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Sample records for high luminosity insertion

  1. High luminosity particle colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p{anti p}), lepton (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed.

  2. Dijet spectroscopy at high luminosity

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1990-07-01

    A study of the dijet mass resolution has been made appropriate to high luminosity operation. As a benchmark, the mass resolution of W {yields} jj for a Higgs boson of 800 GeV has been optimized for no, eight, and sixteen overlapping minbias events. A factor of 2.5 degradation in M{sub jj} width is seen. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  3. High Luminosity LHC: Challenges and plans

    DOE PAGES

    Arduini, G.; Barranco, J.; Bertarelli, A.; ...

    2016-12-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will undergo a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its rate of collisions by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor ten. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), willmore » rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11–12 T superconducting magnets, including Nb3Sn-based magnets never used in accelerators before, compact superconducting cavities for longitudinal beam rotation, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation. As a result, the dynamics of the HL-LHC beams will be also particularly challenging and this aspect is the main focus of this paper.« less

  4. High Luminosity LHC: Challenges and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Arduini, G.; Barranco, J.; Bertarelli, A.; Biancacci, N.; Bruce, R.; Bruning, O.; Buffat, X.; Cai, Y.; Carver, L. R.; Fartoukh, S.; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Iadarola, G.; Li, K.; Lechner, A.; Medrano, L. Medina; Metral, E.; Nosochkov, Y.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pellegrini, D.; Pieloni, T.; Qiang, J.; Redaelli, S.; Romano, A.; Rossi, L.; Rumolo, G.; Salvant, B.; Schenk, M.; Tambasco, C.; Tomas, R.; Valishev, S.; Van der Veken, F. F.

    2016-12-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will undergo a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its rate of collisions by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor ten. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11–12 T superconducting magnets, including Nb3Sn-based magnets never used in accelerators before, compact superconducting cavities for longitudinal beam rotation, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation. As a result, the dynamics of the HL-LHC beams will be also particularly challenging and this aspect is the main focus of this paper.

  5. High Luminosity LHC: challenges and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arduini, G.; Barranco, J.; Bertarelli, A.; Biancacci, N.; Bruce, R.; Brüning, O.; Buffat, X.; Cai, Y.; Carver, L. R.; Fartoukh, S.; Giovannozzi, M.; Iadarola, G.; Li, K.; Lechner, A.; Medina Medrano, L.; Métral, E.; Nosochkov, Y.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pellegrini, D.; Pieloni, T.; Qiang, J.; Redaelli, S.; Romano, A.; Rossi, L.; Rumolo, G.; Salvant, B.; Schenk, M.; Tambasco, C.; Tomás, R.; Valishev, S.; Van der Veken, F. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will undergo a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its rate of collisions by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor ten. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 T superconducting magnets, including Nb3Sn-based magnets never used in accelerators before, compact superconducting cavities for longitudinal beam rotation, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation. The dynamics of the HL-LHC beams will be also particularly challenging and this aspect is the main focus of this paper.

  6. Results From the DAFNE High Luminosity Test

    SciTech Connect

    Milardi, C.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Mazzitelli, G.; Murtas, F.; Pellegrino, L.; /Frascati /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN /INFN, Cosenza /INFN, Rome /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL /Rome U. /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Rome3 /SLAC

    2012-04-11

    The DAPHNE collider, based on a new collision scheme including Large Piwinsky angle and Crab-Waist, has been successfully commissioned and is presently delivering luminosity to the SIDDHARTA detector. Large crossing angle and Crab-Waist scheme proved to be effective in: (1) Increasing luminosity, now a factor 2.7 higher than in the past; and (2) controlling transverse beam blow-up due to the beam-beam. Work is in progress to reach the ultimate design luminosity goal 5.0 {center_dot} 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The new collision scheme is the main design concept for a new project aimed at building a Super-B factory that is expected to achieve a luminosity of the order of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and it has been also taken into account to upgrade one of the LHC interaction regions.

  7. High-field Magnet Development toward the High Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, Giorgio

    2014-07-01

    The upcoming Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) will rely on the use of Accelerator Quality Nb3Sn Magnets which have been the focus of an intense R&D effort in the last decade. This contribution will describe the R&D and results of Nb3Sn Accelerator Quality High Field Magnets development efforts, with emphasis on the activities considered for the HL-LHC upgrades.

  8. Simulation of the LHC BRAN luminosity monitor for high luminosity interaction regions

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Matis, H.; Ratti, A.; Stiller, J.; White, S.M.

    2010-05-23

    The BRAN (Beam RAte of Neutrals) detector monitors the collision rates in the high luminosity interaction regions of LHC (ATLAS and CMS). This Argon gas ionization detector measures the forward neutral particles from collisions at the interaction point. To predict and improve the understanding of the detector's performance, we produced a detailed model of the detector and its surroundings in Fluka. In this paper, we present the model and results of our simulations including the detectors estimated response to interactions for beam energies of 3.5, 5, and 7 TeV.

  9. Accretion disk coronae in high-luminosity systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen D.; Castor, John I.; Klein, Richard I.; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of self-consistent models of Compton-heated accretion disk coronae. The models are calculated using a new method for computing monochromatic radiative transfer n two dimensions. The method splits the radiation into direct and scattered components. The direct radiation is computed by calculating the optical depth along rays, while transfer of the scattered radiation is approximated by flux-limited diffusion. The resulting code agrees with more accurate treatments to within 50%, and is highly efficient, making it practical for use in large hydrodynamic simulations. The coronal models are used to confirm the results of earlier work, and to extend it to higher luminosities. In contrast to earlier work, which found the outer disks to be shadowed by the inner corona at high luminosities, we find our results to form an almost continuous extension of the models at lower luminosities. This is due to the presence of multiply scattered radiation, which acts to partially offset the loss of direct radiation from the central source. Although the analytic methods derived at lower luminosities cannot be used to derive the coronal structure for L/L(sub Edd) approx. greater than 0.1, the results of the models are amenable to semiempirical fits. We also discuss possible observational consequences of the results for coronal veiling and line fluorescence from the disk.

  10. Physics of a high-luminosity Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.E.

    1992-10-01

    This paper highlights the physics capabilities of a Tau-Charm Factory; i.e., high luminosity ({approximately}10{sup 33}cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}) e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider operating in the center-of-mass energy range of 3-5 GeV, with a high-precision, general-purpose detector. Recent developments in {tau} and charm physics are emphasized.

  11. OH megamasers in high-luminosity IRAS galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirabel, I. F.; Sanders, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    OH megamaser emission and H I and CO profiles from the distant infrared galaxies IRAS 10173 + 0828, III Zw 035, and Zw 475.056 are reported. The OH isotropic luminosities at 1667 MHz are 463, 534, and 6.6 solar luminosities, respectively. Far-infrared pumping efficiencies of the OH greater than 1 percent are found in IRAS 10173 + 0828 and III Zw 035. These two galaxies show anomalously large 1667/1665 MHz emission line ratios. OH megamasers reside in the nuclei of superluminous far-infrared galaxies that have a high content of molecular gas, high efficiency of star formation, and in some instances, a striking deficiency of atomic hydrogen.

  12. High Speed Measurements of the LHC Luminosity Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beche, J. F.; Byrd, J. M.; Monroy, M.; Ratti, A.; Turner, W.; Bravin, E.

    2006-11-01

    The LHC luminosity monitor is a gas ionization chamber designed to operate in the high radiation environment present in the TAN neutral absorbers at the LHC. One of the challenges is to measure the luminosity of individual bunch crossings with a minimum separation of 25 nsec. To test the time response and other aspects of a prototype chamber, we have performed a test using an x-ray beam of 40-60 keV with pulse spacing of 26 nsec as an ionizing beam. The tests were made at BL 8.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  13. 4D fast tracking for experiments at high luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, N.; Cardini, A.; Calabrese, R.; Fiorini, M.; Luppi, E.; Marconi, U.; Petruzzo, M.

    2016-11-01

    The full exploitation of the physics potential of the high luminosity LHC is a big challenge that requires new instrumentation and innovative solutions. We present here a conceptual design and simulation studies of a fast timing pixel detector with embedded real-time tracking capabilities. The system is conceived to operate at 40 MHz event rate and to reconstruct tracks in real-time, using precise space and time 4D information of the hit, for fast trigger decisions. This work is part of an R&D project aimed at building an innovative tracking detector with superior time (10 ps) and position (10 μm) resolutions to be used in very harsh radiation environments, for the ultimate flavour physics experiment at the high luminosity phase of the LHC.

  14. Dynamic aperture studies for the LHC high luminosity lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Maria, R. de; Giovannozzi, M.; McIntosh, E.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Cai, Y.; Wang, M. -H.

    2015-07-14

    Since quite some time, dynamic aperture studies have been undertaken with the aim of specifying the required field quality of the new magnets that will be installed in the LHC ring in the framework of the high-luminosity upgrade. In this paper the latest results concerning the specification work will be presented, taking into account both injection and collision energies and the field quality contribution from all the magnets in the newly designed interaction regions.

  15. IUE observations of blue halo high luminosity stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, M.; Franco, M. L.; Stalio, R.

    1981-01-01

    Two high luminosity population II blue stars of high galactic latitude, BD+33 deg 2642 and HD 137569 were observed at high resolution. The stellar spectra show the effect of mass loss in BD+33 deg 2642 and abnormally weak metallic lines in HD 137569. The interstellar lines in the direction of BD+33 deg 2642, which lies at a height z greater than or equal to 6.2 kpc from the galactic plane, are split into two components. No high ionization stages are found at the low velocity component; nor can they be detected in the higher velocity clouds because of mixing with the corresponding stellar/circumstellar lines.

  16. SLHC, the High-Luminosity Upgrade (public event)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In the morning of June 23rd a public event is organised in CERN's Council Chamber with the aim of providing the particle physics community with up-to-date information about the strategy for the LHC luminosity upgrade and to describe the current status of preparation work. The presentations will provide an overview of the various accelerator sub-projects, the LHC physics prospects and the upgrade plans of ATLAS and CMS. This event is organised in the framework of the SLHC-PP project, which receives funding from the European Commission for the preparatory phase of the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade project. Informing the public is among the objectives of this EU-funded project. A simultaneous transmission of this meeting will be broadcast, available at the following address: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  17. High luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ptitsyn, V.; Aschenauer, E.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M..; Calaga, R.; Chang, X.; Fedotov, A.; Gassner, D.; Hammons, L.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; He, P.; Hao, Y.; Jackson, W.; Jain, A.; Johnson, E.C.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luo, Y.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Parker, B.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Skaritka, J.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Webb, S.; Wu, Q.; Xu, W.; Pozdeyev, E.; Tsentalovich, E.

    2011-03-28

    We present the design of a future high-energy high-luminosity electron-hadron collider at RHIC called eRHIC. We plan on adding 20 (potentially 30) GeV energy recovery linacs to accelerate and to collide polarized and unpolarized electrons with hadrons in RHIC. The center-of-mass energy of eRHIC will range from 30 to 200 GeV. The luminosity exceeding 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved in eRHIC using the low-beta interaction region with a 10 mrad crab crossing. We report on the progress of important eRHIC R&D such as the high-current polarized electron source, the coherent electron cooling, ERL test facility and the compact magnets for recirculation passes. A natural staging scenario of step-by-step increases of the electron beam energy by building-up of eRHIC's SRF linacs is presented.

  18. GRO J1655-40 enters a highly-variable, high-luminosity state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Jeroen; Miller, Jon M.; Wijnands, Rudy; Lewin, Walter H. G.

    2005-05-01

    GRO J1655-40 enters a highly-variable, high-luminosity state Jeroen Homan (MIT), Jon M. Miller (CfA), Rudy Wijnands (U. of Amsterdam), and Walter H.G. Lewin (MIT) Recent RXTE observations of the black hole X-ray transient GRO J1655-40, which is currently in outburst (e.g. ATEL #414,#417,#418,#419,#432,#438), show that the source has entered a highly variable, high-luminosity state. During the past two months the source has been steadily increasing in luminosity, while remaining spectrally soft.

  19. CMS HCAL Endcap Simulations for the High Luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Kevin

    2013-04-01

    The long-term high luminosity upgrade to the LHC will increase the levels of radiation affecting the CMS calorimeters. By the end of Phase 2, parts of the electromagnetic and hadronic endcap calorimeters could receive up to 10 MRad of radiation. A model of the radiation damage to HCAL, which has been implemented in the CMS fast simulation, will be described. The effects of radiation on physics capabilities with jets will be presented, with the most important effect coming from scaling of photodetector noise due to recalibration. In addition, a standalone Geant4 simulation with a simplified geometry can be used to test configurations with new radiation-hard ECALs. Results for pion response and resolution with new configurations will be shown.

  20. Red and Blue Shifted Broad Lines in High Luminosity QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, D. H.; Rieke, M. J.; Rix, H.-W.; Foltz, C. B.; Weymann, R. J.; Chaffee, F. H.

    1998-05-01

    We have observed a sample of 25 high luminosity QSOs, in the range 2.0 ≲ z ≲ 2.5, at 1.6micron with the near-infrared spectrograph FSPEC on the Multiple Mirror Telescope. We have measured the systemic redshift z_sys by direct detection of the strong [O 3]lambda5007 line emitted from the narrow-line-region. We have found that the broad Hβ lines, from the same spectra, have a systematic mean red shift of 530+/-80 km s(-1) with respect to systemic. From data in the literature, we have found that the high ionization, rest-frame ultraviolet broad lines C 4lambda1549 and Lyalpha are systematically blue shifted ~ 1500 km s(-1) and ~ 1000 km s(-1) , respectively, from systemic. Therefore, estimating the ionizing flux from the inter-galactic-medium J_ν() IGM via the Proximity Effect, using redshift measurements from these two broad line species, results in an over-estimation of J_ν() IGM by factors of 2.5-4.0. Furthermore, related calculations of the lower limit for the density of baryons Omega_b will be over-estimated by factors of 1.6-2.0. However, the low ionization broad line Mg 2lambda2798 is within 100 km s(-1) of systemic, and thus would be the line of choice for determining the true redshift of distant (z>1) QSOs without near-infrared spectroscopy.

  1. SuperB: a Linear High-Luminosity B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.; Bettarini, S.; Biagini, M.; Bonneaud, G.; Cai, Y.; Calderini, G.; Ciuchini, M.; Dubois-Felsmann, G.P.; Ecklund, S.; Forti, F.; Gershon, T.J.; Giorgi, M.A.; Hitlin, D.G.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Lusiani, A.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Neri, N.; Novokhatski, A.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; /Caltech /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Frascati /Ecole Polytechnique /SLAC /Rome III U. /INFN, Rome3 /Warwick U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Wisconsin U., Madison /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Edinburgh U. /Orsay, LAL

    2006-02-08

    This paper is based on the outcome of the activity that has taken place during the recent workshop on ''SuperB in Italy'' held in Frascati on November 11-12, 2005. The workshop was opened by a theoretical introduction of Marco Ciuchini and was structured in two working groups. One focused on the machine and the other on the detector and experimental issues.. The present status on CP is mainly based on the results achieved by BABAR and Belle. Establishment of the indirect CP violation in B sector in 2001 and of the direct CP violation in 2004 thanks to the success of PEP-II and KEKB e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric B Factories operating at the center of mass energy corresponding to the mass of the {Upsilon}(4S ). With the two B Factories taking data, the Unitarity Triangle is now beginning to be over constrained by improving the measurements of the sides and now also of the angles {alpha}, and {gamma}. We are also in presence of the very intriguing results about the measurements of sin2{beta} in the time dependent analysis of decay channels via penguin loops, where b {yields} s{bar s}s and b {yields} s{bar d}d. {tau} physics, in particular LFV search, as well as charm and ISR physics are important parts of the scientific program of a SuperB Factory. The physics case together with possible scenarios for the high luminosity SuperB Factory based on the concepts of the Linear Collider and the related experimental issues are discussed.

  2. UVUDF: UV Luminosity Functions at the Cosmic High Noon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Vihang; Scarlata, Claudia; Rafelski, Marc; Gburek, Timothy; Teplitz, Harry I.; Alavi, Anahita; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Finkelstein, Steven; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton; Kurczynski, Peter; Siana, Brian; Codoreanu, Alex; de Mello, Duilia F.; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Soto, Emmaris

    2017-03-01

    We present the rest-1500 Å UV luminosity functions (LF) for star-forming galaxies during the cosmic high noon—the peak of cosmic star formation rate at 1.5< z< 3. We use deep NUV imaging data obtained as part of the Hubble Ultra-Violet Ultra Deep Field (UVUDF) program, along with existing deep optical and NIR coverage on the HUDF. We select F225W, F275W, and F336W dropout samples using the Lyman break technique, along with samples in the corresponding redshift ranges selected using photometric redshifts, and measure the rest-frame UV LF at z∼ 1.7,2.2,3.0, respectively, using the modified maximum likelihood estimator. We perform simulations to quantify the survey and sample incompleteness for the UVUDF samples to correct the effective volume calculations for the LF. We select galaxies down to {M}{UV}=-15.9,-16.3,-16.8 and fit a faint-end slope of α =-{1.20}-0.13+0.10,-{1.32}-0.14+0.10,-{1.39}-0.12+0.08 at 1.4< z< 1.9, 1.8< z< 2.6, and 2.4< z< 3.6, respectively. We compare the star formation properties of z∼ 2 galaxies from these UV observations with results from Hα and UV+IR observations. We find a lack of high-SFR sources in the UV LF compared to the Hα and UV+IR, likely due to dusty SFGs not being properly accounted for by the generic {IRX}{--}β relation used to correct for dust. We compute a volume-averaged UV-to-Hα ratio by abundance matching the rest-frame UV LF and Hα LF. We find an increasing UV-to-Hα ratio toward low-mass galaxies ({M}\\star ≲ 5× {10}9 {M}ȯ ). We conclude that this could be due to a larger contribution from starbursting galaxies compared to the high-mass end.

  3. High-energy high-luminosity µ+ µ- collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Robert B.; Fernow, Richard; Gallardo, Juan C.; Lee, Y. Y.; Torun, Yagmur; Neuffer, David; Winn, David

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the design of a high luminosity (1035 cm-2 s-1), high energy (2 + 2 TeV) µ+µ- collider, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muon beams and proceeding through the muon storage ring.

  4. High Luminosity Heavy Quark and Electromagnetic Probes at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    David, G; Frawley, A D; Rapp, R; Ullrich, T; Vogt, R; Xu, Z

    2008-03-30

    The Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory was designed to study the properties of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) in a hot and dense medium. The first years of RHIC operation and accompanying theoretical studies have helped pinpoint certain classes of measurements needed to more fully probe the medium and determine its properties. The medium created in these heavy-ion (AA) collisions appears to thermalize quickly and exhibits collective flow patterns consistent with hydrodynamic predictions. The initial temperature of the medium is not known and it is not yet understood whether deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration are realized during its evolution. The answers to these questions require higher luminosities and detector upgrades, referred to as RHIC-II. The goal of RHIC II is to achieve the answers to the above questions by increasing the ion luminosity. The measurements thus far at RHIC could not fully address these fundamental questions, either due to incomplete detection capabilities or insufficient statistics to draw meaningful and robust conclusions. Working groups were formed to determine which physics topics could best be addressed by the combination of planned upgrades and increased luminosity. Reports from each working group were used to prepare a white paper for RHIC II, along with additional inputs from the conveners of all working groups.

  5. Spontaneous Radiation Emission from Short, High Field Strength Insertion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2005-09-15

    Since the earliest papers on undulaters were published, it has been known how to calculate the spontaneous emission spectrum from ''short'' undulaters when the magnetic field strength parameter is small compared to unity, or in ''single'' frequency sinusoidal undulaters where the magnetic field strength parameter is comparable to or larger than unity, but where the magnetic field amplitude is constant throughout the undulater. Fewer general results have been obtained in the case where the insertion device is both short, i.e., the magnetic field strength parameter changes appreciably throughout the insertion device, and the magnetic field strength is high enough that ponderomotive effects, radiation retardation, and harmonic generation are important physical phenomena. In this paper a general method is presented for calculating the radiation spectrum for short, high-field insertion devices. It is used to calculate the emission from some insertion device designs of recent interest.

  6. Evaluation of a high resolution silicon PET insert module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grkovski, Milan; Brzezinski, Karol; Cindro, Vladimir; Clinthorne, Neal H.; Kagan, Harris; Lacasta, Carlos; Mikuž, Marko; Solaz, Carles; Studen, Andrej; Weilhammer, Peter; Žontar, Dejan

    2015-07-01

    Conventional PET systems can be augmented with additional detectors placed in close proximity of the region of interest. We developed a high resolution PET insert module to evaluate the added benefit of such a combination. The insert module consists of two back-to-back 1 mm thick silicon sensors, each segmented into 1040 1 mm2 pads arranged in a 40 by 26 array. A set of 16 VATAGP7.1 ASICs and a custom assembled data acquisition board were used to read out the signal from the insert module. Data were acquired in slice (2D) geometry with a Jaszczak phantom (rod diameters of 1.2-4.8 mm) filled with 18F-FDG and the images were reconstructed with ML-EM method. Both data with full and limited angular coverage from the insert module were considered and three types of coincidence events were combined. The ratio of high-resolution data that substantially improves quality of the reconstructed image for the region near the surface of the insert module was estimated to be about 4%. Results from our previous studies suggest that such ratio could be achieved at a moderate technological expense by using an equivalent of two insert modules (an effective sensor thickness of 4 mm).

  7. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (1/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Calorimetry and Muon Spectrometers - Part I : In the first part of the lecture series, the motivation for a high luminosity upgrade of the LHC will be quickly reviewed together with the challenges for the LHC detectors. In particular, the plans and ongoing research for new calorimeter detectors will be explained. The main issues in the high-luminosity era are an improved radiation tolerance, natural ageing of detector components and challenging trigger and physics requirements. The new technological solutions for calorimetry at a high-luminosity LHC will be reviewed.

  8. Overview of a high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of a 4 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. The authors discuss the various systems in such muon colliders.

  9. Wedge Absorbers for Final Cooling for a High-Energy High-Luminosity Lepton Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David; Mohayai, Tanaz; Snopok, Pavel; Summers, Don

    2016-06-01

    A high-energy high-luminosity muon collider scenario requires a "final cooling" system that reduces transverse emittance to ~25 microns (normalized) while allowing longitudinal emittance increase. Ionization cooling using high-field solenoids (or Li Lens) can reduce transverse emittances to ~100 microns in readily achievable configurations, confirmed by simulation. Passing these muon beams at ~100 MeV/c through cm-sized diamond wedges can reduce transverse emittances to ~25 microns, while increasing longitudinal emittance by a factor of ~5. Implementation will require optical matching of the exiting beam into downstream acceleration systems.

  10. Optical Variability of Two High-Luminosity Radio-Quiet Quasars, PDS 456 and PHL 1811

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, C. M.; Benker, A. J.; Campbell, J. S.; Crowley, K. A.; George, T. A.; Hedrick, C. H.; Hiller, M. E.; Klimek, E. S.; Leonard, J. P.; Peterson, B. W.; Sanders, K. M.

    2003-12-01

    PDS 456 and PHL 1811 are two of the highest luminosity low-redshift quasars. Both have optical luminosities comparable to 3C 273, but they have low radio luminosities. PDS 456 is a broad line object but PHL 1811 could be classified as a high-luminosity Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) object. We present the results of optical (V-band) continuum monitoring of PDS 456 and PHL 1811. We compare the variability properties of these two very different AGNs compared with the radio-loud AGN 3C 273, and we discuss the implications for the origin of the optical continuum variability in AGNs. This research has been supported in part by the Howard Hughes Foundation, Nebraska EPSCoR, the University of Nebraska Layman Fund, the University of Nebraska Undergraduate Creative Activities and Research Experiences, Pepsi-Cola, and the National Science Foundation through grant AST 03-07912.

  11. Extra-galactic high-energy transients: event rate density and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2015-08-01

    Several types of extra-galactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with a relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the reshift-dependent event rate densities and luminosity functions of these extra-galactic high-energy transients. We consider star formation history as the tracer of the redshift distribution for long GRBs and SBOs. For short GRBs, we consider the compact star merger model to introduce several possible merger delay time distribution models. For TDEs, we consider the mass distribution of supermassive black holes as a function of redshift. We derive some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate density for different types of transients. Based on the observed events, we derive the local specific event rate density, ρ0,L ∝ dρ0/dL for each type of transient, which represents its luminosity function. All the transients are consistent with having a single power law luminosity function, except the high luminosity long GRBs (HL-lGRBs), whose luminosity function can be well described by a broken power law. The total event rate density for a particular transient depends on the luminosity threshold, and we obtain the following values in units of Gpc-3 yr-1: 2.82^{+0.41}_{-0.36} for HL-lGRBs above 4×1049 erg s-1 218^{+130}_{-86} for low luminosity long GRBs above 6×1046 erg s-1 3.18^{+0.88}_{-0.70}, 2.87^{+0.80}_{-0.64}, and 6.25^{+1.73}_{-1.38} above 5×1049 erg s-1 for short GRBs with three different merger delay models (Gaussian, log-normal, and power law); 2.0^{+2.6}_{-1.3}×104 above 9×1043 erg s-1 for SBOs, 3.0^{+1.0}_{-0.8}×105 for normal TDEs above 1042 erg s-1 and 6.2^{+8.2}_{-4.0} above 3×1047 erg s-1for TDE jets as discovered by Swift. Intriguingly, the global specific event rate densities

  12. ATLAS Upgrades Towards the High Luminosity LHC: extending the discovery potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valero-Biot, A.

    2014-06-01

    After successful LHC operation at the center-of-mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV in 2011 and 2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades, culminating roughly 10 years from now in the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of order five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The final goal is to extend the data set from about few hundred fb-1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb-1 by around 2030. The current planning in ATLAS also foresees significant upgrades to the detector during the consolidation of the LHC to reach full LHC energy and further upgrades to accommodate running already beyond nominal luminosity this decade. The challenge of coping with HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for an all-new inner-tracker, significant upgrades in the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. This presentation summarizes the various improvements to the ATLAS detector required to cope with the anticipated evolution of the LHC instantaneous luminosity during this decade and the next.

  13. An Alternative High Luminosity LHC with Flat Optics and Long-Range Beam-Beam Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Fartoukh, Stephane; Valishev, Alexander; Shatilov, Dmitry

    2015-06-01

    In the baseline scenario of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the geometric loss of luminosity in the two high luminosity experiments due to collisions with a large crossing angle is recovered by tilting the bunches in the interaction region with the use of crab cavities. A possible backup scenario would rely on a reduced crossing angle together with flat optics (with different horizontal and vertical $\\beta^{\\ast}$values) for the preservation of luminosity performance. However, the reduction of crossing angle coupled with the flat optics significantly enhances the strength of long-range beam-beam interactions. This paper discusses the possibility to mitigate the long-range beam-beam effects by current bearing wire compensators (or e-lens). We develop a new HL-LHC parameter list and analyze it in terms of integrated luminosity performance as compared to the baseline. Further, we evaluate the operational scenarios using numerical simulations of single-particle dynamics with beam-beam effects.

  14. High luminosity {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider: Report of a feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.; Tollestrup, A.; Sessler, A.

    1996-12-01

    Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV (c-of-m) high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are analyzed. Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. We briefly mention the luminosity requirements of hadrons and lepton machines and their high-energy-physics advantages and disadvantages in reference to their effective center of mass energy. Finally, we present an R & D plan to determine whether such machines are practical.

  15. Nb3Sn High Field Magnets for the High Luminosity LHC Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosio, Giorgio

    2015-06-01

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN requires a new generation of high field superconducting magnets. High field large aperture quadrupoles (MQXF) are needed for the low-beta triplets close to the ATLAS and CMS detectors, and high field two-in-one dipoles (11 T dipoles) are needed to make room for additional collimation. The MQXF quadrupoles, with a field gradient of 140 T/m in 150 mm aperture, have a peak coil field of 12.1 T at nominal current. The 11 T dipoles, with an aperture of 60 mm, have a peak coil field of 11.6 T at nominal current. Both magnets require Nb3Sn conductor and are the first applications of this superconductor to actual accelerator magnets.

  16. Final Cooling For a High-luminosity High-Energy Lepton Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Sayed, H.; Hart, T.; Summers, D.

    2015-05-01

    The final cooling system for a high-energy high-luminosity heavy lepton collider requires reduction of the transverse emittance εt by an order of magnitude to ~0.00003 m (rms, N), while allowing longitudinal emittance εL to increase to ~0.1m. In the present baseline approach, this is obtained by transverse cooling of low-energy muons within a sequence of high-field solenoids with low-frequency rf systems. Recent studies of such systems are presented. Since the final cooling steps are mostly emittance exchange, a variant form of that final system can be obtained by a round to flat transform in x-y, with transverse slicing of the enlarged flat transverse dimension followed by longitudinal recombination of the sliced bunchlets. Other variants are discussed. More explicit emittance exchange can greatly reduce the cost of a final cooling system.

  17. Extragalactic High-energy Transients: Event Rate Densities and Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2015-10-01

    Several types of extragalactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with an associated relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the redshift-dependent event rate densities and the global luminosity functions (GLFs; ignoring redshift evolution) of these transients. We introduce some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate densities for different types of transients and derive the local specific event rate density, which also represents its GLF. Long GRBs (LGRBs) have a large enough sample to reveal features in the GLF, which is best charaterized as a triple power law (PL). All the other transients are consistent with having a single-power-law (SPL) LF. The total event rate density depends on the minimum luminosity, and we obtain the following values in units of Gpc-3 yr-1: {0.8}-0.1+0.1 for high-luminosity LGRBs above 1050 erg s-1 {164}-65+98 for low-luminosity LGRBs above 5 × 1046 erg s-1 {1.3}-0.3+0.4, {1.2}-0.3+0.4, and {3.3}-0.8+1.0 above 1050 erg s-1 for short GRBs with three different merger delay models (Gaussian, lognormal, and PL); {1.9}-1.2+2.4× {10}4 above 1044 erg s-1 for SBOs, {4.8}-2.1+3.2× {10}2 for normal TDEs above 1044 erg s-1 and {0.03}-0.02+0.04 above 1048 erg s-1 for TDE jets as discovered by Swift. Intriguingly, the GLFs of different kinds of transients, which cover over 12 orders of magnitude, are consistent with an SPL with an index of -1.6.

  18. High-luminosity single carbon stars in stellar and galactic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1991-01-01

    In the solar neighborhood, approximately half of all intermediate mass main sequence stars with initially between 1 solar mass and about 5 solar masses become carbon stars with luminosities near 10,000 lunar luminosities for typically less than 1 million years. These high luminosity carbon stars lose mass at rates nearly always in excess of 10 to the -7th solar mass/yr and sometimes in excess of 0.00001 solar mass/yr. Locally, close to half of the mass returned into the interstellar medium by intermediate mass stars before they become white dwarfs is during the carbon star phase. A much greater fraction of lower metallicity stars become carbon-rich before they evolve into planetary nebulae, than do higher-metallicity stars; therefore, carbon stars are much more important in the outer than in the inner Galaxy.

  19. Accurate crab cavity modeling for the high luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, D. R.; Appleby, R. B.; De Maria, R.; Garcia, J. Barranco; Garcia, R. Tomás; Hall, B.; Burt, G.

    2014-10-01

    As part of the Large Hadron Collider high luminosity upgrade it is proposed to include crab cavities in the lattice in order to enhance the luminosity. For one proposed cavity design the dynamics of the cavity is considered in terms of its impact upon the dynamic aperture of the machine. Taylor maps of the cavity are created and used to perform this analysis with a full assessment of their validity. Furthermore from these Taylor maps, symplectic methods are developed further, guided by the knowledge gained in the study of the physics contained in them.

  20. Theoretical studies of hadronic calorimetry for high luminosity, high energy colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, J.E.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments at the high luminosity, high energy colliders of the future are going to demand optimization of the state of the art of calorimetry design and construction. During the past few years, the understanding of the basic phenomenology of hadron calorimeters has advanced through paralleled theoretical and experimental investigations. The important underlying processes are reviewed to set the framework for the presentation of recent calculations of the expected performance of silicon detector based hadron calorimeters. Such devices employing uranium are expected to achieve the compensation condition (that is, e/h approx. 1.0) based on the understanding that has been derived from the uranium-liquid argon and uranium-plastic scintillator systems. In fact, even lead-silicon calorimeters are found to achieve the attractive value for the e/h ratio of 1.16 at 10 GeV. 62 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (4/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Tracking Detectors - Part II. Calorimetry, muon detection, vertexing, and tracking will play a central role in determining the physics reach for the High Luminosity LHC Era. In these lectures we will cover the requirements, options, and the R&D; efforts necessary to upgrade the current LHC detectors and enabling discoveries.

  2. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (4/4)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-22

    Tracking Detectors - Part II. Calorimetry, muon detection, vertexing, and tracking will play a central role in determining the physics reach for the High Luminosity LHC Era. In these lectures we will cover the requirements, options, and the R&D; efforts necessary to upgrade the current LHC detectors and enabling discoveries.

  3. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (3/4)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-22

    Tracking Detectors - Part I. Calorimetry, muon detection, vertexing, and tracking will play a central role in determining the physics reach for the High Luminosity LHC Era. In these lectures we will cover the requirements, options, and the R&D; efforts necessary to upgrade the current LHC detectors and enabling discoveries.

  4. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (3/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Tracking Detectors - Part I. Calorimetry, muon detection, vertexing, and tracking will play a central role in determining the physics reach for the High Luminosity LHC Era. In these lectures we will cover the requirements, options, and the R&D; efforts necessary to upgrade the current LHC detectors and enabling discoveries.

  5. The radiation hardness and temperature stability of Planar Light-wave Circuit splitters for the High Luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, N. C.; Hamilton, P.; Huffman, B. T.; Teng, P. K.; Weidberg, A. R.; Issever, C.

    2011-10-01

    High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) Inner Tracker designs may include the sharing of Timing, Trigger and Control (TTC) signals between several tracker modules. This is possible because the highest frequency signals are common to all modules. Such designs are an attractive option because they reduce the number of optical links required and hence the cost. These designs will require optical signal splitters that are radiation hard up to high doses and capable of operating in cold temperatures. Optical splitters are available as either fused-fibre splitters or Planar Light-wave Circuit (PLC) splitters. PLC splitters are preferable because they are smaller than fused-fibre splitters. A selection of PLC splitters from different manufacturers and of two different technologies (silica and glass based) have been tested for radiation hardness up to a dose of 500 kGy(Si) and for temperature stability. All the tested splitters displayed small increases in insertion losses ( < 0.1 dB) in reducing the operating temperature from 25°C to -25°C. The silica based splitters from all manufacturers did not exhibit significant radiation induced insertion losses, despite the high dose they were exposed to. The glass based sample, however, had a per channel radiation induced insertion loss of up to 1.16 dB. Whilst the silica based splitters can be considered as qualified for HL-LHC use with regards to radiation hardness, the glass technology would require further testing at a lower, more realistic, dose to also be considered as a potential component for HL-LHC upgrade designs.

  6. An incremental high-utility mining algorithm with transaction insertion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jerry Chun-Wei; Gan, Wensheng; Hong, Tzung-Pei; Zhang, Binbin

    2015-01-01

    Association-rule mining is commonly used to discover useful and meaningful patterns from a very large database. It only considers the occurrence frequencies of items to reveal the relationships among itemsets. Traditional association-rule mining is, however, not suitable in real-world applications since the purchased items from a customer may have various factors, such as profit or quantity. High-utility mining was designed to solve the limitations of association-rule mining by considering both the quantity and profit measures. Most algorithms of high-utility mining are designed to handle the static database. Fewer researches handle the dynamic high-utility mining with transaction insertion, thus requiring the computations of database rescan and combination explosion of pattern-growth mechanism. In this paper, an efficient incremental algorithm with transaction insertion is designed to reduce computations without candidate generation based on the utility-list structures. The enumeration tree and the relationships between 2-itemsets are also adopted in the proposed algorithm to speed up the computations. Several experiments are conducted to show the performance of the proposed algorithm in terms of runtime, memory consumption, and number of generated patterns.

  7. Populations of High-Luminosity Density-Bounded HII Regions in Spiral Galaxies? Evidence and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckman, J. E.; Rozas, M.; Zurita, A.; Watson, R. A.; Knapen, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present evidence that the H II regions of high luminosity in disk galaxies may be density bounded, so that a significant fraction of the ionizing photons emitted by their exciting OB stars escape from the regions. The key piece of evidence is the presence, in the Ha luminosity functions (LFs) of the populations of H iI regions, of glitches, local sharp peaks at an apparently invariant luminosity, defined as the Stromgren luminosity Lstr), LH(sub alpha) = Lstr = 10(sup 38.6) (+/- 10(sup 0.1)) erg/ s (no other peaks are found in any of the LFs) accompanying a steepening of slope for LH(sub alpha) greater than Lstr This behavior is readily explicable via a physical model whose basic premises are: (a) the transition at LH(sub alpha) = Lstr marks a change from essentially ionization bounding at low luminosities to density bounding at higher values, (b) for this to occur the law relating stellar mass in massive star-forming clouds to the mass of the placental cloud must be such that the ionizing photon flux produced within the cloud is a function which rises more steeply than the mass of the cloud. Supporting evidence for the hypothesis of this transition is also presented: measurements of the central surface brightnesses of H II regions for LH(sub alpha) less than Lstr are proportional to L(sup 1/3, sub H(sub alpha)), expected for ionization bounding, but show a sharp trend to a steeper dependence for LH(sub alpha) greater than Lstr, and the observed relation between the internal turbulence velocity parameter, sigma, and the luminosity, L, at high luminosities, can be well explained if these regions are density bounded. If confirmed, the density-bounding hypothesis would have a number of interesting implications. It would imply that the density-bounded regions were the main sources of the photons which ionize the diffuse gas in disk galaxies. Our estimates, based on the hypothesis, indicate that these regions emit sufficient Lyman continuum not only to

  8. Long term dynamics of the high luminosity Large Hadron Collider with crab cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco García, J.; De Maria, R.; Grudiev, A.; Tomás García, R.; Appleby, R. B.; Brett, D. R.

    2016-10-01

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) aims to achieve an integrated luminosity of 200 - 300 fb-1 per year, including the contribution from the upgrade of the injector chain. For the HL-LHC the larger crossing angle together with a smaller beta function at the collision point would result in more than 70% luminosity loss due to the incomplete geometric overlap of colliding bunches. To recover head-on collisions at the high-luminosity particle-physics detectors ATLAS and CMS and benefit from the very low β* provided by the Achromatic Telescopic Squeezing (ATS) optics, a local crab cavity scheme provides transverse kicks to the proton bunches. The tight space constraints at the location of these cavities leads to designs which are axially non-symmetric, giving rise to high order multipoles components of the main deflecting mode and, since these kicks are harmonic in time, we expand them in a series of multipoles in a similar fashion as is done for static field magnets. In this work we calculate, for the first time, the higher order multipoles and their impact on beam dynamics for three different crab cavity prototypes. Different approaches to calculate the multipoles are presented. Furthermore, we perform the first calculation of their impact on the long term stability of the machine using the concept of dynamic aperture.

  9. Luminosity enhancements at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, D.H.

    1984-04-01

    Several ideas are discussed that have been proposed to improve the luminosity at the SPEAR and PEP electron-positron storage rings and to insure good luminosity at the SLAC Linear Collider. There have been two proposals studied recently for SPEAR: a Microbeta insertion using Samarium Cobalt permanent magnets, and a Minibeta insertion using conventional quadrupole magnets. The notations Microbeta and minibeta used here are somewhat arbitrary since the front faces of the first quadrupole magnets for both insertions are at nearly the same distance from the interaction point.

  10. Detecting Alu insertions from high-throughput sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    David, Matei; Mustafa, Harun; Brudno, Michael

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the cataloguing of variation in personal human genomes. In this manuscript, we present alu-detect, a tool that combines read-pair and split-read information to detect novel Alus and their precise breakpoints directly from either whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing data while also identifying insertions directly in the vicinity of existing Alus. To set the parameters of our method, we use simulation of a faux reference, which allows us to compute the precision and recall of various parameter settings using real sequencing data. Applying our method to 100 bp paired Illumina data from seven individuals, including two trios, we detected on average 1519 novel Alus per sample. Based on the faux-reference simulation, we estimate that our method has 97% precision and 85% recall. We identify 808 novel Alus not previously described in other studies. We also demonstrate the use of alu-detect to study the local sequence and global location preferences for novel Alu insertions. PMID:23921633

  11. Long Term Optical and Infrared Reverberation Mapping of High and Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorjian, Varoujan; Barth, Aaron; Brandt, Niel; Dawson, Kyle; Green, Paul; Ho, Luis; Horne, Keith; Jiang, Linhua; Joner, Mike; Kenney, John; McGreer, Ian; Nordgren, Tyler; Schneider, Donald; Shen, Yue; Tao, Charling

    2016-08-01

    Previous Spitzer reverberation monitoring projects looking for UV/optical light absorbed and re-emitted in the IR by dust have been limited to very low luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN) that could potentially show reverberation within a single cycle (~1 year). Cycle 11-12's two year baseline allowed for the reverberation mapping of 17 high luminosity quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project. By combining ground based monitoring from Pan-STARRS, CFHT, and Steward Observatory telescopes with Spitzer data we have for the first time detected dust reverberation in quasars. We propose to continue this project to capitalize on the continuing optical motnoring from the ground and to increase the confidence in the detected lags. Additionally, the Call for Proposals asks for up to 1000 hours of observations in the Spitzer CVZ to accommodate battery charging needs. We propose to add to our quasar sample five lower luminosity Seyfert galaxies from the Pan-STARRS ground based optical survey that are in the Spitzer CVZ, which will increase the luminosity range of AGN we are studying and, combined with additional ground based observatories, provide for a continuous monitoring campaign lasting 2 years and thus provide the most detailed study of dust around AGN to date.

  12. The ATLAS Fast Tracker and Tracking at the High-Luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilic, N.

    2017-02-01

    The increase in centre-of-mass energy and luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider makes controlling trigger rates with high efficiency challenging. The ATLAS Fast TracKer is a hardware processor built to reconstruct tracks at a rate of up to 100 kHz and provide them to the high level trigger. The tracker reconstructs tracks by matching incoming detector hits with pre-defined track patterns stored in associative memory on custom ASICs. Inner detector hits are fitted to these track patterns using modern FPGAs. This proceeding describe the electronics system used for the massive parallelization performed by the Fast TracKer. An overview of the installation, commissioning and running of the system is given. The ATLAS upgrades planned to enable tracking at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider are also discussed.

  13. High-energy high-luminosity electron-ion collider eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hammons, L.; Hao, Y.; Webb, S.; et al

    2011-08-09

    In this paper, we describe a future electron-ion collider (EIC), based on the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) hadron facility, with two intersecting superconducting rings, each 3.8 km in circumference. The replacement cost of the RHIC facility is about two billion US dollars, and the eRHIC will fully take advantage and utilize this investment. We plan adding a polarized 5-30 GeV electron beam to collide with variety of species in the existing RHIC accelerator complex, from polarized protons with a top energy of 325 GeV, to heavy fully-striped ions with energies up to 130 GeV/u. Brookhaven's innovative design, is based on one of the RHIC's hadron rings and a multi-pass energy-recovery linac (ERL). Using the ERL as the electron accelerator assures high luminosity in the 10{sup 33}-10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} range, and for the natural staging of eRHIC, with the ERL located inside the RHIC tunnel. The eRHIC will provide electron-hadron collisions in up to three interaction regions. We detail the eRHIC's performance in Section 2. Since first paper on eRHIC paper in 2000, its design underwent several iterations. Initially, the main eRHIC option (the so-called ring-ring, RR, design) was based on an electron ring, with the linac-ring (LR) option as a backup. In 2004, we published the detailed 'eRHIC 0th Order Design Report' including a cost-estimate for the RR design. After detailed studies, we found that an LR eRHIC has about a 10-fold higher luminosity than the RR. Since 2007, the LR, with its natural staging strategy and full transparency for polarized electrons, became the main choice for eRHIC. In 2009, we completed technical studies of the design and dynamics for MeRHIC with 3-pass 4 GeV ERL. We learned much from this evaluation, completed a bottom-up cost estimate for this $350M machine, but then shelved the design. In the same year, we turned again to considering the cost-effective, all-in-tunnel six-pass ERL for our design of the high-luminosity

  14. From Nearby Low Luminosity AGN to High Redshift Radio Galaxies: Science Interests with Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharb, P.; Lal, D. V.; Singh, V.; Bagchi, J.; Ishwara Chandra, C. H.; Hota, A.; Konar, C.; Wadadekar, Y.; Shastri, P.; Das, M.; Baliyan, K.; Nath, B. B.; Pandey-Pommier, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present detailed science cases that a large fraction of the Indian AGN community is interested in pursuing with the upcoming Square Kilometre Array (SKA). These interests range from understanding low luminosity active galactic nuclei in the nearby Universe to powerful radio galaxies at high redshifts. Important unresolved science questions in AGN physics are discussed. Ongoing low-frequency surveys with the SKA pathfinder telescope GMRT, are highlighted.

  15. Beam Losses in the NLC Extraction Line for High Luminosity Beam Parameters (LCC-0049)

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Y

    2004-03-19

    In this note we present results of beam tracking in the NLC extraction line for the NLC option with high luminosity beam parameters (option H). Particle losses for 0.5 TeV and 1 TeV cms energy beams have been computed and examined as a function of beam offset at the interaction point (IP). Updated tracking results for the NLC option A are presented as well.

  16. The Physics Program of a High-Luminosity Asymmetric B Factory at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Eisner, A.; Mandelkern, M.; Morrison, R.; Witherell, M.; Burchat, P.; Kent, J.; Erbacher, R.; Vernon, W.; Eigen, G.; Hitlin, D.; Porter, F.; Weinstein, A.; Wisniewski, W.; Wagner, S.; Franzini, P.; Tuts, M.; Averill, D.; Snyder, A.; Goldhaber, G.; Oddone, P.; Roe, N.; Ronan, M.; Spahn, M.; MacFarlane, D.; Bartelt, J.; Bloom, E.; Bulos, F.; Cords, D.; Dib, C.; Dorfan, J.; Dunietz, I.; Gilman, F.; Godfrey, G.; Hyer, T.; Jensen, G.; Leith, D.; Marsiske, H.; Nir, Y.; Lee-Franzini, J.

    1989-10-01

    A high-luminosity asymmetric energy B Factory, proposed as an upgrade to the PEP storage ring at SLAC, provides the best opportunity to study CP violation as a means of testing the consistency of the Standard Model. If the phenomenon of CP violation is xplained by the Standard Model simply through the non-zero angles and phase of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, then there are precise relations between the K-M parameters and the various measurable CP-violating asymmetries in B meson decay. Should these onsistency relations fail, the origin of CP violation must lie outside the Standard Model framework. Our measurements would then lead to the first experiment-driven extensions of the Standard Model. The B Factory will also carry out a varied, high-quality program of studies f other aspects of the physics of b quarks, as well as high-precision measurements in r and charm physics. We describe a detailed series of measurements to be carried out in the first few years at a peak luminosity of 3 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}sec{sup -1}, the initial luminosity goal of the B Factory, as well as the program accessible to a larger data sample.

  17. Line and continuum variability of two intermediate-redshift, high-luminosity quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevese, D.; Paris, D.; Stirpe, G. M.; Vagnetti, F.; Zitelli, V.

    2007-08-01

    Context: It has been shown that the luminosity of active galactic nuclei and the size of their broad line region obey a simple relation of the type R_BLR=a Lγ, from faint Seyfert nuclei to bright quasars, allowing single-epoch determination of the central black hole mass M_BH= b Lγ Δ^2_Hβ from their luminosity L and width of Hβ emission line. Adopting this mass determination for cosmological studies requires the extrapolation to high redshift and luminosity of a relation whose calibration relies so far on reverberation mapping measurements performed for L ⪉ 1046 erg s-1 and redshift z ⪉ 0.4. Aims: We initiated a campaign for the spectrophotometric monitoring of a few luminous, intermediate redshift quasars whose apparent magnitude, V < 15.7, allows observations with a 1.8 m telescope, aimed at proving that emission lines vary and respond to continuum variations even for luminosities ⪆1047 erg s-1, and determining eventually their M_BH from reverberation mapping. Methods: We have repeatedly performed simultaneous spectrophotometric observations of quasars and reference stars to determine relative variability of continuum and emission lines. We describe the observations and methods of analysis. Results: For the quasars PG 1634+706 and PG 1247+268 we obtain light-curves respectively for CIII] (λλ1909 Å), MgII(λλ2798 Å) and for CIV(λλ1549 Å), CIII] (λλ1909 Å) emission lines with the relevant continua. During 3.2 years of observation, in the former case no continuum variability was detected and the evidence for line variability is marginal, while in the latter case both continuum and line variability are detected with high significance and the line variations appear correlated with continuum variations. Conclusions: The detection of the emission line variability in a quasar with L ~ 1047 erg s-1 encourages the continuation of the monitoring campaign which should provide a black hole mass estimate in another 5-6 years, constraining the mass-luminosity

  18. L1Track: A fast Level 1 track trigger for the ATLAS high luminosity upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerri, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    With the planned high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC), the ATLAS detector will see its collision rate increase by approximately a factor of 5 with respect to the current LHC operation. The earliest hardware-based ATLAS trigger stage ("Level 1") will have to provide a higher rejection factor in a more difficult environment: a new improved Level 1 trigger architecture is under study, which includes the possibility of extracting with low latency and high accuracy tracking information in time for the decision taking process. In this context, the feasibility of potential approaches aimed at providing low-latency high-quality tracking at Level 1 is discussed.

  19. First Test Results of the 150 mm Aperture IR Quadrupole Models for the High Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosio, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Wanderer, P.; Ferracin, P.; Sabbi, G.

    2016-10-06

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the LHC at CERN will use large aperture (150 mm) quadrupole magnets to focus the beams at the interaction points. The high field in the coils requires Nb3Sn superconductor technology, which has been brought to maturity by the LHC Accelerator Re-search Program (LARP) over the last 10 years. The key design targets for the new IR quadrupoles were established in 2012, and fabrication of model magnets started in 2014. This paper discusses the results from the first single short coil test and from the first short quadrupole model test. Remaining challenges and plans to address them are also presented and discussed.

  20. High luminosity operation of large solid angle scintillator arrays in Jefferson Lab Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Shneor, Ran

    2003-12-01

    This thesis describes selected aspects of high luminosity operation of large solid angle scintillator arrays in Hall A of the CEBAF (Central Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) at TJNAF (Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility ). CEBAF is a high current, high duty factor electron accelerator with a maximum beam energy of about 6 GeV and a maximum current of 200 μA. Operating large solid angle scintillator arrays in high luminosity environment presents several problems such as high singles rates, low signal to noise ratios and shielding requirements. To demonstrate the need for large solid angle and momentum acceptance detectors as a third arm in Hall A, we will give a brief overview of the physics motivating five approved experiments, which utilize scintillator arrays. We will then focus on the design and assembly of these scintillator arrays, with special focus on the two new detector packages built for the Short Range Correlation experiment E01-015. This thesis also contains the description and results of different tests and calibrations which where conducted for these arrays. We also present the description of a number of tests which were done in order to estimate the singles rates, data reconstruction, filtering techniques and shielding required for these counters.

  1. Development of planar pixel modules for the ATLAS high luminosity LHC tracker upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allport, P. P.; Ashby, J.; Bates, R. L.; Blue, A.; Burdin, S.; Buttar, C. M.; Casse, G.; Dervan, P.; Doonan, K.; Forshaw, D.; Lipp, J.; McMullen, T.; Pater, J.; Stewart, A.; Tsurin, I.

    2014-11-01

    The high-luminosity LHC will present significant challenges for tracking systems. ATLAS is preparing to upgrade the entire tracking system, which will include a significantly larger pixel detector. This paper reports on the development of large area planar detectors for the outer pixel layers and the pixel endcaps. Large area sensors have been fabricated and mounted onto 4 FE-I4 readout ASICs, the so-called quad-modules, and their performance evaluated in the laboratory and testbeam. Results from characterisation of sensors prior to assembly, experience with module assembly, including bump-bonding and results from laboratory and testbeam studies are presented.

  2. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (2/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Calorimetry and Muon Spectromers - Part II: When upgrading the LHC to higher luminosities, the detector and trigger performance shall be preserved - if not improved - with respect to the nominal performance. The ongoing R&D; for new radiation tolerant front-end electronics for calorimeters with higher read-out bandwidth are summarized and new possibilities for the trigger systems are presented. Similar developments are foreseen for the muon spectrometers, where also radiation tolerance of the muon detectors and functioning at high background rates is important. The corresponding plans and research work for the calorimeter and muon detectors at a LHC with highest luminsity are presented.

  3. Studies of helium based drift chamber gases for high-luminosity low energy machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarski, A.; Briggs, D.; Burchat, P. R.

    1992-02-01

    Future high luminosity low energy machines will need low mass tracking chambers in order to minimize multiple scattering of the relatively low momentum tracks produced at these facilities. A drift chamber using a helium based gas rather than a conventional argon based gas would greatly reduce the amount of multiple scattering. This paper summarizes measurements of the drift velocity and position resolution for gas mixtures of helium with CO2 and isobutane and helium with DME. Good spatial resolutions are obtained. A design of a drift chamber with only 0.12 percent of a radiation length (gas plus wire) over a 60 cm tracking distance is presented.

  4. Studies of helium based drift chamber gases for high-luminosity low energy machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarski, Adam; Briggs, Don; Burchat, Patricia R.

    1992-12-01

    Future high luminosity low energy machines will need low mass tracking chambers in order to minimize multiple scattering of the relatively low momentum tracks produced at these facilities. A drift chamber using a helium based gas rather than a conventional argon based gas would greatly reduce the amount of multiple scattering. This paper summarizes measurements of the drift velocity and position resolution for gas mixtures of helium with CO 2 and isobutane and helium with DME. Good spatial resolutions are obtained. A design of a drift chamber with only 0.12% of a radiation length (gas plus wire) over a 60 cm tracking distance is presented.

  5. Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays from low-luminosity active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duţan, Ioana; Caramete, Laurenţiu I.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the production of ultra-high-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) in relativistic jets from low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGN). We start by proposing a model for the UHECR contribution from the black holes (BHs) in LLAGN, which present a jet power Pj ⩽1046 erg s-1. This is in contrast to the opinion that only high-luminosity AGN can accelerate particles to energies ⩾ 50 EeV. We rewrite the equations which describe the synchrotron self-absorbed emission of a non-thermal particle distribution to obtain the observed radio flux density from sources with a flat-spectrum core and its relationship to the jet power. We found that the UHECR flux is dependent on the observed radio flux density, the distance to the AGN, and the BH mass, where the particle acceleration regions can be sustained by the magnetic energy extraction from the BH at the center of the AGN. We use a complete sample of 29 radio sources with a total flux density at 5 GHz greater than 0.5 Jy to make predictions for the maximum particle energy, luminosity, and flux of the UHECRs from nearby AGN. These predictions are then used in a semi-analytical code developed in Mathematica (SAM code) as inputs for the Monte-Carlo simulations to obtain the distribution of the arrival direction at the Earth and the energy spectrum of the UHECRs, taking into account their deflection in the intergalactic magnetic fields. For comparison, we also use the CRPropa code with the same initial conditions as for the SAM code. Importantly, to calculate the energy spectrum we also include the weighting of the UHECR flux per each UHECR source. Next, we compare the energy spectrum of the UHECRs with that obtained by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  6. Matching into the Helical Bunch Coalescing Channel for a High Luminosity Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, Amy; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Neuffer, David; Yonehara, Katsuya; Yoshikawa, Cary; Johnson, R. P.

    2015-09-01

    For high luminosity in a muon collider, muon bunches that have been cooled in the six-dimensional helical cooling channel (HCC) must be merged into a single bunch and further cooled in preparation for acceleration and transport to the collider ring. The helical bunch coalescing channel has been previously simulated and provides the most natural match from helical upstream and downstream subsystems. This work focuses on the matching from the exit of the multiple bunch HCC into the start of the helical bunch coalescing channel. The simulated helical matching section simultaneously matches the helical spatial period lambda in addition to providing the necessary acceleration for efficient bunch coalescing. Previous studies assumed that the acceleration of muon bunches from p=209.15 MeV/c to 286.816 MeV/c and matching of lambda from 0.5 m to 1.0 m could be accomplished with zero particle losses and zero emittance growth in the individual bunches. This study demonstrates nonzero values for both particle loss and emittance growth, and provides considerations for reducing these adverse effects to best preserve high luminosity.

  7. Influence on collective effects on the performance of high-luminosity colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    1990-10-01

    The design of a high-luminosity electron-position collider to study B physics is a challenging task from many points of view. In this paper we consider the influence of collective effects on the machine performance; most of our findings are ``generic,'' in the sense that they depend rather weakly on the details of the machine design. Both single-bunch and coupled-bunch instabilities are described and their effects are estimated based upon an example machine design (APIARY-IV). In addition, we examine the possibility of emittance growth from intrabeam scattering and calculate the beam lifetime from both Touschek and gas scattering. We find that the single-bunch instabilities should not lead to difficulty, and that the emittance growth is essentially negligible. At a background gas pressure of 10 nTorr, beam lifetimes of only a few hours are expected. Multibunch growth rates are very severe, even when using an optimized RF system consisting of single-cell, room-temperature RF cavities with geometrical shapes typical of superconducting cavities. Thus, a powerful feedback system will be required. In terms of collective effects, it does not appear that there are any fundamental problems standing in the way of successfully designing and building a high-luminosity B factory.

  8. Influence on collective effects on the performance of high-luminosity colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S. )

    1990-10-10

    The design of a high-luminosity electron-position collider to study B physics is a challenging task from many points of view. In this paper we consider the influence of collective effects on the machine performance; most of our findings are generic,'' in the sense that they depend rather weakly on the details of the machine design. Both single-bunch and coupled-bunch instabilities are described and their effects are estimated based upon an example machine design (APIARY-IV). In addition, we examine the possibility of emittance growth from intrabeam scattering and calculate the beam lifetime from both Touschek and gas scattering. We find that the single-bunch instabilities should not lead to difficulty, and that the emittance growth is essentially negligible. At a background gas pressure of 10 nTorr, beam lifetimes of only a few hours are expected. Multibunch growth rates are very severe, even when using an optimized RF system consisting of single-cell, room-temperature RF cavities with geometrical shapes typical of superconducting cavities. Thus, a powerful feedback system will be required. In terms of collective effects, it does not appear that there are any fundamental problems standing in the way of successfully designing and building a high-luminosity B factory.

  9. Influence of collective effects on the performance of high-luminosity colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S. )

    1990-05-25

    The design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider to study B physics is a challenging task from many points of view. In this paper we consider the influence of collective effects on the machine performance; most of our findings are generic,'' in the sense that they depend rather weakly on the details of the machine design. Both single-bunch and coupled-bunch instabilities are described and their effects are estimated based upon an example machine design (APIARY-IV). In addition, we examine the possibility of emittance growth from intrabeam scattering and calculate the beam lifetime from both Touschek and gas scattering. We find that the single-bunch instabilities should not lead to difficulty, and that the emittance growth is essentially negligible. At a background gas pressure of 10 nTorr, beam lifetimes of only a few hours are expected. Multibunch growth rates are very severe, even when using an optimized RF system consisting of single-cell, room-temperature RF cavities with geometrical shapes typical of superconducting cavities. Thus, a powerful feedback system will be required. In terms of collective effects, it does not appear that there are any fundamental problems standing in the way of successfully designing and building a high-luminosity B factory. 15 refs., 21 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Results of FE65-P2 Stability Tests for the High Luminosity LHC Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Katherine; Atlas Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC sets an imperative for readout technology capable of handling the consequences of higher particle interaction rates. Increased luminosity exists hand-in-hand with unprecedented levels of radiation and the need for exceptional logic density to store hit information during a trigger latency period on the order of 10 μs. The RD53 collaboration has developed specifications for the new generation of hybrid pixel readout chips to be included in the ATLAS and CMS Phase 2 upgrades. The FE65-P2 is a test readout chip fabricated on 65 nm CMOS technology that prototypes these design variants. Objectives of FE65-P2 include demonstrating the novel process of isolated analog front ends embedded in a digital design, known as ``analog islands in a digital sea.'' In addition, the innermost layer of the pixel detector in the upgraded ATLAS experiment will reach doses approaching 1 Mrad per run, and a single FE65-P2 should be tolerant to a lifetime dose near 500 Mrad. This talk will cover the test results of FE65-P2 calibration and stability. The experience gained from such tests will advise the development of RD53A, a large format readout chip to be fabricated in early 2017.

  11. The Host Galaxies of High-Luminosity Obscured Quasars at 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Nicholas; Strauss, M. A.; Greene, J. E.; Zakamska, N. L.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexandroff, R.; Liu, G.; Smith, P. S.; The SDSS-III BOSS Quasar Working Group

    2014-01-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei play a key role in the evolution of galaxies. However, very little is known about the host galaxies of the most luminous quasars at redshift 2.5, the epoch when massive black hole growth peaked. The brightness of the quasar itself, which can easily outshine a galaxy by a large factor, makes it very difficult to study emission from extended gas or stars in the host galaxy. However, we have imaged the extended emission from the host galaxies of a unique sample of six optically extinguished (Type II) luminous quasars with 2.5, with the Hubble Space Telescope (Cycle 20, GO 13014) using ACS/F814W to access the rest-frame near-ultraviolet, and WFC3/F160W for the rest-frame optical longward of 4000A. These objects are selected from the spectroscopic database of the SDSS/Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey to have strong, narrow emission lines and weak continua. With these images, we have quantified the luminosity, morphology, and dynamical state of the host galaxies, and searched for extended scattered light from the obscured central engine. These observations are the first comprehensive study of both host galaxy light and scattered light in high-luminosity quasars at the epoch of maximum black hole growth, and give insights into the relationship between host galaxies and black holes during this important, and yet largely unexplored period.

  12. Design and testing of a four rod crab cavity for High Luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, B.; Burt, G.; Apsimon, R.; Lingwood, C. J.; Tutte, A.; Grudiev, A.; Macpherson, A.; Navarro-Tapia, M.; Calaga, R.; Hernández-Chahín, K. G.; Appleby, R. B.; Goudket, P.

    2017-01-01

    A 4-rod deflecting structure is proposed as a possible crab cavity design for the LHC high luminosity upgrade. Crab cavities are required for the LHC luminosity upgrade to provide a greater bunch overlap in the presence of a crossing angle, but must fit in the existing limited space. The structure has two parallel sections consisting of two longitudinally opposing quarter-wave rods, where each rod has the opposite charge from each of its nearest neighbors. The structure is transversely compact because the frequency is dependent on the rod lengths rather than the cavity radius. Simulations were undertaken to investigate the effect of rod shape on surface fields, higher order multipole terms and induced wakefields in order to obtain the optimal rod shape. The simulation results presented show that the addition of focus electrodes or by shaping the rods the sextupole contribution of the cavity voltage can be negated; the sextupole contribution is 321.57 mTm /m2 , Epeak=27.7 MV /m , and Bpeak=63.9 mT at the design voltage of 3 MV. The damping requirements for the LHC are critical and suitable couplers to damp all modes but the operating mode are presented. The results of various testing cycles of the first SRF 4 rod prototype cavity are presented and show that the cavity has reached the required transverse voltage of 3 MV.

  13. Soft X-ray spectral observations of quasars and high X-ray luminosity Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, R.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Krolik, J. H.; Holt, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    Results of the analysis of 28 Einstein SSS observations of 15 high X-ray luminosity (L(x) 10 to the 435 power erg/s) quasars and Seyfert type 1 nuclei are presented. The 0.75-4.5 keV spectra are in general well fit by a simple model consisting of a power law plus absorption by cold gas. The averager spectral index alpha is 0.66 + or - .36, consistent with alpha for the spectrum of these objects above 2 keV. In all but one case, no evidence was found for intrinsic absorption, with an upper limit of 2 x 10 to the 21st power/sq cm. Neither was evidence found for partial covering of the active nucleus by dense, cold matter (N(H) 10 to the 22nd power/sq cm; the average upper limit on the partial covering fraction is 0.5. There is no obvious correlation between spectral index and 0175-4.5 keV X-ray luminosity (which ranges from 3 x 10 to the 43rd to 47th powers erg/s or with other source properties. The lack of intrinsic X-ray absorption allows us to place constraints on the density and temperature of the broad-line emission region, and narrow line emission region, and the intergalactic medium.

  14. Exploring the Standard Model with the High Luminosity, Polarized Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Milner, Richard G.

    2009-08-04

    The Standard Model is only a few decades old and has been successfully confirmed by experiment, particularly at the high energy frontier. This will continue with renewed vigor at the LHC. However, many important elements of the Standard Model remain poorly understood. In particular, the exploration of the strong interaction theory Quantum Chromodynamics is in its infancy. How does the spin-1/2 of the proton arise from the fundamental quark and gluon constituents? Can we understand the new QCD world of virtual quarks and gluons in the nucleon? Using precision measurements can we test the limits of the Standard Model and look for new physics? To address these and other important questions, physicists have developed a concept for a new type of accelerator, namely a high luminosity, polarized electron-ion collider. Here the scientific motivation is summarized and the accelerator concepts are outlined.

  15. Changes to the Transfer Line Collimation System for the High-Luminosity LHC Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kain, V.; Aberle, O.; Bracco, C.; Fraser, M.; Galleazzi, F.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kosmicki, A.; Maciariello, F.; Meddahi, M.; Nuiry, F. X.; Steele, G.; Velotti, F.

    2015-06-01

    The current LHC transfer line collimation system will not be able to provide enough protection for the high brightness beams in the high-luminosity LHC era. The new collimation system will have to attenuate more and be more robust than its predecessor. The active jaw length of the new transfer line collimators will therefore be 2.1 m instead of currently 1.2 m. The transfer line optics will have to be adjusted for the new collimator locations and larger beta functions at the collimators for absorber robustness reasons. In this paper the new design of the transfer line collimation system will be presented with its implications on transfer line optics and powering, maintainability, protection of transfer line magnets in case of beam loss on a collimator and protection of the LHC aperture.

  16. A readout driver for the ATLAS LAr-calorimeter at a High Luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kielburg-Jeka, A.; Stärz, S.

