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Sample records for high interfacial adhesionvia

  1. Preparation of pHEMA-CP composites with high interfacial adhesionvia template-driven mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jie; Saiz, Eduardo; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2002-12-05

    We report a template-driven nucleation and mineral growth process for the high-affinity integration of calcium phosphate (CP) with a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) hydrogel scaffold. A mineralization technique was developed that exposes carboxylate groups on the surface of crosslinked pHEMA, promoting high-affinity nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate on the surface along with extensive calcification of the hydrogel interior. External factors such as the heating rate, the agitation of the mineral stock solution and the duration of the process that affect the outcome of the mineralization were investigated. This template-driven mineralization technique provides an efficient approach toward bonelike composites with high mineral-hydrogel interfacial adhesion strength.

  2. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  3. Interfacial fracture between highly crosslinked polymer networks and a solid surface: Effect of interfacial bond density

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-03-23

    For highly crosslinked, polymer networks bonded to a solid surface, the effect of interfacial bond density as well as system size on interfacial fracture is studied molecular dynamics simulations. The correspondence between the stress-strain curve and the sequence of molecular deformations is obtained. The failure strain for a fully bonded surface is equal to the strain necessary to make taut the average minimal path through the network from the bottom solid surface to the top surface. At bond coverages less than full, nanometer scale cavities form at the surface yielding an inhomogeneous strain profile. The failure strain and stress are linearly proportional to the number of bonds at the interface unless the number of bonds is so few that van der Waals interactions dominate. The failure is always interfacial due to fewer bonds at the interface than in the bulk.

  4. Interfacial shear stress measurement using high spatial resolution multiphase PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2015-06-01

    In multiphase flows, form drag and viscous shear stress transfer momentum between phases. For numerous environmental and man-made flows, it is of primary importance to predict this transfer at a liquid-gas interface. In its general expression, interfacial shear stress involves local velocity gradients as well as surface velocity, curvature, and surface tension gradients. It is therefore a challenging quantity to measure experimentally or compute numerically. In fact, no experimental work to date has been able to directly resolve all the terms contributing to the shear stress in the case of curved and moving surfaces. In an attempt to fully resolve the interface shear stress when surface tension gradients are negligible, high-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) data are acquired simultaneously on both sides of a water-air interface. The flow consists of a well-conditioned uniform and homogeneous water jet discharging in quiescent air, which exhibits two-dimensional surface waves as a result of a shear layer instability below the surface. PIV provides velocity fields in both phases, while planar laser-induced fluorescence is used to track the interface and obtain its curvature. To compute the interfacial shear stress from the data, several processing schemes are proposed and compared, using liquid and/or gas phase data. Vorticity at the surface, which relates to the shear stress through the dynamic boundary condition at the surface, is also computed and provides additional strategies for estimating the shear. The various schemes are in agreement within the experimental uncertainties, validating the methodology for experimentally resolving this demanding quantity.

  5. Towards high performance inverted polymer solar cells through interfacial reengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiong

    2013-10-01

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells (PSCs) that can be fabricated by solution processing techniques are under intense investigation in both academic institutions and industrial companies because of their potential to enable mass production of flexible and cost-effective alternative to silicon-based solar cells. A combination of novel polymer development, nanoscale morphology control and processing optimization has led to over 8% of power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) for BHJ PSCs with a conventional device structure. Attempts to develop PSCs with an inverted device structure as required for achieving high PECs and good stability have, however, met with limited success. Here, we report that (1) solution-processed zinc oxide (ZnO) thin film as an electron extraction layer for inverted polymer solar cells. Operated at room temperature, no obviously degradation was observed from the PSCs with ZnO layer after continuously illuminating the devices for 4 hours. However, a significantly degradation was observed from the PSCs without ZnO buffer layer after illuminating the devices only for 1 hour. Furthermore, PSCs with ZnO buffer layer also show very good shelf stability; only 10 % degradation observed in PCEs after 6 months; (2) a high PCE of 8.4% under AM1.5G irradiation was achieved for BHJ PSCs with an inverted device structure. This high efficiency was obtained through interfacial engineering of solution-processed electron extraction layer, ZnO, leading to facilitate electron transport and suppress bimolecular recombination. All these results provided an important progress for solution-processed PSCs, and demonstrated that PSCs with an inverted device structure are comparable with PSCs with the conventional device structure.

  6. Highly conductive free standing polypyrrole films prepared by freezing interfacial polymerization.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guijin; Huang, Liyan; Wang, Huiliang

    2012-08-25

    Highly conductive free standing polypyrrole (PPy) films were prepared by a novel freezing interfacial polymerization method. The films exhibit metallic luster and electrical conductivity up to 2000 S cm(-1). By characterizing with SEM, FTIR, Raman and XRD, the high conductivity is attributed to the smooth surface, higher conjugation length and more ordered molecular structure of PPy.

  7. Interfacial Evolution of Cement and Steel in CO2 Dissolved Solution Under High Temperature and High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Chengqiang; Peng, Ye; Li, Bing; Wang, Shuliang; Shi, Taihe

    2016-09-01

    The experiments were operated for the cylindrical sample (cement/steel) in high temperature and high pressure (HTHP) CO2 environment to simulate surrounding CO2 attack in oil and gas well. The interfacial evolutions between well cement and casing steel were measured, including mechanical property, structure alteration, chemical change and electrochemical character. The interfacial behaviors are attributed to the competition of hydration and degradation of Portland cement. The damage at the interface was faster than the cement bulk deterioration by carbonation. Thus, the interface provided a potential flow leakage pathway for the HTHP gas and fluid in the well, so improving interfacial stability between well cement and casing steel is the key issue to long-term zonal isolation.

  8. High interfacial activity of polymers "grafted through" functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle clusters.

    PubMed

    Foster, Lynn M; Worthen, Andrew J; Foster, Edward L; Dong, Jiannan; Roach, Clarissa M; Metaxas, Athena E; Hardy, Clifford D; Larsen, Eric S; Bollinger, Jonathan A; Truskett, Thomas M; Bielawski, Christopher W; Johnston, Keith P

    2014-09-01

    The mechanism by which polymers, when grafted to inorganic nanoparticles, lower the interfacial tension at the oil-water interface is not well understood, despite the great interest in particle stabilized emulsions and foams. A simple and highly versatile free radical "grafting through" technique was used to bond high organic fractions (by weight) of poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) monomethyl ether methacrylate) onto iron oxide clusters, without the need for catalysts. In the resulting ∼1 μm hybrid particles, the inorganic cores and grafting architecture contribute to the high local concentration of grafted polymer chains to the dodecane/water interface to produce low interfacial tensions of only 0.003 w/v % (polymer and particle core). This "critical particle concentration" (CPC) for these hybrid inorganic/polymer amphiphilic particles to lower the interfacial tension by 36 mN/m was over 30-fold lower than the critical micelle concentration of the free polymer (without inorganic cores) to produce nearly the same interfacial tension. The low CPC is favored by the high adsorption energy (∼10(6) kBT) for the large ∼1 μm hybrid particles, the high local polymer concentration on the particles surfaces, and the ability of the deformable hybrid nanocluster cores as well as the polymer chains to conform to the interface. The nanocluster cores also increased the entanglement of the polymer chains in bulk DI water or synthetic seawater, producing a viscosity up to 35,000 cP at 0.01 s(-1), in contrast with only 600 cP for the free polymer. As a consequence of these interfacial and rheological properties, the hybrid particles stabilized oil-in-water emulsions at concentrations as low as 0.01 w/v %, with average drop sizes down to 30 μm. In contrast, the bulk viscosity was low for the free polymer, and it did not stabilize the emulsions. The ability to influence the interfacial activity and rheology of polymers upon grafting them to inorganic particles, including clusters

  9. High interfacial activity of polymers "grafted through" functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle clusters.

    PubMed

    Foster, Lynn M; Worthen, Andrew J; Foster, Edward L; Dong, Jiannan; Roach, Clarissa M; Metaxas, Athena E; Hardy, Clifford D; Larsen, Eric S; Bollinger, Jonathan A; Truskett, Thomas M; Bielawski, Christopher W; Johnston, Keith P

    2014-09-01

    The mechanism by which polymers, when grafted to inorganic nanoparticles, lower the interfacial tension at the oil-water interface is not well understood, despite the great interest in particle stabilized emulsions and foams. A simple and highly versatile free radical "grafting through" technique was used to bond high organic fractions (by weight) of poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) monomethyl ether methacrylate) onto iron oxide clusters, without the need for catalysts. In the resulting ∼1 μm hybrid particles, the inorganic cores and grafting architecture contribute to the high local concentration of grafted polymer chains to the dodecane/water interface to produce low interfacial tensions of only 0.003 w/v % (polymer and particle core). This "critical particle concentration" (CPC) for these hybrid inorganic/polymer amphiphilic particles to lower the interfacial tension by 36 mN/m was over 30-fold lower than the critical micelle concentration of the free polymer (without inorganic cores) to produce nearly the same interfacial tension. The low CPC is favored by the high adsorption energy (∼10(6) kBT) for the large ∼1 μm hybrid particles, the high local polymer concentration on the particles surfaces, and the ability of the deformable hybrid nanocluster cores as well as the polymer chains to conform to the interface. The nanocluster cores also increased the entanglement of the polymer chains in bulk DI water or synthetic seawater, producing a viscosity up to 35,000 cP at 0.01 s(-1), in contrast with only 600 cP for the free polymer. As a consequence of these interfacial and rheological properties, the hybrid particles stabilized oil-in-water emulsions at concentrations as low as 0.01 w/v %, with average drop sizes down to 30 μm. In contrast, the bulk viscosity was low for the free polymer, and it did not stabilize the emulsions. The ability to influence the interfacial activity and rheology of polymers upon grafting them to inorganic particles, including clusters

  10. Interfacial optimization of tungsten fibre-reinforced copper for high-temperature heat sink material for fusion application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, A.; Schmid, K.; Balden, M.; Bolt, H.

    2009-04-01

    W fibre-reinforced Cu shows great promise to improve the mechanical performance at high-temperatures compared to conventional Cu-based alloys. Focus was placed on the optimization of the interface to achieve an enhanced adhesion between W fibre and Cu matrix. The interfacial properties were investigated through pull-out measurements of single matrix-coated fibres for different interfacial concepts. The interfacial adhesion of W and Cu is determined solely through mechanical interlocking. Interdiffusion and segregations experiment showed that there are no interface reactions between W and Cu at elevated temperatures. From the investigated interfacial concepts, a stepwise graded transition interface with additional heat treatment was found to achieve the highest interfacial shear strength. The thermal stability of the MMC in thermal cycling tests can be assured by depositing a stepwise graded transition between W fibre and Cu matrix.

  11. Simulation of interfacial fracture in highly crosslinked adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-05-22

    The fracture of highly-crosslinked networks is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The network is modeled as a bead-spring polymer network between two solid surfaces. The network is dynamically formed by crosslinking an equilibrated liquid mixture. Tensile pull fracture is simulated as a function of the number of interracial bonds. The sequence of molecular structural deformations that lead to failure are determined, and the connectivity is found to strongly control the stress-strain response and failure modes. The failure strain is related to the minimal paths in the network that connect the two solid surfaces. The failure stress is a fraction of the ideal stress required to fracture all the interracial bonds, and is linearly proportional to the number of interracial bonds. By allowing only a single bond between a crosslinker and the surface, interracial failure always occurs. Allowing up to half of the crosslinker's bonds to occur with the surface, cohesive failure can occur.

  12. Interfacial electron and phonon scattering processes in high-powered nanoscale applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2011-10-01

    The overarching goal of this Truman LDRD project was to explore mechanisms of thermal transport at interfaces of nanomaterials, specifically linking the thermal conductivity and thermal boundary conductance to the structures and geometries of interfaces and boundaries. Deposition, fabrication, and post possessing procedures of nanocomposites and devices can give rise to interatomic mixing around interfaces of materials leading to stresses and imperfections that could affect heat transfer. An understanding of the physics of energy carrier scattering processes and their response to interfacial disorder will elucidate the potentials of applying these novel materials to next-generation high powered nanodevices and energy conversion applications. An additional goal of this project was to use the knowledge gained from linking interfacial structure to thermal transport in order to develop avenues to control, or 'tune' the thermal transport in nanosystems.

  13. High On/Off Ratio Memristive Switching of Manganite/Cuprate Bilayer by Interfacial Magnetoelectricity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shen, Xiao; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Hernandez-Martin, David; Pérez, Ana; Puzyrev, Yevgeniy S.; Liu, Yaohua; te Velthuis, Suzanne G. E.; Freeland, John W.; Shafer, Padraic; Zhu, Chenhui; et al

    2016-05-27

    Memristive switching serves as the basis for a new generation of electronic devices. Conventional memristors are two-terminal devices in which the current is turned on and off by redistributing point defects, e.g., vacancies. Memristors based on alternative mechanisms have been explored, but achieving both high on/off ratio and low switching energy, as needed in applications, remains a challenge. This paper reports memristive switching in La0.7Ca0.3MnO3/PrBa2Cu3O7 bilayers with an on/off ratio greater than 103 and results of density functional theory calculations in terms of which it is concluded that the phenomenon is likely the result of a new type of interfacialmore » magnetoelectricity. More specifically, this study shows that an external electric field induces subtle displacements of the interfacial Mn ions, which switches on/off an interfacial magnetic “dead layer”, resulting in memristive behavior for spin-polarized electron transport across the bilayer. The interfacial nature of the switching entails low energy cost, about of a tenth of atto Joule for writing/erasing a “bit”. To conclude, the results indicate new opportunities for manganite/cuprate systems and other transition metal oxide junctions in memristive applications.« less

  14. Effect of Interfacial characteristics of metal clad polymeric substrates on electrical high frequency interconnection performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Ponchak, G. E.; Liu, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    Etched metallic conductor lines on metal clad polymeric substrates are used for electronic component interconnections. Significant signal losses are observed for microstrip conductor lines used for interconnecting high frequency devices. At these frequencies, the electronic signal travels closer to the metal-polymer interface due to the skin effect. Copper-teflon interfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) to determine the interfacial properties. Data relating roughness of the copper film to signal losses was compared to theory. Films used to enhance adhesion are found, to contribute to these losses.

  15. Interfacial Engineering for Highly Efficient-Conjugated Polymer-Based Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Jen; David Ginger; Christine Luscombe; Hong Ma

    2012-04-02

    The aim of our proposal is to apply interface engineering approach to improve charge extraction, guide active layer morphology, improve materials compatibility, and ultimately allow the fabrication of high efficiency tandem cells. Specifically, we aim at developing: i. Interfacial engineering using small molecule self-assembled monolayers ii. Nanostructure engineering in OPVs using polymer brushes iii. Development of efficient light harvesting and high mobility materials for OPVs iv. Physical characterization of the nanostructured systems using electrostatic force microscopy, and conducting atomic force microscopy v. All-solution processed organic-based tandem cells using interfacial engineering to optimize the recombination layer currents vi. Theoretical modeling of charge transport in the active semiconducting layer The material development effort is guided by advanced computer modeling and surface/ interface engineering tools to allow us to obtain better understanding of the effect of electrode modifications on OPV performance for the investigation of more elaborate device structures. The materials and devices developed within this program represent a major conceptual advancement using an integrated approach combining rational molecular design, material, interface, process, and device engineering to achieve solar cells with high efficiency, stability, and the potential to be used for large-area roll-to-roll printing. This may create significant impact in lowering manufacturing cost of polymer solar cells for promoting clean renewable energy use and preventing the side effects from using fossil fuels to impact environment.

  16. Bismuth Interfacial Doping of Organic Small Molecules for High Performance n-type Thermoelectric Materials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dazhen; Wang, Chao; Zou, Ye; Shen, Xingxing; Zang, Yaping; Shen, Hongguang; Gao, Xike; Yi, Yuanping; Xu, Wei; Di, Chong-An; Zhu, Daoben

    2016-08-26

    Development of chemically doped high performance n-type organic thermoelectric (TE) materials is of vital importance for flexible power generating applications. For the first time, bismuth (Bi) n-type chemical doping of organic semiconductors is described, enabling high performance TE materials. The Bi interfacial doping of thiophene-diketopyrrolopyrrole-based quinoidal (TDPPQ) molecules endows the film with a balanced electrical conductivity of 3.3 S cm(-1) and a Seebeck coefficient of 585 μV K(-1) . The newly developed TE material possesses a maximum power factor of 113 μW m(-1)  K(-2) , which is at the forefront for organic small molecule-based n-type TE materials. These studies reveal that fine-tuning of the heavy metal doping of organic semiconductors opens up a new strategy for exploring high performance organic TE materials. PMID:27496293

  17. High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy of interfacial water at single bond limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ying

    Hydrogen bond is one of the most important weak interactions in nature and plays an essential role in a broad spectrum of physics, chemistry, biology, energy and material sciences. The conventional methods for studying hydrogen-bonding interaction are all based on spectroscopic or diffraction techniques. However, those techniques have poor spatial resolution and only measure the average properties of many hydrogen bonds, which are susceptible to the structural inhomogeneity and local environments, especially when interfacial systems are concerned. The spatial variation and inter-bond coupling of the hydrogen bonds leads to significant spectral broadening, which prohibits the accurate understanding of the experimental data. In this talk, I will present our recent progress on the development of new-generation scanning probe microscopy/spectroscopy (SPM/S) with unprecedentedly high sensitivity and resolution, for addressing weak inter- and intra-molecular interactions, such as hydrogen bonds and van der Waals force. Based on a qPlus sensor, we have succeeded to push the real-space study of a prototypical hydrogen-bonded system, i.e. water, down to single bond limit. Combined with state-of-the-arts quantum simulations, we have discovered exotic nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) in interfacial water and revealed the quantum nature of the hydrogen bond from a completely new perspective

  18. Interfacial tension measurement of Ni-S liquid using high-pressure X-ray micro-tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaki, H.; Urakawa, S.; Funakoshi, K.; Wang, Y.; Shibazaki, Y.; Sanehira, T.; Ueda, Y.; Ohtani, E.

    2008-11-12

    High-pressure, high-temperature X-ray tomography experiments have been carried out using a large volume toroidal cell, which is optimized for interfacial tension measurements. A wide anvil gap, which corresponds to a field of view in the radiography imaging, was successively maintained to high pressures and temperatures using a composite plastic gasket. Obtained interfacial tensions of Ni-S liquid against Na, K-disilicate melt, were 414 and 336 mN/m at 1253 and 1293 K, respectively. Three-dimensional tomography images revealed that the sample had an irregular shape at the early stage of melting, suggesting either non-equilibrium in sample texture and force balance or partial melting of surrounding silicate. This information cannot always be obtained from two-dimensional radiographic imaging techniques. Therefore, a three-dimensional tomography measurement is appropriate for the precise interfacial measurements.

  19. Interfacial thermal resistance between high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Kun; Zhu, Jie; Ma, Yong-Mei; Tang, Da-Wei; Wang, Fo-Song

    2014-10-01

    To improve the thermal conductivity of polymeric composites, the numerous interfacial thermal resistance (ITR) inside is usually considered as a bottle neck, but the direct measurement of the ITR is hardly reported. In this paper, a sandwich structure which consists of transducer/high density polyethylene (HDPE)/sapphire is prepared to study the interface characteristics. Then, the ITRs between HDPE and sapphire of two samples with different HDPE thickness values are measured by time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) method and the results are ~ 2 × 10-7 m2·K·W-1. Furthermore, a model is used to evaluate the importance of ITR for the thermal conductivity of composites. The model's analysis indicates that reducing the ITR is an effective way of improving the thermal conductivity of composites. These results will provide valuable guidance for the design and manufacture of polymer-based thermally conductive materials.

  20. Hydrophobic and high adhesive polyaniline layer of rectangular microtubes fabricated by a modified interfacial polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanqiang; Gong, Xiangxiang; Qu, Yun; Han, Jie

    2016-08-01

    A modified interfacial polymerization of aniline is developed to fabricate hydrophobic and adhesive polyaniline (PANI) layer of rectangular microtubes on the glass substrate. The modified method uses pentanol as an organic medium to dissolve aniline monomer, with the water film of oxidant and surfactant on the glass substrate as water phase. The effects of some synthetic parameters (such as monomer concentration, alcohol molecular structure and surfactant type) on the morphology of PANI layer are studied for better understanding the fabrication of PANI nanostructures on the film. The alcohol molecular structure plays key role for the supermolecular assembly of PANI chains into nanostructures, while the surfactant may direct the array and deposition of these nanostructures on the glass substrate. The formation reason of PANI rectangular sub-microtubes is roughly interpreted according to our previous works. Wettability experiment indicates that the as-prepared PANI layer exhibits excellent hydrophobicity and high adhesive properties to water drop.

  1. Interfacial kinematics and governing mechanisms under the influence of high strain rate impact conditions: Numerical computations of experimental observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoelison, R. N.; Sapanathan, T.; Padayodi, E.; Buiron, N.; Rachik, M.

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the complex interfacial kinematics and governing mechanisms during high speed impact conditions. A robust numerical modelling technique using Eulerian simulations are used to explain the material response of the interface subjected to a high strain rate collision during a magnetic pulse welding. The capability of this model is demonstrated using the predictions of interfacial kinematics and revealing the governing mechanical behaviours. Numerical predictions of wave formation resulted with the upward or downward jetting and complex interfacial mixing governed by wake and vortex instabilities corroborate the experimental observations. Moreover, the prediction of the material ejection during the simulation explains the experimentally observed deposited particles outside the welded region. Formations of internal cavities along the interface is also closely resemble the resulted confined heating at the vicinity of the interface appeared from those wake and vortex instabilities. These results are key features of this simulation that also explains the potential mechanisms in the defects formation at the interface. These results indicate that the Eulerian computation not only has the advantage of predicting the governing mechanisms, but also it offers a non-destructive approach to identify the interfacial defects in an impact welded joint.

  2. High-performance reverse osmosis CNT/polyamide nanocomposite membrane by controlled interfacial interactions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Joong; Choi, Kwonyong; Baek, Youngbin; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Shim, Jimin; Yoon, Jeyong; Lee, Jong-Chan

    2014-02-26

    Polyamide reverse osmosis (RO) membranes with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are prepared by interfacial polymerization using trimesoyl chloride (TMC) solutions in n-hexane and aqueous solutions of m-phenylenediamine (MPD) containing functionalized CNTs. The functionalized CNTs are prepared by the reactions of pristine CNTs with acid mixture (sulfuric acid and nitric acid of 3:1 volume ratio) by varying amounts of acid, reaction temperature, and reaction time. CNTs prepared by an optimized reaction condition are found to be well-dispersed in the polyamide layer, which is confirmed from atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy studies. The polyamide RO membranes containing well-dispersed CNTs exhibit larger water flux values than polyamide membrane prepared without any CNTs, although the salt rejection values of these membranes are close. Furthermore, the durability and chemical resistance against NaCl solutions of the membranes containing CNTs are found to be improved compared with those of the membrane without CNTs. The high membrane performance (high water flux and salt rejection) and the improved stability of the polyamide membranes containing CNTs are ascribed to the hydrophobic nanochannels of CNTs and well-dispersed states in the polyamide layers formed through the interactions between CNTs and polyamide in the active layers.

  3. Modelling of AlAs/GaAs interfacial structures using high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) image simulations.

    PubMed

    Robb, Paul D; Finnie, Michael; Craven, Alan J

    2012-07-01

    High angle annular dark field (HAADF) image simulations were performed on a series of AlAs/GaAs interfacial models using the frozen-phonon multislice method. Three general types of models were considered-perfect, vicinal/sawtooth and diffusion. These were chosen to demonstrate how HAADF image measurements are influenced by different interfacial structures in the technologically important III-V semiconductor system. For each model, interfacial sharpness was calculated as a function of depth and compared to aberration-corrected HAADF experiments of two types of AlAs/GaAs interfaces. The results show that the sharpness measured from HAADF imaging changes in a complicated manner with thickness for complex interfacial structures. For vicinal structures, it was revealed that the type of material that the probe projects through first of all has a significant effect on the measured sharpness. An increase in the vicinal angle was also shown to generate a wider interface in the random step model. The Moison diffusion model produced an increase in the interface width with depth which closely matched the experimental results of the AlAs-on-GaAs interface. In contrast, the interface width decreased as a function of depth in the linear diffusion model. Only in the case of the perfect model was it possible to ascertain the underlying structure directly from HAADF image analysis.

  4. Surface and interfacial engineering of iron oxide nanoplates for highly efficient magnetic resonance angiography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zijian; Wu, Changqiang; Liu, Hanyu; Zhu, Xianglong; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Wang, Lirong; Xu, Ye; Ai, Hua; Gao, Jinhao

    2015-03-24

    Magnetic resonance angiography using gadolinium-based molecular contrast agents suffers from short diagnostic window, relatively low resolution and risk of toxicity. Taking into account the chemical exchange between metal centers and surrounding protons, magnetic nanoparticles with suitable surface and interfacial features may serve as alternative T1 contrast agents. Herein, we report the engineering on surface structure of iron oxide nanoplates to boost T1 contrast ability through synergistic effects between exposed metal-rich Fe3O4(100) facets and embedded Gd2O3 clusters. The nanoplates show prominent T1 contrast in a wide range of magnetic fields with an ultrahigh r1 value up to 61.5 mM(-1) s(-1). Moreover, engineering on nanobio interface through zwitterionic molecules adjusts the in vivo behaviors of nanoplates for highly efficient magnetic resonance angiography with steady-state acquisition window, superhigh resolution in vascular details, and low toxicity. This study provides a powerful tool for sophisticated design of MRI contrast agents for diverse use in bioimaging applications.

  5. Interfacial tension measured at high expansion rates and within milliseconds using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Muijlwijk, Kelly; Hinderink, Emma; Ershov, Dmitry; Berton-Carabin, Claire; Schroën, Karin

    2016-05-15

    To understand droplet formation and stabilisation, technologies are needed to measure interfacial tension at micrometer range and millisecond scale. In this paper, microtechnology is used, and that allows us to access these ranges and derive a model for surfactant free systems. The predicting power of the model was tested, and we found that it can be used to accurately (validated with >60 experiments) describe droplet size for a wide range of flow rates, interfacial tensions, and continuous phase viscosities. The model was used next to determine interfacial tensions in a system with hexadecane and sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) solutions, and it was found that the model can be used for droplet formation times ranging from 0.4 to 9.4ms while using a wide range of process conditions. The method described here differs greatly from standard dynamic interfacial tension methods that use quiescent, mostly diffusion-limited situations. The effects that we measured are much faster due to enhanced mass transfer; this allows us to assess the typical time scales used in industrial emulsification devices.

  6. High efficiency of the spin-orbit torques induced domain wall motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Do; Awano, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-07

    We investigated current-induced DW motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires for various thicknesses of magnetic and Pt-capping layers. It is found that the driving mechanism for the DW motion changes from interfacial to bulk effects at much thick magnetic layer (up to 19.8 nm). In thin wires, linearly depinning field dependence of critical current density and in-plane field dependence of DW velocity suggest that the extrinsic pinning governs field-induced DW motion and injecting current can be regarded as an effective field. It is expected that the high efficiency of spin-orbit torques in thick magnetic multilayers would have important implication for future spintronic devices based on in-plane current induced-DW motion or switching.

  7. Determination of the metal/die interfacial heat transfer coefficient of high pressure die cast B390 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yongyou; Guo, Zhipeng; Xiong, Shoumei

    2012-07-01

    High-pressure die cast B390 alloy was prepared on a 350 ton cold chamber die casting machine. The metal/die interfacial heat transfer coefficient of the alloy was investigated. Considering the filling process, a "finger"-shaped casting was designed for the experiments. This casting consisted of five plates with different thicknesses (0.05 inch or 1.27 mm to 0.25 inch or 6.35 mm) as well as individual ingates and overflows. Experiments under various operation conditions were conducted, and temperatures were measured at various specific locations inside the die. Based on the results, the interfacial heat transfer coefficient and heat flux were determined by solving the inverse heat transfer problem. The influence of the mold-filling sequence, sensor locations, as well as processing parameters including the casting pressure, die temperature, and fast/slow shot speeds on the heat transfer coefficient were discussed.

  8. The origin of high electrolyte-electrode interfacial resistances in lithium cells containing garnet type solid electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Crumlin, Ethan J; Chen, Wei; Qiao, Ruimin; Hou, Huaming; Franz Lux, Simon; Zorba, Vassilia; Russo, Richard; Kostecki, Robert; Liu, Zhi; Persson, Kristin; Yang, Wanli; Cabana, Jordi; Richardson, Thomas; Chen, Guoying; Doeff, Marca

    2014-09-14

    Dense LLZO (Al-substituted Li7La3Zr2O12) pellets were processed in controlled atmospheres to investigate the relationships between the surface chemistry and interfacial behavior in lithium cells. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies revealed that Li2CO3 was formed on the surface when LLZO pellets were exposed to air. The distribution and thickness of the Li2CO3 layer were estimated by a combination of bulk and surface sensitive techniques with various probing depths. First-principles thermodynamic calculations confirmed that LLZO has an energetic preference to form Li2CO3 in air. Exposure to air and the subsequent formation of Li2CO3 at the LLZO surface is the source of the high interfacial impedances observed in cells with lithium electrodes. Surface polishing can effectively remove Li2CO3 and dramatically improve the interfacial properties. Polished samples in lithium cells had an area specific resistance (ASR) of only 109 Ω cm(2) for the LLZO/Li interface, the lowest reported value for Al-substituted LLZO. Galvanostatic cycling results obtained from lithium symmetrical cells also suggest that the quality of the LLZO/lithium interface has a significant impact on the device lifetime.

  9. Interfacial adhesion between the iron fillers and the silicone matrix in magneto-rheological elastomers at high deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pössinger, Tobias; Bolzmacher, Christian; Bodelot, Laurence; Triantafyllidis, Nicolas

    2013-05-01

    This work investigates the interfacial adhesion between the iron fillers and the silicone matrix in magneto-rheological elastomers at high deformations. Carbonyl iron powder, composed of mechanically soft spherical particles with a median size of 3.5 μm and a volume concentration of 3.5%, was mixed in a soft silicone matrix (Shore 00-20); the compound was then degassed and cured under temperature. The presence of a homogeneous magnetic field of 0.3 T during the curing process allowed the formation of particle chains. Tensile tests of these samples under scanning electron microscope showed interfacial slipping and debonding between the two phases. To improve interfacial adhesion, a silane primer was applied to the iron particles, following two different procedures, before the mixing and crosslinking process, thus giving two additional types of samples. In tensile testing lengthwise to the particle alignment, with engineering strains up to 150%, the structural responses of the different types of samples were compared. An enhanced adhesion of the iron fillers to the silicone matrix resulting in a reinforced matrix and increased tensile strength during the first loading path could be observed. Furthermore, scanning electron microscope images show that a more elaborated particle-matrix interface was obtained with the primer additive.

  10. Studies of the nature of interfacial barriers in high efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Clayton W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of interfacial barriers in crystalline silicon solar cells were studied. The effort was directed toward the investigation and use of such techniques as Angular Resolved Parameter Spectroscopy (ARAPS) and Impedance Spectroscopy in initially characterizing n-type Si doped to levels commonly used for n+p solar cells, and eventually Si solar cells. The objectives of the research are given. Those accomplished are detailed, as are recommendations for future work.

  11. Effects of surface treating methods of high-strength carbon fibers on interfacial properties of epoxy resin matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Quansheng; Gu, Yizhuo; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims to study the effects of surface treating methods, including electrolysis of anodic oxidation, sizing and heat treatment at 200 °C, on physical and chemical properties of T700 grade high-strength carbon fiber GQ4522. The fiber surface roughness, surface energy and chemical properties were analyzed for different treated carbon fibers, using atom force microscopy, contact angle, Fourier transformed infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The results show that the adopted surface treating methods significantly affect surface roughness, surface energy and active chemical groups of the studied carbon fibers. Electrolysis and sizing can increase the roughness, surface energy and chemical groups on surface, while heat treatment leads to decreases in surface energy and chemical groups due to chemical reaction of sizing. Then, unidirectional epoxy 5228 matrix composite laminates were prepared using different treated GQ4522 fibers, and interlaminar shear strength and flexural property were measured. It is revealed that the composite using electrolysis and sizing-fiber has the strongest interfacial bonding strength, indicating the important roles of the two treating processes on interfacial adhesion. Moreover, the composite using heat-treating fiber has lower mechanical properties, which is attributed to the decrease of chemical bonding between fiber surface and matrix after high temperature treatment of fiber.

  12. Interfacial characteristics of diamond/aluminum composites with high thermal conductivity fabricated by squeeze-casting method

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Longtao; Wang, Pingping; Xiu, Ziyang; Chen, Guoqin; Lin, Xiu; Dai, Chen; Wu, Gaohui

    2015-08-15

    In this work, aluminum matrix composites reinforced with diamond particles (diamond/aluminum composites) were fabricated by squeeze casting method. The material exhibited a thermal conductivity as high as 613 W / (m · K). The obtained composites were investigated by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope in terms of the (100) and (111) facets of diamond particles. The diamond particles were observed to be homogeneously distributed in the aluminum matrix. The diamond{sub (111)}/Al interface was found to be devoid of reaction products. While at the diamond{sub (100)}/Al interface, large-sized aluminum carbides (Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}) with twin-crystal structure were identified. The interfacial characteristics were believed to be responsible for the excellent thermal conductivity of the material. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Squeeze casting method was introduced to fabricate diamond/Al composite. • Sound interfacial bonding with excellent thermal conductivity was produced. • Diamond{sub (111)}/ aluminum interface was firstly characterized by TEM/HRTEM. • Physical combination was the controlling bonding for diamond{sub (111)}/aluminum. • The growth mechanism of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} was analyzed by crystallography theory.

  13. High reduction of interfacial charge recombination in colloidal quantum dot solar cells by metal oxide surface passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jin; Kuga, Yuki; Mora-Seró, Iván; Toyoda, Taro; Ogomi, Yuhei; Hayase, Shuzi; Bisquert, Juan; Shen, Qing

    2015-03-01

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells based on colloidal QDs and metal oxide nanowires (NWs) possess unique and outstanding advantages in enhancing light harvesting and charge collection in comparison to planar architectures. However, the high surface area of the NW structure often brings about a large amount of recombination (especially interfacial recombination) and limits the open-circuit voltage in BHJ solar cells. This problem is solved here by passivating the surface of the metal oxide component in PbS colloidal quantum dot solar cells (CQDSCs). By coating thin TiO2 layers onto ZnO-NW surfaces, the open-circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency have been improved by over 40% in PbS CQDSCs. Characterization by transient photovoltage decay and impedance spectroscopy indicated that the interfacial recombination was significantly reduced by the surface passivation strategy. An efficiency as high as 6.13% was achieved through the passivation approach and optimization for the length of the ZnO-NW arrays (device active area: 16 mm2). All solar cells were tested in air, and exhibited excellent air storage stability (without any performance decline over more than 130 days). This work highlights the significance of metal oxide passivation in achieving high performance BHJ solar cells. The charge recombination mechanism uncovered in this work could shed light on the further improvement of PbS CQDSCs and/or other types of solar cells.Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells based on colloidal QDs and metal oxide nanowires (NWs) possess unique and outstanding advantages in enhancing light harvesting and charge collection in comparison to planar architectures. However, the high surface area of the NW structure often brings about a large amount of recombination (especially interfacial recombination) and limits the open-circuit voltage in BHJ solar cells. This problem is solved here by passivating the surface of the metal oxide component in PbS colloidal quantum dot solar

  14. Silicon dioxide with a silicon interfacial layer as an insulating gate for highly stable indium phosphide metal-insulator-semiconductor field effect transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, V. J.; Shokrani, M.

    1991-01-01

    A novel gate insulator consisting of silicon dioxide (SiO2) with a thin silicon (Si) interfacial layer has been investigated for high-power microwave indium phosphide (InP) metal-insulator-semiconductor field effect transistors (MISFETs). The role of the silicon interfacial layer on the chemical nature of the SiO2/Si/InP interface was studied by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the silicon interfacial layer reacted with the native oxide at the InP surface, thus producing silicon dioxide, while reducing the native oxide which has been shown to be responsible for the instabilities in InP MISFETs. While a 1.2-V hysteresis was present in the capacitance-voltage (C-V) curve of the MIS capacitors with silicon dioxide, less than 0.1 V hysteresis was observed in the C-V curve of the capacitors with the silicon interfacial layer incorporated in the insulator. InP MISFETs fabricated with the silicon dioxide in combination with the silicon interfacial layer exhibited excellent stability with drain current drift of less than 3 percent in 10,000 sec, as compared to 15-18 percent drift in 10,000 sec for devices without the silicon interfacial layer. High-power microwave InP MISFETs with Si/SiO2 gate insulators resulted in an output power density of 1.75 W/mm gate width at 9.7 GHz, with an associated power gain of 2.5 dB and 24 percent power added efficiency.

  15. Tuning indium tin oxide work function with solution-processed alkali carbonate interfacial layers for high-efficiency inverted organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Chen, Qi; Mao, Lin; Wang, Yixin; Huang, Xun; Lu, Wei; Wang, Bing; Chen, Liwei

    2013-12-01

    Selective electron collection by an interfacial layer modified indium tin oxide cathode is critically important for achieving high-efficiency inverted structure organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Here, we demonstrate that solution-processed alkali carbonates, such as Li2CO3, Na2CO3, K2CO3, Rb2CO3, Cs2CO3, are good interfacial layer materials. Both carbonate concentration and annealing conditions can affect cathode work function and surface roughness. By proper optimization, different alkali carbonates can be almost equally effective as the cathode interfacial layer. Furthermore, good device performance can be achieved at a low annealing temperature (<50 ° C), which allows for potential applications in solution-processed inverted OPV cells on plastic substrates. This work indicates that alkali carbonates, not just cesium carbonate, are valid choices as the cathode interlayer in inverted OPV devices.

  16. MODELING THE EFFECT OF WATER VAPOR ON THE INTERFACIAL BEHAVIOR OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE AIR IN CONTACT WITH Fe20Cr SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Brady, Michael P; Keiser, James R; Cole, David R

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this communication is to provide an atomistic view, via molecular dynamic simulation, of the contrasting interfacial behavior between high temperature dry- and (10-40 vol%) wet-air in contact with stainless steels as represented by Fe20Cr. It was found that H2O preferentially adsorbs and displaces oxygen at the metal/fluid interface. Comparison of these findings with experimental studies reported in the literature is discussed. Keywords: Fe-Cr alloys, metal-fluid interfacial behavior, wet-air, molecular simulation

  17. High efficiency and high photo-stability zinc-phthalocyanine based planar heterojunction solar cells with a double interfacial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Min; Whan Kim, Ji; Shim, Hyun-Sub; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2012-09-01

    The use of CuI and MoO3 as a double interfacial layer between indium tin oxide (ITO) and a zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) layer improves the power conversion efficiency (ηp) and the photo-stability at the same time in ZnPc based solar cells. Insertion of CuI without MoO3 increased ηp more than 2 times to 3.3%. However, the photo-stability is lowered even further due to diffusion of Cu. Insertion of the MoO3 layer between the ITO and CuI prevents the diffusion of Cu under UV illumination to achieve the improved photo-stability and ηp.

  18. Observation of Work Functions, Metallicity, Band Bending, Interfacial Dipoles by EUPS for Characterizing High-k/Metal Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tomie, Toshihisa; Ishitsuka, Tomoaki; Ootsuka, Teruhisa; Ota, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-10

    EUPS (EUV excited photoelectron spectroscopy) is a novel photoelectron spectroscopy technique, in which a sample is excited with 4.86 nm (255 eV), 3-ns pulse EUV light emitted from a laser-produced plasma and the resulting electron spectrum is analyzed with a time-of-flight (TOF) analyzer. EUPS gives information of the topmost atoms because the escape depth of photo-electrons excited by 4.86 nm light is only 0.5 nm. EUPS can evaluate band-bending because the peak density of the excitation light on the sample is extremely high, so that bent electronic bands in semiconductors can be flattened. Secondary electron spectra, from which the vacuum level of the material surface can be determined, are obtained very quickly owing to the use of a TOF analyzer, The metal gate related issues are one of the most challenging topics facing CMOS technology. This paper demonstrates EUPS as a powerful method for characterizing high-k/metal interfaces by showing data from direct observations of interfacial dipoles.

  19. Formation of carbonaceous nano-layers under high interfacial pressures during lubrication with mineral and bio-based oils

    SciTech Connect

    Baltrus, John P.

    2014-01-01

    In order to better protect steel surfaces against wear under high loads, understanding of chemical reactions between lubricants and metal at high interfacial pressures and elevated temperatures needs to be improved. Solutions at 5 to 20 wt. % of zinc di-2-ethylhexyl dithio phosphate (ZDDP) and chlorinated paraffins (CP) in inhibited paraffinic mineral oil (IPMO) and inhibited soy bean oil (ISBO) were compared on a Twist Compression Tribotester (TCT) at 200 MPa. Microscopy of wear tracks after 10 seconds tribotesting showed much smoother surface profiles than those of unworn areas. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) coupled with Ar-ion sputtering demonstrated that additive solutions in ISBO formed 2–3 times thicker carbon-containing nano-layers compared to IPMO. The amounts of Cl, S or P were unexpectedly low and detectable only on the top surface with less than 5 nm penetration. CP blends in IPMO formed more inorganic chlorides than those in ISBO. It can be concluded that base oils are primarily responsible for the thickness of carbonaceous nano-layers during early stages of severe boundary lubrication, while CP or ZDDP additive contributions are important, but less significant.

  20. Tensile properties and interfacial bonding of multi-layered, high-purity titanium strips fabricated by ARB process.

    PubMed

    Ghafari-Gousheh, Soroush; Nedjad, Syamak Hossein; Khalil-Allafi, Jafar

    2015-11-01

    Severe plastic deformation (SPD) processing has shown very effective in promotion of mechanical properties of metals and alloys. In this study, the results of investigating mechanical properties and also inter-layer bond performance of accumulative roll bonded high purity titanium (HP-Ti) strips are presented. High purity titanium plates were severely deformed by use of a combination of cold rolling (CR) to a thickness reduction of approximately 87% and then accumulative roll bonding (ARB) for three cycles (N=3) at ambient temperature. Optical and scanning electron microscopy, tensile testing, and hardness measurements were conducted. The ARB strips exhibited lower tensile strength and ductility in comparison to cold rolled one which can basically be attributed to the poor function of the latest bonds established in the centerlines of the strips. Fractographic examinations revealed the interfacial de-bonding along the centerline between the layers having undergone roll bonding for just one cycle. It was while the interfaces having experienced roll bonding for more cycles showed much higher resistance against delaminating. PMID:26253205

  1. Parameterization of an interfacial force field for accurate representation of peptide adsorption free energy on high-density polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Abramyan, Tigran M; Snyder, James A; Yancey, Jeremy A; Thyparambil, Aby A; Wei, Yang; Stuart, Steven J; Latour, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial force field (IFF) parameters for use with the CHARMM force field have been developed for interactions between peptides and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Parameterization of the IFF was performed to achieve agreement between experimental and calculated adsorption free energies of small TGTG-X-GTGT host-guest peptides (T = threonine, G = glycine, and X = variable amino-acid residue) on HDPE, with ±0.5 kcal/mol agreement. This IFF parameter set consists of tuned nonbonded parameters (i.e., partial charges and Lennard-Jones parameters) for use with an in-house-modified CHARMM molecular dynamic program that enables the use of an independent set of force field parameters to control molecular behavior at a solid-liquid interface. The R correlation coefficient between the simulated and experimental peptide adsorption free energies increased from 0.00 for the standard CHARMM force field parameters to 0.88 for the tuned IFF parameters. Subsequent studies are planned to apply the tuned IFF parameter set for the simulation of protein adsorption behavior on an HDPE surface for comparison with experimental values of adsorbed protein orientation and conformation. PMID:25818122

  2. Parameterization of an interfacial force field for accurate representation of peptide adsorption free energy on high-density polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Abramyan, Tigran M.; Snyder, James A.; Yancey, Jeremy A.; Thyparambil, Aby A.; Wei, Yang; Stuart, Steven J.; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial force field (IFF) parameters for use with the CHARMM force field have been developed for interactions between peptides and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Parameterization of the IFF was performed to achieve agreement between experimental and calculated adsorption free energies of small TGTG–X–GTGT host–guest peptides (T = threonine, G = glycine, and X = variable amino-acid residue) on HDPE, with ±0.5 kcal/mol agreement. This IFF parameter set consists of tuned nonbonded parameters (i.e., partial charges and Lennard–Jones parameters) for use with an in-house-modified CHARMM molecular dynamic program that enables the use of an independent set of force field parameters to control molecular behavior at a solid–liquid interface. The R correlation coefficient between the simulated and experimental peptide adsorption free energies increased from 0.00 for the standard CHARMM force field parameters to 0.88 for the tuned IFF parameters. Subsequent studies are planned to apply the tuned IFF parameter set for the simulation of protein adsorption behavior on an HDPE surface for comparison with experimental values of adsorbed protein orientation and conformation. PMID:25818122

  3. Contacts on n-type germanium using variably doped zinc oxide and highly doped indium tin oxide interfacial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramahans Manik, Prashanth; Lodha, Saurabh

    2015-05-01

    The impact of varying interfacial layer (IL) doping on the performance of Ti/IL/n-Ge contacts is demonstrated using undoped ZnO, aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO), and O-vacancy-doped n+-ZnO ILs having similar conduction band offsets ΔEc with respect to Ti and Ge. Diode and transfer length method measurements show Fermi-level unpinning for all the ILs; however, the contact resistance and its dependence on the IL thickness decrease with increasing IL doping owing to the reduction in the tunneling resistance. The contact resistivity depends on the IL doping (NIL) as ρ \\text{c-n + \\text{-ZnO}} < ρ \\text{c-AZO} < ρ \\text{c-ZnO} for N\\text{n + \\text{-ZnO}} > N\\text{AZO} > N\\text{ZnO}. Contacts using a highly doped, low ΔEc tin-doped In2O3 IL exhibit the lowest value, 1.4 × 10-7 Ω·cm2.

  4. Interfacial strength of compression-molded specimens between PMMA powder and PMMA/MMA monomer solution-treated ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) powder.

    PubMed

    Park, K D; Park, J B

    2000-01-01

    The interface between bone cement and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been considered a weak link of cemented UHMWPE acetabular cup in total hip replacement (THR). For the improvement of this weak interface, adhesion between the UHMWPE acetabular cup and bone cement made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) has been investigated in our laboratory. Virgin UHMWPE powders were treated with methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomer and PMMA/MMA solution. The treated UHMWPE powders were then compression-molded with virgin UHMWPE powders or PMMA powders, creating two different interfaces, i. e., treated/virgin UHMWPE powder and treated UHMWPE/PMMA powder. For the present study, the interfacial strengths between PMMA powder and the treated UHMWPE power were investigated following the same protocol previously set. The maximum interfacial strength was 17.0 +/- 0.25MPa with the same molding condition of 166.5 degrees C, 38.7 MPa and l h. In addition to the molding condition, we tested the strengths for the treated UHMWPE powders, which have different ratios between PMMA/MMA solution and MMA-treated UHMWPE powders. Significant differences on the interfacial strengths resulted due to the ratio change; more PMMA in the PMMA/MMA solution-treated UHMWPE powder exhibited higher interfacial strength. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) pictures showed that the interface is composed of three major portions: PMMA powder, UHMWPE, and coated PMMA, indicating strong mechanical interlocking of UHMWPE and PMMA powder matrix and chemical bonding between PMMA powder and the precoated PMMA onto the UHMWPE. In addition, another interfacial strength between PMMA powder, which is equivalent to the outermost part of the cup, and bone cement was investigated. The average strength reached up to 42.4 +/- 3.6 MPa, close to the tensile strength of bone cement itself.

  5. Control of interfacial layers for high-performance porous Si lithium-ion battery anode.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyungmin; Lee, Sungjun; Yoo, Seungmin; Shin, Myoungsoo; Kim, Jieun; Chun, Myungjin; Choi, Nam-Soon; Park, Soojin

    2014-09-24

    We demonstrate a facile synthesis of micrometer-sized porous Si particles via copper-assisted chemical etching process. Subsequently, metal and/or metal silicide layers are introduced on the surface of porous Si particles using a simple chemical reduction process. Macroporous Si and metal/metal silicide-coated Si electrodes exhibit a high initial Coulombic efficiency of ∼90%. Reversible capacity of carbon-coated porous Si gradually decays after 80 cycles, while metal/metal silicide-coated porous Si electrodes show significantly improved cycling performance even after 100 cycles with a reversible capacity of >1500 mAh g(-1). We confirm that a stable solid-electrolyte interface layer is formed on metal/metal silicide-coated porous Si electrodes during cycling, leading to a highly stable cycling performance. PMID:25153926

  6. Control of interfacial layers for high-performance porous Si lithium-ion battery anode.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyungmin; Lee, Sungjun; Yoo, Seungmin; Shin, Myoungsoo; Kim, Jieun; Chun, Myungjin; Choi, Nam-Soon; Park, Soojin

    2014-09-24

    We demonstrate a facile synthesis of micrometer-sized porous Si particles via copper-assisted chemical etching process. Subsequently, metal and/or metal silicide layers are introduced on the surface of porous Si particles using a simple chemical reduction process. Macroporous Si and metal/metal silicide-coated Si electrodes exhibit a high initial Coulombic efficiency of ∼90%. Reversible capacity of carbon-coated porous Si gradually decays after 80 cycles, while metal/metal silicide-coated porous Si electrodes show significantly improved cycling performance even after 100 cycles with a reversible capacity of >1500 mAh g(-1). We confirm that a stable solid-electrolyte interface layer is formed on metal/metal silicide-coated porous Si electrodes during cycling, leading to a highly stable cycling performance.

  7. The role of interfacial dislocation networks in high temperature creep of superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Draper, S. L.; Hull, D. R.; Mackay, R. A.; Nathal, M. V.

    1989-01-01

    The dislocation networks generated during high-temperature creep of several single-crystal nickel-based superalloys are analyzed. The networks continually evolve during creep at relatively low temperatures or eventually reach a more stable configuration at high temperatures. Specifically, the role of these networks in directional coarsening processes are studied, along with their formation kinetics, characteristics, and stability during creep. The results of this study combined with previous findings suggest that the directional coarsening process is strongly influenced by elastic strain energy. The dislocation networks formed during primary creep are found to be stable during all subsequent creep stages. Aspects of these dislocation networks are determined to be a product of both the applied creep stress and coherency strains.

  8. High post-annealing stability for perpendicular [Co/Ni] n multilayers by preventing interfacial diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xu-Jing; Jiang, Shao-Long; Zhang, Jing-Yan; Han, Gang; Liu, Qian-Qian; Liu, Yi-Wei; Wang, Dong-Wei; Feng, Chun; Li, Ming-Hua; Yu, Guang-Hua

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports that by introducing an appropriate thickness of Cu spacer at a Co/Ni interface, the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of [Co/Cu/Ni] n multilayers can be maintained at the annealing temperature as high as 400 °C, implying high post-annealing stability. X-ray reflectivity results demonstrate that the multilayers with Cu spacer exhibit good multilayer structure, indicating the weak intermixing of Co and Ni, which is one important reason for the enhanced post-annealing stability of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The result is of great importance for out-of-plane magnetized spintronic devices which need to be combined with complementary metal-oxide semiconductors.

  9. X-ray study of interfacial interactions in highly milled Sn-Ge powders

    SciTech Connect

    Jayanetti, J.K.D.S.; Heald, S.M.; Tan, Z.

    1991-12-31

    We have studied possible structural changes occurring at the Sn/Ge interface of highly milled Sn/Ge composites. EXAFS and X-ray Diffraction measurements were made on mechanically milled powders having compositions ranging from 20 to 50 vol.% Sn. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate the increasing amorphization of Sn as the Sn content is decreased. EXAFS results indicate that this amorphous phase is due to the formation of an {alpha}-Sn/Ge alloy. The EXAFS from this alloy did not change significantly at the Sn melting point. X-ray diffraction measurements made at room temperature show a systematic decrease in the intensity of Sn peaks and broadening of Ge peaks with the decreasing Sn content.

  10. X-ray study of interfacial interactions in highly milled Sn-Ge powders

    SciTech Connect

    Jayanetti, J.K.D.S.; Heald, S.M.; Tan, Z.

    1991-01-01

    We have studied possible structural changes occurring at the Sn/Ge interface of highly milled Sn/Ge composites. EXAFS and X-ray Diffraction measurements were made on mechanically milled powders having compositions ranging from 20 to 50 vol.% Sn. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate the increasing amorphization of Sn as the Sn content is decreased. EXAFS results indicate that this amorphous phase is due to the formation of an {alpha}-Sn/Ge alloy. The EXAFS from this alloy did not change significantly at the Sn melting point. X-ray diffraction measurements made at room temperature show a systematic decrease in the intensity of Sn peaks and broadening of Ge peaks with the decreasing Sn content.

  11. Reducing GaN-on-diamond interfacial thermal resistance for high power transistor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Huarui; Simon, Roland B.; Pomeroy, James W.; Francis, Daniel; Faili, Firooz; Twitchen, Daniel J.; Kuball, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Integration of chemical vapor deposited polycrystalline diamond offers promising thermal performance for GaN-based high power radio frequency amplifiers. One limiting factor is the thermal barrier at the GaN to diamond interface, often referred to as the effective thermal boundary resistance (TBReff). Using a combination of transient thermoreflectance measurement, finite element modeling and microstructural analysis, the TBReff of GaN-on-diamond wafers is shown to be dominated by the SiNx interlayer for diamond growth seeding, with additional impacts from the diamond nucleation surface. By decreasing the SiNx layer thickness and minimizing the diamond nucleation region, TBReff can be significantly reduced, and a TBReff as low as 12 m2K/GW is demonstrated. This enables a major improvement in GaN-on-diamond transistor thermal resistance with respect to GaN-on-SiC wafers. A further reduction in TBReff towards the diffuse mismatch limit is also predicted, demonstrating the full potential of using diamond as the heat spreading substrate.

  12. Interfacial Engineering of Semiconductor–Superconductor Junctions for High Performance Micro-Coolers

    PubMed Central

    Gunnarsson, D.; Richardson-Bullock, J. S.; Prest, M. J.; Nguyen, H. Q.; Timofeev, A. V.; Shah, V. A.; Whall, T. E.; Parker, E. H. C.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M.; Prunnila, M.

    2015-01-01

    The control of electronic and thermal transport through material interfaces is crucial for numerous micro and nanoelectronics applications and quantum devices. Here we report on the engineering of the electro-thermal properties of semiconductor-superconductor (Sm-S) electronic cooler junctions by a nanoscale insulating tunnel barrier introduced between the Sm and S electrodes. Unexpectedly, such an interface barrier does not increase the junction resistance but strongly reduces the detrimental sub-gap leakage current. These features are key to achieving high cooling power tunnel junction refrigerators, and we demonstrate unparalleled performance in silicon-based Sm-S electron cooler devices with orders of magnitudes improvement in the cooling power in comparison to previous works. By adapting the junctions in strain-engineered silicon coolers we also demonstrate efficient electron temperature reduction from 300 mK to below 100 mK. Investigations on junctions with different interface quality indicate that the previously unexplained sub-gap leakage current is strongly influenced by the Sm-S interface states. These states often dictate the junction electrical resistance through the well-known Fermi level pinning effect and, therefore, superconductivity could be generally used to probe and optimize metal-semiconductor contact behaviour. PMID:26620423

  13. Interfacial Engineering of Semiconductor-Superconductor Junctions for High Performance Micro-Coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnarsson, D.; Richardson-Bullock, J. S.; Prest, M. J.; Nguyen, H. Q.; Timofeev, A. V.; Shah, V. A.; Whall, T. E.; Parker, E. H. C.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M.; Prunnila, M.

    2015-12-01

    The control of electronic and thermal transport through material interfaces is crucial for numerous micro and nanoelectronics applications and quantum devices. Here we report on the engineering of the electro-thermal properties of semiconductor-superconductor (Sm-S) electronic cooler junctions by a nanoscale insulating tunnel barrier introduced between the Sm and S electrodes. Unexpectedly, such an interface barrier does not increase the junction resistance but strongly reduces the detrimental sub-gap leakage current. These features are key to achieving high cooling power tunnel junction refrigerators, and we demonstrate unparalleled performance in silicon-based Sm-S electron cooler devices with orders of magnitudes improvement in the cooling power in comparison to previous works. By adapting the junctions in strain-engineered silicon coolers we also demonstrate efficient electron temperature reduction from 300 mK to below 100 mK. Investigations on junctions with different interface quality indicate that the previously unexplained sub-gap leakage current is strongly influenced by the Sm-S interface states. These states often dictate the junction electrical resistance through the well-known Fermi level pinning effect and, therefore, superconductivity could be generally used to probe and optimize metal-semiconductor contact behaviour.

  14. Interfacial Engineering of Semiconductor-Superconductor Junctions for High Performance Micro-Coolers.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, D; Richardson-Bullock, J S; Prest, M J; Nguyen, H Q; Timofeev, A V; Shah, V A; Whall, T E; Parker, E H C; Leadley, D R; Myronov, M; Prunnila, M

    2015-01-01

    The control of electronic and thermal transport through material interfaces is crucial for numerous micro and nanoelectronics applications and quantum devices. Here we report on the engineering of the electro-thermal properties of semiconductor-superconductor (Sm-S) electronic cooler junctions by a nanoscale insulating tunnel barrier introduced between the Sm and S electrodes. Unexpectedly, such an interface barrier does not increase the junction resistance but strongly reduces the detrimental sub-gap leakage current. These features are key to achieving high cooling power tunnel junction refrigerators, and we demonstrate unparalleled performance in silicon-based Sm-S electron cooler devices with orders of magnitudes improvement in the cooling power in comparison to previous works. By adapting the junctions in strain-engineered silicon coolers we also demonstrate efficient electron temperature reduction from 300 mK to below 100 mK. Investigations on junctions with different interface quality indicate that the previously unexplained sub-gap leakage current is strongly influenced by the Sm-S interface states. These states often dictate the junction electrical resistance through the well-known Fermi level pinning effect and, therefore, superconductivity could be generally used to probe and optimize metal-semiconductor contact behaviour.

  15. Potential Impact of Interfacial Bonding Efficiency on High-Burnup Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity during Normal Transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the impacts of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet pellet and pellet clad interfaces on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) vibration integrity. The FEA simulation results were also validated and benchmarked with reverse bending fatigue test results on surrogate rods consisting of stainless steel (SS) tubes with alumina-pellet inserts. Bending moments (M) are applied to the FEA models to evaluate the system responses of the surrogate rods. From the induced curvature, , the flexural rigidity EI can be estimated as EI=M/ . The impacts of interfacial bonding efficiency on SNF vibration integrity include the moment carrying capacity distribution between pellets and clad and the impact of cohesion on the flexural rigidity of the surrogate rod system. The result also indicates that the immediate consequences of interfacial de-bonding are a load carrying capacity shift from the fuel pellets to the clad and a reduction of the composite rod flexural rigidity. Therefore, the flexural rigidity of the surrogate rod and the bending moment bearing capacity between the clad and fuel pellets are strongly dependent on the efficiency of interfacial bonding at the pellet pellet and pellet clad interfaces. The above-noted phenomenon was calibrated and validated by reverse bending fatigue testing using a surrogate rod system.

  16. Phase behavior and interfacial properties of a switchable ethoxylated amine surfactant at high temperature and effects on CO2-in-water foams.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunshen; Elhag, Amro S; Reddy, Prathima P; Chen, Hao; Cui, Leyu; Worthen, Andrew J; Ma, Kun; Quintanilla, Heriberto; Noguera, Jose A; Hirasaki, George J; Nguyen, Quoc P; Biswal, Sibani L; Johnston, Keith P

    2016-05-15

    The interfacial properties for surfactants at the supercritical CO2-water (C-W) interface at temperatures above 80°C have very rarely been reported given limitations in surfactant solubility and chemical stability. These limitations, along with the weak solvent strength of CO2, make it challenging to design surfactants that adsorb at the C-W interface, despite the interest in CO2-in-water (C/W) foams (also referred to as macroemulsions). Herein, we examine the thermodynamic, interfacial and rheological properties of the surfactant C12-14N(EO)2 in systems containing brine and/or supercritical CO2 at elevated temperatures and pressures. Because the surfactant is switchable from the nonionic state to the protonated cationic state as the pH is lowered over a wide range in temperature, it is readily soluble in brine in the cationic state below pH 5.5, even up to 120°C, and also in supercritical CO2 in the nonionic state. As a consequence of the affinity for both phases, the surfactant adsorption at the CO2-water interface was high, with an area of 207Å(2)/molecule. Remarkably, the surfactant lowered the interfacial tension (IFT) down to ∼5mN/m at 120°C and 3400 psia (23MPa), despite the low CO2 density of 0.48g/ml, indicating sufficient solvation of the surfactant tails. The phase behavior and interfacial properties of the surfactant in the cationic form were favorable for the formation and stabilization of bulk C/W foam at high temperature and high salinity. Additionally, in a 1.2 Darcy glass bead pack at 120°C, a very high foam apparent viscosity of 146 cP was observed at low interstitial velocities given the low degree of shear thinning. For a calcium carbonate pack, C/W foam was formed upon addition of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in the feed brine to keep the pH below 4, by the common ion effect, in order to sufficiently protonate the surfactant. The ability to form C/W foams at high temperatures is of interest for a variety of applications in chemical synthesis

  17. Interfacial material for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Baozhen, Li; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

  18. High sulfur content polymer nanoparticles obtained from interfacial polymerization of sodium polysulfide and 1,2,3-trichloropropane in water.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeewoo; Jung, Unho; Joe, Won Tae; Kim, Eui Tae; Pyun, Jeffrey; Char, Kookheon

    2015-06-01

    Sulfur-rich materials have recently attracted keen interest for their potentials in optical, electrochemical, and pesticidal applications as well as their utility in dynamic covalent bond chemistry. Many sulfur-rich polymers, however, are insoluble and processing methods are therefore very limited. The synthesis and characterization of water-dispersible polymer nanoparticles (NPs) with the sulfur content exceeding 75% by weight, obtained from the interfacial polymerization between 1,2,3-trichloropropane and sodium polysulfide in water is reported here. The interfacial polymerization yields well-defined sulfur-rich NPs in the presence of surfactants, which are capable of serving a dual role as a phase transfer catalyst on top of emulsifiers. Such dual role allows for the control of the product NP size by varying its concentration. The surfactants can be easily removed by centrifugation and redispersion in water is also reported here. The resulting sulfur-rich NPs are characterized through elemental analysis, dynamic light scattering, ζ-potential measurements, and scanning electron microscopy. PMID:25847485

  19. Interface engineering for high interfacial strength between SiCOH and porous SiCOH interconnect dielectrics and diffusion caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, A.; Edelstein, D.; Lane, M.; Patel, V.; Gates, S.; Restaino, D.; Molis, S.

    2008-03-01

    The integration of low- and ultralow-k SiCOH dielectrics in the interconnect structures of very large scale integrated chips involves complex stacks with multiple interfaces. Successful fabrication of reliable chips requires strong adhesion between the different layers of the stacks. A critical interface in the dielectric stack is the interface between the SiCNH diffusion cap and the SiCOH inter- and intralevel dielectrics (ILDs). It was observed that, due to the original deposition conditions, the interface layer was weakened both by a low adhesion strength between SiCNH and SiCOH and by the formation of an initial layer of SiCOH with reduced cohesive strength. The manufacturing process has been modified to engineer this interface and obtain interfacial strengths close to the cohesive strengths of the bulk ILDs. This paper discusses the causes for the original low interfacial strength and presents an approach for enhancing it by engineering the interface to the cap for both the dense SiCOH and porous SiCOH ILDs.

  20. An approach for an advanced anode interfacial layer with electron-blocking ability to achieve high-efficiency organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jun-Seok; Yun, Jin-Mun; Kang, Minji; Khim, Dongyoon; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Seok-Soon; Na, Seok-In; Kim, Dong-Yu

    2014-11-26

    The interfacial properties of PEDOT:PSS, pristine r-GO, and r-GO with sulfonic acid (SR-GO) in organic photovoltaic are investigated to elucidate electron-blocking property of PEDOT:PSS anode interfacial layer (AIL), and to explore the possibility of r-GO as electron-blocking layers. The SR-GO results in an optimized power conversion efficiency of 7.54% for PTB7-th:PC71BM and 5.64% for P3HT:IC61BA systems. By combining analyses of capacitance-voltage and photovoltaic-parameters dependence on light intensity, it is found that recombination process at SR-GO/active film is minimized. In contrast, the devices using r-GO without sulfonic acid show trap-assisted recombination. The enhanced electron-blocking properties in PEDOT:PSS and SR-GO AILs can be attributed to surface dipoles at AIL/acceptor. Thus, for electron-blocking, the AIL/acceptor interface should be importantly considered in OPVs. Also, by simply introducing sulfonic acid unit on r-GO, excellent contact selectivity can be realized in OPVs.

  1. High sulfur content polymer nanoparticles obtained from interfacial polymerization of sodium polysulfide and 1,2,3-trichloropropane in water.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeewoo; Jung, Unho; Joe, Won Tae; Kim, Eui Tae; Pyun, Jeffrey; Char, Kookheon

    2015-06-01

    Sulfur-rich materials have recently attracted keen interest for their potentials in optical, electrochemical, and pesticidal applications as well as their utility in dynamic covalent bond chemistry. Many sulfur-rich polymers, however, are insoluble and processing methods are therefore very limited. The synthesis and characterization of water-dispersible polymer nanoparticles (NPs) with the sulfur content exceeding 75% by weight, obtained from the interfacial polymerization between 1,2,3-trichloropropane and sodium polysulfide in water is reported here. The interfacial polymerization yields well-defined sulfur-rich NPs in the presence of surfactants, which are capable of serving a dual role as a phase transfer catalyst on top of emulsifiers. Such dual role allows for the control of the product NP size by varying its concentration. The surfactants can be easily removed by centrifugation and redispersion in water is also reported here. The resulting sulfur-rich NPs are characterized through elemental analysis, dynamic light scattering, ζ-potential measurements, and scanning electron microscopy.

