip red LEDs by using the van Cittert-Zernike theorem. It is theoretically demonstrated that the light generated from multi-chip LEDs evolves into partially coherent light after propagation, and the spatial coherence is increased with the increase of propagation distance. Moreover, the spatial coherence of the light is found to be closely related to the chip distribution of multi-chip LEDs. The distribution of the spatial coherence of the light is experimentally examined by Young's double-slit interference. It is found that the experimental results are consistent with the theoretical ones.

  14. Characteristic evaluation of linear LED grating projector for high-speed shape measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujigaki, Motoharu; Yokoyama, Tsutomu; Oura, Yohei; Sakaguchi, Toshimasa; Asai, Daisuke; Murata, Yorinobu

    2013-06-01

    High-speed shape measurement is required to analysis the behavior of a breaking object, a vibrating object or a rotating object. A shape measurement by a phase shifting method can measure the shape with high spatial resolution because the coordinates can be obtained pixel by pixel. The key-device is a grating projector. The projector can shift the projected grating in high-speed. So, authors proposed a light source stepping method using a linear LED device. A grating projector is composed with the linear LED and a Ronchi ruling. Grating pattern can be projected when the linear LED is turned on. The phase of the projected grating on the object can be shifted with changing the position of lighted linear LED easily and quickly. Authors call this method a light source stepping method. In this paper, a linear LED grating projector is developed. The characteristic of the linear LED grating projector such as the wavelength, directional characteristics, response are evaluated. The results show that this projector is useful for high-speed shape measurement.

  15. A robust pulsating heat pipe cooler for integrated high power LED chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Lucang; Li, Ji; Zhou, Guohui

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a closed loop pulsating heat pipe (CLPHP) with specific pipe arrangement for high power LED cooling. Two CLPHPs were fabricated and charged with DI water and methanol, respectively. The effects of gravity force and working fluid on the heat transfer performance were investigated carefully. Results show that the water-CLPHP performed better than the methanol-CLPHP, with a minimum thermal resistance of 0.06 °C/W at a 220 W heat load under air natural convection situation. In addition, the gravity force can help the CLPHP starting up and enhance the robustness of the thermal transportation at steady state. Finally, the real application to cooling a 100 W LED chip indicates that the proposed CLPHP can meet the thermal control requirement for integrated high power LEDs. Nevertheless, the low cost and light weight of the proposed CLPHP heat sink are very suitable for the LED lighting devices.

  16. Modular design of a high-efficiency LED headlamp system based on freeform reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Heng; Zhang, Xianmin; Ge, Peng

    2015-09-01

    A modular of the LED headlamp system based on freeform reflectors is proposed. Glare suppression and optical design are taken into account during the module design. The proposed module consists of six LEDs and each of them has a freeform reflector correspondingly, which is constructed based on the light energy maps and Snell's Law. Through lighting up different LEDs, the high-beam light and the low-beam light can be switched conveniently. With the proposed method, a module is designed and LUW HWQP LED source whose chip size is 1.0 mm×1.0 mm is adopted for the simulation. Results demonstrate that the lighting distribution can well fulfill the requirements of ECE R112 regulation without any other lenses, shields or baffles. Furthermore, the total optical efficiency can reach up to 80.29% and 81.16% for the low-beam light and high-beam light respectively.

  17. Heat dissipation performance of a high-brightness LED package assembly using high-thermal conductivity filler.

    PubMed

    Yung, K C; Liem, H; Choy, H S

    2013-12-10

    This paper presents a thermal analysis and experimental validation of natural convective heat transfer of a high-brightness light-emitting diode (LED) package assembly. The substrate materials used in the LED package assembly were filled and doped using boron nitride (BN) filler. The thermal conductivity of the BN-filled substrate was measured. The temperature distribution and heat flow of the LED package were assessed by thermal profile measurement using an infrared (IR) camera and thermocouples. In addition, the heat transfer process of the LED package assembly in natural convection was also simulated using the computational fluid dynamics method. The optical performance of the LED package was monitored and investigated with various filler contents. The heat conduction mechanism in the substrate was analyzed. IR thermogram showed that the BN-doped substrate could effectively lower the surface temperature of the LED package by 21.5°C compared with the traditional FR4 substrate. According to the IESNA LM 80 lifetime testing method, reduction in LED temperature can prolong the LED's lifetime by 19,000 h. The optical performance of the LED package assembly was also found to be improved significantly in lighting power by 10%. As a result, the overall heat dissipation capability of the LED package to the surrounding is enhanced, which improves the LED's efficacy.

  18. Positron microanalysis with high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Donohue, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    One of the more common applications for a high intensity slow positron facility will be microanalysis of solid materials. In the first section of this paper some examples are given of procedures that can be developed. Since most of the attendees of this workshop are experts in positron spectroscopy, comprehensive descriptions will be omitted. With the exception of positron emission microscopy, most of the procedures will be based on those already in common use with broad beams. The utility of the methods have all been demonstrated, but material scientists use very few of them because positron microbeams are not generally available. A high intensity positron facility will make microbeams easier to obtain and partially alleviate this situation. All microanalysis techniques listed below will have a common requirement, which is the ability to locate the microscopic detail or area of interest and to focus the positron beam exclusively on it. The last section of this paper is a suggestion of how a high intensity positron facility might be designed so as to have this capability built in. The method will involve locating the specimen by scanning it with the microbeam of positrons and inducing a secondary electron image that will immediately reveal whether or not the positron beam is striking the proper portion of the specimen. This scanning positron microscope' will be a somewhat prosaic analog of the conventional SEM. It will, however, be an indispensable utility that will enhance the practicality of positron microanalysis techniques. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  19. High-efficiency isolated SEPIC converter with reduced conduction losses for LED displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo-Young; Yang, Min-Kwon

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes a high-efficiency isolated bridgeless single-ended primary inductor converter (SEPIC) for light-emitting-diode (LED) displays. The proposed isolated SEPIC converter can supply LED back-light power with reduced conduction losses. Switching power losses as well as conduction losses are reduced. The proposed converter is theoretically analysed. Experimental results based on a 28 V, 300 W back-light power are discussed to verify the performance of the proposed converter.

  20. Replacement of fluorescent lamps with high-brightness LEDs in a bridge lighting application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, John W.; Keeney, Shawn P.

    2006-08-01

    There are many advantages that LEDs offer for use in general illumination. The use of LEDs in certain applications can provide improved energy efficiency. For example, in traffic lights in the United States, LED technology has taken over the market not only because of the energy savings as compared to standard incandescents, but also because of the reduced maintenance costs associated with bulb replacement and improved reliability. With useful lifetimes exceeding 40,000 hours or more, today's high flux LEDs can provide illumination solutions with replacement periods of 8 to 10 years or more. This paper will examine a bridge roadway lighting feasibility study which the authors' company recently undertook. The application required the LED units to reproduce the photometric performance of 64-inch (1.625m) fluorescent lamps. In addition, the LED units were required to survive a harsh, outdoor marine environment with an expected lifetime of 7 years or more. To achieve these results, a number of design elements were studied including: optimum heat dissipation in a sealed enclosure, ease of installation, and design of power supplies having expected lifetimes to match the LED light engines. Results of these studies will be discussed as well as illustrations of the designs chosen.

  1. Determining contrast sensitivity functions for monochromatic light emitted by high-brightness LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, Vasudha; Narendran, Nadarajah; Freyssinier, Jean Paul; Raghavan, Ramesh; Boyce, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) technology is becoming the choice for many lighting applications that require monochromatic light. However, one potential problem with LED-based lighting systems is uneven luminance patterns. Having a uniform luminance distribution is more important in some applications. One example where LEDs are becoming a viable alternative and luminance uniformity is an important criterion is backlighted monochromatic signage. The question is how much uniformity is required for these applications. Presently, there is no accepted metric that quantifies luminance uniformity. A recent publication proposed a method based on digital image analysis to quantify beam quality of reflectorized halogen lamps. To be able to employ such a technique to analyze colored beams generated by LED systems, it is necessary to have contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) for monochromatic light produced by LEDs. Several factors including the luminance, visual field size, and spectral power distribution of the light affect the CSFs. Although CSFs exist for a variety of light sources at visual fields ranging from 2 degrees to 20 degrees, CSFs do not exist for red, green, and blue light produced by high-brightness LEDs at 2-degree and 10-degree visual fields and at luminances typical for backlighted signage. Therefore, the goal of the study was to develop a family of CSFs for 2-degree and 10-degree visual fields illuminated by narrow-band LEDs at typical luminances seen in backlighted signs. The details of the experiment and the results are presented in this manuscript.

  2. Nursing intensive care skills training: a nurse led, short, structured, and practical training program, developed and tested in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    De Silva, A Pubudu; Stephens, Tim; Welch, John; Sigera, Chathurani; De Alwis, Sunil; Athapattu, Priyantha; Dharmagunawardene, Dilantha; Olupeliyawa, Asela; de Abrew, Ashwini; Peiris, Lalitha; Siriwardana, Somalatha; Karunathilake, Indika; Dondorp, Arjen; Haniffa, Rashan

    2015-04-01

    To assess the impact of a nurse-led, short, structured training program for intensive care unit (ICU) nurses in a resource-limited setting. A training program using a structured approach to patient assessment and management for ICU nurses was designed and delivered by local nurse tutors in partnership with overseas nurse trainers. The impact of the course was assessed using the following: pre-course and post-course self-assessment, a pre-course and post-course Multiple Choice Questionnaire (MCQ), a post-course Objective Structured Clinical Assessment station, 2 post-course Short Oral Exam (SOE) stations, and post-course feedback questionnaires. In total, 117 ICU nurses were trained. Post-MCQ scores were significantly higher when compared with pre-MCQ (P < .0001). More than 95% passed the post-course Objective Structured Clinical Assessment (patient assessment) and SOE 1 (arterial blood gas analysis), whereas 76.9% passed SOE 2 (3-lead electrocardiogram analysis). The course was highly rated by participants, with 98% believing that this was a useful experience. Nursing Intensive Care Skills Training was highly rated by participants and was effective in improving the knowledge of the participants. This sustainable short course model may be adaptable to other resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Injection molding of high precision optics for LED applications made of liquid silicone rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Hopmann, Christian; Röbig, Malte

    2016-03-09

    Light Emitting Diodes (LED) conquer the growing global market of lighting technologies. Due to their advantages, they are increasingly used in consumer products, in lighting applications in the home and in the mobility sector as well as in industrial applications. Particularly, with regard to the increasing use of high-power LED (HP-LED) the materials in the surrounding area of the light emitting semiconductor chip are of utmost importance. While the materials behind the semiconductor chip are optimized for maximum heat dissipation, the materials currently used for the encapsulation of the semiconductor chip (primary optics) and the secondary optics encounter their limits due to the high temperatures. In addition certain amounts of blue UV radiation degrade the currently used materials such as epoxy resins or polyurethanes for primary optics. In the context of an ongoing joint research project with various partners from the industry, an innovative manufacturing method for high precision optics for LED applications made of liquid silicone rubber (LSR) is analyzed at the Institut of Plastics Processing (IKV), Aachen. The aim of this project is to utilize the material-specific advantages of high transparent LSR, especially the excellent high temperature resistance and the great freedom in design. Therefore, a high integrated injection molding process is developed. For the production of combined LED primary and secondary optics a LED board is placed in an injection mold and overmolded with LSR. Due to the integrated process and the reduction of subcomponents like the secondary optics the economics of the production process can be improved significantly. Furthermore combined LED optics offer an improved effectiveness, because there are no losses of the light power at the transition of the primary and secondary optics.

  4. Opto-thermal performance of high power LEDs: Packaging and materials dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jiun-Pyng

    The first part of this work is focusing on the thermal management of light-emitting diode (LED) packages. The diode forward voltage technique is utilized to characterize the thermal performance of power LEDs. We have evaluated thermal characteristics of commercial die attach adhesives (DAA) in terms of p-n junction temperature and thermal resistance from the junction to the board in the LED packages. For a given LED package, the results show that the thermal impact is minimal when the thermal conductivities of DAA are larger than 5 W(mK)-1 for 1 W blue LEDs. We also developed the DAA with thin bondline by preparing polymer filled with nano-sized silver particles. Although the thermal conductivity of nano silver DAA is low, the thermal resistance from the junction to printed circuit board is just 1.6 KW-1 with the bondline thickness of 5.3 mum, which is comparable with the best commercial DAA. In high power LED thermal design, low thermal resistance can be achieved not only with high thermal conductivity of DAA but also with thin bondline thickness. In the second part, the phosphor concentration effects on opto-thermal characteristics of power phosphor-converted white LEDs (pc-WLEDs) are investigated. It is found that the phosphor conversion efficiency of white LEDs driven under constant current is lower than under pulse current. In addition, the pc-WLEDs driven under constant current exhibit a higher junction temperature than under pulse current, and the difference depends the phosphor concentration. Moreover, it is found that the phosphor conversion efficiency linearly decreases with the junction temperature. For both pulse and constant current modes, pc-WLEDs with a relatively higher phosphor concentration show relatively stable optical characteristics under a large drive current range. At a relatively higher phosphor concentration, the correlated color temperature (CCT) and the chromaticity coordinates have also been observed to be relatively stable for white

  5. The High-efficiency LED Driver for Visible Light Communication Applications.

    PubMed

    Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lee, Yu-Chen; Lai, Jyun-Liang; Yu, Chueh-Hao; Huang, Li Ren; Yang, Chia-Yen

    2016-08-08

    This paper presents a LED driver for VLC. The main purpose is to solve the low data rate problem used to be in switching type LED driver. The GaN power device is proposed to replace the traditional silicon power device of switching LED driver for the purpose of increasing switching frequency of converter, thereby increasing the bandwidth of data transmission. To achieve high efficiency, the diode-connected GaN power transistor is utilized to replace the traditional ultrafast recovery diode used to be in switching type LED driver. This work has been experimentally evaluated on 350-mA output current. The results demonstrate that it supports the data of PWM dimming level encoded in the PPM scheme for VLC application. The experimental results also show that system's efficiency of 80.8% can be achieved at 1-Mb/s data rate.

  6. The High-efficiency LED Driver for Visible Light Communication Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lee, Yu-Chen; Lai, Jyun-Liang; Yu, Chueh-Hao; Huang, Li Ren; Yang, Chia-Yen

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a LED driver for VLC. The main purpose is to solve the low data rate problem used to be in switching type LED driver. The GaN power device is proposed to replace the traditional silicon power device of switching LED driver for the purpose of increasing switching frequency of converter, thereby increasing the bandwidth of data transmission. To achieve high efficiency, the diode-connected GaN power transistor is utilized to replace the traditional ultrafast recovery diode used to be in switching type LED driver. This work has been experimentally evaluated on 350-mA output current. The results demonstrate that it supports the data of PWM dimming level encoded in the PPM scheme for VLC application. The experimental results also show that system’s efficiency of 80.8% can be achieved at 1-Mb/s data rate. PMID:27498921

  7. The High-efficiency LED Driver for Visible Light Communication Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lee, Yu-Chen; Lai, Jyun-Liang; Yu, Chueh-Hao; Huang, Li Ren; Yang, Chia-Yen

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a LED driver for VLC. The main purpose is to solve the low data rate problem used to be in switching type LED driver. The GaN power device is proposed to replace the traditional silicon power device of switching LED driver for the purpose of increasing switching frequency of converter, thereby increasing the bandwidth of data transmission. To achieve high efficiency, the diode-connected GaN power transistor is utilized to replace the traditional ultrafast recovery diode used to be in switching type LED driver. This work has been experimentally evaluated on 350-mA output current. The results demonstrate that it supports the data of PWM dimming level encoded in the PPM scheme for VLC application. The experimental results also show that system’s efficiency of 80.8% can be achieved at 1-Mb/s data rate.

  8. High intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1973-12-11

    This invention relates to a high intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source comprising a neutron-producing source which emits pulses of fast neutrons, a moderator block adjacent to the last neutron source, a reflector block which encases the fast neutron source and the moderator block and has a thermal neutron exit port extending therethrough from the moderator block, and a neutron energy- dependent decoupling reflector liner covering the interior surfaces of the thermal neutron exit port and surrounding all surfaces of the moderator block except the surface viewed by the thermal neutron exit port. (Official Gazette)

  9. Plating Processes Utilizing High Intensity Acoustic Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor); Denofrio, Charles (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system and a method for selective plating processes are disclosed which use directed beams of high intensity acoustic waves to create non-linear effects that alter and improve the plating process. The directed beams are focused on the surface of an object, which in one embodiment is immersed in a plating solution, and in another embodiment is suspended above a plating solution. The plating processes provide precise control of the thickness of the layers of the plating, while at the same time, in at least some incidents, eliminates the need for masking.

  10. Prognostics-based qualification of high-power white LEDs using Lévy process approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Kam-Chuen; Sun, Bo; Jiang, Xiaopeng

    2017-01-01

    Due to their versatility in a variety of applications and the growing market demand, high-power white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have attracted considerable attention. Reliability qualification testing is an essential part of the product development process to ensure the reliability of a new LED product before its release. However, the widely used IES-TM-21 method does not provide comprehensive reliability information. For more accurate and effective qualification, this paper presents a novel method based on prognostics techniques. Prognostics is an engineering technology predicting the future reliability or determining the remaining useful lifetime (RUL) of a product by assessing the extent of deviation or degradation from its expected normal operating conditions. A Lévy subordinator of a mixed Gamma and compound Poisson process is used to describe the actual degradation process of LEDs characterized by random sporadic small jumps of degradation degree, and the reliability function is derived for qualification with different distribution forms of jump sizes. The IES LM-80 test results reported by different LED vendors are used to develop and validate the qualification methodology. This study will be helpful for LED manufacturers to reduce the total test time and cost required to qualify the reliability of an LED product.

  11. Broadband Radiometric LED Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Eppeldauer, G. P.; Cooksey, C. C.; Yoon, H. W.; Hanssen, L. M.; Podobedov, V. B.; Vest, R. E.; Arp, U.; Miller, C. C.

    2017-01-01

    At present, broadband radiometric measurements of LEDs with uniform and low-uncertainty results are not available. Currently, either complicated and expensive spectral radiometric measurements or broadband photometric LED measurements are used. The broadband photometric measurements are based on the CIE standardized V(λ) function, which cannot be used in the UV range and leads to large errors when blue or red LEDs are measured in its wings, where the realization is always poor. Reference irradiance meters with spectrally constant response and high-intensity LED irradiance sources were developed here to implement the previously suggested broadband radiometric LED measurement procedure [1, 2]. Using a detector with spectrally constant response, the broadband radiometric quantities of any LEDs or LED groups can be simply measured with low uncertainty without using any source standard. The spectral flatness of filtered-Si detectors and low-noise pyroelectric radiometers are compared. Examples are given for integrated irradiance measurement of UV and blue LED sources using the here introduced reference (standard) pyroelectric irradiance meters. For validation, the broadband measured integrated irradiance of several LED-365 sources were compared with the spectrally determined integrated irradiance derived from an FEL spectral irradiance lamp-standard. Integrated responsivity transfer from the reference irradiance meter to transfer standard and field UV irradiance meters is discussed. PMID:28649167

  12. Broadband radiometric LED measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppeldauer, G. P.; Cooksey, C. C.; Yoon, H. W.; Hanssen, L. M.; Podobedov, V. B.; Vest, R. E.; Arp, U.; Miller, C. C.

    2016-09-01

    At present, broadband radiometric LED measurements with uniform and low-uncertainty results are not available. Currently, either complicated and expensive spectral radiometric measurements or broadband photometric LED measurements are used. The broadband photometric measurements are based on the CIE standardized V(λ) function, which cannot be used in the UV range and leads to large errors when blue or red LEDs are measured in its wings, where the realization is always poor. Reference irradiance meters with spectrally constant response and high-intensity LED irradiance sources were developed here to implement the previously suggested broadband radiometric LED measurement procedure [1, 2]. Using a detector with spectrally constant response, the broadband radiometric quantities of any LEDs or LED groups can be simply measured with low uncertainty without using any source standard. The spectral flatness of filtered-Si detectors and low-noise pyroelectric radiometers are compared. Examples are given for integrated irradiance measurement of UV and blue LED sources using the here introduced reference (standard) pyroelectric irradiance meters. For validation, the broadband measured integrated irradiance of several LED-365 sources were compared with the spectrally determined integrated irradiance derived from an FEL spectral irradiance lamp-standard. Integrated responsivity transfer from the reference irradiance meter to transfer standard and field UV irradiance meters is discussed.

  13. High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides

    DOEpatents

    Lapatovich, Walter P.; Keeffe, William M.; Liebermann, Richard W.; Maya, Jakob

    1987-01-01

    A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO.sub.2, with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube.

  14. High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides

    DOEpatents

    Lapatovich, W.P.; Keeffe, W.M.; Liebermann, R.W.; Maya, J.

    1987-06-09

    A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO[sub 2], with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube. 7 figs.

  15. High-intensity laser-atom interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachain, Charles J.

    2014-11-01

    Following a historical introduction on the nature of light and its interaction with matter, a survey is given of the development of lasers capable of delivering short pulses of very intense radiation. The peak intensities of these laser pulses are so high that the corresponding laser fields can compete with, or even dominate, the Coulomb field in governing the dynamics of atomic systems. As a result, new phenomena, known as multiphoton processes, can occur. An outline is given of the basic properties found in the study of three important multiphoton processes. Firstly, the multiphoton ionization of atoms and the phenomenon of “above-threshold ionization”. Secondly, the emission by atoms of high-order harmonics of the frequency of the driving laser and their use to generate laser pulses having durations in the attosecond range. Thirdly, laser-assisted electron-atom collisions. A review is then given of the main non-perturbative methods which have been used to perform theoretical studies of multiphoton processes.

  16. High-power, high-intensity laser propagation and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, Phillip; Hafizi, Bahman

    2014-05-15

    This paper presents overviews of a number of processes and applications associated with high-power, high-intensity lasers, and their interactions. These processes and applications include: free electron lasers, backward Raman amplification, atmospheric propagation of laser pulses, laser driven acceleration, atmospheric lasing, and remote detection of radioactivity. The interrelated physical mechanisms in the various processes are discussed.

  17. Peer-Led Learning Communities: Exploring Integrative High-Impact Educational Practices for Leadership Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priest, Kerry L.; de Campos Paula, Ana Luiza

    2016-01-01

    The use of high-impact practices is well documented in higher education literature. This brief describes the integrative practice of undergraduate peer-led leadership learning communities as a model of delivery within a large introductory leadership education course for first-year students. Utilizing open-ended questions embedded within…

  18. Analysis of a passive heat sink for temperature stabilization of high-power LED bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvís, Eduardo; Bendaña, Ricardo; Michinel, Humberto; Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro; Paredes, Angel

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a numerical analysis and experimental measurements of the temperature stabilization of high-power LED chips that we have obtained by employing an aluminum passive heat sink, designed to be used in a compact light bulb configuration. We demonstrate that our system keeps the temperature of the LED chip well-below 70° C yielding long-term operation of the device. Our simulations have been performed for a low-cost device ready to install in public streetlights. The experimental measurements performed in different configurations show a nice agreement with the numerical calculations.

  19. High light extraction efficiency LEDs with asymmetric obtuse angle micro-structured roofs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chang-Jiang; Chao, Ju-Hung; Zhu, Wenbin; Yin, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    This study reports a high light extraction efficiency (LEE) light emitting diode (LED) by harnessing asymmetric obtuse angle micro-structured roofs. In comparison to conventional symmetric micro-structured roofs, the LEE has been improved from 62% to 73%. This represents an 11% improvement in LEE, which is significant for LED. It is speculated that this improvement is largely due to the increased surface area and better randomization on the direction of transmitted/reflected light, which enhances the escaping probability after multiple reflections.

  20. Numerical simulation and optimization of enhanced heat transfer for high power LED light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Pu; Peng, Xu; Houchao, Miao; Li, Zhang

    2013-07-01

    A mathematical model of high power LED lights heat transfer was established, in which heat transfer structure of heat pipe was simplified based on the equivalent thermal resistance network model, and numerically solved by using the CFD software, the steady state temperature distributions were obtained. The simulation results indicate that ambient air temperature, the number of heat pipe, the thickness of bond coating, and the size of radiator play important roles for LED chip temperature, however, the influence of copper sink thickness is negligible. The heat transfer structure was optimized based on these results, and the optimized structure can achieve a better balance between cost reducing and heat transfer enhancement.

  1. Highly efficient InGaN MQW LEDs grown on 200 mm Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onomura, Masaaki

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate InGaN MQW LEDs on Si substrates have both high performance and low cost structure. The blue LED structures were grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition via unique buffer layers on 200 mm-diameter Si (111) substrates. The epitaxial wafers had slightly ex-situ convex bow without micro-cracks. Median and standard deviation of dominant wavelength by photoluminescence measurement were 448.9 nm and 2.0 nm within 4 mm edge exclusion, respectively. XRC FWHMs of GaN (0002) and GaN (10-12) were 341 arcsec and 388 arcsec, respectively, corresponding to be estimated to edge dislocation density of 2.0 × 109 /cm2. The blue LED structures were fabricated by legacy 8-inch (200-mm) Si device equipment without remodeling, because no particular thicker Si wafer was needed for our LED epitaxial growth. Encapsulated blue lamps were fabricated after dicing with 45 × 45 mil2. Median light output power of 641 mW was obtained under injection current of 350 mA at 25 deg-C. The operating voltage was 2.9 V. It corresponds to wall plug efficiency, WPE of 63 %. Stable operation more than 6,000 hours under 450 mA at 85 deg-C was confirmed. These results suggest the InGaN MQW LEDs on the large-scale Si wafers are promising for the near future solid-state lighting.

  2. Low-Cost Substrates for High-Performance Nanorod Array LEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Sands, Timothy; Stach, Eric; Garcia, Edwin

    2009-04-30

    The completed project, entitled Low-Cost Substrates for High-Performance Nanorod LEDs, targeted the goal of a phosphor-free nanorod-based white LED with IQE > 50% across the spectrum from 450 nm to 600 nm on metallized silicon substrates. The principal achievements of this project included: Demonstration of (In,Ga)N nanopyramid heterostructures by a conventional OMVPE process. Verification of complete filtering of threading dislocations to yield dislocation-free pyramidal heterostructures. Demonstration of electroluminescence with a peak wavelength of ~600 nm from an (In,Ga)N nanopyramid array LED. Development of a reflective ZrN/AlN buffer layer for epitaxial growth of GaN films and GaN nanopyramid arrays on (111)Si.

  3. HIGH-INTENSITY, HIGH CHARGE-STATE HEAVY ION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI,J.G.

    2004-08-16

    There are many accelerator applications for high intensity heavy ion sources, with recent needs including dc beams for RIA, and pulsed beams for injection into synchrotrons such as RHIC and LHC. The present status of sources producing high currents of high charge state heavy ions is reviewed. These sources include ECR, EBIS, and Laser ion sources. Benefits and limitations for these type sources are described. Possible future improvements in these sources are also mentioned.

  4. Applications of High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Rajendran; Mishra, Shekhar

    2010-06-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency linac development at Fermilab / S. D. Holmes -- Rare muon decay experiments / Y. Kuno -- Rare kaon decays / D. Bryman -- Muon collider / R. B. Palmer -- Neutrino factories / S. Geer -- ADS and its potential / J.-P. Revol -- ADS history in the USA / R. L. Sheffield and E. J. Pitcher -- Accelerator driven transmutation of waste: high power accelerator for the European ADS demonstrator / J. L. Biarrotte and T. Junquera -- Myrrha, technology development for the realisation of ADS in EU: current status & prospects for realisation / R. Fernandez ... [et al.] -- High intensity proton beam production with cyclotrons / J. Grillenberger and M. Seidel -- FFAG for high intensity proton accelerator / Y. Mori -- Kaon yields for 2 to 8 GeV proton beams / K. K. Gudima, N. V. Mokhov and S. I. Striganov -- Pion yield studies for proton driver beams of 2-8 GeV kinetic energy for stopped muon and low-energy muon decay experiments / S. I. Striganov -- J-Parc accelerator status and future plans / H. Kobayashi -- Simulation and verification of DPA in materials / N. V. Mokhov, I. L. Rakhno and S. I. Striganov -- Performance and operational experience of the CNGS facility / E. Gschwendtner -- Particle physics enabled with super-conducting RF technology - summary of working group 1 / D. Jaffe and R. Tschirhart -- Proton beam requirements for a neutrino factory and muon collider / M. S. Zisman -- Proton bunching options / R. B. Palmer -- CW SRF H linac as a proton driver for muon colliders and neutrino factories / M. Popovic, C. M. Ankenbrandt and R. P. Johnson -- Rapid cycling synchrotron option for Project X / W. Chou -- Linac-based proton driver for a neutrino factory / R. Garoby ... [et al.] -- Pion production for neutrino factories and muon colliders / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Proton bunch compression strategies / V. Lebedev -- Accelerator test facility for muon collider and neutrino factory R&D / V. Shiltsev -- The superconducting RF linac for muon

  5. Color and contrast sensitivity after glare from high-brightness LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidenbach, H.-D.

    2008-02-01

    The color contrast capability was investigated for 3 volunteers with 7 specially developed test charts in red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, yellow and black as a reference, namely without and after glare from 4 colored high-brightness LEDs. Each subject completed 56 tests in order to check especially the ability to discriminate low contrast. It was found that a contrast decrease of one level is equivalent to an increase of about 4 s in the required identification time and in addition a delay time between about 14 s and 16 s has been measured at the beginning of the respective test as a result of the dazzling glare from an LED. In addition trials have been performed with 4 different pseudoisochromatic color plates designed by Ishihara for color vision. These plates have been used to determine temporary color deficiencies after an exposure from a high-brightness LED. For this purpose 40 volunteers have been included in a laboratory test. Color vision was impaired for periods between 27 s and 186 s depending on the applied color plate and respective LED color.

  6. High-power LEDs based on InGaAsP/InP heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Rakovics, V.; Imenkov, A. N.; Sherstnev, V. V.; Serebrennikova, O. Yu.; Il’inskaya, N. D.; Yakovlev, Yu. P.

    2014-12-15

    High-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with mesa diameters of 100, 200, and 300 μm are developed on the basis of InGaAsP/InP heterostructures. The mesas are close in shape to a truncated cone with a generatrix inclination angle of ∼45° in the vicinity of the active region of the LED, with a ring etched around the mesa serving as a reflector. The emission spectra and directivity patterns of these LEDs are studied in a wide range of current densities and it is shown that radiative recombination is dominant to a current density of ∼5000 A/cm{sup 2}, which makes these structures promising for the development of high-power LEDs. An emission power of ∼14 mW is obtained in the continuous-wave mode (I = 0.2 A, λ = 1.1 μm), and that of 77 mW, in the pulsed mode (I = 2 A, λ = 1.1 μm), which corresponds to external quantum efficiencies of 6.2 and 3.4%, respectively.

  7. Development of a cryogenic hydrogen microjet for high-intensity, high-repetition rate experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. B.; Göde, S.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-08-19

    The advent of high-intensity, high-repetition-rate lasers has led to the need for replenishing targets of interest for high energy density sciences. We describe the design and characterization of a cryogenic microjet source, which can deliver a continuous stream of liquid hydrogen with a diameter of a few microns. The jet has been imaged at 1 μm resolution by shadowgraphy with a short pulse laser. In conclusion, the pointing stability has been measured at well below a mrad, for a stable free-standing filament of solid-density hydrogen.

  8. Development of a cryogenic hydrogen microjet for high-intensity, high-repetition rate experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. B.; Göde, S.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    The advent of high-intensity, high-repetition-rate lasers has led to the need for replenishing targets of interest for high energy density sciences. We describe the design and characterization of a cryogenic microjet source, which can deliver a continuous stream of liquid hydrogen with a diameter of a few microns. The jet has been imaged at 1 μm resolution by shadowgraphy with a short pulse laser. The pointing stability has been measured at well below a mrad, for a stable free-standing filament of solid-density hydrogen.

  9. High Color-Rendering-index Hybrid White LEDs Employing CdSe/ZnS Core/Shell Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yajing; Sun, Dapeng; Zhang, Zhongping; Zhang, Yugang; Yao, Xudong; Jiang, Danlu; Yu, Yalan; Mi, Longfei; Chen, Lei; Zhong, Honghai; Jiang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid white LEDs were constructed by leveraging a combination of CdSe/ZnS core/shell QDs and YAG: Ce³⁺ phosphors. The CdSe/ZnS core/shell QDs were synthesized by a two-step process in which CdSe QDs were first prepared via a hot-injection method, followed by ZnS coating through a facile single-molecular precursor approach. The resultant red-emitting CdSe/ZnS QDs showed decent fluorescent quantum yielding (36%). The resultant hybrid white LEDs--that based on CdSe/ZnS QDs and solid-state-reaction-processed YAG: Ce³⁺ phosphors--showed good luminescence properties, including bright warm light, a high color rendering index of 91.3, a low color temperature of 4965 K and a luminous efficiency of 44.22 lm/W. Moreover, increased luminous intensity has been observed in the presence of increased forward current without luminescence saturation, promising an ideal approach to construct warm-white LEDs with excellent color rendering properties.

  10. High-Efficiency Non-Polar GaN-Based LEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Fini

    2010-11-30

    Inlustra Technologies with subcontractor U.C. Santa Barbara conducted a project with the principle goal of demonstrating high internal quantum efficiency blue (430 nm) and green (540nm) light emitting diodes (LEDs) on low-defect density non-polar GaN wafers. Inlustra pursued the fabrication of smooth thick a-plane and m-plane GaN films, as well as defect reduction techniques such as lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) to uniformly lower dislocation density in these films. Limited free-standing wafers were produced as well. By the end of the reporting period, Inlustra had met its milestone of dislocation reduction to < 5 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}. Stacking faults were still present in appreciable density ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 5} cm{sup -1}), but were not the primary focus of defect reduction since there have been no published studies establishing their detrimental effects on LED performance. Inlustra's LEO progress built a solid foundation upon which further commercial development of GaN substrates will occur. UCSB encountered multiple delays in its LED growth and fabrication efforts due to unavoidable facilities outages imposed by ongoing construction in an area adjacent to the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) laboratory. This, combined with the large amount of ab initio optimization required for the MOCVD system used during the project, resulted in unsatisfactory LED progress. Although numerous blue-green photoluminescence results were obtained, only a few LED structures exhibited electroluminescence at appreciable levels. UCSB also conducting extensive modeling (led by Prof. Van de Walle) on the problem of non-radiative Auger recombination in GaN-based LED structures, which has been posited to contribute to LED efficiency 'droop' at elevated current density. Unlike previous modeling efforts, UCSB's approach was truly a first-principles ab initio methodology. Building on solid numerical foundations, the Auger recombination rates of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x

  11. Effects of light intensity and curing time of the newest LED Curing units on the diametral tensile strength of microhybrid composite resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariani, D.; Herda, E.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of light intensity and curing time of the latest LED curing units on the diametral tensile strength of microhybrid composite resins. Sixty-three specimens from three brands (Polofil Supra, Filtek Z250, and Solare X) were divided into two test groups and one control group. The test groups were polymerized with a Flashmax P3 LED curing unit for one or three seconds. The control group was polymerized with a Ledmax 450 curing unit with the curing time based on the resin manufacturer’s instructions. A higher light intensity and shorter curing time did not influence the diametral tensile strength of microhybrid composite resins.

  12. Reference-based optical characterization of glass-ceramic converter for high-power white LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Letz, M.; Zachau, T.; Pawlowski, E.; Seneschal-Merz, K.; Korb, T.; Enseling, D.; Hoppe, B.; Peuchert, U.; Hayden, J. S.

    2007-02-01

    Fluorescence techniques are known for their high sensitivity and are widely used as analytical tools and detection methods for product and process control, material sciences, environmental and bio-technical analysis, molecular genetics, cell biology, medical diagnostics and drug screening. According to DIN/ISO 17025 certified standards are used for fluorescence diagnostics having the drawback of giving relative values for fluorescence intensities only. Therefore reference materials for a quantitative characterization have to be related directly to the materials under investigation. In order to evaluate these figures it is necessary to calculate absolute numbers like absorption/excitation cross section and quantum yield. This can be done for different types of dopants in different materials like glass, glass ceramics, crystals or nano crystalline material embedded in polymer matrices. Here we consider a special type of glass ceramic with Ce doped YAG as the main crystalline phase. This material has been developed for the generation of white light realized by a blue 460 nm semiconductor transition using a yellow phosphor or converter material respectively. Our glass ceramic is a pure solid state solution for a yellow phosphor. For the production of such a kind of material a well controlled thermal treatment is employed to transfer the original glass into a glass ceramic with a specific crystalline phase. In our material Ce doped YAG crystallites of a size of several µm are embedded in a matrix of a residual glass. We present chemical, structural and spectroscopic properties of our material. Based on this we will discuss design options for white LED's with respect to heat management, scattering regime, reflection losses, chemical durability and stability against blue and UV radiation, which evolve from our recently developed material. In this paper we present first results on our approaches to evaluate quantum yield and light output. Used diagnostics are

  13. High Intensity Organic Light-emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiangfei

    This thesis is dedicated to the fabrication, modeling, and characterization to achieve high efficiency organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) for illumination applications. Compared to conventional lighting sources, OLEDs enabled the direct conversion of electrical energy into light emission and have intrigued the world's lighting designers with the long-lasting, highly efficient illumination. We begin with a brief overview of organic technology, from basic organic semiconductor physics, to its application in optoelectronics, i.e. light-emitting diodes, photovoltaics, photodetectors and thin-film transistors. Due to the importance of phosphorescent materials, we will focus on the photophysics of metal complexes that is central to high efficiency OLED technology, followed by a transient study to examine the radiative decay dynamics in a series of phosphorescent platinum binuclear complexes. The major theme of this thesis is the design and optimization of a novel architecture where individual red, green and blue phosphorescent OLEDs are vertically stacked and electrically interconnected by the compound charge generation layers. We modeled carrier generation from the metal-oxide/doped organic interface based on a thermally assisted tunneling mechanism. The model provides insights to the optimization of a stacked OLED from both electrical and optical point of view. To realize the high intensity white lighting source, the efficient removal of heat is of a particular concern, especially in large-area devices. A fundamental transfer matrix analysis is introduced to predict the thermal properties in the devices. The analysis employs Laplace transforms to determine the response of the system to the combined effects of conduction, convection, and radiation. This perspective of constructing transmission matrices greatly facilitates the calculation of transient coupled heat transfer in a general multi-layer composite. It converts differential equations to algebraic forms, and

  14. A high efficiency LED portable desk lamp based on V-groove cells LGP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chi-Feng; Kuo, Shin-Hong

    2014-11-01

    The research studies a new LED portable desk lamp with V-groove cells light guide plate (LGP). Such LGP enables light of edge LED to be transmitted from the LGP with high efficiency and uniformity to enter a lighting area. Here, the so called V-groove cell is a unit composed of multiple V-grooves we provided, which may regulate light effectively with appropriate design to implement the design goal of lighting. We analyze the impact of V-grooves parameters on LGP, and further, use portable DL as an example to search for suitable V-groove units, and acquire successfully a set of LGP with high efficiency, high illuminance uniformity, and low direct glare. Compared to the commercially available DL, the efficiency is increased by 1.4 times, and the illuminance distribution of target area is similar. Obviously, such microstructure unit composed of multiple V-groove microstructure (VGM) cells can implement design goal of LED portable DL with high efficiency.

  15. Thermal performance of direct illumination high-power LED backlight units with different assembling structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiwei; Cen, Jiwen; Cao, Wenjiong; Jiang, Fangming

    2017-05-01

    This work presents a detailed study about the heat dissipation performance of direct illumination high-power light emitting diode (LED) backlight units with two different assembling structures, one of which is traditional and the other is new. The traditional structure, referred to by structure-1, consists of multiple LEDs being directly welded to the printed circuit board (PCB), where the PCB is used as a physical support, an electrical connector and also as a heat dissipation medium. The new structure, referred to by structure-2, places the LEDs directly on the cooling boss; in this case the PCB plays mainly the role of an electrical connector. Thermal characteristics related to the two backlight units are analyzed in terms of thermal resistance network, numerically simulated and experimentally tested. The obtained results by different methods accord with each other reasonably well and all indicate that both structures can meet the requirements of heat dissipation for backlight units at an ambient temperature of 30 °C. Among the two structures, the LED junction temperature of structure-1 backlight unit is 7-8 °C higher and the temperature distribution in the back plane of the backlight unit is also more uniform.

  16. Reflective Optics Design for an LED High Beam Headlamp of Motorbikes

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Peng; Wang, Xiang; Li, Yang; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    We propose a reflective optics design for an LED motorbike high beam lamp. We set the measuring screen as an elliptical zone and divide it into many small lattices and divide the spatial angle of the LED source into many parts and make relationships between them. According to the conservation law of energy and the Snell's law, the reflector is generated by freeform optics design method. Then the optical system is simulated by Monte Carlo method using ASAP software. Light pattern of simulation could meet the standard. The high beam headlamp is finally fabricated and assembled into a physical object. Experiment results can fully comply with United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (ECE) vehicle regulations R113 revision 2 (Class C). PMID:25961073

  17. Reflective optics design for an LED high beam headlamp of motorbikes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Peng; Wang, Xiang; Li, Yang; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    We propose a reflective optics design for an LED motorbike high beam lamp. We set the measuring screen as an elliptical zone and divide it into many small lattices and divide the spatial angle of the LED source into many parts and make relationships between them. According to the conservation law of energy and the Snell's law, the reflector is generated by freeform optics design method. Then the optical system is simulated by Monte Carlo method using ASAP software. Light pattern of simulation could meet the standard. The high beam headlamp is finally fabricated and assembled into a physical object. Experiment results can fully comply with United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (ECE) vehicle regulations R113 revision 2 (Class C).

  18. Portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source provides increased experimental accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, W. C.; Stewart, D. C.; Wahlgren, M. A.

    1968-01-01

    Small portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source combines twelve curium-americium beryllium sources. This high intensity of neutrons, with a flux which slowly decreases at a known rate, provides for increased experimental accuracy.

  19. BEAM LOSS MECHANISMS IN HIGH INTENSITY LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In the present operation of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, 60-Hz, 825-us H beam pulses are accelerated to 910 MeV, and then compressed to less than a microsecond in the storage ring, to deliver 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. The beam loss in the superconducting portion of the linac is higher than expected, and it has shown a surprising counter-intuitive correlation with quadrupole magnetic fields, with a loss minimum occurring when the quadrupoles are set to approximately half their design values. This behavior can now be explained by a recent set of experiments that show the beam loss is primarily due to intra-beam stripping. Beam halo is another important beam loss contributor, and collimation in the 2.5 MeV Medium Energy Beam Transport has proven to be an effective mitigation strategy. In this presentation, we will summarize these and other beam loss mechanisms that are important for high intensity linacs.

  20. High-Intensity Sweeteners and Energy Balance

    PubMed Central

    Swithers, Susan E.; Martin, Ashley A.; Davidson, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence points to a link between a variety of negative health outcomes (e.g. metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease) and the consumption of both calorically sweetened beverages and beverages sweetened with high-intensity, non-caloric sweeteners. Research on the possibility that non-nutritive sweeteners promote food intake, body weight gain, and metabolic disorders has been hindered by the lack of a physiologically-relevant model that describes the mechanistic basis for these outcomes. We have suggested that based on Pavlovian conditioning principles, consumption of non-nutritive sweeteners could result in sweet tastes no longer serving as consistent predictors of nutritive postingestive consequences. This dissociation between the sweet taste cues and the caloric consequences could lead to a decrease in the ability of sweet tastes to evoke physiological responses that serve to regulate energy balance. Using a rodent model, we have found that intake of foods or fluids containing non-nutritive sweeteners was accompanied by increased food intake, body weight gain, accumulation of body fat, and weaker caloric compensation, compared to consumption of foods and fluids containing glucose. Our research also provided evidence consistent with the hypothesis that these effects of consuming saccharin may be associated with a decrement in the ability of sweet taste to evoke thermic responses, and perhaps other physiological, cephalic phase, reflexes that are thought to help maintain energy balance. PMID:20060008

  1. High-intensity sweeteners and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Swithers, Susan E; Martin, Ashley A; Davidson, Terry L

    2010-04-26

    Recent epidemiological evidence points to a link between a variety of negative health outcomes (e.g. metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease) and the consumption of both calorically sweetened beverages and beverages sweetened with high-intensity, non-caloric sweeteners. Research on the possibility that non-nutritive sweeteners promote food intake, body weight gain, and metabolic disorders has been hindered by the lack of a physiologically-relevant model that describes the mechanistic basis for these outcomes. We have suggested that based on Pavlovian conditioning principles, consumption of non-nutritive sweeteners could result in sweet tastes no longer serving as consistent predictors of nutritive postingestive consequences. This dissociation between the sweet taste cues and the caloric consequences could lead to a decrease in the ability of sweet tastes to evoke physiological responses that serve to regulate energy balance. Using a rodent model, we have found that intake of foods or fluids containing non-nutritive sweeteners was accompanied by increased food intake, body weight gain, accumulation of body fat, and weaker caloric compensation, compared to consumption of foods and fluids containing glucose. Our research also provided evidence consistent with the hypothesis that these effects of consuming saccharin may be associated with a decrement in the ability of sweet taste to evoke thermic responses, and perhaps other physiological, cephalic phase, reflexes that are thought to help maintain energy balance.

