Science.gov

Sample records for high occupancy vehicles

  1. Advanced traffic management systems and high-occupancy-vehicle systems. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    ;Contents: Distributed Approach to Real-Time Control of Complex Signalized Networks; MULTIBAND-96: A Program for Variable-Bandwidth Progression Optimization of Multiarterial Traffic Networks; Determination of Timings in Signal Systems with Traffic-Actuated Controllers; Combined Model for Signal Control and Route Choice in Urbn Traffic Networks; Multivariate Optimization Strategies for Real-Time Traffic Control Signals; Implementation Vision for Distributed Control of Traffic Signal Subsystems; Current Developments in SCOOT: Version 3; Estimating Impact of Signal Hardware Improvements; Guidelines for Actuated Controllers in Coordinated Systems; Evaluation of Bus Priority Signal Strategies in Ann Arbor, Michigan; NETSIM-Based Approach to Evaluation of Bus Preemption Strategies; Simulation-Based Methodology for Evaluation of High-Occupancy-Vehicle Facilities; Predicting High-Occupancy-Vehicle Facility Demand; Evaluation of High-Occupancy-Vehicle Lanes on Long Island Expressway; Effect on Congestion and Motorcycle Safety of Motorcycle Travel on High-Occupancy-Vehicle Facilities in Virginia; Development of Arterial High-Occupancy-Vehicle Land Enforcement Techniques; Multiple-Interval Freeway Traffic Flow Forecasting; New Methodology for Smoothing Freeway Loop Detector Data: Introduction to Digital Filtering; Evaluation of Compliance Rates and Travel Time Calculation for Automatic Alternative Route Guidance Systems on Freeways; Algorithm for Controlling Spillback from Ramp Meters; Systemwide Analysis of Freeway Improvements; Transferability of Freeway Incident Detection Algorithms; Deriving Incident Management Measures Using Incident Probability Models and Simulation; and I-880 Field Experiment: Data-Base Development and Incident Delay Estimation Procedures.

  2. Arterial high-occupancy-vehicle alternatives: Planning and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hochuan.

    1992-01-01

    Nowadays, the HOV lane is regarded as one of the most popular and effective urban peak-hour traffic congestion solutions. However, the current planning process cannot provide enough traffic impact information for evaluating arterial HOV lane alternatives because no suitable traffic operation model is now used in the evaluation methods. The main research focus of this study was to decrease the limitations of arterial-traffic simulation models TRAF-NETSIM and TRANSYT-7F so that they could be applied for evaluating arterial HOV alternatives. In brief, the objective were to: (1) modify the logic of TRAF-NETSIM turning movements for simulating arterial HOV lanes realistically, (2) modify the calculation algorithms of TRAF-NETSIM link statistics to provide the travel time of each vehicle type for HOV Lane evaluation, (3) develop the smoothing-factor-analysis method for the TRANSYT platoon dispersion model, and (4) develop two iteration algorithms for TRANSYT platoon prediction. This study is organized into six chapters with results and future research needs given.

  3. Analysis of Road Pricing, Metering and the Priority Treatment of High Occupancy Vehicles Using System Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    examines four computer modeling approaches to determine which of the approaches are valid in terms of predicting the behavior of trip makers seeking to use...which of the approaches are valid in terms of predicting the behavior of trip makers seeking to use the facility in response to various combinations...charged with the intended purpose of reducing demand. 4 High-occupancy vehicles can be given priority treatment in an effort to persuade more trip makers

  4. Recreation Vehicle Mechanic. Occupational Analyses Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Ann; Embree, Rick

    This analysis covers tasks performed by a recreation vehicle mechanic, an occupational title some provinces and territories of Canada have also identified as recreation vehicle technician and recreation vehicle service technician. A guide to analysis discusses development, structure, and validation method; scope of the occupation; trends; and…

  5. Analysis of road pricing, metering and the priority treatment of high occupancy vehicles using system dynamics. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, W.

    1992-01-01

    Transportation Systems Management (TSM) employs various techniques such as road pricing, metering and the priority treatment of high occupancy vehicles (HOVs) in an effort to make more efficient use of existing transportation facilities. Efficiency is improved in terms of moving more people through the facility while simultaneously reducing the number of vehicles using the facility. This report uses a hypothetical toll facility and examines four computer modeling approaches to determine which of the approaches are valid in terms of predicting the behavior of trip makers seeking to use the facility in response to various combinations of TSM techniques. Once an approach has been determined to be valid, seven different combination of TSM techniques, or strategies, are compared to a base strategy to determine what strategy or strategies are most affective in achieving the goals of TSM.

  6. Occupant-to-occupant contact injury in motor vehicle crashes.

    PubMed

    Viano, David C; Parenteau, Chantal S

    2017-10-03

    This is a descriptive study of the frequency and risk of occupant-to-occupant contact injury by crash type and occupant age. It focused on rear impacts because of a recent Senate inquiry. 1994-2013 NASS-CDS data were used to investigate the effects of occupant-to-occupant contact on the risk of serious-to-fatal injury (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] 3+) by crash type and age group. NASS-CDS in-depth cases were analyzed to identify crash circumstances for AIS 3+ occupant-to-occupant contact injury in rear crashes. Serious injury (AIS 3+) due to occupant-to-occupant contact was uncommon. It represented only 0.84% of all AIS 3+ injury for all age groups. The overall risk of AIS 3+ occupant-to-occupant contact injury was 0.042 ± 0.007%. The highest incidence was in side impacts (69.8%) followed by rollovers (22.9%). Occupant-to-occupant contact injury risk was lower in rear impacts than in other crash types, at 0.0078 ± 0.0054%. The highest risk of AIS 3+ injury with occupant-to-occupant was for the <9-year-old age group when compared to other age groups for all crash types. The risk was 0.051 ± 0.026%, representing 2.69% of all AIS 3+ injury in the <9-year-old age group. Only 4.2% of AIS 3+ occupant-to-occupant contact injury occurred to children <9 years old in rear impacts. The corresponding injury risk was lowest in rear impacts, at 0.014 ± 0.014%%, when compared to other crash types. The analysis of in-depth NASS-CDS cases of occupant-to-occupant contact injury in children< 9 years old involved in rear impacts identified very severe collisions in older model vehicles with deformation of the occupant compartment and yielding front seats as main factors for the contact injury. Front seat occupants injuring rear-seated children was not identified in the in-depth NASS-CDS cases. AIS 3+ occupant-to-occupant contact injury occurs primarily in side impacts and rollovers. Most contact injury is to adults (89.4% incidence). Occupant-to-occupant contact injury to

  7. Inherently low-emission vehicle program, estimated emission benefits and impact on high-occupancy vehicle lanes. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wyborny, L.

    1992-10-01

    According to the detailed analysis in the report, ILEVs would provide substantial emission reductions compared to LEVs and other conventional vehicles. The evaporative and refueling emissions (vapor emissions) from ILEVs are estimated to be near zero. With the near-elimination of vapor emissions, ILEVs are expected to emit about one-half the volatile organic compound emissions as other LEVs. The report also concludes that ILEVs are expected to result in little or no detrimental effect on traffic flow in HOV lanes. This conclusion was derived from studying the HOV lanes in Los Angeles, Houston, the District of Columbia, and Seattle. Overall, the report concludes that widespread and rapid introduction of ILEVs would generally offer significant air quality benefits to society wherever they are used, and that the prudent use of TCM exemptions and incentives could encourage these purchases without significant impact on the effectiveness of the other programs.