    2011-01-01

    A new readout driver (ROD) is being developed as a central part of the signal processing of the ATLAS liquid-argon calorimeters for operation at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). In the architecture of the upgraded readout system, the ROD modules will have several challenging tasks: receiving of up to 1.4 Tb/s of data per board from the detector front-end on multiple high-speed serial links, low-latency data processing, data buffering, and data transmission to the ATLAS trigger and DAQ systems. In order to evaluate the different components, prototype boards in ATCA format equipped with modern Xilinx and Altera FPGAs have been built. We will report on the measured performance of the SERDES devices, the parallel signal processing using DSP slices, the implementation of trigger interfaces, using e.g. multi-Gb Ethernet, as well as the development of the ATCA infrastructure on the very first ROD prototype modules.

  17. A high-redshift IRAS galaxy with huge luminosity - Hidden quasar or protogalaxy?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan-Robinson, M.; Broadhurst, T.; Oliver, S. J.; Taylor, A. N.; Lawrence, A.; Mcmahon, R. G.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Hacking, P. B.; Conrow, T.

    1991-01-01

    An emission line galaxy with the enormous far-IR luminosity of 3 x 10 to the 14th solar has been found at z = 2.286. The spectrum is very unusual, showing lines of high excitation but with very weak Lyman-alpha emission. A self-absorbed synchrotron model for the IR energy distribution cannot be ruled out, but a thermal origin seems more plausible. A radio-quiet quasar embedded in a very dusty galaxy could account for the IR emission, as might a starburst embedded in 1-10 billion solar masses of dust. The latter case demands so much dust that the object would probably be a massive galaxy in the process of formation. The presence of a large amount of dust in an object of such high redshift implies the generation of heavy elements at an early cosmological epoch.

  18. Research and development for a free-running readout system for the ATLAS LAr Calorimeters at the high luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hils, Maximilian

    2016-07-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters were designed and built to measure electromagnetic and hadronic energy in proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities up to 1034 cm-2 s-1. The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) programme is now developed for up to 5-7 times the design luminosity, with the goal of accumulating an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1. In the HL-LHC phase, the increased radiation levels and an improved ATLAS trigger system require a replacement of the Front-end (FE) and Back-end (BE) electronics of the LAr Calorimeters. Results from research and development of individual components and their radiation qualification as well as the overall system design will be presented.

  19. The High-Redshift Quasar Luminosity Function from Multi-Epoch Imaging Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlSayyad, Yusra

    Upcoming time-domain imaging surveys such as the LSST will detect over a million high-redshift z > 4 quasars, making complete spectroscopic followup unfeasible. Statistical estimates such as luminosity functions and clustering measurements will require purely photometric methods for classifying quasars, estimating redshifts and estimating selection functions. We validate these methods and constrain the optical, type I quasar luminosity function (QLF) at 3.75 < z < 4.5 for -27.5 < M1450 3.75) and constraint on the characteristic luminosity (M*1450 = -26.7) from a single, uniformly-selected survey at z 4. We used the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) repeated imaging of the 275 sq. deg. equatorial region of the sky (-50 < R.A. < +60; -1.26 < Dec. < +1.26), known as Stripe 82, to select a statistical sample of z 4 quasars. We extracted 40 million lightcurves from the imaging using forced photometry on all u, g, r, i, z epochs at the positions of sources detected on a deep i-band co-add. We developed a classification method based on photometric information alone (colors and variability metrics derived from these new multi-band lightcurves), which we validated with a spectroscopically complete 55 sq. deg. sub-region augmented with 102 new spectroscopic observations of quasars at z > 3.4 with i < 22.5. We demonstrate that selection functions for ensemble classifiers can be estimated by building generative models of empirical distributions of quasars previously selected with a diverse set of selection criteria. The z 4 QLF contributes to our understanding of supermassive black hole growth and cosmic reionization of both H I and He II which likely began at z 4 as a result of hard UV emissivity from quasars. The resulting QLF measurement is consistent with the previous lower number densities reported from deep, narrow-field surveys (COSMOS); it is not consistent with higher number densities reported from the NDWFS-DLS and CANDELS GOODS-S fields. In the context of recent 2

  20. High Luminosity Options for the JLC.NLC at 500 GeV cms(LCC-0004)

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T

    2004-04-22

    The present JLC/NLC parameters are chosen to provide luminosities between 0.5 {approx} 0.75 x 10{sup 34} s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} at a cms energy of 500 GeV; the parameters are listed in Table 1 for both the 500 GeV and 1 TeV cases. In all cases, these luminosities assume extensive margins and emittance dilutions to ensure that they are attainable. In this note, they consider the feasibility of substantially higher luminosities which might be attained by operating with smaller emittance dilutins and higher beam currents. The parameters they describe are listed in Table 2 where these high luminosity sets (ILC-IHa and ILC-IHb) are compared with the base JLC/NLC set (ILC-Ib) and with the high luminosity TESLA parameter set. In the next sections, they will discuss the limitations and assumptions leading to these higher luminosity parameter sets. The details in their discussion will be based on the NLC design described in the Zeroth-order Design Report (ZDR) but the same arguments, with slightly different values, could be applied to the JLC reference design.

  1. Gas related effects on multi-gap RPC performance in high luminosity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, P.; Wang, Y.; Guo, B.; Han, D.; Xie, B.; Li, Y.; Wang, F.

    2016-11-01

    The Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) is a new type of gas detector developed in recent years. It has excellent time resolution (better than 100 ps) and high efficiency (higher than 95%). This detector has been used to construct large-area time-of-flight (TOF) system in many nuclear and particle physics experiments. However, as a type of gaseous detector, the aging of the gas mixture under long-time exposure to ionizing radiation cannot be neglected. With the increase of accelerator luminosity, impurities in the gas mixture can be potentially dangerous for long-term operation of the MRPC. This has been observed in some experiments, for example with the RHIC-STAR muon telescope detector. The CBM-TOF, used for hadron identification, is proposed to be assembled with MRPCs. These counters have to stand particle fluxes as high as 25 kHz/cm2, and thus the gas pollution is a critical aspect to be studied. In order to better understand the gas quality's impact on the MRPC performance, a two-dimensional simulation based on the SIMPLE algorithm is carried out to imitate the distribution of impurities in a MRPC gas box. The preliminary results show that gas pollution grows stronger with the increase of the gas-flowing volume. In addition, we conducted a series of experiments with a 50 × 50 cm2, 8-gap MRPC prototype. The results match the simulation quite well. Gas pollution indeed has a severe impact on the MRPC performance, and further study can be very useful to reduce gas aging effects in high-luminosity experiments.

  2. Simulations of a fast feedback system for the High Luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daw, Aron; Mastoridis, Themistoklis; Nguyen, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC upgrade, expected to be finished by 2025, will generate a tenfold increase in the number of recorded collisions. Part of this improvement will come from the implementation of crab cavities, which exert transverse momentum kicks on the bunches of particles just before they collide, in order to have head-on collisions. The crab cavity field will include amplitude and phase noise, leading to undesirable consequences, such as the increase of the particle cloud size (emittance). Simulations were performed to evaluate the performance improvement with a proposed fast feedback system acting through the crab cavities. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1535536.

  3. Models of stellar population at high redshift, as constrainedby PN yields and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraston, C.

    The stellar phase of Thermally-Pulsating Asymptotic giant branch is the last major evolutionary stage of intermediate-mass stars which afterwards evolve into planetary nebulae. The TP-AGB phase is affected by mass-loss and instabilities which notoriously make its theoretical modelling uncertain. This review focuses on the effects such modelling has on stellar population models for galaxies, with particular focus on the high-z Universe where galaxies are young and contain a large number of short-living TP-AGB stars. I shall present the models, discuss how different prescriptions for the treatment of the TP-AGB affect the theoretical integrated spectral energy distribution and how these compare to galaxy data, and discuss implications for the PN nebulae luminosity function stemming from the various assumptions. Finally I shall discuss the inclusion of hot evolved stars on stellar population models and how they compare to data for old galaxies at our present time.

  4. CP violation in the B system: Physics at a high luminosity B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1991-06-01

    CP Violation remains one of the unsolved puzzles in particle physics. Measurements of CP violating asymmetries in {beta} meson decay will test the Standard Model of electro-weak interactions and tell whether this phenomenon can be explained simply through the non-zero angles and phase in the CKM matrix. A high luminosity, energy asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} storage ring provides the most versatile and best opportunity to measure CP violating effects and to test the consistency of the Standard Model, and should discrepancies occur, information will be available to establish the origin of CP violation outside the model. Such a machine is a very challenging, though technically achievable device, that when complemented with a suitable detector will represent a very exiting laboratory for studies of many aspects of beauty, charm, and {tau}{sup +-} physics in the coming decade. 26 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Routine preoperative insertion of IABP in high-risk off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Hunaid A; Briffa, Norman P

    2005-01-01

    The beneficial effects of intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) in coronary artery bypass graft surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass have been reported. However, whether preoperative insertion of IABP in high-risk off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) has any beneficial effects remains to be established. We report our experience of preoperative insertion of IABP in OPCAB.

  6. THE FAINT END OF THE CLUSTER-GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Mancone, Conor L.; Baker, Troy; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Snyder, Greg; Stanford, Spencer A.; Brodwin, Mark; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Wright, Edward L.

    2012-12-20

    We measure the faint-end slope of the galaxy luminosity function (LF) for cluster galaxies at 1 < z < 1.5 using Spitzer IRAC data. We investigate whether this slope, {alpha}, differs from that of the field LF at these redshifts, and with the cluster LF at low redshifts. The latter is of particular interest as low-luminosity galaxies are expected to undergo significant evolution. We use seven high-redshift spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters drawn from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey to measure the cluster-galaxy LF down to depths of M* + 3 (3.6 {mu}m) and M* + 2.5 (4.5 {mu}m). The summed LF at our median cluster redshift (z = 1.35) is well fit by a Schechter distribution with {alpha}{sub 3.6{mu}m} = -0.97 {+-} 0.14 and {alpha}{sub 4.5{mu}m} = -0.91 {+-} 0.28, consistent with a flat faint-end slope and is in agreement with measurements of the field LF in similar bands at these redshifts. A comparison to {alpha} in low-redshift clusters finds no statistically significant evidence of evolution. Combined with past studies which show that M* is passively evolving out to z {approx} 1.3, this means that the shape of the cluster LF is largely in place by z {approx} 1.3. This suggests that the processes that govern the buildup of the mass of low-mass cluster galaxies have no net effect on the faint-end slope of the cluster LF at z {approx}< 1.3.

  7. Development of N+ in P pixel sensors for a high-luminosity large hadron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Shintaro; Yamamura, Kazuhisa; Unno, Yoshinobu; Ikegami, Yoichi

    2014-11-01

    Hamamatsu Photonics K. K. is developing an N+ in a p planar pixel sensor with high radiation tolerance for the high-luminosity large hadron collider (HL-LHC). The N+ in the p planar pixel sensor is a candidate for the HL-LHC and offers the advantages of high radiation tolerance at a reasonable price compared with the N+ in an n planar sensor, the three-dimensional sensor, and the diamond sensor. However, the N+ in the p planar pixel sensor still presents some problems that need to be solved, such as its slim edge and the danger of sparks between the sensor and readout integrated circuit. We are now attempting to solve these problems with wafer-level processes, which is important for mass production. To date, we have obtained a 250-μm edge with an applied bias voltage of 1000 V. To protect against high-voltage sparks from the edge, we suggest some possible designs for the N+ edge.

  8. Elliptical Accretion and Low Luminosity from High Accretion Rate Stellar Tidal Disruption Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirski, Gilad; Piran, Tsvi; Krolik, Julian

    2017-01-01

    Models for tidal disruption events (TDEs) in which a supermassive black hole disrupts a star commonly assume that the highly eccentric streams of bound stellar debris promptly form a circular accretion disk at the pericenter scale. However, the bolometric peak luminosity of most TDE candidates, ˜ 10^{44} {erg s^{-1}}, implies that we observe only ˜1% of the energy expected from radiatively efficient accretion. Even the energy that must be lost to circularize the returning tidal flow is larger than the observed energy. Recently, Piran et al. (2015) suggested that the observed optical TDE emission is powered by shocks at the apocenter between freshly infalling material and earlier arriving matter. This model explains the small radiated energy, the low temperature, and the large radius implied by the observations as well as the t-5/3 light curve. However the question of the system's low bolometric efficiency remains unanswered. We suggest that the high orbital energy and low angular momentum of the flow make it possible for magnetic stresses to reduce the matter's already small angular momentum to the point at which it can fall ballistically into the SMBH before circularization. As a result, the efficiency is only ˜1-10% of a standard accretion disk's efficiency. Thus, the intrinsically high eccentricity of the tidal debris naturally explains why most TDE candidates are fainter than expected.

  9. The Protostellar Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offner, Stella S. R.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2011-07-01

    The protostellar luminosity function (PLF) is the present-day luminosity function of the protostars in a region of star formation. It is determined using the protostellar mass function in combination with a stellar evolutionary model that provides the luminosity as a function of instantaneous and final stellar mass. In 2010, McKee & Offner considered three main accretion models: the isothermal sphere (IS) model, the turbulent core (TC) model, and an approximation of the competitive accretion (CA) model. We also consider the effect of an accretion rate that tapers off linearly in time and an accelerating star formation rate. For each model, we characterize the luminosity distribution using the mean, median, maximum, ratio of the median to the mean, standard deviation of the logarithm of the luminosity, and the fraction of very low luminosity objects. We compare the models with bolometric luminosities observed in local star-forming regions and find that models with an approximately constant accretion time, such as the TC and CA models, appear to agree better with observation than those with a constant accretion rate, such as the IS model. We show that observations of the mean protostellar luminosity in these nearby regions of low-mass star formation suggest a mean star formation time of 0.3 ± 0.1 Myr. Such a timescale, together with some accretion that occurs non-radiatively and some that occurs in high-accretion, episodic bursts, resolves the classical "luminosity problem" in low-mass star formation, in which observed protostellar luminosities are significantly less than predicted. An accelerating star formation rate is one possible way of reconciling the observed star formation time and mean luminosity. Future observations will place tighter constraints on the observed luminosities, star formation time, and episodic accretion, enabling better discrimination between star formation models and clarifying the influence of variable accretion on the PLF.

  10. THE PROTOSTELLAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Offner, Stella S. R.; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: cmckee@astro.berkeley.edu

    2011-07-20

    The protostellar luminosity function (PLF) is the present-day luminosity function of the protostars in a region of star formation. It is determined using the protostellar mass function in combination with a stellar evolutionary model that provides the luminosity as a function of instantaneous and final stellar mass. In 2010, McKee and Offner considered three main accretion models: the isothermal sphere (IS) model, the turbulent core (TC) model, and an approximation of the competitive accretion (CA) model. We also consider the effect of an accretion rate that tapers off linearly in time and an accelerating star formation rate. For each model, we characterize the luminosity distribution using the mean, median, maximum, ratio of the median to the mean, standard deviation of the logarithm of the luminosity, and the fraction of very low luminosity objects. We compare the models with bolometric luminosities observed in local star-forming regions and find that models with an approximately constant accretion time, such as the TC and CA models, appear to agree better with observation than those with a constant accretion rate, such as the IS model. We show that observations of the mean protostellar luminosity in these nearby regions of low-mass star formation suggest a mean star formation time of 0.3 {+-} 0.1 Myr. Such a timescale, together with some accretion that occurs non-radiatively and some that occurs in high-accretion, episodic bursts, resolves the classical 'luminosity problem' in low-mass star formation, in which observed protostellar luminosities are significantly less than predicted. An accelerating star formation rate is one possible way of reconciling the observed star formation time and mean luminosity. Future observations will place tighter constraints on the observed luminosities, star formation time, and episodic accretion, enabling better discrimination between star formation models and clarifying the influence of variable accretion on the PLF.

  11. Constraining the minimum luminosity of high redshift galaxies through gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Mashian, Natalie; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-12-01

    We simulate the effects of gravitational lensing on the source count of high redshift galaxies as projected to be observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields program and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in the near future. Taking the mass density profile of the lensing object to be the singular isothermal sphere (SIS) or the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, we model a lens residing at a redshift of z{sub L} = 0.5 and explore the radial dependence of the resulting magnification bias and its variability with the velocity dispersion of the lens, the photometric sensitivity of the instrument, the redshift of the background source population, and the intrinsic maximum absolute magnitude (M{sub max}) of the sources. We find that gravitational lensing enhances the number of galaxies with redshifts z∼> 13 detected in the angular region θ{sub E}/2 ≤ θ ≤ 2θ{sub E} (where θ{sub E} is the Einstein angle) by a factor of ∼ 3 and 1.5 in the HUDF (df/dν{sub 0} ∼ 9 nJy) and medium-deep JWST surveys (df/dν{sub 0} ∼ 6 nJy). Furthermore, we find that even in cases where a negative magnification bias reduces the observed number count of background sources, the lensing effect improves the sensitivity of the count to the intrinsic faint-magnitude cut-off of the Schechter luminosity function. In a field centered on a strong lensing cluster, observations of z∼> 6 and z∼> 13 galaxies with JWST can be used to infer this cut-off magnitude for values as faint as M{sub max} ∼ -14.4 and -16.1 mag (L{sub min} ≈ 2.5 × 10{sup 26} and 1.2 × 10{sup 27} erg s{sup −1} Hz{sup −1}) respectively, within the range bracketed by existing theoretical models. Gravitational lensing may therefore offer an effective way of constraining the low-luminosity cut-off of high-redshift galaxies.

  12. High Energy Flares Of FSRQs: The Connection Of Flaring States With The Accretion Disk Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacciani, Luigi; Tavecchio, F.; Donnarumma, I.; Stamerra, A.

    2016-10-01

    High-Energy gamma-ray flares (E>10 GeV) of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQ) give us strong constraints on jet-physics, and on the surrounding-mediumWe performed the first study of these flares, examining FERMI-LAT archival-data, and triggering 40 ToO-observations from near-ir to TeV (e.g., for PKS 1441+25), at the occurrence of new flaresWe identified about 270 gamma-ray HE flares, and we already investigated peculiar and short-flares of 3C 454.3, CTA 102 and other 10 HE-flares, showing remarkably hard gamma-ray spectra. We argued that these flares originate at parsec distance from the Supermassive Black-Hole (distant scenario), possibly powered by magnetic-reconnections or turbulence in the flowFor the whole sample of 270 flares, we will show here spectral and temporal propertiesFurthermore, we compared the sub-sample of HE-flares with the whole sample of gamma-ray flares. We will show and discuss that jet luminosities and disks correlate not only on years averaged time-scales, but also during High-Energy gamma-ray flares (time-resolved within this investigation with time-scale of the order of 10 days or less).

  13. Radiological Environmental Protection for PEP-II Ring High Luminosity Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C.; Nakao, Noriaki; /SLAC

    2006-08-16

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is located in northern California, USA. Radiological environmental protection is one of the main elements of the radiation protection program. One of SLAC's accelerator facilities is B-Factory, whose PEP-II accelerator ring has been operating since 1997 and is being upgraded to higher luminosity operation. Four radiological issues associated with high luminosity operation up to CY2008 are re-evaluated: (1) annual doses in IR halls, (2) annual skyshine doses at site boundaries, (3) potential radioactive air releases, and (4) potential groundwater activation. This paper presents the skyshine doses and air emission doses to the Maximally Exposed Individual (MEI) at SLAC site boundaries. The normal beam loss scenarios around PEP-II ring are presented first. In CY2008, the luminosity is 2 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, and the stored current is 4.0-A for low-energy ring (LER ) and 2.2-A for high-energy ring (HER). The beam losses around PEP-II ring include those near injection region in IR10 and IR8 and those at collimators (e.g., HER collimators in IR12, LER collimators in IR4 and IR6). The beam losses in IR8 and IR10 (where injection into ring occurs) are further divided into septum, BAD (beam abort dump) and TD (tune-up dump), as well as apertures. The skyshine prompt dose rate distributions as a function of distance from an IR hall at four directions were calculated using the MARS15 Monte Carlo code. For skyshine dose to the MEI, the annual dose (7200 h/y occupancy) is calculated to be 2.9 mrem/y at Sand Hill Road (from e{sup -} losses in IR12 HER collimators) and 1.2 mrem/y at Horse Track Offices near IR6 (from e{sup +} losses in IR8, IR6 and IR4). These are lower than the SLAC skyshine limit of 5 mrem/y for any single facility within SLAC. Radionuclide productions in the air at the PEP-II IR10 were calculated using MARS15. Beam losses of 9-GeV electrons were assumed in three target cases: the copper TD, septum and BAD

  14. Influence of collective effects on the performance of high-luminosity colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S.

    1990-04-01

    The design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider to study B physics is a challenging task from many points of view. In this paper we consider the influence of collective effects on the machine performance; most of our findings are generic,'' in the sense that they depend rather weakly on the details of the machine design. Both single-bunch and coupled-bunch instabilities are described and their effects are estimated based upon an example machine design (APIARY-IV). In addition, we examine the possibility of emittance growth from intrabeam scattering and calculate the beam lifetime from both Touschek and gas scattering. We find that the single-bunch instabilities should not lead to difficulty, and that the emittance growth is essentially negligible. At a background gas pressure of 10 nTorr, beam lifetimes of only a few hours are expected. Multibunch growth rates are very severe, even when using an optimized RF system consisting of single-cell, room-temperature RF cavities with geometrical shapes typical of superconducting cavities. Thus, a powerful feedback system will be required. In terms of collective effects, it does not appear

  15. A new high-gradient correction quadrupole for the Fermilab luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Mantsch, P.; Carson, J.; Riddiford, A.; Lamm, M.J.

    1989-03-01

    Special superconducting correction quadrupoles are needed for the luminosity upgrade of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. These correctors are part of the low-beta system for the interaction regions at B/phi/ and D/phi/. The requirements are high gradient and low current. A quadrupole has been designed that meets the operating gradient of 0.63 T/cm at 1086 A. The one-layer quadrupole is wound with a cable consisting of five individually insulated rectangular strands. The five strands are overwrapped with Kapton and epoxy impregnated glass tape. The winding, curing and collaring of the magnet is accomplished in the same manner as Tevatron-like magnets using Rutherford style cable. Once the magnet is complete the five strands are connected in series. A prototype quadrupole has been assembled and tested. The magnet reached a plateau current of 1560 A corresponding to a gradient of 0.91 T/cm without training. The measured field harmonics are substantially better than required. 8 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Field Tolerances for the Triplet Quadrupoles of the LHC High Luminosity Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Yuri; Cai, Y.; Jiao, Y.; Wang, M-H.; Fartoukh, S.; Giovannozzi, M.; Maria, R.de; McIntosh, E.

    2012-06-25

    It has been proposed to implement the so-called Achromatic Telescopic Squeezing (ATS) scheme in the LHC high luminosity (HL) lattice to reduce beta functions at the Interaction Points (IP) up to a factor of 8. As a result, the nominal 4.5 km peak beta functions reached in the Inner Triplets (IT) at collision will be increased by the same factor. This, therefore, justifies the installation of new, larger aperture, superconducting IT quadrupoles. The higher beta functions will enhance the effects of the triplet quadrupole field errors leading to smaller beam dynamic aperture (DA). To maintain the acceptable DA, the effects of the triplet field errors must be re-evaluated, thus specifying new tolerances. Such a study has been performed for the so-called '4444' collision option of the HL-LHC layout version SLHCV3.01, where the IP beta functions are reduced by a factor of 4 in both planes with respect to a pre-squeezed value of 60 cm at two collision points. The dynamic aperture calculations were performed using SixTrack. The impact on the triplet field quality is presented.

  17. Development of the Continuous Acquisition Pixel (CAP) sensor for high luminosity lepton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varner, G.; Aihara, H.; Barbero, M.; Bozek, A.; Browder, T.; Hazumi, M.; Kennedy, J.; Martin, E.; Mueller, J.; Olsen, S.; Palka, H.; Rosen, M.; Ruckman, L.; Stanič, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, K.; Yang, Q.; Yarema, R.

    2006-09-01

    A future higher luminosity B-factory detector and concept study detectors for the proposed International Linear Collider require precision vertex reconstruction while coping with high track densities and radiation exposures. Compared with current silicon strip and hybrid pixels, a significant reduction in the overall detector material thickness is needed to achieve the desired vertex resolution. Considerable progress in the development of thin CMOS-based Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in recent years makes them a viable technology option and feasibility studies are being actively pursued. The most serious concerns are their radiation hardness and their readout speed. To address these, several prototypes denoted as the Continuous Acquisition Pixel (CAP) sensors have been developed and tested. The latest of the CAP sensor prototypes is CAP3, designed in the TSMC 0.25 μm process with a 5-deep Correlated Double Sample (CDS) pair pipeline in each pixel. A setup with several CAP3 sensors is under evaluation to assess the performance of a full-scale pixel readout system running at realistic readout speed. Given the similarity in the occupancy numbers and hit throughput requirements, per unit area, between a Belle vertex detector upgradation and the requirements for a future ILC pixel detector, this effort can be considered a small-scale functioning prototype for such a future system. The results and plans for the next stages of R&D towards a full Belle Pixel Vertex Detector (PVD) are presented.

  18. Influence of collective effects on the performance of high-luminosity colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    1990-04-01

    The design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider to study B physics is a challenging task from many points of view. In this paper we consider the influence of collective effects on the machine performance; most of our findings are generic, in the sense that they depend rather weakly on the details of the machine design. Both single-bunch and coupled-bunch instabilities are described and their effects are estimated based upon an example machine design (APIARY-IV). In addition, we examine the possibility of emittance growth from intrabeam scattering and calculate the beam lifetime from both Touschek and gas scattering. We find that the single-bunch instabilities should not lead to difficulty, and that the emittance growth is essentially negligible. At a background gas pressure of 10 nTorr, beam lifetimes of only a few hours are expected. Multibunch growth rates are very severe, even when using an optimized RF system consisting of single-cell, room-temperature RF cavities with geometrical shapes typical of superconducting cavities. Thus, a powerful feedback system will be required. In terms of collective effects, it does not appear.

  19. Boosted Higgs bosons from chromomagnetic b 's: b b ¯h at high luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, Joseph; Delgado, Antonio; Lehman, Landon; Martin, Adam

    2016-03-01

    This paper examines detection prospects and constraints on the chromomagnetic dipole operator for the bottom quark. This operator has a flavor, chirality and Lorentz structure that is distinct from other dimension-6 operators considered in Higgs coupling studies. Its nonstandard Lorentz structure results in boosted b b ¯h events, providing a rate-independent signal of new physics. To date, we find this operator is unconstrained by p p →h +jets and p p →b ¯b searches: for order-1 couplings the permitted cutoff Λ for this operator can be as low as Λ ˜1 TeV . We show how to improve this bound with collider cuts that allow a b -tagged Higgs-plus-dijet search in the Higgs-to-diphoton decay channel to exclude cutoffs as high as ˜6 TeV at 2 σ with 3 ab-1 of luminosity at the 14 TeV LHC. Cuts on the pT of the Higgs are key to this search, because the chromomagnetic dipole yields a nonstandard fraction of boosted Higgses.

  20. Operation of the Cherenkov Detector DIRC of BaBar at High Luminosity

    SciTech Connect

    Spanier, Stefane

    2001-03-07

    The DIRC (acronym for Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov (light)) is the ring imaging Cherenkov detector of the BaBar detector at the Pep-II ring of SLAC. It provides the identification of pions, kaons and protons for momenta up to 4 GeV/c with high efficiency. This is needed to reconstruct CP-violating B-decay final states and to provide B-meson flavour tagging for time dependent asymmetry measurements. The DIRC radiators consists of long rectangular bars made of synthetic fused silica and the photon detector is a water tank equipped with an array of 10,752 conventional photomultipliers. At the end of the year 2000 BaBar has recorded about 22 million {bar B}B pairs reaching the design luminosity of L = 3 x 10{sup 33}/cm{sup 2}s. The ability to keep the beam background level low at highest collision rates and the long term reliability of the DIRC components during continuous data taking are requirements of BaBar to accomplish its physics program.

  1. MAD Adaptive Optics Imaging of High-luminosity Quasars: A Pilot Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzo, E.; Falomo, R.; Paiano, S.; Treves, A.; Uslenghi, M.; Arcidiacono, C.; Baruffolo, A.; Diolaiti, E.; Farinato, J.; Lombini, M.; Moretti, A.; Ragazzoni, R.; Brast, R.; Donaldson, R.; Kolb, J.; Marchetti, E.; Tordo, S.

    2016-08-01

    We present near-IR images of five luminous quasars at z ˜ 2 and one at z ˜ 4 obtained with an experimental adaptive optics (AO) instrument at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope. The observations are part of a program aimed at demonstrating the capabilities of multi-conjugated adaptive optics imaging combined with the use of natural guide stars for high spatial resolution studies on large telescopes. The observations were mostly obtained under poor seeing conditions but in two cases. In spite of these nonoptimal conditions, the resulting images of point sources have cores of FWHM ˜ 0.2 arcsec. We are able to characterize the host galaxy properties for two sources and set stringent upper limits to the galaxy luminosity for the others. We also report on the expected capabilities for investigating the host galaxies of distant quasars with AO systems coupled with future Extremely Large Telescopes. Detailed simulations show that it will be possible to characterize compact (2-3 kpc) quasar host galaxies for quasi-stellar objects at z = 2 with nucleus K-magnitude spanning from 15 to 20 (corresponding to absolute magnitude -31 to -26) and host galaxies that are 4 mag fainter than their nuclei.

  2. A Compton-thick Wind in the High Luminosity Quasar, PDS 456

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, J. N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Behar, E.; Miller, L.; Turner, T. J.; Braito, V.; Fabian, A. C.; Kaspi, S.; Mushotzky, R.; Ward, M.

    2009-01-01

    PDS 456 is a nearby (z=0.184), luminous (L(sub bol) approximately equal to 10(exp 47) ergs(exp -1) type I quasar. A deep 190 ks Suzaku observation in February 2007 revealed the complex, broad band X-ray spectrum of PDS 456. The Suzaku spectrum exhibits highly statistically significant absorption features near 9 keV in the quasar rest-frame. We show that the most plausible origin of the absorption is from blue-shifted resonance (1s-2p) transitions of hydrogen-like iron (at 6.97 keV in the rest frame). This indicates that a highly ionized outflow may be present moving at near relativistic velocities (0.26-0.31c). A possible hard X-ray excess is detected above 15 keV with HXD (at 99.8% confidence), which may arise from high column density gas (N(sub H) greater than 10(exp 24)cm(exp -2) partially covering the X-ray emission, or through strong Compton reflection. Here we propose that the iron K-shell absorption in PDS 456 is associated with a thick, possibly clumpy outflow, covering about 20% of 4(pi) steradian solid angle. The outflow is likely launched from the inner accretion disk, within 15-100 gravitational radii of the black hole. The kinetic power of the outflow may be similar to the bolometric luminosity of PDS 456. Such a powerful wind could have a significant effect on the co-evolution of the host galaxy and its supermassive black hole, through feedback.

  3. The global 21-cm signal in the context of the high- z galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirocha, Jordan; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Sun, Guochao

    2017-01-01

    We build a new model for the global 21-cm signal that is calibrated to measurements of the high-z galaxy luminosity function (LF) and further tuned to match the Thomson scattering optical depth of the cosmic microwave background, τe. Assuming that the z ≲ 8 galaxy population can be smoothly extrapolated to higher redshifts, the recent decline in best-fitting values of τe and the inefficient heating induced by X-ray binaries (the presumptive sources of the high-z X-ray background) imply that the entirety of cosmic reionization and reheating occurs at z ≲ 12. In contrast to past global 21-cm models, whose z ˜ 20 (ν ˜ 70 MHz) absorption features and strong ˜25 mK emission features were driven largely by the assumption of efficient early star formation and X-ray heating, our new models peak in absorption at ν ˜ 110 MHz at depths ˜-160 mK and have negligible emission components. Current uncertainties in the faint-end of the LF, binary populations in star-forming galaxies, and UV and X-ray escape fractions introduce ˜20 MHz (˜50 mK) deviations in the trough's frequency (amplitude), while emission signals remain weak (≲10 mK) and are confined to ν ≳ 140 MHz. These predictions, which are intentionally conservative, suggest that the detection of a 21-cm absorption minimum at frequencies below ˜90 MHz and/or emission signals stronger than ˜10mK at ν ≲ 140 MHz would provide strong evidence for `new' sources at high redshifts, such as Population III stars and their remnants.

  4. Fundamental cavity impedance and longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities at the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudrenghien, P.; Mastoridis, T.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between beam dynamics and the radio frequency (rf) station in circular colliders is complex and can lead to longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities at high beam currents. The excitation of the cavity higher order modes is traditionally damped using passive devices. But the wakefield developed at the cavity fundamental frequency falls in the frequency range of the rf power system and can, in theory, be compensated by modulating the generator drive. Such a regulation is the responsibility of the low-level rf (llrf) system that measures the cavity field (or beam current) and generates the rf power drive. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) rf was designed for the nominal LHC parameter of 0.55 A DC beam current. At 7 TeV the synchrotron radiation damping time is 13 hours. Damping of the instability growth rates due to the cavity fundamental (400.789 MHz) can only come from the synchrotron tune spread (Landau damping) and will be very small (time constant in the order of 0.1 s). In this work, the ability of the present llrf compensation to prevent coupled-bunch instabilities with the planned high luminosity LHC (HiLumi LHC) doubling of the beam current to 1.1 A DC is investigated. The paper conclusions are based on the measured performances of the present llrf system. Models of the rf and llrf systems were developed at the LHC start-up. Following comparisons with measurements, the system was parametrized using these models. The parametric model then provides a more realistic estimation of the instability growth rates than an ideal model of the rf blocks. With this modeling approach, the key rf settings can be varied around their set value allowing for a sensitivity analysis (growth rate sensitivity to rf and llrf parameters). Finally, preliminary measurements from the LHC at 0.44 A DC are presented to support the conclusions of this work.

  5. The hard X-ray luminosity function of high-redshift (3 < z ≲ 5) active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vito, F.; Gilli, R.; Vignali, C.; Comastri, A.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Iwasawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present the hard-band (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosity function (HXLF) of 0.5-2 keV band selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshift. We have assembled a sample of 141 AGN at 3 < z ≲ 5 from X-ray surveys of different size and depth, in order to sample different regions in the LX - z plane. The HXLF is fitted in the range log LX ˜ 43-45 with standard analytical evolutionary models through a maximum likelihood procedure. The evolution of the HXLF is well described by a pure density evolution, with the AGN space density declining by a factor of ˜10 from z = 3 to 5. A luminosity-dependent density evolution model, which, normally, best represents the HXLF evolution at lower redshift, is also consistent with the data, but a larger sample of low-luminosity (log LX < 44), high-redshift AGN is necessary to constrain this model. We also estimated the intrinsic fraction of AGN obscured by a column density log NH ≥ 23 to be 0.54 ± 0.05, with no strong dependence on luminosity. This fraction is higher than the value in the Local Universe, suggesting an evolution of the luminous (LX > 1044 erg s-1) obscured AGN fraction from z = 0 to z > 3.

  6. An empirical model for the galaxy luminosity and star formation rate function at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashian, Natalie; Oesch, Pascal A.; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Using the most recent measurements of the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions (LFs) and dust estimates of early galaxies, we derive updated dust-corrected star formation rate functions (SFRFs) at z ˜ 4-8, which we model to predict the evolution to higher redshifts, z > 8. We employ abundance matching techniques to calibrate a relation between galaxy star formation rate (SFR) and host halo mass Mh by mapping the shape of the observed SFRFs at z ˜ 4-8 to that of the halo mass function. The resulting scaling law remains roughly constant over this redshift range. We apply the average SFR-Mh relation to reproduce the observed SFR functions at 4 ≲ z ≲ 8 and also derive the expected UV LFs at higher redshifts. At z ˜ 9 and z ˜ 10 these model LFs are in excellent agreement with current observed estimates. Our predicted number densities and UV LFs at z > 10 indicate that James Webb Space Telescope will be able to detect galaxies out to z ˜ 15 with an extensive treasury sized program. We also derive the redshift evolution of the star formation rate density (SFRD) and associated reionization history by galaxies. Models which integrate down to the current HUDF12/XDF detection limit (MUV ˜ -17.7 mag) result in a SFRD that declines as (1 + z)-10.4 ± 0.3 at high redshift and fail to reproduce the observed cosmic microwave background electron scattering optical depth, τ ≃ 0.066, to within 1σ. On the other hand, we find that the inclusion of galaxies with SFRs well below the current detection limit (MUV < -5.7 mag) leads to a fully reionized universe by z ˜ 6.5 and an optical depth of τ ≃ 0.054, consistent with the recently derived Planck value at the 1σ level.

  7. High Frequency Cluster Radio Galaxies: Luminosity Functions and Implications for SZE Selected Cluster Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, N.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Benson, B. A.; Bocquet, S.; Capasso, R.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chiu, I.; Crawford, T. M.; de Haan, T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Gangkofner, C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; McDonald, M.; Rapetti, D.; Reichardt, C. L.

    2017-01-01

    We study the overdensity of point sources in the direction of X-ray-selected galaxy clusters from the Meta-Catalog of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC; = 0.14) at South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS) frequencies. Flux densities at 95, 150 and 220 GHz are extracted from the 2500 deg2 SPT-SZ survey maps at the locations of SUMSS sources, producing a multi-frequency catalog of radio galaxies. In the direction of massive galaxy clusters, the radio galaxy flux densities at 95 and 150 GHz are biased low by the cluster Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) signal, which is negative at these frequencies. We employ a cluster SZE model to remove the expected flux bias and then study these corrected source catalogs. We find that the high frequency radio galaxies are centrally concentrated within the clusters and that their luminosity functions (LFs) exhibit amplitudes that are characteristically an order of magnitude lower than the cluster LF at 843 MHz. We use the 150 GHz LF to estimate the impact of cluster radio galaxies on an SPT-SZ like survey. The radio galaxy flux typically produces a small bias on the SZE signal and has negligible impact on the observed scatter in the SZE mass-observable relation. If we assume there is no redshift evolution in the radio galaxy LF then 1.8 ± 0.7 percent of the clusters with detection significance ξ ≥ 4.5 would be lost from the sample. Allowing for redshift evolution of the form (1 + z)2.5 increases the incompleteness to 5.6 ± 1.0 percent. Improved constraints on the evolution of the cluster radio galaxy LF require a larger cluster sample extending to higher redshift.

  8. Light dark sector searches at low-energy high-luminosity e + e - colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Peng-Fei; Zhu, Shou-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Although the standard model (SM) is extremely successful, there are various motivations for considering the physics beyond the SM. For example, the SM includes neither dark energy nor dark matter, which has been confirmed through astrophysical observations. Examination of the dark sector, which contains new, light, weakly-coupled particles at the GeV scale or lower, is well motivated by both theory and dark-matter detection experiments. In this mini-review, we focus on one particular case in which these new particles can interact with SM particles through a kinematic mixing term between U(1) gauge bosons. The magnitude of the mixing can be parameterized by a parameter є. Following a brief overview of the relevant motivations and the constraints determined from numerous experiments, we focus on the light dark sector phenomenology at low-energy high-luminosity e + e - colliders. These colliders are ideal for probing the new light particles, because of their large production rates and capacity for precise resonance reconstruction. Depending on the details of a given model, the typical observed signatures may also contain multi lepton pairs, displaced vertices, and/or missing energy. Through the use of extremely large data samples from existing experiments, such as KLOE, CLEO, BABAR, Belle, and BESIII, the magnitude of the mixing can be parameterized by a parameter є < 10-4-10-3 constraint can be obtained. Obviously, future experiments with larger datasets will provide opportunities for the discovery of new particles in the dark sector, or for stricter upper limits on є. Once the light dark sector is confirmed, the particle physics landscape will be changed significantly.

  9. Conductor Specification and Validation for High-Luminosity LHC Quadrupole Magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Cooley, L. D.; Ghosh, A. K.; Dietderich, D. R.; ...

    2017-06-01

    The High Luminosity Upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) at CERN will replace the main ring inner triplet quadrupoles, identified by the acronym MQXF, adjacent to the main ring intersection regions. For the past decade, the U.S. LHC Accelerator R&D Program, LARP, has been evaluating conductors for the MQXFA prototypes, which are the outer magnets of the triplet. Recently, the requirements for MQXF magnets and cables have been published in P. Ferracin et al., IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond., vol. 26, no. 4, 2016, Art. no.4000207, along with the final specification for Ti-alloyed Nb3Sn conductor determined jointly by CERN andmore » LARP. This paper describes the rationale beneath the 0.85 mm diameter strand’s chief parameters, which are 108 or more sub-elements, a copper fraction not less than 52.4%, strand critical current at 4.22 K not less than 631 A at 12 T and 331 A at 15 T, and residual resistance ratio of not less than 150. This paper also compares the performance for ~100 km production lots of the five most recent LARP conductors to the first 163 km of strand made according to the HL-LHC specification. Two factors emerge as significant for optimizing performance and minimizing risk: a modest increase of the sub-element diameter from 50 to 55 μm, and a Nb:Sn molar ratio of 3.6 instead of 3.4. Furthermore, the statistics acquired so far give confidence that the present conductor can balance competing demands in production for the HL-LHC project.« less

  10. Large area thinned planar sensors for future high-luminosity-LHC upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, T.; Lawerenz, A.; Röder, R.

    2016-12-01

    Planar hybrid silicon sensors are a well proven technology for past and current particle tracking detectors in HEP experiments. However, the future high-luminosity upgrades of the inner trackers at the LHC experiments pose big challenges to the detectors. A first challenge is an expected radiation damage level of up to 2ṡ 1016 neq/cm2. For planar sensors, one way to counteract the charge loss and thus increase the radiation hardness is to decrease the thickness of their active area. A second challenge is the large detector area which has to be built as cost-efficient as possible. The CiS research institute has accomplished a proof-of-principle run with n-in-p ATLAS-Pixel sensors in which a cavity is etched to the sensor's back side to reduce its thickness. One advantage of this technology is the fact that thick frames remain at the sensor edges and guarantee mechanical stability on wafer level while the sensor is left on the resulting thin membrane. For this cavity etching technique, no handling wafers are required which represents a benefit in terms of process effort and cost savings. The membranes with areas of up to ~ 4 × 4 cm2 and thicknesses of 100 and 150 μm feature a sufficiently good homogeneity across the whole wafer area. The processed pixel sensors show good electrical behaviour with an excellent yield for a suchlike prototype run. First sensors with electroless Ni- and Pt-UBM are already successfully assembled with read-out chips.

  11. A physical model for the evolving ultraviolet luminosity function of high redshift galaxies and their contribution to the cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zhen-Yi; Lapi, Andrea; Bressan, Alessandro; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Danese, Luigi; Negrello, Mattia

    2014-04-10

    We present a physical model for the evolution of the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function of high-redshift galaxies, taking into account in a self-consistent way their chemical evolution and the associated evolution of dust extinction. Dust extinction is found to increase fast with halo mass. A strong correlation between dust attenuation and halo/stellar mass for UV selected high-z galaxies is thus predicted. The model yields good fits of the UV and Lyman-α (Lyα) line luminosity functions at all redshifts at which they have been measured. The weak observed evolution of both luminosity functions between z = 2 and z = 6 is explained as the combined effect of the negative evolution of the halo mass function; of the increase with redshift of the star formation efficiency due to the faster gas cooling; and of dust extinction, differential with halo mass. The slope of the faint end of the UV luminosity function is found to steepen with increasing redshift, implying that low luminosity galaxies increasingly dominate the contribution to the UV background at higher and higher redshifts. The observed range of the UV luminosities at high z implies a minimum halo mass capable of hosting active star formation M {sub crit} ≲ 10{sup 9.8} M {sub ☉}, which is consistent with the constraints from hydrodynamical simulations. From fits of Lyα line luminosity functions, plus data on the luminosity dependence of extinction, and from the measured ratios of non-ionizing UV to Lyman-continuum flux density for samples of z ≅ 3 Lyman break galaxies and Lyα emitters, we derive a simple relationship between the escape fraction of ionizing photons and the star formation rate. It implies that the escape fraction is larger for low-mass galaxies, which are almost dust-free and have lower gas column densities. Galaxies already represented in the UV luminosity function (M {sub UV} ≲ –18) can keep the universe fully ionized up to z ≅ 6. This is consistent with (uncertain) data

  12. Co-incident insertion enables high efficiency genome engineering in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Shy, Brian R.; MacDougall, Matthew S.; Clarke, Ryan; Merrill, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases have enabled powerful, new genome editing capabilities; however, the preponderance of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) mediated repair events over homology directed repair (HDR) in most cell types limits the ability to engineer precise changes in mammalian genomes. Here, we increase the efficiency of isolating precise HDR-mediated events in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells by more than 20-fold through the use of co-incidental insertion (COIN) of independent donor DNA sequences. Analysis of on:off-target frequencies at the Lef1 gene revealed that bi-allelic insertion of a PGK-Neo cassette occurred more frequently than expected. Using various selection cassettes targeting multiple loci, we show that the insertion of a selectable marker at one control site frequently coincided with an insertion at an unlinked, independently targeted site, suggesting enrichment of a sub-population of HDR-proficient cells. When individual cell events were tracked using flow cytometry and fluorescent protein markers, individual cells frequently performed either a homology-dependent insertion event or a homology-independent event, but rarely both types of insertions in a single cell. Thus, when HDR-dependent selection donors are used, COIN enriches for HDR-proficient cells among heterogeneous cell populations. When combined with a self-excising selection cassette, COIN provides highly efficient and scarless genome editing. PMID:27484482

  13. Final Cooling for a High-Energy High-Luminosity Lepton Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David; Sayed, H.; Hart, T.; Summers, D.

    2015-12-03

    A high-energy muon collider scenario require a “final cooling” system that reduces transverse emittance by a factor of ~10 while allowing longitudinal emittance increase. The baseline approach has low-energy transverse cooling within high-field solenoids, with strong longitudinal heating. This approach and its recent simulation are discussed. Alternative approaches which more explicitly include emittance exchange are also presented. Round-to-flat beam transform, transverse slicing, and longitudinal bunch coalescence are possible components of an alternative approach. Wedge-based emittance exchange could provide much of the required transverse cooling with longitudinal heating. Li-lens and quadrupole focusing systems could also provide much of the required final cooling.

  14. THE CANADA-FRANCE HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: NINE NEW QUASARS AND THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT REDSHIFT 6

    SciTech Connect

    Willott, Chris J.; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B.; Schade, David; Delorme, Philippe; Reyle, Celine; Albert, Loic; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Omont, Alain; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; McLure, Ross J.

    2010-03-15

    We present discovery imaging and spectroscopy for nine new z {approx} 6 quasars found in the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) bringing the total number of CFHQS quasars to 19. By combining the CFHQS with the more luminous Sloan Digital Sky Survey sample, we are able to derive the quasar luminosity function from a sample of 40 quasars at redshifts 5.74 < z < 6.42. Our binned luminosity function shows a slightly lower normalization and flatter slope than found in previous work. The binned data also suggest a break in the luminosity function at M {sub 1450} {approx} -25. A double power-law maximum likelihood fit to the data is consistent with the binned results. The luminosity function is strongly constrained (1{sigma} uncertainty <0.1 dex) over the range -27.5 < M {sub 1450} < -24.7. The best-fit parameters are {phi}(M*{sub 1450}) = 1.14 x 10{sup -8} Mpc{sup -3} mag{sup -1}, break magnitude M*{sub 1450} = -25.13, and bright end slope {beta} = -2.81. However, the covariance between {beta} and M*{sub 1450} prevents strong constraints being placed on either parameter. For a break magnitude in the range -26 < M*{sub 1450} < -24, we find -3.8 < {beta} < -2.3 at 95% confidence. We calculate the z = 6 quasar intergalactic ionizing flux and show it is between 20 and 100 times lower than that necessary for reionization. Finally, we use the luminosity function to predict how many higher redshift quasars may be discovered in future near-IR imaging surveys.

  15. Run II luminosity progress

    SciTech Connect

    Gollwitzer, K.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron Collider Run II program continues at the energy and luminosity frontier of high energy particle physics. To the collider experiments CDF and D0, over 3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity has been delivered to each. Upgrades and improvements in the Antiproton Source of the production and collection of antiprotons have led to increased number of particles stored in the Recycler. Electron cooling and associated improvements have help make a brighter antiproton beam at collisions. Tevatron improvements to handle the increased number of particles and the beam lifetimes have resulted in an increase in luminosity.

  16. RelocaTE2: a high resolution transposable element insertion site mapping tool for population resequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinfeng; Wrightsman, Travis R.; Wessler, Susan R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Transposable element (TE) polymorphisms are important components of population genetic variation. The functional impacts of TEs in gene regulation and generating genetic diversity have been observed in multiple species, but the frequency and magnitude of TE variation is under appreciated. Inexpensive and deep sequencing technology has made it affordable to apply population genetic methods to whole genomes with methods that identify single nucleotide and insertion/deletion polymorphisms. However, identifying TE polymorphisms, particularly transposition events or non-reference insertion sites can be challenging due to the repetitive nature of these sequences, which hamper both the sensitivity and specificity of analysis tools. Methods We have developed the tool RelocaTE2 for identification of TE insertion sites at high sensitivity and specificity. RelocaTE2 searches for known TE sequences in whole genome sequencing reads from second generation sequencing platforms such as Illumina. These sequence reads are used as seeds to pinpoint chromosome locations where TEs have transposed. RelocaTE2 detects target site duplication (TSD) of TE insertions allowing it to report TE polymorphism loci with single base pair precision. Results and Discussion The performance of RelocaTE2 is evaluated using both simulated and real sequence data. RelocaTE2 demonstrate high level of sensitivity and specificity, particularly when the sequence coverage is not shallow. In comparison to other tools tested, RelocaTE2 achieves the best balance between sensitivity and specificity. In particular, RelocaTE2 performs best in prediction of TSDs for TE insertions. Even in highly repetitive regions, such as those tested on rice chromosome 4, RelocaTE2 is able to report up to 95% of simulated TE insertions with less than 0.1% false positive rate using 10-fold genome coverage resequencing data. RelocaTE2 provides a robust solution to identify TE insertion sites and can be incorporated into

  17. Cryogenic test of double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC High luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, B.; Alberty, L.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Calaga, R.; Cullen, C.; Capatina, O.; Hammons, L.; Li, Z.; Marques, C.; Skaritka, J.; Verdu-Andres, S.; Wu, Q.

    2015-05-03

    A Proof-of-Principle (PoP) Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed and fabricated for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A vertical cryogenic test has been done at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). The cavity achieved 4.5 MV deflecting voltage with a quality factor above 3×109. We report the test results of this design.

  18. High luminosity operation, beam-beam effects and their compensation in Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Over the past 2 years the Tevatron peak luminosity steadily progressed and reached the level of 3.15 {center_dot} 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} which exceeds the Run II Upgrade goal. We discuss the collider performance, illustrate limitations and understanding of beam-beam effects and present experimental results of compensation of the beam-beam effects by electron lenses--a technique of great interest for the LHC.

  19. Recent Progress on Design Studies of High-Luminosity Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Bruell, A; Chevtsov, P; Derbenev, Y S; Ent, R; Krafft, G A; Li, R; Merminga, L; Yunn, B C

    2009-05-01

    The conceptual design of a ring-ring electron-ion collider based on CEBAF has been continuously optimized to cover a wide center-of-mass energy region and to achieve high luminosity and polarization to support next generation nuclear science programs. Here, we summarize the recent design improvements and R&D progress on interaction region optics with chromatic aberration compensation, matching and tracking of electron polarization in the Figure-8 ring, beam-beam simulations and ion beam cooling studies.

  20. PROBING HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY FORMATION AT THE HIGHEST LUMINOSITIES: NEW INSIGHTS FROM DEIMOS SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Dey, Arjun; Cooper, Michael C.; Reddy, Naveen; Jannuzi, Buell T.

    2013-07-01

    We present Keck DEIMOS spectroscopic observations of the most UV-luminous star-forming galaxies at redshifts 3.2 < z < 4.6. Our sample, selected in the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey, contains galaxies with luminosities of L* {approx}< L{sub UV} {approx}< 7 L* and is one of the largest samples to date of the most UV-luminous galaxies at these redshifts. Our spectroscopic data confirm 41 candidates as star-forming galaxies at 3.2 < z < 4.6 and validate the relatively clean selection of the photometric candidates with a contamination rate of 11%-28%. We find that the fraction of Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies increases with decreasing UV luminosity. None of the 12 galaxies with M{sub UV} < -22 (i.e., L{sub UV} > 3 L*) exhibit strong Ly{alpha} emission. We find strong evidence of large-scale outflows, transporting the neutral/ionized gas in the interstellar medium away from the galaxy. Galaxies exhibiting both interstellar absorption and Ly{alpha} emission lines show a significant offset between the two features, with a relative velocity of 200-1150 km s{sup -1}. We find tentative evidence that this measure of the outflow velocity increases with UV luminosity and/or stellar mass. The luminosity- and mass-dependent outflow strengths suggest that the efficiency of feedback and enrichment of the surrounding medium depend on these galaxy parameters. We also stack the individual spectra to construct composite spectra of the absorption-line-only and Ly{alpha}-emitting subsets of the UV luminous galaxies at z {approx_equal} 3.7. The composite spectra are very similar to those of lower-redshift and lower-luminosity Lyman break galaxy (LBG) samples, but with some subtle differences. Analyses of the composite spectra suggest that the UV luminous LBGs at z {approx_equal} 3.7 may have a higher covering fraction of absorbing gas, and may be older (or have had more prolonged star formation histories) than their lower-redshift and lower-luminosity counterparts. In

  1. Discovery of 1-5 Hz flaring at high luminosity in SAX J1808.4-3658

    SciTech Connect

    Bult, Peter; Van der Klis, Michiel

    2014-07-10

    We report the discovery of a 1-5 Hz X-ray flaring phenomenon observed at >30 mCrab near peak luminosity in the 2008 and 2011 outbursts of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 in observations with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. In each of the two outbursts this high luminosity flaring is seen for ∼3 continuous days and switches on and off on a timescale of 1-2 hr. The flaring can be seen directly in the light curve, where it shows sharp spikes of emission at quasi-regular separation. In the power spectrum it produces a broad noise component, which peaks at 1-5 Hz. The total 0.05-10 Hz variability has a fractional rms amplitude of 20%-45%, well in excess of the 8%-12% rms broadband noise usually seen in power spectra of SAX J1808.4-3658. We perform a detailed timing analysis of the flaring and study its relation to the 401 Hz pulsations. We find that the pulse amplitude varies proportionally with source flux through all phases of the flaring, indicating that the flaring is likely due to mass density variations created at or outside the magnetospheric boundary. We suggest that this 1-5 Hz flaring is a high mass accretion rate version of the 0.5-2 Hz flaring which is known to occur at low luminosity (<13 mCrab), late in the tail of outbursts of SAX J1808.4-3658. We propose the dead-disk instability, previously suggested as the mechanism for the 0.5-2 Hz flaring, as a likely mechanism for the high luminosity flaring reported here.

  2. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs): New z > 6 Quasar Survey with Subaru/HSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; SHELLQs Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Quasars at high redshift are an important and unique probe of the distant Universe, for understanding the origin and progress of cosmic reionization, the early growth of supermassive black holes, and the evolution of quasar host galaxies and their dark matter halos, among other topics. We are currently carrying out a new spectroscopic survey, called SHELLQs (Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars), to search for low-luminosity quasars at z > 6. By exploiting the exquisite imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey, we aim to probe quasar luminosities down to M1450 ~ -22 mag, i.e., below the classical threshold between quasars and Seyfert galaxies. Candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm. A large spectroscopic observing program is underway, using Subaru/FOCAS, GTC/OSIRIS, and Gemini/GMOS; in particular, SHELLQs has been approved as a Subaru intensive program to use 20 nights in the coming four semesters. As of August 2016, we have discovered ~40 quasars and bright galaxies at z ~ 6 and beyond, from the first 100 deg2 of the HSC survey (Matsuoka et al. 2016, ApJ, 828, 26). Surprisingly, we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of high-z galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M1450 ~ -22 mag or zAB ~ 24 mag. Multi-wavelength follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.

  3. Performance of the first short model 150 mm aperture Nb$_3$Sn Quadrupole MQXFS for the High- Luminosity LHC upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Chlachidze, G.; et al.

    2016-08-30

    The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and CERN combined their efforts in developing Nb3Sn magnets for the High-Luminosity LHC upgrade. The ultimate goal of this collaboration is to fabricate large aperture Nb3Sn quadrupoles for the LHC interaction regions (IR). These magnets will replace the present 70 mm aperture NbTi quadrupole triplets for expected increase of the LHC peak luminosity by a factor of 5. Over the past decade LARP successfully fabricated and tested short and long models of 90 mm and 120 mm aperture Nb3Sn quadrupoles. Recently the first short model of 150 mm diameter quadrupole MQXFS was built with coils fabricated both by the LARP and CERN. The magnet performance was tested at Fermilab’s vertical magnet test facility. This paper reports the test results, including the quench training at 1.9 K, ramp rate and temperature dependence studies.

  4. Support Structure Design of the $$\\hbox{Nb}_{3}\\hbox{Sn}$$ Quadrupole for the High Luminosity LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Juchno, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; ...

    2014-10-31

    New low-β quadrupole magnets are being developed within the scope of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project in collaboration with the US LARP program. The aim of the HLLHC project is to study and implement machine upgrades necessary for increasing the luminosity of the LHC. The new quadrupoles, which are based on the Nb₃Sn superconducting technology, will be installed in the LHC Interaction Regions and will have to generate a gradient of 140 T/m in a coil aperture of 150 mm. In this paper, we describe the design of the short model magnet support structure and discuss results of themore » detailed 3D numerical analysis performed in preparation for the first short model test.« less

  5. SuperB: A High-Luminosity Asymmetric e+e- Super Flavor Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Bona, M.; /et al.

    2007-05-18

    We discuss herein the exciting physics program that can be accomplished with a very large sample of heavy quark and heavy lepton decays produced in the very clean environment of an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider; a program complementary to that of an experiment such as LHCb at a hadronic machine. It then presents the conceptual design of a new type of e{sup +}e{sup -} collider that produces a nearly two-order-of-magnitude increase in luminosity over the current generation of asymmetric B Factories. The key idea is the use of low emittance beams produced in an accelerator lattice derived from the ILC Damping Ring Design, together with a new collision region, again with roots in the ILC final focus design, but with important new concepts developed in this design effort. Remarkably, SuperB produces this very large improvement in luminosity with circulating currents and wallplug power similar to those of the current B Factories. There is clear synergy with ILC R&D; design efforts have already influenced one another, and many aspects of the ILC Damping Rings and Final Focus would be operationally tested at SuperB. Finally, the design of an appropriate detector, based on an upgrade of BABAR as an example, is discussed in some detail. A preliminary cost estimate is presented, as is an example construction timeline.

  6. Medially-shifted rather than high-riding vertebral arteries preclude safe pedicle screw insertion.

    PubMed

    Maki, Satoshi; Koda, Masao; Iijima, Yasushi; Furuya, Takeo; Inada, Taigo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Junya; Okawa, Akihiko; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    We enrolled 100 patients who underwent preoperative CT angiography before cervical spine instrumentation and investigated the morphology of the C2 pedicle from the perspective of pedicle screw (PS) trajectory using volume rendering and multiplanar reconstruction. The narrowest portion of the pedicle was identified as the pedicle isthmus. Safe C2 PS insertion was regarded to be not feasible when the height of the medullary cavity of the pedicle isthmus and/or width of the medullary cavity of the pedicle isthmus was ⩽4mm. Forty-five (22.5%) pedicles were ⩽4mm in width, and safe insertion of a PS was determined to be not feasible. Among these, seven pedicles were ⩽4mm in both height and width. The remaining 38 pedicles were ⩽4mm in width with heights >4mm. There was no pedicle with a width >4mm and height <4mm. In other words, short pedicles were always concomitantly narrow. Therefore, the seven pedicles ⩽4mm in both height and width were considered to be morphologically narrow. The heights of the pedicle isthmus were not limited by the vertebral artery groove (VAG) and safe C2 PS insertion can be considered feasible where the VAG is marginally cranial, whereas the widths of the pedicle isthmus are limited by the VAG. Therefore, safe C2 PS insertion is precluded only when the VAG courses cranially and medially. It is a medially-shifted, rather than a high-riding, vertebral artery that precludes safe C2 PS insertion. Therefore to avoid vertebral artery injury an axial CT scan, parallel to the pedicle axis, should be evaluated before C2 PS insertion.

  7. Magnetic Measurements of the First Nb$_3$Sn Model Quadrupole (MQXFS) for the High-Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect

    DiMarco, J.; Ambrosio, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Ferracin, P.; Holik, E.; Sabbi, G.; Stoynev, S.; Strauss, T.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Todesco, E.; Velev, G.; Wang, X.

    2016-09-06

    The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and CERN are developing high-gradient Nb3Sn magnets for the High Luminosity LHC interaction regions. Magnetic measurements of the first 1.5 m long, 150 mm aperture model quadrupole, MQXFS1, were performed during magnet assembly at LBNL, as well as during cryogenic testing at Fermilab’s Vertical Magnet Test Facility. This paper reports on the results of these magnetic characterization measurements, as well as on the performance of new probes developed for the tests.

  8. Dedicated mobile high resolution prostate PET imager with an insertable transrectal probe

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2010-12-28

    A dedicated mobile PET imaging system to image the prostate and surrounding organs. The imaging system includes an outside high resolution PET imager placed close to the patient's torso and an insertable and compact transrectal probe that is placed in close proximity to the prostate and operates in conjunction with the outside imager. The two detector systems are spatially co-registered to each other. The outside imager is mounted on an open rotating gantry to provide torso-wide 3D images of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs. The insertable probe provides closer imaging, high sensitivity, and very high resolution predominately 2D view of the prostate and immediate surroundings. The probe is operated in conjunction with the outside imager and a fast data acquisition system to provide very high resolution reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs.

  9. Magnetic analysis of the Nb$$_3$$Sn low-beta quadrupole for the high luminosity LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Bermudez, Susana Izquierdo; Ambrosio, G.; Chlachidze, G.; ...

    2017-01-10

    As part of the Large Hadron Collider Luminosity upgrade (HiLumi-LHC) program, the US LARP collaboration and CERN are working together to design and build 150 mm aperture Nb3Sn quadrupoles for the LHC interaction regions. A first series of 1.5 m long coils were fabricated, assembled and tested in the first short model. This paper presents the magnetic analysis, comparing magnetic field measurements with the expectations and the field quality requirements. The analysis is focused on the geometrical harmonics, iron saturation effect and cold-warm correlation. Three dimensional effects such as the variability of the field harmonics along the magnet axis andmore » the contribution of the coil ends are also discussed. Furthemore, we present the influence of the conductor magnetization and the dynamic effects.« less

  10. X-ray View of Four High-Luminosity Swift-BAT AGN: Unveiling Obscuration and Reflection with Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorettil, V.; Angelini, L.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Koss, M.; Malaguti, G.

    2013-01-01

    Aims. A complete census of obscured Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) is necessary to reveal the history of the super massive black hole (SMBH) growth and galaxy evolution in the Universe given the complex feedback processes and the fact that much of this growth occurs in an obscured phase. In this context, hard X-ray surveys and dedicated follow-up observations represent a unique tool for selecting highly absorbed AGN and for characterizing the obscuring matter surrounding the SMBH. Here we focus on the absorption and reflection occurring in highly luminous, quasar-like AGN, to study the relation between the geometry of the absorbing matter and the AGN nature (e.g. X-ray, optical, and radio properties), and to help to determine the column density dependency on the AGN luminosity. Methods. The Swift/BAT nine-month survey observed 153 AGN, all with ultra-hard X-ray BAT fluxes in excess of 10(exp -11) erg per square centimeter and an average redshift of 0.03. Among them, four of the most luminous BAT AGN (44.73 less than LogLBAT less than 45.31) were selected as targets of Suzaku follow-up observations: J2246.0+3941 (3C 452), J0407.4+0339 (3C 105), J0318.7+6828, and J0918.5+0425. The column density, scattered/reflected emission, the properties of the Fe K line, and a possible variability are fully analyzed. For the latter, the spectral properties from Chandra, XMM-Newton and Swift/XRT public observations were compared with the present Suzaku analysis, adding an original spectral analysis when non was available from the literature. Results. Of our sample, 3C 452 is the only certain Compton-thick AGN candidate because of i) the high absorption (N(sub H) approximately 4 × 10(exp 23) per square centimeter) and strong Compton reflection; ii) the lack of variability; iii) the "buried" nature, i.e. the low scattering fraction (less than 0.5%) and the extremely low relative [OIII] luminosity. In contrast 3C 105 is not reflection-dominated, despite the comparable column density

  11. Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter for high-luminosity LHC run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoor, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) will undergo a major replacement of its on- and off-detector electronics for the Long Shutdown 3 that is planned for 2024 and 2025. All signals will be digitised and transferred directly to the off-detector electronics, where the signals are reconstructed, stored, and sent to the first level of trigger at a rate of 40 MHz. This will provide better precision of the calorimeter signals used by the trigger system and will allow the development of more complex trigger algorithms. Changes to the electronics will also contribute to the reliability and redundancy of the system. Three different front-end options are presently being investigated for the upgrade and will be chosen after extensive test beam studies. A Hybrid Demonstrator module has been developed. The demonstrator is undergoing extensive testing and is planned for insertion in ATLAS.

  12. RHIC LUMINOSITY UPGRADE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2010-05-23

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operates with either ions or polarized protons. After increasing the heavy ion luminosity by two orders of magnitude since its commissioning in 2000, the current luminosity upgrade program aims for an increase by another factor of 4 by means of 3D stochastic cooling and a new 56 MHz SRF system. An Electron Beam Ion Source is being commissioned that will allow the use of uranium beams. Electron cooling is considered for collider operation below the current injection energy. For the polarized proton operation both luminosity and polarization are important. In addition to ongoing improvements in the AGS injector, the construction of a new high-intensity polarized source has started. In RHIC a number of upgrades are under way to increase the intensity and polarization transmission to 250 GeV beam energy. Electron lenses will be installed to partially compensate the head-on beam-beam effect.