  2. Double-faced γ-Fe2O3||SiO2 nanohybrids: flame synthesis, in situ selective modification and highly interfacial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunfeng; Hu, Yanjie; Jiang, Hao; Li, Chunzhong

    2013-05-01

    Double-faced γ-Fe2O3||SiO2 nanohybrids (NHs) and their in situ selective modification on silica faces with the 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane molecules have been successfully prepared by a simple, rapid and scalable flame aerosol route. The double-faced NHs perfectly integrate magnetic hematite hemispheres and non-magnetic silica parts into an almost intact nanoparticle as a result of phase segregation during the preparation process. The unique feature allows us to easily manipulate these particles into one-dimensional chain-like nanostructures. On the other hand, in situ selectively modified double-faced γ-Fe2O3||SiO2 NHs possess excellent interfacial activities, which can assemble into many interesting architectures, such as interfacial film, magnetic responsive capsules, novel magnetic liquid marbles and so forth. The modified NHs prefer to assemble at the interface of water-oil or oil-water systems. It is believed that the highly interfacial active NHs are not only beneficial for the development of interface reaction in a miniature reactor, but also very promising functional materials for other smart applications.Double-faced γ-Fe2O3||SiO2 nanohybrids (NHs) and their in situ selective modification on silica faces with the 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane molecules have been successfully prepared by a simple, rapid and scalable flame aerosol route. The double-faced NHs perfectly integrate magnetic hematite hemispheres and non-magnetic silica parts into an almost intact nanoparticle as a result of phase segregation during the preparation process. The unique feature allows us to easily manipulate these particles into one-dimensional chain-like nanostructures. On the other hand, in situ selectively modified double-faced γ-Fe2O3||SiO2 NHs possess excellent interfacial activities, which can assemble into many interesting architectures, such as interfacial film, magnetic responsive capsules, novel magnetic liquid marbles and so forth. The modified NHs

  3. Exploring the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and the kinetics of protein adsorption: an in situ high-energy X-ray reflectivity study.

    PubMed

    Evers, Florian; Shokuie, Kaveh; Paulus, Michael; Sternemann, Christian; Czeslik, Claus; Tolan, Metin

    2008-09-16

    The high energy X-ray reflectivity technique has been applied to study the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and protein adsorption kinetics in situ. For this purpose, the adsorption of lysozyme at the hydrophilic silica-water interface has been chosen as a model system. The structure of adsorbed lysozyme layers was probed for various aqueous solution conditions. The effect of solution pH and lysozyme concentration on the interfacial structure was measured. Monolayer formation was observed for all cases except for the highest concentration. The adsorbed protein layers consist of adsorbed lysozyme molecules with side-on or end-on orientation. By means of time-dependent X-ray reflectivity scans, the time-evolution of adsorbed proteins was monitored as well. The results of this study demonstrate the capabilities of in situ X-ray reflectivity experiments on protein adsorbates. The great advantages of this method are the broad wave vector range available and the high time resolution.

  4. Exploring the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and the kinetics of protein adsorption: an in situ high-energy X-ray reflectivity study.

    PubMed

    Evers, Florian; Shokuie, Kaveh; Paulus, Michael; Sternemann, Christian; Czeslik, Claus; Tolan, Metin

    2008-09-16

    The high energy X-ray reflectivity technique has been applied to study the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and protein adsorption kinetics in situ. For this purpose, the adsorption of lysozyme at the hydrophilic silica-water interface has been chosen as a model system. The structure of adsorbed lysozyme layers was probed for various aqueous solution conditions. The effect of solution pH and lysozyme concentration on the interfacial structure was measured. Monolayer formation was observed for all cases except for the highest concentration. The adsorbed protein layers consist of adsorbed lysozyme molecules with side-on or end-on orientation. By means of time-dependent X-ray reflectivity scans, the time-evolution of adsorbed proteins was monitored as well. The results of this study demonstrate the capabilities of in situ X-ray reflectivity experiments on protein adsorbates. The great advantages of this method are the broad wave vector range available and the high time resolution. PMID:18715021

  5. Tris(trimethylsilyl)borate as an electrolyte additive for improving interfacial stability of high voltage layered lithium-rich oxide cathode/carbonate-based electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianhui; Xing, Lidan; Zhang, Ruiqin; Chen, Min; Wang, Zaisheng; Xu, Mengqing; Li, Weishan

    2015-07-01

    Tris(trimethylsilyl)borate (TMSB) is used as an electrolyte additive for high voltage lithium-rich oxide cathode of lithium ion battery. The interfacial natures of Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2/carbonate-based electrolyte are investigated with a combination of electrochemical measurements and physical characterizations. Charge/discharge tests show that the cyclic performance of Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 in a mixed carbonate electrolyte is significantly improved by using TMSB. After 200 cycles between 2 V and 4.8 V (vs. Li/Li+) at 0.5 C rate, the capacity retention of Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 is only 19% in the blank electrolyte, while it is improved to 74% when 0.5% TMSB is applied. The results from physical characterizations demonstrate that this excellent cyclic performance is attributed to the improved interfacial stability of Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2/electrolyte due to the thin and protective film generated by TMSB.

  6. Interfacial bonding enhancement of reel-to-reel selective electrodeposition of copper stabilizer on a multifilamentary second-generation high-temperature superconductor tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xinwei; Li, Wei; Bose, Anima; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2016-10-01

    A reel-to-reel copper selective electrodeposition process over a multifilamentary second-generation high-temperature superconductor (2G-HTS) has been demonstrated in our previous work. If the interfacial bonding between the deposited copper layer and the underlying silver overlayer is weak, it might lead to delamination in applications including magnets, motors and generators. In this study, two approaches have been used to improve the copper-silver bonding without the degradation of superconductor performance. The first approach is acidifying the electrolyte by adding sulfuric acid, by which the kinetics of copper electrodeposition is enhanced, resulting in finer microstructure at the copper-silver interface and thus, improved interfacial bonding strength. The second approach consists of blocking the electrolyte outflow at the entrance of the reel-to-reel electroplating cell, by which the occurrence of large copper seeds on the tape caused by the heavy turbulence flow is effectively prevented. With these two improvements together deployed in the process, the peeling strength between the copper and silver layers of the 2G-HTS tape has been improved from <0.3 N to >2 N in 90° peeling and from <0.5 N to >3.0 N in 180° peeling, without any degradation on the superconducting performance.

  7. NiSi(x)/a-Si Nanowires with Interfacial a-Ge as Anodes for High-Rate Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiang; Chen, Huixin; Li, Xin; Lai, Shumei; Xu, Yihong; Li, Cheng; Chen, Songyan; Yang, Yong

    2016-01-13

    Conductive metal nanowire is a promising current collector for the Si-based anode material in high-rate lithium-ion batteries. However, to harness this remarkable potential for high power density energy storage, one has to address the interfacial potential barrier that hinders the electron injection from the metal side. Herein, we present that, solely by inserting ultrathin amorphous germanium (a-Ge) (∼5 nm) at the interface of NiSix/amorphous Si (a-Si), the rate capacity was substantially enhanced, 477 mAh g(-1) even at a high rate of 40 A g(-1). In addition, batteries containing the NiSix/Ge+Si anodes cycled over 1000 times at 10 A g(-1) while the capacity retaining more than 877 mAh g(-1), which is among the highest reported. The excellent electrochemical performance is directly correlated with the significantly improved electrical conductivity and mechanical stability throughout the entire electrode. The potential barrier between the NiSix and a-Si was modulated by a-Ge, which constructs an electron highway. Besides, the a-Ge interlayer enhances the interfacial adhesion by reducing void fraction and the inhomogeneous strain of the Li-Ge and Li-Si stacking structure was accommodated through the bending and twist of relatively thin NiSix, thus ensures a more stable high-rate cycling performance. Our work shows an effective way to fabricate metal/a-Si nanowires for high-rate lithium-ion battery anodes.

  8. Interfacial behavior of polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, John; Kerr, John B.; Han, Yong Bong; Liu, Gao; Reeder, Craig; Xie, Jiangbing; Sun, Xiaoguang

    2003-06-03

    Evidence is presented concerning the effect of surfaces on the segmental motion of PEO-based polymer electrolytes in lithium batteries. For dry systems with no moisture the effect of surfaces of nano-particle fillers is to inhibit the segmental motion and to reduce the lithium ion transport. These effects also occur at the surfaces in composite electrodes that contain considerable quantities of carbon black nano-particles for electronic connection. The problem of reduced polymer mobility is compounded by the generation of salt concentration gradients within the composite electrode. Highly concentrated polymer electrolytes have reduced transport properties due to the increased ionic cross-linking. Combined with the interfacial interactions this leads to the generation of low mobility electrolyte layers within the electrode and to loss of capacity and power capability. It is shown that even with planar lithium metal electrodes the concentration gradients can significantly impact the interfacial impedance. The interfacial impedance of lithium/PEO-LiTFSI cells varies depending upon the time elapsed since current was turned off after polarization. The behavior is consistent with relaxation of the salt concentration gradients and indicates that a portion of the interfacial impedance usually attributed to the SEI layer is due to concentrated salt solutions next to the electrode surfaces that are very resistive. These resistive layers may undergo actual phase changes in a non-uniform manner and the possible role of the reduced mobility polymer layers in dendrite initiation and growth is also explored. It is concluded that PEO and ethylene oxide-based polymers are less than ideal with respect to this interfacial behavior.

  9. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  10. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  11. Effective thermal conductivity of metal and non-metal particulate composites with interfacial thermal resistance at high volume fraction of nano to macro-sized spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Faroughi, Salah Aldin; Huber, Christian

    2015-02-07

    In this study, we propose a theoretical model to compute the effective thermal conductivity of metal and dielectric spherical particle reinforced composites with interfacial thermal resistance. We consider a wide range of filler volume fraction with sizes ranging from nano- to macro-scale. The model, based on the differential effective medium theory, accounts for particle interactions through two sets of volume fraction corrections. The first correction accounts for a finite volume of composite and the second correction introduces a self-crowding factor that allows us to develop an accurate model for particle interaction even for high volume fraction of fillers. The model is examined to other published models, experiments, and numerical simulations for different types of composites. We observe an excellent agreement between the model and published datasets over a wide range of particle volume fractions and material properties of the composite constituents.

  12. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan W; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J; Ryan, Joseph V; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Kelvin H L; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampilai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    The use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass (SON68) and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems because of their fundamental and practical significance. Our results show that high sputter rates and accurate interfacial information can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering, whereas this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the analysis efficiency of insulating materials and, thus, can expand its applications to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin film characterization, and many other systems of interest.

  13. Understanding the interfacial phenomena of a 4.7 V and 55 °C Li-ion battery with Li-rich layered oxide cathode and grap2hite anode and its correlation to high-energy cycling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hieu Quang; Hwang, Eui-Hyung; Kwon, Young-Gil; Song, Seung-Wan

    2016-08-01

    Research progress of high-energy performance and interfacial phenomena of Li1.13Mn0.463Ni0.203Co0.203O2 cathode and graphite anode in a 55 °C full-cell under an aggressive charge cut-off voltage to 4.7 V (4.75 V vs. Li/Li+) is reported. Although anodic instability of conventional electrolyte is the critical issue on high-voltage and high-temperature cell operation, interfacial phenomena and the solution to performance improvement have not been reported. Surface spectroscopic evidence revealed that structural degradation of both cathode and anode materials, instability of surface film at cathode, and metal-dissolution from cathode and -deposition at anode, and a rise of interfacial resistance with high-voltage cycling in 55 °C conventional electrolyte are resolved by the formation of a stable surface film with organic/inorganic mixtures at cathode and solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) at anode using blended additives of fluorinated linear carbonate and vinylene carbonate. As a result, significantly improved cycling stability of 77% capacity retention delivering 227-174 mAhg-1 after 50 cycles is obtained, corresponding to 819-609 Wh per kg of cathode active material. Interfacial stabilization approach would pave the way of controlling the performance and safety, and widening the practical application of Li-rich layered oxide cathode materials and high-voltage electrolyte materials in various high-energy density Li-ion batteries.

  14. Interfacial thermodynamics and kinetics of sorption of diclofenac on prepared high performance flower-like MoS2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yalei; Yin, Zengfu; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhou, Xuefei; Chen, Wen

    2016-11-01

    Flower-like MoS2 with numerous wrinkled nanosheets was prepared via a facile hydrothermal method. The surface morphology and microstructure of the obtained materials were characterized using X-ray diffraction data (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Additionally, the compositions of the flower-like MoS2 were further revealed by an energy dispersion spectrometer (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). The obtained MoS2 was used as an adsorbent to remove diclofenac (DCF, C14H10Cl2NO2Na) from aqueous solutions and presented excellent performance for removing DCF. The sorption kinetics, isotherms and effect of solution pH on the sorption were evaluated in batch sorption experiments. The sorption characteristics of the interactions between DCF and MoS2 in water were analyzed using a pseudo-second-order model, an intraparticle diffusion model and Boyd model to determine the sorption rate-determining steps. It was concluded that the sorption of DCF on MoS2 was fitted better by the pseudo-second-order model and that external diffusion governed the sorption process of DCF onto the MoS2. The interfacial interaction free energies between DCF and MoS2 in the sorption process can be calculated based on the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO). The flower-like MoS2 presenting excellent performance for removing DCF, could be a better choice of treating DCF-containing wastewaters.

  15. Interfacial thermodynamics and kinetics of sorption of diclofenac on prepared high performance flower-like MoS2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yalei; Yin, Zengfu; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhou, Xuefei; Chen, Wen

    2016-11-01

    Flower-like MoS2 with numerous wrinkled nanosheets was prepared via a facile hydrothermal method. The surface morphology and microstructure of the obtained materials were characterized using X-ray diffraction data (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Additionally, the compositions of the flower-like MoS2 were further revealed by an energy dispersion spectrometer (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). The obtained MoS2 was used as an adsorbent to remove diclofenac (DCF, C14H10Cl2NO2Na) from aqueous solutions and presented excellent performance for removing DCF. The sorption kinetics, isotherms and effect of solution pH on the sorption were evaluated in batch sorption experiments. The sorption characteristics of the interactions between DCF and MoS2 in water were analyzed using a pseudo-second-order model, an intraparticle diffusion model and Boyd model to determine the sorption rate-determining steps. It was concluded that the sorption of DCF on MoS2 was fitted better by the pseudo-second-order model and that external diffusion governed the sorption process of DCF onto the MoS2. The interfacial interaction free energies between DCF and MoS2 in the sorption process can be calculated based on the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO). The flower-like MoS2 presenting excellent performance for removing DCF, could be a better choice of treating DCF-containing wastewaters. PMID:27475708

  16. Quasiparticle Interfacial Level Alignment of Highly Hybridized Frontier Levels: H2O on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Migani, Annapaola; Mowbray, Duncan J.; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2015-01-13

    Knowledge of the frontier levels’ alignment prior to photoirradiation is necessary to achieve a complete quantitative description of H2O photocatalysis on TiO2(110). Although H2O on rutile TiO2(110) has been thoroughly studied both experimentally and theoretically, a quantitative value for the energy of the highest H2O occupied levels is still lacking. For experiment, this is due to the H2O levels being obscured by hybridization with TiO2(110) levels in the difference spectra obtained via ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS). For theory, this is due to inherent difficulties in properly describing many-body effects at the H2O–TiO2(110) interface. Using the projected density of states (DOS) from state-of-the-art quasiparticle (QP) G0W0, we disentangle the adsorbate and surface contributions to the complex UPS spectra of H2O on TiO2(110). We perform this separation as a function of H2O coverage and dissociation on stoichiometric and reduced surfaces. Due to hybridization with the TiO2(110) surface, the H2O 3a1 and 1b1 levels are broadened into several peaks between 5 and 1 eV below the TiO2(110) valence band maximum (VBM). These peaks have both intermolecular and interfacial bonding and antibonding character. We find the highest occupied levels of H2O adsorbed intact and dissociated on stoichiometric TiO2(110) are 1.1 and 0.9 eV below the VBM. We also find a similar energy of 1.1 eV for the highest occupied levels of H2O when adsorbed dissociatively on a bridging O vacancy of the reduced surface. In both cases, these energies are significantly higher (by 0.6 to 2.6 eV) than those estimated from UPS difference spectra, which are inconclusive in this energy region. Finally, we apply self-consistent QPGW (scQPGW1) to obtain the ionization potential of the H2O–TiO2(110) interface.

  17. Quasiparticle interfacial level alignment of highly hybridized frontier levels: H2O on TiO2(110).

    PubMed

    Migani, Annapaola; Mowbray, Duncan J; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2015-01-13

    Knowledge of the frontier levels' alignment prior to photoirradiation is necessary to achieve a complete quantitative description of H2O photocatalysis on TiO2(110). Although H2O on rutile TiO2(110) has been thoroughly studied both experimentally and theoretically, a quantitative value for the energy of the highest H2O occupied levels is still lacking. For experiment, this is due to the H2O levels being obscured by hybridization with TiO2(110) levels in the difference spectra obtained via ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS). For theory, this is due to inherent difficulties in properly describing many-body effects at the H2O-TiO2(110) interface. Using the projected density of states (DOS) from state-of-the-art quasiparticle (QP) G0W0, we disentangle the adsorbate and surface contributions to the complex UPS spectra of H2O on TiO2(110). We perform this separation as a function of H2O coverage and dissociation on stoichiometric and reduced surfaces. Due to hybridization with the TiO2(110) surface, the H2O 3a1 and 1b1 levels are broadened into several peaks between 5 and 1 eV below the TiO2(110) valence band maximum (VBM). These peaks have both intermolecular and interfacial bonding and antibonding character. We find the highest occupied levels of H2O adsorbed intact and dissociated on stoichiometric TiO2(110) are 1.1 and 0.9 eV below the VBM. We also find a similar energy of 1.1 eV for the highest occupied levels of H2O when adsorbed dissociatively on a bridging O vacancy of the reduced surface. In both cases, these energies are significantly higher (by 0.6 to 2.6 eV) than those estimated from UPS difference spectra, which are inconclusive in this energy region. Finally, we apply self-consistent QPGW (scQPGW1) to obtain the ionization potential of the H2O-TiO2(110) interface. PMID:26574222

  18. High interfacial storage capability of porous NiMn2O4/C hierarchical tremella-like nanostructures as the lithium ion battery anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Wenpei; Tang, Yongbing; Li, Wenyue; Yang, Xia; Xue, Hongtao; Yang, Qingdan; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2014-11-01

    Porous hierarchical NiMn2O4/C tremella-like nanostructures are obtained through a simple solvothermal and calcination method. As the anode of lithium ion batteries (LIBs), porous NiMn2O4/C nanostructures exhibit a superior specific capacity and an excellent long-term cycling performance even at a high current density. The discharge capacity can stabilize at 2130 mA h g-1 within 350 cycles at a current density of 1000 mA g-1. After a long-term cycling of 1500 cycles, the capacity is still as high as 1773 mA h g-1 at a high current density of 4000 mA g-1, which is almost five times higher than the theoretical capacity of graphite. The porous NiMn2O4/C hierarchical nanostructure provides sufficient contact with the electrolyte and fast three-dimensional Li+ diffusion channels, and dramatically improves the capacity of NiMn2O4/C via interfacial storage.Porous hierarchical NiMn2O4/C tremella-like nanostructures are obtained through a simple solvothermal and calcination method. As the anode of lithium ion batteries (LIBs), porous NiMn2O4/C nanostructures exhibit a superior specific capacity and an excellent long-term cycling performance even at a high current density. The discharge capacity can stabilize at 2130 mA h g-1 within 350 cycles at a current density of 1000 mA g-1. After a long-term cycling of 1500 cycles, the capacity is still as high as 1773 mA h g-1 at a high current density of 4000 mA g-1, which is almost five times higher than the theoretical capacity of graphite. The porous NiMn2O4/C hierarchical nanostructure provides sufficient contact with the electrolyte and fast three-dimensional Li+ diffusion channels, and dramatically improves the capacity of NiMn2O4/C via interfacial storage. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04031g

  19. High-Performance Si/SiOx Nanosphere Anode Material by Multipurpose Interfacial Engineering with Black TiO(2-x).

    PubMed

    Bae, Juhye; Kim, Dae Sik; Yoo, Hyundong; Park, Eunjun; Lim, Young-Geun; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Young-Jun; Kim, Hansu

    2016-02-01

    Silicon oxides (SiOx) have attracted recent attention for their great potential as promising anode materials for lithium ion batteries as a result of their high energy density and excellent cycle performance. Despite these advantages, the commercial use of these materials is still impeded by low initial Coulombic efficiency and high production cost associated with a complicated synthesis process. Here, we demonstrate that Si/SiOx nanosphere anode materials show much improved performance enabled by electroconductive black TiO(2-x) coating in terms of reversible capacity, Coulombic efficiency, and thermal reliability. The resulting anode material exhibits a high reversible capacity of 1200 mAh g(-1) with an excellent cycle performance of up to 100 cycles. The introduction of a TiO(2-x) layer induces further reduction of the Si species in the SiOx matrix phase, thereby increasing the reversible capacity and initial Coulombic efficiency. Besides the improved electrochemical performance, the TiO(2-x) coating layer plays a key role in improving the thermal reliability of the Si/SiOx nanosphere anode material at the same time. We believe that this multipurpose interfacial engineering approach provides another route toward high-performance Si-based anode materials on a commercial scale.

  20. A polymerized C60 coating enhancing interfacial stability at three-dimensional LiCoO2 in high-potential regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudaya, Chairul; Halim, Martin; Pröll, Johannes; Besser, Heino; Choi, Wonchang; Pfleging, Wilhelm; Seifert, Hans Jürgen; Lee, Joong Kee

    2015-12-01

    The interfacial instabilities, including side reactions due to electrolyte decompositions and Cobalt (Co) dissolutions, are the main detrimental processes at LiCoO2 cathode when a high-voltage window (>4.2 V) is applied. Nevertheless, cycling the cathode with a voltage above 4.2 V would deliver an increased gravimetric capacity, which is desired for high power battery operation. To address these drawbacks, we demonstrate a synergistic approach by manufacturing the three-dimensional high-temperature LiCoO2 electrodes (3D HT-LCO) using laser-microstructuring, laser-annealing and subsequent coating with polymerized C60 thin films (C60@3D HT-LCO) by plasma-assisted thermal evaporation. The C60@3D HT-LCO cathode delivers higher initial discharge capacity compared to its theoretical value, i.e. 175 mA h g-1 at 0.1 C with cut-off voltage of 3.0-4.5 V. This cathode combines the advantages of the 3D electrode architecture and an advanced C60 coating/passivation concept leading to an improved electrochemical performance, due to an increased active surface area, a decreased charge transfer resistance, a prevented Co dissolution into the electrolyte and a suppressed side reaction and electrolyte decomposition. This work provides a novel solution for other cathode materials having similar concerns in high potential regimes for application in lithium-ion microbatteries.

  1. High interfacial storage capability of porous NiMn2O4/C hierarchical tremella-like nanostructures as the lithium ion battery anode.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wenpei; Tang, Yongbing; Li, Wenyue; Yang, Xia; Xue, Hongtao; Yang, Qingdan; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-01-01

    Porous hierarchical NiMn2O4/C tremella-like nanostructures are obtained through a simple solvothermal and calcination method. As the anode of lithium ion batteries (LIBs), porous NiMn2O4/C nanostructures exhibit a superior specific capacity and an excellent long-term cycling performance even at a high current density. The discharge capacity can stabilize at 2130 mA h g(-1) within 350 cycles at a current density of 1000 mA g(-1). After a long-term cycling of 1500 cycles, the capacity is still as high as 1773 mA h g(-1) at a high current density of 4000 mA g(-1), which is almost five times higher than the theoretical capacity of graphite. The porous NiMn2O4/C hierarchical nanostructure provides sufficient contact with the electrolyte and fast three-dimensional Li(+) diffusion channels, and dramatically improves the capacity of NiMn2O4/C via interfacial storage.

  2. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    SciTech Connect

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  3. Universal nanopatternable interfacial bonding.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuzhe; Garland, Shaun; Howland, Michael; Revzin, Alexander; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-12-01

    A nanopatternable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) oligomer layer is demonstrated as an interfacial adhesive for its intrinsic transferability and universal adhesiveness. Utilizing the well-established surface modification and bonding techniques of PDMS surfaces, irreversible bonding is formed (up to 400 kPa) between a wide range of substrate pairs, representing ones within and across different materials categories, including metals, ceramics, thermoset, and thermoplastic polymers.

  4. Exploring Chromophore-Binding Pocket: High-Resolution Solid-State H-C Interfacial Correlation NMR Spectra with Windowed PMLG Scheme.

    PubMed

    Song, Chen; Lang, Christina; Mailliet, Jo; Hughes, Jon; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Matysik, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional (2D) (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear correlation spectra are recorded for selective observation of interfacial 3-5.5 Å contacts of the uniformly (13)C-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore with its unlabeled binding pocket. The experiment is based on a medium- and long-distance heteronuclear correlation (MELODI-HETCOR) method. For improving (1)H spectral resolution, a windowed phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg (wPMLG) decoupling scheme is applied during the t(1) evolution period. Our approach allows for identification of chromophore-protein interactions, in particular for elucidation of the hydrogen-bonding networks and charge distributions within the chromophore-binding pocket. The resulting pulse sequence is tested on the cyanobacterial (Cph1) phytochrome sensory module (residues 1-514, Cph1Δ2) containing uniformly (13)C- and (15)N-labeled PCB chromophore (u-[(13)C,(15)N]-PCB-Cph1Δ2) at 17.6 T. PMID:22303079

  5. Interfacial electronic structure and charge transfer of hybrid graphene quantum dot and graphitic carbon nitride nanocomposites: insights into high efficiency for photocatalytic solar water splitting.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zuju; Sa, Rongjian; Li, Qiaohong; Wu, Kechen

    2016-01-14

    New metal-free carbon nanodot/carbon nitride (C3N4) nanocomposites have shown to exhibit high efficiency for photocatalytic solar water splitting. (J. Liu, et al., Science, 2015, 347, 970) However, the mechanism underlying the ultrahigh performance of these nanocomposites and consequently the possibilities for further improvements are not at present clear. In this work, we performed hybrid functional calculations and included long-range dispersion corrections to accurately characterize the interfacial electron coupling of the graphene quantum dot-graphitic carbon nitride composites (Gdot/g-C3N4). The results revealed that the band gap of Gdot/g-C3N4 could be engineered by changing the lateral size of Gdots. In particular, the C24H12/g-C3N4 composites present an ideal band gap of 1.92 eV to harvest a large part of solar light. More interestingly, a type-II heterojunction is formed at the interface of the Gdot/g-C3N4 composites, a desirable feature for enhanced photocatalytic activity. The charge redistribution at the interface leads to strong electron depletion above the Gdot sheet and electron accumulation below the g-C3N4 monolayer, potentially facilitating the separation of H2O oxidation and reduction reactions. Furthermore, we suggested that the photocatalytic performance of the Gdot/g-C3N4 nanocomposites can be further improved by decreasing the thickness of Gdots and tuning the size of Gdots.

  6. Effect of high-pressure H{sub 2}O treatment on elimination of interfacial GeO{sub X} layer between ZrO{sub 2} and Ge stack

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chen-Shuo; Liu, Po-Tsun

    2011-08-22

    This investigation demonstrates the effect of high-pressure H{sub 2}O treatment on the elimination of the interfacial germanium suboxide (GeO{sub X}) layer between ZrO{sub 2} and Ge. The formation of GeO{sub X} interlayer increases the gate-leakage current and worsen the controllability of the gate during deposition or thermal cycles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveal that high-pressure H{sub 2}O treatment eliminates the interfacial GeO{sub X} layer. The physical mechanism involves the oxidation of non-oxidized Zr with H{sub 2}O and the reduction of GeO{sub X} by H{sub 2}. Treatment with H{sub 2}O reduces the gate-leakage current of a ZrO{sub 2}/Ge capacitor by a factor of 1000.

  7. Mesoporous titania-vertical nanorod films with interfacial engineering for high performance dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Irfan; Fakharuddin, Azhar; Wali, Qamar; Zainun, Ayib Rosdi Bin; Ismail, Jamil; Jose, Rajan

    2015-03-01

    Working electrode (WE) fabrication offers significant challenges in terms of achieving high-efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). We have combined the beneficial effects of vertical nanorods grown on conducting glass substrate for charge transport and mesoporous particles for dye loading and have achieved a high photoconversion efficiency of (η) > 11% with an internal quantum efficiency of ˜93% in electrode films of thickness ˜7 ± 0.5 μm. Controlling the interface between the vertical nanorods and the mesoporous film is a crucial step in attaining high η. We identify three parameters, viz., large surface area of nanoparticles, increased light scattering of the nanorod-nanoparticle layer, and superior charge transport of nanorods, that simultaneously contribute to the improved photovoltaic performance of the WE developed.

  8. Mesoporous titania-vertical nanorod films with interfacial engineering for high performance dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Irfan; Fakharuddin, Azhar; Wali, Qamar; Bin Zainun, Ayib Rosdi; Ismail, Jamil; Jose, Rajan

    2015-03-13

    Working electrode (WE) fabrication offers significant challenges in terms of achieving high-efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). We have combined the beneficial effects of vertical nanorods grown on conducting glass substrate for charge transport and mesoporous particles for dye loading and have achieved a high photoconversion efficiency of (η) > 11% with an internal quantum efficiency of ∼93% in electrode films of thickness ∼7 ± 0.5 μm. Controlling the interface between the vertical nanorods and the mesoporous film is a crucial step in attaining high η. We identify three parameters, viz., large surface area of nanoparticles, increased light scattering of the nanorod-nanoparticle layer, and superior charge transport of nanorods, that simultaneously contribute to the improved photovoltaic performance of the WE developed. PMID:25687409

  9. Preparation of hybrid thiol-acrylate emulsion-templated porous polymers by interfacial copolymerization of high internal phase emulsions.

    PubMed

    Langford, Caitlin R; Johnson, David W; Cameron, Neil R

    2015-05-01

    Emulsion-templated highly porous polymers (polyHIPEs), containing distinct regions differing in composition, morphology, and/or properties, are prepared by the simultaneous polymerization of two high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) contained within the same mould. The HIPEs are placed together in the mould and subjected to thiol-acrylate photopolymerization. The resulting polyHIPE material is found to contain two distinct semicircular regions, reflecting the composition of each HIPE. The original interface between the two emulsions becomes a copolymerized band between 100 and 300 μm wide, which is found to be mechanically robust. The separate polyHIPE layers are distinguished from one another by their differing average void diameter, chemical composition, and extent of contraction upon drying.

  10. Perylene Bisimide as a Promising Zinc Oxide Surface Modifier: Enhanced Interfacial Combination for Highly Efficient Inverted Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nian, Li; Zhang, Wenqiang; Wu, Siping; Qin, Leiqiang; Liu, Linlin; Xie, Zengqi; Wu, Hongbin; Ma, Yuguang

    2015-11-25

    We report the application of a perylene bisimide (PBI-H) as zinc oxide (ZnO) surface modifier to afford an organic-inorganic co-interlayer for highly efficient inverted organic photovoltaics (i-OPV). By thermal annealing, a N-Zn chemical bond formed between PBI-H and ZnO, inducing close organic-inorganic combination. In addition, this co-interlayer shows decreased work function and increased electron transportation and conductivity, which are benefits for the cathode to enhance charge extraction efficiency and decrease recombination losses. As a result a highly efficient i-OPV was achieved with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 9.43% based on this co-interlayer with PTB7:PC71BM as the active layer, which shows over 35% enhancement compared to that of the device without the PBI-H layer. Moreover, this co-interlayer was widely applicable for i-OPVs based on various material systems, such as P3HT:PC61BM and PTB7-Th:PC71BM, resulting in PCE as high as 4.78% and 10.31%, respectively.

  11. FinalReport for completed IPP-0110 and 0110A Projects:"High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications"

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Ian

    2009-09-01

    The DOE-supported IPP (Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention) Project, IPP-0110, and its accompanying 'add-on project' IPP-0110A, entitled 'High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications' was a collaborative project involving the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) as the U.S. DOE lab; the US surface modification company, Phygen, Inc., as the US private company involved; and the High Current Electronics Institute (HCEI) of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Siberia, Russia, as the NIS Institute involved. Regular scientific research progress meetings were held to which personnel came from all participating partners. The meetings were held mostly at the Phygen facilities in Minneapolis, Minnesota (with Phygen as host) with meetings also held at Tomsk, Russia (HCEI as host), and at Berkeley, California (LBNL as host) In this way, good exposure of all researchers to the various different laboratories involved was attained. This report contains the Final Reports (final deliverables) from the Russian Institute, HCEI. The first part is that for IPP-0110A (the 'main part' of the overall project) and the second part is that for the add-on project IPP-0110A. These reports are detailed, and contain all aspects of all the research carried out. The project was successful in that all deliverables as specified in the proposals were successfully developed, tested, and delivered to Phygen. All of the plasma hardware was designed, made and tested at HCEI, and the performance was excellent. Some of the machine and performance parameters were certainly of 'world class'. The goals and requirements of the IPP Project were well satisfied. I would like to express my gratitude to the DOE IPP program for support of this project throughout its entire duration, and for the unparalleled opportunity thereby provided for all of the diverse participants in the project to join in this collaborative research. The

  12. High-Magnetization FeCo Nanochains with Ultrathin Interfacial Gaps for Broadband Electromagnetic Wave Absorption at Gigahertz.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Li, Yixing; Liu, Rongge; Rao, Yi; Rong, Huawei; Qin, Gaowu

    2016-02-10

    Superparamagnetic FeCo nanochains consisting of assembled ∼25 nm nanoparticles and ∼1 nm gaps are synthesized by facial wet-chemical route and exhibit significant electromagnetic absorption at gigahertz. Both the dielectric and magnetic loss factors present dual-resonance behaviors at 2-18 GHz frequencies, originated from the asymmetric architecture of the cubic FeCo particles that assembled in a one-dimensional chain structure. Theoretical analyses uncover that the origins of the enhancement of electromagnetic losses are ascribed to the high magnetization (228 emu/g) and the ultrathin gaps (∼1 nm), which enhances the Snoek limit and induces anisotropic dielectric polarizations, consequently constructing a proper electromagnetic match.

  13. High-Efficiency Nonfullerene Polymer Solar Cell Enabling by Integration of Film-Morphology Optimization, Donor Selection, and Interfacial Engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Weiping; Yao, Jiannian; Zhan, Chuanlang

    2016-06-22

    Carrier mobility is a vital factor determining the electrical performance of organic solar cells. In this paper we report that a high-efficiency nonfullerene organic solar cell (NF-OSC) with a power conversion efficiency of 6.94 ± 0.27% was obtained by optimizing the hole and electron transportations via following judicious selection of polymer donor and engineering of film-morphology and cathode interlayers: (1) a combination of solvent annealing and solvent vapor annealing optimizes the film morphology and hence both hole and electron mobilities, leading to a trade-off of fill factor and short-circuit current density (Jsc); (2) the judicious selection of polymer donor affords a higher hole and electron mobility, giving a higher Jsc; and (3) engineering the cathode interlayer affords a higher electron mobility, which leads to a significant increase in electrical current generation and ultimately the power conversion efficiency (PCE). PMID:27246160

  14. High-Magnetization FeCo Nanochains with Ultrathin Interfacial Gaps for Broadband Electromagnetic Wave Absorption at Gigahertz.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Li, Yixing; Liu, Rongge; Rao, Yi; Rong, Huawei; Qin, Gaowu

    2016-02-10

    Superparamagnetic FeCo nanochains consisting of assembled ∼25 nm nanoparticles and ∼1 nm gaps are synthesized by facial wet-chemical route and exhibit significant electromagnetic absorption at gigahertz. Both the dielectric and magnetic loss factors present dual-resonance behaviors at 2-18 GHz frequencies, originated from the asymmetric architecture of the cubic FeCo particles that assembled in a one-dimensional chain structure. Theoretical analyses uncover that the origins of the enhancement of electromagnetic losses are ascribed to the high magnetization (228 emu/g) and the ultrathin gaps (∼1 nm), which enhances the Snoek limit and induces anisotropic dielectric polarizations, consequently constructing a proper electromagnetic match. PMID:26775668

  15. High-Efficiency Nonfullerene Polymer Solar Cell Enabling by Integration of Film-Morphology Optimization, Donor Selection, and Interfacial Engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Weiping; Yao, Jiannian; Zhan, Chuanlang

    2016-06-22

    Carrier mobility is a vital factor determining the electrical performance of organic solar cells. In this paper we report that a high-efficiency nonfullerene organic solar cell (NF-OSC) with a power conversion efficiency of 6.94 ± 0.27% was obtained by optimizing the hole and electron transportations via following judicious selection of polymer donor and engineering of film-morphology and cathode interlayers: (1) a combination of solvent annealing and solvent vapor annealing optimizes the film morphology and hence both hole and electron mobilities, leading to a trade-off of fill factor and short-circuit current density (Jsc); (2) the judicious selection of polymer donor affords a higher hole and electron mobility, giving a higher Jsc; and (3) engineering the cathode interlayer affords a higher electron mobility, which leads to a significant increase in electrical current generation and ultimately the power conversion efficiency (PCE).

  16. Metal-related gate sinking due to interfacial oxygen layer in Ir/InAlN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostermaier, C.; Pozzovivo, G.; Basnar, B.; Schrenk, W.; Schmid, M.; Tóth, L.; Pécz, B.; Carlin, J.-F.; Gonschorek, M.; Grandjean, N.; Strasser, G.; Pogany, D.; Kuzmik, J.

    2010-06-01

    We report on an annealing-induced "gate sinking" effect in a 2-nm-thin In0.17Al0.83N/AlN barrier high electron mobility transistor with Ir gate. Investigations by transmission electron microscopy linked the effect to an oxygen containing interlayer between the gate metal and the InAlN layer and revealed diffusion of oxygen into iridium during annealing. Below 700 °C the diffusion is inhomogeneous and seems to occur along grain boundaries, which is consistent with the capacitance-voltage analysis. Annealing at 700 °C increased the gate capacitance over a factor 2, shifted the threshold voltage from +0.3 to +1 V and increased the transconductance from 400 to 640 mS/mm.

  17. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  18. Interfacial Reaction Between Cu Substrates and Zn-Al Base High-Temperature Pb-Free Solders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaku, Yoshikazu; Felicia, Lazuardi; Ohnuma, Ikuo; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kiyohito

    2008-03-01

    Chemical reactions between Cu substrates and Zn-Al high-temperature solder alloys, Zn-4Al and Zn-4Al-1Cu (mass%), at temperatures ranging from 420°C to 530°C were experimentally investigated by a scanning electron microscope using backscattered electrons (SEM-BSE) and an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). Intermediate phases (IMPs), β(A2) or β'(B2), γ(D82), and ɛ(A3) phases formed and grew during the soldering and aging treatments. The consumption rate of the IMP for Cu substrates is described by the square root of t in both the alloys, while the additional Cu in the molten Zn-Al alloy slightly suppresses the consumption of Cu substrates. The growth of IMPs during soldering treatment is controlled by the volume diffusion of constituent elements, and its activation energy increases in the order of Q ɛ < Q γ < Q β. In view of the aging process, the growth of IMPs is considered to be controlled by the volume diffusion. In particular, the layer thickness of γ rapidly grows over 200°C, although the thickness of the β layer grows very slowly.

  19. Highly stable phase change material emulsions fabricated by interfacial assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers during phase inversion.

    PubMed

    Park, Hanhee; Han, Dong Wan; Kim, Jin Woong

    2015-03-10

    This study introduced a robust and promising approach to fabricate highly stable phase change material (PCM) emulsions consisting of n-tetradecane as a dispersed phase and a mixture of meso-2,3-butanediol (m-BDO) and water as a continuous phase. We showed that amphiphilic poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) block copolymers assembled to form a flexible but tough polymer membrane at the interface during phase inversion from water-in-oil emulsion to oil-in-water emulsion, thus remarkably improving the emulsion stability. Although the incorporation of m-BDO into the emulsion lowered the phase changing enthalpy, it provided a useful means to elevate the melting temperature of the emulsions near to 15 °C. Interestingly, supercooling was commonly observed in our PCM emulsions. We attributed this to the fact that the PCM molecules confined in submicron-scale droplets could not effectively nucleate to grow molecular crystals. Moreover, the presence of m-BDO in the continuous phase rather dominated the heat emission of the emulsion system during freezing, which made the supercooling more favorable. PMID:25674921

  20. pH-induced inversion of water-in-oil emulsions to oil-in-water high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) using core cross-linked star (CCS) polymer as interfacial stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qijing; Deng, Xiaoyong; An, Zesheng

    2014-06-01

    A pH-responsive core cross-linked star (CCS) polymer containing poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) arms was used as an interfacial stabilizer for emulsions containing toluene (80 v%) and water (20 v%). In the pH range of 12.1-9.3, ordinary water-in-oil emulsions were formed. Intermediate multiple emulsions of oil-in-water-in-oil and water-in-oil-in-water were formed at pH 8.6 and 7.5, respectively. Further lowering the pH resulted in the formation of gelled high internal phase emulsions of oil-in-water type in the pH range of 6.4-0.6. The emulsion behavior was correlated with interfacial tension, conductivity and configuration of the CCS polymer at different pH.

  1. Convection and interfacial mass exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinet, P.; Legros, J. C.; Dauby, P. C.; Lebon, G.; Bestehorn, M.; Stephan, P.; Tadrist, L.; Cerisier, P.; Poncelet, D.; Barremaecker, L.

    2005-10-01

    Mass-exchange through fluid interfaces is ubiquitous in many natural and industrial processes. Yet even basic phase-change processes such as evaporation of a pure liquid are not fully understood, in particular when coupled with fluid motions in the vicinity of the phase-change interface, or with microscopic physical phenomena in the vicinity of a triple line (where the interface meets a solid). Nowadays, many industries recognise that this lack of fundamental knowledge is hindering the optimisation of existing processes. Their modelling tools are too dependent on empirical correlations with a limited - and often unknown - range of applicability. In addition to the intrinsic multiscale nature of the phenomena involved in typical industrial processes linked to interfacial mass exchange, their study is highly multi-disciplinary, involving tools and techniques belonging to physical chemistry, chemical engineering, fluid dynamics, non-linear physics, non-equilibrium thermodynamics, chemistry and statistical physics. From the experimental point of view, microgravity offers a unique environment to obtain valuable data on phase-change processes, greatly reducing the influence of body forces and allowing the detailed and accurate study of interfacial dynamics. In turn, such improved understanding leads to optimisation of industrial processes and devices involving phase-change, both for space and ground applications.

  2. Interfacial solvation thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-10-19

    Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the interplay of cavity formation, polarizability, desolvation, and surface capillary waves in driving the interfacial adsorptions of ions and molecules at air-water interfaces. Here we revisit these questions by combining exact potential distribution results with linear response theory and other physically motivated approximations. The results highlight both exact and approximate compensation relations pertaining to direct (solute-solvent) and indirect (solvent-solvent) contributions to adsorption thermodynamics, of relevance to solvation at air-water interfaces, as well as a broader class of processes linked to the mean force potential between ions, molecules, nanoparticles, proteins, and biological assemblies. PMID:27545849

  3. Interfacial solvation thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the interplay of cavity formation, polarizability, desolvation, and surface capillary waves in driving the interfacial adsorptions of ions and molecules at air-water interfaces. Here we revisit these questions by combining exact potential distribution results with linear response theory and other physically motivated approximations. The results highlight both exact and approximate compensation relations pertaining to direct (solute-solvent) and indirect (solvent-solvent) contributions to adsorption thermodynamics, of relevance to solvation at air-water interfaces, as well as a broader class of processes linked to the mean force potential between ions, molecules, nanoparticles, proteins, and biological assemblies.

  4. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.

  5. Interfacial instabilities and Kapitsa pendula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, Madison

    2015-11-01

    Determining the critera for onset and amplitude growth of instabilities is one of the central problems of fluid mechanics. We develop a parallel between the Kapitsa effect, in which a pendulum subject to high-frequency low-amplitude vibrations becomes stable in the inverted position, and interfaces separating fluids of different density. It has long been known that such interfaces can be stabilized by vibrations, even when the denser fluid is on top. We demonstrate that the stability diagram for these fluid interfaces is identical to the stability diagram for an appopriate Kapitsa pendulum. We expand the robust, ``dictionary''-type relationship between Kapitsa pendula and interfacial instabilities by considering the classical Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz and Plateau instabilities, as well as less-canonical examples ranging in scale from the micron to the width of a galaxy.

  6. Interfacial instabilities in vibrated fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier

    2016-07-01

    that leads to splitting (fluid separation). We investigate the interaction of these prominent interfacial instabilities in the absence of gravity, concentrating on harmonically vibrated rectangular containers of fluid. We compare vibroequilibria theory with direct numerical simulations and consider the effect of surfaces waves, which can excite sloshing motion of the vibroequilibria. We systematically investigate the saddle-node bifurcation experienced by a symmetric singly connected vibroequilibria solution, for sufficiently deep containers, as forcing is increased. Beyond this instability, the fluid rapidly separates into (at least) two distinct masses. Pronounced hysteresis is associated with this transition, even in the presence of gravity. The interaction of vibroequilibria and frozen waves is investigated in two-fluid systems. Preparations for a parabolic flight experiment on fluids vibrated at high frequencies are discussed.

  7. More About Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Del Signore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents additional discussion of technique for measuring interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Technique described in "Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids" (LEW-15855).

  8. Interfacial dislocation motion and interactions in single-crystal superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; Raabe, D.; Roters, F.; Arsenlis, A.

    2014-10-01

    The early stage of high-temperature low-stress creep in single-crystal superalloys is characterized by the rapid development of interfacial dislocation networks. Although interfacial motion and dynamic recovery of these dislocation networks have long been expected to control the subsequent creep behavior, direct observation and hence in-depth understanding of such processes has not been achieved. Incorporating recent developments of discrete dislocation dynamics models, we simulate interfacial dislocation motion in the channel structures of single-crystal superalloys, and investigate how interfacial dislocation motion and dynamic recovery are affected by interfacial dislocation interactions and lattice misfit. Different types of dislocation interactions are considered: self, collinear, coplanar, Lomer junction, glissile junction, and Hirth junction. The simulation results show that strong dynamic recovery occurs due to the short-range reactions of collinear annihilation and Lomer junction formation. The misfit stress is found to induce and accelerate dynamic recovery of interfacial dislocation networks involving self-interaction and Hirth junction formation, but slow down the steady interfacial motion of coplanar and glissile junction forming dislocation networks. The insights gained from these simulations on high-temperature low-stress creep of single-crystal superalloys are also discussed.

  9. Interfacial shear stress in stratified flow in a horizontal rectangular duct

    SciTech Connect

    Lorencez, C.; Kawaji, M.; Murao, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Interfacial shear stress has been experimentally examined for both cocurrent and countercurrent stratified wavy flows in a horizontal interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress values at high gas flow rates which could be attributed to the assumptions and procedures involved in each method. The interfacial waves and secondary motions were also found to have significant effects on the accuracy of Reynolds stress and turbulence kinetic energy extrapolation methods.

  10. Electrical properties and interfacial issues of high-k/Si MIS capacitors characterized by the thickness of Al2O3 interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing; Liu, Hongxia; Fei, Chenxi; Zhao, Lu; Chen, Shupeng; Wang, Shulong

    2016-06-01

    A thin Al2O3 interlayer deposited between La2O3 layer and Si substrate was used to scavenge the interfacial layer (IL) by blocking the out-diffusion of substrate Si. Some advantages and disadvantages of this method were discussed in detail. Evident IL reduction corroborated by the transmission electron microscopy results suggested the feasibility of this method in IL scavenging. Significant improvements in oxygen vacancy and leakage current characteristics were achieved as the thickness of Al2O3 interlayer increase. Meanwhile, some disadvantages such as the degradations in interface trap and oxide trapped charge characteristics were also observed.

  11. Understanding interfacial chemistry and stability for performance improvement and fade of high-energy Li-ion battery of LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2//silicon-graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dan-Thien; Kang, Joonsup; Nam, Kyoung-Mo; Paik, Younkee; Song, Seung-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the chemical processes that occur at the electrode/electrolyte interface in a battery is crucial, as the interactions between anode/cathode and electrolyte and between cathode and anode of a full-cell determine the final battery performance. We have investigated the correlation among cycling performance, interfacial reaction behavior and the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) stability of a LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2//Si-graphite full-cell under an aggressive test condition between 3.0 and 4.55 V using fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC)-based electrolyte, and blended additives of methyl (2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)carbonate (FEMC) and vinylene carbonate (VC). Through the formation of a stable SEI at both high-voltage cathode and anode, metal dissolution from the cathode is inhibited and full-cell achieves enhanced cycling performance. Interfacially stabilized full-cell delivers a high energy of 622 Wh per kg of active material and improved capacity retention, whereas the cell in conventional electrolyte shows a rapid performance fade.

  12. Mesoscale Interfacial Dynamics in Magnetoelectric Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Shashank, Priya

    2009-12-14

    Biphasic composites are the key towards achieving enhanced magnetoelectric response. In order understand the control behavior of the composites and resultant symmetry of the multifunctional product tensors, we need to synthesized model material systems with the following features (i) interface formation through either deposition control or natural decomposition; (ii) a very high interphase-interfacial area, to maximize the ME coupling; and (iii) an equilibrium phase distribution and morphology, resulting in preferred crystallographic orientation relations between phases across the interphase-interfacial boundaries. This thought process guided the experimental evolution in this program. We initiated the research with the co-fired composites approach and then moved on to the thin film laminates deposited through the rf-magnetron sputtering and pulsed laser deposition process

  13. Characterization of interfacial bonding using a scanning Kelvin probe

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Li, D.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Interfaces play a crucial role in determining the ultimate properties and service life of coating and film materials. However, the characterization and measurement of interfacial bonding, in particular of the local strength, is difficult. The high sensitivity of the electron work function (EWF) to surface conditions has attracted increasing interest in applications of the Kelvin probing technique to investigate the mechanical behavior of materials. In this study, the Kelvin method was used to characterize the interfacial bond formed between pure copper and brass after annealing in argon gas. It was demonstrated that low EWF values, small EWF fluctuations, and narrow fluctuation ranges in interfacial regions corresponded to good bonding. Furthermore, there was a strong correlation between the EWF and the interfacial strength determined by the microindentation method using a universal microtribometer. The Kelvin probing technique could be a powerful tool for studying the local property and structure of interfaces.

  14. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saye, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of "gauge freedom" to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  15. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Saye, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of “gauge freedom” to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  16. Interfacial Kinetics of High-Al-Containing Ultra-Lightweight Steels with Calcium Silicate-Based Molten Oxides at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gi Hyun; Sohn, Il

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the high-temperature reaction between high-Al- and -Mn-containing steels and synthesized molten calcium silicate-based fluxes from 1623 K to 1643 K (1350 °C to 1370 °C) was studied. Cylindrical steel rods were rotated in the molten fluxes for 300 to 1200 seconds at various temperatures below the melting point of the steels. The rods were connected to a rheometer, and the initial reaction rates were estimated from the torque variations. The dissolution of the steel into the molten slag was correlated to the variation in torque. The kinetics of the reaction between the rods and the slag estimated from the torque and subsequently from the viscosity were confirmed from the mass balance and from the variation in the chemical compositions of the rods and the molten slags, respectively. The liquid-phase mass transfer coefficient of Al2O3 was calculated to be 1.14 × 10-2 cm/s at 1623 K (1350 °C) and 1.52 × 10-2 cm/s at 1633 K (1360 °C). The kinetics calculated assuming liquid-phase mass transfer control was observed to be similar to the aforementioned kinetics determined from the dynamic viscosity variations. On the basis of dimensionless analysis of the Sherwood number (Sh = 0.05·Re0.65Sc0.31), liquid-phase mass transfer from the metal/flux interface was observed to be the rate-controlling step.

  17. Achieving high capacity in bulk-type solid-state lithium ion battery based on Li6.75La3Zr1.75Ta0.25O12 electrolyte: Interfacial resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Ren, Yaoyu; Shen, Yang; Zhao, Shi-Xi; Lin, Yuanhua; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2016-08-01

    A bulk-type all-solid-state lithium ion battery based on Ta-doped Li6.75La3Zr1.75Ta0.25O12 (LLZ-Ta) is prepared by a simple solid state process with high capacity of 279.0 μAh cm-2 at 80 °C. However, severe polarization is discovered during charging/discharging cycles at room temperature (RT) for battery with a higher active cathode loading. Large interfacial resistance due to the poor contact at the interfaces between cathode and LLZ-Ta solid electrolyte and at the interfaces within the composite cathode layer is proven to be the main reason for the poor electrochemical performance of the battery at RT. The polarization could be suppressed at elevated temperature, which is attributed to the decreased interfacial resistance as indicated by the results of impedance measurements and gives rise to much enhanced performance of the all-solid-state battery.

  18. Achieving high capacity in bulk-type solid-state lithium ion battery based on Li6.75La3Zr1.75Ta0.25O12 electrolyte: Interfacial resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Ren, Yaoyu; Shen, Yang; Zhao, Shi-Xi; Lin, Yuanhua; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2016-08-01

    A bulk-type all-solid-state lithium ion battery based on Ta-doped Li6.75La3Zr1.75Ta0.25O12 (LLZ-Ta) is prepared by a simple solid state process with high capacity of 279.0 μAh cm-2 at 80 °C. However, severe polarization is discovered during charging/discharging cycles at room temperature (RT) for battery with a higher active cathode loading. Large interfacial resistance due to the poor contact at the interfaces between cathode and LLZ-Ta solid electrolyte and at the interfaces within the composite cathode layer is proven to be the main reason for the poor electrochemical performance of the battery at RT. The polarization could be suppressed at elevated temperature, which is attributed to the decreased interfacial resistance as indicated by the results of impedance measurements and gives rise to much enhanced performance of the all-solid-state battery.

  19. Morphology controlled synthesis of platinum nanoparticles performed on the surface of graphene oxide using a gas-liquid interfacial reaction and its application for high-performance electrochemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wushuang; Sheng, Qinglin; Zheng, Jianbin

    2016-07-21

    In this paper, we report a novel morphology-controlled synthetic method. Platinum (Pt) nanoparticles with three kinds of morphology (aggregation-like, cube-like and globular) were grown on the surface of graphene oxide (GO) using a simple gas-liquid interfacial reaction and Pt/GO nanocomposites were obtained successfully. According to the experimental results, the morphology of the Pt nanoparticles can be controlled by adjusting the reaction temperature with the protection of chitosan. The obtained Pt/GO nanocomposites were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Then the Pt/GO nanocomposites with the three kinds of morphology were all used to fabricate electrochemical sensors. The electrochemical experimental results indicated that compared with various reported electrochemical sensors, the Pt/GO modified sensors in this work exhibit a low detection limit, high sensitivity and an extra wide linear range for the detection of nitrite. In addition, the synthesis of Pt particles based on a gas-liquid interfacial reaction provides a new platform for the controllable synthesis of nanomaterials. PMID:27181605

  20. Morphology controlled synthesis of platinum nanoparticles performed on the surface of graphene oxide using a gas-liquid interfacial reaction and its application for high-performance electrochemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wushuang; Sheng, Qinglin; Zheng, Jianbin

    2016-07-21

    In this paper, we report a novel morphology-controlled synthetic method. Platinum (Pt) nanoparticles with three kinds of morphology (aggregation-like, cube-like and globular) were grown on the surface of graphene oxide (GO) using a simple gas-liquid interfacial reaction and Pt/GO nanocomposites were obtained successfully. According to the experimental results, the morphology of the Pt nanoparticles can be controlled by adjusting the reaction temperature with the protection of chitosan. The obtained Pt/GO nanocomposites were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Then the Pt/GO nanocomposites with the three kinds of morphology were all used to fabricate electrochemical sensors. The electrochemical experimental results indicated that compared with various reported electrochemical sensors, the Pt/GO modified sensors in this work exhibit a low detection limit, high sensitivity and an extra wide linear range for the detection of nitrite. In addition, the synthesis of Pt particles based on a gas-liquid interfacial reaction provides a new platform for the controllable synthesis of nanomaterials.

  1. Roles of interfacial reaction on mechanical properties of solder interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pilin

    This study investigated roles of interfacial reaction in fracture and fatigue of solder interconnects. The interfacial reaction phases in the as-reflowed and after aging were examined by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) while interfacial mechanical properties were determined from a flexural peel fracture mechanics technique. Because of their widespread uses in microelectronic packaging, SnPb solder interfaces, and Bi-containing Pb-free solder interfaces were chosen as the subjects of this study. In the interfacial reaction study, we observed a complicated micro structural evolution during solid-state aging of electroless-Ni(P)/SnPb solder interconnects. In as-reflowed condition, the interfacial reaction produced Ni3Sn 4 and P-rich layers. Following overaging, the interfacial microstructure degenerated into a complex multilayer structure consisting of multiple layers of Ni-Sn compounds and transformed Ni-P phases. In SnPb solder interfacial system, fatigue study showed that the overaging of the high P electroless Ni-P/SnPb interconnects resulted in a sharp reduction in the fatigue resistance of the interface in the high crack growth rate regime. Fracture mechanism analysis indicated that the sharp drop in fatigue resistance was triggered by the brittle fracture of the Ni3Sn2 intermetallic phase developed at the overaged interface. The fatigue behavior was strongly dependent on P concentration in electroless Ni. Kirkendall voids were found in the interfacial region after aging, but they did not cause premature fracture of the solder interfaces. In Bi-containing solder interfacial system, we found that Bi segregated to the Cu-intermetallic interface during aging in SnBi/Cu interconnect. This caused serious embrittlement of Sn-Bi/Cu interface. Further aging induced numerous voids along the Cu3Sn/Cu interface. These interfacial voids were different from Kirkendall voids. Their formation was explained on basis of vacancy condensation at the

  2. Interfacial microfluidic transport on micropatterned superhydrophobic textile.

    PubMed

    Xing, Siyuan; Jiang, Jia; Pan, Tingrui

    2013-05-21

    Textile-enabled interfacial microfluidics, utilizing fibrous hydrophilic yarns (e.g., cotton) to guide biological reagent flows, has been extended to various biochemical analyses recently. The restricted capillary-driving mechanism, however, persists as a major challenge for continuous and facilitated biofluidic transport. In this paper, we have first introduced a novel interfacial microfluidic transport principle to drive three-dimensional liquid flows on a micropatterned superhydrophobic textile (MST) platform in a more autonomous and controllable manner. Specifically, the MST system utilizes the surface tension-induced Laplace pressure to facilitate the liquid motion along the hydrophilic yarn, in addition to the capillarity present in the fibrous structure. The fabrication of MST is simply accomplished by stitching hydrophilic cotton yarn into a superhydrophobic fabric substrate (contact angle 140 ± 3°), from which well-controlled wetting patterns are established for interfacial microfluidic operations. The geometric configurations of the stitched micropatterns, e.g., the lengths and diameters of the yarn and bundled arrangement, can all influence the transport process, which is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Two operation modes, discrete and continuous transport, are also presented in detail. In addition, the gravitational effect as well as the droplet removal process have been also considered and quantitatively analysed during the transport process. As a demonstration, an MST design has been implemented on an artificial skin surface to collect and remove sweat in a highly efficient and facilitated means. The results have illustrated that the novel interfacial transport on the textile platform can be potentially extended to a variety of biofluidic collection and removal applications.

  3. Interfacial chemistry and structure in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Saenz, N.T.; Schilling, C.H.

    1990-09-01

    The interfacial chemistry and structure of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) play a major role in the properties of these materials. Fiber-matrix interfaces chemistries are vitally important in the fracture strength, fracture toughness, and fracture resistance of ceramic composites because they influence fiber loading and fiber pullout. Elevated-temperature properties are also linked to the interfacial characteristics through the chemical stability of the interface in corrosive environments and the creep/pullout behavior of the interface. Physical properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity are also dependent on the interface. Fiber-matrix interfaces containing a 1-{mu}m-thick multilayered interface with amorphous and graphitic C to a 1-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer can result from sintering operations for some composite systems. Fibers coated with C, BN, C/BC/BN, and Si are also used to produce controlled interface chemistries and structures. Growth interfaces within the matrix resulting from processing of CMCs can also be crucial to the behavior of these materials. Evaluation of the interfacial chemistry and structure of CMCs requires the use of a variety of analytical tools, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. A review of the interfacial chemistry and structure of SiC whisker- and fiber-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC/SiC materials is presented. Where possible, correlations with fracture properties and high-temperature stability are made. 94 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Charged Surfaces and Interfacial Ions.

    PubMed

    Kallay; Zalac

    2000-10-01

    Interfacial charge in a solid/liquid system is due to interactions of ions with surface sites affected by the electrostatic potential that is a consequence of their accumulation. The present theoretical approach is based on the so-called Surface Complexation Model that has several modifications known as either the 1-pK, the 2-pK, or the "MUSIC" model. These models assume different surface reactions and their equilibrium constants, taking into account electrostatic interactions. For that purpose the relationships between potentials affecting the state of interfacial ions and their surface densities need to be known, so that a certain model of the electrical interfacial layer should be introduced. The complexity of the problem results in the use of a variety of different theoretical approaches that cannot be distinguished experimentally. This article discusses several aspects of the problem, such as counterion association, structure of the electrical interfacial layer, potential-charge relationships, surface potentials, the zero charge condition, enthalpy of surface reactions, and the influence of the interfacial ionic equilibrium on the colloid stability. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10998282

  5. Low interfacial trap density and high-temperature thermal stability in atomic layer deposited single crystal Y2O3/n-GaAs(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Hsun; Fu, Chien-Hua; Lin, Keng-Yung; Chen, Kuan-Hsiung; Chang, Tsong-Wen; Raynien Kwo, J.; Hong, Minghwei

    2016-08-01

    A low interfacial trap density (D it) of 2.2 × 1011 eV-1 cm-2 has been achieved with an atomic layer deposited (ALD) single crystal Y2O3 epitaxially on n-GaAs(001), along with a small frequency dispersion of 10.3% (2.6%/decade) at the accumulation region in the capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves. The D it and frequency dispersion in the C-V curves in this work are the lowest among all of the reported ALD-oxides on n-type GaAs(001). The D it was measured using the conductance-voltage (G-V) and quasi-static C-V (QSCV) methods. Moreover, the heterostructure was thermally stable with rapid annealing at 900 °C under various durations in He and N2, which has not been achieved in the heterostructures of ALD-Al2O3 or HfO2 on GaAs.

  6. Low interfacial trap density and high-temperature thermal stability in atomic layer deposited single crystal Y2O3/n-GaAs(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Hsun; Fu, Chien-Hua; Lin, Keng-Yung; Chen, Kuan-Hsiung; Chang, Tsong-Wen; Raynien Kwo, J.; Hong, Minghwei

    2016-08-01

    A low interfacial trap density (D it) of 2.2 × 1011 eV‑1 cm‑2 has been achieved with an atomic layer deposited (ALD) single crystal Y2O3 epitaxially on n-GaAs(001), along with a small frequency dispersion of 10.3% (2.6%/decade) at the accumulation region in the capacitance–voltage (C–V) curves. The D it and frequency dispersion in the C–V curves in this work are the lowest among all of the reported ALD-oxides on n-type GaAs(001). The D it was measured using the conductance–voltage (G–V) and quasi-static C–V (QSCV) methods. Moreover, the heterostructure was thermally stable with rapid annealing at 900 °C under various durations in He and N2, which has not been achieved in the heterostructures of ALD-Al2O3 or HfO2 on GaAs.

  7. Interfacial rheology in complex flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jeffrey; Hudson, Steven

    2009-03-01

    Multiphase liquid systems are omnipresent in and essential to everyday life, e.g. foods, pharmaceutics, cosmetics, paints, oil recovery, etc. The morphology and stability of such systems depend on dynamic interfacial properties and processes. Typical methods utilized to measure such interfacial properties often employ drops that are much larger and flows that are much simpler than those encountered in typical processing applications. A microfluidic approach is utilized to measure dynamic structure and kinetics in multiphase systems with drop sizes comparable to those encountered in applications and flow complexity that is easily adjustable. The internal circulation and deformation of an aqueous droplet in clear mineral oil is measured using particle tracers and a detailed shape analysis, which is capable of measuring sub-micron deviations in drop shape. Deformation dynamics, detailed drop shape, interfacial tension, and internal circulation patterns and velocities are measured in Poiseuille and transient elongational flows. Flow kinematics are adjusted by varying the microchannel geometry, relative drop size, and drop height. The effects of confinement on interfacial dynamics and circulation patterns and velocities are also explored.

  8. Temporal interfacial instability in vertical gas-liquid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Patrick; Ó Náraigh, Lennon; Lucquiaud, Mathieu; Valluri, Prashant

    2015-11-01

    We consider onset and dynamics of interfacial instability in gas-liquid flows, using two-dimensional channel flow of a thin falling film sheared by counter-current gas as a model. Our methodology consists of linear stability theory together with DNS of the two-phase flow in the case of nonlinear disturbances. We study the influence of three main flow parameters (density contrast between liquid and gas, film thickness, pressure drop applied to drive the gas stream) on the interfacial dynamics. Energy budget analyses based on Orr-Sommerfeld theory reveal coexisting unstable modes (interfacial, shear, internal) in the case of high density contrast, resulting in mode coalescence and mode competition, but only one dynamically relevant unstable interfacial mode for low density contrast. DNS of this scenario shows that linear theory holds up remarkably well upon the onset of large-amplitude waves as well as the existence of weakly nonlinear waves. In comparison, although linear stability theory successfully determines the most-dominant features in the interfacial wave dynamics at early-to-intermediate times in a high-density-contrast case, short waves selected by linear theory undergo secondary instability and the wave train is no longer regular but rather exhibits chaotic.

  9. Passivation of GaSb using molecular beam epitaxy Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} to achieve low interfacial trap density and high-performance self-aligned inversion-channel p-metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, R. L.; Chiang, T. H.; Hsueh, W. J.; Chyi, J. I.; Chen, K. H.; Lin, K. Y.; Hong, M. E-mail: mhong@phys.ntu.edu.tw; Brown, G. J.; Kwo, J. E-mail: mhong@phys.ntu.edu.tw

    2014-11-03

    Molecular beam epitaxy deposited rare-earth oxide of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} has effectively passivated GaSb, leading to low interfacial trap densities of (1–4) × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} across the energy bandgap of GaSb. A high saturation drain current density of 130 μA/μm, a peak transconductance of 90 μS/μm, a low subthreshold slope of 147 mV/decade, and a peak field-effect hole mobility of 200 cm{sup 2}/V-s were obtained in 1 μm-gate-length self-aligned inversion-channel GaSb p-Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect-Transistors (MOSFETs). In this work, high-κ/GaSb interfacial properties were better in samples with a high substrate temperature of 200 °C than in those with high κ's deposited at room temperature, in terms of the interfacial electrical properties, particularly, the reduction of interfacial trap densities near the conduction band and the MOSFET device performance.