  8. Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) (Orion) Occupant Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie-Gregg, Nancy J.; Gernhardt, Michael L.; Lawrence, Charles; Somers, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Nancy J. Currie, of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC), Chief Engineer at Johnson Space Center (JSC), requested an assessment of the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) occupant protection as a result of issues identified by the Constellation Program and Orion Project. The NESC, in collaboration with the Human Research Program (HRP), investigated new methods associated with occupant protection for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), known as Orion. The primary objective of this assessment was to investigate new methods associated with occupant protection for the CEV, known as Orion, that would ensure the design provided minimal risk to the crew during nominal and contingency landings in an acceptable set of environmental and spacecraft failure conditions. This documents contains the outcome of the NESC assessment. NASA/TM-2013-217380, "Application of the Brinkley Dynamic Response Criterion to Spacecraft Transient Dynamic Events." supercedes this document.

  9. High strength steels, stiffness of vehicle front-end structure, and risk of injury to rear seat occupants.

    PubMed

    Sahraei, Elham; Digges, Kennerly; Marzougui, Dhafer; Roddis, Kim

    2014-05-01

    Previous research has shown that rear seat occupant protection has decreased over model years, and front-end stiffness is a possible factor causing this trend. In this research, the effects of a change in stiffness on protection of rear seat occupants in frontal crashes were investigated. The stiffness was adjusted by using higher strength steels (DP and TRIP), or thicker metal sheets. Finite element simulations were performed, using an LS Dyna vehicle model coupled with a MADYMO dummy. Simulation results showed that an increase in stiffness, to the extent it happened in recent model years, can increase the risk of AIS3+ head injuries from 4.8% in the original model (with a stiffness of 1,000 N/mm) to 24.2% in a modified model (with a stiffness of 2,356 N/mm). The simulations also showed an increased risk of chest injury from 9.1% in the original model to 11.8% in the modified model. Distribution of injuries from real world accident data confirms the findings of the simulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Vehicle occupant exposure to carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Koushki, P A; al-Dhowalia, K H; Niaizi, S A

    1992-12-01

    This paper focuses on the auto commuting micro-environment and presents typical carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations to which auto commuters in central Riyadh, Saudi Arabia were exposed. Two test vehicles traveling over four main arterial roadways were monitored for inside and outside CO levels during eighty peak and off-peak hours extending over an eight-month period. The relative importance of several variables which explained the variability in CO concentrations inside autos was also assessed. It was found that during peak hours auto commuters were exposed to mean CO levels that ranged from 30 to 40 ppm over trips that typically took between 25 to 40 minutes. The mean ratio of inside to outside CO levels was 0.84. Results of variance component analyses indicated that the most important variables affecting CO concentrations inside autos were, in addition to the smoking of vehicle occupants, traffic volume, vehicle speed, period of day and wind velocity. An increase in traffic volume from 1,000 to 5,000 vehicles per hour (vph) increased mean CO level exposure by 71 percent. An increase in vehicle speed from 14 to 55 km/h reduced mean CO exposure by 36 percent. The number of traffic interruptions had a moderate effect on mean concentrations of CO inside vehicles.

  11. Occupant Protection Project for the Orion Crew Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.; Jones, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    This powerpoint presentation describes the occupant protection project for the Orion Crew Vehicle. Background information on the Orion Crew Vehicle along with comparisons of the Space Shuttle, Ares I, Ares V, Saturn V and Soyuz-FG are also described. The contents include: 1) Background and Overview; 2) Crew health and safety overview; 3) Occupant Protection project overview; and 4) Suit Element injury risk.

  12. Patterns of correlation between vehicle occupant seat pressure and anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Paul, Gunther; Daniell, Nathan; Fraysse, François

    2012-01-01

    Seat pressure is known as a major factor of seat comfort in vehicles. In passenger vehicles, there is lacking research into the seat comfort of rear seat occupants. As accurate seat pressure measurement requires significant effort, simulation of seat pressure is evolving as a preferred method. However, analytic methods are based on complex finite element modeling and therefore are time consuming and involve high investment. Based on accurate anthropometric measurements of 64 male subjects and outboard rear seat pressure measurements in three different passenger vehicles, this study investigates if a set of parameters derived from seat pressure mapping are sensitive enough to differentiate between different seats and whether they correlate with anthropometry in linear models. In addition to the pressure map analysis, H-Points were measured with a coordinate measurement system based on palpated body landmarks and the range of H-Point locations in the three seats is provided. It was found that for the cushion, cushion contact area and cushion front area/force could be modeled by subject anthropometry, while only seatback contact area could be modeled based on anthropometry for all three vehicles. Major differences were found between the vehicles for other parameters.

  13. Occupant and crash characteristics for case occupants with cervical spine injuries sustained in motor vehicle collisions.

    PubMed

    Stein, Deborah M; Kufera, Joseph A; Ho, Shiu M; Ryb, Gabriel E; Dischinger, Patricia C; O'Connor, James V; Scalea, Thomas M

    2011-02-01

    Motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) are the leading cause of spine and spinal cord injuries in the United States. Traumatic cervical spine injuries (CSIs) result in significant morbidity and mortality. This study was designed to evaluate both the epidemiologic and biomechanical risk factors associated with CSI in MVCs by using a population-based database and to describe occupant and crashes characteristics for a subset of severe crashes in which a CSI was sustained as represented by the Crash Injury Research Engineering Network (CIREN) database. Prospectively collected CIREN data from the eight centers were used to identify all case occupants between 1996 and November 2009. Case occupants older than 14 years and case vehicles of the four most common vehicle types were included. The National Automotive Sampling System's Crashworthiness Data System, a probability sample of all police-reported MVCs in the United States, was queried using the same inclusion criteria between 1997 and 2008. Cervical spinal cord and spinal column injuries were identified using Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score codes. Data were abstracted on all case occupants, biomechanical crash characteristics, and injuries sustained. Univariate analysis was performed using a χ analysis. Logistic regression was used to identify significant risk factors in a multivariate analysis to control for confounding associations. CSIs were identified in 11.5% of CIREN case occupants. Case occupants aged 65 years or older and those occupants involved in rollover crashes were more likely to sustain a CSI. In univariate analysis of the subset of severe crashes represented by CIREN, the use of airbag and seat belt together (reference) were more protective than seat belt alone (odds ratio [OR]=1.73, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.32-2.27) or the use of neither restraint system (OR=1.45, 95% CI=1.02-2.07). The most frequent injury sources in CIREN crashes were roof and its components (24.8%) and noncontact sources (15

  14. Preventing passenger vehicle occupant injuries by vehicle design--a historical perspective from IIHS.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Brian

    2009-04-01

    Motor vehicle crashes result in some 1.2 million deaths and many more injuries worldwide each year and is one of the biggest public health problems facing societies today. This article reviews the history of, and future potential for, one important countermeasure-designing vehicles that reduce occupant deaths and injuries. For many years, people had urged automakers to add design features to reduce crash injuries, but it was not until the mid-1960s that the idea of pursuing vehicle countermeasures gained any significant momentum. In 1966, the U.S. Congress passed the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act, requiring the government to issue a comprehensive set of vehicle safety standards. This was the first broad set of requirements issued anywhere in the world, and within a few years similar standards were adopted in Europe and Australia. Early vehicle safety standards specified a variety of safety designs resulting in cars being equipped with lap/shoulder belts, energy-absorbing steering columns, crash-resistant door locks, high-penetration-resistant windshields, etc. Later, the standards moved away from specifying particular design approaches and instead used crash tests and instrumented dummies to set limits on the potential for serious occupant injuries by crash mode. These newer standards paved the way for an approach that used the marketplace, in addition to government regulation, to improve vehicle safety designs-using crash tests and instrumented dummies to provide consumers with comparative safety ratings for new vehicles. The approach began in the late 1970s, when NHTSA started publishing injury measures from belted dummies in new passenger vehicles subjected to frontal barrier crash tests at speeds somewhat higher than specified in the corresponding regulation. This program became the world's first New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) and rated frontal crashworthiness by awarding stars (five stars being the best and one the worst) derived from head