  13. On the faint-end of the high-z galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Bin; Ferrara, Andrea; Xu, Yidong

    2016-12-01

    Recent measurements of the luminosity function (LF) of galaxies in the Epoch of Reionization (EoR, z ≳ 6) indicate a very steep increase of the number density of low-mass galaxies populating the LF faint-end. However, as star formation in low-mass haloes can be easily depressed or even quenched by ionizing radiation, a turnover is expected at some faint UV magnitudes. Using a physically motivated analytical model, we quantify reionization feedback effects on the LF faint-end shape. We find that if reionization feedback is neglected, the power-law Schechter parametrization characterizing the LF faint-end remains valid up to absolute UV magnitude ˜-9. If instead radiative feedback is strong enough that quenches star formation in haloes with circular velocity smaller than 50 km s-1, the LF starts to drop at absolute UV magnitude ˜-15, i.e. slightly below the detection limits of current (unlensed) surveys at z ˜ 5. The LFs may rise again at higher absolute UV magnitude, where, as a result of interplay between reionization process and galaxy formation, most of the galaxy light is from relic stars formed before the EoR. We suggest that the galaxy number counts data, particularly in lensed fields, can put strong constraints on reionization feedback. In models with stronger reionization feedback, stars in galaxies with absolute UV magnitude higher than ˜-13 and smaller than ˜-8 are typically older. Hence, the stellar age-UV magnitude relation can be used as an alternative feedback probe.

  14. High-luminosity primary vertex selection in top-quark studies using the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Buzatu, Adrian; /McGill U.

    2006-08-01

    Improving our ability to identify the top quark pair (t{bar t}) primary vertex (PV) on an event-by-event basis is essential for many analyses in the lepton-plus-jets channel performed by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) Collaboration. We compare the algorithm currently used by CDF (A1) with another algorithm (A2) using Monte Carlo simulation at high instantaneous luminosities. We confirm that A1 is more efficient than A2 at selecting the t{bar t} PV at all PV multiplicities, both with efficiencies larger than 99%. Event selection rejects events with a distance larger than 5 cm along the proton beam between the t{bar t} PV and the charged lepton. We find flat distributions for the signal over background significance of this cut for all cut values larger than 1 cm, for all PV multiplicities and for both algorithms. We conclude that any cut value larger than 1 cm is acceptable for both algorithms under the Tevatron's expected instantaneous luminosity improvements.

  15. Mechanical Analysis of the 400 MHz RF-Dipole Crabbing Cavity Prototype for LHC High Luminosity Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Subashini U.; Park, HyeKyoung; Delayen, Jean R.; Li, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The proposed LHC high luminosity upgrade requires two crabbing systems in increasing the peak luminosity, operating both vertically and horizontally at two interaction points of IP1 and IP5. The required system has tight dimensional constraints and needs to achieve higher operational gradients. A proof-of-principle 400 MHz crabbing cavity design has been successfully tested and has proven to be an ideal candidate for the crabbing system. The cylindrical proof-of-principle rf-dipole design has been adapted in to a square shaped design to further meet the dimensional requirements. The new rf-dipole design has been optimized in meeting the requirements in rf-properties, higher order mode damping, and multipole components. A crabbing system in a cryomodule is expected to be tested on the SPS beam line prior to the test at LHC. The new prototype is required to achieve the mechanical and thermal specifications of the SPS test followed by the test at LHC. This paper discusses the detailed mechanical and thermal analysis in minimizing Lorentz force detuning and sensitivity to liquid He pressure fluctuations.

  16. High luminosity, slow ejecta and persistent carbon lines: SN 2009dc challenges thermonuclear explosion scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubenberger, S.; Benetti, S.; Childress, M.; Pakmor, R.; Hachinger, S.; Mazzali, P. A.; Stanishev, V.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Agnoletto, I.; Bufano, F.; Ergon, M.; Harutyunyan, A.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Kromer, M.; Navasardyan, H.; Nicolas, J.; Pastorello, A.; Prosperi, E.; Salgado, F.; Sollerman, J.; Stritzinger, M.; Turatto, M.; Valenti, S.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2011-04-01

    Extended optical and near-IR observations reveal that SN 2009dc shares a number of similarities with normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), but is clearly overluminous, with a (pseudo-bolometric) peak luminosity of log (L) = 43.47 (erg s-1). Its light curves decline slowly over half a year after maximum light [Δm15(B)true= 0.71], and the early-time near-IR light curves show secondary maxima, although the minima between the first and the second peaks are not very pronounced. The bluer bands exhibit an enhanced fading after ˜200 d, which might be caused by dust formation or an unexpectedly early IR catastrophe. The spectra of SN 2009dc are dominated by intermediate-mass elements and unburned material at early times, and by iron-group elements at late phases. Strong C II lines are present until ˜2 weeks past maximum, which is unprecedented in thermonuclear SNe. The ejecta velocities are significantly lower than in normal and even subluminous SNe Ia. No signatures of interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) are found in the spectra. Assuming that the light curves are powered by radioactive decay, analytic modelling suggests that SN 2009dc produced ˜1.8 M⊙ of 56Ni assuming the smallest possible rise time of 22 d. Together with a derived total ejecta mass of ˜2.8 M⊙, this confirms that SN 2009dc is a member of the class of possible super-Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia similar to SNe 2003fg, 2006gz and 2007if. A study of the hosts of SN 2009dc and other superluminous SNe Ia reveals a tendency of these SNe to explode in low-mass galaxies. A low metallicity of the progenitor may therefore be an important prerequisite for producing superluminous SNe Ia. We discuss a number of possible explosion scenarios, ranging from super-Chandrasekhar-mass white-dwarf progenitors over dynamical white-dwarf mergers and Type I? SNe to a core-collapse origin of the explosion. None of the models seems capable of explaining all properties of SN 2009dc, so that the true nature of this SN

  17. AC loss evaluation of an HTS insert for high field magnet cooled by cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajikawa, Kazuhiro; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2016-12-01

    AC losses in a high temperature superconducting (HTS) insert coil for 25-T cryogen-free superconducting magnet during its initial energization are numerically calculated under the assumption of slab approximation. The HTS insert consisting of 68 single pancakes wound using coated conductors generates a central magnetic field of 11.5 T in addition to the contribution of 14.0 T from a set of low temperature superconducting (LTS) outsert coils. Both the HTS insert and the LTS coils are cooled using cryocoolers, and energized simultaneously up to the central field of 25.5 T with a constant ramp rate for 60 min. The influences of the magnitudes and orientations of locally applied magnetic fields, magnetic interactions between turns and transport currents flowing in the windings are taken into account in the calculations of AC losses. The locally applied fields are separated into axial and radial components, and the individual contributions of these field components to the AC losses are simply summed up to obtain the total losses. The AC losses due to the axial fields become major in the beginning of energization, whereas the total losses monotonically increase with time after the AC losses due to the radial fields become major.

  18. Effect of insertion method on knoop hardness of high viscous glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Raggio, Daniela Prócida; Bonifácio, Clarissa Calil; Bönecker, Marcelo; Imparato, José Carlos P; Gee, Anton J de; Amerongen, Willem Evert van

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the Knoop hardness of three high viscous glass ionomer cements: G1 - Ketac Molar; G2 - Ketac Molar Easymix (3M ESPE) and G3 - Magic Glass ART (Vigodent). As a parallel goal, three different methods for insertion of Ketac Molar Easymix were tested: G4 - conventional spatula; G5 - commercial syringe (Centrix) and G6 - low-cost syringe. Ten specimens of each group were prepared and the Knoop hardness was determined 5 times on each specimen with a HM-124 hardness machine (25 g/30 s dwell time) after 24 h, 1 and 2 weeks. During the entire test period, the specimens were stored in liquid paraffin at 37ºC. Significant differences were found between G3 and G1/G2 (two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test; p<0.01). There was no significant difference in the results among the multiple ways of insertion. The glass ionomer cement Magic Glass ART showed the lowest hardness, while the insertion technique had no significant influence on hardness.

  19. Development of edgeless silicon pixel sensors on p-type substrate for the ATLAS high-luminosity upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderini, G.; Bagolini, A.; Bomben, M.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Chauveau, J.; Giacomini, G.; La Rosa, A.; Marchiori, G.; Zorzi, N.

    2014-11-01

    In view of the LHC upgrade for the high luminosity phase (HL-LHC), the ATLAS experiment is planning to replace the inner detector with an all-silicon system. The n-in-p bulk technology represents a valid solution for the modules of most of the layers, given the significant radiation hardness of this option and the reduced cost. The large area necessary to instrument the outer layers will demand to tile the sensors, a solution for which the inefficient region at the border of each sensor needs to be reduced to the minimum size. This paper reports on a joint R&D project by the ATLAS LPNHE Paris group and FBK Trento on a novel n-in-p edgeless planar pixel design, based on the deep-trench process available at FBK.

  20. Development of Edgeless Silicon Pixel Sensors on p-type substrate for the ATLAS High-Luminosity Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderini, G.; Bagolini, A.; Beccherle, R.; Bomben, M.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Chauveau, J.; Giacomini, G.; La Rosa, A.; Marchiori, G.; Zorzi, N.

    2016-09-01

    In view of the LHC upgrade phases towards the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the ATLAS experiment plans to upgrade the Inner Detector with an all-silicon system. The n-on-p silicon technology is a promising candidate to achieve a large area instrumented with pixel sensors, since it is radiation hard and cost effective. The presentation describes the performance of novel n-in-p edgeless planar pixel sensors produced by FBK-CMM, making use of the active trench for the reduction of the dead area at the periphery of the device. After discussing the sensor technology, some feedback from preliminary results of the first beam test will be discussed.

  1. Errata: A Wide-Field Multicolor Survey for High-Redshift Quasars, Z >= 2.2. III. The Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Stephen J.; Hewett, Paul C.; Osmer, Patrick S.

    1995-01-01

    In the paper "A Wide-Field Multicolor Survey for High-Redshift Quasars, z >= 2.2. III. The Luminosity Function" by Stephen. Warren, Paul C. Hewett and Patrick S. Osmer (ApJ, 421,412 [1994]), two equations should be corrected: On page 419, column one, line 11, the expression following the words "the error,, should have an opening parenthesis just before the integral sign, to read: [{SIGMA} 1/({integral} ρ(z)dV_a_)^2^]^1/2^. On page 421, equation (15) is missing the asterisk (*) in the M_c_^*^ term just prior to (β + 1); that is, the exponent in the second term the denominator should read: 0.4(M_c_ - M_c_^*^)(β + 1). The authors wish to draw these errors to the attention of any readers who will be using the expression and equation.

  2. Effect of Wedge Insertion Angle on Posterior Tibial Slope in Medial Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Matsumoto, Kazu; Ogawa, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Kentaro; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a well-established surgery for medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) wherein the lower extremity is realigned to shift the load distribution from the medial compartment of the knee to the lateral compartment. However, this surgery is known to affect the posterior tibial slope angle (PTSA), which could lead to abnormal knee kinematics and instability, and eventually to knee OA. Although PTSA control is as important as coronal realignment, few appropriate measurements for this parameter have been reported. The placement of a wedge spacer might have an effect on PTSA. Purpose: To elucidate the relationship between the PTSA and the direction of insertion of a wedge spacer. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This study assessed 43 knees from 34 patients who underwent medial opening wedge HTO for knee OA. Pre- and postoperative lateral radiographs of the knee as well as postoperative computed tomography scans were performed to evaluate the relationship among PTSA, wedge insertion angle (WIA), and opening gap ratio (distance of the anterior opening gap/distance of the posterior opening gap at the osteotomy site). Results: The PTSA significantly increased from 9.0° ± 2.8° preoperatively to 13.2° ± 4.1° postoperatively (P < .001), resulting in a mean ΔPTSA of 4.7° ± 4.5°. The mean opening gap ratio was 0.86 ± 0.11, and the mean WIA was 25.9° ± 8.4°. The WIA and opening gap ratio were both highly correlated with ΔPTSA (r = 0.71 and 0.72, respectively), implying that a smaller WIA or smaller gap ratio leads to less increase in posterior slope. Conclusion: The direction of wedge insertion is highly correlated with PTSA increase, which suggests that the PTSA can be controlled for by adjusting the direction of wedge insertion during surgery. Clinical Relevance: Study results suggest that it is possible to adjust the PTSA by controlling the WIA during surgery. Proper

  3. Designing high performance metal-mMoS2 interfaces by two-dimensional insertions with suitable thickness.

    PubMed

    Su, Jie; Feng, Liping; Zeng, Wei; Liu, Zhengtang

    2016-11-16

    Thickness has been proved to have significant influence on the physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials and their corresponding devices. Understanding the effect of the thickness of 2D insertions on the contact properties of metal-monolayer MoS2 interfaces (viz. metal-mMoS2 interfaces) is vital to designing high performance mMoS2 devices. In this work, the electronic structures, Schottky barriers, contact resistance, and tunneling barriers of scandium-mMoS2 (Sc-mMoS2) interfaces with BN and graphene insertions have been comparatively studied by density functional theory. No Schottky barriers are found at Sc-mMoS2 interfaces with monolayer 2D insertions. Although the contact resistance and charge injection efficiency of Sc-mMoS2 interfaces with monolayer insertions deteriorate relatively to those of the Sc-mMoS2 interface, they are still sufficient to realize high-performance mMoS2-based devices. Note that, upon increasing the number of layers of 2D insertions, these contact properties are further deteriorated with the increasing number of layers of insertions. Moreover, additional significant Schottky barriers are introduced into Sc-mMoS2 interfaces with multilayer BN; the nature Dirac points of graphene insertions are opened, suggesting low performances of Sc-mMoS2 interfaces with multilayer BN and graphene insertions. These variations can be understood on the basis of the orbital hybridization and charge redistribution between the Sc slab and mMoS2 layer. In addition, these characteristics are expected to occur in other metal-mMoS2 interfaces with two-dimensional material insertions. Overall, monolayer rather than multilayer two-dimensional insertions can be used to improve the transport properties of mMoS2-based devices.

  4. Large enhancement of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and high annealing stability by Pt insertion layer in (Co/Ni)-based multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Li, Minghua; Yang, Kang; Jiang, Shaolong; Han, Gang; Liu, Qianqian; Yu, Guanghua

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the influence of ultrathin Pt insertion layers on the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) and annealing stability of Ta/Pt/(Co/Ni)×3/Co/Pt/Ta multilayered films. When the Pt layers were inserted at the Co/Ni interfaces, the PMA of the multilayered films decreased monotonically as the thickness of the Pt insertion layer (tPt) was increased. However, when the Pt layers were inserted at the Ni/Co interfaces, the PMA increased from 1.39 × 106 to 3.5 × 106 erg/cm3 as tPt increased from 0 to 10 Å. Moreover, the multilayered film containing 6-Å-thick Pt insertion layers that inserted at the Ni/Co interfaces exhibited the highest annealing stability for PMA, which was up to temperature of 480 °C. We hypothesize that the introduced Pt/Co interfaces, due to the Pt insertion layers, are responsible for the enhanced PMA and high annealing stability. This study is particularly important for perpendicularly magnetized spintronic devices that require high PMA and high annealing stability.

  5. Dry Sliding Wear Behaviours of Valve Seat Inserts Produced from High Chromium White Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyon, Ali; Özyürek, Dursun; Günay, Mustafa; Aztekin, Hasan

    2015-11-01

    In this present study, wear behaviours of high chromium white iron valve seat inserts and tappets used in the automotive sector were investigated. Wear behaviours of three different rates of high chromium white cast irons (containing 10, 12 and 14% chromium) were examined under heavy service conditions. For that purpose, the produced valve seat inserts were characterized through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and hardness measurements. They were tested at a sliding speed of 1 ms-1, under 120 N load and for six different sliding distances (500, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, 3000 m) by using a standard wear apparatus (pin-on-disk type). The result showed that as the amount of Cr increased in the alloys, their hardness decreased. The decrease in the hardness were considered to be as the result of transformation of M7C3 carbides into M23C6 carbides in the structure. This decrease in hardness with increasing chromium content also increased the weight loss. Thus, it was determined that the white iron with 14% Cr (which had a greater amount of M23C6 carbides) was subjected to the highest wear.

  6. Upgrades to the CMS Cathode Strip Chambers for 2017 and the High Luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, David; CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    An overview will be given of upgrades to the CMS Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) during the extended technical stop 2016-2017 and plans for future upgrades targeting the HL-LHC. HL-LHC conditions will surpass the physical capabilities of the present detector, and require novel hardware to cope with increased rates and maintain the high performance of the CSC achieved up to now.

  7. Seamless Insert-Plasmid Assembly at High Efficiency and Low Cost.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Roger M; Ostermeier, Christian; Geiser, Martin; Li, Julia Su Zhou; Widmer, Hans; Auer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Seamless cloning methods, such as co-transformation cloning, sequence- and ligation-independent cloning (SLIC) or the Gibson assembly, are essential tools for the precise construction of plasmids. The efficiency of co-transformation cloning is however low and the Gibson assembly reagents are expensive. With the aim to improve the robustness of seamless cloning experiments while keeping costs low, we examined the importance of complementary single-stranded DNA ends for co-transformation cloning and the influence of single-stranded gaps in circular plasmids on SLIC cloning efficiency. Most importantly, our data show that single-stranded gaps in double-stranded plasmids, which occur in typical SLIC protocols, can drastically decrease the efficiency at which the DNA transforms competent E. coli bacteria. Accordingly, filling-in of single-stranded gaps using DNA polymerase resulted in increased transformation efficiency. Ligation of the remaining nicks did not lead to a further increase in transformation efficiency. These findings demonstrate that highly efficient insert-plasmid assembly can be achieved by using only T5 exonuclease and Phusion DNA polymerase, without Taq DNA ligase from the original Gibson protocol, which significantly reduces the cost of the reactions. We successfully used this modified Gibson assembly protocol with two short insert-plasmid overlap regions, each counting only 15 nucleotides.

  8. Simulations of planar pixel sensors for the ATLAS high luminosity upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderini, G.; Benoit, M.; Dinu, N.; Lounis, A.; Marchiori, G.

    2011-04-01

    A physics-based device simulation was used to study the charge carrier distribution and the electric field configuration inside simplified two-dimensional models for pixel layouts based on the ATLAS pixel sensor. In order to study the behavior of such detectors under different levels of irradiation, a three-level defect model was implemented into the simulation. Using these models, the number of guard rings, the dead edge width and the detector thickness were modified to investigate their influence on the detector depletion at the edge and on its internal electric field distribution in order to optimize the layout parameters. Simulations indicate that the number of guard rings can be reduced by a few hundred microns with respect to the layout used for the present ATLAS sensors, with a corresponding extension of the active area of the sensors. A study of the inter-pixel capacitance and of the capacitance between the implants and the high-voltage contact as a function of several parameters affecting the geometry and the doping level of the implants was also carried out. The results are needed in order to evaluate the noise and the cross-talk among neighboring pixels when connected to the front-end electronics.

  9. THE ELECTRON ION COLLIDER. A HIGH LUMINOSITY PROBE OF THE PARTONIC SUBSTRUCTURE OF NUCLEONS AND NUCLEI.

    SciTech Connect

    EDITED BY M.S. DAVIS

    2002-02-01

    By the end of this decade, the advancement of current and planned research into the fundamental structure of matter will require a new facility, the Electron Ion Collider (EIC). The EIC will collide high-energy beams of polarized electrons from polarized protons and neutrons, and unpolarized beams of electrons off atomic nuclei with unprecedented intensity. Research at the EIC will lead to a detailed understanding of the structure of the proton, neutron, and atomic nuclei as described by Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD), the accepted theory of the strong interaction. The EIC will establish quantitative answers to important questions by delivering dramatically increased precision over existing and planned experiments and by providing completely new experimental capabilities. Indeed, the EIC will probe QCD in a manner not possible previously. This document presents the scientific case for the design, construction and operation of the EIC. While realization of the EIC requires a significant advance in the development of efficient means of producing powerful beams of energetic electrons, an important consideration for choosing the site of the EIC is the planned upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The upgrade planned for RHIC will fully meet the requirements for the ion beam for the EIC, providing a distinct advantage in terms of cost, schedule and the final operation.

  10. High-frequency transposition of IS1373, the insertion sequence delimiting the amplifiable element AUD2 of Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed Central

    Volff, J N; Altenbuchner, J

    1997-01-01

    IS1373 is the putative insertion sequence delimiting the amplifiable unit AUD2 of Streptomyces lividans. Two IS1373-derived thiostrepton-resistant transposons, Tn5492 and Tn5494, transposed into multiple sites of the S. lividans chromosome at frequencies as high as 0.4 and 1%, respectively. Hence, IS1373 is a functional insertion sequence and its unique open reading frame, insA, encodes the transposase. PMID:9287031

  11. Common envelope mechanisms: constraints from the X-ray luminosity function of high-mass X-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Zhao-Yu; Li, Xiang-Dong E-mail: lixd@nju.edu.cn

    2014-12-10

    We use the measured X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) in nearby star-forming galaxies to constrain the common envelope (CE) mechanisms, which play a key role in governing the binary evolution. We find that the XLF can be reproduced quite closely under both CE mechanisms usually adopted, i.e., the α{sub CE} formalism and the γ algorithm, with a reasonable range of parameters considered. Provided that the parameter combination is the same, the γ algorithm is likely to produce more HMXBs than the α{sub CE} formalism, by a factor of up to ∼10. In the framework of the α{sub CE} formalism, a high value of α{sub CE} is required to fit the observed XLF, though it does not significantly affect the global number of the HMXB populations. We present the detailed components of the HMXB populations under the γ algorithm and compare them with those in Zuo et al. and observations. We suggest the distinct observational properties, as well as period distributions of HMXBs, may provide further clues to discriminate between these two types of CE mechanisms.

  12. Probing TeV scale Top-Philic Resonances with Boosted Top-Tagging at the High Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeong Han; Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Seung J.; Mohlabeng, Gopolang

    2016-04-25

    We investigate the discovery potential of singly produced top-philic resonances at the high luminosity (HL) LHC in the four-top final state. Our analysis spans over the fully-hadronic, semi-leptonic, and same-sign dilepton channels where we present concrete search strategies adequate to a boosted kinematic regime and high jet-multiplicity environments. We utilize the Template Overlap Method (TOM) with newly developed template observables for tagging boosted top quarks, a large-radius jet variable $M_J$ and customized b-tagging tactics for background discrimination. Our results show that the same-sign dilepton channel gives the best sensitivity among the considered channels, with an improvement of significance up to 10%-20% when combined with boosted-top tagging. Both the fully-hadronic and semi-leptonic channels yield comparable discovery potential and contribute to further enhancements in the sensitivity by combining all channels. Finally, we show the sensitivity of a top-philic resonance at the LHC and HL-LHC by showing the $2\\sigma$ exclusion limit and $5\\sigma$ discovery reach, including a combination of all three channels.

  13. High-energy cosmic-ray nuclei from high- and low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts and implications for multimessenger astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakamura, Takashi

    2008-07-15

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are one of the candidates of ultrahigh-energy (> or approx. 10{sup 18.5} eV) cosmic-ray (UHECR) sources. We investigate high-energy cosmic-ray acceleration including heavy nuclei in GRBs by using Geant 4, and discuss its various implications, taking both high-luminosity (HL) and low-luminosity (LL) GRBs into account. This is because LL GRBs may also make a significant contribution to the observed UHECR flux if they form a distinct population. We show that not only protons, but also heavier nuclei can be accelerated up to ultrahigh energies in the internal, (external) reverse, and forward shock models. We also show that the condition for ultrahigh-energy heavy nuclei such as iron to survive is almost the same as that for {approx}TeV gamma rays to escape from the source and for high-energy neutrinos not to be much produced. The multimessenger astronomy by neutrino and GeV-TeV gamma-ray telescopes such as IceCube and KM3Net, GLAST and MAGIC will be important to see whether GRBs can be accelerators of ultrahigh-energy heavy nuclei. We also demonstrate expected spectra of high-energy neutrinos and gamma rays, and discuss their detectabilities. In addition, we discuss implications of the GRB-UHECR hypothesis. We point out, since the number densities of HL GRBs and LL GRBs are quite different, its determination by UHECR observations is also important.

  14. Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment in the High Temperature Insert-Reflight (HTI-R)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.; Garrabos, Yves; Lecoutre, Carole; Zappoli, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Current research on supercritical water processes on board the International Space Station (ISS) focuses on salt precipitation and transport in a test cell designed for supercritical water. This study, known as the Supercritical Water Mixture Experiment (SCWM) serves as a precursor experiment for developing a better understanding of inorganic salt precipitation and transport during supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) processes for the eventual application of this technology for waste management and resource reclamation in microgravity conditions. During typical SCWO reactions any inorganic salts present in the reactant stream will precipitate and begin to coat reactor surfaces and control mechanisms (e.g., valves) often severely impacting the systems performance. The SCWM experiment employs a Sample Cell Unit (SCU) filled with an aqueous solution of Na2SO4 0.5-w at the critical density and uses a refurbished High Temperature Insert, which was used in an earlier ISS experiment designed to study pure water at near-critical conditions. The insert, designated as the HTI-Reflight (HTI-R) will be deployed in the DECLIC (Device for the Study of Critical Liquids and Crystallization) Facility on the International Space Station (ISS). Objectives of the study include measurement of the shift in critical temperature due to the presence of the inorganic salt, assessment of the predominant mode of precipitation (i.e., heterogeneously on SCU surfaces or homogeneously in the bulk fluid), determination of the salt morphology including size and shapes of particulate clusters, and the determination of the dominant mode of transport of salt particles in the presence of an imposed temperature gradient. Initial results from the ISS experiments will be presented and compared to findings from laboratory experiments on the ground.

  15. Spectroscopic observations of active solar-analog stars with high X-ray luminosity, as a proxy of superflare stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notsu, Yuta; Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Namekata, Kosuke; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies of solar-type superflare stars have suggested that even old slowly rotating stars similar to the Sun can have large starspots and superflares. We conducted high-dispersion spectroscopy of 49 nearby solar-analog stars (G-type main-sequence stars with Teff ≈ 5600-6000 K) identified as ROSAT soft X-ray sources, which are not binary stars from previous studies. We expected that these stars could be used as a proxy of bright solar-analog superflare stars, since superflare stars are expected to show strong X-ray luminosity. More than half (37) of the 49 target stars show no evidence of binarity, and their atmospheric parameters (temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity) are within the range of ordinary solar-analog stars. We measured the intensity of Ca II 8542 and Hα lines, which are good indicators of the stellar chromospheric activity. The intensity of these lines indicates that all the target stars have large starspots. We also measured v sin i (projected rotational velocity) and lithium abundance for the target stars. Li abundance is a key to understanding the evolution of the stellar convection zone, which reflects the stellar age, mass and rotational history. We confirmed that many of the target stars rapidly rotate and have high Li abundance, compared with the Sun, as suggested by many previous studies. There are, however, also some target stars that rotate slowly (v sin i = 2-3 km s-1) and have low Li abundance like the Sun. These results support that old and slowly rotating stars similar to the Sun could have high activity levels and large starspots. This is consistent with the results of our previous studies of solar-type superflare stars. In the future, it is important to conduct long-term monitoring observations of these active solar-analog stars in order to investigate detailed properties of large starspots from the viewpoint of stellar dynamo theory.

  16. Very high-z low luminosity dusty galaxy candidates in the LABOCA follow up of the Herschel Lensing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Frederic; Schaerer, Daniel; Lutz, Dieter; Weiss, Axel; Richard, Johan; Clement, Benjamin; Rawle, Tim; Egami, Eiichi; Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava; Combes, Francoise; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Smail, Ian; Pello, Roser; HLS Team

    2015-08-01

    To unveil the yet hidden part of dusty star formation in the distant Universe, we have undertaken a 870μm follow-up of ten massive lensing clusters of the Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS, Egami et al 2010, Rawle et al 2010) with the APEX/LABOCA bolometer array in a large program of ˜300 hours.In four clusters (AS1063, A2744, MS2137 and A2667) we find LABOCA sources that are undetected with Herschel (PACS and SPIRE) and have S850μm /S500μm > 0.5. This very red color implies either a very high redshift (z > 4) or a very low dust temperature (T < 25K). These sources have observed fluxes S850μm < 10 mJy, and are therefore expected to have lower intrinsic luminosities than the flux-selected SMGs (H-ATLAS and SPT samples) or than blank field SMGs (e.g., LESS sample). Some of them are extended and could correspond to multiple sources or to multiple images of a lensed source.Thus, we found a very red submm source in AS1063 that may be associated with a multiple-image system confirmed spectroscopically at z=6.107. This may be the first dusty star forming galaxy with LFIR < 10^12 Lsol at z>5 selected from submm observations. Similarly, we identified potential z>4 counterparts to all the other very red LABOCA sources. We discuss the implications of these discoveries and the ongoing ALMA Cycle 2 observations.

  17. The Local [CII] Emission Line Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmati, Shoubaneh

    2017-01-01

    I present, for the first time, the local [CII]158 $\\mu$m emission line luminosity function measured using a sample of more than 500 galaxies from the RBGS. [CII] luminosities are measured from the Herschel PACS observations of the LIRGs in the GOALS survey and estimated for the rest of the sample based on the far-IR luminosity and color. The sample covers 91.3% of the sky and is complete at $S_{60\\mu m} > 5.24 Jy$. We calculated the completeness as a function of [CII] line luminosity and distance, based on the far-IR color and flux densities. The [CII] luminosity function is constrained in the range $\\sim 10^{7-9} \\ L_{\\odot}$ from both the 1/Vmax and the STY maximum likelihood methods. The shape of our derived [CII] emission line luminosity function agrees well with the IR luminosity function. For the CO(1-0) and [CII] luminosity functions to agree, we propose a varying ratio of [CII]/CO(1-0) as a function of CO luminosity, with larger ratios for fainter CO luminosities. Limited [CII] high redshift observations as well as estimates based on the IR and UV luminosity functions, are suggestive of an evolution in the [CII] luminosity function similar to the evolution trend of the cosmic star formation rate density. ALMA with full capability will be able to confirm this prediction.

  18. Higher order mode filter design for double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC high luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, B.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burt, G.; Calaga, R.; Capatina, O.; Hall, B.; Jones, T.; Skaritka, J.; Verdu-Andres, S.; Wu, Q.

    2015-05-03

    A Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A compact Higher Order Mode (HOM) filter with wide stop band at the deflecting mode is developed for this cavity. Multiphysics finite element simulation results are presented. The integration of this design to the cavity cryomodule is described.

  19. Luminosity monitor at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Franklin, M.E.B.

    1981-02-01

    The luminosity monitor system utilized by the MKII Detector and by the PEP operators is described. This system processes information from 56 photomultipliers and calculates independent luminosities for each of the 3 colliding bunches in PEP. Design considerations, measurement techniques, and sources of error in the luminosity measurement are discussed.

  20. Chromaticity and low-β insertions in particle colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autin, Bruno

    1990-12-01

    Besides its energy range, the main characteristic of a particle collider is its luminosity. A very important piece of equipment to achieve high luminosities is a low-β insertion, a device which focuses the beam down to a tiny spot size. The focusing limits are not only technological, they are also associated with the aberrations of such systems. This paper deals with the chromatic aberrations. In a first part, the treatment of the focusing errors is reviewed and a formalism using symbolic computation is set up so that high-order perturbations can be evaluated, although results are limited to the second-order betatron tune shift and to its interpretation. In a second part, a completely analytical theory of the final doublet of a low-β insertion is given for a special model of flat-beam focusing.

  1. Mapping IS6110 in high-copy number Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains shows specific insertion points in the Beijing genotype

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains are characterized by a large number of IS6110 copies, suggesting the potential implication of this element in the virulence and capacity for rapid dissemination characteristic of this family. This work studies the insetion points of IS6110 in high-copy clinical isolates specifically focusing on the Beijing genotype. Results In the present work we mapped the insertion points of IS6110 in all the Beijing strains available in the literature and in the DNA sequence databases. We generated a representative primer collection of the IS6110 locations, which was used to analyse 61 high-copy clinical isolates. A total of 440 points of insertion were identified and analysis of their flanking regions determined the exact location, the direct repeats (DRs), the orientation and the distance to neighboring genes of each copy of IS6110. We identified specific points of insertion in Beijing strains that enabled us to obtain a dendrogram that groups the Beijing genotype. Conclusions This work presents a detailed analysis of locations of IS6110 in high-copy clinical isolates, showing points of insertion present with high frequency in the Beijing family and absent in other strains. PMID:23800083

  2. Efficient screening of long terminal repeat retrotransposons that show high insertion polymorphism via high-throughput sequencing of the primer binding site.

    PubMed

    Monden, Yuki; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Ikeo, Kazuho; Nakazawa, Yoshiko; Waki, Takamitsu; Hirashima, Keita; Uchimura, Yosuke; Tahara, Makoto

    2014-05-01

    Retrotransposons have been used frequently for the development of molecular markers by using their insertion polymorphisms among cultivars, because multiple copies of these elements are dispersed throughout the genome and inserted copies are inherited genetically. Although a large number of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon families exist in the higher eukaryotic genomes, the identification of families that show high insertion polymorphism has been challenging. Here, we performed an efficient screening of these retrotransposon families using an Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencing platform with comprehensive LTR library construction based on the primer binding site (PBS), which is located adjacent to the 5' LTR and has a motif that is universal and conserved among LTR retrotransposon families. The paired-end sequencing library of the fragments containing a large number of LTR sequences and their insertion sites was sequenced for seven strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duchesne) cultivars and one diploid wild species (Fragaria vesca L.). Among them, we screened 24 families with a "unique" insertion site that appeared only in one cultivar and not in any others, assuming that this type of insertion should have occurred quite recently. Finally, we confirmed experimentally the selected LTR families showed high insertion polymorphisms among closely related cultivars.

  3. Quantitative insertion-site sequencing (QIseq) for high throughput phenotyping of transposon mutants.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Iraad F; Otto, Thomas D; Zhang, Min; Udenze, Kenneth; Wang, Chengqi; Quail, Michael A; Jiang, Rays H Y; Adams, John H; Rayner, Julian C

    2016-07-01

    Genetic screening using random transposon insertions has been a powerful tool for uncovering biology in prokaryotes, where whole-genome saturating screens have been performed in multiple organisms. In eukaryotes, such screens have proven more problematic, in part because of the lack of a sensitive and robust system for identifying transposon insertion sites. We here describe quantitative insertion-site sequencing, or QIseq, which uses custom library preparation and Illumina sequencing technology and is able to identify insertion sites from both the 5' and 3' ends of the transposon, providing an inbuilt level of validation. The approach was developed using piggyBac mutants in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum but should be applicable to many other eukaryotic genomes. QIseq proved accurate, confirming known sites in >100 mutants, and sensitive, identifying and monitoring sites over a >10,000-fold dynamic range of sequence counts. Applying QIseq to uncloned parasites shortly after transfections revealed multiple insertions in mixed populations and suggests that >4000 independent mutants could be generated from relatively modest scales of transfection, providing a clear pathway to genome-scale screens in P. falciparum QIseq was also used to monitor the growth of pools of previously cloned mutants and reproducibly differentiated between deleterious and neutral mutations in competitive growth. Among the mutants with fitness defects was a mutant with a piggyBac insertion immediately upstream of the kelch protein K13 gene associated with artemisinin resistance, implying mutants in this gene may have competitive fitness costs. QIseq has the potential to enable the scale-up of piggyBac-mediated genetics across multiple eukaryotic systems.

  4. Generation of highly N-type, defect passivated transition metal oxides using plasma fluorine insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, L. Robert; Seo, Hyungtak; Hervier, Antoine; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2016-04-12

    A new composition of matter is disclosed wherein oxygen vacancies in a semiconducting transition metal oxide such as titanium dioxide are filled with a halogen such as Fluorine, whereby the conductivity of the composition is greatly enhanced, while at the same time the chemical stability of the composition is greatly improved. Stoichiometric titanium dioxide having less than 3 % oxygen vacancies is subject to fluorine insertion such that oxygen vacancies are filled, limited amounts of fluorine replace additional oxygen atoms and fluorine interstitially inserts into the body of the TiO.sub.2 composition.

  5. High risk of deep vein thrombosis associated with peripherally inserted central catheters in lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao-Feng; Wang, Yu; Liu, Pan-Pan; Bi, Xi-Wen; Sun, Peng; Lin, Tong-Yu; Jiang, Wen-Qi; Li, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are widely used in cancer patients. Although PICC is a convenient tool, its use is associated with an obvious increase in the incidence of venous thrombosis. The risk factors for deep vein thrombosis associated with the use of PICCs in cancer patients are largely unexplored. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of PICC-associated thrombosis in lymphoma compared with its incidences in other types of cancer. A total of 8028 adult cancer patients inserted with PICC between June 2007 and June 2015 were included in this study. A total of 249 of the 8028 included patients (3.1%) inserted with PICC developed upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (PICC-UEDVT). Patients with lymphoma were more likely to have PICC-UEDVT than those with other types of malignancies (7.1% vs. 2.80%; P < 0.001). Logistic analysis revealed that a lymphoma diagnosis was a risk factor for UEDVT in cancer patients inserted with PICC (OR: 3.849, 95% CI: 2.334–6.347). Patients with lymphoma may be more predisposed to developing PICC-UEDVT than those with other types of malignancies. Identifying the mechanism underlying the relationship between PICC-UEDVT and lymphoma requires further study. PMID:27078849

  6. B_c Meson Production Around the Z^0 Peak at a High Luminosity e^+ e^- Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhi; Wu, Xing-Gang; Chen, Gu; Liao, Qi-Li; Zhang, Jia-Wei; /Chongqing U.

    2012-05-22

    Considering the possibility to build an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the energies around the Z{sup 0}-boson resonance with a planned luminosity so high as L {proportional_to} 10{sup 34} {approx} 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} (super Z-factory), we make a detailed discussion on the (c{bar b})-quarkonium production through e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} (c{bar b})[n] + b + {bar c} within the framework of non-relativistic QCD. Here [n] stands for the Fock-states |(c{sub b}){sub 1}[{sup 1}S{sub 0}]>, |(c{bar b})8[{sup 1}S{sub 0}]g>, |(c{bar b} ){sub 1}[{sup 3}S{sub 1}]>, |(c{bar b}){sub 8}[{sup 3}S{sub 1}]g>, |(c{bar b}){sub 1}[{sup 1}P{sub 1}]> and |(c{bar b}){sub 1}[{sup 3}P{sub J}]> (with J = (1, 2, 3)) respectively. To simplify the hard-scattering amplitude as much as possible and to derive analytic expressions for the purpose of future events simulation, we adopt the 'improved trace technology' to do our calculation, which deals with the hard scattering amplitude directly at the amplitude level other than the conventional way at the squared-amplitude level. Total cross-section uncertainties caused by the quark masses are predicted by taking m{sub c} = 1.50 {+-} 0.30 GeV and m{sub b} = 4.90 {+-} 0.40 GeV. If all higher (c{bar b})-quarkonium states decay to the ground state B{sub c} (|(c{bar b}){sub 1}[{sup 1}S{sub 0}]>) with 100% efficiency, we obtain {sigma}{sub e{sup +}+e{sup -}{yields}B{sub c}+b+{bar c}} = 5.190{sub -2.419}{sup +6.222} pb, which shows that about 10{sup 5} {approx} 10{sup 7} B{sub c} events per operation year can be accumulated in the super Z-factory. If taking the collider energy runs slightly off the Z{sup 0}-peak, i.e. {radical}S = (1.00 {+-} 0.05)m{sub Z}, the total cross-section shall be lowered by about one-order from its peak value. Such a super Z-factory shall provide another useful platform to study the properties of B{sub c} meson, or even the properties of its excited P-wave states, in addition to its production at the hadronic colliders

  7. The High-Luminosity upgrade of the LHC: Physics and Technology Challenges for the Accelerator and the Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Burkhard

    2016-04-01

    In the second phase of the LHC physics program, the accelerator will provide an additional integrated luminosity of about 2500/fb over 10 years of operation to the general purpose detectors ATLAS and CMS. This will substantially enlarge the mass reach in the search for new particles and will also greatly extend the potential to study the properties of the Higgs boson discovered at the LHC in 2012. In order to meet the experimental challenges of unprecedented pp luminosity, the experiments will need to address the aging of the present detectors and to improve the ability to isolate and precisely measure the products of the most interesting collisions. The lectures gave an overview of the physics motivation and described the conceptual designs and the expected performance of the upgrades of the four major experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb, along with the plans to develop the appropriate experimental techniques and a brief overview of the accelerator upgrade. Only some key points of the upgrade program of the four major experiments are discussed in this report; more information can be found in the references given at the end.

  8. STELLAR VELOCITY DISPERSION MEASUREMENTS IN HIGH-LUMINOSITY QUASAR HOSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE AGN BLACK HOLE MASS SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Grier, C. J.; Martini, P.; Peterson, B. M.; Pogge, R. W.; Zu, Y.; Watson, L. C.; Bentz, M. C.; Dasyra, K. M.; Dietrich, M.; Ferrarese, L.

    2013-08-20

    We present new stellar velocity dispersion measurements for four luminous quasars with the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer instrument and the ALTAIR laser guide star adaptive optics system on the Gemini North 8 m telescope. Stellar velocity dispersion measurements and measurements of the supermassive black hole (BH) masses in luminous quasars are necessary to investigate the coevolution of BHs and galaxies, trace the details of accretion, and probe the nature of feedback. We find that higher-luminosity quasars with higher-mass BHs are not offset with respect to the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation exhibited by lower-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with lower-mass BHs, nor do we see correlations with galaxy morphology. As part of this analysis, we have recalculated the virial products for the entire sample of reverberation-mapped AGNs and used these data to redetermine the mean virial factor (f) that places the reverberation data on the quiescent M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation. With our updated measurements and new additions to the AGN sample, we obtain (f) = 4.31 {+-} 1.05, which is slightly lower than, but consistent with, most previous determinations.

  9. Testing Design and Response of Multi-anode Photo-multiplier Tubes in High-rate Environments for Use in Future High-luminosity Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolone, Michael; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Joosten, Sylvester; Rehfuss, Melanie; Duran, Burcu

    2016-09-01

    As future experiments are designed on the edge of the high luminosity frontier, such as the proposed experiments for the SoLID detector at Jefferson Lab or the EIC, development of stable and efficient detectors capable of handling a high rate environment is crucial to their success. Multi-anode photo-multiplier tubes (MaPMTs), as a newer technology that is sensitive to the spatial distribution of intensity across its surface, are replacing traditional tube PMTs in many proposed experimental devices. In comparison to standard quartz-glass PMTs, MaPMT's are more cost effective, can be tiled to cover a detection plane more uniformly, and can be coated with wavelength shifting p-Terphenyl to provide similar detection efficiency in the UV spectrum. We have designed a prototype Cherenkov to test the capabilities of Hamamatsu 12700C MaPMTs in high rate conditions. Specifics of the Cherenkov detector and electronics design, as well as the response of the MaPMTs, will be presented. This work is supported through DOE Grant DE-FG02-94ER4084.

  10. Characterizing luminosity evolution in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; McCrory, E.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    We derive an approximate form of a luminosity evolution in a high intensity hadron collider taking into account the most important phenomena of intrabeam scattering (IBS), beam burn-up due to luminosity and beam-beam effects. It is well known that an exponential decay does not describe luminosity evolution very well unless the lifetime is allowed to vary with time. However, a ''1/time'' evolution, which this derivation shows is a good approximation, fits data from the Tevatron well.

  11. Insert Coil Test for HEP High Field Magnets Using YBCO Coated Conductor Tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, V.; Barzi, E.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-15

    The final beam cooling stages of a Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields of 30-50 T. In this paper we present progress in insert coil development using commercially available YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} Coated Conductor. Technological aspects covered in the development, including coil geometry, insulation, manufacturing process and testing are summarized and discussed. Test results of double pancake coils operated in liquid nitrogen and liquid helium are presented and compared with the performance of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} tape short samples.

  12. (N2)6Ne7: A High Pressure van der Waals Insertion Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plisson, Thomas; Weck, Gunnar; Loubeyre, Paul

    2014-07-01

    The binary phase diagram of N2-Ne mixtures has been measured at 296 K by visual observation and Raman spectroscopy. The topology of the phase diagram points to the existence of the stoichiometric compound (N2)6Ne7. Its structure has been solved by single-crystal synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The N2 molecules form a guest lattice that hosts the Ne atoms. This insertion compound can be viewed as a clathrate with the centers of the N2 molecules forming distorted dodecahedron cages, each enclosing 14 Ne atoms. Remarkably, the (N2)6Ne7 compound is somehow the first clathrate organized by the quadrupolar interaction.

  13. (N(2))(6)Ne(7): A high pressure van der Waals insertion compound.

    PubMed

    Plisson, Thomas; Weck, Gunnar; Loubeyre, Paul

    2014-07-11

    The binary phase diagram of N(2)-Ne mixtures has been measured at 296 K by visual observation and Raman spectroscopy. The topology of the phase diagram points to the existence of the stoichiometric compound N(2))(6)Ne(7). Its structure has been solved by single-crystal synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The N(2) molecules form a guest lattice that hosts the Ne atoms. This insertion compound can be viewed as a clathrate with the centers of the N(2) molecules forming distorted dodecahedron cages, each enclosing 14 Ne atoms. Remarkably, the N(2))(6)Ne(7) compound is somehow the first clathrate organized by the quadrupolar interaction.

  14. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube insertion; G-tube insertion; PEG tube insertion; Stomach tube insertion; Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion ... and down the esophagus, which leads to the stomach. After the endoscopy tube is inserted, the skin ...

  15. Construction of a linkage map based on retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms in sweetpotato via high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Monden, Yuki; Hara, Takuya; Okada, Yoshihiro; Jahana, Osamu; Kobayashi, Akira; Tabuchi, Hiroaki; Onaga, Shoko; Tahara, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is an outcrossing hexaploid species with a large number of chromosomes (2n = 6x = 90). Although sweetpotato is one of the world's most important crops, genetic analysis of the species has been hindered by its genetic complexity combined with the lack of a whole genome sequence. In the present study, we constructed a genetic linkage map based on retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms using a mapping population derived from a cross between 'Purple Sweet Lord' (PSL) and '90IDN-47' cultivars. High-throughput sequencing and subsequent data analyses identified many Rtsp-1 retrotransposon insertion sites, and their allele dosages (simplex, duplex, triplex, or double-simplex) were determined based on segregation ratios in the mapping population. Using a pseudo-testcross strategy, 43 and 47 linkage groups were generated for PSL and 90IDN-47, respectively. Interestingly, most of these insertions (~90%) were present in a simplex manner, indicating their utility for linkage map construction in polyploid species. Additionally, our approach led to savings of time and labor for genotyping. Although the number of markers herein was insufficient for map-based cloning, our trial analysis exhibited the utility of retrotransposon-based markers for linkage map construction in sweetpotato.

  16. Construction of a linkage map based on retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms in sweetpotato via high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Monden, Yuki; Hara, Takuya; Okada, Yoshihiro; Jahana, Osamu; Kobayashi, Akira; Tabuchi, Hiroaki; Onaga, Shoko; Tahara, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is an outcrossing hexaploid species with a large number of chromosomes (2n = 6x = 90). Although sweetpotato is one of the world’s most important crops, genetic analysis of the species has been hindered by its genetic complexity combined with the lack of a whole genome sequence. In the present study, we constructed a genetic linkage map based on retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms using a mapping population derived from a cross between ‘Purple Sweet Lord’ (PSL) and ‘90IDN-47’ cultivars. High-throughput sequencing and subsequent data analyses identified many Rtsp-1 retrotransposon insertion sites, and their allele dosages (simplex, duplex, triplex, or double-simplex) were determined based on segregation ratios in the mapping population. Using a pseudo-testcross strategy, 43 and 47 linkage groups were generated for PSL and 90IDN-47, respectively. Interestingly, most of these insertions (~90%) were present in a simplex manner, indicating their utility for linkage map construction in polyploid species. Additionally, our approach led to savings of time and labor for genotyping. Although the number of markers herein was insufficient for map-based cloning, our trial analysis exhibited the utility of retrotransposon-based markers for linkage map construction in sweetpotato. PMID:26069444

  17. MR-compatibility of a high-resolution small animal PET insert operating inside a 7 T MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiessen, J. D.; Shams, E.; Stortz, G.; Schellenberg, G.; Bishop, D.; Khan, M. S.; Kozlowski, P.; Retière, F.; Sossi, V.; Thompson, C. J.; Goertzen, A. L.

    2016-11-01

    A full-ring PET insert consisting of 16 PET detector modules was designed and constructed to fit within the 114 mm diameter gradient bore of a Bruker 7 T MRI. The individual detector modules contain two silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays, dual-layer offset LYSO crystal arrays, and high-definition multimedia interface (HDMI) cables for both signal and power transmission. Several different RF shielding configurations were assessed prior to construction of a fully assembled PET insert using a combination of carbon fibre and copper foil for RF shielding. MR-compatibility measurements included field mapping of the static magnetic field (B 0) and the time-varying excitation field (B 1) as well as acquisitions with multiple pulse sequences: spin echo (SE), rapid imaging with refocused echoes (RARE), fast low angle shot (FLASH) gradient echo, and echo planar imaging (EPI). B 0 field maps revealed a small degradation in the mean homogeneity (+0.1 ppm) when the PET insert was installed and operating. No significant change was observed in the B 1 field maps or the image homogeneity of various MR images, with a 9% decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) observed only in EPI images acquired with the PET insert installed and operating. PET detector flood histograms, photopeak amplitudes, and energy resolutions were unchanged in individual PET detector modules when acquired during MRI operation. There was a small baseline shift on the PET detector signals due to the switching amplifiers used to power MRI gradient pulses. This baseline shift was observable when measured with an oscilloscope and varied as a function of the gradient duty cycle, but had no noticeable effect on the performance of the PET detector modules. Compact front-end electronics and effective RF shielding led to minimal cross-interference between the PET and MRI systems. Both PET detector and MRI performance was excellent, whether operating as a standalone system or a hybrid PET/MRI.

  18. MR-compatibility of a high-resolution small animal PET insert operating inside a 7 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, J D; Shams, E; Stortz, G; Schellenberg, G; Bishop, D; Khan, M S; Kozlowski, P; Retière, F; Sossi, V; Thompson, C J; Goertzen, A L

    2016-11-21

    A full-ring PET insert consisting of 16 PET detector modules was designed and constructed to fit within the 114 mm diameter gradient bore of a Bruker 7 T MRI. The individual detector modules contain two silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays, dual-layer offset LYSO crystal arrays, and high-definition multimedia interface (HDMI) cables for both signal and power transmission. Several different RF shielding configurations were assessed prior to construction of a fully assembled PET insert using a combination of carbon fibre and copper foil for RF shielding. MR-compatibility measurements included field mapping of the static magnetic field (B 0) and the time-varying excitation field (B 1) as well as acquisitions with multiple pulse sequences: spin echo (SE), rapid imaging with refocused echoes (RARE), fast low angle shot (FLASH) gradient echo, and echo planar imaging (EPI). B 0 field maps revealed a small degradation in the mean homogeneity (+0.1 ppm) when the PET insert was installed and operating. No significant change was observed in the B 1 field maps or the image homogeneity of various MR images, with a 9% decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) observed only in EPI images acquired with the PET insert installed and operating. PET detector flood histograms, photopeak amplitudes, and energy resolutions were unchanged in individual PET detector modules when acquired during MRI operation. There was a small baseline shift on the PET detector signals due to the switching amplifiers used to power MRI gradient pulses. This baseline shift was observable when measured with an oscilloscope and varied as a function of the gradient duty cycle, but had no noticeable effect on the performance of the PET detector modules. Compact front-end electronics and effective RF shielding led to minimal cross-interference between the PET and MRI systems. Both PET detector and MRI performance was excellent, whether operating as a standalone system or a hybrid PET/MRI.

  19. Hiding from the moonlight: luminosity and temperature affect activity of Asian nocturnal primates in a highly seasonal forest.

    PubMed

    Starr, Carly; Nekaris, K A I; Leung, Luke

    2012-01-01

    The effect of moonlight and temperature on activity of slow lorises was previously little known and this knowledge might be useful for understanding many aspects of their behavioural ecology, and developing strategies to monitor and protect populations. In this study we aimed to determine if the activity of the pygmy loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus) is affected by ambient temperature and/or moonlight in a mixed deciduous forest. We radio-collared five females and five males in the Seima Protection Forest, Cambodia, in February to May, 2008 and January to March, 2009 and recorded their behaviour at 5 minutes intervals, totalling 2736 observations. We classified each observation as either inactive (sleeping or alert) or active behaviour (travel, feeding, grooming, or others). Moon luminosity (bright/dark) and ambient temperature were recorded for each observation. The response variable, activity, was binary (active or inactive), and a logit link function was used. Ambient temperature alone did not significantly affect mean activity. Although mean activity was significantly affected by moonlight, the interaction between moonlight and temperature was also significant: on bright nights, studied animals were increasingly more active with higher temperature; and on dark nights they were consistently active regardless of temperature. The most plausible explanation is that on bright cold nights the combined risk of being seen and attacked by predators and heat loss outweigh the benefit of active behaviours.

  20. Second-generation coil design of the Nb3Sn low-β quadrupole for the high luminosity LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Bermudez, S. Izquierdo; Ambrosio, G.; Ballarino, A.; ...

    2016-01-18

    As part of the Large Hadron Collider Luminosity upgrade (HiLumi-LHC) program, the US LARP collaboration and CERN are working together to design and build a 150 mm aperture Nb3Sn quadrupole for the LHC interaction regions. A first series of 1.5 m long coils were fabricated and assembled in a first short model. A detailed visual inspection of the coils was carried out to investigate cable dimensional changes during heat treatment and the position of the windings in the coil straight section and in the end region. The analyses allow identifying a set of design changes which, combined with a finemore » tune of the cable geometry and a field quality optimization, were implemented in a new, second-generation, coil design. In this study, we review the main characteristics of the first generation coils, describe the modification in coil lay-out, and discuss their impact on parts design and magnet analysis.« less

  1. Development of an FPW Biosensor with Low Insertion Loss and High Fabrication Yield for Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Je-Wei; Huang, I-Yu; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Chang-Yu; Chen, Jian-Lin; Hsieh, Chia-Hsu

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, various flexural plate-wave (FPW)-based biosensors with low phase velocity, low operation frequency, high sensitivity, and short response time, have been developed. However, conventional FPW transducers have low fabrication yield because controlling the thickness of silicon/isolation/metal/piezoelectric multilayer floating thin-plate is difficult. Additionally, conventional FPW devices usually have high insertion loss because of wave energy dissipation to the silicon substrate or outside area of the output interdigital transducers (IDTs). These two disadvantages hinder the application of FPW devices. To reduce the high insertion loss of FPW devices, we designed two focus-type IDTs (fan-shaped and circular, respectively) that can effectively confine the launched wave energy, and adopted a focus-type silicon-grooved reflective grating structure (RGS) that can reduce the wave propagation loss. To accurately control the thickness of the silicon thin-plate and substantially improve the fabrication yield of FPW transducers, a 60 °C/27 °C two-step anisotropic wet etching process was developed. Compared with conventional FPW devices (with parallel-type IDTs and without RGS), the proposed FPW devices have lower insertion loss (36.04 dB) and higher fabrication yield (63.88%). Furthermore, by using cystamine-based self-assembled monolayer (SAM) nanotechnology, we used the improved FPW device to develop a novel FPW-based carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) biosensor for detection of colorectal cancer, and this FPW-CEA biosensor has a low detection limit (5 ng/mL), short response time (<10 min), high sensitivity (60.16–70.06 cm2/g), and high sensing linearity (R-square = 0.859–0.980). PMID:27834798

  2. Bright end of the luminosity function of high-mass X-ray binaries: contributions of hard, soft and supersoft sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, S.; Khabibullin, I.

    2017-04-01

    Using a spectral analysis of bright Chandra X-ray sources located in 27 nearby galaxies and maps of star-formation rate (SFR) and interstellar medium surface densities for these galaxies, we constructed the intrinsic X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of luminous high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), taking into account absorption effects and the diversity of HMXB spectra. The XLF per unit SFR can be described by a power-law dN/dlog LX,unabs ≈ 2.0(LX,unabs/1039 erg s-1)-0.6 (M⊙ yr-1)-1 from LX,unabs = 1038 to 1040.5 erg s-1, where LX,unabs is the unabsorbed luminosity at 0.25-8 keV. The intrinsic number of luminous HMXBs per unit SFR is a factor of ∼2.3 larger than the observed number reported before. The intrinsic XLF is composed of hard, soft and supersoft sources (defined here as those with the 0.25-2 keV to 0.25-8 keV flux ratio of <0.6, 0.6-0.95 and >0.95, respectively) in ∼ 2:1:1 proportion. We also constructed the intrinsic HMXB XLF in the soft X-ray band (0.25-2 keV). Here, the numbers of hard, soft and supersoft sources prove to be nearly equal. The cumulative present-day 0.25-2 keV emissivity of HMXBs with luminosities between 1038 and 1040.5 erg s-1 is ∼5 × 1039 erg s-1(M⊙ yr-1)-1, which may be relevant for studying the X-ray preheating of the early Universe.

  3. Metal-film subwavelength-grating polarizer with low insertion losses and high extinction ratios in the terahertz region.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Kazuo; Muraki, Kengo

    2015-06-29

    A metal-film subwavelength-grating polarizer with high performance in the terahertz region is presented. The polarizer was obtained by depositing a thin Au film on a resin grating with a triangular cross section duplicated from a metal mold by using the imprinting method. Microstructural parameters were investigated in detail. Measured insertion losses were less than 0.5 dB in the frequency range of 0.5-3 THz, while extinction ratios were 50 dB in the range of 0.5-2.3 THz. The proposed fabrication method is suited to mass production of large-aperture robust polarizers.

  4. A Novel Protein Domain Induces High Affinity Selenocysteine Insertion Sequence Binding and Elongation Factor Recruitment*

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Jesse; Caban, Kelvin; Ranaweera, Ruchira; Gonzalez-Flores, Jonathan N.; Copeland, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec) is incorporated at UGA codons in mRNAs possessing a Sec insertion sequence (SECIS) element in their 3′-untranslated region. At least three additional factors are necessary for Sec incorporation: SECIS-binding protein 2 (SBP2), Sec-tRNASec, and a Sec-specific translation elongation factor (eEFSec). The C-terminal half of SBP2 is sufficient to promote Sec incorporation in vitro, which is carried out by the concerted action of a novel Sec incorporation domain and an L7Ae RNA-binding domain. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis, we show that two distinct regions of the Sec incorporation domain are required for Sec incorporation. Physical separation of the Sec incorporation and RNA-binding domains revealed that they are able to function in trans and established a novel role of the Sec incorporation domain in promoting SECIS and eEFSec binding to the SBP2 RNA-binding domain. We propose a model in which SECIS binding induces a conformational change in SBP2 that recruits eEFSec, which in concert with the Sec incorporation domain gains access to the ribosomal A site. PMID:18948268

  5. Search for single production of the heavy vectorlike T quark with T →t h and h →γ γ at the high-luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao-Bei

    2017-02-01

    The vectorlike top partners T are predicted in many extensions of the Standard Model (SM). In a simplified model including a single vectorlike T quark with charge 2 /3 , we investigate the process p p →T j induced by the couplings between the top partner with the first and the third generation quarks at the LHC. We find that the mixing with the first generation can enhance the production cross section. We further study the observability of the single heavy top partner through the process p p →T (→t h )j →t (→b ℓνℓ)h (→γ γ )j at the high-luminosity (HL)-LHC (a 14 TeV p p collider with an integrated luminosity of 3 ab-1 ). For three typical heavy T quark masses mT=600 , 800 and 1000 GeV, the 3 σ exclusion limits, as well as the 5 σ discovery reach in the parameter plane of the two variables g*-RL, are respectively obtained at the HL-LHC.

  6. The First Detection of [O IV] from an Ultraluminous X-ray Source with Spitzer. II. Evidence for High Luminosity in Holmberg II ULX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berghea, C. T.; Dudik, R. P.; Weaver, K. A.; Kallman, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    This is the second of two papers examining Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in Holmberg II. Here we perform detailed photoionization modeling of they infrared lines. Our analysis suggests that the luminosity and morphology of the [O IV] 25.89 micron emission line is consistent with photoionization by the soft X-ray and far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from the accretion disk of the binary system and inconsistent with narrow beaming. We show that the emission nebula is matter-bounded both in the line of sight direction and to the east, and probably radiation-bounded to the west. A bolometric luminosity in excess of 1040 erg per second would be needed to produce the measured [O IV] flux. We use modeling and previously published studies to conclude that shacks likely contribute very little, if at all, to the high excitation line fluxes observed in the Holmberg II ULX. Additionally, we find that the spectral type of the companion star has a surprisingly strong effect on they predicted strength of the [O IV] emission. This finding could explain the origin of [O IV] hi some starburst systems containing black hole binaries.

  7. The First Detection of [O IV] from an Ultraluminous X-ray Source with Spitzer. 2; Evidence for High Luminosity in Holmberg II ULX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berghea, C. T.; Dudik, R. P.; Weaver, K. A.; Kallman, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    This is the second of two papers examining Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in Holmberg II. Here we perform detailed photoionization modeling of the infrared lines. Our analysis suggests that the luminosity and morphology of the [O IV] 25.89 micron emission line is consistent with photoionization by the soft X-ray and far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from the accretion disk of the binary system and inconsistent with narrow beaming. We show that the emission nebula is matter-bounded both in the line of sight direction and to the east, and probably radiation-bounded to the west. A bolometric luminosity in excess of 10(exp 40) erg/s would be needed to produce the measured [O IV] flux. We use modeling and previously published studies to conclude that shocks likely contribute very little, if at all, to the high-excitation line fluxes observed in the Holmberg II ULX. Additionally, we find that the spectral type of the companion star has a surprisingly strong effect on the predicted strength of the [O IV] emission. This finding could explain the origin of [O IV] in some starburst systems containing black hole binaries.

  8. The First Detection of (O IV) from an Ultraluminous X-Ray Source with Spitzer. 2. Evidence for High Luminosity in Holmberg II ULX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berghea, C T.; Dudik, R P.; Weaver, K A.; Kallman, T R.

    2010-01-01

    This is the second of two papers examining Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in Holmberg II. Here, we perform detailed photoionization modeling of the infrared lines. Our analysis suggests that the luminosity and morphology of the [Oiv] 25.89 micronmeters emission line is consistent with photoionization by the soft X-ray and far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from the accretion disk of the binary system and inconsistent with narrow beaming. We show that the emission nebula is matter bounded both in the line-of-sight direction and to the east, and probably radiation-bounded to the west. A bolometric luminosity in excess of 10(exp 40) erg s(exp -1) would be needed to produce the measured [O iv] flux. We use modeling and previously published studies to conclude that shocks likely contribute very little, if at all,to the high-ionization line fluxes observed in the Holmberg II ULX. Additionally, we find that the spectral type of the companion star has a surprisingly strong effect on the predicted strength of the [O iv] emission. This finding could explain the origin of [O iv] in some starburst systems containing black hole binaries.

  9. Mechanical studies towards a silicon micro-strip super module for the ATLAS inner detector upgrade at the high luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, G.; Cadoux, F.; Clark, A.; Endo, M.; Favre, Y.; Ferrere, D.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Hanagaki, K.; Hara, K.; Iacobucci, G.; Ikegami, Y.; Jinnouchi, O.; La Marra, D.; Nakamura, K.; Nishimura, R.; Perrin, E.; Seez, W.; Takubo, Y.; Takashima, R.; Terada, S.; Todome, K.; Unno, Y.; Weber, M.

    2014-04-01

    It is expected that after several years of data-taking, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) physics programme will be extended to the so-called High-Luminosity LHC, where the instantaneous luminosity will be increased up to 5 × 1034 cm-2 s-1. For the general-purpose ATLAS experiment at the LHC, a complete replacement of its internal tracking detector will be necessary, as the existing detector will not provide the required performance due to the cumulated radiation damage and the increase in the detector occupancy. The baseline layout for the new ATLAS tracker is an all-silicon-based detector, with pixel sensors in the inner layers and silicon micro-strip detectors at intermediate and outer radii. The super-module (SM) is an integration concept proposed for the barrel strip region of the future ATLAS tracker, where double-sided stereo silicon micro-strip modules (DSM) are assembled into a low-mass local support (LS) structure. Mechanical aspects of the proposed LS structure are described.

  10. Herschel-ATLAS Galaxy Counts and High-redshift Luminosity Functions: The Formation of Massive Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapi, A.; González-Nuevo, J.; Fan, L.; Bressan, A.; De Zotti, G.; Danese, L.; Negrello, M.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Maddox, S.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bonfield, D. G.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dariush, A.; Dye, S.; Fritz, J.; Herranz, D.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kaviraj, S.; López-Caniego, M.; Massardi, M.; Michałowski, M. J.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Rigby, E.; Rodighiero, G.; Serjeant, S.; Smith, D. J. B.; Temi, P.; Wardlow, J.; van der Werf, P.

    2011-11-01

    Exploiting the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey Science Demonstration Phase survey data, we have determined the luminosity functions (LFs) at rest-frame wavelengths of 100 and 250 μm and at several redshifts z >~ 1, for bright submillimeter galaxies with star formation rates (SFRs) >~ 100 M ⊙ yr-1. We find that the evolution of the comoving LF is strong up to z ≈ 2.5, and slows down at higher redshifts. From the LFs and the information on halo masses inferred from clustering analysis, we derived an average relation between SFR and halo mass (and its scatter). We also infer that the timescale of the main episode of dust-enshrouded star formation in massive halos (M H >~ 3 × 1012 M ⊙) amounts to ~7 × 108 yr. Given the SFRs, which are in the range of 102-103 M ⊙ yr-1, this timescale implies final stellar masses of the order of 1011-1012 M ⊙. The corresponding stellar mass function matches the observed mass function of passively evolving galaxies at z >~ 1. The comparison of the statistics for submillimeter and UV-selected galaxies suggests that the dust-free, UV bright phase is >~ 102 times shorter than the submillimeter bright phase, implying that the dust must form soon after the onset of star formation. Using a single reference spectral energy distribution (SED; the one of the z ≈ 2.3 galaxy SMM J2135-0102), our simple physical model is able to reproduce not only the LFs at different redshifts >1 but also the counts at wavelengths ranging from 250 μm to ≈1 mm. Owing to the steepness of the counts and their relatively broad frequency range, this result suggests that the dispersion of submillimeter SEDs of z > 1 galaxies around the reference one is rather small. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  11. Accelerator Science: Luminosity vs. Energy

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-09-28

    In the world of high energy physics there are several parameters that are important when one constructs a particle accelerator. Two crucial ones are the energy of the beam and the luminosity, which is another word for the number of particles in the beam. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the differences and the pros and cons. He even works in an unexpected sporting event.