  2. High-Power Warm-White Hybrid LED Package for Illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Soer, Wouter

    2013-09-19

    In this project, an integrated warm-white hybrid light engine was developed. The hybrid approach involves combining phosphor-converted off-white InGaN LEDs and direct-emitting red AlInGaP LEDs in a single light engine to achieve high efficacy together with high color rendering index. We developed and integrated technology improvements in InGaN and AlInGaP die technology, phosphor technology, package architecture and encapsulation, to realize a hybrid warm-white LED package with an efficacy of 140 lm/W at a correlated color temperature of 3000K and a color rendering index of 90, measured under representative operating conditions. This efficacy is 26% higher than the best warm-white LEDs of similar specification that are commercially available at the end of the project. Since the InGaN- and AlInGaP-based LEDs used in the hybrid engine show different behavior as a function of current and temperature, a control system needs to be in place to ensure a stable color point over all operating conditions. In this project, we developed an electronic control circuit that is fully integrated into the light engine in such a way that the module can simply be driven by a conventional single-channel driver. The integrated control circuit uses a switch-mode boost converter topology to control the LED drive currents based on the temperature and the input current of the light engine. A color control performance of 5 SDCM was demonstrated, and improvement to 3 SDCM is considered well within reach. The combination of high efficacy and ease of integration with existing single-channel drivers is expected to facilitate the adoption of the hybrid technology and accelerate the energy savings associated with solid-state lighting. In the product commercialization plan, downlights and indirect-lit troffers have been selected as the first target applications for this product concept. Fully functional integrated prototypes have been developed for both applications, and the business case

  3. Biaxial flexural strength of high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements heat-cured with an LED lamp during setting.

    PubMed

    Fabián Molina, Gustavo; Cabral, Ricardo Juan; Mazzola, Ignacio; Brain Lascano, Laura; Frencken, Jo E

    2013-01-01

    Adding heat to glass ionomers during setting might improve mechanical properties. The aim was to compare the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) between and within four glass ionomers, by time of exposure to a high-intensity LED light-curing unit. Materials and methods. Samples of Fuji 9 Gold Label, Ketac Molar Easymix, ChemFil Rock, and the EQUIA system were divided into three treatment groups (n = 30): without heating (Group 1), heated with LED lamp of 1400 mW/cm(2) for 30 s while setting (Group 2), and heated with LED lamp of 1400 mW/cm(2) for 60 s while setting (Group 3). Samples were stored for 48 hours in distilled water at 37°C until tested. BFS was tested, using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed, using ANOVA test with the Bonferroni correction (α = 0.05). Heating the glass-ionomer cements with an LED curing light of 1400 mW/cm(2) during setting for 30 s increased the BFS value of all GICs. No statistically significant difference in mean BFS scores was found between the EQUIA system and ChemFil Rock at 30 s and 60 s. The mean BFS value was statistically significantly higher for the EQUIA system and ChemFil Rock than for Fuji 9 Gold Label and Ketac Molar Easymix at all exposure times.

  4. Degradation of phosphor-in-glass encapsulants with various phosphor types for high power LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Fauzia; Kim, Sunil; Kim, Hyungsun

    2017-10-01

    In order to replace conventional silicone-based phosphor light emitting diodes (LEDs), inorganic color converters with high thermal stabilities and transparencies, i.e., phosphors-in-glass (PiGs), have been investigated as encapsulants for high-power LEDs. In this paper, the effect of various types of phosphors, i.e., LuAG (green, Lu3Al5O12:Ce3+), silicate (yellow, Sr2SiO4:Eu2+), CASN (red, CaAlSiN3:Eu2+), and oxynitride (yellow, (Sr,Ba) Si2O2N2:Eu2+), on the reliability/degradation of the remote PiG encapsulants is explored for high power LEDs. For this purpose, a glass composition (SiO2-B2O3-ZnO-Na2O) was separately mixed with each type of phosphor and then sintered at appropriate temperatures to make the corresponding PiG. The reliabilities of the formed PiGs were evaluated by standard accelerated-aging tests (85 °C/85% RH) for 1000 h. Luminosity losses and shifts in the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of the PiGs were measured before and after aging. Thermal, and moisture-induced quenching behavior was also analyzed. The surface of PiGs with different phosphors degraded differently, possibly because of structural incompatibilities between the glass matrix and phosphor type. Determining the compatibility of the glass composition with the type of phosphor used is therefore important in order to ensure the long-term stabilities of encapsulants for use in commercial LEDs.

  5. High-performance epoxy casting resins for SMD-LED packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogner, Georg; Debray, Alexandra; Hoehn, Klaus

    2000-04-01

    In order to come up with high volume SMD-LED production encompassing 1.9 billion devices for current fiscal year we did basic exploratory work to establish structure-processing- property relations for robust epoxy casting resin packages with identical ppm level of one. Bisphenol A-based epoxy casting resins (DGEBA) with acidic ester modified Hexahydrophthalic anhydride (HHPA) hardeners using strictly controlled high-grade raw materials were formulated and thermally transferred to highly transparent polyester networks. For 1 mm thick samples transparency in the 400 to 800 nm region is above 90%. Thermal aging tests for 6 weeks at 120 degrees Celsius reveal only slight discoloration with a color distance of 2. To avoid significant light losses within the LED operating life of 100,000 hrs stress on mechanically sensitive light-emitting chips was reduced by matching glass transition temperature Tg and E-modulus to 115 degrees Celsius and 2,800 MPa, respectively. Total chloride content below 1,000 ppm imply low corrosion potential. Further, resin composition, epoxy-hardener mixing ratio as well as curing profile were adapted to materialize fast curing for demand quantities while introducing effective low stress moieties in the final structure. Low internal stress, superior thermal shock and crack resistance were derived from supreme fracture toughness: KIC and GIC values were 1.350 MPam1/2 and 560 J/m2. With favorable water absorption behavior LED-packages withstand all soldering processes including TTW (through the wave) soldering. Thus, SMD-LEDs fulfill electronic industry standard JEDEC LEVEL 2.

  6. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    DOE PAGES

    Edgecock, T. R.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; ...

    2013-02-20

    The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fréjus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of μ+ and μ– beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case ismore » a 100 kt magnetized iron neutrino detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular 6He and 18Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fréjus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the physics reach of each facility, in particular for the measurement of CP violation in the lepton sector, and estimated the cost of construction. These have demonstrated that the best facility to build is the Neutrino Factory. Furthermore, if a powerful proton driver is constructed for another purpose or if the MEMPHYS detector is built for astroparticle physics, the Super Beam also becomes very attractive.« less

  7. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the

  8. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Edgecock, T. R.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densam, C.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Hansen, C.; Benedetto, E.; Jensen, E.; Kosmicki, A.; Martini, M.; Osborne, J.; Prior, G.; Stora, T.; Melo Mendonca, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Waaijer, C.; Cupial, P.; Chance, A.; Longhin, A.; Payet, J.; Zito, M.; Baussan, E.; Bobeth, C.; Bouquerel, E.; Dracos, M.; Gaudiot, G.; Lepers, B.; Osswald, F.; Poussot, P.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wurtz, J.; Zeter, V.; Bielski, J.; Kozien, M.; Lacny, L.; Skoczen, B.; Szybinski, B.; Ustrycka, A.; Wroblewski, A.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Balint, P.; Fourel, C.; Giraud, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Mitrofanov, S.; Loiselet, M.; Keutgen, Th.; Delbar, Th.; Debray, F.; Trophine, C.; Veys, S.; Daversin, C.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A. C.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; De Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Collazuol, G.; Laveder, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Mezzetto, M.; Signorini, C.; Vardaci, E.; Di Nitto, A.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Moro, R.; Palladino, V.; Gelli, N.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hirsh, T. Y.; Schaumann, M.; Stahl, A.; Wehner, J.; Bross, A.; Kopp, J.; Neuffer, D.; Wands, R.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, P.; Agarwalla, S. K.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Donini, A.; Ghosh, T.; Gomez Cadenas, J. J.; Hernandez, P.; Martin-Albo, J.; Mena, O.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Agostino, L.; Buizza-Avanzini, M.; Marafini, M.; Patzak, T.; Tonazzo, A.; Duchesneau, D.; Mosca, L.; Bogomilov, M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Akhmedov, E.; Blennow, M.; Lindner, M.; Schwetz, T.; Fernandez Martinez, E.; Maltoni, M.; Menendez, J.; Giunti, C.; Gonzalez Garcia, M. C.; Salvado, J.; Coloma, P.; Huber, P.; Li, T.; Lopez Pavon, J.; Orme, C.; Pascoli, S.; Meloni, D.; Tang, J.; Winter, W.; Ohlsson, T.; Zhang, H.; Scotto-Lavina, L.; Terranova, F.; Bonesini, M.; Tortora, L.; Alekou, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Kurup, A.; Jenner, L. J.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Pozimski, J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Beard, K.; Bogacz, A.; Berg, J. S.; Stratakis, D.; Witte, H.; Snopok, P.; Bliss, N.; Cordwell, M.; Moss, A.; Pattalwar, S.; Apollonio, M.

    2013-02-20

    The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fréjus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of μ+ and μ beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt magnetized iron neutrino detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular 6He and 18Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fréjus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the physics reach of each facility, in particular for the measurement of CP violation in the lepton sector, and estimated the cost of construction. These have demonstrated that the best facility to build is the Neutrino Factory. Furthermore, if a powerful proton driver is constructed for another purpose or if the MEMPHYS detector is built for astroparticle physics, the Super Beam also becomes very attractive.

  9. High-throughput imaging of adult fluorescent zebrafish with an LED fluorescence macroscope

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Jessica S; Liu, Sali; Raimondi, Aubrey R; Ignatius, Myron S; Salthouse, Christopher D; Langenau, David M

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish are a useful vertebrate model for the study of development, behavior, disease and cancer. A major advantage of zebrafish is that large numbers of animals can be economically used for experimentation; however, high-throughput methods for imaging live adult zebrafish had not been developed. Here, we describe protocols for building a light-emitting diode (LED) fluorescence macroscope and for using it to simultaneously image up to 30 adult animals that transgenically express a fluorescent protein, are transplanted with fluorescently labeled tumor cells or are tagged with fluorescent elastomers. These protocols show that the LED fluorescence macroscope is capable of distinguishing five fluorescent proteins and can image unanesthetized swimming adult zebrafish in multiple fluorescent channels simultaneously. The macroscope can be built and used for imaging within 1 day, whereas creating fluorescently labeled adult zebrafish requires 1 hour to several months, depending on the method chosen. The LED fluorescence macroscope provides a low-cost, high-throughput method to rapidly screen adult fluorescent zebrafish and it will be useful for imaging transgenic animals, screening for tumor engraftment, and tagging individual fish for long-term analysis. PMID:21293462

  10. High-Brightness Blue and White LEDs based on Inorganic Perovskite Nanocrystals and their Composites

    DOE PAGES

    Yao, En -Ping; Yang, Zhanlue; Meng, Lei; ...

    2017-04-10

    Inorganic metal halide perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) have been employed universally in light-emitting applications during the past two years. Here, blue-emission (≈ 470 nm) Cs-based perovskite NCs are derived by directly mixing synthesized bromide and chloride nanocrystals with a weight ratio of 2:1. High-brightness blue perovskite light-emitting diodes (PeLEDs) are obtained by controlling the grain size of the perovskite films. Moreover, a white PeLED is demonstrated for the first time by blending orange polymer materials with the blue perovskite nanocrystals as the active layer. Exciton transfer from the blue nanocrystals to the orange polymers via Forster or Dexter energy transfer ismore » analyzed through time resolved photoluminescence. In conclusion, by tuning the ratio between the perovskite nanocrystals and polymers, pure white light is achieved with the a CIE coordinate at (0.33,0.34).« less

  11. Numerical simulation and experimental research of the integrated high-power LED radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, J. H.; Zhang, C. L.; Gan, Z. J.; Zhou, C.; Chen, C. G.; Chen, S.

    2017-01-01

    The thermal management has become an urgent problem to be solved with the increasing power and the improving integration of the LED (light emitting diode) chip. In order to eliminate the contact resistance of the radiator, this paper presented an integrated high-power LED radiator based on phase-change heat transfer, which realized the seamless connection between the vapor chamber and the cooling fins. The radiator was optimized by combining the numerical simulation and the experimental research. The effects of the chamber diameter and the parameters of fin on the heat dissipation performance were analyzed. The numerical simulation results were compared with the measured values by experiment. The results showed that the fin thickness, the fin number, the fin height and the chamber diameter were the factors which affected the performance of radiator from primary to secondary.

  12. A highly sensitive hexachromium monitor using water core optical fiber with UV LED.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shiquan; Winstead, Christopher B; Xian, Hui; Soni, Krunal

    2002-10-01

    A simply structured, cheap hexachromium monitor was developed. The monitor is based on UV/VIS absorption technique. A 2-m long water core optical fiber was employed as a long path length sample cell and a UV light emitting diode (LED) was used as a light source. The emission profile of the UV LED fits very well with the absorption spectrum of chromate ions in water. Therefore, the light-dispersing element, which is usually used in an optical spectrometer, is not necessary in this monitor design. The water core fiber as a long path length makes the monitor highly sensitive for hexachromium detection. This monitor is specific for hexachromium detection without interference from tri-valence chromium ions. A detection limit of 0.1 ng Cr(VI) ml(-1) was obtained with this simple monitor.

  13. High-Brightness Blue and White LEDs based on Inorganic Perovskite Nanocrystals and their Composites.

    PubMed

    Yao, En-Ping; Yang, Zhanlue; Meng, Lei; Sun, Pengyu; Dong, Shiqi; Yang, Ye; Yang, Yang

    2017-04-10

    Inorganic metal halide perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) have been employed universally in light-emitting applications during the past two years. Here, blue-emission (≈470 nm) Cs-based perovskite NCs are derived by directly mixing synthesized bromide and chloride nanocrystals with a weight ratio of 2:1. High-brightness blue perovskite light-emitting diodes (PeLEDs) are obtained by controlling the grain size of the perovskite films. Moreover, a white PeLED is demonstrated for the first time by blending orange polymer materials with the blue perovskite nanocrystals as the active layer. Exciton transfer from the blue nanocrystals to the orange polymers via Förster or Dexter energy transfer is analyzed through time resolved photoluminescence. By tuning the ratio between the perovskite nanocrystals and polymers, pure white light is achieved with the a CIE coordinate at (0.33,0.34).

  14. Optimal design of optical system for LED road lighting with high illuminance and luminance uniformity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaojia; Qian, Keyuan

    2013-08-20

    A new method is proposed to achieve high illuminance and luminance uniformity of the road surface in LED road lighting. Based on the reflection properties of the road surface, the illuminance and luminance are analyzed simultaneously with the least-square method; meanwhile, energy efficiency and glare requirements are considered. Through the analysis and calculations, the optimal light distribution of a luminaire is obtained, and then a freeform lens with this light distribution is designed. For a 2-lane C1 class road illuminated by LED luminaires mounted with these lenses, the overall illuminance and luminance uniformity on the road surface can reach over 0.9 and 0.85, respectively, and the glare factors less than 10%.

  15. High intensity ultrasound effects on meat brining.

    PubMed

    Cárcel, J A; Benedito, J; Bon, J; Mulet, A

    2007-08-01

    Pork loin (longissimus dorsi) samples of two different geometries, cylinders and slabs, were immersed in saturated NaCl brine for 45min under different conditions: without brine agitation (STAT), with brine agitation (AG) and with ultrasound application (US) at eight levels of ultrasonic intensity. Moisture content change and NaCl gain were considered in order to evaluate the difference in the brining treatments. No significant differences were found in moisture and NaCl content of samples treated under STAT conditions and AG conditions, while the influence of ultrasound on the mass transfer process during meat brining depended on the intensity applied. There was an ultrasonic intensity threshold above which the influence of ultrasound appeared. At the highest level of intensity studied, the water content of samples was significantly higher than the initial water content of meat. As regards NaCl transfer, once above the intensity threshold, the increase in the NaCl content was proportional to the applied ultrasonic intensity. Not statistically significant differences were found for sample geometry.

  16. Low-noise moisture meter with high-speed LED techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikio, Rami; Lindström, Hannu; Suopajärvi, Pekka; Malinen, Jouko; Mäntylä, Markku

    2010-04-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy can provide inexpensive, rapid and contact-free chemical content measurements for on-line, hand-held and laboratory applications. Traditionally multiwavelength NIR analyzers are based on incandescent lamp light sources with rotating filter wheels, even though designs relying on lamp technology and moving parts mean larger size, require frequent maintenance and eventually limit measurement speed of the system. Today, optical power and available wavelength range of LEDs enable their use in chemical content analyzers. In this publication, a paper moisture meter with high speed LED techniques is presented. A prototype developed at VTT utilizes an extended InGaAs detector to measure diffuse reflection at four NIR wavelengths ranging from 1.2 to 2.1 μm. Source LED currents are amplitude modulated with fixed sinusoidal frequencies. Optical signals at each wavelength are demodulated from the detector signal using real-time digital lock-in detection method on an FPGA. Moisture content is calculated and displayed on the embedded platform. The design allows very high speed operation, where the result is updated every 1 ms. Performance of the prototype system was studied by measuring a set of known sealed paper samples. Paper moisture measurement accuracy was 0.14, repeatability 0.01 and 2σ noise 0.04 moisture percent. Laboratory tests showed that channel crosstalk after detection is below background noise level. The measured signal-to-noise ratios per channel were 70 - 85 dB when all LEDs were on. The overall performance equals the level of incandescent lamp based on-line moisture meters currently in use in paper mill and process automation. The developed system forms a good basis also for other content measurements.

  17. Cooling of High-Power LED Lamp Using a Commercial Paraffin Wax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmywaczyk, J.; Zbińkowski, P.; Smogór, H.; Olejnik, A.; Koniorczyk, P.

    2017-03-01

    Commercial paraffin wax used by Bolsius Nederland B.V. for manufacturing various kinds of candles was applied as a phase-change material (PCM) for cooling a 28 W high-power light emitting diode (LED) panel during its operation. The main problem arising during operation of an LED is thermal management. According to the manufacturer's datasheet specifications (BioSolution Ltd. www.biosolution.pl, the operating temperature range for the LED street lamp UL28W is (-30 {°}C) to (+40 {°}C). The object of the present study was an LED panel containing 28 pieces of high-power 1W LEDs connected in series (4 LEDs in each of the 7 rows) mounted on an aluminum plate of dimensions 80 mm by 135 mm. The tested aluminum plate was placed in a block made of aluminum with a hollow compartment containing Bolsius paraffin wax of density 914 kg\\cdot m^{-3} at room temperature. Temperatures were recorded using K-type thermocouples at selected locations of the tested LED panel for several values of the power supplied to it, while utilizing PCM and without it. As the manufacturer of Bolsius wax candles does not provide any data on the thermal properties of the material used, it was necessary to carry out micro-calorimetric research. Thermophysical properties of the paraffin wax such as the apparent specific heat, enthalpy of phase transition and temperature of phase change transition during heating and cooling were determined using the Netzsch DSC 214 Polyma. The Netzsch TG 209F3 Tarsus was used for TG/DTG measurements. DSC investigations revealed the following thermal transitions taking place during the first heating: solid-solid transition (onset 30.4 {°}C, peak at 40.9 {°}C), solid-liquid transition (onset 47.7 {°}C, peak at 54.9 {°}C, end at 58.3 {°}C), latent heat of energy storage 201 J\\cdot g^{-1}, apparent specific heat corresponding to peak at 41.5 {°}C (5.498 J\\cdot g^{-1}\\cdot K^{-1}). DTG investigations revealed that the decomposition of paraffin wax is a two

  18. Proton shock acceleration using a high contrast high intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Maxence; Roedel, Christian; Kim, Jongjin; Aurand, Bastian; Curry, Chandra; Goede, Sebastian; Propp, Adrienne; Goyon, Clement; Pak, Art; Kerr, Shaun; Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Ruby, John; William, Jackson; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven proton acceleration is a field of intense research due to the interesting characteristics of this novel particle source including high brightness, high maximum energy, high laminarity, and short duration. Although the ion beam characteristics are promising for many future applications, such as in the medical field or hybrid accelerators, the ion beam generated using TNSA, the acceleration mechanism commonly achieved, still need to be significantly improved. Several new alternative mechanisms have been proposed such as collisionless shock acceleration (CSA) in order to produce a mono-energetic ion beam favorable for those applications. We report the first results of an experiment performed with the TITAN laser system (JLF, LLNL) dedicated to the study of CSA using a high intensity (5x1019W/cm2) high contrast ps laser pulse focused on 55 μm thick CH and CD targets. We show that the proton spectrum generated during the interaction exhibits high-energy mono-energetic features along the laser axis, characteristic of a shock mechanism.

  19. Degradation Physics of High Power LEDs in Outdoor Environment and the Role of Phosphor in the degradation process

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Preetpal; Tan, Cher Ming

    2016-01-01

    A moisture- electrical – temperature (MET) test is proposed to evaluate the outdoor reliability of high power blue LEDs, with and without phosphor, and to understand the degradation physics of LEDs under the environment of combined humidity, temperature and electrical stresses. The blue LEDs with phosphor will be the high power white LEDs. Scanning acoustic microscopy is used to examine the resulted delamination during this test for the LEDs. The degradation mechanisms of blue LEDs (LEDs without phosphor) and white LEDs (LEDs with phosphor) are found to be different, under both the power on (i.e. with 350 mA through each LED) and power off (i.e. without current supply) conditions. Difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the molding part and the lens material as well as the heat generated by the phosphor layer are found to account for the major differences in the degradation mechanisms observed. The findings indicate that the proposed MET test is necessary for the LED industry in evaluating the reliability of LEDs under practical outdoor usage environment. PMID:27052103

  20. Degradation Physics of High Power LEDs in Outdoor Environment and the Role of Phosphor in the degradation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Preetpal; Tan, Cher Ming

    2016-04-01

    A moisture- electrical – temperature (MET) test is proposed to evaluate the outdoor reliability of high power blue LEDs, with and without phosphor, and to understand the degradation physics of LEDs under the environment of combined humidity, temperature and electrical stresses. The blue LEDs with phosphor will be the high power white LEDs. Scanning acoustic microscopy is used to examine the resulted delamination during this test for the LEDs. The degradation mechanisms of blue LEDs (LEDs without phosphor) and white LEDs (LEDs with phosphor) are found to be different, under both the power on (i.e. with 350 mA through each LED) and power off (i.e. without current supply) conditions. Difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the molding part and the lens material as well as the heat generated by the phosphor layer are found to account for the major differences in the degradation mechanisms observed. The findings indicate that the proposed MET test is necessary for the LED industry in evaluating the reliability of LEDs under practical outdoor usage environment.

  1. Degradation Physics of High Power LEDs in Outdoor Environment and the Role of Phosphor in the degradation process.

    PubMed

    Singh, Preetpal; Tan, Cher Ming

    2016-04-07

    A moisture- electrical - temperature (MET) test is proposed to evaluate the outdoor reliability of high power blue LEDs, with and without phosphor, and to understand the degradation physics of LEDs under the environment of combined humidity, temperature and electrical stresses. The blue LEDs with phosphor will be the high power white LEDs. Scanning acoustic microscopy is used to examine the resulted delamination during this test for the LEDs. The degradation mechanisms of blue LEDs (LEDs without phosphor) and white LEDs (LEDs with phosphor) are found to be different, under both the power on (i.e. with 350 mA through each LED) and power off (i.e. without current supply) conditions. Difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the molding part and the lens material as well as the heat generated by the phosphor layer are found to account for the major differences in the degradation mechanisms observed. The findings indicate that the proposed MET test is necessary for the LED industry in evaluating the reliability of LEDs under practical outdoor usage environment.

  2. The design of a wireless batteryless biflash installation with high power LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelle, J.; De Geest, W.; Hanselaer, P.

    2011-05-01

    Adding flashlights at crosswalks may make these weak traffic points safer. Unfortunately plugging in traffic lights into the electrical grid is expensive and complex. This paper reports about the energetic, the electronic and the optical design and building of a wireless and batteryless biflash installation in the framework of a flemish SME supporting program. The energy is supplied by a small solar panel and is buffered by supercapacitors instead of batteries. This has the advantage of being maintenance free: the number of charge-discharge cycles is almost unlimited because there is no chemical reaction involved in the storage mechanism. On the other hand the limited energy storage capacity of supercapacitors requires a new approach for the system design. Based on the EN-12352 standard for warning light devices, all design choices were filled in to be as energy efficient as possible. The duty cycle and the light output of the high power led flashlights are minimized. The components for the electronic circuits for the led driver, the control and the RF communication are selected based on their energy consumption and power management techniques are implemented. A lot of energy is saved by making the biflash system active. The leds are only flashing on demand or at preprogrammed moments. A biflash installation is typically installed at both sides of a crosswalk. A call at one of the sides should result in flashing at both sides. To maintain the drag and drop principle, a wireless RF communication system is designed.

  3. Compact collimators for high-brightness blue LEDs using dielectric multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, Hugo J.; Ma, Haiyan; Ho, Chenhung; Li, Meijie; Mu, Cong

    2011-10-01

    A novel method is presented to inject the light of millimeter-sized high-brightness blue LEDs into light guides of submillimeter thickness. Use is made of an interference filter that is designed to pass only those modes that will propagate in the light guide by total internal reflection. Other modes are reflected back to the LED cavity and recycled, leading to an increased brightness. With this method a collimator has been designed and made that is only 1mm thick, with a diameter of 6.5mm. It creates a beam of 26deg Full Width at Half Maximum. Presently, collimators with these characteristics have a thickness of 10-20mm and a diameter of 20-30mm and require careful mounting and alignment. The new collimator contains a 4.5micron thick interference filter made of 54 layers of Nb2O5 and SiO2 layers. The filter is optically coupled to the LED with Silicone adhesive which makes the configuration very robust. A cylindrical lightguide, tapered from 6.5mm to 2.5mm diameter and 1mm thick captures the light that passes the filter, folds the light path and redirects the beam. Measurements on collimator prototypes show good agreement with the designed characteristics. This promising approach enables much more compact collimators optics that offer material cost savings and design freedom.

  4. Intense white light luminescent Dy3+ doped lithium borate glasses for W-LED: A correlation between physical, thermal, structural and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, P. P.; Munishwar, S. R.; Gedam, R. S.

    2017-02-01

    In this article the physical, thermal structural and optical properties of Dy3+ doped lithium borate glasses have been studied for white LED application. The emission spectra shows two intense emission bands at around 483 nm and 574 nm corresponds to the 4F9/2 → 6H15/2 and 4F9/2 → 6H13/2 transitions along with one feeble band at 663 nm corresponds to 4F9/2 → 6H11/2 transition. The average lifetime <τ> of Dy3+ were found to be about 2.95 and 4.94 ns for blue and yellow emission bands respectively. CIE chromaticity diagram shows glass LBD-4 containing 0.5 mol% Dy2O3 with colour co-ordinates x = 0.33 and y = 0.37 have highest emission intensity. These glasses having emission in the white region and thus can be used for bright white LED's and modern white LED bulbs.

  5. Single-crystal phosphors for high-brightness white LEDs/LDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Víllora, Encarnación G.; Arjoca, Stelian; Inomata, Daisuke; Shimamura, Kiyoshi

    2016-03-01

    White light-emitting diodes (wLEDs) are the new environmental friendly sources for general lighting purposes. For applications requiring a high-brightness, current wLEDs present overheating problems, which drastically decrease their emission efficiency, color quality and lifetime. This work gives an overview of the recent investigations on single-crystal phosphors (SCPs), which are proposed as novel alternative to conventional ceramic powder phosphors (CPPs). This totally new approach takes advantage of the superior properties of single-crystals in comparison with ceramic materials. SCPs exhibit an outstanding conversion efficiency and thermal stability up to 300°C. Furthermore, compared with encapsulated CPPs, SCPs possess a superior thermal conductivity, so that generated heat can be released efficiently. The conjunction of all these characteristics results in a low temperature rise of SCPs even under high blue irradiances, where conventional CPPs are overheated or even burned. Therefore, SCPs represent the ideal, long-demanded all-inorganic phosphors for high-brightness white light sources, especially those involving the use of high-density laser-diode beams.

  6. Recovery Act: Low-Cost, Highly Lambertian Reflector Composite For Improved LED Fixture Efficiency and Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Teather, Eric

    2013-02-15

    The overall objective of the program was to demonstrate a 98% or greater reflective, highly diffuse, low-cost composite material that significantly improves luminaire efficiency, is able to withstand 50,000 hours or greater luminaire operation under expected LED system thermal and environmental operating extremes and meets the cost targets required to be an effective commercial solution for the Solid State Lighting industry. This project met most of the goals defined and contributed to the understanding of high reflectance, white coatings. Research under this program increased the understanding of coatings development using particle size reduction techniques and preparation of coating solutions with a broad range of particle types. The research explored scale-up of coating systems and generated understanding of processing required for high volume manufacturing applications. The work demonstrated how coating formulation and application technique can translate to material durability and LED system lifetime. The research also demonstrated improvements in lighting efficiency to be gained using high reflectance white coatings.

  7. HIGH INTENSITY BEAM OPERATION OF THE BROOKHAVEN AGS

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.

    1999-06-28

    For the last few years the Brookhaven AGS has operated at record proton intensities. This high beam intensity allowed for the simultaneous operation of several high precision rare kaon decay experiments. The record beam intensities were achieved after the AGS Booster was commissioned and a transition jump system, a powerful transverse damper, and an rf upgrade in the AGS were completed. The intensity is presently limited by space charge effects at both Booster and AGS injection and transverse instabilities in the AGS.

  8. Performances of BNL high-intensity synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1998-03-01

    The AGS proton synchrotron was completed in 1960 with initial intensity in the 10 to the 10th power proton per pulse (ppp) range. Over the years, through many upgrades and improvements, the AGS now reached an intensity record of 6.3 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp, the highest world intensity record for a proton synchrotron on a single pulse basis. At the same time, the Booster reached 2.2 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp surpassing the design goal of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp due to the introduction of second harmonic cavity during injection. The intensity limitation caused by space charge tune spread and its relationship to injection energy at 50 MeV, 200 MeV, and 1,500 MeV will be presented as well as many critical accelerator manipulations. BNL currently participates in the design of an accumulator ring for the SNS project at Oak Ridge. The status on the issues of halo formation, beam losses and collimation are also presented.

  9. Carrier capture efficiency in InGaN/GaN LEDs: Role of high temperature annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Vinattieri, A.; Batignani, F.; Bogani, F.; Meneghini, M.; Meneghesso, G.; Zanoni, E.; Zhu, D.; Humphreys, C. J.

    2014-02-21

    By means of time integrated (TI), time-resolved (TR) photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation spectra, we investigate the role of an high temperature post-growth thermal annealing (TA) on a set of InGaN/GaN LED structures with different dislocation densities. We provide evidence of the nature of the radiative recombination from a wide distribution of non-interacting localised states and we show the beneficial effect of thermal annealing in reducing the contribution of non-radiative recombination in the well region.

  10. Stretching Effects: High-intensity & Moderate-duration vs. Low-intensity & Long-duration.

    PubMed

    Freitas, S R; Vaz, J R; Bruno, P M; Andrade, R; Mil-Homens, P

    2016-03-01

    This study examined whether a high-intensity, moderate-duration bout of stretching would produce the same acute effects as a low-intensity, long-duration bout of stretching. 17 volunteers performed 2 knee-flexor stretching protocols: a high-intensity stretch (i. e., 100% of maximum tolerable passive torque) with a moderate duration (243.5 ± 69.5-s); and a low-intensity stretch (50% of tolerable passive torque) with a long duration (900-s). Passive torque at a given sub-maximal angle, peak passive torque, maximal range of motion (ROM), and muscle activity were assessed before and after each stretching protocol (at intervals of 1, 30 and 60 min). The maximal ROM and tolerable passive torque increased for all time points following the high-intensity stretching (p<0.05), but not after the low-intensity protocol (p>0.05). 1 min post-stretching, the passive torque decreased in both protocols, but to a greater extent in the low-intensity protocol. 30 min post-test, torque returned to baseline for the low-intensity protocol and had increased above the baseline for the high-intensity stretches. The following can be concluded: 1) High-intensity stretching increases the maximal ROM and peak passive torque compared to low-intensity stretching; 2) low-intensity, long-duration stretching is the best way to acutely decrease passive torque; and 3) high-intensity, moderate-duration stretching increases passive torque above the baseline 30 min after stretching.

  11. Emergency positioning system accuracy with infrared LEDs in high-security facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoch, Sierra N.; Nelson, Charles; Walker, Owens

    2017-05-01

    Instantaneous personnel location presents a challenge in Department of Defense applications where high levels of security restrict real-time tracking of crew members. During emergency situations, command and control requires immediate accountability of all personnel. Current radio frequency (RF) based indoor positioning systems can be unsuitable due to RF leakage and electromagnetic interference with sensitively calibrated machinery on variable platforms like ships, submarines and high-security facilities. Infrared light provide a possible solution to this problem. This paper proposes and evaluates an indoor line-of-sight positioning system that is comprised of IR and high-sensitivity CMOS camera receivers. In this system the movement of the LEDs is captured by the camera, uploaded and analyzed; the highest point of power is located and plotted to create a blueprint of crewmember location. Results provided evaluate accuracy as a function of both wavelength and environmental conditions. Research will further evaluate the accuracy of the LED transmitter and CMOS camera receiver system. Transmissions in both the 780 and 850nm IR are analyzed.

  12. Improvement of electroluminescent property of blue LED coated with highly luminescent yellow-emitting phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, H. S.; Won, Y.-H.; Jeon, D. Y.

    2009-06-01

    White light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) were fabricated by combining InGaN-based blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with highly luminescent Tb3Al5O12:Ce3+ (TAG:Ce), Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ (YAG:Ce), and Sr3SiO5:Eu2+ (SS:Eu). The TAG:Ce-based WLED showed a color rendering index ( R a ) of 79 and a luminous efficiency ( η L ) of 34.1 lm/W at 20 mA. The YAG:Ce-based WLED and the SS:Eu-based WLED showed low R a values of 75 and 57 but high luminous efficiency values of 38.9 and 41.3 lm/W at 20 mA, respectively. When a mixture of YAG:Ce and SS:Eu was coated on a blue LED and the resultant WLED operated at 20 mA, the WLED showed a highly bright white light similar to daylight ( η L =40.9 lm/W, color temperature T c =5,716 K, and R a =76). Moreover, the WLED showed stable color coordinates against a considerable variation of applied current.

  13. Low-intensity cognitive-behaviour therapy interventions for obsessive-compulsive disorder compared to waiting list for therapist-led cognitive-behaviour therapy: 3-arm randomised controlled trial of clinical effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Karina; Bower, Peter; Gellatly, Judith; Byford, Sarah; Bee, Penny; McMillan, Dean; Arundel, Catherine; Gilbody, Simon; Gega, Lina; Hardy, Gillian; Reynolds, Shirley; Barkham, Michael; Mottram, Patricia; Lidbetter, Nicola; Pedley, Rebecca; Molle, Jo; Peckham, Emily; Knopp-Hoffer, Jasmin; Price, Owen; Connell, Janice; Heslin, Margaret; Foley, Christopher; Plummer, Faye; Roberts, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is prevalent and without adequate treatment usually follows a chronic course. "High-intensity" cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) from a specialist therapist is current "best practice." However, access is difficult because of limited numbers of therapists and because of the disabling effects of OCD symptoms. There is a potential role for "low-intensity" interventions as part of a stepped care model. Low-intensity interventions (written or web-based materials with limited therapist support) can be provided remotely, which has the potential to increase access. However, current evidence concerning low-intensity interventions is insufficient. We aimed to determine the clinical effectiveness of 2 forms of low-intensity CBT prior to high-intensity CBT, in adults meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for OCD. This study was approved by the National Research Ethics Service Committee North West-Lancaster (reference number 11/NW/0276). All participants provided informed consent to take part in the trial. We conducted a 3-arm, multicentre randomised controlled trial in primary- and secondary-care United Kingdom mental health services. All patients were on a waiting list for therapist-led CBT (treatment as usual). Four hundred and seventy-three eligible patients were recruited and randomised. Patients had a median age of 33 years, and 60% were female. The majority were experiencing severe OCD. Patients received 1 of 2 low-intensity interventions: computerised CBT (cCBT; web-based CBT materials and limited telephone support) through "OCFighter" or guided self-help (written CBT materials with limited telephone or face-to-face support). Primary comparisons concerned OCD symptoms, measured using the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale-Observer-Rated (Y-BOCS-OR) at 3, 6, and 12 months. Secondary outcomes included health-related quality of life, depression, anxiety, and functioning. At

  14. Can high-intensity exercise be more pleasant?: attentional dissociation using music and video.

    PubMed

    Jones, Leighton; Karageorghis, Costas I; Ekkekakis, Panteleimon

    2014-10-01

    Theories suggest that external stimuli (e.g., auditory and visual) may be rendered ineffective in modulating attention when exercise intensity is high. We examined the effects of music and parkland video footage on psychological measures during and after stationary cycling at two intensities: 10% of maximal capacity below ventilatory threshold and 5% above. Participants (N = 34) were exposed to four conditions at each intensity: music only, video only, music and video, and control. Analyses revealed main effects of condition and exercise intensity for affective valence and perceived activation (p < .001), state attention (p < .05), and exercise enjoyment (p < .001). The music-only and music-and-video conditions led to the highest valence and enjoyment scores during and after exercise regardless of intensity. Findings indicate that attentional manipulations can exert a salient influence on affect and enjoyment even at intensities slightly above ventilatory threshold.

  15. A novel MOCVD reactor for growth of high-quality GaN-related LED layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shaolin; Liu, Sheng; Zhang, Zhi; Yan, Han; Gan, Zhiyin; Fang, Haisheng

    2015-04-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN), a direct bandgap semiconductor widely used in bright light-emitting diodes (LEDs), is mostly grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method. A good reactor design is critical for the production of high-quality GaN thin films. In this paper, we presented a novel buffered distributed spray (BDS) MOCVD reactor with vertical gas sprayers and horizontal gas inlets. Experiments based on a 36×2″ BDS reactor were conducted to examine influence of the process parameters, such as the operating pressure and the gas flow rate, on the growth efficiency and on the layer thickness uniformity. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and photoluminescence (PL) are further conducted to evaluate quality of the epitaxial layers and to check performance of the reactor. Results show that the proposed novel reactor is of high performance in growing high-quality thin films, including InGaN/GaN multiquantum wells (MQWs) structures.

  16. Plasmonics toward high-efficiency LEDs from the visible to the deep-UV region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, K.; Funato, M.; Kawakami, Y.; Okada, N.; Tadatomo, K.; Tamada, K.

    2017-02-01

    The surface plasmon (SP) resonance was used to increase the emission efficiencies toward high efficiency light-emitting diodes (LEDs). We obtained the enhancements of the electroluminescence from the fabricated plasmonic LED device structure by employing the very thin p+-GaN layer. The further enhancements should be achievable by optimization of the metal and device structures. Next important challenge is to extend this method from the visible to the deep UV region. By using Aluminum, we obtained the enhancements of emissions at 260 nm from AlGaN/AlN quantum wells. We succeeded to control the SP resonance by using the various metal nanostructures. These localized SP resonance spectra in the deep-UV regions presented here would be useful to enhance deep UV emissions of super wide bandgap materials such as AlGaN/AlN. We believe that our approaches based on ultra-deep UV plasmonics would bring high efficiency ultra-deep UV light sources.

  17. Design and optimization of a collimating optical system for high divergence LED light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, E.; Otaduy, D.; González, F.; Saiz, J. M.; Moreno, F.

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents the design of an efficient collimating optical system for an extended light source, namely a highbrightness high divergence light emitting diode (LED), sized 1x1mm, and viewing angle of 130°. The design lies in a catadioptric rotationally symmetrical system, which modeling and optimization has been done by specific optical design software, ZEMAX®, and its development was based on geometrical principles. The device consists of two optical systems, one for the rays emerging from the source with low numerical apertures (NA<0.26) and another one for those emerging with NA>0.26. The system for rays with low NA consists of an aspherical lens system which parameters are optimized by means of standard criterion for collimation. The system for high NA rays is a combination of a hyperbolic and a parabolic mirror, being the first one the only surface shared by both system (refractive near-axis, reflective offaxis). The result of this work is a system that reaches a collection efficiency of 80% of the LED emitted light. Moreover, the beam collimation quality has been analyzed obtaining a residual divergence of less than 2°. Thus, the results achieved by the proposed optical system improve those obtained with several commercially available devices and other previously proposed systems.

  18. The influence of acoustic-dislocation interaction on intensity of the bound exciton recombination in initial and irradiated GaAsP LEDs structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoreva, O. V.; Olikh, Ya. M.; Pinkovska, M. B.; Radkevych, O. I.; Tartachnyk, V. P.; Shlapatska, V. V.

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic-excitant interaction of GaAsP light emitting diodes (initial and irradiated by 2 MeV electrons) was studied. Structure based on GaAs1-xPx solid solutions, grown by epitaxy from the vapor phase, were the object of the research. It was observed that ultrasonic treatment (UST) results in the drop of the emitting intensity of structures, which relaxes to the previous values after ultrasound termination. The possible reason of observed changes concerning nonequilibrium dislocation clusters were discussed. Electron irradiation leads to the exponential drop of emitting intensity, which restores after UST much slower than initial one. Radiation degradation parameters τ0/Kτ of yellow and orange LEDs were found.

  19. Compact LED-based full-field optical coherence microscopy for high-resolution high-speed in vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogien, Jonas; Dubois, Arnaud

    2017-02-01

    This work reports on a compact full-field optical coherence microscopy (FF-OCM) setup specifically designed to meet the needs for in vivo imaging, illuminated by a high-brightness broadband light emitting diode (LED). Broadband LEDs have spectra potentially large enough to provide imaging spatial resolutions similar to those reached using conventional halogen lamps, but their radiance can be much higher, which leads to high speed acquisition and makes in vivo imaging possible. We introduce a FF-OCM setup using a 2.3 W broadband LED, with an interferometer designed to be as compact as possible in order to provide the basis for a portable system that will make it possible to fully benefit from the capacity for in vivo imaging by providing the ability to image any region of interest in real-time. The interferometer part of the compact FF-OCM setup weighs 210 g for a size of 11x11x5 cm3. Using this setup, a sub-micron axial resolution was reached, with a detection sensitivity of 68 dB at an imaging rate of 250 Hz. Due to the high imaging rate, the sensitivity could be improved by accumulation while maintaining an acquisition time short enough for in vivo imaging. It was possible to reach a sensitivity of 75 dB at a 50 Hz imaging rate. High resolution in vivo human skin images were obtained with this setup and compared with images of excised human skin, showing high similarity.

  20. Design and demonstration of high efficiency anti-glare LED luminaires for indoor lighting.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Che-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Kai; Pan, Jui-Wen

    2015-02-09

    An anti-glare luminaire design is proposed to reduce the effect of glare and the multi-shadow while preserving high optical efficiency, high illumination uniformity and low unified glare rating (UGR). Comparison to the traditional direct light emitting diode (LED) luminaire in optical simulations showed an enhancement of the illumination uniformity from 64.9% to 80.0%. The optical efficiency was 79.5%, and the UGR value was controlled under 18.8. For the actual measurement, the finished product had an illumination uniformity of 77.0%, optical efficiency of 76.0%, UGR value of 19.0, and efficacy of 81.4 lm/w. Through this design, the lighting performance was greatly enhanced.

  1. Terrain following of arbitrary surfaces using a high intensity LED proximity sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    Many robotic operations, e.g., mapping, scanning, feature following, etc., require accurate surface following of arbitrary targets. This paper presents a versatile surface following and mapping system designed to promote hardware, software and application independence, modular development, and upward expandability. These goals are met by: a full, a priori specification of the hardware and software interfaces; a modular system architecture; and a hierarchical surface-data analysis method, permitting application specific tuning at each conceptual level of topological abstraction. This surface following system was fully designed and independently of any specific robotic host, then successfully integrated with and demonstrated on a completely a priori unknown, real-time robotic system. 7 refs.

  2. Light shield and cooling apparatus. [high intensity ultraviolet lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, T. G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A light shield and cooling apparatus was developed for a high intensity ultraviolet lamp including water and high pressure air for cooling and additional apparatus for shielding the light and suppressing the high pressure air noise.

  3. Dicing of high-power white LEDs in heat sinks with the water jet-guided laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Tuan Anh; Housh, Roy; Brulé, Arnaud; Richerzhagen, Bernold

    2007-02-01

    High-brightness LEDs are compound semiconductor devices and distinguish themselves from conventional LEDs by their exceptional luminosity. Today they are increasingly used as light sources, replacing conventional incandescent and fluorescent lamp technologies. HB LEDs are difficult to manufacture, as they must be grown by sophisticated epitaxial growth techniques such as MOCVD. They are packaged like power semiconductors, using surface mount technology and thermal pads. After having been successfully applied to GaN scribing for side-emitting LEDs, the Laser MicroJet (R) is used today for cutting heat sinks of HB white LEDs. Due to the high-emitted light power, the generated heat must be dissipated through a heat sink. Materials typically employed are metals with high heat conductivity, notably CuW and molybdenum. Applying the Laser MicroJet (R) the achieved cutting quality in these metals is outstanding - smooth edges, no contamination, no burrs, no heat damage, no warping - all this at high speed.