  15. Design and optimization for the occupant restraint system of vehicle based on a single freedom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junyuan; Ma, Yue; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Yan

    2013-05-01

    Throughout the vehicle crash event, the interactions between vehicle, occupant, restraint system (VOR) are complicated and highly non-linear. CAE and physical tests are the most widely used in vehicle passive safety development, but they can only be done with the detailed 3D model or physical samples. Often some design errors and imperfections are difficult to correct at that time, and a large amount of time will be needed. A restraint system concept design approach which based on single-degree-of-freedom occupant-vehicle model (SDOF) is proposed in this paper. The interactions between the restraint system parameters and the occupant responses in a crash are studied from the view of mechanics and energy. The discrete input and the iterative algorithm method are applied to the SDOF model to get the occupant responses quickly for arbitrary excitations (impact pulse) by MATLAB. By studying the relationships between the ridedown efficiency, the restraint stiffness, and the occupant response, the design principle of the restraint stiffness aiming to reduce occupant injury level during conceptual design is represented. Higher ridedown efficiency means more occupant energy absorbed by the vehicle, but the research result shows that higher ridedown efficiency does not mean lower occupant injury level. A proper restraint system design principle depends on two aspects. On one hand, the restraint system should lead to as high ridedown efficiency as possible, and at the same time, the restraint system should maximize use of the survival space to reduce the occupant deceleration level. As an example, an optimization of a passenger vehicle restraint system is designed by the concept design method above, and the final results are validated by MADYMO, which is the most widely used software in restraint system design, and the sled test. Consequently, a guideline and method for the occupant restraint system concept design is established in this paper.

  16. Numerical simulation of vehicle crashworthiness and occupant protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Nripen K.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical simulation of vehicle crashworthiness and occupant protection are addressed. The vehicle crashworthiness design objectives are to design the vehicle structure for optimum impact energy absorption, and to design the restraint system (seatbelts, airbags, bolsters, etc.) for optimum occupant protection. The following approaches are taken; a major part of the impact energy is to be absorbed by the vehicle structure; the restraint components will provide protection against the remaining crash energy; certain vehicle components are designed to deform under specific types and speeds of impact in a desired mode for sound energy management; structural components such as front side rails, rear rails, door structure and pillars undergo large amounts of deformation; and with properly designed geometry and material these components assist in mitigating the effects of impact.

  17. Detection of vehicle occupants in HOV lanes: exploration of image sensing for detection of vehicle occupants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, Wayne; Usher, Colin; Arif, Omar; Stewart, John; Wood, Jack; Turgeson, John; Hanson, Erin

    2013-03-01

    One technique to better utilize existing roadway infrastructure is the use of HOV and HOT lanes. Technology to monitor the use of these lanes would assist managers and planners in efficient roadway operation. There are no available occupancy detection systems that perform at acceptable levels of accuracy in permanent field installations. The main goal of this research effort is to assess the possibility of determining passenger use with imaging technology. This is especially challenging because of recent changes in the glass types used by car manufacturers to reduce the solar heat load on the vehicles. We describe in this research a system to use multi-plane imaging with appropriate wavelength selection for sensing passengers in the front and rear seats of vehicles travelling in HOV/HOT lanes. The process of determining the geometric relationships needed, the choice of illumination wavelengths, and the appropriate sensors are described, taking into account driver safety considerations. The paper will also cover the design and implementation of the software for performing the window detection and people counting utilizing both image processing and machine learning techniques. The integration of the final system prototype will be described along with the performance of the system operating at a representative location.

  18. Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) (Orion) Occupant Protection. Part 1; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie-Gregg, Nancy J.; Gernhardt, Michael L.; Lawrence, Charles; Somers, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Nancy J. Currie, of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC), Chief Engineer at Johnson Space Center (JSC), requested an assessment of the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) occupant protection as a result of issues identified by the Constellation Program and Orion Project. The NESC, in collaboration with the Human Research Program (HRP), investigated new methods associated with occupant protection for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), known as Orion. The primary objective of this assessment was to investigate new methods associated with occupant protection for the CEV, known as Orion, that would ensure the design provided minimal risk to the crew during nominal and contingency landings in an acceptable set of environmental and spacecraft failure conditions. This documents contains the appendices to the NESC assessment report. NASA/TM-2013-217380, Application of the Brinkley Dynamic Response Criterion to Spacecraft Transient Dynamic Events supersedes this document.

  19. Assessment of Bilateral Thoracic Loading on the Near-Side Occupant Due to Occupant-to-Occupant Interaction in Vehicle Crash Tests.

    PubMed

    Sunnevång, Cecilia; Pipkorn, Bengt; Boström, Ola

    2015-01-01

    This study aims, by means of the WorldSID 50th percentile male, to evaluate thoracic loading and injury risk to the near-side occupant due to occupant-to-occupant interaction in combination with loading from an intruding structure. Nine vehicle crash tests were performed with a 50th percentile WorldSID male dummy in the near-side (adjacent to the intruding structure) seat and a THOR or ES2 dummy in the far-side (opposite the intruding structure) seat. The near-side seated WorldSID was equipped with 6 + 6 IR-Traccs (LH and RH) in the thorax/abdomen enabling measurement of bilateral deflection. To differentiate deflection caused by the intrusion, and the deflection caused by the neighboring occupant, time history curves were analyzed. The crash tests were performed with different modern vehicles, equipped with thorax side airbags and inflatable curtains, ranging from a compact car to a large sedan, and in different loading conditions such as car-to-car, barrier, and pole tests. Lateral delta V based on vehicle tunnel acceleration and maximum residual intrusion at occupant position were used as a measurement of crash severity to compare injury measurements. In the 9 vehicle crash tests, thoracic loading, induced by the intruding structure as well as from the far-side occupant, varied due to the size and structural performance of the car as well as the severity of the crash. Peak deflection on the thoracic outboard side occurred during the first 50 ms of the event. Between 70 to 150 ms loading induced by the neighboring occupant occurred and resulted in an inboard-side peak deflection and viscous criterion. In the tests where the target vehicle lateral delta V was below 30 km/h and intrusion less than 200 mm, deflections were low on both the outboard (20-40 mm) and inboard side (10-15 mm). At higher crash severities, delta V 35 km/h and above as well as intrusions larger than 350 mm, the inboard deflections (caused by interaction to the far-side occupant) were of the

  20. Sleep in High Stress Occupations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn-Evans, Erin

    2014-01-01

    High stress occupations are associated with sleep restriction, circadian misalignment and demanding workload. This presentation will provide an overview of sleep duration, circadian misalignment and fatigue countermeasures and performance outcomes during spaceflight and commercial aviation.