  12. Accelerator Science: Luminosity vs. Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-09-19

    In the world of high energy physics there are several parameters that are important when one constructs a particle accelerator. Two crucial ones are the energy of the beam and the luminosity, which is another word for the number of particles in the beam. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the differences and the pros and cons. He even works in an unexpected sporting event.

  13. Detector Technologies for Sub-500um High-Sensitivity PET Imaging via a Novel PET Insert Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2011-12-21

    The objective of this project was to develop detector technologies that would enable an ultrahigh resolution Virtual Pinhole (VP) PET insert device to provide sub-500 um resolution high-sensitivity PET imaging of a mouse in the future. To achieve this goal, we proposed to develop and characterize finely pixellated cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors and the associated readout electronics with the following specific aims: 1. Develop pixellated CZT detectors with 350um pitches using 2-5 mm substrates; characterize their spatial, energy and timing performance through experiments; and optimize the anode design with steering grid if found necessary. 2. Develop a high-bandwidth readout system using a novel ASIC that can be directly bonded to CZT detectors with 2048 anodes of 350um pitches; optimize its overall performance for VP-PET applications considering the tradeoffs between spatial resolution (in 3D), count rate capability, timing and energy resolutions. 3. Evaluate the performance of a VP-PET insert based on the proposed detector technology through Monte Carlo simulation and experimental validation. Overall, we have completed all three specific aims and demonstrated that pixelated CZT detectors of 350um pitches, combined with VP-PET geometry, can provide PET image resolution of ~460 um FWHM for small animal imaging applications.

  14. A rotational and axial motion system load frame insert for in situ high energy x-ray studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shade, Paul A. Schuren, Jay C.; Turner, Todd J.; Blank, Basil; Kenesei, Peter; Goetze, Kurt; Lienert, Ulrich; Almer, Jonathan; Suter, Robert M.; Bernier, Joel V.; Li, Shiu Fai; Lind, Jonathan

    2015-09-15

    High energy x-ray characterization methods hold great potential for gaining insight into the behavior of materials and providing comparison datasets for the validation and development of mesoscale modeling tools. A suite of techniques have been developed by the x-ray community for characterizing the 3D structure and micromechanical state of polycrystalline materials; however, combining these techniques with in situ mechanical testing under well characterized and controlled boundary conditions has been challenging due to experimental design requirements, which demand new high-precision hardware as well as access to high-energy x-ray beamlines. We describe the design and performance of a load frame insert with a rotational and axial motion system that has been developed to meet these requirements. An example dataset from a deforming titanium alloy demonstrates the new capability.

  15. Effect of High-speed Milling tool path strategies on the surface roughness of Stavax ESR mold insert machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebrahitom, A.; Rizuan, D.; Azmir, M.; Nassif, M.

    2016-02-01

    High speed milling is one of the recent technologies used to produce mould inserts due to the need for high surface finish. It is a faster machining process where it uses a small side step and a small down step combined with very high spindle speed and feed rate. In order to effectively use the HSM capabilities, optimizing the tool path strategies and machining parameters is an important issue. In this paper, six different tool path strategies have been investigated on the surface finish and machining time of a rectangular cavities of ESR Stavax material. CAD/CAM application of CATIA V5 machining module for pocket milling of the cavities was used for process planning.

  16. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of a Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus: The Structure and Dynamics of M81*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A. J.; Nowak, M. A.; Markoff, S.; Marshall, H. L.; Canizares, C. R.

    2007-11-01

    We present Chandra HETGS observations of the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN) of M81. The HETGS is unique in providing high-resolution spectroscopy of the central 1" of M81, including the iron K bandpass. The continuum is a power law of photon index Γ=1.8, similar to that seen in highly luminous AGNs. Highly ionized emission lines, characteristic of gas at temperatures of T=106-108 K, are detected. Many of these thermal lines are velocity broadened, with a FWHM of approximately 1500 km s-1. A separate thermal component is associated with a 2557 km s-1 redshifted Fe XXVI emission line, characteristic of gas at temperatures T=107.4-108 K. Neutral Fe, Ar, and Si Kα fluorescence lines indicate the presence of cold, dense material. The Si Kα fluorescence line is velocity broadened, with a FWHM of 1200 km s-1. If the fluorescence lines are produced by reflection from cold, Compton thick material, then the line strengths are not compatible with solar abundances, instead favoring enhanced Ar and Si abundances with respect to the Fe abundance. The Fe Kα line is narrow, with no evidence of a thin disk extending inside 55rg (where rg=GM/c2 is the gravitational radius for a black hole of mass M). We show that a simple spectral model used to represent the expectations from a radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) describes the X-ray data well, while in a companion paper we will show that jet models with parameters similar to fits of hard state X-ray binaries describe both the X-ray and broadband (radio/optical) spectra. The HETGS spectra we present here offer an unprecedented view of the inner workings of a low-luminosity accretion flow, and thus can quantitatively constrain theoretical accretion flow models of LLAGNs such as M81*.

  17. The search for low-luminosity high-mass X-ray binaries and the study of X-ray populations in the Galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornasini, Francesca; Tomsick, John; Bodaghee, Arash; Rahoui, Farid; Krivonos, Roman; Corral-Santana, Jesus; An, Hongjun; Bauer, Franz E.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Stern, Daniel; NuSTAR Galactic Plane Survey Team

    2016-01-01

    High-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which consist of a neutron star (NS) or black hole (BH) accreting material from a massive stellar companion, provide valuable insights into the evolution of massive stars and the merger rates of NS/NS, NS/BH, and BH/BH binaries whose gravitational wave signatures will soon be detectable by facilities such as Advanced-LIGO. INTEGRAL discoveries of new classes of lower-luminosity HMXBs, some highly obscured and some showing extreme transient activity, as well as the recent discovery of the very quiescent and only known Be-BH binary, have considerably changed our understanding of clumping in massive stellar winds and the relative importance of different binary evolutionary channels. In order to better characterize the low-luminosity HMXB population, we have performed a survey of a square degree region in the direction of the Norma spiral arm with Chandra and NuSTAR. These surveys, combined with optical and infrared spectroscopic follow-up of the counterparts of hard X-ray sources, have yielded three HMXB candidates to date. Future radial-velocity follow-up of these candidates, as well as other Be HMXB candidates from the NuSTAR serendipitous survey, will help determine whether these sources truly are HMXBs and, if so, constrain the mass of the compact object in these systems. If confirmed, these HMXB candidates could extend our measurement of the HMXB luminosity function by about two orders of magnitude and provide important constraints on massive binary evolutionary models. In addition, the colliding wind binaries and pulsar wind nebulae discovered in the Norma X-ray survey will help shed light on other aspects of massive stellar evolution and massive stellar remnants. Finally, these surveys provide the opportunity to compare the hard X-ray populations in the Galactic disk and the Galactic Center. While the dominant hard X-ray populations in both of these Galactic regions appear to be cataclysmic variables (CVs), those in the Norma

  18. High pressure coolant effect on PVD coated inserts during end milling of Ti-6AL-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Arvind

    Titanium alloys are being employed extensively in engineering and aerospace applications for their high strength to weight ratio, mechanical strength and ability to withstand high temperatures. Out of the different alloys of titanium available, the most commonly used alloy is Ti-6Al-4V. It is also called `Grade-5 titanium alloy' or 'α+β titanium alloy'. High speed machining of titanium alloys generates high temperatures in the cutting zone, promoting accelerated tool wear and reducing the efficiency in metal cutting. Consequently, the ability of the coolant to remove heat from the cutting zone plays an increasingly important role in the economics of the process as well as on the life of tool inserts. With the introduction of thru-tool coolant delivery, the coolant can now be delivered directly at the point of machining without having to flood the area of machining. This research tries to address the effects that high pressure and thru-tool coolant has on insert wear while end milling Ti-6Al-4V. The parameters used in this study are speed, feed, axial depth of cut, radial depth of cut and coolant pressure. A structured design of experiments along with a central composite design approach is used to determine the main effects of coolant pressure and its interactions with the remaining parameters. The results show that, within the parameters of this experiment, coolant pressure was not a significant main effect. However, pressure seems to react positively with feed rate. Contributions from this research can be used to recommend settings of the cutting factors in order to obtain the minimal tool wear.

  19. Unusual features of negative leaders' development in natural lightning, according to simultaneous records of current, electric field, luminosity, and high-speed video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimaraes, Miguel; Arcanjo, Marcelo; Murta Vale, Maria Helena; Visacro, Silverio

    2017-02-01

    The development of downward and upward leaders that formed two negative cloud-to-ground return strokes in natural lightning, spaced only about 200 µs apart and terminating on ground only a few hundred meters away, was monitored at Morro do Cachimbo Station, Brazil. The simultaneous records of current, close electric field, relative luminosity, and corresponding high-speed video frames (sampling rate of 20,000 frames per second) reveal that the initiation of the first return stroke interfered in the development of the second negative leader, leading it to an apparent continuous development before the attachment, without stepping, and at a regular two-dimensional speed. Based on the experimental data, the formation processes of the two return strokes are discussed, and plausible interpretations for their development are provided.

  20. NLC Luminosity as a Function of Beam Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Yuri

    2002-06-06

    Realistic calculation of NLC luminosity has been performed using particle tracking in DIMAD and beam-beam simulations in GUINEA-PIG code for various values of beam emittance, energy and beta functions at the Interaction Point (IP). Results of the simulations are compared with analytic luminosity calculations. The optimum range of IP beta functions for high luminosity was identified.

  1. Efficient DNA fingerprinting based on the targeted sequencing of active retrotransposon insertion sites using a bench-top high-throughput sequencing platform.

    PubMed

    Monden, Yuki; Yamamoto, Ayaka; Shindo, Akiko; Tahara, Makoto

    2014-10-01

    In many crop species, DNA fingerprinting is required for the precise identification of cultivars to protect the rights of breeders. Many families of retrotransposons have multiple copies throughout the eukaryotic genome and their integrated copies are inherited genetically. Thus, their insertion polymorphisms among cultivars are useful for DNA fingerprinting. In this study, we conducted a DNA fingerprinting based on the insertion polymorphisms of active retrotransposon families (Rtsp-1 and LIb) in sweet potato. Using 38 cultivars, we identified 2,024 insertion sites in the two families with an Illumina MiSeq sequencing platform. Of these insertion sites, 91.4% appeared to be polymorphic among the cultivars and 376 cultivar-specific insertion sites were identified, which were converted directly into cultivar-specific sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using these insertion sites, which corresponded well with known pedigree information, thereby indicating their suitability for genetic diversity studies. Thus, the genome-wide comparative analysis of active retrotransposon insertion sites using the bench-top MiSeq sequencing platform is highly effective for DNA fingerprinting without any requirement for whole genome sequence information. This approach may facilitate the development of practical polymerase chain reaction-based cultivar diagnostic system and could also be applied to the determination of genetic relationships.

  2. Efficient DNA Fingerprinting Based on the Targeted Sequencing of Active Retrotransposon Insertion Sites Using a Bench-Top High-Throughput Sequencing Platform

    PubMed Central

    Monden, Yuki; Yamamoto, Ayaka; Shindo, Akiko; Tahara, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    In many crop species, DNA fingerprinting is required for the precise identification of cultivars to protect the rights of breeders. Many families of retrotransposons have multiple copies throughout the eukaryotic genome and their integrated copies are inherited genetically. Thus, their insertion polymorphisms among cultivars are useful for DNA fingerprinting. In this study, we conducted a DNA fingerprinting based on the insertion polymorphisms of active retrotransposon families (Rtsp-1 and LIb) in sweet potato. Using 38 cultivars, we identified 2,024 insertion sites in the two families with an Illumina MiSeq sequencing platform. Of these insertion sites, 91.4% appeared to be polymorphic among the cultivars and 376 cultivar-specific insertion sites were identified, which were converted directly into cultivar-specific sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using these insertion sites, which corresponded well with known pedigree information, thereby indicating their suitability for genetic diversity studies. Thus, the genome-wide comparative analysis of active retrotransposon insertion sites using the bench-top MiSeq sequencing platform is highly effective for DNA fingerprinting without any requirement for whole genome sequence information. This approach may facilitate the development of practical polymerase chain reaction-based cultivar diagnostic system and could also be applied to the determination of genetic relationships. PMID:24935865

  3. Large-scale preparation of graphene by high temperature insertion of hydrogen into graphite.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Ali Reza; Fray, Derek J

    2015-07-14

    Experimental evidence for high temperature diffusion of hydrogen into the interlayer space of graphite is provided. This process is discussed as a possible method for the rapid production of high-quality, inexpensive graphene in large quantities, which could lead to the widespread application of graphene. It was found that hydrogen cations, dissolved in molten LiCl, can be discharged on cathodically polarized graphite rods, which then intercalate into the graphite structure, leading to the peeling of graphite to produce graphene. The graphene nanosheets produced displayed a single-crystalline structure with a lateral size of several hundred nanometers and a high degree of crystallinity and thermal stability. The method introduced could be scaled up to produce industrial quantities of high-quality graphene.

  4. Cermet insert high voltage holdoff for ceramic/metal vacuum devices

    DOEpatents

    Ierna, William F.

    1987-01-01

    An improved metal-to-ceramic seal is provided wherein the ceramic body of the seal contains an integral region of cermet material in electrical contact with the metallic member, e.g., an electrode, of the seal. The seal is useful in high voltage vacuum devices, e.g., vacuum switches, and increases the high-voltage holdoff capabilities of such devices. A method of fabricating such seals is also provided.

  5. Cermet insert high voltage holdoff improvement for ceramic/metal vacuum devices

    DOEpatents

    Ierna, W.F.

    1986-03-11

    An improved metal-to-ceramic seal is provided wherein the ceramic body of the seal contains an integral region of cermet material in electrical contact with the metallic member, e.g., an electrode, of the seal. The seal is useful in high voltage vacuum devices, e.g., vacuum switches, and increases the high-voltage holdoff capabilities of such devices. A method of fabricating such seals is also provided.

  6. Insertion Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mahillon, Jacques; Chandler, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Insertion sequences (ISs) constitute an important component of most bacterial genomes. Over 500 individual ISs have been described in the literature to date, and many more are being discovered in the ongoing prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome-sequencing projects. The last 10 years have also seen some striking advances in our understanding of the transposition process itself. Not least of these has been the development of various in vitro transposition systems for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic elements and, for several of these, a detailed understanding of the transposition process at the chemical level. This review presents a general overview of the organization and function of insertion sequences of eubacterial, archaebacterial, and eukaryotic origins with particular emphasis on bacterial elements and on different aspects of the transposition mechanism. It also attempts to provide a framework for classification of these elements by assigning them to various families or groups. A total of 443 members of the collection have been grouped in 17 families based on combinations of the following criteria: (i) similarities in genetic organization (arrangement of open reading frames); (ii) marked identities or similarities in the enzymes which mediate the transposition reactions, the recombinases/transposases (Tpases); (iii) similar features of their ends (terminal IRs); and (iv) fate of the nucleotide sequence of their target sites (generation of a direct target duplication of determined length). A brief description of the mechanism(s) involved in the mobility of individual ISs in each family and of the structure-function relationships of the individual Tpases is included where available. PMID:9729608

  7. Pinhole Luminosity Monitor with Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J

    2004-05-17

    Previously, the generalized luminosity L was defined and calculated for all incident channels based on an NLC e{sup +}e{sup -} design. Alternatives were then considered to improve the differing beam-beam e{sup -}e{sup -} e{gamma} and {gamma}{gamma} channels. Regardless of the channel, there was a large flux of outgoing, high energy photons that were produced from the beam-beam interaction e.g. beamsstrahlung that needs to be disposed of and whose flux depended on L. One approach to this problem is to consider it a resource and attempt to take advantage of it by disposing of these straight-ahead photons in more useful ways than simply dumping them. While there are many options for monitoring the luminosity, any method that allows feedback and optimization in real time and in a non-intercepting and non-interfering way during normal data taking is extremely important--especially if it provides other capabilities such as high resolution tuning of spot sizes and can be used for all incident channels without essential modifications to their setup. Our ''pin-hole'' camera appears to be such a device if it can be made to work with high energy photons in ways that are compatible with the many other constraints and demands on space around the interaction region. The basis for using this method is that it has, in principle, the inherent resolution and bandwidth to monitor the very small spot sizes and their stabilities that are required for very high, integrated luminosity. While there are many possible, simultaneous uses of these outgoing photon beams, we limit our discussion to a single, blind, proof-of-principle experiment that was done on the FFTB line at SLAC to certify the concept of a camera obscura for high energy photons.

  8. Insertion of N2 into the Channels of AFI Zeolite under High Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Hang; yao, Mingguang; Li, Quanjun; Liu, Ran; Liu, Bo; Yao, Zhen; Liu, Dedi; Liu, Zhaodong; Liu, Jing; Chen, Zhiqiang; Zou, Bo; Cui, Tian; Liu, Bingbing

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental study of a new hybrid material where nitrogen is encapsulated in the channels of porous zeolite AlPO4-5 (AFI) single crystals by a high-pressure method. The high-pressure behavior of nitrogen confined inside the AFI nano-channels is then investigated by Raman spectroscopy up to 44 GPa. Under pressure, the Raman modes of confined nitrogen show behaviors different from those of the bulk nitrogen. After the return to atmospheric pressure, it is demonstrated that non-gaseous nitrogen can be effectively stabilized by being confined inside the intact AFI sample. This result provides new insight into nitrogen capture and storage technologies. PMID:26282881

  9. Apparatus for inserting and removing specimens from high temperature vacuum furnaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, C. W. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The apparatus comprises a high speed gate valve for isolating the interior of the furnance from an air lock chamber on the opposite side of the gate valve. The air lock chamber is provided with valve ports connected to a vacuum source, a source of inert quenching gas, and the atmosphere, respectively. Attached to the end of the air lock chamber away from the furnace is a cylindrical tube having disposed within it a rod carrying specimen pan at the end towards the furnace and having mounted at its top end an annular magnet having a diameter slightly less than the interior diameter of the tube. The top end of the tube is closed by a removeable cap. Encircling the tube in the vicinity of the magnet is a carbon steel ring which when axially moved along the tube causes the magnet to follow it and thereby controls the position of the rod and specimen pan within the tube.

  10. High-Throughput Parallel Sequencing to Measure Fitness of Leptospira interrogans Transposon Insertion Mutants during Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, James; Haake, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic species of Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease that causes mortality and morbidity worldwide. The understanding of the virulence mechanisms of Leptospira spp is still at an early stage due to the limited number of genetic tools available for this microorganism. The development of random transposon mutagenesis in pathogenic strains a decade ago has contributed to the identification of several virulence factors. In this study, we used the transposon sequencing (Tn-Seq) technique, which combines transposon mutagenesis with massive parallel sequencing, to study the in vivo fitness of a pool of Leptospira interrogans mutants. We infected hamsters with a pool of 42 mutants (input pool), which included control mutants with insertions in four genes previously analyzed by virulence testing (loa22, ligB, flaA1, and lic20111) and 23 mutants with disrupted signal transduction genes. We quantified the mutants in different tissues (blood, kidney and liver) at 4 days post-challenge by high-throughput sequencing and compared the frequencies of mutants recovered from tissues to their frequencies in the input pool. Control mutants that were less fit in the Tn-Seq experiment were attenuated for virulence when tested separately in the hamster model of lethal leptospirosis. Control mutants with unaltered fitness were as virulent as the wild-type strain. We identified two mutants with the transposon inserted in the same putative adenylate/guanylate cyclase gene (lic12327) that had reduced in vivo fitness in blood, kidney and liver. Both lic12327 mutants were attenuated for virulence when tested individually in hamsters. Growth of the control mutants and lic12327 mutants in culture medium were similar to that of the wild-type strain. These results demonstrate the feasibility of screening large pools of L. interrogans transposon mutants for those with altered fitness, and potentially attenuated virulence, by transposon sequencing. PMID

  11. High-Throughput Parallel Sequencing to Measure Fitness of Leptospira interrogans Transposon Insertion Mutants during Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Lourdault, Kristel; Matsunaga, James; Haake, David A

    2016-11-01

    Pathogenic species of Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease that causes mortality and morbidity worldwide. The understanding of the virulence mechanisms of Leptospira spp is still at an early stage due to the limited number of genetic tools available for this microorganism. The development of random transposon mutagenesis in pathogenic strains a decade ago has contributed to the identification of several virulence factors. In this study, we used the transposon sequencing (Tn-Seq) technique, which combines transposon mutagenesis with massive parallel sequencing, to study the in vivo fitness of a pool of Leptospira interrogans mutants. We infected hamsters with a pool of 42 mutants (input pool), which included control mutants with insertions in four genes previously analyzed by virulence testing (loa22, ligB, flaA1, and lic20111) and 23 mutants with disrupted signal transduction genes. We quantified the mutants in different tissues (blood, kidney and liver) at 4 days post-challenge by high-throughput sequencing and compared the frequencies of mutants recovered from tissues to their frequencies in the input pool. Control mutants that were less fit in the Tn-Seq experiment were attenuated for virulence when tested separately in the hamster model of lethal leptospirosis. Control mutants with unaltered fitness were as virulent as the wild-type strain. We identified two mutants with the transposon inserted in the same putative adenylate/guanylate cyclase gene (lic12327) that had reduced in vivo fitness in blood, kidney and liver. Both lic12327 mutants were attenuated for virulence when tested individually in hamsters. Growth of the control mutants and lic12327 mutants in culture medium were similar to that of the wild-type strain. These results demonstrate the feasibility of screening large pools of L. interrogans transposon mutants for those with altered fitness, and potentially attenuated virulence, by transposon sequencing.

  12. GAMA/WiggleZ: the 1.4 GHz radio luminosity functions of high- and low-excitation radio galaxies and their redshift evolution to z = 0.75

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pracy, Michael B.; Ching, John H. Y.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Croom, Scott M.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Couch, Warrick J.; Davis, Tamara M.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarvis, M. J.; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J.; Loveday, J.; Pimbblet, K. A.; Prescott, M.; Wisnioski, Emily; Woods, David

    2016-07-01

    We present radio active galactic nuclei (AGN) luminosity functions over the redshift range 0.005 < z < 0.75. The sample from which the luminosity functions are constructed is an optical spectroscopic survey of radio galaxies, identified from matched Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm survey (FIRST) sources and Sloan Digital Sky Survey images. The radio AGN are separated into low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and high-excitation radio galaxies (HERGs) using the optical spectra. We derive radio luminosity functions for LERGs and HERGs separately in the three redshift bins (0.005 < z < 0.3, 0.3 < z < 0.5 and 0.5 < z < 0.75). The radio luminosity functions can be well described by a double power law. Assuming this double power-law shape the LERG population displays little or no evolution over this redshift range evolving as {˜ } (1+z)^{0.06^{+0.17}_{-0.18}} assuming pure density evolution or {˜ } (1+z)^{0.46^{+0.22}_{-0.24}} assuming pure luminosity evolution. In contrast, the HERG population evolves more rapidly, best fitted by {˜ } (1+z)^{2.93^{+0.46}_{-0.47}} assuming a double power-law shape and pure density evolution. If a pure luminosity model is assumed, the best-fitting HERG evolution is parametrized by {˜ } (1+z)^{7.41^{+0.79}_{-1.33}}. The characteristic break in the radio luminosity function occurs at a significantly higher power (≳1 dex) for the HERG population in comparison to the LERGs. This is consistent with the two populations representing fundamentally different accretion modes.

  13. High-Throughput Genotyping of Green Algal Mutants Reveals Random Distribution of Mutagenic Insertion Sites and Endonucleolytic Cleavage of Transforming DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ru; Patena, Weronika; Armbruster, Ute; Gang, Spencer S; Blum, Sean R; Jonikas, Martin C

    2014-04-01

    A high-throughput genetic screening platform in a single-celled photosynthetic eukaryote would be a transformative addition to the plant biology toolbox. Here, we present ChlaMmeSeq (Chlamydomonas MmeI-based insertion site Sequencing), a tool for simultaneous mapping of tens of thousands of mutagenic insertion sites in the eukaryotic unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We first validated ChlaMmeSeq by in-depth characterization of individual insertion sites. We then applied ChlaMmeSeq to a mutant pool and mapped 11,478 insertions, covering 39% of annotated protein coding genes. We observe that insertions are distributed in a manner largely indistinguishable from random, indicating that mutants in nearly all genes can be obtained efficiently. The data reveal that sequence-specific endonucleolytic activities cleave the transforming DNA and allow us to propose a simple model to explain the origin of the poorly understood exogenous sequences that sometimes surround insertion sites. ChlaMmeSeq is quantitatively reproducible, enabling its use for pooled enrichment screens and for the generation of indexed mutant libraries. Additionally, ChlaMmeSeq allows genotyping of hits from Chlamydomonas screens on an unprecedented scale, opening the door to comprehensive identification of genes with roles in photosynthesis, algal lipid metabolism, the algal carbon-concentrating mechanism, phototaxis, the biogenesis and function of cilia, and other processes for which C. reinhardtii is a leading model system.

  14. Effect of primordial non-Gaussianities on the far-UV luminosity function of high-redshift galaxies: implications for cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevallard, Jacopo; Silk, Joseph; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Habouzit, Melanie; Mamon, Gary A.; Peirani, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how the intergalactic medium (IGM) was reionized at z ≳ 6 is one of the big challenges of current high-redshift astronomy. It requires modelling the collapse of the first astrophysical objects (Pop III stars, first galaxies) and their interaction with the IGM, while at the same time pushing current observational facilities to their limits. The observational and theoretical progress of the last few years have led to the emergence of a coherent picture in which the budget of hydrogen-ionizing photons is dominated by low-mass star-forming galaxies, with little contribution from Pop III stars and quasars. The reionization history of the Universe therefore critically depends on the number density of low-mass galaxies at high redshift. In this work, we explore how changes in the cosmological model, and in particular in the statistical properties of initial density fluctuations, affect the formation of early galaxies. Following Habouzit et al. (2014), we run five different N-body simulations with Gaussian and (scale-dependent) non-Gaussian initial conditions, all consistent with Planck constraints. By appealing to a phenomenological galaxy formation model and to a population synthesis code, we compute the far-UV galaxy luminosity function down to MFUV = -14 at redshift 7 ≤ z ≤ 15. We find that models with strong primordial non-Gaussianities on ≲ Mpc scales show a far-UV luminosity function significantly enhanced (up to a factor of 3 at z = 14) in low-mass galaxies. We adopt a reionization model calibrated from state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations and show that such scale-dependent non-Gaussianities leave a clear imprint on the Universe reionization history and electron Thomson scattering optical depth τe. Although current uncertainties in the physics of reionization and on the determination of τe still dominate the signatures of non-Gaussianities, our results suggest that τe could ultimately be used to constrain the statistical properties

  15. The First Detection of [O IV] from an Ultraluminous X-ray Source with Spitzer: Evidence of High Unbeamed Luminosity in Holmberg II ULX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berghea, C. T.; Dudik, R. P.; Weaver, K. A.; Kallman, T. R.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of the [O IV] 25.89 micron emission line detected from the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in Holmberg II. This line is a well established signature of high excitation, usually associated with AGN. Its detection suggests that the ULX has a strong impact on the surrounding gas. A Spitzer high resolution spectral map shows that the [O IV] is coincident with the X-ray position of the Holmberg II ULX. We find that the luminosity and the morphology of the line emission is consistent with photoionization by the soft X-ray and far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from the accretion disk of the binary system and inconsistent with narrow beaming. We show that the emission nebula is radiation bounded both in the line of sight direction and to the west, and probably matter bounded to the east. Evidence for a massive black hole (BH) in this ULX is mounting. Detailed photoionization models favor an intermediate mass black hole of at least 85 Solar Mass as the ionization source for the [OIV] emission. We find that the spectral type of the companion star strongly affects the expected strength of the [O IV] emission. This finding could explain the origin of [O IV] in some starburst galaxies containing black hole binaries.

  16. ALS insertion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W. V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

    1991-08-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), the first US third generation synchrotron radiation source, is currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The low-emittance, 1.5 GeV electron storage ring and the insertion devices are specifically designed to produce high brightness beams in the UV to soft X-Ray range. The planned initial complement of insertion devices includes four 4.6 m long undulators, with period lengths of 3.9 cm, 5.0 cm (2) and 8.0 cm, and a 2.9 m long wiggler of 16 cm period length. Undulator design is well advanced and fabrication has begun on the 5.0 cm and 8.0 cm period length undulators. This paper discusses ALS insertion device requirements; general design philosophy; and design of the magnetic structure, support structure/drive systems, control system and vacuum system.

  17. The galactic census of high- and medium-mass protostars. II. Luminosities and evolutionary states of a complete sample of dense gas clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Bo; Tan, Jonathan C.; Barnes, Peter J.

    2013-12-10

    The Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) is the first large-scale (280° < l < 300°, –4° < b < 2°), unbiased, subparsec resolution survey of Galactic molecular clumps and their embedded stars. Barnes et al. presented the source catalog of ∼300 clumps based on HCO{sup +}(1-0) emission, used to estimate masses M. Here we use archival midinfrared-to-millimeter continuum data to construct spectral energy distributions. Fitting two-temperature gray-body models, we derive bolometric luminosities, L. We find that the clumps have 10 ≲ L/L {sub ☉} ≲ 10{sup 6.5} and 0.1 ≲ L/M/[L {sub ☉}/M {sub ☉}] ≲ 10{sup 3}, consistent with a clump population spanning a range of instantaneous star-formation efficiencies from 0 to ∼50%. We thus expect L/M to be a useful, strongly varying indicator of clump evolution during the star cluster formation process. We find correlations of the ratio of warm-to-cold component fluxes and of cold component temperature with L/M. We also find a near-linear relation between L/M and Spitzer-IRAC specific intensity (surface brightness); thus, this relation may also be useful as a star-formation efficiency indicator. The lower bound of the clump L/M distribution suggests that the star-formation efficiency per free-fall time is ε{sub ff} < 0.2. We do not find strong correlations of L/M with mass surface density, velocity dispersion, or virial parameter. We find a linear relation between L and L{sub HCO{sup +}(1--0)}, although with large scatter for any given individual clump. Fitting together with extragalactic systems, the linear relation still holds, extending over 10 orders of magnitude in luminosity. The complete nature of the CHaMP survey over a several kiloparsec-scale region allows us to derive a measurement at an intermediate scale, bridging those of individual clumps and whole galaxies.

  18. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  19. Association of an HLA-G 14-bp Insertion/Deletion polymorphism with high HBV replication in chronic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Laaribi, A B; Zidi, I; Hannachi, N; Ben Yahia, H; Chaouch, H; Bortolotti, D; Zidi, N; Letaief, A; Yacoub, S; Boudabous, A; Rizzo, R; Boukadida, J

    2015-10-01

    Identification of an HLA-G 14-bp Insertion/Deletion (Ins/Del) polymorphism at the 3' untranslated region of HLA-G revealed its importance in HLA-G mRNA stability and HLA-G protein level variation. We evaluated the association between the HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism in patients with chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in a case-control study. Genomic DNA was extracted from 263 patients with chronic HBV hepatitis and 246 control subjects and was examined for the HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism by PCR. The polymorphic variants were genotyped in chronic HBV seropositive cases stratified according to HBV DNA levels, fibrosis stages and in a control population. There was no statistical significant association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and increased susceptibility to HBV infection neither for alleles (P = 0.09) nor for genotypes (P = 0.18). The stratification of HBV patients based on HBV DNA levels revealed an association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and an enhanced HBV activity with high HBV DNA levels. In particular, the Ins allele was significantly associated with high HBV DNA levels (P = 0.0024, OR = 1.71, 95% CI 1.2-2.4). The genotype Ins/Ins was associated with a 2.5-fold (95% CI, 1.29-4.88) increased risk of susceptibility to high HBV replication compared with the Del/Del and Ins/Del genotypes. This susceptibility is linked to the presence of two Ins alleles. No association was observed between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and fibrosis stage of HBV infection. We observed an association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and high HBV replication characterized by high HBV DNA levels in chronic HBV patients. These results suggest a potential prognostic value for disease outcome evaluation.

  20. SDSS J013127.34–032100.1: A NEWLY DISCOVERED RADIO-LOUD QUASAR AT z = 5.18 WITH EXTREMELY HIGH LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Wei-Min; Bai, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Ju-jia; Wang, Fang; Wang, Jian-Guo; Fan, Yu-Feng; Chang, Liang; Wang, Chuan-Jun; Lun, Bao-Li; Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Ho, Luis C.; Zuo, Wenwen; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli; Fan, Xiaohui; Brandt, William N.; Kim, Minjin; Wang, Ran; and others

    2014-11-10

    Very few of the z > 5 quasars discovered to date have been radio-loud, with radio-to-optical flux ratios (radio-loudness parameters) higher than 10. Here we report the discovery of an optically luminous radio-loud quasar, SDSS J013127.34–032100.1 (J0131–0321 in short), at z = 5.18 ± 0.01 using the Lijiang 2.4 m and Magellan telescopes. J0131–0321 has a spectral energy distribution consistent with that of radio-loud quasars. With an i-band magnitude of 18.47 and a radio flux density of 33 mJy, its radio-loudness parameter is ∼100. The optical and near-infrared spectra taken by Magellan enable us to estimate its bolometric luminosity to be L {sub bol} ∼ 1.1 × 10{sup 48} erg s{sup –1}, approximately 4.5 times greater than that of the most distant quasar known to date. The black hole mass of J0131–0321 is estimated to be 2.7 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}, with an uncertainty up to 0.4 dex. Detailed physical properties of this high-redshift, radio-loud, potentially super-Eddington quasar can be probed in the future with more dedicated and intensive follow-up observations using multi-wavelength facilities.

  1. SMA observations on faint submillimeter galaxies with S {sub 850} < 2 mJy: Ultra dusty low-luminosity galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2014-07-01

    We obtained Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of eight faint (intrinsic 850 μm fluxes < 2 mJy) submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) discovered in SCUBA images of the massive lensing cluster fields A370, A2390, and A1689 and detected five. In total, we obtain five SMA detections, all of which have de-lensed fluxes <1 mJy with estimated total infrared luminosities 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}, comparable to luminous infrared galaxies and normal star-forming galaxies. Based on the latest number counts, these galaxies contribute ∼70% of the 850 μm extragalactic background light and represent the dominant star-forming galaxy population in the dusty universe. However, only 40{sub −16}{sup +30}% of our faint SMGs would be detected in deep optical or near-infrared surveys, which suggests many of these sources are at high redshifts (z ≳ 3) or extremely dusty, and they are not included in current star formation history estimates.

  2. Evaluation of Young’s modulus of MgB2 filaments in composite wires for the superconducting links for the high-luminosity LHC upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugano, Michinaka; Ballarino, Amalia; Bartova, Barbora; Bjoerstad, Roger; Gerardin, Alexandre; Scheuerlein, Christian

    2016-02-01

    MgB2 wire is a promising superconductor for the superconducting links for the high-luminosity upgrade of the large Hadron collider at CERN. The mechanical properties of MgB2 must be fully quantified for the cable design, and in this study, we evaluate the Young’s modulus of MgB2 filaments in wires with a practical level of critical current. The Young’s moduli of MgB2 filaments by two different processes, in situ and ex situ, were compared. Two different evaluation methods were applied to an in situ MgB2 wire, a single-fiber tensile test and a tensile test after removing Monel. In addition, the Young’s modulus of the few-micron-thick Nb-Ni reaction layer in an ex situ processed wire was evaluated using a nanoindentation testing technique to improve the accuracy of analysis based on the rule of mixtures. The Young’s moduli of the in situ and ex situ MgB2 wires were in the range of 76-97 GPa and no distinct difference depending on the fabrication process was found.

  3. Mechanical qualification of the support structure for MQXF, the Nb3Sn low-β quadrupole for the high luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Juchno, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Bajas, H.; Bajko, M.; Bourcey, N.; Cheng, D. W.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Grosclaude, P.; Guinchard, M.; Perez, J. C.; Prin, H.; Schmalzle, J.

    2016-01-26

    Within the scope of the High Luminosity LHC project, the collaboration between CERN and U.S. LARP is developing new low-β quadrupoles using the Nb3Sn superconducting technology for the upgrade of the LHC interaction regions. The magnet support structure of the first short model was designed and two units were fabricated and tested at CERN and at LBNL. The structure provides the preload to the collars-coils subassembly by an arrangement of outer aluminum shells pre-tensioned with water-pressurized bladders. For the mechanical qualification of the structure and the assembly procedure, superconducting coils were replaced with solid aluminum “dummy coils”, the structure was preloaded at room temperature, and then cooled-down to 77 K. Mechanical behavior of the magnet structure was monitored with the use of strain gauges installed on the aluminum shells, the dummy coils and the axial preload system. As a result, this paper reports on the outcome of the assembly and the cool-down tests with dummy coils, which were performed at CERN and at LBNL, and presents the strain gauge measurements compared to the 3D finite element model predictions.

  4. Mechanical qualification of the support structure for MQXF, the Nb3Sn low-β quadrupole for the high luminosity LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Juchno, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; ...

    2016-01-26

    Within the scope of the High Luminosity LHC project, the collaboration between CERN and U.S. LARP is developing new low-β quadrupoles using the Nb3Sn superconducting technology for the upgrade of the LHC interaction regions. The magnet support structure of the first short model was designed and two units were fabricated and tested at CERN and at LBNL. The structure provides the preload to the collars-coils subassembly by an arrangement of outer aluminum shells pre-tensioned with water-pressurized bladders. For the mechanical qualification of the structure and the assembly procedure, superconducting coils were replaced with solid aluminum “dummy coils”, the structure wasmore » preloaded at room temperature, and then cooled-down to 77 K. Mechanical behavior of the magnet structure was monitored with the use of strain gauges installed on the aluminum shells, the dummy coils and the axial preload system. As a result, this paper reports on the outcome of the assembly and the cool-down tests with dummy coils, which were performed at CERN and at LBNL, and presents the strain gauge measurements compared to the 3D finite element model predictions.« less

  5. Protostellar Luminosity Functions in 11 Diverse Star Forming Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukova, Erin; Megeath, S. T.; Gutermuth, R.; Pipher, J.; Allen, T. S.; Allen, L. E.; Myers, P. C.; Muzerolle, J.; Cygnus-X Legacy Team

    2012-01-01

    Protostars exist in a variety of environments, ranging from clouds with dispersed low-mass stars, such as Taurus, to clustered regions in clouds forming high-mass stars, like Orion. The effect these different environments have on protostar properties such as mass or luminosity is uncertain. One way to probe the effects of cloud environment on the observable property, protostar luminosity is to compare protostellar luminosity functions of clouds hosting varied populations of protostars. In this dissertation talk I will discuss the protostellar luminosity functions from 11 star forming clouds including Lupus, Chamaeleon, Ophiuchus, Perseus, Serpens, Orion, Cep OB3, Mon R2, Cygnus-X, and Maddalena's Cloud, which encompass a wide range of star forming environments. The luminosity functions are constructed from Spitzer surveys of these molecular clouds. I employ a new technique for estimating the bolometric luminosity from near and mid-IR fluxes alone and for subtracting contamination from galaxies, reddened pre-main sequence stars with disks, and edge-on disk systems. The clouds which are forming massive stars show a significant peak at low luminosity and a tail extending toward luminosities above 10 solar luminosities, while the luminosity functions of clouds which are not forming massive stars have no significant peak down to the sensitivity limit and do not exhibit the tail. I compare these luminosity functions to existing models of protostellar evolution. I also compare the luminosity functions of protostars in distributed and clustered environments, as determined using nearest-neighbor distances. In Orion and Cygnus-X, the clouds which contain the largest populations of protostars there is a clear difference in luminosity functions between protostars incrowded and distributed regions, with the luminosity function biased towards higher luminosities in more luminous regions. I will discuss the implications of these variations and the possibility that the IMF is

  6. Operational results from the LHC luminosity monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Ratti, A.; Matis, H.S.; Stezelberger, T.; Turner, W.C.; Yaver, H.; Bravin, E.

    2011-03-28

    The luminosity monitors for the high luminosity regions in the LHC have been operating to monitor and optimize the luminosity since 2009. The device is a gas ionization chamber inside the neutral particle absorber 140 m from the interaction point and monitors showers produced by high energy neutral particles from the collisions. It has the ability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation in the nominal LHC operation. We present operational results of the device during proton and lead ion operations in 2010 and make comparisons with measurements of experiments. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN can accelerate proton and lead ion beams to 7 TeV and 547 TeV and produce collisions of these particles. Luminosity measures performance of the LHC and is particularly important for experiments in high luminosity interaction points (IPs), ATLAS (IP1) and CMS (IP5). To monitor and optimize the luminosities of these IPs, BRAN (Beam RAte Neutral) detectors [1, 2] have been installed and operating since the beginning of the 2009 operation [3]. A neutral particle absorber (TAN) protects the D2 separation dipole from high energy forward neutral particles produced in the collisions [4]. These neutral particles produce electromagnetic and hadronic showers inside the TAN and their energy flux is proportional to the collision rate and hence to the luminosity. The BRAN detector is an Argon gas ionization chamber installed inside the TANs on both sides of the IP1 and IP5 and monitors the relative changes in the luminosity by detecting the ionization due to these showers. When the number of collisions per bunch crossing (multiplicity) is small, the shower rate inside the TAN is also proportional to the luminosity. Hence, the detector is designed to operate by measuring either the shower rate (counting mode for low and intermediate luminosities) or the average shower flux (pulse height mode for high luminosities). The detector is

  7. Effect of Insertion of a Heat Flux Gage into a High Temperature Cylindrical Blackbody Cavity on the Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.; Horn, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Detailed transient thermal models have been developed to simulate a heat flux gage calibration process capable of generating high heat flux levels. These heat flux levels are of interest to the reciprocating and gas turbine engine industries as well as the aerospace industry. The transient models are based on existing, experimentally validated steady state models of a cylindrical blackbody calibration system. The steady state models were modified to include insertion of a heat flux gage into the hot zone of the calibration system, time-varying electrical current that passes through the resistance heated blackbody, and the resulting heating of the heat flux gage. Heat fluxes computed using detailed transient models were compared to experimental measurements. The calculated and measured transient heat fluxes agreed to within 2 percent, indicating that the models had captured the physical phenomena in the transient calibration. The predicted and measured transient heat fluxes were also compared for two different blackbody configurations. The effect of convection on the blackbody extension was evaluated and found to be a minor factor.

  8. The high-mass end of the red sequence at z ˜ 0.55 from SDSS-III/BOSS: completeness, bimodality and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Swanson, Molly; Dawson, Kyle; Prada, Francisco; Eisenstein, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Thomas, Daniel; Comparat, Johan; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; McBride, Cameron K.; Favole, Ginevra; Guo, Hong; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-09-01

    We have developed an analytical method based on forward-modelling techniques to characterize the high-mass end of the red sequence (RS) galaxy population at redshift z ˜ 0.55, from the DR10 BOSS (Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey) CMASS spectroscopic sample, which comprises ˜600 000 galaxies. The method, which follows an unbinned maximum likelihood approach, allows the deconvolution of the intrinsic CMASS colour-colour-magnitude distributions from photometric errors and selection effects. This procedure requires modelling the covariance matrix for the i-band magnitude, g - r colour and r - i colour using Stripe 82 multi-epoch data. Our results indicate that the error-deconvolved intrinsic RS distribution is consistent, within the photometric uncertainties, with a single point (<0.05 mag) in the colour-colour plane at fixed magnitude, for a narrow redshift slice. We have computed the high-mass end (0.55Mi ≲ -22) of the 0.55i-band RS luminosity function (RS LF) in several redshift slices within the redshift range 0.52 < z < 0.63. In this narrow redshift range, the evolution of the RS LF is consistent, within the uncertainties in the modelling, with a passively evolving model with Φ* = (7.248 ± 0.204) × 10- 4 Mpc-3 mag-1, fading at a rate of 1.5 ± 0.4 mag per unit redshift. We report RS completeness as a function of magnitude and redshift in the CMASS sample, which will facilitate a variety of galaxy-evolution and clustering studies using BOSS. Our forward-modelling method lays the foundations for future studies using other dark-energy surveys like the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey or the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, which are affected by the same type of photometric blurring/selection effects.

  9. High-Quality Perovskite Films Grown with a Fast Solvent-Assisted Molecule Inserting Strategy for Highly Efficient and Stable Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuai; Qiu, Zhiwen; Gao, Chaomin; Zhang, Hailiang; Jiang, Yanan; Li, Cuncheng; Yu, Jinghua; Cao, Bingqiang

    2016-08-31

    The performance of organolead halide perovskites based solar cells has been enhanced dramatically due to the morphology control of the perovskite films. In this paper, we present a fast solvent-assisted molecule inserting (S-AMI) strategy to grow high-quality perovskite film, in which the methylammonium iodide/2-propanol (MAI/IPA) solution is spin-coated onto a dimethylformamide (DMF) wetted mixed lead halide (PbX2) precursor film. The DMF can help the inserting of MAI molecules into the PbX2 precursor film and provide a solvent environment to help the grain growth of the perovskite film. The perovskite film grown by the S-AMI approach shows large and well-oriented grains and long carrier lifetime due to the reduced grain boundary. Solar cells constructed with these perovskite films yield an average efficiency over 17% along with a high average fill factor of 80%. Moreover, these unsealed solar cell devices exhibit good stability in an ambient atmosphere.

  10. [Management of High-Risk Prostate Cancer and Left Ectopic Ureter Inserting into Seminal Vesicle with Ipsilateral Hypoplastic Kidney of a Young Patient : A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Teppei; Koie, Takuya; Soma, Osamu; Kusaka, Ayumu; Hosogoe, Shogo; Hamano, Itsuto; Imai, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ohyama, Chikara

    2016-06-01

    A 44-year-old male patient visited our hospital with a chief complaint of macroscopic hematuria. Prostate biopsies were performed due to prostate specific antigen (PSA) 11.6 ng/ml, and he was diagnosed with Gleason score 5+4 prostate cancer. Computed tomography showed a left hypoplastic kidney. T2- weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed the left ureter stump with ectopic insertion into the dilated left seminal vesicle. He was diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer and left ectopic ureter inserting into the seminal vesicle with ipsilateral hypoplastic kidney. Laparoscopic left nephroureterectomy and open radical prostatectomy were performed.

  11. Extremely high fracture rate of a modular acetabular component with a sandwich polyethylene ceramic insertion for THA: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kircher, Jörn; Bader, Rainer; Schroeder, Bettina; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2009-09-01

    Improvements of ceramic components and design changes have reduced failure rates over the past 30 years in total hip arthroplasty. We present a series of n = 11 cases with ceramic failure out of n = 113 implantations, from which n = 66 were ceramic-on-ceramic (n = 50 with ceramic insert with sandwich in polyethylene and n = 16 with directly fixed ceramic inlay) and n = 47 ceramic on polyethylene bearings, between 1999 and 2001 after introduction of a new implantation system to the market. The overall fracture rate of ceramic for the whole series (n = 113) was 9.7%. For the combination ceramic head with UHMW-PE (n = 47) the fracture rate was 2.1%. For the combination ceramic with ceramic (n = 66) the fracture rate was 15.2%. For the combination ceramic with ceramic sandwich in PE (n = 50) the failure rate was 18%. Only three patients experienced a trauma. Demography of patients (age, gender, body weight and BMI) was not statistically different between patients with failed ceramics and the rest of the patients making patient-specific risk factors unlikely to be an explanation for the failures. Retrospective X-ray analysis of the cup positioning did not show significant difference between failed and non-failed implants in terms of mean cup inclination and version making also operation-specific factors unlikely to be the only reason of this high failure rate. Therefore, manufacturer-specific factors such as design features may have contributed to this high failure rate. Further analysis of the whole series with biomechanical testing of the retrieved material needs to be performed.

  12. Mechanisms for Complex Chromosomal Insertions

    PubMed Central

    Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Akdemir, Zeynep Coban; Yuan, Bo; Cooper, Mitchell L.; Magriñá, Maria A.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Lalani, Seema R.; Patel, Ankita; Song, Rodger H.; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Carvalho, Claudia M. B.; Lupski, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal insertions are genomic rearrangements with a chromosome segment inserted into a non-homologous chromosome or a non-adjacent locus on the same chromosome or the other homologue, constituting ~2% of nonrecurrent copy-number gains. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their formation. We identified 16 individuals with complex insertions among 56,000 individuals tested at Baylor Genetics using clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Custom high-density aCGH was performed on 10 individuals with available DNA, and breakpoint junctions were fine-mapped at nucleotide resolution by long-range PCR and DNA sequencing in 6 individuals to glean insights into potential mechanisms of formation. We observed microhomologies and templated insertions at the breakpoint junctions, resembling the breakpoint junction signatures found in complex genomic rearrangements generated by replication-based mechanism(s) with iterative template switches. In addition, we analyzed 5 families with apparently balanced insertion in one parent detected by FISH analysis and found that 3 parents had additional small copy-number variants (CNVs) at one or both sides of the inserting fragments as well as at the inserted sites. We propose that replicative repair can result in interchromosomal complex insertions generated through chromothripsis-like chromoanasynthesis involving two or three chromosomes, and cause a significant fraction of apparently balanced insertions harboring small flanking CNVs. PMID:27880765

  13. THE STRUCTURE AND SPECTRAL FEATURES OF A THIN DISK AND EVAPORATION-FED CORONA IN HIGH-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. Y.; Mineshige, S. E-mail: bfliu@nao.cas.cn

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the accretion process in high-luminosity active galactic nuclei (HLAGNs) in the scenario of the disk evaporation model. Based on this model, the thin disk can extend down to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) at accretion rates higher than 0.02 M-dot{sub Edd} while the corona is weak since part of the coronal gas is cooled by strong inverse Compton scattering of the disk photons. This implies that the corona cannot produce as strong X-ray radiation as observed in HLAGNs with large Eddington ratio. In addition to the viscous heating, other heating to the corona is necessary to interpret HLAGN. In this paper, we assume that a part of accretion energy released in the disk is transported into the corona, heating up the electrons, and is thereby radiated away. For the first time, we compute the corona structure with additional heating, fully taking into account the mass supply to the corona, and find that the corona could indeed survive at higher accretion rates and that its radiation power increases. The spectra composed of bremsstrahlung and Compton radiation are also calculated. Our calculations show that the Compton-dominated spectrum becomes harder with the increase of energy fraction (f) liberating in the corona, and the photon index for hard X-ray (2-10 keV) is 2.2 < {Gamma} < 2.7. We discuss possible heating mechanisms for the corona. Combining the energy fraction transported to the corona with the accretion rate by magnetic heating, we find that the hard X-ray spectrum becomes steeper at a larger accretion rate and the bolometric correction factor (L{sub bol}/L{sub 2-10keV}) increases with increasing accretion rate for f < 8/35, which is roughly consistent with the observational results.

  14. Rhodium(I)-Catalyzed Highly Enantioselective Insertion of Carbenoid into Si-H: Efficient Access to Functional Chiral Silanes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Diao; Zhu, Dong-Xing; Xu, Ming-Hua

    2016-02-10

    The first rhodium(I)-catalyzed enantioselective Si-H insertion reaction of α-diazoesters and α-diazophosphonates has been developed. The use of a C1-symmetric chiral diene ligand enabled the asymmetric reaction to proceed under exceptionally mild conditions and give versatile chiral α-silyl esters and phosphonates with excellent enantioselectivities (up to 99% ee). The mechanism and stereochemical pathway of this novel Rh(I)-carbene-directed Si-H insertion was investigated by deuterium kinetic isotope effect experiments and DFT calculations.

  15. High thermal stability in W/MgO/CoFeB/W/CoFeB/W stacks via ultrathin W insertion with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Yu, Tao; Zhu, Zhengyong; Zhong, Huicai; Khamis, Khamis Masoud; Zhu, Kaigui

    2016-07-01

    The perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) of a series of top MgO/CoFeB/W stacks were studied. In these stacks, the thickness of CoFeB is limited in a range of 1.1-2.2 nm. It was found that the stack can still maintain PMA in a 1.9 nm thick CoFeB free layer. Besides, we investigated the thermal stability factor ∆ of a spin transfer torque magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM) by inserting an ultra-thin W film of 0.8 nm between two CoFeB films. The result shows a clear PMA behavior for the samples with CoFeB thickness up to 2.5 nm, and an in-plane magnetic anisotropy (IMA) when the CoFeB is thicker than 2.5 nm. Moreover, the thermal stability factor ∆ of the CoFeB stack with W insertion is about 132 for a 50 nm size STT-MRAM device, which is remarkably improved compared to 112 for a sample without W insertion. Our results represent an alternative way to realize the endurance at high annealing temperature, high-density and high ∆ in STT-MRAM device by ultra-thin W insertion.

  16. Dihalocarbene Insertion Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the insertion reaction using the insertion of carbenes into carbon-hydrogen bonds as an example. Outlines an experiment that will illustrate dihalocarbene insertions into diisopropyl ether. (GS)

  17. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your head. Sometimes, ...

  18. The BRAN luminosity detectors for the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matis, H. S.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, A.; Turner, W. C.; Bravin, E.; Miyamoto, R.

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes the several phases which led, from the conceptual design, prototyping, construction and tests with beam, to the installation and operation of the BRAN (Beam RAte of Neutrals) relative luminosity monitors for the LHC. The detectors have been operating since 2009 to contribute, optimize and maintain the accelerator performance in the two high luminosity interaction regions (IR), the IR1 (ATLAS) and the IR5 (CMS). The devices are gas ionization chambers installed inside a neutral particle absorber 140 m away from the Interaction Points in IR1 and IR5 and monitor the energy deposited by electromagnetic showers produced by high-energy neutral particles from the collisions. The detectors have the capability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity at the 40 MHz bunch rate, as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation during the nominal LHC operation. The devices have operated since the early commissioning phase of the accelerator over a broad range of luminosities reaching 1.4×1034 cm-2 s-1 with a peak pileup of 45 events per bunch crossing. Even though the nominal design luminosity of the LHC has been exceeded, the BRAN is operating well. After describing how the BRAN can be used to monitor the luminosity of the collider, we discuss the technical choices that led to its construction and the different tests performed prior to the installation in two IRs of the LHC. Performance simulations are presented together with operational results obtained during p-p operations, including runs at 40 MHz bunch rate, Pb-Pb operations and p-Pb operations.

  19. Inserted layer of AZO thin film with high work function between transparent conductive oxide and p-layer and its solar cell application.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeongsik; Lee, Jaehyeong; Lee, Youn-Jung; Kim, Heewon; Jung, Junhee; Hussain, S Qamar; Park, Jinjoo; Shin, Chonghoon; Kim, Sunbo; Ahn, Shihyun; Yil, Junsin

    2013-10-01

    We report aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) films with high work function as an insertion layer between transparent conducting oxides (TCO) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) layer to improve open circuit voltage (V(oc)) and fill factor (FF) for thin film solar cells. Amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells exhibit poor fill factors due to a Schottky barrier at the interface between a-SiC:H window and TCO. The interface engineering is carried out by inserting an AZO layer with high work function (4.95 eV at O2 = 2 sccm). As a result, V(oc) and FF improved significantly. FF as high as 63.35% is obtained.

  20. Wear Mechanism of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Carbide Insert in Orthogonal Cutting Ti-6Al-4V ELI at High Cutting Speed

    SciTech Connect

    Gusri, A. I.; Che Hassan, C. H.; Jaharah, A. G.

    2011-01-17

    The performance of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) carbide insert with ISO designation of CCMT 12 04 04 LF, when turning titanium alloys was investigated. There were four layers of coating materials for this insert i.e.TiN-Al2O3-TiCN-TiN. The insert performance was evaluated based on the insert's edge resistant towards the machining parameters used at high cutting speed range of machining Ti-6Al-4V ELI. Detailed study on the wear mechanism at the cutting edge of CVD carbide tools was carried out at cutting speed of 55-95 m/min, feed rate of 0.15-0.35 mm/rev and depth of cut of 0.10-0.20 mm. Wear mechanisms such as abrasive and adhesive were observed on the flank face. Crater wear due to diffusion was also observed on the rake race. The abrasive wear occurred more at nose radius and the fracture on tool were found at the feed rate of 0.35 mm/rev and the depth of cut of 0.20 mm. The adhesion wear takes place after the removal of the coating or coating delaminating. Therefore, adhesion or welding of titanium alloy onto the flank and rake faces demonstrates a strong bond at the workpiece-tool interface.

  1. First Detection of the [O(sub III)] 88 Micrometers Line at High Redshifts: Characterizing the Starburst and Narrow-Line Regions in Extreme Luminosity Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferkinhoff, C.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Nikola, T.; Parshley, S. C.; Stacey, G. J.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.

    2010-01-01

    We have made the first detections of the 88 micrometers [O(sub III)] line from galaxies in the early universe, detecting the line from the lensed active galactic nucleus (AGN)/starburst composite systems APM 08279+5255 at z 3.911 and SMM J02399-0136 at z = 2.8076. The line is exceptionally bright from both systems, with apparent (lensed) luminosities approx.10(exp 11) Solar Luminosity, For APM 08279, the [O(sub III)] line flux can be modeled in a star formation paradigm, with the stellar radiation field dominated by stars with effective temperatures, T(sub eff) > 36,000 K, similar to the starburst found in M82. The model implies approx.35% of the total far-IR luminosity of the system is generated by the starburst, with the remainder arising from dust heated by the AGN. The 881,tm line can also be generated in the narrow-line region of the AGN if gas densities are around a few 1000 cu cm. For SMM J02399, the [O(sub III)] line likely arises from HII regions formed by hot (T(sub eff) > 40,000 K) young stars in a massive starburst that dominates the far-IR luminosity of the system. The present work demonstrates the utility of the [O(sub III)] line for characterizing starbursts and AGN within galaxies in the early universe. These are the first detections of this astrophysically important line from galaxies beyond a redshift of 0.05.s

  2. Simulations of the LHC high luminosity monitors at beam energies from 3.5 TeV to 7.0 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, H.S.; Miyamoto, R.; Humphreys, P.; Ratti, A.; Turner, W.C.; Stiller, J.

    2011-03-28

    We have constructed two pairs of fast ionization chambers (BRAN) for measurement and optimization of luminosity at IR1 and IR5 of the LHC. These devices are capable of monitoring the performance of the LHC at low luminosity 10{sup 28} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} during beam commissioning all the way up to the expected full luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} at 7.0 TeV. The ionization chambers measure the intensity of hadronic/electromagnetic showers produced by the forward neutral particles of LHC collisions. To predict and improve the understanding of the BRAN performance, we created a detailed FLUKA model of the detector and its surroundings. In this paper, we describe the model and the results of our simulations including the detector's estimated response to pp collisions at beam energies of 3.5, 5.0, and 7.0 TeV per beam. In addition, these simulations show the sensitivity of the BRAN to the crossing angle of the two LHC beams. It is shown that the BRAN sensitivity to the crossing angle is proportional to the measurement of crossing angle by the LHC beam position monitors.

  3. CoFeB Inserted Perpendicular Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with CoFe/Pd Multilayers for High Tunnel Magnetoresistance Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizunuma, Kotaro; Ikeda, Shoji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Gan, Hua Dong; Miura, Katsuya; Hasegawa, Haruhiro; Hayakawa, Jun; Ito, Kenchi; Matsukura, Fumihiro; Ohno, Hideo

    2010-04-01

    The effect of Co20Fe60B20 insertion on tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) properties of MgO barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) was studied with Co90Fe10/Pd multilayer electrodes showing perpendicular anisotropy. The TMR ratio, which depended on the sputtering power density of the CoFeB layer, reached 43% at 1.77 W/cm2 in MTJs with a 1.8-nm-thick CoFeB layer inserted on both sides of the MgO barrier. With increasing CoFeB layer thickness, the optimal annealing temperature (Ta) realizing the maximum TMR ratio increased along with the TMR ratio. The MTJs with 3.0-nm-thick CoFeB deposited at 1.77 W/cm2 showed a TMR ratio of 91% at Ta = 250 °C, where the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is maintained.

  4. Modified C1 lateral mass screw insertion using a high entry point to avoid postoperative occipital neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Ho; Kim, Eun-Sang; Eoh, Whan

    2013-01-01

    For the past decade, a screw-rod construct has been used commonly to stabilize the atlantoaxial joint, but the insertion of the screw through the C1 lateral mass (LM) can cause several complications. We evaluated whether using a higher screw entry point for C1 lateral mass (LM) fixation than in the standard procedure could prevent screw-induced occipital neuralgia. We enrolled 12 consecutive patients who underwent bilateral C1 LM fixation, with the modified screw insertion point at the junction of the C1 posterior arch and the midpoint of the posterior inferior portion of the C1 LM. We measured postoperative clinical and radiological parameters and recorded intraoperative complications, postoperative neurological deficits and the occurrence of occipital neuralgia. Postoperative plain radiographs were used to check for malpositioning of the screw or failure of the construct. Four patients underwent atlantoaxial stabilization for a transverse ligament injury or a C1 or C2 fracture, six patients for os odontoideum, and two patients for C2 metastasis. No patient experienced vertebral artery injury or cerebrospinal fluid leak, and all had minimal blood loss. No patient suffered significant occipital neuralgia, although one patient developed mild, transient unilateral neuralgia. There was also no radiographic evidence of construct failure. Twenty screws were positioned correctly through the intended entry points, but three screws were placed inferiorly (that is, below the arch), and one screw was inserted too medially. When performing C1-C2 fixation using the standard (Harms) construct, surgeons should be aware of the possible development of occipital neuralgia. A higher entry point may prevent this complication; therefore, we recommend that the screw should be inserted into the arch of C1 if it can be accommodated.

  5. RHIC PLANS TOWARDS HIGHER LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.

    2007-06-25

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide luminosity over a wide range of beam energies and species, including heavy ions, polarized protons, and tric beam collisions. In the first seven years of operation there has been a rapid increase in the achieved peak and average luminosity, substantially exceeding design values. Work is presently underway to achieve the Enhanced Design parameters. Planned major upgrades include the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), RHIC-11, and construction of an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). We review the expected RHIC upgrade performance. Electron cooling and its impact on the luminosity both for heavy ions and protons are discussed in detail.

  6. Support Structure Design of the $\\hbox{Nb}_{3}\\hbox{Sn}$ Quadrupole for the High Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Juchno, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Cheng, D.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Perez, J. C.; Prin, H.; Schmalzle, J.

    2014-10-31

    New low-β quadrupole magnets are being developed within the scope of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project in collaboration with the US LARP program. The aim of the HLLHC project is to study and implement machine upgrades necessary for increasing the luminosity of the LHC. The new quadrupoles, which are based on the Nb₃Sn superconducting technology, will be installed in the LHC Interaction Regions and will have to generate a gradient of 140 T/m in a coil aperture of 150 mm. In this paper, we describe the design of the short model magnet support structure and discuss results of the detailed 3D numerical analysis performed in preparation for the first short model test.

  7. Voltage-programming-based capillary gel electrophoresis for the fast detection of angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism with high sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Woo, Nain; Kim, Su-Kang; Kang, Seong Ho

    2016-08-01

    A voltage-programming-based capillary gel electrophoresis method with a laser-induced fluorescence detector was developed for the fast and highly sensitive detection of DNA molecules related to angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism, which has been reported to influence predisposition to various diseases such as cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, myocardial infarction, and Alzheimer's disease. Various voltage programs were investigated for fast detection of specific DNA molecules of angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism as a function of migration time and separation efficiency to establish the effect of voltage strength to resolution. Finally, the amplified products of the angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism (190 and 490 bp DNA) were analyzed in 3.2 min without losing resolution under optimum voltage programming conditions, which were at least 75 times faster than conventional slab gel electrophoresis. In addition, the capillary gel electrophoresis method also successfully applied to the analysis of real human blood samples, although no polymorphism genes were detected by slab gel electrophoresis. Consequently, the developed voltage-programming capillary gel electrophoresis method with laser-induced fluorescence detection is an effective, rapid analysis technique for highly sensitive detection of disease-related specific DNA molecules.

  8. A Survey of Luminous High-redshift Quasars with SDSS and WISE. II. the Bright End of the Quasar Luminosity Function at z ≈ 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinyi; Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; McGreer, Ian D.; Bian, Fuyan; Yi, Weimin; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zuo, Wenwen; Green, Richard; Jiang, Linhua; Wang, Shu; Wang, Ran; Yue, Minghao

    2016-09-01

    This is the second paper in a series on a new luminous z ˜ 5 quasar survey using optical and near-infrared colors. Here we present a new determination of the bright end of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z ˜ 5. Combining our 45 new quasars with previously known quasars that satisfy our selections, we construct the largest uniform luminous z ˜ 5 quasar sample to date, with 99 quasars in the range of 4.7 ≤ z < 5.4 and -29 < M 1450 ≤ -26.8, within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. We use a modified 1/V a method including flux limit correction to derive a binned QLF, and we model the parametric QLF using maximum likelihood estimation. With the faint-end slope of the QLF fixed as α = -2.03 from previous deeper samples, the best fit of our QLF gives a flatter bright end slope β = -3.58 ± 0.24 and a fainter break magnitude {M}1450* = -26.98 ± 0.23 than previous studies at similar redshift. Combined with previous work at lower and higher redshifts, our result is consistent with a luminosity evolution and density evolution model. Using the best-fit QLF, the contribution of quasars to the ionizing background at z ˜ 5 is found to be 18%-45% with a clumping factor C of 2-5. Our sample suggests an evolution of radio loud fraction with optical luminosity but no obvious evolution with redshift.