  4. Is high-intensity exercise better than moderate-intensity exercise for weight loss?

    PubMed

    De Feo, P

    2013-11-01

    This viewpoint debates the state-of-the-art research focusing on the optimal intensity of the exercise programs for inducing a sustained weight or fat-mass loss in overweight/obese people. In our demanding society, the most attractive messages in the popular press are those promising the best results in a short time. This might explain the emphasis given by media to those scientific articles that report the efficacy on weight loss of exercise programs by their shorter duration and higher intensity. However, in the literature on overweight or obese people, there is little conclusive evidence for more favorable effects with high-intensity training than with continuous moderate-intensity exercise on body weight or fat mass loss. Since both exercise protocols have been demonstrated as useful to reduce body weight, the decision on the intensity of exercise prescription should be individualized and based on outcomes different from fat or weight loss. In this regard, there are pro and contra arguments for the prescription of high-intensity aerobic exercise in obese people. Among the pro arguments, is the demonstration that, in several studies, high-intensity training appears to induce superior improvements in aerobic fitness. Among the contra arguments to prescribe high-intensity exercise is the demonstration that prescribing a higher-intensity exercise decreases adherence and results in the completion of less exercise. Thus, a successful exercise program should be proposed at a moderate intensity and a low perceived effort because obese subjects who have low self-efficacy, poor mood status, and are not familiar with high-intensity workouts could easily drop out. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Speckle-correlation imaging through highly scattering turbid media with LED illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiaopeng; Dai, Weijia; Wu, Tengfei; Li, Huijuan; Wang, Lin

    2015-05-01

    We address an optical imaging method that allows imaging, which owing to the "memory-effect" for speckle correlations, through highly scattering turbid media with "Error Reduction - Hybid Input Ouput (ER-HIO)" algorithm. When light propagates through the opaque materials, such as white paint, paper or biological tissues, it will be scattered away due to the inhomogeneity of the refractive index. Multiple scattering of light in highly scattering media forms speckle field, which will greatly reduce the imaging depth and degrade the imaging quality. Some methods have been developed to solve this problem in recent years, including wavefront modulation method (WMM), transmission matrix method (TMM) and speckle correlations method (SCM). A novel approach is proposed to image through a highly scattering turbid medium, which combines speckle correlations method (SCM) with phase retrieval algorithm (PRA). Here, we show that, owing to the "optical memory effect" for speckle correlations, a single frame image of the speckle field, captured with a high performance detector, encodes sufficient information to image through highly scattering turbid media. Theoretical and experimental results show that, neither the light source, nor wave-front shaping is required in this method, and that the imaging can be easily realized here using just a simple optical system with the help of optical memory effect. Our method does not require coherent light source, which can be achieved with LED illumination, unlike previous approaches, and therefore is potentially suitable for more and more areas. Consequently, it will be beneficial to achieve imaging in currently inaccessible scenarios.

  6. Balanced Gene Losses, Duplications and Intensive Rearrangements Led to an Unusual Regularly Sized Genome in Arbutus unedo Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Alberola, Fernando; del Campo, Eva M.; Lázaro-Gimeno, David; Mezquita-Claramonte, Sergio; Molins, Arantxa; Mateu-Andrés, Isabel; Pedrola-Monfort, Joan; Casano, Leonardo M.; Barreno, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Completely sequenced plastomes provide a valuable source of information about the duplication, loss, and transfer events of chloroplast genes and phylogenetic data for resolving relationships among major groups of plants. Moreover, they can also be useful for exploiting chloroplast genetic engineering technology. Ericales account for approximately six per cent of eudicot diversity with 11,545 species from which only three complete plastome sequences are currently available. With the aim of increasing the number of ericalean complete plastome sequences, and to open new perspectives in understanding Mediterranean plant adaptations, a genomic study on the basis of the complete chloroplast genome sequencing of Arbutus unedo and an updated phylogenomic analysis of Asteridae was implemented. The chloroplast genome of A. unedo shows extensive rearrangements but a medium size (150,897 nt) in comparison to most of angiosperms. A number of remarkable distinct features characterize the plastome of A. unedo: five-fold dismissing of the SSC region in relation to most angiosperms; complete loss or pseudogenization of a number of essential genes; duplication of the ndhH-D operon and its location within the two IRs; presence of large tandem repeats located near highly re-arranged regions and pseudogenes. All these features outline the primary evolutionary split between Ericaceae and other ericalean families. The newly sequenced plastome of A. unedo with the available asterid sequences allowed the resolution of some uncertainties in previous phylogenies of Asteridae. PMID:24260278

  7. [An updated overview of the high intensity lipid lowering therapy in high cardiovascular risk patients].

    PubMed

    Pedro-Botet, Juan; Pintó, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Statins are highly effective drugs to decrease the plasma concentrations of atherogenic lipoproteins and prevent cardiovascular disease. The clinical practice guidelines recommend the use of high-intensity statins to lower LDL-cholesterol by at least 50% in patients with CVD and those at high cardiovascular risk. The recommendations for the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia by the ACC/AHA have led to a paradigm shift in cardiovascular prevention. These recommendations have abandoned the therapeutic goals of LDL-cholesterol, and recommend the treatment with statins of high or moderate intensity in four high cardiovascular risk groups. These recommendations are different from the European guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention, in which their objectives are still towards LDL-cholesterol. This paper reviews this controversy from different angles and from the perspective of the Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention. Intervention studies with high intensity statins in primary prevention, in patients with acute coronary syndrome, and with stable ischaemic heart disease are also described. Likewise, treatment with statins of high intensity is addressed in terms of their effectiveness in cardiovascular prevention and in terms of their safety, with particular attention to muscle effects, as well as taking into account the pharmacological characteristics of the different statins and the increased safety of those with less potential for interactions. Finally, new agents are described for the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia, with special emphasis on anti-PCSK9 monoclonal antibodies, a new therapeutic group for the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia that will offer a huge progress in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Double freeform surfaces lens design for LED uniform illumination with high distance-height ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Heng; Zhang, Xianmin; Ge, Peng

    2015-10-01

    A practical method is proposed to design a double freeform surfaces (DFS) lens for LED sources, in order to form uniform illumination in the high distance-height ratio (DHR) lighting system. The ray mapping relationship is first established between the solid angle of the source and the target plane according to the energy conservation law and the variable separation method. A DFS lens is then constructed simultaneously and point by point to the ray mapping based on the Snell's law. Optical performance of the lens is investigated by the Monte Carlo method. A simple and effective method is utilized to optimize the lens design in accordance with the simulation results. As an example, a DFS lens with DHR of 2.5 (distance 30 mm, height 12 mm) is designed by the proposed method. Compared with the traditional methods, the illuminance uniformity is significantly improved from 67.20% to 86.43% and the size of the lens is dramatically reduced.

  9. Leveraging the Power of Peer-Led Learning: Investigating Effects on STEM Performance in Urban High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Ally S.; Bonner, Sarah M.; Everson, Howard T.; Somers, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    The Peer Enabled Restructured Classroom (PERC) is an instructional innovation developed to address gaps in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) in urban high schools. The PERC model changes instruction from teacher led to peer led by bringing peer students into the classroom to lead small-group work. Our study sought to provide…

  10. Remarks About Fields Of High Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, Edward

    1986-12-05

    At high field strength any known material will break down by the production of electrons and ions. At a higher field strength, massive production of pairs will occur. This phenomenon is discussed when heavy ions of Υ ≈ 100 collide.

  11. Comparison of Bond Strength of Metal and Ceramic Brackets Bonded with Conventional and High-Power LED Light Curing Units

    PubMed Central

    Chalipa, Javad; Jalali, Yasamin Farajzadeh; Gorjizadeh, Fatemeh; Baghaeian, Pedram; Hoseini, Mohammad Hashem

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of conventional and high-power light emitting diode (LED) light curing units on shear bond strength (SBS) of metal and ceramic brackets to tooth surface. Materials and Methods: Forty sound bovine maxillary central incisors were used for the study. The teeth were divided into four groups (n=10). Teeth surfaces were etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 20 seconds. After applying a uniform layer of adhesive primer on the etched enamel, composite was placed on the base of brackets. The samples were light cured according to the manufacturer’s instructions and thermocycled. The SBS was measured. The failure mode was scored using the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Results: The mean SBS of samples in groups A (high-power LED, metal bracket), B (high-power LED, ceramic bracket), C (conventional LED, metal bracket) and D (conventional LED, ceramic bracket) was 23.1±3.69, 10.7±2.06, 24.92±6.37 and 10.74±3.18MPa, respectively. The interaction effect of type of LED unit (high-power/conventional) and bracket type on SBS was not statistically significant (P=0.483). In general, type of LED unit did not affect SBS. Type of bracket significantly affected SBS (P<0.001). The ARI score was not significantly influenced by the interaction between the type of LED unit and bracket. Conclusions: The obtained SBS is the same for both bracket types by use of high-power and conventional LED light curing units. Regardless of the type of LED unit, SBS of ceramic brackets was significantly lower than that of metal brackets. PMID:28243304

  12. Engineering Food Ingredients with High-Intensity Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jochen; Kristbergsson, Kristberg; Kjartansson, Gunnar Thor

    The use of ultrasound in the food industry has increased in the last decades. Ultrasound has been used both to analyze food structure and composition at low ultrasonic intensities and high frequencies and to modify ingredients at high ultrasonic intensities and low frequencies. Application of the latter is referred to as high-intensity (power) ultrasonication and is generally carried out at frequencies of =0.1 MHz and ultrasonic intensities of 10-100 W cm-2. In the food industry, power ultrasonication has proved to be a highly effective food processing and preservation technology, and use of high-intensity ultrasound with or without heat may be used, for example, to denature enzymes, aid in the extraction of valuable compounds from plants and seeds, tenderize meat, and homogenize or disperse two-phase systems such as emulsions or suspensions (Mason et al., 1996).

  13. A compact high intensity cooler (CHIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, T. J.; Niggemann, R. E.; Parekh, M. B.

    1983-07-01

    A unique heat exchanger has been developed with potential applications for cooling high power density electronics and perhaps high energy laser mirrors. The device was designed to absorb heat fluxes of approximately 50 w/sq cm (158,000 Btu/hr sq ft), with a low thermal resistance, a high surface temperature uniformity, and very low hydraulic pumping power. A stack of thin copper orifice plates and spacers was bonded together and arranged to provide liquid jet impingement heat transfer on successive plates. This configuration resulted in effective heat transfer coefficients, based on the prime surface, of about 85,000 w/sq m deg C (15,000 Btu/hr sq ft deg F) and 1.8 watts (0.002 hp) hydraulic power with liquid Freon 11 as coolant.

  14. High intensity copper atom beam - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, A. J.; Santavicca, D.

    1973-01-01

    The development of a nozzle which gas-dynamically accelerates neutral copper atoms at controlled energy levels and flux rates suitable for the investigation of inelastic copper atom collision processes is reported. Preliminary test data demonstrate that vapor-deposited rhenium nozzles do not degrade in the presence of copper vapor at high temperatures. Operation with high purity helium gas at nozzle stagnation temperatures in the range 2650-2700 K and total stagnation pressures from 1/4 to 2 atm with continuous copper atom flux rates of approximately 10 to the 18th power per second has been maintained, for a total time of 8-1/2 h to date.

  15. Sustained high external quantum efficiency in ultrasmall blue III–nitride micro-LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, David; Mughal, Asad; Pynn, Christopher D.; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasmall blue InGaN micro-light-emitting diodes (µLEDs) with areas from 10‑4 to 0.01 mm2 were fabricated to study their optical and electrical properties. The peak external quantum efficiencies (EQEs) of the smallest and largest µLEDs were 40.2 and 48.6%, respectively. The difference in EQE was from nonradiative recombination originating from etching damage. This decrease is less severe than that in red AlInGaP LEDs. The efficiency droop at 900 A/cm2 of the smallest µLED was 45.7%, compared with 56.0% for the largest, and was lower because of improved current spreading. These results show that ultrasmall µLEDs may be fabricated without a significant loss in optical or electrical performance.

  16. Benefits of High-Intensity Intensive Care Unit Physician Staffing under the Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    Logani, Sachin; Green, Adam; Gasperino, James

    2011-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act signed into law by President Obama, with its value-based purchasing program, is designed to link payment to quality processes and outcomes. Treatment of critically ill patients represents nearly 1% of the gross domestic product and 25% of a typical hospital budget. Data suggest that high-intensity staffing patterns in the intensive care unit (ICU) are associated with cost savings and improved outcomes. We evaluate the literature investigating the cost-effectiveness and clinical outcomes of high-intensity ICU physician staffing as recommended by The Leapfrog Group (a consortium of companies that purchase health care for their employees) and identify ways to overcome barriers to nationwide implementation of these standards. Hospitals that have implemented the Leapfrog initiative have demonstrated reductions in mortality and length of stay and increased cost savings. High-intensity staffing models appear to be an immediate cost-effective way for hospitals to meet the challenges of health care reform. PMID:22110908

  17. High intensity positron program at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka-Kumar, P.; Howell, R.H.; Stoeffl, W.

    1998-09-23

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of the world's highest current beam of keV positrons. The potential for establishing a national center for materials analysis using positron annihilation techniques around this capability is being actively pursued. The high LLNL beam current will enable investigations in several new areas. We are developing a positron microprobe that will produce a pulsed, focused positron beam for 3-dimensional scans of defect size and concentration with submicron resolution. Below we summarize the important design features of this microprobe. Several experimental end stations will be available that can utilize the high current beam with a time distribution determined by the electron linac pulse structure, quasi-continuous, or bunched at 20 MHz, and can operate in an electrostatic or (and) magnetostatic environment. Some of the planned early experiments are: two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation of thin films and buried interfaces, positron diffraction holography, positron induced desorption, and positron induced Auger spectra.

  18. High-intensity sources for light ions

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.

    1995-10-01

    The use of the multicusp plasma generator as a source of light ions is described. By employing radio-frequency induction discharge, the performance of the multicusp source is greatly improved, both in lifetime and in high brightness H{sup +} and H{sup {minus}} beam production. A new technique for generating multiply-charged ions in this type of ion source is also presented.

  19. Fundamental Studies and Development of III-N Visible LEDs for High-Power Solid-State Lighting Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, Russell

    2012-02-29

    The goal of this program is to understand in a fundamental way the impact of strain, defects, polarization, and Stokes loss in relation to unique device structures upon the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and efficiency droop (ED) of III-nitride (III-N) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and to employ this understanding in the design and growth of high-efficiency LEDs capable of highly-reliable, high-current, high-power operation. This knowledge will be the basis for our advanced device epitaxial designs that lead to improved device performance. The primary approach we will employ is to exploit new scientific and engineering knowledge generated through the application of a set of unique advanced growth and characterization tools to develop new concepts in strain-, polarization-, and carrier dynamics-engineered and low-defect materials and device designs having reduced dislocations and improved carrier collection followed by efficient photon generation. We studied the effects of crystalline defect, polarizations, hole transport, electron-spillover, electron blocking layer, underlying layer below the multiplequantum- well active region, and developed high-efficiency and efficiency-droop-mitigated blue LEDs with a new LED epitaxial structures. We believe new LEDs developed in this program will make a breakthrough in the development of high-efficiency high-power visible III-N LEDs from violet to green spectral region.

  20. High intensity anthropogenic sound damages fish ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Robert D.; Fewtrell, Jane; Popper, Arthur N.

    2003-01-01

    Marine petroleum exploration involves the repetitive use of high-energy noise sources, air-guns, that produce a short, sharp, low-frequency sound. Despite reports of behavioral responses of fishes and marine mammals to such noise, it is not known whether exposure to air-guns has the potential to damage the ears of aquatic vertebrates. It is shown here that the ears of fish exposed to an operating air-gun sustained extensive damage to their sensory epithelia that was apparent as ablated hair cells. The damage was regionally severe, with no evidence of repair or replacement of damaged sensory cells up to 58 days after air-gun exposure.

  1. Commerical Transition to LEDs: A Pathway to High-Value Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    The use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to support plant growth is a radical departure from use of gas-discharge lamps, which were developed in mid-19th and widely adopted by the industry during the 20th century. Initial investigation by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the late 1980s on the use of LEDs to grow plant in space is resulting in an industry-wide transition from gas discharge to solid-state lighting systems. This global transformation is given urgency by national policies to reduce energy consumption and being facilitated by ready access to information on LEDs. The combination of research, government policy, and information technology has resulted in an exponential increase in research into the use and application of LED technology in horticulture. Commercial horticulture has identified the opportunities provided by LEDs to optimize light spectra to promote growth, regulate morphology, increase nutrient content, and reduce operating costs. LED-light technology is enabling the development of innovative lighting systems, and is being incorporated into large-scale plant factories for the production of edible, ornamental, and medicinal plants. An overview of prevalence of readily accessible information on LEDs and implications for future adoption in horticulture is discussed.

  2. Computer modeling of high intensity solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, J. L.; Lundstrom, M. S.; Schwartz, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to provide general analytic support to Sandia National Laboratories' effort to develop high efficiency, high concentration solar cells. This report covers work performed between November 5, 1984, and December 31, 1985, and includes reprints of three papers presented at the 18th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists' Conference. In the first paper, the factors that presently prevent achieving the predicted theoretical efficiencies (in excess of 30% at concentration) are examined. It is demonstrated, by two-dimensional computer simulations, that these efficiencies might be obtained by improved light trapping techniques and by fabrication of low resistance heteroface contacts. The second paper examines the Rose-Weaver lifetime and surface recombination velocity measurement technique. It is shown that the very small uncertainties in the measured quantities lead to large uncertainties in the computed lifetime and surface recombination velocity. This leads to radically different interpretations of how the recombination is distributed throughout the device, and therefore limits the usefulness of the measurement technique. Design options and constraints of GaAs concentrator cells are examined in the third paper. The effectiveness of various design options is assessed. It is shown that although such design options are of little use in increasing the efficiency of heteroface cells, they can improve the efficiency of shallow junction cells so that it is comparable to that of heteroface cells, In addition, documentation describing the use of both the one- and two-dimensional silicon codes, SCAP1D and SCAP2D, as well as the one-dimensional AlGaAs solar cell simulation code is included.

  3. High performance of Ga-doped ZnO transparent conductive layers using MOCVD for GaN LED applications.

    PubMed

    Horng, Ray-Hua; Shen, Kun-Ching; Yin, Chen-Yang; Huang, Chiung-Yi; Wuu, Dong-Sing

    2013-06-17

    High performance of Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) prepared using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) was employed in GaN blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as transparent conductive layers (TCL). By the post-annealing process, the annealed 800°C GZO films exhibited a high transparency above 97% at wavelength of 450 nm. The contact resistance of GZO decreased with the annealing temperature increasing. It was attributed to the improvement of the GZO crystal quality, leading to an increase in electron concentration. It was also found that some Zn atom caused from the decomposition process diffused into the p-GaN surface of LED, which generated a stronger tunneling effect at the GZO/p-GaN interface and promoted the formation of ohmic contact. Moreover, contrast to the ITO-LED, a high light extraction efficiency of 77% was achieved in the GZO-LED at injection current of 20 mA. At 350 mA injection current, the output power of 256.51 mW of GZO-LEDs, corresponding to a 21.5% enhancement as compared to ITO-LEDs was obtained; results are promising for the development of GZO using the MOCVD technique for GaN LED applications.

  4. Big Data Meets Physics Education Research: From MOOCs to University-Led High School Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) movement has catalyzed discussions of digital learning on campuses around the world and highlighted the increasingly large, complex datasets related to learning. Physics Education Research can and should play a key role in measuring outcomes of this most recent wave of digital education. In this talk, I will discuss big data and learning analytics through multiple modes of teaching and learning enabled by the open-source edX platform: open-online, flipped, and blended. Open-Online learning will be described through analysis of MOOC offerings from Harvard and MIT, where 2.5 million unique users have led to 9 million enrollments across nearly 300 courses. Flipped instruction will be discussed through an Advanced Placement program at Davidson College that empowers high school teachers to use AP aligned, MOOC content directly in their classrooms with only their students. Analysis of this program will be highlighted, including results from a pilot study showing a positive correlation between content usage and externally validated AP exam scores. Lastly, blended learning will be discussed through specific residential use cases at Davidson College and MIT, highlighting unique course models that blend open-online and residential experiences. My hope for this talk is that listeners will better understand the current wave of digital education and the opportunities it provides for data-driven teaching and learning.

  5. Promoting Safer Use of High-Risk Pharmacotherapy: Impact of Pharmacist-Led Targeted Medication Reviews.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Clare; MacRae, Yvonne

    2015-09-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a recognised cause of hospital admissions. A small group of medicines carry a higher risk of adverse outcomes and are more frequently involved in hospital admissions than other medicines. These 'high-risk medicines' have been identified in previous research. However, it is less clear how to reduce the risks associated with these known high-risk medicines, or which high-risk medicines should be prioritised when implementing risk reduction interventions. Previous research has questioned the efficacy of pharmacist-led medication reviews in reducing hospital admissions and drug-related morbidity and mortality. In this study, we aimed to identify high-risk medicines through medication review to reduce iatrogenic disease; to determine a short list of high-risk medicines to target in medication reviews to achieve the greatest impact on reducing iatrogenic disease and patient harm; and to determine whether pharmacist-conducted medication reviews of high-risk medicines are safe and effective. A prospective cohort study was undertaken in 16 general practices in one Scottish health board. All patients prescribed a high-risk medicine were identified and received a medication review from a pharmacist (3643 patients from a total population of 38,399). The pharmacist decided whether it was appropriate to continue the high-risk medicine, or if the medicine should be stopped or amended. The pharmacist made recommendations to the patient's general practitioner (GP) for medicines to be stopped or amended, which the GP could choose to accept or not. Patient outcomes for all of the pharmacist's recommendations were identified 1 year later to determine the effectiveness of the recommendations. High-risk medicines were prescribed to 3643 patients from a total population of 38,399 patients. The pharmacist made 440 recommendations for GPs to stop or amend high-risk medicines. GPs accepted 214 recommendations and rejected 226, giving an acceptance rate of 49

  6. Intensive Scheduling: A Hybrid Model for the Junior High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGorry, Eugene; McGorry, Susan Y.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses Intensive Scheduling as an approach to learning. Describes how educators in the Pocono Mountain School District in Pennsylvania searched for a more effective way to schedule classes. Describes how the junior high administration and teachers piloted a hybrid modified intensive schedule. Presents student opinions about the hybrid model,…

  7. Light-intensity modulator withstands high heat fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, H. G.; Strass, H. K.

    1966-01-01

    Mechanism modulates and controls the intensity of luminous radiation in light beams associated with high-intensity heat flux. This modulator incorporates two fluid-cooled, externally grooved, contracting metal cylinders which when rotated about their longitudinal axes present a circular aperture of varying size depending on the degree of rotation.

  8. Characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound transducers using acoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Prasanna; Myers, Matthew R; Robinson, Ronald A; Maruvada, Subha H; Sliwa, Jack; Banerjee, Rupak K

    2008-03-01

    A new approach for characterizing high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducers is presented. The technique is based upon the acoustic streaming field generated by absorption of the HIFU beam in a liquid medium. The streaming field is quantified using digital particle image velocimetry, and a numerical algorithm is employed to compute the acoustic intensity field giving rise to the observed streaming field. The method as presented here is applicable to moderate intensity regimes, above the intensities which may be damaging to conventional hydrophones, but below the levels where nonlinear propagation effects are appreciable. Intensity fields and acoustic powers predicted using the streaming method were found to agree within 10% with measurements obtained using hydrophones and radiation force balances. Besides acoustic intensity fields, the streaming technique may be used to determine other important HIFU parameters, such as beam tilt angle or absorption of the propagation medium.

  9. Repeated high-intensity exercise in professional rugby union.

    PubMed

    Austin, Damien; Gabbett, Tim; Jenkins, David

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the frequency, duration, and nature of repeated high-intensity exercise in Super 14 rugby union. Time-motion analysis was used during seven competition matches over the 2008 and 2009 Super 14 seasons; five players from each of four positional groups (front row forwards, back row forwards, inside backs, and outside backs) were assessed (20 players in total). A repeated high-intensity exercise bout was considered to involve three or more sprints, and/or tackles and/or scrum/ruck/maul activities within 21 s during the same passage of play. The range of repeated high-intensity exercise bouts for each group in a match was as follows: 11-18 for front row forwards, 11-21 for back row forwards, 13-18 for inside backs, and 2-11 for outside backs. The durations of the most intense repeated high-intensity exercise bouts for each position ranged from 53 s to 165 s and the minimum recovery periods between repeated high-intensity exercise bouts ranged from 25 s for the back row forwards to 64 s for the front row forwards. The present results show that repeated high-intensity exercise bouts vary in duration and activities relative to position but all players in a game will average at least 10 changes in activity in the most demanding bouts and complete at least one tackle and two sprints. The most intense periods of activity are likely to last as long as 120 s and as little as 25 s recovery may separate consecutive repeated high-intensity exercise bouts. The present findings can be used by coaches to prepare their players for the most demanding passages of play likely to be experienced in elite rugby union.

  10. Thermally Stable White Emitting Eu(3+) Complex@Nanozeolite@Luminescent Glass Composite with High CRI for Organic-Resin-Free Warm White LEDs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinhui; Gong, Shuming; Yu, Jinbo; Li, Peng; Zhang, Xuejie; He, Yuwei; Zhou, Jianbang; Shi, Rui; Li, Huanrong; Peng, Aiyun; Wang, Jing

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, it is still a great challenge for lanthanide complexes to be applied in solid state lighting, especially for high-power LEDs because they will suffer severe thermal-induced luminescence quenching and transmittance loss when LEDs are operated at high current. In this paper, we have not only obtained high efficient and thermally chemical stable red emitting hybrid material by introducing europium complex into nanozeolite (NZ) functionalized with the imidazolium-based stopper but also abated its thermal-induced transmittance loss and luminescence quenching behavior via coating it onto a heat-resistant luminescent glass (LG) with high thermal conductivity (1.07 W/mK). The results show that the intensity at 400 K for Eu(PPO)n-C4Si@NZ@LG remains 21.48% of the initial intensity at 300 K, which is virtually 153 and 13 times the intensity of Eu(PPO)3·2H2O and Eu(PPO)n-C4Si@NZ, respectively. Moreover, an organic-resin-free warm white LEDs device with a low CCT of 3994K, a high Ra of 90.2 and R9 of 57.9 was successfully fabricated simply by combining NUV-Chip-On-Board with a warm white emitting glass-film composite (i.e., yellowish-green emitting luminescent glass coated with red emitting hybrid film). Our method and results provide a feasible and promising way for lanthanide complexes to be used for general illumination in the future.

  11. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Chakravarthy, D P

    2009-12-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10(11) cm(-3) and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 pi mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  12. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2009-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  13. Space Station Live: High-Intensity Exercise in Space

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Lori Meggs talks with SPRINT Principal Investigator Lori Ploutz-Snyder to learn more about this high-intensity exercise research taking place aboard the International Sp...

  14. Physiological responses at the lactate-minimum-intensity with and without prior high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Zagatto, Alessandro Moura; Padulo, Johnny; Silva, Adelino Ramos Sanchez da; Müller, Paulo de Tarso Guerrero; Miyagi, Willian Eiji; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre

    2016-11-01

    This study examined the physiological responses during exercise-to-exhaustion at the lactate-minimum-intensity with and without prior high-intensity exercise. Eleven recreationally trained males performed a graded exercise test, a lactate minimum test and two constant-load tests at lactate-minimum-intensity until exhaustion, which were applied with or without prior hyperlactatemia induction (i.e., 30-s Wingate test). The physiological responses were significantly different (P < 0.05) between constant-load tests for pulmonary ventilation ([Formula: see text]), blood-lactate-concentration ([La(-)]), pH, bicarbonate concentration ([HCO3]) and partial pressure of carbon dioxide during the initial minutes. The comparisons within constant-load tests showed steady state behaviour for oxygen uptake and the respiratory exchange ratio, but heart rate and rating of perceived exertion increased significantly during both exercise conditions, while the [Formula: see text] increased only during constant-load effort. During effort performed after high-intensity exercise: [Formula: see text], [La(-)], pH and [HCO3] differed at the start of exercise compared to another condition but were similar at the end (P > 0.05). In conclusion, the constant-load exercises performed at lactate-minimum-intensity with or without prior high-intensity exercise did not lead to the steady state of all analysed parameters; however, variables such as [La(-)], pH and [HCO3] - altered at the beginning of effort performed after high-intensity exercise - were reestablished after approximately 30 min of exercise.

  15. High Intensity Tactical Power Sources for the 1990 Army.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    conceptual or physical study which may become feasible as high intensity power sources . These considerations include present state of the art of...requirements, energy and power output capabilities, and fixed costs. From these tables, it may be seen that a variety of electrical power sources would be...required to satisfy diverse requirements, but an attempt is made to categorize possible high intensity power sources into their areas of optimum

  16. LED surgical lighting system with multiple free-form surfaces for highly sterile operating theater application.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yaqin; Zheng, Zhenrong; Li, Haifeng; Liu, Xu

    2014-06-01

    Although the ventilation system is widely employed in the operating theater, a strictly sterile surgical environment still cannot be ensured because of laminar disturbance, which is mainly caused by the surgical lighting system. Abandoning traditional products, we propose an LED surgical lighting system, which can alleviate the laminar disturbance and provide an appropriate lighting condition for surgery. It contains a certain amount of LED lens units, which are embedded in the ceiling and arranged around the air supply smallpox. The LED lens unit integrated with an LED light source and a free-form lens is required to produce a uniform circular illumination with a large tolerance to the change of lighting distance. To achieve such a dedicated lens, two free-form refractive surfaces, which are converted into two ordinary differential equations by the design method presented in this paper, are used to deflect the rays. The results show that the LED surgical lighting system can provide an excellent illumination environment for surgery, and, apparently, the laminar disturbance also can be relieved.

  17. High power GaN-based LEDs with nano-structured Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) transparent conductive layer (TCL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Weiqing; Fan, Bingfeng; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Baijun; Xian, Yulun; Huang, Shanjing; Zheng, Zhiyuan; Wu, Zhisheng; Tong, Keny; Wong, Raymond; Wang, Gang

    2010-12-01

    High power GaN-based LEDs with nano-structured Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) transparent conductive layer (TCL) were fabricated by using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method. Compared with the conventional LED with Ni/Au or ITO process, the saturation current in the LEDs with GZO TCL approximately increased up to more than 14 % and 13 %, and the light output intensity up to 57.5 % and 30.1 %, respectively. This improvement was attributed to the high carrier concentration of GZO TCL and the planar structure at the TCL bottom, which improved the electrical conductivity, and therefore promoted current spreading. The refractive index of GZO is similar to GaN (n ~ 2) and thereby results in the reduction of the reflection loss between GaN and TCL interface. In addition, the nano-structure of GZO TCL increased the light output critical angle and enhanced surface light emitting while reducing the lateral light loss and consequently improved light extraction efficiency of LEDs.

  18. Estimation of the squared modulus of the mutual intensity from high-light-level intensity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Timothy J.

    1995-06-01

    The problem of estimating the squared modulus of the mutual intensity (or the complex coherence factor) from high-light-level intensity measurements is addressed for the situation in which the fluctuations of the complex-valued amplitude are governed by circular-Gaussian statistics and the light level is high enough that all nonclassical fluctuations of the measurements can be ignored. A lower bound on the variance of any unbiased estimator is presented, and this bound is compared with the variance of Ebstein's polynomial estimators [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 8, 1450 (1991)] along with the variance of the maximum-likelihood estimator.

  19. High-intensity aerobic interval exercise in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Philippe; Gayda, Mathieu; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil

    2013-06-01

    Aerobic exercise training is strongly recommended in patients with heart failure (HF) and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) to improve symptoms and quality of life. Moderate-intensity aerobic continuous exercise (MICE) is the best established training modality in HF patients. For about a decade, however, another training modality, high-intensity aerobic interval exercise (HIIE), has aroused considerable interest in cardiac rehabilitation. Originally used by athletes, HIIE consists of repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise interspersed with recovery periods. The rationale for its use is to increase exercise time spent in high-intensity zones, thereby increasing the training stimulus. Several studies have demonstrated that HIIE is more effective than MICE, notably for improving exercise capacity in patients with HF. The aim of the present review is to describe the general principles of HIIE prescription, the acute physiological effects, the longer-term training effects, and finally the future perspectives of HIIE in patients with HF.

  20. Optimization of Light-Diffracting Photonic-Crystals for High Extraction Efficiency LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Aurélien; Benisty, Henri; Weisbuch, Claude

    2007-06-01

    Photonic-crystal (PhC)-assisted light extraction is a promising method for ultrahigh efficiency, planar light-emitting diodes (LEDs). However, modeling of such structures is challenging due to the variety of their parameters and the heavy computational burden they represent. We present a thorough theoretical discussion of the optimization of PhC LEDs, which relies both on approximate treatments and on rigorous 3-D calculations. Two material systems (GaAs and GaN) are investigated, leading to quite different optimal regimes. Notably, it appears that besides the properties of the 2-D PhC itself, design of the vertical structure plays a major role in optimization.

  1. High-intensity interval training evokes larger serum BDNF levels compared with intense continuous exercise.

    PubMed

    Saucedo Marquez, Cinthia Maria; Vanaudenaerde, Bart; Troosters, Thierry; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2015-12-15

    Exercise can have a positive effect on the brain by activating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-related processes. In healthy humans there appears to be a linear relationship between exercise intensity and the positive short-term effect of acute exercise on BDNF levels (i.e., the highest BDNF levels are reported after high-intensity exercise protocols). Here we performed two experiments to test the effectiveness of two high-intensity exercise protocols, both known to improve cardiovascular health, to determine whether they have a similar efficacy in affecting BDNF levels. Participants performed a continuous exercise (CON) protocol at 70% of maximal work rate and a high-intensity interval-training (HIT) protocol at 90% of maximal work rate for periods of 1 min alternating with 1 min of rest (both protocols lasted 20 min). We observed similar BDNF kinetics in both protocols, with maximal BDNF concentrations being reached toward the end of training (experiment 1). We then showed that both exercise protocols significantly increase BDNF levels compared with a rest condition (CON P = 0.04; HIT P < 0.001), with HIT reaching higher BDNF levels than CON (P = 0.035) (experiment 2). These results suggest that shorter bouts of high intensity exercise are slightly more effective than continuous high-intensity exercise for elevating serum BDNF. Additionally, 73% of the participants preferred the HIT protocol (P = 0.02). Therefore, we suggest that the HIT protocol might represent an effective and preferred intervention for elevating BDNF levels and potentially promoting brain health.

  2. High-yield thin GaN LED using metal bonding and laser lift-off technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horng, Ray-Hua; Chen, Ching-Ho; Kao, Wei-Cheng; Wuu, Dong-Sing

    2012-10-01

    Gold-indium metal bonding method was used in this study to increase the product yield of vertical light emitting diodes (LEDs) during laser lift-off (LLO) process. The vertical GaN LED transferred onto Si substrate presented good electrical and optical properties due to the existence of high reflective mirror and texture surface. The chip size and dominant wavelength for vertical type LED are 40×40 mil2 and 450 nm. The optimal conditions of temperature and pressure for 2-inch wafer bonding are set of 200oC and 100 kg/inch2, respectively. The products yield of light output power, forward voltage and leakage current are 96 %, 96.4% and 61.2%, respectively. After aging test, the characteristics decay of light output power, forward voltage and leakage current are less than 4%. Summarization of optical and electrical properties, the total yield of these LEDs products is about 60 %.

  3. Enhancement emission intensity of CaMoO4 : Eu3+, Na+ phosphor via Bi co-doping and Si substitution for application to white LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, An; Yuan, Ximing; Hai, Shujie; Wang, Juanjuan; Wang, Fengxiang; Li, Liu

    2009-05-01

    Through the use of Bi as a co-activator and Si as a substituting element for the host lattice, red emitting Ca_{0.5}MoO_4\\,:\\,Eu^{3+}_{0.25-x} , Bi^{3+}_{x} , Na^{+}_{0.25} (x = 0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15 and 0.20) and Ca_{0.5}Mo_{1-y}Si_yO_4\\,:\\,Eu^{3+}_{0.25} , Na^{+}_{0.25} (y = 0.005, 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0.05) phosphors were synthesized by the conventional solid state reaction method, respectively. The photo-luminescent results show all samples can be excited efficiently by UV (396 nm) and blue (467 nm) light and emit red light at 615 nm with line spectra, which are coupled well with the characteristic emission from UVLED and blue LED, respectively. In the Eu3+-Bi3+ co-doped system, both Eu3+ f-f transition and Bi3+ CT transition absorptions are observed in the excitation spectra, the intensities of the main emission line (5D0 → 7F2 transition of Eu3+ at 615 nm) are strengthened because of the energy transition from Bi3+ to Eu3+. The introduction of Si4+ ions did not change the position of the peaks but enhanced the emission intensity of Eu3+ under 396 nm excitations. The results showed that the optimal doping concentration of Bi3+ ions and Si4+ ions was 1 mol%, respectively.

  4. A Portable, Low-Cost, LED Fluorimeter for Middle School, High School, and Undergraduate Chemistry Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigton, Benjamin T.; Chohan, Balwant S.; McDonald, Cole; Johnson, Matt; Schunk, Doug; Kreuter, Rod; Sykes, Dan

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost portable fluorimeter was constructed using a 360 nm LED for excitation and a silicon photodiode for detection. The instrument is simple to operate and has been used to investigate fluorescent whitening agents extracted from various brands of paper, to determine the linear range and limit of detection of quinine in various commercial…

  5. A Portable, Low-Cost, LED Fluorimeter for Middle School, High School, and Undergraduate Chemistry Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigton, Benjamin T.; Chohan, Balwant S.; McDonald, Cole; Johnson, Matt; Schunk, Doug; Kreuter, Rod; Sykes, Dan

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost portable fluorimeter was constructed using a 360 nm LED for excitation and a silicon photodiode for detection. The instrument is simple to operate and has been used to investigate fluorescent whitening agents extracted from various brands of paper, to determine the linear range and limit of detection of quinine in various commercial…

  6. High color rendering white light-emitting-diode illuminator using the red-emitting Eu(2+)-activated CaZnOS phosphors excited by blue LED.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Te-Wen; Liu, Wei-Ren; Chen, Teng-Ming

    2010-04-12

    A red phosphor CaZnOS:Eu(2+) was synthesized by solid state reaction and has been evaluated as a candidate for white LEDs. For this material, the XRD, PL, PL excitation (PLE) and diffuse reflection spectra have also been investigated. CaZnOS:Eu(2+) reveals a broad absorption band and good color purity. By utilizing a mixture of red-emitting CaZnOS:Eu(2+), green-emitting (Ba,Sr)(2)SiO(4):Eu(2+) and yellow-emitting Y(3)Al(5)O(12):Ce(3+) as light converters, an intense white InGaN-based blue-LED (~460 nm) was fabricated to exhibit a high color-rendering index Ra of 85 at a correlated color temperature of 4870 K. Based on the results, we are currently evaluating the potential application of CaZnOS:Eu(2+) as a red-emitting blue-chip convertible phosphor.

  7. Development of a High Irradiance LED Configuration for Small Field of View Motion Estimation of Fertilizer Particles

    PubMed Central

    Cool, Simon; Pieters, Jan G.; Mertens, Koen C.; Mora, Sergio; Cointault, Frédéric; Dubois, Julien; van de Gucht, Tim; Vangeyte, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Better characterization of the fertilizer spreading process, especially the fertilizer pattern distribution on the ground, requires an accurate measurement of individual particle properties and dynamics. Both 2D and 3D high speed imaging techniques have been developed for this purpose. To maximize the accuracy of the predictions, a specific illumination level is required. This paper describes the development of a high irradiance LED system for high speed motion estimation of fertilizer particles. A spectral sensitivity factor was used to select the optimal LED in relation to the used camera from a range of commercially available high power LEDs. A multiple objective genetic algorithm was used to find the optimal configuration of LEDs resulting in the most homogeneous irradiance in the target area. Simulations were carried out for different lenses and number of LEDs. The chosen configuration resulted in an average irradiance level of 452 W/m2 with coefficient of variation less than 2%. The algorithm proved superior and more flexible to other approaches reported in the literature and can be used for various other applications. PMID:26569261

  8. Development of a High Irradiance LED Configuration for Small Field of View Motion Estimation of Fertilizer Particles.

    PubMed

    Cool, Simon; Pieters, Jan G; Mertens, Koen C; Mora, Sergio; Cointault, Frédéric; Dubois, Julien; van de Gucht, Tim; Vangeyte, Jürgen

    2015-11-12

    Better characterization of the fertilizer spreading process, especially the fertilizer pattern distribution on the ground, requires an accurate measurement of individual particle properties and dynamics. Both 2D and 3D high speed imaging techniques have been developed for this purpose. To maximize the accuracy of the predictions, a specific illumination level is required. This paper describes the development of a high irradiance LED system for high speed motion estimation of fertilizer particles. A spectral sensitivity factor was used to select the optimal LED in relation to the used camera from a range of commercially available high power LEDs. A multiple objective genetic algorithm was used to find the optimal configuration of LEDs resulting in the most homogeneous irradiance in the target area. Simulations were carried out for different lenses and number of LEDs. The chosen configuration resulted in an average irradiance level of 452 W/m² with coefficient of variation less than 2%. The algorithm proved superior and more flexible to other approaches reported in the literature and can be used for various other applications.

  9. Ultra-High Intensity Proton Accelerators and their Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W. T.

    1997-12-31

    The science and technology of proton accelerators have progressed considerably in the past three decades. Three to four orders of magnitude increase in both peak intensity and average flux have made it possible to construct high intensity proton accelerators for modern applications, such as: spallation neutron sources, kaon factory, accelerator production of tritium, energy amplifier and muon collider drivers. The accelerator design focus switched over from intensity for synchrotrons, to brightness for colliders to halos for spallation sources. An overview of this tremendous progress in both accelerator science and technology is presented, with special emphasis on the new challenges of accelerator physics issues such as: H(-) injection, halo formation and reduction of losses.

  10. High-intensity interval versus moderate-intensity continuous training: Superior metabolic benefits in diet-induced obesity mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ningning; Liu, Yang; Ma, Yanan; Wen, Deliang

    2017-08-23

    Exercise is beneficial in obesity, however, the debate about the value of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) vs. moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) has been long lasting. Therefore, here we have compared the possible beneficial effects of two different exercise training regimes in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Following 7wk. on high fat diet (HFD), ten-week-old male ICR mice (n=30) were assigned to HIIT, distance-matched MICT or remained sedentary for the next 8 constitutive weeks while maintaining the dietary treatments. Age-matched sedentary mice with standard diet were used as a control (n=10). Exercise was performed on a motorized treadmill for 5days a week. Both modes of exercise ameliorated adiposity and related metabolic dysfunction induced by HFD and sedentary lifestyle, while mice following HIIT exhibited significantly lower body weight, percentage of fat mass and smaller adipocyte size. HIIT was more favorable in preventing liver lipid accumulation by restoring mRNA levels of genes involved in hepatic lipogenesis (SREBP1, ACC1, FAS) and β-oxidation (PPARα, CPT1a, HAD). In addition, HIIT was more efficient in mitigating adipose tissue inflammation and insulin insensitivity, partly dependent on abrogating phosphorylation of JNK/IRS1 (Ser307) pathway. Moreover, only HIIT led to pronounced beige adipocyte recruitment in inguinal subcutaneous adipose tissue. We conclude that HIIT contribute a more favorable regulation of metabolic dysfunctions in DIO mice compared with MICT. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Review of High-intensity Interval Training in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shigenori; Mizoguchi, Tatsuya; Saeki, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    For the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is required. This involves optimal medical therapy, education on nutrition and exercise therapy, and smoking cessation. Of these, efficient exercise therapy is a key factor. A highly effective training protocol is therefore warranted, which requires a high rate of compliance. Although moderate-intensity continuous training has been the main training regimen recommended in cardiac rehabilitation guidelines, high-intensity interval training has been reported to be more effective in the clinical and experimental setting from the standpoint of peak oxygen uptake and central and peripheral adaptations. In this review, we illustrate the scientific evidence for high-intensity interval training. We then verify this evidence and discuss its significance and the remaining issues.

  12. Glass light guides for color mixing of high-power LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paßlick, C.; Geyer, U.; Heßling, T.; Hellwig, A.; Hübner, M. C.

    2016-09-01

    Constant LED developments show increasing levels of luminous flux and power densities. In particular, automotive and entertainment industries are requesting mechanically and optically stable light guides for their new mid to highest-power lighting solutions. The switch from polymer to glass optics comes with improved temperature resistance, higher optical performance and better longevity of the systems [1, 2]. Even highest-power LEDs can be driven at maximum current obtaining best light output. The option of directly implementing micro structures on the output aperture of glass light guides gives the opportunity to customize final color mixing and light scattering over a wide range. This reduces the amount of required components and subsequently the total system costs.

  13. Semi-polar GaN materials technology for high IQE green LEDs.

    SciTech Connect

    Koleske, Daniel; Lee, Stephen Roger; Crawford, Mary H; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Fini, Paul

    2013-06-01

    The goal of this NETL funded program was to improve the IQE in green (and longer wavelength) nitride- based LEDs structures by using semi-polar GaN planar orientations for InGaN multiple quantum well (MQW) growth. These semi-polar orientations have the advantage of significantly reducing the piezoelectric fields that distort the QW band structure and decrease electron-hole overlap. In addition, semipolar surfaces potentially provide a more open surface bonding environment for indium incorporation, thus enabling higher indium concentrations in the InGaN MQW. The goal of the proposed work was to select the optimal semi-polar orientation and explore wafer miscuts around this orientation that produced the highest quantum efficiency LEDs. At the end of this program we had hoped to have MQWs active regions at 540 nm with an IQE of 50% and an EQE of 40%, which would be approximately twice the estimated current state-of-the-art.

  14. Quality engineering tools focused on high power LED driver design using boost power stages in switch mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ileana, Ioan; Risteiu, Mircea; Marc, Gheorghe

    2016-12-01

    This paper is a part of our research dedicated to high power LED lamps designing. The boost-up selected technology wants to meet driver producers' tendency in the frame of efficiency and disturbances constrains. In our work we used modeling and simulation tools for implementing scenarios of the driver work when some controlling functions are executed (output voltage/ current versus input voltage and fixed switching frequency, input and output electric power transfer versus switching frequency, transient inductor voltage analysis, and transient out capacitor analysis). Some electrical and thermal stress conditions are also analyzed. Based on these aspects, a high reliable power LED driver has been designed.