  10. Interfacial electronic effects control the reaction selectivity of platinum catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangxu; Xu, Chaofa; Huang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Jinyu; Gu, Lin; Li, Gang; Tang, Zichao; Wu, Binghui; Yang, Huayan; Zhao, Zipeng; Zhou, Zhiyou; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-05-01

    Tuning the electronic structure of heterogeneous metal catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to optimize their catalytic activities. By preparing ethylenediamine-coated ultrathin platinum nanowires as a model catalyst, here we demonstrate an interfacial electronic effect induced by simple organic modifications to control the selectivity of metal nanocatalysts during catalytic hydrogenation. This we apply to produce thermodynamically unfavourable but industrially important compounds, with ultrathin platinum nanowires exhibiting an unexpectedly high selectivity for the production of N-hydroxylanilines, through the partial hydrogenation of nitroaromatics. Mechanistic studies reveal that the electron donation from ethylenediamine makes the surface of platinum nanowires highly electron rich. During catalysis, such an interfacial electronic effect makes the catalytic surface favour the adsorption of electron-deficient reactants over electron-rich substrates (that is, N-hydroxylanilines), thus preventing full hydrogenation. More importantly, this interfacial electronic effect, achieved through simple organic modifications, may now be used for the optimization of commercial platinum catalysts.

  11. Graphene as an efficient interfacial layer for electrochromic devices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng; Bult, Justin B; Nanayakkara, Sanjini; Dillon, Anne C; Richards, Ryan M; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Engtrakul, Chaiwat

    2015-06-01

    This study presents an interfacial modification strategy to improve the performance of electrochromic films that were fabricated by a magnetron sputtering technique. High-quality graphene sheets, synthesized by chemical vapor deposition, were used to modify fluorine-doped tin oxide substrates, followed by the deposition of high-performance nanocomposite nickel oxide electrochromic films. Electrochromic cycling results revealed that a near-complete monolayer graphene interfacial layer improves the electrochromic performance in terms of switching kinetics, activation period, coloration efficiency, and bleached-state transparency, while maintaining ∼100% charge reversibility. The present study offers an alternative route for improving the interfacial properties between electrochromic and transparent conducting oxide films without relying on conventional methods such as nanostructuring or thin film composition control. PMID:25950270

  12. Comparison of fluid-fluid interfacial areas measured with X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer tests for the same samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Kieran; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2016-07-01

    Two different methods are currently used for measuring interfacial areas between immiscible fluids within 3-D porous media, high-resolution microtomographic imaging and interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT). Both methods were used in this study to measure nonwetting/wetting interfacial areas for a natural sand. The microtomographic imaging was conducted on the same packed columns that were used for the IPTTs. This is in contrast to prior studies comparing the two methods, for which in all cases different samples were used for the two methods. In addition, the columns were imaged before and after the IPTTs to evaluate the potential impacts of the tracer solution on fluid configuration and attendant interfacial area. The interfacial areas measured using IPTT are ˜5 times larger than the microtomographic-measured values, which is consistent with previous work. Analysis of the image data revealed no significant impact of the tracer solution on NAPL configuration or interfacial area. Other potential sources of error were evaluated, and all were demonstrated to be insignificant. The disparity in measured interfacial areas between the two methods is attributed to the limitation of the microtomography method to characterize interfacial area associated with microscopic surface roughness due to resolution constraints.

  13. A Thermodynamic Study of Dopant Interfacial Segregation Effect on Nanostability and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Longjia

    Nanoparticles, with great surface area and high surface to volume ratio, have been widely applied in many applications due to their unique size related effects. However, this high surface area character of nanoparticles also brings great excess energy to the whole system, making the system unstable and even causing the failure of nanoparticles, especially at higher temperatures. In order to maintain nanocrystalline structure of the materials, nanostability enhancement is of great significance in nanotechnology. It is well known that the global driving force for particles growth is to eliminate the excess energy brought by surface and grain boundary. Therefore, interfacial energetics has a great influence on the nanostability of the materials. And according to previous studies, dopant interfacial segregation could be a potential way to control the interfacial energetics of the nanoparticles and possibly lead to an improved nanostability. Furthermore, the interfacial energetics even can affect mechanical properties of nano-grain ceramic materials based on recent research. The main goals of the present work were to experimentally measure the interfacial energies of nanoparticles as well as nano-grain ceramics, modify the interfacial energetics through dopant segregation effect and engineer the nanostability and mechanical properties of the nanocrystalline materials through interfacial energetics modification. To achieve this goal, Mn cation has been chosen to introduce Mn interfacial segregation on ceria nanoparticles, and La cation has been added to 12 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia (12YSZ) and magnesium aluminate spinel (MAO) two-phase nano-grain ceramics to cause La interfacial segregation. Both of the dopant segregation phenomena were directly proved by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). To quantify the dopant segregation effect on the interfacial energies, high-temperature oxide melt drop solution calorimetry, water adsorption calorimetry and differential

  14. Interfacial activity in alkaline flooding enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization of long-chained organic acids in the crude oil to form soaps was shown to be primarily responsible for the lowering of oil-water interfacial tension at alkaline pH. These active acids can be concentrated by silica gel chromatography into a minor polar fraction. An equilibrium chemical model was proposed based on 2 competing reactions: the ionization of acids to form active anions, and the formation of undissociated soap between acid anions and sodium ions. It correlates the interfacial activity with the interfacial concentration of active acid anions which is expressed in terms of the concentrations of the chemical species in the system. The model successfully predicts the observed oil-alkaline solution interfacial phenomenon, including its dependence on pH, alkali and salt concentrations, type of acid present and type of soap formed. Flooding at different alkali concentrations to activate different acid species present in the crude was shown to give better recovery than flooding at a single high alkali concentration. Treating the crude oil with a dilute solution of mineral acids liberates additional free active acids and yields better interfacial activity during subsequent alkali contact.

  15. Self-Powered, High-Speed and Visible-Near Infrared Response of MoO(3-x)/n-Si Heterojunction Photodetector with Enhanced Performance by Interfacial Engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chuanxi; Liang, Zhimin; Su, Mingze; Liu, Pengyi; Mai, Wenjie; Xie, Weiguang

    2015-11-25

    Photodetectors with a wide spectrum response are important components for sensing, imaging, and other optoelectronic applications. A molybdenum oxide (MoO(3-x))/Si heterojunction has been applied as solar cells with great success, but its potential in photodetectors has not been explored yet. Herein, a self-powered, high-speed heterojunction photodetector fabricated by coating an n-type Si hierarchical structure with an ultrathin hole-selective layer of molybdenum oxide (MoO(3-x)) is first investigated. Excellent and stable photoresponse performance is obtained by using a methyl group passivated interface. The heterojunction photodetector demonstrated high sensitivity to a wide spectrum from 300 to 1100 nm. The self-powered photodetector shows a high detectivity of (∼6.29 × 10(12) cmHz(1/2) W(-1)) and fast response time (1.0 μs). The excellent photodetecting performance is attributed to the enhanced interfacial barrier height and three-dimensional geometry of Si nanostructures, which is beneficial for efficient photocarrier collection and transportation. Finally, our devices show excellent long-term stability in air for 6 months with negligible performance degradation. The thermal evaporation method for large-scale fabrication of MoO(3-x)/n-Si photodetectors makes it suitable for self-powered, multispectral, and high-speed response photodetecting applications.

  16. Supramolecular interfacial architectures for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fang; Yao, Danfeng; Christensen, Danica; Neumann, Thomas; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2004-12-01

    This contribution summarizes some of our efforts in designing, assembling and functionally characterizing supramolecular interfacial architectures for bio-affinity studies and for biosensor development. All the surface interaction studies will be based on the recently introduced novel sensor platforms involving surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) and -microscopy (SPFM). Emphasis will be put on documenting the distance-dependence of fluorescence intensity at the metal-dielectric interface and utilizing this principle to optimize the conformation/orientation of the interfacial supra-molecular sensor coatings. This is exemplified by a number of examples, including a layer-by-layer assembly system, antibody-antigen interactions, oligonucleotide-oligonucleotide, and oligonucleotide-PCR amplicon hybridization. For practical sensing purposes, a three-dimensionally extended surface coating is then employed to overcome the fluorescence quenching problem on a planar matrix. A commercial dextran layer is shown to be an optimized matrix for SPFS, with an example of a protein-binding study.

  17. Mechanics of interfacial composite materials.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Abkarian, Manouk; Mahadevan, L; Stone, Howard A

    2006-11-21

    Recent experiments and simulations have demonstrated that particle-covered fluid/fluid interfaces can exist in stable nonspherical shapes as a result of the steric jamming of the interfacially trapped particles. The jamming confers the interface with solidlike properties. We provide an experimental and theoretical characterization of the mechanical properties of these armored objects, with attention given to the two-dimensional granular state of the interface. Small inhomogeneous stresses produce a plastic response, while homogeneous stresses produce a weak elastic response. Shear-driven particle-scale rearrangements explain the basic threshold needed to obtain the near-perfect plastic deformation that is observed. Furthermore, the inhomogeneous stress state of the interface is exhibited experimentally by using surfactants to destabilize the particles on the surface. Since the interfacially trapped particles retain their individual characteristics, armored interfaces can be recognized as a kind of composite material with distinct chemical, structural, and mechanical properties.

  18. The Chemically Driven Interfacial Convection (CDIC) experiment on MASER 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ying; Eckert, Kerstin; Heinze, Armin; Acker, Margret

    2005-08-01

    We present a sounding rocket experiment studying the interplay between chemistry and interfacial-tension-driven hydrodynamic instabilities. The system on hand is a combination of two immiscible liquids separated along an initially plane interface at which an interfacial reaction takes place. The reaction leads to an in-situ formation of a surface-active product. This system is studied using an integrated Hele-Shaw cell concept developed in the project. With onset of the microgravity phase four Hele-Shaw cells are filled manually. Basic diagnostic tools are two shadowgraph visualization systems of high resolution and two differential interferometer, each of them containing one cell. The experiment shows an intriguing dynamic interplay between cellular Marangoni convection, thin film dynamics and interfacial deformations.

  19. Environmental Applications of Interfacial Materials with Special Wettability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhangxin; Elimelech, Menachem; Lin, Shihong

    2016-03-01

    Interfacial materials with special wettability have become a burgeoning research area in materials science in the past decade. The unique surface properties of materials and interfaces generated by biomimetic approaches can be leveraged to develop effective solutions to challenging environmental problems. This critical review presents the concept, mechanisms, and fabrication techniques of interfacial materials with special wettability, and assesses the environmental applications of these materials for oil-water separation, membrane-based water purification and desalination, biofouling control, high performance vapor condensation, and atmospheric water collection. We also highlight the most promising properties of interfacial materials with special wettability that enable innovative environmental applications and discuss the practical challenges for large-scale implementation of these novel materials.

  20. Impact of interfacial misfit dislocation growth mode on highly lattice-mismatched InxGa1-xSb epilayer grown on GaAs substrate by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Sa Hoang; Ha, Minh Thien Huu; Do, Huy Binh; Luc, Quang Ho; Yu, Hung Wei; Chang, Edward Yi

    2016-09-01

    Highly lattice-mismatch (over 8%) ternary InxGa1-xSb alloy directly grown on GaAs substrates was demonstrated by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The influence of growth parameters, such as growth temperature, indium vapor composition, and V/III ratio, on the film properties was investigated, and it was found that the growth temperature has the strongest effect on the surface morphology and the crystal quality of the InxGa1-xSb epilayer. An optimized growth temperature of ˜590 °C and a V/III ratio of 2.5 were used for the growth of the InxGa1-xSb epilayer on GaAs that displays a lower surface roughness. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy micrographs exhibit that InxGa1-xSb epilayer growth on GaAs was governed by the interfacial misfit dislocation growth mode. Furthermore, the variation of the intermixing layer thickness at the InxGa1-xSb/GaAs heterointerface was observed. These results provide an information of growing highly lattice-mismatched epitaxial material systems by MOCVD growth process.

  1. Interfacial adsorption and aggregation of amphiphilic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, David

    2012-02-01

    The adsorption and aggregation on liquid interfaces of proteins is important in many biological contexts, such as the formation of aerial structures, immune response, and catalysis. Likewise the adsorption of proteins onto interfaces has applications in food technology, drug delivery, and in personal care products. As such there has been much interest in the study of a wide range of biomolecules at liquid interfaces. One class of proteins that has attracted particular attention are hydrophobins, small, fungal proteins with a distinct, amphiphilic surface structure. This makes these proteins highly surface active and they recently attracted much interest. In order to understand their potential applications a microscopic description of their interfacial and self-assembly is necessary and molecular simulation provides a powerful tool for providing this. In this presentation I will describe some recent work using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to study the interfacial and aggregation behaviour of hydrophobins. Specifically this will present the calculation of their adsorption strength at oil-water and air-water interfaces, investigate the stability of hydrophobin aggregates in solution and their interaction with surfactants.

  2. Meter-long multiblock copolymer microfibers via interfacial bioorthogonal polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Han; Remy, Roddel A.; Deng, Fei; Mackay, Michael E.; Fox, Joseph M.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2015-01-01

    High molecular weight multiblock copolymers are synthesized as robust polymer fibers via interfacial bioorthogonal polymerization employing the rapid cycloaddition of s-tetrazines with strained trans-cyclooctenes. When cell-adhesive peptide was incorporated in the tetrazine monomer, the resulting protein-mimetic polymer fibers provide guidance cues for cell attachment and elongation. PMID:25824805

  3. Meter-long multiblock copolymer microfibers via interfacial bioorthogonal polymerization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Han; Remy, Roddel A; Deng, Fei; Mackay, Michael E; Fox, Joseph M; Jia, Xinqiao

    2015-05-01

    High-molecular-weight multiblock copolymers are synthesized as robust polymer fibers via interfacial bioorthogonal polymerization employing the rapid cycloaddition of s-tetrazines with strained trans-cyclooctenes. When cell-adhesive peptide is incorporated in the tetrazine monomer, the resulting protein-mimetic polymer fibers provide guidance cues for cell attachment and elongation.

  4. [Interfacial area and interfacial transfer in two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.

    1993-09-01

    A joint research program funded by the DOE/BES at Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee has been underway. The main efforts of the Purdue program were concentrated on the following tasks. Development of Four Sensor Measurement Method; Experimental Study of Axial Changes of Transverse Void and Interfacial Area Profiles in Bubbly Flow; Modeling of the Probe-Particle Interaction Using Monte Carlo Numerical Simulation; and Experimental Study of the Stability of Interface of Very Large Bubbles. Highlights of these research results are reported.

  5. Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Glass capillary tube technique measures interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Yields useful data over fairly wide range of interfacial tensions, both for pairs of liquids having equal densities and pairs of liquids having unequal densities. Data on interfacial tensions important in diverse industrial chemical applications, including enhanced extraction of oil; printing; processing foods; and manufacture of paper, emulsions, foams, aerosols, detergents, gel encapsulants, coating materials, fertilizers, pesticides, and cosmetics.

  6. Interfacial reactions between titanium and borate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Brow, R.K.; Saha, S.K.; Goldstein, J.I.

    1992-12-31

    Interfacial reactions between melts of several borate glasses and titanium have been investigated by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A thin titanium boride interfacial layer is detected by XPS after short (30 minutes) thermal treatments. ASEM analyses after longer thermal treatments (8--120 hours) reveal boron-rich interfacial layers and boride precipitates in the Ti side of the interface.

  7. The effect of interfacial layer on the performance of organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choulis, Stelios A.; Choong-En, Vi; Mathai, Mathew K.; So, Franky

    2005-09-01

    We demonstrate high efficiency organic light-emitting devices by incorporation of a nanoscale interfacial layer between a hole-conducting layer (PEDOT:PSS) and a light-emitting polymer layer (LEP) to improve hole injection. The interfacial layer has appropriate highest occupied molecular orbital level in order to act as a bridge for efficient hole injection from the PEDOT:PSS into the LEP. As an example we have incorporated a suitable interfacial layer into a green-emitting single-layer electrophosphorescent light-emitting diode. Devices with the interfacial layer show a peak efficiency of 41lm/W, an improvement of more than 25% in their performance over comparable devices without the interfacial layer. The results presented here introduce a novel method to improve hole injection and thus efficiency in organic electroluminescent devices.

  8. Hierarchical Sheet-on-Sheet ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 Heterostructure with Highly Efficient Photocatalytic H2 production Based on Photoinduced Interfacial Charge Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyi; Liu, Kuichao; Feng, Zhiqing; Bao, Yanan; Dong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    We have realized in-situ growth of ultrathin ZnIn2S4 nanosheets on the sheet-like g-C3N4 surfaces to construct a “sheet-on-sheet” hierarchical heterostructure. The as-synthesized ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 heterojunction nanosheets exhibit remarkably enhancement on the photocatalytic activity for H2 production. This enhanced photoactivity is mainly attributed to the efficient interfacial transfer of photoinduced electrons and holes from g-C3N4 to ZnIn2S4 nanosheets, resulting in the decreased charge recombination on g-C3N4 nanosheets and the increased amount of photoinduced charge carriers in ZnIn2S4 nanosheets. Meanwhile, the increased surface-active-sites and extended light absorption of g-C3N4 nanosheets after the decoration of ZnIn2S4 nanosheets may also play a certain role for the enhancement of photocatalytic activity. Further investigations by the surface photovoltage spectroscopy and transient photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrate that ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 heterojunction nanosheets considerable boost the charge transfer efficiency, therefore improve the probability of photoinduced charge carriers to reach the photocatalysts surfaces for highly efficient H2 production. PMID:26753795

  9. Measurement of surface and interfacial tension using pendant drop tensiometry.

    PubMed

    Berry, Joseph D; Neeson, Michael J; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Tabor, Rico F

    2015-09-15

    Pendant drop tensiometry offers a simple and elegant solution to determining surface and interfacial tension - a central parameter in many colloidal systems including emulsions, foams and wetting phenomena. The technique involves the acquisition of a silhouette of an axisymmetric fluid droplet, and iterative fitting of the Young-Laplace equation that balances gravitational deformation of the drop with the restorative interfacial tension. Since the advent of high-quality digital cameras and desktop computers, this process has been automated with high speed and precision. However, despite its beguiling simplicity, there are complications and limitations that accompany pendant drop tensiometry connected with both Bond number (the balance between interfacial tension and gravitational forces) and drop volume. Here, we discuss the process involved with going from a captured experimental image to a fitted interfacial tension value, highlighting pertinent features and limitations along the way. We introduce a new parameter, the Worthington number, Wo, to characterise the measurement precision. A fully functional, open-source acquisition and fitting software is provided to enable the reader to test and develop the technique further.

  10. Evolution of interfacial Fermi level in In0.53Ga0.47As/high-κ/TiN gate stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Adra; Rozen, John; Frank, Martin M.; Ando, Takashi; Cartier, Eduard A.; Kerber, Pranita; Narayanan, Vijay; Haight, Richard

    2015-07-01

    The net charge state was probed of metal-oxide-semiconductor gate stacks consisting of In0.53Ga0.47As /high-κ dielectric/5 nm TiN, for both Al2O3 and HfO2 dielectrics, via investigation of band bending at the InGaAs/high-κ interface. Using pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy, changes to band bending were studied for each sequential layer deposited onto the InGaAs substrate and subsequent annealing up to 600 °C. Two behavioral regions were observed in annealing studies: (1) a lower temperature (<350 °C) region, attributed to changes at the high-κ/TiN interface, and (2) a higher temperature region (> 350 °C), associated with a net positive charge increase within the oxide. These band bending measurements delineate the impact of processing steps inherently inaccessible via capacitance-voltage electrical characterization.

  11. Dynamics of deeply supercooled interfacial water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Jan; Cerveny, Silvina

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss the relaxation dynamics of glassy and deeply supercooled water in different types of systems. We compare the dynamics of such interfacial water in ordinary aqueous solutions, hard confinements and biological soft materials. In all these types of systems the dielectric relaxation time of the main water process exhibits a dynamic crossover from a high-temperature non-Arrhenius temperature dependence to a low-temperature Arrhenius behavior. Moreover, at large enough water content the low-temperature process is universal and exhibits the same temperature behavior in all types of systems. However, the physical nature of the dynamic crossover is somewhat different for the different types of systems. In ordinary aqueous solutions it is not even a proper dynamic crossover, since the water relaxation decouples from the cooperative α-relaxation of the solution slightly above the glass transition in the same way as all secondary (β) relaxations of glass-forming materials. In hard confinements, the physical origin of the dynamic crossover is not fully clear, but it seems to occur when the cooperative main relaxation of water at high temperatures reaches a temperature where the volume required for its cooperative motion exceeds the size of the geometrically-confined water cluster. Due to this confinement effect the α-like main relaxation of the confined water seems to transform to a more local β-relaxation with decreasing temperature. Since this low-temperature β-relaxation is universal for all systems at high water content it is possible that it can be considered as an intrinsic β-relaxation of supercooled water, including supercooled bulk water. This possibility, together with other findings for deeply supercooled interfacial water, suggests that the most accepted relaxation scenarios for supercooled bulk water have to be altered.

  12. Highly Enhanced Electromechanical Stability of Large-Area Graphene with Increased Interfacial Adhesion Energy by Electrothermal-Direct Transfer for Transparent Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jangheon; Kim, Gi Gyu; Kim, Soohyun; Jung, Wonsuk

    2016-09-01

    Graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms in a hexagonal lattice structure, has been extensively investigated for research and industrial applications as a promising material with outstanding electrical, mechanical, and chemical properties. To fabricate graphene-based devices, graphene transfer to the target substrate with a clean and minimally defective surface is the first step. However, graphene transfer technologies require improvement in terms of uniform transfer with a clean, nonfolded and nontorn area, amount of defects, and electromechanical reliability of the transferred graphene. More specifically, uniform transfer of a large area is a key challenge when graphene is repetitively transferred onto pretransferred layers because the adhesion energy between graphene layers is too low to ensure uniform transfer, although uniform multilayers of graphene have exhibited enhanced electrical and optical properties. In this work, we developed a newly suggested electrothermal-direct (ETD) transfer method for large-area high quality monolayer graphene with less defects and an absence of folding or tearing of the area at the surface. This method delivers uniform multilayer transfer of graphene by repetitive monolayer transfer steps based on high adhesion energy between graphene layers and the target substrate. To investigate the highly enhanced electromechanical stability, we conducted mechanical elastic bending experiments and reliability tests in a highly humid environment. This ETD-transferred graphene is expected to replace commercial transparent electrodes with ETD graphene-based transparent electrodes and devices such as a touch panels with outstanding electromechanical stability. PMID:27564120

  13. Protein interfacial structure and nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John W.; Perriman, Adam W.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Lin, Jhih-Min

    2009-02-01

    Here we briefly recapitulate the use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry at the air-water interface to find protein structures and thermodynamics at interfaces and test a possibility for understanding those interactions between nanoparticles and proteins which lead to nanoparticle toxicology through entry into living cells. Stable monomolecular protein films have been made at the air-water interface and, with a specially designed vessel, the substrate changed from that which the air-water interfacial film was deposited. This procedure allows interactions, both chemical and physical, between introduced species and the monomolecular film to be studied by reflectometry. The method is briefly illustrated here with some new results on protein-protein interaction between β-casein and κ-casein at the air-water interface using X-rays. These two proteins are an essential component of the structure of milk. In the experiments reported, specific and directional interactions appear to cause different interfacial structures if first, a β-casein monolayer is attacked by a κ-casein solution compared to the reverse. The additional contrast associated with neutrons will be an advantage here. We then show the first results of experiments on the interaction of a β-casein monolayer with a nanoparticle titanium oxide sol, foreshadowing the study of the nanoparticle "corona" thought to be important for nanoparticle-cell wall penetration.

  14. Sinusoidal Forcing of Interfacial Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Fayaz; Raghunandan, Aditya; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Fluid transport, in vivo, is accomplished via pumping mechanisms of the heart and lungs, which results in biological fluids being subjected to oscillatory shear. Flow is known to influence biological macromolecules, but predicting the effect of shear is incomplete without also accounting for the influence of complex interfaces ubiquitous throughout the body. Here, we investigated the oscillatory response of the structure of aqueous interfacial films using a cylindrical knife edge viscometer. Vitamin K1 was used as a model monolayer because its behaviour has been thoroughly quantified and it doesn't show any measurable hysteresis. The monolayer was subjected to sinusoidal forcing under varied conditions of surface concentrations, periodic frequencies, and knife edge amplitudes. Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) data was collected using Brewster Angle Microscopy(BAM), revealing the influence of oscillatory interfacial shear stress on the monolayer. Insights were gained as to how the velocity profile dampens at specific distances from the knife edge contact depending on the amplitude, frequency, and concentration of Vitamin K1. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  15. Evolution of interfacial Fermi level in In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/high-κ/TiN gate stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Adra; Rozen, John; Frank, Martin M.; Ando, Takashi; Cartier, Eduard A.; Kerber, Pranita; Narayanan, Vijay; Haight, Richard

    2015-07-06

    The net charge state was probed of metal-oxide-semiconductor gate stacks consisting of In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As /high-κ dielectric/5 nm TiN, for both Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} dielectrics, via investigation of band bending at the InGaAs/high-κ interface. Using pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy, changes to band bending were studied for each sequential layer deposited onto the InGaAs substrate and subsequent annealing up to 600 °C. Two behavioral regions were observed in annealing studies: (1) a lower temperature (<350 °C) region, attributed to changes at the high-κ/TiN interface, and (2) a higher temperature region (> 350 °C), associated with a net positive charge increase within the oxide. These band bending measurements delineate the impact of processing steps inherently inaccessible via capacitance-voltage electrical characterization.

  16. Interfacial Characterization of Dissimilar Joints Between Al/Mg/Al-Trilayered Clad Sheet to High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macwan, A.; Jiang, X. Q.; Chen, D. L.

    2015-07-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys are increasingly used in the automotive and aerospace sectors to reduce vehicle weight. Al/Mg/Al tri-layered clad sheets are deemed as a promising alternative to improve the corrosion resistance and formability of Mg alloys. The structural application of Al/Mg/Al tri-layered clad sheets inevitably involves welding and joining in the multi-material vehicle body manufacturing. This study aimed to characterize the bonding interface microstructure of the Al/Mg/Al-clad sheet to high-strength low-alloy steel with and without Zn coating using ultrasonic spot welding at different levels of welding energy. It was observed that the presence of Zn coating improved the bonding at the interface due to the formation of Al-Zn eutectic structure via enhanced diffusion. At a higher level of welding energy, characteristic flow patterns of Zn into Al-clad layer were observed with an extensive penetration mainly along some high angle grain boundaries. The dissimilar joints without Zn coating made at a high welding energy of 800 J failed partially from the Al/Fe weld interface and partially from the Al/Mg clad interface, while the joints with Zn coating failed from the Al/Mg clad interface due to the presence of brittle Al12Mg17 phase.

  17. Interfacial tension measurements using MRI drop shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, R; Vogt, S J; Honari, A; Hollingsworth, K G; Sederman, A J; Mitchell, J; Johns, M L

    2014-02-18

    Accurate interfacial tension data for fluid systems such as hydrocarbons and water is essential to many applications such as reservoir oil and gas recovery predictions. Conventional interfacial tension measurement techniques typically use optical images to analyze droplet shapes but require that the continuous-phase fluid be optically transparent and that the fluids are not refractive index matched. Magnetic resonance images obtain contrast between fluids using other mechanisms such as magnetic relaxation weighting, so systems that are impossible to measure with optical methods may be analyzed. In this article, we present high-field (9.4 T) MRI images of various droplets analyzed with axisymmetric drop shape analysis. The resultant interfacial tension data show good agreement with literature data. The method is subsequently demonstrated using both opaque continuous phases and refractive-index-matched fluids. We conclude with a brief consideration of the potential to extrapolate the methodology to lower magnetic fields (0.3 T), featuring more accessible hardware; although droplet imaging is possible, resolution and stability do not currently permit accurate interfacial tension measurements. PMID:24471906

  18. Time-Dependent Interfacial Properties and DNAPL Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-03-10

    Interfacial properties play a major role in governing where and how dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) move in the subsurface. Interfacial tension and contact angle measurements were obtained for a simple, single component DNAPL (tetrachloroethene, PCE), complex laboratory DNAPLs (PCE plus Sudan IV dye), and a field DNAPL from the Savannah River Site (SRS) M-Area DNAPL (PCE, trichloroethene [TCE], and maching oils). Interfacial properties for complex DNAPLs were time-dependent, a phenomenon not observed for PCE alone. Drainage capillary pressure-saturation curves are strongly influenced by interfacial properties. Therefore time-dependence will alter the nature of DNAPL migration and penetration. Results indicate that the time-dependence of PCE with relatively high Sudan IV dye concentrations is comparable to that of the field DNAPL. Previous DNAPL mobility experiments in which the DNAPL was dyed should be reviewed to determine whether time-dependent properties influenced the resutls. Dyes appear to make DNAPL more complex, and therefore a more realistic analog for field DNAPLs than single component DNAPLs.

  19. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Hongliang; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    For the first time, the use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass, SON68, and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems due to their fundamental and practical significance. Our study shows that if the size of analysis areas is same, the highest sputter rate of argon cluster sputtering can be 2-3 times faster than the highest sputter rates of oxygen or cesium sputtering. More importantly, high quality data and high sputter rates can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering while this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, for deep depth profiling of insulating samples, the measurement efficiency of argon cluster sputtering can be about 6-15 times better than traditional cesium and oxygen sputtering. Moreover, for a SrTiO3/SrCrO3 bi-layer thin film on a SrTiO3 substrate, the true 18O/16O isotopic distribution at the interface is better revealed when using the argon cluster sputtering source. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the measurement efficiency of insulating materials, and thus can expand the application of ToF-SIMS to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin films, and many other potential systems.

  20. Interfacial behaviours of smart composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Chi-Kin

    The success of conventional fiber reinforced composites (FRC) relies on the quality of bonding between fibers and matrix. A review of literatures shows that there is a lack of theoretical models and experimental findings on the interfacial behaviours of the SMA-composites. In the past, the operation limit as well as the ideal actuation condition of SMA inclusions could not be predicted accurately during the design stage and the SMA-composite structures may therefore suffer a potential risk of sudden failure due to overloading or over-actuation. The theoretical models developed in this research provide a study basis for the prediction of internal stresses and interfacial strength of the SMA-composites. Martensite volume fraction is considered as a critical parameter which determines the material properties and shape memory effect (SME) of the SMA inclusions. The proposed model reproduce the SMA behaviour inside a substrate, evolutions of martensite volume fraction and elastic modulus of SMA, and the internal stresses along the embedded length in different loading and actuation scenarios. The concepts of 'constant martensite volume fraction region (CMR)' and 'constant axial stress region (CASR)' are proposed to justify the desired SMA actuation. In addition, substantial improvement of the initial debond stress is predicted with the increase of the actuation temperature. The 'Optimum Actuation Condition (OAC)' that ensures the reinforcement of SMA composite but avoids the failure of composite interface due to over-actuation is also defined to optimize the application of SME in the composite structure within a safety actuation limit. A simplified OAC (SOAC) is also developed to provide an analytical solution of OAC and thus the ideal actuation temperature for achieving such specific actuation condition can be estimated more easily. Single fiber pullout test and finite element analysis (FEA) are employed to evaluate the interfacial behaviours and analyze the stress

  1. Impact of interfacial tension on residual CO2 clusters in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei; Tsuji, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    We develop a numerical simulation that uses the lattice Boltzmann method to directly calculate the characteristics of residual nonwetting-phase clusters to quantify capillary trapping mechanisms in real sandstone. For this purpose, a digital-rock-pore model reconstructed from micro-CT-scanned images of Berea sandstone is filtered and segmented into a binary file. The residual-cluster distribution is generated following simulation of the drainage and imbibition processes. The characteristics of the residual cluster in terms of size distribution, major length, interfacial area, and sphericity are investigated under conditions of different interfacial tension (IFT). Our results indicate that high interfacial tension increases the residual saturation and leads to a large size distribution of residual clusters. However, low interfacial tension results in a larger interfacial area, which is beneficial for dissolution and reaction processes during geological carbon storage. Analysis of the force balance acting on the residual clusters demonstrates that trapping stability is higher in high interfacial tension case, and the interfacial tension should be a controlling factor for the trapping stability in addition to the pore geometry and connectivity. The proposed numerical method can handle the complex displacement of multicomponent systems in porous media. By using this method, we can obtain residual-cluster distributions under different conditions for optimizing the storage capacity of carbon-storage projects.

  2. Pt- and TCO-Free Flexible Cathode for DSSC from Highly Conducting and Flexible PEDOT Paper Prepared via in Situ Interfacial Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Anothumakkool, Bihag; Agrawal, Ishita; Bhange, Siddheshwar N; Soni, Roby; Game, Onkar; Ogale, Satishchandra B; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2016-01-13

    Here, we report the preparation of a flexible, free-standing, Pt- and TCO-free counter electrode in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC)-derived from polyethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT)-impregnated cellulose paper. The synthetic strategy of making the thin flexible PEDOT paper is simple and scalable, which can be achieved via in situ polymerization all through a roll coating technique. The very low sheet resistance (4 Ω/□) obtained from a film of 40 μm thick PEDOT paper (PEDOT-p-5) is found to be superior to the conventional fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate. The high conductivity (357 S/cm) displayed by PEDOT-p-5 is observed to be stable under ambient conditions as well as flexible and bending conditions. With all of these features in place, we could develop an efficient Pt- and TCO-free flexible counter electrode from PEDOT-p-5 for DSSC applications. The catalytic activity toward the tri-iodide reduction of the flexible electrode is analyzed by adopting various electrochemical methodologies. PEDOT-p-5 is found to display higher exchange current density (7.12 mA/cm(2)) and low charge transfer resistance (4.6 Ω) compared to the benchmark Pt-coated FTO glass (2.40 mA/cm(2) and 9.4 Ω, respectively). Further, a DSSC fabricated using PEDOT-p-5 as the counter electrode displays a comparable efficiency of 6.1% relative to 6.9% delivered by a system based on Pt/FTO as the counter electrode.

  3. Hydrated interfacial ions and electrons.

    PubMed

    Abel, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Charged particles such as hydrated ions and transient hydrated electrons, the simplest anionic reducing agents in water, and the special hydronium and hydroxide ions at water interfaces play an important role in many fields of science, such as atmospheric chemistry, radiation chemistry, and biology, as well as biochemistry. This article focuses on these species near hydrophobic interfaces of water, such as the air or vacuum interface of water or water protein/membrane interfaces. Ions at interfaces as well as solvated electrons have been reviewed frequently during the past decade. Although all species have been known for some time with seemingly familiar features, recently the picture in all cases became increasingly diffuse rather than clearer. The current account gives a critical state-of-the art overview of what is known and what remains to be understood and investigated about hydrated interfacial ions and electrons.

  4. Interfacial adhesion: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along wiith recommendations for future progress and needs.

  5. Interfacial adhesion - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Banerjea, Amitava; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along with recommendations for future progress and needs.

  6. Interfacial Bioorthogonal Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Described herein is interfacial bioorthogonal cross-linking, the use of bioorthogonal chemistry to create and pattern biomaterials through diffusion-controlled gelation at the liquid-gel interface. The basis is a rapid (k2 284000 M–1 s–1) reaction between strained trans-cyclooctene (TCO) and tetrazine (Tz) derivatives. Syringe delivery of Tz-functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA-Tz) to a bath of bis-TCO cross-linker instantly creates microspheres with a cross-linked shell through which bis-TCO diffuses freely to introduce further cross-linking at the interface. Tags can be introduced with 3D resolution without external triggers or templates. Water-filled hydrogel channels were prepared by simply reversing the order of addition. Prostate cancer cells encapsulated in the microspheres have 99% viability, proliferate readily, and form aggregated clusters. This process is projected to be useful in the fabrication of cell-instructive matrices for in vitro tissue models. PMID:25177528

  7. Studies on the disbonding initiation of interfacial cracks.

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, Brian J.; Pearson, Raymond A.

    2005-08-01

    With the continuing trend of decreasing feature sizes in flip-chip assemblies, the reliability tolerance to interfacial flaws is also decreasing. Small-scale disbonds will become more of a concern, pointing to the need for a better understanding of the initiation stage of interfacial delamination. With most accepted adhesion metric methodologies tailored to predict failure under the prior existence of a disbond, the study of the initiation phenomenon is open to development and standardization of new testing procedures. Traditional fracture mechanics approaches are not suitable, as the mathematics assume failure to originate at a disbond or crack tip. Disbond initiation is believed to first occur at free edges and corners, which act as high stress concentration sites and exhibit singular stresses similar to a crack tip, though less severe in intensity. As such, a 'fracture mechanics-like' approach may be employed which defines a material parameter--a critical stress intensity factor (K{sub c})--that can be used to predict when initiation of a disbond at an interface will occur. The factors affecting the adhesion of underfill/polyimide interfaces relevant to flip-chip assemblies were investigated in this study. The study consisted of two distinct parts: a comparison of the initiation and propagation phenomena and a comparison of the relationship between sub-critical and critical initiation of interfacial failure. The initiation of underfill interfacial failure was studied by characterizing failure at a free-edge with a critical stress intensity factor. In comparison with the interfacial fracture toughness testing, it was shown that a good correlation exists between the initiation and propagation of interfacial failures. Such a correlation justifies the continuing use of fracture mechanics to predict the reliability of flip-chip packages. The second aspect of the research involved fatigue testing of tensile butt joint specimens to determine lifetimes at sub

  8. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Interfacial Phenomena Using Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Ian C.

    Surfactants play an integral role in numerous functions ranging from stabilizing the emulsion in a favorite salad dressing to organizing the cellular components that make life possible. We are interested in lung surfactant, which is a mixture of lipids and proteins essential for normal respiration because it modulates the surface tension of the air-liquid interface of the thin fluid lining in the lungs. Through this surface tension modulation, lung surfactant ensures effortless lung expansion and prevents lung collapse during exhalation, thereby effecting proper oxygenation of the bloodstream. The function of lung surfactant, as well as numerous interfacial lipid systems, is not solely dictated by the behavior of materials confined to the two-dimensional interface. Rather, the distributions of materials in the liquid subphase also greatly influence the performance of interfacial films of lung surfactant. Therefore, to better understand the behavior of lung surfactant and other interfacial lipid systems, we require a three-dimensional characterization technique. In this dissertation, we have developed a novel confocal microscopy methodology for investigating the interfacial phenomena of surfactants at the air-liquid interface of a Langmuir trough. Confocal microscopy provides the excellent combination of in situ, fast, three-dimensional visualization of multiple components of the lung surfactant system that other characterization techniques lack. We detail the solutions to the numerous challenges encountered when imaging a dynamic air-liquid interface with a high-resolution technique like confocal microscopy. We then use confocal microscopy to elucidate the distinct mechanisms by which a polyelectrolyte (chitosan) and nonadsorbing polymer (polyethylene glycol) restore the function of lung surfactant under inhibitory conditions mimicking the effects of lung trauma. Beyond this physiological model, we also investigate several one- and two-component interfacial films

  9. Interfacial tension of aluminum in cryolite melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utigard, T.; Toguri, J. M.

    1985-06-01

    The interfacial tension between aluminum and cryolite melts containing different salt additions has been measured based on a combination of the sessile drop and X-ray radiographie technique. A computer program was used to calculate the interfacial tension from approximately twenty randomly measured coordinate points of the drop profile. Aluminum and salt mixtures containing different amounts of Na3AlF6, A1F3, NaF, A12O3, CaF2, KF, LiF, and NaCl were melted in a graphite or alumina crucible in a graphite resistor furnace under an argon atmosphere. The interfacial tension was found to be strongly dependent on the NaF/AlF3 ratio. At the cryolite composition the interfacial tension was 481 mN/m at 1304 K, while it was 650 mN/m when the NaF/AlF3 ratio was equal to 1.5. The change in interfacial tension with composition is explained by sodium enrichment of the Al/melt interface. Additions of A12O3 increased the interfacial tension for a given NaF/AlF3 ratio. KF was found to be surface active, while CaF2, LiF, and NaCl slightly increased the interfacial tension by decreasing the sodium activity.

  10. Interfacial Activity of Gold Nanoparticles Coated with a Polymeric Patchy Shell and the Role of Spreading Agents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Gold patchy nanoparticles (PPs) were prepared under surfactant-free conditions by functionalization with a binary ligand mixture of polystyrene and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands, respectively. The interfacial activity of PPs was compared to that of homogeneous hydrophilic nanoparticles (HPs), fully functionalized with PEG, by means of pendant drop tensiometry at water/air and water/decane interfaces. We compared interfacial activities in three different spreading agents: water, water/chloroform, and pure chloroform. We found that the interfacial activity of PPs was close to zero (∼2 mN/m) when the spreading agent was water and increased to ∼14 mN/m when the spreading agent was water/chloroform. When the nanoparticles were deposited with pure chloroform, the interfacial activity reached up to 60 mN/m by compression. In all cases, PPs exhibited higher interfacial activity than HPs, which were not interfacially active, regardless of the spreading agent. The interfacial activity at the water/decane interface was found to be significantly lower than that at the water/air interface because PPs aggregate in decane. Interfacial dilatational rheology showed that PPs form a stronger elastic shell at the pendant drop interface, compared to HPs. The significantly high interfacial activity obtained with PPs in this study highlights the importance of the polymeric patchy shell and the spreading agent.

  11. Interfacial Activity of Gold Nanoparticles Coated with a Polymeric Patchy Shell and the Role of Spreading Agents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Gold patchy nanoparticles (PPs) were prepared under surfactant-free conditions by functionalization with a binary ligand mixture of polystyrene and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands, respectively. The interfacial activity of PPs was compared to that of homogeneous hydrophilic nanoparticles (HPs), fully functionalized with PEG, by means of pendant drop tensiometry at water/air and water/decane interfaces. We compared interfacial activities in three different spreading agents: water, water/chloroform, and pure chloroform. We found that the interfacial activity of PPs was close to zero (∼2 mN/m) when the spreading agent was water and increased to ∼14 mN/m when the spreading agent was water/chloroform. When the nanoparticles were deposited with pure chloroform, the interfacial activity reached up to 60 mN/m by compression. In all cases, PPs exhibited higher interfacial activity than HPs, which were not interfacially active, regardless of the spreading agent. The interfacial activity at the water/decane interface was found to be significantly lower than that at the water/air interface because PPs aggregate in decane. Interfacial dilatational rheology showed that PPs form a stronger elastic shell at the pendant drop interface, compared to HPs. The significantly high interfacial activity obtained with PPs in this study highlights the importance of the polymeric patchy shell and the spreading agent. PMID:27656691

  12. Interfacial stress transfer and property mismatch in discontinuous nanofiber/nanotube composite materials.

    PubMed

    Xu, L Roy; Sengupta, Sreeparna

    2005-04-01

    Novel nanotubes/nanofibers with high strength and stiffness did not lead to high failure strengths/strains of nanocomposite materials. Therefore, the interfacial stress transfer and possible stress singularities, arising at the interfacial ends of discontinuous nanofibers embedded in a matrix, subjected to tensile and shear loading, were investigated by finite element analysis. The effects of Young's moduli and volume fractions on interfacial stress distributions were studied. Round-ended nanofibers were proposed to remove the interfacial singular stresses, which were caused by high stiffness mismatch of the nanoscale reinforcement and the matrix. However, the normal stress induced in the nanofiber through interfacial stress transfer was still less than 2 times that in the matrix. This stress value is far below the high strength of the nanofiber. Therefore, the load transfer efficiency of discontinuous nanofibers or nanotube composites is very low. Hence, nanofibers or nanotubes in continuous forms, which also preclude the formation of singular interfacial stress zones, are recommended over discontinuous nanofibers to achieve high strengths in nanocomposite materials. PMID:16004129

  13. Polymer nanofilms with enhanced microporosity by interfacial polymerization.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Solomon, Maria F; Song, Qilei; Jelfs, Kim E; Munoz-Ibanez, Marta; Livingston, Andrew G

    2016-07-01

    Highly permeable and selective membranes are desirable for energy-efficient gas and liquid separations. Microporous organic polymers have attracted significant attention in this respect owing to their high porosity, permeability and molecular selectivity. However, it remains challenging to fabricate selective polymer membranes with controlled microporosity that are stable in solvents. Here we report a new approach to designing crosslinked, rigid polymer nanofilms with enhanced microporosity by manipulating the molecular structure. Ultrathin polyarylate nanofilms with thickness down to 20 nm are formed in situ by interfacial polymerization. Enhanced microporosity and higher interconnectivity of intermolecular network voids, as rationalized by molecular simulations, are achieved by using contorted monomers for the interfacial polymerization. Composite membranes comprising polyarylate nanofilms with enhanced microporosity fabricated in situ on crosslinked polyimide ultrafiltration membranes show outstanding separation performance in organic solvents, with up to two orders of magnitude higher solvent permeance than membranes fabricated with nanofilms made from non-contorted planar monomers.

  14. Effect of Aggregation and Interfacial Thermal Resistance on Thermal Conductivity of Nanocomposites and Colloidal Nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    William Evans; Ravi Prasher; Jacob Fish; Paul Meakin; Patrick Phelan; Pawel Keblinski

    2008-03-01

    We analyzed the role of aggregation and interfacial thermal resistance on the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids and nanocomposites. We found that the thermal conductivity of nanofluids and nanocomposites can be significantly enhanced by the aggregation of nanoparticles into clusters. The value of the thermal conductivity enhancement is determined by the cluster morphology, filler conductivity and interfacial thermal resistance. We also compared thermal conductivity enhancement due to aggregation with that associated with high-aspect ratio fillers, including fibers and plates.

  15. Covalent bonding modulated graphene-metal interfacial thermal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Xueqiang; Vishwanath, Suresh; Mu, Xin; Kanzyuba, Vasily; Sokolov, Denis A.; Ptasinska, Sylwia; Go, David B.; Xing, Huili Grace; Luo, Tengfei

    2016-05-01

    We report the covalent bonding enabled modulation of the interfacial thermal conductance between graphene and metals Cu, Al, and Pt by controlling the oxidation of graphene. By combining comprehensive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis and time-domain thermoreflectance measurements, we quantify the effect of graphene oxidation on interfacial thermal conductance. It was found that thermal conductance increases with the degree of graphene oxidation until a peak value is obtained at an oxygen/carbon atom percentage of ~7.7%. The maximum enhancement in thermal conductance was measured to be 55%, 38%, and 49% for interfaces between oxidized graphene and Cu, Al, and Pt, respectively. In situ XPS measurements show that oxygen covalently binds to Cu and graphene simultaneously, forming a highly efficient bridge to enhance the thermal transport. Our molecular dynamics simulations verify that strong interfacial covalent bonds are the key to the thermal conductance enhancement. This work provides valuable insights into the mechanism of functionalization-induced thermal conductance enhancement and design guidelines for graphene-based devices.We report the covalent bonding enabled modulation of the interfacial thermal conductance between graphene and metals Cu, Al, and Pt by controlling the oxidation of graphene. By combining comprehensive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis and time-domain thermoreflectance measurements, we quantify the effect of graphene oxidation on interfacial thermal conductance. It was found that thermal conductance increases with the degree of graphene oxidation until a peak value is obtained at an oxygen/carbon atom percentage of ~7.7%. The maximum enhancement in thermal conductance was measured to be 55%, 38%, and 49% for interfaces between oxidized graphene and Cu, Al, and Pt, respectively. In situ XPS measurements show that oxygen covalently binds to Cu and graphene simultaneously, forming a highly efficient bridge to enhance

  16. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, H.K.; Babcock, W.C.; Friensen, D.T.; Smith, K.L.; Johnson, B.M.; Wamser, C.C.

    1990-08-14

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclosed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers. 3 figs.

  17. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Babcock, Walter C.; Friensen, Dwayne T.; Smith, Kelly L.; Johnson, Bruce M.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclsoed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers.

  18. Electric Field Induced Interfacial Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusner, Robert E.; Min, Kyung Yang; Wu, Xiao-Lun; Onuki, Akira

    1996-01-01

    The study of the interface in a charge-free, nonpolar, critical and near-critical binary fluid in the presence of an externally applied electric field is presented. At sufficiently large fields, the interface between the two phases of the binary fluid should become unstable and exhibit an undulation with a predefined wavelength on the order of the capillary length. As the critical point is approached, this wavelength is reduced, potentially approaching length-scales such as the correlation length or critical nucleation radius. At this point the critical properties of the system may be affected. In zero gravity, the interface is unstable at all long wavelengths in the presence of a field applied across it. It is conjectured that this will cause the binary fluid to break up into domains small enough to be outside the instability condition. The resulting pattern formation, and the effects on the critical properties as the domains approach the correlation length are of acute interest. With direct observation, laser light scattering, and interferometry, the phenomena can be probed to gain further understanding of interfacial instabilities and the pattern formation which results, and dimensional crossover in critical systems as the critical fluctuations in a particular direction are suppressed by external forces.

  19. Interfacial adsorption in ternary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Cruz, M.O. de la; Voorhees, P.W.

    1999-11-26

    Interfaces of A-B-C ternary alloys decomposed into two and three phases are studied. The effect of the gradient energy coefficients {bar {kappa}}{sub II}, I = A, B, C, on the interface composition profiles of ternary alloys is examined. The adsorption of component C in ternary alloys is obtained numerically by finding steady-state solutions of the nonlinear Cahn-Hilliard equations and by solving the two Euler-Lagrange equations resulting from minimizing the interfacial energy, and analytically near the critical point. It is found that the solutions from both numerical methods are identical for a two-phase system. In symmetric ternary systems (equal interaction energy between each pair of components) with a minority component C, the gradient energy coefficient of C, {bar {kappa}}{sub CC}, can have a very strong influence on the degree of adsorption. In the {alpha} and {beta} two-phase regions, where {alpha} and {beta} are the phases rich in the majority components A and B, respectively, as {bar {kappa}}{sub CC} increases, the adsorption of the minority component C in the {alpha} and {beta} interfaces decreases. Near a critical point, however, the degree of adsorption of minority component C is independent of the gradient energy coefficient.

  20. Interfacial engineering for silica nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, David; Hui, Yue; Middelberg, Anton P J; Zhao, Chun-Xia

    2016-10-01

    Silica nanocapsules have attracted significant interest due to their core-shell hierarchical structure. The core domain allows the encapsulation of various functional components such as drugs, fluorescent and magnetic nanoparticles for applications in drug delivery, imaging and sensing, and the silica shell with its unique properties including biocompatibility, chemical and physical stability, and surface-chemistry tailorability provides a protection layer for the encapsulated cargo. Therefore, significant effort has been directed to synthesize silica nanocapsules with engineered properties, including size, composition and surface functionality, for various applications. This review provides a comprehensive overview of emerging methods for the manufacture of silica nanocapsules, with a special emphasis on different interfacial engineering strategies. The review starts with an introduction of various manufacturing approaches of silica nanocapsules highlighting surface engineering of the core template nanomaterials (solid nanoparticles, liquid droplets, and gas bubbles) using chemicals or biomolecules which are able to direct nucleation and growth of silica at the boundary of two-phase interfaces (solid-liquid, liquid-liquid, and gas-liquid). Next, surface functionalization of silica nanocapsules is presented. Furthermore, strategies and challenges of encapsulating active molecules (pre-loading and post-loading approaches) in these capsular systems are critically discussed. Finally, applications of silica nanocapsules in controlled release, imaging, and theranostics are reviewed. PMID:27522646

  1. Modeling interfacial fracture in Sierra.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Arthur A.; Ohashi, Yuki; Lu, Wei-Yang; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Foulk, James W.,; Reedy, Earl David,; Austin, Kevin N.; Margolis, Stephen B.

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes computational efforts to model interfacial fracture using cohesive zone models in the SIERRA/SolidMechanics (SIERRA/SM) finite element code. Cohesive surface elements were used to model crack initiation and propagation along predefined paths. Mesh convergence was observed with SIERRA/SM for numerous geometries. As the funding for this project came from the Advanced Simulation and Computing Verification and Validation (ASC V&V) focus area, considerable effort was spent performing verification and validation. Code verification was performed to compare code predictions to analytical solutions for simple three-element simulations as well as a higher-fidelity simulation of a double-cantilever beam. Parameter identification was conducted with Dakota using experimental results on asymmetric double-cantilever beam (ADCB) and end-notched-flexure (ENF) experiments conducted under Campaign-6 funding. Discretization convergence studies were also performed with respect to mesh size and time step and an optimization study was completed for mode II delamination using the ENF geometry. Throughout this verification process, numerous SIERRA/SM bugs were found and reported, all of which have been fixed, leading to over a 10-fold increase in convergence rates. Finally, mixed-mode flexure experiments were performed for validation. One of the unexplained issues encountered was material property variability for ostensibly the same composite material. Since the variability is not fully understood, it is difficult to accurately assess uncertainty when performing predictions.

  2. Interfacial area transport in bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; Revankar, S.T.

    1997-12-31

    In order to close the two-fluid model for two-phase flow analyses, the interfacial area concentration needs to be modeled as a constitutive relation. In this study, the focus was on the investigation of the interfacial area concentration transport phenomena, both theoretically and experimentally. The interfacial area concentration transport equation for air-water bubbly up-flow in a vertical pipe was developed, and the models for the source and sink terms were provided. The necessary parameters for the experimental studies were identified, including the local time-averaged void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble interfacial velocity, liquid velocity and turbulent intensity. Experiments were performed with air-water mixture at atmospheric pressure. Double-sensor conductivity probe and hot-film probe were employed to measure the identified parameters. With these experimental data, the preliminary model evaluation was carried out for the simplest form of the developed interfacial area transport equation, i.e., the one-dimensional transport equation.

  3. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    PubMed Central

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics. PMID:26582248

  4. Interfacial Engineering for Quantum-Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chao; Fichou, Denis; Wang, Qing

    2016-04-20

    Quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) are promising solar-energy-conversion devices, as low-cost alternatives to the prevailing photovoltaic technologies. Compared with molecular dyes, nanocrystalline quantum dot (QD) light absorbers exhibit higher molar extinction coefficients and a tunable photoresponse. However, the power-conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of QDSCs are generally below 9.5 %, far behind their molecular sensitizer counterparts (up to 13 %). These low PCEs have been attributed to a large free-energy loss during sensitizer regeneration, energy loss during the charge-carrier transport and transfer processes, and inefficient charge separation at the QD/electrolyte interfaces, and various interfacial engineering strategies for enhancing the PCE and cell stability have been reported. Herein, we review recent progress in the interfacial engineering of QDSCs and discuss future prospects for the development of highly efficient and stable QDSCs. PMID:26879244

  5. Actuation of interfacial waves in oil-water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyeong; Weheliye, Weheliye; Chinaud, Maxime; Angeli, Panagiota; James Percival Collaboration; Omar. K. Matar Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Droplet detachment from interfacial waves in two-phase flows has pulled in noteworthy exploration interest. In order to examine this phenomenon experimentally and empower quantitative estimation, it is important to spatially confine the drop formation. In the present study, a cylinder, located close to the inlet of the test section and perpendicular to the direction of the flow, is placed in a two-phase stratified oil-water pipe flow. The introduction of this cylinder actuated interfacial waves and move from stratified to dispersed flow pattern. High speed visualisation and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurement are utilized to investigate the flow pattern maps of the two-phase flow and the velocity fields in the wake of the cylinder, respectively. These results will be compared with previous experimental studies. Department of Chemical Engineering South Kensington Campus Imperial College London SW7 2AZ.

  6. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growthmore » of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.« less

  7. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    SciTech Connect

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.

  8. Sound-induced Interfacial Dynamics in a Microfluidic Two-phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Sze Yi; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2014-11-01

    Retrieving sound wave by a fluidic means is challenging due to the difficulty in visualizing the very minute sound-induced fluid motion. This work studies the interfacial response of multiphase systems towards fluctuation in the flow. We demonstrate a direct visualization of music in the form of ripples at a microfluidic aqueous-aqueous interface with an ultra-low interfacial tension. The interface shows a passive response to sound of different frequencies with sufficiently precise time resolution, enabling the recording of musical notes and even subsequent reconstruction with high fidelity. This suggests that sensing and transmitting vibrations as tiny as those induced by sound could be realized in low interfacial tension systems. The robust control of the interfacial dynamics could be adopted for droplet and complex-fiber generation.

  9. Interfacial stress transfer in a graphene nanosheet toughened hydroxyapatite composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. G.; Chen, Y.; Su, J. N.; Liu, W. W.; Zhang, T. H.; Qi, F.; Wang, Y. G.

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, graphene has emerged as potential reinforcing nanofiller in the composites for structural engineering due to its extraordinary high elastic modulus and mechanical strength. As recognized, the transfer of stress from a low modulus matrix to a high-modulus reinforcing graphene and the interfacial behavior at a graphene-matrix interface is the fundamental issue in these composites. In the case of graphene nanosheet (GNS) reinforced hydroxyapatite (HA) composite, this research presented analytical models and simulated that the number of graphene layers of GNSs has little effect on the maximum axial stress (˜0.35 GPa) and the maximum shear stress (˜0.14 GPa) at a GNS-HA interface, and the energy dissipation by GNS pull-out decreases with increasing the number of graphene layers due to weak bonding between them. Also, GNS-HA interfacial delamination and/or GNS rupture were also indentified to be the two key failure mechanisms. The computed results are expected to facilitate a better understanding of the interfacial behavior at a GNS-ceramic interface and to achieve tough ceramics reinforced with GNSs.

  10. Interfacial Materials for Organic Solar Cells: Recent Advances and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhigang; Wei, Jiajun

    2016-01-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) have shown great promise as low‐cost photovoltaic devices for solar energy conversion over the past decade. Interfacial engineering provides a powerful strategy to enhance efficiency and stability of OSCs. With the rapid advances of interface layer materials and active layer materials, power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of both single‐junction and tandem OSCs have exceeded a landmark value of 10%. This review summarizes the latest advances in interfacial layers for single‐junction and tandem OSCs. Electron or hole transporting materials, including metal oxides, polymers/small‐molecules, metals and metal salts/complexes, carbon‐based materials, organic‐inorganic hybrids/composites, and other emerging materials, are systemically presented as cathode and anode interface layers for high performance OSCs. Meanwhile, incorporating these electron‐transporting and hole‐transporting layer materials as building blocks, a variety of interconnecting layers for conventional or inverted tandem OSCs are comprehensively discussed, along with their functions to bridge the difference between adjacent subcells. By analyzing the structure–property relationships of various interfacial materials, the important design rules for such materials towards high efficiency and stable OSCs are highlighted. Finally, we present a brief summary as well as some perspectives to help researchers understand the current challenges and opportunities in this emerging area of research. PMID:27812480

  11. Interfacial Shear Strength of Oxide Scale and SS 441 Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-05-01

    Recent developments on decreasing the operating temperature for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) have enabled the use of high temperature ferritic alloys as interconnect materials. Oxide scale will inevitably grow on the ferritic interconnects in a high temperature oxidation environment of SOFCs. The growth of the oxide scale induces growth stresses in the scale layer and on the scale/substrate interface. These growth stresses combined with the thermal stresses induced upon stacking cooling by the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the oxide scale and the substrate may lead to scale delamination/buckling and eventual spallation, which may lead to serious cell performance degradation. Hence the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the substrate is crucial to the reliability and durability of the metallic interconnect in SOFC operating environments. In this paper, we applied an integrated experimental/modeling methodology to quantify the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the SS 441 metallic interconnect. The predicted interfacial strength is discussed in details.

  12. Interfacial Shear Strength of Oxide Scale and SS 441 Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenning; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth; Khaleel, Moe

    2011-05-01

    Recent developments on decreasing the operating temperature for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have enabled the use of high-temperature ferritic alloys as interconnect materials. Oxide scale will inevitably grow on the ferritic interconnects in a high-temperature oxidation environment of SOFCs. The growth of the oxide scale induces growth stresses in the scale layer and on the scale/substrate interface. These growth stresses combined with the thermal stresses induced after stacking cooling by the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the oxide scale and the substrate may lead to scale delamination/buckling and eventual spallation, which may lead to serious cell performance degradation. Hence, the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the substrate is crucial to the reliability and durability of the metallic interconnect in SOFC operating environments. In this article, we applied an integrated experimental/modeling methodology to quantify the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the SS 441 metallic interconnect. The predicted interfacial strength is discussed in detail.

  13. Exploration of Interfacial Hydration Networks of Target-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Jeszenői, Norbert; Bálint, Mónika; Horváth, István; van der Spoel, David; Hetényi, Csaba

    2016-01-25

    Interfacial hydration strongly influences interactions between biomolecules. For example, drug-target complexes are often stabilized by hydration networks formed between hydrophilic residues and water molecules at the interface. Exhaustive exploration of hydration networks is challenging for experimental as well as theoretical methods due to high mobility of participating water molecules. In the present study, we introduced a tool for determination of the complete, void-free hydration structures of molecular interfaces. The tool was applied to 31 complexes including histone proteins, a HIV-1 protease, a G-protein-signaling modulator, and peptide ligands of various lengths. The complexes contained 344 experimentally determined water positions used for validation, and excellent agreement with these was obtained. High-level cooperation between interfacial water molecules was detected by a new approach based on the decomposition of hydration networks into static and dynamic network regions (subnets). Besides providing hydration structures at the atomic level, our results uncovered hitherto hidden networking fundaments of integrity and stability of complex biomolecular interfaces filling an important gap in the toolkit of drug design and structural biochemistry. The presence of continuous, static regions of the interfacial hydration network was found necessary also for stable complexes of histone proteins participating in chromatin assembly and epigenetic regulation.

  14. Interfacial Area Estimates for a NAPL-Water System and Their Effect on Predicting Groundwater Remediation Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildenschild, D.; Bradford, S. A.

    2005-12-01

    In mass transfer relationships pertaining to immiscible contaminant clean-up, NAPL-water interfacial area is in many cases substituted by the total NAPL-blob surface area because the latter is much easier to measure with various imaging techniques. Apart from results obtained indirectly with interfacial tracer techniques, data on the NAPL-water interfacial area has been difficult to obtain. We have used high-resolution micro-tomography to image NAPL (Soltrol) and water distribution, and quantity, in a system of sintered glass beads. The interfacial areas between NAPL and water and for the total NAPL surface were calculated using various image processing techniques and the results show a significant difference between the NAPL-water and total NAPL interfacial areas. Using the total NAPL area as a proxy for the NAPL-water interfacial area results in an order of magnitude overestimation at low saturations and a factor 5 overestimation at high saturations. This has serious implications for modeled predictions pertaining to clean-up efficiency and resulting concentrations removed during a pump-and-treat clean-up scenario. We have incorporated the different interfacial area estimates in a numerical model (MISER) and simulated NAPL dissolution in a realistic porous medium to illustrate the magnitude of the potential error introduced by using the total NAPL area as a proxy for the NAPL-water interfacial area.

  15. Interfacial Layer Properties of a Polyaromatic Compound and its Role in Stabilizing Water-in-Oil Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Bi, Jiebin; Yang, Fan; Harbottle, David; Pensini, Erica; Tchoukov, Plamen; Simon, Sébastien; Sjöblom, Johan; Dabros, Tadek; Czarnecki, Jan; Liu, Qingxia; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-09-29

    Physical properties of interfacial layers formed at the xylene-water interface by the adsorption of a polyaromatic organic compound, N-(1-hexylheptyl)-N'-(5-carbonylicpentyl) perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic bisimide (in brief, C5Pe), were studied systematically. The deprotonation of the carboxylic group of C5Pe at alkaline pH made it highly interfacially active, significantly reducing the xylene-water interfacial tension. Thin liquid film experiments showed a continuous buildup of heterogeneous C5Pe interfacial layers at the xylene-water interfaces, which contributed to the formation of stable W/O emulsions. Continual accumulation and rearrangement of C5Pe aggregates at the xylene-water interface to form a thick layer was confirmed by in situ Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The rheology measurement of the interfacial layer by double-wall ring interfacial rheometry under oscillatory shear showed that the interfacial layers formed from C5Pe solutions of high concentrations were substantially more elastic and rigid. The presence of elastically dominant interfacial layers of C5Pe led to the formation of stable water-in-xylene emulsions.

  16. Interfacial and near interfacial crack growth phenomena in metal bonded alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzic, Jamie Joseph

    2002-03-01

    Metal/ceramic interfaces can be found in many engineering applications including microelectronic packaging, multi-layered films, coatings, joints, and composite materials. In order to design reliable engineering systems that contain metal/ceramic interfaces, a comprehensive understanding of interfacial and near interfacial failure mechanisms is necessary.

  17. Interfacial area and interfacial transfer in two-phase systems. DOE final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Mamoru; Hibiki, T.; Revankar, S.T.; Kim, S.; Le Corre, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    In the two-fluid model, the field equations are expressed by the six conservation equations consisting of mass, momentum and energy equations for each phase. The existence of the interfacial transfer terms is one of the most important characteristics of the two-fluid model formulation. The interfacial transfer terms are strongly related to the interfacial area concentration and to the local transfer mechanisms such as the degree of turbulence near interfaces. This study focuses on the development of a closure relation for the interfacial area concentration. A brief summary of several problems of the current closure relation for the interfacial area concentration and a new concept to overcome the problem are given.

  18. Quantum interference in an interfacial superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Srijit; Mulazimoglu, Emre; Monteiro, Ana M. R. V. L.; Wölbing, Roman; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold; Blanter, Ya. M.; Vandersypen, Lieven M. K.; Caviglia, Andrea D.

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional superconductor that forms at the interface between the complex oxides lanthanum aluminate (LAO) and strontium titanate (STO) has several intriguing properties that set it apart from conventional superconductors. Most notably, an electric field can be used to tune its critical temperature (Tc; ref. 7), revealing a dome-shaped phase diagram reminiscent of high-Tc superconductors. So far, experiments with oxide interfaces have measured quantities that probe only the magnitude of the superconducting order parameter and are not sensitive to its phase. Here, we perform phase-sensitive measurements by realizing the first superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) at the LAO/STO interface. Furthermore, we develop a new paradigm for the creation of superconducting circuit elements, where local gates enable the in situ creation and control of Josephson junctions. These gate-defined SQUIDs are unique in that the entire device is made from a single superconductor with purely electrostatic interfaces between the superconducting reservoir and the weak link. We complement our experiments with numerical simulations and show that the low superfluid density of this interfacial superconductor results in a large, gate-controllable kinetic inductance of the SQUID. Our observation of robust quantum interference opens up a new pathway to understanding the nature of superconductivity at oxide interfaces.

  19. Nanotube attachment for prevention of interfacial delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M.; Karumuri, Anil K.