  9. Enhanced electrical properties of oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors with high conductivity thin layer insertion for the channel region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Cam Phu Thi; Raja, Jayapal; Kim, Sunbo; Jang, Kyungsoo; Le, Anh Huy Tuan; Lee, Youn-Jung; Yi, Junsin

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the performance and the stability of indium tin zinc oxide (ITZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) by inserting an ultra-thin indium tin oxide (ITO) layer at the active/insulator interface. The electrical properties of the double channel device (ITO thickness of 5 nm) were improved in comparison with the single channel ITZO or ITO devices. The TFT characteristics of the device with an ITO thickness of less than 5 nm were degraded due to the formation of an island-like morphology and the carriers scattering at the active/insulator interface. The 5 nm-thick ITO inserted ITZO TFTs (optimal condition) exhibited a superior field effect mobility (∼95 cm2/V·s) compared with the ITZO-only TFTs (∼34 cm2/V·s). The best characteristics of the TFT devices with double channel layer are due to the lowest surface roughness (0.14 nm) and contact angle (50.1°) that result in the highest hydrophicility, and the most effective adhesion at the surface. Furthermore, the threshold voltage shifts for the ITO/ITZO double layer device decreased to 0.80 and -2.39 V compared with 6.10 and -6.79 V (for the ITZO only device) under positive and negative bias stress, respectively. The falling rates of EA were 0.38 eV/V and 0.54 eV/V for the ITZO and ITO/ITZO bi-layer devices, respectively. The faster falling rate of the double channel devices suggests that the trap density, including interface trap and semiconductor bulk trap, can be decreased by the ion insertion of a very thin ITO film into the ITZO/SiO2 reference device. These results demonstrate that the double active layer TFT can potentially be applied to the flat panel display.

  10. Ion bunch length effects on the beam-beam interaction and its compensation in a high-luminosity ring-ring electron-ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.; Oeftiger, A.; Fischer, W.

    2012-05-20

    One of the luminosity limits in a ring-ring electron-ion collider is the beam-beam effect on the electrons. In the limit of short ion bunches, simulation studies have shown that this limit can be significantly increased by head-on beam-beam compensation with an electron lens. However, with an ion bunch length comparable to the beta-function at the IP in conjunction with a large beam-beam parameter, the electrons perform a sizeable fraction of a betatron oscillation period inside the long ion bunches. We present recent simulation results on the compensation of this beam-beam interaction with multiple electron lenses.

  11. Dynamic and High-Resolution Metabolic Imaging of Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-Pyruvate in the Rat Brain Using a High-Performance Gradient Insert

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Dirk; Yen, Yi-Fen; Takahashi, Atsushi; Josan, Sonal; Tropp, James; Rutt, B.K.; Hurd, Ralph E.; Spielman, Daniel M.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2010-01-01

    Fast chemical shift imaging techniques are advantageous in metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized compounds due to the limited duration of the signal amplification. At the same time, reducing the acquisition time in hyperpolarized imaging does not necessarily lead to the conventional penalty in signal-to-noise ratio that occurs in imaging at thermal equilibrium polarization levels. Here a high-performance gradient insert was used in combination with undersampled spiral chemical shift imaging to increase either the imaging speed or the spatial resolution of hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging on a clinical 3T MR scanner. Both a single-shot sequence with a total acquisition time of 125 ms and a 3-shot sequence with a nominal in-plane resolution of 1.5 mm were implemented. The k-space trajectories were measured and then used during image reconstruction. The technique was applied to metabolic imaging of the rat brain in vivo after the injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate. Dynamic imaging afforded the measurement of region-of-interest-specific time courses of pyruvate and its metabolic products, while imaging at high spatial resolution was used to better characterize the spatial distribution of the metabolite signals. PMID:21500253

  12. The Effect of Malrotation of Tibial Component of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Tibial Insert during High Flexion Using a Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Todo, Mitsugu

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common errors of total knee arthroplasty procedure is a malrotation of tibial component. The stress on tibial insert is closely related to polyethylene failure. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of malrotation of tibial component for the stress on tibial insert during high flexion using a finite element analysis. We used Stryker NRG PS for analysis. Three different initial conditions of tibial component including normal, 15° internal malrotation, and 15° external malrotation were analyzed. The tibial insert made from ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene was assumed to be elastic-plastic while femoral and tibial metal components were assumed to be rigid. Four nonlinear springs attached to tibial component represented soft tissues around the knee. Vertical load was applied to femoral component which rotated from 0° to 135° while horizontal load along the anterior posterior axis was applied to tibial component during flexion. Maximum equivalent stresses on the surface were analyzed. Internal malrotation caused the highest stress which arose up to 160% of normal position. External malrotation also caused higher stress. Implanting prosthesis in correct position is important for reducing the risk of abnormal wear and failure. PMID:24895658

  13. The ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.

    2013-12-01

    Preparing for the high luminosity LHC phase, the ATLAS experiment will upgrade its Pixel Detector with the installation of a new pixel layer. The new sub detector, called the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), will be installed during the LHC first shut down in 2013-2014, in between the innermost current pixel layer and the beampipe. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, a new readout chip FE-I4 and two different silicon sensor technologies, planar and 3D have been developed. Furthermore, the physics performance should be improved through the reduction of pixel size and a new mechanical support using lightweight staves. Two pre-series staves were made in order to qualify the assembly procedure, the loaded module electrical integrity and the readout chain before going into production.

  14. Aspects of High-Resolution Gas Chromatography as Applied to the Analysis of Hydrocarbon Fuels and Other Complex Organic Mixtures. Volume 2. Survey of Sample Insertion Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    AD-A158 772 ASPECTS OF HIGH-RESOL.UTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY S 1ll APPLIED0 TO THE ANALYSIS 0..(U)1 DAYTON UNIV ON RESEARCH INST W A RUSEY ET AL. JUN...RESOLUTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY AS APPLIED TO THE ANALYSIS OF HYDROCARBON FUELS AND OTHER COMPLEX ORGANIC MIXTURES Volume II - Survey of Sample Insertion...NO. NO. 45433-6563 62203F 3048 05 91 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) (cont’ d on reverse) ASPECTS OF HIGH-RESOLUTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY T

  15. Second-generation coil design of the Nb3Sn low-β quadrupole for the high luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bermudez, S. Izquierdo; Ambrosio, G.; Ballarino, A.; Cavanna, E.; Bossert, R.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Ghosh, A.; Hagen, P.; Holik, E.; Perez, J. C.; Rochepault, E.; Schmalzle, J.; Todesco, E.; Yu, M.

    2016-01-18

    As part of the Large Hadron Collider Luminosity upgrade (HiLumi-LHC) program, the US LARP collaboration and CERN are working together to design and build a 150 mm aperture Nb3Sn quadrupole for the LHC interaction regions. A first series of 1.5 m long coils were fabricated and assembled in a first short model. A detailed visual inspection of the coils was carried out to investigate cable dimensional changes during heat treatment and the position of the windings in the coil straight section and in the end region. The analyses allow identifying a set of design changes which, combined with a fine tune of the cable geometry and a field quality optimization, were implemented in a new, second-generation, coil design. In this study, we review the main characteristics of the first generation coils, describe the modification in coil lay-out, and discuss their impact on parts design and magnet analysis.

  16. A complete X-ray sample of the high latitude sky from HEAO-1 A-2: log N lo S and luminosity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piccinotti, G.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Marshall, F. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Shafer, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment was performed in which a complete X-ray survey of the 8.2 steradians of the sky at galactic latitudes where the absolute value of b is 20 deg down to a limiting sensitivity of 3.1 x ten to the minus 11th power ergs/sq cm sec in the 2-10 keV band. Of the 85 detected sources 17 were identified with galactic objects, 61 were identified with extragalactic objects, and 7 remain unidentified. The log N - log S relation for the non-galactic objects is well fit by the Euclidean relationship. The X-ray spectra of these objects were used to construct log N - log S in physical units. The complete sample of identified sources was used to construct X-ray luminosity functions, using the absolute maximum likelihood method, for clusters galaxies and active galactic nuclei.

  17. Multiwavelength Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    I have developed a technique for measuring multi-variate luminosity functions of galaxies. Multivariate or multi-wavelength luminosity functions will reveal the interplay between star formation, chemical evolution, and absorption and re-emission of dust within evolving galaxy populations. By using principle component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the problem, I optimally extract the relevant photometric information from large galaxy catalogs. As a demonstration of the technique, I derive the multiwavelength luminosity function for the galaxies in the released SDSS catalog, and show that the results are consistent with those obtained by traditional methods. This technique will be applicable to catalogs of galaxies from datasets obtained by the SIRTF and GALEX missions.

  18. AMMONIA AND CO OBSERVATIONS TOWARD LOW-LUMINOSITY 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y. W.; Xu, Y.; Yang, J.; Zhang, S. B.; Pandian, J. D.; Henkel, C.; Menten, K. M.

    2010-09-01

    To investigate whether distinctions exist between low- and high-luminosity Class II 6.7 GHz methanol masers, we have undertaken multi-line mapping observations of various molecular lines, including the NH{sub 3} (1,1), (2,2), (3,3), (4,4), and {sup 12}CO (1-0) transitions, toward a sample of nine low-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers and {sup 12}CO (1-0) observations toward a sample of eight high-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers, for which we already had NH{sub 3} spectral line data. Emission in the NH{sub 3} (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) transitions was detected in eight out of nine low-luminosity maser sources, in which 14 cores were identified. We derive densities, column densities, temperatures, core sizes, and masses of both low- and high-luminosity maser regions. A comparative analysis of the physical quantities reveals marked distinctions between the low-luminosity and high-luminosity groups: in general, cores associated with high-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers are larger and more massive than those traced by low-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers; regions traced by the high-luminosity masers have larger column densities but lower densities than those of the low-luminosity maser regions. Further, strong correlations between 6.7 GHz maser luminosity and NH{sub 3} (1,1) and (2,2) line widths are found, indicating that internal motions in high-luminosity maser regions are more energetic than those in low-luminosity maser regions. A {sup 12}CO (1-0) outflow analysis also shows distinctions in that outflows associated with high-luminosity masers have wider line wings and larger sizes than those associated with low-luminosity masers.

  19. Diamond Pixel Luminosity Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Halyo, Valerie

    2014-12-15

    In this document, Halyo summaries her key contributions to CMS at the LHC and provide an explanation of their importance and her role in each project. At the end Halyo describes her recent research interest that includes GPU/MIC Acceleration of the High Level Trigger (HLT) to Extend the Physics Research at the LHC. A description of her work the recent promising results that she accomplished and the deliverable are also elaborated. These contribution were only possible thanks to DOE support of junior faculty research and their clear goal to promote research and innovations.

  20. Evolutionary variations of solar luminosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical arguments for a 30% increase in the solar luminosity over the past 4.7 billion years are reviewed. A scaling argument shows that this increase can be predicted without detailed numerical calculations. The magnitude of the increase is independent of nuclear reaction rates, as long as conversion of hydrogen to helium provides the basic energy source of the Sun. The effect of the solar luminosity increase on the terrestrial climate is briefly considered. It appears unlikely that an enhanced greenhouse effect, due to reduced gases (NH3, CH4), can account for the long-term paleoclimatic trends.

  1. High association of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism with recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Karakus, Nevin; Yigit, Serbulent; Kalkan, Goknur; Sezer, Saime

    2013-08-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common ulcerative disease of the oral mucosa. Oral ulcers are also the most common feature of Behçet's disease (BD). Association of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism with BD has been reported in Turkish population. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible association between ACE gene I/D polymorphism and RAS, and evaluate if there was an association with clinical features in a relatively large cohort of Turkish patients. The study included 198 patients affected by RAS and 214 healthy controls. ACE gene I/D polymorphism genotypes were determined using polymerase chain reaction with I and D allele-specific primers. The genotype and allele frequencies of I/D polymorphism showed statistically significant differences between RAS patients and controls (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively). After stratifying RAS patients according to clinical and demographical characteristics, no significant association was observed. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that I/D polymorphism of the ACE gene was positively associated with predisposition to develop RAS in Turkish population. Further studies with larger populations are recommended.

  2. Brochothrix thermosphacta Bacteriophages Feature Heterogeneous and Highly Mosaic Genomes and Utilize Unique Prophage Insertion Sites ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kilcher, Samuel; Loessner, Martin J.; Klumpp, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    Brochothrix belongs to the low-GC branch of Gram-positive bacteria (Firmicutes), closely related to Listeria, Staphylococcus, Clostridium, and Bacillus. Brochothrix thermosphacta is a nonproteolytic food spoilage organism, adapted to growth in vacuum-packaged meats. We report the first genome sequences and characterization of Brochothrix bacteriophages. Phage A9 is a myovirus with an 89-nm capsid diameter and a 171-nm contractile tail; it belongs to the Spounavirinae subfamily and shares significant homologies with Listeria phage A511, Staphylococcus phage Twort, and others. The A9 unit genome is 127 kb long with 11-kb terminal redundancy; it encodes 198 proteins and 6 tRNAs. Phages BL3 and NF5 are temperate siphoviruses with a head diameter of 56 to 59 nm. The BL3 tail is 270 nm long, whereas NF5 features a short tail of only 94 nm. The NF5 genome (36.95 kb) encodes 57 gene products, BL3 (41.52 kb) encodes 65 products, and both are arranged in life cycle-specific modules. Surprisingly, BL3 and NF5 show little relatedness to Listeria phages but rather demonstrate relatedness to lactococcal phages. Peptide mass fingerprinting of viral proteins indicate programmed −1 translational frameshifts in the NF5 capsid and the BL3 major tail protein. Both NF5 and BL3 feature circularly permuted, terminally redundant genomes, packaged by a headful mechanism, and integrases of the serine (BL3) and tyrosine (NF5) types. They utilize unique target sequences not previously described: BL3 inserts into the 3′ end of a RNA methyltransferase, whereas NF5 integrates into the 5′-terminal part of a putative histidinol-phosphatase. Interestingly, both genes are reconstituted by phage sequence. PMID:20709901

  3. Evidence for Amino Acid Snorkeling from a High-Resolution, In Vivo Analysis of Fis1 Tail-Anchor Insertion at the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Abdurrahman; Akdoğan, Emel; Dunn, Cory D

    2017-02-01

    Proteins localized to mitochondria by a carboxyl-terminal tail anchor (TA) play roles in apoptosis, mitochondrial dynamics, and mitochondrial protein import. To reveal characteristics of TAs that may be important for mitochondrial targeting, we focused our attention upon the TA of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fis1 protein. Specifically, we generated a library of Fis1p TA variants fused to the Gal4 transcription factor, then, using next-generation sequencing, revealed which Fis1p TA mutations inhibited membrane insertion and allowed Gal4p activity in the nucleus. Prompted by our global analysis, we subsequently analyzed the ability of individual Fis1p TA mutants to localize to mitochondria. Our findings suggest that the membrane-associated domain of the Fis1p TA may be bipartite in nature, and we encountered evidence that the positively charged patch at the carboxyl terminus of Fis1p is required for both membrane insertion and organelle specificity. Furthermore, lengthening or shortening of the Fis1p TA by up to three amino acids did not inhibit mitochondrial targeting, arguing against a model in which TA length directs insertion of TAs to distinct organelles. Most importantly, positively charged residues were more acceptable at several positions within the membrane-associated domain of the Fis1p TA than negatively charged residues. These findings, emerging from the first high-resolution analysis of an organelle targeting sequence by deep mutational scanning, provide strong, in vivo evidence that lysine and arginine can "snorkel," or become stably incorporated within a lipid bilayer by placing terminal charges of their side chains at the membrane interface.

  4. A highly polymorphic insertion in the Y-chromosome amelogenin gene can be used for evolutionary biology, population genetics and sexing in Cetacea and Artiodactyla

    PubMed Central

    Macé, Matthias; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte

    2008-01-01

    Background The early radiation of the Cetartiodactyla is complex, and unambiguous molecular characters are needed to clarify the positions of hippotamuses, camels and pigs relative to the remaining taxa (Cetacea and Ruminantia). There is also a need for informative genealogic markers for Y-chromosome population genetics as well as a sexing method applicable to all species from this group. We therefore studied the sequence variation of a partial sequence of the evolutionary conserved amelogenin gene to assess its potential use in each of these fields. Results and discussion We report a large interstitial insertion in the Y amelogenin locus in most of the Cetartiodactyla lineages (cetaceans and ruminants). This sex-linked size polymorphism is the result of a 460–465 bp inserted element in intron 4 of the amelogenin gene of Ruminants and Cetaceans. Therefore, this polymorphism can easily be used in a sexing assay for these species. When taking into account this shared character in addition to nucleotide sequence, gene genealogy follows sex-chromosome divergence in Cetartiodactyla whereas it is more congruent with zoological history when ignoring these characters. This could be related to a loss of homology between chromosomal copies given the old age of the insertion. The 1 kbp Amel-Y amplified fragment is also characterized by high nucleotide diversity (64 polymorphic sites spanning over 1 kbp in seven haplotypes) which is greater than for other Y-chromosome sequence markers studied so far but less than the mitochondrial control region. Conclusion The gender-dependent polymorphism we have identified is relevant not only for phylogenic inference within the Cetartiodactyla but also for Y-chromosome based population genetics and gender determination in cetaceans and ruminants. One single protocol can therefore be used for studies in population and evolutionary genetics, reproductive biotechnologies, and forensic science. PMID:18925953

  5. Evidence for Amino Acid Snorkeling from a High-Resolution, In Vivo Analysis of Fis1 Tail-Anchor Insertion at the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Abdurrahman; Akdoğan, Emel; Dunn, Cory D.

    2017-01-01

    Proteins localized to mitochondria by a carboxyl-terminal tail anchor (TA) play roles in apoptosis, mitochondrial dynamics, and mitochondrial protein import. To reveal characteristics of TAs that may be important for mitochondrial targeting, we focused our attention upon the TA of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fis1 protein. Specifically, we generated a library of Fis1p TA variants fused to the Gal4 transcription factor, then, using next-generation sequencing, revealed which Fis1p TA mutations inhibited membrane insertion and allowed Gal4p activity in the nucleus. Prompted by our global analysis, we subsequently analyzed the ability of individual Fis1p TA mutants to localize to mitochondria. Our findings suggest that the membrane-associated domain of the Fis1p TA may be bipartite in nature, and we encountered evidence that the positively charged patch at the carboxyl terminus of Fis1p is required for both membrane insertion and organelle specificity. Furthermore, lengthening or shortening of the Fis1p TA by up to three amino acids did not inhibit mitochondrial targeting, arguing against a model in which TA length directs insertion of TAs to distinct organelles. Most importantly, positively charged residues were more acceptable at several positions within the membrane-associated domain of the Fis1p TA than negatively charged residues. These findings, emerging from the first high-resolution analysis of an organelle targeting sequence by deep mutational scanning, provide strong, in vivo evidence that lysine and arginine can “snorkel,” or become stably incorporated within a lipid bilayer by placing terminal charges of their side chains at the membrane interface. PMID:28007883

  6. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS REVEAL VERY HIGH X-RAY LUMINOSITY FROM THE CARBON-RICH WOLF-RAYET STAR WR 48a

    SciTech Connect

    Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Gagne, Marc; Skinner, Stephen L. E-mail: mgagne@wcupa.edu

    2011-01-20

    We present XMM-Newton observations of the dusty Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star WR 48a. This is the first detection of this object in X-rays. The XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are heavily absorbed and the presence of numerous strong emission lines indicates a thermal origin of the WR 48a X-ray emission, with dominant temperature components at kT{sub cool} {approx} 1 keV and kT{sub hot} {approx} 3 keV, the hotter component dominating the observed flux. No significant X-ray variability was detected on timescales {<=}1 day. Although the distance to WR 48a is uncertain, if it is physically associated with Open clusters Danks 1 and 2 at d {approx}4 kpc, then the resultant X-ray luminosity L{sub X}{approx} 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1} makes it the most X-ray luminous W-R star in the Galaxy detected so far, after the black hole candidate Cyg X-3. We assume the following scenarios as the most likely explanation for the X-ray properties of WR 48a: (1) colliding stellar winds in a wide WR+O binary system, or in a hierarchical triple system with non-degenerate stellar components and (2) accretion shocks from the WR 48a wind onto a close companion (possibly a neutron star). More specific information about WR 48a and its wind properties will be needed to distinguish between the above possibilities.

  7. Unveiling TiNb2 O7 as an insertion anode for lithium ion capacitors with high energy and power density.

    PubMed

    Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Sundaramurthy, Jayaraman; Jain, Akshay; Kumar, Palaniswamy Suresh; Ling, Wong Chui; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Srinivasan, Madapusi P; Madhavi, Srinivasan

    2014-07-01

    This is the first report of the utilization of TiNb2 O7 as an insertion-type anode in a lithium-ion hybrid electrochemical capacitor (Li-HEC) along with an activated carbon (AC) counter electrode derived from a coconut shell. A simple and scalable electrospinning technique is adopted to prepare one-dimensional TiNb2 O7 nanofibers that can be characterized by XRD with Rietveld refinement, SEM, and TEM. The lithium insertion properties of such electrospun TiNb2 O7 are evaluated in the half-cell configuration (Li/TiNb2 O7 ) and it is found that the reversible intercalation of lithium (≈3.45 mol) is feasible with good capacity retention characteristics. The Li-HEC is constructed with an optimized mass loading based on the electrochemical performance of both the TiNb2 O7 anode and AC counter electrode in nonaqueous media. The Li-HEC delivers very high energy and power densities of approximately 43 Wh kg(-1) and 3 kW kg(-1) , respectively. Furthermore, the AC/TiNb2 O7 Li-HEC delivers a good cyclability of 3000 cycles with about 84% of the initial value.

  8. Pin-Hole Luminosity Monitor with Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norem, James H.; Spencer, James E.

    Previously, the generalized luminosity { L} was defined and calculated for all incident channels based on an NLC e+e- design. Alternatives were then considered to improve the differing beam-beam effects in the e-e-, eγ and γγ channels. Regardless of the channel, there was a large flux of outgoing, high energy photons that were produced from the beam-beam interaction e.g. beamstrahlung that needs to be disposed of and whose flux depended on { L}. One approach to this problem is to consider it a resource and attempt to take advantage of it by disposing of these straight-ahead photons in more useful ways than simply dumping them. While there are many options for monitoring the luminosity, any method that allows feedback and optimization in real time and in a non-intercepting and non-interfering way during normal data taking is extremely important - especially if it provides other capabilities such as high resolution tuning of spot sizes and can be used for all incident channels without essential modifications to their setup. Our "pin-hole" camera appears to be such a device if it can be made to work with high energy photons in ways that are compatible with the many other constraints and demands on space around the interaction region. The basis for using this method is that it has, in principle, the inherent resolution and bandwidth to monitor the very small spot sizes and their stabilities that are required for very high, integrated luminosity. While there are many possible, simultaneous uses of these outgoing photon beams, we limit our discussion to a single, blind, proof-of-principle experiment that was done on the FFTB line at SLAC to certify the concept of a camera obscura for high energy photons.

  9. Does the obscured AGN fraction really depend on luminosity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, S.; Churazov, E.; Krivonos, R.

    2015-12-01

    We use a sample of 151 local non-blazar active galactic nuclei (AGN) selected from the INTEGRAL all-sky hard X-ray survey to investigate if the observed declining trend of the fraction of obscured (i.e. showing X-ray absorption) AGN with increasing luminosity is mostly an intrinsic or selection effect. Using a torus-obscuration model, we demonstrate that in addition to negative bias, due to absorption in the torus, in finding obscured AGN in hard X-ray flux-limited surveys, there is also positive bias in finding unobscured AGN, due to Compton reflection in the torus. These biases can be even stronger taking into account plausible intrinsic collimation of hard X-ray emission along the axis of the obscuring torus. Given the AGN luminosity function, which steepens at high luminosities, these observational biases lead to a decreasing observed fraction of obscured AGN with increasing luminosity even if this fraction has no intrinsic luminosity dependence. We find that if the central hard X-ray source in AGN is isotropic, the intrinsic (i.e. corrected for biases) obscured AGN fraction still shows a declining trend with luminosity, although the intrinsic obscured fraction is significantly larger than the observed one: the actual fraction is larger than ˜85 per cent at L ≲ 1042.5 erg s-1 (17-60 keV), and decreases to ≲60 per cent at L ≳ 1044 erg s-1. In terms of the half-opening angle θ of an obscuring torus, this implies that θ ≲ 30° in lower luminosity AGN, and θ ≳ 45° in higher luminosity ones. If, however, the emission from the central supermassive black hole is collimated as dL/dΩ ∝ cos α, the intrinsic dependence of the obscured AGN fraction is consistent with a luminosity-independent torus half-opening angle θ ˜ 30°.

  10. The luminosity function of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pei, Yichuan C.

    1995-01-01

    We propose a new evolutionary model for the optical luminosity function of quasars. Our analytical model is derived from fits to the empirical luminosity function estimated by Hartwick and Schade and Warren, Hewett, and Osmer on the basis of more than 1200 quasars over the range of redshifts 0 approximately less than z approximately less than 4.5. We find that the evolution of quasars over this entire redshift range can be well fitted by a Gaussian distribution, while the shape of the luminosity function can be well fitted by either a double power law or an exponential L(exp 1/4) law. The predicted number counts of quasars, as a function of either apparent magnitude or redshift, are fully consistent with the observed ones. Our model indicates that the evolution of quasars reaches its maximum at z approximately = 2.8 and declines at higher redshifts. An extrapolation of the evolution to z approximately greater than 4.5 implies that quasars may have started their cosmic fireworks at z(sub f) approximately = 5.2-5.5. Forthcoming surveys of quasars at these redshifts will be critical to constrain the epoch of quasar formation. All the results we derived are based on observed quasars and are therefore subject to the bias of obscuration by dust in damped Ly alpha systems. Future surveys of these absorption systems at z approximately greater than 3 will also be important if the formation epoch of quasars is to be known unambiguously.

  11. Higher luminosities via alternative incident channels

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1985-04-01

    We show that PEP provides some unique opportunities for one and two photon physics with real photons as well as for QCD studies with internal targets. Photon beams would avoid the major limitation on the luminosity of present machines and could provide PEP an ideal b-physics factory producing the full range of J/sub c//sup PC/ and J/sub b//sup PC/ states that may not be observable otherwise as well as allow a whole new class of ''missing-mass'' experiments. These latter particles are the pseudo-Goldstone bosons and their supersymmetric counterparts. These and related possibilities like a single-pass, ''free electron laser'' facility or even synchrotron radiation beam lines all favor a mini-maxi configuration for the low-beta insertions in PEP. This allows more diverse experiments without excluding any ongoing experimental programs. Such possibilities have interesting implications for a number of proposed facilities including the SSC. Some systematic machine physics studies over a range of energies are suggested. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Control of the static and high-frequency magnetic properties of perpendicular anisotropic Co–HfN granular films through insertion of HfN interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yang; Zhang, Yiwen; Ohnuma, Shigehiro; Kobayashi, Nobukiyo; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    We propose a multilayer granular structure wherein Hf–nitride (HfN) interlayers are inserted into Co–HfN granular films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) to control their static and high-frequency magnetic properties. The transition between soft ferromagnetic properties and PMA was achieved by varying the thickness of Co–HfN layers (2–30 nm) and HfN interlayers (1–4 nm). The resonance frequency of the Co–HfN (24 nm)/HfN films decreased from 2 to 0.9 GHz with increasing HfN interlayer thickness, owning to the separation of the columnar granules and reduced interlayer interaction between Co–HfN granular layers via a HfN interlayer.

  13. Strontium Insertion in Methylammonium Lead Iodide: Long Charge Carrier Lifetime and High Fill-Factor Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez-del-Rey, Daniel; Savenije, Tom J.; Nordlund, Dennis; Schulz, Philip; Berry, Joseph J.; Sessolo, Michele

    2016-09-22

    The addition of Sr2+ in CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films enhances the charge carrier collection efficiency of solar cells leading to very high fill factors, up to 85%. The charge carrier lifetime of Sr2+-containing perovskites is in excess of 40 us, longer than those reported for perovskite single crystals.

  14. Grommet Having Metal Insert

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-28

    axially with respect to the body. The 1 means for releasably securing a tool to the insert comprises 2 female threads formed on an inner surface of the...below 10 the flange 32. These surfaces 34, 36 are threaded ( female 11 threads) so that the end of a tool 38 having male threads can 12 engage the...further includes a rigid insert secured to the body in the 12 centrally located aperture. The insert has female threads formed 13 therein for releasably

  15. The GRB luminosity function: prediction of the internal shock model and comparison to observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouni, H.; Daigne, F.; Mochkovitch, R.

    2008-05-01

    We compute the expected GRB luminosity function in the internal shock model. We find that if the population of GRB central engines produces all kind of relativistic outflows, from very smooth to highly variable, the luminosity function has to branchs: at low luminosity, the distribution is dominated by low efficiency GRBs and is close to a power law of slope -0.5, whereas at high luminosity, the luminosity function follows the distribution of injected kinetic power. Using Monte Carlo simulations and several observational constrains (BATSE logN-logP diagram, peak energy distribution of bright BATSE bursts, fraction of XRFs in the HETE2 sample), we show that it is currently impossible to distinguish between a single power law or a broken power law luminosity function. However, when the second case is considered, the low-luminosity slope is found to be -0.6+/-0.2, which is compatible with the prediction of the internal shock model.

  16. High-sensitivity temperature-independent force sensor based on PS-LPFG formed by inserting a microbend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaolan; Zhang, Yanxin; Zhang, Weigang; Yan, Tieyi

    2017-03-01

    A unique phase-shifted long period grating (PS-LPFG) is proposed and demonstrated by means of fabricating a microbend in the center of LPFG written by CO2 laser. Experiments demonstrate that this PS-LPFG can be used to develop a promising high sensitive force sensor by measuring the wavelength separation between the two resonance loss dips. Moreover, the wavelength separation is insensitive to the external temperature. The force sensitivity of the PS-LPFG with a bending radius 2.62 mm is measured to be up to ‑186.74 nm N‑1, which is enhanced two orders compared to the LPFG without a microbend.

  17. Strontium insertion in methlyammonium lead iodide: long charge carrier lifetime and high fill factor solar cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momblona, Cristina; Gil-Escrig, Lidón; Ávila, Jorge; Pérez-Del-Rey, Daniel; Forgács, David; Sessolo, Michele; Bolink, Hendrik J.

    2016-09-01

    Organic-inorganic (hybrid) lead halide perovskites are taking the lead among the emerging photovoltaics technologies, thanks to the demonstration of power conversion efficiencies exceeding 20 %. Hybrid perovskites have a wide spectrum of desirable properties; they are direct bandgap semiconductors with very high absorption coefficients, high and balanced hole and electron mobility, and large diffusion length. A unique feature of these materials is their versatility in terms of bandgap energy, which can be tuned by simple exchange of their components. In this paper we present vacuum and hybrid deposition routes for the preparation of different organic-inorganic lead perovskite thin films, and their incorporation into efficient solar cells. The influence of the type of organic semiconductors used as hole/electron transport layer in p-i-n solar cells will be presented. We also discuss their electroluminescence properties, either for applications in light-emitting diodes or as a diagnostic tool of the optical and electronic quality of perovskite thin films. Finally, the effect of additives and dopants in the perovskite absorber as well as in the charge selective layers will be described.

  18. Plastic pipe insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Diskin, J.

    1987-05-01

    In March 1987 KPL changed all that when the utility inserted 1,000 ft of 16-in. SDR 15.5 Phillips Driscopipe 8000 pipe with a wall thickness of 1.032-in., into an abandoned 24-in. cast-iron line in downtown Kansas City. This is believed to be the largest diameter insert removal job ever done for gas distribution in the U.S. For KPL it was a natural progression from the smaller sizes used earlier. The procedure is the same, and the operation was quick and comparatively simple. Lower construction costs were the bottom line because with insert renewal there is no need to cut up the streets, a major expense in any urban pipeline work. There are other significant costs savings as well because the insert renewal construction process is faster than other techniques.

  19. Ear tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100045.htm Ear tube insertion - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 4 Overview The eardrum (tympanic membrane) separates the ear canal from the middle ear. Review Date 8/ ...

  20. Luminosity function and jet structure of Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescalli, A.; Ghirlanda, G.; Salafia, O. S.; Ghisellini, G.; Nappo, F.; Salvaterra, R.

    2015-02-01

    The structure of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets impacts on their prompt and afterglow emission properties. The jet of GRBs could be uniform, with constant energy per unit solid angle within the jet aperture, or it could be structured, namely with energy and velocity that depend on the angular distance from the axis of the jet. We try to get some insight about the still unknown structure of GRBs by studying their luminosity function. We show that low (1046-48 erg s-1) and high (i.e. with L ≥ 1050 erg s-1) luminosity GRBs can be described by a unique luminosity function, which is also consistent with current lower limits in the intermediate luminosity range (1048-50 erg s-1). We derive analytical expressions for the luminosity function of GRBs in uniform and structured jet models and compare them with the data. Uniform jets can reproduce the entire luminosity function with reasonable values of the free parameters. A structured jet can also fit adequately the current data, provided that the energy within the jet is relatively strongly structured, i.e. E ∝ θ-k with k ≥ 4. The classical E ∝ θ-2 structured jet model is excluded by the current data.

  1. Can Sequentially-irradiated and Annealed Highly Cross-linked Polyethylene Inserts Thinner than Eight-millimeters Be Utilized in Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Sayeed, Siraj A; Jauregui, Julio J; Korduba, Laryssa A; Essner, Aaron; Harwin, Steven F; Delanois, Ronald E; Mont, Michael A

    2015-05-01

    The routine use of highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has remained controversial secondary to the possibility of decreased material properties when compared to conventional UHMWPE. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if thin, sequentially-irradiated, and annealed highly cross-linked UHMWPE tibial inserts would have improved wear properties, while maintaining mechanical integrity, compared to conventional UHMWPE during biomechanical testing under aligned and malaligned conditions. Polyethylene inserts (4.27 and 6.27 mm) manufactured from GUR 1020-UHMWPE were cyclically loaded to analyze for wear. All wear scars were visually examined after loading using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Volume loss was plotted versus cycle count with linear regression analysis yielding wear rates. There was no statistical difference in wear between both thicknesses for all testing conditions. During aligned condition testing, the volumetric wear rate for sequentially-irradiated and annealed polyethylene thicknesses of 4.27 and 6.27 mm was 4.0 and 4.4 mm3/million cycles; and during malaligned conditions, it was 13.9 and 15.1 mm3/million cycles. For conventional polyethylene during aligned conditions, the volumetric wear rate was 33.0 and 22.8 mm3/million cycles; and during malaligned conditions it was 50.0 and 50.8 mm3/million cycles. By SEM evaluation, condylar wear surfaces for conventional and sequentially-irradiated and annealed polyethylene displayed surface ripples typical of adhesive wear. There were no observed visible differences between the wear scars for conventional compared to sequentially-irradiated and annealed polyethylene with no evidence of fatigue failure. This study demonstrated no differences between polyethylenes with thicknesses of 4.27 and 6.27 mm. This strengthens the conclusion that sequentially-irradiated and annealed highly cross-linked UHMWPE can be utilized in total knee arthroplasty. The successful wear

  2. Characterization of new hybrid pixel module concepts for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus, M.

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) collaboration plans to insert a fourth pixel layer inside the present Pixel Detector to recover from eventual failures in the current pixel system, especially the b-layer. Additionally the IBL will ensure excellent tracking, vertexing and b-tagging performance during the LHC phase I and add robustness in tracking with high luminosity pile-up. The expected peak luminosity for IBL is 2 to 3·1034 cm-2s-1 and IBL is designed for an integrated luminosity of 700 fb-1. This corresponds to an expected fluence of 5·1015 1 MeV neqcm-2 and a total ionizing dose of 250 MRad. In order to cope with these requirements, two new module concepts are under investigation, both based on a new front end IC, called FE-I4. This IC was designed as readout chip for future ATLAS Pixel Detectors and its first application will be the IBL. The planar pixel sensor (PPS) based module concept benefits from its well understood design, which is kept as similar as possible to the design of the current ATLAS Pixel Detector sensor. The second approach of the new three dimensional (3D) silicon sensor technology benefits from the shorter charge carrier drift distance to the electrodes, which completely penetrate the sensor bulk. Prototype modules of both sensor concepts have been build and tested in laboratory and test beam environment before and after irradiation. Both concepts show very high performance even after irradiation to 5·1015 1 MeV neqcm-2 and meet the IBL specifications in terms of hit efficiency being larger than 97%. Lowest operational threshold studies have been effected and prove independent of the used sensor concept the excellent performance of FE-I4 based module concepts in terms of noise hit occupancy at low thresholds.

  3. The First Detection of (O IV) from an Ultraluminous X-Ray Source with Spitzer. 2. Evidence for High Luminosity in Holmberg II ULX

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    from the accretion disk of the binary system and inconsistent with narrow beaming. We show that the emission nebula is matter- bounded both in the line...making them very dif- ficult to characterize. The ionization nebulae surrounding some ULXs have become critical for understanding the properties of...Abolmasov et al. 2007). It is located inside an ionized nebula (the “Foot nebula ”), and shows high- ionization optical emission lines coincident with

  4. Multipurpose Transposon-Insertion Libraries in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj

    2016-06-01

    Libraries of transposon-insertion alleles constitute powerful and versatile tools for large-scale analysis of yeast gene function. Transposon-insertion libraries are constructed most simply through mutagenesis of a plasmid-based genomic DNA library; modification of the mutagenizing transposon by incorporation of yeast selectable markers, recombination sites, and an epitope tag enables the application of insertion alleles for phenotypic screening and protein localization. In particular, yeast genomic DNA libraries have been mutagenized with modified bacterial transposons carrying the URA3 marker, lox recombination sites, and sequence encoding multiple copies of the hemagglutinin (HA) epitope. Mutagenesis with these transposons has yielded a large resource of insertion alleles affecting nearly 4000 yeast genes in total. Through well-established protocols, these insertion libraries can be introduced into the desired strain backgrounds and the resulting insertional mutants can be screened or systematically analyzed. Relative to alternative methods of UV irradiation or chemical mutagenesis, transposon-insertion alleles can be easily identified by PCR-based approaches or high-throughput sequencing. Transposon-insertion libraries also provide a cost-effective alternative to targeted deletion approaches, although, in contrast to start-codon to stop-codon deletions, insertion alleles might not represent true null-mutants. For protein-localization studies, transposon-insertion alleles can provide encoded epitope tags in-frame with internal codons; in many cases, these transposon-encoded epitope tags can provide a more accurate localization for proteins in which terminal sequences are crucial for intracellular targeting. Thus, overall, transposon-insertion libraries can be used quickly and economically and have a particular utility in screening for desired phenotypes and localization patterns in nonstandard genetic backgrounds.

  5. Mass Accretion Rate of Very Low Luminosity Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Ren-Shiang; Lai, Shih-Ping; Hsieh, Tien-Hao

    2013-08-01

    We propose to measure the mass accretion rate of six Very Low Luminosity Objects (VeLLOs) using Near-infrared Integral Spectrometer (NIFS). The extremely low luminosity of VeLLOs, L_int ≤ 0.1 L_⊙, was previously thought not existing in the nature because the typical accretion rate gives much larger accretion luminosity even for the lowest mass star (``Luminosity Problem''). The commonly accepted solution is that the accretion rate is not constant but episodic. Thus, VeLLOs could be interpreted as protostars being in the quiescent phase of accretion activities. However, there is no observational data directly measuring the mass accretion rate of VeLLOs. The main goal of this proposal is to examine such theory and directly measure the mass accretion rate of VeLLOs for the first time. We propose to measure the blue continuum excess (veiling) of the stellar spectrum, which is the most reliable method for measuring the accretion rate. The measurements have to be made in infrared due to the very high extinction for highly embedded protostars. Our proposal provide a first opportunity to explain the long time ``Luminosity Problem'' through the observational aspects, and Gemini is the only instrument that can provide accurate and high sensitivity infrared spectroscopy measurements within reasonably short time scale.

  6. Descemet's Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty Tissue Insertion Devices

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Salman Nasir; Shiakolas, Panos S.; Mootha, Venkateswara Vinod

    2015-01-01

    This review study provides information regarding the construction, design, and use of six commercially available endothelial allograft insertion devices applied for Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK). We also highlight issues being faced in DSAEK and discuss the methods through which medical devices such as corneal inserters may alleviate these issues. Inserter selection is of high importance in the DSAEK procedure since overcoming the learning curve associated with the use of an insertion device is a time and energy consuming process. In the present review, allograft insertion devices were compared in terms of design, construction material, insertion technique, dimensions, incision requirements and endothelial cell loss to show their relative merits and capabilities based on available data in the literature. Moreover, the advantages/disadvantages of various insertion devices used for allograft insertion in DSAEK are reviewed and compared. The information presented in this review can be utilized for better selection of an insertion device for DSAEK. PMID:27051492

  7. Insertion device calculations with mathematica

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.; Lidia, S.

    1995-02-01

    The design of accelerator insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators has usually been aided by numerical modeling on digital computers, using code in high level languages like Fortran. In the present era, there are higher level programming environments like IDL{reg_sign}, MatLab{reg_sign}, and Mathematica{reg_sign} in which these calculations may be performed by writing much less code, and in which standard mathematical techniques are very easily used. The authors present a suite of standard insertion device modeling routines in Mathematica to illustrate the new techniques. These routines include a simple way to generate magnetic fields using blocks of CSEM materials, trajectory solutions from the Lorentz force equations for given magnetic fields, Bessel function calculations of radiation for wigglers and undulators and general radiation calculations for undulators.

  8. Construction of luminosity function for galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godłowski, Włodzimierz; Popiela, Joanna; Bajan, Katarzyna; Biernacka, Monika; Flin, Piotr; Panko, Elena

    2015-02-01

    The luminosity function is an important quantity for analysis of large scale structure statistics, interpretation of galaxy counts (Lin & Kirshner 1996). We investigate the luminosity function of galaxy clusters. This is performed by counting the brightness of galaxies belonging to clusters in PF Catalogue. The obtained luminosity function is significantly different than that obtained both for optical and radiogalaxies (Machalski & Godowski 2000). The implications of this result for theories of galaxy formation are discussed as well.

  9. On the Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Lawrence, A.; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.

    2011-05-20

    We calculate simultaneously the radio and optical luminosity evolutions of quasars, and the distribution in radio loudness R defined as the ratio of radio and optical luminosities, using a flux limited data set containing 636 quasars with radio and optical fluxes from White et al. We first note that when dealing with multivariate data it is imperative to first determine the true correlations among the variables, not those introduced by the observational selection effects, before obtaining the individual distributions of the variables. We use the methods developed by Efron and Petrosian which are designed to obtain unbiased correlations, distributions, and evolution with redshift from a data set truncated due to observational biases. It is found that as expected the population of quasars exhibits strong positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities and that this correlation deviates from a simple linear relation in a way indicating that more luminous quasars are more radio loud. We also find that there is a strong luminosity evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with significantly higher radio than optical evolution. We conclude that the luminosity evolution obtained by arbitrarily separating the sources into radio loud (R > 10) and radio quiet (R < 10) populations introduces significant biases that skew the result considerably. We also construct the local radio and optical luminosity functions and the density evolution. Finally, we consider the distribution of the radio loudness parameter R obtained from careful treatment of the selection effects and luminosity evolutions with that obtained from the raw data without such considerations. We find a significant difference between the two distributions and no clear sign of bi-modality in the true distribution. Our results indicate therefore, somewhat surprisingly, that there is no critical switch in the efficiency of the production of disk outflows/jets between very radio quiet and very radio

  10. Measuring the Radius of a Neutron Star; Origin of High X-Ray Luminosities in Optically Passive Galaxies; Resolving the Source of X-Rays in IC 1613"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.

    1998-01-01

    This recently expired grant has supported the work of the PI, his students, and his collaborators on a variety of ROSAT projects over the past three years. Annual reports have summarized much of the work accomplished; here we provide a brief review of the work resulting from this effort, and a summary of the personnel who have benefited from its support. A high resolution ROSAT HRI X-ray image of the Local Group dwarf IC1613 revealed that the principal source of X-ray emission in this direction arises in a background cluster of galaxies, as first suggested by Eskridge (1995). In addition, however, we found a bright X-ray source coincident with the only known supernova remnant in this galaxy, S # 8. Extensive ground-based follow-up observations in the radio and optical regimes were conducted. We confirmed the nonthermal radio spectral index of the source and measured its extent to be approx. 3 sec at 20 cm. Imaging spectrophotometric observations taken with the multi-pupil spectrograph of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in the FSU allowed us to determine the density and velocity distribution of the gas in the remnant. The simultaneous presence of luminous X-ray and optical emission suggests a relatively young remnant in which the outward-moving shock has recently encountered dense material. Many of this object's properties are similar to those of the brightest optical remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud, N49. Another potential source of X-rays in this galaxy which featured prominently in our original proposal, an Oxygen Wolf-Rayet star with a large surrounding wind-blown bubble, was not detected.

  11. Is the dependence of spectral index on luminosity real in optically selected AGN samples?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Su Min; Zhang, Shuang Nan; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2007-05-01

    We critically examine the dependence of spectral index on luminosity in optically selected AGN samples. An analysis of optically selected high-z quasars showed an anticorrelation of αOX, the spectral index between the rest-frame 2500 Å and 2 keV, with optical luminosity. We examine this relationship by means of Monte Carlo simulations and conclude that a constant αOX independent of optical luminosity is still consistent with this high-z sample. We further find that contributions of large dispersions and narrow range of optical luminosity are most important for the apparent, yet artificial, αOX-lo correlation reported. We also examine another, but more complete, low-z optical selected AGN sub-sample from Steffen et al., and our analysis shows that a constant αOX independent of optical luminosity is also consistent with the data. By comparing X-ray and optical luminosity functions, we find that a luminosity-independent αOX is in fact more preferred than the luminosity-dependent αOX model. We also discuss the selection effects caused by flux limits, which might systematically bias the lX-lo relation and cause discrepancy in optically selected and X-ray selected AGN samples. To correctly establish a dependence of αOX of AGNs on their luminosity, a larger and more complete sample is needed and consequences of luminosity dispersions and selection effects in flux-limited samples must be taken into account properly.

  12. A novel eight amino acid insertion contributes to the hemagglutinin cleavability and the virulence of a highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H7N3) virus in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiangjie; Belser, Jessica A.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2016-01-15

    In 2012, an avian influenza A H7N3 (A/Mexico/InDRE7218/2012; Mx/7218) virus was responsible for two confirmed cases of human infection and led to the death or culling of more than 22 million chickens in Jalisco, Mexico. Interestingly, this virus acquired an 8-amino acid (aa)-insertion (..PENPK-DRKSRHRR-TR/GLF) near the hemagglutinin (HA) cleavage site by nonhomologous recombination with host rRNA. It remains unclear which specific residues at the cleavage site contribute to the virulence of H7N3 viruses in mammals. Using loss-of-function approaches, we generated a series of cleavage site mutant viruses by reverse genetics and characterized the viruses in vitro and in vivo. We found that the 8-aa insertion and the arginine at position P4 of the Mx/7218 HA cleavage site are essential for intracellular HA cleavage in 293T cells, but have no effect on the pH of membrane fusion. However, we identified a role for the histidine residue at P5 position in viral fusion pH. In mice, the 8-aa insertion is required for Mx/7218 virus virulence; however, the basic residues upstream of the P4 position are dispensable for virulence. Overall, our study provides the first line of evidence that the insertion in the Mx/7218 virus HA cleavage site confers its intracellular cleavability, and consequently contributes to enhanced virulence in mice. - Highlights: • An avian influenza H7N3 virus acquired a unique 8-amino acid (aa) insertion. • The role of specific basic residues in the HA insertion in viral pathogenesis was determined. • In mice, the 8-aa insertion is required for H7N3 virus virulence. • The R residue at position P4 is essential for HA intracellular cleavage and virus virulence.

  13. Implications of the Observed Ultraluminous X-Ray Source Luminosity Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn; Soria, Roberto; Yukita, Mihoko

    2012-01-01

    We present the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of ultraluminous X-ray (ULX) sources with 0.3-10.0 keV luminosities in excess of 10(sup 39) erg/s in a complete sample of nearby galaxies. The XLF shows a break or cut-off at high luminosities that deviates from its pure power law distribution at lower luminosities. The cut-off is at roughly the Eddington luminosity for a 90-140 solar mass accretor. We examine the effects on the observed XLF of sample biases, of small-number statistics (at the high luminosity end) and of measurement uncertainties. We consider the physical implications of the shape and normalization of the XLF. The XLF is also compared and contrasted to results of other recent surveys.

  14. The rate and luminosity function of long gamma ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescalli, A.; Ghirlanda, G.; Salvaterra, R.; Ghisellini, G.; Vergani, S. D.; Nappo, F.; Salafia, O. S.; Melandri, A.; Covino, S.; Götz, D.

    2016-03-01

    We derive, adopting a direct method, the luminosity function and the formation rate of long Gamma Ray Bursts through a complete, flux-limited, sample of Swift bursts which has a high level of completeness in redshift z (~82%). We parametrise the redshift evolution of the GRB luminosity as L = L0(1 + z)k and we derive k = 2.5, consistently with recent estimates. The de-evolved luminosity function φ(L0) of GRBs can be represented by a broken power law with slopes a = -1.32 ± 0.21 and b = -1.84 ± 0.24 below and above, respectively, a break luminosity L0,b = 1051.45±0.15 erg/s. Under the hypothesis of luminosity evolution we find that the GRB formation rate increases with redshift up to z ~ 2, where it peaks, and then decreases in agreement with the shape of the cosmic star formation rate. We test the direct method through numerical simulations and we show that if it is applied to incomplete (both in redshift and/or flux) GRB samples it can misleadingly result in an excess of the GRB formation rate at low redshifts.

  15. The Tonantzintla Search for High Luminosity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, H. A.

    2011-04-01

    Starting with the paper by G. González and G. González, 1952, BOTT, 1, 5, 1 in the first volume of the Bulletin, various Tonantzintla astronomers worked for years to find the OB stars that delineate the local spiral arms. Perhaps they became discouraged when the 21 cm radio maps appeared, but they should not have been because the optical data produce distances while the radio data measure only radial motions, that need to be interpreted with a model of the motions in our Galaxy. Those motions are more complicated than they thought, so their maps are very inaccurate. The recent 4.5 μm infrared map shows our Galaxy to have a central bar, two major spiral arms, and five small ones.

  16. Correlation analysis of radio properties and accretion-disk luminosity for low luminosity AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Renzhi; Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    The correlation between the jet power and accretion disk luminosity is investigated and analyzed with our model for 7 samples of low luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). The main results are: (1) the power-law correlation index (P_{jet} ∝ L_{disk} ^{μ}) typically ranges μ=0.4-0.7 for the LLAGN samples, and there is a hint of steep index for the LLAGN sample which hosted by a high fraction of elliptical galaxies, and there are no significant correlation between the μ and the LLAGN types (Seyfert, LINER); (2) for μ≈1, as noted in Liu et al., the accretion disk dominates the jet power and the black hole (BH) spin is not important, for the LLAGN samples studied in this paper we find that the μ is significantly less than unity, implying that BH spin may play a significant role in the jet power of LLAGNs; (3) the BH spin-jet power is negatively correlated with the BH mass in our model, which means a high spin-jet efficiency in the `low' BH-mass LLAGNs; (4) an anti-correlation between radio loudness and disk luminosity is found, which is apparently due to the flatter power-law index in the jet-disk correlation of the LLAGNs, and the radio loudness can be higher in the LLAGNs than in luminous AGNs/quasars when the BH spin-jet power is comparable to or dominate over the accretion-jet power in the LLAGNs. The high radio-core dominance of the LLAGNs is also discussed.

  17. LUMINOSITY OPTIMIZATION USING AUTOMATED IR STEERING AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    DREES,A.D'OTTAVIO,T.

    2004-07-05

    The goal of the RHIC 2004 Au-Au run was to maximize the achieved integrated luminosity. One way is to increase beam currents and minimize beam transverse emittances. Another important ingredient is the minimization of time spent on activities postponing the declaration of ''physics conditions'', i.e. stable beam conditions allowing the experimental detectors to take data. Since collision rates are particularly high in the beginning of the store the integrated luminosity benefits considerably from any minute saved early in the store. In the RHIC run 2004 a new IR steering application uses luminosity monitor signals as a feedback for a fully automated steering procedure. This report gives an overview of the used procedure and summarizes the achieved results.

  18. Luminosity limit for alpha-viscosity accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Edison P.; Wandel, Amri

    1991-01-01

    The existence of a luminosity limit for alpha-viscosity physically thin accretion disks around black holes is established, using a new formulation of the radiation equation bridging optically thick and thin regimes. For alpha close to unity, this limit can be lower than the Eddington limit. Physically, this limit is due to the combined effects of gas and radiation pressure which become too large to satisfy vertical hydrostatic balance at intermediate optical depths for sufficiently high luminosities. This effect was overlooked in previous treatments using only the optically thin or thick limits of the radiative equation.

  19. A Flexible Method of Estimating Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Brandon C.; Fan, Xiaohui; Vestergaard, Marianne

    2008-08-01

    We describe a Bayesian approach to estimating luminosity functions. We derive the likelihood function and posterior probability distribution for the luminosity function, given the observed data, and we compare the Bayesian approach with maximum likelihood by simulating sources from a Schechter function. For our simulations confidence intervals derived from bootstrapping the maximum likelihood estimate can be too narrow, while confidence intervals derived from the Bayesian approach are valid. We develop our statistical approach for a flexible model where the luminosity function is modeled as a mixture of Gaussian functions. Statistical inference is performed using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, and we describe a Metropolis-Hastings algorithm to perform the MCMC. The MCMC simulates random draws from the probability distribution of the luminosity function parameters, given the data, and we use a simulated data set to show how these random draws may be used to estimate the probability distribution for the luminosity function. In addition, we show how the MCMC output may be used to estimate the probability distribution of any quantities derived from the luminosity function, such as the peak in the space density of quasars. The Bayesian method we develop has the advantage that it is able to place accurate constraints on the luminosity function even beyond the survey detection limits, and that it provides a natural way of estimating the probability distribution of any quantities derived from the luminosity function, including those that rely on information beyond the survey detection limits.

  20. Highly sensitive detection of a HER2 12-base pair duplicated insertion mutation in lung cancer using the Eprobe-PCR method

    PubMed Central

    Takase, Yoshiaki; Usui, Kengo; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Kimura, Yasumasa; Ichihara, Tatsuo; Ohkawa, Takahiro; Atsumi, Jun; Enokida, Yasuaki; Nakazawa, Seshiru; Obayashi, Kai; Ohtaki, Yoichi; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Mitani, Yasumasa; Takeyoshi, Izumi

    2017-01-01

    Somatic mutation in human epidermal growth factor receptor-related 2 gene (HER2) is one of the driver mutations in lung cancer. HER2 mutations are found in about 2% of lung adenocarcinomas (ADCs). Previous reports have been based mainly on diagnostic screening by Sanger sequencing or next-generation sequencing (NGS); however, these methods are time-consuming and complicated. We developed a rapid, simple, sensitive mutation detection assay for detecting HER2 12 base pair-duplicated insertion mutation based on the Eprobe-mediated PCR method (Eprobe-PCR) and validated the sensitivity of this assay system for clinical diagnostics. We examined 635 tumor samples and analyzed HER2 mutations using the Eprobe-PCR method, NGS, and Sanger sequencing. In a serial dilution study, the Eprobe-PCR was able to detect mutant plasmid DNA when its concentration was reduced to 0.1% by mixing with wild-type DNA. We also confirmed amplification of the mutated plasmid DNA with only 10 copies per reaction. In ADCs, Eprobe-PCR detected the HER2 mutation in 2.02% (9/446), while Sanger sequencing detected it in 1.57% (7/446). Eprobe-PCR was able to detect the mutation in two samples that were undetectable by Sanger sequencing. All non-ADC samples were wild-type. There were no discrepancies between frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues in the nine samples. HER2 mutations detected by NGS data validated the high sensitivity of the method. Therefore, this new technique can lead to precise molecular-targeted therapies. PMID:28152008

  1. Highly sensitive detection of a HER2 12-base pair duplicated insertion mutation in lung cancer using the Eprobe-PCR method.

    PubMed

    Takase, Yoshiaki; Usui, Kengo; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Kimura, Yasumasa; Ichihara, Tatsuo; Ohkawa, Takahiro; Atsumi, Jun; Enokida, Yasuaki; Nakazawa, Seshiru; Obayashi, Kai; Ohtaki, Yoichi; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Mitani, Yasumasa; Takeyoshi, Izumi

    2017-01-01

    Somatic mutation in human epidermal growth factor receptor-related 2 gene (HER2) is one of the driver mutations in lung cancer. HER2 mutations are found in about 2% of lung adenocarcinomas (ADCs). Previous reports have been based mainly on diagnostic screening by Sanger sequencing or next-generation sequencing (NGS); however, these methods are time-consuming and complicated. We developed a rapid, simple, sensitive mutation detection assay for detecting HER2 12 base pair-duplicated insertion mutation based on the Eprobe-mediated PCR method (Eprobe-PCR) and validated the sensitivity of this assay system for clinical diagnostics. We examined 635 tumor samples and analyzed HER2 mutations using the Eprobe-PCR method, NGS, and Sanger sequencing. In a serial dilution study, the Eprobe-PCR was able to detect mutant plasmid DNA when its concentration was reduced to 0.1% by mixing with wild-type DNA. We also confirmed amplification of the mutated plasmid DNA with only 10 copies per reaction. In ADCs, Eprobe-PCR detected the HER2 mutation in 2.02% (9/446), while Sanger sequencing detected it in 1.57% (7/446). Eprobe-PCR was able to detect the mutation in two samples that were undetectable by Sanger sequencing. All non-ADC samples were wild-type. There were no discrepancies between frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues in the nine samples. HER2 mutations detected by NGS data validated the high sensitivity of the method. Therefore, this new technique can lead to precise molecular-targeted therapies.

  2. Thought Insertion Clarified

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, Matthew; Wilkinson, Sam

    2016-01-01

    ‘Thought insertion’ in schizophrenia involves somehow experiencing one’s own thoughts as someone else’s. Some philosophers try to make sense of this by distinguishing between ownership and agency: one still experiences oneself as the owner of an inserted thought but attributes it to another agency. In this paper, we propose that thought insertion involves experiencing thought contents as alien, rather than episodes of thinking. To make our case, we compare thought insertion to certain experiences of ‘verbal hallucination’ and show that they amount to different descriptions of the same phenomenon: a quasi-perceptual experience of thought content. We add that the agency/ownership distinction is unhelpful here. What requires explanation is not why a person experiences a type of intentional state without the usual sense of agency, but why she experiences herself as the agent of one type of intentional state rather than another. We conclude by sketching an account of how this might happen. PMID:28123340

  3. Insertion sequence elements in Lactococcus garvieae.

    PubMed

    Eraclio, Giovanni; Ricci, Giovanni; Fortina, Maria Grazia

    2015-01-25

    Insertion sequences are the simplest intracellular Mobile Genetic Elements which can occur in very high numbers in prokaryotic genomes, where they play an important evolutionary role by promoting genome plasticity. As such, the studies on the diversity and distribution of insertion sequences in genomes not yet investigated can contribute to improve the knowledge on a bacterial species and to identify new transposable elements. The present work describes the occurrence of insertion sequences in Lactococcus garvieae, an opportunistic emerging zoonotic and human pathogen, also associated with different food matrices. To date, no insertion elements have been described for L. garvieae in the IS element database. The analysis of the twelve published L. garvieae genomes identified 15 distinct insertion sequences that are members of the IS3, IS982, IS6, IS21 and IS256 families, including five new elements. Most of the insertion sequences in L. garvieae show substantial homology to the Lactococcus lactis elements, suggesting the movement of IS between these two species phylogenetically closely related. ISLL6 elements belonging to IS3 family were most abundant, with several copies distributed in 9 of the 12 genomes analyzed. An alignment analysis of two complete genomes carrying multi-copies of this insertion sequence indicates a possible involvement of ISLL6 in chromosomal rearrangement.

  4. DESIGN OF A HIGH COMPRESSION, DIRECT INJECTION, SPARK-IGNITION, METHANOL FUELED RESEARCH ENGINE WITH AN INTEGRAL INJECTOR-IGNITION SOURCE INSERT, SAE PAPER 2001-01-3651

    EPA Science Inventory

    A stratified charge research engine and test stand were designed and built for this work. The primary goal of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using a removal integral injector ignition source insert which allows a convenient method of charging the relative locat...

  5. A complete X-ray sample of the high-latitude /absolute value of b greater than 20 deg/ sky from HEAO 1 A-2 - Log N-log S and luminosity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piccinotti, G.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Marshall, F. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Shafer, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    An all-sky survey of X-ray sources was performed, complete to a limiting sensitivity of 3.1 x 10 to the -11 ergs/sq cm/s in the 2-10 keV band. The complete sample has allowed construction of luminosity functions based on a flux-limited sample for clusters of galaxies and active galactic nuclei. Integration of the best-fit luminosity functions indicates that clusters of galaxies contribute about 4% of the 2-10 keV DXRB, and active galactic nuclei about 20%. It is predicted that many of the objects seen in the deep survey should be local, relatively low luminosity active galactic nuclei and clusters of galaxies.

  6. MODELING THE RED SEQUENCE: HIERARCHICAL GROWTH YET SLOW LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, Rosalind E.; Bell, Eric F.; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2012-07-01

    We explore the effects of mergers on the evolution of massive early-type galaxies by modeling the evolution of their stellar populations in a hierarchical context. We investigate how a realistic red sequence population set up by z {approx} 1 evolves under different assumptions for the merger and star formation histories, comparing changes in color, luminosity, and mass. The purely passive fading of existing red sequence galaxies, with no further mergers or star formation, results in dramatic changes at the bright end of the luminosity function and color-magnitude relation. Without mergers there is too much evolution in luminosity at a fixed space density compared to observations. The change in color and magnitude at a fixed mass resembles that of a passively evolving population that formed relatively recently, at z {approx} 2. Mergers among the red sequence population ('dry mergers') occurring after z = 1 build up mass, counteracting the fading of the existing stellar populations to give smaller changes in both color and luminosity for massive galaxies. By allowing some galaxies to migrate from the blue cloud onto the red sequence after z = 1 through gas-rich mergers, younger stellar populations are added to the red sequence. This manifestation of the progenitor bias increases the scatter in age and results in even smaller changes in color and luminosity between z = 1 and z = 0 at a fixed mass. The resultant evolution appears much slower, resembling the passive evolution of a population that formed at high redshift (z {approx} 3-5), and is in closer agreement with observations. We conclude that measurements of the luminosity and color evolution alone are not sufficient to distinguish between the purely passive evolution of an old population and cosmologically motivated hierarchical growth, although these scenarios have very different implications for the mass growth of early-type galaxies over the last half of cosmic history.

  7. THE z = 5 QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM SDSS STRIPE 82

    SciTech Connect

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan Xiaohui; Jiang Linhua; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin; Shen Yue; Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W. Niel; Myers, Adam D.; DeGraf, Colin; Glikman, Eilat; Ge Jian; Streblyanska, Alina

    2013-05-10

    We present a measurement of the Type I quasar luminosity function at z = 5 using a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed quasars selected from optical imaging data. We measure the bright end (M{sub 1450} < -26) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data covering {approx}6000 deg{sup 2}, then extend to lower luminosities (M{sub 1450} < -24) with newly discovered, faint z {approx} 5 quasars selected from 235 deg{sup 2} of deep, coadded imaging in the SDSS Stripe 82 region (the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap). The faint sample includes 14 quasars with spectra obtained as ancillary science targets in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, and 59 quasars observed at the MMT and Magellan telescopes. We construct a well-defined sample of 4.7 < z < 5.1 quasars that is highly complete, with 73 spectroscopic identifications out of 92 candidates. Our color selection method is also highly efficient: of the 73 spectra obtained, 71 are high-redshift quasars. These observations reach below the break in the luminosity function (M{sub 1450}{sup *}{approx}-27). The bright-end slope is steep ({beta} {approx}< -4), with a constraint of {beta} < -3.1 at 95% confidence. The break luminosity appears to evolve strongly at high redshift, providing an explanation for the flattening of the bright-end slope reported previously. We find a factor of {approx}2 greater decrease in the number density of luminous quasars (M{sub 1450} < -26) from z = 5 to z = 6 than from z = 4 to z = 5, suggesting a more rapid decline in quasar activity at high redshift than found in previous surveys. Our model for the quasar luminosity function predicts that quasars generate {approx}30% of the ionizing photons required to keep hydrogen in the universe ionized at z = 5.

  8. Estimation of insertion depth angle based on cochlea diameter and linear insertion depth: a prediction tool for the CI422.

    PubMed

    Franke-Trieger, Annett; Mürbe, Dirk

    2015-11-01

    Beside the cochlear size, the linear insertion depth (LID) influences the insertion depth angle of cochlear implant electrode arrays. For the specific implant CI422 the recommended LID is not fixed but can vary continuously between 20 and 25 mm. In the current study, the influence of cochlea size and LID on the final insertion depth angle was investigated to develop a prediction tool for the insertion depth angle by means of cochlea diameter and LID. Preoperative estimation of insertion depth angles might help surgeons avoid exceeding an intended insertion depth, especially with respect to low-frequency residual hearing preservation. Postoperative, high-resolution 3D-radiographs provided by Flat Panel Computed Volume Tomography (FPCT) were used to investigate the insertion depth angle in 37 CI422 recipients. Furthermore, the FPCT images were used to measure linear insertion depth and diameter of the basal turn of the cochlea. A considerable variation of measured insertion depth angles ranging from 306° to 579° was identified. The measured linear insertion depth ranged from -18.6 to 26.2 mm and correlated positively with the insertion depth angle. The cochlea diameter ranged from 8.11 to 10.42 mm and correlated negatively with the insertion depth angle. The results suggest that preoperatively measured cochlea diameter combined with the option of different array positions by means of LID may act as predictors for the final insertion depth angle.

  9. Strength of inserts in titanium alloy machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V.; Huang, Z.; Zhang, J.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a stressed state of a non-worn cutting wedge in a machined titanium alloy (Ti6Al2Mo2Cr) is analyzed. The distribution of contact loads on the face of a cutting tool was obtained experimentally with the use of a ‘split cutting tool’. Calculation of internal stresses in the indexable insert made from cemented carbide (WC8Co) was carried out with the help of ANSYS 14.0 software. Investigations showed that a small thickness of the cutting insert leads to extremely high compressive stresses near the cutting edge, stresses that exceed the ultimate compressive strength of cemented carbide. The face and the base of the insert experience high tensile stresses, which approach the ultimate tensile strength of cemented carbide and increase a probability of cutting insert destruction. If the thickness of the cutting insert is bigger than 5 mm, compressive stresses near the cutting edge decrease, and tensile stresses on the face and base decrease to zero. The dependences of the greatest normal and tangential stresses on thickness of the cutting insert were found. Abbreviation and symbols: m/s - meter per second (cutting speed v); mm/r - millimeter per revolution (feed rate f); MPa - mega Pascal (dimension of specific contact loads and stresses); γ - rake angle of the cutting tool [°] α - clearance angle of the sharp cutting tool [°].