  1. Occupant Protection during Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Landings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.; Jones, J. A.; Granderson, B. K.; Somers, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    The constellation program is evaluating current vehicle design capabilities for nominal water landings and contingency land landings of the Orion Crew Exploration vehicle. The Orion Landing Strategy tiger team was formed to lead the technical effort for which associated activities include the current vehicle design, susceptibility to roll control and tip over, reviewing methods for assessing occupant injury during ascent / aborts /landings, developing an alternate seat/attenuation design solution which improves occupant protection and operability, and testing the seat/attenuation system designs to ensure valid results. The EVA physiology, systems and Performance (EPSP) project is leading the effort under the authority of the Tiger Team Steering committee to develop, verify, validate and accredit biodynamics models using a variety of crash and injury databases including NASCAR, Indy Car and military aircraft. The validated biodynamics models will be used by the Constellation program to evaluate a variety of vehicle, seat and restraint designs in the context of multiple nominal and off-nominal landing scenarios. The models will be used in conjunction with Acceptable Injury Risk definitions to provide new occupant protection requirements for the Constellation Program.

  2. 29 CFR 570.52 - Occupations of motor-vehicle driver and outside helper (Order 2).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Occupations of motor-vehicle driver and outside helper... Health or Well-Being § 570.52 Occupations of motor-vehicle driver and outside helper (Order 2). (a... motor-vehicle driver and outside helper on any public road, highway, in or about any mine...

  3. 29 CFR 570.52 - Occupations of motor-vehicle driver and outside helper (Order 2).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Occupations of motor-vehicle driver and outside helper... Health or Well-Being § 570.52 Occupations of motor-vehicle driver and outside helper (Order 2). (a... motor-vehicle driver and outside helper on any public road, highway, in or about any mine...

  4. 29 CFR 570.52 - Occupations of motor-vehicle driver and outside helper (Order 2).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Occupations of motor-vehicle driver and outside helper... Health or Well-Being § 570.52 Occupations of motor-vehicle driver and outside helper (Order 2). (a... motor-vehicle driver and outside helper on any public road, highway, in or about any mine...

  5. Optimization of vehicle deceleration to reduce occupant injury risks in frontal impact.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Koji; Itakura, Takuya; Hirabayashi, Satoko; Tanaka, Eiichi; Ito, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    In vehicle frontal impacts, vehicle acceleration has a large effect on occupant loadings and injury risks. In this research, an optimal vehicle crash pulse was determined systematically to reduce injury measures of rear seat occupants by using mathematical simulations. The vehicle crash pulse was optimized based on a vehicle deceleration-deformation diagram under the conditions that the initial velocity and the maximum vehicle deformation were constant. Initially, a spring-mass model was used to understand the fundamental parameters for optimization. In order to investigate the optimization under a more realistic situation, the vehicle crash pulse was also optimized using a multibody model of a Hybrid III dummy seated in the rear seat for the objective functions of chest acceleration and chest deflection. A sled test using a Hybrid III dummy was carried out to confirm the simulation results. Finally, the optimal crash pulses determined from the multibody simulation were applied to a human finite element (FE) model. The optimized crash pulse to minimize the occupant deceleration had a concave shape: a high deceleration in the initial phase, low in the middle phase, and high again in the final phase. This crash pulse shape depended on the occupant restraint stiffness. The optimized crash pulse determined from the multibody simulation was comparable to that from the spring-mass model. From the sled test, it was demonstrated that the optimized crash pulse was effective for the reduction of chest acceleration. The crash pulse was also optimized for the objective function of chest deflection. The optimized crash pulse in the final phase was lower than that obtained for the minimization of chest acceleration. In the FE analysis of the human FE model, the optimized pulse for the objective function of the Hybrid III chest deflection was effective in reducing rib fracture risks. The optimized crash pulse has a concave shape and is dependent on the occupant restraint

  6. A comparison of safety belt use between commercial and noncommercial light-vehicle occupants.

    PubMed

    Eby, David W; Fordyce, Tiffani A; Vivoda, Jonathon M

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct an observational survey of safety belt use to determine the use rate of commercial versus noncommercial light-vehicle occupants. Observations were conducted on front-outboard vehicle occupants in eligible commercial and noncommercial vehicles in Michigan (i.e.. passenger cars, vans/minivans, sport-utility vehicles, and pickup trucks). Commercial vehicles that did not fit into one of the four vehicle type categories, such as tractor-trailers, buses, or heavy trucks, were not included in the survey. The study found that the restraint use rate for commercial light-vehicle occupants was 55.8% statewide. The statewide safety belt use rate for commercial light-vehicles was significantly lower than the rate of 71.2% for noncommercial light-vehicles. The safety belt use rate for commercial vehicles was also significantly different as a function of region, vehicle type, seating position, age group, and road type. The results provide important preliminary data about safety belt use in commercial versus noncommercial light-vehicles and indicate that further effort is needed to promote safety belt use in the commercial light-vehicle occupant population. The study also suggests that additional research is required in order to develop effective programs that address low safety belt use in the commercial light-vehicle occupant population.

  7. Vehicle occupancy detection camera position optimization using design of experiments and standard image references

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Peter; Hoover, Martin; Rabbani, Mojgan

    2013-03-01

    Camera positioning and orientation is important to applications in domains such as transportation since the objects to be imaged vary greatly in shape and size. In a typical transportation application that requires capturing still images, inductive loops buried in the ground or laser trigger sensors are used when a vehicle reaches the image capture zone to trigger the image capture system. The camera in such a system is in a fixed position pointed at the roadway and at a fixed orientation. Thus the problem is to determine the optimal location and orientation of the camera when capturing images from a wide variety of vehicles. Methods from Design for Six Sigma, including identifying important parameters and noise sources and performing systematically designed experiments (DOE) can be used to determine an effective set of parameter settings for the camera position and orientation under these conditions. In the transportation application of high occupancy vehicle lane enforcement, the number of passengers in the vehicle is to be counted. Past work has described front seat vehicle occupant counting using a camera mounted on an overhead gantry looking through the front windshield in order to capture images of vehicle occupants. However, viewing rear seat passengers is more problematic due to obstructions including the vehicle body frame structures and seats. One approach is to view the rear seats through the side window. In this situation the problem of optimally positioning and orienting the camera to adequately capture the rear seats through the side window can be addressed through a designed experiment. In any automated traffic enforcement system it is necessary for humans to be able to review any automatically captured digital imagery in order to verify detected infractions. Thus for defining an output to be optimized for the designed experiment, a human defined standard image reference (SIR) was used to quantify the quality of the line-of-sight to the rear seats of

  8. Vehicle occupant injury severity on highways: an empirical investigation.

    PubMed

    Christoforou, Zoi; Cohen, Simon; Karlaftis, Matthew G

    2010-11-01

    Accident severity analysis is important to both researchers and practitioners because of its implications in accident cost estimation, external cost estimation and road safety. Although much research has been done to explore the factors influencing crash-injury severity, few studies have investigated the association between severity and traffic characteristics collected real-time during the time the accident occurred. We apply a random parameters ordered probit model to explore the influence of speed and traffic volume on the injury level sustained by vehicle occupants involved in accidents on the A4-A86 junction in the Paris region. Results indicate that increased traffic volume has a consistently positive effect on severity, while speed has a differential effect on severity depending on flow conditions. 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Disability risk in pediatric motor vehicle crash occupants.