  15. High-speed phosphor-LED wireless communication system utilizing no blue filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, C. H.; Chow, C. W.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J.; Liu, Y. L.; Wu, Y. F.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose and investigate an adaptively 84.44 to 190 Mb/s phosphor-LED visible light communication (VLC) system at a practical transmission distance. Here, we utilize the orthogonal-frequency-division-multiplexing quadrature-amplitude-modulation (OFDM-QAM) modulation with power/bit-loading algorithm in proposed VLC system. In the experiment, the optimal analogy pre-equalization design is also performed at LED-Tx side and no blue filter is used at the Rx side for extending the modulation bandwidth from 1 MHz to 30 MHz. In addition, the corresponding free space transmission lengths are between 75 cm and 2 m under various data rates of proposed VLC. And the measured bit error rates (BERs) of < 3.8×10-3 [forward error correction (FEC) limit] at different transmission lengths and measured data rates can be also obtained. Finally, we believe that our proposed scheme could be another alternative VLC implementation in practical distance, supporting < 100 Mb/s, using commercially available LED and PD (without optical blue filtering) and compact size.

  16. High efficiency GaN-based LEDs and lasers on SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmond, John; Abare, Amber; Bergman, Mike; Bharathan, Jayesh; Lee Bunker, Kristin; Emerson, Dave; Haberern, Kevin; Ibbetson, James; Leung, Michael; Russel, Phil; Slater, David

    2004-12-01

    Group III-nitride layers have been grown via metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) on single crystal-silicon carbide (SiC) substrates and fabricated into light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs). Deep ultraviolet (UV) LEDs from 321 to 343 nm operating at 20 mA and 4.1 V exhibit an output of 0.2-2.9 mW, respectively, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 0.26-4.0%. In the visible spectrum, an EQE of ˜47% was achieved in the blue at 455-460 nm corresponding to an output of 25.5 mW at 20 mA and 3.1 V. The value of EQE decreased to ˜30% at 395 nm (violet) and ˜22% at 535 nm (green). Interaction between defects and charge carriers is speculated to dominate the radiative recombination process at shorter wavelengths (<˜440 nm) whereas evidence is presented that piezoelectric polarization dominates at longer wavelengths, predominantly in the green. White LEDs have been fabricated using 24 mW blue chips via phosphor excitation and exhibit luminous efficacies of 78 lumens/W, which is considerably more efficient than standard incandescent bulbs. Continuous-wave (CW) LD operation from 348-410 nm, and pulsed operation as short as 343 nm were achieved.

  17. Degradation of blue AlGaN/InGaN/GaN LEDs subjected to high current pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, D.L.; Zeller, J.; Phillips, B.S.; Chiu, P.C.; Askar, S.; Lee, D.S.; Osinski, M.; Malloy, K.J.

    1994-12-31

    Short-wavelength, visible-light emitting optoelectronic devices are needed for a wide range of commercial applications, including high-density optical data storage, full-color displays, and underwater communications. In 1994, high-brightness blue LEDs based on gallium nitride and related compounds (InGaN/AlGaN) were introduced by Nichia Chemical Industries. The Nichia diodes are 100 times brighter than the previously available SiC blue LEDs. Group-III nitrides combine a wide, direct bandgap with refractory properties and high physical strength. So far, no studies of degradation of GaN based LEDs have been reported. The authors study, reported in this paper, focuses on the performance of GaN LEDs under high electrical stress conditions. Their observations indicate that, in spite of a high defect density, which normally would have been fatal to other III-V devices, defects in group-III nitrides are not mobile even under high electrical stress. Defect tubes, however, can offer a preferential path for contact metals to electromigrate towards the p-n junction, eventually resulting in a short. The proposed mechanism of GaN diode degradation raises concern for prospects of reliable lasers in the group-III nitrides grown on sapphire.

  18. High-Power, High-Intensity Laser Propagation and Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-10

    for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data...paccel NqzE  / . The accelerating gradient accelE is proportional to IN p~ , where   /ÊcI  is the intensity, and can be ~ 10 3 times ...Lpgp g ph zzzz z z     , (9) where  z g zdzt  )’(v/’ is the time measured in the frame of the pulse with group velocity )(v zg and L

  19. High efficiency GaN-based LEDs: light extraction by photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, A.

    2006-11-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN)-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are seen as promising candidates for the replacement of conventional light sources by all-solid state lighting. However, their efficiency is currently limited by the difficulty of extracting the light emitted within the LED, which is mostly trapped in the material by total internal reflection. This book explores the use of photonic crystals (PhCs) to increase light extraction in a deterministic fashion. PhCs act as bi-dimensional diffraction gratings which extract guided light from the LED. However, the peculiarities of GaN epitaxial layers make the optimization of such structures challenging. In particular, it turns out that the vertical structure of the LED has to be engineered so that all of the guided light may interact efficiently with the photonic crystal. Various implementations of such LEDs are proposed, modeled (by 3D methods), fabricated and characterized. Diodes GaN à haute efficacité: extraction de la lumière par cristaux photoniques. Les diodes électro-luminescentes à base de nitrure de gallium (GaN) ont le potentiel de remplacer les sources d'éclairage conventionnel en offrant des économies d'énergie considérables. Toutefois, leur efficacité est actuellement limitée par le problème de l'extraction de la lumière émise dans la diode, dont une grande partie reste piégée dans le matériau par réflexion totale interne. Cet ouvrage explore l'emploi de cristaux photoniques (PhC) pour augmenter l'extraction de la lumière de façon déterministe. Les PhC sont ici employés comme réseau de diffraction à deux dimensions afin d'extraire la lumière guidée hors de la diode. Les caractéristiques des couches épitaxiées de GaN rendent toutefois l'optimisation de telles structures difficile. Notamment, il apparaît que la structure verticale de la diode doit être adaptée pour que toute la lumière guidée puisse interagir efficacement avec les cristaux photoniques. Diverses impl

  20. H- Ion Sources for High Intensity Proton Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland Paul; Dudnikov, Vadim

    2015-02-20

    Existing RF Surface Plasma Sources (SPS) for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H+ and H- ion generation around 3 to 5 mA/cm2 per kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) SPS described here was developed to improve H- ion production efficiency, reliability and availability for pulsed operation as used in the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source . At low RF power, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm2 per kW of RF power at 13.56 MHz. Initial cesiation of the SPS was performed by heating cesium chromate cartridges by discharge as was done in the very first versions of the SPS. A small oven to decompose cesium compounds and alloys was developed and tested. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power 1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with 4 kW RF power in the plasma and 250 Gauss longitudinal magnetic field. The ratio of electron current to negative ion current was improved from 30 to 2. Stable generation of H- beam without intensity degradation was demonstrated in the aluminum nitride (AlN) discharge chamber for 32 days at high discharge power in an RF SPS with an external antenna. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. The extracted collector current can be increased significantly by optimizing the longitudinal magnetic field in the discharge chamber. While this project demonstrated the advantages of the pulsed version of the SA RF SPS as an upgrade to the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source, it led to a possibility for upgrades to CW machines like the many cyclotrons used for commercial applications. Four appendices contain important details of the work carried out under this grant.

  1. High Intensity Interval Training for Maximizing Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Trine; Aamot, Inger-Lise; Haykowsky, Mark; Rognmo, Øivind

    2017-04-03

    Regular physical activity and exercise training are important actions to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and maintain health throughout life. There is solid evidence that exercise is an effective preventative strategy against at least 25 medical conditions, including cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, colon and breast cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Traditionally, endurance exercise training (ET) to improve health related outcomes has consisted of low- to moderate ET intensity. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that higher exercise intensities may be superior to moderate intensity for maximizing health outcomes. The primary objective of this review is to discuss how aerobic high-intensity interval training (HIIT) as compared to moderate continuous training may maximize outcomes, and to provide practical advices for successful clinical and home-based HIIT.

  2. Acoustic intensity near a high-powered military jet aircraft.

    PubMed

    Stout, Trevor A; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Wall, Alan T; James, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    The spatial variation in vector acoustic intensity has been calculated between 100 and 3000 Hz near a high-performance military aircraft. With one engine of a tethered F-22A Raptor operating at military power, a tetrahedral intensity probe was moved to 27 locations in the geometric near and mid-fields to obtain the frequency-dependent intensity vector field. The angles of the maximum intensity region rotate from aft to sideline with increasing frequency, becoming less directional above 800 Hz. Between 100 and 400 Hz, which are principal radiation frequencies, the ray-traced dominant source region rapidly contracts and moves upstream, approaching nearly constant behavior by 1000 Hz.

  3. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.

    1993-11-01

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics. Issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. The author discusses in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of the discussion is inspired by the problems that were encountered and the useful things learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is the work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  4. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M. )

    1994-10-10

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics, issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. I will discuss in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of our discussion is inspired by the problems we have encountered and the useful things we have learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is our work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  5. Response of graphene to femtosecond high-intensity laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Adam; Cormode, Daniel; Reynolds, Collin; Newhouse-Illige, Ty; LeRoy, Brian J.; Sandhu, Arvinder S.

    2011-08-01

    We study the response of graphene to high-intensity, 50-femtosecond laser pulse excitation. We establish that graphene has a high ({approx}3 x 10{sup 12} Wcm{sup -2}) single-shot damage threshold. Above this threshold, a single laser pulse cleanly ablates graphene, leaving microscopically defined edges. Below this threshold, we observe laser-induced defect formation leading to degradation of the lattice over multiple exposures. We identify the lattice modification processes through in-situ Raman microscopy. The effective lifetime of chemical vapor deposition grown graphene under femtosecond near-infrared irradiation and its dependence on laser intensity is determined. These results also define the limits of non-linear applications of graphene in femtosecond high-intensity regime.

  6. Analysis of high intensity activity in Premier League soccer.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, V; Gregson, W; Atkinson, G; Tordoff, P; Drust, B

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to provide a detailed analysis of the high intensity running activity completed by elite soccer players during match-play. A further aim of the study was to evaluate the importance of high intensity running activity to overall team success. Observations on individual match performance measures were undertaken on 563 outfield players (median of 8 games per player; range=1-57) competing in the English Premier League from 2003/2004 to 2005/2006 using a computerised tracking system (Prozone, Leeds, England). High intensity activities selected for analysis included total high intensity running distance (THIR), total sprint distance (TSD) and the number and type of sprints undertaken. Total high intensity running distance in possession and without possession of the ball was also analysed. The THIR was dependant upon playing position with wide midfield (1,049+/-106 m) and central defenders (681+/-128 m) completing the highest and lowest distance respectively (p<0.001). High intensity activity was also related to team success with teams finishing in the bottom five (919+/-128 m) and middle ten (917+/-143 m) league positions completing significantly more THIR compared with teams in the top five (885+/-113 m) (p=0.003). The THIR and TSD also significantly declined during the 2nd half with the greatest decrements observed in wide midfield and attacking players (p<0.05). Both positional differences in high intensity activity and the observed change in activity throughout the game were also influenced by team success (p<0.05). The results of the present study indicate that high intensity activity in elite soccer match-play is influenced by both playing position and previous activity in the game. These activity patterns are also dependant upon success of the team. This may indicate that overall technical and tactical effectiveness of the team rather than high levels of physical performance per se are more important in determining success

  7. A novel banded structure ceramic phosphor for high-power white LEDs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Yun; Luo, Zhao-Hua; Jiang, Hao-Chuan; Jiang, Jun; Chen, Chun-Hua; Zhang, Jing-Xian; Gui, Zhen-Zhen

    2017-06-20

    A novel banded structure ceramic phosphor has been fabricated in this research. This structure provides a convenient and effective method for regulating the full spectrum. It has the advantage of being able to adjust the intensity of all three primary colors independently, regardless of the mutual absorption among different active ions.

  8. Color tunable hybrid lamp: LED-incandescent and LED-fluorescent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Ivan

    2007-03-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) can be chosen to emit light in a wide variety of highly saturated colors. As a consequence, a hybrid lamp assembled with colored LEDs and with one incandescent or fluorescent source easily allows the user to dynamically select the desired color point without additional filters, with high color rendering index, and at a low cost. We measure some properties of a color tunable lamp that uses both colored LEDs and an incandescent or a fluorescent source. For the LED-incandescent type, we assemble an array of blue LEDs with a typical incandescent bulb source, and to assemble a LED-fluorescent type we used an array of red LEDs with a commercially available compact fluorescent lamp. Incandescent and fluorescent sources have a fixed intensity, while LED intensities are adjusted to tune color. For LED-incandescent lamps, our experimental data show that the correlated color temperature (CCT) can be linearly tuned with the electric current of the LED array. The LED-fluorescent lamp exhibits a CCT that exponentially varies with the drive current of red LEDs.

  9. On the high intensity aspects of AGS Booster proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Bleser, E.J.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Roser, T.; Shoji, Y.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-06-01

    Observations of high intensity effects on the proton performance of the AGS Booster are presented, including present operational limits and correction methods. The transverse emittances, optimum tune working points, damping of coherent transverse oscillations and correction of stopband resonances through third-order are discussed in addition to the observed tune spread due to space charge forces. The initial longitudinal phase space distribution, capture and acceleration parameters and measurements are also given. Operational tools and strategies relevant to the high intensity setup are mentioned.

  10. On the high intensity aspects of AGS Booster proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Bleser, E.J.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Roser, T.; Shoji, Y.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-01-01

    Observations of high intensity effects on the proton performance of the AGS Booster are presented, including present operational limits and correction methods. The transverse emittances, optimum tune working points, damping of coherent transverse oscillations and correction of stopband resonances through third-order are discussed in addition to the observed tune spread due to space charge forces. The initial longitudinal phase space distribution, capture and acceleration parameters and measurements are also given. Operational tools and strategies relevant to the high intensity setup are mentioned.

  11. High-intensity subpicosecond vacuum ultraviolet laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubodera, Shoichi; Kaku, Masanori; Taniguchi, Yuta; Katto, Masahito; Yokotani, Atsushi; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Mima, Kunioki

    2008-02-01

    We have been developing an ultrashort-pulse high-intensity vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser. Ultrashort VUV pulses at 126 nm have been produced in rare-gases by nonlinear wavelength conversion of an infrared Ti:sapphire laser at 882 nm. This pulse will be amplified inside an Ar II* amplifier excited by optical-field-induced ionization electrons. The amplification characteristics of the Ar II* amplifier has been improved by plasma channeling induced by a high-intensity plasma-initiating laser.

  12. Axion-like-particle search with high-intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döbrich, Babette; Gies, Holger

    2010-10-01

    We study ALP -photon-conversion within strong inhomogeneous electromagnetic fields as provided by contemporary high-intensity laser systems. We observe that probe photons traversing the focal spot of a superposition of Gaussian beams of a single high-intensity laser at fundamental and frequency-doubled mode can experience a frequency shift due to their intermittent propagation as axion-like-particles. This process is strongly peaked for resonant masses on the order of the involved laser frequencies. Purely laser-based experiments in optical setups are sensitive to ALPs in the eV mass range and can thus complement ALP searches at dipole magnets.

  13. Computational Simulations of High Intensity X-Ray Matter Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    London, R A; Rionta, R; Tatchyn, R; Roessler, S

    2001-08-02

    Free electron lasers have the promise of producing extremely high-intensity short pulses of coherent, monochromatic radiation in the 1-10 keV energy range. For example, the Linac Coherent Light Source at Stanford is being designed to produce an output intensity of 2 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} in a 230 fs pulse. These sources will open the door to many novel research studies. However, the intense x-ray pulses may damage the optical components necessary for studying and controlling the output. At the full output intensity, the dose to optical components at normal incidence ranges from 1-10 eV/atom for low-Z materials (Z < 14) at photon energies of 1 keV. It is important to have an understanding of the effects of such high doses in order to specify the composition, placement, and orientation of optical components, such as mirrors and monochromators. Doses of 10 eV/atom are certainly unacceptable since they will lead to ablation of the surface of the optical components. However, it is not precisely known what the damage thresholds are for the materials being considered for optical components for x-ray free electron lasers. In this paper, we present analytic estimates and computational simulations of the effects of high-intensity x-ray pulses on materials. We outline guidelines for the maximum dose to various materials and discuss implications for the design of optical components.

  14. Ion source and injection line for high intensity medical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, XianLu Guan, Fengping; Yao, Hongjuan; Zhang, TianJue; Yang, Jianjun; Song, Guofang; Ge, Tao; Qin, Jiuchang

    2014-02-15

    A 14 MeV high intensity compact cyclotron, CYCIAE-14, was built at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). An injection system based on the external H− ion source was used on CYCIAE-14 so as to provide high intensity beam, while most positron emission tomography cyclotrons adopt internal ion source. A beam intensity of 100 μA/14 MeV was extracted from the cyclotron with a small multi-cusp H− ion source (CIAE-CH-I type) and a short injection line, which the H− ion source of 3 mA/25 keV H− beam with emittance of 0.3π mm mrad and the injection line of with only 1.2 m from the extraction of ion source to the medial plane of the cyclotron. To increase the extracted beam intensity of the cyclotron, a new ion source (CIAE-CH-II type) of 9.1 mA was used, with maximum of 500 μA was achieved from the cyclotron. The design and test results of the ion source and injection line optimized for high intensity acceleration will be given in this paper.

  15. Light-intensity and high-intensity interval training improve cardiometabolic health in rats.

    PubMed

    Batacan, Romeo B; Duncan, Mitch J; Dalbo, Vincent J; Connolly, Kylie J; Fenning, Andrew S

    2016-09-01

    Physical activity has the potential to reduce cardiometabolic risk factors but evaluation of different intensities of physical activity and the mechanisms behind their health effects still need to be fully established. This study examined the effects of sedentary behaviour, light-intensity training, and high-intensity interval training on biometric indices, glucose and lipid metabolism, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, and vascular and cardiac function in adult rats. Rats (12 weeks old) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: control (CTL; no exercise), sedentary (SED; no exercise and housed in small cages to reduce activity), light-intensity trained (LIT; four 30-min exercise bouts/day at 8 m/min separated by 2-h rest period, 5 days/week), and high-intensity interval trained (HIIT, four 2.5-min work bouts/day at 50 m/min separated by 3-min rest periods, 5 days/week). After 12 weeks of intervention, SED had greater visceral fat accumulation (p < 0.01) and slower cardiac conduction (p = 0.04) compared with the CTL group. LIT and HIIT demonstrated beneficial changes in body weight, visceral and epididymal fat weight, glucose regulation, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and mesenteric vessel contractile response compared with the CTL group (p < 0.05). LIT had significant improvements in insulin sensitivity and cardiac conduction compared with the CTL and SED groups whilst HIIT had significant improvements in systolic blood pressure and endothelium-independent vasodilation to aorta and mesenteric artery compared with the CTL group (p < 0.05). LIT and HIIT induce health benefits by improving traditional cardiometabolic risk factors. LIT improves cardiac health while HIIT promotes improvements in vascular health.

  16. Validation of the Amsterdam Dynamic Facial Expression Set – Bath Intensity Variations (ADFES-BIV): A Set of Videos Expressing Low, Intermediate, and High Intensity Emotions

    PubMed Central

    Wingenbach, Tanja S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the existing sets of facial expressions of emotion contain static photographs. While increasing demand for stimuli with enhanced ecological validity in facial emotion recognition research has led to the development of video stimuli, these typically involve full-blown (apex) expressions. However, variations of intensity in emotional facial expressions occur in real life social interactions, with low intensity expressions of emotions frequently occurring. The current study therefore developed and validated a set of video stimuli portraying three levels of intensity of emotional expressions, from low to high intensity. The videos were adapted from the Amsterdam Dynamic Facial Expression Set (ADFES) and termed the Bath Intensity Variations (ADFES-BIV). A healthy sample of 92 people recruited from the University of Bath community (41 male, 51 female) completed a facial emotion recognition task including expressions of 6 basic emotions (anger, happiness, disgust, fear, surprise, sadness) and 3 complex emotions (contempt, embarrassment, pride) that were expressed at three different intensities of expression and neutral. Accuracy scores (raw and unbiased (Hu) hit rates) were calculated, as well as response times. Accuracy rates above chance level of responding were found for all emotion categories, producing an overall raw hit rate of 69% for the ADFES-BIV. The three intensity levels were validated as distinct categories, with higher accuracies and faster responses to high intensity expressions than intermediate intensity expressions, which had higher accuracies and faster responses than low intensity expressions. To further validate the intensities, a second study with standardised display times was conducted replicating this pattern. The ADFES-BIV has greater ecological validity than many other emotion stimulus sets and allows for versatile applications in emotion research. It can be retrieved free of charge for research purposes from the corresponding author

  17. [Treatment of uterine fibroids using high-intensity ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Pessarrodona, Antoni; Isern, Jordi; Rodríguez, Jordi; Vallejo, Elena; Cassado, Jordi

    2013-07-01

    High-intensity ultrasound surgery is being actively introduced as an alternative treatment to conventional surgery for uterine fibroids. Numerous studies have shown that high-intensity ultrasound surgery is a safe and effective treatment, with fewer side effects than fibroidectomy and hysterectomy, and is cost-effective. It is now possible to offer this alternative therapy to patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids. We describe the technical basis of ultrasound surgery, the pretherapy selection of patients, the limiting factors and the risks of high-intensity ultrasound therapy. We describe our unit's clinical experience with 319 patients treated in an outpatient regimen, which resulted in a high rate of success (81%) and an acceptable rate of mild complications, as well as a virtually immediate return to daily activities. We comment on the follow-up of pregnancies that occurred after treatment with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) with no side effects attributable to the therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    She, W H; Cheung, T T; Jenkins, C R; Irwin, M G

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound has been developed for therapeutic use in addition to its diagnostic ability. The use of focused ultrasound energy can offer a non-invasive method for tissue ablation, and can therefore be used to treat various solid tumours. High-intensity focused ultrasound is being increasingly used in the treatment of both primary and metastatic tumours as these can be precisely located for ablation. It has been shown to be particularly useful in the treatment of uterine fibroids, and various solid tumours including those of the pancreas and liver. High-intensity focused ultrasound is a valid treatment option for liver tumours in patients with significant medical co-morbidity who are at high risk for surgery or who have relatively poor liver function that may preclude hepatectomy. It has also been used as a form of bridging therapy while patients awaiting cadaveric donor liver transplantation. In this article, we outline the principles of high-intensity focused ultrasound and its clinical applications, including the management protocol development in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in Hong Kong by performing a search on MEDLINE (OVID), EMBASE, and PubMed. The search of these databases ranged from the date of their establishment until December 2015. The search terms used were: high-intensity focused ultrasound, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, liver tumour, hepatocellular carcinoma, pancreas, renal cell carcinoma, prostate cancer, breast cancer, fibroids, bone tumour, atrial fibrillation, glaucoma, Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and neuropathic pain.

  19. Thomson scattering in high-intensity chirped laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Holkundkar, Amol R.; Harvey, Chris Marklund, Mattias

    2015-10-15

    We consider the Thomson scattering of an electron in an ultra-intense laser pulse. It is well known that at high laser intensities, the frequency and brilliance of the emitted radiation will be greatly reduced due to the electron losing energy before it reaches the peak field. In this work, we investigate the use of a small frequency chirp in the laser pulse in order to mitigate this effect of radiation reaction. It is found that the introduction of a negative chirp means the electron enters a high frequency region of the field while it still has a large proportion of its original energy. This results in a significant enhancement of the frequency and intensity of the emitted radiation as compared to the case without chirping.

  20. High intensity performance and upgrades at the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, T.

    1998-12-01

    The high intensity proton beam of the AGS is used both for the slow-extracted-beam (SEB) area with many target station to produce secondary beams and the fast-extracted-beam (FEB) line used for the production of muons for the g-2 experiment and for high intensity target testing for the spallation neutron sources and muon production targets for the muon collider. The same FEB line will also be used for the transfer of beam to RHIC. The proton beam intensity in the AGS has increased steadily over the 35 year existence of the AGS, but the most dramatic increase occurred over the last couple of years with the addition of the new AGS Booster. All modifications associated with this are discussed.

  1. Short-pulse, high-intensity lasers at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Roberts, J.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Fulton, R.D.; Kyrala, G.A.; Schappert, G.T.

    1994-03-01

    Advances in ultrafast lasers and optical amplifiers have spurred the development of terawatt-class laser systems capable of delivering focal spot intensities approaching 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. At these extremely high intensities, the optical field strength is more than twenty times larger than the Bohr electric field, permitting investigations of the optical properties of matter in a previously unexplored regime. The authors describe two laser systems for high intensity laser interaction experiments: The first is a terawatt system based on amplification of femtosecond pulses in XeCl which yields 250 mJ in 275 fs and routinely produces intensifies on target in excess of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. The second system is based on chirped pulse amplification of 100-fs pulses in Ti:sapphire.

  2. Plasma-based polarization modulator for high-intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Pukhov, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Manipulation of laser pulses at high intensities is an important yet challenging issue. New types of plasma-based optical devices are promising alternatives to achieve this goal. Here we propose to modulate the polarization state of intense lasers based on oblique reflection from solid-plasma surfaces. A new analytical description is presented considering the plasma as an uniaxial medium that causes birefringence effect. Particle-in-cell simulation results numerically demonstrate that such a scheme can provide a tunable polarization control of the laser pulses even in the relativistic regime. The results are thus relevant for the design of compact, easy to use, and versatile polarization modulators for high-intensity laser pulses.

  3. Self-trapping of intensities changing under SHG and SWG for high intensive femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Kharitonov, Dmitry M.; Fedotov, Mikhail V.

    2017-05-01

    SHG and SFG (SWG) and THG are used widely in many practical applications such as a substance diagnostics, and imaging of various physical, chemical and biological processes as well as for laser radiation frequency conversion. One of very interesting phenomena under the frequency conversion takes place if a basic wave incident intensity is enough high: a synchronic mode of the laser pulse intensities changing along a propagation coordinate appears under certain conditions. First of all, we investigate this phenomenon using the frame-work of long pulse duration approximation and plane wave approximation without applying the basic wave energy non-depletion approximation. Applying an original approach we derive the solution of Schr¨odinger equations describing the THG via a SHG process and summary frequency wave generation (SFG) process for femtosecond pulses. Among many modes of the frequency conversion process under consideration we found out analytically the mode corresponding to synchronous intensities changing for the interacting waves. We derive conditions of such mode realization in dependence of the problem parameters. After that we verify our analytical consideration using a computer simulation of the problem on the base of the corresponding Schr¨odinger equations. Computer simulation shown also a new phenomenon at three-wave interaction: interacting wave intensities changing with two (or more) oscillation periods.

  4. High-speed height measurement by a light-source-stepping method using a linear LED array.

    PubMed

    Fujigaki, Motoharu; Oura, Yohei; Asai, Daisuke; Murata, Yorinobu

    2013-10-07

    High-speed height measurement is required in industrial fields for analyzing the behavior of a breaking object, a vibrating object or a rotating object. A shape measurement performed using a phase-shifting method can measure the shape with high spatial resolution because the coordinates can be obtained pixel by pixel. A light-source-stepping method (LSSM) that uses a linear LED array by means of a whole-space tabulation method (WSTM) has been proposed. Accurate shape measurement can be performed using this method. The response speed of the LED array is greater than 12 kHz. In this paper, height measurement is performed using WSTM and LSSM with a linear LED array and a high-speed camera. It was verified that the response speed of the linear LED is greater than 200 kHz. The phase shifting was performed at 12 kHz, and the height measurement of the vibrating woofer was performed at 4 kHz using a 3-step phase-shifting method.

  5. Tolerable Beam Loss at High-Intensity Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Oleg E. Krivosheev, Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2000-08-28

    Tolerable beam losses are estimated for high-intensity ring accelerators with proton energy of 3 to 16 GeV. Dependence on beam energy, lattice and magnet geometry is studied via full Monte Carlo MARS14 simulations in lattice elements, shielding, tunnel and surrounding dirt with realistic geometry, materials and magnetic fields.

  6. The classical theory of dispersion of high-intensity light

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, S.A.

    1995-08-01

    The dependence of the nonlinear refractive index of an optical medium on the optical wave frequency in the classical theory of dispersion of high-intensity light is shown to have the same form as in the quantum theory if a structural unit of substance in the Lorentz model is considered as two parametrically coupled nonlinear oscillators rather than one oscillator. 13 refs.

  7. Risking Intensity: Reading and Writing Poetry with High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, Judith Rowe

    Aimed at junior and senior high school teachers and artists in residence, this book urges teachers and students to read and write poetry "as though their lives depended upon it," and to breathe life into classroom writing traditions that are not hands-on or intense. Each chapter is set in the classroom. Poems by students and teacher illustrate…

  8. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Liska, D.J.; Schamaun, R.G.; Clark, D.C.; Potter, R.C.; Frank, J.A.

    1980-03-11

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  9. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Liska, Donald J.; Schamaun, Roger G.; Clark, Donald C.; Potter, R. Christopher; Frank, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  10. High-intensity and resistance training and elite young athletes.

    PubMed

    Ratel, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Although in the past resistance and high-intensity exercise training among young children was the subject of numerous controversies, it is now well-documented that this training mode is a safe and effective means of developing maximal strength, maximal power output and athletic performance in youth, provided that exercises are performed with appropriate supervision and precautions. Muscular strength and power output values measured from vertical jump and Wingate anaerobic tests are higher in elite than in non-elite young athletes and normal children, and the specific training effects on maximal power output normalised for body size are clearly more distinct before puberty. At present, there is no scientific evidence to support the view that high-intensity and/or resistance training might hinder growth and maturation in young children. Pre-pubertal growth is not adversely affected by sport at a competitive level and anthropometric factors are of importance for choice of sport in children. However, coaches, teachers and parents should be aware that unsupervised high-intensity and resistance training programmes involving maximal loads or too frequently repeated resistance exercises increase the risk of injury. Resistance training alone is an effective additional means of developing athletic performance throughout planned youth sports training programmes. Strategies for enhancing the effectiveness and safety of youth resistance and high-intensity exercise training are discussed in this chapter.

  11. Reuse Recycler: High Intensity Proton Stacking at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.

    2016-07-17

    After a successful career as an antiproton storage and cooling ring, Recycler has been converted to a high intensity proton stacker for the Main Injector. We discuss the commissioning and operation of the Recycler in this new role, and the progress towards the 700 kW design goal.

  12. Critical design issues of high intensity proton linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.P.

    1994-08-01

    Medium-energy proton linear accelerators are being studied as drivers for spallation applications requiring large amounts of beam powder. Important design factors for such high-intensity linacs are reviewed, and issues and concerns specific to this unprecedented power regime are discussed.

  13. Nonlinear behavior in high-intensity discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Bernd; Schwieger, Joerg; Wolff, Marcus; Manders, Freddy; Suijker, Jos

    2016-06-01

    The light flicker problem of high intensity discharge lamps is studied numerically and experimentally. It is shown that in some respects the systems behave very similar to the forced Duffing oscillator with a softening spring. In particular, the jump phenomenon and hysteresis are observed in the simulations and in the experiments.

  14. The Worker Three Months after High Intensity Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadeau, Richard P.

    A study of the long-range effects of high-intensity training (HIT) was conducted in 13 different programs in eight companies in Baltimore. A total of 99 HIT trainees were interviewed three months after completing the training. After three months the trainees were examined for higher salaries and higher skill levels. HIT appeared to have a positive…

  15. High-Intensity Interval Training for Improving Postprandial Hyperglycemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Jonathan P.; Francois, Monique E.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has garnered attention in recent years as a time-efficient exercise option for improving cardiovascular and metabolic health. New research demonstrates that HIIT may be particularly effective for improving postprandial hyperglycemia in individuals with, or at risk for, type 2 diabetes (T2D). These findings…

  16. Evidence based exercise - clinical benefits of high intensity interval training.

    PubMed

    Shiraev, Tim; Barclay, Gabriella

    2012-12-01

    Aerobic exercise has a marked impact on cardiovascular disease risk. Benefits include improved serum lipid profiles, blood pressure and inflammatory markers as well as reduced risk of stroke, acute coronary syndrome and overall cardiovascular mortality. Most exercise programs prescribed for fat reduction involve continuous, moderate aerobic exercise, as per Australian Heart Foundation clinical guidelines. This article describes the benefits of exercise for patients with cardiovascular and metabolic disease and details the numerous benefits of high intensity interval training (HIIT) in particular. Aerobic exercise has numerous benefits for high-risk populations and such benefits, especially weight loss, are amplified with HIIT. High intensity interval training involves repeatedly exercising at a high intensity for 30 seconds to several minutes, separated by 1-5 minutes of recovery (either no or low intensity exercise). HIT is associated with increased patient compliance and improved cardiovascular and metabolic outcomes and is suitable for implementation in both healthy and 'at risk' populations. Importantly, as some types of exercise are contraindicated in certain patient populations and HIIT is a complex concept for those unfamiliar to exercise, some patients may require specific assessment or instruction before commencing a HIIT program.

  17. High-Intensity Interval Training for Improving Postprandial Hyperglycemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Jonathan P.; Francois, Monique E.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has garnered attention in recent years as a time-efficient exercise option for improving cardiovascular and metabolic health. New research demonstrates that HIIT may be particularly effective for improving postprandial hyperglycemia in individuals with, or at risk for, type 2 diabetes (T2D). These findings…

  18. Potential Causes of Elevated REE following High-Intensity Exercise.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gary R; Moellering, Douglas R; Carter, Stephen J; Gower, Barbara A; Bamman, Marcas M; Hornbuckle, Lyndsey M; Plaisance, Eric P; Fisher, Gordon

    2017-07-21

    Resting energy expenditure (REE) increases following intense exercise; however, little is known concerning mechanisms. Determine effects of a single bout of moderate-intensity continuous aerobic exercise (MIC), or high intensity interval exercise (HII) on REE under energy balance conditions. Thirty-three untrained premenopausal women were evaluated at baseline, after 8-16 weeks of training, 22 hours following either MIC (50% peak VO2) or HII (84% peak VO2). Participants were in a room calorimeter during and following the exercise challenge. Food intake was adjusted to obtain energy balance across 23 hours. REE was measured after 22 hours following all conditions. Twenty-three hour urine norepinephrine concentration and serum creatine kinase activity (CrKact) were obtained. Muscle biopsies were obtained in a subset of 15 participants to examine muscle mitochondrial state 2, 3, and 4 fat oxidation. REE was increased 22 hours following MIC (64±119 kcal) and HII (103±137 kcal). Markers of muscle damage (CrKact) increased following HII (9.6±25.5 units/liter) and MIC (22.2±22.8 units/liter) while sympathetic tone (urine norepinephrine) increased following HII (1.1±10.6 ng/mg). Uncoupled phosphorylation (states 2 and 4) fat oxidation were related to REE (respectively r=0.65 and r=0.55); however, neither state 2 or 4 fat oxidation increased following MIC or HII. REE was not increased following 8 weeks of aerobic training when exercise was restrained for 60 hours. Under energy balance conditions REE increased 22 hours following both moderate intensity and high intensity exercise. Exercise-induced muscle damage/repair and increased sympathetic tone may contribute to increased REE whereas uncoupled phosphorylation does not. These results suggest that moderate to high intensity exercise may be valuable for increasing energy expenditure for at least 22 hours following the exercise.

  19. Accurate colorimetric feedback for RGB LED clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Kwong; Ashdown, Ian

    2006-08-01

    We present an empirical model of LED emission spectra that is applicable to both InGaN and AlInGaP high-flux LEDs, and which accurately predicts their relative spectral power distributions over a wide range of LED junction temperatures. We further demonstrate with laboratory measurements that changes in LED spectral power distribution with temperature can be accurately predicted with first- or second-order equations. This provides the basis for a real-time colorimetric feedback system for RGB LED clusters that can maintain the chromaticity of white light at constant intensity to within +/-0.003 Δuv over a range of 45 degrees Celsius, and to within 0.01 Δuv when dimmed over an intensity range of 10:1.

  20. High intensity proton operation at the Brookhaven AGS accelerator complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, L.A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bleser, E.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Onillon, E.; Reece, R.K.; Roser, T.; Soukas, A.

    1994-08-01

    With the completion of the AGS rf upgrade, and the implementation of a transition {open_quotes}jump{close_quotes}, all of accelerator systems were in place in 1994 to allow acceleration of the proton intensity available from the AGS Booster injector to AGS extraction energy and delivery to the high energy users. Beam commissioning results with these new systems are presented. Progress in identifying and overcoming other obstacles to higher intensity are given. These include a careful exploration of the stopband strengths present on the AGS injection magnetic porch, and implementation of the AGS single bunch transverse dampers throughout the acceleration cycle.

  1. Employing low-temperature barriers to achieve strain-relaxed and high-performance GaN-based LEDs.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhiting; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Wenliang; Lin, Yunhao; Yang, Meijuan; Chen, Shuqi; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-05-30

    The epitaxial structure design of low-temperature barriers has been adopted to promote strain relaxation in multiple quantum well (MQWs) and achieve high-efficient GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). With these barriers, the relaxation value of wells increases from 0 to 4.59%. The strain-relaxed mechanism of low-temperature barriers is also discussed. The LED chip with the barriers grown at the TMIn flow of 75 sccm and the growth temperature of 830 °C has an optimal strain relaxation value of 1.53% in wells, and exhibits the largest light output power of 63.83 mW at the injection current of 65 mA, which is higher than that of conventional LED (51.89 mW) by 23%. In-depth studies reveal that the optimal low-temperature barriers remarkably promote the strain relaxation in wells without forming large density of crystalline defects. This achievement of high-efficiency LEDs sheds light on the future solid-state lighting applications.

  2. LED Update

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Mark L.; Gordon, Kelly L.

    2006-09-01

    This article, which will appear in RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING MAGAZINE, interviews PNNL's Kelly Gordon and presents the interview in question and answer format. The topic is a light emitting diode (LED) lighting also known as solid state lighting. Solid state lighting will be a new category in an energy efficient lighting fixture design competition called Lighting for Tomorrow sponsored by the US Department of Energy Emerging Technologies Office, the American Institute for Lighting, and the Consortium for Energy Efficiency. LED technology has been around since the ’60s, but it has been used mostly for indicator lights on electronics equipment. The big breakthrough was the development in the 1990s of blue LEDs which can be combined with the red and green LEDs that already existed to make white light. LEDs produce 25 to 40 lumens of light per watt of energy used, almost as much as a CFL (50 lumens per watt) and much more efficient than incandescent sources, which are around 15 lumens per watt. They are much longer lived and practical in harsh environments unsuitable for incandescent lighting. They are ready for niche applications now, like under-counter lighting and may be practical for additional applications as technological challenges are worked out and the technology is advancing in leaps and bounds.

  3. High-intensity laser heating in liquids: Multiphoton absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    At high laser intensities, otherwise transparent liquids can absorb strongly by the mechanism of multiphoton absorption, resulting in absorption and heating several orders of magnitude greater than classical, low-intensity mechanisms. The use of multiphoton absorption provides a new mechanism for strong, controlled energy deposition in liquids without bulk plasma formation, shock waves, liquid ejection, etc., which is of interest for many laser-liquid applications, including laser desorption of liquid films, laser particle removal, and laser water removal from microdevices. This work develops a microscopically based model of the heating during multiphoton absorption in liquids. The dependence on pulse duration, intensity, wavelength, repetition rate, and liquid properties is discussed. Pure water exposed to 266 nm laser radiation is investigated, and a novel heating mechanism for water is proposed that uses multiple-wavelength laser pulses.

  4. LED lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Galvez, Miguel; Grossman, Kenneth; Betts, David

    2013-11-12

    There is herein described a lamp for providing white light comprising a plurality of light sources positioned on a substrate. Each of said light sources comprises a blue light emitting diode (LED) and a dome that substantially covers said LED. A first portion of said blue light from said LEDs is transmitted through said domes and a second portion of said blue light is converted into a red light by a first phosphor contained in said domes. A cover is disposed over all of said light sources that transmits at least a portion of said red and blue light emitted by said light sources. The cover contains a second phosphor that emits a yellow light in response to said blue light. The red, blue and yellow light combining to form the white light and the white light having a color rendering index (CRI) of at least about 80.

  5. Thermal behavior of silicon-copper micro vapor chamber for high power LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yi; Li, Zhi-xin; Zhou, Chuan-peng; Wang, Xiao-dong; You, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Micro vapor chamber (MVC) for light emitting diodes (LEDs) can be designed and fabricated to enhance the heat dissipation efficiency and improve the reliability. In this paper, we used photoresist SU-8 and electroforming copper (Cu) to fabricate three kinds of wick structures, which are star, radiation and parallel ones, and the substrate is silicon with thickness of 0.5 mm. Electroforming Cu on silicon to make micro wick structure was a critical step, the ampere-hour factor was used, and accordingly the electroforming time was predicted. The composition of electroforming solution and parameters of electroforming were optimized too. After charging and packaging, thermal behavior tests were carried out to study the heat dissipation performance of MVCs. When the input power was 8 W, the parallel wick structure reached the equivalent temperature of 69.0 °C in 226 s, while the others were higher than that. The experimental results prove that the wick structures have significant influence on the heat transfer capability of MVCs.

  6. Design of LED freeform optical system for road lighting with high luminance/illuminance ratio.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zexin; Luo, Yi; Han, Yanjun

    2010-10-11

    A systematic method is proposed for designing an optical system for road lighting using an LED and a freeform lens that is optimized to produce a certain luminance distribution on the road surface. The proposed design method takes account of the luminance characteristics of the road surface, the energy efficiency of the system, the glare problem of the luminaire and the effects of four adjacent luminaries illuminating a single road surface. Firstly, the road surface illuminance with a polynomial of cosine functions along the road is optimized to maximize Q (the ratio of the average luminance to the average illuminance) as well as satisfying the lighting requirements provided by CIE. Then, a smooth freeform lens with this optimized illuminance is designed based on the variable separation method and the feedback modification method. Results show that, from two typical observer positions on the 2-lane C2 class road, luminaires with these freeform lenses can provide Q values of 7.90 × 10(-2) and 8.69 × 10(-2), the overall road surface luminance uniformity of 0.55 and 0.56, the longitudinal road surface luminance uniformity of 0.72 and 0.79, and the glare factors of 10.06% and 6.73% .

  7. Radiation control in the intensive care unit for high intensity iridium-192 brain implants

    SciTech Connect

    Sewchand, W.; Drzymala, R.E.; Amin, P.P.; Salcman, M.; Salazar, O.M.

    1987-04-01

    A bedside lead cubicle was designed to minimize the radiation exposure of intensive care unit staff during routine interstitial brain irradiation by removable, high intensity iridium-192. The cubicle shields the patient without restricting intensive care routines. The design specifications were confirmed by exposure measurements around the shield with an implanted anthropomorphic phantom simulating the patient situation. The cubicle reduces the exposure rate around an implant patient by as much as 90%, with the exposure level not exceeding 0.1 mR/hour/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir. Evaluation of data accumulated for the past 3 years has shown that the exposure levels of individual attending nurses are 0.12 to 0.36 mR/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per 12-hour shift. The corresponding range for entire nursing teams varies between 0.18 and 0.26. A radiation control index (exposure per mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per nurse-hour) is thus defined for individual nurses and nursing teams; this index is a significant guide to the planning of nurse rotations for brain implant patients with various /sup 192/Ir loads. The bedside shield reduces exposure from /sup 192/Ir implants by a factor of about 20, as expected, and the exposure from the lower energy radioisotope iodine-125 is barely detectable.

  8. Ultra High Performance, Highly Reliable, Numeric Intensive Processors and Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    to design high-performance DSP/IP systems using either off-the-shelf components or application specific integrated circuitry [ ASIC ]. -9 - HSDAL . ARO...are the chirp-z transform ( CZT ) [13] and (Rader’s) Prime Factor Transform (PFT) [11]. The RNS/ CZT is being studied by a group a MITRE [14] and is given...PFT RNS/CRNS/QRNS implementation has dynamic range requirements on the order of NQ2 (vs NQ4 for the CZT and much higher for the FFT). Therefore, the

  9. Time dependent and temperature dependent properties of the forward voltage characteristic of InGaN high power LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulmek, P. L.; Haumer, P.; Wenzl, F. P.; Nemitz, W.; Nicolics, J.

    2017-03-01

    Estimating the junction temperature and its dynamic behavior in dependence of various operating conditions is an important issue, since these properties influence the optical characteristics as well as the aging processes of a light-emitting diode (LED). Particularly for high-power LEDs and pulsed operation, the dynamic behavior and the resulting thermal cycles are of interest. The forward voltage method relies on the existence of a time-independent unique triple of forward-voltage, forward-current, and junction temperature. These three figures should as well uniquely define the optical output power and spectrum, as well as the loss power of the LED, which is responsible for an increase of the junction temperature. From transient FEM-simulations one may expect an increase of the temperature of the active semiconductor layer of some 1/10 K within the first 10 μs. Most of the well-established techniques for junction temperature measurement via forward voltage method evaluate the measurement data several dozens of microseconds after switching on or switching off and estimate the junction temperature by extrapolation towards the time of switching. In contrast, the authors developed a measurement procedure with the focus on the first microseconds after switching. Besides a fast data acquisition system, a precise control of the switching process is required, i.e. a precisely defined current pulse amplitude with fast rise-time and negligible transient by-effects. We start with a short description of the measurement setup and the newly developed control algorithm for the generation of short current pulses. The thermal characterization of the LED chip during the measurement procedures is accomplished by an IR thermography system and transient finite element simulations. The same experimental setup is used to investigate the optical properties of the LED in an Ulbricht-sphere. Our experiments are performed on InGaN LED chips mounted on an Al based insulated metal substrate

  10. High efficiency and enhanced ESD properties of UV LEDs by inserting p-GaN/p-AlGaN superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Li, PeiXian; Yang, Zhuo; Hao, Yue; Wang, XiaoBo

    2014-05-01

    Significantly improved electrostatic discharge (ESD) properties of InGaN/GaN-based UV light-emitting diode (LED) with inserting p-GaN/p-AlGaN superlattice (p-SLs) layers (instead of p-AlGaN single layer) between multiple quantum wells and Mg-doped GaN layer are reported. The pass yield of the LEDs increased from 73.53% to 93.81% under negative 2000 V ESD pulses. In addition, the light output power (LOP) and efficiency droop at high injection current were also improved. The mechanism of the enhanced ESD properties was then investigated. After excluding the effect of capacitance modulation, high-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements demonstrated that the dominant mechanism of the enhanced ESD properties is the material quality improved by p-SLs, which indicated less leakage paths, rather than the current spreading improved by p-SLs.