  10. Luminosity Limitations of Linear Colliders Based on Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Valeri; Burov, Alexey; Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Particle acceleration in plasma creates a possibility of exceptionally high accelerating gradients and appears as a very attractive option for future linear electron-positron and/or photon-photon colliders. These high accelerating gradients were already demonstrated in a number of experiments. Furthermore, a linear collider requires exceptionally high beam brightness which still needs to be demonstrated. In this article we discuss major phenomena which limit the beam brightness of accelerated beam and, consequently, the collider luminosity.

  11. Inserts Automatically Lubricate Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Inserts on ball-separator ring of ball bearings provide continuous film of lubricant on ball surfaces. Inserts are machined or molded. Small inserts in ball pockets provide steady supply of lubricant. Technique is utilized on equipment for which maintenance is often poor and lubrication interval is uncertain, such as household appliances, automobiles, and marine engines.

  12. The Local [C ii] 158 μm Emission Line Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Yan, Lin; Diaz-Santos, Tanio; Armus, Lee; Capak, Peter; Faisst, Andreas; Masters, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We present, for the first time, the local [C ii] 158 μm emission line luminosity function measured using a sample of more than 500 galaxies from the Revised Bright Galaxy Sample. [C ii] luminosities are measured from the Herschel PACS observations of the Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey and estimated for the rest of the sample based on the far-infrared (far-IR) luminosity and color. The sample covers 91.3% of the sky and is complete at S60 μm > 5.24 Jy. We calculate the completeness as a function of [C ii] line luminosity and distance, based on the far-IR color and flux densities. The [C ii] luminosity function is constrained in the range ∼107–9 L⊙ from both the 1/Vmax and a maximum likelihood methods. The shape of our derived [C ii] emission line luminosity function agrees well with the IR luminosity function. For the CO(1-0) and [C ii] luminosity functions to agree, we propose a varying ratio of [C ii]/CO(1-0) as a function of CO luminosity, with larger ratios for fainter CO luminosities. Limited [C ii] high-redshift observations as well as estimates based on the IR and UV luminosity functions are suggestive of an evolution in the [C ii] luminosity function similar to the evolution trend of the cosmic star formation rate density. Deep surveys using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array with full capability will be able to confirm this prediction.

  13. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SPITZER-IDENTIFIED PROTOSTARS IN NINE NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Allen, T. S.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Pipher, J.; Allen, L. E.; Myers, P. C.; Muzerolle, J.

    2012-08-15

    We identify protostars in Spitzer surveys of nine star-forming (SF) molecular clouds within 1 kpc: Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Lupus, Taurus, Orion, Cep OB3, and Mon R2, which combined host over 700 protostar candidates. These clouds encompass a variety of SF environments, including both low-mass and high-mass SF regions, as well as dense clusters and regions of sparsely distributed star formation. Our diverse cloud sample allows us to compare protostar luminosity functions in these varied environments. We combine near- and mid-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer to create 1-24 {mu}m spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using protostars from the c2d survey with well-determined bolometric luminosities, we derive a relationship between bolometric luminosity, mid-IR luminosity (integrated from 1-24 {mu}m), and SED slope. Estimations of the bolometric luminosities for protostar candidates are combined to create luminosity functions for each cloud. Contamination due to edge-on disks, reddened Class II sources, and galaxies is estimated and removed from the luminosity functions. We find that luminosity functions for high-mass SF clouds (Orion, Mon R2, and Cep OB3) peak near 1 L{sub Sun} and show a tail extending toward luminosities above 100 L{sub Sun }. The luminosity functions of the low-mass SF clouds (Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Taurus, Lupus, and Chamaeleon) do not exhibit a common peak, however the combined luminosity function of these regions peaks below 1 L{sub Sun }. Finally, we examine the luminosity functions as a function of the local surface density of young stellar objects. In the Orion molecular clouds, we find a significant difference between the luminosity functions of protostars in regions of high and low stellar density, the former of which is biased toward more luminous sources. This may be the result of primordial mass segregation, although this interpretation is not unique. We compare our luminosity

  14. High-level expression of improved thermo-stable alkaline xylanase variant in Pichia Pastoris through codon optimization, multiple gene insertion and high-density fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yihong; Fang, Cheng; Wang, Qinhong; Zhou, Yuling; Zhang, Guimin; Ma, Yanhe

    2016-01-01

    In paper industry, xylanases are used to increase the pulp properties in bleaching process as its eco-friendly nature. The xylanases activity is hindered by high temperature and alkaline conditions with high enzyme production cost in the paper industry. Here, XynHB, an alkaline stable xylanase from Bacillus pumilus HBP8 was mutated at N188A to XynHBN188A. Expressed mutant in E. coli showed 1.5-fold higher xylanase activity than XynHB at 60 °C. The mutant expressed in Pichia pastoris was glycosylated, remained stable for 30 min at 60 °C. XynHBN188A optimized based on codon usage bias for P. pastoris (xynHBN188As) showed an increase of 39.5% enzyme activity. The strain Y16 forming the largest hydrolysis halo in the xylan plate was used in shake flask experiments produced an enzyme activity of 6,403 U/ml. The Y16 strain had 9 copies of the recombinant xynHBN188As gene in the genome revealed by qPCR. The enzymatic activity increased to 48,241 U/ml in a 5 L fermentor. Supplement of 15 U/g xylanase enhanced the brightness of paper products by 2% in bleaching experiment, and thereby improved the tensile strength and burst factor by 13% and 6.5%, respectively. XynHBN188As has a great potential in paper industries. PMID:27897254

  15. High-level expression of improved thermo-stable alkaline xylanase variant in Pichia Pastoris through codon optimization, multiple gene insertion and high-density fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yihong; Fang, Cheng; Wang, Qinhong; Zhou, Yuling; Zhang, Guimin; Ma, Yanhe

    2016-11-29

    In paper industry, xylanases are used to increase the pulp properties in bleaching process as its eco-friendly nature. The xylanases activity is hindered by high temperature and alkaline conditions with high enzyme production cost in the paper industry. Here, XynHB, an alkaline stable xylanase from Bacillus pumilus HBP8 was mutated at N188A to XynHBN188A. Expressed mutant in E. coli showed 1.5-fold higher xylanase activity than XynHB at 60 °C. The mutant expressed in Pichia pastoris was glycosylated, remained stable for 30 min at 60 °C. XynHBN188A optimized based on codon usage bias for P. pastoris (xynHBN188As) showed an increase of 39.5% enzyme activity. The strain Y16 forming the largest hydrolysis halo in the xylan plate was used in shake flask experiments produced an enzyme activity of 6,403 U/ml. The Y16 strain had 9 copies of the recombinant xynHBN188As gene in the genome revealed by qPCR. The enzymatic activity increased to 48,241 U/ml in a 5 L fermentor. Supplement of 15 U/g xylanase enhanced the brightness of paper products by 2% in bleaching experiment, and thereby improved the tensile strength and burst factor by 13% and 6.5%, respectively. XynHBN188As has a great potential in paper industries.

  16. Characterization of three active transposable elements recently inserted in three independent DFR-A alleles and one high-copy DNA transposon isolated from the Pink allele of the ANS gene in onion (Allium cepa L.).

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunggil; Park, Jee Young; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Intact retrotransposon and DNA transposons inserted in a single gene were characterized in onions (Allium cepa) and their transcription and copy numbers were estimated in this study. While analyzing diverse onion germplasm, large insertions in the DFR-A gene encoding dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) involved in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway were found in two accessions. A 5,070-bp long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon inserted in the active DFR-A (R4) allele was identified from one of the large insertions and designated AcCOPIA1. An intact ORF encoded typical domains of copia-like LTR retrotransposons. However, AcCOPIA1 contained atypical 'TG' and 'TA' dinucleotides at the ends of the LTRs. A 4,615-bp DNA transposon was identified in the other large insertion. This DNA transposon, designated AcCACTA1, contained an ORF coding for a transposase showing homology with the CACTA superfamily transposable elements (TEs). Another 5,073-bp DNA transposon was identified from the DFR-A (TRN) allele. This DNA transposon, designated AchAT1, belonged to the hAT superfamily with short 4-bp terminal inverted repeats (TIRs). Finally, a 6,258-bp non-autonomous DNA transposon, designated AcPINK, was identified in the ANS-p allele encoding anthocyanidin synthase, the next downstream enzyme to DFR in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway. AcPINK also possessed very short 3-bp TIRs. Active transcription of AcCOPIA1, AcCACTA1, and AchAT1 was observed through RNA-Seq analysis and RT-PCR. The copy numbers of AcPINK estimated by mapping the genomic DNA reads produced by NextSeq 500 were predominantly high compared with the other TEs. A series of evidence indicated that these TEs might have transposed in these onion genes very recently, providing a stepping stone for elucidation of enormously large-sized onion genome structure.

  17. The luminosity of Population III star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSouza, Alexander L.; Basu, Shantanu

    2015-06-01

    We analyse the time evolution of the luminosity of a cluster of Population III protostars formed in the early Universe. We argue from the Jeans criterion that primordial gas can collapse to form a cluster of first stars that evolve relatively independently of one another (i.e. with negligible gravitational interaction). We model the collapse of individual protostellar clumps using non-axisymmetric numerical hydrodynamics simulations. Each collapse produces a protostar surrounded by a massive disc (i.e. Mdisc /M* ≳ 0.1), whose evolution we follow for a further 30-40 kyr. Gravitational instabilities result in the fragmentation and the formation of gravitationally bound clumps within the disc. The accretion of these fragments by the host protostar produces accretion and luminosity bursts on the order of 106 L⊙. Within the cluster, we show that a simultaneity of such events across several protostellar cluster members can elevate the cluster luminosity to 5-10 times greater than expected, and that the cluster spends ˜15 per cent of its star-forming history at these levels. This enhanced luminosity effect is particularly enabled in clusters of modest size with ≃10-20 members. In one such instance, we identify a confluence of burst events that raise the luminosity to nearly 1000 times greater than the cluster mean luminosity, resulting in L > 108 L⊙. This phenomenon arises solely through the gravitational-instability-driven episodic fragmentation and accretion that characterizes this early stage of protostellar evolution.

  18. Luminosity Function of Faint Globular Clusters in M87

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Christopher Z.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Lauer, Tod R.; Baltz, Edward A.; Silk, Joseph; /Oxford U.

    2006-07-14

    We present the luminosity function to very faint magnitudes for the globular clusters in M87, based on a 30 orbit Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 imaging program. The very deep images and corresponding improved false source rejection allow us to probe the mass function further beyond the turnover than has been done before. We compare our luminosity function to those that have been observed in the past, and confirm the similarity of the turnover luminosity between M87 and the Milky Way. We also find with high statistical significance that the M87 luminosity function is broader than that of the Milky Way. We discuss how determining the mass function of the cluster system to low masses can constrain theoretical models of the dynamical evolution of globular cluster systems. Our mass function is consistent with the dependence of mass loss on the initial cluster mass given by classical evaporation, and somewhat inconsistent with newer proposals that have a shallower mass dependence. In addition, the rate of mass loss is consistent with standard evaporation models, and not with the much higher rates proposed by some recent studies of very young cluster systems. We also find that the mass-size relation has very little slope, indicating that there is almost no increase in the size of a cluster with increasing mass.

  19. Bolometric Luminosities of 3 New Bright Lensed Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigby, Jane; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Gladders, Mike; Papovich, Casey

    2008-08-01

    We propose DDT observations of three recently--discovered, very bright, lensed galaxies. We propose IRAC, 24, and 70 um photometry and IRS LL1 spectra for SDSS1226+2152, an extremely bright UV--selected galaxy at z=2.93. Because this galaxy is a full magnitude brighter in g-band than cB58 (the longstanding Rosetta Stone), its optical spectrum provides a resolved, high-S/N window into stellar populations, star formation, and star formation history at high redshift. Spitzer observations will constrain the stellar mass, measure the bolometric luminosity, and measure the 7.7um aromatic luminosity. Because this galaxy was not discovered until Jan 2008, it could not have been proposed in Cycle 5. We also propose 70um photometry for two UV-selected lensed galaxies at z=1.7 and z=2.73, RCS0327-1326 and SDSS1527+0652. These galaxies were discovered in late 2007. Photometry at 70um will measure the bolometric luminosities of these three galaxies. LL1 spectroscopy for S1226 will accurately measure the 7.7um aromatic luminosity. Together, these observations will enable us to: * determine the spectral energy distributions of Lyman break galaxies; * test whether the strange SED of cB58 is anomalous or typical; * test whether the aromatic--to--bolometric luminosity ratios of these galaxies evolve with redshift (as do IR--selected lensed galaxies); compare near-IR, mid-IR, and optical diagnostics of star formation rate; * and work to understand the relationship between IR--selected and UV--selected star--forming galaxies.

  20. Status and Outlook for the RHIC Luminosity Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mei

    2010-02-01

    As the world highest energy heavy ion collider, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been the center for exploring the universe at its infant stage. The operations of RHIC over the past decade has produced many results. A new state of matter, the quark-gluon plasma which is believed to only have existed right after the birth of the universe, was first observed at RHIC during the collisions of Au ions. The experimental data also revealed that this new state of matter behaves like a perfect fluid. In addition to the heavy ion program, RHIC is also capable to accelerate polarized proton beams to high energy, which allows one to explore the spin structure of polarized protons. Both the heavy ion program and spin physics program require high luminosities at RHIC. Various efforts aimed at increasing the RHIC luminosity of heavy ion and polarized proton collisions, such as NEG coating beam pipes to reduce electron clouds, using intrabeam scattering lattice for heavy ion operations as well as longitudinal stochastic cooling. The average store luminosity of Au collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV/u has reached 1027cm-2s-1. The average store luminosity of RHIC polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV reached 28x1030cm-2s-1 and 55x1030 cm-2s-1 for the polarized proton collisions at a beam energy 250 GeV. Currently, the luminosity is limited by beam-beam effects for polarized proton collisions and intrabeam scattering for heavy ion collisions. Novel techniques are explored and under development to address these issues. The addition of transverse stochastic cooling will minimize the beam size growth due to intrabeam scattering and increase the heavy ion luminosity lifetime. The technique of using 9MHz cavity to accelerate polarized protons minimizes the electron cloud effect, which can cause emittance blowup. It also helps to preserve the longitudinal emittance and yields shorter bunches. The technique of employing an

  1. IMPROVED PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS WITH SURFACE LUMINOSITY PRIORS

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Lifang; Cohen, Seth; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; Grogin, Norman; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Pirzkal, Nor; Xu Chun

    2009-07-15

    We apply Bayesian statistics with prior probabilities of galaxy surface luminosity (SL) to improve photometric redshifts. We apply the method to a sample of 1266 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the GOODS North and South fields at 0.1 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.0. We start with spectrophotometric redshifts (SPZs) based on Probing Evolution and Reionization Spectroscopically grism spectra, which cover a wavelength range of 6000-9000 A, combined with (U)BViz(JHK) broadband photometry in the GOODS fields. The accuracy of SPZ redshifts is estimated to be {sigma}({delta}(z)) = 0.035 with an systematic offset of -0.026, where {delta}(z) = {delta}z/(1 + z), for galaxies in redshift range of 0.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.25. The addition of the SL prior probability helps break the degeneracy of SPZ redshifts between low redshift 4000 A break galaxies and high-redshift Lyman break galaxies which are mostly catastrophic outliers. For the 1138 galaxies at z {approx}< 1.6, the fraction of galaxies with redshift deviation {delta}(z)>0.2 is reduced from 15.0% to 10.4%, while the rms scatter of the fractional redshift error does not change much.

  2. [Informed consent to the insertion of a PEG tube in a 53-year-old male patient with highly advanced dementia].

    PubMed

    Roden, Christian

    2014-05-01

    In patients with advanced dementia and dysphagia, regular fluid- and food intake together with oral medication can be guaranteed by insertion of a PEG tube. Consent to a treatment in a patient without legal capacity requires nomination of a legal substitute by an Austrian court. The following case report describes the problems associated with this particular situation exposing additional psychosocial stress to closest relatives and to the palliative care team in charge for the patient. This case report describes the legal options together with the finally chosen path of medical treatment which in clinical praxis may not always match.

  3. Threaded insert for compact cryogenic-capable pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Espinosa-Loza, Francisco; Ross, Timothy O.; Switzer, Vernon A.; Aceves, Salvador M.; Killingsworth, Nicholas J.; Ledesma-Orozco, Elias

    2015-06-16

    An insert for a cryogenic capable pressure vessel for storage of hydrogen or other cryogenic gases at high pressure. The insert provides the interface between a tank and internal and external components of the tank system. The insert can be used with tanks with any or all combinations of cryogenic, high pressure, and highly diffusive fluids. The insert can be threaded into the neck of a tank with an inner liner. The threads withstand the majority of the stress when the fluid inside the tank that is under pressure.

  4. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  5. High field Nb/sub 3/Sn Axicell insert coils for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) axicell configuration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, R.W.; Tatro, R.E.; Scanlan, R.M.; Agarwal, K.L.; Bailey, R.E.; Burgeson, J.E.; Kim, I.K.; Magnuson, G.D.; Mallett, B.D.; Pickering, J.L.

    1984-03-01

    Two 12-tesla superconducting insert coils are being designed by General Dynamics Convair Division for the axicell regions of MFTF-B for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A major challenge of this project is to ensure that combined fabrication and operational strains induced in the conductor are within stringent limitations of the relatively brittle Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor filaments. These coils are located in the axicell region of MFTF-B. They have a clear-bore diameter of 36.195cm (14.25 inches) and consist of 27 double pancakes (i.e., 54 pancakes per coil) would on an electrically insulated 304LN stainless steel/bobbin helium vessel. Each pancake has 57 turns separated by G-10CR insulation. The complete winding bundle has 4.6 million ampere-turns and uniform current density of 2007 A/cm/sup 2/. In conjunction with the other magnets in the system, they produce a 12-tesla central field and a 12.52-tesla peak field. A multifilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn conductor was selected to meet these requirements. The conductor consists of a monolithic insert soldered into a copper stabilizer. Sufficient cross-sectional area and work-hardening of the copper stabilizer has been provided for the conductor to self-react the electromagnetic Lorentz force induced hoop stresses with normal operational tensile strains less than 0.07 percent.

  6. Core Vessel Insert Handling Robot for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Van B; Dayton, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source provides the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams for scientific research and industrial development. Its eighteen neutron beam lines will eventually support up to twenty-four simultaneous experiments. Each beam line consists of various optical components which guide the neutrons to a particular instrument. The optical components nearest the neutron moderators are the core vessel inserts. Located approximately 9 m below the high bay floor, these inserts are bolted to the core vessel chamber and are part of the vacuum boundary. They are in a highly radioactive environment and must periodically be replaced. During initial SNS construction, four of the beam lines received Core Vessel Insert plugs rather than functional inserts. Remote replacement of the first Core Vessel Insert plug was recently completed using several pieces of custom-designed tooling, including a highly complicated Core Vessel Insert Robot. The design of this tool are discussed.

  7. Optical Variability of Quasars as a Function of Luminosity and Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, C. M.; Koratkar, A. P.; Kwon, T.-Y.; Liang, Y.; Scott, J. H.; Wysota, A.

    1987-09-01

    Various models of the "central engine" in quasars make different predictions of how the degree of variability and its timescale vary with luminosity. In the past there have been conflicting claims about the luminosity and redshift dependence of quasar variability. We have examined the photographic light curves obtained at the Rosemary Hill Observatory (U. of Florida) and the Royal Greenwich Observatory (Herstmonceux) for over a hundred quasars (both radio-loud and radio-quiet). We demonstrate how the previously-reported redshift dependence is a consequence of time dilation, and find that, after allowance for this, there is no luminosity dependence in the amplitude of variability. High-luminosity quasars are not less variable than their low-luminosity counterparts. This creates major difficulties for some classes of quasar model with discrete accretion events (e.g., gas cloud or disrupted stars being "swallowed" directly).

  8. The effect of anisotropic emission from thick accretion disks on the luminosity functions of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. M.; Marziani, P.; Calvani, M.

    1991-01-01

    High-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) powered by accretion onto a massive black hole (or other compact object) may have bolometric luminosities dominated by thermal emission from a geometrically thick accretion disk. Radiation from these disks is strongly anisotropic, which has important consequences for the observed luminosity distribution, and therefore for systematic biases in flux-limited samples. The effect of anisotropic emission from an ensemble of AGNs with random oriented thick disks radiating at or near the Eddington limit is calculated. Because of their higher luminosities, it is predicted face-on disks should constitute an increasing fraction of observed high-redshift, high-luminosity AGNs. Comparison of the results with observed quasar luminosity functions suggests a narrow mass distribution with an upper limit of about a billion solar masses for high-redshift quasars.

  9. The Luminosity Measurement for the DZERO Experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Gregory R.

    2016-08-01

    Primary project objective: The addition of University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) human resources supported by this grant helped ensure that Fermilab’s DZERO experiment had a reliable luminosity measurement through the end of Run II data taking and an easily-accessible repository of luminosity information for all collaborators performing physics analyses through the publication of its final physics results. Secondary project objective: The collaboration between the UNL Instrument Shop and Fermilab’s Scintillation Detector Development Center enhanced the University of Nebraska’s future role as a particle detector R&D and production facility for future high energy physics experiments. Overall project objective: This targeted project enhanced the University of Nebraska’s presence in both frontier high energy physics research in DZERO and particle detector development, and it thereby served the goals of the DOE Office of Science and the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) for the state of Nebraska.

  10. The X-ray luminosity functions of Abell clusters from the Einstein Cluster Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1994-01-01

    We have derived the present epoch X-ray luminosity function of northern Abell clusters using luminosities from the Einstein Cluster Survey. The sample is sufficiently large that we can determine the luminosity function for each richness class separately with sufficient precision to study and compare the different luminosity functions. We find that, within each richness class, the range of X-ray luminosity is quite large and spans nearly a factor of 25. Characterizing the luminosity function for each richness class with a Schechter function, we find that the characteristic X-ray luminosity, L(sub *), scales with richness class as (L(sub *) varies as N(sub*)(exp gamma), where N(sub *) is the corrected, mean number of galaxies in a richness class, and the best-fitting exponent is gamma = 1.3 +/- 0.4. Finally, our analysis suggests that there is a lower limit to the X-ray luminosity of clusters which is determined by the integrated emission of the cluster member galaxies, and this also scales with richness class. The present sample forms a baseline for testing cosmological evolution of Abell-like clusters when an appropriate high-redshift cluster sample becomes available.

  11. LHC Abort Gap Cleaning Studies During Luminosity Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Bartmann, W.; Boccardi, A.; Bracco, C.; Bravin, E.; Goddard, B.; Hofle, W.; Jacquet, D.; Jeff, A.; Kain, V.; Meddahi, M.; /CERN

    2012-05-11

    The presence of significant intensities of un-bunched beam is a potentially serious issue in the LHC. Procedures using damper kickers for cleaning both the Abort Gap (AG) and the buckets targeted for injection, are currently in operation at flat bottom. Recent observations of relatively high population of the AG during physics runs brought up the need for AG cleaning during luminosity operation. In this paper the results of experimental studies performed in October 2011 are presented.

  12. Radio luminosity function of brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Z. S.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.

    2016-08-01

    By cross-matching the currently largest optical catalogue of galaxy clusters and the NVSS radio survey data base, we obtain a large complete sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the redshift range of 0.05 < z ≤ 0.45, which have radio emission and redshift information. We confirm that more powerful radio BCGs tend to be these optically very bright galaxies located in more relaxed clusters. We derived the radio luminosity functions of the largest sample of radio BCGs, and find that the functions depend on the optical luminosity of BCGs and the dynamic state of galaxy clusters. However, the radio luminosity function does not show significant evolution with redshift.

  13. Stellar luminosity variations and global warming.

    PubMed

    Foukal, P

    1994-04-08

    Recent studies indicate that variation in the sun's luminosity is less than that observed in many other stars of similar magnetic activity. Current findings also indicate that in more active stars, the attenuation by faculae of sunspot luminosity modulation is less effective than in the sun at present. The sun could thus become photometrically more variable (and dimmer) if its magnetic activity exceeded present levels. But the levels of solar activity required for this to occur are not observed in carbon-14 and beryllium-10 records over the past several millennia, which indicates that such an increase in amplitude of surface magnetism-driven variations in solar luminosity is unlikely in the present epoch.

  14. Multi-wavelength Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. P.; Miller, N. A.

    2002-01-01

    Multivariate or multi-wavelength luminosity functions will reveal the interplay between star formation, chemical evolution, and absorption and re-emission of dust within evolving galaxy populations. By using principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the problem, we optimally extract the relevant photometric information from large galaxy catalogs. As a demonstration of the technique, we derive the multi-wavelength luminosity function for the galaxies in the released SDSS catalog, and compare the results with those obtained by traditional methods. This technique will be applicable to catalogs of galaxies from datasets obtained by 2MASS, and the SIRTF and GALEX missions.

  15. Multi-Wavelength Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2002-01-01

    Multivariate or multi-wavelength luminosity functions will reveal the interplay between star formation, chemical evolution, and ab- sorption and re-emission of dust within evolving galaxy populations. By using principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the problem, I optimally extract the relevant photometric information from large galaxy catalogs. As a demonstration of the technique, I derive the multi-wavelength luminosity function for the galaxies in the released SDSS catalog, and compare the results with those obtained by traditional methods. This technique will be applicable to catalogs of galaxies from datasets obtained by 2MASS, and the SIRTF and GALEX missions.

  16. The VIMOS VLT deep survey. The ultraviolet galaxy luminosity function and luminosity density at 3 ≤ z ≤ 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paltani, S.; Le Fèvre, O.; Ilbert, O.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Tresse, L.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J.-P.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Brinchmann, J.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; Lamareille, F.; Mellier, Y.; Merluzzi, P.; Temporin, S.; Vergani, D.; Walcher, C. J.

    2007-03-01

    Aims:We study the luminosity function of the high-redshift galaxy population with redshifts 3≤ z ≤ 4 using a purely I-band magnitude-selected spectroscopic sample obtained in the framework of the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS). Methods: We determine the luminosity function from the VVDS, taking care to add as few assumptions and as simple corrections as possible, and compare our results with those obtained from photometric studies, based on Lyman-break selections or photometric-redshift measurements. Results: We find that in the redshift range 3≤ z ≤ 4, the VVDS luminosity function is parameterized by φ^*=1.24+0.48-0.50×10-3 mag-1 Mpc-3 and M^*=-21.49+0.19-0.19, assuming a slope α=-1.4 consistent with most previous studies. While φ* is comparable to previously found values, M* is significantly brighter by about 0.5 mag at least. Using the conservative slope α=-1.4, we find a luminosity density at 1700 Å L1700(M<-18.5)=2.4×1019 W Mpc-3 and L1700Total=3.1×1019 W Mpc-3, comparable to that estimated in other studies. Conclusions: .The unexpectedly large number of very bright galaxies found in the VVDS indicates that the color-selection and photometric-redshift techniques that are generally used to build high-redshift galaxy samples may be affected by a significant fraction of color-measurement failures or by incomplete modelling of the mix of stellar emission, AGN contribution, dust absorption and intergalactic extinction assumed to identify high-redshift galaxies, making pure magnitude selection better able to trace the full population. Because of the difficulty to identify all low-luminosity galaxies in a spectroscopic survey, the luminosity density could still be significantly underestimated. We also find that the relative contribution of the most luminous galaxies compared to the fainter ones is at least twice as large in the VVDS compared to former estimates. Therefore, the VVDS paints a quite different picture of the role of the most actively star

  17. Sink Inserts for Flood Prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Fraser F.; Bodnar, Daniel J.; Hardesty, David L.

    2004-09-01

    A simple, inexpensive insert is described for preventing flooding in lab sinks. The insert is essentially a tube with slots cut into the side that fits snugly into the drain outlet, preventing water buildup and providing additional drainage sites to avoid constriction by small lab items and paper towels.

  18. Luminosity variations in several parallel auroral arcs before auroral breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safargaleev, V.; Lyatsky, W.; Tagirov, V.

    1997-08-01

    Variation of the luminosity in two parallel auroral arcs before auroral breakup has been studied by using digitised TV-data with high temporal and spatial resolution. The intervals when a new arc appears near already existing one were chosen for analysis. It is shown, for all cases, that the appearance of a new arc is accompanied by fading or disappearance of another arc. We have named these events out-of-phase events, OP. Another type of luminosity variation is characterised by almost simultaneous enhancement of intensity in the both arcs (in-phase event, IP). The characteristic time of IP events is 10-20 s, whereas OP events last about one minute. Sometimes out-of-phase events begin as IP events. The possible mechanisms for OP and IP events are discussed.

  19. Mosaic retroposon insertion patterns in placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Churakov, Gennady; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Baertsch, Robert; Zemann, Anja; Brosius, Jürgen; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2009-05-01

    One and a half centuries after Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace outlined our current understanding of evolution, a new scientific era is dawning that enables direct observations of genetic variation. However, pure sequence-based molecular attempts to resolve the basal origin of placental mammals have so far resulted only in apparently conflicting hypotheses. By contrast, in the mammalian genomes where they were highly active, the insertion of retroelements and their comparative insertion patterns constitute a neutral, virtually homoplasy-free archive of evolutionary histories. The "presence" of a retroelement at an orthologous genomic position in two species indicates their common ancestry in contrast to its "absence" in more distant species. To resolve the placental origin controversy we extracted approximately 2 million potentially phylogenetically informative, retroposon-containing loci from representatives of the major placental mammalian lineages and found highly significant evidence challenging all current single hypotheses of their basal origin. The Exafroplacentalia hypothesis (Afrotheria as the sister group to all remaining placentals) is significantly supported by five retroposon insertions, the Epitheria hypothesis (Xenarthra as the sister group to all remaining placentals) by nine insertion patterns, and the Atlantogenata hypothesis (a monophyletic clade comprising Xenarthra and Afrotheria as the sister group to Boreotheria comprising all remaining placentals) by eight insertion patterns. These findings provide significant support for a "soft" polytomy of the major mammalian clades. Ancestral successive hybridization events and/or incomplete lineage sorting associated with short speciation intervals are viable explanations for the mosaic retroposon insertion patterns of recent placental mammals and for the futile search for a clear root dichotomy.

  20. Mosaic retroposon insertion patterns in placental mammals

    PubMed Central

    Churakov, Gennady; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Baertsch, Robert; Zemann, Anja; Brosius, Jürgen; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    One and a half centuries after Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace outlined our current understanding of evolution, a new scientific era is dawning that enables direct observations of genetic variation. However, pure sequence-based molecular attempts to resolve the basal origin of placental mammals have so far resulted only in apparently conflicting hypotheses. By contrast, in the mammalian genomes where they were highly active, the insertion of retroelements and their comparative insertion patterns constitute a neutral, virtually homoplasy-free archive of evolutionary histories. The “presence” of a retroelement at an orthologous genomic position in two species indicates their common ancestry in contrast to its “absence” in more distant species. To resolve the placental origin controversy we extracted ∼2 million potentially phylogenetically informative, retroposon-containing loci from representatives of the major placental mammalian lineages and found highly significant evidence challenging all current single hypotheses of their basal origin. The Exafroplacentalia hypothesis (Afrotheria as the sister group to all remaining placentals) is significantly supported by five retroposon insertions, the Epitheria hypothesis (Xenarthra as the sister group to all remaining placentals) by nine insertion patterns, and the Atlantogenata hypothesis (a monophyletic clade comprising Xenarthra and Afrotheria as the sister group to Boreotheria comprising all remaining placentals) by eight insertion patterns. These findings provide significant support for a “soft” polytomy of the major mammalian clades. Ancestral successive hybridization events and/or incomplete lineage sorting associated with short speciation intervals are viable explanations for the mosaic retroposon insertion patterns of recent placental mammals and for the futile search for a clear root dichotomy. PMID:19261842

  1. The connection between galaxy environment and the luminosity function slopes of star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Lee, Janice C.; Thilker, David; Calzetti, Daniela; Kennicutt, Robert C.

    2016-11-01

    We present the first study of GALEX far-ultraviolet (FUV) luminosity functions of individual star-forming regions within a sample of 258 nearby galaxies spanning a large range in total stellar mass and star formation properties. We identify ˜65 000 star-forming regions (i.e. FUV sources), measure each galaxy's luminosity function, and characterize the relationships between the luminosity function slope (α) and several global galaxy properties. A final sample of 82 galaxies with reliable luminosity functions are used to define these relationships and represent the largest sample of galaxies with the largest range of galaxy properties used to study the connection between luminosity function properties and galaxy environment. We find that α correlates with global star formation properties, where galaxies with higher star formation rates and star formation rate densities (ΣSFR) tend to have flatter luminosity function slopes. In addition, we find that neither stochastic sampling of the luminosity function in galaxies with low-number statistics nor the effects of blending due to distance can fully account for these trends. We hypothesize that the flatter slopes in high ΣSFR galaxies is due to higher gas densities and higher star formation efficiencies which result in proportionally greater numbers of bright star-forming regions. Finally, we create a composite luminosity function composed of star-forming regions from many galaxies and find a break in the luminosity function at brighter luminosities. However, we find that this break is an artefact of varying detection limits for galaxies at different distances.

  2. Direct Oxygen Abundances for the Lowest Luminosity LVL Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Danielle; Skillman, E. D.; Marble, A. R.; van Zee, L.; Engelbracht, C. W.

    2012-01-01

    We present new MMT spectroscopic observations of HII regions in 42 of the lowest luminosity galaxies in the Spitzer Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey. For 31 of the galaxies in our sample we were able to measure the [OIII] ? auroral line at a strength of 4σ or greater, and thus determine oxygen abundances using the direct method. Direct oxygen abundances were compared to B-band luminosity, 4.5 μm luminosity, and stellar mass to characterize the luminosity-metallicity (L-Z) and mass-metallicity (M-Z) relationships at low-luminosity. We examined a "Combined Select” sample composed of 38 objects, from the present sample and the literature, with direct oxygen abundances and reliable distance determinations (based on the tip of the red giant branch or Cepheid variables). The B-band and 4.5 μm L-Z relationships were found to be 12+log(O/H) = (6.19±0.07) + (-0.12±0.01)MB and 12+log(O/H) = (5.93±0.11) + (-0.11±0.01)M[4.5] with dispersions of σ = 0.17 and σ = 0.14 respectively. Since the slope of the L-Z relationship doesn't seem to vary from the optical to the near-IR, as has been observed in studies of more luminous galaxies, we propose that less extinction due to dust is created in the lowest luminosity galaxies. We subsequently derived a M-Z relationship of 12+log(O/H) = (5.49±0.23) + (0.31±0.03)log M*, with a dispersion of σ = 0.16. None of the relationships seem to hold an advantage with respect to dispersion, supporting the idea of minimized dust. Additionally, the trend of N/O abundance with respect to B-V color and oxygen abundance was examined. Similar to the conclusions of van Zee & Haynes (2006), we find a positive correlation between N/O ratio and B-V color: log(N/O) = 0.92 (B-V) - 1.83. Furthermore, there are no objects with high N/O ratio below 12+log(O/H)=7.9.

  3. The MOSDEF Survey: Metallicity Dependence of PAH Emission at High Redshift and Implications for 24 μm Inferred IR Luminosities and Star Formation Rates at z ∼ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaei, Irene; Reddy, Naveen A.; Shapley, Alice E.; Siana, Brian; Kriek, Mariska; Mobasher, Bahram; Coil, Alison L.; Freeman, William R.; Sanders, Ryan L.; Price, Sedona H.; Azadi, Mojegan; Zick, Tom

    2017-03-01

    We present results on the variation of 7.7 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in galaxies spanning a wide range in metallicity at z ∼ 2. For this analysis, we use rest-frame optical spectra of 476 galaxies at 1.37 ≤ z ≤ 2.61 from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey to infer metallicities and ionization states. Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm and Herschel/PACS 100 and 160 μm observations are used to derive rest-frame 7.7 μm luminosities ({L}7.7) and total IR luminosities ({L}{IR}), respectively. We find significant trends between the ratio of {L}7.7 to {L}{IR} (and to dust-corrected star formation rate [SFR]) and both metallicity and [O iii]/[O ii] ({{{O}}}32) emission line ratio. The latter is an empirical proxy for the ionization parameter. These trends indicate a paucity of PAH emission in low-metallicity environments with harder and more intense radiation fields. Additionally, {L}7.7/{L}{IR} is significantly lower in the youngest quartile of our sample (ages of ≲500 Myr) compared to older galaxies, which may be a result of the delayed production of PAHs by AGB stars. The relative strength of {L}7.7 to {L}{IR} is also lower by a factor of ∼2 for galaxies with masses {M}* < {10}10 {M}ȯ , compared to the more massive ones. We demonstrate that commonly used conversions of {L}7.7 (or 24 μm flux density, f 24) to {L}{IR} underestimate the IR luminosity by more than a factor of 2 at {M}* ∼ {10}9.6{--10.0} {M}ȯ . We adopt a mass-dependent conversion of {L}7.7 to {L}{IR} with {L}7.7/{L}{IR} = 0.09 and 0.22 for {M}* ≤slant {10}10 and > {10}10 {M}ȯ , respectively. Based on the new scaling, the SFR–M * relation has a shallower slope than previously derived. Our results also suggest a higher IR luminosity density at z ∼ 2 than previously measured, corresponding to a ∼30% increase in the SFR density.

  4. The pulse luminosity function of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral-Rogers, A.; Willingale, R.; O'Brien, P. T.

    2017-01-01

    The complete Swift Burst Alert Telescope and X-Ray Telescope light curves of 118 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with known redshifts were fitted using the physical model of GRB pulses by Willingale et al. to produce a total of 607 pulses. We compute the pulse luminosity function utilizing three GRB formation rate models: a progenitor that traces the cosmic star formation rate density (CSFRD) with either a single population of GRBs, coupled to various evolutionary parameters, or a bimodal population of high- and low-luminosity GRBs; and a direct fit to the GRB formation rate excluding any a priori assumptions. We find that a single population of GRB pulses with an evolving luminosity function is preferred over all other univariate evolving GRB models, or bimodal luminosity functions in reproducing the observed GRB pulse L-z distribution and that the magnitude of the evolution in brightness is consistent with studies that utilize only the brightest GRB pulses. We determine that the appearance of a GRB formation rate density evolution component is an artefact of poor parametrization of the CSFRD at high redshifts rather than indicating evolution in the formation rate of early epoch GRBs. We conclude that the single brightest region of a GRB light curve holds no special property; by incorporating pulse data from the totality of GRB emission we boost the GRB population statistics by a factor of 5, rule out some models utilized to explain deficiencies in GRB formation rate modelling, and constrain more tightly some of the observed parameters of GRB behaviour.

  5. Luminosity enhancement in relativistic jets and altered luminosity functions for beamed objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. M.; Shafer, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Due to relativistic effects, the observed emission from relativistic jets is quite different from the rest frame emission. Systematic differences between the observed and intrinsic intensities of sources in which jet phenomena are occurring are discussed. Assuming that jets have a power law luminosity function of a slope B, the observed luminosity distribution as a function of the velocity of the jet, the spectral index of the rest frame emission, and the range of angles of the jets relative to our line of sight are calculated. The results is well-approximated by two power laws, the higher luminosity end having the original power law index X and the lower luminosity end having a flattened exponent independent of B and only slightly greater than 1. A model consisting of beamed emission from a jet and unbeamed emission from a stationary central component is investigated. The luminosity functions for these two-component sources are calculated for two ranges of angles. For sources in which beaming is important, the luminosity function is much flatter. Because of this, the relative numbers of ""beamed'' and ""unbeamed'' sources detected on the sky depend strongly on the luminosity at which the comparison is made.

  6. Recent improvements in luminosity at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, R.; Allen, M.; Chao, A.

    1983-03-01

    We will describe improvements which have led to new records for peak and average luminosity at PEP. Comparison of recent results with several earlier lattice and optical modifications shows rather good correlation with the predictions of a beam-beam simulation program.

  7. RHIC Proton Luminosity and Polarization Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-01-17

    The RHIC proton beam polarization can be improved by raising the Booster scraping, which also helps to reduce the RHIC transverse emittance, and therefore to improve the luminosity. By doing this, the beam-beam effect would be enhanced. Currently, the RHIC working point is constrained between 2/3 and 7/10, the 2/3 resonance would affect intensity and luminosity lifetime, and the working point close to 7/10 would enhance polarization decay in store. Run 2013 shows that average polarization decay is merely 1.8% in 8 hours, and most fills have the luminosity lifetime better than 14 hours, which is not a problem. Therefore, even without beam-beam correction, there is room to improve for RHIC polarization and luminosity. The key to push the Booster scraping is to raise the Booster input intensity; for that, two approaches can be used. The first is to extend the LINAC tank 9 pulse width, which has been successfully applied in run 2006. The second is to raise the source temperature, which has been successfully applied in run 2006 and run 2012.

  8. LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hirotani, Kouichi

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the electrodynamic structure of a pulsar outer-magnetospheric particle accelerator and the resulting gamma-ray emission. By considering the condition for the accelerator to be self-sustained, we derive how the trans-magnetic-field thickness of the accelerator evolves with the pulsar age. It is found that the thickness is small but increases steadily if the neutron-star envelope is contaminated by sufficient light elements. For such a light element envelope, the gamma-ray luminosity of the accelerator is kept approximately constant as a function of age in the initial 10,000 yr, forming the lower bound of the observed distribution of the gamma-ray luminosity of rotation-powered pulsars. If the envelope consists of only heavy elements, on the other hand, the thickness is greater, but it increases less rapidly than a light element envelope. For such a heavy element envelope, the gamma-ray luminosity decreases relatively rapidly, forming the upper bound of the observed distribution. The gamma-ray luminosity of a general pulsar resides between these two extreme cases, reflecting the envelope composition and the magnetic inclination angle with respect to the rotation axis. The cutoff energy of the primary curvature emission is regulated below several GeV even for young pulsars because the gap thickness, and hence the acceleration electric field, is suppressed by the polarization of the produced pairs.

  9. The Luminosity Function of QSO Host Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Timothy S.; Casertano, Stefano; Turnshek, David A.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present some results from our HST archival image study of 71 QSO host galaxies. The objects are selected to have z less than or equal to 0.46 and total absolute magnitude M(sub v) less than or equal to -23 in our adopted cosmology (H(sub 0) = 50 kilometers per second Mpc(sup-1), q(sub 0) = 0.5, lambda = 0)). The aim of this initial study is to investigate the composition of the sample with respect to host morphology and radio loudness, as well as derive the QSO host galaxy luminosity function. We have analyzed available WFPC2 images in R or I band (U in one case), using a uniform set of procedures. The host galaxies span a narrow range of luminosities and are exceptionally bright, much more so than normal galaxies, usually L greater than L*(sub v). The QSOs are almost equally divided among three subclasses: radio-loud QSOs with elliptical hosts, radio-quiet QSOs with elliptical hosts, and radio-quiet QSOs with spiral hosts. Radio-loud QSOs with spiral hosts are extremely rare. Using a weighting procedure, we derive the combined luminosity function of QSO host galaxies. We find that the luminosity function of QSO hosts differs in shape from that of normal galaxies but that they coincide at the highest luminosities. The ratio of the number of quasar hosts to the number of normal galaxies at a luminosity L*(sub v) is R = (Lv/11.48L*(sub v))(sup 2.46), where L*(sub v) corresponds to M*(sub v)= -22.35, and a QSO is defined to be an object with total nuclear plus host light M(sub v) less than or equal to -23. This ratio can be interpreted as the probability that a galaxy with luminosity L(sub V) will host a QSO at redshift z approximately equal to 0.26.

  10. A Solar-luminosity Model and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    Although the mechanisms of climatic change are not completely understood, the potential causes include changes in the Sun's luminosity. Solar activity in the form of sunspots, flares, proton events, and radiation fluctuations has displayed periodic tendencies. Two types of proxy climatic data that can be related to periodic solar activity are varved geologic formations and freshwater diatom deposits. A model for solar luminosity was developed by using the geometric progression of harmonic cycles that is evident in solar and geophysical data. The model assumes that variation in global energy input is a result of many periods of individual solar-luminosity variations. The 0.1-percent variation of the solar constant measured during the last sunspot cycle provided the basis for determining the amplitude of each luminosity cycle. Model output is a summation of the amplitudes of each cycle of a geometric progression of harmonic sine waves that are referenced to the 11-year average solar cycle. When the last eight cycles in Emiliani's oxygen-18 variations from deep-sea cores were standardized to the average length of glaciations during the Pleistocene (88,000 years), correlation coefficients with the model output ranged from 0.48 to 0.76. In order to calibrate the model to real time, model output was graphically compared to indirect records of glacial advances and retreats during the last 24,000 years and with sea-level rises during the Holocene. Carbon-14 production during the last millenium and elevations of the Great Salt Lake for the last 140 years demonstrate significant correlations with modeled luminosity. Major solar flares during the last 90 years match well with the time-calibrated model.

  11. Complete sequencing and comparative analyses of the pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plastome revealed high frequency of tandem repeats and large insertion/deletions on pepper plastome.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeong Deuk; Park, Jongsun; Kim, Jungeun; Song, Wonho; Hur, Cheol-Goo; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2011-02-01

    Plants in the family Solanaceae are used as model systems in comparative and evolutionary genomics. The complete chloroplast genomes of seven solanaceous species have been sequenced, including tobacco, potato and tomato, but not peppers. We analyzed the complete chloroplast genome sequence of the hot pepper, Capsicum annuum. The pepper chloroplast genome was 156,781 bp in length, including a pair of inverted repeats (IR) of 25,783 bp. The content and the order of 133 genes in the pepper chloroplast genome were identical to those of other solanaceous plastomes. To characterize pepper plastome sequence, we performed comparative analysis using complete plastome sequences of pepper and seven solanaceous plastomes. Frequency and contents of large indels and tandem repeat sequences and distribution pattern of genome-wide sequence variations were investigated. In addition, a phylogenetic analysis using concatenated alignments of coding sequences was performed to determine evolutionary position of pepper in Solanaceae. Our results revealed two distinct features of pepper plastome compared to other solanaceous plastomes. Firstly, large indels, including insertions on accD and rpl20 gene sequences, were predominantly detected in the pepper plastome compared to other solanaceous plastomes. Secondly, tandem repeat sequences were particularly frequent in the pepper plastome. Taken together, our study represents unique features of evolution of pepper plastome among solanaceous plastomes.

  12. High-throughput sequencing of Campylobacter jejuni insertion mutant libraries reveals mapA as a fitness factor for chicken colonization.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremiah G; Livny, Jonathan; Dirita, Victor J

    2014-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of gastrointestinal infections worldwide, due primarily to its ability to asymptomatically colonize the gastrointestinal tracts of agriculturally relevant animals, including chickens. Infection often occurs following consumption of meat that was contaminated by C. jejuni during harvest. Because of this, much interest lies in understanding the mechanisms that allow C. jejuni to colonize the chicken gastrointestinal tract. To address this, we generated a C. jejuni transposon mutant library that is amenable to insertion sequencing and introduced this mutant pool into day-of-hatch chicks. Following deep sequencing of C. jejuni mutants in the cecal outputs, several novel factors required for efficient colonization of the chicken gastrointestinal tract were identified, including the predicted outer membrane protein MapA. A mutant strain lacking mapA was constructed and found to be significantly reduced for chicken colonization in both competitive infections and monoinfections. Further, we found that mapA is required for in vitro competition with wild-type C. jejuni but is dispensable for growth in monoculture.

  13. A Search for Low-Luminosity BL Lacertae Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rector, Travis A.; Stocke, John T.; Perlman, Eric S.

    1999-05-01

    Many properties of BL Lacs have become explicable in terms of the ``relativistic beaming'' hypothesis, whereby BL Lacs are FR 1 radio galaxies viewed nearly along the jet axis. However, a possible problem with this model is that a transition population between beamed BL Lacs and unbeamed FR 1 galaxies has not been detected. A transition population of ``low-luminosity BL Lacs'' was predicted to exist in abundance in X-ray-selected samples such as the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS) by Browne & Marcha. However, these BL Lacs may have been misidentified as clusters of galaxies. We have conducted a search for such objects in the EMSS with the ROSAT High-Resolution Imager (HRI) here we present ROSAT HRI images, optical spectra, and VLA radio maps for a small number of BL Lacs that were previously misidentified in the EMSS catalog as clusters of galaxies. While these objects are slightly lower in luminosity than other EMSS BL Lacs, their properties are too similar to the other BL Lacs in the EMSS sample to ``bridge the gap'' between BL Lacs and FR 1 radio galaxies. Also, the number of new BL Lacs found is too low to alter significantly the X-ray luminosity function or value for the X-ray-selected EMSS BL Lac sample. Thus, these observations do not explain fully the discrepancy between the X-ray- and radio-selected BL Lac samples.

  14. THE SIZE-LUMINOSITY DISTRIBUTIONS OF LYMAN-BREAK GALAXIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuang-Han; CANDELS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) comprise the largest sample of star-forming galaxies at z>3 and are crucial to our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Their luminosity functions allow us to calculate the cosmic star formation history, and their sizes also provide valuable information about the angular momentum content of the galaxies and dark matter halos. However, due to surface brightness dimming effects, galaxies at high redshifts are especially susceptible to selection effects; it is important to understand the selection effects before we can draw conclusions from the statistics of LBG properties. In this work we will investigate the size--luminosity distribution of LBGs between 3 and 6 with careful modeling of selection effects and measurement errors of size and magnitude. Our modeling is more careful than previous studies because it is performed in the two-dimensional size--magnitude space. The results of this work show that (1) the effective radii of star-forming galaxies likely evolve as H(z)^{-2/3} at a fixed luminosity, (2) the widths of the LBG size distribution are larger than expected from the spin parameter distribution of dark matter halos, and (3) the size--luminosity relation slopes of LBGs are similar to those for late-type disk galaxies in the local universe. These results favor the disk formation theory put forward by Fall & Efstathiou (1980) if the majority of LBGs are disks, but more observational evidence is needed to confirm the kinematical structure of LBGs as well as to explain the widths of the size distribution.

  15. LUMINOUS SATELLITES. II. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION, LUMINOSITY FUNCTION, AND COSMIC EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Nierenberg, A. M.; Treu, T.; Auger, M. W.; Marshall, P. J.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Busha, Michael T.

    2012-06-20

    We infer the normalization and the radial and angular distributions of the number density of satellites of massive galaxies (log{sub 10}[M*{sub h}/M{sub Sun }] > 10.5) between redshifts 0.1 and 0.8 as a function of host stellar mass, redshift, morphology, and satellite luminosity. Exploiting the depth and resolution of the COSMOS Hubble Space Telescope images, we detect satellites up to 8 mag fainter than the host galaxies and as close as 0.3 (1.4) arcsec (kpc). Describing the number density profile of satellite galaxies to be a projected power law such that P(R){proportional_to}R{sup {gamma}{sub p}}, we find {gamma}{sub p} = -1.1 {+-} 0.3. We find no dependency of {gamma}{sub p} on host stellar mass, redshift, morphology, or satellite luminosity. Satellites of early-type hosts have angular distributions that are more flattened than the host light profile and are aligned with its major axis. No significant average alignment is detected for satellites of late-type hosts. The number of satellites within a fixed magnitude contrast from a host galaxy is dependent on its stellar mass, with more massive galaxies hosting significantly more satellites. Furthermore, high-mass late-type hosts have significantly fewer satellites than early-type galaxies of the same stellar mass, possibly indicating that they reside in more massive halos. No significant evolution in the number of satellites per host is detected. The cumulative luminosity function of satellites is qualitatively in good agreement with that predicted using SubHalo Abundance Matching techniques. However, there are significant residual discrepancies in the absolute normalization, suggesting that properties other than the host galaxy luminosity or stellar mass determine the number of satellites.

  16. Radiative return capabilities of a high-energy, high-luminositye+e-collider

    SciTech Connect

    Karliner, Marek; Low, Matthew; Rosner, Jonathan L.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-08-14

    An electron-positron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy ECM can collect events at all lower energies through initial-state radiation (ISR or radiative return). We explore the capabilities for radiative return studies by a proposed high-luminosity collider at ECM = 250 or 90 GeV, to fill in gaps left by lower-energy colliders such as PEP, PETRA, TRISTAN, and LEP. These capabilities are compared with those of the lower-energy e+e- colliders as well as hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Some examples of accessible questions in dark photon searches and heavy flavor spectroscopy are given.

  17. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  18. Tool Removes Coil-Spring Thread Inserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Gerald J., Jr.; Swenson, Gary J.; Mcclellan, J. Scott

    1991-01-01

    Tool removes coil-spring thread inserts from threaded holes. Threads into hole, pries insert loose, grips insert, then pulls insert to thread it out of hole. Effects essentially reverse of insertion process to ease removal and avoid further damage to threaded inner surface of hole.

  19. Probing the Ultraviolet Luminosity Function of the Earliest Galaxies with the Renaissance Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, Brian W.; Wise, John H.; Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we present the first results from the Renaissance Simulations, a suite of extremely high-resolution and physics-rich AMR calculations of high-redshift galaxy formation performed on the Blue Waters supercomputer. These simulations contain hundreds of well-resolved galaxies at z˜ 25-8, and make several novel, testable predictions. Most critically, we show that the ultraviolet luminosity function of our simulated galaxies is consistent with observations of high-z galaxy populations at the bright end of the luminosity function ({M}1600≤slant -17), but at lower luminosities is essentially flat rather than rising steeply, as has been inferred by Schechter function fits to high-z observations, and has a clearly defined lower limit in UV luminosity. This behavior of the luminosity function is due to two factors: (i) the strong dependence of the star formation rate (SFR) on halo virial mass in our simulated galaxy population, with lower-mass halos having systematically lower SFRs and thus lower UV luminosities; and (ii) the fact that halos with virial masses below ≃ 2× {10}8 {M}⊙ do not universally contain stars, with the fraction of halos containing stars dropping to zero at ≃ 7× {10}6 {M}⊙ . Finally, we show that the brightest of our simulated galaxies may be visible to current and future ultra-deep space-based surveys, particularly if lensed regions are chosen for observation.

  20. RF TECHNIQUES FOR IMPROVED LUMINOSITY IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNAN,J.M.BLASKIEWICZ,J.BUTLER,J.DELONG,J.FISCHER,W.HAYES,T.

    2004-07-05

    The luminosity of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has improved significantly [1] over the first three physics runs. A number of special rf techniques have been developed to facilitate higher luminosity. The techniques described herein include: an ultra low-noise rf source for the 197 MHz storage rf system, a frequency shift switch-on technique for transferring bunches from the acceleration to the storage system, synchronizing the rings during the energy ramp (including crossing the transition energy) to avoid incidental collisions, installation of dedicated 200 MHZ cavities to provide longitudinal Landau damping on the ramp, and the development of a bunch merging scheme in the Booster to increase the available bunch intensity from the injectors.

  1. Optimization of integrated luminosity in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gattuso, C.; Convery, M.; Syphers, M.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    We present the strategy which has been used recently to optimize the performance of the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. We use a relatively simple heuristic model based on the antiproton production rate, which optimizes the number of antiprotons in a store in order to maximize the integrated luminosity. A store is terminated as soon as the target number of antiprotons is reached and the Tevatron quickly resets to load another store. Since this procedure was implemented, the integrated luminosity has improved by {approx} 35%. Other recent operational improvements include decreasing the shot setup time, and reducing beam-beam effects by making the proton and antiproton brightness more compatible, for example by scraping protons to smaller emittances.

  2. RR Lyrae period luminosity relations with Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeley, Jillian R.; Marengo, Massimo; CRRP Team

    2017-01-01

    RR Lyrae variable stars have long been known to be valuable distance indicators, but only recently has a well defined period luminosity relationship been utilized at infrared wavelengths. In my thesis, I am combining Spitzer Space Telescope data of RR Lyrae stars obtained as part of the Carnegie RR Lyrae Program with ground based NIR data to characterize the period-luminosity-metallicity (PLZ) relation and provide an independent Population II calibration of the cosmic distance scale. I will discuss the ongoing efforts to calibrate this relation using objects such as M4 and NGC 6441 and how the first data release from the Gaia mission impacts our findings. I will also compare my preliminary empirical relations to theoretical PLZ relations derived from stellar pulsation models.

  3. Luminosity limitations for Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Valeri Lebedev

    2000-09-01

    The major limitations on reaching the maximum luminosity for an electron ion collider are discussed in application to the ring-ring and linac-ring colliders. It is shown that with intensive electron cooling the luminosity of 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} is feasible for both schemes for the center-of-mass collider energy above approximately 15 GeV. Each scheme has its own pros and cons. The ring-ring collider is better supported by the current accelerator technology while the linac-ring collider suggests unique features for spin manipulations of the electron beam. The article addresses a general approach to a choice of collider scheme and parameters leaving details for other conference publications dedicated to particular aspects of the ring-ring and linac-ring colliders.

  4. EVOLUTION OF THE Halpha LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Westra, Eduard; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Dell'Antonio, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS) is a window on the star formation history over the last 4 Gyr. SHELS is a spectroscopically complete survey for R{sub tot} < 20.3 over 4 square{sup 0}. We use the 10k spectra to select a sample of pure star-forming galaxies based on their Halpha emission line. We use the spectroscopy to determine extinction corrections for individual galaxies and to remove active galaxies in order to reduce systematic uncertainties. We use the large volume of SHELS with the depth of a narrowband survey for Halpha galaxies at z approx 0.24 to make a combined determination of the Halpha luminosity function at z approx 0.24. The large area covered by SHELS yields a survey volume big enough to determine the bright end of the Halpha luminosity function from redshift 0.100 to 0.377 for an assumed fixed faint-end slope alpha = -1.20. The bright end evolves: the characteristic luminosity L* increases by 0.84 dex over this redshift range. Similarly, the star formation density increases by 0.11 dex. The fraction of galaxies with a close neighbor increases by a factor of 2-5 for L{sub Ha}lpha approx> L* in each of the redshift bins. We conclude that triggered star formation is an important influence for star-forming galaxies with Halpha emission.

  5. The AGN Luminosity Fraction in Galaxy Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Jeremy; Weiner, Aaron; Ashby, Matthew; Martinez-Galarza, Juan Rafael; Smith, Howard Alan

    2017-01-01

    Galaxy mergers are key events in galaxy evolution, generally triggering massive starbursts and AGNs. However, in these chaotic systems, it is not yet known what fraction each of these two mechanisms contributes to the total luminosity. Here we measure and model spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using the Code for Investigating Galaxy Emission (CIGALE) in up to 33 broad bands from the UV to the far-IR for 23 IR-luminous galaxies to estimate the fraction of the bolometric IR luminosity that can be attributed to the AGN. The galaxies are split nearly evenly into two subsamples: late-stage mergers, found in the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample or Faint Source Catalog, and early-stage mergers found in the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Sample. We find that the AGN contribution to the total IR luminosity varies greatly from system to system, from 0% up to ~90%, but is substantially greater in the later-stage and brighter mergers. This is consistent with what is known about galaxy evolution and the triggering of AGNs.The SAO REU program is funded in part by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no. 1262851, and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  6. The GRB luminosity function: predictions from the internal shock model and comparison with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouni, H.; Daigne, F.; Mochkovich, R.; Zerguini, T. H.

    2008-05-01

    We compute the expected luminosity function of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the context of the internal shock model. We assume that GRB central engines generate relativistic outflows characterized by the respective distributions of injected kinetic power and contrast in Lorentz factor κ = Γmax/Γmin. We find that if the distribution of contrast extends down to values close to unity (i.e. if both highly variable and smooth outflows can exist), then the luminosity function has two branches. At high luminosity it follows the distribution of while at low luminosity it is close to a power law of slope -0.5. We then examine if existing data can constrain the luminosity function. Using the logN-logP curve, the Ep distribution of bright Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) bursts and the X-ray flash (XRF)/GRB ratio obtained by High Energy Transient Explorer 2 (HETE2), we show that single and broken power laws can provide equally good fits of these data. Present observations are therefore unable to favour one form or the other. However, when a broken power law is adopted they clearly indicate a low-luminosity slope ~= -0.6 +/- 0.2, compatible with the prediction of the internal shock model.

  7. The dependence of protostellar luminosity on environment in the Cygnus-X star-forming complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Hora, J. L.; Smith, Howard A.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Bontemps, S.; Schneider, N.; Kraemer, K.; Hennemann, M.; Motte, F.

    2014-07-01

    The Cygnus-X star-forming complex is one of the most active regions of low- and high-mass star formation within 2 kpc of the Sun. Using mid-infrared photometry from the IRAC and MIPS Spitzer Cygnus-X Legacy Survey, we have identified over 1800 protostar candidates. We compare the protostellar luminosity functions of two regions within Cygnus-X: CygX-South and CygX-North. These two clouds show distinctly different morphologies suggestive of dissimilar star-forming environments. We find the luminosity functions of these two regions are statistically different. Furthermore, we compare the luminosity functions of protostars found in regions of high and low stellar density within Cygnus-X and find that the luminosity function in regions of high stellar density is biased to higher luminosities. In total, these observations provide further evidence that the luminosities of protostars depend on their natal environment. We discuss the implications this dependence has for the star formation process.

  8. Clustering, Cosmology and a New Era of Black Hole Demographics: The Conditional Luminosity Function of AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Deep X-ray surveys have provided a comprehensive and largely unbiased view of AGN evolution stretching back to z˜5. However, it has been challenging to use the survey results to connect this evolution to the cosmological environment that AGNs inhabit. Exploring this connection will be crucial to understanding the triggering mechanisms of AGNs and how these processes manifest in observations at all wavelengths. In anticipation of upcoming wide-field X-ray surveys that will allow quantitative analysis of AGN environments, we present a method to observationally constrain the Conditional Luminosity Function (CLF) of AGNs at a specific z. Once measured, the CLF allows the calculation of the AGN bias, mean dark matter halo mass, AGN lifetime, halo occupation number, and AGN correlation function - all as a function of luminosity. The CLF can be constrained using a measurement of the X-ray luminosity function and the correlation length at different luminosities. The method is demonstrated at z ≈0 and 0.9, and clear luminosity dependence in the AGN bias and mean halo mass is predicted at both z. The results support the idea that there are at least two different modes of AGN triggering: one, at high luminosity, that only occurs in high mass, highly biased haloes, and one that can occur over a wide range of halo masses and leads to luminosities that are correlated with halo mass. This latter mode dominates at z<0.9. The CLFs for Type 2 and Type 1 AGNs are also constrained at z ≈0, and we find evidence that unobscured quasars are more likely to be found in higher mass halos than obscured quasars. Thus, the AGN unification model seems to fail at quasar luminosities.

  9. RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS: IS THERE A LINK BETWEEN LUMINOSITY AND CLUSTER ENVIRONMENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Ineson, J.; Croston, J. H.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kraft, R. P.; Evans, D. A.

    2013-06-20

    We present here the first results from the Chandra ERA (Environments of Radio-loud AGN) Large Project, characterizing the cluster environments of a sample of 26 radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z {approx} 0.5 that covers three decades of radio luminosity. This is the first systematic X-ray environmental study at a single epoch, and has allowed us to examine the relationship between radio luminosity and cluster environment without the problems of Malmquist bias. We have found a weak correlation between radio luminosity and host cluster X-ray luminosity, as well as tentative evidence that this correlation is driven by the subpopulation of low-excitation radio galaxies, with high-excitation radio galaxies showing no significant correlation. The considerable scatter in the environments may be indicative of complex relationships not currently included in feedback models.

  10. A supersoft variable low-luminosity X-ray source in the globular cluster M3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertz, P.; Grindlay, J. E.; Bailyn, C. D.

    1993-01-01

    The globular cluster M3 (NGC 5272) was observed twice with the ROSAT high-resolution imager in order to study the low-luminosity X-ray source 1E 1339.8 + 2837. In 1992 January 1E 1339.8 + 2837 had an X-ray luminosity of 2 x 10 exp 35 ergs/s over an order of magnitude brighter than it was when observed with the Einstein Observatory. The source was unresolved and very soft; such supersoft outbursts would be difficult to detect in the vast majority of globular clusters which are more heavily absorbed than M3. In 1992 June the source was too faint to be detected. The soft outburst luminosity and the blackbody radius suggest that 1E 1339.8 + 2837 is a cataclysmic variable in which much of the luminosity is generated by steady nuclear burning of accreted material on the surface of the white dwarf primary.

  11. Hα as a Luminosity Class Diagnostic for K- and M-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Jeff; Levesque, Emily M.

    2016-04-01

    We have identified the Hα absorption feature as a new spectroscopic diagnostic of luminosity class in K- and M-type stars. From high-resolution spectra of 19 stars with well-determined physical properties (including effective temperatures and stellar radii), we measured equivalent widths for Hα and the Ca ii triplet and examined their dependence on both luminosity class and stellar radius. Hα shows a strong relation with both luminosity class and radius that extends down to late M spectral types. This behavior in Hα has been predicted as a result of the density-dependent overpopulation of the metastable 2s level in hydrogen, an effect that should become dominant for Balmer line formation in non-LTE conditions. We conclude that this new metallicity-insensitive diagnostic of luminosity class in cool stars could serve as an effective means of discerning between populations such as Milky Way giants and supergiant members of background galaxies.

  12. Cruciate retaining and cruciate substituting ultra-congruent insert

    PubMed Central

    Deledda, Davide; Rosso, Federica; Ratto, Nicola; Bruzzone, Matteo; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Rossi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) conservation and the polyethylene insert constraint in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are still debated. The PCL is one of the primary stabilizers of the joint, but cruciate retaining (CR) implants have the disadvantage of a difficult balancing of the PCL. Postero-stabilized (PS) implants were introduced to reduce this problem. However, also the PS implants have some disadvantages, due to the cam-mechanism, such as high risk of cam-mechanism polyethylene wear. To minimize the polyethylene wear of the cam-mechanism and the bone sacrifice due to the intercondylar box, different types of inserts were developed, trying to increase the implant conformity and to reduce stresses on the bone-implant interface. In this scenario ultra-congruent (UC) inserts were developed. Those inserts are characterized by a high anterior wall and a deep-dished plate. This conformation should guarantee a good stability without the posterior cam. Few studies on both kinematic and clinical outcomes of UC inserts are available. Clinical and radiological outcomes, as well as kinematic data are similar between UC mobile bearing (MB) and standard PS MB inserts at short to mid-term follow-up. In this manuscript biomechanics and clinical outcomes of UC inserts will be described, and they will be compared to standard PS or CR inserts. PMID:26855938

  13. Constraints of the Luminosities of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkila, J.; Meegan, C.; Horack, J.; Pendleton, G.; Briggs, M.; Paciesas, W.; Emslie, G.; Mallozzi, R.