    PubMed

    Doud, Andrea N; Schoell, Samantha L; Weaver, Ashley A; Talton, Jennifer W; Barnard, Ryan T; Petty, John K; Stitzel, Joel D

    2017-05-01

    Mortality rates among children in motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) are typically low; however, nonfatal injuries can vary in severity by imposing differing levels of short- and long-term disability. To better discriminate the severity of nonfatal MVC injuries, a pediatric-specific disability risk (DR) metric was created. The National Automotive Sampling System 2000 to 2011 was used to define the top 95% most common Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) 2+ injuries among pediatric MVC occupants. Functional Independence Measure scores were abstracted from the National Trauma Data Bank 2002 to 2006. Multiple imputation was used to account for missing data. The DR and coinjury-adjusted DR (DRMAIS) of the most common AIS 2+ MVC-induced injuries were calculated for 7-year-old to 18-year-old children by determining the proportion of those disabled after an injury to those sustaining the injury. DR and DRMAIS values ranged from 0 to 1, representing 0% to 100% DR. The mean DR and DRMAIS of all injuries were 0.290 and 0.191, respectively. DR and DRMAIS were greatest for injuries to the head (DR, 0.340; DRMAIS, 0.279), thorax (DR, 0.320; DRMAIS, 0.233), and spine (DR, 0.315; DRMAIS, 0.200). The mean DR and DRMAIS increased with increasing AIS severity but there was significant variation and overlapping values across AIS severity levels. Comparison of DRMAIS to coinjury-adjusted mortality risk (MRMAIS) revealed that among 118 injuries with MRMAIS of 0.000, DRMAIS ranged from 0.000 to 0.429. Incorporation of DR metrics into injury severity metrics may improve the ability to distinguish between the severity of different nonfatal injuries. This is especially crucial in the pediatric population where permanent disability can result in a high number of years lost due to disability. The accuracy of such severity metrics is crucial to the success of pediatric triage algorithms such as Advanced Automatic Crash Notification algorithms. Epidemiologic/prognostic study, level III.

  10. Occupant and Crash Characteristics in Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Injuries Resulting From Motor Vehicle Collisions

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raj D.; Berry, Chirag; Yoganandan, Narayan; Agarwal, Arnav

    2016-01-01

    Background context Motor vehicle collisions (MVC) are a leading cause of thoracic and lumbar (T and L) spine injuries. Mechanisms of injury in vehicular crashes that result in thoracic and lumbar fractures and the spectrum of injury in these occupants have not been extensively studied in the literature. Purpose The objective was to investigate the patterns of T and L spine injury following MVC; correlate these patterns with restraint use, crash characteristics and demographic variables; and study the associations of these injuries with general injury morbidity and fatality. Study design/Setting Retrospective study of a prospectively gathered database. Patient sample Six hundred and thirty-one occupants with T and L (T1-L5) spine injuries from 4572 occupants included in the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) database between 1996 and 2011. Outcome measures No clinical outcome measures were evaluated in this study. Methods The CIREN database includes moderate to severely injured occupants from MVC involving vehicles manufactured recently. Demographic, injury and crash data from each patient was analyzed for correlations between pattern of T and L spine injury, associated extra-spinal injuries and overall injury severity score (ISS), type and use of seat belts, and other crash characteristics. T and L spine injury pattern was categorized using a modified Denis classification, to include extension injuries as a separate entity. Results T and L spine injuries were identified in 631 of 4572 vehicle occupants, of whom 299 sustained major injuries (including 21 extension injuries) and 332 sustained minor injuries. Flexion-distraction injuries were more prevalent in children and young adults, and extension injuries in older adults (mean age 65.7 years). Occupants with extension injuries had a mean BMI of 36.0 and a fatality rate of 23.8%, much higher than the fatality rate for the entire cohort (10.9%). The most frequent extra-spinal injuries (Abbreviated

  11. Occupant and crash characteristics in thoracic and lumbar spine injuries resulting from motor vehicle collisions.

    PubMed

    Rao, Raj D; Berry, Chirag A; Yoganandan, Narayan; Agarwal, Arnav

    2014-10-01

    Motor vehicle collisions (MVC) are a leading cause of thoracic and lumbar (T and L) spine injuries. Mechanisms of injury in vehicular crashes that result in thoracic and lumbar fractures and the spectrum of injury in these occupants have not been extensively studied in the literature. The objective was to investigate the patterns of T and L spine injuries after MVC; correlate these patterns with restraint use, crash characteristics, and demographic variables; and study the associations of these injuries with general injury morbidity and fatality. The study design is a retrospective study of a prospectively gathered database. Six hundred thirty-one occupants with T and L (T1-L5) spine injuries from 4,572 occupants included in the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) database between 1996 and 2011 were included in this study. No clinical outcome measures were evaluated in this study. The CIREN database includes moderate to severely injured occupants from MVC involving vehicles manufactured recently. Demographic, injury, and crash data from each patient were analyzed for correlations between patterns of T and L spine injuries, associated extraspinal injuries and overall injury severity score (ISS), type and use of seat belts, and other crash characteristics. T and L spine injuries patterns were categorized using a modified Denis' classification to include extension injuries as a separate entity. T and L spine injuries were identified in 631 of 4,572 vehicle occupants, of whom 299 sustained major injuries (including 21 extension injuries) and 332 sustained minor injuries. Flexion-distraction injuries were more prevalent in children and young adults and extension injuries in older adults (mean age, 65.7 years). Occupants with extension injuries had a mean body mass index of 36.0 and a fatality rate of 23.8%, much higher than the fatality rate for the entire cohort (10.9%). The most frequent extraspinal injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale Grade 2 or more

  12. Motor Vehicle and Machinery Repairers. Reprinted from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1978-79 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Focusing on motor vehicle and machinery repairers, this document is one in a series of forty-one reprints from the Occupational Outlook Handbook providing current information and employment projections for individual occupations and industries through 1985. The specific occupations covered in this document include automobile body repairers,…

  13. Multilevel Vehicle Design: Fuel Economy, Mobility and Safety Considerations, Part B. Ground Vehicle Weight and Occupant Safety Under Blast Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-11

    apeak) Livermore Software Technology Corporation (2007). LS - DYNA Keyword User’s Manual. http://lstc.com/pdf/ ls -dyna_971_manual_k.pdf, accessed April...B Ground Vehicle Weight and Occupant Safety Under Blast Loading Steven Hoffenson, presenter (U of M) Panos Papalambros, PI (U of M) Michael...Safety Considerations, Part B Ground Vehicle Weight and Occupant Safety Under Blast Loading 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  14. High mobility vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H. (Inventor); Nasif, Annette K. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A vehicle, for driving over a ground surface, has a body with a left side, a right side, a front and a back. The vehicle includes left and right drive mechanisms. Each mechanism includes first and second traction elements for engaging the ground surface and transmitting a driving force between the vehicle and ground surface. Each mechanism includes first and second arms coupled to the first and second traction elements for relative rotation about first and second axis respectively. Each mechanism includes a rotor having a third axis, the rotor coupled to the body for rotation about the third axis and coupled to the first and second arms for relative rotation about the third axis. The mechanism includes first and second drive motors for driving the first and second traction elements and first and second transmissions, driven by the first and second motors and engaging the rotor. Driving the first and second traction elements simultaneously rotates the rotor relative to the first and second arms, respectively.

  15. Analysis of injury severity and vehicle occupancy in truck- and non-truck-involved accidents.

    PubMed

    Chang, L Y; Mannering, F

    1999-09-01

    The impact that large trucks have on accident severity has long been a concern in the accident analysis literature. One important measure of accident severity is the most severely injured occupant in the vehicle. Such data are routinely collected in state accident data files in the U.S. Among the many risk factors that determine the most severe level of injury sustained by vehicle occupants, the number of occupants in the vehicle is an important factor. These effects can be significant because vehicles with higher occupancies have an increased likelihood of having someone seriously injured. This paper studies the occupancy/injury severity relationship using Washington State accident data. The effects of large trucks, which are shown to have a significant impact on the most severely injured vehicle occupant, are accounted for by separately estimating nested logit models for truck-involved accidents and for non-truck-involved accidents. The estimation results uncover important relationships between various risk factors and occupant injury. In addition, by comparing the accident characteristics between truck-involved accidents and non-truck-involved accidents, the risk factors unique to large trucks are identified along with the relative importance of such factors. The findings of this study demonstrate that nested logit modeling, which is able to take into account vehicle occupancy effects and identify a broad range of factors that influence occupant injury, is a promising methodological approach.