    2010-09-01

    A new approach to suppressing interfacial delamination in composites has been investigated. It involves growing strongly attached nanotubes on the surface of the core phase prior to matrix infiltration. Unusually durable interfaces between epoxy and graphite have been demonstrated using this technique. Two types of graphitic core materials have been studied: complex cellular foams having open-interconnected porosity and highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) providing a model flat interface. When untreated foam is infiltrated with epoxy, the resulting composite is brittle, and shatters before 10% compression. However, when carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are grown on the foam prior to epoxy infiltration, the specimen becomes pliable, and visibly flattens out rather than fracturing. Model studies on a flat graphite-epoxy interface were performed by joining two HOPG specimens with a thin layer of epoxy, and testing the flexural response of the 'seam' using the three-point bend test. The untreated HOPG sandwich fails easily, whereas nanotube-attached HOPG sandwich shows an over three times increase in flexural load-carrying capacity, close to that of seamless monolithic graphite having identical dimensions. Microscopic evaluations of fractured interfaces indicate that, in all geometries, CNT grafting prevents delamination at the graphite-epoxy interface, and forces any crack(s) to propagate through the graphitic phase. This added inter-laminar strength and toughness can be related to the hierarchical morphology of the interface created by CNT attachment, and unprecedented composite structures can be envisioned.

  20. Modelling interfacial cracking with non-matching cohesive interface elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Vinh Phu; Nguyen, Chi Thanh; Bordas, Stéphane; Heidarpour, Amin

    2016-07-01

    Interfacial cracking occurs in many engineering problems such as delamination in composite laminates, matrix/interface debonding in fibre reinforced composites etc. Computational modelling of these interfacial cracks usually employs compatible or matching cohesive interface elements. In this paper, incompatible or non-matching cohesive interface elements are proposed for interfacial fracture mechanics problems. They allow non-matching finite element discretisations of the opposite crack faces thus lifting the constraint on the compatible discretisation of the domains sharing the interface. The formulation is based on a discontinuous Galerkin method and works with both initially elastic and rigid cohesive laws. The proposed formulation has the following advantages compared to classical interface elements: (i) non-matching discretisations of the domains and (ii) no high dummy stiffness. Two and three dimensional quasi-static fracture simulations are conducted to demonstrate the method. Our method not only simplifies the meshing process but also it requires less computational demands, compared with standard interface elements, for problems that involve materials/solids having a large mismatch in stiffnesses.

  1. Covalent bonding modulated graphene-metal interfacial thermal transport.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Xueqiang; Vishwanath, Suresh; Mu, Xin; Kanzyuba, Vasily; Sokolov, Denis A; Ptasinska, Sylwia; Go, David B; Xing, Huili Grace; Luo, Tengfei

    2016-06-01

    We report the covalent bonding enabled modulation of the interfacial thermal conductance between graphene and metals Cu, Al, and Pt by controlling the oxidation of graphene. By combining comprehensive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis and time-domain thermoreflectance measurements, we quantify the effect of graphene oxidation on interfacial thermal conductance. It was found that thermal conductance increases with the degree of graphene oxidation until a peak value is obtained at an oxygen/carbon atom percentage of ∼7.7%. The maximum enhancement in thermal conductance was measured to be 55%, 38%, and 49% for interfaces between oxidized graphene and Cu, Al, and Pt, respectively. In situ XPS measurements show that oxygen covalently binds to Cu and graphene simultaneously, forming a highly efficient bridge to enhance the thermal transport. Our molecular dynamics simulations verify that strong interfacial covalent bonds are the key to the thermal conductance enhancement. This work provides valuable insights into the mechanism of functionalization-induced thermal conductance enhancement and design guidelines for graphene-based devices.

  2. Modelling interfacial cracking with non-matching cohesive interface elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Vinh Phu; Nguyen, Chi Thanh; Bordas, Stéphane; Heidarpour, Amin

    2016-11-01

    Interfacial cracking occurs in many engineering problems such as delamination in composite laminates, matrix/interface debonding in fibre reinforced composites etc. Computational modelling of these interfacial cracks usually employs compatible or matching cohesive interface elements. In this paper, incompatible or non-matching cohesive interface elements are proposed for interfacial fracture mechanics problems. They allow non-matching finite element discretisations of the opposite crack faces thus lifting the constraint on the compatible discretisation of the domains sharing the interface. The formulation is based on a discontinuous Galerkin method and works with both initially elastic and rigid cohesive laws. The proposed formulation has the following advantages compared to classical interface elements: (i) non-matching discretisations of the domains and (ii) no high dummy stiffness. Two and three dimensional quasi-static fracture simulations are conducted to demonstrate the method. Our method not only simplifies the meshing process but also it requires less computational demands, compared with standard interface elements, for problems that involve materials/solids having a large mismatch in stiffnesses.

  3. Mimicking mussel adhesion to improve interfacial properties in composites.

    PubMed

    Hamming, L M; Fan, X W; Messersmith, P B; Brinson, L C

    2008-07-01

    The macroscale properties of polymer-matrix composites depend immensely on the quality of the interaction between the reinforcement phase and the bulk polymer. This work presents a method to improve the interfacial adhesion between metal-oxides and a polymer matrix by performing surface-initiated polymerization (SIP) by way of a biomimetic initiator. The initiator was modeled after 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (dopa), an amino acid that is highly concentrated in mussel foot adhesive proteins. Mechanical pull out tests of NiTi and Ti-6Al-4V wires from poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were performed to directly test the interfacial adhesion. These tests demonstrated improvements in maximum interfacial shear stress of 116% for SIP-modified NiTi wires and 60% for SIP-modified Ti-6Al-4V wires over unmodified specimens. Polymer chain growth from the metal oxides was validated using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), ellipsometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and contact angle analysis. PMID:19578545

  4. Relaxations and Interfacial Water Ordering at the Corundum (110) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2010-09-17

    In situ high resolution specular X-ray reflectivity measurements were used to examine relaxations and interfacial water ordering occurring at the corundum (110)-water interface. Sample preparation affected the resulting surface structure. Annealing in air at 1373 K produced a reconstructed surface formed through an apparently ordered aluminum vacancy. The effect of the reconstruction on in-plane periodicity was not determined. The remaining aluminum sites on the surface maintain full coordination by oxygen and the surface was coated with a layer of physically adsorbed water. Ordering of water further from the surface was not observed. Acid etching of this surface and preparing a surface through annealing at 723 K both produced an unreconstructed surface with identical relaxations and water ordering. Relaxations were confined primarily to the top {approx}4 {angstrom} of the surface and were dominated by an increased distribution width of the fully occupied surface aluminum site and outward relaxation of the oxygen surface functional groups. A layer of adsorbed water fully coated the surface and occurred in two distinct sites. Water above this showed signs of layering and indicated that water ordering extended 7-10 {angstrom} from the surface. Relaxations and the arrangement of interfacial water were nearly identical on both the unreconstructed corundum and isostructural hematite (110) surfaces. Comparison to corundum and hematite (012) suggests that the arrangement of interfacial water is primarily controlled by mineral surface structure.

  5. Measurement and Estimation of Organic-Liquid/Water Interfacial Areas for Several Natural Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Brusseau, M.L.; Narter, M.; Schnaar, G.; Marble, J.

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to quantitatively characterize the impact of porous-medium texture on interfacial area between immiscible organic liquid and water residing within natural porous media. Synchrotron X-ray microtomography was used to obtain high-resolution, three-dimensional images of solid and liquid phases in packed columns. The image data were processed to generate quantitative measurements of organic-liquid/water interfacial area and of organic-liquid blob sizes. Ten porous media, comprising a range of median grain sizes, grain-size distributions, and geochemical properties, were used to evaluate the impact of porous-medium texture on interfacial area. The results show that fluid-normalized specific interfacial area (A{sub f}) and maximum specific interfacial area (A{sub m}) correlate very well to inverse median grain diameter. These functionalities were shown to result from a linear relationship between effective organic-liquid blob diameter and median grain diameter. These results provide the basis for a simple method for estimating specific organic-liquid/water interfacial area as a function of fluid saturation for a given porous medium. The availability of a method for which the only parameter needed is the simple-to-measure median grain diameter should be of great utility for a variety of applications.

  6. Ordered mesoporous silica prepared by quiescent interfacial growth method - effects of reaction chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Acidic interfacial growth can provide a number of industrially important mesoporous silica morphologies including fibers, spheres, and other rich shapes. Studying the reaction chemistry under quiescent (no mixing) conditions is important for understanding and for the production of the desired shapes. The focus of this work is to understand the effect of a number of previously untested conditions: acid type (HCl, HNO3, and H2SO4), acid content, silica precursor type (TBOS and TEOS), and surfactant type (CTAB, Tween 20, and Tween 80) on the shape and structure of products formed under quiescent two-phase interfacial configuration. Results show that the quiescent growth is typically slow due to the absence of mixing. The whole process of product formation and pore structuring becomes limited by the slow interfacial diffusion of silica source. TBOS-CTAB-HCl was the typical combination to produce fibers with high order in the interfacial region. The use of other acids (HNO3 and H2SO4), a less hydrophobic silica source (TEOS), and/or a neutral surfactant (Tweens) facilitate diffusion and homogenous supply of silica source into the bulk phase and give spheres and gyroids with low mesoporous order. The results suggest two distinct regions for silica growth (interfacial region and bulk region) in which the rate of solvent evaporation and local concentration affect the speed and dimension of growth. A combined mechanism for the interfacial bulk growth of mesoporous silica under quiescent conditions is proposed. PMID:24237719

  7. Evaluation of the interfacial mechanical properties in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ferber, M.K.; Wereszczak, A.A.; Riester, L.; Lowden, R.A.; Chawla, K.K.

    1993-06-01

    The present study examined the application of a micro-indentation technique to the measurement of interfacial properties in fiber reinforced ceramic composites. Specific fiber/matrix systems included SiC/glass, SiC/macro-defect-free (MDF) cement, SiC/SiC, and mullite/glass. The effect of fiber coatings upon the interfacial properties was also investigated. These properties, which included the debond strength, interfacial shear stress, and residual axial fiber stress, were evaluated by measuring the force-displacement curves generated during load-unload cycles. Estimates of these three stress values were obtained by matching the experimental force-displacement curves with data predicted from an existing model. In general the SiC/glass composites exhibited the lowest values of the interfacial shear and debond stresses. The sliding characteristics of the SiC/MDF cement and SiC/SiC composites were strongly influenced by the residual axial stress and the nature of the fiber coating. In the case of the mullite/glass composite, the high values of the interfacial shear and debond stresses reduced the measurement sensitivity, thereby increasing the uncertainty in the estimates of the interfacial properties. 17 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab.

  8. Polyfluorene Electrolytes Interfacial Layer for Efficient Polymer Solar Cells: Controllably Interfacial Dipoles by Regulation of Polar Groups.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimin; Hu, Lin; Wu, Feiyan; Chen, Lie; Chen, Yiwang

    2016-04-20

    The polar groups in the conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) can create the favorable dipoles at the electrode/active layer interface, which is critical for the CPEs to minimize the interfacial energy barrier in polymer solar cells (PSCs). Herein, a series of CPEs based on poly [(9,9-bis(3'-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-co-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] derivates (PFNs) (PFN30, PFN50, PFN70, and PFN100) with different mole ratio of polar groups (-N(C2H5)2) were designed and synthesized to investigate the effect of the numbers of polar groups on the interfacial dipoles. Controllably interfacial dipoles could be readily achieved by only tuning the numbers of -N(C2H5)2 in PFNs, as revealed by the work function of the PFNs modified ITO gradually reduced as the loadings of the -N(C2H5)2 increased. In addition, increasing the numbers of -N(C2H5)2 in PFNs were also favorable for developing the smooth and homogeneous morphology of the active layer. As a result, the content of the polar amine in the PFNs exerted great influence on the performance of polymer solar cells. Increasing the numbers of the pendent -N(C2H5)2 could effectively improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the devices. Among these PFNs, PFN100 with the highest content of -N(C2H5)2 polar groups delivered the device with the best PCE of 3.27%. It indicates tailoring the content of the polar groups in the CPEs interlayer is a facial and promising approach for interfacial engineering to developing high performance PSCs.

  9. Effects of sintering temperature on interfacial structure and interfacial resistance for all-solid-state rechargeable lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takehisa; Yoshida, Ryuji; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Hirayama, Tsukasa; Motoyama, Munekazu; West, William C.; Iriyama, Yasutoshi

    2016-09-01

    Sintering processes yield a mutual diffusion region at the electrode/solid electrolyte interface, which is considered as a crucial problem for developing large-sized all-solid-state rechargeable lithium batteries with high power density. This work focuses on the interface between LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NMC) and NASICON-structured Li+ conductive glass ceramics solid electrolyte (Li2Osbnd Al2O3sbnd SiO2sbnd P2O5sbnd TiO2sbnd GeO2: LATP sheet (AG-01)), and investigates the effects of sintering temperature on interfacial structure and interfacial resistance at the NMC/LATP sheet. Thin films of NMC were fabricated on the LATP sheets at 700 °C or 900 °C as a model system. We found that the thickness of the mutual diffusion region was almost the same, ca. 30 nm, in these two samples, but the NMC film prepared at 900 °C had three orders of magnitude larger interfacial resistance than the NMC film prepared at 700 °C. Around the interface between the NMC film prepared at 900 °C and the LATP sheet, Co in the NMC accumulates as a reduced valence and lithium-free impurity crystalline phase will be also formed. These two problems must contribute to drastic increasing of interfacial resistance. Formation of de-lithiated NMC around the interface and its thermal instability at higher temperature may be considerable reason to induce these problems.

  10. Microfluidic ultralow interfacial tensiometry with magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Scott S H; Wexler, Jason S; Wan, Jiandi; Stone, Howard A

    2013-01-01

    We describe a technique that measures ultralow interfacial tensions using paramagnetic spheres in a co-flow microfluidic device designed with a magnetic section. Our method involves tuning the distance between the co-flowing interface and the magnet's center, and observing the behavior of the spheres as they approach the liquid-liquid interface-the particles either pass through or are trapped by the interface. Using threshold values of the magnet-to-interface distance, we make estimates of the two-fluid interfacial tension. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique for measuring very low interfacial tensions, O(10(-6)-10(-5)) N m(-1), by testing solutions of different surfactant concentrations, and we show that our results are comparable with measurements made using a spinning drop tensiometer. PMID:23154819

  11. A swarm of Stokeslets with interfacial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, Ludwig C.; Schaflinger, Uwe

    2001-06-01

    A formal analogy between sedimenting drops in Stokes flow and a swarm of Stokeslets [Machu et al., J. Fluid Mech. (in press)] is extended to include interfacial tension. Using a cohesive potential, mean curvature is extended as a meaningful quantity off the interface, allowing the boundary-integral formulation to be rewritten in volumetric form. A prescription for assigning forces to the Stokeslets comprising the swarm incorporates the action of interfacial tension without having to identify a boundary surface. Numerical simulations agree with linear small-deformation theory, and reproduce the spontaneous coalescense of two touching drops.

  12. Monitoring of interfacial tensions by drop counting

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, W.K.; Boring, C.P.; McLaughlin, J.F.; Harless, D.P.

    1988-11-01

    A capillary tube device was shown to provide a rapid means of measuring the interfacial tension between water and Freon-113. The measurement technique is based on counting the number of drops that form when a fixed volume of water passes through the capillary tube into the bulk Freon. The interfacial tension is predicted to be proportional to the number of drops to the negative 2/3 power. Calibration curves were obtained for Freon-water samples containing known concentrations of a surfactant. A standard Gibbs adsorption curve was obtained. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Fiber reinforced solids possessing great fracture toughness: The role of interfacial strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, A. G.

    1974-01-01

    The high tensile strength characteristic of strong interfacial filament/matrix bonding can be combined with the high fracture toughness of weak interfacial bonding, when the filaments are arranged to have alternate sections of high and low shear stress (and low and high toughness). Such weak and strong areas can be achieved by appropriate intermittent coating of the fibers. An analysis is presented for toughness and strength which demonstrates, in broad terms, the effects of varying the coating parameters of concern. Results show that the toughness of interfaces is an important parameter, differences in which may not be shown up in terms of interfacial strength. Some observations are made upon methods of measuring the components of toughness in composites.

  14. The effect of filler-polymer interfacial adhesion on the rheological behavior of filled polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucker, Derek Peck

    1997-11-01

    Current applications for filled polymers require small particle, high surface area fillers as well as extremely specific flow behavior. It has long been suspected that filler-polymer interfacial adhesion affects the rheological properties of filled polymers. Only recently, however, have filler surface areas become so large and fine control of rheological behavior become so important that these effects must be considered. Several predictions exist for the effect of interfacial adhesion on filled polymer rheological behavior. When there is strong interfacial adhesion, the filler particles may act as cross-link sites, or may increase their effective size by trapping polymer on their surface. Either effect would result in an increase in the solid-like character of the material with increasing adhesion. If the interfacial adhesion is weaker, the material may behave much like a traditional colloid, with an increase in the liquid-like behavior with increasing particle stability, or in this case, increasing interfacial adhesion. The goal of this research was to use a model system of surface treated silica in polyethylene and poly (methyl methacrylate) to investigate the effect of interfacial adhesion on oscillatory rheological behavior. Frequency sweep experiments were primarily used in this work to prevent the breakdown of interfacial adhesion induced structure. The two polymers were chosen for their non-polar and polar surface characteristics, respectively, yielding a wide range of adhesion behavior with surface modified silica. The relative storage modulus behavior for the different systems was compared, and a normalized plot was developed as a function of work of adhesion. The relative storage modulus of these systems was shown to decrease with increasing work of adhesion for all filler volume fractions and over all frequencies. This suggests that the traditional colloidal model for interfacial adhesion effects is appropriate for the adhesion range studied in this work

  15. Interfacial Behavior of Polymer Coated Nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Luqing; Shamsijazeyi, Hadi; Mann, Jason; Verduzco, Rafael; Hirasaki, George; Rice University Team

    2015-03-01

    Oxidized carbon black (OCB) nanoparticle is functionalized with different coatings, i.e. alkyl group, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and partially sulfonated polyvinyl alcohol (sPVA). In oil and water systems, the functionalized nanoparticle is found to have a versatile dispersion i.e. in lower aqueous phase, in upper oil phase, or in middle phase microemulsion. Oil substitute n-octane and commercial oil IOSPAR have been test as oil phase; series of commercially available surfactant, C12-4,5 orthoxylene sulfonate(OXS), i-C13-(PO)7 -SO4Na (S13B), surfactant blend of anionic Alfoterra with nonionic Tergitol have been test as additive to help with the OCB dispersion. It is found that the OCB with sulfonated polyvinyl alcohol attachment (sPVA-OCB) stays in microemulsion; with the increase of salinity, it follows the microemulsion to go from lower phase, to middle phase, and to upper phase. The dispersion of sPVA and alkyl functionalized OCB (Cn-OCB-sPVA) is the balance of the length of alkyl and sPVA and the degree of sulfonation of PVA, depending on which, it can either disperse into microemulsion or form a separate layer. The sPVA-OCB also indicates a tolerance of high salinity; this is shown by the stable dispersion of it in blend surfactant solution of anionic Alfoterra and nonionic Tergitol at high salinity API brine(8% NaCl and 2% CaCl2). The study of different functionality on OCB dispersion can help design appropriate modified nanoparticle as additive for enhanced oil recovery either to reduce the interfacial tension between oil and water, or to stabilize microemulsion.

  16. INTERFACIAL AREA TRANSPORT AND REGIME TRANSITION IN COMBINATORIAL CHANNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Seugjin Kim

    2011-01-28

    . This study investigates the geometric effects of 90-degree vertical elbows and flow configurations in two-phase flow. The study shows that the elbows make a significant effect on the transport characteristics of two-phase flow, which includes the changes in interfacial structures, bubble interaction mechanisms and flow regime transition. The effect of the elbows is characterized for global and local two-phase flow parameters. The global two-phase flow parameters include two-phase pressure, interfacial structures and flow regime transition. In order to characterize the frictional pressure drop and minor loss across the vertical elbows, pressure measurements are obtained across the test section over a wide range of flow conditions in both single-phase and two-phase flow conditions. A two-phase pressure drop correlation analogous to Lockhart-Martinelli correlation is proposed to predict the minor loss across the elbows. A high speed camera is employed to perform extensive flow visualization studies across the elbows in vertical upward, horizontal and vertical downward sections and modified flow regime maps are proposed. It is found that modified flow regime maps immediately downstream of the vertical upward elbow deviate significantly from the conventional flow regime map. A qualitative assessment of the counter-current flow limitation characteristics specific to the current experimental facility is performed. A multi-sensor conductivity probe is used to measure local two-phase flow parameters such as: void fraction, bubble velocity, interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency. The local measurements are obtained for six different flow conditions at ten measurement locations along axial direction of the test section. Both the vertical-upward and vertical-downward elbows have a significant impact on bubble distribution, resulting in, a bimodal distribution along the horizontal radius of the tube cross-section and migration of bubbles towards the inside of the

  17. The interfacial chemistry of organic materials on commercial glass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Joy

    The hydrolytic stability of glass is dependent on its composition. Glasses are exposed to water during their processing and in many applications; therefore, their surface or interface with other materials must withstand hydrolytic attack. Multi-component silicate glasses are widely used but have been the least studied. In coatings-based applications, these glasses come in contact with organosilanes and organic molecules where the adsorption may be affected by surface water. For example, the influence of glass composition on the wet strength of a glass/polymer composite material is unclear, but it is presumed to be driven by the hydrolytic stability of the interfacial chemistry. Organosilanes are critical for increasing the performance of composite materials in humid environments but the precise manner by which the improvement occurs has not been verified. The current school of thought is that the application of silane coatings on a multi-component glass surface transforms the chemically heterogeneous surface into a homogenous and hydrolytically stable surface. In this study, multi-component silicate glass surfaces were silanized by both aqueous and non-aqueous methods. The effect of glass composition and surface hydration on silane coverage was quantified by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The monolayer-level adsorption results showed that the low-sodium content glasses had greater coverage than a high-sodium content glass in dry conditions in contrast to an equivalent coverage in wet conditions. The hydrolytically-stable coverage on multi-component silicate glass surfaces by both silanization methods was found to be sub-monolayer. A thin film model in conjunction with XPS and Infrared Spectroscopy was used to probe the interfacial region of a fiberglass insulation material containing a sodium-rich multi-component silicate glass and an acrylate resin binder. Upon the application of the aqueous binder, the leaching of sodium from the glass promoted

  18. The Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment - Interfacial Flow Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundan, Akshay; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Plawsky, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal heat transfer coefficient of the CVB correlated to the presence of the interfacial flow region. Competition between capillary and Marangoni flow caused Flooding and not a Dry-out region. Interfacial flow region growth is arrested at higher power inputs. 1D heat model confirms the presence of interfacial flow region. 1D heat model confirms the arresting phenomena of interfacial flow region Visual observations are essential to understanding.

  19. Detrimental effect of interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction on perpendicular spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Peong-Hwa; Lee, Seo-Won E-mail: kj-lee@korea.ac.kr; Song, Kyungmi; Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Kyung-Jin E-mail: kj-lee@korea.ac.kr

    2015-11-16

    Interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction in ferromagnet/heavy metal bilayers is recently of considerable interest as it offers an efficient control of domain walls and the stabilization of magnetic skyrmions. However, its effect on the performance of perpendicular spin transfer torque memory has not been explored yet. We show based on numerical studies that the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction decreases the thermal energy barrier while increases the switching current. As high thermal energy barrier as well as low switching current is required for the commercialization of spin torque memory, our results suggest that the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction should be minimized for spin torque memory applications.

  20. Determination of interfacial properties using a PC-SAFT based classical density functional theory for fluid mixtures of industrial interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Cristancho, Diego; Srivastava, Rakesh

    In this paper, a recent development of a PC-SAFT based classical density functional theory (DFT) is applied to the determination of interfacial properties of pure fluids and mixtures of industrial interest. Initially, the DFT formalism is described and the methodology for the property calculations explained. The consistency of this approach allows the determination of interfacial properties for fluids using the PC-SAFT equation of state parameters determined from bulk physical property data, such as vapor-liquid-equilibrium and densities. This methodology is an excellent alternative for the predictions of interfacial property of fluids and extrapolation to high pressure ranges where experimental measurements becomes challenging.

  1. An excellent candidate for largely reducing interfacial thermal resistance: a nano-confined mass graded interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanguang; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Pursuing extremely low interfacial thermal resistance has long been the task of many researchers in the area of nano-scale heat transfer, in particular pertaining to improve heat dissipation performance in electronic cooling. While it is well known and documented that confining a macroscopic third layer between two dissimilar materials usually increases the overall interfacial thermal resistance, no research has realized the fundamental decrease in resistance so far. By performing nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we report that the overall interfacial thermal resistance can be reduced by 6 fold by confining mass graded materials with thickness of the order of nanometers. As comparison we also studied the thermal transport across the perfectly abrupt interface and the widely used alloyed (rough) interface, which shows an opposing and significantly large increase in the overall thermal resistance. With the help of frequency dependent interfacial thermal conductance and wave packet dynamics simulation, different mechanisms governing the heat transfer across these three types of interfaces are identified. It is found that for the rough interface there are two different regimes of interfacial heat transfer, which originates from the competition between phonon scattering and the thickness of the interface. The mechanism of dramatically improved interfacial heat transfer across the nano-confined mass graded interface resides in the minor phonon reflection when the phonons first reach the mass graded area and the rare occurrence of phonon scattering in the subsequent interior region. The phonons are found to be gradually truncated by the geometric interfaces and can travel through the mass graded layer with a high transmission coefficient, benefited from the small mass mismatch between two neighboring layers in the interfacial region. Our findings provide deep insight into the phonon transport across nano-confined mass graded layers and also offer significant

  2. Mathematical problems arising in interfacial electrohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseluiko, Dmitri

    established estimates are compared with numerical solutions of the equations which in turn suggest an optimal upper bound for the radius of the absorbing ball. A scaling argument is used to explain this, and a general conjecture is made based on extensive computations. We also carry out a complete study of the nonlinear behavior of competing physical mechanisms: long wave instability above a critical Reynolds number, short wave damping due to surface tension and intermediate growth due to the electric field. Through a combination of analysis and extensive numerical experiments, we elucidate parameter regimes that support non-uniform travelling waves, time-periodic travelling waves and complex nonlinear dynamics including chaotic interfacial oscillations. It is established that a sufficiently high electric field will drive the system to chaotic oscillations, even when the Reynolds number is smaller than the critical value below which the non-electrified problem is linearly stable. A particular case of this is Stokes flow, which is known to be stable for this class of problems (an analogous statement holds for horizontally supported films also). Our theoretical results indicate that such highly stable flows can be rendered unstable by using electric fields. This opens the way for possible heat and mass transfer applications which can benefit significantly from interfacial oscillations and interfacial turbulence. For the case of a horizontal plane, a weakly nonlinear theory is not possible due to the absence of the shear flow generated by the gravitational force along the plate when the latter is inclined. We study the fully nonlinear equation, which in this case is asymptotically correct and is obtained at the leading order. The model equation describes both overlying and hanging films - in the former case gravity is stabilizing while in the latter it is destabilizing. The numerical and theoretical analysis of the fully nonlinear evolution is complicated by the fact that the

  3. The influence of interfacial energies and gravitational levels on the directionally solidified structures in hypermonotectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. B.; Curreri, P. A.; Sandlin, A. C.

    1988-01-01

    Various Cu-Pb-Al alloys were directionally solidified under 1-g conditions and alternating high-g/low-g conditions (achieved using NSAS's KC-135 aircraft) as a means of studying the influence of interfacial energies and gravitational levels on the resulting microstructures. Directional solidification of low Al content alloys was found to result in samples with coarser more irregular microstructures than in alloys with high Al contents under all the gravity conditions considered. Structures are correlated with interfacial energies, growth rates, and gravitational levels.

  4. A new method for modeling rough membrane surface and calculation of interfacial interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Leihong; Zhang, Meijia; He, Yiming; Chen, Jianrong; Hong, Huachang; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fouling control necessitates the establishment of an effective method to assess interfacial interactions between foulants and rough surface membrane. This study proposed a new method which includes a rigorous mathematical equation for modeling membrane surface morphology, and combination of surface element integration (SEI) method and the composite Simpson's approach for assessment of interfacial interactions. The new method provides a complete solution to quantitatively calculate interfacial interactions between foulants and rough surface membrane. Application of this method in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) showed that, high calculation accuracy could be achieved by setting high segment number, and moreover, the strength of three energy components and energy barrier was remarkably impaired by the existence of roughness on the membrane surface, indicating that membrane surface morphology exerted profound effects on membrane fouling in the MBR. Good agreement between calculation prediction and fouling phenomena was found, suggesting the feasibility of this method.

  5. Forming compliance dominated memristive switching through interfacial reaction in Ti/TiO2/Au structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhensen; Fang, Liang; Xu, Nuo; Liu, Rulin

    2015-11-01

    The effects of the forming compliance current (CC) on bipolar resistive switching (BRS) characteristics in Au/Ti/TiO2/Au memristive switches were investigated. After forming with a low CC, a typical BRS with an abrupt SET and negative differential resistance RESET behaviors were observed. In comparison, the sample formed with a high CC exhibited an abnormal BRS with stepwise SET and abrupt RESET transitions. The conduction mechanisms at a high resistance state and a low resistance state were analyzed, respectively. The impact of the forming compliance on the interfacial reaction between Ti and TiO2 was discussed. The Ti-induced interfacial layer played an important role of manipulating the oxygen vacancies, thus providing the possibility of affecting the switching behavior. A physical model based on a combination of the bulk and interfacial effects was proposed to explain our observations.

  6. GaN as an interfacial passivation layer: tuning band offset and removing fermi level pinning for III-V MOS devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaofu; Cao, Ruyue; Wang, Changhong; Li, Hao-Bo; Dong, Hong; Wang, Wei-Hua; Lu, Feng; Cheng, Yahui; Xie, Xinjian; Liu, Hui; Cho, Kyeongjae; Wallace, Robert; Wang, Weichao

    2015-03-11

    The use of an interfacial passivation layer is one important strategy for achieving a high quality interface between high-k and III-V materials integrated into high-mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) devices. Here, we propose gallium nitride (GaN) as the interfacial layer between III-V materials and hafnium oxide (HfO2). Utilizing first-principles calculations, we explore the structural and electronic properties of the GaN/HfO2 interface with respect to the interfacial oxygen contents. In the O-rich condition, an O8 interface (eight oxygen atoms at the interface, corresponding to 100% oxygen concentration) displays the most stability. By reducing the interfacial O concentration from 100 to 25%, we find that the interface formation energy increases; when sublayer oxygen vacancies exist, the interface becomes even less stable compared with O8. The band offset is also observed to be highly dependent on the interfacial oxygen concentration. Further analysis of the electronic structure shows that no interface states are present at the O8 interface. These findings indicate that the O8 interface serves as a promising candidate for high quality III-V MOS devices. Moreover, interfacial states are present when such interfacial oxygen is partially removed. The interface states, leading to Fermi level pinning, originate from unsaturated interfacial Ga atoms. PMID:25639492

  7. Morphology and Rheology of Model Immiscible Blends with Interfacial Crosslinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLeo, Candice L.; Velankar, Sachin S.

    2008-07-01

    Reactive compatibilization—generating a compatibilizer by an interfacial chemical reaction between polymers in different phases—is a well-established method in the polymer blend industry. In this paper we explore immiscible polymer blends in which both reactive species are multifunctional, and thus form a crosslinked network at the interface. Experiments were conducted on blends of ˜30% polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) drops in a polyisoprene (PI) matrix. Optical microscopy of a reactively blended sample show clustering of non-spherical drops and non-smooth drop surfaces, suggesting that a crosslinked "skin" covers the interface of the drops and a crosslink network spans across multiple drops. The reactively blended sample also shows many unusual rheological features including a high viscosity and high creep recovery at low stress, overshoots in viscosity in creep experiments, and gel-like oscillatory behavior. However, at high stress, the viscosity of the reactively blended sample is comparable to the viscosity of a blend compatibilized with a diblock copolymer, suggesting that that interfacial crosslinking by multifunctional chains does not adversely affect processability.

  8. Ordered mesoporous materials based on interfacial assembly and engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yue, Qin; Deng, Yonghui; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2013-10-01

    Ordered mesoporous materials have inspired prominent research interest due to their unique properties and functionalities and potential applications in adsorption, separation, catalysis, sensors, drug delivery, energy conversion and storage, and so on. Thanks to continuous efforts over the past two decades, great achievements have been made in the synthesis and structural characterization of mesoporous materials. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in preparing ordered mesoporous materials from the viewpoint of interfacial assembly and engineering. Five interfacial assembly and synthesis are comprehensively highlighted, including liquid-solid interfacial assembly, gas-liquid interfacial assembly, liquid-liquid interfacial assembly, gas-solid interfacial synthesis, and solid-solid interfacial synthesis, basics about their synthesis pathways, princples and interface engineering strategies.

  9. In Situ STEM-EELS observation of nanoscale interfacial phenomena in all-solid-state batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Ziying; Xin, Huolin L.; Santhanagopalan, Dhamodaran; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Feng; He, Kai; Li, Juchuan; Dudney, Nancy; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-05-03

    Behaviors of functional interfaces are crucial factors in the performance and safety of energy storage and conversion devices. Indeed, solid electrode–solid electrolyte interfacial impedance is now considered the main limiting factor in all-solid-state batteries rather than low ionic conductivity of the solid electrolyte. Here, we present a new approach to conducting in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in order to uncover the unique interfacial phenomena related to lithium ion transport and its corresponding charge transfer. Our approach allowed quantitative spectroscopic characterization of a galvanostatically biased electrochemical system under in situ conditions. Usingmore » a LiCoO2/LiPON/Si thin film battery, an unexpected structurally disordered interfacial layer between LiCoO2 cathode and LiPON electrolyte was discovered to be inherent to this interface without cycling. During in situ charging, spectroscopic characterization revealed that this interfacial layer evolved to form highly oxidized Co ions species along with lithium oxide and lithium peroxide species. Here, these findings suggest that the mechanism of interfacial impedance at the LiCoO2/LiPON interface is caused by chemical changes rather than space charge effects. Insights gained from this technique will shed light on important challenges of interfaces in all-solid-state energy storage and conversion systems and facilitate improved engineering of devices operated far from equilibrium.« less

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the AgCl/Electrolyte Interfacial Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Piotr; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2010-06-03

    Molecular dynamics simulation of the AgCl(100)/KCl(aq) interfacial electrostatic capacity is presented. The simulations are motivated by the need to reduce ambiguities in electrical double layer model parametrization, which here we attempt by reducing the computed interfacial molecular structure to hypothetical planes of charge separation consistent with a treatment of the interface in terms of parallel plate capacitors. The calculated interfacial capacity (cint = 8.43 μF/cm2) is in excellent agreement with measurements for the closely related AgI/electrolyte interface, and the dependence on electrolyte concentration and temperature are qualitatively similar to experimental observations. Molecular dynamics based capacity profiles show a similar overall decay to the classical Helmholtz model, validating its use for approximating the interfacial capacity at relatively high electrolyte concentration. However, fine structure is present and the interfacial electrostatic properties oscillate with distance from the surface. Finally, the dielectric constant for first layer water is calculated to equal 5.1, which confirms that water nearest the interface is under dielectric saturation conditions.

  11. Direct observation of interfacial Au atoms on TiO₂ in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenpei; Sivaramakrishnan, Shankar; Wen, Jianguo; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2015-04-01

    Interfacial atoms, which result from interactions between the metal nanoparticles and support, have a large impact on the physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles. However, they are difficult to observe; the lack of knowledge has been a major obstacle toward unraveling their role in chemical transformations. Here we report conclusive evidence of interfacial Au atoms formed on the rutile (TiO2) (110) surfaces by activation using high-temperature (∼500 °C) annealing in air. Three-dimensional imaging was performed using depth-sectioning enabled by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Results show that the interface between Au nanocrystals and TiO2 (110) surfaces consists of a single atomic layer with Au atoms embedded inside Ti-O. The number of interfacial Au atoms is estimated from ∼1-8 in an interfacial atomic column. Direct impact of interfacial Au atoms is observed on an enhanced Au-TiO2 interaction and the reduction of surface TiO2; both are critical to Au catalysis.

  12. In Situ STEM-EELS Observation of Nanoscale Interfacial Phenomena in All-Solid-State Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziying; Santhanagopalan, Dhamodaran; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Feng; Xin, Huolin L; He, Kai; Li, Juchuan; Dudney, Nancy; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-06-01

    Behaviors of functional interfaces are crucial factors in the performance and safety of energy storage and conversion devices. Indeed, solid electrode-solid electrolyte interfacial impedance is now considered the main limiting factor in all-solid-state batteries rather than low ionic conductivity of the solid electrolyte. Here, we present a new approach to conducting in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in order to uncover the unique interfacial phenomena related to lithium ion transport and its corresponding charge transfer. Our approach allowed quantitative spectroscopic characterization of a galvanostatically biased electrochemical system under in situ conditions. Using a LiCoO2/LiPON/Si thin film battery, an unexpected structurally disordered interfacial layer between LiCoO2 cathode and LiPON electrolyte was discovered to be inherent to this interface without cycling. During in situ charging, spectroscopic characterization revealed that this interfacial layer evolved to form highly oxidized Co ions species along with lithium oxide and lithium peroxide species. These findings suggest that the mechanism of interfacial impedance at the LiCoO2/LiPON interface is caused by chemical changes rather than space charge effects. Insights gained from this technique will shed light on important challenges of interfaces in all-solid-state energy storage and conversion systems and facilitate improved engineering of devices operated far from equilibrium.

  13. The Silver-Nickel Interfacial Enthalpy Determined by Magnetic and Calorimetric Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolla, Howard Gordon

    1995-01-01

    A new method for the determination of the average interfacial enthalpy, sigma_sp{A -B}{H}, between unlike phases is presented. A differential scanning calorimeter is used to measure the heat released during precipitation of a superparamagnetic phase from a supersaturated solid solution. The volume fraction distribution of the precipitated phase is determined by maximum entropy modeling of the magnetization, measured to ultra-high fields, as a linear superposition of Langevin functions. Transmission electron microscopy is used to determine the aspect ratios of the precipitates, which is combined with the volume fraction distributions to calculate the total interfacial area in each specimen. The saturation magnetization is used to determine the total amount of the precipitated phase in each sample. The changes in enthalpy, interfacial area, and amount precipitated are used in a thermodynamic and kinetic model to calculate the interfacial enthalpy and heat of mixing. This method is applied to Ag-(5-10)at.% Ni alloys, produced in thin-film form by electron-beam co-evaporation. The average interfacial enthalpy between Ag and Ni, sigma_sp {Ag-Ni} {H}, and the heat of mixing are found to be, respectively, 0.779 +/- 0.076 J/m^2 and 3.59 +/- 0.03 kJ/mol for the average alloy composition of 6.89 at.% Ni.

  14. Finite-size effects on molecular dynamics interfacial thermal-resistance predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-08-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the role of finite size effects on the determination of interfacial thermal resistance between two solids characterized by high phonon mean free paths. In particular, we will show that a direct, heat source-sink method leads to strong size effect, associated with ballistic phonon transport to and from, and specular reflections at the simulation domain boundary. Lack of proper account for these effects can lead to incorrect predictions about the role of interfacial bonding and structure on interfacial thermal resistance. We also show that the finite size effect can be dramatically reduced by introduction of rough external boundaries leading to diffuse phonon scattering, as explicitly demonstrated by phonon wave-packet simulations. Finally, we demonstrate that when careful considerations are given to the effects associated with the finite heat capacity of the simulation domains and phonon scattering from the external surfaces, a size-independent interfacial resistance can be properly extracted from the time integral of the correlation function of heat power across the interface. Our work demonstrates that reliable and consistent values of the interfacial thermal resistance can be obtained by equilibrium and nonequilibrium methods with a relatively small computational cost.

  15. Comparative Study of Interfacial Effects in Photovoltaic Diodes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakolian, Hossein

    1988-12-01

    Several different type of photodiodes (NASA standard n-p, p-on-n single crystal silicon, GaAs homojunction, ITO/p-Si, Au/n-GaAs Schottky diode and CdS/CuInSe _2) have been examined. Measurements of current vs. voltage as a function of temperature and light intensity, plus capacitance vs. voltage and frequency were an attempt to identify the causes on non-ideal behavior. An automatic, computer controlled system greatly enhanced the precision of measurements and the ability to separate non-ideal effects. No dispersion in capacitance with frequency was observed in single crystal homojunction diodes and Au/n -GaAs Schottky barrier, indicating near zero interfacial states for these devices. High efficiency (about 12%) ITO/Si showed interfacial states densities in the range of 10^9-10^{10 } cm^{-2} -eV^{-1}. This number increased to 2.5 times 10 ^{12} for cells with low efficiency (about 5%). CdS/CuInSe_2 cells from ARCO Solar, Boeing and IEC all showed interfacial states with a wide range of time constants and zero bias densities at the Fermi level in the junction of 10^ {10} to 10^{11} states/cm^2-eV. In reverse bias, however, the density of states, decreased by an order of magnitude. Under illumination, this number increased with increasing light intensity and saturated near 100 mW/cm^2. The CdS/CuInSe_2 solar cell is modeled as a heterojunction diode with charge at the junction interface. The low open-circuit voltage and the shift to lower voltage (about 125 mV) observed in some photodiodes is explained by this model. A circuit model for the photovoltaic diodes is proposed which includes the effect of traps as parallel resistance and capacitance elements.

  16. Interfacial shear rheology of DPPC under physiologically relevant conditions.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Eline; Vermant, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Lipids, and phosphatidylcholines in particular, are major components in cell membranes and in human lung surfactant. Their ability to encapsulate or form stable layers suggests a significant role of the interfacial rheological properties. In the present work we focus on the surface rheological properties of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). Literature results are confusing and even contradictory; viscosity values have been reported differ by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, even both purely viscous and gel-like behaviours have been described. Assessing the literature critically, a limited experimental window has been explored correctly, which however does not yet include conditions relevant for the physiological state of DPPC in vivo. A complete temperature and surface pressure analysis of the interfacial shear rheology of DPPC is performed, showing that the monolayer behaves as a viscoelastic liquid with a domain structure. At low frequencies and for a thermally structured monolayer, the interaction of the molecules within the domains can be probed. The low frequency limit of the complex viscosity is measured over a wide range of temperatures and surface pressures. The effects of temperature and surface pressure on the low frequency viscosity can be analysed in terms of the effects of free molecular area. However, at higher frequencies or following a preshear at high shear rates, elasticity becomes important; most probably elasticity due to defects at the edge of the domains in the layer is probed. Preshearing refines the structure and induces more defects. As a result, disagreeing interfacial rheology results in various publications might be due to different pre-treatments of the interface. The obtained dataset and scaling laws enable us to describe the surface viscosity, and its dependence under physiological conditions of DPPC. The implications on functioning of lung surfactants and lung surfactant replacements will be discussed. PMID:24651838

  17. Salinity Influence on Interfacial Area, Wettability, and NAPL Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, L.; Valenta, M. M.

    2007-12-01

    wettability status. Water with 8%, 4%, 2%, 0% wt NaCl salinity was used to displace NAPL from the sand column sequentially. The interfacial tension (IFT) between the salinity water and the ANS oil was monitored. The residual oil saturations indicated that the fraction of NAPL retained in the column increased after water flushing as the salinity in the displacing water increased from 0 to 8%, clearly confirming the earlier findings that lower salinity may cause additional oil to be released. The NAPL-water interfacial area, anw, does not show a monotonic dependence on salinity; instead, anw shows an increasing trend with increasing salinity in the lower salinity range, and the opposite trend at high salinity values. The maximum anw was obtained in systems flushed with 2% salinity water. This trend appears to be consistent with a similar nonlinear dependence of interfacial tension on salinity, and might be an indication of wettability alternation. The observation of this research shread lights on the optimum operation in NAPL removal. The IFT change between NAPL and the salinity water might be attributed to the enhanced NAPL recovery.

  18. Recent Advances in Colloidal and Interfacial Phenomena Involving Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yiqun; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes recent advances in several areas of research involving the interfacial ordering of liquid crystals (LCs). The first advance revolves around the ordering of LCs at bio/chemically functionalized surfaces. Whereas the majority of past studies of surface-induced ordering of LCs have involved surfaces of solids that present a limited diversity of chemical functional groups (surfaces at which van der Waals forces dominate surface-induced ordering), recent studies have moved to investigate the ordering of LCs on chemically complex surfaces. For example, surfaces decorated with biomolecules (e.g. oligopeptides and proteins) and transition metal ions have been investigated, leading to an understanding of the roles that metal-ligand coordination interactions, electrical double-layers, acid-base interactions, and hydrogen bonding can have on the interfacial ordering of LCs. The opportunity to create chemically-responsive LCs capable of undergoing ordering transitions in the presence of targeted molecular events (e.g., ligand exchange around a metal center) has emerged from these fundamental studies. A second advance has focused on investigations of the ordering of LCs at interfaces with immiscible isotropic fluids, particularly water. In contrast to prior studies of surface-induced ordering of LCs on solid surfaces, LC- aqueous interfaces are deformable and molecules at these interfaces exhibit high levels of mobility and thus can reorganize in response to changes in interfacial environment. A range of fundamental investigations involving these LC-aqueous interfaces have revealed that (i) the spatial and temporal characteristics of assemblies formed from biomolecular interactions can be reported by surface-driven ordering transitions in the LCs, (ii) the interfacial phase behaviour of molecules and colloids can be coupled to (and manipulated via) the ordering (and nematic elasticity) of LCs, and (iii) confinement of LCs leads to unanticipated size

  19. Probing the interfacial region in polymer-graphene oxide nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, Michael; Boothroyd, Stephen; Johnson, David; Thompson, Richard; Clarke, Nigel; Coleman, Karl

    2015-03-01

    Graphene and related two-dimensional materials are excellent candidates as filler materials in nanocomposites due to their extraordinary physical properties and high aspect ratio. We are studying graphene oxide (GO), a highly functionalized form of graphene, due to its relative ease of dispersion within polymer matrices. Interruptions to the pristine two-dimensional carbon network by oxygen-containing groups, which provide functionality, also make GO rather flexible. In this paper we show that GO is wrinkled and rough over a hierarchy of length scales from a few nanometers to a few microns, when it is incorporated in composites with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS). Small-angle neutron scattering measurements, highlighting individual polymer chains, show a decrease in polymer radius of gyration with increasing GO concentration in PMMA/GO nanocomposites. The decrease is consistent with models of a solid interface in a polymer melt. The interface influences the polymer matrix within an interfacial volume stretching on the order of one polymer radius of gyration from the surface. This work is a direct measurement of the effect of the nanofiller upon the polymer matrix and progresses our understanding of interfacial interactions within nanocomposites.

  20. The contact area dependent interfacial thermal conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chenhan; Wei, Zhiyong; Bi, Kedong; Yang, Juekuan; Chen, Yunfei; Wang, Jian

    2015-12-15

    The effects of the contact area on the interfacial thermal conductance σ are investigated using the atomic Green’s function method. Different from the prediction of the heat diffusion transport model, we obtain an interesting result that the interfacial thermal conductance per unit area Λ is positively dependent on the contact area as the area varies from a few atoms to several square nanometers. Through calculating the phonon transmission function, it is uncovered that the phonon transmission per unit area increases with the increased contact area. This is attributed to that each atom has more neighboring atoms in the counterpart of the interface with the increased contact area, which provides more channels for phonon transport.

  1. Frontiers of interfacial water research :workshop report.

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, Randall Timothy; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2005-10-01

    Water is the critical natural resource of the new century. Significant improvements in traditional water treatment processes require novel approaches based on a fundamental understanding of nanoscale and atomic interactions at interfaces between aqueous solution and materials. To better understand these critical issues and to promote an open dialog among leading international experts in water-related specialties, Sandia National Laboratories sponsored a workshop on April 24-26, 2005 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The ''Frontiers of Interfacial Water Research Workshop'' provided attendees with a critical review of water technologies and emphasized the new advances in surface and interfacial microscopy, spectroscopy, diffraction, and computer simulation needed for the development of new materials for water treatment.

  2. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  3. Interfacial transport in lithium-ion conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaofei, Wang; Liquan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Physical models of ion diffusion at different interfaces are reviewed. The use of impedance spectroscopy (IS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) techniques are also discussed. The diffusion of ions is fundamental to the operation of lithium-ion batteries, taking place not only within the grains but also across different interfaces. Interfacial ion transport usually contributes to the majority of the resistance in lithium-ion batteries. A greater understanding of the interfacial diffusion of ions is crucial to improving battery performance. Project supported by the Beijing S&T Project, China (Grant No. Z13111000340000), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51325206 and 11234013) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB932900).

  4. Scaling for interfacial tensions near critical endpoints.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Shun-Yong; Fisher, Michael E

    2005-01-01

    Parametric scaling representations are obtained and studied for the asymptotic behavior of interfacial tensions in the full neighborhood of a fluid (or Ising-type) critical endpoint, i.e., as a function both of temperature and of density/order parameter or chemical potential/ordering field. Accurate nonclassical critical exponents and reliable estimates for the universal amplitude ratios are included naturally on the basis of the "extended de Gennes-Fisher" local-functional theory. Serious defects in previous scaling treatments are rectified and complete wetting behavior is represented; however, quantitatively small, but unphysical residual nonanalyticities on the wetting side of the critical isotherm are smoothed out "manually." Comparisons with the limited available observations are presented elsewhere but the theory invites new, searching experiments and simulations, e.g., for the vapor-liquid interfacial tension on the two sides of the critical endpoint isotherm for which an amplitude ratio -3.25+/-0.05 is predicted.

  5. Effects of Impurities on Alumina-Niobium InterfacialMicrostructures

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Sugar, Joshua D.; Gronsky, Ronald; Glaeser,Andreas M.

    2005-06-20

    Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were employed to examine the interfacial microstructural effects of impurities in alumina substrates used to fabricate alumina-niobium interfaces via liquid-film-assisted joining. Three types of alumina were used: undoped high-purity single-crystal sapphire; a high-purity, high-strength polycrystalline alumina; and a lower-purity, lower-strength polycrystalline alumina. Interfaces formed between niobium and both the sapphire and high-purity polycrystalline alumina were free of detectable levels of impurities. In the lower-purity alumina, niobium silicides were observed at the alumina-niobium interface and on alumina grain boundaries near the interface. These silicides formed in small-grained regions of the alumina and were found to grow from the interface into the alumina along grain boundaries. Smaller silicide precipitates found on grain boundaries are believed to form upon cooling from the bonding temperature.

  6. Understanding controls on interfacial wetting at epitaxial graphene: Experiment and Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hua; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Presser, Volker; Wander, Matthew C; Fenter, Paul; Kent, Paul R; Jiang, Deen; Chialvo, Ariel A; Mcdonough, John; Shuford, Kevin L; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of interfacial water with graphitic carbon at the atomic scale is studied as a function of the hydrophobicity of epitaxial graphene. High resolution x-ray reflectivity shows that the graphene-water contact angle is controlled by the average graphene thickness, due to the fraction of the film surface expressed as the epitaxial buffer layer whose contact angle (contact angle c = 73 ) is substantially smaller than that of multilayer graphene ( c = 93 ). Classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the reduced contact angle of the buffer layer is due to both its epitaxy with the SiC substrate and the presence of interfacial defects. This insight clarifies the relationship between interfacial water structure and hydrophobicity, in general, and suggests new routes to control interface properties of epitaxial graphene.

  7. Understanding controls on interfacial wetting at epitaxial graphene: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua; Ganesh, P.; Presser, Volker; Wander, Matthew C. F.; Fenter, Paul; Kent, Paul R. C.; Jiang, De-En; Chialvo, Ariel A.; McDonough, John; Shuford, Kevin L.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of interfacial water with graphitic carbon at the atomic scale is studied as a function of the hydrophobicity of epitaxial graphene. High resolution x-ray reflectivity shows that the graphene-water contact angle is controlled by the average graphene thickness, due to the fraction of the film surface expressed as the epitaxial buffer layer whose contact angle (contact angle θc = 73°) is substantially smaller than that of multilayer graphene (θc = 93°). Classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the reduced contact angle of the buffer layer is due to both its epitaxy with the SiC substrate and the presence of interfacial defects. This insight clarifies the relationship between interfacial water structure and hydrophobicity, in general, and suggests new routes to control interface properties of epitaxial graphene.

  8. Understanding controls on interfacial wetting at epitaxial graphene: Experiment and Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of interfacial water with graphitic carbon at the atomic scale is studied as a function of the hydrophobicity of epitaxial graphene. High resolution x-ray reflectivity shows that the graphene-water contact angle is controlled by the average graphene thickness, due to the fraction of the film surface expressed as the epitaxial buffer layer whose contact angle (contact angle {Theta}{sub c} = 73{sup o}) is substantially smaller than that of multilayer graphene ({Theta}{sub c} = 93{sup o}). Classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the reduced contact angle of the buffer layer is due to both its epitaxy with the SiC substrate and the presence of interfacial defects. This insight clarifies the relationship between interfacial water structure and hydrophobicity, in general, and suggests new routes to control interface properties of epitaxial graphene.

  9. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Research this past year continued to emphasize characterization of the physicochemical nature of the microscopic interfaces, i.e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co, and Na in order to improve on the model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of model extractant (surfactant) molecules was further investigated. 1 fig.

  10. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Research last year emphasized the nature of microscopic interfaces, i. e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co and Na in order to improve on a recently proposed model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of extractant molecules and their interactions with metal ions which occur in hydrometallurgical solvent extraction systems were further investigated.

  11. Intrinsic interfacial phenomena in manganite heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, C. A. F.; Walker, F. J.; Ahn, C. H.; Ismail-Beigi, S.

    2015-04-01

    We review recent advances in our understanding of interfacial phenomena that emerge when dissimilar materials are brought together at atomically sharp and coherent interfaces. In particular, we focus on phenomena that are intrinsic to the interface and review recent work carried out on perovskite manganites interfaces, a class of complex oxides whose rich electronic properties have proven to be a useful playground for the discovery and prediction of novel phenomena.

  12. Microstructural Evolution Based on Fundamental Interfacial Properties

    SciTech Connect

    A. D. Rollett; D. J. Srolovitz; A. Karma

    2003-07-11

    This first CMSN project has been operating since the summer of 1999. The main achievement of the project was to bring together a community of materials scientists, physicists and mathematicians who share a common interest in the properties of interfaces and the impact of those properties on microstructural evolution. Six full workshops were held at Carnegie Mellon (CMU), Northwestern (NWU), Santa Fe, Northeastern University (NEU), National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST), Ames Laboratory, and at the University of California in San Diego (UCSD) respectively. Substantial scientific results were obtained through the sustained contact between the members of the project. A recent issue of Interface Science (volume 10, issue 2/3, July 2002) was dedicated to the output of the project. The results include: the development of methods for extracting anisotropic boundary energy and mobility from molecular dynamics simulations of solid/liquid interfaces in nickel; the extraction of anisotropic energies and mobilities in aluminum from similar MD simulations; the application of parallel computation to the calculation of interfacial properties; the development of a method to extract interfacial properties from the fluctuations in interface position through consideration of interfacial stiffness; the use of anisotropic interface properties in studies of abnormal grain growth; the discovery of abnormal grain growth from random distributions of orientation in subgrain networks; the direct comparison at the scale of individual grains between experimentally observed grain growth and simulations, which confirmed the importance of including anisotropic interfacial properties in the simulations; the classification of a rich variety of dendritic morphologies based on slight variations in the anisotropy of the solid-liquid interface; development of phase field methods that permit both solidification and grain growth to be simulated within the same framework.

  13. Interfacial Properties of a Hydrophobic Dye in the Tetrachloroethylene-Water-Glass Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-02-23

    Interfacial effects play an important role in governing multiphase fluid behavior in porous media. Strongly hydrophobic organic dyes, used in many experimental studies to facilitate visual observation of the phase distributions, have generally been implicitly assumed to have no influence on the interfacial properties of the various phases in porous media. Sudan IV is the most commonly used dye for non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in laboratory experiments. It has also been used in at least one field experiment. The effects of this dye on the tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-water-glass system were investigated to test the assumption that the dye does not effect the interfacial properties and therefore PCE mobility. The results indicate that the dye does indeed change the interfacial relationships.The effect of the dye on the interfacial relationships is a complex function of the dye concentration, the solid phase composition, and the dynamic rate of new interface formation. The dye caused a slight (<10 percent) increase in interfacial tension at low concentrations (<0.1 g/L) and high rates of new interface formation. The dye reduced interfacial tension between PCE and water at low rates of new interface formation for all dye concentrations tested (0.00508 to 5.08 g/L). At the highest dye concentration, the PCE-water interfacial tension was significantly reduced regardless of the rate of new interface formation. The apparent interfacial tension increase at low dye concentrations is suspected to be an artifact of a low measured IFT value for the undyed PCE caused by leaching of rubber o-rings by the PCE prior to testing in the final drop-volume configuration.In addition to reducing interfacial tension, the dye was found to significantly alter the wetting relationship between PCE and water on a glass surface at and above the range of reported dye concentrations cited in the literature (1.1 to 1.7 g/L). The wetting relationship was rendered neutral from a water-wet initial

  14. Effect of interfacial interactions on the thermal conductivity and interfacial thermal conductance in tungsten–graphene layered structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jagannadham, K.

    2014-09-01

    Graphene film was deposited by microwave plasma assisted deposition on polished oxygen free high conductivity copper foils. Tungsten–graphene layered film was formed by deposition of tungsten film by magnetron sputtering on the graphene covered copper foils. Tungsten film was also deposited directly on copper foil without graphene as the intermediate film. The tungsten–graphene–copper samples were heated at different temperatures up to 900 °C in argon atmosphere to form an interfacial tungsten carbide film. Tungsten film deposited on thicker graphene platelets dispersed on silicon wafer was also heated at 900 °C to identify the formation of tungsten carbide film by reaction of tungsten with graphene platelets. The films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. It was found that tungsten carbide film formed at the interface upon heating only above 650 °C. Transient thermoreflectance signal from the tungsten film surface on the samples was collected and modeled using one-dimensional heat equation. The experimental and modeled results showed that the presence of graphene at the interface reduced the cross-plane effective thermal conductivity and the interfacial thermal conductance of the layer structure. Heating at 650 and 900 °C in argon further reduced the cross-plane thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance as a result of formation nanocrystalline tungsten carbide at the interface leading to separation and formation of voids. The present results emphasize that interfacial interactions between graphene and carbide forming bcc and hcp elements will reduce the cross-plane effective thermal conductivity in composites.

  15. On the axial and interfacial shear stresses due to thermal mismatch in hybrid composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rossettos, J.N.; Shen, X.

    1994-12-31

    An analytical model is formulated which attempts to account for the axial and the interfacial shear stresses which can develop in hybrid fiber composites due to the mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion and Youngs modulus. A finite width hybrid composite monolayer with alternating high modulus and low modulus fibers is considered. To properly account for the interfacial shear between fiber and matrix, a modified shear lag model is used, which permits extensional deformation in the matrix in the fiber direction. Typical stresses due solely to temperature changes are calculated, and show steep boundary layer edge stresses at free corners.

  16. TFB:TPDSi2 interfacial layer usable in organic photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Iobin J.; Hains, Alexander W.

    2011-02-15

    The present invention, in one aspect, relates to a solar cell. In one embodiment, the solar cell includes an anode; an active organic layer comprising an electron-donating organic material and an electron-accepting organic material; and an interfacial layer formed between the anode and active organic layer, where the interfacial layer comprises a hole-transporting polymer characterized with a hole-mobility higher than that of the electron-donating organic material in the active organic layer, and a small molecule that has a high hole-mobility and is capable of crosslinking on contact with air.

  17. Interfacial Symmetry Control of Emergent Ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutter, Alexander; Borchers, Julie; Kirby, Brian; He, Chunyong; Arenholz, Elke; Vailionis, Arturas; Flint, Charles; Suzuki, Yuri

    Atomically precise complex oxide heterostructures provide model systems for the discovery of new emergent phenomena since their magnetism, structure and electronic properties are strongly coupled. Octahedral tilts and rotations have been shown to alter the magnetic properties of complex oxide heterostructures, but typically induce small, gradual magnetic changes. Here, we demonstrate sharp switching between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic order at the emergent ferromagnetic interfaces of CaRuO3/CaMnO3 superlattices. Through synchrotron X-ray diffraction and neutron reflectometry, we show that octahedral distortions in superlattices with an odd number of CaMnO3 unit cells in each layer are symmetry mismatched across the interface. In this case, the rotation symmetry switches across the interface, reducing orbital overlap, suppressing charge transfer from Ru to Mn, and disrupting the interfacial double exchange. This disruption switches half of the interfaces from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic and lowers the saturation magnetic of the superlattice from 1.0 to 0.5 μB/interfacial Mn. By targeting a purely interfacial emergent magnetic system, we achieve drastic alterations to the magnetic ground state with extremely small changes in layer thickness.

  18. Interfacial Studies of Sized Carbon Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrul, S. N.; Hartini, M. N.; Hilmi, E. A.; Nizam, A.

    2010-03-11

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of sizing treatment on carbon fiber in respect of interfacial adhesion in composite materials, Epolam registered 2025. Fortafil unsized carbon fiber was used to performed the experiment. The fiber was commercially surface treated and it was a polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber with 3000 filament per strand. Epicure registered 3370 was used as basic sizing chemical and dissolved in two types of solvent, ethanol and acetone for the comparison purpose. The single pull out test has been used to determine the influence of sizing on carbon fiber. The morphology of carbon fiber was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The apparent interfacial strength IFSS values determined by pull out test for the Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sized carbon fiber pointed to a good interfacial behaviour compared to the Epicure registered 3370/acetone sized carbon fiber. The Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sizing agent was found to be effective in promoting adhesion because of the chemical reactions between the sizing and Epolam registered 2025 during the curing process. From this work, it showed that sized carbon fiber using Epicure registered 3370 with addition of ethanol give higher mechanical properties of carbon fiber in terms of shear strength and also provided a good adhesion between fiber and matrix compared to the sizing chemical that contain acetone as a solvent.

  19. Investigation of interfacial rheology & foam stability.

    SciTech Connect

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn M.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D.; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-05-01

    The rheology at gas-liquid interfaces strongly influences the stability and dynamics of foams and emulsions. Several experimental techniques are employed to characterize the rheology at liquid-gas interfaces with an emphasis on the non-Newtonian behavior of surfactant-laden interfaces. The focus is to relate the interfacial rheology to the foamability and foam stability of various aqueous systems. An interfacial stress rheometer (ISR) is used to measure the steady and dynamic rheology by applying an external magnetic field to actuate a magnetic needle suspended at the interface. Results are compared with those from a double wall ring attachment to a rotational rheometer (TA Instruments AR-G2). Micro-interfacial rheology (MIR) is also performed using optical tweezers to manipulate suspended microparticle probes at the interface to investigate the steady and dynamic rheology. Additionally, a surface dilatational rheometer (SDR) is used to periodically oscillate the volume of a pendant drop or buoyant bubble. Applying the Young-Laplace equation to the drop shape, a time-dependent surface tension can be calculated and used to determine the effective dilatational viscosity of an interface. Using the ISR, double wall ring, SDR, and MIR, a wide range of sensitivity in surface forces (fN to nN) can be explored as each experimental method has different sensitivities. Measurements will be compared to foam stability.

  20. Interfacial Studies of Sized Carbon Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrul, S. N.; Hartini, M. N.; Hilmi, E. A.; Nizam, A.

    2010-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of sizing treatment on carbon fiber in respect of interfacial adhesion in composite materials, Epolam® 2025. Fortafil unsized carbon fiber was used to performed the experiment. The fiber was commercially surface treated and it was a polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber with 3000 filament per strand. Epicure® 3370 was used as basic sizing chemical and dissolved in two types of solvent, ethanol and acetone for the comparison purpose. The single pull out test has been used to determine the influence of sizing on carbon fiber. The morphology of carbon fiber was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The apparent interfacial strength IFSS values determined by pull out test for the Epicure® 3370/ethanol sized carbon fiber pointed to a good interfacial behaviour compared to the Epicure® 3370/acetone sized carbon fiber. The Epicure® 3370/ethanol sizing agent was found to be effective in promoting adhesion because of the chemical reactions between the sizing and Epolam® 2025 during the curing process. From this work, it showed that sized carbon fiber using Epicure® 3370 with addition of ethanol give higher mechanical properties of carbon fiber in terms of shear strength and also provided a good adhesion between fiber and matrix compared to the sizing chemical that contain acetone as a solvent.

  1. Electric Field Induced Interfacial Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusner, Robert E.; Min, Kyung Yang; Wu, Xiao-lun; Onuki, Akira

    1999-01-01

    The study of the interface in a charge-free, critical and near-critical binary fluid in the presence of an externally applied electric field is presented. At sufficiently large fields, the interface between the two phases of the binary fluid should become unstable and exhibit an undulation with a predefined wavelength on the order of the capillary length. As the critical point is approached, this wavelength is reduced, potentially approaching length-scales such as the correlation length or critical nucleation radius. At this point the critical properties of the system may be affected. In this paper, the flat interface of a marginally polar binary fluid mixture is stressed by a perpendicular alternating electric field and the resulting instability is characterized by the critical electric field E(sub c) and the pattern observed. The character of the surface dynamics at the onset of instability is found to be strongly dependent on the frequency f of the field applied. The plot of E(sub c) vs. f for a fixed temperature shows a sigmoidal shape, whose low and high frequency limits are well described by a power-law relationship, E(sub c) = epsilon(exp zeta) with zeta = 0.35 and zeta = 0.08, respectively. The low-limit exponent compares well with the value zeta = 4 for a system of conducting and non-conducting fluids. On the other hand, the high-limit exponent coincides with what was first predicted by Onuki. The instability manifests itself as the conducting phase penetrates the non-conducting phase. As the frequency increases, the shape of the pattern changes from an array of bifurcating strings to an array of column-like (or rod-like) protrusions, each of which spans the space between the plane interface and one of the electrodes. For an extremely high frequency, the disturbance quickly grows into a parabolic cone pointing toward the upper plate. As a result, the interface itself changes its shape from that of a plane to that of a high sloping pyramid.

  2. Interfacial closure of contacting surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, F.; Rauer, C.; Moriceau, H.

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the contact between solid surfaces is a long-standing problem which has a strong impact on the physics of many processes such as adhesion, friction, lubrication and wear. Experimentally, the investigation of solid/solid interfaces remains challenging today, due to the lack of experimental techniques able to provide sub-nanometer scale information on interfaces buried between millimeters of materials. Yet, a strong interest exists improving the modeling of contact mechanics of materials in order to adjust their interface properties (e.g., thermal transport, friction). We show here that the essential features of the residual gap between contacting surfaces can be measured using high energy X-ray synchrotron reflectivity. The presence of this nano-gap is general to the contact of solids. In some special case however, it can be removed when attractive forces take over repulsive contributions, depending on both height and wavelength of asperity distributions (roughness). A criterion for this instability is established in the standard case of van der Waals attractive forces and elastic asperity compression repulsive forces (Hertz model). This collapse instability is confirmed experimentally in the case of silicon direct bonding, using high-energy X-ray synchrotron reflectivity and adhesion energy measurements. The possibility to achieve fully closed interfaces at room temperature opens interesting perspectives to build stronger assemblies with smaller thermal budgets.