  11. Generation of Ultra-high Intensity Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    N.J. Fisch; V.M. Malkin

    2003-06-10

    Mainly due to the method of chirped pulse amplification, laser intensities have grown remarkably during recent years. However, the attaining of very much higher powers is limited by the material properties of gratings. These limitations might be overcome through the use of plasma, which is an ideal medium for processing very high power and very high total energy. A plasma can be irradiated by a long pump laser pulse, carrying significant energy, which is then quickly depleted in the plasma by a short counterpropagating pulse. This counterpropagating wave effect has already been employed in Raman amplifiers using gases or plasmas at low laser power. Of particular interest here are the new effects which enter in high power regimes. These new effects can be employed so that one high-energy optical system can be used like a flashlamp in what amounts to pumping the plasma, and a second low-power optical system can be used to extract quickly the energy from the plasma and focus it precisely. The combined system can be very compact. Thus, focused intensities more than 10{sup 25} W/cm{sup 2} can be contemplated using existing optical elements. These intensities are several orders of magnitude higher than what is currently available through chirped pump amplifiers.

  12. A high-intensity highly coherent soft X-ray femtosecond laser seeded by a high harmonic beam.

    PubMed

    Zeitoun, Ph; Faivre, G; Sebban, S; Mocek, T; Hallou, A; Fajardo, M; Aubert, D; Balcou, Ph; Burgy, F; Douillet, D; Kazamias, S; De Lachèze-Murel, G; Lefrou, T; Le Pape, S; Mercère, P; Merdji, H; Morlens, A S; Rousseau, J P; Valentin, C

    2004-09-23

    Synchrotrons have for decades provided invaluable sources of soft X-rays, the application of which has led to significant progress in many areas of science and technology. But future applications of soft X-rays--in structural biology, for example--anticipate the need for pulses with much shorter duration (femtoseconds) and much higher energy (millijoules) than those delivered by synchrotrons. Soft X-ray free-electron lasers should fulfil these requirements but will be limited in number; the pressure on beamtime is therefore likely to be considerable. Laser-driven soft X-ray sources offer a comparatively inexpensive and widely available alternative, but have encountered practical bottlenecks in the quest for high intensities. Here we establish and characterize a soft X-ray laser chain that shows how these bottlenecks can in principle be overcome. By combining the high optical quality available from high-harmonic laser sources (as a seed beam) with a highly energetic soft X-ray laser plasma amplifier, we produce a tabletop soft X-ray femtosecond laser operating at 10 Hz and exhibiting full saturation, high energy, high coherence and full polarization. This technique should be readily applicable on all existing laser-driven soft X-ray facilities.

  13. High intensity proton linac activities at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B.; Chan, K.C.; Campbell, B.

    1998-09-01

    High-current proton linear accelerators offer an attractive alternative for generating the intense neutron fluxes needed for transmutations technologies, tritium production and neutron science. To achieve the fluxes required for tritium production, a 100-mA, 1700-MeV cw proton accelerator is being designed that uses superconducting cavities for the high-energy portion of the linac, from 211 to 1,700 MeV. The development work supporting the linac design effort is focused on three areas: superconducting cavity performance for medium-beta cavities at 700 MHz, high power rf coupler development, and cryomodule design. An overview of the progress in these three areas is presented.

  14. HELIOS: A high intensity chopper spectrometer at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, T.E.; Broholm, C.; Fultz, B.

    1998-12-31

    A proposal to construct a high intensity chopper spectrometer at LANSCE as part of the SPSS upgrade project is discussed. HELIOS will be optimized for science requiring high sensitivity neutron spectroscopy. This includes studies of phonon density of states in small polycrystalline samples, magnetic excitations in quantum magnets and highly correlated electron systems, as well as parametric studies (as a function of pressure, temperature, or magnetic field) of S(Q,{omega}). By employing a compact design together with the use of supermirror guide in the incident flight path the neutron flux at HELIOS will be significantly higher than any other comparable instrument now operating.

  15. Heat transparent high intensity high efficiency solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An improved solar cell design is described. A surface of each solar cell has a plurality of grooves. Each groove has a vertical face and a slanted face that is covered by a reflecting metal. Light rays are reflected from the slanted face through the vertical face where they traverse a photovoltaic junction. As the light rays travel to the slanted face of an adjacent groove, they again traverse the junction. The underside of the reflecting coating directs the light rays toward the opposite surface of solar cell as they traverse the junction again. When the light rays travel through the solar cell and reach the saw toothed grooves on the under side, the process of reflection and repeatedly traversing the junction again takes place. The light rays ultimately emerge from the solar cell. These solar cells are particularly useful at very high levels of insolation because the infrared or heat radiation passes through the cells without being appreciably absorbed to heat the cell.

  16. A Peer-Led High School Transition Program Increases Graduation Rates among Latino Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Valerie L.; Simon, Patricia; Mun, Eun-Young

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigated the impact of a manualized high school transition program, the Peer Group Connection (PGC) program, on the graduation rate at a low-income, Mid-Atlantic high school. The program utilized 12th-grade student peer leaders to create a supportive environment for incoming ninth-grade students. Results of a randomized control…

  17. A Peer-Led High School Transition Program Increases Graduation Rates among Latino Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Valerie L.; Simon, Patricia; Mun, Eun-Young

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigated the impact of a manualized high school transition program, the Peer Group Connection (PGC) program, on the graduation rate at a low-income, Mid-Atlantic high school. The program utilized 12th-grade student peer leaders to create a supportive environment for incoming ninth-grade students. Results of a randomized control…

  18. A new Cu(TiBN x ) alloy film for boosting the per-watt illuminance of high power LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chon-Hsin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a new Cu(TiBN x ) alloy film has been explored and utilized as a flexible heat dissipation layer for the substrate of high power LEDs to boost their per-watt illuminance by reducing the thermal resistance and increasing the thermal conductivity of the substrate. The new film is a Cu-alloy seed layer fabricated by co-sputtering Cu and TiB in an N2 atmosphere on a Ta/polyimide (Ta/PI) substrate. The film was then annealed at 340 °C for 1 h without noticeable Cu oxide formation around the film-substrate interface. The new film exhibits low resistivity, high thermal conductivity and low thermal resistance, rendering a substantially higher per-watt illuminance for LEDs that utilize the film as their additional heat dissipation layer. The experimental results gained in the study appear to confirm the new Cu(TiBN x ) film as a good candidate material, at least, for boosting the per-watt illuminance of high power LEDs.

  19. Multiwavelength Anomalous Diffraction at High X-Ray Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Chapman, Henry N.; Santra, Robin

    2011-11-01

    The multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method is used to determine phase information in x-ray crystallography by employing anomalous scattering from heavy atoms. X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) show promise for revealing the structure of single molecules or nanocrystals, but the phase problem remains largely unsolved. Because of the ultrabrightness of x-ray FEL, samples experience severe electronic radiation damage, especially to heavy atoms, which hinders direct implementation of MAD with x-ray FELs. Here, we propose a generalized version of MAD phasing at high x-ray intensity. We demonstrate the existence of a Karle-Hendrickson-type equation in the high-intensity regime and calculate relevant coefficients with detailed electronic damage dynamics of heavy atoms. The present method offers a potential for ab initio structural determination in femtosecond x-ray nanocrystallography.

  20. Multiwavelength anomalous diffraction at high x-ray intensity.

    PubMed

    Son, Sang-Kil; Chapman, Henry N; Santra, Robin

    2011-11-18

    The multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method is used to determine phase information in x-ray crystallography by employing anomalous scattering from heavy atoms. X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) show promise for revealing the structure of single molecules or nanocrystals, but the phase problem remains largely unsolved. Because of the ultrabrightness of x-ray FEL, samples experience severe electronic radiation damage, especially to heavy atoms, which hinders direct implementation of MAD with x-ray FELs. Here, we propose a generalized version of MAD phasing at high x-ray intensity. We demonstrate the existence of a Karle-Hendrickson-type equation in the high-intensity regime and calculate relevant coefficients with detailed electronic damage dynamics of heavy atoms. The present method offers a potential for ab initio structural determination in femtosecond x-ray nanocrystallography.

  1. Chrome tannage using high-intensity ultrasonic field.

    PubMed

    Mäntysalo, E; Marjoniemi, M; Kilpeläinen, M

    1997-04-01

    The process time in chrome tannage in leather making, using an elastic compression cycle followed by irradiation by high-intensity ultrasound, is quite short lasting only a few minutes, compared with a process time of several hours in modern chrome tannage. After ultrasonic irradiation, samples were basified in 17 h in chrome liquor at a pH of 4.0 and the shrinkage temperature was measured. The determination of the efficiency for the chrome liquor penetrating into the hides can be based on the steepness of the shrinkage temperature-processing time curve. An approximate value of 20 degrees C min(-1) can be evaluated for the initial slope of the curve when elastic compression and high-intensity ultrasonic irradiation is used, and a processing time of 2 min is required in chrome liquor (plus 17 h basification and 24 h storage time) to obtain leather stable to boiling. Usually, hides are kept in chrome liquor for 2 h.

  2. Fermilab main injector: High intensity operation and beam loss control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bruce C.; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Chou, Weiren; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton K.; Seiya, Kiyomi; Wu, Guan Hong; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2013-07-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  3. Low-intensity resistance training after high-intensity resistance training can prevent the increase of central arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, T; Masuhara, M; Ikuta, K

    2013-05-01

    Although high-intensity resistance training increases arterial stiffness, low-intensity resistance training reduces arterial stiffness. The present study investigates the effect of low-intensity resistance training before and after high-intensity resistance training on arterial stiffness. 30 young healthy subjects were randomly assigned to a group that performed low-intensity resistance training before high-intensity resistance training (BLRT, n=10), a group that performed low-intensity resistance training after high-intensity resistance training (ALRT, n=10) and a sedentary control group (n=10). The BLRT and ALRT groups performed resistance training at 80% and 50% of one repetition maximum twice each week for 10 wk. Arterial stiffness was measured using carotid-femoral and femoral-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV). One-repetition maximum strength in the both ALRT and BLRT significantly increased after the intervention (P<0.05 to P<0.01). Both carotid-femoral PWV and femoral-ankle PWV after combined training in the ALRT group did not change from before training. In contrast, carotid-femoral PWV after combined training in the BLRT group increased from before training (P <0.05). Femoral-ankle PWV after combined training in the both BLRT and ALRT groups did not change from before training. These results suggest that although arterial stiffness is increased by low-intensity resistance training before high-intensity resistance training, performing low-intensity resistance training thereafter can prevent the increase of arterial stiffness.

  4. Enhancement of vasorelaxation in hypertension following high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ai-Lun; Lo, Chia-Wen; Lee, Jen-Ting; Su, Chia-Ting

    2011-04-30

    Exercise can ameliorate vascular dysfunction in hypertension, but its underlying mechanism has not been explored thoroughly. We aimed to investigate whether the high-intensity exercise could enhance vasorelaxation mediated by insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in hypertension. Sixteen-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats were randomly divided into non-exercise sedentary (SHR) and high-intensity exercise (SHR+Ex) groups conducted by treadmill running at a speed of 30 m/ min until exhaustion. Age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were used as the normotensive control group. Immediately after exercise, the agonist-induced vasorelaxation of aortas was evaluated in organ baths with or without endothelial denudation. Selective inhibitors were used to examine the roles of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) in the vasorelaxation. By adding superoxide dismutase (SOD), a superoxide scavenger, the role of superoxide production in the vasorelaxation was also clarified. We found that, the high-intensity exercise significantly (P < 0.05) induced higher vasorelaxant responses to insulin and IGF-1 in the SHR+Ex group than that in the SHR group; after endothelial denudation and pre-treatment of the PI3K inhibitor, NOS inhibitor, or SOD, vasorelaxant responses to insulin and IGF-1 became similar among three groups; the protein expression of insulin receptor, IGF-1 receptor, and endothelial NOS (eNOS) was significantly (P < 0.05) increased in the SHR+Ex group compared with the SHR group;] the relaxation to sodium nitroprusside, a NO donor, was not different among three groups. Our findings suggested that the high-intensity exercise ameliorated the insulin- and IGF-1-mediated vasorelaxation through the endothelium-dependent pathway, which was associated with the reduced level of superoxide production.

  5. Spallation neutron source and other high intensity froton sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2003-02-06

    This lecture is an introduction to the design of a spallation neutron source and other high intensity proton sources. It discusses two different approaches: linac-based and synchrotron-based. The requirements and design concepts of each approach are presented. The advantages and disadvantages are compared. A brief review of existing machines and those under construction and proposed is also given. An R&D program is included in an appendix.

  6. High intensity muon storage rings for neutrino production: Lattice design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, C>

    1998-05-01

    Five energies, 250, 100, 50, 20, and 10 GeV, have been explored in the design of a muon storage ring for neutrino-beam production. The ring design incorporates exceptionally long straight sections with large beta functions in order to produce an intense, parallel neutrino beam via muon decay. To emphasize compactness and reduce the number of muon decays in the arcs, high-field superconducting dipoles are used in the arc design.

  7. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy with High Energy Photon and Hadron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelfke, U.

    2004-07-01

    This short contribution will briefly describe the basic concepts of intensity modulated radiation therapy with high energy photons (IMRT) and charged particle beams (IMPT). Dose delivery and optimization strategies like the `Inverse Planning' approach will be explained for both radiation modalities and their potential advantages are demonstrated for characteristic clinical examples. Finally, future development like image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and adaptive radiation therapy, based on functional imaging methods, will be introduced.

  8. Alpine Skiing as Winter-Time High-Intensity Training.

    PubMed

    Stöggl, Thomas Leonhard; Schwarzl, Christoph; Müller, Edith E; Nagasaki, Masaru; Stöggl, Julia; Schönfelder, Martin; Niebauer, Josef

    2017-09-01

    To counteract the winter activity deficit, we set out to analyze cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses of two high-intensity training (HIT) protocols during alpine skiing (AS), cross-country skiing (XCS), and indoor cycling (IC) and the effects of sex, age, and fitness level in this comparison. Nineteen healthy subjects (two age and fitness groups, both sexes) performed AS, XCS, and IC with measurements of oxygen uptake (V˙O2), energy expenditure (EE), HR, lactate, blood glucose and rate of perceived exertion, determined during 4 min of continuous HIT (HITc: 90% HRmax for XCS and IC or short turn skiing during AS) or 10-min intermittent HIT [HITint: 5 × 1 min high intensity (>90% HRmax or short turn skiing), 1 min active recovery]. During all three exercise modes and irrespective of HIT protocols, sex, age, and fitness, participants were able to reach exercise intensities >90% HRmax and >84% V˙O2max. In all exercise modes 10-min of HITint with a 10-min postexercise O2 consumption phase resulted in greater mean EE per minute compared to 4-min HITc with 10 min postexercise O2 consumption. When applying the same HIT loading and recovery pattern to all three exercise modes, EE during approximately 1:15 h of AS was equivalent to about 1:00 h of either XCS or IC. Across all exercise modes and HIT protocols, high cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses were achieved regardless of age, sex, or fitness. EE during AS can be maximized by choosing the skiing mode "short turn skiing" in combination with an HITint to prolong the duration of continuous high-intensity loading during each descent. Therefore, all exercise modes and both HIT protocols are applicable and feasible in a broad spectrum of healthy subjects.

  9. Silicone rubber curing by high intensity infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tung-Way; Tsai, Jen-Hui; Cherng, Chung-Pin; Chen, Jan-Ku

    1994-08-01

    A high-intensity (12 kW) and compact (80 cm) infrared heating oven for fast curing (12 seconds) of tube-like silicone rubber curing studies is reported. Quality inspection by DSC and DMA and results from pilot-scale curing oven all suggest that infrared heating provides a better way of vulcanization regarding to curing time, quality, cost, and spacing over conventional hot air heating.

  10. Silicone rubber curing by high intensity infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T.; Tsai, J.; Cherng, C.; Chen, J.

    1994-08-10

    A high-intensity (12 kW) and compact (80 cm) infrared heating oven for fast curing (12 seconds) of tube-like silicone rubber curing studies is reported. Quality inspection by DSC and DMA and results from pilot-scale curing oven all suggest that infrared heating provides a better way of vulcanization regarding to curing time, quality, cost, and spacing over conventional hot air heating. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  11. PULSED POWER APPLICATIONS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    Pulsed power technology has been applied in particle accelerators and storage rings for over four decades. It is most commonly used in injection, extraction, beam manipulation, source, and focusing systems. These systems belong to the class of repetitive pulsed power. In this presentation, we review and discuss the history, present status, and future challenge of pulsed power applications in high intensity proton accelerators and storage rings.

  12. Evaluation of the most intense high-intensity running period in English FA premier league soccer matches.

    PubMed

    Di Mascio, Michele; Bradley, Paul S

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the most intense period of high-intensity running during elite soccer matches. Elite players (n = 100) were analyzed using a multicamera computerized tracking system. High-intensity running (speed >19.8 km·h) in 5-min periods were quantified during matches. High-intensity running was performed for approximately 3% of total time, but this doubled (F[1,99] = 9.179, p < 0.001, d > 1.2) during the most intense period (8.4 ± 2.7 vs. 16.4 ± 4.6 seconds). Recovery time between high-intensity efforts was approximately 30 seconds during the most intense period (33.3 ± 19.7 seconds). The work:rest ratio between high-intensity bouts increased (F[1,99] = 2.018, p < 0.001, d > 0.6) from 1:12 for the match average to 1:2 during the most intense period. The distance of each discrete high-intensity running bout increased (F[1,99] = 1.958, p < 0.001, d > 0.6) approximately 13% during the most intense period compared with that of the match average (6.7 ± 1.8 vs. 5.8 ± 0.6 m). Central defenders were running at high-intensity for less (F[4,95] = 4.907, p < 0.05, d > 0.6) time than full-backs, wide midfielders, and attackers (12.9 ± 2.4 vs. 17.9 ± 3.4, 18.3 ± 5.5, and 16.9 ± 3.8 seconds). Central defenders had a greater recovery time (F[4,95] = 3.083, p < 0.05, d > 0.6) between high-intensity efforts than wide midfielders. No differences were evident between playing positions for maximum running speed and average distances of high-intensity running. These results show that high-intensity running, work:rest ratios, and average high-intensity distances change markedly during the most intense period of matches and are highly dependent on positional role. Therefore, conditioning drills and performance tests should closely mimic distances, work:rest ratios, and recovery times of those found during the most intense period of matches.

  13. Red emission generation through highly efficient energy transfer from Ce(3+) to Mn(2+) in CaO for warm white LEDs.

    PubMed

    Feng, Leyu; Hao, Zhendong; Zhang, Xia; Zhang, Liangliang; Pan, Guohui; Luo, Yongshi; Zhang, Ligong; Zhao, Haifeng; Zhang, Jiahua

    2016-01-28

    CaO:Ce(3+),Mn(2+) phosphors with various Mn(2+) concentrations were synthesized by a solid state reaction method. Efficient energy transfer from Ce(3+) to Mn(2+) was observed and it allows the emission color of CaO:Ce(3+),Mn(2+) to be continuously tuned from yellow (contributed by Ce(3+)) to red (by Mn(2+)) with an increase in Mn(2+) concentration and upon blue light excitation. The red emission becomes dominant when the Mn(2+) concentration is ≥0.014 with an energy transfer efficiency higher than 87% which can reach as high as 94% for a Mn(2+) concentration of only 0.02. A critical distance of 10.5 Å for the Ce(3+)-Mn(2+) energy transfer was determined. A faster decrease of Ce(3+) luminescence intensity in comparison with its lifetime was observed on increasing the Mn(2+) concentration. The analysis of this feature reveals that the Ce(3+) excitation energy can be completely transferred to Mn(2+) if the Ce(3+)-Mn(2+) distance is shorter than 7.6 Å. A warm white LED was fabricated through integrating an InGaN blue LED chip and a blend of two phosphors (YAG:Ce(3+) yellow phosphor and CaO:0.007Ce(3+),0.014Mn(2+) red phosphor) into a single package, which has CIE chromaticity coordinates of (x = 0.37, y = 0.35), a correlated color temperature of 3973 K and a color rendering index of 83.1. The results indicate that CaO:Ce(3+),Mn(2+) may serve as a potential red phosphor for blue LED based warm white LEDs.

  14. High intensity laser beam propagation through a relativistic warm magnetoplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, S.; Jafari Milani, M. R.; Jafari, M. J.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, nonlinear aspects of a circularly polarized high intensity Gaussian laser beam propagating in a relativistic warm magnetized plasma are studied, taking into account the relativistic ponderomotive force. The differential equation governing the dimensionless beam width parameter is achieved and numerically solved by introducing the dielectric permittivity of such plasma and using the paraxial ray approximation. The effects of entrance laser intensity and its polarization state, external magnetic field, and electron temperature on the laser spot size evolution are studied. It is found that for both right and left-handed polarization states increasing initial laser intensity deteriorates the self-focusing mechanism while rising electron temperature improves it. It is also observed that enhancing magnetic field leads to faster and stronger self-focusing in the case of right-handed polarization and an attenuation in the self-focusing process in the case of left-handed one. In addition, the spatial distribution of normalized modified electron density as well as laser intensity profiles as a function of plasma length and beam radius is plotted and discussed for three self-focusing, self-trapping, and defocusing regimes.

  15. A Peer-Led High School Transition Program Increases Graduation Rates Among Latino Males

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Valerie L.; Simon, Patricia; Mun, Eun-Young

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the impact of a manualized high school transition program, the Peer Group Connection (PGC) program, on the graduation rate at a low-income, Mid-Atlantic high school. The program utilized twelfth grade student peer leaders to create a supportive environment for incoming ninth grade students. Results of a randomized control trial demonstrated that male students who participated in the program during ninth grade were significantly more likely to graduate from high school within four years than male students in the control group (81% versus 63%). Findings suggest that peers can be effective in delivering a school-based, social emotional learning intervention and that it is possible to intervene in the ninth grade to influence the probability of high school graduation. PMID:24748686

  16. High Intensity Interval- vs Moderate Intensity- Training for Improving Cardiometabolic Health in Overweight or Obese Males: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Gordon; Brown, Andrew W.; Bohan Brown, Michelle M.; Alcorn, Amy; Noles, Corey; Winwood, Leah; Resuehr, Holly; George, Brandon; Jeansonne, Madeline M.; Allison, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the effects of six weeks of high intensity interval training (HIIT) vs continuous moderate intensity training (MIT) for improving body composition, insulin sensitivity (SI), blood pressure, blood lipids, and cardiovascular fitness in a cohort of sedentary overweight or obese young men. We hypothesized that HIIT would result in similar improvements in body composition, cardiovascular fitness, blood lipids, and SI as compared to the MIT group, despite requiring only one hour of activity per week compared to five hours per week for the MIT group. Methods 28 sedentary overweight or obese men (age, 20 ± 1.5 years, body mass index 29.5 ± 3.3 kg/m2) participated in a six week exercise treatment. Participants were randomly assigned to HIIT or MIT and evaluated at baseline and post-training. DXA was used to assess body composition, graded treadmill exercise test to measure cardiovascular fitness, oral glucose tolerance to measure SI, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to assess lipoprotein particles, and automatic auscultation to measure blood pressure. Results A greater improvement in VO2peak was observed in MIT compared to HIIT (11.1% vs 2.83%, P = 0.0185) in the complete-case analysis. No differences were seen in the intention to treat analysis, and no other group differences were observed. Both exercise conditions were associated with temporal improvements in % body fat, total cholesterol, medium VLDL, medium HDL, triglycerides, SI, and VO2peak (P < 0.05). Conclusion Participation in HIIT or MIT exercise training displayed: 1) improved SI, 2) reduced blood lipids, 3) decreased % body fat, and 4) improved cardiovascular fitness. While both exercise groups led to similar improvements for most cardiometabolic risk factors assessed, MIT led to a greater improvement in overall cardiovascular fitness. Overall, these observations suggest that a relatively short duration of either HIIT or MIT training may improve cardiometabolic risk factors in

  17. Transport of intense beams of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, M.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Spadtke, P.; Tinschert, K.

    2005-10-01

    The new generation of ion sources delivers beams with intensities of several mA. This requires a careful design of the analysing system and the low-energy beam transport (LEBT) from the source to the subsequent systems. At INFN-LNS, high intensity proton sources (TRIPS [L. Celona, G. Ciavola, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1423 (2004)], PM-TRIPS [G. Ciavola, L. Celona, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1453 (2004)]) as well as ECR ion sources for the production of highly charged high-intensity heavy ion beams are developed (SERSE [S. Gammino, G. Ciavola, L. Celona et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72(11) 4090 (2001), and references therein], GyroSERSE [S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1637 (2004)], MS-ECRIS [G. Ciavola et al ., (2005), 11th Int. Conf. on Ion Sources, Caen, (in press)]). In this paper, we present ion-optical design studies of various LEBT systems for ion-sources devoted to the production of intense beams. Calculations were performed using the computer codes GIOS [H. Wollnik, J. Brezina and M. Berz, NIM A 258 (1987)], GICO [M. Berz, H.C. Hoffmann, and H. Wollnik, NIM A 258 (1987)], and TRANSPORT [K.L. Brown, F. Rothacker and D.C. Carey, SLAC-R-95-462, Fermilab-Pub-95/069, UC-414 (1995)]. Simulations take into account the expected phase space growth of the beam emittance due to space-charge effects and image aberrations introduced by the magnetic elements.

  18. Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Geffert, Otfried; Santra, Robin

    2017-03-01

    Compton scattering is the nonresonant inelastic scattering of an x-ray photon by an electron and has been used to probe the electron momentum distribution in gas-phase and condensed-matter samples. In the low x-ray intensity regime, Compton scattering from atoms dominantly comes from bound electrons in neutral atoms, neglecting contributions from bound electrons in ions and free (ionized) electrons. In contrast, in the high x-ray intensity regime, the sample experiences severe ionization via x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics. Thus, it becomes necessary to take into account all the contributions to the Compton scattering signal when atoms are exposed to high-intensity x-ray pulses provided by x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). In this paper, we investigate the Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity, using an extension of the integrated x-ray atomic physics toolkit, xatom. As the x-ray fluence increases, there is a significant contribution from ionized electrons to the Compton spectra, which gives rise to strong deviations from the Compton spectra of neutral atoms. The present study provides not only understanding of the fundamental XFEL–matter interaction but also crucial information for single-particle imaging experiments, where Compton scattering is no longer negligible. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J. Phys. B. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Sang-Kil Son was selected by the Editorial Board of J. Phys. B as an Emerging Leader.

  19. Muscle fatigue during high-intensity exercise in children.

    PubMed

    Ratel, Sébastien; Duché, Pascale; Williams, Craig A

    2006-01-01

    Children are able to resist fatigue better than adults during one or several repeated high-intensity exercise bouts. This finding has been reported by measuring mechanical force or power output profiles during sustained isometric maximal contractions or repeated bouts of high-intensity dynamic exercises. The ability of children to better maintain performance during repeated high-intensity exercise bouts could be related to their lower level of fatigue during exercise and/or faster recovery following exercise. This may be explained by muscle characteristics of children, which are quantitatively and qualitatively different to those of adults. Children have less muscle mass than adults and hence, generate lower absolute power during high-intensity exercise. Some researchers also showed that children were equipped better for oxidative than glycolytic pathways during exercise, which would lead to a lower accumulation of muscle by-products. Furthermore, some reports indicated that the lower ability of children to activate their type II muscle fibres would also explain their greater resistance to fatigue during sustained maximal contractions. The lower accumulation of muscle by-products observed in children may be suggestive of a reduced metabolic signal, which induces lower ratings of perceived exertion. Factors such as faster phosphocreatine resynthesis, greater oxidative capacity, better acid-base regulation, faster readjustment of initial cardiorespiratory parameters and higher removal of metabolic by-products in children could also explain their faster recovery following high-intensity exercise.From a clinical point of view, muscle fatigue profiles are different between healthy children and children with muscle and metabolic diseases. Studies of dystrophic muscles in children indicated contradictory findings of changes in contractile properties and the muscle fatigability. Some have found that the muscle of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) fatigued less

  20. Student-Led Project Teams: Significance of Regulation Strategies in High- and Low-Performing Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, Judith

    2016-01-01

    We studied group and individual co-regulatory and self-regulatory strategies of self-managed student project teams using data from intragroup peer evaluations and a postproject survey. We found that high team performers shared their research and knowledge with others, collaborated to advise and give constructive criticism, and demonstrated moral…

  1. The Effectiveness of Peer-Led FAS/FAE Prevention Presentations in Middle and High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulter, Lyn

    2007-01-01

    Pregnant women and women who might become pregnant, including middle school- and high school-age adolescents, continue to consume alcohol, placing themselves at risk of having a child with the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure. However, most prevention programs that attempt to increase public awareness and knowledge of FAS and related disorders…

  2. Student-Led Project Teams: Significance of Regulation Strategies in High- and Low-Performing Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, Judith

    2016-01-01

    We studied group and individual co-regulatory and self-regulatory strategies of self-managed student project teams using data from intragroup peer evaluations and a postproject survey. We found that high team performers shared their research and knowledge with others, collaborated to advise and give constructive criticism, and demonstrated moral…

  3. The Effectiveness of Peer-Led FAS/FAE Prevention Presentations in Middle and High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulter, Lyn

    2007-01-01

    Pregnant women and women who might become pregnant, including middle school- and high school-age adolescents, continue to consume alcohol, placing themselves at risk of having a child with the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure. However, most prevention programs that attempt to increase public awareness and knowledge of FAS and related disorders…

  4. Survey of proposed high intensity accelerators and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schriber, S.O.

    1994-09-01

    Many interesting applications are being considered for high intensity accelerators. Implications of the technology developments that are enhancing these opportunities, or making them possible, will be covered in context of the applications. Applications include those for research (in areas such as material science, biological sciences, nuclear and high energy physics), accelerator-driven transmutation technologies, defense, and medicine. Specific examples will be used to demonstrate the impact that technology development can have and how transfer of this technology to industry can have an impact in the consumer and commercial arenas. Technology Development in rf power, controls, beam optics, rf structures, magnets, injectors, and beam halos will be considered.

  5. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-19

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of the beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.

  6. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    DOE PAGES

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-19

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of themore » beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.« less

  7. Resonant Auger Effect at High X-Ray Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Rohringer, N; Santra, R

    2008-03-27

    The resonant Auger effect of atomic neon exposed to high-intensity x-ray radiation in resonance with the 1s {yields} 3p transition is discussed. High intensity here means that the x-ray peak intensity is sufficient ({approx} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) to induce Rabi oscillations between the neon ground state and the 1s{sup -1}3p ({sup 1}P) state within the relaxation lifetime of the inner-shell vacancy. For the numerical analysis presented, an effective two-level model, including a description of the resonant Auger decay process, is employed. Both coherent and chaotic x-ray pulses are treated. The latter are used to simulate radiation from x-ray free-electron lasers based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission. Observing x-ray-driven atomic population dynamics in the time domain is challenging for chaotic pulse ensembles. A more practical option for experiments using x-ray free-electron lasers is to measure the line profiles in the kinetic energy distribution of the resonant Auger electron. This provides information on both atomic population dynamics and x-ray pulse properties.

  8. High-intensity laser-induced electron acceleration in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Wang, J X; Ho, Y K; Feng, L; Kong, Q; Wang, P X; Yuan, Z S; Scheid, W

    1999-12-01

    In this paper, an approximate pulsed-laser-beam solution of Maxwell's equation in vacuum is derived. Then with the numerical simulation method, electron acceleration induced by high-intensity [Q(0)=eE(0)/(m(e)omega c)=3] lasers is discussed in connection with the recent experiment of Malka et al. It is found that the maximum energy gain and the relationship between the final energy and the scattering angle can be well reproduced, but the polarization effect of electron-laser interactions is not very prominent. These results show that the ponderomotive potential model is still applicable, which means that the stimulated Compton scattering is the main fundamental mechanism responsible for the electron acceleration at this laser intensity.

  9. Short-pulse high intensity laser thin foil interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audebert, Patrick

    2003-10-01

    The technology of ultrashort pulse laser generation has progressed to the point that optical pulses larger than 10 J, 300 fs duration or shorter are routinely produced. Such pulses can be focused to intensities exceeding 10^18 W/cm^2. With high contrast pulses, these focused intensities can be used to heat solid matter to high temperatures with minimal hydrodynamic expansion, producing an extremely high energy-density state of matter for a short period of time. This high density, high temperature plasma can be studied by x-ray spectroscopy. We have performed experiments on thin foils of different elements under well controlled conditions at the 100 Terawatt laser at LULI to study the characteristics X-ray emission of laser heated solids. To suppress the ASE effect, the laser was frequency doubled. S-polarized light with a peak intensity of 10^19W/cm^2 was used to minimize resonance absorption. To decrease the effect of longitudinal temperature gradients very thin (800 μ) aluminum foil targets were used. We have also studied the effect of radial gradient by limiting the measured x-ray emission zone using 50μ or 100μ pinhole on target. The spectra, in the range 7-8Å, were recorded using a conical crystal spectrometer coupled to a 800 fs resolution streak camera. A Fourier Domain Interferometry (FDI) of the back of the foil was also performed providing a measurement of the hydrodynamic expansion as function of time for each shot. To simulate the experiment, we used the 1D hydrodynamic code FILM with a given set of plasma parameter (ρ, Te) as initial conditions. The X-ray emission was calculated by post processing hydrodynamic results with a collisional-radiative model which uses super-configuration average atomic data. The simulation reproduces the main features of the experimental time resolved spectrum.

  10. The development of a high intensity dance performance fitness test.

    PubMed

    Redding, Emma; Weller, Peter; Ehrenberg, Shantel; Irvine, Sarah; Quin, Edel; Rafferty, Sonia; Wyon, Matthew; Cox, Carol

    2009-01-01

    While there is currently a validated dance-specific exercise method of measuring aerobic fitness, no such test has been developed to measure high intensity capabilities in dance. The purpose of this study was to initiate an intermittent high intensity dance-specific fitness test. The test was designed to be able to observe changes in heart rate (HR), thereby allowing for a measurement of physical fitness at high intensities. Sixteen professional dancers (4 males and 12 females) volunteered to take part in this study. The fitness test protocol consists of movements that are representative of contemporary dance, and contains exercise and rest periods that mimic the intermittent nature of dance. The participants performed four trials. The physiological variables measured were HR (b.min(-1)) for each one minute bout of the four minute test for all trials, oxygen uptake (VO(2)) throughout the test, and end blood lactate (BLa mmol.L) for each trial. In addition, five of the participants undertook a maximal oxygen uptake treadmill test, and the scores obtained were compared with those from the dance test. Results show HR consistency across each one minute bout of the test and across each of the four trials of testing for all participants, indicating that the test is reliable. There was good reliability between bouts of each trial (typical error as % of CV = 1.5), intraclass "r" = 0.8, and good reliability between the four trials (typical error as % of CV = 2.1), intraclass "r" = 0.82. There were no significant differences between the maximal VO(2) and BLa scores established in the treadmill and dance tests, demonstrating validity. Thus, the results of this study indicate that the high intensity dance-specific test is a reliable and valid means of assessing and monitoring the cardiovascular fitness of dancers. The test allows dancers to be assessed within an environment that they are accustomed to (the studio), using a mode of exercise that is relevant (dance), and it is

  11. Free-field propagation of high intensity noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welz, Joseph P.; Mcdaniel, Oliver H.

    1990-01-01

    Observed spectral data from supersonic jet aircraft are known to contain much more high frequency energy than can be explained by linear acoustic propagation theory. It is believed that the high frequency energy is an effect of nonlinear distortion due to the extremely high acoustic levels generated by the jet engines. The objective, to measure acoustic waveform distortion for spherically diverging high intensity noise, was reached by using an electropneumatic acoustic source capable of generating sound pressure levels in the range of 140 to 160 decibels (re 20 micro Pa). The noise spectrum was shaped to represent the spectra generated by jet engines. Two microphones were used to capture the acoustic pressure waveform at different points along the propagation path in order to provide a direct measure of the waveform distortion as well as spectral distortion. A secondary objective was to determine that the observed distortion is an acoustic effect. To do this an existing computer prediction code that deals with nonlinear acoustic propagation was used on data representative of the measured data. The results clearly demonstrate that high intensity jet noise does shift the energy in the spectrum to the higher frequencies along the propagation path. In addition, the data from the computer model are in good agreement with the measurements, thus demonstrating that the waveform distortion can be accounted for with nonlinear acoustic theory.

  12. The different effects of high intensity interval training and moderate intensity interval training for weightlessness countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin-Jie; Cheng, Tan; Zhi-Li, Li; Hui-juan, Wang; Wen-juan, Chen; Jianfeng, Zhang; Desheng, Wang; Dongbin, Niu; Qi, Zhao; Chengjia, Yang; Yanqing, Wang

    High intensity interval training (HIIT) has been demonstrated to improve performance in a relatively short training period. But the difference between high intensity interval training and moderate intensity interval training (MIIT) in simulated weightlessness still has not been well studied. This study sought to characterize the difference between 6 weeks high intensity interval training and moderate intensity interval training under reduced weight (RW) gait training device and zero-gravity locomotion system (ZLS). Twenty-three subjects (14M/4F, 32.5±4.5 years) volunteered to participate. They were divided into three groups, that were MITT (alternating 2 min at 40% VO _{2} peak and 2 min at 60% VO _{2} peak for 30min, five days per week) RW group (n=8), HITT (alternating 2 min at 40% VO _{2} peak and 2 min at 90% VO _{2} peak for 30min, three days per week) RW group (n=8) and HITT ZLS group (n=7). The Z-axis load used in RW group was 80% body weight (BW) and in ZLS was 100% BW. Cardiopulmonary function was measured before, after 4-week training and after 6-week training. Isokinetic knee extension-flexion test at 60(°) deg/s and 180(°) deg/s were performed before and after the 6-week training, and isometric knee extension-flexion test at 180(°) deg/s was also examined at the same time. It was found that the VO _{2} peaks, metabolic equivalent (MET), Speedmax and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) were significantly increased after 4 and 6-week training in all three groups and no significant group difference were detected. The peak torque at 60(°) deg/s for right knee flexion were significantly increased after 6 week-training in all three groups, and only in HITT RW group the total power at 60(°) deg/s for right knee flexion enhanced. The total power and average power at 60(°) deg/s for right knee extension decreased significantly after 6-week training in all three groups. The peak torque at 60(°) deg/s for right knee extension in MIIT RW group was

  13. Increased Efficiency LED

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliviera (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    In a semiconductor light emitting diode (LED) a large proportion of the light produced will be internally reflected when it strikes the end face of the LED at a semiconductor-air interface. This is due to the high index of refraction of most LED semiconductor materials. This problem may be partially overcome by modification of the shape of the LED by a reverse taper of the sides of the LED. Light is redirected by the taper to strike the interface at an angle closer to normal. This allows light to exit the LED that would be totally internally reflected in an untapered LED. The novelty of the present invention lies in the tapering of the sides of the LED for increased through transmission of light. Prior art devices have made use surface modifications such as roughening, addition of guiding layers, use of index matching materials and hemispherical shaping of the emitting end of the LED. Current technology LEDs have a transmission efficiency of only a few percent. An increase in this efficiency would be of great value to any technology that makes use of LEDs for light generation. The present invention is related to LAR 1 5050-SB, Collection of Light from Optical Fibers of NA greater than 1.

  14. High-speed underwater optical wireless communication using a blue GaN-based micro-LED.

    PubMed

    Tian, Pengfei; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yi, Suyu; Huang, Yuxin; Zhang, Shuailong; Zhou, Xiaolin; Hu, Laigui; Zheng, Lirong; Liu, Ran

    2017-01-23

    High-speed underwater optical wireless communication (UOWC) was achieved using an 80 μm blue-emitting GaN-based micro-LED. The micro-LED has a peak emission wavelength of ~440 nm and an underwater power attenuation of 1 dB/m in tap water. The -3 dB electrical-to-optical modulation bandwidth of the packaged micro-LED increases with increasing current and saturates at ~160 MHz. At an underwater distance of 0.6 m, 800 Mb/s data rate was achieved with a bit error rate (BER) of 1.3 × 10-3, below the forward error correction (FEC) criteria. And we obtained 100 Mb/s data communication speed with a received light output power of -40 dBm and a BER of 1.9 × 10-3, suggesting that UOWC with extended distance can be achieved. Through reflecting the light emission beam by mirrors within a water tank, we experimentally demonstrated a 200 Mb/s data rate with a BER of 3.0 × 10-6 at an underwater distance of 5.4 m.

  15. Effects of intensity and duration in aerobic high-intensity interval training in highly trained junior cross-country skiers.

    PubMed

    Sandbakk, Øyvind; Sandbakk, Silvana B; Ettema, Gertjan; Welde, Boye

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether a long duration of aerobic high-intensity interval training is more effective than shorter intervals at a higher intensity in highly trained endurance athletes. The sample comprised of 12 male and 9 female, national-level, junior cross-country skiers (age, 17.5 ± 0.4 years, maximal oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max): 67.4 ± 7.7 ml min kg), who performed 8-week baseline and 8-week intervention training periods on dry land. During the intervention period, a short-interval group (SIG, n = 7) added 2 weekly sessions with short duration intervals (2- to 4-minute bouts, total duration of 15-20 minutes), a long-interval group (LIG; n = 7) added 2 weekly sessions with long duration intervals (5- to 10-minute bouts, total duration of 40-45 minutes). The interval sessions were performed with the athletes' maximal sustainable intensity. A control group (CG; n = 7) added 2 weekly sessions with low-intensity endurance training at 65-74% of maximal heart rate. Before and after the intervention period, the skiers were tested for time-trial performance on 12-km roller-ski skating and 7-km hill run. V[Combining Dot Above]O2max and oxygen uptake at the ventilatory threshold (V[Combining Dot Above]O2VT) were measured during treadmill running. After the intervention training period, the LIG-improved 12-km roller ski, 7-km hill run, V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, and V[Combining Dot Above]O2VT by 6.8 ± 4.0%, 4.8 ± 2.6%, 3.7 ± 1.6%, and 5.8 ± 3.3%, respectively, from pre- to posttesting, and improved both performance tests and V[Combining Dot Above]O2VT when compared with the SIG and the CG (all p < 0.05). The SIG improved V[Combining Dot Above]O2max by 3.5 ± 3.2% from pre- to posttesting (p < 0.05), whereas the CG remained unchanged. As hypothesized, a long duration of aerobic high-intensity interval training improved endurance performance and oxygen uptake at the ventilatory threshold more than shorter intervals at a higher

  16. Highly efficient low color temperature organic LED using blend carrier modulation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yao-Ching; Chen, Szu-Hao; Shen, Shih-Ming; Wang, Ching-Chiun; Chen, Chien-Chih; Jou, Jwo-Huei

    2012-10-01

    Color temperature (CT) of light has great effect on human physiology and psychology, and low CT light, minimizing melatonin suppression and decreasing the risk of breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer. We demonstrates the incorporation of a blend carrier modulation interlayer (CML) between emissive layers to improve the device performance of low CT organic light emitting diodes, which exhibits an external quantum efficiency of 22.7% and 36 lm W-1 (54 cd A-1) with 1880 K at 100 cd m-2, or 20.8% and 29 lm W-1 (50 cd A-1) with 1940 K at 1000 cd m-2. The result shows a CT much lower than that of incandescent bulbs, which is 2500 K with 15 lmW-1 efficiency, and even as low as that of candles, which is 2000 K with 0.1 lmW-1. The high efficiency of the proposed device may be attributed to its CML, which helps effectively distribute the entering carriers into the available recombination zones.

  17. Repeated high intensity bouts with long recovery: are bicarbonate or carbohydrate supplements an option?

    PubMed

    Stöggl, Thomas; Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Cetin, Ebru; Nagasaki, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    The effects of varying recovery modes and the influence of preexercise sodium bicarbonate and carbohydrate ingestion on repeated high intensity performance, acid-base response, and recovery were analyzed in 12 well-trained males. They completed three repeated high intensity running bouts to exhaustion with intervening recovery periods of 25 min under the following conditions: sodium bicarbonate, active recovery (BIC); carbohydrate ingestion, active recovery (CHO); placebo ingestion, active recovery (ACTIVE); placebo ingestion, passive recovery (PASSIVE). Blood lactate (BLa), blood gases, heart rate, and time to exhaustion were collected. The three high intensity bouts had a duration of 138 ± 9, 124 ± 6, and 121 ± 6 s demonstrating a decrease from bout 1 to bout 3. Supplementation strategy had no effect on performance in the first bout, even with differences in pH and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)). Repeated sprint performance was not affected by supplementation strategy when compared to ACTIVE, while PASSIVE resulted in a more pronounced decrease in performance compared with all other interventions. BIC led to greater BLa, pH, and HCO3(-) values compared with all other interventions, while for PASSIVE the opposite was found. BLa recovery was lowest in PASSIVE; recovery in pH, and HCO3(-) was lower in PASSIVE and higher in BIC.

  18. HIGH INTENSITY PERFORMANCE AND UPGRADES AT THE BROOKHAVEN AGS

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.