  16. 76 FR 53648 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards: Occupant Crash Protection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-29

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 571 RIN 2127-AK25 Federal Motor Vehicle Safety... vehicle safety standard (FMVSS) on occupant crash protection to remove the sunset of a requirement that a vehicle's lap belt must be lockable, without the use of special tools, to tightly secure a child...

  17. 77 FR 29247 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Occupant Crash Protection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 571 RIN 2127-AL07 Federal Motor Vehicle Safety... technical amendments to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 208, Occupant Crash Protection.... This document also makes a correction to the air bag warning label requirements for vehicle...

  18. Improved vehicle occupancy data collection methods. Final report, 1994--1997

    SciTech Connect

    Heidtman, K.; Skarpness, B.; Tornow, C.

    1997-12-31

    The report evaluates current and emerging vehicle occupancy data collection methodologies. Five primary methods for collecting vehicle occupancy data were identified: the traditional roadside/windshield observation method, a recently developed carousel observational method, photographic surveillance, mail-out or telephone surveys, and accident database extraction method. The findings show that other methods besides the traditional windshield method may be advantageous for collecting vehicle occupancy information. The key factors in selecting a collection method are the conditions under which vehicle occupancy is to be estimated. For example, the accident method and mail-out surveys are well suited for developing regional vehicle occupancy estimates, while the windshield method and carousel method are well suited for corridor-specific estimates. Another key finding, which impact the selection of a method and sampling period, is the fact that average vehicle occupancy estimates vary significantly by time-of-day, day-of-week, and month-of-year. The implications of this finding is that agencies cannot continue to infer yearly AVO estimates from data collected during a limited time period such as the morning rush hour period. Recommendations for selecting and implementing a vehicle occupancy data collection method are also provided.

  19. High-risk occupations for suicide.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S E; Jaremin, B; Lloyd, K

    2013-06-01

    High occupational suicide rates are often linked to easy occupational access to a method of suicide. This study aimed to compare suicide rates across all occupations in Britain, how they have changed over the past 30 years, and how they may vary by occupational socio-economic group. Method We used national occupational mortality statistics, census-based occupational populations and death inquiry files (for the years 1979-1980, 1982-1983 and 2001-2005). The main outcome measures were suicide rates per 100 000 population, percentage changes over time in suicide rates, standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and proportional mortality ratios (PMRs). Several occupations with the highest suicide rates (per 100 000 population) during 1979-1980 and 1982-1983, including veterinarians (ranked first), pharmacists (fourth), dentists (sixth), doctors (tenth) and farmers (thirteenth), have easy occupational access to a method of suicide (pharmaceuticals or guns). By 2001-2005, there had been large significant reductions in suicide rates for each of these occupations, so that none ranked in the top 30 occupations. Occupations with significant increases over time in suicide rates were all manual occupations whereas occupations with suicide rates that decreased were mainly professional or non-manual. Variation in suicide rates that was explained by socio-economic group almost doubled over time from 11.4% in 1979-1980 and 1982-1983 to 20.7% in 2001-2005. Socio-economic forces now seem to be a major determinant of high occupational suicide rates in Britain. As the increases in suicide rates among manual occupations occurred during a period of economic prosperity, carefully targeted suicide prevention initiatives could be beneficial.

  20. Preliminary evaluation of wheelchair occupant restraint system usage in motor vehicles.

    PubMed

    van Roosmalen, Linda; Bertocci, Gina E; Hobson, Douglas A; Karg, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    Individuals using wheeled mobility devices (WMDs) often use them as motor vehicle seats during transportation. Wheelchair occupant restraint systems (WORSs), consisting of upper torso and pelvic restraints, are usually mounted to the structure of transit vehicles to secure individuals within their wheelchair seats. This preliminary study attempts to evaluate the use and satisfaction of currently installed vehicle-mounted WORSs for individuals using WMD as seats in motor vehicles. A survey was conducted among 33 adults who use their WMD to travel in motor vehicles. Results from the survey showed that upper torso and pelvic restraints installed in private vehicles are quick, comfortable, and easy to use. However, WORS installed in mass transit and paratransit are often uncomfortable to wear, difficult to reach, and time-consuming to use. This preliminary study documents the growing need for developing alternative WORS that are safe, comfortable, and that allow independent usage for wheelchair occupants while traveling in a motor vehicle.

  1. Daylight saving time and motor vehicle crashes: the reduction in pedestrian and vehicle occupant fatalities.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, S A; Preusser, D F; Lund, A K; Zador, P L; Ulmer, R G

    1995-01-01

    Fatal crashes were tabulated for 6-hour periods around sunrise and sunset, from 13 weeks before the fall change to standard time until 9 weeks after the spring change to daylight saving time. Fatal-crash occurrence was related to changes in daylight, whether these changes occurred abruptly with the fall and spring time changes or gradually with the changing seasons of the year. During daylight saving time, which shifts an hour of daylight to the busier evening traffic hours, there were fewer fatal crashes. An estimated 901 fewer fatal crashes (727 involving pedestrians, 174 involving vehicle occupants) might have occurred if daylight saving time had been retained year-round from 1987 through 1991.

  2. Daylight saving time and motor vehicle crashes: the reduction in pedestrian and vehicle occupant fatalities.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, S A; Preusser, D F; Lund, A K; Zador, P L; Ulmer, R G

    1995-01-01

    Fatal crashes were tabulated for 6-hour periods around sunrise and sunset, from 13 weeks before the fall change to standard time until 9 weeks after the spring change to daylight saving time. Fatal-crash occurrence was related to changes in daylight, whether these changes occurred abruptly with the fall and spring time changes or gradually with the changing seasons of the year. During daylight saving time, which shifts an hour of daylight to the busier evening traffic hours, there were fewer fatal crashes. An estimated 901 fewer fatal crashes (727 involving pedestrians, 174 involving vehicle occupants) might have occurred if daylight saving time had been retained year-round from 1987 through 1991. PMID:7832269

  3. Rear seat safety: Variation in protection by occupant, crash and vehicle characteristics.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Dennis R; Jermakian, Jessica S; Kallan, Michael J; McCartt, Anne T; Arbogast, Kristy B; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Myers, Rachel K

    2015-07-01

    Current information on the safety of rear row occupants of all ages is needed to inform further advances in rear seat restraint system design and testing. The objectives of this study were to describe characteristics of occupants in the front and rear rows of model year 2000 and newer vehicles involved in crashes and determine the risk of serious injury for restrained crash-involved rear row occupants and the relative risk of fatal injury for restrained rear row vs. front passenger seat occupants by age group, impact direction, and vehicle model year. Data from the National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) and Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) were queried for all crashes during 2007-2012 involving model year 2000 and newer passenger vehicles. Data from NASS-CDS were used to describe characteristics of occupants in the front and rear rows and to determine the risk of serious injury (AIS 3+) for restrained rear row occupants by occupant age, vehicle model year, and impact direction. Using a combined data set containing data on fatalities from FARS and estimates of the total population of occupants in crashes from NASS-CDS, logistic regression modeling was used to compute the relative risk (RR) of death for restrained occupants in the rear vs. front passenger seat by occupant age, impact direction, and vehicle model year. Among all vehicle occupants in tow-away crashes during 2007-2012, 12.3% were in the rear row where the overall risk of serious injury was 1.3%. Among restrained rear row occupants, the risk of serious injury varied by occupant age, with older adults at the highest risk of serious injury (2.9%); by impact direction, with rollover crashes associated with the highest risk (1.5%); and by vehicle model year, with model year 2007 and newer vehicles having the lowest risk of serious injury (0.3%). Relative risk of death was lower for restrained children up to age 8 in the rear compared with passengers in the right