    1995-09-01

    Constraints are found on the gamma-ray burst luminosity function from an analysis of the combined BATSE/PVO intensity distribution. If bursts originate in an extended Galactic halo, then the intrinsic luminosity range is narrow, with bursts spanning only a factor of five or less in luminosity. If bursts originate in a simple Friedmann cosmology with Ω = 1 and Λ = 0, then very few luminosity constraints exist.

  14. Upper limits on the total cosmic-ray luminosity of individual sources

    SciTech Connect

    Anjos, R.C.; De Souza, V.; Supanitsky, A.D. E-mail: vitor@ifsc.usp.br

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, upper limits on the total luminosity of ultra-high-energy cosmic-rays (UHECR) E > 10{sup 18} eV) are determined for five individual sources. The upper limit on the integral flux of GeV--TeV gamma-rays is used to extract the upper limit on the total UHECR luminosity of individual sources. The correlation between upper limit on the integral GeV--TeV gamma-ray flux and upper limit on the UHECR luminosity is established through the cascading process that takes place during propagation of the cosmic rays in the background radiation fields, as explained in reference [1]. Twenty-eight sources measured by FERMI-LAT, VERITAS and MAGIC observatories have been studied. The measured upper limit on the GeV--TeV gamma-ray flux is restrictive enough to allow the calculation of an upper limit on the total UHECR cosmic-ray luminosity of five sources. The upper limit on the UHECR cosmic-ray luminosity of these sources is shown for several assumptions on the emission mechanism. For all studied sources an upper limit on the ultra-high-energy proton luminosity is also set.

  15. Characterization of the FE-I4B pixel readout chip production run for the ATLAS Insertable B-layer upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus, M.

    2013-03-01

    The Insertable B-layer (IBL) is a fourth pixel layer that will be added inside the existing ATLAS pixel detector during the long LHC shutdown of 2013 and 2014. The new four layer pixel system will ensure excellent tracking, vertexing and b-tagging performance in the high luminosity pile-up conditions projected for the next LHC run. The peak luminosity is expected to reach 3·1034 cm-2s-1with an integrated luminosity over the IBL lifetime of 300 fb-1 corresponding to a design lifetime fluence of 5·1015 neqcm-2 and ionizing dose of 250 Mrad including safety factors. The production front-end electronics FE-I4B for the IBL has been fabricated at the end of 2011 and has been extensively characterized on diced ICs as well as at the wafer level. The production tests at the wafer level were performed during 2012. Selected results of the diced IC characterization are presented, including measurements of the on-chip voltage regulators. The IBL powering scheme, which was chosen based on these results, is described. Preliminary wafer to wafer distributions as well as yield calculations are given.

  16. Gene Insertion Patterns and Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vain, Philippe; Thole, Vera

    During the past 25 years, the molecular analysis of transgene insertion patterns and sites in plants has greatly contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying transgene integration, expression, and stability in the nuclear genome. Molecular characterization is also an essential step in the safety assessment of genetically modified crops. This chapter describes the standard experimental procedures used to analyze transgene insertion patterns and loci in cereals and grasses transformed using Agrobacterium tumefaciens or direct transfer of DNA. Methods and protocols enabling the determination of the number and configuration of transgenic loci via a combination of inheritance studies, polymerase chain reaction, and Southern analyses are presented. The complete characterization of transgenic inserts in plants is, however, a holistic process relying on a wide variety of experimental approaches. In this chapter, these additional approaches are not detailed but references to relevant bibliographic records are provided.

  17. The bright end of the luminosity function at z ~ 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporte, N.; Pelló, R.; Hayes, M.; Schaerer, D.; Boone, F.; Richard, J.; Le Borgne, J. F.; Kneib, J. P.; Combes, F.

    2012-06-01

    Context. We present additional constraints on the galaxy luminosity function at z ~ 9 based on observations carried out with ESO/VLT FORS2, HAWK-I, and X-Shooter around the lensing cluster A2667, as part of our project designed to select z ~ 7-10 candidates accessible to spectroscopy. We find that only one selected J-dropout source in this field fulfills the color and magnitude criteria. This source was recently confirmed as a mid-z interloper based on X-Shooter spectroscopy. Aims: Owing to the considerable depth and area covered by our survey, we are able to set strong constraints on the bright end of the galaxy luminosity function and hence on the star formation history at very high redshift. Methods: We used our non-detection of reliable J-dropout sources over the ~36 arcmin2 field of view towards A2667 to carefully determine the lens-corrected effective volume and the corresponding upper limit to the density of sources. Results: Our strongest limit is obtained for Φ(M1500 = -21.4 ± 0.50) < 6.70 × 10-6 Mpc-3 mag-1 at z ~ 9. A maximum-likelihood fit of the luminosity function to all available data points including the present new result yields M⋆ > -19.7 with fixed α = -1.74 and Φ⋆ = 1.10 × 10-3 Mpc-3. The corresponding star-formation rate density should be ρSFR < 5.97 × 10-3 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc3 at z ~ 9. These results are in good agreement with the most recent estimates already published for this range of redshift and luminosity domain. Conclusions: This new result confirms previously measured decreases in the density of luminous galaxies at very high redshift, hence provides strong constraints on the design of future surveys aiming to explore the very high-redshift Universe. Based on observations collected at The European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, as part of the ESO 082.A-0163 and 087.A-0118.

  18. THE LUMINOSITY PROFILES OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Donzelli, C. J.; Muriel, H.; Madrid, J. P.

    2011-08-01

    We have derived detailed R-band luminosity profiles and structural parameters for a total of 430 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), down to a limiting surface brightness of 24.5 mag arcsec{sup -2}. Light profiles were initially fitted with a Sersic's R {sup 1/n} model, but we found that 205 ({approx}48%) BCGs require a double component model to accurately match their light profiles. The best fit for these 205 galaxies is an inner Sersic model, with indices n {approx} 1-7, plus an outer exponential component. Thus, we establish the existence of two categories of the BCG luminosity profiles: single and double component profiles. We found that double profile BCGs are brighter ({approx}0.2 mag) than single profile BCGs. In fact, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test applied to these subsamples indicates that they have different total magnitude distributions, with mean values M{sub R} = -23.8 {+-} 0.6 mag for single profile BCGs and M{sub R} = -24.0 {+-} 0.5 mag for double profile BCGs. We find that partial luminosities for both subsamples are indistinguishable up to r = 15 kpc, while for r > 20 kpc the luminosities we obtain are on average 0.2 mag brighter for double profile BCGs. This result indicates that extra-light for double profile BCGs does not come from the inner region but from the outer regions of these galaxies. The best-fit slope of the Kormendy relation for the whole sample is a = 3.13 {+-} 0.04. However, when fitted separately, single and double profile BCGs show different slopes: a{sub single} = 3.29 {+-} 0.06 and a{sub double} = 2.79 {+-} 0.08. Also, the logarithmic slope of the metric luminosity {alpha} is higher in double profile BCGs ({alpha}{sub double} = 0.65 {+-} 0.12) than in single profile BCGs ({alpha}{sub single} = 0.59 {+-} 0.14). The mean isophote outer ellipticity (calculated at {mu} {approx} 24 mag arcsec{sup -2}) is higher in double profile BCGs (e{sub double} = 0.30 {+-} 0.10) than in single profile BCGs (e{sub single} = 0.26 {+-} 0.11). Similarly

  19. Untangling the White Dwarf Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, M. C.

    2017-03-01

    The inversion of the white dwarf luminosity function provides an independent way to prove the past star formation history of the Milky Way independent of any cosmological models. In Rowell & Hambly (2011), the effective volume method uses the average properties of all the objects in a given bin, so a significant amount of information is lost in the early stage of the analysis. In this work, I explore the possibility of assigning objects individually in a probabilistic way using the generalised Schmidt density estimator (1/Vmax).

  20. Oxygen-rich Mira variables: Near-infrared luminosity calibrations. Populations and period-luminosity relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, R.; Mennessier, M.-O.; Barthes, D.; Luri, X.; Mattei, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Hipparcos astrometric and kinematical data of oxygen-rich Mira variables are used to calibrate absolute near-infrared magnitudes and kinematic parameters. Three distinct classes of stars with different kinematics and scale heights were identified. The two most significant groups present characteristics close to those usually assigned to extended/thick disk-halo populations and old disk populations, respectively, and thus they may differ by their metallicity abundance. Two parallel period-luminosity relations are found, one for each population. The shift between these relations is interpreted as the consequence of the effects of metallicity abundance on the luminosity.

  1. Evolution of the luminosity function of quasar accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caditz, David M.; Petrosian, Vahe; Wandel, Amri

    1991-01-01

    Using an accretion-disk model, accretion disk luminosities are calculated for a grid of black hole masses and accretion rates. It is shown that, as the black-hole mass increases with time, the monochromatic luminosity at a given frequency first increases and then decreases rapidly as this frequency is crossed by the Wien cutoff. The upper limit on the monochromatic luminosity, which is characteristic for a given epoch, constrains the evolution of quasar luminosities and determines the evolultion of the quasar luminosity function.

  2. INSERTION DEVICE ACTIVITIES FOR NSLS-II.

    SciTech Connect

    TANABE,T.; HARDER, D.A.; HULBERT, S.; RAKOWSKI, G.; SKARITKA, J.

    2007-06-25

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) will be a medium energy storage ring of 3GeV electron beam energy with sub-nm.rad horizontal emittance and top-off capability at 500mA. Damping wigglers will be used not only to reduce the beam emittance but also used as broadband sources for users. Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulators (CPMUs) are considered for hard X-ray linear device, and permanent magnet based elliptically polarized undulators (EPUs) for variable polarization devices for soft X-ray. 6T superconducting wiggler with minimal fan angle will be installed in the second phase as well as quasi-periodic EPU for VUV and possibly high-temperature superconducting undulator. R&D plans have been established to pursue the performance enhancement of the baseline devices and to design new types of insertion devices. A new insertion device development laboratory will also be established.

  3. Dust Properties, Star Formation, and Chemical Enrichment of Low Luminosity Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zee, Liese; Marble, Andrew; Englebracht, Charles; Skillman, Evan

    2009-08-01

    The recently completed Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey has yielded multi-wavelength observations from the ultraviolet to the radio for a volume-complete sample of 258 galaxies in the local universe, providing detailed information about their star formation rates and dust content. We propose to leverage this rich dataset by obtaining oxygen abundance metallicity measurements for 28 of the lowest luminosity LVL galaxies, in order to investigate the relationship between dust properties, metallicity, and star formation at low-luminosity. Recent studies have suggested departures in this regime from known correlations at higher luminosity; however, these findings have been based on only a few low- luminosity galaxies. Specifically, although the weakening of the aromatic emission features in low luminosity galaxies has largely been ascribed to a metallicity effect, high star formation intensities could also produce the observed trends. The proposed observations will target low luminosity galaxies with low star formation rates (< 0.005 M_⊙ yr^-1) in order to explore the full range of parameter space to determine if the observed behavior of the emission from the IR aromatic features is driven primarily by metallicity or star formation.

  4. The origin of the far-infrared luminosity within the spiral galaxy M101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereux, Nicholas A.; Scowen, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    High resolution 60 and 100 micron images obtained with the Infared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) are compared with H alpha images in order to investigate the origin of the far-infrared luminosity within the late-type spiral galaxy M101. There is a good correspondence between the far-infrared and H-alpha morphology. The far-infrared and H-alpha luminosities have been measured at 129 independent locations on the star forming disk of M101. After correcting the H-alpha luminosity for extinction and extrapolating the IRAS (40-120 microns) luminosity to 1000 microns we find that the far-infrared luminosity is commensurate with that expected from the O and B stars which are required to ionize the hydrogen gas, at all locations within M101. Additionally, the IRAS HiRes 60 and 100 micron images reveal that the dust temperature peaks coincide identically with the location of H II regions. The far-infrared luminosity of M101 is radiated primarily by dust with temperatures well in excess of that expected for cirrus, but similar to that observed for Galactic and extragalactic H II regions.

  5. Beamline Insertions Manager at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael C.

    2015-09-01

    The beam viewer system at Jefferson Lab provides operators and beam physicists with qualitative and quantitative information on the transverse electron beam properties. There are over 140 beam viewers installed on the 12 GeV CEBAF accelerator. This paper describes an upgrade consisting of replacing the EPICS-based system tasked with managing all viewers with a mixed system utilizing EPICS and high-level software. Most devices, particularly the beam viewers, cannot be safely inserted into the beam line during high-current beam operations. Software is partly responsible for protecting the machine from untimely insertions. The multiplicity of beam-blocking and beam-vulnerable devices motivates us to try a data-driven approach. The beamline insertions application components are centrally managed and configured through an object-oriented software framework created for this purpose. A rules-based engine tracks the configuration and status of every device, along with the beam status of the machine segment containing the device. The application uses this information to decide on which device actions are allowed at any given time.

  6. Discovery of a low-luminosity spiral DRAGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, D. D.; Mao, M. Y.; Mitsuishi, I.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Clarke, A. O.; Babazaki, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Suganuma, R.; Matsumoto, H.; Tawara, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Standard galaxy formation models predict that large-scale double-lobed radio sources, known as DRAGNs, will always be hosted by elliptical galaxies. In spite of this, in recent years a small number of spiral galaxies have also been found to host such sources. These so-called spiral DRAGNs are still extremely rare, with only 5 cases being widely accepted. Here we report on the serendipitous discovery of a new spiral DRAGN in data from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 322 MHz. The host galaxy, MCG+07-47-10, is a face-on late-type Sbc galaxy with distinctive spiral arms and prominent bulge suggesting a high black hole mass. Using WISE infra-red and GALEX UV data we show that this galaxy has a star formation rate of 0.16-0.75 M⊙ yr-1, and that the radio luminosity is dominated by star-formation. We demonstrate that this spiral DRAGN has similar environmental properties to others of this class, but has a comparatively low radio luminosity of L1.4 GHz = 1.12 × 1022 W Hz-1, two orders of magnitude smaller than other known spiral DRAGNs. We suggest that this may indicate the existence of a previously unknown low-luminosity population of spiral DRAGNS. FITS cutout image of the observed spiral DRAGN MCG+07-47- 10 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/595/L8

  7. Thermodynamics and luminosities of rainbow black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Benrong; Wang, Peng; Yang, Haitang E-mail: pengw@scu.edu.cn

    2015-11-01

    Doubly special relativity (DSR) is an effective model for encoding quantum gravity in flat spacetime. As result of the nonlinearity of the Lorentz transformation, the energy-momentum dispersion relation is modified. One simple way to import DSR to curved spacetime is ''Gravity's rainbow'', where the spacetime background felt by a test particle would depend on its energy. Focusing on the ''Amelino-Camelia dispersion relation'' which is E{sup 2} = m{sup 2}+p{sup 2}[1−η(E/m{sub p}){sup n}] with n > 0, we investigate the thermodynamical properties of a Schwarzschild black hole and a static uncharged black string for all possible values of η and n in the framework of rainbow gravity. It shows that there are non-vanishing minimum masses for these two black holes in the cases with η < 0 and n ≥ 2. Considering effects of rainbow gravity on both the Hawking temperature and radius of the event horizon, we use the geometric optics approximation to compute luminosities of a 2D black hole, a Schwarzschild one and a static uncharged black string. It is found that the luminosities can be significantly suppressed or boosted depending on the values of η and n.

  8. Thermodynamics and luminosities of rainbow black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Benrong; Wang, Peng; Yang, Haitang

    2015-11-01

    Doubly special relativity (DSR) is an effective model for encoding quantum gravity in flat spacetime. As result of the nonlinearity of the Lorentz transformation, the energy-momentum dispersion relation is modified. One simple way to import DSR to curved spacetime is ``Gravity's rainbow'', where the spacetime background felt by a test particle would depend on its energy. Focusing on the ``Amelino-Camelia dispersion relation'' which is E2 = m2+p2[1-η(E/mp)n] with n > 0, we investigate the thermodynamical properties of a Schwarzschild black hole and a static uncharged black string for all possible values of η and n in the framework of rainbow gravity. It shows that there are non-vanishing minimum masses for these two black holes in the cases with η < 0 and n >= 2. Considering effects of rainbow gravity on both the Hawking temperature and radius of the event horizon, we use the geometric optics approximation to compute luminosities of a 2D black hole, a Schwarzschild one and a static uncharged black string. It is found that the luminosities can be significantly suppressed or boosted depending on the values of η and n.

  9. Low extreme-ultraviolet luminosities impinging on protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, I.; Hendler, N. P.; Ricci, L.; Gorti, U.; Hollenbach, D.; Brooks, K. J.; Contreras, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The amount of high-energy stellar radiation reaching the surface of protoplanetary disks is essential to determine their chemistry and physical evolution. Here, we use millimetric and centimetric radio data to constrain the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) luminosity impinging on 14 disks around young (∼2-10 Myr) sun-like stars. For each object we identify the long-wavelength emission in excess to the dust thermal emission, attribute that to free-free disk emission, and thereby compute an upper limit to the EUV reaching the disk. We find upper limits lower than 10{sup 42} photons s{sup –1} for all sources without jets and lower than 5 × 10{sup 40} photons s{sup –1} for the three older sources in our sample. These latter values are low for EUV-driven photoevaporation alone to clear out protoplanetary material in the timescale inferred by observations. In addition, our EUV upper limits are too low to reproduce the [Ne II] 12.81 μm luminosities from three disks with slow [Ne II]-detected winds. This indicates that the [Ne II] line in these sources primarily traces a mostly neutral wind where Ne is ionized by 1 keV X-ray photons, implying higher photoevaporative mass loss rates than those predicted by EUV-driven models alone. In summary, our results suggest that high-energy stellar photons other than EUV may dominate the dispersal of protoplanetary disks around sun-like stars.

  10. Construction, arraying, and high-density screening of large insert libraries of human chromosomes X and 21: Their potential use as reference libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Nizetic, D.; Zehetner, G.; Monaco, A.P.; Gellen, L.; Lehrach, H. ); Young, B.D. )

    1991-04-15

    The authors have constructed cosmid libraries from flow-sorted human chromosomes X and 21, each of which contains {gt}30 genome equivalents, and have developed systems allowing permanent storage of primary clones, easy screening of libraries in high-density filter formats, and the simultaneous generation of fingerprinting and mapping data on the same set of cosmid clones. Clones are picked into microtiter plate wells and stored at {minus}70C. A semiautomatic robot system allows the generation of filter replicas containing up to 10,000 clones per membrane. Sets of membranes containing 15-20 chromosome equivalents of both chromosomes will be used for the construction of ordered clone libraries by hybridization fingerprinting protocols. The authors describe the construction of the libraries and demonstrate the use of high-density screening filters in oligonucleotide probe hybridizations and the isolation of cosmids by hybridization with probes from the X chromosome.

  11. LiVP2O7/C: A New Insertion Anode Material for High-Rate Lithium-Ion Battery Applications.

    PubMed

    Mani, Vellaisamy; Kalaiselvi, Nallathamby

    2016-04-18

    LiVP2O7/C, popularly known so far as an environmentally compatible and economically viable lithium battery cathode material, was exploited for the first time as an anode through the current study. LiVP2O7/C was synthesized by adopting oxalyl dihydrazide assisted solution combustion method and explored as an anode material in rechargeable lithium cell assembly. Notably, an initial capacity of 600 mAh g(-1) was exhibited by LiVP2O7/C anode, at the rate of 0.5 C along with an excellent Coulombic efficiency of 99% up to 150 cycles. The title anode demonstrates its suitability for high capacity and high rate applications by way of exhibiting appreciable capacity values of 200, 150, 120, and 110 mAh g(-1), under the influence of 2, 4, 6, and 8 C rates, respectively. Further, LiVP2O7/C anode, when subjected to a high current 10 C rate, exhibits an acceptable capacity of 107 mAh g(-1) up to 500 cycles, which is closer to its theoretical capacity value of 117 mAh g(-1). The study demonstrates the possibility of exploiting LiVP2O7/C as yet another potential anode and thereby opens a newer avenue to explore wide variety of LiMP2O7/C composites for their probable anode behavior in rechargeable lithium batteries.

  12. High prevalence of IncP-1 plasmids and IS1071 insertion sequences in on-farm biopurification systems and other pesticide-polluted environments.

    PubMed

    Dunon, Vincent; Sniegowski, Kristel; Bers, Karolien; Lavigne, Rob; Smalla, Kornelia; Springael, Dirk

    2013-12-01

    Mobile genetic elements (MGEs) are considered as key players in the adaptation of bacteria to degrade organic xenobiotic recalcitrant compounds such as pesticides. We examined the prevalence and abundance of IncP-1 plasmids and IS1071, two MGEs that are frequently linked with organic xenobiotic degradation, in laboratory and field ecosystems with and without pesticide pollution history. The ecosystems included on-farm biopurification systems (BPS) processing pesticide-contaminated wastewater and soil. Comparison of IncP-1/IS1071 prevalence between pesticide-treated and nontreated soil and BPS microcosms suggested that both IncP-1 and IS1071 proliferated as a response to pesticide treatment. The increased prevalence of IncP-1 plasmids and IS1071-specific sequences in treated systems was accompanied by an increase in the capacity to mineralize the applied pesticides. Both elements were also encountered in high abundance in field BPS ecosystems that were in operation at farmyards and that showed the capacity to degrade/mineralize a wide range of chlorinated aromatics and pesticides. In contrast, IS1071 and especially IncP-1, MGE were less abundant in field ecosystems without pesticide history although some of them still showed a high IS1071 abundance. Our data suggest that MGE-containing organisms were enriched in pesticide-contaminated environments like BPS where they might contribute to spreading of catabolic genes and to pathway assembly.

  13. Construction, arraying, and high-density screening of large insert libraries of human chromosomes X and 21: their potential use as reference libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Nizetić, D; Zehetner, G; Monaco, A P; Gellen, L; Young, B D; Lehrach, H

    1991-01-01

    We have constructed cosmid libraries from flow-sorted human chromosomes X and 21, each of which contains greater than 30 genome equivalents, and have developed systems allowing permanent storage of primary clones, easy screening of libraries in high-density filter formats, and the simultaneous generation of fingerprinting and mapping data on the same set of cosmid clones. Clones are picked into microtiter plate wells and stored at -70 degrees C. A semiautomatic robot system allows the generation of filter replicas containing up to 10,000 clones per membrane. Sets of membranes containing 15-20 chromosome equivalents of both chromosomes will be used for the construction of ordered clone libraries by hybridization fingerprinting protocols. In addition, multiple sets of two membranes containing 4 chromosome equivalents of the human X chromosome, and one membrane containing 3 chromosome equivalents of chromosome 21, have been distributed to other interested laboratories as part of a system of reference libraries. This system allows other groups easy access to the clones and offers an efficient protocol to combine results generated in different laboratories using these libraries. Here we describe the construction of the libraries and demonstrate the use of high-density screening filters in oligonucleotide probe hybridizations and the isolation of cosmids by hybridization with probes from the X chromosome. Images PMID:2014245

  14. Operation of the Run IIB D0 Luminosity System and Determination of the Run IIB Luminosity Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Prewitt, Michelle Victoria; /Rice U.

    2010-04-01

    The luminosity system is an integral part of the D0 detector that must be properly maintained to provide accurate luminosity measurements for physics analysis. After the addition of a readout layer to the silicon vertex detector in 2006, it was necessary to re-calculate the effective inelastic cross section to which the luminosity monitor is sensitive. The preliminary analysis showed that the luminosity constant did not change with the addition of the extra layer of silicon. A full study of the revised luminosity constant including a complete analysis of systematic uncertainties has been completed. The luminosity constant was determined to be {sigma}{sub eff} = 48.3 {+-} 1.9 {+-} 0.6 mb, which reduces the D0 contribution to the luminosity measurement uncertainty by almost 3%.

  15. FORCAST Spectroscopy of Orion Protostars: Probing Intermediate Luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megeath, Tom

    2015-10-01

    We propose FORECAST low resolution spectroscopy of seven protostars in the Orion molecular clouds. These protostars have luminosities between those of low mass protostars which were the primary focus of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS) and those of the high mass protostars in the Orion Nebula. Although we have constructed 1-870 micron SEDs from 2MASS, Spitzer, Herschel and APEX photometry of these intermediate (40-600 Lsun) luminosity protostars, we do not have Spitzer IRS spectra showing the shape and depth of the 10 micron silicate features and the slope of the mid-IR spectral energy distribution (SED). Given the importance of such spectra for constraining the properties of the protostars through radiative transfer modeling, we request time to obtain FORCAST FOR-G111 (8.4-13.7 micron) and FOR-G227 (17.6-27.7 micron) grism spectra. With these data, we can extend our study of protostars in Orion to include a sample of more luminous protostar which are expected to include both intermediate mass protostars and low mass protostars undergoing outbursts. To investigate potential variability between Spitzer and WISE epochs, we also request photomety of a protostar potentially undergoing an episodic outburst.

  16. Dark and luminous properties of low-luminosity spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogoshvili, N.; Borchkhadze, T.

    2012-08-01

    On the basis of data in our Merged Catalogue of Galaxies (MERCG), for which an online version is now available, we have analysed some properties of spiral galaxies that are members of pairs or small groups of galaxies. Our sample consists of a total of approximately 300 pairs and groups, distributed over the entire sky. In this context, low-luminosity spirals (LLS), here defined as those with an absolute magnitude of MB ≥ -20.6, are of particular interest, since they are thought to harbour dark matter. We find that the mean distance between the two components in LLS/LLS pairs of galaxies is significantly smaller than in LLS/elliptical (E), LLS/high-luminosity spiral (HLS) and HLS/HLS pairs, as well as in groups with at least one LLS. Moreover, LLS from this sample in the mean have larger central surface densities μo and smaller values of the full angular momentum K than HLS. In the second part, we investigate the relative frequencies of LLS galaxies, single as well as in pairs/groups. We find that they are 4-5 times more frequent inside and around three major clusters of galaxies (Virgo, Pegasus I and Perseus) than in the general field. Our findings all support the assumption that LLS galaxies are indeed carriers of dark matter.

  17. The Discovery of Low-Luminosity BL Lacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rector, Travis A.; Stocke, John T.

    1995-12-01

    Many of the properties of BL Lacs have become explicable in terms of the ``relativistic beaming'' hypothesis whereby BL Lacs are ``highly beamed'' FR-I radio galaxies (i.e. our line of sight to these objects is nearly along the jet axis). Further, radio-selected BL Lacs (RBLs) are believed to be seen nearly ``on-axis'' (the line-of-sight angle theta ~ 8deg ) while X-ray selected BL Lacs (XBLs) are seen at larger angles (theta ~ 30deg ; the X-ray emitting jet is believed to be less collimated). However, a major problem with this model was that a transition population between beamed BL Lacs and unbeamed FR-Is had not been detected. Low-luminosity BL Lacs may be such a transition population, and were predicted to exist by Browne and Marcha (1993). We present ROSAT HRI images, VLA radio maps and optical spectra which confirm the existence of low-luminosity BL Lacs, objects which were previously mis-identified in the EMSS catalog as clusters of galaxies. Thus our results strengthen the relativistic beaming hypothesis.

  18. Comparative Genomics of a Helicobacter pylori Isolate from a Chinese Yunnan Naxi Ethnic Aborigine Suggests High Genetic Divergence and Phage Insertion

    PubMed Central

    You, Yuanhai; He, Lihua; Zhang, Maojun; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a common pathogen correlated with several severe digestive diseases. It has been reported that isolates associated with different geographic areas, different diseases and different individuals might have variable genomic features. Here, we describe draft genomic sequences of H. pylori strains YN4-84 and YN1-91 isolated from patients with gastritis from the Naxi and Han populations of Yunnan, China, respectively. The draft sequences were compared to 45 other publically available genomes, and a total of 1059 core genes were identified. Genes involved in restriction modification systems, type four secretion system three (TFS3) and type four secretion system four (TFS4), were identified as highly divergent. Both YN4-84 and YN1-91 harbor intact cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) and have EPIYA-A/B/D type at the carboxyl terminal of cagA. The vacA gene type is s1m2i1. Another major finding was a 32.5-kb prophage integrated in the YN4-84 genome. The prophage shares most of its genes (30/33) with Helicobacter pylori prophage KHP30. Moreover, a 1,886 bp transposable sequence (IS605) was found in the prophage. Our results imply that the Naxi ethnic minority isolate YN4-84 and Han isolate YN1-91 belong to the hspEAsia subgroup and have diverse genome structure. The genome has been extensively modified in several regions involved in horizontal DNA transfer. The important roles played by phages in the ecology and microevolution of H. pylori were further emphasized. The current data will provide valuable information regarding the H. pylori genome based on historic human migrations and population structure. PMID:25799515

  19. Interpreting the H II Region Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oey, M. S.; Clarke, C. J.

    1998-12-01

    We construct Monte Carlo simulations of the H II region luminosity function (H II LF), drawing ionizing stars from a constant stellar IMF, and the number of ionizing stars from a power-law distribution of constant slope. We find that observed variations in the form of the H II LF across the Hubble sequence can be explained by a trend in the maximum number of ionizing stars per nebula. In addition, variations in the form of the H II LF between arm and interarm populations of spiral galaxies can be explained by evolutionary effects. The H II LF can thus reveal features in the most recent (< 10 Myr) star formation history of the host galaxies.

  20. On Coupled Stellar Luminosity and Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuenschwander, Dwight E.; McCully, C. V.

    2008-09-01

    We derive a analytic nonperturbative solution to the coupled field equations of general relativity and electrodynamics, for a star of initial mass Mo and lifetime-averaged luminosity L. We carry out our solution in familiar spherical coordinates, including an off-diagonal term in the metric tensor to allow for "frame dragging” caused by the radial flux of light. We then show how our metric can be transformed into a diagonal one; and how the "photon dust” electomagnetic stress tensor assumed by early investigators of this problem forms an approximation to our solution. We also estimate the magnitude of some of the small effects inferred by this model of radial frame dragging. We thank The Catalysts, an SNU science alumni organization, for its support.

  1. libprofit: Image creation from luminosity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robotham, A. S. G.; Taranu, D.; Tobar, R.

    2016-12-01

    libprofit is a C++ library for image creation based on different luminosity profiles. It offers fast and accurate two-dimensional integration for a useful number of profiles, including Sersic, Core-Sersic, broken-exponential, Ferrer, Moffat, empirical King, point-source and sky, with a simple mechanism for adding new profiles. libprofit provides a utility to read the model and profile parameters from the command-line and generate the corresponding image. It can output the resulting image as text values, a binary stream, or as a simple FITS file. It also provides a shared library exposing an API that can be used by any third-party application. R and Python interfaces are available: ProFit (ascl:1612.004) and PyProfit (ascl:1612.005).

  2. Ultrasound guided spine needle insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Elvis C. S.; Mousavi, Parvin; Gill, Sean; Fichtinger, Gabor; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2010-02-01

    An ultrasound (US) guided, CT augmented, spine needle insertion navigational system is introduced. The system consists of an electromagnetic (EM) sensor, an US machine, and a preoperative CT volume of the patient anatomy. Three-dimensional (3D) US volume is reconstructed intraoperatively from a set of two-dimensional (2D) freehand US slices, and is coregistered with the preoperative CT. This allows the preoperative CT volume to be used in the intraoperative clinical coordinate. The spatial relationship between the patient anatomy, surgical tools, and the US transducer are tracked using the EM sensor, and are displayed with respect to the CT volume. The pose of the US transducer is used to interpolate the CT volume, providing the physician with a 2D "x-ray vision" to guide the needle insertion. Many of the system software components are GPU-accelerated, allowing real-time performance of the guidance system in a clinical setting.

  3. An Investigation of X-ray Luminosity versus Crystalline Powder Granularity

    SciTech Connect

    Borade, Ramesh; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; ,

    2012-03-07

    At the High-throughput Discovery of Scintillator Materials Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, scintillators are synthesized by solid-state reaction or melt mixing, forming crystalline powders. These powders are formed in various granularity and the crystal grain size affects the apparent luminosity of the scintillator. To accurately predict a "full-size" scintillator's crystal luminosity, the crystal luminosity as a function of crystal granularity size has to be known. In this study, we examine Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO), Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce (LSO), YAlO{sub 3}:Ce (YAP:Ce), and CsBa{sub 2}I{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} (CBI) luminosities as a function of crystalline grain size. The highest luminosities were measured for 600- to 1000-{micro}m crystal grain sizes for BGO and LSO, for 310- to 600-{micro}m crystal grain sizes for CBI, and for crystal grains larger than 165{micro}m for YAP:Ce. Crystal grains that were larger than 1 mm had a lower packing fraction, and smaller grains were affected by internal scattering. We measured a 34% decrease in luminosity for BGO when decreasing from the 600- to 1000- {micro}m crystal grain size range down to the 20- to 36-{micro}m range. The corresponding luminosity decrease for LSO was 44% for the same grain size decrease. YAP:Ce exhibited a luminosity decrease of 47% when the grain size decreased from the 165- to 310-{micro}m crystal grains to the 20- to 36-{micro}m range, and CBI exhibited a luminosity decrease of 98% when the grain size decreased from the 310- to 600-{micro}m crystal grain range to the 36- to 50-{micro}m range. We were able to very accurately estimate full-size crystal luminosities from crystalline grains that are larger than 90 {micro}m.

  4. Inserting Agility in System Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Agile IT Acquisition, IT Box, Scrum Inserting Agility in System Development Matthew R. Kennedy and Lt Col Dan Ward, USAF With the fast-paced nature...1,700 individuals and 71 countries, found Scrum and eXtreme Programming to be the most widely followed method- ologies (VersionOne, 2007). Other...University http://www.dau.mil 259 Defense ARJ, July 2012, Vol. 19 No. 3 : 249–264 Scrum Scrum is a framework used for project management, which is

  5. The genomic landscape of polymorphic human nuclear mitochondrial insertions

    PubMed Central

    Dayama, Gargi; Emery, Sarah B.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Mills, Ryan E.

    2014-01-01

    The transfer of mitochondrial genetic material into the nuclear genomes of eukaryotes is a well-established phenomenon that has been previously limited to the study of static reference genomes. The recent advancement of high throughput sequencing has enabled an expanded exploration into the diversity of polymorphic nuclear mitochondrial insertions (NumtS) within human populations. We have developed an approach to discover and genotype novel Numt insertions using whole genome, paired-end sequencing data. We have applied this method to a thousand individuals in 20 populations from the 1000 Genomes Project and other datasets and identified 141 new sites of Numt insertions, extending our current knowledge of existing NumtS by almost 20%. We find that recent Numt insertions are derived from throughout the mitochondrial genome, including the D-loop, and have integration biases that differ in some respects from previous studies on older, fixed NumtS in the reference genome. We determined the complete inserted sequence for a subset of these events and have identified a number of nearly full-length mitochondrial genome insertions into nuclear chromosomes. We further define their age and origin of insertion and present an analysis of their potential impact to ongoing studies of mitochondrial heteroplasmy and disease. PMID:25348406

  6. Evolution of the luminosity function of extragalactic objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1985-01-01

    A nonparametric procedure for determination of the evolution of the luminosity function of extragalactic objects and use of this for prediction of expected redshift and luminosity distribution of objects is described. The relation between this statistical evolution of the population and their physical evolution, such as the variation with cosmological epoch of their luminosity and formation rate is presented. This procedure when applied to a sample of optically selected quasars with redshifts less than two shows that the luminosity function evolves more strongly for higher luminosities, indicating a larger quasar activity at earlier epochs and a more rapid evolution of the objects during their higher luminosity phases. It is also shown that absence of many quasars at redshifts greater than three implies slowing down of this evolution in the conventional cosmological models, perhaps indicating that this is near the epoch of the birth of the quasar (and galaxies).

  7. Luminosity Dependence and Redshift Evolution of Strong Emission-Line Diagnostics in Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, L. L.; Barger, A. J.; Songaila, A.

    2016-01-01

    We examine the redshift evolution of standard strong emission-line diagnostics for Hβ-selected star-forming galaxies using the local SDSS sample and a new z=0.2{--}2.3 sample obtained from Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 grism and Keck DEIMOS and MOSFIRE data. We use the SDSS galaxies to show that there is a systematic dependence of the strong emission-line properties on Balmer-line luminosity, which we interpret as showing that both the N/O abundance and the ionization parameter increase with increasing line luminosity. Allowing for the luminosity dependence tightens the diagnostic diagrams and the metallicity calibrations. The combined SDSS and high-redshift samples show that there is no redshift evolution in the line properties once the luminosity correction is applied, i.e., all galaxies with a given L({{H}}β ) have similar strong emission-line distributions at all the observed redshifts. We argue that the best metal diagnostic for the high-redshift galaxies may be a luminosity-adjusted version of the [N ii]6584/Hα metallicity relation. Based in part on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  8. Burst Statistics Using the Lag-Luminosity Relationship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D. L.; Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    Using the lag-luminosity relation and various BATSE catalogs we create a large catalog of burst redshifts, peak luminosities and emitted energies. These catalogs permit us to evaluate the lag-luminosity relation, and to study the burst energy distribution. We find that this distribution can be described as a power law with an index of alpha = 1.76 +/- 0.05 (95% confidence), close to the alpha = 2 predicted by the original quasi-universal jet model.

  9. X-ray luminosity functions of clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavaliere, A.; Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.

    1991-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies must have a considerable intrinsic spread in their X-ray luminosities at given mass if they are formed bottom-up by direct gravitational instability. The distributions of luminosities at given mass take on the general form of a flat power law with a sharp upper cutoff, consistent with the recently obtained luminosity functions for Abell clusters of given richness classes. The quantitative features depend on the specific hierarchical cosmogony, with models including mass accretion after first collapse providing the best agreement. The same clustering mechanism, after integrating over mass, yields a steep overall luminosity function consistent with existing measurements.

  10. THE LOW-LUMINOSITY END OF THE RADIUS-LUMINOSITY RELATIONSHIP FOR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Misty C.; Denney, Kelly D.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Grier, Catherine J.; Peterson, Bradley M.; De Rosa, Gisella; Pogge, Richard W.; Barth, Aaron J.; Bennert, Vardha N.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li Weidong; Gates, Elinor L.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Stern, Daniel; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2013-04-20

    We present an updated and revised analysis of the relationship between the H{beta} broad-line region (BLR) radius and the luminosity of the active galactic nucleus (AGN). Specifically, we have carried out two-dimensional surface brightness decompositions of the host galaxies of nine new AGNs imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3. The surface brightness decompositions allow us to create ''AGN-free'' images of the galaxies, from which we measure the starlight contribution to the optical luminosity measured through the ground-based spectroscopic aperture. We also incorporate 20 new reverberation-mapping measurements of the H{beta} time lag, which is assumed to yield the average H{beta} BLR radius. The final sample includes 41 AGNs covering four orders of magnitude in luminosity. The additions and updates incorporated here primarily affect the low-luminosity end of the R{sub BLR}-L relationship. The best fit to the relationship using a Bayesian analysis finds a slope of {alpha}= 0.533{sup +0.035}{sub -0.033}, consistent with previous work and with simple photoionization arguments. Only two AGNs appear to be outliers from the relationship, but both of them have monitoring light curves that raise doubt regarding the accuracy of their reported time lags. The scatter around the relationship is found to be 0.19 {+-} 0.02 dex, but would be decreased to 0.13 dex by the removal of these two suspect measurements. A large fraction of the remaining scatter in the relationship is likely due to the inaccurate distances to the AGN host galaxies. Our results help support the possibility that the R{sub BLR}-L relationship could potentially be used to turn the BLRs of AGNs into standardizable candles. This would allow the cosmological expansion of the universe to be probed by a separate population of objects, and over a larger range of redshifts.

  11. Intermodal interferometer with low insertion loss and high extinction ratio composed of a slight offset point and a matching long period grating in two-mode photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Liu, Yan-ge; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Bo; Guo, Junqi; Luo, Mingming; Lin, Lie

    2015-01-10

    An all-fiber modal interferometer based on a long period grating (LPG) inscribed in a two-mode photonic crystal fiber (PCF) and a slight core-offset spliced end is proposed and demonstrated. The LPG is fabricated to realize energy coupling from LP01 core mode to LP11 core mode, and the two core modes will interfere at the slight core-offset spliced end. We analyze the impact of energy coupling efficiencies of the LPG and the output spliced end on the extinction ratio of the interference fringes. With an appropriate energy coupling efficiency matching condition, our modal interferometer can realize lower insertion loss and high extinction ratio. Moreover, the sensitivities of our interferometer to strain and temperature are investigated, and the good stability of this device to external refractive index change is also demonstrated. As an all-fiber interferometer made of pure silica, this device has great potential applications in high temperature sensing fields, especially in harsh conditions.

  12. A study of the discrepant QSO X-ray luminosity function from the HEAO-2 data archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, B.

    1984-01-01

    An in-progress investigation aimed at characterizing the X-ray luminosity of very faint QSOs is described. More than 100 faint, previously uncataloged QSOs which lie in areas imaged in X rays at very high sensitivity were discovered.

  13. Luminosity distributions of Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashall, C.; Mazzali, P.; Sasdelli, M.; Prentice, S. J.

    2016-08-01

    We have assembled a data set of 165 low redshift, z < 0.06, publicly available Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We produce maximum light magnitude (MB and MV) distributions of SNe Ia to explore the diversity of parameter space that they can fill. Before correction for host galaxy extinction we find that the mean MB and MV of SNe Ia are -18.58 ± 0.07 and -18.72 ± 0.05 mag, respectively. Host galaxy extinction is corrected using a new method based on the SN spectrum. After correction, the mean values of MB and MV of SNe Ia are -19.10 ± 0.06 and -19.10 ± 0.05 mag, respectively. After correction for host galaxy extinction, `normal' SNe Ia (Δm15(B) < 1.6 mag) fill a larger parameter space in the width-luminosity relation than previously suggested, and there is evidence for luminous SNe Ia with large Δm15(B). We find a bimodal distribution in Δm15(B), with a pronounced lack of transitional events at Δm15(B) = 1.6 mag. We confirm that faster, low-luminosity SNe tend to come from passive galaxies. Dividing the sample by host galaxy type, SNe Ia from star-forming (S-F) galaxies have a mean MB = -19.20 ± 0.05 mag, while SNe Ia from passive galaxies have a mean MB = -18.57 ± 0.24 mag. Even excluding fast declining SNe, `normal' (MB < -18 mag) SNe Ia from S-F and passive galaxies are distinct. In the V band, there is a difference of 0.4 ± 0.13 mag between the median (MV) values of the `normal' SN Ia population from passive and S-F galaxies. This is consistent with (˜15 ± 10) per cent of `normal' SNe Ia from S-F galaxies coming from an old stellar population.

  14. Field errors in hybrid insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    Hybrid magnet theory as applied to the error analyses used in the design of Advanced Light Source (ALS) insertion devices is reviewed. Sources of field errors in hybrid insertion devices are discussed.

  15. Development of Magnet Technologies for HTS Insert Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesche, Rainer; Uglietti, Davide; Bruzzone, Pierluigi; March, Stephen; Marinucci, Claudio; Stepanov, Boris; Glowa, Natalia

    An existing Nb3Sn laboratory magnet generating a magnetic field of 12 T is intended to be upgraded to 16 T by means of the use of a high temperature superconductor (HTS) insert coil. An outline design of the HTS insert coil is presented. In the design, the aspects of the maximum achievable operation current, the required copper cross-section to ensure a hot spot temperature below 200 K and the resulting forces and stresses have been considered. The length of the insert coil has been selected in such a way that the field uniformity will be better than 1% within a sphere of 3 cm diameter. The protection of the whole magnet system (LTS & HTS insert) is briefly described.

  16. A DENSITY DEPENDENCE FOR PROTOSTELLAR LUMINOSITY IN CLASS I SOURCES: COLLABORATIVE ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Hurst, Rachel; Koenig, Xavier

    2014-02-10

    Class I protostars in three high-mass star-forming regions are found to have correlations among the local projected density of other Class I protostars, the summed flux from these other protostars, and the protostellar luminosity in the WISE 22 μm band. Brighter Class I sources form in higher-density and higher-flux regions, while low luminosity sources form anywhere. These correlations depend slightly on the number of neighbors considered (from 2 to 20) and could include a size-of-sample effect from the initial mass function (i.e., larger numbers include rarer and more massive stars). Luminosities seem to vary by neighborhood with nearby protostars having values proportional to each other and higher density regions having higher values. If Class I luminosity is partially related to the accretion rate, then this luminosity correlation is consistent with the competitive accretion model, although it is more collaborative than competitive. The correlation is also consistent with primordial mass segregation and could explain why the stellar initial mass function resembles the dense core mass function even when cores form multiple stars.

  17. The luminosity-bias relation from filaments in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Four

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Biswajit; Bharadwaj, Somnath

    2007-05-01

    We compare quantitative estimates of the filamentarity of the galaxy distribution in seven nearly two-dimensional sections from the survey against the predictions of Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) N-body simulations. The filamentarity of the actual galaxy distribution is known to be luminosity-dependent. It is also known that the filamentarity of the simulated galaxy distribution is highly sensitive to the bias, and the simulations are consistent with the data for only a narrow range of bias. We apply this feature to several volume-limited subsamples with different luminosities to determine a luminosity-bias relation. The relative bias b/b* as a function of the luminosity ratio L/L* is found to be well described by a straight line b/b* = A + B(L/L*) with A = 0.833 +/- 0.009 and B = 0.171 +/- 0.009. Comparing with the earlier works, all of which use ratios of the two-point statistics, we find that our results are consistent with Norberg et al. and Tegmark et al., while a steeper luminosity dependence found by Benoist et al. is inconsistent.

  18. Insert metering plates for gas turbine nozzles

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven S.; Itzel, Gary; Chopra, Sanjay; Abuaf, Nesim; Correia, Victor H.

    2004-05-11

    The invention comprises a metering plate which is assembled to an impingement insert for use in the nozzle of a gas turbine. The metering plate can have one or more metering holes and is used to balance the cooling flow within the nozzle. A metering plate with multiple holes reduces static pressure variations which result from the cooling airflow through the metering plate. The metering plate can be assembled to the insert before or after the insert is inserted into the nozzle.

  19. On the maximum luminosity in X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Paradijs, J.

    1981-01-01

    A qualitative model is proposed which relates the burst behavior of 1608-52 observed by Murakami et al (1980) to the composition of the envelope in which the X-ray bursts occur. The model provides an explanation for the large scatter in the peak fluxes when the accretion rate is high. A flux would be transported outward at the top of the convective region which equals 1.5 to 2 times the Eddington limit appropriate to a helium-rich gas. Upon traversing the outer part of the accreted layer, which is not affected by the nuclear processes and is therefore hydrogen-rich, this flux is about a factor of 3 to 4 higher than the local value of the Eddington luminosity.

  20. TWO MASSIVE, LOW-LUMINOSITY CORES TOWARD INFRARED DARK CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, Jonathan J.

    2009-11-10

    This article presents high-resolution interferometric mosaics in the 850 mum wave band of two massive, quiescent infrared dark clouds. The two clouds were chosen based on their likelihood to represent environments preceding the formation of massive stars. The brightest compact sources detected in each cloud have masses approx110 M{sub sun} and approx60 M{sub sun} with radii <0.1 pc, implying mean densities of (n) approx 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} and (N) approx 1 g cm{sup -2}. Supplementary data show these cores to be cold and inactive. Low upper limits to their bolometric luminosities and temperatures place them at a very early stage of evolution, while current models of massive star formation suggest they have the potential to form massive stars.

  1. JT/LJT connector insert material evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, J.R.F.

    1991-10-01

    Different insert (insulator) materials are undergoing evaluation to replace the Fiberite E-3938 BE96 material currently used. Also being evaluated is the reconfiguration of the insert and metal shell-edge geometries for the purpose of reducing the alleged interference principally responsible for insert damage.

  2. Broadband Electromagnetic Pulses Coinciding with Sprite Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, M.; Roussel-Dupre, R. A.; Symbalisty, E.; Chanrion, O.; van der Velde, O. A.; Odzimek, A.; Whitley, T.; Neubert, T.

    2009-12-01

    This study reports novel optical sprite observations in southern France during the summer months 2009 and the associated electromagnetic radiation emitted in the frequency range >50 kHz. About 10% of the observed sprites are associated with consecutive pulses of >50 kHz electromagnetic radiation. Some of these broadband pulses occur simultaneously with the sprite luminosity. In particular, the electromagnetic radiation of the sprite itself can coincide with a broadband pulse. This behaviour is predicted by the relativistic runaway breakdown theory, in which the lightning electromagnetic field accelerates free electrons to form a narrow particle beam shooting upward into near-Earth space. This vertical relativistic runaway breakdown describes a novel physical process within the Earth's atmosphere, even though it may occur only on extremely rare occasions, i.e., ~100 upward particle beams per day around the globe. The wealth of currently planned future space missions in this research area will greatly enhance the detection likelihood of the predicted particle beams.

  3. Wind Variability in Intermediate Luminosity B Supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Derck

    1996-01-01

    This study used the unique spectroscopic diagnostics of intermediate luminosity B supergiants to determine the ubiquity and nature of wind variability. Specifically, (1) A detailed analysis of HD 64760 demonstrated massive ejections into its wind, provided the first clear demonstration of a 'photospheric connection' and ionization shifts in a stellar wind; (2) The international 'IUE MEGA campaign' obtained unprecedented temporal coverage of wind variability in rapidly rotating stars and demonstrated regularly repeating wind features originating in the photosphere; (3) A detailed analysis of wind variability in the rapidly rotating B1 Ib, gamma Ara demonstrated a two component wind with distinctly different mean states at different epochs; (4) A follow-on campaign to the MEGA project to study slowly rotating stars was organized and deemed a key project by ESA/NASA, and will obtain 30 days of IUE observations in May-June 1996; and (5) A global survey of archival IUE time series identified recurring spectroscopic signatures, identified with different physical phenomena. Items 4 and 5 above are still in progress and will be completed this summer in collaboration with Raman Prinja at University College, London.

  4. Implications of Lag-Luminosity Relationship for Unified GRB Paradigms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Spectral lags (tau(sub lag)) are deduced for 1437 long (T(sub 90) greater than 2 s) BATSE gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with peak flux F(sub p) greater than 0.25 photons cm(sup -2)/s, near to the BATSE trigger threshold. The lags are modeled to approximate the observed distribution in the F(sub p)-T(sub lag) plane, realizing a noise-free representation. Assuming a two-branch lag-luminosity relationship, the lags are self-consistently corrected for cosmological effects to yield distributions in luminosity, distance, and redshift. The results have several consequences for GRB populations and for unified gamma-ray/afterglow scenarios which would account for afterglow break times and gamma-ray spectral evolution in terms of jet opening angle, viewing angle, or a profiled jet with variable Lorentz factor: A component of the burst sample is identified - those with few, wide pulses, lags of a few tenths to several seconds, and soft spectra - whose Log[N]-Log[F(sub p)] distribution approximates a -3/2 power-law, suggesting homogeneity and thus relatively nearby sources. The proportion of these long-lag bursts increases from negligible among bright BATSE bursts to approx. 50% at trigger threshold. Bursts with very long lags, approx. 1-2 less than tau(sub lag) (S) less than 10, show a tendency to concentrate near the Supergalactic Plane with a quadrupole moment of approx. -0.10 +/- 0.04. GRB 980425 (SN 1998bw) is a member of this subsample of approx. 90 bursts with estimated distances less than 100 Mpc. The frequency of the observed ultra-low luminosity bursts is approx. 1/4 that of SNe Ib/c within the same volume. If truly nearby, the core-collapse events associated with these GRBs might produce gravitational radiation detectable by LIGO-II. Such nearby bursts might also help explain flattening of the cosmic ray spectrum at ultra-high energies, as observed by AGASA.

  5. Variations of the core luminosity and solar neutrino fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandpierre, Attila

    that errors add up linearly. This conservative error estimation gives δ u/u = 1.7 %, δ ρ/ρ = 7 % at r=0.06× Rsolar, and so the δ T/T = 9 %, since δ T/T ~ δ ρ/ρ + δ P/P. At r=0.04× Rsolar, δ u/u=2.2 %, δ ρ/ρ=10 %, δ T/T=13 %. At r=0, δ u/u=3.5 %, therefore δ ρ/ρ=16 % and so δ T/T=20 %. So even with the usual, not conservative error estimation, roughly dividing these conservative errors by 4, with δ u/u=0.4 %, we still get an allowed range cca. 2 % temperature change at r=0.06× Rsolar and higher in the more central regions. In solar core varying cyclically on a decade timescale, the longer timescale nuclear reactions cannot build up equilibrium. In such a short timescale the variations of the local temperature regulates the proton-proton chain instead of the global luminosity constraint that is applicable only on evolutionary timescales. Therefore, the temperature dependences of the pp cycle neutrinos will be different from the ones determined by solar model calculations with the luminosity constraint: instead of the usual pp ~ T-1/2, Be ~ T8, B~ T18. we determined by the nuclear reaction rates formulas pp ~ T4.2, Be ~ T-1/2, B~ T13.5, for τ < 102 years. These latter relations have high significance at estimating the uncertaintiesof the solar central temperatures without assuming the luminosity constraint. Although the purely astrophysical solutions seem to be ruled out, this is not the case for a model in which astrophysical effects are included besides the neutrino oscillations. Therefore a combined, DSM+MSW model is suggested to calculate the observed solar neutrino fluxes. At present we have three types of neutrino detectors, and they offer us the data as the total rates (3 measurements), zenith angle dependences, energy spectra and day-night variations, all together 6 kind of data. The highest statistical significance is found in the total rates data. The evaluation of these 6 data sets is not straightforward. For example, the combined fits

  6. Assessing the contribution of centaur impacts to ice giant luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Voyager 2 observations revealed that Neptune's internal luminosity is an order of magnitude higher than that of Uranus. If the two planets have similar interior structures and cooling histories, Neptune's luminosity can only be explained by invoking some energy source beyond gravitational contraction. This paper investigates whether centaur impacts could provide the energy necessary to produce Neptune's luminosity. The major findings are (1) that impacts on both Uranus and Neptune are too infrequent to provide luminosities of order Neptune's observed value, even for optimistic impact-rate estimates and (2) that Uranus and Neptune rarely have significantly different impact-generated luminosities at any given time. Uranus and Neptune most likely have structural differences that force them to cool and contract at different rates.

  7. Upgrade of the D0 luminosity monitor readout system

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, John; Bridges, Lloyd; Casey, Brendan; Enari, Yuji; Green, Johnny; Johnson, Marvin; Kwarciany, Rick; Miao, Chyi-Chiang; Partridge, Richard; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Wang, Jigang; /Brown U. /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    We describe upgrades to the readout system for the D0 Luminosity Monitor. The D0 Luminosity Monitor consists of plastic scintillation detectors with fine-mesh photomultiplier readout that cover the pseudorapidity range 2.7 < |{eta}| < 4.4. The detector is designed to provide a precise measurement of the rate for non-diffractive inelastic collisions that is used to calculate the TeVatron luminosity at D0. The new readout system is based on custom VME electronics that make precise time-of-flight and charge measurements for each luminosity counter. These measurements are used to identify beam crossings with non-diffractive interactions by requiring in-time hits in both the forward and backward luminosity counters. We have also significantly increased signal/noise for the photomultiplier signals by developing a new front-end preamplifier and improving the grounding scheme.

  8. The luminosity function of quasars and its evolution: A comparison of optically selected quasars and quasars found in radio catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1973-01-01

    The luminosity function of quasars and its evolution are discussed, based on comparison of available data on optically selected quasars and quasars found in radio catalogs. It is assumed that the red shift of quasars is cosmological and the results are expressed in the framework of the Lambda = 0, Q sub Q = 1 cosmological model. The predictions of various density evolution laws are compared with observations of an optically selected sample of quasars and quasar samples from radio catalogs. The differences between the optical luminosity functions, the red shift distributions and the radio to optical luminosity ratios of optically selected quasars and radio quasars rule out luminosity functions where there is complete absence of correlation between radio and optical luminosities. These differences also imply that Schmidt's (1970) luminosity function, where there exists a statistical correlation between radio and optical luminosities, although may be correct for high red shift objects, disagrees with observation at low red shifts. These differences can be accounted for by postulating existence of two classes (1 and 2) of objects.

  9. Near-Infrared Properties of Moderate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: Luminosity Functions and Density Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H.K.C.; Hall, Patrick B.; Ellingson, E.; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    We present K-band imaging for 15 of the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology (CNOC1) clusters. The extensive spectroscopic dataset available for these clusters allows us to determine the cluster K-band luminosity function and density profile without the need for statistical background subtraction. The luminosity density and number density profiles can be described by NFW models with concentration parameters of c{sub l} = 4.28 {+-} 0.70 and c{sub g} = 4.13 {+-} 0.57 respectively. Comparing these to the dynamical mass analysis of the same clusters shows that the galaxy luminosity and number density profiles are similar to the dark matter profile, and are not less concentrated like in local clusters. The luminosity functions show that the evolution of K. over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.5 is consistent with a scenario where the majority of stars in cluster galaxies form at high-redshift (z{sub f} > 1.5) and evolve passively thereafter. The best-fit for the faint-end slope of the luminosity function is {alpha} = -0.84 {+-} 0.08, which indicates that it does not evolve between z = 0 and z = 0.3. Using Principal Component Analysis of the spectra we classify cluster galaxies as either star-forming/recently-star-forming (EM+BAL) or non-star forming (ELL) and compute their respective luminosity functions. The faint-end slope of the ELL luminosity function is much shallower than for the EM+BAL galaxies at z = 0.3, and suggests the number of faint ELL galaxies in clusters decreases by a factor of {approx} 3 from z = 0 to z = 0.3. The redshift evolution of K* for both EM+BAL and ELL types is consistent with a passively evolving stellar population formed at high-redshift. Passive evolution in both classes, as well as the total cluster luminosity function, demonstrates that the bulk of the stellar population in all bright cluster galaxies is formed at high-redshift and subsequent transformations in morphology/color/spectral-type have little effect on the total stellar

  10. Quench Module Insert (QMI) and the Diffusion Module Insert (DMI) Furnace Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Myscha; Carswell, William; Farmer, Jeff; Rose, Fred; Tidwell, Paul

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents, in viewgraph form, QMI (Quench Module Insert) and DMI (Diffusion Module Insert) furnace development. The topics include: 1) Furnace Module in Rack; 2) Quench Module Insert; 3) QMI in MSL Core; 4) Diffusion Module Insert; 5) QMI; and 6) QMI Development and Testing.

  11. Evaluation of preferable insertion routes for esophagogastroduodenoscopy using ultrathin endoscopes

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Satoshi; Niimi, Keiko; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Yu; Sakaguchi, Yoshiki; Nakayama, Chiemi; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Matsuda, Rie; Hirayama-Asada, Itsuko; Tsuji, Yosuke; Mochizuki, Satoshi; Kodashima, Shinya; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Ozeki, Atsuko; Matsumoto, Lumine; Ohike, Yumiko; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the discomfort associated with esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) using an ultrathin endoscope through different insertion routes. METHODS: This study (January 2012-March 2013) included 1971 consecutive patients [male/female (M/F), 1158/813, 57.5 ± 11.9 years] who visited a single institute for annual health checkups. Transnasal EGD was performed in 1394 patients and transoral EGD in 577. EGD-associated discomfort was assessed using a visual analog scale score (VAS score: 0-10). RESULTS: Multivariate analysis revealed gender (M vs F: 4.02 ± 2.15 vs 5.06 ± 2.43) as the only independent predictor of the VAS score in 180 patients who underwent EGD for the first time; whereas it revealed gender (M vs F 3.60 ± 2.20 vs 4.84 ± 2.37), operator, age group (A: < 39 years; B: 40-49 years; C: 50-59 years; D: 60-69 years; E: > 70 years; A/B/C/D/E: 4.99 ± 2.32/4.34 ± 2.49/4.19 ± 2.31/3.99 ± 2.27/3.63 ± 2.31), and type of insertion as independent predictors in the remaining patients. Subanalysis for gender, age group, and insertion route revealed that the VAS score decreased with age regardless of gender and insertion route, was high in female patients regardless of age and insertion route, and was low in males aged over 60 years who underwent transoral insertion. CONCLUSION: Although comprehensive analysis revealed that the insertion route may not be an independent predictor of the VAS score, transoral insertion may reduce EGD-associated discomfort in elderly patients. PMID:24803817

  12. Embryonic Lethals and T-DNA Insertional Mutagenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Errampalli, D; Patton, D; Castle, L; Mickelson, L; Hansen, K; Schnall, J; Feldmann, K; Meinke, D

    1991-01-01

    T-DNA insertional mutagenesis represents a promising approach to the molecular isolation of genes with essential functions during plant embryo development. We describe in this report the isolation and characterization of 18 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana defective in embryo development following seed transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Random T-DNA insertion was expected to result in a high frequency of recessive embryonic lethals because many target genes are required for embryogenesis. The cointegrate Ti plasmid used in these experiments contained the nopaline synthase and neomycin phosphotransferase gene markers. Nopaline assays and resistance to kanamycin were used to estimate the number of functional inserts present in segregating families. Nine families appeared to contain a T-DNA insert either within or adjacent to the mutant gene. Eight families were clearly not tagged with a functional insert and appeared instead to contain mutations induced during the transformation process. DNA gel blot hybridization with internal and right border probes revealed a variety of rearrangements associated with T-DNA insertion. A general strategy is presented to simplify the identification of tagged embryonic mutants and facilitate the molecular isolation of genes required for plant embryogenesis. PMID:12324593

  13. [Duration and complications following grommet insertion in childhood].

    PubMed

    Fiebach, A; Matschke, R G

    1987-02-01

    We report 1000 insertions of ventilation tubes in 534 children for secretory otitis media (SOM) within a period of 6 years. In 77.5% of the cases, the air-bone gap was greater than 20 dB. The grommets are allowed to undergo spontaneous expulsion which happened in 319 ears, about 7 months after insertion. SOM recurred in 32.6% of the cases once, in 5.0% of the cases twice, and in 1.9% three times, requiring re-insertion of grommets. Recurrence appeared between 4 and 65 months after the first insertion. In three cases perforations of the tympanic membrane persisted and required tympanoplasty. Tympanometric examination and pure tone audiometry are necessary, in addition to pure tone audiometry to follow up successfully ventilated middle ears and to show recurrence as early as possible. Pre-existing but unsuspected sensorineural hearing loss was discovered in 10 cases. The deprivation of neural auditory pathways in early childhood and the possible retardation of speech development caused by SOM are mentioned. Normal hearing is the most important goal of therapy in children suffering from SOM, and insertion of ventilation tubes is the preferred method of achieving that goal safely. Adenoidectomy and treatment of upper airway infections are indispensable parts of the therapy of SOM. Regular follow up after insertion of grommets and even after their expulsion is necessary because of the high rate of late recurrence of SOM. Induction of cholesteatoma by grommets was not observed.

  14. Anticorrelation of Variability Amplitude with X-Ray Luminosity for Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Gang; Abramowicz, Marek A.

    1996-07-01

    The bright-spot model for the short-term X-ray variability of active galactic nuclei predicts that, statistically, sources with larger luminosities should have smaller variability amplitudes. This quantitatively agrees with the analysis of the observational data from 12 high-quality EXOSAT long looks performed by Lawrence & Papadakis.

  15. The luminosities of the coldest brown dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Tinney, C. G.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cushing, Mike; Morley, Caroline V.; Wright, Edward L.

    2014-11-20

    In recent years, brown dwarfs have been extended to a new Y-dwarf class with effective temperatures colder than 500 K and masses in the range of 5-30 Jupiter masses. They fill a crucial gap in observable atmospheric properties between the much colder gas-giant planets of our own solar system (at around 130 K) and both hotter T-type brown dwarfs and the hotter planets that can be imaged orbiting young nearby stars (both with effective temperatures in the range of 1500-1000 K). Distance measurements for these objects deliver absolute magnitudes that make critical tests of our understanding of very cool atmospheres. Here we report new distances for nine Y dwarfs and seven very late T dwarfs. These reveal that Y dwarfs do indeed represent a continuation of the T-dwarf sequence to both fainter luminosities and cooler temperatures. They also show that the coolest objects display a large range in absolute magnitude for a given photometric color. The latest atmospheric models show good agreement with the majority of these Y-dwarf absolute magnitudes. This is also the case for WISE0855-0714, the coldest and closest brown dwarf to the Sun, which shows evidence for water ice clouds. However, there are also some outstanding exceptions, which suggest either binarity or the presence of condensate clouds. The former is readily testable with current adaptive optics facilities. The latter would mean that the range of cloudiness in Y dwarfs is substantial with most hosting almost no clouds—while others have dense clouds, making them prime targets for future variability observations to study cloud dynamics.

  16. Jet or Shock Breakout? The Low-Luminosity GRB 060218

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Christopher; Chevalier, Roger

    2016-01-01

    We consider a model for the long-duration, low-luminosity gamma-ray burst GRB 060218 that plausibly accounts for multiwavelength observations to day 20. The components of our model are: (1) a long-lived (tj ~ 3000 s) central engine and accompanying low-luminosity (Lj ~ 1045 erg s-1), mildly relativistic jet; (2) a low-mass (~ 10-2 Msun) envelope surrounding the progenitor star; and (3) a modest amount of dust (AV ~ 0.1) in the circumstellar or interstellar environment. Blackbody emission from the transparency radius in a low-power jet outflow can fit the prompt thermal X-ray emission, and the prompt nonthermal X-rays and γ-rays may be produced via Compton scattering of thermal photons from hot leptons in the jet interior or the external shocks. The later mildly relativistic phase of this outflow can produce the radio emission via synchrotron radiation from the forward shock. Meanwhile, interaction of the associated SN 2006aj with a circumstellar envelope extending to ~ 1013 cm can explain the early optical peak. The X-ray afterglow can be interpreted as a light echo of the prompt emission from dust at ~ 30 pc. Our model is a plausible alternative to that of Nakar, who recently proposed shock breakout of a jet smothered by an extended envelope as the source of prompt emission. Both our results and Nakar's suggest that ultra-long bursts such as GRB 060218 and GRB 100316D may originate from unusual progenitors with extended circumstellar envelopes, and that a jet is necessary to decouple the prompt high-energy emission from the supernova.