  3. Interfacial Symmetry Control of Emergent Ferromagnetism at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Grutter, A J; Vailionis, A; Borchers, J A; Kirby, B J; Flint, C L; He, C; Arenholz, E; Suzuki, Y

    2016-09-14

    The emergence of complex new ground states at interfaces has been identified as one of the most promising routes to highly tunable nanoscale materials. Despite recent progress, isolating and controlling the underlying mechanisms behind these emergent properties remains among the most challenging materials physics problems to date. In particular, generating ferromagnetism localized at the interface of two nonferromagnetic materials is of fundamental and technological interest. Moreover, the ability to turn the ferromagnetism on and off would shed light on the origin of such emergent phenomena and is promising for spintronic applications. We demonstrate that ferromagnetism confined within one unit cell at the interface of CaRuO3 and CaMnO3 can be switched on and off by changing the symmetry of the oxygen octahedra connectivity at the boundary. Interfaces that are symmetry-matched across the boundary exhibit interfacial CaMnO3 ferromagnetism while the ferromagnetism at symmetry-mismatched interfaces is suppressed. We attribute the suppression of ferromagnetic order to a reduction in charge transfer at symmetry-mismatched interfaces, where frustrated bonding weakens the orbital overlap. Thus, interfacial symmetry is a new route to control emergent ferromagnetism in materials such as CaMnO3 that exhibit antiferromagnetism in bulk form. PMID:27472285

  4. Influence of interfacial rheology on stabilization of the tear film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhamla, M. Saad; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2014-11-01

    The tear film that protecting the ocular surface is a complex, thin film comprised of a collection of proteins and lipids that come together to provide a number of important functions. Of particular interest in this presentation is meibum, an insoluble layer that is spread from glands lining our eyelids. Past work has focussed on the role of this layer in reducing evaporation, although conflicting evidence on its ability to reduce evaporative loss has been published. We present here the beneficial effects that are derived through the interfacial viscoelasticity of the meibomian lipid film. This is a duplex film is comprised of a rich mixture of phospholipids, long chain fatty esters, and cholesterol esters. Using interfacial rheology measurements, meibum has been shown to be highly viscoelastic. By measuring the drainage and dewetting dynamics of thin aqueous films from hemispherical surfaces where those films are laden with insoluble layers of lipids at controlled surface pressure, we offer evidence that these layers strongly stabilize the films because of their ability to support surface shearing stresses. This alternative view of the role of meibum can help explain the origin of meibomian gland dysfunction, or dry eye disease, where improper compositions of this lipid mixture do not offer the proper mechanical resistance to breakage and dewetting of the tear film.

  5. Interfacial Shear Strength of Multilayer Graphene Oxide Films.

    PubMed

    Daly, Matthew; Cao, Changhong; Sun, Hao; Sun, Yu; Filleter, Tobin; Singh, Chandra Veer

    2016-02-23

    Graphene oxide (GO) is considered as one of the most promising layered materials with tunable physical properties and applicability in many important engineering applications. In this work, the interfacial behavior of multilayer GO films was directly investigated via GO-to-GO friction force microscopy, and the interfacial shear strength (ISS) was measured to be 5.3 ± 3.2 MPa. Based on high resolution atomic force microscopy images and the available chemical data, targeted molecular dynamics simulations were performed to evaluate the influence of functional structure, topological defects, and interlayer registry on the shear response of the GO films. Theoretical values for shear strength ranging from 17 to 132 MPa were predicted for the different structures studied, providing upper bounds for the ISS. Computational results also revealed the atomic origins of the stochastic nature of friction measurements. Specifically, the wide scatter in experimental measurements was attributed to variations in functional structure and topological defects within the sliding volume. The findings of this study provide important insight for understanding the significant differences in strength between monolayer and bulk graphene oxide materials and can be useful for engineering topological structures with tunable mechanical properties.

  6. Interfacial Symmetry Control of Emergent Ferromagnetism at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Grutter, A J; Vailionis, A; Borchers, J A; Kirby, B J; Flint, C L; He, C; Arenholz, E; Suzuki, Y

    2016-09-14

    The emergence of complex new ground states at interfaces has been identified as one of the most promising routes to highly tunable nanoscale materials. Despite recent progress, isolating and controlling the underlying mechanisms behind these emergent properties remains among the most challenging materials physics problems to date. In particular, generating ferromagnetism localized at the interface of two nonferromagnetic materials is of fundamental and technological interest. Moreover, the ability to turn the ferromagnetism on and off would shed light on the origin of such emergent phenomena and is promising for spintronic applications. We demonstrate that ferromagnetism confined within one unit cell at the interface of CaRuO3 and CaMnO3 can be switched on and off by changing the symmetry of the oxygen octahedra connectivity at the boundary. Interfaces that are symmetry-matched across the boundary exhibit interfacial CaMnO3 ferromagnetism while the ferromagnetism at symmetry-mismatched interfaces is suppressed. We attribute the suppression of ferromagnetic order to a reduction in charge transfer at symmetry-mismatched interfaces, where frustrated bonding weakens the orbital overlap. Thus, interfacial symmetry is a new route to control emergent ferromagnetism in materials such as CaMnO3 that exhibit antiferromagnetism in bulk form.

  7. The influence of interfacial energies and gravitational levels on the directionally solidified structures in hypermonotectic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandlin, A. C.; Andrews, J. B.; Curreri, P. A.

    1988-11-01

    Several Cu-Pb-Al alloys were directionally solidified under one-g conditions and alternating high-g/low-g conditions in order to determine the influence of interfacial energies and gravitational levels on the resulting microstructures. The low-g conditions were obtained through use of NASA's KC-135 aircraft. In the Cu-Pb-Al system, changes in the Al content are known to result in variations in the interfacial energy relationships between the phases. Theory predicts that this should lead to a transition from an irregular to a regular, aligned microstructure in monotectic composition alloys. Four different hypermonotectic alloy compositions were used in this study in order to vary systematically the interfacial energies between the phases. Preliminary results indicate microstructural variations between control and flight samples and samples processed at different rates under both one-g and high-g/low-g conditions. In addition, directional solidification of low Al content alloys resulted in samples with coarse, irregular microstructures, as compared to finer, more aligned microstructures in alloys with high Al contents. This was seen in samples processed under both one-g and high-g/low-g conditions. The resulting structures have been related to interfacial energies, growth rates, and gravitational levels.

  8. Interfacial electrofluidics in confined systems

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Biao; Groenewold, Jan; Zhou, Min; Hayes, Robert A.; Zhou, Guofu (G.F.)

    2016-01-01

    Electrofluidics is a versatile principle that can be used for high speed actuation of liquid interfaces. In most of the applications, the fundamental mechanism of electro-capillary instability plays a crucial role, yet it’s potential richness in confined fluidic layers has not been well addressed. Electrofluidic displays which are comprised of thin pixelated colored films in a range of architectures are excellent systems for studying such phenomena. In this study we show theoretically and experimentally that confinement leads to the generation of a cascade of voltage dependent modes as a result of the electro-capillary instability. In the course of reconciling theory with our experimental data we have observed a number of previously unreported phenomena such as a significant induction time (several milliseconds) prior to film rupture as well as a rupture location not corresponding to the minimum electric field strength in the case of the standard convex water/oil interface used in working devices. These findings are broadly applicable to a wide range of switchable electrofluidic applications and devices having confined liquid films. PMID:27221211

  9. Interfacial electrofluidics in confined systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Biao; Groenewold, Jan; Zhou, Min; Hayes, Robert A.; Zhou, Guofu (G. F.)

    2016-05-01

    Electrofluidics is a versatile principle that can be used for high speed actuation of liquid interfaces. In most of the applications, the fundamental mechanism of electro-capillary instability plays a crucial role, yet it’s potential richness in confined fluidic layers has not been well addressed. Electrofluidic displays which are comprised of thin pixelated colored films in a range of architectures are excellent systems for studying such phenomena. In this study we show theoretically and experimentally that confinement leads to the generation of a cascade of voltage dependent modes as a result of the electro-capillary instability. In the course of reconciling theory with our experimental data we have observed a number of previously unreported phenomena such as a significant induction time (several milliseconds) prior to film rupture as well as a rupture location not corresponding to the minimum electric field strength in the case of the standard convex water/oil interface used in working devices. These findings are broadly applicable to a wide range of switchable electrofluidic applications and devices having confined liquid films.

  10. Fluid displacement fronts in porous media: pore scale interfacial jumps, pressure bursts and acoustic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Franziska; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    The macroscopically smooth and regular motion of fluid fronts in porous media is composed of numerous rapid pore-scale interfacial jumps and pressure bursts that involve intense interfacial energy release in the form of acoustic emissions. The characteristics of these pore scale events affect residual phase entrapment and transport properties behind the front. We present experimental studies using acoustic emission technique (AE), rapid imaging, and liquid pressure measurements to characterize these processes during drainage and imbibition in simple porous media. Imbibition and drainage produce different AE signatures (AE amplitudes obey a power law). For rapid drainage, AE signals persist long after cessation of front motion reflecting fluid redistribution and interfacial relaxation. Imaging revealed that the velocity of interfacial jumps often exceeds front velocity by more than 50 fold and is highly inertial component (Re>1000). Pore invasion volumes reduced deduced from pressure fluctuations waiting times (for constant withdrawal rates) show remarkable agreement with geometrically-deduced pore volumes. Discrepancies between invaded volumes and geometrical pores increase with increasing capillary numbers due to constraints on evacuation opportunity times and simultaneous invasion events. A mechanistic model for interfacial motions in a pore-throat network was developed to investigate interfacial dynamics focusing on the role of inertia. Results suggest that while pore scale dynamics were sensitive to variations in pore geometry and boundary conditions, inertia exerted only a minor effect on phase entrapment. The study on pore scale invasion events paints a complex picture of rapid and inertial motions and provides new insights on mechanisms at displacement fronts that are essential for improved macroscopic description of multiphase flows in porous media.

  11. Direct handling of sharp interfacial energy for microstructural evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández–Rivera, Efraín; Tikare, Veena; Noirot, Laurence; Wang, Lumin

    2014-08-24

    In this study, we introduce a simplification to the previously demonstrated hybrid Potts–phase field (hPPF), which relates interfacial energies to microstructural sharp interfaces. The model defines interfacial energy by a Potts-like discrete interface approach of counting unlike neighbors, which we use to compute local curvature. The model is compared to the hPPF by studying interfacial characteristics and grain growth behavior. The models give virtually identical results, while the new model allows the simulator more direct control of interfacial energy.

  12. Functionalization enhancement on interfacial shear strength between graphene and polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yikuang; Duan, Fangli; Mu, Xiaojing

    2016-11-01

    Pull-out processes were simulated to investigate the interfacial mechanical properties between the functionalized graphene sheet (FGS) and polyethylene (PE) matrix by using molecular dynamics simulation with ReaxFF reactive force field. The interfacial structure of polymer and the interfacial interaction in the equilibrium FGS/PE systems were also analyzed to reveal the enhancement mechanism of interfacial shear strength. We observed the insertion of functional groups into polymer layer in the equilibrium FGS/PE systems. During the pull-out process, some interfacial chains were attached on the FGS and pulled out from the polymer matrix. The behavior of these pulled out chains was further analyzed to clarify the different traction action of functional groups applied on them. The results show that the traction effect of functional groups on the pulled-out chains is agreement with their enhancement influence on the interfacial shear strength of the FGS/PE systems. They both are basically dominated by the size of functional groups, suggesting the enhancement mechanism of mechanical interlocking. However, interfacial binding strength also exhibits an obvious influence on the interfacial shear properties of the hybrid system. Our simulation show that geometric constrains at the interface is the principal contributor to the enhancement of interfacial shear strength in the FGS/PE systems, which could be further strengthened by the wrinkled morphology of graphene in experiments.

  13. Interfacial welding of dynamic covalent network polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kai; Shi, Qian; Li, Hao; Jabour, John; Yang, Hua; Dunn, Martin L.; Wang, Tiejun; Qi, H. Jerry

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic covalent network (or covalent adaptable network) polymers can rearrange their macromolecular chain network by bond exchange reactions (BERs) where an active unit replaces a unit in an existing bond to form a new bond. Such macromolecular events, when they occur in large amounts, can attribute to unusual properties that are not seen in conventional covalent network polymers, such as shape reforming and surface welding; the latter further enables the important attributes of material malleability and powder-based reprocessing. In this paper, a multiscale modeling framework is developed to study the surface welding of thermally induced dynamic covalent network polymers. At the macromolecular network level, a lattice model is developed to describe the chain density evolution across the interface and its connection to bulk stress relaxation due to BERs. The chain density evolution rule is then fed into a continuum level interfacial model that takes into account surface roughness and applied pressure to predict the effective elastic modulus and interfacial fracture energy of welded polymers. The model yields particularly accessible results where the moduli and interfacial strength of the welded samples as a function of temperature and pressure can be predicted with four parameters, three of which can be measured directly. The model identifies the dependency of surface welding efficiency on the applied thermal and mechanical fields: the pressure will affect the real contact area under the consideration of surface roughness of dynamic covalent network polymers; the chain density increment on the real contact area of interface is only dependent on the welding time and temperature. The modeling approach shows good agreement with experiments and can be extended to other types of dynamic covalent network polymers using different stimuli for BERs, such as light and moisture etc.

  14. Thermodynamic Model for Fluid-Fluid Interfacial Areas in Porous Media for Arbitrary Drainage-Imbibition Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Schroth, Martin H.; Oostrom, Mart; Dobson, Richard; Zeyer, Josef

    2008-08-01

    Fluid/fluid interfacial areas are important in controlling the rate of mass and energy transfer between fluid phases in porous media. We present a modified thermodynamically based model (TBM) to predict fluid/fluid interfacial areas in porous media for arbitrary drainage/imbibition sequences. The TBM explicitly distinguishes between interfacial areas associated with continuous (free) and isolated (entrapped) nonwetting fluids. The model is restricted to two-fluid systems in which (1) no significant conversion of mechanical work into heat occurs, (2) the wetting fluid completely wets the porous medium’s solid surfaces, and (3) no changes in interfacial area due to mass transfer between phases occur. We show example calculations for two different drainage/imbibition sequences in two porous media: a highly uniform silica sand and a well-graded silt. The TBM’s predictions for interfacial area associated with free nonwetting-fluid are identical to those of a previously published geometry-based model (GBM). However, predictions for interfacial area associated with entrapped nonwetting-fluid are consistently larger in the TBM than in the GBM. Although a comparison of model predictions with experimental data is currently only possible to a limited extent, good general agreement was found for the TBM. As required model parameters are commonly used as inputs for or tracked during multifluid-flow simulations, the modified TBM may be easily incorporated in numerical codes.

  15. Evaluation of Interfacial Tensile Strength in Glass Fiber/Epoxy Resin Interface using the Cruciform Specimen Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogihara, Shinji; Sakamoto, Yoriaki; Koyanagi, Jun

    Glass/epoxy interfacial tensile strength is investigated by the cruciform specimen method. The conventional transverse tensile test for single fiber composite is one of methods for evaluating the interfacial tensile strength, but stress singularity at the specimen edge is a very complicated problem to be solved. A cruciform specimen which has large width only around fiber embedded in transverse direction can potentially prevent the stress singularity problem. The cruciform specimen geometry is first discussed by means of finite element analysis considering experimental conditions. Transverse tensile test is conducted and an interfacial debonding which initiates at the middle of specimen not at edge is observed using the cruciform specimens. The interfacial tensile strength can be obtained by the value of stress concentration factor at interface multiplied by specimen stress. The location which the debonding initiates from is discussed and the validity of the evaluation method in this study is verified when interfacial tensile strength is as high as or lower than interfacial shear strength.

  16. Viscosity of interfacial water regulates ice nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kaiyong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan; Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin; Cui, Dapeng; Wang, Jianjun Song, Yanlin

    2014-03-10

    Ice formation on solid surfaces is an important phenomenon in many fields, such as cloud formation and atmospheric icing, and a key factor for applications in preventing freezing. Here, we report temperature-dependent nucleation rates of ice for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The results show that hydrophilic surface presents a lower ice nucleation rate. We develop a strategy to extract the thermodynamic parameters, J{sub 0} and Γ, in the context of classical nucleation theory. From the extracted J{sub 0} and Γ, we reveal the dominant role played by interfacial water. The results provide an insight into freezing mechanism on solid surfaces.

  17. Rheology of interfacial protein-polysaccharide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.

    2013-05-01

    The morphology and mechanical properties of protein adsorption layers can significantly be altered by the presence of surfactants, lipids, particles, other proteins, and polysaccharides. In food emulsions, polysaccharides are primarily considered as bulk thickener but can under appropriate environmental conditions stabilize or destabilize the protein adsorption layer and, thus, the entire emulsion system. Despite their ubiquitous usage as stabilization agent, relatively few investigations focus on the interfacial rheology of composite protein/polysaccharide adsorption layers. The manuscript provides a brief review on both main stabilization mechanisms, thermodynamic phase separation and electrostatic interaction and discusses the rheological response in light of the environmental conditions such as ionic strength and pH.

  18. Interfacial Molecular Searching Using Forager Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserud, Jon H.; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2016-03-01

    Many biological and technological systems employ efficient non-Brownian intermittent search strategies where localized searches alternate with long flights. Coincidentally, molecular species exhibit intermittent behavior at the solid-liquid interface, where periods of slow motion are punctuated by fast flights through the liquid phase. Single-molecule tracking was used here to observe the interfacial search process of DNA for complementary DNA. Measured search times were qualitatively consistent with an intermittent-flight model, and ˜10 times faster than equivalent Brownian searches, suggesting that molecular searches for reactive sites benefit from similar efficiencies as biological organisms.

  19. Interfacial force microscopy: Application to polymer surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    HOUSTON,JACK E.; WINTER,R.M.

    2000-05-16

    Scanning-probe microscopies (SPM) are presently widely used in remarkably diverse applications and, as evidenced by this symposium these techniques are rapidly expanding into the important areas of polymer surfaces and interfaces. The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is presently the most widely used of the scanning-probe techniques. However, the AFM's range of application suffers from an inherent mechanical instability in its deflection force sensor. The instability problem has been overcome by the development of the Interfacial Force Microscope (IFM), which utilizes a force-feedback sensor concept. In the following, the authors present several examples of polymer applications to illustrate the utility of the IFM sensor concept.

  20. Interfacial models of nerve fiber cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Malev, V V; Gromov, D B; Komissarchik YaYu; Brudnaya, M S

    1992-01-01

    A new approach, basing on a resemblance between cytoskeleton structures associated with plasma membranes and interfacial layers of coexisting phases, is proposed. In particular, a lattice model, similar to those of the theory of surface properties of pure liquids and nonelectrolyte solutions (Ono, S., and S. Kondo. 1960. Handbuch der Physik.), has been developed to describe nerve fiber cytoskeleton. The preliminary consideration of the model shows the existence of submembrane cytoskeleton having increased peripheral densities of microtubules (compared with the bulk density) which is in qualitative agreement with the data in literature. Some additional possibilities of the approach proposed are briefly discussed. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:1420929

  1. Direct measurement of anisotropy of interfacial free energy from grain boundary groove morphology in transparent organic metal analong systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rustwick, Bryce A.

    2005-01-01

    Both academia and industry alike have paid close attention to the mechanisms of microstructural selection during the solidification process. The forces that give rise to and the principles which rule the natural selection of particular morphologies are important to understanding and controlling new microstructures. Interfacial properties play a very crucial role to the selection of such microstructure formation. In the solidification of a metallic alloy, the solid-liquid interface is highly mobile and responds to very minute changes in the local conditions. At this interface, the driving force must be large enough to drive solute diffusion, maintain local curvature, and overcome the kinetic barrier to move the interface. Therefore, the anisotropy of interfacial free energy with respect to crystallographic orientation is has a significant influence on the solidification of metallic systems. Although it is generally accepted that the solid-liquid interfacial free energy and its associated anisotropy are highly important to the overall selection of morphology, the confident measurement of these particular quantities remains a challenge, and reported values are scarce. Methods for measurement of the interfacial free energy include nucleation experiments and grain boundary groove experiments. The predominant method used to determine anisotropy of interfacial energy has been equilibrium shape measurement. There have been numerous investigations involving grain boundaries at a solid-liquid interface. These studies indicated the GBG could be used to describe various interfacial energy values, which affect solidification. Early studies allowed for an estimate of interfacial energy with respect to the GBG energy, and finally absolute interfacial energy in a constant thermal gradient. These studies however, did not account for the anisotropic nature of the material at the GBG. Since interfacial energy is normally dependent on orientation of the crystallographic plane of the

  2. Interfacial Nonlinear Dynamics, Phenomena, and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping

    The dynamics of an optical switch based on a dielectric -clad nonlinear film is presented. Two transition processes of the optical switching, from total internal reflection (TIR) to transmission (Tr) and from Tr to TIR, are investigated in theory as well as experiment. Nonlinear dynamic layered transfer matrix theory is developed to study the transition process from TIR to Tr at a nonlinear thin film due to the optically induced refractive index change. A simple theoretical model based on a dynamic nonlinear Fabry-Perot etalon is given for the analysis of the switching process from Tr to TIR. The quantitative analysis can be used for the design and optimization of an optical sensor protector and other devices. Experiments have been done on both the processes of TIR to Tr and Tr to TIR switching for visible as well as infrared wavelengths. A theory for the design of an optimal anti-reflection coating is proposed in order to aid the design and optimization of a nonlinear interfacial switch. Furthermore, a detailed study of the dynamic optical tunneling through the nonlinear interface indicates that the reflected wave would undergo an additional dynamic nonlinear phase shift which is a novel nonlinear interfacial phenomenon, first revealed by this study.

  3. Weighing graphene with QCM to monitor interfacial mass changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakenov, Nurbek; Balci, Osman; Salihoglu, Omer; Hur, Seung Hyun; Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun

    2016-08-01

    In this Letter, we experimentally determined the mass density of graphene using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) as a mechanical resonator. We developed a transfer printing technique to integrate large area single-layer graphene on QCM. By monitoring the resonant frequency of an oscillating quartz crystal loaded with graphene, we were able to measure the mass density of graphene as ˜118 ng/cm2, which is significantly larger than the ideal graphene (˜76 ng/cm2) mainly due to the presence of wrinkles and organic/inorganic residues on graphene sheets. High sensitivity of the quartz crystal resonator allowed us to determine the number of graphene layers in a particular sample. Additionally, we extended our technique to probe interfacial mass variation during adsorption of biomolecules on graphene surface and plasma-assisted oxidation of graphene.

  4. Interfacial reaction dependent performance of hollow carbon nanosphere - sulfur composite as a cathode for Li-S battery

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Gu, Meng; Wagner, Michael J.; Hays, Kevin A.; Chen, Junzheng; Li, Xiaohong S.; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Ji -Guang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-05-26

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising energy storage system due to its high energy density, cost effectiveness and environmental friendliness of sulfur. However, there are still a number of challenges, such as low Coulombic efficiency and poor long-term cycling stability, impeding the commercialization of Li-S battery. The electrochemical performance of Li-S battery is closely related with the interfacial reactions occurring between hosting substrate and active sulfur species which are poorly conducting at fully oxidized and reduced states. Here, we correlate the relationship between the performance and interfacial reactions in the Li-S battery system, using a hollow carbon nanosphere (HCNS) with highly graphitic character as hosting substrate for sulfur. With an appropriate amount of sulfur loading, HCNS/S composite exhibits excellent electrochemical performance because of the fast interfacial reactions between HCNS and the polysulfides. However, further increase of sulfur loading leads to increased formation of highly resistive insoluble reaction products (Li2S2/Li2S) which limits the reversibility of the interfacial reactions and results in poor electrochemical performance. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the importance of the interfacial reaction reversibility in the whole electrode system on achieving high capacity and long cycle life of sulfur cathode for Li-S batteries.

  5. Interfacial reaction dependent performance of hollow carbon nanosphere - sulfur composite as a cathode for Li-S battery

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Gu, Meng; Wagner, Michael J.; Hays, Kevin A.; Chen, Junzheng; Li, Xiaohong S.; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Ji -Guang; Liu, Jun; et al

    2015-05-26

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising energy storage system due to its high energy density, cost effectiveness and environmental friendliness of sulfur. However, there are still a number of challenges, such as low Coulombic efficiency and poor long-term cycling stability, impeding the commercialization of Li-S battery. The electrochemical performance of Li-S battery is closely related with the interfacial reactions occurring between hosting substrate and active sulfur species which are poorly conducting at fully oxidized and reduced states. Here, we correlate the relationship between the performance and interfacial reactions in the Li-S battery system, using a hollow carbon nanosphere (HCNS) withmore » highly graphitic character as hosting substrate for sulfur. With an appropriate amount of sulfur loading, HCNS/S composite exhibits excellent electrochemical performance because of the fast interfacial reactions between HCNS and the polysulfides. However, further increase of sulfur loading leads to increased formation of highly resistive insoluble reaction products (Li2S2/Li2S) which limits the reversibility of the interfacial reactions and results in poor electrochemical performance. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the importance of the interfacial reaction reversibility in the whole electrode system on achieving high capacity and long cycle life of sulfur cathode for Li-S batteries.« less

  6. Preface: Special Topic on Interfacial and Confined Water

    SciTech Connect

    Molinero, Valeria; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-11-14

    This Special Topic on the Chemical Physics of Interfacial and Confined Water contains a collection of original research papers that showcase recent theoretical and experimental advances in the field. These papers provide a timely discussion of fundamental aspects of interfacial and confined water that are important in both natural environments and engineered applications.

  7. Improved Interfacial Bonding in Magnesium/Aluminum Overcasting Systems by Aluminum Surface Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Chen, Yiqing; Luo, Alan A.

    2014-12-01

    "Overcasting" technique is used to produce bimetallic magnesium/aluminum (Mg/Al) structures where lightweight Mg can be cast onto solid Al substrates. An inherent difficulty in creating strong Mg/Al interfacial bonding is the natural oxide film on the solid Al surfaces, which reduces the wettability between molten Mg and Al substrates during the casting process. In the paper, an "electropolishing + anodizing" surface treatment has been developed to disrupt the oxide film on a dilute Al-0.08 wt pct Ga alloy, improving the metallurgical bonding between molten Mg and Al substrates in the bimetallic experiments carried out in a high-vacuum test apparatus. The test results provided valuable information of the interfacial phenomena of the Mg/Al bimetallic samples. The results show significantly improved metallurgical bonding in the bimetallic samples with "electropolishing + anodizing" surface treatment and Ga alloying. It is recommended to adjust the pre-heating temperature and time of the Al substrates and the Mg melt temperature to control the interfacial reactions for optimum interfacial properties in the actual overcasting processes.

  8. Carbon Fiber—Vinyl Ester Interfacial Adhesion Improvement by the Use of an Epoxy Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautard, Frederic; Xu, Lanhong; Drzal, Lawrence T.

    With the use of composites expanding into larger structural applications, vinyl ester matrices which are not dependent on an autoclave cure and are more environmentally resistant to water absorption are being investigated. The degree of adhesion between the fiber and matrix has been recognized to be a critical factor in determining the performance of fiber-reinforced composites. The mechanical properties of carbon fiber-vinyl ester composites are low compared to carbon fiber-epoxy composites, partly because of lower interfacial adhesion. The origins of this limitation were investigated. The influence of preferential adsorption of the matrix constituents on the interfacial adhesion was not significant. However, the high cure volume shrinkage was found to be an important factor. An engineered interphase consisting of a partially cross-linked epoxy sizing that could chemically bond to the carbon fiber and form an interpenetrating network with the vinyl ester matrix was found to sharply improve the interfacial adhesion. The mechanisms involved in that improvement were investigated. The diffusion of styrene in the epoxy coating decreased the residual stress induced by the volume shrinkage of the vinyl ester matrix. The optimal value of the thickness was found to be a dominant factor in increasing the value of the interfacial shear strength according to a 2D non-linear finite element model.

  9. Time-dependent behavior of RC beams strengthened with externally bonded FRP plates: interfacial stresses analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyoucef, S.; Tounsi, A.; Benrahou, K. H.; Adda Bedia, E. A.

    2007-12-01

    External bonding of fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites has becomes a popular technique for strengthening concrete structures all over the world. An important failure mode of such strengthened members is the debonding of the FRP plate from the concrete due to high interfacial stresses near the plate ends. For correctly installed FRP plate, failure will occur within the concrete. Accurate predictions of the interfacial stresses are prerequisite for designing against debonding failures. In particular, the interfacial stresses between a beam and soffit plate within the linear elastic range have been addressed by numerous analytical investigations. In this study, the time-dependent behavior of RC beams bonded with thin composite plate was investigated theoretically by including the effect of the adherend shear deformations. The time effects considered here are those that arise from shrinkage and creep deformations of the concrete. This paper presents an analytical model for the interfacial stresses between RC beam and a thin FRP plate bonded to its soffit. The influence of creep and shrinkage effect relative to the time of the casting and the time of the loading of the beams is taken into account. Numerical results from the present analysis are presented to illustrate the significance of time-dependent of adhesive stresses.

  10. Lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion equations with general interfacial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zexi; Huang, Juntao; Yong, Wen-An

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose an interfacial scheme accompanying the lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion equations with general interfacial conditions, including conjugate conditions with or without jumps in heat and mass transfer, continuity of macroscopic variables and normal fluxes in ion diffusion in porous media with different porosity, and the Kapitza resistance in heat transfer. The construction of this scheme is based on our boundary schemes [Huang and Yong, J. Comput. Phys. 300, 70 (2015), 10.1016/j.jcp.2015.07.045] for Robin boundary conditions on straight or curved boundaries. It gives second-order accuracy for straight interfaces and first-order accuracy for curved ones. In addition, the new scheme inherits the advantage of the boundary schemes in which only the current lattice nodes are involved. Such an interfacial scheme is highly desirable for problems with complex geometries or in porous media. The interfacial scheme is numerically validated with several examples. The results show the utility of the constructed scheme and very well support our theoretical predications.

  11. Interfacial phenomena and microscale transport processes in evaporating ultrathin menisci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchamgam, Sashidhar S.

    The study of interfacial phenomena in the three-phase contact line region, where a liquid-vapor interface intersects a solid surface, is of importance to many equilibrium and non-equilibrium processes. However, lack of experimental data on microscale transport processes controlled by interfacial phenomena has restricted progress. This thesis includes a high resolution image analyzing technique, based on reflectivity measurements, that accurately measures the thickness, contact angle and curvature profiles of ultrathin films, drops and curved menisci. In particular, the technique was used to emphasize measurements for thicknesses, delta < 100 nm, while studying delta < 2.5 mum. Using the "reflectivity technique", we studied fluid flow and heat transfer in a wickless, miniature heat pipe, a device which will be a very effective passive heat exchanger in a microgravity environment. The heat pipe is based on the Vertical Constrained Vapor Bubble (VCVB) concept. The broad objective was to increase the efficiency of the miniature heat pipe by enhancing the liquid flow towards the hotter region. This was achieved by understanding and manipulating the wetting and spreading characteristics of the liquid on the solid surface. By using a binary mixture (98% pentane and 2% octane by volume) instead of either pure pentane or octane, we were able to achieve a significant increase in the microscale phase change heat transfer. The experimental work was supported by numerical studies to understand the physics of the system at microscopic scale. In addition, using the reflectivity technique, we enhanced our understanding of interfacial phenomena in the contact line region. Experiments included flow instabilities in HFE-7000 meniscus on quartz (System S1), the spreading of a pentane (System S2 and S3), octane (System S4) and binary mixture menisci (System S5) during evaporation. The main objectives of the work are to present a new experimental technique, new observations, new data

  12. Interfacial rheometry of polymer at a water-oil interface by intra-pair magnetophoresis.

    PubMed

    Cappelli, Stefano; de Jong, Arthur M; Baudry, Jean; Prins, Menno W J

    2016-07-01

    We describe an interfacial rheometry technique based on pairs of micrometer-sized magnetic particles at a fluid-fluid interface. The particles are repeatedly attracted and repelled by well-controlled magnetic dipole-dipole forces, so-called interfacial rheometry by intra-pair magnetophoresis (IPM). From the forces (∼pN), displacements (∼μm) and velocities (∼μm s(-1)) of the particles we are able to quantify the interfacial drag coefficient of particles within a few seconds and over very long timescales. The use of local dipole-dipole forces makes the system insensitive to fluid flow and suited for simultaneously recording many particles in parallel over a long period of time. We apply IPM to study the time-dependent adsorption of an oil-soluble amino-modified silicone polymer at a water-oil interface using carboxylated magnetic particles. At low polymer concentration the carboxylated particles remain on the water side of the water-oil interface, while at high polymer concentrations the particles transit into the oil phase. Both conditions show a drag coefficient that does not depend on time. However, at intermediate polymer concentrations data show an increase of the interfacial drag coefficient as a function of time, with an increase over more than three orders of magnitude (10(-7) to 10(-4) N s m(-1)), pointing to a strong polymer-polymer interaction at the interface. The time-dependence of the interfacial drag appears to be highly sensitive to the polymer concentration and to the ionic strength of the aqueous phase. We foresee that IPM will be a very convenient technique to study fluid-fluid interfaces for a broad range of materials systems. PMID:27253322

  13. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) microgels at the oil-water interface: interfacial properties as a function of temperature.

    PubMed

    Monteux, Cécile; Marlière, Claire; Paris, Pauline; Pantoustier, Nadège; Sanson, Nicolas; Perrin, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    Highly monodisperse poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), PNiPAM, microgels were prepared by the conventional radical polymerization of NiPAM in the presence of dimethylamino ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) monomers at various concentrations. The effect of DMAEMA on the polymerization of PNiPAM microgels was examined at constant initiator (V50) and cross-linker (MBA) concentrations. The presence of DMAEMA in the synthesis batch allows for the preparation of PNiPAM microgels with controlled size and a narrow size distribution. The oil(dodecane)/water interfacial properties of the model PNiPAM microgels were then investigated. The pendant drop technique was used to measure the interfacial tensions as a function of temperature. Over the whole range of temperature (20-45 degrees C), the interfacial tension remains low (on the order of 17 mN/m) and goes through a minimum (12 mN/m) at a temperature of about 34 degrees C, which well matches the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of PNiPAM microgels. Below the VPTT, the decrease in the interfacial tension with temperature is likely to be due to the adsorption of dense layers because of the decrease of the excluded volume interactions. Above the VPTT, we suggest that the increase in the interfacial tension with temperature comes from the adsorption of loosely packed PNiPAM microgels. We also studied the effect of temperature on the stability of emulsions. Dodecane in water emulsions, which form at ambient temperature, are destabilized as the temperature exceeds the VPTT. In light of the interfacial tension results, we suggest that emulsion destabilization arises from the adsorption of aggregates above the VPTT and not from an important desorption of microgels. Aggregate adsorption would bring a sufficiently high number of dodecane molecules into contact with water to induce coalescence without changing the interfacial tension very much. PMID:20681739

  14. Non-Contact Method for Measurement of Surface/Interfacial Liquid Properties with Laser Manipulation Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mitani, Shujiro; Sakai, Keiji

    2008-07-07

    The laser manipulation technique is a powerful tool for studying the liquid surface properties such as surface tension and viscosity. This method has several remarkable features, for example, non-contact, wide range and high sensitivity. Ultra-low interfacial tension, {approx}l{mu}N/m, was measured with this method on the water/heptane interface containing surfactant. This method is also applicable to the observation of highly-viscous and colloidal liquids.

  15. Field evidence for a hybrid interfacial-coseismic seismoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, K. E.; Kulessa, B.; Pugin, A.

    2014-12-01

    In May, 2011, we carried out a field experiment in Leda Clay sediments near Ottawa, Canada to investigate whether seismoelectric conversions might be observed along with the clear P, S and PS converted waves regularly observed during near-surface seismic reflection surveys in that environment. Although high electrical conductivities (~10 Ωm below 6 m depth) were expected to result in weak electrical fields, we were encouraged by the availability of an IVI Minivib 1 vibroseis source, and by the presence of interfacial targets including the top of bedrock at ~23 m depth as well as porosity and textural changes within the overburden revealed by geotechnical logs. Seismic and seismoelectric shot records were acquired separately using both the MiniVib and an in-hole shotgun source. The recording system included 26 grounded dipoles, 4.5 m in length, all equipped with custom-made differential amplifiers. Harmonic subtraction, remote reference subtraction, and stacking of shot records were used to combat electrical noise levels associated with unstable powerline harmonics and apparent AM radio demodulation. Seismic and seismoelectric shot records bear a striking resemblance to each other; direct and refracted P-waves as well as P, S, and PS wave reflections all appear clearly in the seismoelectric records. At first glance, these would appear to be simply co-seismic seismoelectric effects. However, closer inspection reveals that some precede their corresponding seismic arrivals by several milliseconds, and exhibit broader bandwidths (up to 600 Hz) and better coherency. They are inferred to have been generated beneath each dipole receiver by upward travelling P and S-waves arriving at an interface, defined by contrasts in porosity and clay content, 7 m below the surface. These arrivals do not conform to either true co-seismic or true interfacial effects and therefore present a new challenge to our understanding of seismoelectric phenomena.

  16. Orientational anisotropy and interfacial transport in polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, M. M.; Rickman, J. M.; Harmer, M. P.; Chan, H. M.

    2016-04-01

    Interfacial diffusion is governed to a large degree by geometric parameters that are determined by crystallographic orientation. In this study, we assess the impact of orientational anisotropy on mass transport at internal interfaces, focusing on the role of preferred crystallographic orientation (i.e., texture) on mass diffusion in a polycrystal. More specifically, we perform both numerical and analytical studies of steady-state diffusion for polycrystals having various grain-orientation distributions. By relating grain misorientation to grain-boundary energies and, via the Borisov relation, to the diffusivity, we link microstructure variability to kinetics. Our aim is to correlate shape features of the orientation distribution, such as the location and shapes of peaks, with the calculated effective diffusivity. Finally, we discuss the role of crystallographic constraints, such as those associated with grain junctions, in determining the effective diffusivity of a polycrystal.

  17. Nucleation and interfacial adsorption in ternary systems.

    PubMed

    Philippe, T

    2015-03-01

    Nucleation is studied in incompressible ternary fluids by examining the topology of the overall landscape of the energy surface. Minimum free energy paths for nucleation (MFEPs) of a single nucleus in an infinite matrix are computed with the string method in the framework of the continuum theory of nucleation for the regular solution. Properties of the critical nucleus are compared with the predictions of the classical nucleation theory. MFEPs are found to exhibit complex nucleation pathways with non-monotonic variations of compositions in the interfacial region, specifically adsorption of a component. In the symmetric regular solution, the minority component is found to segregate at the interface during nucleation with a concomitant depletion of the nucleus core, resulting in unpredicted partition of the non-selective component. Despite increasing the gradient energy, such inhomogeneity in composition is shown to lower the nucleation barrier. PMID:25747088

  18. Oscillatory interfacial instability between miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Gaponenko, Yuri; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Torregrosa, Marita; Yasnou, Viktar

    Interfacial instabilities occurring between two fluids are of fundamental interest in fluid dynamics, biological systems and engineering applications such as liquid storage, solvent extraction, oil recovery and mixing. Horizontal vibrations applied to stratified layers of immiscible liquids may generate spatially periodic waving of the interface, stationary in the reference frame of the vibrated cell, referred to as a "frozen wave". We present experimental evidence that frozen wave instability exists between two ordinary miscible liquids of similar densities and viscosities. At the experiments and at the numerical model, two superimposed layers of ordinary liquids, water-alcohol of different concentrations, are placed in a closed cavity in a gravitationally stable configuration. The density and viscosity of these fluids are somewhat similar. Similar to the immiscible fluids this instability has a threshold. When the value of forcing is increased the amplitudes of perturbations grow continuously displaying a saw-tooth structure. The decrease of gravity drastically changes the structure of frozen waves.

  19. Surfactants and interfacial phenomena, 2nd Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen

    1989-01-01

    The second edition of this monograph on surfactants has been updated to reflect recent advances in our knowledge of theory and practices. New applications run the gamut from microelectronics and magnetic recording, to biotechnology and nonconventional energy conversion. There is a new chapter on the interactions between surfactants. New sections have been added, and original sections expanded, on such topics as ultralow liquid-liquid interfacial tension; microemulsions, miniemulsions, and multiple emulsions; liquid crystal formation; hydrotropy; and steric forces in the stabilization of dispersions. There is also new material on lime soap dispersing agents; fabric softeners, adsorption and wetting of solid surfaces, both equilibrium and none-equilibrium; the relationship between adsorption and micellation in aqueous solutions and its effect on surface tension reduction; and factors determining micellar structure and shape.

  20. Wear and interfacial transport of material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Bonding across the interface for two solids in contact and the subsequent transfer of material from one surface to another is a direct result of the interfacial bonds being stronger than the cohesive bonds in either of the two solids. Surface tools such as LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe are used to examine adhesive contacts and to determine the direction, nature, quantity of material transfer and properties of the solids which effect transfer and wear. The electronic nature, cohesive binding energies, surface structure, lattice disregistry and distribution of species in surface layers are all found to effect adhesion and transfer or transport for clean surfaces in solid state contact. The influence of adsorbed and reacted surface films from fractions of a monolayer to multilayer reactive films are considered. It is shown that even fractions of a monolayer of surface active species such as oxygen and sulfur can markedly inhibit adhesion and transport.

  1. Liquid-liquid interfacial nanoparticle assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Emrick, Todd S.; Russell, Thomas P.; Dinsmore, Anthony; Skaff, Habib; Lin, Yao

    2008-12-30

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles at the interface between two fluids, and methods to control such self-assembly process, e.g., the surface density of particles assembling at the interface; to utilize the assembled nanoparticles and their ligands in fabrication of capsules, where the elastic properties of the capsules can be varied from soft to tough; to develop capsules with well-defined porosities for ultimate use as delivery systems; and to develop chemistries whereby multiple ligands or ligands with multiple functionalities can be attached to the nanoparticles to promote the interfacial segregation and assembly of the nanoparticles. Certain embodiments use cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles, since the photoluminescence of the particles provides a convenient means by which the spatial location and organization of the particles can be probed. However, the systems and methodologies presented here are general and can, with suitable modification of the chemistries, be adapted to any type of nanoparticle.

  2. Interfacial stress transfer in graphene oxide nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheling; Young, Robert J; Kinloch, Ian A

    2013-01-23

    Raman spectroscopy has been used for the first time to monitor interfacial stress transfer in poly(vinyl alcohol) nanocomposites reinforced with graphene oxide (GO). The graphene oxide nanocomposites were prepared by a simple mixing method and casting from aqueous solution. They were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and polarized Raman spectroscopy and their mechanical properties determined by tensile testing and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. It was found that GO was fully exfoliated during the nanocomposite preparation process and that the GO nanoplatelets tended align in the plane of the films. The stiffness and yield stress of the nanocomposites were found to increase with GO loading but the extension to failure decreased. It was shown that the Raman D band at ~1335 cm(-1) downshifted as the nanocomposites were strained as a result of the interfacial stress transfer between the polymer matrix and GO reinforcement. From knowledge of the Grüneisen parameter for graphene, it was possible to estimate the effective Young's modulus of the GO from the Raman D band shift rate per unit strain to be of the order of 120 GPa. A similar value of effective modulus was found from the tensile mechanical data using the "rule of mixtures" that decreased with GO loading. The accepted value of Young's modulus for GO is in excess of 200 GPa and it is suggested that the lower effective Young's modulus values determined may be due to a combination of finite flake dimensions, waviness and wrinkles, aggregation, and misalignment of the GO flakes.

  3. Stokes-Flow Destabilization by Interfacial Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenkel, Alexander; Halpern, David

    2002-11-01

    We consider the infinitesimal-disturbance stability of a plane Couette-Poiseuille flow of two Newtonian fluids with an insoluble surfactant at the interface, with gravity being excluded to isolate the Marangoni effect of the surfactant-dependent surface-tension. The principal result is that, in contrast to the (well-studied) surfactantless cases of such flows, there is instability (for certain ranges of parameters), for which inertia plays no role, but the non-zero shear of basic velocity at (both sides of) the interface is necessary. A quadratic equation is found for the complex wave-speed of the "interfacial" normal modes of disturbances. Hence, the growth-rate is available as an elementary function of five variables--the wavenumber and the four dimensionless parameters of the problem: the Marangoni number, the viscosity ratio, the interfacial shear-rate of basic velocity, and the thickness ratio. The comparative simplicity of the growth-rate function allows for a rather extensive characterization of instability (by asymptotic and numerical means) over the entire parameter space and for all wavenumbers. In particular, it is long-wave in most cases, but has a "mid-wave" character for some ranges of parameters. The growth rate approaches zero at small wavenumbers. It decreases (linearly) toward negative infinity in the limit of infinitly large wavenumbers. The maximum (over all wavenumbers) growth rate approaches zero in both the limits of small and large Marangoni numbers. Among the different asymptotic limits, the only singular one is the zero limit of surface tension at zero surfactant concentration; only in this (probably, non-physical) case, the instability is short-wave. Finally, the critical (instability-onset) hypersurface in the parameter space is ascertained.

  4. A nanoscale study of charge extraction in organic solar cells: the impact of interfacial molecular configurations.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fu-Ching; Wu, Fu-Chiao; Yen, Chia-Te; Chang, Jay; Chou, Wei-Yang; Gilbert Chang, Shih-Hui; Cheng, Horng-Long

    2015-01-01

    In the optimization of organic solar cells (OSCs), a key problem lies in the maximization of charge carriers from the active layer to the electrodes. Hence, this study focused on the interfacial molecular configurations in efficient OSC charge extraction by theoretical investigations and experiments, including small molecule-based bilayer-heterojunction (sm-BLHJ) and polymer-based bulk-heterojunction (p-BHJ) OSCs. We first examined a well-defined sm-BLHJ model system of OSC composed of p-type pentacene, an n-type perylene derivative, and a nanogroove-structured poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (NS-PEDOT) hole extraction layer. The OSC with NS-PEDOT shows a 230% increment in the short circuit current density compared with that of the conventional planar PEDOT layer. Our theoretical calculations indicated that small variations in the microscopic intermolecular interaction among these interfacial configurations could induce significant differences in charge extraction efficiency. Experimentally, different interfacial configurations were generated between the photo-active layer and the nanostructured charge extraction layer with periodic nanogroove structures. In addition to pentacene, poly(3-hexylthiophene), the most commonly used electron-donor material system in p-BHJ OSCs was also explored in terms of its possible use as a photo-active layer. Local conductive atomic force microscopy was used to measure the nanoscale charge extraction efficiency at different locations within the nanogroove, thus highlighting the importance of interfacial molecular configurations in efficient charge extraction. This study enriches understanding regarding the optimization of the photovoltaic properties of several types of OSCs by conducting appropriate interfacial engineering based on organic/polymer molecular orientations. The ultimate power conversion efficiency beyond at least 15% is highly expected when the best state-of-the-art p-BHJ OSCs are combined with present arguments.

  5. Interfacial bonding and electronic structure of GaN/GaAs interface: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Ruyue; Zhang, Zhaofu; Wang, Changhong; Li, Haobo; Dong, Hong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Weichao; Xie, Xinjian

    2015-04-07

    Understanding of GaN interfacing with GaAs is crucial for GaN to be an effective interfacial layer between high-k oxides and III-V materials with the application in high-mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) devices. Utilizing first principles calculations, here, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the GaN/GaAs interface with respect to the interfacial nitrogen contents. The decrease of interfacial N contents leads to more Ga dangling bonds and As-As dimers. At the N-rich limit, the interface with N concentration of 87.5% shows the most stability. Furthermore, a strong band offsets dependence on the interfacial N concentration is also observed. The valance band offset of N7 with hybrid functional calculation is 0.51 eV. The electronic structure analysis shows that significant interface states exist in all the GaN/GaAs models with various N contents, which originate from the interfacial dangling bonds and some unsaturated Ga and N atoms. These large amounts of gap states result in Fermi level pinning and essentially degrade the device performance.

  6. Rheological and interfacial properties at the equilibrium of almond gum tree exudate (Prunus dulcis) in comparison with gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Mahfoudhi, Nesrine; Sessa, Mariarenata; Ferrari, Giovanna; Hamdi, Salem; Donsi, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Almond gum contains an arabinogalactan-type polysaccharide, which plays an important role in defining its interfacial and rheological properties. In this study, rheological and interfacial properties of almond gum and gum arabic aqueous dispersions were comparatively investigated. The interfacial tension of almond gum and gum arabic aqueous dispersions was measured using the pendant drop method in hexadecane. The asymptotic interfacial tension values for almond gum were significantly lower than the corresponding values measured for gum arabic, especially at high concentration. Rheological properties were characterized by steady and oscillatory tests using a coaxial geometry. Almond gum flow curves exhibited a shear thinning non-Newtonian behavior with a tendency to a Newtonian plateau at low shear rate, while gum arabic flow curves exhibited such behavior only at high shear rate. The influence of temperature (5-50  ℃) on the flow curves was studied at 4% (m/m) gum concentration and the Newtonian viscosities at infinite and at zero shear rate, for gum arabic and almond gum, respectively, were accurately fitted by an Arrhenius-type equation. The dynamic properties of the two gum dispersions were also studied. Both gum dispersions exhibited viscoelastic properties, with the viscous component being predominant in a wider range of concentrations for almond gum, while for gum arabic the elastic component being higher than the elastic one especially at higher concentrations.The rheological and interfacial tension properties of almond gum suggest that it may represent a possible substitute of gum arabic in different food applications.

  7. Interfacial bonding and electronic structure of GaN/GaAs interface: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ruyue; Zhang, Zhaofu; Wang, Changhong; Li, Haobo; Xie, Xinjian; Dong, Hong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Weichao

    2015-04-01

    Understanding of GaN interfacing with GaAs is crucial for GaN to be an effective interfacial layer between high-k oxides and III-V materials with the application in high-mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) devices. Utilizing first principles calculations, here, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the GaN/GaAs interface with respect to the interfacial nitrogen contents. The decrease of interfacial N contents leads to more Ga dangling bonds and As-As dimers. At the N-rich limit, the interface with N concentration of 87.5% shows the most stability. Furthermore, a strong band offsets dependence on the interfacial N concentration is also observed. The valance band offset of N7 with hybrid functional calculation is 0.51 eV. The electronic structure analysis shows that significant interface states exist in all the GaN/GaAs models with various N contents, which originate from the interfacial dangling bonds and some unsaturated Ga and N atoms. These large amounts of gap states result in Fermi level pinning and essentially degrade the device performance.

  8. Interfacial Micromechanics in Fibrous Composites: Design, Evaluation, and Models

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Zhenkun; Li, Xuan; Qin, Fuyong; Qiu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances of interfacial micromechanics in fiber reinforced composites using micro-Raman spectroscopy are given. The faced mechanical problems for interface design in fibrous composites are elaborated from three optimization ways: material, interface, and computation. Some reasons are depicted that the interfacial evaluation methods are difficult to guarantee the integrity, repeatability, and consistency. Micro-Raman study on the fiber interface failure behavior and the main interface mechanical problems in fibrous composites are summarized, including interfacial stress transfer, strength criterion of interface debonding and failure, fiber bridging, frictional slip, slip transition, and friction reloading. The theoretical models of above interface mechanical problems are given. PMID:24977189

  9. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1995-08-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites mechanical behavior are influenced by the bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  10. Interfacial micromechanics in fibrous composites: design, evaluation, and models.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhenkun; Li, Xuan; Qin, Fuyong; Qiu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances of interfacial micromechanics in fiber reinforced composites using micro-Raman spectroscopy are given. The faced mechanical problems for interface design in fibrous composites are elaborated from three optimization ways: material, interface, and computation. Some reasons are depicted that the interfacial evaluation methods are difficult to guarantee the integrity, repeatability, and consistency. Micro-Raman study on the fiber interface failure behavior and the main interface mechanical problems in fibrous composites are summarized, including interfacial stress transfer, strength criterion of interface debonding and failure, fiber bridging, frictional slip, slip transition, and friction reloading. The theoretical models of above interface mechanical problems are given. PMID:24977189

  11. Interfacial tension in immiscible mixtures of alkali halides.

    PubMed

    Lockett, Vera; Rukavishnikova, Irina V; Stepanov, Victor P; Tkachev, Nikolai K

    2010-02-01

    The interfacial tension of the liquid-phase interface in seven immiscible reciprocal ternary mixtures of lithium fluoride with the following alkali halides: CsCl, KBr, RbBr, CsBr, KI, RbI, and CsI was measured using the cylinder weighing method over a wide temperature range. It was shown that for all mixtures the interfacial tension gradually decreases with growing temperature. The interfacial tension of the reciprocal ternary mixtures at a given temperature increases both with the alkali cation radius (K(+) < Rb(+) < Cs(+)) and with the radius of the halogen anion (Cl(-) < Br(-) < I(-)). PMID:20094678

  12. Interfacial self-assembly of amino acids and peptides: Scanning tunneling microscopy investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Liu, Yibiao; Zhang, Xueji

    2011-12-01

    Proteins play important roles in human daily life. To take advantage of the lessons learned from nature, it is essential to investigate the self-assembly of subunits of proteins, i.e., amino acids and polypeptides. Due to its high resolution and versatility of working environment, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has become a powerful tool for studying interfacial molecular assembly structures. This review is intended to reflect the progress in studying interfacial self-assembly of amino acids and peptides by STM. In particular, we focus on environment-induced polymorphism, chiral recognition, and coadsorption behavior with molecular templates. These studies would be highly beneficial to research endeavors exploring the mechanism and nanoscale-controlling molecular assemblies of amino acids and polypeptides on surfaces, understanding the origin of life, unravelling the essence of disease at the molecular level and deeming what is necessary for the ``bottom-up'' nanofabrication of molecular devices and biosensors being constructed with useful properties and desired performance.

  13. Surface modification of carbon fibers by a polyether sulfone emulsion sizing for increased interfacial adhesion with polyether sulfone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Haojie; Zhang, Shouchun; Lu, Chunxiang

    2014-10-01

    Interests on carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites are growing rapidly, but the challenges with poor interfacial adhesion have slowed their adoption. In this work, a polyether sulfone (PES) emulsion sizing was prepared successfully for increased interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber/PES composites. To obtain a high-quality PES emulsion sizing, the key factor, emulsifier concentration, was studied by dynamic light scattering technique. The results demonstrated that the suitable weight ratio of PES to emulsifier was 8:3, and the resulting PES emulsion sizing had an average particle diameter of 117 nm and Zeta potential of -52.6 mV. After sizing, the surface oxygen-containing functional groups, free energy and wettability of carbon fibers increased significantly, which were advantageous to promote molecular-level contact between carbon fiber and PES. Finally, short beam shear tests were performed to evaluate the interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber/PES composites. The results indicated that PES emulsion sizing played a critical role for the enhanced interfacial adhesion in carbon fiber/PES composites, and a 26% increase of interlaminar shear strength was achieved, because of the improved fiber surface wettability and interfacial compatibility between carbon fiber and PES.

  14. Particle-laden interfaces: direct calculation of interfacial stress from a discrete particle simulation of a pendant drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Chuan; Botto, Lorenzo

    2015-11-01

    The adsorption of solid particles to fluid interfaces is exploited in several multiphase flow technologies, and plays a fundamental role in the dynamics of particle-laden drops. A fundamental question is how the particles modify the effective mechanical properties of the interface. Using a fast Eulerian-Lagrangian model for interfacial colloids, we have simulated a pendant drop whose surface is covered with spherical particles having short-range repulsion. The interface curvature induces non-uniform and anisotropic interfacial stresses, which we calculate by an interfacial extension of the Irving-Kirkwood formula. The isotropic component of this stress, related to the effective surface tension, is in good agreement with that calculated by fitting the drop shape to the Young-Laplace equation. The anisotropic component, related to the interfacial shear elasticity, is highly non uniform: small at the drop apex, significant along the drop sides. The reduction in surface tension can be substantial even below maximum surface packing. We illustrate this point by simulating phase-coarsening of a two-phase mixture in which the presence of interfacial particles ``freezes'' the coarsening process, for surface coverage well below maximum packing This work is supported by the EU through the Marie Curie Grant FLOWMAT (618335).

  15. Interfacial adhesion for microelectronics and MEMS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Marian Siobhan

    2007-12-01

    The reliability of thin film systems is important to the continued development of microelectronic and micro-electro-mechanical systems. Most often, reliability of these systems is tied to the ability of the films to remain adhered to its substrate. By measuring the amount of energy to separate the film, interfacial fracture energy, and prediciting trends researchers can predicts film lifetimes. Recent work to measure this energy has resulted in several different testing techniques including spontaneous buckling, indentation induced delamination and four point bending. Literature has shown good agreement between delamination test methods, but only when energy dissipation into the substrate is minimized. Using a W/Si system, the effect of energy dissipation was shown to decrease from 0.6 J/m2 to 0.2 J/m2 between different methods; one where the only fracture was along the interface and the other where cracking also occurred in the film and substrate. For systems where fracture only occurs along the interface, such as Au/Si, the calculated fracture energies are identical if the energy put into the system is kept near the needed strain energy to cause delamination. Overlayers of different stresses and thickness on Au/Si showed that the adhesion energies could change by a factor of three (Chapter 3). This dependence on applied energy is also shown when comparisons of four point bending and stressed overlayer test methods were completed on Pt/Si systems. The fracture energies of Pt/Ti/SiO2 were studied using four-point bending and compressive overlayers. Varying the thickness of the Ti film from 2 to 17 nm in a Pt/Ti/SiO2 system, both test methods showed an increase of adhesion energy until the nominal Ti thickness was 12nm. Then this adhesion energy began to decrease. This decrease was due to an increase in the Pt grain size after a nominal 12nm thickness (Chapter 4 and 5). While the trends in energy release rate are similar, the magnitude of the toughness between the

  16. Interfacial patterns in magnetorheological fluids: Azimuthal field-induced structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Eduardo O.; Lira, Sérgio A.; Miranda, José A.

    2015-08-01

    Despite their practical and academic relevance, studies of interfacial pattern formation in confined magnetorheological (MR) fluids have been largely overlooked in the literature. In this work, we present a contribution to this soft matter research topic and investigate the emergence of interfacial instabilities when an inviscid, initially circular bubble of a Newtonian fluid is surrounded by a MR fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell apparatus. An externally applied, in-plane azimuthal magnetic field produced by a current-carrying wire induces interfacial disturbances at the two-fluid interface, and pattern-forming structures arise. Linear stability analysis, weakly nonlinear theory, and a vortex sheet approach are used to access early linear and intermediate nonlinear time regimes, as well as to determine stationary interfacial shapes at fully nonlinear stages.

  17. Interfacial patterns in magnetorheological fluids: Azimuthal field-induced structures.

    PubMed

    Dias, Eduardo O; Lira, Sérgio A; Miranda, José A

    2015-08-01

    Despite their practical and academic relevance, studies of interfacial pattern formation in confined magnetorheological (MR) fluids have been largely overlooked in the literature. In this work, we present a contribution to this soft matter research topic and investigate the emergence of interfacial instabilities when an inviscid, initially circular bubble of a Newtonian fluid is surrounded by a MR fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell apparatus. An externally applied, in-plane azimuthal magnetic field produced by a current-carrying wire induces interfacial disturbances at the two-fluid interface, and pattern-forming structures arise. Linear stability analysis, weakly nonlinear theory, and a vortex sheet approach are used to access early linear and intermediate nonlinear time regimes, as well as to determine stationary interfacial shapes at fully nonlinear stages. PMID:26382499

  18. Molecular dynamics study of contact mechanics: contact area and interfacial separation from small to full contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chunyan; Persson, Bo

    2008-03-01

    We report a molecular dynamics study of the contact between a rigid solid with a randomly rough surface and an elastic block with a flat surface. We study the contact area and the interfacial separation from small contact (low load) to full contact (high load). For small load the contact area varies linearly with the load and the interfacial separation depends logarithmically on the load [1-4]. For high load the contact area approaches to the nominal contact area (i.e., complete contact), and the interfacial separation approaches to zero. The present results may be very important for soft solids, e.g., rubber, or for very smooth surfaces, where complete contact can be reached at moderate high loads without plastic deformation of the solids. References: [1] C. Yang and B.N.J. Persson, arXiv:0710.0276, (to appear in Phys. Rev. Lett.) [2] B.N.J. Persson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 125502 (2007) [3] L. Pei, S. Hyun, J.F. Molinari and M.O. Robbins, J. Mech. Phys. Sol. 53, 2385 (2005) [4] M. Benz, K.J. Rosenberg, E.J. Kramer and J.N. Israelachvili, J. Phy. Chem. B.110, 11884 (2006)

  19. Interfacial activation of Candida antarctica lipase B: combined evidence from experiment and simulation

    PubMed Central

    Zisis, Themistoklis; Freddolino, Peter L.; Turunen, Petri; van Teeseling, Muriel C. F.

    2015-01-01

    Lipase immobilization is frequently used for altering the catalytic properties of these industrially used enzymes. Many lipases bind strongly to hydrophobic surfaces where they undergo interfacial activation. Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB), one of the most commonly used biocatalysts, is frequently discussed as an atypical lipase lacking interfacial activation. Here we show that CalB displays an enhanced catalytic rate for large, bulky substrates when adsorbed to a hydrophobic interface composed of densely packed alkyl chains. We attribute this increased activity of more than 7-fold to a conformational change that yields a more open active site. This hypothesis is supported by molecular dynamics simulations that show a high mobility for a small ‘lid’ (helix α5) close to the active site. Molecular docking calculations confirm that a highly open conformation of this helix is required for binding large, bulky substrates and that this conformation is favored in a hydrophobic environment. Taken together, our combined approach provides clear evidence for the interfacial activation of CalB on highly hydrophobic surfaces. In contrast to other lipases, however, the conformational change only affects large, bulky substrates, leading to the conclusion that CalB acts like an esterase for small substrates and as a lipase for substrates with large alcohol substituents. PMID:26346632

  20. Quantifying Interfacial Electric Fields and Local Crystallinity in Polymer-Fullerene Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gearba, Raluca I.; Mills, Travis; Morris, Josh; Pindak, Ron; Black, Charles T.; Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2011-01-01

    The challenges of experimentally probing the physical and electronic structures of the highly intermixed organic semiconductor blends that comprise active layers in high-performance organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells ultimately limit the fundamental understanding of the device performance. We use Fourier-transform IR (FTIR)-absorption spectroscopy to quantitatively determine the interfacial electric field in blended poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):phenyl- C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) thin films. The interfacial electric field is ≈0.2 V nm-1 in the as-spun film and blends annealing at temperatures as high as 150 °C, which is the optimal annealing temperature in terms of OPV performance. The field decreases to a negligible value upon further annealing to 170 °C, at which temperature PCBM changes from amorphous to crystalline and the open-circuit voltage of the solar cell decreases from 0.62 to 0.4 V. In addition, our measurements also allow determination of the absolute degree of crystallinity within the acceptor material. The roles of interfacial field and local crystallinity in OPV device performance are discussed.

  1. Effect of self-assembled InAs islands on the interfacial roughness of optical-switched resonant tunneling diode.

    PubMed

    Tian, Haitao; Wang, Lu; Shi, Zhenwu; Gao, Huaiju; Zhang, Shuhui; Wang, Wenxin; Chen, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Embedding a quantum dot [QD] layer between the double barriers of resonant tunneling diode [RTD] is proved to be an effective method to increase the sensitivity of QD-RTD single-photon detector. However, the interfacial flatness of this device would be worsened due to the introduction of quantum dots. In this paper, we demonstrate that the interfacial quality of this device can be optimized through increasing the growth temperature of AlAs up barrier. The glancing incidence X-ray reflectivity and the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements show that the interfacial smoothness has been greatly improved, and the photo-luminescence test indicated that the InAs QDs were maintained at the same time. The smoother interface was attributed to the evaporation of segregated indium atoms at InGaAs surface layer. PACS: 73.40.GK, 73.23._b, 73.21.La, 74.62.Dh. PMID:22333518

  2. Effect of self-assembled InAs islands on the interfacial roughness of optical-switched resonant tunneling diode.

    PubMed

    Tian, Haitao; Wang, Lu; Shi, Zhenwu; Gao, Huaiju; Zhang, Shuhui; Wang, Wenxin; Chen, Hong

    2012-02-14

    Embedding a quantum dot [QD] layer between the double barriers of resonant tunneling diode [RTD] is proved to be an effective method to increase the sensitivity of QD-RTD single-photon detector. However, the interfacial flatness of this device would be worsened due to the introduction of quantum dots. In this paper, we demonstrate that the interfacial quality of this device can be optimized through increasing the growth temperature of AlAs up barrier. The glancing incidence X-ray reflectivity and the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements show that the interfacial smoothness has been greatly improved, and the photo-luminescence test indicated that the InAs QDs were maintained at the same time. The smoother interface was attributed to the evaporation of segregated indium atoms at InGaAs surface layer. PACS: 73.40.GK, 73.23._b, 73.21.La, 74.62.Dh.

  3. Interfacial Behavior of Polymers: Using Interfaces to Manipulate Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Thomas P.

    2015-02-26

    The self-assembly of block copolymers into arrays of nanoscopic domains with areal densities approaching 10 terbit/in2 offer tremendous promise for the fabrication of ultrahigh density storage devices, batteries and other energy relevant devices. Interfacial interactions play a key role in dictating the orientation and ordering of these self-assembling materials. We have investigated the use of preferential and neutral solvents to overcome interfacial interactions and to rapid accelerate the dynamics of these materials, since the high molecular weight of the polymers significantly slows diffusion processes. Using a tailor-made chamber, we have introduced solvent vapor annealing (SVA) where solvent with a well-defined vapor pressures sells the copolymer film, enabling control over the solvent content in the film and, therefore, the thermodynamics governing the microphase separation of the copolymer, the interactions with the substrate and air interfaces and the dynamics. This tailor-made chamber also allows us to perform in situ grazing incidence x-ray scattering studies where the copolymer films can be characterized on the nanoscopic level over macroscopic distances. The methodologies developed in our laboratories are now used in numerous laboratories world-wide. We have found that arrays of block copolymer microdomains with perfect orientational order can be achieved over macroscopic areas using the SVA processes but the translational order is perturbed during the film drying process. As the copolymer film is swollen, the confinement of the film to the substrate introduces a frustration to the ordering of the microdomains. After equilibrium is achieved, when the swollen films are brought very close to the ordering transition, near perfect ordering is achieved. However, upon removal of the solvent, the confinement of the film to the substrate introduces translational disorder. We have investigated the influence of the rate of solvent removal and have found that

  4. Bulk and interfacial glass transitions of water.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Deepanjan; Payne, Candace N; Sadtchenko, Vlad

    2011-06-16

    Fast scanning calorimetry (FSC) was employed to investigate glass softening dynamics in bulk-like and ultrathin glassy water films. Bulk-like water samples were prepared by vapor-deposition on the surface of a tungsten filament near 140 K where vapor-deposition results in low enthalpy glassy water films. The vapor-deposition approach was also used to grow multiple nanoscale (approximately 50 nm thick) water films alternated with benzene and methanoic films of similar dimensions. When heated from cryogenic temperatures, the ultrathin water films underwent a well manifested glass softening transition at temperatures 20 K below the onset of crystallization. However, no such transition was observed in bulk-like samples prior to their crystallization. These results indicate that thin-film water demonstrates glass softening dynamics that are dramatically distinct from those of the bulk phase. We attribute these differences to water's interfacial glass transition, which occurs at temperatures tens of degrees lower than that in the bulk. Implications of these findings for past studies of glass softening dynamics in various glassy water samples are discussed. PMID:21401034

  5. Modeling interfacial liquid layers on environmental ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, M. H.; Moussa, S. G.; McNeill, V. F.