    1998-05-04

    Fig. 1 shows the present layout of the AGS-RHIC accelerator complex. The high intensity proton beam of the AGS is used both for the slow-extracted-beam (SEB) area with many target station to produce secondary beams and the fast-extracted-beam (FEB) line used for the production of muons for the g-2 experiment and for high intensity target testing for the spallation neutron sources and muon production targets for the muon collider. The same FEB line will also be used for the transfer of beam to RHIC. The proton beam intensity in the AGS has increased steadily over the 35 year existence of the AGS, but the most dramatic increase occurred over the last couple of years with the addition of the new AGS Booster[1]. In Fig. 2 the history of the AGS intensity improvements is shown and the major upgrades are indicated. The AGS Booster has one quarter the circumference of the AGS and therefore allows four Booster beam pulses to be stacked in the AGS at an injection energy of 1.5--1.9 GeV. At this increased energy, space charge forces are much reduced and this in turn allows for the dramatic increase in the AGS beam intensity. The 200 MeV LINAC is being used both for the injection into the Booster as well as an isotope production facility. A recent upgrade of the LINAC rf system made it possible to operated at an average H{sup {minus}} current of 150 {micro}A and a maximum of 12 x 10{sup 13} H{sup {minus}} per 500 {micro}s LINAC pulse for the isotope production target. Typical beam currents during the 500 {micro}s pulse are about 80 mA at the source, 60 mA after the 750 keV RFQ, 38 mA after the first LINAC tank (10 MeV), and 37 mA at end of the LINAC at 200 MeV. The normalized beam emittance is about 2 {pi} mm mrad for 95% of the beam and the beam energy spread is about {+-}1.2 MeV. A magnetic fast chopper installed at 750 keV allows the shaping of the beam injected into the Booster to avoid excessive beam loss.

  19. Similar Responses of Circulating MicroRNAs to Acute High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Vigorous-Intensity Continuous Exercise.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shu F; Wang, Cheng; Yin, Xin; Tian, Dong; Lu, Qiu J; Zhang, Chen Y; Chen, Xi; Ma, Ji Z

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) has been reported to be more beneficial for physical adaptation than low-to-moderate exercise intensity. Recently, it is becoming increasingly evident that circulating miRNAs (c-miRNAs) may distinguish between specific stress signals imposed by variations in the duration, modality, and type of exercise. The aim of this study is to investigate whether or not HIIE is superior to vigorous-intensity continuous exercise (VICE), which is contributing to develop effective fitness assessment. Twenty-six young males were enrolled, and plasma samples were collected prior to exercise and immediately after HIIE or distance-matched VICE. The miRNA level profiles in HIIE were initially determined using TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA). And the differentially miRNAs levels were validated by stem-loop quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR). Furthermore, these selective c-miRNAs were measured for VICE. Our results showed that some muscle-related miRNAs levels in the plasma, such as miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b, and miR-206 significantly increased following HIIE or VICE compared to those at rest (P < 0.05), and there was only a significant reduction in miR-1 level for HIIE compared to VICE (P < 0.05), while no significant differences were observed for other muscle-related miRNAs between both exercises (P > 0.05). In addition, some tissue-related or unknown original miRNA levels, such as miR-485-5p, miR-509-5p, miR-517a, miR-518f, miR-520f, miR-522, miR-553, and miR-888, also significantly increased (P < 0.05) in both exercises compared to rest. However, no significant differences were found between both exercises (P > 0.05). Overall, endurance exercise assessed in this study both led to significant increases in selective c-miRNAs of comparable magnitude, suggesting that both types of endurance exercise have general stress processes. Accordingly, the similar responses to both acute exercises likely indicate both exercises can be used

  20. High Intensity 2-Photon Photoassociation Spectroscopy of Strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, S. B.; Martinez, Y. N.; Mickelson, P. G.; Killian, T. C.

    2007-06-01

    We perform high intensity, 2-photon photoassociation spectroscopy near the 461 nm ^1S0-^1P1 transition of strontium to determine the binding energy of the least bound level in the ground state atomic potential. Previous work by our group has constrained the value of the s-wave scattering length in both ^86Sr and ^88Sr. This work provides a more precise value of the s-wave scattering lengths using the newly-determined binding energy, thus informing efforts to attain quantum degeneracy in strontium.

  1. High intensity positron beam and angular correlation experiments at Livermore

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.; Fluss, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    A positron beam apparatus that produces a variable energy positron beam with sufficient intensity to perform new positron experiments in an ultrahigh vacuum environment has been installed at the Lawrence Livermore 100 MeV electron linac. We have installed two large area position sensitive gamma-ray detectors to measure angular correlations in two dimensions and a separate highly collimated detector to measure positronium energy distributions by time-of-flight velocity determination. Data from measurements on single crystals of Cu will be described.

  2. High-intensity tone generation by aeroacoustic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out on the production of high-intensity tones by axisymmetric ring cavities. Maximum sound production occurs during an acoustic resonance at Strouhal numbers, which depend only on the local flow velocity independent of cavity location. Values of sound pressure of about 115 dB at 1-m distance can be generated by axisymmetric ring cavities on projectiles moving at a relatively low flight speed equal to 70 m/s. Frequencies in the audible range up to several kilohertz can be generated aeroacoustically. A simple analytical model has been developed to explain the experimental observations.

  3. Beam instrumentation for future high intense hadron accelerators at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Hu, M.; Tassotto, G.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Scarpine, V.; Shin, S.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    High intensity hadron beams of up to 2 MW beam power are a key element of new proposed experimental facilities at Fermilab. Project X, which includes a SCRF 8 GeV H{sup -} linac, will be the centerpiece of future HEP activities in the neutrino sector. After a short overview of this, and other proposed projects, we present the current status of the beam instrumentation activities at Fermilab with a few examples. With upgrades and improvements they can meet the requirements of the new beam facilities, however design and development of new instruments is needed, as shown by the prototype and conceptual examples in the last section.

  4. Lead paint removal with high-intensity light pulses.

    PubMed

    Grapperhaus, Michael J; Schaefer, Raymond B

    2006-12-15

    This paper presents the results of an initial investigation into using high-intensity incoherent light pulses to strip paint. Measurements of light pulse characteristics, the reflectivity of different paints and initial experiments on the threshold for paint removal, and paint removal are presented, along with an approximate model consistent with experimental results. Paint removal tests include lead paint, the reduction of lead levels to below levels required for lead abatement, as well as air and light emissions measurements that are within regulatory guidelines.

  5. Fast damping in mismatched high intensity beam transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variale, V.

    2001-08-01

    A very fast damping of beam envelope oscillation amplitudes was recently observed in simulations of high intensity beam transport, through periodic FODO cells, in mismatched conditions [V. Variale, Nuovo Cimento Soc. Ital. Fis. 112A, 1571-1582 (1999) and T. Clauser et al., in Proceedings of the Particle Accelerator Conference, New York, 1999 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1999), p. 1779]. A Landau damping mechanism was proposed at the origin of observed effect. In this paper, to further investigate the source of this fast damping, extensive simulations have been carried out. The results presented here support the interpretation of the mechanism at the origin of the fast damping as a Landau damping effect.

  6. ELECTRON COUD DYNAMICS IN HIGH-INTENSITY RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG, L.; WEI, J.

    2005-05-16

    Electron cloud due to beam-induced multipacting is one of the main concerns for the high intensity. Electrons generated and accumulated inside the beam pipe form an ''electron cloud'' that interacts with the circulating charged particle beam. With sizeable amount of electrons, this interaction can cause beam instability, beam loss and emittance growth. At the same time, the vacuum pressure will rise due to electron desorption. This talk intends to provide an overview of the mechanism and dynamics of the typical electron multipacting in various magnetic fields and mitigation measures with different beams.

  7. Nanoplasma Formation by High Intensity Hard X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, T.; Jurek, Z.; Fukuzawa, H.; Motomura, K.; Nagaya, K.; Wada, S.; Johnsson, P.; Siano, M.; Mondal, S.; Ito, Y.; Kimura, M.; Sakai, T.; Matsunami, K.; Hayashita, H.; Kajikawa, J.; Liu, X.-J.; Robert, E.; Miron, C.; Feifel, R.; Marangos, J. P.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y.; Yabashi, M.; Son, S.-K.; Ziaja, B.; Yao, M.; Santra, R.; Ueda, K.

    2015-01-01

    Using electron spectroscopy, we have investigated nanoplasma formation from noble gas clusters exposed to high-intensity hard-x-ray pulses at ~5 keV. Our experiment was carried out at the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron LAser (SACLA) facility in Japan. Dedicated theoretical simulations were performed with the molecular dynamics tool XMDYN. We found that in this unprecedented wavelength regime nanoplasma formation is a highly indirect process. In the argon clusters investigated, nanoplasma is mainly formed through secondary electron cascading initiated by slow Auger electrons. Energy is distributed within the sample entirely through Auger processes and secondary electron cascading following photoabsorption, as in the hard x-ray regime there is no direct energy transfer from the field to the plasma. This plasma formation mechanism is specific to the hard-x-ray regime and may, thus, also be important for XFEL-based molecular imaging studies. In xenon clusters, photo- and Auger electrons contribute more significantly to the nanoplasma formation. Good agreement between experiment and simulations validates our modelling approach. This has wide-ranging implications for our ability to quantitatively predict the behavior of complex molecular systems irradiated by high-intensity hard x-rays. PMID:26077863

  8. CW high intensity non-scaling FFAG proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, C.; Berz, M.; Makino, K.; Snopok, P.; /IIT, Chicago

    2011-04-01

    Accelerators are playing increasingly important roles in basic science, technology, and medicine including nuclear power, industrial irradiation, material science, and neutrino production. Proton and light-ion accelerators in particular have many research, energy and medical applications, providing one of the most effective treatments for many types of cancer. Ultra high-intensity and high-energy (GeV) proton drivers are a critical technology for accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS) and many HEP programs (Muon Collider). These high-intensity GeV-range proton drivers are particularly challenging, encountering duty cycle and space-charge limits in the synchrotron and machine size concerns in the weaker-focusing cyclotrons; a 10-20 MW proton driver is not presently considered technically achievable with conventional re-circulating accelerators. One, as-yet, unexplored re-circulating accelerator, the Fixed-field Alternating Gradient, or FFAG, is an attractive alternative to the cyclotron. Its strong focusing optics are expected to mitigate space charge effects, and a recent innovation in design has coupled stable tunes with isochronous orbits, making the FFAG capable of fixed-frequency, CW acceleration, as in the classical cyclotron. This paper reports on these new advances in FFAG accelerator technology and references advanced modeling tools for fixed-field accelerators developed for and unique to the code COSY INFINITY.

  9. Transcranial Clot Lysis Using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, Thilo; Zadicario, Eyal; Fisher, David J.; Bradley, William G.

    2010-03-01

    Stroke is the third common cause of death worldwide. The majority of strokes are caused by sudden vessel occlusion, due to a blood clot. Vessel recanalization is the primary goal of all acute stroke treatment strategies. Initial data using ultrasound in combination with a therapeutic agent for clot lysis in stroke are promising. However, sound absorption and defocusing of the ultrasound beam occur during transskull insonation, limiting the efficiency of this approach to high extent. Using a transskull High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) head system we were able to lyse blood clots within seconds and in absence of further lytic agents. We could show that any correction for the distortion might be negligible to focus the ultrasound beam after transskull insonation. The use of transskull HIFU for immediate clot lysis in the human brain without the need of further drugs and disregarding individual skull bone characteristics could become a successful strategy in early stroke treatment. Using magnetic resonance tomography for neuronavigation MRI Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound has the potential to open new avenues for therapeutic applications in the brain including Stroke, Intracranial Hemorrhages, Braintumors, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Thalamic Pain, BBB opening, and local drug delivery. First results in transcranial clot lysis will be presented in this paper.

  10. High Intensity X-Ray Coupling to Meteorite Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remo, J. L.; Furnish, M. D.; Hammerling, P.

    2001-06-01

    The responses of iron-nickel and stony meteorite samples to high-intensity X-ray pulses (70 - 215 GW/cm^2) pulses generated by exploding wire array hohlraums from the Sandia Z machine are reported. Induced shock waves created particle velocities of 25 - 75 m/s after rarefaction overtake, as measured by VISAR. From these values both momentum and energy coupling coefficients were obtained. These results are compared to recent high-powered-pulsed ( 1 GW/cm2 for 20 ns) 1054 nm laser induced shock pressures and momentum transfer, and energy coupling to iron-rich and stony meteorite targets (J. L. Remo et al, Laser and Particle Beams, 17, 25-44, 1999). These comparisons provide data on the scaling of shock induced effects on inhomogeneous materials in general and meteoritic materials in particular. The combination of both of these experiments extends the regime of high intensity pulsed energy deposition on non-homogeneous materials from the GW/cm^2 to 100's of GW/cm^2, providing valuable empirical insights into the shock critical equations of state and coupling responses. Application to astrophysical and geophysical modeling will be discussed.

  11. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Tumor Therapy System and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fucheng; He, Ye; Li, Rui

    2007-05-01

    At the end of last century, a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) tumor therapy system was successfully developed and manufactured in China, which has been already applied to clinical therapy. This article aims to discuss the HIFU therapy system and its application. Detailed research includes the following: power amplifiers for high-power ultrasound, ultrasound transducers with large apertures, accurate 3-D mechanical drives, a software control system (both high-voltage control and low-voltage control), and the B-mode ultrasonic diagnostic equipment used for treatment monitoring. Research on the dosage of ultrasound required for tumour therapy in multiple human cases has made it possible to relate a dosage formula, presented in this paper, to other significant parameters such as the volume of thermal tumor solidification, the acoustic intensity (I), and the ultrasound emission time (tn). Moreover, the HIFU therapy system can be applied to the clinical treatment of both benign and malignant tumors in the pelvic and abdominal cavity, such as uterine fibroids, liver cancer and pancreatic carcinoma.

  12. Is blue optical filter necessary in high speed phosphor-based white light LED visible light communications?

    PubMed

    Sung, Jiun-Yu; Chow, Chi-Wai; Yeh, Chien-Hung

    2014-08-25

    Optical blue filter is usually regarded as a critical optical component for high speed phosphor-based white light emitting diode (LED) visible-light-communication (VLC). However, the optical blue filter plays different roles in VLC when using modulations of on-off keying (OOK) or discrete multi-tone (DMT). We show that in the DMT VLC system, the blue optical filter may be unnecessary, and even degrade the transmission performance (by reducing the optical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)). Analyses and verifications by experiments are performed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the function of blue filters in VLC is explicitly analyzed.

  13. Diet composition and the performance of high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Maughan, R J; Greenhaff, P L; Leiper, J B; Ball, D; Lambert, C P; Gleeson, M

    1997-06-01

    The crucial role of muscle glycogen as a fuel during prolonged exercise is well established, and the effects of acute changes in dietary carbohydrate intake on muscle glycogen content and on endurance capacity are equally well known. More recently, it has been recognized that diet can also affect the performance of high-intensity exercise of short (2-7 min) duration. If the muscle glycogen content is lowered by prolonged (1-1.5 h) exhausting cycle exercise, and is subsequently kept low for 3-4 days by consumption of a diet deficient in carbohydrate (< 5% of total energy intake), there is a dramatic (approximately 10-30%) reduction in exercise capacity during cycling sustainable for about 5 min. The same effect is observed if exercise is preceded by 3-4 days on a carbohydrate-restricted diet or by a 24 h total fast without prior depletion of the muscle glycogen. Consumption of a diet high in carbohydrate (70% of total energy intake from carbohydrate) for 3-4 days before exercise improves exercise capacity during high-intensity exercise, although this effect is less consistent. The blood lactate concentration is always lower at the point of fatigue after a diet low in carbohydrate and higher after a diet high in carbohydrate than after a normal diet. Even when the duration of the exercise task is kept constant, the blood lactate concentration is higher after exercise on a diet high in carbohydrate than on a diet low in carbohydrate. Consumption of a low-carbohydrate isoenergetic diet is achieved by an increased intake of protein and fat. A high-protein diet, particularly when combined with a low carbohydrate intake, results in metabolic acidosis, which ensues within 24 h and persists for at least 4 days. This appears to be the result of an increase in the circulating concentrations of strong organic acids, particularly free fatty acids and 3-hydroxybutyrate, together with an increase in the total plasma protein concentration. This acidosis, rather than any decrease

  14. Infrared LED Enhanced Spectroscopic CdZnTe Detector Working under High Fluxes of X-rays.

    PubMed

    Pekárek, Jakub; Dědič, Václav; Franc, Jan; Belas, Eduard; Rejhon, Martin; Moravec, Pavel; Touš, Jan; Voltr, Josef

    2016-09-27

    This paper describes an application of infrared light-induced de-polarization applied on a polarized CdZnTe detector working under high radiation fluxes. We newly demonstrate the influence of a high flux of X-rays and simultaneous 1200-nm LED illumination on the spectroscopic properties of a CdZnTe detector. CdZnTe detectors operating under high radiation fluxes usually suffer from the polarization effect, which occurs due to a screening of the internal electric field by a positive space charge caused by photogenerated holes trapped at a deep level. Polarization results in the degradation of detector charge collection efficiency. We studied the spectroscopic behavior of CdZnTe under various X-ray fluxes ranging between 5 × 10 5 and 8 × 10 6 photons per mm 2 per second. It was observed that polarization occurs at an X-ray flux higher than 3 × 10 6 mm - 2 ·s - 1 . Using simultaneous illumination of the detector by a de-polarizing LED at 1200 nm, it was possible to recover X-ray spectra originally deformed by the polarization effect.

  15. Infrared LED Enhanced Spectroscopic CdZnTe Detector Working under High Fluxes of X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Pekárek, Jakub; Dědič, Václav; Franc, Jan; Belas, Eduard; Rejhon, Martin; Moravec, Pavel; Touš, Jan; Voltr, Josef

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an application of infrared light-induced de-polarization applied on a polarized CdZnTe detector working under high radiation fluxes. We newly demonstrate the influence of a high flux of X-rays and simultaneous 1200-nm LED illumination on the spectroscopic properties of a CdZnTe detector. CdZnTe detectors operating under high radiation fluxes usually suffer from the polarization effect, which occurs due to a screening of the internal electric field by a positive space charge caused by photogenerated holes trapped at a deep level. Polarization results in the degradation of detector charge collection efficiency. We studied the spectroscopic behavior of CdZnTe under various X-ray fluxes ranging between 5×105 and 8×106 photons per mm2 per second. It was observed that polarization occurs at an X-ray flux higher than 3×106 mm−2·s−1. Using simultaneous illumination of the detector by a de-polarizing LED at 1200 nm, it was possible to recover X-ray spectra originally deformed by the polarization effect. PMID:27690024

  16. High-voltage thin-film GaN LEDs fabricated on ceramic substrates: the alleviated droop effect at 670 W/cm(2).

    PubMed

    Tsai, M L; Liao, J H; Yeh, J H; Hsu, T C; Hon, S J; Chung, T Y; Lai, K Y

    2013-11-04

    High-voltage thin-film GaN LEDs with the emission wavelength of 455 nm were fabricated on ceramic substrates (230 W/m · K). The high-voltage operation was achieved by three cascaded sub-LEDs with dielectric passivation and metal bridges conformally deposited on the side walls. Under the driving power of 670 W/cm(2), the high-voltage LEDs exhibit much alleviated efficiency droop and the operative temperature below 80 °C. The excellent performances were attributed to the improved current spreading within each sub-LED and the superior heat sinking of the ceramic substrate.

  17. High-Intensity Interval Training Elicits Higher Enjoyment than Moderate Intensity Continuous Exercise.

    PubMed

    Thum, Jacob S; Parsons, Gregory; Whittle, Taylor; Astorino, Todd A

    2017-01-01

    Exercise adherence is affected by factors including perceptions of enjoyment, time availability, and intrinsic motivation. Approximately 50% of individuals withdraw from an exercise program within the first 6 mo of initiation, citing lack of time as a main influence. Time efficient exercise such as high intensity interval training (HIIT) may provide an alternative to moderate intensity continuous exercise (MICT) to elicit substantial health benefits. This study examined differences in enjoyment, affect, and perceived exertion between MICT and HIIT. Twelve recreationally active men and women (age = 29.5 ± 10.7 yr, VO2max = 41.4 ± 4.1 mL/kg/min, BMI = 23.1 ± 2.1 kg/m2) initially performed a VO2max test on a cycle ergometer to determine appropriate workloads for subsequent exercise bouts. Each subject returned for two additional exercise trials, performing either HIIT (eight 1 min bouts of cycling at 85% maximal workload (Wmax) with 1 min of active recovery between bouts) or MICT (20 min of cycling at 45% Wmax) in randomized order. During exercise, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), affect, and blood lactate concentration (BLa) were measured. Additionally, the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES) was completed after exercise. Results showed higher enjoyment (p = 0.013) in response to HIIT (103.8 ± 9.4) versus MICT (84.2 ± 19.1). Eleven of 12 participants (92%) preferred HIIT to MICT. However, affect was lower (p<0.05) and HR, RPE, and BLa were higher (p<0.05) in HIIT versus MICT. Although HIIT is more physically demanding than MICT, individuals report greater enjoyment due to its time efficiency and constantly changing stimulus.

  18. High-Intensity Interval Training Elicits Higher Enjoyment than Moderate Intensity Continuous Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Thum, Jacob S.; Parsons, Gregory; Whittle, Taylor

    2017-01-01

    Exercise adherence is affected by factors including perceptions of enjoyment, time availability, and intrinsic motivation. Approximately 50% of individuals withdraw from an exercise program within the first 6 mo of initiation, citing lack of time as a main influence. Time efficient exercise such as high intensity interval training (HIIT) may provide an alternative to moderate intensity continuous exercise (MICT) to elicit substantial health benefits. This study examined differences in enjoyment, affect, and perceived exertion between MICT and HIIT. Twelve recreationally active men and women (age = 29.5 ± 10.7 yr, VO2max = 41.4 ± 4.1 mL/kg/min, BMI = 23.1 ± 2.1 kg/m2) initially performed a VO2max test on a cycle ergometer to determine appropriate workloads for subsequent exercise bouts. Each subject returned for two additional exercise trials, performing either HIIT (eight 1 min bouts of cycling at 85% maximal workload (Wmax) with 1 min of active recovery between bouts) or MICT (20 min of cycling at 45% Wmax) in randomized order. During exercise, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), affect, and blood lactate concentration (BLa) were measured. Additionally, the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES) was completed after exercise. Results showed higher enjoyment (p = 0.013) in response to HIIT (103.8 ± 9.4) versus MICT (84.2 ± 19.1). Eleven of 12 participants (92%) preferred HIIT to MICT. However, affect was lower (p<0.05) and HR, RPE, and BLa were higher (p<0.05) in HIIT versus MICT. Although HIIT is more physically demanding than MICT, individuals report greater enjoyment due to its time efficiency and constantly changing stimulus. Trial Registration: NCT:02981667. PMID:28076352

  19. High-Intensity Sweeteners in Alternative Tobacco Products

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Shida; Beach, Evan S.; Sommer, Toby J.; Zimmerman, Julie B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Sweeteners in tobacco products may influence use initiation and reinforcement, with special appeal to adolescents. Recent analytical studies of smokeless tobacco products (snuff, snus, dissolvables) detected flavorants identical to those added to confectionary products such as hard candy and chewing gum. However, these studies did not determine the levels of sweeteners. The objective of the present study was to quantify added sweeteners in smokeless tobacco products, a dissolvable product, electronic cigarette liquids and to compare with sweetener levels in confectionary products. Methods: Sweetener content of US-sourced smokeless tobacco, electronic cigarette liquid, and confectionary product samples was analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization–mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). Results: All smokeless products contained synthetic high intensity sweeteners, with snus and dissolvables exceeding levels in confectionary products (as much as 25-fold). All snus samples contained sucralose and most also aspartame, but no saccharin. In contrast, all moist snuff samples contained saccharin. The dissolvable sample contained sucralose and sorbitol. Ethyl maltol was the most common sweet-associated component in electronic cigarette liquids. Discussion: Sweetener content was dependent on product category, with saccharin in moist snuff, an older category, sucralose added at high levels to more recently introduced products (snus, dissolvable) and ethyl maltol in electronic cigarette liquid. The very high sweetener concentrations may be necessary for the consumer to tolerate the otherwise aversive flavors of tobacco ingredients. Regulation of sweetener levels in smokeless tobacco products may be an effective measure to modify product attractiveness, initiation and use patterns. Implications: Dissolvables, snus and electronic cigarettes have been promoted as risk-mitigation products due to their relatively low content of nitrosamines and other tobacco

  20. High-Intensity Sweeteners in Alternative Tobacco Products.

    PubMed

    Miao, Shida; Beach, Evan S; Sommer, Toby J; Zimmerman, Julie B; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2016-11-01

    Sweeteners in tobacco products may influence use initiation and reinforcement, with special appeal to adolescents. Recent analytical studies of smokeless tobacco products (snuff, snus, dissolvables) detected flavorants identical to those added to confectionary products such as hard candy and chewing gum. However, these studies did not determine the levels of sweeteners. The objective of the present study was to quantify added sweeteners in smokeless tobacco products, a dissolvable product, electronic cigarette liquids and to compare with sweetener levels in confectionary products. Sweetener content of US-sourced smokeless tobacco, electronic cigarette liquid, and confectionary product samples was analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). All smokeless products contained synthetic high intensity sweeteners, with snus and dissolvables exceeding levels in confectionary products (as much as 25-fold). All snus samples contained sucralose and most also aspartame, but no saccharin. In contrast, all moist snuff samples contained saccharin. The dissolvable sample contained sucralose and sorbitol. Ethyl maltol was the most common sweet-associated component in electronic cigarette liquids. Sweetener content was dependent on product category, with saccharin in moist snuff, an older category, sucralose added at high levels to more recently introduced products (snus, dissolvable) and ethyl maltol in electronic cigarette liquid. The very high sweetener concentrations may be necessary for the consumer to tolerate the otherwise aversive flavors of tobacco ingredients. Regulation of sweetener levels in smokeless tobacco products may be an effective measure to modify product attractiveness, initiation and use patterns. Dissolvables, snus and electronic cigarettes have been promoted as risk-mitigation products due to their relatively low content of nitrosamines and other tobacco toxicants. This study is the first to quantify high

  1. Highly efficient narrow-band green and red phosphors enabling wider color-gamut LED backlight for more brilliant displays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Wang, Xiaojun; Kohsei, Takahashi; Yoshimura, Ken-ichi; Izumi, Makoto; Hirosaki, Naoto; Xie, Rong-Jun

    2015-11-02

    In this contribution, we propose to combine both narrow-band green (β-sialon:Eu(2+)) and red (K(2)SiF(6):Mn(4+)) phosphors with a blue InGaN chip to achieve white light-emitting diodes (wLEDs) with a large color gamut and a high efficiency for use as the liquid crystal display (LCD) backlighting. β-sialon:Eu(2+), prepared by a gas-pressure sinteing technique, has a peak emission at 535 nm, a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 54 nm, and an external quantum efficiency of 54.0% under the 450 nm excitation. K(2)SiF(6):Mn(4+) was synthesized by a twe-step co-precipitation methods, and exhibits a sharp line emission spectrum with the most intensified peak at 631 nm, a FWHM of ~3 nm, and an external quantum efficiency of 54.5%. The prepared three-band wLEDs have a high color temperature of 11,184 - 13,769 K (i.e., 7,828 - 8,611 K for LCD displays), and a luminous efficacy of 91 - 96 lm/W, measured under an applied current of 120 mA. The color gamut defined in the CIE 1931 and CIE 1976 color spaces are 85.5 - 85.9% and 94.3 - 96.2% of the NTSC stanadard, respectively. These optical properties are better than those phosphor-cpnverted wLED backlights using wide-band green or red phosphoprs, suggesting that the two narrow-band phosphors investigated are the most suitable luminescent materials for achieving more bright and vivid displays.

  2. Multifunctional pulse generator for high-intensity focused ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamano, Satoshi; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-Ichiro

    2017-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can achieve high spatial resolution for the treatment of diseases. A major technical challenge in implementing a HIFU therapeutic system is to generate high-voltage high-current signals for effectively exciting a multichannel HIFU transducer at high efficiencies. In this paper, we present the development of a multifunctional multichannel generator/driver. The generator can produce a long burst as well as an extremely high-voltage short pulse of pseudosinusoidal waves (trigger HIFU) and second-harmonic superimposed waves for HIFU transmission. The transmission timing, waveform, and frequency can be controlled using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) via a universal serial bus (USB) microcontroller. The hardware is implemented in a compact printed circuit board. The test results of trigger HIFU reveal that the power consumption and the temperature rise of metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors were reduced by 19.9% and 38.2 °C, respectively, from the previous design. The highly flexible performance of the novel generator/driver is demonstrated in the generation of second-harmonic superimposed waves, which is useful for cavitation-enhanced HIFU treatment, although the previous design exhibited difficulty in generating it.

  3. Hardware Acceleration of Non-Uniformity Correction for High-Performance Real-Time Infrared LED Scene Projectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-31

    color, 48-micron pitch superlattice light - emitting diode (SLED) array driven from a digital visual interface (DVI) computer interface at a frame rate... Emitting Diodes (IRLEDs) is described that achieves high performance without requiring a model of temperature levels present. An off-the-shelf...Engineering University of Delaware Newark, DE USA 19716 Abstract: A novel approach to correcting for intensity non-uniformity in the InfraRed Light

  4. Free-field propagation of high intensity noise. [supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, O. H.; Roth, S. D.; Welz, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Research on high intensity (finite amplitude) acoustic waves shows that nonlinear distortion effects generally result in a shift of energy to higher frequencies. The higher intensities associated with supersonic jets would therefore indicate that high frequency enhancement of the spectrum should occur, resulting in the differences observed between subsonic and supersonic jets. A 10,000 acoustic watt source installed in an anechoic chamber generates sound levels such that acoustic shocks are readily observable. Dual frequency excitation of the source produces a strong parametric effect with a difference frequency comparable in level to the primary frequency. The test set up and recording equipment being used to determine the finite amplitude noise representative of an actual supersonic jet are described as well as the development of a computer program based on Burger's equation. The spectra of 1/2 octave band, 1 kHz sine wave, and dual frequency input and output are presented in graphs along with waveforms at Z = .025, 0.1, and 1.0.

  5. Formation of a high intensity low energy positron string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Syresin, E. M.; Itahashi, T.; Dubinov, A. E.

    2004-05-01

    The possibility of a high intensity low energy positron beam production is discussed. The proposed Positron String Trap (PST) is based on the principles and technology of the Electron String Ion Source (ESIS) developed in JINR during the last decade. A linear version of ESIS has been used successfully for the production of intense highly charged ion beams of various elements. Now the Tubular Electron String Ion Source (TESIS) concept is under study and this opens really new promising possibilities in physics and technology. In this report, we discuss the application of the tubular-type trap for the storage of positrons cooled to the cryogenic temperatures of 0.05 meV. It is intended that the positron flux at the energy of 1-5 eV, produced by the external source, is injected into the Tubular Positron Trap which has a similar construction as the TESIS. Then the low energy positrons are captured in the PST Penning trap and are cooled down because of their synchrotron radiation in the strong (5-10 T) applied magnetic field. It is expected that the proposed PST should permit storing and cooling to cryogenic temperature of up to 5×109 positrons. The accumulated cooled positrons can be used further for various physics applications, for example, antihydrogen production.

  6. Challenges of PIC Simulations at High Laser Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luedtke, Scott V.; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Toncian, Toma; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel

    2015-11-01

    New lasers with very high intensity pulses (I >1022 W/cm2) are being commissioned to explore new regimes of laser-matter interactions. These lasers require accurate particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, which may require new computational approaches to efficiently produce physically accurate results. We examine the constraints on PIC simulations at high field intensity imposed by both the particle pusher and field solver. As proposed by Arefiev, et al. (Physics of Plasmas 22, 013103 (2015)), we implement adaptive sub-cycling in the Boris pusher of the EPOCH code and demonstrate its effectiveness in efficiently reducing errors from the pusher. It is well know that the use of a finite-difference scheme also modifies the electromagnetic wave dispersion relation. We examine the effect of the resulting discrepancy in the phase velocity on electron acceleration, and demonstrate that relatively small errors in the phase velocity lead to substantial changes in the electron energy gain from the laser pulse. We discuss the corresponding conditions for the field solver. These results are relevant to direct laser acceleration and underdense ionization experiments. This work was supported by NNSA cooperative agreement DE-NA0002008, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's PULSE program (12-63-PULSE-FP014) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-14-1-0045).

  7. High color rendering index of remote-type white LEDs with multi-layered quantum dot-phosphor films and short-wavelength pass dichroic filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hee Chang; Oh, Ji Hye; Do, Young Rag

    2014-09-01

    This paper introduces high color rendering index (CRI) white light-emitting diodes (W-LEDs) coated with red emitting (Sr,Ca)AlSiN3:Eu phosphors and yellowish-green emitting AgIn5S8/ZnS (AIS/ZS) quantum dots (QDs) on glass or a short-wavelength pass dichroic filter (SPDF), which transmit blue wavelength regions and reflect yellow wavelength regions. The red emitting (Sr,Ca)AlSiN3:Eu phosphor film is coated on glass and a SPDF using a screen printing method, and then the yellowish-green emitting AIS/ZS QDs are coated on the red phosphor (Sr,Ca)AlSiN3:Eu film-coated glass and SPDF using the electrospray (e-spray) method.To fabricate the red phosphor film, the optimum amount of phosphor is dispersed in a silicon binder to form a red phosphor paste. The AIS/ZS QDs are mixed with dimethylformamide (DMF), toluene, and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) for the e-spray coating. The substrates are spin-coated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) to fabricate a conductive surface. The CRI of the white LEDs is improved through inserting the red phosphor film between the QD layer and the glass substrate. Furthermore, the light intensities of the multi-layered phosphor films are enhanced through changing the glass substrate to the SPDF. The correlated color temperatures (CCTs) vary as a function of the phosphor concentration in the phosphor paste. The optical properties of the yellowish-green AIS/ZS QDs and red (Sr,Ca)AlSiN3:Eu phosphors are characterized using photoluminescence (PL), and the multi-layered QD-phosphor films are measured using electroluminescence (EL) with an InGaN blue LED (λmax = 450 nm) at 60 mA.

  8. Position estimation for fiducial marks based on high intensity retroreflective tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushkina, Anna; Serikova, Mariya; Pantyushin, Anton

    2016-04-01

    3D position estimation of an object usually involve computer vision techniques, which require fiducial markers attached to the objects surface. Modern technology provides a high intensity retroreflective material in the form of a tape which is easy to mount to the object and can be used as a base for fiducial marks. But inevitable drawback of the tapes with the highest retroreflective intensity is the presence of technological pattern which affects spatial distribution of retroreflected light and deforms border of any print on tape's surface. In this work we compare various shapes of metrological pattern and examine Fourier descriptors based image processing to obtain estimation of accuracy of mark image position. To verify results we developed a setup consisting of a camera based on Sony ICX274 CCD, 25 mm lens, 800 nm LED lightning and high intensity microprismatic tape. The experiment showed that there is no significant difference between proposed mark shapes as well as between direct and indirect contrast when proposed image processing is used. The experiments confirmed that the image processing implemented without elimination of non-reflective netting pattern can only provide an accuracy of coordinates extraction close to 1 pix.

  9. Efficacy of high intensity atorvastatin versus moderate intensity atorvastatin for acute coronary syndrome patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi; Xu, Yueqiao; Hao, Hengjian; Yin, Chunlin; Xu, Ji; Li, Jing; Wang, Yanling; Xu, Dong

    2016-11-01

    To investigate whether more benefits can be achieved through high intensity atorvastatin compared with moderate intensity atorvastatin in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). This was a randomized controlled trail. Total 591 ACS patients with DM who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention were enrolled, 297 in high intensity atorvastatin group (40mg/day) and 294 in moderate intensity atorvastatin group (20mg/day). The primary end point was one-year incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE, including cardiovascular death, spontaneous myocardial infarction, unplanned revascularization). Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to analyze the association between clinical endpoints and atorvastatin treatment. At the end of one-year, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was lower in high intensity group than in moderate group (1.6±0.6 vs 1.8±0.6, p=0.041). MACE in high intensity group decreased 44.5% than moderate group (8.4% vs. 14.6%, p=0.018). The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for MACE in patients with atorvastatin 40mg/d was lower compared to patients with atorvastatin 20mg/d (HR [95% CI] 0.61 [0.36 to 0.91], p=0.026). The rates of adverse events were no significantly different between the two groups. For ACS patients with DM, high intensity atorvastatin induced better long-term outcomes compared with moderate intensity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered. PMID:25053938

  11. Ultra-High Intensity Magnetic Field Generation in Dense Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2014-01-08

    The main objective of this grant proposal was to explore the efficient generation of intense currents. Whereas the efficient generation of electric current in low-­energy-­density plasma has occupied the attention of the magnetic fusion community for several decades, scant attention has been paid to carrying over to high-­energy-­density plasma the ideas for steady-­state current drive developed for low-­energy-­density plasma, or, for that matter, to inventing new methodologies for generating electric current in high-­energy-­density plasma. What we proposed to do was to identify new mechanisms to accomplish current generation, and to assess the operation, physics, and engineering basis of new forms of current drive in regimes appropriate for new fusion concepts.

  12. Chemical modification of chitosan under high-intensity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Cravotto, Giancarlo; Tagliapietra, Silvia; Robaldo, Bruna; Trotta, Michele

    2005-01-01

    Chitosan (CTS), a biocompatible, biodegradable, non-toxic polymer, dissolves in water only if pH is lowered under 6.5, when a substantial fraction of the amino groups is protonated. Its range of application has been much extended by partially depolymerising it or converting it to water-soluble derivatives. Working under high-intensity ultrasound at 17.8-18.5 kHz, using either a simple horn or a cup horn, we achieved a controlled depolymerization of CTS, also prepared in high yields several derivatives that can be useful intermediates for further chemical modification, as well as several water-soluble derivatives that lend themselves to a host of industrial applications. Compared to conventional methods, all these reactions went to completion in considerably shorter times at lower temperatures.

  13. Increased collection efficiency of LIFI high intensity electrodeless light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafidi, Abdeslam; DeVincentis, Marc; Duelli, Markus; Gilliard, Richard

    2008-02-01

    Recently, RF driven electrodeless high intensity light sources have been implemented successfully in the projection display systems for HDTV and videowall applications. This paper presents advances made in the RF waveguide and electric field concentrator structures with the purpose of reducing effective arc size and increasing light collection. In addition, new optical designs are described that further improve system efficiency. The results of this work demonstrate that projection system light throughput is increased relative to previous implementations and performance is optimized for home theater and other front projector applications that maintain multi-year lifetime without re-lamping, complete spectral range, fast start times and high levels of dynamic contrast due to dimming flexibility in the light source system.

  14. Digital control of high-intensity acoustic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A high intensity acoustic test system is reported that consists of a reverberation room measuring 18 feet wide by 21 feet long by 26 feet high, with an internal volume of 10,900 cubic feet. The room is rectangular in shape. Acoustic energy is supplied through two 50-Hz cutoff exponential horns about 12 feet long. Each of the two horns has two transducers rated at 4000 acoustic watts each. A gaseous nitrogen supply is used to supply the energy. The equalized electrical signal is corrected by a circuit designed to compensate for the transducer nonlinearity, then fed into one channel of a phase linear power amplifier, then into the transducer. The amplifiers have been modified to increase their reliability. The acoustic energy in the room is monitored by six B and K 1/2-inch condenser microphones. The electrical signal from each microphone is fed into a six channel real time averager to give a spatial average of the signals.

  15. Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Kristie L.; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary R.

    2006-11-14

    This report summarizes technical progress during the program “Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries”, performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The objective of this program was to use technology recently invented at Virginia Tech to develop and demonstrate the application of self-calibrating optical fiber temperature and pressure sensors to several key energy-intensive industries where conventional, commercially available sensors exhibit greatly abbreviated lifetimes due primarily to environmental degradation. A number of significant technologies were developed under this program, including • a laser bonded silica high temperature fiber sensor with a high temperature capability up to 700°C and a frequency response up to 150 kHz, • the world’s smallest fiber Fabry-Perot high temperature pressure sensor (125 x 20 μm) with 700°C capability, • UV-induced intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors for distributed measurement, • a single crystal sapphire fiber-based sensor with a temperature capability up to 1600°C. These technologies have been well demonstrated and laboratory tested. Our work plan included conducting major field tests of these technologies at EPRI, Corning, Pratt & Whitney, and Global Energy; field validation of the technology is critical to ensuring its usefulness to U.S. industries. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, DOE was unable to follow through with its funding commitment to support Energy Efficiency Science Initiative projects and this final phase was eliminated.

  16. System and method that suppresses intensity fluctuations for free space high-speed optical communication

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Bishop, Alan R.; Nguyen, Dinh C.; Chernobrod, Boris M.; Gorshkov, Vacheslav N.

    2009-10-13

    A high-speed (Gbps), free space optical communication system is based on spectral encoding of radiation from a wide band light source, such as a laser. By using partially coherent laser beams in combination with a relatively slow photosensor, scintillations can be suppressed by orders of magnitude for distances of more than 10 km. To suppress the intensity fluctuations due to atmospheric turbulence, a source with partial transverse coherence in combination with slow response time photodetector is used. Information is encoded in the spectral domain of a wideband optical source by modulation of spectral amplitudes. A non-coherent light source with wide spectrum (an LED, for example) may be used for high-speed communication over short (less than about a mile) distances.

  17. Outcomes of exertional rhabdomyolysis following high-intensity resistance training.

    PubMed

    Huynh, A; Leong, K; Jones, N; Crump, N; Russell, D; Anderson, M; Steinfort, D; Johnson, D F

    2016-05-01

    High-intensity resistance training (HIRT) programmes are increasingly popular amongst personal trainers and those attending gymnasiums. We report the experience of exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) at two tertiary hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. To compare the clinical outcomes of ER with other causes of rhabdomyolysis. Retrospective cross-sectional study of patients presenting with a serum creatine kinase (CK) of greater than 25 000 units/L from 1 September 2013 to 31 August 2014 at two tertiary referral hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. Records were examined to identify care measures implemented during hospital stay, clinical outcomes during admission and on subsequent follow up. Thirty four cases of rhabdomyolysis with a CK of greater than 25 000 units/L (normal range: 20-180 units/L) were identified during the 12-month study period. Twelve of the 34 cases (35%) had ER with 10 of 12 related to HIRT. No acute kidney injury, intensive care admission or death were seen among those with ER. All cases were managed conservatively, with 11 admitted and 9 receiving intravenous fluids only. In contrast, patients with rhabdomyolysis from other causes experienced significantly higher rates of intensive care admission (64%, P = 0.0002), acute kidney injury (82%, P = 0.0001) and death (27%, P = 0.069). ER resulting from HIRT appears to have a benign course compared with rhabdomyolysis of other aetiologies in patients with a serum CK greater than 25 000 units/L. Conservative management of ER appears to be adequate, although this requires confirmation in future prospective studies. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  18. Design Aspects of Focal Beams From High-Intensity Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Kruse, Dustin E.; Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2011-01-01

    As the applications of ultrasonic thermal therapies expand, the design of the high-intensity array must address both the energy delivery of the main beam and the character and relevance of off-target beam energy. We simulate the acoustic field performance of a selected set of circular arrays organized by array format, including flat versus curved arrays, periodic versus random arrays, and center void diameter variations. Performance metrics are based on the −3-dB focal main lobe (FML) positioning range, axial grating lobe (AGL) temperatures, and side lobe levels. Using finite-element analysis, we evaluate the relative heating of the FML and the AGLs. All arrays have a maximum diameter of 100λ, with element count ranging from 64 to 1024 and continuous wave frequency of 1.5 MHz. First, we show that a 50% spherical annulus produces focus beam side lobes which decay as a function of lateral distance at nearly 87% of the exponential rate of a full aperture. Second, for the arrays studied, the efficiency of power delivery over the −3-dB focus positioning range for spherical arrays is at least 2-fold greater than for flat arrays; the 256-element case shows a 5-fold advantage for the spherical array. Third, AGL heating can be significant as the focal target is moved to its distal half-intensity depth from the natural focus. Increasing the element count of a randomized array to 256 elements decreases the AGL-to-FML heating ratio to 0.12 at the distal half-intensity depth. Further increases in element count yield modest improvements. A 49% improvement in the AGL-to-peak heating ratio is predicted by using the Sumanaweera spiral element pattern with randomization. PMID:21859578

  19. [Research on the Highly Stable White LED with CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dot as Light Conversion Layer].