  17. PROPERTIES OF THE MOLECULAR CORES OF LOW LUMINOSITY OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Tien-Hao; Lai, Shih-Ping; Belloche, Arnaud; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Hung, Chao-Ling E-mail: shawinchone@gmail.com

    2015-04-01

    We present a survey toward 16 low luminosity objects (LLOs with an internal luminosity, L{sub int}, lower than 0.2 L{sub ⊙}) with N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1–0), N{sub 2}H{sup +} (3–2), N{sub 2}D{sup +} (3–2), HCO{sup +} (3–2), and HCN (3–2) using the Arizona Radio Observatory Kitt Peak 12 m Telescope and Submillimeter Telescope. Our goal is to probe the nature of these faint protostars which are believed to be either very low mass or extremely young protostars. We find that the N{sub 2}D{sup +}/N{sub 2}H{sup +} column density ratios of LLOs are similar to those of typical starless cores and Class 0 objects. The N{sub 2}D{sup +}/N{sub 2}H{sup +} column density ratios are relatively high (>0.05) for LLOs with kinetic temperatures less than 10 K in our sample. The distribution of N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1–0) line widths spreads between that of starless cores and young Class 0 objects. If we use the line width as a dynamic evolutionary indicator, LLOs are likely young Class 0 protostellar sources. We further use the optically thick tracers, HCO{sup +} (3–2) and HCN (3–2), to probe the infall signatures of our targets. We derive the asymmetry parameters from both lines and estimate the infall velocities by fitting the HCO{sup +} (3–2) spectra with two-layer models. As a result, we identify eight infall candidates based on the infall velocities and seven candidates have infall signatures supported by asymmetry parameters from at least one of HCO{sup +} (3–2) and HCN (3–2)

  18. Star-formation rates, molecular clouds, and the origin of the far-infrared luminosity of isolated and interacting galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, P. M.; Sage, L. J.

    1988-01-01

    The CO luminosities of 93 galaxies have been determined and are compared with their IRAS FIR luminosities. Strongly interacting/merging galaxies have L(FIR)/L(CO) substantially higher than that of isolated galaxies or galactic giant molecular clouds (GMCs). Galaxies with tidal tails/bridges are the most extreme type with L(FIR)/L(CO) nine times as high as isolated galaxies. Interactions between close pairs of galaxies do not have much effect on the molecular content and global star-formation rate. If the high ratio L(FIR)/L(CO) in strongly interacting galaxies is due to star formation then the efficiency of this process is higher than that of any galactic GMC. Isolated galaxies, distant pairs, and close pairs have an FIR/CO luminosity ratio which is within a factor of two of galactic GMCs with H II regions. The CO luminosities of FIR-luminous galaxies are among the highest observed for any spiral galaxies.

  19. Cell line fingerprinting using retroelement insertion polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Ustyugova, Svetlana V; Amosova, Anna L; Lebedev, Yuri B; Sverdlov, Eugene D

    2005-04-01

    Human cell lines are an indispensable tool for functional studies of living entities in their numerous manifestations starting with integral complex systems such as signal pathways and networks, regulation of gene ensembles, epigenetic factors, and finishing with pathological changes and impact of artificially introduced elements, such as various transgenes, on the behavior of the cell. Therefore, it is highly desirable to have reliable cell line identification techniques to make sure that the cell lines to be used in experiments are exactly what is expected. To this end, we developed a set of informative markers based on insertion polymorphism of human retroelements (REs). The set includes 47 pairs of PCR primers corresponding to introns of the human genes with dimorphic LINE1 (L1) and Alu insertions. Using locus-specific PCR assays, we have genotyped 10 human cell lines of various origins. For each of these cell lines, characteristic fingerprints were obtained. An estimated probability that two different cell lines possess the same marker genotype is about 10-18. Therefore, the proposed set of markers provides a reliable tool for cell line identification.

  20. Model of a Hollow Cathode Insert Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2004-01-01

    A 2-D axisymmetric fluid model of the plasma in the insert region of a hollow cathode is presented. The level of sophistication included in the model is motivated in part by the need to determine quantitatively plasma fluxes to the emitter surface. The ultimate goal is to assess whether plasma effects can degrade the life of impregnated inserts beyond those documented throughout the 30-50 year history of vacuum cathode technologies. Results from simulations of a 1.2-cm diameter cathode operating at a discharge current of 25 A, and a gas flow rate of 5 sccm, suggest that approximately 10 A of electron current, and 3.5 A of ion current return to the emitter surface. The total emitted electron current computed by the model is about 35 A. Comparisons with plasma measurements suggest that anomalous heating of the plasma due to two-stream instabilities is possible near the orifice region. Solution to the heavy species energy equation, with classical transport and no viscous effects, predicts heavy species temperatures as high as 2640 K.

  1. Mars Observer Orbit Insertion Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Steve Wall is the host of this video entitled, "Return to the Red Planet". Live animation of the Mars Observer orbiting Mars is presented. Steve Wall explains the spacecraft insertion maneuver and also explains the purpose for the Mars Observer launch. Live coverage of the Cape Canaveral launch of the Mars Observer is also presented. Suzanne Dodd, Chief of the Mission Planning team describes the burn start and how the spacecraft will be captured by Mars' gravity. Glenn Cunningham, Mars Observer Project Manager, gives background information on the Mars Observer and describes the organizations behind the Mars Observer Spacecraft, such as the Deep Space Network, the Mission Operation Support Office, Science Investigators, the Flight Engineering Office, Operations Office, and the Ground Data System Office. Dr. William Piotrowski, Acting Director, Solar System Exploration Division, NASA, talks about the purpose of the Mars Pathfinder which is to develop the technology and systems for landing small science packages on Mars. Mr. Roger Gibbs, Former Mars Observer Spacecraft Systems Engineer, tells us how the Mars Observer was built and describes the structural elements on the Mars Observer. The 11-month cruise period for the spacecraft is given by Joseph Beerer, Manager of the Engineering office. The thrust for the Mars Orbit Insertion is described by Ronald Klemetson, Technical Manager, Propulsion Subsystem Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). George Chen, Lead Engineer Attitude and Articulation Subsystem Spacecraft Team, explains the importance of the attitude control engines on the Spacecraft. Marvin Traxler, Manager of Tracking and Data Acquisition, describes how searching for a signal from the Mars Observer works. See NONP-NASA-VT-2000081555 for a continuation of this discussion with Marvin Traxler.

  2. Optimized production and concentration of lentiviral vectors containing large inserts.

    PubMed

    al Yacoub, Nadya; Romanowska, Malgorzata; Haritonova, Natalie; Foerster, John

    2007-07-01

    Generation of high titer lentiviral stocks and efficient virus concentration are central to maximize the utility of lentiviral technology. Here we evaluate published protocols for lentivirus production on a range of transfer vectors differing in size (7.5-13.2 kb). We present a modified virus production protocol robustly yielding useful titers (up to 10(7)/ml) for a range of different transfer vectors containing packaging inserts up to 7.5 kb. Moreover, we find that virus recovery after concentration by ultracentrifugation depends on the size of the packaged inserts, heavily decreasing for large packaged inserts. We describe a fast (4 h) centrifugation protocol at reduced speed allowing high virus recovery even for large and fragile lentivirus vectors. The protocols outlined in the current report should be useful for many labs interested in producing and concentrating high titer lentiviral stocks.

  3. Regulatory perspective on incomplete control rod insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterton, M.

    1997-01-01

    The incomplete control rod insertions experienced at South Texas Unit 1 and Wolf Creek are of safety concern to the NRC staff because they represent potential precursors to loss of shutdown margin. Even before it was determined if these events were caused by the control rods or by the fuel there was an apparent correlation of the problem with high burnup fuel. It was determined that there was also a correlation between high burnup and high drag forces as well as with rod drop time histories and lack of rod recoil. The NRC staff initial actions were aimed at getting a perspective on the magnitude of the problem as far as the number of plants and the amount of fuel that could be involved, as well as the safety significance in terms of shutdown margin. As tests have been performed and data has been analyzed the focus has shifted more toward understanding the problem and the ways to eliminate it. At this time the staff`s understanding of the phenomena is that it was a combination of factors including burnup, power history and temperature. The problem appears to be very sensitive to these factors, the interaction of which is not clearly understood. The model developed by Westinghouse provides a possible explanation but there is not sufficient data to establish confidence levels and sensitivity studies involving the key parameters have not been done. While several fixes to the problem have been discussed, no definitive fixes have been proposed. Without complete understanding of the phenomena, or fixes that clearly eliminate the problem the safety concern remains. The safety significance depends on the amount of shutdown margin lost due to incomplete insertion of the control rods. Were the control rods to stick high in the core, the reactor could not be shutdown by the control rods and other means such as emergency boration would be required.

  4. Galaxy Clustering in the Completed SDSS Redshift Survey: The Dependence on Color and Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehavi, Idit; Zheng, Zheng; Weinberg, David H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Brinkmann, Jon; Frieman, Joshua A.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Nichol, Robert C.; Percival, Will J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Strauss, Michael A.; Tegmark, Max; York, Donald G.

    2011-07-01

    luminosity range, with a smaller ratio above L *. The growth and steepening of wp (rp ) for redder galaxies reflects the increasing fraction of galaxies that are satellite systems in high-mass halos instead of central systems in low-mass halos, a trend that is especially marked at low luminosities. Our extensive measurements, provided in tabular form, will allow detailed tests of theoretical models of galaxy formation, a firm grounding of semiempirical models of the galaxy population, and new constraints on cosmological parameters from combining real-space galaxy clustering with mass-sensitive statistics such as redshift-space distortions, cluster mass-to-light ratios, and galaxy-galaxy lensing.

  5. Seeking the epoch of maximum luminosity for dusty quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Vardanyan, Valeri; Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu

    2014-08-01

    Infrared luminosities νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) arising from dust reradiation are determined for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars with 1.4 luminosity does not show a maximum at any redshift z < 5, reaching a plateau for z ≳ 3 with maximum luminosity νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) ≳ 10{sup 47} erg s{sup –1}; luminosity functions show one quasar Gpc{sup –3} having νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) > 10{sup 46.6} erg s{sup –1} for all 2 luminosity has not yet been identified at any redshift below 5. The most ultraviolet luminous quasars, defined by rest frame νL{sub ν}(0.25 μm), have the largest values of the ratio νL{sub ν}(0.25 μm)/νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) with a maximum ratio at z = 2.9. From these results, we conclude that the quasars most luminous in the ultraviolet have the smallest dust content and appear luminous primarily because of lessened extinction. Observed ultraviolet/infrared luminosity ratios are used to define 'obscured' quasars as those having >5 mag of ultraviolet extinction. We present a new summary of obscured quasars discovered with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and determine the infrared luminosity function of these obscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1. This is compared with infrared luminosity functions of optically discovered, unobscured quasars in the SDSS and in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. The comparison indicates comparable numbers of obscured and unobscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1 with a possible excess of obscured quasars at fainter luminosities.

  6. Active galactic nuclei from He II: a more complete census of AGN in SDSS galaxies yields a new population of low-luminosity AGN in highly star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bär, Rudolf E.; Weigel, Anna K.; Sartori, Lia F.; Oh, Kyuseok; Koss, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin

    2017-04-01

    In order to perform a more complete census of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the local Universe, we investigate the use of the He II λ4685 emission line diagnostic diagram by Shirazi & Brinchmann (2012) in addition to the standard methods based on other optical emission lines. The He II-based diagnostics is more sensitive to AGN ionization in the presence of strong star formation than conventional line diagnostics. We survey a magnitude-limited sample of 63 915 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 at 0.02 < z < 0.05 and use both the conventional BPT emission line diagnostic diagrams, as well as the He II diagram to identify AGN. In this sample, 1075 galaxies are selected as AGN using the BPT diagram, while additional 234 galaxies are identified as AGN using the He II diagnostic diagram, representing a 22 per cent increase of AGN in the parent galaxy sample. We explore the host galaxy properties of these new He II-selected AGN candidates and find that they are most common in star-forming galaxies on the blue cloud and on the main sequence where ionization from star formation is most likely to mask AGN emission in the BPT lines. We note in particular a high He II AGN fraction in galaxies above the high-mass end of the main sequence where quenching is expected to occur. We use archival Chandra observations to confirm the AGN nature of candidates selected through He II-based diagnostic. Finally, we discuss how this technique can help inform galaxy/black hole coevolution scenarios.

  7. Active Galactic Nuclei from He II: a more complete census of AGN in SDSS galaxies yields a new population of low-luminosity AGN in highly star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Rudolf E.; Weigel, Anna; Sartori, Lia F.; Oh, Kyuseok; Koss, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    In order to perform a more complete census of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the local Universe, we investigate the use of the He II emission line diagnostic diagram by Shirazi & Brinchmann (2012) in addition to the standard methods based on other optical emission lines. The He II based diagnostics is more sensitive to AGN ionization in the presence of strong star formation than conventional line diagnostics. We survey a magnitude-limited sample of 81,192 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 at 0.02 < z < 0.05 and apply both the conventional BPT emission line diagnostic diagrams, as well as the He II diagram to identify AGN. In this sample, 1,075 galaxies are selected as AGN using the BPT diagram, while an additional 234 galaxies are identified as AGN using the He II diagnostic, representing a 22% increase of AGN in the parent galaxy sample. We use archival Chandra observations to confirm the AGN nature of candidates selected through He II based diagnostic. Finally, we explore the host galaxy properties of these new He II selected AGN candidates and find that they are most common in star-forming galaxies on the blue cloud and on the main sequence where ionization from star-formation is most likely to mask AGN emission in the BPT lines. We note in particular a high He II AGN fraction in galaxies above the high-mass end of the main sequence where quenching is expected to occur. We discuss how this technique can help inform galaxy/black hole co-evolution scenarios.

  8. COMPARING SYMBIOTIC NEBULAE AND PLANETARY NEBULAE LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Frankowski, Adam; Soker, Noam E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.i

    2009-10-01

    We compare the observed symbiotic nebulae (SyN) luminosity function (SyNLF) in the [O III] lambda5007 A line to the planetary nebulae (PN) luminosity function (PNLF) and find that the intrinsic SyNLF (ISyNLF) of galactic SyNs has-within its uncertainty of 0.5-0.8 mag-very similar cutoff luminosity and general shape to those of the PNLF. The [O III]/(Halpha+[N II]) line ratios of SyNs and PNs are shown to be also related. Possible implications of these results for the universality of the PNLF are briefly outlined.

  9. Luminosity Optimization With Offset, Crossing Angle, and Distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Juhao; Raubenheimer, T.O.; /SLAC

    2005-06-15

    In a linear collider, sources of beam jitter due to kicker noise, quadrupole vibration and long-range transverse wakefields will lead to beam offsets and tilts at the Intersection Point (IP). In addition, sources of emittance dilution such as short-range transverse wakefields or dispersive errors will lead to internal beam distortions. When the IP disruption parameter is large, these beam imperfections will be amplified by a single bunch kink instability which will lead to luminosity loss. In this paper, we study the luminosity loss and then the optimization required to partially cancel the luminosity loss both analytically and with direct simulation.

  10. Constraining the rate and luminosity function of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. J.; Coward, D. M.; Stratta, G.; Gendre, B.; Zhou, H.

    2014-10-01

    We compute the intrinsic isotropic peak luminosity function (LF) and formation rate of long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) using a novel approach. We complement a standard log N-log P brightness distribution and Vmax estimations with two observation-time relations: a redshift-observation-time relation (log z-log T) and a new luminosity-observation-time relation (log L-log T). We show that this approach reduces degeneracies that exist between the rate and LF of a brightness distribution. To account for the complex triggering algorithm employed by Swift, we use recent results of Lien et al. (2014) to produce a suite of efficiency functions. Using these functions with the above methods, we show that a log L-log T method can provide good constraints on the form of the LF, particularly the high end. Using a sample of 175 peak luminosities determined from redshifts with well-defined selection criteria, our results suggest that LGRBs occur at a local rate (without beaming corrections) of [0.7 < ρ0 < 0.8] Gpc-3 yr-1. Within this range, assuming a broken power-law LF, we find best estimates for the low- and high-energy indices of -0.95 ± 0.09 and -2.59 ± 0.93, respectively, separated by a break luminosity 0.80 ± 0.43 × 1052 erg s-1.

  11. HTRA1 (high temperature requirement A serine peptidase 1) gene is transcriptionally regulated by insertion/deletion nucleotides located at the 3' end of the ARMS2 (age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2) gene in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Iejima, Daisuke; Itabashi, Takeshi; Kawamura, Yuich; Noda, Toru; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Fukuda, Keiichi; Oka, Chio; Iwata, Takeshi

    2015-01-30

    Dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) accounts for over 85% of AMD cases in the United States, whereas Japanese AMD patients predominantly progress to wet AMD or polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy. Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed a strong association between AMD and an insertion/deletion sequence between the ARMS2 (age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2) and HTRA1 (high temperature requirement A serine peptidase 1) genes. Transcription regulator activity was localized in mouse retinas using heterozygous HtrA1 knock-out mice in which HtrA1 exon 1 was replaced with β-galactosidase cDNA, thereby resulting in dominant expression of the photoreceptors. The insertion/deletion sequence significantly induced HTRA1 transcription regulator activity in photoreceptor cell lines but not in retinal pigmented epithelium or other cell types. A deletion construct of the HTRA1 regulatory region indicated that potential transcriptional suppressors and activators surround the insertion/deletion sequence. Ten double-stranded DNA probes for this region were designed, three of which interacted with nuclear extracts from 661W cells in EMSA. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) of these EMSA bands subsequently identified a protein that bound the insertion/deletion sequence, LYRIC (lysine-rich CEACAM1 co-isolated) protein. In addition, induced pluripotent stem cells from wet AMD patients carrying the insertion/deletion sequence showed significant up-regulation of the HTRA1 transcript compared with controls. These data suggest that the insertion/deletion sequence alters the suppressor and activator cis-elements of HTRA1 and triggers sustained up-regulation of HTRA1. These results are consistent with a transgenic mouse model that ubiquitously overexpresses HtrA1 and exhibits characteristics similar to those of wet AMD patients.

  12. Insertion devices at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Moog, E.R.

    1996-07-01

    The insertion devices being installed at the Advanced Photon Source cause the stored particle beam to wiggle, emitting x-rays with each wiggle. These x-rays combine to make an intense beam of radiation. Both wiggler and undulator types of insertion devices are being installed; the characteristics of the radiation produced by these two types of insertion devices are discussed, along with the reasons for those characteristics.

  13. Nozzle insert for mixed mode fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, Keith E.

    2006-11-21

    A fuel injector includes a homogenous charge nozzle outlet set and a conventional nozzle outlet set controlled respectively, by first and second needle valve members. The homogeneous charged nozzle outlet set is defined by a nozzle insert that is attached to an injector body, which defines the conventional nozzle outlet set. The nozzle insert is a one piece metallic component with a large diameter segment separated from a small diameter segment by an annular engagement surface. One of the needle valve members is guided on an outer surface of the nozzle insert, and the nozzle insert has an interference fit attachment to the injector body.

  14. Properties of a symmetric RHIC insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    1991-07-01

    This report evaluates the lattice functions of the symmetric insertion proposed by A.G. Ruggiero for the RHIC insertion. The crossing geometry, Inner and Outer matching sections, and chromatic properties are studied in detail. Some properties of the missing dipole dispersion correction scheme are also discussed. We found that the chromatic properties of the symmetric insertion is not better than the antisymmetric insertion. The problem is that the four family sextupole correction scheme seems not able to improve the chromatic distortion. Analytic understanding of the failure of the four family sextupole correction scheme will be very useful. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  15. The Similarity of Luminosity in Quasar Doppelganger Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotherton, Michael S.; Rochais, Thomas Bernard; Singh, Vikram; Chick, William T.; Maithil, Jaya; Sutter, Jessica; Shang, Zhaohui

    2017-01-01

    Quasars, the accreting supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies, are among the most luminous objects in the universe and in principle ideal for use as so-called "standard candles" with applications in cosmology. Despite possessing a number of spectral features long known to correlate with luminosity, quasars have failed to realize their potential. We have employed spectral principal component analysis to identify more than 1000 quasar pairs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with virtually identical ultraviolet spectra, which we call doppelgangers, in order to understand the limits of determining luminosity from spectral features alone. While the majority of doppelgangers have very similar luminosity, there exists a surprisingly large scatter and objects with identical spectra can differ in luminosity by factors of four or larger. We offer some possible physical explanations for this large variance and how it quantifies the problem of ever using quasars as standard candles based on spectral features.

  16. the D0 Luminosity Monitor operations and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Prewitt, Michelle; /Rice U.

    2011-09-01

    The D0 Luminosity Monitor (LM) plays a crucial role in D0 physics analyses by providing the normalization for many cross section measurements. The detector consists of two sets of 24 scintillator wedges read out with photomultiplier tubes. The detector is located in the forward regions surrounding the beam pipe, covering a pseudo-rapidity range of 2.7 < |{eta}| < 4.4. The LM is sensitive to a large fraction of the total inelastic cross section and measures the luminosity by counting the number of empty proton-antiproton bunch crossings, using Poisson statistics to extract the instantaneous luminosity. The techniques used to convert the measurements made by the LM into the assessed luminosity will be discussed, as well as the performance and operational details of the detector.

  17. Unified treatment of the luminosity distance in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jaiyul; Scaccabarozzi, Fulvio

    2016-09-01

    Comparing the luminosity distance measurements to its theoretical predictions is one of the cornerstones in establishing the modern cosmology. However, as shown in Biern & Yoo, its theoretical predictions in literature are often plagued with infrared divergences and gauge-dependences. This trend calls into question the sanity of the methods used to derive the luminosity distance. Here we critically investigate four different methods—the geometric approach, the Sachs approach, the Jacobi mapping approach, and the geodesic light cone (GLC) approach to modeling the luminosity distance, and we present a unified treatment of such methods, facilitating the comparison among the methods and checking their sanity. All of these four methods, if exercised properly, can be used to reproduce the correct description of the luminosity distance.

  18. The Kinematics of the Lag-Luminosity Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Salmonson, J D

    2004-03-17

    Herein I review the argument that kinematics, i.e. relativistic motions of the emitting source in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), are the cause of the lag-luminosity relationship observed in bursts with known redshifts.

  19. Luminosity for NLC Design Variations(LCC-0014)

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, K

    2004-04-20

    In this note we give Guineapig [l] simulation results for the luminosity and luminosity spectrum of three baseline NLC designs at 0.5 TeV (NLC-A-500, NLCB-500, and NLC-C-500) and 1.0 TeV (NLC-A-1000, NLC-B-1000, and NLC-C-1000) [2]. We examine the effects of variations of several design parameters away from the NLC-B-500 and NLC-B-1000 designs. One of our purposes is to study possible trade-offs of parameters to ease tolerances or increase luminosity. Another (future) application will be to examine how the basic designs might be modified in special cases where one wants to optimize the luminosity for particular physics channels.

  20. Frequency domain analysis of triggered lightning return stroke luminosity velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, F. L.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Moore, R. C.

    2017-02-01

    Fourier analysis is applied to time domain return stroke luminosity signals to calculate the phase and group velocities and the amplitude of the luminosity signals as a function of frequency measured between 4 m and 115 m during 12 triggered lightning strokes. We show that pairs of time domain luminosity signals measured at different heights can be interpreted as the input and the output of a system whose frequency domain transfer function can be determined from the measured time domain signals. From the frequency domain transfer function phase we find the phase and group velocities, and luminosity amplitude as a function of triggered lightning channel height and signal frequency ranging from 50 kHz to 300 kHz. We show that higher-frequency luminosity components propagate faster than the lower frequency components and that higher-frequency luminosity components attenuate more rapidly than lower frequency components. Finally, we calculate time domain return stroke velocities as a function of channel height using two time delay techniques: (1) measurement at the 20% amplitude level and (2) cross correlation.

  1. Instrumentation for beam radiation and luminosity measurement in the CMS experiment using novel detector technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthoff, Moritz

    2017-02-01

    The higher energy and luminosity of the LHC initiated the development of dedicated technologies for radiation monitoring and luminosity measurement. A dedicated pixelated luminosity detector measures coincidences in several three-layer telescopes of silicon pixel detectors to arrive at a luminosity for each colliding LHC bunch pair. In addition, charged particle tracking allows to monitor the location of the collision point. The upgraded fast beam conditions monitor measures the particle flux using 24 two-pad single crystalline diamond sensors, equipped with a fast front-end ASIC produced in 130 nm CMOS technology. The excellent time resolution is used to separate collision products from machine induced background. A new beam-halo monitor at larger radius exploits Cherenkov light produced by relativistic charged particles in fuzed quartz crystals to provide direction sensitivity and time resolution to separate incoming and outgoing particles. The back-end electronics of the beam monitoring systems includes dedicated modules with high bandwidth digitizers developed in both VME and microTCA standards for per bunch beam measurements and gain monitoring. All new and upgraded sub-detectors have been taking data from the first day of LHC operation in April 2015. Results on their commissioning and essential characteristics using data since the start-up of LHC will be presented.

  2. GEM luminosity monitors for the OLYMPUS experiment to determine the effect of two-photon exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ates, Ozgur

    The OLYMPUS experiment at DESY acquired its data in two distinct periods between 2012-2013 to measure the ratio of positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections. In light of those measurements, OLYMPUS will be able to quantify the effect of two-photon exchange, which is widely considered to be responsible for the discrepancy between measurements of the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio with the Rosenbluth separation and polarization transfer methods. In order to control the systematic uncertainties to the sub-percent level, the luminosities were monitored redundantly and with high precision. This was done by measuring the rates for symmetric Moller and Bhabha scattering and by measuring the ep-elastic count rates at forward angles and low momentum transfer with tracking telescopes based on GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) and MWPC (Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber technology. A total of nine GEM detectors were constructed for the OLYMPUS experiment. Within the scope of this thesis, every single step of construction, testing and installation of the GEM OLYMPUS luminosity monitors are explained in the hardware part of this thesis. Moreover, based on the analysis of the data taken with the GEM luminosity monitors at the OLYMPUS experiment, individual GEM detector performance and preliminary results on the positron/electron luminosity ratio measured with elastic scattering at forward angles are discussed in the analysis part of the thesis.

  3. TRUNCATION OF THE INNER ACCRETION DISK AROUND A BLACK HOLE AT LOW LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Tomsick, John A.; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Corbel, Stephane; Kaaret, Philip; Kalemci, Emrah; Migliari, Simone

    2009-12-10

    Most black hole binaries show large changes in X-ray luminosity caused primarily by variations in mass accretion rate. An important question for understanding black hole accretion and jet production is whether the inner edge of the accretion disk recedes at low accretion rate. Measurements of the location of the inner edge (R {sub in}) can be made using iron emission lines that arise due to fluorescence of iron in the disk, and these indicate that R {sub in} is very close to the black hole at high and moderate luminosities (approx>1% of the Eddington luminosity, L {sub Edd}). Here, we report on X-ray observations of the black hole GX 339 - 4 in the hard state by Suzaku and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer that extend iron line studies to 0.14% L {sub Edd} and show that R {sub in} increases by a factor of >27 over the value found when GX 339 - 4 was bright. The exact value of R {sub in} depends on the inclination of the inner disk (i), and we derive 90% confidence limits of R {sub in} > 35R{sub g} at i = 0{sup 0} and R {sub in} > 175R{sub g} at i = 30{sup 0}. This provides direct evidence that the inner portion of the disk is not present at low luminosity, allowing for the possibility that the inner disk is replaced by advection- or magnetically dominated accretion flows.

  4. DETERMINING THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF SWIFT LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH PSEUDO-REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Weiwei; Yu Yunwei; Cao Xiaofeng

    2013-07-20

    The determination of the luminosity function (LF) of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is an important role for the cosmological applications of the GRBs, which, however, is seriously hindered by some selection effects due to redshift measurements. In order to avoid these selection effects, we suggest calculating pseudo-redshifts for Swift GRBs according to the empirical L-E{sub p} relationship. Here, such a L-E{sub p} relationship is determined by reconciling the distributions of pseudo- and real redshifts of redshift-known GRBs. The values of E{sub p} taken from Butler's GRB catalog are estimated with Bayesian statistics rather than observed. Using the GRB sample with pseudo-redshifts of a relatively large number, we fit the redshift-resolved luminosity distributions of the GRBs with a broken-power-law LF. The fitting results suggest that the LF could evolve with redshift by a redshift-dependent break luminosity, e.g., L{sub b} = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51}(1 + z){sup 2} erg s{sup -1}. The low- and high-luminosity indices are constrained to 0.8 and 2.0, respectively. It is found that the proportional coefficient between the GRB event rate and the star formation rate should correspondingly decrease with increasing redshifts.

  5. The Radio Luminosity Function and Galaxy Evolution in the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Neal A.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Mabasher, Bahram; Brudgesm Terrry J.; Hudson, Michael J.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Smith, Russell J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the radio luminosity function and radio source population for two fields within the Coma cluster of galaxies, with the fields centered on the cluster core and southwest infall region and each covering about half a square degree. Using VLA data with a typical rms sensitivity of 28 (mu)Jy per 4.4" beam, we identify 249 radio sources with optical counterparts brighter than r = 22 (equivalent to M(sub r) = -13 for cluster member galaxies). Comprehensive optical spectroscopy identifies 38 of these as members of the Coma cluster, evenly split between sources powered by an active nucleus and sources powered by active star formation. The radio-detected star-forming galaxies are restricted to radio luminosities between about 10(exp 21) and 10(exp 22) W/Hz, an interesting result given that star formation dominates field radio luminosity functions below about 10(exp 23) W/Hz. The majority of the radio-detected star-forming galaxies have characteristics of starbursts, including high specific star formation rates and optical spectra with strong emission lines. In conjunction with prior studies on post-starburst galaxies within the Coma cluster, this is consistent with a picture in which late-type galaxies entering Coma undergo a starburst prior to a rapid cessation of star formation. Optically bright elliptical galaxies (Mr less than or equals -20.5) make the largest contribution to the radio luminosity function at both the high (> approx. 3x10(exp 22) W/Hz) and low (< approx. 10(exp 21) W/Hz) ends. Through a stacking analysis of these optically-bright ellipticals we find that they continue to harbor radio sources down to luminosities as faint as 3x10(exp 19) W/Hz. However, contrary to published results for the Virgo cluster we find no evidence for the existence of a population of optically faint (M(sub r) approx. equals -14) dwarf ellipticals hosting strong radio AGN.

  6. The galaxy cluster mid-infrared luminosity function at 1.3 < z < 3.2

    SciTech Connect

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Vernet, Joël; De Breuck, Carlos; Stern, Daniel; Brodwin, Mark; Galametz, Audrey; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jarvis, Matt; Hatch, Nina; Seymour, Nick; Stanford, Spencer A.

    2014-05-01

    We present 4.5 μm luminosity functions for galaxies identified in 178 candidate galaxy clusters at 1.3 < z < 3.2. The clusters were identified as Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) color-selected overdensities in the Clusters Around Radio-Loud AGN project, which imaged 420 powerful radio-loud active galactic nuclei (RLAGNs) at z > 1.3. The luminosity functions are derived for different redshift and richness bins, and the IRAC imaging reaches depths of m* + 2, allowing us to measure the faint end slopes of the luminosity functions. We find that α = –1 describes the luminosity function very well in all redshift bins and does not evolve significantly. This provides evidence that the rate at which the low mass galaxy population grows through star formation gets quenched and is replenished by in-falling field galaxies does not have a major net effect on the shape of the luminosity function. Our measurements for m* are consistent with passive evolution models and high formation redshifts (z{sub f} ∼ 3). We find a slight trend toward fainter m* for the richest clusters, implying that the most massive clusters in our sample could contain older stellar populations, yet another example of cosmic downsizing. Modeling shows that a contribution of a star-forming population of up to 40% cannot be ruled out. This value, found from our targeted survey, is significantly lower than the values found for slightly lower redshift, z ∼ 1, clusters found in wide-field surveys. The results are consistent with cosmic downsizing, as the clusters studied here were all found in the vicinity of RLAGNs—which have proven to be preferentially located in massive dark matter halos in the richest environments at high redshift—and they may therefore be older and more evolved systems than the general protocluster population.

  7. Intermetallic insertion anodes for lithium batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Thackeray, M. M.; Vaughey, J.; Johnson, C. S.; Kepler, K. D.

    1999-11-12

    Binary intermetallic compounds containing lithium, or lithium alloys, such as Li{sub x}Al, Li{sub x}Si and Li{sub x}Sn have been investigated in detail in the past as negative electrode materials for rechargeable lithium batteries. It is generally acknowledged that the major limitation of these systems is the large volumetric expansion that occurs when lithium reacts with the host metal. Such large increases in volume limit the practical use of lithium-tin electrodes in electrochemical cells. It is generally recognized that metal oxide electrodes, MO{sub y}, in lithium-ion cells operate during charge and discharge by means of a reversible lithium insertion/extraction process, and that the cells offer excellent cycling behavior when the crystallographic changes to the unit cell parameters and unit cell volume of the Li{sub x}MO{sub y} electrode are kept to a minimum. An excellent example of such an electrode is the spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}, which maintains its cubic symmetry without any significant change to the lattice parameter (and hence unit cell volume) during lithium insertion to the rock-salt composition Li{sub 7}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}. This spinel electrode is an example of a ternary Li{sub x}MO{sub y} system in which a binary MO{sub y} framework provides a stable host structure for lithium. With this approach, the authors have turned their attention to exploring ternary intermetallic systems Li{sub x}MM{prime} in the hope of finding a system that is not subject to the high volumetric expansion that typifies many binary systems. In this paper, the authors present recent data of their investigations of lithium-copper-tin and lithium-indium-antimonide electrodes in lithium cells. The data show that lithium can be inserted reversibly into selected intermetallic compounds with relatively small expansion of the lithiated intermetallic structures.

  8. 20 TeV collider lattices with low-. beta. insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.A.

    1983-08-01

    A lattice containing insertions designed for collisions of 20 TeV proton beams at crossing points having beta values of two meters or less is presented. The machine would use high-field double bore superconducting magnets, with opposite focusing action on the two beams passing through each quadrupole. Hence the focusing pattern in the insertions is antisymmetric about the crossings. The beams, separated by 16 cms in the arcs are made colinear by dipoles common to both beams and then focused to the low-..beta.. collision points by quadrupole triplets. A similar machine design for pp collisions is also included.

  9. Tool Life Detecting System Using Damage Sensor-Integrated Insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Katsuhiko; Yamane, Yasuo; Torimoto, Ayumu

    In-process tool life detecting system has been developed. In order to detect tool life, we monitored breakage of an electrical conductive thin film band of titanium nitride (TiN) on flank faces of a ceramic insert that was an insulation material. The conductive band was parallel to the cutting edge and was broken by fracture of the cutting edge or excessive tool wear. A coil and a capacitor were connected in series to the band on an insert to make a series resonance circuit in a tool holder for turning, or in an arbor for face milling. A detecting coil with high frequency oscillator was coupled to the coil in the holder/arbor electromagnetically. An electromagnetic induction between two coils was used to take the signal from the insert. The system developed in this study showed good stability against electric noises radiated from electrical devices of machine tools.

  10. Transition-metal-catalyzed enantioselective heteroatom-hydrogen bond insertion reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shou-Fei; Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2012-08-21

    Carbon-heteroatom bonds (C-X) are ubiquitous and are among the most reactive components of organic compounds. Therefore investigations of the construction of C-X bonds are fundamental and vibrant fields in organic chemistry. Transition-metal-catalyzed heteroatom-hydrogen bond (X-H) insertions via a metal carbene or carbenoid intermediate represent one of the most efficient approaches to form C-X bonds. Because of the availability of substrates, neutral and mild reaction conditions, and high reactivity of these transformations, researchers have widely applied transition-metal-catalyzed X-H insertions in organic synthesis. Researchers have developed a variety of rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric C-H insertion reactions with high to excellent enantioselectivities for a wide range of substrates. However, at the time that we launched our research, very few highly enantioselective X-H insertions had been documented primarily because of a lack of efficient chiral catalysts and indistinct insertion mechanisms. In this Account, we describe our recent studies of copper- and iron-catalyzed asymmetric X-H insertion reactions by using chiral spiro-bisoxazoline and diimine ligands. The copper complexes of chiral spiro-bisoxazoline ligands proved to be highly enantioselective catalysts for N-H insertions of α-diazoesters into anilines, O-H insertions of α-diazoesters into phenols and water, O-H insertions of α-diazophosphonates into alcohols, and S-H insertions of α-diazoesters into mercaptans. The iron complexes of chiral spiro-bisoxazoline ligands afforded the O-H insertion of α-diazoesters into alcohols and water with unprecedented enantioselectivities. The copper complexes of chiral spiro-diimine ligands exhibited excellent reactivity and enantioselectivity in the Si-H insertion of α-diazoacetates into a wide range of silanes. These transition-metal-catalyzed X-H insertions have many potential applications in organic synthesis because the insertion products, including chiral

  11. Root cause of incomplete control rod insertions at Westinghouse reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, S.

    1997-01-01

    Within the past year, incomplete RCCA insertions have been observed on high burnup fuel assemblies at two Westinghouse PWRs. Initial tests at the Wolf Creek site indicated that the direct cause of the incomplete insertions observed at Wolf Creek was excessive fuel assembly thimble tube distortion. Westinghouse committed to the NRC to perform a root cause analysis by the end of August, 1996. The root cause analysis process used by Westinghouse included testing at ten sites to obtain drag, growth and other characteristics of high burnup fuel assemblies. It also included testing at the Westinghouse hot cell of two of the Wolf Creek incomplete insertion assemblies. A mechanical model was developed to calculate the response of fuel assemblies when subjected to compressive loads. Detailed manufacturing reviews were conducted to determine if this was a manufacturing related issue. In addition, a review of available worldwide experience was performed. Based on the above, it was concluded that the thimble tube distortion observed on the Wolf Creek incomplete insertion assemblies was caused by unusual fuel assembly growth over and above what would typically be expected as a result of irradiation exposure. It was determined that the unusual growth component is a combination of growth due to oxide accumulation and accelerated growth, and would only be expected in high temperature plants on fuel assemblies that see long residence times and high power duties.

  12. Quench Module Insert Capabilities and Development Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carswell, B.; Crouch, M.; Farmer, J.; Breeding, S.; Rose, F.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Quench Module Insert is a directional solidification furnace, which will fly in the Materials Science Research Facility. The QMI provides high thermal gradient and quench capabilities for processing metals and alloys in microgravity. This paper will describe the capabilities and present of on-going analysis and development testing.

  13. Turbine vane segment and impingement insert configuration for fail-safe impingement insert retention

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Kellock, Iain Robertson

    2003-05-13

    An impingement insert sleeve is provided that is adapted to be disposed in a coolant cavity defined through a stator vane. The insert has a generally open inlet end and first and second pairs of diametrically opposed side walls, and at least one fail-safe tab defined at a longitudinal end of the insert for limiting radial displacement of the insert with respect to the stator vane.

  14. Patterns of Transposable Element Expression and Insertion in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Evan A.; Wang, Lu; Rishishwar, Lavanya; Wang, Jianrong; McDonald, John F.; Jordan, I. King

    2016-01-01

    Human transposable element (TE) activity in somatic tissues causes mutations that can contribute to tumorigenesis. Indeed, TE insertion mutations have been implicated in the etiology of a number of different cancer types. Nevertheless, the full extent of somatic TE activity, along with its relationship to tumorigenesis, have yet to be fully explored. Recent developments in bioinformatics software make it possible to analyze TE expression levels and TE insertional activity directly from transcriptome (RNA-seq) and whole genome (DNA-seq) next-generation sequence data. We applied these new sequence analysis techniques to matched normal and primary tumor patient samples from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) in order to analyze the patterns of TE expression and insertion for three cancer types: breast invasive carcinoma, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and lung adenocarcinoma. Our analysis focused on the three most abundant families of active human TEs: Alu, SVA, and L1. We found evidence for high levels of somatic TE activity for these three families in normal and cancer samples across diverse tissue types. Abundant transcripts for all three TE families were detected in both normal and cancer tissues along with an average of ~80 unique TE insertions per individual patient/tissue. We observed an increase in L1 transcript expression and L1 insertional activity in primary tumor samples for all three cancer types. Tumor-specific TE insertions are enriched for private mutations, consistent with a potentially causal role in tumorigenesis. We used genome feature analysis to investigate two specific cases of putative cancer-causing TE mutations in further detail. An Alu insertion in an upstream enhancer of the CBL tumor suppressor gene is associated with down-regulation of the gene in a single breast cancer patient, and an L1 insertion in the first exon of the BAALC gene also disrupts its expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Our results are consistent with

  15. ATLAS ALFA—measuring absolute luminosity with scintillating fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2009-10-01

    ALFA is a high-precision scintillating fibre tracking detector under construction for the absolute determination of the LHC luminosity at the ATLAS interaction point. This detector, mounted in so-called Roman Pots, will track protons elastically scattered under μrad angles at IP1.In total there are four pairs of vertically arranged detector modules which approach the LHC beam axis to mm distance. Each detector module consists of ten layers of two times 64 scintillating fibres each (U and V planes). The fibres are coupled to 64 channels Multi-Anodes PhotoMultipliers Tubes read out by compact front-end electronics. Each detector module is complemented by so-called overlap detectors: Three layers of two times 30 scintillating fibres which will be used to measure the relative positioning of two vertically arranged main detectors. The total number of channels is about 15000. Conventional plastic scintillator tiles are mounted in front of the fibre detectors and will serve as trigger counter. The extremely restricted space inside the pots makes the coupling to the read out devices very challenging. Several technologies have been tested in a beam at DESY and a cosmic-ray setup at CERN. A possible upgrade of the photo detection could consist in the replacement of the PMT by Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes. Preliminary tests are being performed comparing the performance of these devices with the ones of the PMTs.

  16. Understanding Intermediate-luminosity X- ray Objects and their Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, Andrew

    2002-07-01

    X-ray observations of normal galaxies with ROSAT, ASCA and Chandra have revealed that off-nuclear, compact, Intermediate- luminosity {L_X sim10^39-40 erg/s} X-ray Objects {IXOs} are quite common. On average, we find that 1 in every 5 galaxies contains one of these intriguing objects, based on our ROSAT HRI catalog, which is the most complete IXO catalog yet known. IXOs have received wide attention as putative intermediate- mass black holes with masses 10^2-10^5 M_odot, which would be quite interesting and puzzling. It is also possible that IXOs are ``ordinary'' X-ray binaries with stellar-mass black holes, and their X-ray emission is mildly beamed. Otherwise, little is known about the geometrical and physical properties of this exciting new class of astrophysical objects. X-ray observations of IXOs alone have not been able to provide good diagnostics. Deep, high spatial resolution optical imaging observations can provide important clues to their nature by examining the environment around the accreting black hole. We request funding to analyze 267 HST archival images for 38 IXOs from our catalog in order to search for individual stellar companions and star clusters that may be associated with IXOs, and to generally identify the nature of the regions harboring IXOs. This AR proposal is a companion to a SNAP proposal by PI Colbert, which proposes to image IXOs for which no HST imaging exists yet.

  17. Influence of luminosity bursts on properties of protostellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, E. I.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya. N.; Trinkl, P.

    2014-08-01

    A (2+ 1)-dimensional numerical model for the formation and evolution of young stellar objects with sub-solar masses is presented. The numerical hydrodynamicall code describing the formation and evolution of a protostellar disk in a two-dimensional approximation is supplemented by one-dimensional code for the evolution of the star and an algorithm for establishing the vertical structure of the disk. This code is used to investigate the influence of luminosity bursts with intensities similar to those observed in FU Orionis objects (FUors) on the properties and thermal balance of protostellar disks. A model with gravitational instability and fragmentation of the disk, with subsequent migration of the fragments onto the protostar, is used as a basic model for FUors. Typical FUor bursts ( L ˜ 100 L ⊙) can appreciably influence the thermal balance of their disks and parent envelopes, leading to an increase in the disk temperature by more than a factor of two. On the other hand, massive fragments in the disk are only weakly perturbed by such bursts, partially due to screening by the disk and partially due to their high temperature brought about by adiabatic heating. Apart from massive fragments, the characteristic thermal time scales are appreciably shorter than the dynamical time scales throughout the radial extent of the disk and envelope; this enables the use of a stationary radiative-transfer equation when determining the vertical structure of the disk.

  18. Quasar UV luminosity function evolution up to z = 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manti, S.; Gallerani, S.; Ferrara, A.; Greig, B.; Feruglio, C.

    2017-04-01

    We study the redshift evolution of the quasar (QSO) UV luminosity function (LF) for 0.5 < z < 6.5, by collecting the most up to date observational data and, in particular, the recently discovered population of faint active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We fit the QSO LF using either a double power-law function or a Schechter function, finding that both forms provide good fits to the data. We derive empirical relations for the LF parameters as a function of redshift and, based on these results, predict the QSO UV LF at z = 8. From the inferred LF evolution, we compute the redshift evolution of the QSO/AGN comoving ionizing emissivity and hydrogen photoionization rate. If faint AGNs are included, the contribution of QSOs to reionization increases substantially. However, their level of contribution critically depends on the detailed shape of the QSO LF, which can be constrained by efficient searches of high-z QSOs. To this aim, we predict the expected (i) number of z > 6 QSOs detectable by ongoing and future near-infrared surveys (as EUCLID and Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope), and (ii) number counts for a single radio-recombination line observation with Square Kilometre Array-MID (FoV = 0.49 deg2) as a function of the Hnα flux density, at 0 < z < 8. These surveys (even at z < 6) will be fundamental to better constrain the role of QSOs as reionization sources.

  19. Hyper-Eddington mass accretion on to a black hole with super-Eddington luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yuya; Inayoshi, Kohei; Haiman, Zoltán

    2016-10-01

    We perform 1D radiation hydrodynamical simulations to solve accretion flows on to massive black holes (BHs) with a very high rate. Assuming that photon trapping limits the luminosity emerging from the central region to L ≲ LEdd, Inayoshi, Haiman & Ostriker (2016) have shown that an accretion flow settles to a `hyper-Eddington solution, with a steady and isothermal (T ≃ 8000 K) Bondi profile reaching ≳ 5000 times the Eddington accretion rate dot{M}_Eddequiv L_Edd/c^2. Here, we address the possibility that gas accreting with finite angular momentum forms a bright nuclear accretion disc, with a luminosity exceeding the Eddington limit (1 ≲ L/LEdd ≲ 100). Combining our simulations with an analytic model, we find that a transition to steady hyper-Eddington accretion still occurs, as long as the luminosity remains below L/LEdd ≲ 35 (MBH/104 M⊙)3/2(n∞/105 cm-3)(T∞/104 K)-3/2(r⋆/1014 cm)-1/2, where n∞ and T∞ are the density and temperature of the ambient gas, and r⋆ is the radius of the photosphere, at which radiation emerges. If the luminosity exceeds this value, accretion becomes episodic. Our results can be accurately recovered in a toy model of an optically thick spherical shell, driven by radiation force into a collapsing medium. When the central source is dimmer than the above critical value, the expansion of the shell is halted and reversed by ram pressure of the collapsing medium, and by shell's weight. Our results imply that rapid, unimpeded hyper-Eddington accretion is possible even if the luminosity of the central source far exceeds the Eddington limit, and can be either steady or strongly episodic.

  20. Central Solenoid Insert Technical Specification

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N; Smirnov, Alexandre

    2011-09-01

    The US ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for the ITER central solenoid (CS) contribution to the ITER project. The Central Solenoid Insert (CSI) project will allow ITER validation the appropriate lengths of the conductors to be used in the full-scale CS coils under relevant conditions. The ITER Program plans to build and test a CSI to verify the performance of the CS conductor. The CSI is a one-layer solenoid with an inner diameter of 1.48 m and a height of 4.45 m between electric terminal ends. The coil weight with the terminals is approximately 820 kg without insulation. The major goal of the CSI is to measure the temperature margin of the CS under the ITER direct current (DC) operating conditions, including determining sensitivity to load cycles. Performance of the joints, ramp rate sensitivity, and stability against thermal or electromagnetic disturbances, electrical insulation, losses, and instrumentation are addressed separately and therefore are not major goals in this project. However, losses and joint performance will be tested during the CSI testing campaign. The USIPO will build the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka, Japan. The industrial vendors (the Suppliers) will report to the USIPO (the Company). All approvals to proceed will be issued by the Company, which in some cases, as specified in this document, will also require the approval of the ITER Organization. Responsibilities and obligations will be covered by respective contracts between the USIPO, called Company interchangeably, and the industrial Prime Contractors, called Suppliers. Different stages of work may be performed by more than one Prime Contractor, as described in this specification. Technical requirements of the contract between the Company and the Prime Contractor will be covered by the Fabrication Specifications developed by the Prime Contractor based on this document and approved by

  1. Luminosity functions for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Gregory; Bodenheimer, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the luminosity function for low-mass objects to constrain the stellar initial mass function at the low-mass end is reported. The ways in which luminosity functions for low-mass stars are affected by star formation histories, brown dwarf and premain-sequence cooling rates and main-sequence mass luminosity relations, and the IMF are examined. Cooling rates and the mass-luminosity relation are determined through a new series of evolutionary calculations for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs in the range 0.05-0.50 solar mass. Model luminosity functions are constructed for specific comparison with the results of four recent observational surveys. The likelihood that the stellar mass function in the solar neighborhood is increasing at masses near the bottom of the main sequence and perhaps at lower masses is confirmed. In the most optimistic case, brown dwarfs contribute half of the local missing disk mass. The actual contribution is likely to be considerably less.

  2. Systematic properties of CO emission from galaxies. I - Luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verter, Frances

    1987-01-01

    A sensitive survey of normal galaxies covering a wide range of luminosities and morphological types is combined with galaxy observations in the literature to provide a sample for statistical study. The global CO emission of these galaxies is extrapolated by modeling the galaxies with an exponential radial profile. The maximum-likelihood distribution functions of CO luminosity and CO/H I flux ratio are similar in behavior. Both have long tails of bright galaxies. However, the typical galaxy has a CO luminosity of about 10 to the 6th Jy km/s Mpc-squared or less and a CO/H I ratio of the order of 10 or less. Averages of the distributions of CO luminosity and CO/H I flux ratio are higher for galaxies of Hubble type Sb-Sbc than for groups of earlier or later types. Quantitative estimates of the possible error sources in the conversion of CO luminosity to molecular mass indicates that the peaking of CO emission at intermediate types is a fairly confident result.

  3. 1. 4 gigahertz luminosity function and its evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Condon, J. J.

    1989-03-01

    The local luminosity function was determined at v = 1.4 GHz from radio observations of two low-redshift galaxy samples: (1) spiral and irregular galaxies with apparent blue magnitudes and declinations and (2) galaxies of all morphologies with blue angular diameters of 1.0 arcmin or greater in the declination range between -2.5 deg and +82 deg. Separate luminosity functions for the radio source populations powered by 'starbursts' and 'monsters' were obtained from the latter sample. The amount of evolution required for the local luminosity function to account for the faint sources is discussed. The cosmological evolution of extragalactic radio sources appears to be so strong at all observed luminosities that the local luminosity function and counts of all sources between S of roughly 10 micro-Jy and S of roughly 10 Jy at v = 1.4 GHz can be matched with a model in which most sources are confined to a hollow shell with z of roughly 0.8. 36 refs.

  4. The intrinsic quasar luminosity function: Accounting for accretion disk anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Myers, A. D.; Brotherton, M. S.; Runnoe, J. C.; Green, R. F.

    2014-05-20

    Quasar luminosity functions are a fundamental probe of the growth and evolution of supermassive black holes. Measuring the intrinsic luminosity function is difficult in practice, due to a multitude of observational and systematic effects. As sample sizes increase and measurement errors drop, characterizing the systematic effects is becoming more important. It is well known that the continuum emission from the accretion disk of quasars is anisotropic—in part due to its disk-like structure—but current luminosity function calculations effectively assume isotropy over the range of unobscured lines of sight. Here, we provide the first steps in characterizing the effect of random quasar orientations and simple models of anisotropy on observed luminosity functions. We find that the effect of orientation is not insignificant and exceeds other potential corrections such as those from gravitational lensing of foreground structures. We argue that current observational constraints may overestimate the intrinsic luminosity function by as much as a factor of ∼2 on the bright end. This has implications for models of quasars and their role in the universe, such as quasars' contribution to cosmological backgrounds.

  5. Luminosity limits for liquid argon calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    J, Rutherfoord; B, Walker R.

    2012-12-01

    We have irradiated liquid argon ionization chambers with betas using high-activity Strontium-90 sources. The radiation environment is comparable to that in the liquid argon calorimeters which are part of the ATLAS detector installed at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. We measure the ionization current over a wide range of applied potential for two different source activities and for three different chamber gaps. These studies provide operating experience at exceptionally high ionization rates. We can operate these chambers either in the normal mode or in the space-charge limited regime and thereby determine the transition point between the two. From the transition point we indirectly extract the positive argon ion mobility.

  6. Non-insertion-related complications of central venous catheterization--temporary vascular access for hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Bevc, Sebastjan; Pecovnik-Balon, Breda; Ekart, Robert; Hojs, Radovan

    2007-01-01

    The authors analyzed 309 central venous catheters (CVC) inserted in 147 hemodialysis patients before the maturation of the first or new arteriovenous fistula. One clinical manifestations of sepsis after CVC insertion was found. In all, 33.7% of the catheters were removed because of early minor complications: CVC occlusion, inadequate blood flow in CVC, shattered suture and malposition of CVC, fever, signs of infection at the site of CVC insertion, and bleeding at the site of CVC insertion. The most frequently isolated pathogenic bacteria at the tips of the catheters were coagulase-negative staphylococci highly sensitive to vancomycin and gentamicin.

  7. Sequential cooling insert for turbine stator vane

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Russell B; Krueger, Judson J; Plank, William L

    2014-04-01

    A sequential impingement cooling insert for a turbine stator vane that forms a double impingement for the pressure and suction sides of the vane or a triple impingement. The insert is formed from a sheet metal formed in a zigzag shape that forms a series of alternating impingement cooling channels with return air channels, where pressure side and suction side impingement cooling plates are secured over the zigzag shaped main piece. Another embodiment includes the insert formed from one or two blocks of material in which the impingement channels and return air channels are machined into each block.

  8. Elliptically polarizing adjustable phase insertion device

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Roger

    1995-01-01

    An insertion device for extracting polarized electromagnetic energy from a beam of particles is disclosed. The insertion device includes four linear arrays of magnets which are aligned with the particle beam. The magnetic field strength to which the particles are subjected is adjusted by altering the relative alignment of the arrays in a direction parallel to that of the particle beam. Both the energy and polarization of the extracted energy may be varied by moving the relevant arrays parallel to the beam direction. The present invention requires a substantially simpler and more economical superstructure than insertion devices in which the magnetic field strength is altered by changing the gap between arrays of magnets.

  9. Insertion Profiles of 4 Headless Compression Screws

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Adam; Harvey, Edward J.; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; Barthelat, Francois; Rabiei, Reza; Martineau, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In practice, the surgeon must rely on screw position (insertion depth) and tactile feedback from the screwdriver (insertion torque) to gauge compression. In this study, we identified the relationship between interfragmentary compression and these 2 factors. Methods The Acutrak Standard, Acutrak Mini, Synthes 3.0, and Herbert-Whipple implants were tested using a polyurethane foam scaphoid model. A specialized testing jig simultaneously measured compression force, insertion torque, and insertion depth at half-screw-turn intervals until failure occurred. Results The peak compression occurs at an insertion depth of −3.1 mm, −2.8 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.5 mm for the Acutrak Mini, Acutrak Standard, Herbert-Whipple, and Synthes screws respectively (insertion depth is positive when the screw is proud above the bone and negative when buried). The compression and insertion torque at a depth of −2 mm were found to be 113 ± 18 N and 0.348 ± 0.052 Nm for the Acutrak Standard, 104 ± 15 N and 0.175 ± 0.008 Nm for the Acutrak Mini, 78 ± 9 N and 0.245 ± 0.006 Nm for the Herbert-Whipple, and 67 ± 2N, 0.233 ± 0.010 Nm for the Synthes headless compression screws. Conclusions All 4 screws generated a sizable amount of compression (> 60 N) over a wide range of insertion depths. The compression at the commonly recommended insertion depth of −2 mm was not significantly different between screws; thus, implant selection should not be based on compression profile alone. Conically shaped screws (Acutrak) generated their peak compression when they were fully buried in the foam whereas the shanked screws (Synthes and Herbert-Whipple) reached peak compression before they were fully inserted. Because insertion torque correlated poorly with compression, surgeons should avoid using tactile judgment of torque as a proxy for compression. Clinical relevance Knowledge of the insertion profile may improve our understanding of the implants, provide a better basis for comparing screws

  10. Sequential cooling insert for turbine stator vane

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Russel B; Krueger, Judson J; Plank, William L

    2014-11-04

    A sequential impingement cooling insert for a turbine stator vane that forms a double impingement for the pressure and suction sides of the vane or a triple impingement. The insert is formed from a sheet metal formed in a zigzag shape that forms a series of alternating impingement cooling channels with return air channels, where pressure side and suction side impingement cooling plates are secured over the zigzag shaped main piece. Another embodiment includes the insert formed from one or two blocks of material in which the impingement channels and return air channels are machined into each block.

  11. Influence of luminosity leveling on the CDF-II B-Physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Matthew; Lewis, Jonathan; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The effective bandwidth of the CDF-II level 1 trigger is approximately 25 kHz. Some of this bandwidth is used to record events that form the data sets used by the high p{sub T} physics analyses. The remaining bandwidth is used by triggers that are sensitive to hadronic B decays and provide one of the most important samples used for the study of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing. At high luminosities, the hadronic B triggers have rates that greatly exceed the available bandwidth. Rather than incur large dead-times associated with these excessive rates, these B triggers are prescaled to limit the total trigger rate to the effective level 1 trigger bandwidth. The prescales are dynamically adjusted as the store progresses so that all of the bandwidth that is not used for the high p{sub T} physics program is used to record hadronic B triggers. In principle, the luminosity could be held at a more constant level throughout the store in such a way that the integrated luminosity would be the same as that obtained from a normal store. It has been suggested that this would allow B triggers to be recorded with lower prescales and consequently with higher B{sub s}{sup 0} signal efficiencies. This note describes a parametric model of the high p{sub T} and hadronic B triggers used by CDF and compares the yields of reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} decays that would result with and without luminosity leveling.

  12. Evidence for evolution of the luminosity function of clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edge, A. C.; Stewart, G. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Arnaud, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    From an all sky, X-ray flux limited sample of clusters of galaxies evidence for a significant deficit in the number of high luminosity clusters is found in the redshift range z approximately 0.1 to 0.2 compared with numbers of nearby clusters. This indicates that the X-ray luminous clusters are undergoing strong evolution. The strength of the effect is consistent with hierarchical merging models. The implications of such strong evolution for clusters are discussed.

  13. Evidence for evolution of the luminosity function of clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edge, Alastair C.; Stewart, G. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Arnaud, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    From an all sky, x-ray flux limited sample of clusters of galaxies evidence for a significant deficit in the number of high luminosity clusters is found in the redshift range z approximately 0.1 to 0.2 compared with numbers of nearby clusters. This indicates that the x-ray luminous clusters are undergoing strong evolution. The strength of the effect is consistent with hierarchical merging models. The implications of such strong evolution for clusters are discussed.

  14. Effects of lithium insertion on thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-04-27

    Recently, silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have been applied as high-performance Li battery anodes, since they can overcome the pulverization and mechanical fracture during lithiation. Although thermal stability is one of the most important parameters that determine safety of Li batteries, thermal conductivity of SiNWs with Li insertion remains unclear. In this letter, using molecular dynamics simulations, we study room temperature thermal conductivity of SiNWs with Li insertion. It is found that compared with the pristine SiNW, there is as much as 60% reduction in thermal conductivity with 10% concentration of inserted Li atoms, while under the same impurity concentration the reduction in thermal conductivity of the mass-disordered SiNW is only 30%. With lattice dynamics calculations and normal mode decomposition, it is revealed that the phonon lifetimes in SiNWs decrease greatly due to strong scattering of phonons by vibrational modes of Li atoms, especially for those high frequency phonons. The observed strong phonon scattering phenomenon in Li-inserted SiNWs is similar to the phonon rattling effect. Our study serves as an exploration of thermal properties of SiNWs as Li battery anodes or weakly coupled with impurity atoms.

  15. RHIC 100 GeV Polarized Proton Luminosity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-01-17

    A big problem in RHIC 100 GeV proton run 2009 was the significantly lower luminosity lifetime than all previous runs. It is shown in this note that the beam intensity decay in run 2009 is caused by the RF voltage ramping in store. It is also shown that the beam decay is not clearly related to the beam momentum spread, therefore, not directly due to the 0.7m. β* Furthermore, the most important factor regarding the low luminosity lifetime is the faster transverse emittance growth in store, which is also much worse than the previous runs, and is also related to the RF ramping. In 100 GeV proton run 2012a, the RF ramping was abandoned, but the β* was increased to 0.85m, with more than 20% loss of luminosity, which is not necessary. It is strongly suggested to use smaller β* in 100 GeV polarized proton run 2015/2016

  16. CLIC Crab Cavity Design Optimisation for Maximum Luminosity

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, A.C.; Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dolgashev, V.; Jones, R.; /Manchester U.

    2012-04-25

    The bunch size and crossing angle planned for CERN's compact linear collider CLIC dictate that crab cavities on opposing linacs will be needed to rotate bunches of particles into alignment at the interaction point if the desired luminosity is to be achieved. Wakefield effects, RF phase errors between crab cavities on opposing linacs and unpredictable beam loading can each act to reduce luminosity below that anticipated for bunches colliding in perfect alignment. Unlike acceleration cavities, which are normally optimised for gradient, crab cavities must be optimised primarily for luminosity. Accepting the crab cavity technology choice of a 12 GHz, normal conducting, travelling wave structure as explained in the text, this paper develops an analytical approach to optimise cell number and iris diameter.

  17. The luminosity of the double-mode Cepheid Y Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Nancy R.

    1992-01-01

    IUE spectra of the double-mode Cepheid Y Carinae have been used to determine the spectral type of the binary companion. From the companion spectral type (B9.O V), the absolute magnitude of the Cepheid is found to be -2.94 mag, with an estimated uncertainty of +/-0.3. This luminosity is in good agreement with that from the period-luminosity-color relation of Feast and Walker for the fundamental mode. This agreement, together with the large magnitude difference between the B9.0 V star and the Cepheid, confirm that the Cepheid is a normal classical Cepheid with a mass much larger than that inferred from the ratio of the two periods (beat mass). The two double-mode Cepheids with independently determined luminosities (Y Car and V 367 Sct) both fall on the blue edge of the instability strip.

  18. The LUCID detector ATLAS luminosity monitor and its electronic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghi, F. Lasagni

    2016-07-01

    In 2015 LHC is starting a new run, at higher center of mass energy (13 TeV) and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. The ATLAS luminosity monitor LUCID has been completely rebuilt, both the detector and the electronics, in order to cope with the new running conditions. The new detector electronics features a new read-out board (LUCROD) for signal acquisition and digitization, PMT-charge integration and single-side luminosity measurements, and a revisited LUMAT board for combination of signals from the two detectors. This note describes the new board design, the firmware and software developments, the implementation of luminosity algorithms, the optical communication between boards and the integration into the ATLAS TDAQ system.

  19. Reduction of beta* and increase of luminosity at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat,F.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-05-04

    The reduction of {beta}* beyond the 1m design value at RHIC has been consistently achieved over the last 6 years of RHIC operations, resulting in an increase of luminosity for different running modes and species. During the recent 2007-08 deuteron-gold run the reduction to 0.70 from the design 1m achieved a 30% increase in delivered luminosity. The key ingredients allowing the reduction have been the capability of efficiently developing ramps with tune and coupling feedback, orbit corrections on the ramp, and collimation, to minimize beam losses in the final focus triplets, the main aperture limitations for the collision optics. We will describe the operational strategy used to reduce the {beta}*, at first squeezing the beam at store, to test feasibility, followed by the operationally preferred option of squeezing the beam during acceleration, and the resulting luminosity increase. We will conclude with future plans for the beta squeeze.

  20. The X-ray luminosity function of active galactic nuclei in the redshift interval z=3-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakis, A.; Aird, J.; Buchner, J.; Salvato, M.; Menzel, M.-L.; Brandt, W. N.; McGreer, I. D.; Dwelly, T.; Mountrichas, G.; Koki, C.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Hsu, L.-T.; Merloni, A.; Liu, Z.; Nandra, K.; Ross, N. P.

    2015-10-01

    We combine deep X-ray survey data from the Chandra observatory and the wide-area/shallow XMM-XXL field to estimate the active galactic nuclei (AGN) X-ray luminosity function in the redshift range z = 3-5. The sample consists of nearly 340 sources with either photometric (212) or spectroscopic (128) redshift in the above range. The combination of deep and shallow survey fields also provides a luminosity baseline of three orders of magnitude, LX(2-10 keV) ≈ 1043-1046 erg s- 1 at z > 3. We follow a Bayesian approach to determine the binned AGN space density and explore their evolution in a model-independent way. Our methodology properly accounts for Poisson errors in the determination of X-ray fluxes and uncertainties in photometric redshift estimates. We demonstrate that the latter is essential for unbiased measurement of space densities. We find that the AGN X-ray luminosity function evolves strongly between the redshift intervals z = 3-4 and z = 4-5. There is also suggestive evidence that the amplitude of this evolution is luminosity dependent. The space density of AGN with LX(2-10 keV) < 1045 erg s- 1 drops by a factor of 5 between the redshift intervals above, while the evolution of brighter AGN appears to be milder. Comparison of our X-ray luminosity function with that of ultraviolet (UV)/optical selected quasi-stellar objects at similar redshifts shows broad agreement at bright luminosities, LX(2-10 keV) > 1045 erg s- 1. At fainter luminosities X-ray surveys measure higher AGN space densities. The faint-end slope of UV/optical luminosity functions, however, is steeper than for X-ray selected AGN. This implies that the Type I AGN fraction increases with decreasing luminosity at z > 3, opposite to trends established at lower redshift. We also assess the significance of AGN in keeping the hydrogen ionized at high redshift. Our X-ray luminosity function yields ionizing photon rate densities that are insufficient to keep the Universe ionized at redshift z > 4. A