    2011-09-01

    Interfacial layers on ice significantly influence air-ice chemical interactions. In solute-containing aqueous systems, a liquid brine may form upon freezing due to the exclusion of impurities from the ice crystal lattice coupled with freezing point depression in the concentrated brine. The brine may be segregated to the air-ice interface where it creates a surface layer, in micropockets, or at grain boundaries or triple junctions. We present a model for brines and their associated liquid layers in environmental ice systems that is valid over a wide range of temperatures and solute concentrations. The model is derived from fundamental equlibrium thermodynamics and takes into account nonideal solution behavior in the brine, partitioning of the solute into the ice matrix, and equilibration between the brine and the gas phase for volatile solutes. We find that these phenomena are important to consider when modeling brines in environmental ices, especially at low temperatures. We demonstrate its application for environmentally important volatile and nonvolatile solutes including NaCl, HCl, and HNO3. The model is compared to existing models and experimental data from literature where available. We also identify environmentally relevant regimes where brine is not predicted to exist, but the QLL may significantly impact air-ice chemical interactions. This model can be used to improve the representation of air-ice chemical interactions in polar atmospheric chemistry models.

  6. Interfacial phase transitions in conducting fluids.

    PubMed

    Freyland, Werner

    2008-02-21

    We present a review, largely based on recent experimental work of our group, on phase transitions at interfaces of fluid metals, alloys and ionic liquids. After a brief analysis of possible experimental errors and limitations of surface sensitive methods, we first deal with first-order wetting transitions at the liquid/vapour and liquid/wall interface in systems such as Ga-based alloys, K-KCl melts, and fluid Hg. The following chapter refers to surface freezing or surface induced crystallization in different metal alloys. The respective surface phase diagrams are discussed in comparison with their bulk counterpart. In the last part we present very recent investigations of ionic liquid interfaces, including order-disorder transitions at the liquid/vapour interface and examples of two-dimensional phase transitions at the electrified ionic liquid/metal interface. Finally, a simple electrowetting experiment with an ionic liquid droplet under vacuum is described which gives new insight into the contact angle saturation problem. The article ends up with a few perspective remarks on open problems and potential impact of interfacial phenomena on applied research. PMID:18259631

  7. Nanofiber Scaffold Gradients for Interfacial Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Murugan; Young, Marian F.; Thomas, Vinoy; Sun, Limin; Chow, Laurence C.; Tison, Christopher K.; Chatterjee, Kaushik; Miles, William C.; Simon, Carl G.

    2012-01-01

    We have designed a 2-spinnerette device that can directly electrospin nanofiber scaffolds containing a gradient in composition that can be used to engineer interfacial tissues such as ligament and tendon. Two types of nanofibers are simultaneously electrospun in an overlapping pattern to create a nonwoven mat of nanofibers containing a composition gradient. The approach is an advance over previous methods due to its versatility - gradients can be formed from any materials that can be electrospun. A dye was used to characterize the 2-spinnerette approach and applicability to tissue engineering was demonstrated by fabricating nanofibers with gradients in amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles (nACP). Adhesion and proliferation of osteogenic cells (MC3T3-E1 murine pre-osteoblasts) on gradients was enhanced on the regions of the gradients that contained higher nACP content yielding a graded osteoblast response. Since increases in soluble calcium and phosphate ions stimulate osteoblast function, we measured their release and observed significant release from nanofibers containing nACP. The nanofiber-nACP gradients fabricated herein can be applied to generate tissues with osteoblast gradients such as ligaments or tendons. In conclusion, these results introduce a versatile approach for fabricating nanofiber gradients that can have application for engineering graded tissues. PMID:22286209

  8. Design principles of interfacial thermal conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanco, Carlos; Rastgarkafshgarkolaei, Rouzbeh; Zhang, Jingjie; Le, Nam; Norris, Pamela; Ghosh, Avik

    We explore fundamental principles to design the thermal conductance across solid interfaces by changing the composition and disorder of an intermediate matching layer. In absence of phonon-phonon interactions, the layer addition involves two competing effects that influence the conductance. The layer can act as an impedance matching 'bridge' to increase the mode-averaged phonon transmission. However, it also reduces the relevant modes that conserve their momenta transverse to the interface, so that the net result depends on features such as the overlap of conserving modes and the dispersivity of the transverse subbands. Moving into the interacting anharmonic regime, we find that the added layer aids conductance when the decreased resistances at the contact-layer boundaries compensate for the layer resistance. In fact, we show that the maximum conductance corresponds to an exact matching of the two separate contact-layer resistances. For instance, if we vary just the atomic mass across layers, then maximum conductance happens when the intervening layer mass is the geometric mean of the contact masses. We conjecture that the best interfacial layer is one that is compositionally graded into many geometric means - in other words, an exponential variation in thermal impedance.

  9. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries. PMID:26781172

  10. Interfacial properties of stanene-metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ying; Pan, Feng; Ye, Meng; Wang, Yangyang; Pan, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiuying; Li, Jingzhen; Zhang, Han; Lu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Recently, two-dimensional buckled honeycomb stanene has been manufactured by molecular beam epitaxy growth. Free-standing stanene is predicted to have a sizable opened band gap of 100 meV at the Dirac point due to spin-orbit coupling (SOC), resulting in many fascinating properties such as quantum spin Hall effect, quantum anomalous Hall effect, and quantum valley Hall effect. In the first time, we systematically study the interfacial properties of stanene-metal interfaces (metals = Ag, Au, Cu, Al, Pd, Pt, Ir, and Ni) by using ab initio electronic structure calculations considering the SOC effects. The honeycomb structure of stanene is preserved on the metal supports, but the buckling height is changed. The buckling of stanene on the Au, Al, Ag, and Cu metal supports is higher than that of free-standing stanene. By contrast, a planar graphene-like structure is stabilized for stanene on the Ir, Pd, Pt, and Ni metal supports. The band structure of stanene is destroyed on all the metal supports, accompanied by a metallization of stanene because the covalent bonds between stanene and the metal supports are formed and the structure of stanene is distorted. Besides, no tunneling barrier exists between stanene and the metal supports. Therefore, stanene and the eight metals form a good vertical Ohmic contact.

  11. Interfacial functionalization and engineering of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang

    The intense research interest in nanoscience and nanotechnology is largely fueled by the unique properties of nanoscale materials. In this dissertation, the research efforts are focused on surface functionalization and interfacial engineering of functional nanoparticles in the preparation of patchy nanoparticles (e.g., Janus nanoparticles and Neapolitan nanoparticles) such that the nanoparticle structures and properties may be manipulated to an unprecedented level of sophistication. Experimentally, Janus nanoparticles were prepared by an interfacial engineering method where one hemisphere of the originally hydrophobic nanoparticles was replaced with hydrophilic ligands at the air|liquid or solid|liquid interface. The amphiphilic surface characters of the Janus nanoparticles were verified by contact angle measurements, as compared to those of the bulk-exchange counterparts where the two types of ligands were distributed rather homogeneously on the nanoparticle surface. In a further study, a mercapto derivative of diacetylene was used as the hydrophilic ligands to prepare Janus nanoparticles by using hydrophobic hexanethiolate-protected gold nanoparticles as the starting materials. Exposure to UV irradiation led to effective covalent cross-linking between the diacetylene moieties of neighboring ligands and hence marked enhancement of the structural integrity of the Janus nanoparticles, which was attributable to the impeded surface diffusion of the thiol ligands on the nanoparticle surface, as manifested in fluorescence measurements of aged nanoparticles. More complicated bimetallic AgAu Janus nanoparticles were prepared by interfacial galvanic exchange reactions of a Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer of 1-hexanethiolate-passivated silver nanoparticles on a glass slide with gold(I)-mercaptopropanediol complex in a water/ethanol solution. The resulting nanoparticles exhibited an asymmetrical distribution not only of the organic capping ligands on the nanoparticle surface but

  12. Interfacial properties of stanene–metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ying; Pan, Feng; Ye, Meng; Wang, Yangyang; Pan, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiuying; Li, Jingzhen; Zhang, Han; Lu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Recently, two-dimensional buckled honeycomb stanene has been manufactured by molecular beam epitaxy growth. Free-standing stanene is predicted to have a sizable opened band gap of 100 meV at the Dirac point due to spin–orbit coupling (SOC), resulting in many fascinating properties such as quantum spin Hall effect, quantum anomalous Hall effect, and quantum valley Hall effect. In the first time, we systematically study the interfacial properties of stanene–metal interfaces (metals = Ag, Au, Cu, Al, Pd, Pt, Ir, and Ni) by using ab initio electronic structure calculations considering the SOC effects. The honeycomb structure of stanene is preserved on the metal supports, but the buckling height is changed. The buckling of stanene on the Au, Al, Ag, and Cu metal supports is higher than that of free-standing stanene. By contrast, a planar graphene-like structure is stabilized for stanene on the Ir, Pd, Pt, and Ni metal supports. The band structure of stanene is destroyed on all the metal supports, accompanied by a metallization of stanene because the covalent bonds between stanene and the metal supports are formed and the structure of stanene is distorted. Besides, no tunneling barrier exists between stanene and the metal supports. Therefore, stanene and the eight metals form a good vertical Ohmic contact.

  13. Surface and interfacial creases in a bilayer tubular soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Mir Jalil; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-08-01

    Surface and interfacial creases induced by biological growth are common types of instability in soft biological tissues. This study focuses on the criteria for the onset of surface and interfacial creases as well as their morphological evolution in a growing bilayer soft tube within a confined environment. Critical growth ratios for triggering surface and interfacial creases are investigated both analytically and numerically. Analytical interpretations provide preliminary insights into critical stretches and growth ratios for the onset of instability and formation of both surface and interfacial creases. However, the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution pattern of the model after instability; therefore nonlinear finite element simulations are carried out to replicate the poststability morphological patterns of the structure. Analytical and computational simulation results demonstrate that the initial geometry, growth ratio, and shear modulus ratio of the layers are the most influential factors to control surface and interfacial crease formation in this soft tubular bilayer. The competition between the stretch ratios in the free and interfacial surfaces is one of the key driving factors to determine the location of the first crease initiation. These findings may provide some fundamental understanding in the growth modeling of tubular biological tissues such as esophagi and airways as well as offering useful clues into normal and pathological functions of these tissues. PMID:27627333

  14. Interfacial Water-Transport Effects in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kienitz, Brian; Yamada, Haruhiko; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Weber, Adam

    2009-11-19

    It is well known that the proton-exchange membrane is perhaps the most critical component of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. Typical membranes, such as Nafion(R), require hydration to conduct efficiently and are instrumental in cell water management. Recently, evidence has been shown that these membranes might have different interfacial morphology and transport properties than in the bulk. In this paper, experimental data combined with theoretical simulations will be presented that explore the existence and impact of interfacial resistance on water transport for Nafion(R) 21x membranes. A mass-transfer coefficient for the interfacial resistance is calculated from experimental data using different permeation cells. This coefficient is shown to depend exponentially on relative humidity or water activity. The interfacial resistance does not seem to exist for liquid/membrane or membrane/membrane interfaces. The effect of the interfacial resistance is to flatten the water-content profiles within the membrane during operation. Under typical operating conditions, the resistance is on par with the water-transport resistance of the bulk membrane. Thus, the interfacial resistance can be dominant especially in thin, dry membranes and can affect overall fuel-cell performance.

  15. Surface and interfacial creases in a bilayer tubular soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Mir Jalil; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-08-01

    Surface and interfacial creases induced by biological growth are common types of instability in soft biological tissues. This study focuses on the criteria for the onset of surface and interfacial creases as well as their morphological evolution in a growing bilayer soft tube within a confined environment. Critical growth ratios for triggering surface and interfacial creases are investigated both analytically and numerically. Analytical interpretations provide preliminary insights into critical stretches and growth ratios for the onset of instability and formation of both surface and interfacial creases. However, the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution pattern of the model after instability; therefore nonlinear finite element simulations are carried out to replicate the poststability morphological patterns of the structure. Analytical and computational simulation results demonstrate that the initial geometry, growth ratio, and shear modulus ratio of the layers are the most influential factors to control surface and interfacial crease formation in this soft tubular bilayer. The competition between the stretch ratios in the free and interfacial surfaces is one of the key driving factors to determine the location of the first crease initiation. These findings may provide some fundamental understanding in the growth modeling of tubular biological tissues such as esophagi and airways as well as offering useful clues into normal and pathological functions of these tissues.

  16. Surface and interfacial creases in a bilayer tubular soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Mir Jalil; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-08-01

    Surface and interfacial creases induced by biological growth are common types of instability in soft biological tissues. This study focuses on the criteria for the onset of surface and interfacial creases as well as their morphological evolution in a growing bilayer soft tube within a confined environment. Critical growth ratios for triggering surface and interfacial creases are investigated both analytically and numerically. Analytical interpretations provide preliminary insights into critical stretches and growth ratios for the onset of instability and formation of both surface and interfacial creases. However, the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution pattern of the model after instability; therefore nonlinear finite element simulations are carried out to replicate the poststability morphological patterns of the structure. Analytical and computational simulation results demonstrate that the initial geometry, growth ratio, and shear modulus ratio of the layers are the most influential factors to control surface and interfacial crease formation in this soft tubular bilayer. The competition between the stretch ratios in the free and interfacial surfaces is one of the key driving factors to determine the location of the first crease initiation. These findings may provide some fundamental understanding in the growth modeling of tubular biological tissues such as esophagi and airways as well as offering useful clues into normal and pathological functions of these tissues.

  17. Interfacial and transport properties of nanoconstrained inorganic and organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocherlakota, Lakshmi Suhasini

    Nanoscale constraints impact the material properties of both organic and inorganic systems. The systems specifically studied here are (i) nanoconstrained polymeric systems, poly(l-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) relevant to gas separation membranes (ii) Zwitterionic polymers poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate)(pSBMA), poly(carboxybetaine acrylamide) (pCBAA), and poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl methacrylate) (PEGMA) brushes critical for reducing bio-fouling (iii) Surface properties of N-layer graphene sheets. Interfacial constraints in ultrathin poly(l-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP) membranes yielded gas permeabilities and CO2/helium selectivities that exceed bulk PTMSP membrane transport properties by up to three-fold for membranes of submicrometer thickness. Indicative of a free volume increase, a molecular energetic mobility analysis (involving intrinsic friction analysis) revealed enhanced methyl side group mobilities in thin PTMSP membranes with maximum permeation, compared to bulk films. Aging studies conducted over the timescales relevant to the conducted experiments signify that the free volume states in the thin film membranes are highly unstable in the presence of sorbing gases such as CO2. To maintain this high free volume configuration of polymer while improving the temporal stability an "inverse" architecture to conventional polymer nanocomposites was investigated, in which the polymer phase of PTMSP and PEO were interfacially and dimensionally constrained in nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. While with this architecture the benefits of nanocomposite and ultrathin film membranes of PTMSP could be reproduced and improved upon, also the temporal stability could be enhanced substantially. The PEO-AAO nanocomposite membranes also revealed improved gas selectivity properties of CO2 over helium. In the thermal transition studies of zwitterionic pSBMA brushes a reversible critical transition temperature of 60

  18. Interfacial shear strength of cast and directionally solidified NiAl-sapphire fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Asthana, R.; Noebe, R. D.

    1993-09-01

    The feasibility of fabricating intermetallic NiAl-sapphire fiber composites by casting and zone directional solidification has been examined. The fiber-matrix interfacial shear strengths measured using a fiber push-out technique in both cast and directionally solidified composites are greater than the strengths reported for composites fabricated by powder cloth process using organic binders. Microscopic examination of fibers extracted from cast, directionally solidified (DS), and thermally cycled composites, and the high values of interfacial shear strengths suggest that the fiber-matrix interface does not degrade due to casting and directional solidification. Sapphire fibers do not pin grain boundaries during directional solidification, suggesting that this technique can be used to fabricate sapphire fiber reinforced NiAl composites with single crystal matrices.

  19. Interfacial Shear Strength of Cast and Directionally Solidified Nial-Sapphire Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Asthana, R.; Noebe, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating intermetallic NiAl-sapphire fiber composites by casting and zone directional solidification has been examined. The fiber-matrix interfacial shear strengths measured using a fiber push-out technique in both cast and directionally solidified composites are greater than the strengths reported for composites fabricated by powder cloth process using organic binders. Microscopic examination of fibers extracted from cast, directionally solidified (DS), and thermally cycled composites, and the high values of interfacial shear strengths suggest that the fiber-matrix interface does not degrade due to casting and directional solidification. Sapphire fibers do not pin grain boundaries during directional solidification, suggesting that this technique can be used to fabricate sapphire fiber reinforced NiAl composites with single crystal matrices.

  20. A Deterministic Interfacial Cyclic Oxidation Spalling Model. Part 1; Model Development and Parametric Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2002-01-01

    An equation has been developed to model the iterative scale growth and spalling process that occurs during cyclic oxidation of high temperature materials. Parabolic scale growth and spalling of a constant surface area fraction have been assumed. Interfacial spallation of the only the thickest segments was also postulated. This simplicity allowed for representation by a simple deterministic summation series. Inputs are the parabolic growth rate constant, the spall area fraction, oxide stoichiometry, and cycle duration. Outputs include the net weight change behavior, as well as the total amount of oxygen and metal consumed, the total amount of oxide spalled, and the mass fraction of oxide spalled. The outputs all follow typical well-behaved trends with the inputs and are in good agreement with previous interfacial models.

  1. Photocurrent generation of a single-gate graphene p-n junction fabricated by interfacial modification.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Sekine, Y; Suzuki, S; Maeda, F; Hibino, H

    2015-09-25

    A back-gate graphene p-n junction was achieved by selective interfacial modification of a chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene field effect transistor (FET). Silane self-assembled monolayer (SAM) patterns were used to fabricate uniform p- and n-doped regions and a sharp p-n junction in the graphene FET channel. A gate-dependent photocurrent response was observed at the graphene p-n junction, and exhibited a maximum signal between two Dirac point voltages of SAM-doped graphene regions. A spatial photocurrent map shows that the photocurrent generated at the junction region was much larger than that from graphene/electrode junctions under the same incident laser power. This single-peak characteristic photocurrent in CVD graphene is dominated by the photothermoelectric contribution, and is highly sensitive to the power of incident laser. The SAM interfacial modification method provides a feasible route for the fabrication of efficient graphene-based photodetectors. PMID:26334952

  2. On the Role of Interfacial Reaction in the Wetting in Metallic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan; Shen, Ping; Huang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-05-01

    Chemical reaction and formation of intermetallic compounds at the interface are widely believed to have a beneficial effect on the wetting in metallic systems. However, we demonstrated in this study that it might be an erroneous or at least imperfect viewpoint, which is misled by the presence of native oxide film of metals. Using a dispensed sessile drop technique together with substrate pre-annealing treatment in high vacuum, we found that the wetting of clean Cu, Ni and Fe surfaces by clean Sn droplets is almost independent of interfacial reaction; whereas, for oxidized surfaces, the interfacial reaction plays a significant role in the wetting through the disruption of the oxide film covering the liquid or/and solid surface(s), making their intimate contact possible.

  3. Fabrication of interfacial functionalized porous polymer monolith and its adsorption properties of copper ions.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiaxi; Du, Zhongjie; Zou, Wei; Li, Hangquan; Zhang, Chen

    2014-07-15

    The interfacial functionalized poly (glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) porous monolith was fabricated and applied as a novel porous adsorbent for copper ions (Cu(2+)). PGMA porous material with highly interconnected pore network was prepared by concentrated emulsion polymerization template. Then polyacrylic acid (PAA) was grafted onto the interface of the porous monolith by the reaction between the epoxy group on PGMA and a carboxyl group on PAA. Finally, the porous monolith was interfacial functionalized by rich amount of carboxyl groups and could adsorb copper ions effectively. The chemical structure and porous morphology of the porous monolith were measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, the effects of pore size distribution, pH value, co-existing ions, contacting time, and initial concentrations of copper ions on the adsorption capacity of the porous adsorbents were studied.

  4. Interfacial hydrothermal synthesis of SnO{sub 2} nanorods towards photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, L.R. Lian, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhang, L.H.; Yuan, C.Z.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Efficient interfacial hydrothermal strategy was developed. • 1D SnO{sub 2} nanorods as an advanced photocatalyst. • SnO{sub 2} nanorods exhibit photocatalytic degradation of the MO. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) SnO{sub 2} nanorods (NRs) have been successfully synthesized by means of an efficient interfacial hydrothermal strategy. The resulting product was physically characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscope, etc. The as-fabricated SnO{sub 2} NRs exhibited excellent photocatalytic degradation of the methyl orange with high degradation efficiency of 99.3% with only 60 min ultra violet light irradiation. Meanwhile, the 1D SnO{sub 2} NRs exhibited intriguing photostability after four recycles.

  5. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume IV. Chapters 15-19)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  6. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume III. Chapters 11-14)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  7. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume I. Chapters 1-5)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  8. Bulk flow coupled to a viscous interfacial film sheared by a rotating knife edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunandan, Aditya; Rasheed, Fayaz; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    The measurement of the interfacial properties of highly viscous biofilms, such as DPPC (the primary component of lung surfactant), present on the surface of liquids (bulk phase) continues to attract significant attention. Most measurement techniques rely on shearing the interfacial film and quantifying its viscous response in terms of a surface (excess) viscosity at the air-liquid interface. The knife edge viscometer offers a significant advantage over other approaches used to study highly viscous films as the film is directly sheared by a rotating knife edge in direct contact with the film. However, accurately quantifying the viscous response is non-trivial and involves accounting for the coupled interfacial and bulk phase flows. Here, we examine the nature of the viscous response of water insoluble DPPC films sheared in a knife edge viscometer over a range of surface packing, and its influence on the strength of the coupled bulk flow. Experimental results, obtained via Particle Image Velocimetry in the bulk and at the surface (via Brewster Angle Microscopy), are compared with numerical flow predictions to quantify the coupling across hydrodynamic flow regimes, from the Stokes flow limit to regimes where flow inertia is significant. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  9. Effect of periodic surface cracks on the interfacial fracture of thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, X. L.; Xu, R.; Zhang, W. X.; Wang, T. J.

    2012-10-01

    Periodic surface cracks and interfacial debonding in thermal barrier coating (TBC) system may be induced during cooling process. The objective of this work is to investigate the effect of periodic surface cracks on the interfacial fracture of TBC system. The finite element method (FEM) incorporating cohesive zone model is used in analysis. It is found that surface crack spacing has significant effect on the initiation and propagation of short interface crack. Three different regions are identified for describing the effect of surface crack spacing. In Region I the interface crack driving force is dramatically reduced due to high surface crack density. In this case, the initiation of interfacial delamination can be delayed. Region II applies as the surface crack spacing is moderate. Analysis of this transition zone brings to the definition of normalized critical surface crack spacing. Region III arises for sufficient large surface crack spacing. In this case, the interface crack driving force reaches a steady state, where the effects of adjacent surface cracks are relatively insignificant and can be ignored. It can be concluded that an appropriately high surface crack density can enhance the durability of TBC system.

  10. Tuning the Interfacial Thermal Conductance between Polystyrene and Sapphire by Controlling the Interfacial Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kun; Sun, Fangyuan; Tian, Xia; Zhu, Jie; Ma, Yongmei; Tang, Dawei; Wang, Fosong

    2015-10-28

    In polymer-based electric microdevices, thermal transport across polymer/ceramic interface is essential for heat dissipation, which limits the improvement of the device performance and lifetime. In this work, four sets of polystyrene (PS) thin films/sapphire samples were prepared with different interface adhesion values, which was achieved by changing the rotation speeds in the spin-coating process. The interfacial thermal conductance (ITC) between the PS films and the sapphire were measured by time domain thermoreflectance method, and the interfacial adhesion between the PS films and the sapphire, as measured by a scratch tester, was found to increase with the rotation speed from 2000 to 8000 rpm. The ITC shows a similar dependence on the rotation speed, increasing up to a 3-fold from 7.0 ± 1.4 to 21.0 ± 4.2 MW/(m(2) K). This study demonstrates the role of spin-coating rotation speed in thermal transport across the polymer/ceramic interfaces, evoking a much simpler mechanical method for tuning this type of ITC. The findings of enhancement of the ITC of polymer/ceramic interface can shed some light on the thermal management and reliability of macro- and microelectronics, where polymeric and hybrid organic-inorganic nano films are employed.

  11. Engineering interfacial photo-induced charge transfer based on nanobamboo array architecture for efficient solar-to-chemical energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaotian; Liow, Chihao; Bisht, Ankit; Liu, Xinfeng; Sum, Tze Chien; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Shuzhou

    2015-04-01

    Engineering interfacial photo-induced charge transfer for highly synergistic photocatalysis is successfully realized based on nanobamboo array architecture. Programmable assemblies of various components and heterogeneous interfaces, and, in turn, engineering of the energy band structure along the charge transport pathways, play a critical role in generating excellent synergistic effects of multiple components for promoting photocatalytic efficiency. PMID:25704499

  12. Engineering interfacial photo-induced charge transfer based on nanobamboo array architecture for efficient solar-to-chemical energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaotian; Liow, Chihao; Bisht, Ankit; Liu, Xinfeng; Sum, Tze Chien; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Shuzhou

    2015-04-01

    Engineering interfacial photo-induced charge transfer for highly synergistic photocatalysis is successfully realized based on nanobamboo array architecture. Programmable assemblies of various components and heterogeneous interfaces, and, in turn, engineering of the energy band structure along the charge transport pathways, play a critical role in generating excellent synergistic effects of multiple components for promoting photocatalytic efficiency.

  13. Investigations on interfacial dynamics with ultrafast electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdick, Ryan A.

    An ultrafast electron diffractive voltammetry (UEDV) technique is introduced, extended from ultrafast electron diffraction, to investigate the ultrafast charge transport dynamics at interfaces and in nanostructures. Rooted in Coulomb-induced refraction, formalisms are presented to quantitatively deduce the transient surface voltages (TSVs), caused by photoinduced charge redistributions at interfaces, and are applied to examine a prototypical Si/SiO2 interface, known to be susceptible to photoinduced interfacial charging The ultrafast time resolution and high sensitivity to surface charges of this electron diffractive approach allows direct elucidation of the transient effects of photoinduced hot electron transport at nanometer (˜2 nm) interfaces. Two distinctive regimes are uncovered, characterized by the time scales associated with charge separation. At the low fluence regime, the charge transfer is described by a thermally-mediated process with linear dependence on the excitation fluence. Theoretical analysis of the transient thermal properties of the carriers show that it is well-described by a direct tunneling of the laser heated electrons through the dielectric oxide layer to surface states. At higher fluences, a coherent multiphoton absorption process is invoked to directly inject electrons into the conduction band of SiO2, leading to a more efficient surface charge accumulation. A quadratic fluence dependence on this coherent, 3-photon lead electron injection is characterized by the rapid dephasing of the intermediately generated hot electrons from 2-photon absorption, limiting the yield of the consecutive 1-photon absorption by free carriers. The TSV formalism is extended beyond the simple slab geometry associated with planar surfaces (Si/SiO2), to interfaces with arbitrary geometrical features, by imposing a corrective scheme to the slab model. The validity of this treatment is demonstrated in an investigation of the charge transfer dynamics at a metal

  14. Theory of plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luxia; May, Volkhard

    2015-04-10

    A particular attempt to improve the efficiency of a dye sensitized solar cell is it's decoration with metal nano-particles (MNP). The MNP-plasmon induced enhancement of the local field enlarges the photoexcitation of the dyes and a subsequent improvement of the charge separation efficiency may result. In a recent work (2014 J. Phys. Chem. C 118 2812) we presented a theory of plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer for perylene attached to a TiO2 surface and placed in the proximity of a spherical MNP. These earlier studies are generalized here to the coupling of to up to four MNPs and to the use of somewhat altered molecular parameters. If the MNPs are placed close to each other strong hybridization of plasmon excitations appears and a broad resonance to which molecular excitations are coupled is formed. To investigate this situation the whole charge injection dynamics is described in the framework of the density matrix theory. The approach accounts for optical excitation of the dye coupled to the MNPs and considers subsequent electron injection into the rutile TiO2-cluster. Using a tight-binding model for the TiO2-system with about 10(5) atoms the electron motion in the cluster is described. We again consider short optical excitation which causes an intermediate steady state with a time-independent overall probability to have the electron injected into the cluster. This probability is used to introduce an enhancement factor which rates the influence of the MNP. Values larger than 500 are obtained. PMID:25764984

  15. Extraction of net interfacial polarization charge from Al{sub 0.54}In{sub 0.12}Ga{sub 0.34}N/GaN high electron mobility transistors grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, Matthew A.; Gupta, Geetak; Wienecke, Steven; Muqtadir, Azim A.; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K.; DenBaars, Steven P.

    2014-11-14

    Al{sub x}In{sub y}Ga{sub (1-x-y)}N materials show promise for use in GaN-based heterojunction devices. The growth of these materials has developed to the point where they are beginning to see implementation in high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) and light emitting diodes. However, the electrical properties of these materials are still poorly understood, especially as related to the net polarization charge at the AlInGaN/GaN interface (Q{sub π}(net)). All theoretical calculations of Q{sub π}(net) share the same weakness: dependence upon polarization bowing parameters, which describe the deviation in Q{sub π}(net) from Vegard's law. In this study, direct analysis of Q{sub π}(net) for Al{sub 0.54}In{sub 0.12}Ga{sub 0.34}N/GaN HEMTs is reported as extracted from C-V, I-V, and Hall measurements performed on samples grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. An average value for Q{sub π}(net) is calculated to be 2.015 × 10{sup −6} C/cm{sup 2}, with just 6.5% variation between measurement techniques.

  16. Interfacial activity of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Borrell, Marcos; Leal, L Gary

    2007-12-01

    A systematic study of the interfacial activity of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles was performed with the use of a computer-controlled four-roll mill. The nanoparticle locality within the polymeric domains (bulk or interface) was controlled by means of a mixture of polymeric ligands grafted to the gold nanoparticle core. The bulk polymers were polybutadiene (PBd) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Monoterminated PDMS and PBd ligands were synthesized on the basis of the esterification of reactive groups (such as hydroxyl or amino groups) with lipoic acid anhydride. The formation of polymer-coated nanoparticles using these lipoic acid-functionalized polymers was confirmed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their interfacial activity was manifested as a reduction of the interfacial tension and in the enhanced stability of thin films (as seen via the inhibition of coalescence). The nanoparticles showed an equal, if not superior, ability to reduce the interfacial tension when compared to previous studies on the effect of insoluble surfactants; however, these particles proved not to be as effective at inhibiting coalescence as their surfactant counterpart. We suggest that this effect may be caused by an increase in the attractive van der Waals forces created by the presence of metal-core nanoparticles. Experimental measurements using the four-roll mill allow us to explore the relationship between nanoparticle concentration at the interface and interfacial tension. In particular, we have found evidence that the interface concentration can be increased relative to the equilibrium value achieved by diffusion alone, and thus the interfacial tension can be systematically reduced if the interfacial area is increased temporarily via drop deformation or breakup followed by recoalescence. PMID:17973410

  17. Experimentally Determined Interfacial Area Between Immiscible Fluids in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Niessner, J; Hassanizadeh, S.M; Smith, Duane

    2008-01-01

    When multiple fluids flow through a porous medium, the interaction between the fluid interfaces can be of great importance. While this is widely recognized in practical applications, numerical models often disregard interactios between discrete fluid phases due to the computational complexity. And rightly so, for this level of detail is well beyond most extended Darcy Law relationships. A new model of two-phase flow including the interfacial area has been proposed by Hassarizadeh and Gray based upon thermodynamic principles. A version of this general equation set has been implemented by Nessner and Hassarizadeh. Many of the interfacial parameters required by this equation set have never been determined from experiments. The work presented here is a description of how the interfacial area, capillary pressure, interfacial velocity and interfacial permeability from two-phase flow experiments in porous media experiments can be used to determine the required parameters. This work, while on-going, has shown the possibility of digitizing images within translucent porous media and identifying the location and behavior of interfaces under dynamic conditions. Using the described methods experimentally derived interfacial functions to be used in larger scale simulations are currently being developed. In summary, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) by mapping a pore-throat geometry onto an image of immiscible fluid flow, the saturation of fluids and the individual interfaces between the fluids can be identified; (2) the resulting saturation profiles of the low velocity drainage flows used in this study are well described by an invasion percolation fractal scaling; (3) the interfacial area between fluids has been observed to increase in a linear fashion during the initial invasion of the non-wetting fluid; and (4) the average capillary pressure within the entire cell and representative elemental volumes were observed to plateau after a small portion of the volume was

  18. Healing of polymer interfaces: Interfacial dynamics, entanglements, and strength

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Ting; Robbins, Mark O.; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-07-25

    Self-healing of polymer films often takes place as the molecules diffuse across a damaged region, above their melting temperature. Using molecular dynamics simulations we probe the healing of polymer films and compare the results with those obtained for thermal welding of homopolymer slabs. These two processes differ from each other in their interfacial structure since damage leads to increased polydispersity and more short chains. A polymer sample was cut into two separate films that were then held together in the melt state. The recovery of the damaged film was followed as time elapsed and polymer molecules diffused across the interface. The mass uptake and formation of entanglements, as obtained from primitive path analysis, are extracted and correlated with the interfacial strength obtained from shear simulations. We find that the diffusion across the interface is signifcantly faster in the damaged film compared to welding because of the presence of short chains. Though interfacial entanglements increase more rapidly for the damaged films, a large fraction of these entanglements are near chain ends. As a result, the interfacial strength of the healing film increases more slowly than for welding. For both healing and welding, the interfacial strength saturates as the bulk entanglement density is recovered across the interface. However, the saturation strength of the damaged film is below the bulk strength for the polymer sample. At saturation, cut chains remain near the healing interface. They are less entangled and as a result they mechanically weaken the interface. When the strength of the interface saturates, the number of interfacial entanglements scales with the corresponding bulk entanglement density. Chain stiffness increases the density of entanglements, which increases the strength of the interface. Our results show that a few entanglements across the interface are sufficient to resist interfacial chain pullout and enhance the mechanical strength.

  19. Healing of polymer interfaces: Interfacial dynamics, entanglements, and strength

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ge, Ting; Robbins, Mark O.; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-07-25

    Self-healing of polymer films often takes place as the molecules diffuse across a damaged region, above their melting temperature. Using molecular dynamics simulations we probe the healing of polymer films and compare the results with those obtained for thermal welding of homopolymer slabs. These two processes differ from each other in their interfacial structure since damage leads to increased polydispersity and more short chains. A polymer sample was cut into two separate films that were then held together in the melt state. The recovery of the damaged film was followed as time elapsed and polymer molecules diffused across the interface.more » The mass uptake and formation of entanglements, as obtained from primitive path analysis, are extracted and correlated with the interfacial strength obtained from shear simulations. We find that the diffusion across the interface is signifcantly faster in the damaged film compared to welding because of the presence of short chains. Though interfacial entanglements increase more rapidly for the damaged films, a large fraction of these entanglements are near chain ends. As a result, the interfacial strength of the healing film increases more slowly than for welding. For both healing and welding, the interfacial strength saturates as the bulk entanglement density is recovered across the interface. However, the saturation strength of the damaged film is below the bulk strength for the polymer sample. At saturation, cut chains remain near the healing interface. They are less entangled and as a result they mechanically weaken the interface. When the strength of the interface saturates, the number of interfacial entanglements scales with the corresponding bulk entanglement density. Chain stiffness increases the density of entanglements, which increases the strength of the interface. Our results show that a few entanglements across the interface are sufficient to resist interfacial chain pullout and enhance the mechanical

  20. Interfacial charging phenomena of aluminum (hydr)oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Hiemstra, T.; Yong, H.; Van Riemsdijk, W.H.

    1999-08-31

    The interfacial charging of Al(OH){sub 3} (gibbsite and bayerite) and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been studied. For Al(OH){sub 3} it can be shown that the very strong variation in charging behavior for different preparations is related to the relative presence of differently reacting crystal planes. The edge faces of the hexagonal gibbsite crystals are proton reactive over the whole pH range, in contrast to the 001 plane, which is mainly uncharged below pH = 10. On this 001 face only doubly coordinated surface groups are found, in contrast to the edges which also have singly coordinated surface groups. The results are fully in agreement with the predictions of the Multi site complexation (MUSIC) model. The proton adsorption, electrolyte ion adsorption, and shift of the IEP of gibbsite and aluminum oxide have been modeled simultaneously. For gibbsite, the ion pair formation of Na is larger than that of Cl, as is evidenced by modeling the experimentally observed upward shift on the IEP and charge reversal at high electrolyte concentrations. All these experimental results can be satisfactorily modeled with the MUSIC model, including the experimental surface potential of aluminum oxide (ISFET).

  1. Toughening mechanisms in interfacially modified HDPE/thermoplastic starch blends.

    PubMed

    Taguet, Aurélie; Bureau, Martin N; Huneault, Michel A; Favis, Basil D

    2014-12-19

    The mechanical behavior of polymer blends containing 80 wt% of HDPE and 20 wt% of TPS and compatibilized with HDPE-g-MA grafted copolymer was investigated. Unmodified HDPE/TPS blends exhibit high fracture resistance, however, the interfacial modification of those blends by addition of HDPE-g-MA leads to a dramatic drop in fracture resistance. The compatibilization of HDPE/TPS blends increases the surface area of TPS particles by decreasing their size. It was postulated that the addition of HDPE-g-MA induces a reaction between maleic anhydride and hydroxyl groups of the glycerol leading to a decrease of the glycerol content in the TPS phase. This phenomenon increases the stiffness of the modified TPS particles and stiffer TPS particles leading to an important reduction in toughness and plastic deformation, as measured by the EWF method. It is shown that the main toughening mechanism in HDPE/TPS blends is shear-yielding. This article demonstrates that stiff, low diameter TPS particles reduce shear band formation and consequently decrease the resistance to crack propagation. PMID:25263885

  2. Interfacial Charge Transfer Anisotropy in Polycrystalline Lead Iodide Perovskite Films.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Cortecchia, Daniele; Krishna, Anurag; Chen, Shi; Mathews, Nripan; Grimsdale, Andrew C; Soci, Cesare

    2015-04-16

    Solar cells based on organic-inorganic lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) exhibit remarkably high power conversion efficiency (PCE). One of the key issues in solution-processed films is that often the polycrystalline domain orientation is not well-defined, which makes it difficult to predict energy alignment and charge transfer efficiency. Here we combine ab initio calculations and photoelectron spectroscopy to unravel the electronic structure and charge redistribution at the interface between different surfaces of CH3NH3PbI3 and typical organic hole acceptor Spiro-OMeTAD and electron acceptor PCBM. We find that both hole and electron interfacial transfer depend strongly on the CH3NH3PbI3 surface orientation: while the (001) and (110) surfaces tend to favor hole injection to Spiro-OMeTAD, the (100) surface facilitates electron transfer to PCBM due to surface delocalized charges and hole/electron accumulation at the CH3NH3PbI3/organic interfaces. Molecular dynamic simulations indicate that this is due to strong orbital interactions under thermal fluctuations at room temperature, suggesting the possibility to further improve charge separation and extraction in perovskite-based solar cells by controlling perovskite film crystallization and surface orientation.

  3. Interfacial thermal degradation in inverted organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbank, William; Hirsch, Lionel; Wantz, Guillaume; Chambon, Sylvain

    2015-12-28

    The efficiency of organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells is constantly improving; however, the lifetime of the devices still requires significant improvement if the potential of OPV is to be realised. In this study, several series of inverted OPV were fabricated and thermally aged in the dark in an inert atmosphere. It was demonstrated that all of the devices undergo short circuit current-driven degradation, which is assigned to morphology changes in the active layer. In addition, a previously unreported, open circuit voltage-driven degradation mechanism was observed that is highly material specific and interfacial in origin. This mechanism was specifically observed in devices containing MoO{sub 3} and silver as hole transporting layers and electrode materials, respectively. Devices with this combination were among the worst performing devices with respect to thermal ageing. The physical origins of this mechanism were explored by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and atomic force microscopy and an increase in roughness with thermal ageing was observed that may be partially responsible for the ageing mechanism.

  4. Interfacial activity and leaching patterns of Leptospirillum ferrooxidans on pyrite.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Chapana, José A; Tributsch, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    The leaching ability of Leptospirillum ferrooxidans goes beyond the mere oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+). Addition of these bacteria to pyrite triggers interfacial phenomena that lead to bacterial attachment and local forms of corrosion (surface pitting). As the leaching process proceeds, bacterial cells undergo changes, characterized by the release of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and the uptake and storage of electro-dense nanoparticles. The latter are embedded in an exopolymeric capsule, which coats the bacterial surface leading to distinctive biomineralized assemblages. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses, quantitative energy-dispersive X-ray measurements and electron diffraction established that the embedded electron-dense nanoparticles comprise pyrite with a well-defined stoichiometry. Addition of Fe(3+) alone did not induce any form of local corrosion on pyrite, which indicates that the reactions taking place between the attached bacteria and the underlying pyrite surface are responsible for the leaching patterns observed in this study. The observed corrosion process resembles that of 'electrochemical machining', because it uses a corrosion promoter, namely the locally concentrated Fe(3+) in the biofilm environment, formed by the attached cells. PMID:19712343

  5. Interfacial velocities and capillary pressure gradients during Haines jumps.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Ryan T; Berg, Steffen

    2013-10-01

    Drainage is typically understood as a process where the pore space is invaded by a nonwetting phase pore-by-pore, the controlling parameters of which are represented by capillary number and mobility ratio. However, what is less understood and where experimental data are lacking is direct knowledge of the dynamics of pore drainage and the associated intrinsic time scales since the rate dependencies often observed with displacement processes are potentially dependent on these time scales. Herein, we study pore drainage events with a high speed camera in a micromodel system and analyze the dependency of interfacial velocity on bulk flow rate and spatial fluid configurations. We find that pore drainage events are cooperative, meaning that capillary pressure differences which extend over multiple pores directly affect fluid topology and menisci dynamics. Results suggest that not only viscous forces but also capillarity acts in a nonlocal way. Lastly, the existence of a pore morphological parameter where pore drainage transitions from capillary to inertial and/or viscous dominated is discussed followed by a discussion on capillary dispersion and time scale dependencies. We show that the displacement front is disperse when volumetric flow rate is less than the intrinsic time scale for a pore drainage event and becomes sharp when the flow rate is greater than the intrinsic time scale (i.e., overruns the pore drainage event), which clearly shows how pore-scale parameters influence macroscale flow behavior. PMID:24229279

  6. Interfacial synthesis and functionality of self-stabilized polydiaminonaphthalene nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Gui; Zhang, Jia-Li; Huang, Mei-Rong

    2012-08-01

    A simple and effective template-free synthesis method for nanosized conducting polymers with self-stability and functionality is a main challenge. Herein, a strategy is reported for the facile synthesis of poly(1,5-diaminonaphthalene) nanospherical particles by an interfacial miniemulsion oxidative polymerization of 1,5-diaminonaphthalene at mobile microinterfaces between a stirred biphase without external emulsifiers. The size of the nanospheres was carefully optimized by controlling the polymerization conditions. Formation and self-stabilization mechanisms of the nanoparticles are proposed. The constantly movable and refreshed microinterface is a key to successful synthesis of the nanospheres, for significantly suppressing secondary growth leading to agglomerated particles because vigorous stirring makes as-formed self-stabilized nanospheres instantly leave the microinterfaces. The resulting nanospheres possess several advantages: clean surface, self-stability, redispersibility, semiconductivity, electroactivity, and fluorescence emission. The fluorescence emission can be quenched by specific quenchers, thus enabling low-cost, high-performance chemosensors to be obtained for the sensitive detection of Zn(II) ions in a wide linear concentration range of more than five orders of magnitude with a superior detection limit down to 1 nM.

  7. Nucleation at surfaces: the importance of interfacial energy.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Gerard, D E; Nancollas, G H

    1999-11-01

    The nucleation and growth of stone-forming minerals on the surfaces of other crystalline phases, cellular material, and immobilized macromolecules must be important in the formation of stones in the urinary tract. The nucleation and growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals were studied using the constant composition kinetics technique, in solution supersaturated with respect to COM (sigmaCOM = 1.44). The solid phases during the reaction were examined by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Human serum albumin was found to nucleate COM crystals when immobilized on hydroxyapatite (HAP) surfaces. The induction period for nucleation of COM on HAP surfaces preadsorbed with albumin significantly decreased to about 65 min from about 230 min for pure HAP particles. The initial growth rate of COM on pure HAP particles, Rm approximately/= 0.56 X 10(-7) mol/min per m2, was slower than that for HAP surfaces preadsorbed with albumin, 2.14 x 10(-7) mol/min per m2. The surface properties were characterized using contact angle measurements by sessile drop and thin layer wicking. The thermodynamic results suggested that surfaces with high Lewis base parameter values (gamma-) and low interfacial tension with water (gammaSL) are more effective in the nucleation and growth of crystal phases.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of interfacial wave generation in turbulent gas-liquid flows in horizontal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Bryce; Hendrickson, Kelli; Liu, Yuming; Subramani, Hariprasad

    2014-11-01

    For gas-liquid flows through pipes and channels, a flow regime (referred to as slug flow) may occur when waves form at the interface of a stratified flow and grow until they bridge the pipe diameter trapping large elongated gas bubbles within the liquid. Slug formation is often accompanied by strong nonlinear wave-wave interactions, wave breaking, and gas entrainment. This work numerically investigates the fully nonlinear interfacial evolution of a two-phase density/viscosity stratified flow through a horizontal channel. A Navier-Stokes flow solver coupled with a conservative volume-of-fluid algorithm is use to carry out high resolution three-dimensional simulations of a turbulent gas flowing over laminar (or turbulent) liquid layers. The analysis of such flows over a range of gas and liquid Reynolds numbers permits the characterization of the interfacial stresses and turbulent flow statistics allowing for the development of physics-based models that approximate the coupled interfacial-turbulent interactions and supplement the heuristic models built into existing industrial slug simulators.

  9. Polarization-dependent interfacial coupling modulation of ferroelectric photovoltaic effect in PZT-ZnO heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dan-Feng; Bi, Gui-Feng; Chen, Guang-Yi; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jun-Ming; Wang, Guang-Hou; Wan, Jian-Guo

    2016-03-08

    Recently, ferroelectric perovskite oxides have drawn much attention due to potential applications in the field of solar energy conversion. However, the power conversion efficiency of ferroelectric photovoltaic effect currently reported is far below the expectable value. One of the crucial problems lies in the two back-to-back Schottky barriers, which are formed at the ferroelectric-electrode interfaces and blocking most of photo-generated carriers to reach the outside circuit. Herein, we develop a new approach to enhance the ferroelectric photovoltaic effect by introducing the polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect. Through inserting a semiconductor ZnO layer with spontaneous polarization into the ferroelectric ITO/PZT/Au film, a p-n junction with strong polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect is formed. The power conversion efficiency of the heterostructure is improved by nearly two orders of magnitude and the polarization modulation ratio is increased about four times. It is demonstrated that the polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect can give rise to a great change in band structure of the heterostructure, not only producing an aligned internal electric field but also tuning both depletion layer width and potential barrier height at PZT-ZnO interface. This work provides an efficient way in developing highly efficient ferroelectric-based solar cells and novel optoelectronic memory devices.

  10. Polarization-dependent interfacial coupling modulation of ferroelectric photovoltaic effect in PZT-ZnO heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dan-Feng; Bi, Gui-Feng; Chen, Guang-Yi; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jun-Ming; Wang, Guang-Hou; Wan, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Recently, ferroelectric perovskite oxides have drawn much attention due to potential applications in the field of solar energy conversion. However, the power conversion efficiency of ferroelectric photovoltaic effect currently reported is far below the expectable value. One of the crucial problems lies in the two back-to-back Schottky barriers, which are formed at the ferroelectric-electrode interfaces and blocking most of photo-generated carriers to reach the outside circuit. Herein, we develop a new approach to enhance the ferroelectric photovoltaic effect by introducing the polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect. Through inserting a semiconductor ZnO layer with spontaneous polarization into the ferroelectric ITO/PZT/Au film, a p-n junction with strong polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect is formed. The power conversion efficiency of the heterostructure is improved by nearly two orders of magnitude and the polarization modulation ratio is increased about four times. It is demonstrated that the polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect can give rise to a great change in band structure of the heterostructure, not only producing an aligned internal electric field but also tuning both depletion layer width and potential barrier height at PZT-ZnO interface. This work provides an efficient way in developing highly efficient ferroelectric-based solar cells and novel optoelectronic memory devices. PMID:26954833

  11. Interfacial Effect on Confined Crystallization of Poly(ethylene oxide)/Silica Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yunlan; Zhao, Weiwei; Gao, Xia; Xu, Jianjun; Wang, Dujin

    The impact of nanoconfinement introduced by nanoparticles on polymer crystallization has attracted extensive attention because it plays the decisive role in the ultimate properties of polymer nanocomposites. In this study, interfacial and spatial confinement effects of silica (SiO2) nanoparticles on the crystallization behaviors of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)/SiO2 composites were systematically investigated by changing the size and concentration of SiO2 in PEO matrix. The composites with high silica loadings exhibit two crystallization peaks of PEO as determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The first peak at 7-43 °C is related to the bulk PEO, while the second peak at -20 to -30 °C is attributed to the restricted PEO segments. Three-layer (amorphous, interfacial and bulk) model is proposed to interpret the confined crystallization of PEO/SiO2 composites, which is supported by the results of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and solid-state 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In amorphous layer, most PEO segments are directly adsorbed on SiO2 surface via hydrogen bonding. The interfacial PEO layer, which is nonuniform, is composed of crystallizable loops and tails extending from amorphous layer. National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) under Contract 21274156.

  12. Interfacial behavior of polar, weakly polar, and nonpolar compounds bound to activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Gun'ko, V M; Turov, V V; Zarko, V I; Goncharuk, O V; Nychiporuk, Yu M; Kozynchenko, O P; Skubiszewska-Zięba, J; Leboda, R; Charmas, B; Balakin, D Yu; Ptushinskii, Yu G

    2013-08-15

    Detailed analysis of the interfacial behavior of water and weakly polar or nonpolar organics adsorbed alone or co-adsorbed onto activated carbons (AC) at different temperatures is a complex problem important for practical applications of adsorbents. Interaction of water, 1-decanol, and n-decane with AC possessing highly developed porosity (pore volume Vp≈1.4-2.3 cm(3)/g, specific surface area S(BET)≈1500-3500 m(2)/g) was studied over a broad temperature range using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermoporometry, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, cryoporometry, and temperature-programmed desorption with mass-spectrometry control methods. Comparison of the pore size distributions (PSD) calculated using the DSC thermoporometry, NMR cryoporometry, and nitrogen adsorption isotherms allows us to determine localization of adsorbates in different pores, as well as changes in the PSD of AC due to freezing of adsorbates in pores. Theoretical calculations (using ab initio HF/6-31G(d,p), DFT B3LYP/6-31G(d,p), and PM7 methods) explain certain aspects of the interfacial behavior of water, decane, and decanol adsorbed onto AC that appear in the experimental data. Obtained results show strong temperature dependence (above and below the freezing point, Tf, of bulk liquids) of the interfacial behavior of adsorbates on the textural characteristics and hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties of AC and the adsorbate amounts that affect the distributions of adsorbates unfrozen at T

  13. Interfacial behaviour of sodium stearoyllactylate (SSL) as an oil-in-water pickering emulsion stabiliser.

    PubMed

    Kurukji, D; Pichot, R; Spyropoulos, F; Norton, I T

    2013-11-01

    The ability of a food ingredient, sodium stearoyllactylate (SSL), to stabilise oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions against coalescence was investigated, and closely linked to its capacity to act as a Pickering stabiliser. Results showed that emulsion stability could be achieved with a relatively low SSL concentration (≥0.1 wt%), and cryogenic-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) visualisation of emulsion structure revealed the presence of colloidal SSL aggregates adsorbed at the oil-water interface. Surface properties of SSL could be modified by altering the size of these aggregates in water; a faster decrease in surface tension was observed when SSL dispersions were subjected to high pressure homogenisation (HPH). The rate of SSL adsorption at the sunflower oil-water interface also increased after HPH, and a higher interfacial tension (IFT) was observed with increasing SSL concentration. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) enabled a comparison of the thermal behaviour of SSL in aqueous dispersions with SSL-stabilised O/W emulsions. SSL melting enthalpy depended on emulsion interfacial area and the corresponding DSC data was used to determine the amount of SSL adsorbed at the oil-water interface. An idealised theoretical interfacial coverage calculation based on Pickering emulsion theory was in general agreement with the mass of SSL adsorbed as predicted by DSC.

  14. Interfacial behavior of polar, weakly polar, and nonpolar compounds bound to activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Gun'ko, V M; Turov, V V; Zarko, V I; Goncharuk, O V; Nychiporuk, Yu M; Kozynchenko, O P; Skubiszewska-Zięba, J; Leboda, R; Charmas, B; Balakin, D Yu; Ptushinskii, Yu G

    2013-08-15

    Detailed analysis of the interfacial behavior of water and weakly polar or nonpolar organics adsorbed alone or co-adsorbed onto activated carbons (AC) at different temperatures is a complex problem important for practical applications of adsorbents. Interaction of water, 1-decanol, and n-decane with AC possessing highly developed porosity (pore volume Vp≈1.4-2.3 cm(3)/g, specific surface area S(BET)≈1500-3500 m(2)/g) was studied over a broad temperature range using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermoporometry, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, cryoporometry, and temperature-programmed desorption with mass-spectrometry control methods. Comparison of the pore size distributions (PSD) calculated using the DSC thermoporometry, NMR cryoporometry, and nitrogen adsorption isotherms allows us to determine localization of adsorbates in different pores, as well as changes in the PSD of AC due to freezing of adsorbates in pores. Theoretical calculations (using ab initio HF/6-31G(d,p), DFT B3LYP/6-31G(d,p), and PM7 methods) explain certain aspects of the interfacial behavior of water, decane, and decanol adsorbed onto AC that appear in the experimental data. Obtained results show strong temperature dependence (above and below the freezing point, Tf, of bulk liquids) of the interfacial behavior of adsorbates on the textural characteristics and hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties of AC and the adsorbate amounts that affect the distributions of adsorbates unfrozen at T

  15. The effects of physico-chemical interactions and polymer grafting on interfacial adhesion in thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavendra, Venkat Krishna

    The effects of physico-chemical interactions between the carbon fiber and Bisphenol-A polycarbonate matrix was investigated to understand the factors governing the interfacial adhesion in thermoplastic matrix composites. It was found that, the changes in the amount of oxygen functionality achieved through electrochemical oxidative surface treatment of the carbon fibers didn't affect the level of adhesion, indicating negligible polar and hydrogen bond formation. Composites fabricated from these fibers that were subsequently passivated through thermal hydrogenation up to 1000°C, which removed all the oxygen functionality without affecting the fiber topography, indicated that the mechanical interlocking between the fiber and the matrix didn't have a strong influence on the interfacial adhesion. Grafting low molecular weight BPA-PC and high molecular weight PMMA on to the fiber surface improved the interfacial adhesion. However, the level of improvement was observed to be independent of the fiber surface treatment and the molecular weight of the grafted chains. These results are consistent with the cohesive zone models proposed for the chain pull out and chain scission observed in block copolymers.

  16. Interfacial Effects on Lithium Superoxide Disproportionation in Li-O₂ Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Dengyun; Lau, Kah Chun; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Wen, Jianguo; Miller, Dean; Lu, Jun; Kang, Feiyu; Li, Baohua; Yang, Wenge; Gao, Jing; Indacochea, Ernesto; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil

    2015-02-11

    During the cycling of Li-O₂ batteries the discharge process gives rise to dynamically evolving agglomerates composed of lithium-oxygen nanostructures; however, little is known about their composition. In this paper, we present results for a Li-O₂ battery based on an activated carbon cathode that indicate interfacial effects can suppress disproportionation of a LiO₂ component in the discharge product. High-intensity X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements are first used to show that there is a LiO₂ component along with Li₂O₂ in the discharge product. The stability of the discharge product was then probed by investigating the dependence of the charge potential and Raman intensity of the superoxide peak with time. The results indicate that the LiO₂ component can be stable for possibly up to days when an electrolyte is left on the surface of the discharged cathode. Density functional calculations on amorphous LiO₂ reveal that the disproportionation process will be slower at an electrolyte/LiO₂ interface compared to a vacuum/LiO₂ interface. The combined experimental and theoretical results provide new insight into how interfacial effects can stabilize LiO₂ and suggest that these interfacial effects may play an important role in the charge and discharge chemistries of a Li-O₂ battery.

  17. Polarization-dependent interfacial coupling modulation of ferroelectric photovoltaic effect in PZT-ZnO heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dan-Feng; Bi, Gui-Feng; Chen, Guang-Yi; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jun-Ming; Wang, Guang-Hou; Wan, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Recently, ferroelectric perovskite oxides have drawn much attention due to potential applications in the field of solar energy conversion. However, the power conversion efficiency of ferroelectric photovoltaic effect currently reported is far below the expectable value. One of the crucial problems lies in the two back-to-back Schottky barriers, which are formed at the ferroelectric-electrode interfaces and blocking most of photo-generated carriers to reach the outside circuit. Herein, we develop a new approach to enhance the ferroelectric photovoltaic effect by introducing the polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect. Through inserting a semiconductor ZnO layer with spontaneous polarization into the ferroelectric ITO/PZT/Au film, a p-n junction with strong polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect is formed. The power conversion efficiency of the heterostructure is improved by nearly two orders of magnitude and the polarization modulation ratio is increased about four times. It is demonstrated that the polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect can give rise to a great change in band structure of the heterostructure, not only producing an aligned internal electric field but also tuning both depletion layer width and potential barrier height at PZT-ZnO interface. This work provides an efficient way in developing highly efficient ferroelectric-based solar cells and novel optoelectronic memory devices. PMID:26954833

  18. Polarization-dependent interfacial coupling modulation of ferroelectric photovoltaic effect in PZT-ZnO heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Dan-Feng; Bi, Gui-Feng; Chen, Guang-Yi; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jun-Ming; Wang, Guang-Hou; Wan, Jian-Guo

    2016-03-01

    Recently, ferroelectric perovskite oxides have drawn much attention due to potential applications in the field of solar energy conversion. However, the power conversion efficiency of ferroelectric photovoltaic effect currently reported is far below the expectable value. One of the crucial problems lies in the two back-to-back Schottky barriers, which are formed at the ferroelectric-electrode interfaces and blocking most of photo-generated carriers to reach the outside circuit. Herein, we develop a new approach to enhance the ferroelectric photovoltaic effect by introducing the polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect. Through inserting a semiconductor ZnO layer with spontaneous polarization into the ferroelectric ITO/PZT/Au film, a p-n junction with strong polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect is formed. The power conversion efficiency of the heterostructure is improved by nearly two orders of magnitude and the polarization modulation ratio is increased about four times. It is demonstrated that the polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect can give rise to a great change in band structure of the heterostructure, not only producing an aligned internal electric field but also tuning both depletion layer width and potential barrier height at PZT-ZnO interface. This work provides an efficient way in developing highly efficient ferroelectric-based solar cells and novel optoelectronic memory devices.

  19. The effects of interfacial potential on antimicrobial propensity of ZnO nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Arakha, Manoranjan; Saleem, Mohammed; Mallick, Bairagi C.; Jha, Suman

    2015-01-01

    The work investigates the role of interfacial potential in defining antimicrobial propensity of ZnO nanoparticle (ZnONP) against different Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. ZnONPs with positive and negative surface potential are tested against different bacteria with varying surface potentials, ranging −14.7 to −23.6 mV. Chemically synthesized ZnONPs with positive surface potential show very high antimicrobial propensity with minimum inhibitory concentration of 50 and 100 μg/mL for Gram negative and positive bacterium, respectively. On other hand, ZnONPs of the same size but with negative surface potential show insignificant antimicrobial propensity against the studied bacteria. Unlike the positively charged nanoparticles, neither Zn2+ ion nor negatively charged ZnONP shows any significant inhibition in growth or morphology of the bacterium. Potential neutralization and colony forming unit studies together proved adverse effect of the resultant nano-bacterial interfacial potential on bacterial viability. Thus, ZnONP with positive surface potential upon interaction with negative surface potential of bacterial membrane enhances production of the reactive oxygen species and exerts mechanical stress on the membrane, resulting in the membrane depolarization. Our results show that the antimicrobial propensity of metal oxide nanoparticle mainly depends upon the interfacial potential, the potential resulting upon interaction of nanoparticle surface with bacterial membrane. PMID:25873247

  20. Mixed matrix membranes with strengthened MOFs/polymer interfacial interaction and improved membrane performance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rijia; Ge, Lei; Hou, Lei; Strounina, Ekaterina; Rudolph, Victor; Zhu, Zhonghua

    2014-04-23

    MOFs-based mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) have attracted extensive attention in recent years due to their potential high separation performance, the low cost, and good mechanical properties. However, it is still very challenging to achieve defect-free interface between micrometer-sized MOFs and a polymer matrix. In this study, [Cd2L(H2O)]2·5H2O (Cd-6F) synthesized using 4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)diphthalic anhydride (6FDA) as an organic ligand was introduced into the 6FDA-ODA polyimide matrix to achieve novel MOF MMMs. A specific interfacial interaction between MOF crystals and polymer chains was innovatively targeted and achieved through in situ polymerization procedure. The enhanced adhesion between MOF particles and polymer phase was observed, and the improved interfacial interaction between Cd-6F and the 6FDA-ODA polyimide matrix was confirmed by detailed characterizations including FTIR and NMR. In the meantime, the gas permeance and selectivity of the MMMs are strongly dependent on their morphology. The MMM derived from in situ polymerization presents excellent interfaces between micrometer-sized MOF crystals and the polymer matrix, resulting in increased permeability and selectivity. The strategy shown here can be further utilized to select the MOF/polymer pair, eliminate interfacial voids, and improve membrane separation performance of MOFs-based MMMs.

  1. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  2. The effects of a soluble surfactant on the interfacial dynamics of stationary bubbles in inclined tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanagh, Daniel P.; Eckmann, David M.

    2002-10-01

    We have experimentally examined the effects of a common soluble surfactant on gas bubbles in liquid flows in inclined tubes. Air bubbles of known size ([lambda] = 0.8, 1.0, 1.5) are held stationary under minimum flow conditions in tubes inclined at fixed angles ([omega] = 25°, 45°, 65°, 90°). Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) is infused into the bulk flow at two bulk concentrations (C = 10% or 100% critical micelle concentration (CMC)). In addition to recording pressure and flow waveforms, we capture video images of bubbles before and during exposure to the surfactant. Modification of the interfacial properties by the surfactant results in extremely dynamic bubble behaviour including interfacial deformation, deformation plus axial translation, and bubble detachment from the wall plus translation. We measure the corresponding time-dependent pressure gradient within the tube. The surfactant mediated responses observed are dependent upon the interrelated effects of C, [lambda] and [omega]. A high bulk concentration of surfactant may produce more rapid modification of bubble shape and influence wetting, thus increasing the potential for bubble detachment. The likelihood that detachment will occur increases further as bubble volume in increased. In both vertical tubes in which contact forces are absent and in non-vertical tubes, the infusion of surfactant may result in axial translation either in the direction of, or opposite to, the direction of the bulk flow. Critical to the translation and/or detachment of the bubble is the surfactant-mediated modification of contact line mechanics. Contact line velocities corresponding to rates of shrinkage of dewetted surface area are extracted from experimental data. We also explore the potential effects of surfactants on interfacial remobilization. This investigation demonstrates the potential use of surfactants to be used for dislodging dewetted gas bubbles by the intentional manipulation of interfacial properties.

  3. Interfacial load transfer in polymer/carbon nanotube nanocomposites with a nanohybrid shish kebab modification.

    PubMed

    Nie, Min; Kalyon, Dilhan M; Fisher, Frank T

    2014-09-10

    Interfacial properties are known to have a critical effect on the mechanical properties of a nanocomposite material system. Here, the interfacial load transfer in a carbon nanotube (CNT)/nylon-11 composite was studied with a CNT/nylon-11 nanohybrid shish kebab (NHSK) structure modification using Raman spectroscopy. Characterization of the polymer crystal in the NHSK using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) for the first time indicates that the NHSK structure formed a more perfect crystal structure than the bulk polymer. On the basis of transmission electron microscopy and DSC results, a new growth model for the NHSK crystal is hypothesized, indicating the formation of an initial uniform crystal layer on the CNT prior to the crystallization of the kebabs. Characterization of the nanocomposites using Raman spectroscopy, with the samples heated to introduce interfacial shear stress caused by thermal expansion mismatch, found that the D* band of the CNT in the NHSK/nylon-11 composite displayed a more pronounced shift with an increase in temperature, which is attributed to the NHSK structure being more effective at transferring load from the nylon matrix to the nanotube inclusions. The NHSK structure was also used to fabricate composites with two amorphous polymers, polycarbonate and poly(methyl methacrylate), to investigate the load transfer mechanism. It was found that when the compatibility between the polymer in the NHSK structure and the bulk polymer matrix at the molecular level is sufficiently high, the ensuing mechanical interlocking effect further enhances the interfacial load transfer for polymer nanocomposites. Additional mechanical characterization of polymer nanocomposites with 0.1 wt % NHSK reinforcement demonstrates how the moduli and ultimate tensile strength of the nanocomposites can be improved via this NHSK structure.