    PubMed

    Cao, Jin; Zhou, Jie; Xie, Jing-weil; Chen, An-ping; Zhang, Xuel; Yin, Lu-qiao; Zhang, Jian-hua

    2016-02-01

    In accordance with the one-step synthesis, in this paper, we synthesized 510, 550 and 630 nm three emission peaks CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots with high stability and high quantum yield whose quantum yield were 82%, 98% and 97%. We used the quantum dot material to replace the phosphor material, and mixed QDs with the silicone uniformly, then dispersed the QDs/silicone composites onto the blue InGaN LEDs to fabricate the QDs-WLEDs. By successively adding different colors of quantum dots for the preparation of quantum dot light converting layer, We investigated that how does the ratio of the three kind of quantum dots whose peaks were 510, 550 and 630 nm effect on the properties of the white LED devices. This paper also studied the mechanism of energy conversion between different colors of quantum dots. We also utilized the mechanism that the quantum dots effect on the white spectrum and color coordinates; we got the results of the optimization of the white device and the ratio of three-color quantum dots. The results show that when the quantum dot ratio is 24:7:10, white LED devices with high stability and high efficiency can be obtained, in the current range of 20-200 mA, the range of color temperature is from 4 607 to 5 920 K, the CIE-1931 coordinates is from (0.355 1,0.348 3) to (0.323 4, 0.336 1), the color rendering index is from 77. 6 to 84. 2, and the highest power efficiency of the devices achieves to 31.69 lm · W⁻¹ @ 20 mA. In addition, in order to further investigate the reason of stable device performance, We studied the effects of time, temperature, UV treatment on the stability of CdSe/ZnS QDs/silicone light conversion material, the results show that the excellent stability of the devices attributes to the stability of the one-step synthesis of core-shell structure of the quantum dot material, the final optimized device is a low-power high-quality white light source and the device has good application prospects in the field of standard white

  20. High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Postprandial Triacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Burns, Stephen F; Miyashita, Masashi; Stensel, David J

    2015-07-01

    This review examined if high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) reduces postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG) levels. Fifteen studies were identified, in which the effect of interval exercise conducted at an intensity of >65% of maximal oxygen uptake was evaluated on postprandial TAG levels. Analysis was divided between studies that included supramaximal exercise and those that included submaximal interval exercise. Ten studies examined the effect of a single session of low-volume HIIE including supramaximal sprints on postprandial TAG. Seven of these studies noted reductions in the postprandial total TAG area under the curve the morning after exercise of between ~10 and 21% compared with rest, but three investigations found no significant difference in TAG levels. Variations in the HIIE protocol used, inter-individual variation or insufficient time post-exercise for an increase in lipoprotein lipase activity are proposed reasons for the divergent results among studies. Five studies examined the effect of high-volume submaximal interval exercise on postprandial TAG. Four of these studies were characterised by high exercise energy expenditure and effectively attenuated total postprandial TAG levels by ~15-30%, but one study with a lower energy expenditure found no effect on TAG. The evidence suggests that supramaximal HIIE can induce large reductions in postprandial TAG levels but findings are inconsistent. Submaximal interval exercise offers no TAG metabolic or time advantage over continuous aerobic exercise but could be appealing in nature to some individuals. Future research should examine if submaximal interval exercise can reduce TAG levels in line with more realistic and achievable exercise durations of 30 min per day.

  1. Semicircular Canal Pressure Changes During High-intensity Acoustic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Anne K; Banakis Hartl, Renee M; Greene, Nathaniel T; Benichoux, Victor; Mattingly, Jameson K; Cass, Stephen P; Tollin, Daniel J

    2017-08-01

    Acoustic stimulation generates measurable sound pressure levels in the semicircular canals. High-intensity acoustic stimuli can cause hearing loss and balance disruptions. To examine the propagation of acoustic stimuli to the vestibular end-organs, we simultaneously measured fluid pressure in the cochlea and semicircular canals during both air- and bone-conducted sound presentation. Five full-cephalic human cadaveric heads were prepared bilaterally with a mastoidectomy and extended facial recess. Vestibular pressures were measured within the superior, lateral, and posterior semicircular canals, and referenced to intracochlear pressure within the scala vestibuli with fiber-optic pressure probes. Pressures were measured concurrently with laser Doppler vibrometry measurements of stapes velocity during stimulation with both air- and bone-conduction. Stimuli were pure tones between 100 Hz and 14 kHz presented with custom closed-field loudspeakers for air-conducted sounds and via commercially available bone-anchored device for bone-conducted sounds. Pressures recorded in the superior, lateral, and posterior semicircular canals in response to sound stimulation were equal to or greater in magnitude than those recorded in the scala vestibuli (up to 20 dB higher). The pressure magnitudes varied across canals in a frequency-dependent manner. High sound pressure levels were recorded in the semicircular canals with sound stimulation, suggesting that similar acoustical energy is transmitted to the semicircular canals and the cochlea. Since these intralabyrinthine pressures exceed intracochlear pressure levels, our results suggest that the vestibular end-organs may also be at risk for injury during exposure to high-intensity acoustic stimuli known to cause trauma in the auditory system.

  2. NASA's New High Intensity Solar Environment Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    Across the world, new spaceflight missions are being designed and executed that will place spacecraft and instruments into challenging environments throughout the solar system. To aid in the successful completion of these new missions, NASA has developed a new flexible space environment test platform. The High Intensity Solar Environment Test (HISET) capability located at NASA fs Marshall Space Flight Center provides scientists and engineers with the means to test spacecraft materials and systems in a wide range of solar wind and solar photon environments. Featuring a solar simulator capable of delivering approximately 1 MW/m2 of broad spectrum radiation at maximum power, HISET provides a means to test systems or components that could explore the solar corona. The solar simulator consists of three high-power Xenon arc lamps that can be operated independently over a range of power to meet test requirements; i.e., the lamp power can be greatly reduced to simulate the solar intensity at several AU. Integral to the HISET capability are charged particle sources that can provide a solar wind (electron and proton) environment. Used individually or in combination, the charged particle sources can provide fluxes ranging from a few nA/cm2 to 100s of nA/cm2 over an energy range of 50 eV to 100 keV for electrons and 100 eV to 30 keV for protons. Anchored by a high vacuum facility equipped with a liquid nitrogen cold shroud for radiative cooling scenarios, HISET is able to accommodate samples as large as 1 meter in diameter. In this poster, details of the HISET capability will be presented, including the wide ]ranging configurability of the system.

  3. Proceedings of the third ICFA mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, T.

    1997-11-01

    The third mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on May 7-9, 1997 and had about 30 participants. The workshop focussed on rf and longitudinal dynamics issues relevant to intense and/or bright hadron synchrotrons. A plenary session was followed by four sessions on particular topics. This document contains copies of the viewgraphs used as well as summaries written by the session chairs.

  4. HIGH INTENSITY EFFECTS IN THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2008-01-01

    Currently operating at 0.5 MW beam power on target, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is already the world's most powerful pulsed neutron source. However, we are only one third of the way to full power. As we ramp toward full power, the control of the beam and beam loss in the ring will be critical. In addition to practical considerations, such as choice of operating point, painting scheme, RF bunching, and beam scattering, it may be necessary to understand and mitigate collective effects due to space charge, impedances, and electron clouds. At each stage of the power ramp-up, we use all available resources to understand and to minimize beam losses. From the standpoint of beam dynamics, the losses observed so far under normal operating conditions have not involved collective phenomena. We are now entering the intensity regime in which this may change. In dedicated high intensity beam studies, we have already observed resistive wall, extraction kicker impedance-driven, and electron cloud activities. The analysis and simulation of this data are important ongoing activities at SNS. This paper discusses the status of this work, as well as other considerations necessary to the successful full power operation of SNS.

  5. High power targets for production of intense radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, W. L.; Drake, D. M.; Wilson, M. T.; Walker, J. J.; Lenz, J. W.

    1999-04-26

    Issues are discussed in producing intense Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) using the Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL) approach, based on the use of thick targets employed at existing facilities. Some new physics studies may possibly be addressed by improving the performance of these existing targets through improvements in release and effusion properties to optimize the RIB yields. It is, however, acknowledged that many desired physics objectives using RIB can be met only by employing production beams of energetic light ions or protons with currents up to 100 {mu}A. Development of targets that use such intense production beams needs to address the requirement to control operational temperatures derived from internal production beam interactions with the target materials. In addition, issues arise for target materials in terms of their thermal characteristics, such as thermal conductivity and thermo-mechanical properties. A target concept is described for an in-beam test of a prototype target for actual thermal behavior under RIB production conditions. For such a test, a high-power test facility is needed; fortunately, the prototypical production beam currents required exist at the TRIUMF accelerator facility. An experimental proposal has been approved for such a test.

  6. Blood coagulation using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Phuc V.; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-03-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) technology provides a feasible method of achieving thermal coagulation during surgical procedures. One of the potential clinical benefits of HIFU can induce immediate hemostasis without suturing. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficiency of a HIFU system for blood coagulation on severe vascular injury. ngHIFU treatment was implemented immediately after bleeding in artery. The ultrasound probe was made of piezoelectric material, generating a central frequency of 2.0 MHz as well as an ellipsoidal focal spot of 2 mm in lateral dimension and 10 mm in axial dimension. Acoustic coagulation was employed on a perfused chicken artery model in vitro. A surgical incision (1 to 2 mm long) was made with a scapel on the arterial wall, and heparinized autologous blood was made to leak out from the incision with a syringe pump. A total of 5 femoral artery incisions was treated with the HIFU beam. The intensity of 4500 W/cm2 at the focus was applied for all treatments. Complete hemostasis was achieved in all treatments, along with the treatment times of 25 to 50 seconds. The estimated intraoperative blood loss was from 2 to 5 mL. The proposed HIFU system may provide an effective method for immediate blood coagulation for arteries and veins in clinical applications.

  7. Depth-specific optogenetic control in vivo with a scalable, high-density μLED neural probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharf, Robert; Tsunematsu, Tomomi; McAlinden, Niall; Dawson, Martin D.; Sakata, Shuzo; Mathieson, Keith

    2016-06-01

    Controlling neural circuits is a powerful approach to uncover a causal link between neural activity and behaviour. Optogenetics has been widely adopted by the neuroscience community as it offers cell-type-specific perturbation with millisecond precision. However, these studies require light delivery in complex patterns with cellular-scale resolution, while covering a large volume of tissue at depth in vivo. Here we describe a novel high-density silicon-based microscale light-emitting diode (μLED) array, consisting of up to ninety-six 25 μm-diameter μLEDs emitting at a wavelength of 450 nm with a peak irradiance of 400 mW/mm2. A width of 100 μm, tapering to a 1 μm point, and a 40 μm thickness help minimise tissue damage during insertion. Thermal properties permit a set of optogenetic operating regimes, with ~0.5 °C average temperature increase. We demonstrate depth-dependent activation of mouse neocortical neurons in vivo, offering an inexpensive novel tool for the precise manipulation of neural activity.

  8. Nurse led telephone assessment of expanded disability status scale assessment in MS patients at high levels of disability.

    PubMed

    Huda, S; Cavey, A; Izat, A; Mattison, P; Boggild, M; Palace, J

    2016-03-15

    In clinical trials drop out bias reduces the validity of results. This is a particular problem in long-term multiple sclerosis (MS) studies, particularly when patients become progressively disabled and have increasing difficulty attending assessment clinics. To assess the validity of nurse led telephone assessment of Expanded Disability Status Scale (TEDSS) in MS patients with EDSS scores >6.0. We performed a multi-centre, single blind trial to assess nurse derived TEDSS against physician face-to-face EDSS scores derived from neurological examination (FEDSS) in patients with clinically definite MS and EDSS >6.0. Ninety patients (n=15 primary progressive MS, n=74 secondary progressive MS, n=1 relapsing remitting MS) had a mean baseline FEDSS of 7.5. TEDSS correlated with FEDSS (r=0.76, p<0.0001) and kappa scores for perfect agreement, within 0.5 of an EDSS points, and within 1 EDSS point were 0.25, 0.86, and 1.0 respectively. Intra-class correlation between the scoring systems was 0.88, representing a high level of agreement. Nurse-led telephone assessment of EDSS gives good agreement with physician derived face-to-face EDSS in MS patients with higher disability scores. This may be a valuable tool to improve clinical follow-up in routine clinical practice and improve patient retention in long-term outcome studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. High Power, Computer-Controlled, LED-Based Light Sources for Fluorescence Imaging and Image-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gioux, Sylvain; Kianzad, Vida; Ciocan, Razvan; Gupta, Sunil; Oketokoun, Rafiou; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-01-01

    Optical imaging requires appropriate light sources. For image-guided surgery, and in particular fluorescence-guided surgery, high fluence rate, long working distance, computer control, and precise control of wavelength are required. In this study, we describe the development of light emitting diode (LED)-based light sources that meet these criteria. These light sources are enabled by a compact LED module that includes an integrated linear driver, heat-dissipation technology, and real-time temperature monitoring. Measuring only 27 mm W by 29 mm H, and weighing only 14.7 g, each module provides up to 6500 lx of white (400-650 nm) light and up to 157 mW of filtered fluorescence excitation light, while maintaining an operating temperature ≤ 50°C. We also describe software that can be used to design multi-module light housings, and an embedded processor that permits computer control and temperature monitoring. With these tools, we constructed a 76-module, sterilizable, 3-wavelength surgical light source capable of providing up to 40,000 lx of white light, 4.0 mW/cm2 of 670 nm near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence excitation light, and 14.0 mW/cm2 of 760 nm NIR fluorescence excitation light over a 15-cm diameter field-of-view. Using this light source, we demonstrate NIR fluorescence-guided surgery in a large animal model. PMID:19723473

  10. Depth-specific optogenetic control in vivo with a scalable, high-density μLED neural probe

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Robert; Tsunematsu, Tomomi; McAlinden, Niall; Dawson, Martin D.; Sakata, Shuzo; Mathieson, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Controlling neural circuits is a powerful approach to uncover a causal link between neural activity and behaviour. Optogenetics has been widely adopted by the neuroscience community as it offers cell-type-specific perturbation with millisecond precision. However, these studies require light delivery in complex patterns with cellular-scale resolution, while covering a large volume of tissue at depth in vivo. Here we describe a novel high-density silicon-based microscale light-emitting diode (μLED) array, consisting of up to ninety-six 25 μm-diameter μLEDs emitting at a wavelength of 450 nm with a peak irradiance of 400 mW/mm2. A width of 100 μm, tapering to a 1 μm point, and a 40 μm thickness help minimise tissue damage during insertion. Thermal properties permit a set of optogenetic operating regimes, with ~0.5 °C average temperature increase. We demonstrate depth-dependent activation of mouse neocortical neurons in vivo, offering an inexpensive novel tool for the precise manipulation of neural activity. PMID:27334849

  11. High Intensity, Pulsed, D-D Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D. L.; Vainionpaa, J. H.; Jones, G.; Piestrup, M. A.; Gary, C. K.; Harris, J. L.; Fuller, M. J.; Cremer, J. T.; Ludewigt, B. A.; Kwan, J. W.; Reijonen, J.; Leung, K.-N.; Gough, R. A.

    2009-03-10

    Single ion-beam RF-plasma neutron generators are presented as a laboratory source of intense neutrons. The continuous and pulsed operations of such a neutron generator using the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction are reported. The neutron beam can be pulsed by switching the RF plasma and/or a gate electrode. These generators are actively vacuum pumped so that a continuous supply of deuterium gas is present for the production of ions and neutrons. This contributes to the generator's long life. These single-beam generators are capable of producing up to 10{sup 10} n/s. Previously, Adelphi and LBNL have demonstrated these generators' applications in fast neutron radiography, Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). Together with an inexpensive compact moderator, these high-output neutron generators extend useful applications to home laboratory operations.

  12. High Intensity, Pulsed, D-D Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D. L.; Vainionpaa, J. H.; Jones, G.; Piestrup, M. A.; Gary, C. K.; Harris, J. L.; Fuller, M. J.; Cremer, J. T.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Kwan, J. W.; Reijonen, J.; Leung, K.-N.; Gough, R. A.

    2008-08-01

    Single ion-beam RF-plasma neutron generators are presented as a laboratory source of intense neutrons. The continuous and pulsed operations of such a neutron generator using the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction are reported. The neutron beam can be pulsed by switching the RF plasma and/or a gate electrode. These generators are actively vacuum pumped so that a continuous supply of deuterium gas is present for the production of ions and neutrons. This contributes to the generator's long life. These single-beam generators are capable of producing up to 1E10 n/s. Previously, Adelphi and LBNL have demonstrated these generators' applications in fast neutron radiography, Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). Together with an inexpensive compact moderator, these high-output neutron generators extend useful applications to home laboratory operations.

  13. Optimal conditions for tissue perforation using high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Takashi; Kihara, Taizo; Ogawa, Kouji; Tanabe, Ryoko; Yosizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Kakimoto, Takashi; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Chiba, Toshio

    2012-10-01

    To perforate tissue lying deep part in body, a large size transducer was assembled by combining four spherical-shaped transducers, and the optimal conditions for tissue perforation have studied using ventricle muscle of chicken as a target. The ex vivo experiments showed that ventricle muscle was successfully perforated both when it was exposed to High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) directly and when it was exposed to HIFU through atrial muscle layer. Moreover, it was shown that calculated acoustic power distributions are well similar to the perforation patterns, and that the acoustic energy distributes very complexly near the focus. Lastly, perforation on the living rabbit bladder wall was demonstrated as a preliminary in vivo experiment.

  14. High-energy ionization by relativistically intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, J. Z.; Cajiao Vélez, F.; Krajewska, K.

    2017-07-01

    High-energy ionization by relativistically intense, 30~\\text{fs} laser pulses is investigated within the relativistic strong-field approximation. It is shown that the momentum distribution of photoelectrons is focused around a spiral, the analytical form of which is derived from the saddle-point analysis of probability amplitudes. The geometry of this spiral allows one to clearly interpret the exact numerical results of the ionization probability distributions and to identify the photoelectron momentum domains in which the interference- and the interference-free patterns are observed. It is also demonstrated that attosecond single-electron wave packets can be created in this process. Thus, it opens new research opportunities for the four-dimensional electron diffraction experiments, which can be conducted in large-scale laser facilities such as ELI or XCELS.

  15. High-intensity therapeutic ultrasound: metrological requirements versus clinical usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, J.-F.

    2012-10-01

    High-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) is an appealing non-invasive, non-ionizing therapeutic modality with a wide range of tissue interactions ranging from transient permeabilization of cell membranes to thermal ablation. The ability to guide and monitor the treatment with an associated ultrasonic or magnetic resonance imaging device has resulted in a dramatic rise in the clinical use of therapeutic ultrasound in the past two decades. Nevertheless, the range of clinical applications and the number of patients treated has grown at a much higher pace than the definition of standards. In this paper the metrological requirements of the therapeutic beams are reviewed and are compared with the current clinical use of image-guided HITU mostly based on a practical approach. Liver therapy, a particularly challenging clinical application, is discussed to highlight the differences between some complex clinical situations and the experimental conditions of the metrological characterization of ultrasonic transducers.

  16. Comparison of Two High Intensity Acoustic Test Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launay, A.; Tadao Sakita, M.; Kim, Youngkey K.

    2004-08-01

    In two different countries, at the same period of time, the institutes in charge of the development of space activities have decided to extend their satellite integration and test center, and to implement a reverberant acoustic chamber. In Brazil the INPE laboratory (LIT : Laboratorio de Integracao e Testes) and in South Korea the KARI laboratory (SITC : Satellite Integration and Test Center) started their projects in July 2000 for the RATF (Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility) and in May 2001 for the HIAC (High Intensity Acoustic Chamber) respectively, writing the technical specifications. The kick-off meetings took place in December 2000 and in February 2002 and the opening ceremonies in December 19, 2002 in Brazil and in August 22, 2003 in Korea. This paper compares the two projects in terms of design choices, manufacturing processes, equipment installed and technical final characteristics.

  17. Digital control of high-intensity acoustic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    To eliminate previous system instabilities and control high-intensity acoustic tests, a digital control vibration test system is modified by a software change. Three systems for the control of acoustic testing are compared: a hybrid digital/analog system, a digital vibration system, and the same digital vibration system modified by a software change to allow acoustic testing. It is shown that the hybrid system and the modified vibration system exhibit almost equal performance, although the hybrid system performs testing twice as fast. The development of a specialized acoustic test control system is justified since it costs far less than the general-purpose vibration control system. However, the latter is much easier to set up for a test, which is important in preventing overtesting of valuable spacecraft components.

  18. Technology insight: High-intensity focused ultrasound for urologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Chaussy, Christian; Thüroff, Stefan; Rebillard, Xavier; Gelet, Albert

    2005-04-01

    The growing interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) technology is mainly due to its many potential applications as a minimally invasive therapy. It has been introduced to urologic oncology as a treatment for prostate and kidney cancers. While its application in the kidney is still at the clinical feasibility phase, HIFU technology is currently used in daily practice in Europe for the treatment of prostate cancer. Literature describing the results of HIFU for prostate cancer is mainly based on several series of patients from clinical development teams. The latest published results suggest that HIFU treatment is a valuable option for well-differentiated and moderately-differentiated tumors, as well as for local recurrence after external-beam radiation therapy.

  19. High Intensity, Pulsed, D-D Neutron Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. L.; Vainionpaa, J. H.; Jones, G.; Piestrup, M. A.; Gary, C. K.; Harris, J. L.; Fuller, M. J.; Cremer, J. T.; Ludewigt, B. A.; Kwan, J. W.; Reijonen, J.; Leung, K.-N.; Gough, R. A.

    2009-03-01

    Single ion-beam RF-plasma neutron generators are presented as a laboratory source of intense neutrons. The continuous and pulsed operations of such a neutron generator using the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction are reported. The neutron beam can be pulsed by switching the RF plasma and/or a gate electrode. These generators are actively vacuum pumped so that a continuous supply of deuterium gas is present for the production of ions and neutrons. This contributes to the generator's long life. These single-beam generators are capable of producing up to 1010 n/s. Previously, Adelphi and LBNL have demonstrated these generators' applications in fast neutron radiography, Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). Together with an inexpensive compact moderator, these high-output neutron generators extend useful applications to home laboratory operations.

  20. New Zealand Blackcurrant Extract Improves High-Intensity Intermittent Running.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Ian Craig; Vine, Sarah Anne; Blacker, Sam David; Willems, Mark Elisabeth Theodorus

    2015-10-01

    We examined the effect of New Zealand blackcurrant (NZBC) extract on high-intensity intermittent running and postrunning lactate responses. Thirteen active males (age: 25 ± 4 yrs, height: 1.82 ± 0.07 m, body mass: 81 ± 14 kg, VO2max: 56 ± 4 ml·kg-1·min-1, vVO2max: 17.6 ± 0.8 km·h-1) performed a treadmill running protocol to exhaustion, which consisted of stages with 6 × 19 s of sprints with 15 s of low-intensity running between sprints. Interstage rest time was 1 min and stages were repeated with increasing sprint speeds. Subjects consumed capsuled NZBC extract (300 mg·day-1 CurraNZ; containing 105 mg anthocyanin) or placebo for 7 days (double-blind, randomized, crossover design, wash-out at least 14 days). Blood lactate was collected for 30 min postexhaustion. NZBC increased total running distance by 10.6% (NZBC: 4282 ± 833 m, placebo: 3871 ± 622 m, p = .02), with the distance during sprints increased by 10.8% (p = .02). Heart rate, oxygen uptake, lactate and rating of perceived exertion were not different between conditions for the first 4 stages completed by all subjects. At exhaustion, blood lactate tended to be higher for NZBC (NZBC: 6.01 ± 1.07 mmol·L-1, placebo: 5.22 ± 1.52 mmol·L-1, p = .07). There was a trend for larger changes in lactate following 15 min (NZBC: -2.89 ± 0.51 mmol·L-1, placebo: -2.46 ± 0.39 mmol·L-1, p = .07) of passive recovery. New Zealand blackcurrant extract (CurraNZ) may enhance performance in sports characterized by high-intensity intermittent exercise as greater distances were covered with repeated sprints, there was higher lactate at exhaustion, and larger changes in lactate during early recovery after repeated sprints to exhaustion.

  1. Frequency conversion of high-intensity, femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P S

    1997-06-01

    Almost since the invention of the laser, frequency conversion of optical pulses via non- linear processes has been an area of active interest. However, third harmonic generation using ~(~1 (THG) in solids is an area that has not received much attention because of ma- terial damage limits. Recently, the short, high-intensity pulses possible with chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) laser systems allow the use of intensities on the order of 1 TW/cm2 in thin solids without damage. As a light source to examine single-crystal THG in solids and other high field inter- actions, the design and construction of a Ti:sapphire-based CPA laser system capable of ultimately producing peak powers of 100 TW is presented. Of special interest is a novel, all-reflective pulse stretcher design which can stretch a pulse temporally by a factor of 20,000. The stretcher design can also compensate for the added material dispersion due to propagation through the amplifier chain and produce transform-limited 45 fs pulses upon compression. A series of laser-pumped amplifiers brings the peak power up to the terawatt level at 10 Hz, and the design calls for additional amplifiers to bring the power level to the 100 TW level for single shot operation. The theory for frequency conversion of these short pulses is presented, focusing on conversion to the third harmonic in single crystals of BBO, KD*P, and d-LAP (deuterated I-arginine phosphate). Conversion efficiencies of up to 6% are obtained with 500 fs pulses at 1053 nm in a 3 mm thick BBO crystal at 200 GW/cm 2. Contributions to this process by unphasematched, cascaded second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are shown to be very significant. The angular relationship between the two orders is used to measure the tensor elements of C = xt3)/4 with Crs = -1.8 x 1O-23 m2/V2 and .15Cri + .54Crs = 4.0 x 1O-23 m2/V2. Conversion efficiency in d-LAP is about 20% that in BBO and conversion efficiency in KD*P is 1% that of BBO. It is calculated

  2. High precision measurement of intensity peak shifts in tunable cascaded microring intensity sensors.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Prashanth R; Selvaraja, Shankar K; Varma, Manoj M

    2016-07-15

    We demonstrate a method to precisely track intensity peak shifts in tunable cascaded double-microring based refractive index sensors. Without modifications, width of the intensity peak of a tunable cascaded microring device limits the precision of peak-shift measurements and thereby the limit of detection of the sensor. We overcome this limitation by using dual harmonic lock-in detection for precisely determining the position of the intensity maximum. Using this modification, we have demonstrated a reduction in the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the intensity peak by a factor of over 1300. We show that such a reduction in FWHM of the peak curve can significantly improve the detection limit of a tunable cascaded microring-based sensor.

  3. Fluid Flow Characterization of High Turbulent Intensity Compressible Flow Using Particle Image Velocimetry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    TURBULENT INTENSITY COMPRESSIBLE FLOW USING PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY A high turbulent intensity combustion chamber has been designed in order...INTENSITY COMPRESSIBLE FLOW USING PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY Report Title A high turbulent intensity combustion chamber has been designed in order to...USING PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY MARCO EFRAIN QUIROZ-REGALADO Department of Mechanical Engineering APPROVED: Ahsan R. Choudhuri

  4. Operation of the Proto-MPEX High Intensity Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, J. B. O.; Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Campbell, I. H.; Diem, S. J.; Martin, E. H.; Pesavento, P. V.; Rapp, J.; Ray, H. B.; Shaw, G. C.; Showers, M. A.; Luo, G.-N.

    2015-11-01

    The Prototype Materials Plasma Experiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear high-intensity rf plasma source that combines a high-density helicon plasma generator with electron and ion heating sections. It is being used to study the physics of heating over-dense plasmas in a linear configuration. The helicon plasma is produced by coupling 13.56 MHz rf power at levels up to 100 kW. Microwaves at 28 GHz (~ 150 kW) are coupled to the electrons in the over-dense helicon plasma via Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW). Ion cyclotron heating (~ 30 kW) will be via a magnetic beach approach. Plasma diagnostics include Thomson Scattering and a retarding field energy analyzer near the target, while a microwave interferometer and double-Langmuir probes are used to determine plasma parameters elsewhere in the system. Filterscopes are being used to measure D-alpha emission and He line ratios at multiple locations, and IR cameras image the target plates to determine heat deposition. High plasma densities in the helicon region have been produced in He (>3x1019/m3) and D (>1.5x1019/m3) , and operation with on-axis magnetic field strength >1 T has been demonstrated. Details of the experimental results and future plans for studying plasma surface/RF antenna interactions will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  5. Effect of reduced exposure times on the cytotoxicity of resin luting cements cured by high-power led

    PubMed Central

    ERGUN, Gulfem; EGILMEZ, Ferhan; YILMAZ, Sukran

    2011-01-01

    Objective Applications of resin luting agents and high-power light-emitting diodes (LED) light-curing units (LCUs) have increased considerably over the last few years. However, it is not clear whether the effect of reduced exposure time on cytotoxicity of such products have adequate biocompatibility to meet clinical success. This study aimed at assessing the effect of reduced curing time of five resin luting cements (RLCs) polymerized by high-power LED curing unit on the viability of a cell of L-929 fibroblast cells. Material and Methods Disc-shaped samples were prepared in polytetrafluoroethylene moulds with cylindrical cavities. The samples were irradiated from the top through the ceramic discs and acetate strips using LED LCU for 20 s (50% of the manufacturer's recommended exposure time) and 40 s (100% exposure time). After curing, the samples were transferred into a culture medium for 24 h. The eluates were obtained and pipetted onto L-929 fibroblast cultures (3x104 per well) and incubated for evaluating after 24 h. Measurements were performed by dimethylthiazol diphenyltetrazolium assay. Statistical significance was determined by two-way ANOVA and two independent samples were compared by t-test. Results Results showed that eluates of most of the materials polymerized for 20 s (except Rely X Unicem and Illusion) reduced to a higher extent cell viability compared to samples of the same materials polymerized for 40 s. Illusion exhibited the least cytotoxicity for 20 s exposure time compared to the control (culture without samples) followed by Rely X Unicem and Rely X ARC (90.81%, 88.90%, and 83.11%, respectively). For Rely X ARC, Duolink and Lute-It 40 s exposure time was better (t=-1.262 p=0,276; t=-9.399 p=0.001; and t=-20.418 p<0.001, respectively). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that reduction of curing time significantly enhances the cytotoxicity of the studied resin cement materials, therefore compromising their clinical performance. PMID

  6. White LED performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yimin; Narendran, Nadarajah; Freyssinier, Jean Paul

    2004-10-01

    Two life tests were conducted to compare the effects of drive current and ambient temperature on the degradation rate of 5 mm and high-flux white LEDs. Tests of 5 mm white LED arrays showed that junction temperature increases produced by drive current had a greater effect on the rate of light output degradation than junction temperature increases from ambient heat. A preliminary test of high-flux white LEDs showed the opposite effect, with junction temperature increases from ambient heat leading to a faster depreciation. However, a second life test is necessary to verify this finding. The dissimilarity in temperature effect among 5 mm and high-flux LEDs is likely caused by packaging differences between the two device types.

  7. Two-step design method for highly compact three-dimensional freeform optical system for LED surface light source.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xianglong; Li, Hongtao; Han, Yanjun; Luo, Yi

    2014-10-20

    Designing an illumination system for a surface light source with a strict compactness requirement is quite challenging, especially for the general three-dimensional (3D) case. In accordance with the two key features of an expected illumination distribution, i.e., a well-controlled boundary and a precise illumination pattern, a two-step design method is proposed in this paper for highly compact 3D freeform illumination systems. In the first step, a target shape scaling strategy is combined with an iterative feedback modification algorithm to generate an optimized freeform optical system with a well-controlled boundary of the target distribution. In the second step, a set of selected radii of the system obtained in the first step are optimized to further improve the illuminating quality within the target region. The method is quite flexible and effective to design highly compact optical systems with almost no restriction on the shape of the desired target field. As examples, three highly compact freeform lenses with ratio of center height h of the lens and the maximum dimension D of the source ≤ 2.5:1 are designed for LED surface light sources to form a uniform illumination distribution on a rectangular, a cross-shaped and a complex cross pierced target plane respectively. High light control efficiency of η > 0.7 as well as low relative standard illumination deviation of RSD < 0.07 is obtained simultaneously for all the three design examples.

  8. AlGaN UV LED and Photodiodes Radiation Hardness and Space Qualifications and Their Applications in Space Science and High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, K. X.

    2011-05-31

    This presentation provides an overview of robust, radiation hard AlGaN optoelectronic devices and their applications in space exploration & high energy density physics. Particularly, deep UV LED and deep UV photodiodes are discussed with regard to their applications, radiation hardness and space qualification. AC charge management of UV LED satellite payload instruments, which were to be launched in late 2012, is covered.

  9. Silicon solar cells as a high-solar-intensity radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spisz, E. W.; Robson, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    The characteristics of a conventional, 1- by 2-cm, N/P, gridded silicon solar cell when used as a radiometer have been determined for solar intensity levels to 2800 mW/sq cm (20 solar constants). The short-circuit current was proportional to the radiant intensity for levels only to 700 mW/sq cm (5 solar constants). For intensity levels greater than 700 mW/sq cm, it was necessary to operate the cell in a photoconductive mode in order to obtain a linear relation between the measured current and the radiant intensity. When the solar cell was biased with a reverse voltage of -1 V, the measured current and radiant intensity were linearly related over the complete intensity range from 100 to 2800 mW/sq cm.

  10. Gigagauss magnetic field generation from high intensity laser solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T; Moran, M; Hammer, J; Hatchett, S; Hunt, A; Key, M H; Langdon, A B; Lasinski, B F; Pennington, D; Perry, M D; Sefcik, J A; Snavely, R; Trebes, J; Wilks, S C

    1998-10-15

    Intense laser (>1021 W/cm2 ) sources using pulse compression techniques in the sub-picosecond time frame have been used to create dynamic electric field strenghs in excess of 100 Megavolts/micron with associated magnetic field strengths in the Gigagauss regime. We have begun a series of experiments using the Petawatt Laser system at LLNL to determine the potential of these sources for a variety of applications. Hot electron spectra from laser-target interactions in Au have been measured with energies up to 100 MeV. Hot x-ray production has been measured using filtered thermoluminescent dosimeters and threshold nuclear activation ({gamma},n) from giant resonance interactions. High resolution radiographs through a {rho}r > 165 gm/cm² have been obtained. Dose levels in the x-ray band from 2-8 MeV have been measured at the level of several Rads at one meter from the target for a single pulse. The physics of these sources and the scaling relationships and laser technology required to provide high magnetic fields will be discussed. Results of preliminary magnetic field calculations will be presented along with potential applications of this technology and estimates of the fundamental scaling limits for future development.

  11. H- Ion Sources for High Intensity Proton Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Johnson, Rolland P.; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F; Dudnikova, Galina

    2010-01-01

    Spallation neutron source user facilities require reliable, intense beams of protons. The technique of H- charge exchange injection into a storage ring or synchrotron can provide the needed beam currents, but may be limited by the ion sources that have currents and reliability that do not meet future requirements and emittances that are too large for efficient acceleration. In this project we are developing an H- source which will synthesize the most important developments in the field of negative ion sources to provide high current, small emittance, good lifetime, high reliability, and power efficiency. We describe planned modifications to the present external antenna source at SNS that involve: 1) replacing the present 2 MHz plasma-forming solenoid antenna with a 60 MHz saddle-type antenna and 2) replacing the permanent multicusp magnet with a weaker electromagnet, in order to increase the plasma density near the outlet aperture. The SNS test stand will then be used to verify simulations of this approach that indicate significant improvements in H- output current and efficiency, where lower RF power will allow higher duty factor, longer source lifetime, and/or better reliability.

  12. Inelastic scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yelon, W.B.; Schupp, G.

    1993-02-01

    The QUEGS facility at MURR has produced a number of new results and demonstrated the range of potential applications of high resolution, high intensity Moessbauer scattering. This work has been carried out by both MU and Purdue researchers and includes published results on Na, W, pentadecane, polydimethylsiloxane and other systems, manuscripts submitted on alkali halides (Phys. Rev. B) and accurate Moessbauer lineshape measurements (Phys. Rev. C), and manuscripts in preparation on glycerol, NiAl and Moessbauer spectra obtained by modulating a scattering crystal. Recently, new collaborations have been initiated which will substantially enhance our efforts. These are with W. Steiner (Vienna), G. Coddens (Saclay), and R. D. Taylor (Los Alamos). Steiner is experienced with Fe-57 Moessbauer scattering, while Coddens specializes in quasielastic neutron scattering; both of these areas naturally complement our work. R. D. Taylor has pioneered Moessbauer spectroscopy from the time of its discovery and has already made important contributions to our study of lattice dynamics and superconductivity for lead alloyed with small quantities of tin. At the same time, a significant instrument upgrade is underway, funded in part by the DOE-URIP program.

  13. HIGH-SPEED BICHROMATIC INSPECTION OF WHEAT KERNELS FOR MOLD AND COLOR CLASS USING HIGH-POWER PULSED LEDS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High-speed optical sorting of seeds in commercial processing is routinely practiced for removal of discolored seeds, seeds from volunteer plants, and non-seed objects. Sorters are conventionally based on monochromatic or bichromatic light from broad wavebands in the visible and near-infrared region...

  14. Remote Sensing Tertiary Education Meets High Intensity Interval Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, K. E.; White, B.

    2015-04-01

    Enduring a traditional lecture is the tertiary education equivalent of a long, slow, jog. There are certainly some educational benefits if the student is able to maintain concentration, but they are just as likely to get caught napping and fall off the back end of the treadmill. Alternatively, a pre-choreographed interactive workshop style class requires students to continually engage with the materials. Appropriately timed breaks or intervals allow students to recover briefly before being increasingly challenged throughout the class. Using an introductory remote sensing class at Charles Darwin University, this case study presents a transition from the traditional stand and deliver style lecture to an active student-led learning experience. The class is taught at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, with both on-campus as well as online distance learning students. Based on the concept that active engagement in learning materials promotes 'stickiness' of subject matter, the remote sensing class was re-designed to encourage an active style of learning. Critically, class content was reviewed to identify the key learning outcomes for the students. This resulted in a necessary sacrifice of topic range for depth of understanding. Graduates of the class reported high levels of enthusiasm for the materials, and the style in which the class was taught. This paper details a number of techniques that were used to engage students in active and problem based learning throughout the semester. It suggests a number of freely available tools that academics in remote sensing and related fields can readily incorporate into their teaching portfolios. Moreover, it shows how simple it can be to provide a far more enjoyable and effective learning experience for students than the one dimensional lecture.

  15. Beam experiments towards high-intensity beams in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.; Ahrens, L.; Brennan, J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Mernick, K.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2012-05-20

    Proton bunch intensities in RHIC are planned to be increased from 2 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch to increase the luminosity, together with head-on beam-beam compensation using electron lenses. To study the feasibility of the intensity increase, beam experiments are being performed. Recent experimental results are presented.

  16. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  17. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  18. A review of adolescent high-intensity interval training.

    PubMed

    Logan, Greig R M; Harris, Nigel; Duncan, Scott; Schofield, Grant

    2014-08-01

    Despite the promising evidence supporting positive effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on the metabolic profile in adults, there is limited research targeting adolescents. Given the rising burden of chronic disease, it is essential to implement strategies to improve the cardiometabolic health in adolescence, as this is a key stage in the development of healthy lifestyle behaviours. This narrative review summarises evidence of the relative efficacy of HIIT regarding the metabolic health of adolescents. Methodological inconsistencies confound our ability to draw conclusions; however, there is meaningful evidence supporting HIIT as a potentially efficacious exercise modality for use in the adolescent cohort. Future research must examine the effects of various HIIT protocols to determine the optimum strategy to deliver cardiometabolic health benefits. Researchers should explicitly show between-group differences for HIIT intervention and steady-state exercise or control groups, as the magnitude of difference between HIIT and other exercise modalities is of key interest to public health. There is scope for research to examine the palatability of HIIT as an exercise modality for adolescents through investigating perceived enjoyment during and after HIIT, and consequent long-term exercise adherence.

  19. High intensity focused ultrasound in clinical tumor ablation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), which was developed in the 1940s as a viable thermal tissue ablation approach, have increased its popularity. In clinics, HIFU has been applied to treat a variety of solid malignant tumors in a well-defined volume, including the pancreas, liver, prostate, breast, uterine fibroids, and soft-tissue sarcomas. In comparison to conventional tumor/cancer treatment modalities, such as open surgery, radio- and chemo-therapy, HIFU has the advantages of non-invasion, non-ionization, and fewer complications after treatment. Over 100 000 cases have been treated throughout the world with great success. The fundamental principles of HIFU ablation are coagulative thermal necrosis due to the absorption of ultrasound energy during transmission in tissue and the induced cavitation damage. This paper reviews the clinical outcomes of HIFU ablation for applicable cancers, and then summarizes the recommendations for a satisfactory HIFU treatment according to clinical experience. In addition, the current challenges in HIFU for engineers and physicians are also included. More recent horizons have broadened the application of HIFU in tumor treatment, such as HIFU-mediated drug delivery, vessel occlusion, and soft tissue erosion (“histotripsy”). In summary, HIFU is likely to play a significant role in the future oncology practice. PMID:21603311

  20. Spectroscopic imaging of metal halide high-intensity discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvallet, Geoffrey A.

    The body of this work consists of three main research projects. An optical- and near-ultraviolet-wavelength absorption study sought to determine absolute densities of ground and excited level Sc atoms, ground level Sc + ions, and ground level Na atoms in a commercial 250 W metal halide high intensity discharge lamp during operation. These measurements also allowed the determination of the arc temperature and absolute electron density as functions of radius. Through infrared emission spectroscopy, relative densities of sodium and scandium were determined as functions of radius. Using the absolute densities gained from the optical experiment, these relative densities were calibrated. In addition, direct observation of the infrared emission allowed us to characterize the infrared power losses of the lamp. When considered as a fraction of the overall power consumption, the near-infrared spectral power losses were not substantial enough to warrant thorough investigation of their reduction in these lamps. The third project was an attempt to develop a portable x-ray diagnostic experiment. Two-dimensional spatial maps of the lamps were analyzed to determine absolute elemental mercury densities and the arc temperature as a function of radius. Two methods were used to improve the calibration of the density measurements and to correct for the spread in x-ray energy: known solutions of mercury in nitric acid, and an arc lamp which was uniformly heated to evaporate the mercury content. Although many complexities arose in this experiment, its goal was successfully completed.

  1. High-intensity photoionization of H sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, S.W.; Szoeke, A.

    1991-05-01

    A tunable, high-intensity picosecond dye laser system has been employed with electron energy analysis to investigate the dynamics of (3+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of H{sub 2} via different vibrational levels of its B{sub 1}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +} and C{sup 1}{Pi}{sub u} electronic states. We observe production of molecular ions in various vibrational levels, with a shift to increased population of lower vibrational states of H{sub 2}{sup +} consistent with the a.c. Stark shift of the correspondingly lower vibrational levels of the C state into resonance with the three- photon energy of the laser. Clear evidence of direct dissociation of H{sub 2} followed by single-photon ionization of the excited H atom is observed as well. Above threshold ionization of these two processes occurs readily. We also find that dissociative ionization is an increasingly important ionization pathway as the wavelength is increased. Finally, we see evidence of a new ionization pathway, which we assign to photoionization into a transient bound state created by the avoided crossing of the first repulsive electronic state of H{sub 2}{sup +}, {vert bar}2p{sigma}{sub u}, n{r angle}, with the single-photon-dressed ground state of H{sub 2}{sup +}, {vert bar}1s{sigma}{sub g},n + 1{r angle}. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Respiration Based Steering for High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Liver Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Andrew B.; Ghanouni, Pejman; Santos, Juan M.; Dumoulin, Charles; Medan, Yoav; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Respiratory motion makes hepatic ablation using high intensity focused ultrasound challenging. Previous HIFU liver treatment had required apnea induced during general anesthesia. We describe and test a system that allows treatment of the liver in the presence of breathing motion. Materials Mapping a signal from an external respiratory bellow to treatment locations within the liver allows the ultrasound transducer to be steered in real time to the target location. Using a moving phantom, three metrics were used to compare static, steered, and unsteered sonications: the area of sonications once a temperature rise of 15°C was achieved, the energy deposition required to reach that temperature, and the average rate of temperature rise during the first 10 seconds of sonication. Steered HIFU in vivo ablations of the porcine liver were also performed and compared to breath-hold ablations. Results For the last phantom metric, all groups were found to be statistically significantly different (p≤0.003). However, in the other two metrics, the static and unsteered sonications were not statistically different (p>0.9999). Steered in vivo HIFU ablations were not statistically significantly different from ablations during breath-holding. Conclusions A system for performing HIFU steering during ablation of the liver with breathing motion is presented and shown to achieve results equivalent to ablation performed with breath-holding. PMID:23460510

  3. Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy after High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Failure

    PubMed Central

    Telis, Leon; Jazayeri, Seyed Behzad

    2017-01-01

    Background. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men. As new focal therapies become more popular in treatment of prostate cancer, failure cases requiring salvage therapy with either surgical or other techniques are being reported. Objective. To report the options in treatment of prostate cancer after recurrence or failure of the primary treatment modality. Methods. We report a salvage robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) for prostate cancer recurrence following high intensity focused ultrasound treatment (HIFU) in the United States. Results. A 67-year-old man who underwent HIFU treatment for prostate adenocarcinoma 2 years prior was presented with a rising prostate specific antigen of 6.1 ng/mL to our clinic. A biopsy proven recurrent disease in the area of previous treatment documented the failure of treatment. The patient elected to undergo a salvage RALP. The operation time was 159 minutes. The patient was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 1 with no complications. The catheter was removed on post-op day 10. The patient reserved sexual function and urinary continence. The PSA levels on 6 months' follow-up are undetectable. Conclusions. Salvage RALP is an effective and safe treatment choice for recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following failed HIFU treatment if operated by an experienced surgeon. PMID:28243479

  4. High intensity ultrasound modified ovalbumin: Structure, interface and gelation properties.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wenfei; Wang, Yuntao; Zhang, Chunlan; Wan, Jiawei; Shah, Bakht Ramin; Pei, Yaqiong; Zhou, Bin; Li, Jin; Li, Bin

    2016-07-01

    Influence of high intensity ultrasound (HIUS) on the structure and properties of ovalbumin (OVA) were investigated. It was found that the subunits and secondary structure of OVA did not change significantly with HIUS treatment from the electrophoretic patterns and circular dichroism (CD) spectrum. The amount of free sulfhydryl groups increased and intrinsic fluorescence spectra analysis indicated changes in the tertiary structure and partial unfold of OVA after sonication increased. Compared with the untreated OVA, HIUS treatment increased the emulsifying activity and foaming ability, and decreased interface tension (oil-water and air-water interface), which due to the increased surface hydrophobicity and decreased the surface net charge in OVA, while the emulsifying and foaming stability had no remarkable differences. The increased particle size may be attributed to formation of protein aggregates. Moreover, the gelation temperatures of HIUS-treated samples were higher than the untreated OVA according to the temperature sweep model rheology, and this effect was consistent with the increased in surface hydrophobicity for ultrasound treated OVA. These changes in functional properties of OVA would promote its application in food industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The WARP Code: Modeling High Intensity Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D P; Friedman, A; Vay, J L; Haber, I

    2004-12-09

    The Warp code, developed for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy studies, is used to model high intensity ion (and electron) beams. Significant capability has been incorporated in Warp, allowing nearly all sections of an accelerator to be modeled, beginning with the source. Warp has as its core an explicit, three-dimensional, particle-in-cell model. Alongside this is a rich set of tools for describing the applied fields of the accelerator lattice, and embedded conducting surfaces (which are captured at sub-grid resolution). Also incorporated are models with reduced dimensionality: an axisymmetric model and a transverse ''slice'' model. The code takes advantage of modern programming techniques, including object orientation, parallelism, and scripting (via Python). It is at the forefront in the use of the computational technique of adaptive mesh refinement, which has been particularly successful in the area of diode and injector modeling, both steady-state and time-dependent. In the presentation, some of the major aspects of Warp will be overviewed, especially those that could be useful in modeling ECR sources. Warp has been benchmarked against both theory and experiment. Recent results will be presented showing good agreement of Warp with experimental results from the STS500 injector test stand. Additional information can be found on the web page http://hif.lbl.gov/theory/WARP{_}summary.html.