  4. The Lack of Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint Use in Children Arriving at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Kathryn D.; Faries, S. Glenn

    2008-01-01

    Background: Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of mortality for children aged 4-14 in the United States. Many children are driven daily to school, increasing their exposure to potential injury, especially if they are not appropriately restrained. Observing the level of motor vehicle occupant restraint (MVOR) use upon school arrival could…

  5. The Lack of Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint Use in Children Arriving at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Kathryn D.; Faries, S. Glenn

    2008-01-01

    Background: Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of mortality for children aged 4-14 in the United States. Many children are driven daily to school, increasing their exposure to potential injury, especially if they are not appropriately restrained. Observing the level of motor vehicle occupant restraint (MVOR) use upon school arrival could…

  6. 75 FR 37343 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Occupant Crash Protection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 571 Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards... rulemaking submitted by Public Citizen and Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, to amend the Federal motor... systems that are regulated by Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 208, ``Occupant...

  7. The Injury Risk to Wheelchair Occupants Using Motor Vehicle Transportation

    PubMed Central

    Songer, Thomas J.; Fitzgerald, Shirley G.; Rotko, Katherine A.

    2004-01-01

    The transportation safety experience for persons using wheelchairs is largely unknown. Motor vehicle crash involvement and injury frequency was examined in a telephone interview completed by 596 wheelchair users. Overall, 42% were drivers. Most subjects also rode as passengers in private vehicles (87%) and public vehicles (61%). Wheelchair use as a seat in the vehicle was higher among passengers than drivers. Crash involvement was highest among drivers and lower in passengers. Reported injuries from non-crash scenarios, though, were higher in passengers compared to drivers. Persons seated in wheelchairs in vehicles appear to be at a greater safety risk. PMID:15319121

  8. Biomechanical analysis of occupant kinematics in rollover motor vehicle accidents: dynamic spit test.

    PubMed

    Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam; Clarke, Richard; Herbst, Brian; Meyer, Steve

    2005-01-01

    A better understanding of occupant kinematics in rollover accidents helps to advance biomechanical knowledge and to enhance the safety features of motor vehicles. While many rollover accident simulation studies have adopted the static approach to delineate the occupant kinematics in rollover accidents, very few studies have attempted the dynamic approach. The present work was designed to study the biomechanics of restrained occupants during rollover accidents using the steady-state dynamic spit test and to address the importance of keeping the lap belt fastened. Experimental tests were conducted using an anthropometric 50% Hybrid III dummy in a vehicle. The vehicle was rotated at 180 degrees/second and the dummy was restrained using a standard three-point restraint system. The lap belt of the dummy was fastened either by using the cinching latch plate or by locking the retractor. Three configurations of shoulder belt harness were simulated: shoulder belt loose on chest with cinch plate, shoulder belt under the left arm and shoulder belt behind the chest. In all tests, the dummy stayed within the confinement of the vehicle indicating that the securely fastened lap belt holds the dummy with dynamic movement of 3 1/2" to 4". The results show that occupant movement in rollover accidents is least affected by various shoulder harness positions with a securely fastened lap belt. The present study forms a first step in delineating the biomechanics of occupants in rollover accidents.

  9. Occupation, industry, and fatal motor vehicle crashes in 20 states, 1986-1987.

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, D P

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Motor vehicles are a leading cause of injury on and off the job. METHODS: To describe the occurrence of fatal motor vehicle crashes in the working-age population, a case-control study was conducted among persons 15-64 years old who died in 1986 or 1987 in any of 20 states reporting death certificate occupational data to the National Center for Health Statistics. Cases were occupants of motor vehicles (excluding motorcycles) who died of injuries sustained in a crash (E810-E825, 9th revision International Classification of Diseases), and controls died of any other cause. RESULTS: Transportation-related occupations had more than the expected number of deaths for men (odds ratio = 1.6, 95% confidence interval = 1.4-1.9) and women (odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval = 1.0-4.5), as did managerial occupations (odds ratio = 1.3 and 1.7, 95% confidence interval = 1.1-1.5 and 1.3-2.2 for men and women, respectively). Men in mining and oil drilling occupations and the wholesale trade industry also had excess crash deaths. Among women, additional excesses were observed among professional specialists and in several groups with few deaths, including agriculture, construction, and the military, whereas homemakers had markedly fewer vehicle crash deaths than expected. CONCLUSIONS: These findings encourage further investigation of this important safety hazard, but also call attention to a need for more detailed studies and improved data. PMID:2029042

  10. Occupational exposure to noise from authorized emergency vehicle sirens.

    PubMed

    Górski, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Warning signals generated by sirens of authorized emergency vehicles should be audible and recognizable to all road users. Currently, there is no legislation in Poland defining sound pressure levels (SPLs) of audible warning signals generated by sirens of authorized emergency vehicles. Measured A-weighted SPLs of those signals range between 104 and 108 dB. While for road users, an audible warning signal is a source of important information and its A-weighted SPL is acceptable, it may be a source of annoying noise to an emergency vehicle crew. That is why, it is necessary to find a method of improving the acoustic comfort of the crew and, at the same time, maintaining the informational function of audible warning signals.

  11. Maxillofacial injuries in moose-motor vehicle collisions versus other high-speed motor vehicle collisions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sharon; Harrop, A Robertson

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anecdotal experience has suggested that there is a higher frequency of maxillofacial injuries among motor vehicle collisions involving moose. OBJECTIVES: A retrospective cohort study design was used to investigate the incidence of various injuries resulting from moose-motor vehicle collisions versus other high-speed motor vehicle collisions. METHODS: A chart review was conducted among patients presenting to a Canadian regional trauma centre during the five-year period from 1996 to 2000. RESULTS: Fifty-seven moose-motor vehicle collisions were identified; 121 high-speed collisions were randomly selected as a control group. Demographic, collision and injury data were collected from these charts and statistically analyzed. The general demographic features of the two groups were similar. Moose collisions were typically frontal impact resulting in windshield damage. The overall injury severity was similar in both groups. Likewise, the frequency of intracranial, spinal, thoracic and extremity injuries was similar for both groups. The group involved in collisions with moose, however, was 1.8 times more likely then controls to sustain a maxillofacial injury (P=0.004) and four times more likely to sustain a maxillofacial fracture (P=0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Occupants of motor vehicles colliding with moose are more likely to sustain maxillofacial injuries than those involved in other types of motor vehicle collisions. It is speculated that this distribution of injuries relates to the mechanism of collision with these large mammals with a high centre of gravity. PMID:24227930

  12. Vertebral fractures in motor vehicle accidents - a medical and technical analysis of 33,015 injured front-seat occupants.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian W; Otte, Dietmar; Decker, Sebastian; Stübig, Timo; Panzica, Martin; Krettek, Christian; Brand, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    Spinal injuries pose a considerable risk to life and quality of life. In spite of improvements in active and passive safety of motor vehicles, car accidents are regarded as a major cause for vertebral fractures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current incidence of vertebral fractures among front-seat occupants in motor vehicle accidents, and to identify specific risk factors for sustaining vertebral fractures in motor vehicle accidents. Data from an accident research unit were accessed to collect collision details, preclinical data, and clinical data. We included all data on front-seat occupants. Hospital records were retrieved, and radiological images were evaluated. We analysed 33,015 front-seat occupants involved in motor vehicle accidents over a 24-year period. We identified 126 subjects (0.38%) with cervical spine fractures, 78 (0.24%) with thoracic fractures, and 99 (0.30%) with lumbar fractures. The mean relative collision speeds were 48, 39, and 40 kph in subjects with cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine fractures, respectively, while it was 17.3 kph in the whole cohort. Contrary to the overall cohort, these patients typically sustained multiple hits rather than simple front collisions. Occupants with vertebral fractures frequently showed numerous concomitant injuries; for example, additional vertebral fractures. The incidence of vertebral fractures corresponded with collision speed. Safety belts were highly effective in the prevention of vertebral fractures. Apart from high speed, complex injury mechanisms as multiple collisions or rollovers were associated with vertebral fractures. Additional preventive measures should focus on these collision mechanisms.