  4. Interfacial load transfer in polymer/carbon nanotube nanocomposites with a nanohybrid shish kebab modification.

    PubMed

    Nie, Min; Kalyon, Dilhan M; Fisher, Frank T

    2014-09-10

    Interfacial properties are known to have a critical effect on the mechanical properties of a nanocomposite material system. Here, the interfacial load transfer in a carbon nanotube (CNT)/nylon-11 composite was studied with a CNT/nylon-11 nanohybrid shish kebab (NHSK) structure modification using Raman spectroscopy. Characterization of the polymer crystal in the NHSK using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) for the first time indicates that the NHSK structure formed a more perfect crystal structure than the bulk polymer. On the basis of transmission electron microscopy and DSC results, a new growth model for the NHSK crystal is hypothesized, indicating the formation of an initial uniform crystal layer on the CNT prior to the crystallization of the kebabs. Characterization of the nanocomposites using Raman spectroscopy, with the samples heated to introduce interfacial shear stress caused by thermal expansion mismatch, found that the D* band of the CNT in the NHSK/nylon-11 composite displayed a more pronounced shift with an increase in temperature, which is attributed to the NHSK structure being more effective at transferring load from the nylon matrix to the nanotube inclusions. The NHSK structure was also used to fabricate composites with two amorphous polymers, polycarbonate and poly(methyl methacrylate), to investigate the load transfer mechanism. It was found that when the compatibility between the polymer in the NHSK structure and the bulk polymer matrix at the molecular level is sufficiently high, the ensuing mechanical interlocking effect further enhances the interfacial load transfer for polymer nanocomposites. Additional mechanical characterization of polymer nanocomposites with 0.1 wt % NHSK reinforcement demonstrates how the moduli and ultimate tensile strength of the nanocomposites can be improved via this NHSK structure. PMID:25134606

  5. Interfacial phospholipids inhibit ozone-reactive absorption-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Connor, Lydia M; Ballinger, Carol A; Albrecht, Thomas B; Postlethwait, Edward M

    2004-06-01

    The intrapulmonary distribution of inhaled ozone (O(3)) and induction of site-specific cell injury are related to complex interactions among airflow patterns, local gas-phase concentrations, and the rates of O(3) flux into, and reaction and diffusion within, the epithelial lining fluid (ELF). Recent studies demonstrated that interfacial phospholipid films appreciably inhibited NO(2) absorption. Because surface-active phospholipids are present on alveolar and airway interfaces, we investigated the effects of interfacial films on O(3)-reactive absorption and acute cell injury. Compressed films of dipalmitoyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and rat lung lavage lipids significantly reduced O(3)-reactive absorption by ascorbic acid, reduced glutathione, and uric acid. Conversely, unsaturated phosphatidylcholine films did not inhibit O(3) absorption. We evaluated O(3)-mediated cell injury using a human lung fibroblast cell culture system, an intermittent tilting exposure regimen to produce a thin covering layer, and nuclear fluorochrome permeability. Exposure produced negligible injury in cells covered with MEM. However, addition of AH(2) produced appreciable (<50%) cell injury. Film spreading of DPPC monolayers necessitated the use of untilted regimens. Induction of acute cell injury in untilted cultures required both AH(2) plus very high O(3) concentrations. Addition of DPPC films significantly reduced cell injury. We conclude that acute cell injury likely results from O(3) reaction with ELF substrates. Furthermore, interfacial films of surface-active, saturated phospholipids reduce the local dose of O(3)-derived reaction products. Finally, because O(3) local dose and tissue damage likely correlate, we propose that interfacial phospholipids may modulate intrapulmonary distribution of inhaled O(3) and the extent of site-specific cell injury.

  6. Measurement of interfacial tension by automated video techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, V.A.; Miller, R.L.; Watkins, A.D.; Ward, M.B.; Barrett, K.B.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes a simple automated system for measuring interfacial tension using the pendant or sessile drop method. The size and shape of a transparent or opaque drop of one fluid immersed in a second, transparent, fluid is recorded with a CCD video camera and digitized and stored by a computer-controlled system. Custom software determines various droplet shape factors and computes the interfacial tension. A limited number of video frames can be stored on disc, or longer runs can be stored on video tape for later digitization. Alternatively, only the shape factor and interfacial tension data are stored to reduce demands on the storage medium. The first application of the system was measurement of the interfacial tension of crude oil interacting with various bacterial agents in aqueous suspension. Some of these agents can greatly influence the effective interfacial tension of the crude oil and potentially improve recovery rates from oil reserves, particularly of the heavier'' or more viscous oils. 11 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Modeling interfacial area transport in multi-fluid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbro, S.L.

    1996-11-01

    Many typical chemical engineering operations are multi-fluid systems. They are carried out in distillation columns (vapor/liquid), liquid-liquid contactors (liquid/liquid) and other similar devices. An important parameter is interfacial area concentration, which determines the rate of interfluid heat, mass and momentum transfer and ultimately, the overall performance of the equipment. In many cases, the models for determining interfacial area concentration are empirical and can only describe the cases for which there is experimental data. In an effort to understand multiphase reactors and the mixing process better, a multi-fluid model has been developed as part of a research effort to calculate interfacial area transport in several different types of in-line static mixers. For this work, the ensemble-averaged property conservation equations have been derived for each fluid and for the mixture. These equations were then combined to derive a transport equation for the interfacial area concentration. The final, one-dimensional model was compared to interfacial area concentration data from two sizes of Kenics in-line mixer, two sizes of concurrent jet and a Tee mixer. In all cases, the calculated and experimental data compared well with the highest scatter being with the Tee mixer comparison.

  8. Magnetic microwire probes for the magnetic rod interfacial stress rheometer.

    PubMed

    Tajuelo, J; Pastor, J M; Martínez-Pedrero, F; Vázquez, M; Ortega, F; Rubio, R G; Rubio, M A

    2015-02-01

    The magnetic needle interfacial shear rheometer is a valuable tool for the study of the mechanical properties of thin fluid films or monolayers. However, it is difficult to differentiate the interfacial and subphase contributions to the drag on the needle. In principle, the problem can be addressed by decreasing the needle diameter, which decreases the bulk contribution while the interfacial contribution remains essentially the same. Here we show the results obtained when using a new type of needle, that of magnetic microwires with diameter approximately 10 times thinner than for commercial needles. We show that the lower inertia of the microwires calls for a new calibration procedure. We propose such a new calibration procedure based on the flow field solution around the needle introduced in refs 1 and 2. By measuring thin silicone oil films with well-controlled interfacial viscosities as well as eicosanol (C20) and pentadecanoic acid (PDA, C15) Langmuir monolayers, we show that the new calibration method works well for standard needles as well as for the microwire probes. Moreover, we show that the analysis of the force terms contributing to the force on the needle helps to ascertain whether the measurements obtained are reliable for given surface shear viscosity values. We also show that the microwire probes have at least a 10-fold-lower resolution limit, allowing one to measure interfacial viscosities as low as 10(-7) N·m/s. PMID:25495270

  9. Effect of interfacial coupling on rectification in organic spin rectifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Gui-Chao; Zuo, Meng-Ying; Li, Ying; Zhang, Zhao; Ren, Jun-Feng; Wang, Chuan-Kui

    2015-07-01

    The effect of interfacial coupling on rectification in an organic co-oligomer spin diode is investigated theoretically by considering spin-independent and spin-resolved couplings respectively. In the case of spin-independent coupling, an optimal interfacial coupling strength with a significant enhanced rectification ratio is found, whose value depends on the structural asymmetry of the molecule. In the case of spin-resolved coupling, we found that only the variation of the interfacial coupling with specific spin is effective to modulate the rectification, which is due to the spin-filtering property of the central asymmetric magnetic molecule. A transition of the spin-current rectification between parallel spin-current rectification and antiparallel spin-current rectification may be observed with the variation of the spin-resolved interfacial coupling. The interfacial effect on rectification is further analyzed from the spin-dependent transmission spectrum at different biases. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 1374195), the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. ZR2014AM017), and the Excellent Young Scholars Research Fund of Shandong Normal University, China.

  10. Correlated Single Quantum Dot Blinking and Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shengye; Hsiang, Jung-Cheng; Zhu, Haiming; Song, Nianhui; Dickson, Robert M; Lian, Tianquan

    2010-08-31

    The electron transfer (ET) dynamics from core/multi-shell (CdSe/CdS(3ML)ZnCdS(2ML)ZnS(2ML)) quantum dots (QDs) to adsorbed Fluorescein (F27) molecules have been studied by single particle spectroscopy to probe the relationship between single QD interfacial electron transfer and blinking dynamics. Electron transfer from the QD to F27 and the subsequent recombination were directly observed by ensemble-averaged transient absorption spectroscopy. Single QD-F27 complexes show correlated fluctuation of fluorescence intensity and lifetime, similar to those observed in free QDs. With increasing ET rate (controlled by F27-to-QD ratio), the lifetime of on states decreases and relative contribution of off states increases. It was shown that ET is active for QDs in on states, the excited state lifetime of which reflects the ET rate, whereas in the off state QD excitons decay by Auger relaxation and ET is not a competitive quenching pathway. Thus, the blinking dynamics of single QDs modulate their interfacial ET activity. Furthermore, interfacial ET provides an additional pathway for generating off states, leading to correlated single QD interfacial ET and blinking dynamics in QD-acceptor complexes. Because blinking is a general phenomenon of single QDs, it appears that the correlated interfacial ET and blinking and the resulting intermittent ET activity are general phenomena for single QDs.

  11. Some Aspects of Interfacial Phenomena in Steelmaking and Refining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. J.; Viswanathan, N. N.; Muhmood, L.; Kapilashrami, E.; Seetharaman, S.

    2016-08-01

    Unique experiments were designed to study the surface phenomena in steelmaking reactions. The concept of surface sulfide capacities and an understanding of the surface accumulation of surface-active species, based on experimental results, are presented. In order to understand the flow phenomenon at slag/metal interface, experiments were designed to measure the interfacial velocity of S on the surface of an iron drop immersed in an aluminosilicate slag using the X-ray sessile drop method. The oscillation of the iron drop in the slag due to the change in the surface concentration of sulfur at the slag-metal interface was monitored by X-ray imaging. From the observations, the interfacial velocity of sulfur was evaluated. Similar experiments were performed to measure the interfacial velocity of oxygen at the interface as well as the impact of oxygen potential on the interfacial velocity of sulfur. The interfacial shear viscosity and the dilatational modulus were also evaluated. In a study of the wetting of alumina base by iron drop at constant oxygen pressure under isothermal condition, the contact angle was found to be decreased with the progress of the reaction leading to the formation of hercynite as an intermediate layer creating non-wetting conditions. In the case of silica substrate, an intermediate liquid fayalite layer was formed.

  12. Magnetic microwire probes for the magnetic rod interfacial stress rheometer.

    PubMed

    Tajuelo, J; Pastor, J M; Martínez-Pedrero, F; Vázquez, M; Ortega, F; Rubio, R G; Rubio, M A

    2015-02-01

    The magnetic needle interfacial shear rheometer is a valuable tool for the study of the mechanical properties of thin fluid films or monolayers. However, it is difficult to differentiate the interfacial and subphase contributions to the drag on the needle. In principle, the problem can be addressed by decreasing the needle diameter, which decreases the bulk contribution while the interfacial contribution remains essentially the same. Here we show the results obtained when using a new type of needle, that of magnetic microwires with diameter approximately 10 times thinner than for commercial needles. We show that the lower inertia of the microwires calls for a new calibration procedure. We propose such a new calibration procedure based on the flow field solution around the needle introduced in refs 1 and 2. By measuring thin silicone oil films with well-controlled interfacial viscosities as well as eicosanol (C20) and pentadecanoic acid (PDA, C15) Langmuir monolayers, we show that the new calibration method works well for standard needles as well as for the microwire probes. Moreover, we show that the analysis of the force terms contributing to the force on the needle helps to ascertain whether the measurements obtained are reliable for given surface shear viscosity values. We also show that the microwire probes have at least a 10-fold-lower resolution limit, allowing one to measure interfacial viscosities as low as 10(-7) N·m/s.

  13. Thermodynamics of interfacial energy in binary metallic systems: influence of adsorption on dihedral angles

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, I. . E-mail: ichiko@eps.s.u-tiokyo.ac.jp; Takei, Y.

    2005-02-01

    The solid-liquid interfacial energy (or interfacial tension) was investigated by the lattice-liquid statistical calculation and by the Cahn-Hilliard theory of interface. Interfacial energies in binary metallic systems were estimated from a few bulk thermodynamic properties, i.e., melting temperature, entropy of fusion, and the critical temperature of the liquid phase. In eutectic systems, interfacial energy gradually increases with decreasing concentration of the solid species in the liquid. In monotectic systems, interfacial thickening occurs and interfacial energy is reduced around the liquid immiscibility gap. The results of calculation explain the experimental data of dihedral angles fairly well.

  14. The role of electrostatic interactions in protease surface diffusion and the consequence for interfacial biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Feller, Bob E; Kellis, James T; Cascão-Pereira, Luis G; Robertson, Channing R; Frank, Curtis W

    2010-12-21

    This study examines the influence of electrostatic interactions on enzyme surface diffusion and the contribution of diffusion to interfacial biocatalysis. Surface diffusion, adsorption, and reaction were investigated on an immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA) multilayer substrate over a range of solution ionic strength values. Interfacial charge of the enzyme and substrate surface was maintained by performing the measurements at a fixed pH; therefore, electrostatic interactions were manipulated by changing the ionic strength. The interfacial processes were investigated using a combination of techniques: fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, surface plasmon resonance, and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy. We used an enzyme charge ladder with a net charge ranging from -2 to +4 with respect to the parent to systematically probe the contribution of electrostatics in interfacial enzyme biocatalysis on a charged substrate. The correlation between reaction rate and adsorption was determined for each charge variant within the ladder, each of which displayed a maximum rate at an intermediate surface concentration. Both the maximum reaction rate and adsorption value at which this maximum rate occurs increased in magnitude for the more positive variants. In addition, the specific enzyme activity increased as the level of adsorption decreased, and for the lowest adsorption values, the specific enzyme activity was enhanced compared to the trend at higher surface concentrations. At a fixed level of adsorption, the specific enzyme activity increased with positive enzyme charge; however, this effect offers diminishing returns as the enzyme becomes more highly charged. We examined the effect of electrostatic interactions on surface diffusion. As the binding affinity was reduced by increasing the solution ionic strength, thus weakening electrostatic interaction, the rate of surface diffusion increased considerably. The enhancement in specific activity achieved at

  15. Interfacial inhibition of macromolecular interactions: nature's paradigm for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Yves; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2005-03-01

    One of nature's strategies for interfering with molecular interactions is to trap macromolecules in transition states with their partners in dead-end complexes that are unable to complete their biological function. This type of inhibition, which we refer to as "interfacial inhibition", is illustrated by two natural inhibitors, brefeldin A (BFA) and camptothecin (CPT), whose modes of action have been elucidated fully in structural studies. Interfacial inhibition occurs at the protein-protein interface in the case of BFA and at the protein-DNA interface in the case of CPT. In both systems, the drugs take advantage of transient structural and energetic conditions created by the macromolecular complex, which give rise to "hot-spots" for drug binding. In addition to these examples, several natural compounds such as forskolin, tubulin inhibitors and immunophilins target protein interfaces. We propose that interfacial inhibition is a paradigm for the discovery of drugs that interfere with macromolecular complexes.

  16. Solid/liquid interfacial free energies in binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nason, D.; Tiller, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a semiquantitative technique for predicting the segregation characteristics of smooth interfaces between binary solid and liquid solutions in terms of readily available thermodynamic parameters of the bulk solutions. A lattice-liquid interfacial model and a pair-bonded regular solution model are employed in the treatment with an accommodation for liquid interfacial entropy. The method is used to calculate the interfacial segregation and the free energy of segregation for solid-liquid interfaces between binary solutions for the (111) boundary of fcc crystals. The zone of compositional transition across the interface is shown to be on the order of a few atomic layers in width, being moderately narrower for ideal solutions. The free energy of the segregated interface depends primarily upon the solid composition and the heats of fusion of the component atoms, the composition difference of the solutions, and the difference of the heats of mixing of the solutions.

  17. Interfacial waves generated by electrowetting-driven contact line motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jonghyun; Park, Jaebum; Kim, Yunhee; Shin, Bongsu; Bae, Jungmok; Kim, Ho-Young

    2016-10-01

    The contact angle of a liquid-fluid interface can be effectively modulated by the electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) technology. Rapid movement of the contact line can be achieved by swift changes of voltage at the electrodes, which can give rise to interfacial waves under the strong influence of surface tension. Here we experimentally demonstrate EWOD-driven interfacial waves of overlapping liquids and compare their wavelength and decay length with the theoretical results obtained by a perturbation analysis. Our theory also allows us to predict the temporal evolution of the interfacial profiles in either rectangular or cylindrical containers, as driven by slipping contact lines. This work builds a theoretical framework to understand and predict the dynamics of capillary waves of a liquid-liquid interface driven by EWOD, which has practical implications on optofluidic devices used to guide light.

  18. Quantitative morphological characterization of bicontinuous Pickering emulsions via interfacial curvatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Matthew; Stratford, Kevin; Thijssen, Job H. J.

    Bicontinuous Pickering emulsions (bijels) are a physically interesting class of soft materials with many potential applications including catalysis, microfluidics and tissue engineering. They are created by arresting the spinodal decomposition of a partially-miscible liquid with a (jammed) layer of interfacial colloids. Porosity $L$ (average interfacial separation) of the bijel is controlled by varying the radius ($r$) and volume fraction ($\\phi$) of the colloids ($L \\propto r/\\phi$). However, to optimize the bijel structure with respect to other parameters, e.g. quench rate, characterizing by $L$ alone is insufficient. Hence, we have used confocal microscopy and X-ray CT to characterize a range of bijels in terms of local and area-averaged interfacial curvatures. In addition, the curvatures of bijels have been monitored as a function of time, which has revealed an intriguing evolution up to 60 minutes after bijel formation, contrary to previous understanding.

  19. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  20. First-Principles Prediction of Liquid/Liquid Interfacial Tension.

    PubMed

    Andersson, M P; Bennetzen, M V; Klamt, A; Stipp, S L S

    2014-08-12

    The interfacial tension between two liquids is the free energy per unit surface area required to create that interface. Interfacial tension is a determining factor for two-phase liquid behavior in a wide variety of systems ranging from water flooding in oil recovery processes and remediation of groundwater aquifers contaminated by chlorinated solvents to drug delivery and a host of industrial processes. Here, we present a model for predicting interfacial tension from first principles using density functional theory calculations. Our model requires no experimental input and is applicable to liquid/liquid systems of arbitrary compositions. The consistency of the predictions with experimental data is significant for binary, ternary, and multicomponent water/organic compound systems, which offers confidence in using the model to predict behavior where no data exists. The method is fast and can be used as a screening technique as well as to extend experimental data into conditions where measurements are technically too difficult, time consuming, or impossible.

  1. Healing of polymer interfaces: Interfacial dynamics, entanglements, and strength.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ting; Robbins, Mark O; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S

    2014-07-01

    Self-healing of polymer films often takes place as the molecules diffuse across a damaged region, above their melting temperature. Using molecular dynamics simulations we probe the healing of polymer films and compare the results with those obtained for thermal welding of homopolymer slabs. These two processes differ from each other in their interfacial structure since damage leads to increased polydispersity and more short chains. A polymer sample was cut into two separate films that were then held together in the melt state. The recovery of the damaged film was followed as time elapsed and polymer molecules diffused across the interface. The mass uptake and formation of entanglements, as obtained from primitive path analysis, are extracted and correlated with the interfacial strength obtained from shear simulations. We find that the diffusion across the interface is significantly faster in the damaged film compared to welding because of the presence of short chains. Though interfacial entanglements increase more rapidly for the damaged films, a large fraction of these entanglements are near chain ends. As a result, the interfacial strength of the healing film increases more slowly than for welding. For both healing and welding, the interfacial strength saturates as the bulk entanglement density is recovered across the interface. However, the saturation strength of the damaged film is below the bulk strength for the polymer sample. At saturation, cut chains remain near the healing interface. They are less entangled and as a result they mechanically weaken the interface. Chain stiffness increases the density of entanglements, which increases the strength of the interface. Our results show that a few entanglements across the interface are sufficient to resist interfacial chain pullout and enhance the mechanical strength.

  2. Structure formation via the self-gravity interfacial instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueckstaedt, R. M.; Hunter, J. H.; Peterson, A. H.

    2003-12-01

    Interfacial instabilities (such as Rayleigh-Taylor or Kelvin-Helmholtz) are believed to play significant roles in shaping molecular clouds and giving rise to star forming regions. Recent studies (Hunter, Whitaker,and Lovelace ApJ 482, 1997; Hueckstaedt and Hunter MNRAS 327, 2001) have shown that self-gravity causes crenulations along a density interface to grow as the system seeks a lower energy state. The self-gravity interfacial instability (SGI) persists for wavelengths less that the Jean's length and has a timescale on the order of the freefall time. We discuss the SGI and its application toward molecular cloud morphology.

  3. Interfacial Effects in Polymer Membranes for Clean Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soles, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    Polymeric membranes are critical components in several emerging clean energy technologies. Examples include proton exchange membranes for hydrogen fuel cells, anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells, flow batteries, and even block copolymer membranes for solid electrolytes/separators in lithium ion and other battery technologies. In all of these examples the function of the membrane is to physically separate two reactive electrodes or reactants, but allow the transport or exchange of specific ions through the membrane between the active electrodes. The flow of the charged ionic species between the electrodes can be used to balance the flow of electrons through an external electrical circuit that connects the electrodes, thereby storing or delivering charge electrochemically. In this presentation I will review the use of polymeric membranes in electrochemical energy storage technologies and discuss the critical issues related to the membranes that hinder these technologies. In particular I will also focus on the role the polymer membrane interface on device performance. At some point the polymer membrane must be interfaced with an active electrode or catalyst and the nature of this interface can significantly impact performance. Simulations of device performance based on bulk membrane transport properties often fail to predict the actual performance and empirical interfacial impedance terms usually added to capture the device performance. In this presentation I will explore the origins of this interfacial impedance in the different types of fuel cell membranes (proton and alkaline) by creating model thin film membranes where all of the membrane can be considered interfacial. We then use these thin films as a surrogate for the interfacial regions of a bulk membrane and then quantify the structure, dynamics, and transport properties of water and ions in the confined interfacial films. Using neutron reflectivity, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and

  4. Estimating interfacial thermal conductivity in metamaterials through heat flux mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Canbazoglu, Fatih M.; Vemuri, Krishna P.; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2015-04-06

    The variability of the thickness as well as the thermal conductivity of interfaces in composites may significantly influence thermal transport characteristics and the notion of a metamaterial as an effective medium. The consequent modulations of the heat flux passage are analytically and experimentally examined through a non-contact methodology using radiative imaging, on a model anisotropic thermal metamaterial. It was indicated that a lower Al layer/silver interfacial epoxy ratio of ∼25 compared to that of a Al layer/alumina interfacial epoxy (of ∼39) contributes to a smaller deviation of the heat flux bending angle.

  5. A facile microfluidic strategy for measuring interfacial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongbo; Yao, Yuan; Chen, Qiang; Li, Gang; Yao, Shuhuai

    2013-12-01

    We report a facile method for measuring interfacial tension (IFT, γ) of immiscible fluids using a microfluidic device. The IFT is determined by monitoring the pressure drop across a microchannel, where a pair of modified Laplace sensors (formed by tapered channels) are connected, and the curvatures of the interfaces in the tapered channels. The method was tested with the model oil/water systems, and the results agreed well with a commercial tensiometry. We expect this method to be easily implemented in common microfluidic laboratories and supply a low-cost and fast way for interfacial tension measurement.

  6. The ensemble switch method for computing interfacial tensions

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter

    2015-04-14

    We present a systematic thermodynamic integration approach to compute interfacial tensions for solid-liquid interfaces, which is based on the ensemble switch method. Applying Monte Carlo simulations and finite-size scaling techniques, we obtain results for hard spheres, which are in agreement with previous computations. The case of solid-liquid interfaces in a variant of the effective Asakura-Oosawa model and of liquid-vapor interfaces in the Lennard-Jones model are discussed as well. We demonstrate that a thorough finite-size analysis of the simulation data is required to obtain precise results for the interfacial tension.

  7. Dynamically reconfigurable complex emulsions via tunable interfacial tensions.

    PubMed

    Zarzar, Lauren D; Sresht, Vishnu; Sletten, Ellen M; Kalow, Julia A; Blankschtein, Daniel; Swager, Timothy M

    2015-02-26

    Emulsification is a powerful, well-known technique for mixing and dispersing immiscible components within a continuous liquid phase. Consequently, emulsions are central components of medicine, food and performance materials. Complex emulsions, including Janus droplets (that is, droplets with faces of differing chemistries) and multiple emulsions, are of increasing importance in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics, in the fabrication of microparticles and capsules for food, in chemical separations, in cosmetics, and in dynamic optics. Because complex emulsion properties and functions are related to the droplet geometry and composition, the development of rapid, simple fabrication approaches allowing precise control over the droplets' physical and chemical characteristics is critical. Significant advances in the fabrication of complex emulsions have been made using a number of procedures, ranging from large-scale, less precise techniques that give compositional heterogeneity using high-shear mixers and membranes, to small-volume but more precise microfluidic methods. However, such approaches have yet to create droplet morphologies that can be controllably altered after emulsification. Reconfigurable complex liquids potentially have great utility as dynamically tunable materials. Here we describe an approach to the one-step fabrication of three- and four-phase complex emulsions with highly controllable and reconfigurable morphologies. The fabrication makes use of the temperature-sensitive miscibility of hydrocarbon, silicone and fluorocarbon liquids, and is applied to both the microfluidic and the scalable batch production of complex droplets. We demonstrate that droplet geometries can be alternated between encapsulated and Janus configurations by varying the interfacial tensions using hydrocarbon and fluorinated surfactants including stimuli-responsive and cleavable surfactants. This yields a generalizable strategy for the fabrication of multiphase emulsions with

  8. Dynamically reconfigurable complex emulsions via tunable interfacial tensions

    PubMed Central

    Zarzar, Lauren D.; Sresht, Vishnu; Sletten, Ellen M.; Kalow, Julia A.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Swager, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Emulsification is a powerful, well-known technique for mixing and dispersing immiscible components within a continuous liquid phase. Consequently, emulsions are central components of medicine, food and performance materials. Complex emulsions, including multiple emulsions and Janus droplets which contain hemispheres of differing material, are of increasing importance1 in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics2, in the fabrication of microparticles and capsules3–5 for food6, in chemical separations7, in cosmetics8, and in dynamic optics9. Because complex emulsion properties and functions are related to the droplet geometry and composition, the development of rapid, simple fabrication approaches allowing precise control over the droplets’ physical and chemical characteristics is critical. Significant advances in the fabrication of complex emulsions have been made using a number of procedures, ranging from large-scale, less precise techniques that give compositional heterogeneity using high-shear mixers and membranes10, to small-volume but more precise microfluidic methods11,12. However, such approaches have yet to create droplet morphologies that can be controllably altered after emulsification. Reconfigurable complex liquids potentially have greatly increased utility as dynamically tunable materials. Here we describe an approach to the one-step fabrication of three- and four-phase complex emulsions with highly controllable and reconfigurable morphologies. The fabrication makes use of the temperature-sensitive miscibility of hydrocarbon, silicone and fluorocarbon liquids, and is applied to both the microfluidic and the scalable batch production of complex droplets. We demonstrate that droplet geometries can be alternated between encapsulated and Janus configurations by varying the interfacial tensions using hydrocarbon and fluorinated surfactants including stimuli-responsive and cleavable surfactants. This yields a generalizable strategy for the fabrication of

  9. Blind Prediction of Interfacial Water Positions in CAPRI

    PubMed Central

    Moal, Iain H.; Bates, Paul A.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Melquiond, Adrien S.J.; Karaca, Ezgi; Schmitz, Christophe; van Dijk, Marc; Bonvin, Alexandre M.J.J.; Eisenstein, Miriam; Jiménez-García, Brian; Grosdidier, Solène; Solernou, Albert; Pérez-Cano, Laura; Pallara, Chiara; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Xu, Jianqing; Muthu, Pravin; Kilambi, Krishna Praneeth; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Grudinin, Sergei; Derevyanko, Georgy; Mitchell, Julie C.; Wieting, John; Kanamori, Eiji; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Murakami, Yoichi; Sarmiento, Joy; Standley, Daron M.; Shirota, Matsuyuki; Kinoshita, Kengo; Nakamura, Haruki; Chavent, Matthieu; Ritchie, David W.; Park, Hahnbeom; Ko, Junsu; Lee, Hasup; Seok, Chaok; Shen, Yang; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor; Kundrotas, Petras J.; Vakser, Ilya A.; Pierce, Brian G.; Hwang, Howook; Vreven, Thom; Weng, Zhiping; Buch, Idit; Farkash, Efrat; Wolfson, Haim J.; Zacharias, Martin; Qin, Sanbo; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Huang, Shen-You; Zou, Xiaoqin; Wojdyla, Justyna A.; Kleanthous, Colin; Wodak, Shoshana J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first assessment of blind predictions of water positions at protein-protein interfaces, performed as part of the CAPRI (Critical Assessment of Predicted Interactions) community-wide experiment. Groups submitting docking predictions for the complex of the DNase domain of colicin E2 and Im2 immunity protein (CAPRI target 47), were invited to predict the positions of interfacial water molecules using the method of their choice. The predictions – 20 groups submitted a total of 195 models – were assessed by measuring the recall fraction of water-mediated protein contacts. Of the 176 high or medium quality docking models – a very good docking performance per se – only 44% had a recall fraction above 0.3, and a mere 6% above 0.5. The actual water positions were in general predicted to an accuracy level no better than 1.5 Å, and even in good models about half of the contacts represented false positives. This notwithstanding, three hotspot interface water positions were quite well predicted, and so was one of the water positions that is believed to stabilize the loop that confers specificity in these complexes. Overall the best interface water predictions was achieved by groups that also produced high quality docking models, indicating that accurate modelling of the protein portion is a determinant factor. The use of established molecular mechanics force fields, coupled to sampling and optimization procedures also seemed to confer an advantage. Insights gained from this analysis should help improve the prediction of protein-water interactions and their role in stabilizing protein complexes. PMID:24155158

  10. Dynamically reconfigurable complex emulsions via tunable interfacial tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarzar, Lauren D.; Sresht, Vishnu; Sletten, Ellen M.; Kalow, Julia A.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Swager, Timothy M.

    2015-02-01

    Emulsification is a powerful, well-known technique for mixing and dispersing immiscible components within a continuous liquid phase. Consequently, emulsions are central components of medicine, food and performance materials. Complex emulsions, including Janus droplets (that is, droplets with faces of differing chemistries) and multiple emulsions, are of increasing importance in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics, in the fabrication of microparticles and capsules for food, in chemical separations, in cosmetics, and in dynamic optics. Because complex emulsion properties and functions are related to the droplet geometry and composition, the development of rapid, simple fabrication approaches allowing precise control over the droplets' physical and chemical characteristics is critical. Significant advances in the fabrication of complex emulsions have been made using a number of procedures, ranging from large-scale, less precise techniques that give compositional heterogeneity using high-shear mixers and membranes, to small-volume but more precise microfluidic methods. However, such approaches have yet to create droplet morphologies that can be controllably altered after emulsification. Reconfigurable complex liquids potentially have great utility as dynamically tunable materials. Here we describe an approach to the one-step fabrication of three- and four-phase complex emulsions with highly controllable and reconfigurable morphologies. The fabrication makes use of the temperature-sensitive miscibility of hydrocarbon, silicone and fluorocarbon liquids, and is applied to both the microfluidic and the scalable batch production of complex droplets. We demonstrate that droplet geometries can be alternated between encapsulated and Janus configurations by varying the interfacial tensions using hydrocarbon and fluorinated surfactants including stimuli-responsive and cleavable surfactants. This yields a generalizable strategy for the fabrication of multiphase emulsions with

  11. The importance of experimental design on measurement of dynamic interfacial tension and interfacial rheology in diffusion-limited surfactant systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reichert, Matthew D.; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Brooks, Carlton F.; Grillet, Anne M.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Anna, Shelley L.; Walker, Lynn M.

    2014-09-24

    Pendant bubble and drop devices are invaluable tools in understanding surfactant behavior at fluid–fluid interfaces. The simple instrumentation and analysis are used widely to determine adsorption isotherms, transport parameters, and interfacial rheology. However, much of the analysis performed is developed for planar interfaces. Moreover, the application of a planar analysis to drops and bubbles (curved interfaces) can lead to erroneous and unphysical results. We revisit this analysis for a well-studied surfactant system at air–water interfaces over a wide range of curvatures as applied to both expansion/contraction experiments and interfacial elasticity measurements. The impact of curvature and transport on measured propertiesmore » is quantified and compared to other scaling relationships in the literature. Our results provide tools to design interfacial experiments for accurate determination of isotherm, transport and elastic properties.« less

  12. The importance of experimental design on measurement of dynamic interfacial tension and interfacial rheology in diffusion-limited surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reichert, Matthew D.; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Brooks, Carlton F.; Grillet, Anne M.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Anna, Shelley L.; Walker, Lynn M.

    2014-09-24

    Pendant bubble and drop devices are invaluable tools in understanding surfactant behavior at fluid–fluid interfaces. The simple instrumentation and analysis are used widely to determine adsorption isotherms, transport parameters, and interfacial rheology. However, much of the analysis performed is developed for planar interfaces. Moreover, the application of a planar analysis to drops and bubbles (curved interfaces) can lead to erroneous and unphysical results. We revisit this analysis for a well-studied surfactant system at air–water interfaces over a wide range of curvatures as applied to both expansion/contraction experiments and interfacial elasticity measurements. The impact of curvature and transport on measured properties is quantified and compared to other scaling relationships in the literature. Our results provide tools to design interfacial experiments for accurate determination of isotherm, transport and elastic properties.

  13. Comprehensive studies of interfacial strain and oxygen vacancy on metal-insulator transition of VO2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, L. L.; Chen, S.; Liao, G. M.; Chen, Y. L.; Ren, H.; Zou, C. W.

    2016-06-01

    As a typical strong correlation material, vanadium dioxide (VO2) has attracted wide interest due to its particular metal-insulator transition (MIT) property. However, the relatively high critical temperature (T c) of ~68 °C seriously hinders its practical applications. Thus modulating the phase transition process and decreasing the T c close to room temperature have been hot topics for VO2 study. In the current work, we conducted a multi-approach strategy to control the phase transition of VO2 films, including the interfacial tensile/compressive strain and oxygen vacancies. A synchrotron radiation reciprocal space mapping technique was used to directly record the interfacial strain evolution and variations of lattice parameters. The effects of interfacial strain and oxygen vacancies in the MIT process were systematically investigated based on band structure and d-orbital electron occupation. It was suggested that the MIT behavior can be modulated through the combined effects of the interfacial strain and oxygen vacancies, achieving the distinct phase transition close to room temperature. The current findings not only provide better understanding for strain engineering and oxygen vacancies controlling phase transition behavior, but also supply a combined way to control the phase transition of VO2 film, which is essential for VO2 film based device applications in the future.

  14. Comprehensive studies of interfacial strain and oxygen vacancy on metal-insulator transition of VO2 film.

    PubMed

    Fan, L L; Chen, S; Liao, G M; Chen, Y L; Ren, H; Zou, C W

    2016-06-29

    As a typical strong correlation material, vanadium dioxide (VO2) has attracted wide interest due to its particular metal-insulator transition (MIT) property. However, the relatively high critical temperature (T c) of ~68 °C seriously hinders its practical applications. Thus modulating the phase transition process and decreasing the T c close to room temperature have been hot topics for VO2 study. In the current work, we conducted a multi-approach strategy to control the phase transition of VO2 films, including the interfacial tensile/compressive strain and oxygen vacancies. A synchrotron radiation reciprocal space mapping technique was used to directly record the interfacial strain evolution and variations of lattice parameters. The effects of interfacial strain and oxygen vacancies in the MIT process were systematically investigated based on band structure and d-orbital electron occupation. It was suggested that the MIT behavior can be modulated through the combined effects of the interfacial strain and oxygen vacancies, achieving the distinct phase transition close to room temperature. The current findings not only provide better understanding for strain engineering and oxygen vacancies controlling phase transition behavior, but also supply a combined way to control the phase transition of VO2 film, which is essential for VO2 film based device applications in the future.

  15. Probing the Interfacial Interaction in Layered-Carbon-Stabilized Iron Oxide Nanostructures: A Soft X-ray Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Jinyin; Zhao, Guanqi; Gao, Yongjun; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Ma, Ding; Sun, Xu-Hui; Zhong, Jun

    2015-04-22

    We have stabilized the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) of various sizes on layered carbon materials (Fe-oxide/C) that show excellent catalytic performance. From the characterization of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy (XMCD), a strong interfacial interaction in the Fe-oxide/C hybrids has been observed between the small iron oxide NPs and layered carbon in contrast to the weak interaction in the large iron oxide NPs. The interfacial interaction between the NPs and layered carbon is found to link with the improved catalytic performance. In addition, the Fe L-edge XMCD spectra show that the large iron oxide NPs are mainly γ-Fe2O3 with a strong ferromagnetic property, whereas the small iron oxide NPs with strong interfacial interaction are mainly α-Fe2O3 or amorphous Fe2O3 with a nonmagnetic property. The results strongly suggest that the interfacial interaction plays a key role for the catalytic performance, and the experimental findings may provide guidance toward rational design of high-performance catalysts. PMID:25839786

  16. Influence of string-like cooperative atomic motion on surface diffusion in the (110) interfacial region of crystalline Ni

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Yang, Ying; Douglas, Jack F.

    2015-01-01

    Although we often think about crystalline materials in terms of highly organized arrays of atoms, molecules, or even colloidal particles, many of the important properties of this diverse class of materials relating to their catalytic behavior, thermodynamic stability, and mechanical properties derive from the dynamics and thermodynamics of their interfacial regions, which we find they have a dynamics more like glass-forming (GF) liquids than crystals at elevated temperatures. This is a general problem arising in any attempt to model the properties of naturally occurring crystalline materials since many aspects of the dynamics of glass-forming liquids remain mysterious. We examine the nature of this phenomenon in the “simple” case of the (110) interface of crystalline Ni, based on a standard embedded-atom model potential, and we then quantify the collective dynamics in this interfacial region using newly developed methods for characterizing the cooperative dynamics of glass-forming liquids. As in our former studies of the interfacial dynamics of grain-boundaries and the interfacial dynamics of crystalline Ni nanoparticles (NPs), we find that the interface of bulk crystalline Ni exhibits all the characteristics of glass-forming materials, even at temperatures well below the equilibrium crystal melting temperature, Tm. This perspective offers a new approach to modeling and engineering the properties of crystalline materials. PMID:25725748

  17. Characterizing Fluid/Fluid Interfacial Areas for Non-Wetting/Wetting Fluid Pairs in Natural Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narter, M.; Brusseau, M. L.; Araujo, J. B.; Marble, J. C.; Schnaar, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    The interface between fluids in the subsurface mediates a number of pore-scale processes affecting contaminant transport and fate. These processes include multiphase flow, mass transfer, sorption, and bioavailability. The objective of this study was to characterize the interfacial area between pairs of non-wetting and wetting fluids in a variety of natural porous media. Synchrotron X-ray microtomography was used to obtain high-resolution, three-dimensional images of multi-phase porous media systems. Four porous media, comprising a range of physical properties, were used in the study. The three pairs of non-wetting/wetting fluids used were organic-liquid/water, air/organic-liquid, and air/water. Tetrachloroethene and hexadecane were used as the model organic liquids. The results show that for each fluid pair, total (capillary + film) interfacial areas increased linearly with decreasing non-wetting fluid saturation. The maximum specific interfacial area (Am) was determined to quantify the magnitude of interfacial area associated with a given porous medium. The value of Am did not vary significantly between fluid-pairs for a given porous medium.

  18. Specific effects of Ca(2+) ions and molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin interfacial layers that drive macroscopic foam stability.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Björn; Schulze-Zachau, Felix; Nagel, Eva; Engelhardt, Kathrin; Stoyanov, Stefan; Gochev, Georgi; Khristov, Khr; Mileva, Elena; Exerowa, Dotchi; Miller, Reinhard; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) adsorption layers at air-water interfaces were studied in situ with vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG), tensiometry, surface dilatational rheology and ellipsometry as a function of bulk Ca(2+) concentration. The relation between the interfacial molecular structure of adsorbed BLG and the interactions with the supporting electrolyte is additionally addressed on higher length scales along the foam hierarchy - from the ubiquitous air-water interface through thin foam films to macroscopic foam. For concentrations <1 mM, a strong decrease in SFG intensity from O-H stretching bands and a slight increase in layer thickness and surface pressure are observed. A further increase in Ca(2+) concentrations above 1 mM causes an apparent change in the polarity of aromatic C-H stretching vibrations from interfacial BLG which we associate to a charge reversal at the interface. Foam film measurements show formation of common black films at Ca(2+) concentrations above 1 mM due to considerable decrease of the stabilizing electrostatic disjoining pressure. These observations also correlate with a minimum in macroscopic foam stability. For concentrations >30 mM Ca(2+), micrographs of foam films show clear signatures of aggregates which tend to increase the stability of foam films. Here, the interfacial layers have a higher surface dilatational elasticity. In fact, macroscopic foams formed from BLG dilutions with high Ca(2+) concentrations where aggregates and interfacial layers with higher elasticity are found, showed the highest stability with much smaller bubble sizes.

  19. Probing the Interfacial Interaction in Layered-Carbon-Stabilized Iron Oxide Nanostructures: A Soft X-ray Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Jinyin; Zhao, Guanqi; Gao, Yongjun; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Ma, Ding; Sun, Xu-Hui; Zhong, Jun

    2015-04-22

    We have stabilized the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) of various sizes on layered carbon materials (Fe-oxide/C) that show excellent catalytic performance. From the characterization of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy (XMCD), a strong interfacial interaction in the Fe-oxide/C hybrids has been observed between the small iron oxide NPs and layered carbon in contrast to the weak interaction in the large iron oxide NPs. The interfacial interaction between the NPs and layered carbon is found to link with the improved catalytic performance. In addition, the Fe L-edge XMCD spectra show that the large iron oxide NPs are mainly γ-Fe2O3 with a strong ferromagnetic property, whereas the small iron oxide NPs with strong interfacial interaction are mainly α-Fe2O3 or amorphous Fe2O3 with a nonmagnetic property. The results strongly suggest that the interfacial interaction plays a key role for the catalytic performance, and the experimental findings may provide guidance toward rational design of high-performance catalysts.

  20. Interfacial separation of a mature biofilm from a glass surface - A combined experimental and cohesive zone modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Safari, Ashkan; Tukovic, Zeljko; Cardiff, Philip; Walter, Maik; Casey, Eoin; Ivankovic, Alojz

    2016-02-01

    A good understanding of the mechanical stability of biofilms is essential for biofouling management, particularly when mechanical forces are used. Previous biofilm studies lack a damage-based theoretical model to describe the biofilm separation from a surface. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the interfacial separation of a mature biofilm from a rigid glass substrate using a combined experimental and numerical modelling approach. In the current work, the biofilm-glass interfacial separation process was investigated under tensile and shear stresses at the macroscale level, known as modes I and II failure mechanisms respectively. The numerical simulations were performed using a Finite Volume (FV)-based simulation package (OpenFOAM®) to predict the separation initiation using the cohesive zone model (CZM). Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based retraction curve was used to obtain the separation properties between the biofilm and glass colloid at microscale level, where the CZM parameters were estimated using the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model. In this study CZM is introduced as a reliable method for the investigation of interfacial separation between a biofilm and rigid substrate, in which a high local stress at the interface edge acts as an ultimate stress at the crack tip.This study demonstrated that the total interfacial failure energy measured at the macroscale, was significantly higher than the pure interfacial separation energy obtained by AFM at the microscale, indicating a highly ductile deformation behaviour within the bulk biofilm matrix. The results of this study can significantly contribute to the understanding of biofilm detachments.

  1. The effect of thermal cycling on interfacial bonding in a ceramic matrix composite reinforced with a metallic ribbon

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.K.; Subramanian, K.N. )

    1993-06-01

    Ceramic matrix composite materials have great potential for high temperature applications, and are often subject to thermal cycling. As a result, thermal cycling studies on ceramic matrix composites can yield valuable information regarding their potential for high temperature service. The main aim of the present study is to analyze the effects of the maximum temperature used in thermal cycling and the number of such cycles on the interfacial bonding strength of soda lime glass reinforced with Nichrome ribbons.

  2. Interfacial preferential dissolution on silicon carbide particulate/aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, H.Y.; Zhu, R.Z.

    1998-07-01

    Previous studies on corrosion of discontinuously reinforced aluminum alloy composites have assumed that the role of the reinforcement-matrix interface is merely as a preferable site for pitting. In this work, the interfacial preferential dissolution (IPD) occurring on silicon carbide particulate/aluminum (SiC{sub p}/Al) composites in a medium of aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solution was studied. IPD was quite distinct from pitting. IPD occurred on the composites with either a pure aluminum matrix or an aluminum alloy Al 2024 (UNS A92024) matrix, whether they were fabricated by a cast process or by a powder metallurgy process. In the light of elastoplastic mechanics, the width of the plastically deformed zone around SiC particles (created by the contraction misfit between SiC particles and the matrix during quenching) was deduced to be 0.5 D, where D is the diameter of the SiC particles. This was in agreement with the measured width of the IPD region (0.3 D to 0.4 D). It was concluded that IPD was caused by the poor integrity of the surface oxide film upon the plastically deformed zone near the interface and was independent of the chemical, metallurgical, and galvanic coupling factors around the interface, if any. A copper-deposition experiment indicated this poor integrity. IPD caused increased dissolution at SiC clusters and uniform corrosion for the composites with high SiC content. Moreover, IPD and pitting suppressed each other by a means of cathodic protection.

  3. Interfacial phenomena, evaporation and stress in a constrained capillary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, S.; Kim, I. Y.; Wayner, P. C., Jr.

    1992-08-01

    The heat transfer and interfacial characteristics of a small constrained system under stress in the form of an evaporating extended meniscus at the exit of a slot feeder were evaluated. The stress level in the completely wetting fluid-solid system was increased by decreasing the overall size of the film and thereby increasing the relative importance of interfacial phenomena. Recent data concerning the effect of interfacial phenomena on transport processes in a constrained capillary system will be presented. The liquid thickness profile, which was representative of the pressure field in the extended meniscus was measured using ellipsometry and microcomputer enhanced video mciroscopy. The analysis demonstrates that the capillary and disjoining pressures are coupled and they lead to fluid flow and a reduction in vapor pressure. The interfacial forces have a large effect on the heat transfer characteristics. A model equation based on the augmented Young-Laplace equation was numerically solved and compared with the film thickness data to determine the Hamaker constant, in situ. The effects of system resistance on the mass and the heat flux distribution were also investigated.

  4. Recent progress in interfacial tissue engineering approaches for osteochondral defects.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nathan J; Hacking, S Adam; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2012-08-01

    This review provides a brief synopsis of the anatomy and physiology of the osteochondral interface, scaffold-based and non-scaffold based approaches for engineering both tissues independently as well as recent developments in the manufacture of gradient constructs. Novel manufacturing techniques and nanotechnology will be discussed with potential application in osteochondral interfacial tissue engineering. PMID:22677924

  5. Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2004-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its first annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2004. During this period, fourteen PNNL scientists hosted sixteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the sixteen participants, fourteen were graduate students; one was transitioning to graduate school; and one was a university faculty member.

  6. Liquid metal actuation by electrical control of interfacial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaker, Collin B.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2016-09-01

    By combining metallic electrical conductivity with low viscosity, liquid metals and liquid metal alloys offer new and exciting opportunities to serve as reconfigurable components of electronic, microfluidic, and electromagnetic devices. Here, we review the physics and applications of techniques that utilize voltage to manipulate the interfacial tension of liquid metals; such techniques include electrocapillarity, continuous electrowetting, electrowetting-on-dielectric, and electrochemistry. These techniques lower the interfacial tension between liquid metals and a surrounding electrolyte by driving charged species (or in the case of electrochemistry, chemical species) to the interface. The techniques are useful for manipulating and actuating liquid metals at sub-mm length scales where interfacial forces dominate. We focus on metals and alloys that are liquid near or below room temperature (mercury, gallium, and gallium-based alloys). The review includes discussion of mercury—despite its toxicity—because it has been utilized in numerous applications and it offers a way of introducing several phenomena without the complications associated with the oxide layer that forms on gallium and its alloys. The review focuses on the advantages, applications, opportunities, challenges, and limitations of utilizing voltage to control interfacial tension as a method to manipulate liquid metals.

  7. Interfacial thermodynamics of water and six other liquid solvents.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Tod A; Goddard, William A

    2014-06-01

    We examine the thermodynamics of the liquid-vapor interface by direct calculation of the surface entropy, enthalpy, and free energy from extensive molecular dynamics simulations using the two-phase thermodynamics (2PT) method. Results for water, acetonitrile, cyclohexane, dimethyl sulfoxide, hexanol, N-methyl acetamide, and toluene are presented. We validate our approach by predicting the interfacial surface tensions (IFT--excess surface free energy per unit area) in excellent agreement with the mechanical calculations using Kirkwood-Buff theory. Additionally, we evaluate the temperature dependence of the IFT of water as described by the TIP4P/2005, SPC/Ew, TIP3P, and mW classical water models. We find that the TIP4P/2005 and SPC/Ew water models do a reasonable job of describing the interfacial thermodynamics; however, the TIP3P and mW are quite poor. We find that the underprediction of the experimental IFT at 298 K by these water models results from understructured surface molecules whose binding energies are too weak. Finally, we performed depth profiles of the interfacial thermodynamics which revealed long tails that extend far into what would be considered bulk from standard Gibbs theory. In fact, we find a nonmonotonic interfacial free energy profile for water, a unique feature that could have important consequences for the absorption of ions and other small molecules.

  8. Manipulating Ordering Transitions in Interfacially Modified Block Copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, N.; Tureau, M; Epps, T

    2009-01-01

    We report a synthetic strategy that allows us to manipulate the interfacial region between blocks and control ordering transitions in poly(isoprene-b-styrene) [P(I-S)] block copolymers. This interfacial modification is accomplished by combining a semi-batch feed with anionic polymerization techniques. Using this approach, we are able to control the segmental composition and molecular interactions in our phase-separated block copolymers, independent of molecular weight and block constituents. A library of copolymers is prepared with various interfacial modifications to examine the effect of interfacial composition on copolymer self-assembly. The morphological characteristics of the self-assembled structures are investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Normal and inverse tapered block copolymers, containing approximately 15-35 vol% tapered material, show a measurable decrease in the order-disorder transition temperature (TODT) relative to the corresponding non-tapered diblock copolymers, with the inverse tapered materials showing the greatest deviation in TODT. Additionally, TODT was inversely related to the volume fraction of the tapered region in both normal and inverse tapered copolymer materials.

  9. Measurement of Interfacial Area Production and Permeability within Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the pore-level interactions that affect multi-phase flow in porous media is important in many subsurface engineering applications, including enhanced oil recovery, remediation of dense non-aqueous liquid contaminated sites, and geologic CO2 sequestration. Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to have several shortcomings, which might partially be overcome using a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles that includes interfacial area as an additional parameter. A few static experimental studies have been previously performed, which allowed the determination of static parameters of the model, but no information exists concerning the interfacial area dynamic parameters. A new experimental porous flow cell that was constructed using stereolithography for two-phase gas-liquid flow studies was used in conjunction with an in-house analysis code to provide information on dynamic evolution of both fluid phases and gas-liquid interfaces. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the new generalized model of two-phase flow model and describe how the stereolithography flow cell experimental setup was used to obtain the dynamic parameters for the interfacial area numerical model. In particular, the methods used to determine the interfacial area permeability and production terms are shown.

  10. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Modules for Probing Gold Nanoparticle Interfacial Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karunanayake, Akila G.; Gunatilake, Sameera R.; Ameer, Fathima S.; Gadogbe, Manuel; Smith, Laura; Mlsna, Deb; Zhang, Dongmao

    2015-01-01

    Three gold-nanoparticle (AuNP) undergraduate experiment modules that are focused on nanoparticles interfacial phenomena have been developed. Modules 1 and 2 explore the synthesis and characterization of AuNPs of different sizes but with the same total gold mass. These experiments enable students to determine how particle size affects the AuNP…

  11. Measurement of interfacial tension of immiscible liquid pairs in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.; Neilson, George F.; Baertlein, Carl; Subramanian, R. Shankar; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion is given of a containerless microgravity experiment aimed at measuring the interfacial tension of immiscible liquid pairs using a compound drop rotation method. The reasons for the failure to execute such experiments in microgravity are described. Also, the results of post-flight analyses used to confirm our arguments are presented.

  12. The Hydrophobic Effect in Solute Partitioning and Interfacial Tension

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Meyer B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the partitioning of hydrophobic solutes between water and nonpolar solvents provide estimates for the energy cost of creating hydrophobic-water contacts. This energy is a factor of three lower than the work of adhesion derived from interfacial tension measurements. This discrepancy noted by Tanford in 1979 is widely viewed as a serious challenge to our understanding of hydrophobic interactions. However, the interfacial energy of a water-alkane interface depends on chain length. A simple analysis of published data shows that the loss of rotational freedom of an alkane chain at an interface accounts quantitatively for the length-dependent contribution to interfacial tension, leaving a length-independent contribution very close to the free energy of transfer per unit of solvent accessible surface area. This analysis thus clarifies the discrepancy between the thermodynamic and interfacial tension measurements of hydrophobic interaction energy. Alkanes do not loose rotational freedom when transferred between two different liquid phases but they do at an interface. This reconciles the difference between microscopic and macroscopic measurements. Like the partitioning free energy, the work of adhesion also has a large entropy and small enthalpy at 20 oC. PMID:26813712

  13. Glycosaminoglycan degradation reduces mineralized tissue-titanium interfacial strength.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiromi; Shim, Jaewoo; Butz, Frank; Aita, Hideki; Gupta, Vijay; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2006-06-01

    Although the localization of the proteoglycan/glycosaminoglycan (GAG) complex at the bone-titanium implant interface has been implied, the role of proteoglycans on the establishment of bone-titanium integration is unknown. The hypothesis to be tested was that proteoglycans play an important role in establishing bone-titanium interfacial adhesion. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of proteoglycan knockdown by GAG enzymatic degradation on the interfacial strength between mineralized tissue and titanium having different surface topographies. Rat bone marrow-derived osteoblastic cells were cultured on either a machined titanium disk or an acid-etched titanium disk. At day 21 of culture, one of the three following GAG degradation enzymes was added into the culture; chondroitinase AC, chondroitinase B, or keratanase. After 3 days of incubation (at day 24 of culture), the laser spallation technique was applied to the samples in order to assess the tissue-titanium interfacial strength. In this technique, a laser-generated stress wave is used to separate the tissue-titanium interface, and the interfacial strength is determined interferometrically by recording the transient free surface velocity of the tissue. Mineralized tissue cultured on the acid-etched titanium showed 20-30% higher tissue interfacial strength than that cultured on the machined titanium (p < 0.0001). For both the machined and acid-etched surface cultures, administration of the enzyme reduced the interfacial strength by 25-30% compared with the untreated control cultures (p < 0.0001). There were no differences in the effect among the three different enzymes tested. A nanoindentation study revealed that the enzyme treatment did not affect the elastic modulus of the mineralized tissue. Scanning electron microscopic and energy dispersive spectroscopic analyses revealed less post-spallation tissue remnant on the titanium substrates when treated with the enzymes. The tissue remnant was

  14. Enhanced planar hall sensitivity with better thermal stability by introducing interfacial modification of Au spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xu-Jing; Feng, Chun; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Jing-Yan; Liu, Yi-Wei; Jiang, Shao-Long; Liu, Yang; Li, Ming-Hua; Yu, Guang-Hua

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports an enhancement of planar Hall sensitivity in NiFe/Au/IrMn multilayers by introducing interfacial modification. The improvement of the sensitivity derives from the increase of resistivity change (Δρ), which is attributed to strengthened spin-asymmetry of polarized electrons in NiFe layer induced by strong spin-orbit scattering of Au layer. Furthermore, the NiFe/Au/IrMn structure based sensor exhibits good thermal stability. The high sensitivity together with good thermal stability makes the NiFe/Au/IrMn structure based sensor very promising for bio-detections.

  15. Diphenylbutylbenzyl- and diphenyldibenzylphosphonium chlorides are interfacial catalysts in cross-linking of fluorine-containing copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrova, L.N.; Bondarenko, N.A.; Tsvetkov, E.N.; Nudel'man, Z.N.

    1988-09-10

    Vulcanization in a two-phase system with an interfacial transfer catalyst (ITC) is widely used for obtaining highly thermostable rubbers from fluorine-containing rubbers, copolymers of vinylidene fluoride with hexafluoropropylene. A simple method of synthesis of tertiary diphenylalkylphosphines by alkylation of diphenylphosphine with alkyl halides in the presence of an aqueous alkali and aprotic bipolar solvents (dimethyl sulfide, dimethylformamide, and hexamethanol) has now been developed. They synthesized diphenylbutyl- and diphenylbenzylphosphines by this method, and they were subsequently transformed into the corresponding phosphonium salts by treatment with an excess of benzyl chloride. The prepared diphenylbutylbenzyl- and diphenyldibenzyl- phosphonium chlorides were tested as ITC in vulcanization of SKF-26 fluorine-containing rubber.

  16. Interfacial precipitation, segregation and deformation in alloy 600: Implications on primary-side IGSCC

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, S.M.

    1993-04-01

    A great many unknowns still exist concerning the mechanisms controlling intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of alloy 600 in high-temperature, deaerated water environments. Any proposed mechanism must involve the microstructure, microchemistry and mechanical properties of grain boundary regions. To facilitate basic understanding, specific aspects of alloy 600 metallurgy are reviewed and discussed. Interfacial carbide precipitation, chromium depletion, impurity segregation and local deformation characteristics are examined and related to IGSCC behavior. Purpose of this paper is to provide information, and prompt discussion, on these various issues for the EPRI Alloy 600 Experts Meeting.

  17. Exploring interfacial ferromagnetism in manganite-based superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Di; Flint, Charles; Suzuki, Yuri

    Heterointerface of complex oxides provides a rich playground to explore the emergent phenomena that are not found in bulk. In particular, emergent interfacial ferromagnetism has been successfully demonstrated in heterostructures composed of materials which are paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic in bulk. In our previous work, leakage of itinerant electrons from a paramagnetic metal to an antiferromagnetic insulator has been shown to give rise to interfacial ferromagnetism in CaMnO3 based superlattices. However interfacial ferromagnetism in insulating superlattices suggests a more complicated scenario. Therefore a thorough investigation of coupling between charge, lattice and spin degrees of freedom is necessary. In this talk, we focus on the NdNiO3 /CaMnO3 system. By choosing a paramagnetic layer that undergoes a metal-insulator transition, we can explore the role of electron itinerancy in interfacial ferromagnetism in the same sample to eliminate the inconsistencies that may originate from the deposition of multiple samples. We demonstrate that NdNiO3 exhibits a metal-insulator transition as a function of temperature, which can be tuned as a function of film thickness. We have also grown NdNiO3 /CaMnO3 heterostructures with excellent crystallinity. Preliminary transport measurements indicate that the presence of an adjacent CaMnO3 layer also affects the transport in NdNiO3 so that charge transfer from the itinerant layer into the adjacent antiferromagnetic insulating CaMnO3 is likely not the only contribution to interfacial ferromagnetism.

  18. Interfacial characteristic measurements in horizontal bubbly two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Huang, W. D.; Srinivasmurthy, S.; Kocamustafaogullari, G.

    1990-10-01

    Advances in the study of two-phase flow increasingly require detailed internal structure information upon which theoretical models can be formulated. The void fraction and interfacial area are two fundamental parameters characterizing the internal structure of two-phase flow. However, little information is currently available on these parameters, and it is mostly limited to vertical flow configurations. In view of the above, the internal phase distribution of concurrent, air-water bubbly flow in a 50.3 mm diameter transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a double-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 3.74 to 5.60 m/s and 0.25 to 1.59 m/s, respectively, and average void fractions ranged from 2.12 to 22.5 percent. The local values of void fractions, interfacial area concentration, mean bubble diameter, bubble interface velocity, bubble chord-length and bubble frequency distributions were measured. The experimental results indicate that the void fraction interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency have local maxima near the upper pipe wall, and the profiles tend to flatten with increasing void fraction. The observed peak void fraction can reach 0.65, the peak interfacial area can go up to 900 approximately 1000 sq m/cu m, and the bubble frequency can reach a value of 2200 per s. These ranges of values have never been reported for vertical bubbly flow. It is found that either decreasing the liquid flow rate or increasing the gas flow would increase the local void fraction, the interfacial area concentration and the bubble frequency.

  19. Anisotropic nanocolloids: self-assembly, interfacial adsorption, and electrostatic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, J.

    2012-06-01

    In this thesis we consider the influence of anisotropy on the behaviour of colloids using theory and simulations. The recent increase in the ability to synthesize anisotropic particles (cubes, caps, octapods, etc.) has led to samples of sufficient quality to perform self-assembly experiments. Our investigation is therefore particularly relevant to current and future experimental studies of colloids. We examine several topics for which shape anisotropy plays an important role: (1.) - Interfacial adsorption. We introduced the triangular-tessellation technique to approximate the surface areas and line length which are associated with a plane-particle intersection. Our method allowed us to determine the free energy of adsorption for a single irregular colloid with heterogeneous surface properties adsorbed at a flat liquid-liquid interface in the Pieranski approximation. Ellipsoids only adsorbed at the interface perpendicular to the interfacial normal. However, for cylinders we could find a metastable adsorption minimum corresponding to parallel adsorption. We also considered the possible time dependence of the adsorption process using simple dynamics. Finally, we studied the adsorption of truncated nanocubes with a contact-angle surface pattern and we observed that there are three prototypical equilibrium adsorption configurations for these particles. (2.) - Crystal-structure prediction. We extended an existing crystal-structure-prediction algorithm to predict structures for systems comprised of irregular hard particles. Using this technique we examined the high-density crystal structures for 17 irregular nonconvex shapes and we confirmed several mathematical conjectures for the packings of a large set of 142 convex polyhedra. We also proved that we have obtained the densest configurations for rhombicuboctahedra and rhombic enneacontrahedra, respectively. Moreover, we considered a family of truncated cubes, which interpolates between a cube and an octahedron, for which

  20. Interfacially polymerized layers for oxygen enrichment: a method to overcome Robeson's upper-bound limit.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Wei; Tsai, Chieh; Ruaan, Ruoh-Chyu; Hu, Chien-Chieh; Lee, Kueir-Rarn

    2013-06-26

    Interfacial polymerization of four aqueous phase monomers, diethylenetriamine (DETA), m-phenylenediamine (mPD), melamine (Mela), and piperazine (PIP), and two organic phase monomers, trimethyl chloride (TMC) and cyanuric chloride (CC), produce a thin-film composite membrane of polymerized polyamide layer capable of O2/N2 separation. To achieve maximum efficiency in gas permeance and O2/N2 permselectivity, the concentrations of monomers, time of interfacial polymerization, number of reactive groups in monomers, and the structure of monomers need to be optimized. By controlling the aqueous/organic monomer ratio between 1.9 and 2.7, we were able to obtain a uniformly interfacial polymerized layer. To achieve a highly cross-linked layer, three reactive groups in both the aqueous and organic phase monomers are required; however, if the monomers were arranged in a planar structure, the likelihood of structural defects also increased. On the contrary, linear polymers are less likely to result in structural defects, and can also produce polymer layers with moderate O2/N2 selectivity. To minimize structural defects while maximizing O2/N2 selectivity, the planar monomer, TMC, containing 3 reactive groups, was reacted with the semirigid monomer, PIP, containing 2 reactive groups to produce a membrane with an adequate gas permeance of 7.72 × 10(-6) cm(3) (STP) s(-1) cm(-2) cm Hg(-1) and a high O2/N2 selectivity of 10.43, allowing us to exceed the upper-bound limit of conventional thin-film composite membranes. PMID:23731366

  1. Interfacial mechanisms of heterogeneous Fenton reactions catalyzed by iron-based materials: A review.

    PubMed

    He, Jie; Yang, Xiaofang; Men, Bin; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous Fenton reaction can generate highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (OH) from reactions between recyclable solid catalysts and H2O2 at acidic or even circumneutral pH. Hence, it can effectively oxidize refractory organics in water or soils and has become a promising environmentally friendly treatment technology. Due to the complex reaction system, the mechanism behind heterogeneous Fenton reactions remains unresolved but fascinating, and is crucial for understanding Fenton chemistry and the development and application of efficient heterogeneous Fenton technologies. Iron-based materials usually possess high catalytic activity, low cost, negligible toxicity and easy recovery, and are a superior type of heterogeneous Fenton catalysts. Therefore, this article reviews the fundamental but important interfacial mechanisms of heterogeneous Fenton reactions catalyzed by iron-based materials. OH, hydroperoxyl radicals/superoxide anions (HO2/O2(-)) and high-valent iron are the three main types of reactive oxygen species (ROS), with different oxidation reactivity and selectivity. Based on the mechanisms of ROS generation, the interfacial mechanisms of heterogeneous Fenton systems can be classified as the homogeneous Fenton mechanism induced by surface-leached iron, the heterogeneous catalysis mechanism, and the heterogeneous reaction-induced homogeneous mechanism. Different heterogeneous Fenton systems catalyzed by characteristic iron-based materials are comprehensively reviewed. Finally, related future research directions are also suggested. PMID:26899649

  2. Interplay between Interfacial Structures and Device Performance in Organic Solar Cells: A Case Study with the Low Work Function Metal, Calcium.