  6. The WARP Code: Modeling High Intensity Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, David P.; Friedman, Alex; Vay, Jean-Luc; Haber, Irving

    2005-03-15

    The Warp code, developed for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy studies, is used to model high intensity ion (and electron) beams. Significant capability has been incorporated in Warp, allowing nearly all sections of an accelerator to be modeled, beginning with the source. Warp has as its core an explicit, three-dimensional, particle-in-cell model. Alongside this is a rich set of tools for describing the applied fields of the accelerator lattice, and embedded conducting surfaces (which are captured at sub-grid resolution). Also incorporated are models with reduced dimensionality: an axisymmetric model and a transverse 'slice' model. The code takes advantage of modern programming techniques, including object orientation, parallelism, and scripting (via Python). It is at the forefront in the use of the computational technique of adaptive mesh refinement, which has been particularly successful in the area of diode and injector modeling, both steady-state and time-dependent. In the presentation, some of the major aspects of Warp will be overviewed, especially those that could be useful in modeling ECR sources. Warp has been benchmarked against both theory and experiment. Recent results will be presented showing good agreement of Warp with experimental results from the STS500 injector test stand. Additional information can be found on the web page http://hif.lbl.gov/theory/WARP{sub s}ummary.html.

  7. Repeated high-intensity exercise in a professional rugby league.

    PubMed

    Austin, Damien J; Gabbett, Tim J; Jenkins, David J

    2011-07-01

    The primary aim of this study was to identify and describe the frequency and duration of repeated high-intensity exercise (RHIE) bouts in Australian professional rugby league (National Rugby League) and whether these occurred at critical times during a game. Time motion analysis was used during 5 competition matches; 1 player from 3 positional groups (hit-up forward, adjustable, and outside back) was analyzed in each match. The ranges of RHIE bouts for the 3 positional groups were hit-up forwards 9-17, adjustables 2-8, and outside backs 3-7. Hit-up forwards were involved in a significantly greater number of RHIE bouts (p < 0.05) and had the shortest average recovery (376 ± 205 seconds) between RHIE bouts. The single overall maximum durations of RHIE bouts for the hit-up forwards, the adjustables, and the outside backs were 64, 64, and 49 seconds. For all groups, 70% of the total RHIE bouts occurred within 5 minutes prior of a try being scored. The present data show that the nature of RHIE bouts was specific to playing position and occurred frequently at critical times during the game. These results can be used to develop training programs that mimic the 'worst case scenarios' that elite rugby league players are likely to encounter.

  8. A methodology for assessing high intensity RF effects in aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharias, R.A.; Avalle, C.A.; Kunz, K.S.; Molau, N.E.; Pennock, S.T.; Poggio, A.J.; Sharpe, R.M.

    1993-07-01

    Optical components have an inherent immunity to the electromagnetic interference (EMI) associated with High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF). The optical technology embodied in Fly-by-Light (FBL) might therefore minimize the effects of HIRF on digitally controlled systems while providing lifetime immunity to signal EMI. This is one of the primary motivations for developing FBL systems for aircraft. FBL has the potential to greatly simplify EMI certification by enabling technically acceptable laboratory tests of subsystems, as opposed to expensive full airplane tests. In this paper the authors describe a methodology for assessing EMI effects on FBL aircraft that reduces or potentially eliminates the need for full airplane tests. This methodology is based on comparing the applied EMI stress--the level of interference signal that arrives at a unit under test--versus the EMI strength of the unit--the interference level it can withstand without upset. This approach allows one to use computer models and/or low power coupling measurement and similarity (to other previously tested aircraft) to determine the stress applied to installed subsystems, and to use benchtop cable injection tests and/or mode stirred chamber radiated tests to determine the strength of the subsystem.

  9. Particle Simulation Schemes for High Intensity Charged Particle Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Li; Startsev, Edward; Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2003-10-01

    Numerical schemes for the electromagnetic particle simulations of high intensity charged particle beams have been developed. The purpose of devising these schemes is to avoid the numerical difficulties associated with the direct calculation of the time derivatives of the vector potential, partial A / partial t, in the Darwin model, for which the transverse induction current in Ampere's law is neglected. The first scheme requires the calculations of higher order velocity moments of the distribution function to obtain the time derivatives for both the scalar potential Φ and A, similar to the method used for shear-Alfven waves.[1] The second uses the canonical momentum P = p + q A/c in the equations of motion as a means to eliminate the troublesome time derivatives.[2] The use of these schemes for physics problems in heavy ion fusion systems will be reported. [1] W. W. Lee, J. L. V. Lewandowski, T. S. Hahm, and Z. Lin, Phys. Plasmas 8, 4435 (2001). [2] W. W. Lee, E. Startsev, H. Qin and R. C. Davidson, Proceedings of 2001 Particle Accelerator Conference 1906 (2001).

  10. Ablation of tissue volumes using high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, A L; ter Haar, G R

    1996-01-01

    Successful application of high intensity focused ultrasound to cancer treatment requires complete ablation of tissue volumes. In order to destroy an entire tumour it is necessary to place a contiguous array of touching lesions throughout it. In a study of how best to achieve this, exposures were selected to give single lesions that were thermal in origin, while avoiding effects due to tissue water boiling and acoustic cavitation. Arrays were formed in excised bovine liver. Under some exposure conditions, lesions were found to merge in front of the focal point, and failed to cover the desired volume. Using fine wire manganin-constantan thermocouples, temperature studies revealed a substantial rise in the temperature of surrounding untreated tissue. Cooling curves showed that it was necessary to allow surrounding tissue to cool for up to 2 min before ambient temperature was reached. By allowing the tissue to cool between exposures it was possible to form arrays of overlapping lesions thus successfully ablating the complete target region.

  11. Carbohydrate-electrolyte ingestion during intermittent high-intensity running.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, C W; Tsintzas, K; Boobis, L; Williams, C

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of ingesting a carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage or a noncarbohydrate placebo on muscle glycogen utilization during 90 min of intermittent high-intensity running. Six trained games players (age 24.6 +/- 2.2 yr; height 179.6 +/- 1.9 cm; body mass 74.5 +/- 2.0 kg; VO2max 56.3 +/- 1.3 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1); mean +/- SEM) performed two exercise trials, 7 d apart. The subjects were university soccer, hockey, or rugby players. On each occasion, they completed six 15-min periods of intermittent running, consisting of maximal sprinting, interspersed with less intense periods of running and walking. During each trial, subjects consumed either a 6.9% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CHO-E: the CHO trial) or a noncarbohydrate placebo (the CON trial) immediately before exercise (5 mL x kg(-1) BM) and after every 15 min of exercise thereafter (2 mL x kg(-1) BM). Drinks were administered in a double-blind, counter-balanced order, and the total volume of fluid consumed during each trial was 1114 +/- 30 mL. Needle biopsy samples were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle before and after 90 min of exercise. Venous blood samples were collected from an antecubital vein at rest and every 30 min during exercise. Muscle glycogen utilization in mixed muscle samples was lower (P < 0.05) during CHO [192.5 +/- 26.3 mmol glucosyl units (kg x DM(-1))] than CON [245.3 +/- 22.9 mmol glucosyl units (kg x DM(-1))]. Single fiber analysis on the biopsy samples of the subjects during the CON trial showed a greater glycogen utilization in the Type II fibers compared with Type I fibers during this type of exercise [Type I: 182.2 +/- 34.5 vs Type II: 287.4 +/- 41.2 mmol glucosyl units (kg x DM(-1)); P < 0.05). After 30 min of exercise, blood lactate was significantly greater (P < 0.05) and serum insulin concentration lower (P < 0.05) in CON. In summary, when trained games players ingested a carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage, muscle glycogen

  12. Effects of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound on the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vykhodtseva, Natalia; McDannold, Nathan; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2007-05-01

    Bio-effects in the brain resulting from short focused ultrasound (FUS) pulses (1-10 ms, PRF=0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Hz, frequency=1.63 MHz) at high acoustic power (up to 700W) were examined. Fifty-seven locations were targeted through a craniotomy in the brains of 11 rabbits. Temperature rise was measured with MRI-based thermometry. The animals were sacrificed 4 h or 48 h after sonications for histological evaluations. A range of effects was observed: (1) Vascular changes (vasoconstriction/occlusion). (2) Homogenization of tissue. (3) Concentric circular lesions; (4) Hemorrhagic lesions similar to what was described earlier as inertial cavitation effects. Overall, the type of damage correlated with the acoustical power, with substantial overlapping among categories. Vascular changes were found at ˜140-180W, the thresholds for homogenized tissue and hemorrhagic lesions were approximately 200W and 350W, respectively. Some of these effects might be exploited for new therapies. Vascular occlusion might also be exploited for therapy; the lesions with homogenized tissue may suggest a new mechanism for non-thermal tissue ablation; small ones for ophthalmology and for functional neurosurgery (if produced in nerve tracts). The mechanism for this effect is unknown, but with the acoustic intensities used, non-linear absorption, strong radiation forces and microbubble activity were likely to have been present. MRI-based temperature changes suggest that thermal effects were probably not responsible for these lesions, as the average focal temperature (approximately 47°C) was slightly below the threshold for thermal damage. The overlap between types of tissue effects for a given acoustic intensity indicates that a method to guide such cavitation-based therapies is needed. MRI was promising in some ways — we can detect where the effects were happening and whether or not cavitation occurred. While the artifacts in temperature mappings will make temperature measurements problematic

  13. High intensity ultrasound transducer used in gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Kyle P.; Keilman, George W.; Noble, Misty L.; Brayman, Andrew A.; Miao, Carol H.

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes a novel therapeutic high intensity non-focused ultrasound (HIU) transducer designed with uniform pressure distribution to aid in accelerated gene transfer in large animal liver tissues in vivo. The underlying HIU transducer was used to initiate homogeneous cavitation throughout the tissue while delivering up to 2.7 MPa at 1.1 MHz across its radiating surface. The HIU transducer was built into a 6 cm diameter x 1.3 cm tall housing ergonomically designed to avoid collateral damage to the surrounding anatomy during dynamic motion. The ultrasound (US) radiation was applied in a 'paintbrush-like' manner to the surface of the liver. The layers and geometry of the transducer were carefully selected to maximize the active diameter (5.74 cm), maximize the electrical to acoustic conversion efficiency (85%) to achieve 2.7 MPa of peak negative pressure, maximize the frequency operating band at the fundamental resonance to within a power transfer delta of 1 dB, and reduce the pressure delta to within 2 dB across the radiating surface. For maximum peak voltage into the transducer, a high performance piezoceramic was chosen and a DC bias circuit was built integral to the system. An apodized two element annular pattern was made from a single piezoceramic element, resulting in significant pressure uniformity enhancement. In addition to using apodization for pressure uniformity, a proprietary multi-layered structure was used to improve efficiency while sustaining an operating band from 900 kHz to 1.3 MHz. The resultant operating band allowed for dithering techniques using frequency modulation. The underlying HIU transducer for use in large animals enhances gene expression up to 6300-fold.

  14. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  15. Combustion properties of micronized coal for high intensity combustion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.; Knight, B.; Vranos, A.; Hollick, H.; Wicks, K.

    1989-04-19

    Results are presented of an investigation of combustion related properties of micronized coal feeds (all particles less than 40 microns), mixing characteristics of centrifugally driven burner devices, and aerodynamic characteristics of micronized coal particles related to centrifugal mixing for high intensity combustion applications. Combustion related properties investigated are the evolution of fuel bound nitrogen and coal associated mineral matter during the initial stages of combustion. Parent and beneficiated micronized coal samples, as well as narrow size cut samples from a wide range of coal ranks, were investigated using a multireactor approach. The multireactor approach allowed the experimental separation of different aspects of the fuel nitrogen evolution process, enabling a comprehensive understanding of FBN to be formulated and empirical rate constants to be developed. A specially designed on-line gas analysis system allowed nitrogen balance to be achieved. A combined nitrogen and ash tracer technique allowed the quantitative determination of tar yields during rapid devolatilization. Empirical kinetic rates are developed for the evolution of FBN with tar at low temperatures and the appearance of HCN from tar and char species at high temperatures. A specially designed phase separation system, coupled to separate aerosol and char segregation trains, allowed the possible formation of ash aerosol by rapid devolatilization to be monitored. Compensated thermocouple, hot wire anemometry, and digital imaging techniques are employed to characterize the mixing properties of a centrifugally driven combustor. Analytical and experimental investigations of the fidelity of micronized coal particles to gas stream trajectories in the strong centrifugal fields are performed. Both spherical and nonspherical particle morphologies are considered analytically. 14 refs., 141 figs., 34 tabs.

  16. Tools and techniques for estimating high intensity RF effects

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharias, R.; Pennock, S.; Poggio, A.; Ray, S.

    1991-07-01

    With the ever-increasing dependence of modern aircraft on sophisticated avionics and electronic controls, the need to assure aircraft survivatality when exposed to high Intensity RF (HIRF) signals has become of great Interest. Advisory regulation is currently being proposed which would require testing and/or analysis to assure RF hardness of installed flight critical and flight essential equipment. While full-aircraft, full-threat testing may be the most thorough manner to assure survivability, it is not generally practical in loins of cost. Various combinations of limited full-aircraft testing, box-level testing, modeling, and analysis are also being considered as methods to achieve compliance. Modeling, analysis, and low power measurements may hold the key to making full-system survivability estimates at reasonable cost. In this paper we will describe some of the tools and techniques we use for estimating and measuring coupling and component disturbance. A finite difference time domain modeling code, TSAR, used to predict coupling will be described. This code has the capability to quickly generate a mesh model to represent the test object. Some recent applications as well as the advantages and limitations of using such a code will be described. We will also describe some of the facilities and techniques we have developed for making low power coupling measurements and for making direct injection test measurements of device disturbance. Some scaling laws for coupling and device effects will be presented. A method to extrapolate these low-power test results to high-power full-system effects will be presented.

  17. Short-term high-intensity interval training improves phosphocreatine recovery kinetics following moderate-intensity exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Sean C; Slade, Jill M; Meyer, Ronald A

    2008-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that high-intensity training improves biochemical markers of oxidative potential in skeletal muscle within a 2-week period. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of short-term high-intensity interval training on the time constant () of phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery following moderate-intensity exercise, an in vivo measure of functional oxidative capacity. Seven healthy active subjects (age, 21 +/- 4 years; body mass, 69 +/- 11 kg) performed 6 sessions of 4-6 maximal-effort 30 s cycling intervals within a 2-week period, and 7 subjects (age, 24 +/- 5 years; body mass, 80 +/- 15 kg) served as controls. Prior to and following training, phosphorous-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS; GE 3T Excite System) was used to measure relative changes in high-energy phosphates and intracellular pH of the quadriceps muscles during gated dynamic leg-extension exercise (3 cycles of 90 s exercise and 5 min of rest). A monoexponential model was used to estimate the of PCr recovery. The of PCr recovery after leg-extension exercise was reduced by 14% with high-intensity interval training (pretraining, 43 +/- 14 s vs. post-training, 37 +/- 15 s; p < 0.05) with no change in the control group (44 +/- 12 s vs. 43 +/- 12 s, respectively; p > 0.05). These findings demonstrate that short-term high-intensity interval training is an effective means of increasing functional oxidative capacity in skeletal muscle.

  18. Large area LED package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goullon, L.; Jordan, R.; Braun, T.; Bauer, J.; Becker, F.; Hutter, M.; Schneider-Ramelow, M.; Lang, K.-D.

    2015-03-01

    Solid state lighting using LED-dies is a rapidly growing market. LED-dies with the needed increasing luminous flux per chip area produce a lot of heat. Therefore an appropriate thermal management is required for general lighting with LEDdies. One way to avoid overheating and shorter lifetime is the use of many small LED-dies on a large area heat sink (down to 70 μm edge length), so that heat can spread into a large area while at the same time light also appears on a larger area. The handling with such small LED-dies is very difficult because they are too small to be picked with common equipment. Therefore a new concept called collective transfer bonding using a temporary carrier chip was developed. A further benefit of this new technology is the high precision assembly as well as the plane parallel assembly of the LED-dies which is necessary for wire bonding. It has been shown that hundred functional LED-dies were transferred and soldered at the same time. After the assembly a cost effective established PCB-technology was applied to produce a large-area light source consisting of many small LED-dies and electrically connected on a PCB-substrate. The top contacts of the LED-dies were realized by laminating an adhesive copper sheet followed by LDI structuring as known from PCB-via-technology. This assembly can be completed by adding converting and light forming optical elements. In summary two technologies based on standard SMD and PCB technology have been developed for panel level LED packaging up to 610x 457 mm2 area size.

  19. Rain simulation studies for high-intensity acoustic nose cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, R. M.; Cho, Y. I.; Shakkottai, P.; Back, L. H.

    1988-01-01

    Unarmed plastic projectiles can be equipped with small axisymmetric cavities for the generation of intense tones that are useful in training maneuvers. Attention is presently given to the simulation of rainfall in an airstream and the effect of rain droplet impingement on the nose of projectiles, and especially to any penetration or accumulation of water at the base of the cavity that might increase the fundamental cavity frequency and/or reduce the intensity of sound production during rain conditions.

  20. High intensity production of high and medium charge state uraniumand other heavy ion beams with VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Daniela; Galloway, Michelle L.; Loew, Timothy J.; Lyneis, Claude M.; Rodriguez, Ingrid Castro; Todd, Damon S.

    2007-11-15

    The next generation, superconducting ECR ion source VENUS(Versatile ECR ion source for NUclear Science) started operation with 28GHzmicrowave heating in 2004. Since then it has produced world recordion beam intensities. For example, 2850 e mu A of O6+, 200 e mu A of U33+or U34+, and in respect to high charge state ions, 1 e mu A of Ar18+, 270e mu A of Ar16+, 28 e mu A of Xe35+ and 4.9 e mu A of U47+ have beenproduced. A brief overview of the latest developments leading to theserecord intensities is given and the production of high intensity uraniumbeams is discussed in more detail.

  1. Ammonium hydroxide modulated synthesis of high-quality fluorescent carbon dots for white LEDs with excellent color rendering properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shengda; Zhu, Zhifeng; Chang, Yajing; Wang, Hui; Yuan, Nan; Li, Guopeng; Yu, Dabin; Jiang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    A novel type of aqueous fluorescent carbon dot (CD) was synthesized using citric acid as the only carbon source via an ammonium hydroxide modulated method, providing a blue color gamut. The amino group is considered to be the key factor in the high fluorescence of CDs and a model is established to investigate the mechanism of fluorescence. In addition, white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) are fabricated by utilizing the prepared CDs and rare earth luminescent materials (SrSi2O2N2:Eu and Sr2Si5N8:Eu) as color conversion layers and UV-LED chips as the excitation light source. The WLEDs produce bright white light with attractive color rendering properties including a color rendering index of up to 95.1, a CIE coordinate of (0.33, 0.37), and a T c of 5447 K under a 100 mA driven current, indicating that the CDs are promising in the field of optoelectronic devices.

  2. Glass Strengthening via High-Intensity Plasma-Arc Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Harper, David C; Duty, Chad E; Patel, P

    2010-01-01

    The use of a high-intensity plasma-arc lamp was used to irradiate the surface of soda-lime silicate glass tiles to determine if an increase in strength could be achieved. The lamp had a power density of 3500 W/cm2, a processing area of 1 cm x 10 cm, irradiated near-infrared heating at a wavelength between 0.2 1.4 m, and was controlled to unidirectionally sweep across 50-mm-square tiles at a constant speed of 8 mm/s. Ring-on-ring (RoR) equibiaxial flexure and 4 pt uni-directional flexure testings of entire tiles were used to measure and compare failure stress distributions of treated and untreated glass. Even with non-optimized processing conditions, RoR failure stress increased by approximately 25% and the 4 pt bend failure stress increased by approximately 65%. Strengthening was due to a fire-polishing-like mechanism. The arc-lamp heat-treatment caused the location of the strength-limiting flaws in the 4-pt-bend tiles to change; namely, failure initiation occurred on the gage section surface for the treated glass whereas it occurred at a gage section edge for the untreated. Arc-lamp heat-treatment is attractive not only because it provides strengthening, but because it can (non-contact) process large amounts of glass quickly and inexpensively, and is a process that either a glass manufacturer or end-user can readily employ.

  3. Development of a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Hydrophone System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Mark E.; Gessert, James

    2009-04-01

    The growing clinical use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has driven a need for reliable, reproducible measurements of HIFU acoustic fields. We have previously presented data on a reflective scatterer approach, incorporating several novel features for improved bandwidth, reliability, and reproducibility [Proc. 2005 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, 1739-1742]. We now report on several design improvements which have increase the signal to noise ratio of the system, and potentially reduced the cost of implementation. For the scattering element, we now use an artificial sapphire material to provide a more uniform radiating surface. The receiver is a segmented, truncated spherical structure with a 10 cm radius; the scattering element is positioned at the center of the sphere. The receiver is made from 25 micron thick, biaxially stretched PVDF, with a Pt-Au electrode on the front surface. In the new design, a specialized backing material provides the stiffness required to maintain structural stability, while at the same time providing both electrical shielding and ultrasonic absorption. Compared with the previous version, the new receiver design has improved the noise performance by 8-12 dB; the new scattering sphere has reduced the scattering loss by another 14 dB, producing an effective sensitivity of -298 dB re 1 microVolt/Pa. The design trade-off still involves receiver sensitivity with effective spot size, and signal distortion from the scatter structure. However, the reduced cost and improved repeatability of the new scatter approach makes the overall design more robust for routine waveform measurements of HIFU systems.

  4. Comparison of various surface textured layer in InGaN LEDs for high light extraction efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji Hye; Ryu, Jae Hyoung; Kim, Hyun Kyu; Kim, Hee Yun; Han, Nam; Park, Young Jae; Uthirakumar, Periyayya; Hong, Chang-Hee

    2011-02-14

    The various surface texturing effects of InGaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been investigated by comparison of experimented data and simulated data. The single-layer and double-layer texturing were performed with the help of ITO nanospheres using wet etching, where the ITO ohmic contact layer and the p-GaN layer are textured using ITO nanospheres as an etch mask. In case of single-layer texturing, p-type GaN layer texturing was more effective than ITO ohmic contact layer texturing. The maximum enhancement of wall-plug efficiency of double-layered textured LEDs is 40% more than conventional LEDs, after packaging at an injected current of 20 mA. The increase of light scattering at the textured GaN surfaces is a major reason for increasing the light extraction efficiency of LEDs.

  5. High efficiency GaN LEDs with submicron-scale 2Dperiodic structures directly fabricated by laser interference ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Dajun; Yang, Muchuan; Wang, Deli; Sun, Xiaohan

    2017-05-01

    We report the investigation of directly ablating submicron-scale 2D periodic structure method on the p-layer of blue GaN light-emitting diode (LED) by laser interference. Hexagonal lattice structures on the p-layer surface of GaN LED are fabricated by three beam laser interference and the air hole radius can be changed by adjusting the laser fluence. The structure with a period of 400 nm, hole radius of 180 nm, and depth of 78 nm is patterned with the laser fluence of 215 mJ/cm2. Experimental results coincide well with the simulation, and reveal that the patterned LED get a maximum enhancement of 55.7% in light output power compared to flat LED.

  6. ZnO-nanorods: A possible white LED phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, Sachindra Nath; T., Arun; Ray, Dinseh K.; Sahoo, Pratap Kumar; Nozaki, Shinji; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Uchida, Kazuo

    2017-05-01

    The white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have drawn much attention to replace conventional lighting sources because of low energy consumption, high light efficiency and long lifetime. Although the most common approach to produce white light is to combine a blue LED chip and a yellow phosphor, such a white LED cannot be used for a general lighting application, which requires a broad luminescence spectrum in the visible wavelength range. We have successfully chemically synthesized the ZnO nanorods showing intense broad luminescence in the visible wavelength range and made a white LED using the ZnO nanorods as phosphor excited with a blue LED. Their lengths and diameters were 2 - 10 μm and 200 - 800 nm, respectively. The wurtzite structure was confirmed by the x-ray diffraction measurement. The PL spectrum obtained by exciting the ZnO nanorods with the He-Cd laser has two peaks, one associated with the near band-edge recombination and the other with recombination via defects. The peak intensity of the near band-edge luminescence at 388 nm is much weaker than that of the defect-related luminescence. The latter luminescence peak ranges from 450 to 850 nm and broad enough to be used as a phosphor for a white LED. A white LED has been fabricated using a blue LED with 450 nm emission and ZnO nanorod powders. The LED performances show a white light emission and the electroluminescence measurement shows a stiff increase in white light intensity with increasing blue LED current. The Commission International de1'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity colour coordinates of 450 nm LED pumped white emission shows a coordinate of (0.31, 0.32) for white LED at 350 mA. These results indicate that ZnO nanorods provides an alternate and effective approach to achieve high-performance white LEDs and also other optoelectronic devices.

  7. Effectiveness of a nurse-led intensive home-visitation programme for first-time teenage mothers (Building Blocks): a pragmatic randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Robling, Michael; Bekkers, Marie-Jet; Bell, Kerry; Butler, Christopher C; Cannings-John, Rebecca; Channon, Sue; Martin, Belen Corbacho; Gregory, John W; Hood, Kerry; Kemp, Alison; Kenkre, Joyce; Montgomery, Alan A; Moody, Gwenllian; Owen-Jones, Eleri; Pickett, Kate; Richardson, Gerry; Roberts, Zoë E S; Ronaldson, Sarah; Sanders, Julia; Stamuli, Eugena; Torgerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Many countries now offer support to teenage mothers to help them to achieve long-term socioeconomic stability and to give a successful start to their children. The Family Nurse Partnership (FNP) is a licensed intensive home-visiting intervention developed in the USA and introduced into practice in England that involves up to 64 structured home visits from early pregnancy until the child's second birthday by specially recruited and trained family nurses. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of giving the programme to teenage first-time mothers on infant and maternal outcomes up to 24 months after birth. Methods We did a pragmatic, non-blinded, randomised controlled, parallel-group trial in community midwifery settings at 18 partnerships between local authorities and primary and secondary care organisations in England. Eligible participants were nulliparous and aged 19 years or younger, and were recruited at less than 25 weeks' gestation. Field-based researchers randomly allocated mothers (1:1) via remote randomisation (telephone and web) to FNP plus usual care (publicly funded health and social care) or to usual care alone. Allocation was stratified by site and minimised by gestation (<16 weeks vs ≥16 weeks), smoking status (yes vs no), and preferred language of data collection (English vs non-English). Mothers and assessors (local researchers at baseline and 24 months' follow-up) were not masked to group allocation, but telephone interviewers were blinded. Primary endpoints were biomarker-calibrated self-reported tobacco use by the mother at late pregnancy, birthweight of the baby, the proportion of women with a second pregnancy within 24 months post-partum, and emergency attendances and hospital admissions for the child within 24 months post-partum. Analyses were by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ISRCTN, number ISRCTN23019866. Findings Between June 16, 2009, and July 28, 2010, we screened 3251 women. After enrolment, 823

  8. Can Increasing the Manufacturer's Recommended Shortest Curing Time of High-intensity Light-emitting Diodes Adequately Cure Sealants?

    PubMed

    Branchal, Caroline F; Wells, Martha H; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis

    2015-01-01

    To investigate sealant depth of cure after increasing the curing times of high-intensity light-emitting diode units (LEDs). Three sealants (opaque-unfilled, opaque-filled, and clear-filled) were light cured in a covered-slot mold with: (a) three LEDs (VALO, SmartLite, Fusion) for six to 15 seconds; and (b) a quartz-tungsten halogen (QTH) light for 40 seconds as a control (N=10). Twenty-four hours after light curing, microhardness was measured at the sealant surface and through the depth at 0.5 mm increments. Results were analyzed via analysis of variance followed by the Student-Newman-Keuls test (significance level 0.05). The opaque-filled and clear-filled sealants cured with VALO for six or nine seconds had hardness values that were statistically equivalent to or better than the QTH to a depth of 1.5 mm. Using Fusion for 10 seconds (exposure limit) did not adequately cure the three sealants beyond one mm. SmartLite at 15 seconds (maximum exposure period without overheating) did not adequately cure the sealants beyond 0.5 mm. Among the tested high-intensity LEDs, only VALO at double or triple the manufacturers' shortest curing time (six or nine seconds) provided adequate curing of opaque-filled and clear-filled sealants at 1.5 mm depth compared to the 40-second QTH light.

  9. Optimal spectra of the phosphor-coated white LEDs with excellent color rendering property and high luminous efficacy of radiation.

    PubMed

    He, Guoxing; Yan, Huafeng

    2011-01-31

    A model for spectra of the phosphor-coated white LED (p-W LED) with a blue chip, a red chip, and green and yellow phosphors is presented. The optimal spectra of p-W LEDs with correlated color temperatures (CCTs) of 2700-6500 K have been obtained with a nonlinear program for maximizing luminous efficacy of radiation (LER) under conditions of both color-rendering indices (CRIs) and special CRIs of R9 strong red above 98. The simulation results show that p-W LEDs with one InGaN blue (450 nm) chip, one AlGaInP red (634 nm) chip, and green (507 nm) and yellow (580 nm) silicate phosphors can realize white lights with CRIs of about 98 and special CRIs of R9 for strong red above 98. The average of the special CRIs R9 to R12 for the four saturated colors (red, yellow, green, and blue) is above 95. R13 for the skin of women's faces at about 100, as well as LERs above 296 lm/W at CCTs of 2700-6500 K. LERs of excellent CRI p-W LEDs with one InGaN blue chip, one AlGaInP red chip, and green and yellow silicate phosphors increased by 19-49% when compared with that of excellent CRI p-W LEDs with one InGaN blue chip and green and yellow silicate phosphors, as well as red nitride phosphor.

  10. Development of a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Hydrophone System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Mark E.; Gessert, James; Moore, Wayne

    2006-05-01

    Concomitant with the growing clinical use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU), there has been a need for reliable, economical and reproducible measurements of HIFU acoustic fields. A number of approaches have been proposed and investigated, most notably by Kaczkowski et al [Proc. 2003 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, 982-985]. We are developing a similar reflective scatterer approach, incorporating several novel features which improve the hydrophone's bandwidth, reliability, and reproducibility. For the scattering element, we have used a fused silica optical fiber with a polyamide protective coating. The receiver is designed as a segmented, truncated spherical structure with a 10cm radius; the scattering element is positioned at the center of the sphere. The receiver is made from 25 micron thick, biaxially stretched PVDF, with a Pt-Au electrode on the front surface. Each segment has its own high impedance, wideband preamplifier, and the signals from multiple segments are summed coherently. As an additional feature, the system is designed to pulse the PVDF elements so that the pulse-echo response can be used to align the fiber at the center. Initial tests of the system have demonstrated a receiver array sensitivity of -279 dB re 1 microVolt/Pa (before preamplification), with a scattering loss at the fiber of approximately 39dB, producing an effective sensitivity of -318 dB re 1 micro Volt/Pa. The addition of the closely coupled wideband preamplifiers boosts the signal to a range which is sufficient for the measurement of HIFU transducers. The effective bandwidth of the system exceeds 15MHz, through careful design and the use of PVDF as a sensor material. In order to test the system, a HIFU transducer in the 4.0MHz frequency range was tested at low output settings using a conventional PVDF membrane hydrophone. The prototype system was then used to characterize the same HIFU transducer at full power. The results showed good correlation between waveforms and cross

  11. High-Intensity Training and Salivary Immunoglobulin A Responses in Professional Top-Level Soccer Players: Effect of Training Intensity.

    PubMed

    Owen, Adam L; Wong, Del P; Dunlop, Gordon; Groussard, Carole; Kebsi, Wiem; Dellal, Alexandre; Morgans, Ryland; Zouhal, Hassane

    2016-09-01

    Owen, AL, Wong, DP, Dunlop, G, Groussard, C, Kebsi, W, Dellal, A, Morgans, R, and Zouhal, H. High-intensity training and salivary immunoglobulin A responses in professional top-level soccer players: Effect of training intensity. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2460-2469, 2016-This study aimed (a) to test the hypothesis that salivary immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) would vary with training intensity sessions (low-intensity [LI] vs. high-intensity sessions [HI]) during a traditional training program divided into 4 training periods and (b) to identify key variables (e.g., GPS data, rating of perceived exertion [RPE], and training duration), which could affect s-IgA. Saliva samples of 10 elite professional soccer players were collected (a) before the investigation started to establish the baseline level and (b) before and after each 4 training sessions (LI vs. HI). Training intensity was monitored as internal (through heart rate responses and RPE) and external (through GPS) loads. High-intensity sessions were associated with higher external load (GPS) and with higher RPE. Baseline and pretraining s-IgA did not differ between the 4 training sessions both for HI and LI. Post-training s-IgA were not different (in absolute value and in percentage of change) between HI and LI sessions at the first 3 periods. However, at the fourth period, s-IgA concentration for HI session was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05) than the LI session. The percentage change between s-IgA post-training and s-IgA baseline concentrations differ significantly (p ≤ 0.05) between HI and LI training sessions. Significant correlations between s-IgA and training intensity were also noted. High-intensity soccer training sessions might cause a significant decrease in s-IgA values during the postexercise window as compared with LI sessions. This study encourages coaches to monitor s-IgA in routine, particularly during HI training periods, to take precautions to avoid upper respiratory tract infection in highly trained

  12. Co-ingestion of Nutritional Ergogenic Aids and High-Intensity Exercise Performance.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Alireza; Earnest, Conrad P; Lowery, Ryan P; Wilson, Jacob M; Willems, Mark E T

    2016-10-01

    Many sports involve repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise. High-intensity exercise is compromised, however, by the early onset of exercise-induced fatigue. Metabolic by-products, ion dysbalance and amount of phosphocreatine are considered the main peripheral causes of fatigue during high-intensity exercise. Intake of nutritional ergogenic aids is commonplace to enhance performance of high-intensity exercise by offsetting the potential mechanisms of fatigue. Creatine, probably one of the best known nutritional aids to enhance performance of high-intensity exercise, has convincingly substantiated its ergogenic potential. Although multi-ingredient supplements are now common, the justification for effectiveness is mostly based on observations with single intake of those ingredients. In this narrative review, the main focus is on the evidence of the effect of co-ingestion of ergogenic aids on performance of high intensity exercise for which the single intake has shown beneficial effects on high-intensity performance.

  13. High power target approaches for intense radioactive ion beam facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, W.L. ||; Hodges, T.A.; Hsu, H.; Fikani, M.M.

    1997-02-01

    Development of conceptual approaches for targets to produce intense radioactive ion beams is needed in anticipation of activity for a next-generation, intense ISOL-type radioactive beams facility, strongly recommended in the NSAC 1995 Long Range Plan for Nuclear Science. The production of isotopes in vapor form for subsequent mass separation and acceleration will depend on the ability to control target temperature profiles within the target resulting from interactions of the intense production beams with the target material. A number of earlier studies have identified promising approaches which need, however, to be carefully analyzed for specific target systems. A survey will be made of these earlier concepts employing various cooling techniques, including imposition of thermal barriers between the target materials and cooling systems. Some results of preliminary analyses are summarized. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Intensive land use in the Swedish mountains between AD 800 and 1200 led to deforestation and ecosystem transformation with long-lasting effects.

    PubMed

    Östlund, Lars; Hörnberg, Greger; DeLuca, Thomas H; Liedgren, Lars; Wikström, Peder; Zackrisson, Olle; Josefsson, Torbjörn

    2015-10-01

    Anthropogenic deforestation has shaped ecosystems worldwide. In subarctic ecosystems, primarily inhabited by native peoples, deforestation is generally considered to be mainly associated with the industrial period. Here we examined mechanisms underlying deforestation a thousand years ago in a high-mountain valley with settlement artifacts located in subarctic Scandinavia. Using the Heureka Forestry Decision Support System, we modeled pre-settlement conditions and effects of tree cutting on forest cover. To examine lack of regeneration and present nutrient status, we analyzed soil nitrogen. We found that tree cutting could have deforested the valley within some hundred years. Overexploitation left the soil depleted beyond the capacity of re-establishment of trees. We suggest that pre-historical deforestation has occurred also in subarctic ecosystems and that ecosystem boundaries were especially vulnerable to this process. This study improves our understanding of mechanisms behind human-induced ecosystem transformations and tree-line changes, and of the concept of wilderness in the Scandinavian mountain range.

  15. Effects of high versus low-intensity resistance training on bone mineral density in young males.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuku, S; Shimokata, H; Ikegami, Y; Yabe, K; Wasnich, R D

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of high-intensity and low-intensity resistance training upon bone mineral density (BMD) by comparing the BMD of young male powerlifters (n = 5), recreational trainees (n = 5), and controls (n = 5). Lumbar spine (L2-L4), proximal femur, and whole body BMDs were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The high-intensity group showed a significantly greater BMD when the whole body and trochanter regions were measured than the low-intensity and control group. The BMD of the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and Ward's triangle was greater in the high-intensity group compared with the control group. There was no significant BMD difference between the low-intensity and control group except at the trochanter region. These results suggest that high-intensity resistance training is effective for increasing BMD, but low-intensity resistance training is not.

  16. Effects of nonlinear ultrasound propagation on high intensity brain therapy.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Gianmarco; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickael

    2011-03-01

    As an ultrasound wave propagates nonlinearly, energy is transferred to higher frequencies where it is more strongly attenuated. Compared to soft tissue, the skull has strongly heterogeneous material parameters. The authors characterize with experiments and establish a numerical method that can describe the effects of the skull on the nonlinear components of ultrasonic wave propagation for application to high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy in the brain. The impact of nonlinear acoustic propagation on heat deposition and thermal dose delivery is quantified and compared to linear assumptions by coupling an acoustic simulation with a heating model for brain tissue. A degassed dessicated human skull was placed in a water tank and insonified at 1 MPa with 7 mm transducer from a custom array designed for HIFU treatment. Two dimensional scans were performed preceding and following propagation through the skull with a calibrated hydrophone. Data from the scan preceding the skull were used as an input to a three dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation that calculates the effects of diffraction, density, attenuation with linear dependence on frequency via relaxation mechanisms, and second order nonlinearity. A measured representation of the skull was used to determine the skull's acoustic properties. The validated acoustic model was used to determine the loss due to nonlinear propagation and then coupled to a finite difference simulation of the bioheat equation for two focal configurations at 3 and 7.5 cm from the skull surface. Prior to propagation through the skull, the second harmonic component was 19 dB lower than the fundamental, and the third harmonic component was 37 dB lower. Following the skull, the second harmonic component was 35 dB lower and the third harmonic was 55 dB lower. The simulation is in agreement with the measurements to within 0.5 dB across the considered frequency range and shows good agreement across the two

  17. High-intensity re-warm-ups enhance soccer performance.

    PubMed

    Zois, J; Bishop, D; Fairweather, I; Ball, K; Aughey, R J

    2013-09-01

    The effects of high-intensity, short-duration, re-warm-ups on team-sport-related performance were investigated. In a randomised, cross-over study, participants performed 2×26-min periods of an intermittent activity protocol (IAP) on a non-motorized treadmill, interspersed by 15-min of passive recovery (CON); 3-min small-sided game (SSG); or a 5RM leg-press. Measures included counter-movement jump, repeated-sprint, the Loughborough soccer passing test (LSPT), blood lactate concentration, heart-rate, and perceptual measures. Data were analyzed using effect size (90% confidence intervals), and percentage change; determining magnitudes of effects. A 5RM re-warm-up improved flight-time to contraction-time ratio when compared to SSG (9.8%, ES; 0.5±0.3) and CON (ES: 9.4%, 0.7±0.5) re-warm-ups, remaining higher following the second IAP (8.8%, ES; 0.5±0.3 and 10.2%, ES; 0.6±0.6, respectively). Relative-maximum rate-of-force development was greater in the 5RM condition following the second IAP compared to SSG (29.3%, ES; 0.7±0.5) and CON (16.2%, ES; 0.6±0.6). Repeated-sprint ability during the second IAP improved in the 5RM re-warm-up; peak velocity, mean velocity, and acceleration were 4, 3, and 18% greater, respectively. Within groups, the SSG re-warm-up improved LSPT performance post-intervention; 6.4% (ES: 0.6±0.8) and following the second IAP 6.2% (ES: 0.6±0.6), compared to pre-intervention. A 5RM leg-press re-warm-up improved physical performance, while a SSG re-warm-up enhanced skill execution following standardized intermittent exercise. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Effects of different light wavelengths from LEDs on oxidative stress and apoptosis in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) at high water temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong-Seok; Jung, Seo Jin; Choi, Young Jae; Kim, Na Na; Choi, Cheol Young; Kim, Jae-Woo

    2016-08-01

    We investigated how different light spectra affect thermal stress in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), using light emitting diodes (LEDs; blue, 450 nm; green, 530 nm; red, 630 nm) at two intensities (0.3 and 0.5 W/m(2)) at relatively high water temperatures (25 and 30 °C, compared to a control condition of 20 °C). We measured the expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and the levels of plasma hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Furthermore, the levels and mRNA expression of caspase-3 were measured, and terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays of liver and comet assays were performed. The expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes, as well as plasma H2O2 and LPO levels were significantly higher after exposure to high temperatures, and significantly lower after exposure to green and blue light. Caspase-3 levels and mRNA expression showed a similar pattern. The TUNEL assay showed that apoptosis markedly increased at higher water temperatures, compared with the 20 °C control. In contrast, green light irradiation decreased apoptosis rate. Furthermore, the comet assays showed that nuclear DNA damage was caused by thermal stress, and that green light irradiation played a role in partially preventing this damage. Overall, these results suggest that light with green and blue wavelengths can reduce both high temperature-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis, and that particularly green light is efficient for this. Therefore, green light can play a role in protecting in olive flounder from thermal stress damage.

  19. Driving Down HB-LED Costs. Implementation of Process Simulation Tools and Temperature Control Methods of High Yield MOCVD Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, William

    2012-04-30

    The overall objective of this multi-faceted program is to develop epitaxial growth systems that meet a goal of 75% (4X) cost reduction in the epitaxy phase of HB-LED manufacture. A 75% reduction in yielded epitaxy cost is necessary in order to achieve the cost goals for widespread penetration of HB-LED's into back-lighting units (BLU) for LCD panels and ultimately for solid-state lighting (SSL). To do this, the program will address significant improvements in overall equipment Cost of Ownership, or CoO. CoO is a model that includes all costs associated with the epitaxy portion of production. These aspects include cost of yield, capital cost, operational costs, and maintenance costs. We divide the program into three phases where later phases will incorporate the gains of prior phases. Phase one activities are enabling technologies. In collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories we develop a Fluent-compatible chemistry predictive model and a set of mid-infrared and near-ultraviolet pyrometer monitoring tools. Where previously the modeling of the reactor dynamics were studied within FLUENT alone, here, FLUENT and Chemkin are integrated into a comprehensive model of fluid dynamics and the most advanced transport equations developed for Chemkin. Specifically, the Chemkin model offered the key reaction terms for gas-phase nucleation, a key consideration in the optimization of the MOCVD process. This new predictive model is used to design new MOCVD reactors with optimized growth conditions and the newly developed pyrometers are used monitor and control the MOCVD process temperature to within 0.5°C run-to-run and within each wafer. This portion of the grant is in collaboration with partners at Sandia National Laboratories. Phase two activities are continuous improvement projects which extend the current reactor platform along the lines of improved operational efficiency, improved systems control for throughput, and carrier modifications for increased yield

  20. Investigation of the Frohlich hypothesis with high intensity terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weightman, Peter

    2014-03-01

    This article provides an update to recent reviews of the Frohlich hypothesis that biological organisation is facilitated by the creation of coherent excited states driven by a flow of free energy provided by metabolic processes and mediated by molecular motions in the terahertz range. Sources of intense terahertz radiation have the potential to test this hypothesis since if it is true the growth and development of sensitive systems such as stem cells should be influenced by irradiation with intense terahertz radiation. A brief survey of recent work shows that it is not yet possible to make an assessment of the validity of the Frohlich hypothesis. Under some conditions a variety of cell types respond to irradiation with intense THz radiation in ways that involve changes in the activity of their DNA. In other experiments very intense and prolonged THz radiation has no measureable effect on the behavior of very sensitive systems such as stem cells. The wide variation in experimental conditions makes it impossible to draw any conclusions as to characteristics of THz radiation that will induce a response in living cells. It is possible that in environments suitable for their maintenance and growth cells are capable of compensating for any effects caused by exposure to THz radiation up to some currently unknown level of THz peak power.