    PubMed

    Ju, Huanxin; Knesting, Kristina M; Zhang, Wei; Pan, Xiao; Wang, Chia-Hsin; Yang, Yaw-Wen; Ginger, David S; Zhu, Junfa

    2016-01-27

    A better understanding of how interfacial structure affects charge carrier recombination would benefit the development of highly efficient organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. In this paper, transient photovoltage (TPV) and charge extraction (CE) measurements are used in combination with synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SRPES) to gain insight into the correlation between interfacial properties and device performance. OPV devices based on PCDTBT/PC71BM with a Ca interlayer were studied as a reference system to investigate the interfacial effects on device performance. Devices with a Ca interlayer exhibit a lower recombination than devices with only an Al cathode at a given charge carrier density (n). In addition, the interfacial band structures indicate that the strong dipole moment produced by the Ca interlayer can facilitate the extraction of electrons and drive holes away from the cathode/polymer interface, resulting in beneficial reduction in interfacial recombination losses. These results help explain the higher efficiencies of devices made with Ca interlayers compared to that without the Ca interlayer. PMID:26716763

  3. Controlling Interfacial Dynamics: Covalent Bonding versus Physical Adsorption in Polymer Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Holt, Adam P; Bocharova, Vera; Cheng, Shiwang; Kisliuk, Alexander M; White, B Tyler; Saito, Tomonori; Uhrig, David; Mahalik, J P; Kumar, Rajeev; Imel, Adam E; Etampawala, Thusitha; Martin, Halie; Sikes, Nicole; Sumpter, Bobby G; Dadmun, Mark D; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2016-07-26

    It is generally believed that the strength of the polymer-nanoparticle interaction controls the modification of near-interface segmental mobility in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). However, little is known about the effect of covalent bonding on the segmental dynamics and glass transition of matrix-free polymer-grafted nanoparticles (PGNs), especially when compared to PNCs. In this article, we directly compare the static and dynamic properties of poly(2-vinylpyridine)/silica-based nanocomposites with polymer chains either physically adsorbed (PNCs) or covalently bonded (PGNs) to identical silica nanoparticles (RNP = 12.5 nm) for three different molecular weight (MW) systems. Interestingly, when the MW of the matrix is as low as 6 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 5.4) or as high as 140 kg/mol (RNP/Rg= 1.13), both small-angle X-ray scattering and broadband dielectric spectroscopy show similar static and dynamic properties for PNCs and PGNs. However, for the intermediate MW of 18 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 3.16), the difference between physical adsorption and covalent bonding can be clearly identified in the static and dynamic properties of the interfacial layer. We ascribe the differences in the interfacial properties of PNCs and PGNs to changes in chain stretching, as quantified by self-consistent field theory calculations. These results demonstrate that the dynamic suppression at the interface is affected by the chain stretching; that is, it depends on the anisotropy of the segmental conformations, more so than the strength of the interaction, which suggests that the interfacial dynamics can be effectively tuned by the degree of stretching-a parameter accessible from the MW or grafting density. PMID:27337392

  4. Application of optical 3D measurement on thin film buckling to estimate interfacial toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, H. K.; Wang, S. B.; Li, L. A.; Wang, Z. Y.; Goudeau, P.

    2014-03-01

    The shape-from-focus (SFF) method has been widely studied as a passive depth recovery and 3D reconstruction method for digital images. An important step in SFF is the calculation of the focus level for different points in an image by using a focus measure. In this work, an image entropy-based focus measure is introduced into the SFF method to measure the 3D buckling morphology of an aluminum film on a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrate at a micro scale. Spontaneous film wrinkles and telephone-cord wrinkles are investigated after the deposition of a 300 nm thick aluminum film onto the PMMA substrate. Spontaneous buckling is driven by the highly compressive stress generated in the Al film during the deposition process. The interfacial toughness between metal films and substrates is an important parameter for the reliability of the film/substrate system. The height profiles of different sections across the telephone-cord wrinkle can be considered a straight-sided model with uniform width and height or a pinned circular model that has a delamination region characterized by a sequence of connected sectors. Furthermore, the telephone-cord geometry of the thin film can be used to calculate interfacial toughness. The instability of the finite element model is introduced to fit the buckling morphology obtained by SFF. The interfacial toughness is determined to be 0.203 J/m2 at a 70.4° phase angle from the straight-sided model and 0.105 J/m2 at 76.9° from the pinned circular model.

  5. Interfacial toughness of bilayer dental ceramics based on a short-bar, chevron-notch test

    PubMed Central

    Anunmana, Chuchai; Anusavice, Kenneth J.; Mecholsky, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to test the null hypothesis that the interfacial toughness of each of two types of bonded core-veneer bilayer ceramics is not significantly different from the apparent fracture toughness of the control monolithic glass veneer. Methods T-shaped short bars of a lithia-disilicate glass-ceramic core (LC) and yttria-stabilized polycrystalline zirconia core ceramic (ZC) were prepared according to the manufacturer's recommendations. V-shaped notches were prepared by using 25-μm-thick palladium foil, leaving the chevron notch area exposed, and the bars were veneered with a thermally compatible glass veneer (LC/GV and ZC/GV). Additionally, we also bonded the glass veneer to itself as a control group (GV/GV). Specimens were kept in distilled water for 30 days before testing in tension. Eight glass veneer bars were prepared for the analysis of fracture toughness test using the indentation-strength technique. Results The mean interfacial toughness of the LC/GV group was 0.69 [0.11] MPa·m1/2, and did not significantly differ from that of the GV/GV control group, 0.74 (0.17) MPa·m1/2 (p > 0.05). However, the difference between the mean interfacial toughness of the ZC/GV group, 0.13 (0.07) MPa·m1/2, and the LC/GV and the GV/GV groups was statistically significant (p<0.05). Significance For bilayer all-ceramic restorations with high-strength core materials, the veneering ceramics are the weakest link in the design of the structure. Since all-ceramic restorations often fail from chipping of veneer layers or crack initiation at the interface, the protective effects of thermal mismatch stresses oral prosthesis design should be investigated. PMID:19818486

  6. Controlling Interfacial Dynamics: Covalent Bonding versus Physical Adsorption in Polymer Nanocomposites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Holt, Adam P.; Bocharova, Vera; Cheng, Shiwang; Kisliuk, Alexander M.; White, B. Tyler; Saito, Tomonori; Uhrig, David; Mahalik, J. P.; Kumar, Rajeev; Imel, Adam E.; et al

    2016-06-23

    It is generally believed that the strength of the polymer nanoparticle interaction controls the modification of near-interface segmental mobility in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). However, little is known about the effect of covalent bonding on the segmental dynamics and glass transition of matrix-free polymer-grafted nanoparticles (PGNs), especially when compared to PNCs. In this article, we directly compare the static and dynamic properties of poly(2-vinylpyridine)/silica-based nanocomposites with polymer chains either physically adsorbed (PNCs) or covalently bonded (PGNs) to identical silica nanoparticles (RNP = 12.5 nm) for three different molecular weight (MW) systems. Interestingly, when the MW of the matrix is as lowmore » as 6 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 5.4) or as high as 140 kg/mol (RNP/Rg= 1.13), both small-angle X-ray scattering and broadband dielectric spectroscopy show similar static and dynamic properties for PNCs and PGNs. However, for the intermediate MW of 18 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 3.16), the difference between physical adsorption and covalent bonding can be clearly identified in the static and dynamic properties of the interfacial layer. We ascribe the differences in the interfacial properties of PNCs and PGNs to changes in chain stretching, as quantified by self-consistent field theory calculations. These results demonstrate that the dynamic suppression at the interface is affected by the chain stretching; that is, it depends on the anisotropy of the segmental conformations, more so than the strength of the interaction, which suggests that the interfacial dynamics can be effectively tuned by the degree of stretching a parameter accessible from the MW or grafting density.« less

  7. Interfacial and Mechanical Characterization of Soft Materials Using Polymer Membranes Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laprade, Evan J.

    Polymer membranes have found their way in to a wide range of applications including selective barriers, protective coatings, packaging, sensors, and medical implants, becom- ing more pervasive in our lives every day. Their importance is derived not only from their unique mechanical and interfacial properties, but also from the versatility of their geometry. In this thesis, several polymer membrane geometries are employed to interfacially and mechanically characterize the properties of soft materials and polymer thin films. This thesis is organized in to two sections, the first deals with interfacial characterization using a membrane contact geometry. The centerpiece of this section, and this thesis, was the development of a sensitive membrane peel test to measure adhesion. A model membrane-contact system was used to evaluate an analytical model of large deformation contact and ultimately develop a simple protocol for measuring an adhesion energy using a membrane peel geometry. A second investigation in the section looked at the multiple harmonic behavior of quartz crystal resonators during contact mechanics experiments. An analytical solution to the radial mass sensitivity function was calculated and compared to experimentally measured sensitivity profiles from growing water drop and membrane contact experiments. The second half of this thesis deals with non-contact membrane geometries for mechanically characterizing two novel polymer membranes. The first is a highly water permeable sulfonated pentablock copolymer, designed for water purification applications. In this work these membranes were mechanically characterized with a biaxial creep test to investigate the affect of sulfonation level and processing conditions on their deformation behavior. Lastly pendant drop membranes were fabricated by ionically crosslinking amphiphilic gradient copolymers at an oil/water interface. These robust, self healing membranes were modeled with both an elastic and liquid

  8. Effect of solute transfer and interfacial instabilities on scalar and velocity field around a drop rising in quiescent liquid channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanwale, Makrand A.; Khadamkar, Hrushikesh P.; Mathpati, Channamallikarjun S.

    2015-11-01

    Physics of development of flow structures around the drop rising with solute transfer is highly influenced by the interfacial behaviour and is remarkably different than a particle rising under the same conditions. We report on the use of simultaneous particle image velocimetry-planar laser induced fluorescence technique to measure scalar and velocity fields around a drop rising in a quiescent liquid channel. The selected continuous phase is glycerol, and the drop consists of a mixture of toluene, acetone, and a dye rhodamine-6G, with acetone working as a interfacial tension depressant. The drop lies in the spherical region with Eötvös number, Eo = 1.95, Morton number, M = 78.20 and the particle Reynolds number being, Rep = 0.053. With Rep approaching that of creeping flow, we analyse the effect of interfacial instabilities solely, contrary to other investigations [M. Wegener et al., "Impact of Marangoni instabilities on the fluid dynamic behaviour of organic droplets," Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 52, 2543-2551 (2009); S. Burghoff and E. Y. Kenig, "A CFD model for mass transfer and interfacial phenomena on single droplets," AIChE J. 52, 4071-4078 (2006); J. Wang et al., "Numerical simulation of the Marangoni effect on transient mass transfer from single moving deformable drops," AIChE J. 57, 2670-2683 (2011); R. F. Engberg, M. Wegener, and E. Y. Kenig, "The impact of Marangoni convection on fluid dynamics and mass transfer at deformable single rising droplets—A numerical study," Chem. Eng. Sci. 116, 208-222 (2014)] which account for turbulence as well as interfacial instabilities with Rep in the turbulent range. The velocity and concentration fields obtained are subjected to scale-wise energy decomposition using continuous wavelet transform. Scale-wise probability distribution functions of wavelet coefficients are calculated to check intermittent non-Gaussian behaviour for simultaneous velocity and scalar statistics. Multi-fractal singularity spectra for scalar

  9. Surfactant induced complex formation and their effects on the interfacial properties of seawater.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Eduardo; Santini, Eva; Benedetti, Alessandro; Ravera, Francesca; Ferrari, Michele; Liggieri, Libero

    2014-11-01

    The effect of a cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), on the interfacial properties of seawater has been studied by dynamic and equilibrium surface tension and by dilational rheology essays. Important modifications of the surface tension and dilational rheology response have been observed already at the very low CTAB concentrations, where the effects due to the high ionic strength are negligible. The comparison with the effects of CTAB in different seawater models, or in natural seawater fractions, points out the establishment of strong interactions between the surfactant molecules and the lipophilic fraction of organic material dispersed/dissolved in seawater, affecting the interfacial activity of the molecules. Considering the biochemical richness of seawater, these results can be explained assuming interaction mechanisms and adsorption schemes similar to those speculated for protein and other macromolecules in the presence of surfactants, which in fact show similar features. Thus already at the low concentrations the surfactant molecules form highly surface-active complexes with part of the organic fraction of seawater. At the larger surfactant concentrations these complexes compete for adsorption with an excess of free CTAB molecules which, according to the thermodynamic conditions, are most favoured to occupy the liquid interface. The results of this study underline the important role of the sea organic content in enhancing the surface-activity of surfactants, which is relevant for a deeper understand of the direct and indirect effects of these types of pollutants on the physico-chemical environment in the sea coastal areas and develop mitigation strategies.

  10. Computational implementation of interfacial kinetic transport theory for water vapour transport in porous media.

    PubMed

    Albaalbaki, Bashar; Hill, Reghan J

    2014-01-01

    A computational framework is developed for applying interfacial kinetic transport theory to predict water vapour permeability of porous media. Modified conservation equations furnish spatially periodic disturbances from which the average flux and, thus, the effective diffusivity is obtained. The equations are solved exactly for a model porous medium comprising parallel layers of gas and solid with arbitrary solid volume fraction. From the microscale effective diffusivity, a two-point boundary-value problem is solved at the macroscale to furnish the water vapour transport rate in membranes subjected to a finite RH differential. Then, the microscale model is implemented using a computational framework (extended finite-element method) to examine the role of particle size, aspect ratio and positioning for periodic arrays of aligned super-ellipses (model particles that pack with high density). We show that the transverse water vapour permeability can be reduced by an order of magnitude only when fibres with a high-aspect ratio cross section are packed in a periodic staggered configuration. Maximum permeability is achieved at intermediate micro-structural length scales, where gas-phase diffusion is enhanced by surface diffusion, but not limited by interfacial-exchange kinetics. The two-dimensional computations demonstrated here are intended to motivate further efforts to develop efficient computational solutions for realistic three-dimensional microstructures.

  11. Interfacial polymerization of conductive polymers: Generation of polymeric nanostructures in a 2-D space.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Panagiotis; Georgakilas, Vasilios

    2015-10-01

    In the recent advances in the field of conductive polymers, the fibrillar or needle shaped nanostructures of polyaniline and polypyrrole have attracted significant attention due to the potential advantages of organic conductors that exhibit low-dimensionality, uniform size distribution, high crystallinity and improved physical properties compared to their bulk or spherically shaped counterparts. Carrying the polymerization reaction in a restricted two dimensional space, instead of the three dimensional space of the one phase solution is an efficient method for the synthesis of polymeric nanostructures with narrow size distribution and small diameter. Ultra-thin nanowires and nanofibers, single crystal nanoneedles, nanocomposites with noble metals or carbon nanotubes and layered materials can be efficiently synthesized with high yield and display superior performance in sensors and energy storage applications. In this critical review we will focus not only on the interfacial polymerization methods that leads to polymeric nanostructures and composites and their properties, but also on the mechanism and the physico-chemical processes that govern the diffusion and reactivity of molecules and nanomaterials at an interface. Recent advances for the synthesis of conductive polymer composites with an interfacial method for energy storage applications and future perspectives are presented. PMID:26272721

  12. Dissolution rates of model gallstones in human and animal biles and importance of interfacial resistance.

    PubMed

    Molokhia, A M; Hofmann, A F; Higuchi, W I; Tuchinda, M; Feld, K; Prakongpan, S; Danzinger, R G

    1977-08-01

    Cholesterol monohydrate dissolution kinetics in human gallbladder bile were studied to determine the magnitudes of the in vitro dissolution rates, the rate resistances in human gallbladder bile, and the extent that the interfacial resistance is the rate-determining factor. Dissolution rate studies also were conducted using human duodenal bile and animal bile for comparison. The dissolution rate resistance, R, ranged from 10(4) sec/cm for chicken bile to 10(4)-10(6) sec/cm for human bile. Interfacial resistance was the rate-determining factor for essentially all results. Where chemical composition data were obtained, the R values for the human bile samples were consistent with predictions made from the simulated bile studies. In two human gallbladder specimens having low bile acid-lecithin molar ratios (i.e., 2.9 and 2.3), very high R values of 1.9 X 10(5) and 4.1 X 10(5) sec/cm were found. These values were in good agreement with the findings in the simulated bile studies and suggest that stone dissolution in patients with low bile acid-lecithin ratios may proceed very slowly, even when the bile is highly undersaturated with respect to cholesterol.

  13. Interfacial motions and pressure fluctuations during fluid displacement in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, D. M.; Moebius, F.; Mumford, K. G.; Or, D.

    2014-12-01

    Two-phase flow is of interest in many fields including microfluidic devices, geological CO2 sequestration, agriculture, filtration and contaminated site remediation. Macroscopic flow equations are often used to describe two-phase displacement flows in such systems based on constitutive relationships (e.g., capillary pressure-saturation relationships) determined under equilibrium conditions. The potential limitations of such process representation were examined in experiments with direct observation of pore scale dynamics. Transparent sintered glass beads micro-models enabled quantification of the interplay of various phenomena governing fluid flow (e.g., capillary forces, viscous forces, inertial forces). Experiments systematically evaluated the impact of pore water velocity, grain size, surface tension, viscosity and wettability on water pressure and interfacial dynamics, both during flow and after flow cessation. Particular attention was placed on high-velocity conditions, when inertial forces that are not typically considerred in porous media applications can play a larger role. Liquid pressure was quantified at the base of the system and the displacement process was imaged using a high speed camera. Characteristics of pressure fluctuations were strongly linked with interfacial properties with fluctuations manifested during displacement and following flow cessation (pressure relaxation). The patterns of pressure fluctuations varied with boundary conditions and media properties reflecting complex interactions with fluid, surface and dynamics along the displacement front.

  14. Interfacial polymerization of conductive polymers: Generation of polymeric nanostructures in a 2-D space.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Panagiotis; Georgakilas, Vasilios

    2015-10-01

    In the recent advances in the field of conductive polymers, the fibrillar or needle shaped nanostructures of polyaniline and polypyrrole have attracted significant attention due to the potential advantages of organic conductors that exhibit low-dimensionality, uniform size distribution, high crystallinity and improved physical properties compared to their bulk or spherically shaped counterparts. Carrying the polymerization reaction in a restricted two dimensional space, instead of the three dimensional space of the one phase solution is an efficient method for the synthesis of polymeric nanostructures with narrow size distribution and small diameter. Ultra-thin nanowires and nanofibers, single crystal nanoneedles, nanocomposites with noble metals or carbon nanotubes and layered materials can be efficiently synthesized with high yield and display superior performance in sensors and energy storage applications. In this critical review we will focus not only on the interfacial polymerization methods that leads to polymeric nanostructures and composites and their properties, but also on the mechanism and the physico-chemical processes that govern the diffusion and reactivity of molecules and nanomaterials at an interface. Recent advances for the synthesis of conductive polymer composites with an interfacial method for energy storage applications and future perspectives are presented.

  15. Stationary patterns in centrifugally driven interfacial elastic fingering.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Gabriel D; Gadêlha, Hermes; Miranda, José A

    2014-12-01

    A vortex sheet formalism is used to search for equilibrium shapes in the centrifugally driven interfacial elastic fingering problem. We study the development of interfacial instabilities when a viscous fluid surrounded by another of smaller density flows in the confined environment of a rotating Hele-Shaw cell. The peculiarity of the situation is associated to the fact that, due to a chemical reaction, the two-fluid boundary becomes an elastic layer. The interplay between centrifugal and elastic forces leads to the formation of a rich variety of stationary shapes. Visually striking equilibrium morphologies are obtained from the numerical solution of a nonlinear differential equation for the interface curvature (the shape equation), determined by a zero vorticity condition. Classification of the various families of shapes is made via two dimensionless parameters: an effective bending rigidity (ratio of elastic to centrifugal effects) and a geometrical radius of gyration. PMID:25615189

  16. Interfacial charge transfer absorption: Application to metal molecule assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutz, Carol; Brunschwig, Bruce S.; Sutin, Norman

    2006-05-01

    Optically induced charge transfer between adsorbed molecules and a metal electrode was predicted by Hush to lead to new electronic absorption features, but has been only rarely observed experimentally. Interfacial charge transfer absorption (IFCTA) provides information concerning the barriers to charge transfer between molecules and the metal/semiconductor and the magnitude of the electronic coupling and could thus provide a powerful tool for understanding interfacial charge-transfer kinetics. Here, we utilize a previously published model [C. Creutz, B.S. Brunschwig, N. Sutin, J. Phys. Chem. B 109 (2005) 10251] to predict IFCTA spectra of metal-molecule assemblies and compare the literature observations to these predictions. We conclude that, in general, the electronic coupling between molecular adsorbates and the metal levels is so small that IFCTA is not detectable. However, few experiments designed to detect IFCTA have been done. We suggest approaches to optimizing the conditions for observing the process.

  17. Interfacial trapping in an aged discotic liquid crystal semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Nathan J.; Patrick, Michael S.; Paul, Sanjoy; Ellman, Brett; Semyonov, Alexander; Twieg, Robert J.; Matthews, Rachael; Pentzer, Emily; Singer, Kenneth D.

    2015-08-01

    This study reports on time-of-flight (TOF) hole mobility measurements in aged 2,3,6,7,10,11-Hexakis(pentyloxy)triphenylene columnar liquid crystals. In contrast to the original samples reported in 2006, homeotropically aligned samples yielded TOF transients with an extended non-exponential rise. The experimental data were fit to a simple model that accurately reproduces the TOF transients assuming delayed charge release from traps near the optically excited electrode. While interfacial trapping appears only in the aged materials, the bulk mobility is similar to the pristine material. The model addresses dispersive transport in quasi-one-dimensional materials, determines the charge carrier mobility in systems with interfacial traps, and provides a method for characterizing the traps.

  18. Interfacial phenomena in foam flooding process for heavy oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, M.K.; Shah, D.O.

    1983-08-01

    The ability of pure and commercial foaming agents to generate in situ foams and their effects on air mobility, breakthrough time, fluid recovery and oil displacement efficiency have been studied. These parameters were correlated with the interfacial properties of foaming agents. A striking decrease in the air mobility was observed with increasing temperature as well as pressure which in turn increased the effectiveness of foams to displace additional fluid. It was observed that the chain length compatibility and molecular packing at the air-liquid interface strikingly influenced the interfacial properties of foaming agents, microscopic characteristics and behavior of foams. From the studies on mixed surfactant systems, a minimum in surface tension, a maximum in surface viscosity, a minimum in bubble size and a maximum in heavy oil displacement efficiency in a porous medium were observed when both the components of the foaming system had equal chain length.

  19. Stationary patterns in centrifugally driven interfacial elastic fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Gabriel D.; Gadêlha, Hermes; Miranda, José A.

    2014-12-01

    A vortex sheet formalism is used to search for equilibrium shapes in the centrifugally driven interfacial elastic fingering problem. We study the development of interfacial instabilities when a viscous fluid surrounded by another of smaller density flows in the confined environment of a rotating Hele-Shaw cell. The peculiarity of the situation is associated to the fact that, due to a chemical reaction, the two-fluid boundary becomes an elastic layer. The interplay between centrifugal and elastic forces leads to the formation of a rich variety of stationary shapes. Visually striking equilibrium morphologies are obtained from the numerical solution of a nonlinear differential equation for the interface curvature (the shape equation), determined by a zero vorticity condition. Classification of the various families of shapes is made via two dimensionless parameters: an effective bending rigidity (ratio of elastic to centrifugal effects) and a geometrical radius of gyration.

  20. Simulation of thin film membranes formed by interfacial polymerization.

    PubMed

    Oizerovich-Honig, Rachel; Raim, Vladimir; Srebnik, Simcha

    2010-01-01

    Interfacial polymerization is widely used today for the production of ultrathin films for encapsulation, chemical separations, and desalination. Polyamide films, in particular, are employed in manufacturing of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes. While these materials show excellent salt rejection, they have rather low water permeability, both properties that apparently stem from the rigid cross-linked structure. An increasing amount of experimental research on membranes of different chemistries and membrane characterization suggests the importance of other factors (such as unreacted functional groups and surface roughness) in determining membrane performance. We developed a molecular simulation model to qualitatively study the effects of various synthesis conditions on membrane performance, in terms of its estimated porosity and permeability. The model is of an interfacial aggregation process of two types of functional monomers. Film growth with time and structural characteristics of the final film are compared with predictions of existing theories and experimental observations.

  1. Modeling Interfacial Adsorption of Polymer-Grafted Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Xin

    2014-11-01

    Numerous natural and industrial processes demand advances in our fundamental understanding of colloidal adsorption at liquid interfaces. Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we model the interfacial adsorption of core-shell nanoparticles at the water-oil interface. The solid core of the nanoparticle encompasses beads arranged in an fcc lattice structure and its surface is uniformly grafted with polymer chains. The nanoparticles bind to the interface from either phase to minimize total surface energy. With a single nanoparticle, we demonstrate detailed kinetics of different stages in the adsorption process. Prominent effect of grafted polymer chains is characterized by varying molecular weight and polydispersity of the chains. We also preload nanoparticles straddling the interface to reveal the influence of nanoparticle surface density on further adsorption. Importantly, these studies show how surface-grafted polymer chains can alter the interfacial behavior of colloidal particles and provide guidelines for designing on-demand Pickering emulsion.

  2. Enzymatically activated emulsions stabilised by interfacial nanofibre networks.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Inês P; Sasselli, Ivan Ramos; Cannon, Daniel A; Hughes, Meghan; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Tuttle, Tell; Ulijn, Rein V

    2016-03-01

    We report on-demand formation of emulsions stabilised by interfacial nanoscale networks. These are formed through biocatalytic dephosphorylation and self-assembly of Fmoc(9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl)dipeptide amphiphiles in aqueous/organic mixtures. This is achieved by using alkaline phosphatase which transforms surfactant-like phosphorylated precursors into self-assembling aromatic peptide amphiphiles (Fmoc-tyrosine-leucine, Fmoc-YL) that form nanofibrous networks. In biphasic organic/aqueous systems, these networks form preferentially at the interface thus providing a means of emulsion stabilisation. We demonstrate on-demand emulsification by enzyme addition, even after storage of the biphasic mixture for several weeks. Experimental (Fluorescence, FTIR spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy) and computational techniques (atomistic molecular dynamics) are used to characterise the interfacial self-assembly process. PMID:26905042

  3. Reliability assessment on interfacial failure of thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin-Wei; Yang, Li; Zhou, Yi-Chun; He, Li-Min; Zhu, Wang; Cai, Can-Ying; Lu, Chun-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) usually exhibit an uncertain lifetime owing to their scattering mechanical properties and severe service conditions. To consider these uncertainties, a reliability assessment method is proposed based on failure probability analysis. First, a limit state equation is established to demarcate the boundary between failure and safe regions, and then the failure probability is calculated by the integration of a probability density function in the failure area according to the first- or second-order moment. It is shown that the parameters related to interfacial failure follow a Weibull distribution in two types of TBC. The interfacial failure of TBCs is significantly affected by the thermal mismatch of material properties and the temperature drop in service.

  4. The Interfacial-Area-Based Relative Permeability Function

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Khaleel, Raziuddin

    2009-09-25

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) requested the services of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide technical support for the Remediation Decision Support (RDS) activity within the Soil & Groundwater Remediation Project. A portion of the support provided in FY2009, was to extend the soil unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using an alternative approach. This alternative approach incorporates the Brooks and Corey (1964), van Genuchten (1980), and a modified van Genuchten water-retention models into the interfacial-area-based relative permeability model presented by Embid (1997). The general performance of the incorporated models is shown using typical hydraulic parameters. The relative permeability models for the wetting phase were further examined using data from literature. Results indicate that the interfacial-area-based model can describe the relative permeability of the wetting phase reasonably well.

  5. Improved interfacial and electrical properties of Ge MOS capacitor by using TaON/LaON dual passivation interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Z. X.; Xu, J. P.; Liu, L.; Huang, Y.; Lai, P. T.; Tang, W. M.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of TaON/LaON dual passivation interlayer on the interfacial and electrical properties of Ge metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor with HfO2 gate dielectric are investigated. As compared to its counterpart with only LaON as passivation interlayer, the formation of HfGeOx and LaHfOx, which would degrade the interfacial quality, is effectively suppressed due to the strong blocking role of the TaON barrier layer against Hf diffusion. As a result, excellent interfacial and electrical properties are achieved for the Ge MOS device with the TaON/LaON dual passivation interlayer: high k value (20.9), low interface-state density (5.32 × 1011 cm-2 eV-1) and oxide-charge density (-3.90 × 1012 cm-2), low gate leakage current density (1.77 × 10-4 A/cm2 at Vg = Vfb + 1 V), and high reliability under high-field stress.

  6. Interfacial slip friction at a fluid-solid cylindrical boundary.

    PubMed

    Kannam, Sridhar Kumar; Todd, B D; Hansen, J S; Daivis, Peter J

    2012-06-28

    Recently we proposed a method to calculate the interfacial friction coefficient between fluid and solid at a planar interface. In this work we extend the method to cylindrical systems where the friction coefficient is curvature dependent. We apply the method to methane flow in carbon nanotubes, and find good agreement with non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The proposed method is robust, general, and can be used to predict the slip for cylindrical nanofluidic systems.

  7. International Symposium on Interfacial Joining and Surface Technology (IJST2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasuo

    2014-08-01

    Interfacial joining (bonding) is a widely accepted welding process and one of the environmentally benign technologies used in industrial production. As the bonding temperature is lower than the melting point of the parent materials, melting of the latter is kept to a minimum. The process can be based on diffusion bonding, pressure welding, friction welding, ultrasonic bonding, or brazing-soldering, all of which offer many advantages over fusion welding. In addition, surface technologies such as surface modification, spraying, coating, plating, and thin-film formation are necessary for advanced manufacturing, fabrication, and electronics packaging. Together, interfacial joining and surface technology (IJST) will continue to be used in various industrial fields because IJST is a very significant form of environmentally conscious materials processing. The international symposium of IJST 2013 was held at Icho Kaikan, Osaka University, Japan from 27-29 November, 2013. A total of 138 participants came from around the world to attend 56 oral presentations and 36 posters presented at the symposium, and to discuss the latest research and developments on interfacial joining and surface technologies. This symposium was also held to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Technical Commission on Interfacial Joining of the Japan Welding Society. On behalf of the chair of the symposium, it is my great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE). Among the presentations, 43 papers are published here, and I believe all of the papers have provided the welding community with much useful information. I would like to thank the authors for their enthusiastic and excellent contributions. Finally, I would like to thank all members of the committees, secretariats, participants, and everyone who contributed to this symposium through their support and invaluable effort for the success of IJST 2013. Yasuo Takahashi Chair of IJST 2013

  8. Avalanche in adhesion. [interfacial separation between two Ni crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, John R.; Bozzolo, Guillermo; Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    Consider surfaces being brought into contact. It is proposed that atomic layers can collapse or avalanche together when the interfacial spacing falls below a critical distance. This causes a discontinuous drop in the adhesive binding energy. Avalanche can occur regardless of the stiffness of external supports. A simple understanding of the origin of this phenomenon is provided. A numerical calculation has been carried out for adhesion in Ni. A new wear mechanism due to avalanche is suggested.

  9. Shape Oscillations of Gas Bubbles With Newtonian Interfacial Rheological Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadim, Ali

    1996-01-01

    The oscillation frequency and damping rate for small-amplitude axisymmetric shape modes of a gas bubble in an ideal liquid are obtained, in the limit when the bubble interface possesses Newtonian interfacial rheology with constant surface shear and dilatational viscosities. Such results permit the latter surface properties to be measured by analyzing experimental data on frequency shift and damping rate of specific shape modes of suspended bubbles in the presence of surfactants.

  10. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of polyaniline nanofibers by interfacial polymerization.

    PubMed

    Manuel, James; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Kim, Dul-Sun; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Ki-Won; Kim, Jae-Kwang; Jacobsson, Per

    2012-04-01

    Polyaniline nanofibers were prepared by interfacial polymerization with different organic solvents such as chloroform and carbon tetrachloride. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to study the morphological properties of polyaniline nanofibers. Chemical characterization was carried out using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy and surface area was measured using BET isotherm. Polyaniline nanofibers doped with lithium hexafluorophosphate were prepared and their electrochemical properties were evaluated.

  11. Interfacial liquid water on Mars and its potential role in formation of hill and dune gullies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossacki, Konrad J.; Markiewicz, Wojciech J.

    2010-11-01

    Gullies are among the most intriguing structures identified on the surface of Mars. Most common are gullies located on the slopes of craters which are probably formed by liquid water transported by shallow aquifers (Heldmann, J.L., Carlsson, E., Johansson, H., Mellon, M.T., Toon, O.B. [2007]. Icarus 188, 324-344). Two particular types of gullies are found on slopes of isolated hills and dunes. The hill-slope gullies are located mostly at 50°S, which is at the high end of latitudes of bulk of the gullies found so far. The dune gullies are found in several locations up to 65°S (Reiss, D., Jaumann, R., Kereszturi, A., Sik, A., Neukum, G. [2007]. Lunar Planet. Sci. XXXVIII. Abstract 1993), but the best known are those in Russel crater at 54°S. The hill and dune gullies are longer than others making the aquifers explanation for their formation unlikely (Balme, M., Mangold, N., Baratoux, D., Costard, F., Gosselin, M., Masson, P., Pnet, P., Neukum, G. [2006]. J. Geophys. Res. 111. doi:10.1029/2005JE002607). Recently it has been noted that thin liquid films of interfacial water can play a role in rheological processes on the surface of Mars (Moehlmann, D. [2008]. Icarus 195, 131-139. Kereszturi, A., Moehlmann, D., Berczi, Sz., Ganti, T., Kuti, A., Sik, A., Horvath, A. [2009]. Icarus 201, 492-503.). Here we try to answer the question whether interfacial liquid water may occur on Mars in quantities large enough to play a role in formation of gullies. To verify this hypothesis we have calculated thermal models for hills and dunes of various steepness, orientation and physical properties. We find that within a range of average expected values of parameters it is not possible to have more than a few monolayers of liquid water at depths greater than a centimeter. To create subsurface interfacial water film significantly thicker and hence to produce conditions for the slope instability, parameters have to be chosen to have their extreme realistic values or an additional source

  12. Effects of post-annealing and temperature/humidity treatments on the interfacial adhesion energy of the Cu/SiN x interface for Cu interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Minsu; Bae, Byung-Hyun; Lee, Hyeonchul; Kang, Hee-Oh; Hwang, Wook-Jung; Yang, Jun-Mo; Park, Young-Bae

    2016-06-01

    The effects of 200 °C post-annealing and 85 °C and 85% relative humidity temperature and humidity (T/H) treatments on the interfacial adhesion energy of a Cu/SiN x interface were systematically investigated. The results of a four-point bending test, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that the interfacial adhesion energy during T/H treatment decreased with time faster than during annealing treatment, which is closely related to the faster Cu oxidation of SiN x /Cu interfaces.

  13. Etherification of Wood-Based Hemicelluloses for Interfacial Activity.

    PubMed

    Nypelö, Tiina; Laine, Christiane; Aoki, Masaaki; Tammelin, Tekla; Henniges, Ute

    2016-05-01

    We present wetting, hygroscopicity, and interfacial activity of hemicellulose with respect to etherification and contrast it to their potential as interfacial modifiers, which is demonstrated by oil-in-water emulsification containing up to 60 vol% of the oil phase. Tunable amphiphilicity of hardwood and softwood hemicelluloses, xylans, and galactoglucomannans, respectively, was accomplished via controlled etherification. A series of degree of substitution (DS) of hydroxypropylated and 3-butoxy-2-hydroxypropylated ("butylated") grades was synthesized. The hemicellulose ethers were characterized by gel permeation chromatography, spectroscopic techniques, such as NMR, and contact angle measurements. An attenuated total reflectance infrared method was developed for fast identification of the DS. Near infrared analysis was utilized to explore the hygroscopicity of the material and to perform principle component analysis. The modification to butylated grades decreased the hygroscopicity, whereas the hydroxypropylated grades bound moisture. All of the hemicellulose ethers were water-soluble. The interfacial tension of the aqueous hemicellulose solutions was determined by pendant-drop tensiometer, and it was demonstrated to be dependent on the degree of modification. PMID:27086947

  14. Local Interfacial Structure in Downward Two-Phase Bubbly Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroshi Goda; Seungjin Kim; Paranjape, Sidharth S.; Finch, Joshua P.; Mamoru Ishii; Uhle, Jennifer

    2002-07-01

    The local interfacial structure for vertical air-water co-current downward two-phase flow was investigated under adiabatic conditions. A multi-sensor conductivity probe was utilized in order to acquire the local two-phase flow parameters. The present experimental loop consisted of 25.4 mm and 50.8 mm ID round tubes as test sections. The measurement was performed at three axial locations: L/D = 13, 68 and 133 for the 25.4 mm ID loop and L/D 7, 34, 67 for the 50.8 mm ID loop, in order to study the axial development of the flow. A total of 7 and 10 local measurement points along the tube radius were chosen for the 25.4 mm ID loop and the 50.8 mm ID loop, respectively. The experimental flow conditions were determined within bubbly flow regime. The acquired local parameters included the void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble interface frequency, bubble Sauter mean diameter, and interfacial velocity. (authors)

  15. Physicochemical properties and interfacial adaptation of root canal sealers.

    PubMed

    Cañadas, Piedad S; Berástegui, Ester; Gaton-Hernández, Patrícia; Silva, Léa A B; Leite, Giselle A; Silva, Roberto S

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the physicochemical properties and interfacial adaptation to canal walls of Endo-CPM-Sealer, Sealapex and Activ GP with the well-established AH Plus sealer. The following analyses were performed: radiopacity, pH variation and solubility using samples of each material and scanning electron microscopy of root-filled bovine incisors to evaluate the interfacial adaptation. Data were analyzed by the parametric and no-parametric tests (α=0.05). All materials were in accordance with the ANSI/ADA requirements for radiopacity. Endo-CPM-Sealer presented the lowest radiopacity values and AH Plus was the most radiopaque sealer (p=0.0001). Except for ActiV GP, which was acidic, all other sealers had basic chemical nature and released hydroxyl ions. Regarding solubility, all materials met the ANSI/ADA recommendations, with no statistically significant difference between the sealers (p=0.0834). AH Plus presented the best adaptation to canal walls in the middle (p=0.0023) and apical (p=0.0012) thirds, while the sealers Activ GP and Endo-CPM-Sealer had poor adaptation to the canal walls. All sealers, except for ActiV GP, were alkaline and all of them fulfilled the ANSI/ADA requirements for radiopacity and solubility. Regarding the interfacial adaptation, AH Plus was superior to the others considering the adaptation to the bovine root canal walls.

  16. A growing-drop technique for measuring dynamic interfacial tension

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, C.A.; Radke, C.J.

    1993-10-01

    A novel, growing-drop technique is described for measuring dynamic interfacial tension due to sorption of surface-active solutes. The proposed method relates the instantaneous pressure and size of expanding liquid drops to interfacial tension and is useful for measuring both liquid/gas and liquid/liquid tensions over a wide range of time scales, currently from 10 ms to several hours. Growing-drop measurements on surfactant-free water/air and water/octanol interfaces yield constant tensions equal to their known literature values. For surfactant-laden, liquid drops, the growing-drop technique captures the actual transient tension evolution of a single interface, rather than interval times as with the classic maximum-drop-pressure and drop.-volume tension measurements. Dynamic tensions measured for 0.25 mM aqueous 1-decanol solution/air and 0.02 kg/m{sup 3} aqueous Triton X-100 solution/dodecane interfaces show nonmonotonic behavior, indicating slow surfactant transport relative to the imposed rates of interfacial dilatation. The dynamic tension of a purified and fresh 6 mM aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution/air interface shows only a monotonic decrease, indicating rapid surfactant transport relative to the imposed rates of dilatation. ConverselY, an aged SDS solution, naturally containing trace dodecanol impurities, exhibits dynamic tensions which reflect a superposition of the rapidly equilibrating SDS and the slowly adsorbing dodecanol.

  17. Tailored interfacial rheology for gastric stable adsorption layers.

    PubMed

    Scheuble, N; Geue, T; Windhab, E J; Fischer, P

    2014-08-11

    Human lipid digestion begins at the interface of oil and water by interfacial adsorption of lipases. Tailoring the available surface area for lipase activity can lead to specific lipid sensing in the body, thus, tailored satiety hormone release. In this study we present biopolymer layers at the MCT-oil/water interface with different stabilities under human gastric environment (37 °C, pH 2, pepsin). Physicochemical changes and enzymatic degradation of interfacial layers were monitored online by interfacial shear rheology. We show the weakening of β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) layers at body temperature and acidification and their hydrolysis by pepsin. If sufficient concentrations of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) are given to an existing β-lg layer, this weakening is buffered and the proteolysis delayed. A synergistic, composite layer is formed by adding methylated NCC to the β-lg layer. This layer thermogels at body temperature and resists hydrolysis by pepsin. Coexistence of these two emulsifiers at the air/water interface is evidenced by neutron reflectometry measurements, where morphological information are extracted. The utilized layers and their analysis provide knowledge of physicochemical changes during in vitro digestion of interfaces, which promote functional food formulations. PMID:25029559

  18. Interfacial tension between aluminum and chloride-fluoride melts

    SciTech Connect

    Silny, A.; Utigard, T.A.

    1996-11-01

    Scrap and recycled aluminum have to be remelted and refined before being made into useful new products. This often involves melting the aluminum under a molten salt cover in order to prevent oxidation and to enhance the coalescence and recovery of the molten metal. A technique was developed for the measurement of the interfacial tension between liquid metals and molten salts at elevated temperatures. The technique is based on the measurement of the capillary depression occurring when a capillary, which is moved vertically down through the molten salt layer, passes through the salt/metal interface. The depression is measured by simultaneous video recording of the immersion height of the alumina capillary and the position of a liquid meniscus in a horizontal tube connected to the alumina capillary. The interfacial tension was measured for (a) aluminum and an equimolar melt of NaCl + KCl with several salt additions at 1,000 K, (b) aluminum and NaCl + NaF at 1,123 K, and (c) aluminum and NaCl + KF at 1,123 K. It was found that the interfacial tension decreases with increasing amount of NaF, increases with the increasing amount of MgCl{sub 2} additions, remains unchanged with AlF{sub 3} additions, and slightly decreases with the addition of MgF{sub 2} and Na{sub 3}AlF{sub 6}.

  19. Interfacial stability and shape change of anisotropic endoskeleton droplets.

    PubMed

    Caggioni, Marco; Bayles, Alexandra V; Lenis, Jessica; Furst, Eric M; Spicer, Patrick T

    2014-10-14

    The delivery of suspended active ingredients to a surface is a central function of numerous commercial cosmetic, drug, and agricultural formulations. Many products use liquid droplets as a delivery vehicle but, because interfacial tension keeps droplets spherical, these materials cannot exploit the benefits of anisotropic shape and shape change offered by solid colloids. In this work, individual droplet manipulation is used to produce viscoelastic droplets that can stably retain non-spherical shapes by balancing the Laplace pressure of the liquid-liquid interface with the elasticity of an internal crystalline network. A stability criterion is developed for idealized spherocylindrical droplets and shown to agree with experimental data for varying droplet size and rheology. Shape change can be induced in the anisotropic droplets by upsetting the balance of droplet interfacial tension and internal rheology. Using dilution to increase the interfacial tension shows that external stimuli can trigger collapse and shape change in these droplets. The droplets wrap around substrates during collapse, improving contact and adhesion. The model is used to develop design criteria for production of droplets with tunable response.

  20. Quantitative morphological characterization of bicontinuous Pickering emulsions via interfacial curvatures.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Matthew; Stratford, Kevin; Thijssen, Job H J

    2016-05-14

    Bicontinuous Pickering emulsions (bijels) are a physically interesting class of soft materials with many potential applications including catalysis, microfluidics and tissue engineering. They are created by arresting the spinodal decomposition of a partially-miscible liquid with a (jammed) layer of interfacial colloids. Porosity L (average interfacial separation) of the bijel is controlled by varying the radius (r) and volume fraction (ϕ) of the colloids (L∝r/ϕ). However, to optimize the bijel structure with respect to other parameters, e.g. quench rate, characterizing by L alone is insufficient. Hence, we have used confocal microscopy and X-ray CT to characterize a range of bijels in terms of local and area-averaged interfacial curvatures; we further demonstrate that bijels are bicontinuous using an image-analysis technique known as 'region growing'. In addition, the curvatures of bijels have been monitored as a function of time, which has revealed an intriguing evolution up to 60 minutes after bijel formation, contrary to previous understanding. PMID:27035101

  1. Probing Interfacial Processes on Graphene Surface by Mass Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakenov, Nurbek; Kocabas, Coskun

    2013-03-01

    In this work we studied the mass density of graphene, probed interfacial processes on graphene surface and examined the formation of graphene oxide by mass detection. The graphene layers were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition method on copper foils and transfer-printed on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The mass density of single layer graphene was measured by investigating the mechanical resonance of the QCM. Moreover, we extended the developed technique to probe the binding dynamics of proteins on the surface of graphene, were able to obtain nonspecific binding constant of BSA protein of graphene surface in aqueous solution. The time trace of resonance signal showed that the BSA molecules rapidly saturated by filling the available binding sites on graphene surface. Furthermore, we monitored oxidation of graphene surface under oxygen plasma by tracing the changes of interfacial mass of the graphene controlled by the shifts in Raman spectra. Three regimes were observed the formation of graphene oxide which increases the interfacial mass, the release of carbon dioxide and the removal of small graphene/graphene oxide flakes. Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK) grant no. 110T304, 109T209, Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant (IRG) grant no 256458, Turkish Academy of Science (TUBA-Gebip).

  2. Non-contact atomic-level interfacial force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, J.E.; Fleming, J.G.

    1997-02-01

    The scanning force microscopies (notably the Atomic Force Microscope--AFM), because of their applicability to nearly all materials, are presently the most widely used of the scanning-probe techniques. However, the AFM uses a deflection sensor to measure sample/probe forces which suffers from an inherent mechanical instability that occurs when the rate of change of the force with respect to the interfacial separation becomes equal to the spring constant of the deflecting member. This instability dramatically limits the breadth of applicability of AFM-type techniques to materials problems. In the course of implementing a DOE sponsored basic research program in interfacial adhesion, a self-balancing force sensor concept has been developed and incorporated into an Interfacial Force Microscopy (IFM) system by Sandia scientists. This sensor eliminates the instability problem and greatly enhances the applicability of the scanning force-probe technique to a broader range of materials and materials parameters. The impact of this Sandia development was recognized in 1993 by a Department of Energy award for potential impact on DOE programs and by an R and D 100 award for one of the most important new products of 1994. However, in its present stage of development, the IFM is strictly a research-level tool and a CRADA was initiated in order to bring this sensor technology into wide-spread availability by making it accessible in the form of a commercial instrument. The present report described the goals, approach and results of this CRADA effort.

  3. Interfacial thiol-ene photoclick reactions for forming multilayer hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Shih, Han; Fraser, Andrew K; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2013-03-13

    Interfacial visible light-mediated thiol-ene photoclick reactions were developed for preparing step-growth hydrogels with multilayer structures. The effect of a noncleavage type photoinitiator eosin-Y on visible-light-mediated thiol-ene photopolymerization was first characterized using in situ photorheometry, gel fraction, and equilibrium swelling ratio. Next, spectrophotometric properties of eosin-Y in the presence of various relevant macromer species were evaluated using ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) spectrometry. It was determined that eosin-Y was able to reinitiate the thiol-ene photoclick reaction, even after light exposure. Because of its small molecular weight, most eosin-Y molecules readily leached out from the hydrogels. The diffusion of residual eosin-Y from preformed hydrogels was exploited for fabricating multilayer step-growth hydrogels. Interfacial hydrogel coating was formed via the same visible-light-mediated gelation mechanism without adding fresh initiator. The thickness of the thiol-ene gel coating could be easily controlled by adjusting visible light exposure time, eosin-Y concentration initially loaded in the core gel, or macromer concentration in the coating solution. The major benefits of this interfacial thiol-ene coating system include its simplicity and cytocompatibility. The formation of thiol-ene hydrogels and coatings neither requires nor generates any cytotoxic components. This new gelation chemistry may have great utilities in controlled release of multiple sensitive growth factors and encapsulation of multiple cell types for tissue regeneration. PMID:23384151

  4. Growth Kinetics and Mechanics of Hydrate Films by Interfacial Rheology.

    PubMed

    Leopércio, Bruna C; de Souza Mendes, Paulo R; Fuller, Gerald G

    2016-05-01

    A new approach to study and understand the kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrates by interfacial rheology is presented. This is made possible using a "double wall ring" interfacial rheology cell that has been designed to provide the necessary temperature control. Cyclopentane and water are used to form hydrates, and this model system forms these structures at ambient pressures. Different temperature and water/hydrocarbon contact protocols are explored. Of particular interest is the importance of first contacting the hydrocarbon against ice crystals in order to initiate hydrate formation. Indeed, this is found to be the case, even though the hydrates may be created at temperatures above the melting point of ice. Once hydrates completely populate the hydrocarbon/water interface, strain sweeps of the interfacial elastic and viscous moduli are conducted to interrogate the mechanical response and fragility of the hydrate films. The dependence on temperature, Tf, by the kinetics of formation and the mechanical properties is reported, and the cyclopentane hydrate dissociation temperature was found to be between 6 and 7 °C. The formation time (measured from the moment when cyclopentane first contacts ice crystals) as well as the elastic modulus and the yield strain increase as Tf increases. PMID:27076092

  5. Penetration of surfactin into phospholipid monolayers: nanoscale interfacial organization.

    PubMed

    Eeman, M; Berquand, A; Dufrêne, Y F; Paquot, M; Dufour, S; Deleu, M

    2006-12-19

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) combined with surface pressure-area isotherms were used to probe the interfacial behavior of phospholipid monolayers following penetration of surfactin, a cyclic lipopeptide produced by Bacillus subtilis strains. Prior to penetration experiments, interfacial behavior of different surfactin molecules (cyclic surfactins with three different aliphatic chain lengths--S13, S14, and S15--and a linear surfactin obtained by chemical cleavage of the cycle of the surfactin S15) has been investigated. A more hydrophobic aliphatic chain induces greater surface-active properties of the lipopeptide. The opening of the peptide ring reduces the surface activity. The effect of phospholipid acyl chain length (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine- (DPPC), and distearoylphosphatidylcholine) and phospholipid polar head (DPPC, dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine) on monolayer penetration properties of the surfactin S15 has been explored. Results showed that while the lipid monolayer thickness and the presence of electrostatic repulsions from the interfacial film do not significantly influence surfactin insertion, these parameters strongly modulate the ability of the surfactin to alter the nanoscale organization of the lipid films. We also probed the effect of surfactin structure (influence of the aliphatic chain length and of the cyclic structure of the peptide ring) on the behavior of DPPC monolayers. AFM images and isotherms showed that surfactin penetration is promoted by longer lipopeptide chain length and a cyclic polar head. This indicates that hydrophobic interactions are of main importance for the penetration power of surfactin molecules.

  6. Quantitative morphological characterization of bicontinuous Pickering emulsions via interfacial curvatures.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Matthew; Stratford, Kevin; Thijssen, Job H J

    2016-05-14

    Bicontinuous Pickering emulsions (bijels) are a physically interesting class of soft materials with many potential applications including catalysis, microfluidics and tissue engineering. They are created by arresting the spinodal decomposition of a partially-miscible liquid with a (jammed) layer of interfacial colloids. Porosity L (average interfacial separation) of the bijel is controlled by varying the radius (r) and volume fraction (ϕ) of the colloids (L∝r/ϕ). However, to optimize the bijel structure with respect to other parameters, e.g. quench rate, characterizing by L alone is insufficient. Hence, we have used confocal microscopy and X-ray CT to characterize a range of bijels in terms of local and area-averaged interfacial curvatures; we further demonstrate that bijels are bicontinuous using an image-analysis technique known as 'region growing'. In addition, the curvatures of bijels have been monitored as a function of time, which has revealed an intriguing evolution up to 60 minutes after bijel formation, contrary to previous understanding.

  7. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Graded Nanocomposites with Interfacial Thermal Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H. M.; Paulino, G. H.; Buttlar, W. G.; Sun, L. Z.

    2008-02-01

    This work employs the self-consistent method to investigate the effective thermal conductivity distribution in functionally graded materials (FGMs) considering the Kapitza interfacial thermal resistance. A heat conduction solution is first derived for one spherical particle embedded in a graded matrix with a prefect interface. The interfacial thermal resistance of a nanoparticle is simulated by a new particle with a lower thermal conductivity. A novel self-consistent formulation is developed to derive the averaged heat flux field of the particle phase. Then the temperature gradient can be obtained in the gradation direction. From the relation between the effective flux and temperature gradient in the gradation direction, the effective thermal conductivity distribution is solved. If the gradient of the volume fraction distribution is zero, the FGM is reduced to a composite containing uniformly dispersed nanoparticles and a explicit solution of the effective thermal conductivity is provided. Disregarding the interfacial thermal resistance, the proposed model recovers the conventional self-consistent model. Mathematically, effective thermal conductivity is a quantity exactly analogous to effective electric conductivity, dielectric permittivity, magnetic permeability and water permeability in a linear static state, so this method can be extended to those problems for graded materials.

  8. Sparse Sampling of Water Density Fluctuations in Interfacial Environments.

    PubMed

    Xi, Erte; Remsing, Richard C; Patel, Amish J

    2016-02-01

    The free energetics of water density fluctuations near a surface, and the rare low-density fluctuations in particular, serve as reliable indicators of surface hydrophobicity; the easier it is to displace the interfacial waters, the more hydrophobic the underlying surface is. However, characterizing the free energetics of such rare fluctuations requires computationally expensive, non-Boltzmann sampling methods like umbrella sampling. This inherent computational expense associated with umbrella sampling makes it challenging to investigate the role of polarizability or electronic structure effects in influencing interfacial fluctuations. Importantly, it also limits the size of the volume, which can be used to probe interfacial fluctuations. The latter can be particularly important in characterizing the hydrophobicity of large surfaces with molecular-level heterogeneities, such as those presented by proteins. To overcome these challenges, here we present a method for the sparse sampling of water density fluctuations, which is roughly 2 orders of magnitude more efficient than umbrella sampling. We employ thermodynamic integration to estimate the free energy differences between biased ensembles, thereby circumventing the umbrella sampling requirement of overlap between adjacent biased distributions. Further, a judicious choice of the biasing potential allows such free energy differences to be estimated using short simulations, so that the free energetics of water density fluctuations are obtained using only a few, short simulations. Leveraging the efficiency of the method, we characterize water density fluctuations in the entire hydration shell of the protein, ubiquitin, a large volume containing an average of more than 600 waters.

  9. Interfacial thiol-ene photoclick reactions for forming multilayer hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Shih, Han; Fraser, Andrew K; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2013-03-13

    Interfacial visible light-mediated thiol-ene photoclick reactions were developed for preparing step-growth hydrogels with multilayer structures. The effect of a noncleavage type photoinitiator eosin-Y on visible-light-mediated thiol-ene photopolymerization was first characterized using in situ photorheometry, gel fraction, and equilibrium swelling ratio. Next, spectrophotometric properties of eosin-Y in the presence of various relevant macromer species were evaluated using ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) spectrometry. It was determined that eosin-Y was able to reinitiate the thiol-ene photoclick reaction, even after light exposure. Because of its small molecular weight, most eosin-Y molecules readily leached out from the hydrogels. The diffusion of residual eosin-Y from preformed hydrogels was exploited for fabricating multilayer step-growth hydrogels. Interfacial hydrogel coating was formed via the same visible-light-mediated gelation mechanism without adding fresh initiator. The thickness of the thiol-ene gel coating could be easily controlled by adjusting visible light exposure time, eosin-Y concentration initially loaded in the core gel, or macromer concentration in the coating solution. The major benefits of this interfacial thiol-ene coating system include its simplicity and cytocompatibility. The formation of thiol-ene hydrogels and coatings neither requires nor generates any cytotoxic components. This new gelation chemistry may have great utilities in controlled release of multiple sensitive growth factors and encapsulation of multiple cell types for tissue regeneration.

  10. Homocomposites of Polylactide (PLA) with Induced Interfacial Stereocomplex Crystallites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The demand for “green” degradable composite materials increases with growing environmental awareness. The key challenge is achieving the preferred physical properties and maintaining their eco-attributes in terms of the degradability of the matrix and the filler. Herein, we have designed a series of “green” homocomposites materials based purely on polylactide (PLA) polymers with different structures. Film-extruded homocomposites were prepared by melt-blending PLA matrixes (which had different degrees of crystallinity) with PLLA and PLA stereocomplex (SC) particles. The PLLA and SC particles were spherical and with 300–500 nm size. Interfacial crystalline structures in the form of stereocomplexes were obtained for certain particulate-homocomposite formulations. These SC crystallites were found at the particle/matrix interface when adding PLLA particles to a PLA matrix with d-lactide units, as confirmed by XRD and DSC data analyses. For all homocomposites, the PLLA and SC particles acted as nucleating agents and enhanced the crystallization of the PLA matrixes. The SC particles were more rigid and had a higher Young’s modulus compared with the PLLA particles. The mechanical properties of the homocomposites varied with particle size, rigidity, and the interfacial adhesion between the particles and the matrix. An improved tensile strength in the homocomposites was achieved from the interfacial stereocomplex formation. Hereafter, homocomposites with tunable crystalline arrangements and subsequently physical properties, are promising alternatives in strive for eco-composites and by this, creating materials that are completely degradable and sustainable. PMID:26523245

  11. Molecular modeling of nanotube composite materials: Interface formation, interfacial strength, and thermal expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marietta-Tondin, Olivier

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the wonders of modern science. Discovered a little over 15 years ago, they have shown the research community an outstanding set of properties. In terms of mechanical properties, they exhibit extremely high young's modulus, which, coupled with a high strain to break, leads to unsurpassed strength to break. CNTs also demonstrate superior thermal conductivity, good electrical capacity and high thermal stability. In light of these properties, CNTs are expected to be introduced into a wide variety of new materials aimed at applications for various fields, such as high-performance composites, biological and chemical sensors, magnetic recording, nanoelectronic devices and flat panel displays. One such promising application is CNT-reinforced composite materials, exhibiting the possibility of outstanding mechanical properties. In practice, however, many reports indicate that nanocomposites are weaker or only slightly stronger than the neat resins. Several factors are believed to be the primary source of this discrepancy, namely poor nanotube dispersion in resin, inadequate alignment of the nanotubes, and weak interfacial bonding between nanotubes and resins. As a result, these have become crucial investigation issues for developing high-performance nanocomposites. In this dissertation, fundamental understanding of the interfacial phenomena between carbon nanotubes and polymer matrices are studied. Both molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, an effective approach to investigate nanoscale behaviors, and experimental investigation, are utilized to achieve this goal. First, we examine the interface formation phenomena between a Single Wall Carbon Nanotube (SWNT) and the resin, prior to curing, in the case of the Epon862 resin system. The MD simulation results outline the validity of some of the current theories, such as molecular migration and reduction of molecular mobility of the resin, while they seem to indicate some other mechanisms are not

  12. Atomic resolution mapping of interfacial intermixing and segregation in InAs/GaSb superlattices: A correlative study

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Honggyu; Meng Yifei; Zuo Jianmin; Rouviere, Jean-Luc

    2013-03-14

    We combine quantitative analyses of Z-contrast images with composition analyses employing atom probe tomography (APT) correlatively to provide a quantitative measurement of atomic scale interfacial intermixing in an InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL). Contributions from GaSb and InAs in the Z-contrast images are separated using an improved image processing technique. Correlation with high resolution APT composition analyses permits an examination of interfacial segregation of both cations and anions and their incorporation in the short period InAs/GaSb SL. Results revealed short, intermediate, and long-range intermixing of In, Ga, and Sb during molecular beam epitaxial growth and their distribution in the SL.

  13. A method to characterize the dielectric and interfacial properties of metal-insulator-semiconductor structures by microwave measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, Hang-Ting; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen; Huang, Guo-Wei

    2002-04-01

    We have developed a method to investigate the dielectric and interfacial properties of gate dielectric thin films by microwave measurement. Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 (BST) thin films were deposited on 10 Ω cm (normal) and 10 k Ω cm [high-resistivity, (HR)] silicon substrates at the same time by rf magnetron sputtering. For the BST/HR-silicon, coplanar waveguides (CPW) were fabricated and measured at microwave frequencies with thru-reflect-line calibration while capacitance (C-V) measurements were carried out for BST/normal silicon. From the phase change of CPW transmission line and the maximum capacitance in C-V measurement, the dielectric constants of both the BST thin film and interface layer can be determined. Furthermore, the behaviors of insertion loss versus bias voltage were investigated. The results indicate that our method can provide useful information to study the dielectric and interfacial properties of metal-insulator-semiconductor structures.

  14. The interfacial amorphous double layer and the homogeneous nucleation in reflow of a Sn-Zn solder on Cu substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Chien-Cheng; Lin, Kwang-Lung

    2011-05-15

    To illustrate the interfacial reaction mechanism, the Sn-Zn[Sn-8.5Zn-0.5Ag-0.01Al-0.1Ga (wt%)] solder was reflowed on Cu substrate at 250 deg. C for 15 s followed by immediate quench in liquid nitrogen. The frozen interfacial microstructure was investigated with high resolution transmission electron microscope. An amorphous double layer was formed at the interface which consists of a 5 nm pure Cu region and a Cu-Zn diffusion region. Nanocrystalline intermetallic compound (IMC) Cu{sub 5}Zn{sub 8} were observed in the Cu-Zn diffusion region. These nanocrystalline IMCs are suggested to form via a homogeneous nucleation process.

  15. Interfacial electron transfer of P3HT/PDI/ZnO nanocomposite and its application in visible-light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lina; Lin, Hongtao; Wu, Yishi; Zhuo, Shuping

    2016-09-01

    Photoinduced interfacial electron transfer plays a key role in photoactive organic/inorganic hybrid nanomaterials and remains elusive with regard to interfacial energy level alignment. In this study, n-type organic semiconductor 1,6,7,12-tetrachloro-3,4,9,10-Perylenetetracarboxylicdiimide (PDI) molecules bearing carboxylic acid groups at nitrogen positions were grafted onto the surface of the Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles, and then blended with p-type poly (3-hexylthiophene) P3HT. The addition of PDI facilitates the charge transfer process from P3HT to ZnO, which was characterized by steady-state spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. High performance visible-light detector based on P3HT/PDI/ZnO has been fabricated. This provides guidelines for the construction of optoelectronic devices.

  16. The interfacial amorphous double layer and the homogeneous nucleation in reflow of a Sn-Zn solder on Cu substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chien-Cheng; Lin, Kwang-Lung

    2011-05-01

    To illustrate the interfacial reaction mechanism, the Sn-Zn[Sn-8.5Zn-0.5Ag-0.01Al-0.1Ga (wt%)] solder was reflowed on Cu substrate at 250 °C for 15 s followed by immediate quench in liquid nitrogen. The frozen interfacial microstructure was investigated with high resolution transmission electron microscope. An amorphous double layer was formed at the interface which consists of a 5 nm pure Cu region and a Cu-Zn diffusion region. Nanocrystalline intermetallic compound (IMC) Cu5Zn8 were observed in the Cu-Zn diffusion region. These nanocrystalline IMCs are suggested to form via a homogeneous nucleation process.

  17. Direct, Dynamic Measurement of Interfacial Area within Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.; Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to exhibit several shortcomings that might be partially overcome with a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles (Hassanizadeh and Gray, 1990). This alternative two-phase flow model contains a set of new and non-standard parameters, including specific interfacial area. By incorporating interfacial area production, destruction, and propagation into functional relationships that describe the capillary pressure and saturation, a more physical model has been developed. Niessner and Hassanizadeh (2008) have examined this model numerically and have shown that the model captures saturation hysteresis with drainage/imbibition cycles. Several static experimental studies have been performed to examine the validity of this new thermodynamically based approach; these allow the determination of static parameters of the model. To date, no experimental studies have obtained information about the dynamic parameters required for the model. A new experimental porous flow cell has been constructed using stereolithography to study two-phase flow phenomena (Crandall et al. 2008). A novel image analysis tool was developed for an examination of the evolution of flow patterns during displacement experiments (Crandall et al. 2009). This analysis tool enables the direct quantification of interfacial area between fluids by matching known geometrical properties of the constructed flow cell with locations identified as interfaces from images of flowing fluids. Numerous images were obtained from two-phase experiments within the flow cell. The dynamic evolution of the fluid distribution and the fluid-fluid interface locations were determined by analyzing these images. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the thermodynamically based two-phase flow model, review the properties of the stereolithography flow cell, and show how the image analysis procedure has been used to obtain dynamic parameters for the

  18. Determination of interfacial tension of binary mixtures from perturbative approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Blas, F. J.

    2015-05-01

    We determine the interfacial properties of mixtures of spherical Lennard-Jones molecules from direct simulation of the vapour-liquid interface. We consider mixtures with same molecular size but different dispersive energy parameter values. We use the extensions of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janeček, presented recently by MacDowell and Blas and Martínez-Ruiz et al., to deal with the interaction energy and microscopic components of the pressure tensor. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of mixtures of Lennard-Jones molecules with a cut-off distance rc = 3σ in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections. The pressure tensor is obtained using the mechanical (virial) and thermodynamic route. The vapour-liquid interfacial tension is also evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the test-area methodology. This allows to check the validity of the recent extensions presented to deal with the contributions due to long-range corrections for intermolecular energy and pressure tensor in the case of binary mixtures. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles, coexistence densities, and interfacial thickness as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the ratio between the dispersive energy parameters of the mixture, ε22/ε11, is to sharpen the vapour-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative maximum in the density profiles of the less volatile component at the interface. This maximum is related with adsorption or accumulation of these molecules at the interface, a direct consequence of stronger attractive interactions between these molecules in

  19. Interfacial thermal conductance-rheology nexus in metal-contacted nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Indira; Borca-Tasciuc, Theo; Keblinski, Pawel; Ramanath, Ganpati

    2013-10-01

    Tailoring high interfacial thermal conductance is crucial for many applications and is often challenging even for interfaces comprised of high thermal conductivity materials. Here, we report the correlation between the rheological behavior of a gold-nanowire-filled polydimethylsiloxane nanocomposite and its interface thermal conductance with copper. At a critical filler fraction, an abrupt increase in the nanocomposite thermal conductivity is accompanied by a liquid-solid transition and a multifold decrease in interface conductance. These concurrent changes are attributed to nanowire percolation network formation and pre-cure polymer gelation that inhibits the formation of conformal void-free interfaces. These findings will be important for designing processing sequences to realize high thermal conductance interfaces.

  20. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen conditions on the ordering of interfacial water.

    PubMed

    Ypma, Rolf E; Pollack, Gerald H

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) conditions are applied clinically to treat diverse conditions. There is a lack of a unifying consensus as to how HBO2 acts effectively against a broad range of medical conditions, and numerous differing biological explanations have been offered. The possibility of a mechanism dependent on the extensive ordering of interfacial water has not yet been investigated. We examined the hypothesis that zones of ordered water, dubbed "exclusion zones" or "EZ," are expanded under hyperbaric oxygen conditions. Specifically, we tested whether there are significant quantitative differences in EZ size at steady state under high-pressure and/or high-oxygen conditions, compared to normal atmospheric conditions. Oxygen concentration and mechanical pressure were examined separately and in combination. Statistically significant increases in EZ size were seen at elevated air pressures and at high oxygen concentrations. These experimental results suggest the possibility of an ordered water-mediated mechanism of action for hyperbaric oxygen therapy.