  13. Occupant response and vehicle acceleration in a 30 mph frontal impact test, 1981 Ford F150 Custom Explorer Styleside, pickup, NHTSA 810602

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, D. H.

    1981-06-01

    Various impact modes and vehicle types are investigated through staged collisions. The information collected includes occupant injury measurements as well as seat belt loads, and vehicle acceleration.

  14. Professional drivers: protection needed for a high-risk occupation.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, S P; Wong, J; Baron, R D

    1976-01-01

    "On the job" motor vehicle deaths number more than 4,000 annually in the U.S. and comprise nearly one-third of all work-related deaths. Yet the Department of Labor has set no standards relating to on-the-road safety of the millions of workers whose jobs entail large amounts of driving, and Department of Transportation standards affecting occupational safety cover only drivers in interstate commerce. Drivers of some commercial vehicles, such as heavy trucks, are at special risk of injury because trucks have usually been exempted for many years from federal motor vehicle safety standards--such as standards for brakes and seatbelts--designed to prevent crashes or protect occupants in crashes. Observations based on a series of 150 fatal crashes involving tractor trailers illustrate the need for better protection of this large population of high-risk workers. Clarification of responsibility within the various federal agencies and application of available knowledge and technology are essential. PMID:937611

  15. 75 FR 50958 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Motorcoach Definition; Occupant Crash Protection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 571 RIN 2127-AK56 Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Motorcoach Definition; Occupant Crash Protection AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety...: In accordance with NHTSA's 2007 Motorcoach Safety Plan and DOT's 2009 Departmental Motorcoach Safety...

  16. Injury pattern as an indication of seat belt failure in ejected vehicle occupants.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael D; Eriksson, Anders; Leith, Wendy

    2014-09-01

    Prior authors have suggested that when occupant ejection occurs in association with a seat belt failure, entanglement of the outboard upper extremity (OUE) with the retracting shoulder belt will invariably occur, leaving injury pattern evidence of belt use. In the present investigation, the authors assessed this theory using data accessed from the NASS-CDS for ejected front seat occupants of passenger vehicles. Logistic regression models were used to assess the associations between seat belt failure status and injuries. Injury types associated with seat belt failure were significant OUE and head injuries (OR = 3.87, [95% CI 1.2, 13.0] and 3.1, [95% CI 1.0, 9.7], respectively). The two injury types were found to be a predictor of seat belt use and subsequent failure only if combined with a high (≥0.8) precrash probability of belt use. The injury pattern associated with a seat belt failure-related ejection has limited use in the forensic investigation of crash-related ejections. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. The influence of damage distribution on serious brain injury in occupants in frontal motor vehicle crashes.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, Raul; Conroy, Carol; Hoyt, David B; Pacyna, Sharon; May, MarSue; Erwin, Steve; Tominaga, Gail; Kennedy, Frank; Sise, Michael; Velky, Tom

    2008-07-01

    In spite of improvements in motor vehicle safety systems and crashworthiness, motor vehicle crashes remain one of the leading causes of brain injury. The purpose of this study was to determine if the damage distribution across the frontal plane affected brain injury severity of occupants in frontal impacts. Occupants in "head on" frontal impacts with a Principal Direction of Force (PDOF) equal to 11, 12, or 1o'clock who sustained serious brain injury were identified using the Crash Injury Research Engineering Network (CIREN) database. Impacts were further classified based on the damage distribution across the frontal plane as distributed, offset, and extreme offset (corner). Overall, there was no significant difference for brain injury severity (based on Glasgow Coma Scale<9, or brain injury AIS>2) comparing occupants in the different impact categories. For occupants in distributed frontal impacts, safety belt use was protective (odds ratio (OR)=0.61) and intrusion at the occupant's seat position was four times more likely to result in severe (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS)<9) brain injury (OR=4.35). For occupants in offset frontal impacts, again safety belt use was protective against severe brain injury (OR=0.25). Possibly due to the small number of brain-injured occupants in corner impacts, safety belts did not significantly protect against increased brain injury severity during corner impacts. This study supports the importance of safety belt use to decrease brain injury severity for occupants in distributed and offset frontal crashes. It also illustrates how studying "real world" crashes may provide useful information on occupant injuries under impact circumstances not currently covered by crash testing.

  18. Experimental study on occupant's thermal responses under the non-uniform conditions in vehicle cabin during the heating period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wencan; Chen, Jiqing; Lan, Fengchong

    2014-03-01

    The existing investigations on thermal comfort mostly focus on the thermal environment conditions, especially of the air-flow field and the temperature distributions in vehicle cabin. Less attention appears to direct to the thermal comfort or thermal sensation of occupants, even to the relationship between thermal conditions and thermal sensation. In this paper, a series of experiments were designed and conducted for understanding the non-uniform conditions and the occupant's thermal responses in vehicle cabin during the heating period. To accurately assess the transient temperature distribution in cabin in common daily condition, the air temperature at a number of positions is measured in a full size vehicle cabin under natural winter environment in South China by using a discrete thermocouples network. The occupant body is divided into nine segments, the skin temperature at each segment and the occupant's local thermal sensation at the head, body, upper limb and lower limb are monitored continuously. The skin temperature is observed by using a discrete thermocouples network, and the local thermal sensation is evaluated by using a seven-point thermal comfort survey questionnaire proposed by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc(ASHRAE) Standard. The relationship between the skin temperature and the thermal sensation is discussed and regressed by statistics method. The results show that the interior air temperature is highly non-uniform over the vehicle cabin. The locations where the occupants sit have a significant effect on the occupant's thermal responses, including the skin temperature and the thermal sensation. The skin temperature and thermal sensation are quite different between body segments due to the effect of non-uniform conditions, clothing resistance, and the human thermal regulating system. A quantitative relationship between the thermal sensation and the skin temperature at each body segment of occupant in

  19. Asphyxia: a rare cause of death for motor vehicle crash occupants.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Carol; Stanley, Christina; Eastman, A Brent; Vaughan, Teresa; Vilke, Gary M; Hoyt, David B; Pacyna, Sharon; Smith, Alan

    2008-03-01

    Motor vehicle related trauma is one of the leading causes of traumatic death. Although most of these deaths are because of severe blunt force trauma, there are people without severe injury who die of asphyxia related to the motor vehicle collision. There were 37 deaths because of motor vehicle related asphyxia in San Diego County during 1995-2004. Almost half (48.6%) of these deaths were because of compression asphyxia, 29.7% were positional asphyxia deaths, and 16.2% died of a combination of compression and positional asphyxia. We were unable to classify the mechanism of asphyxia for the remaining 5.4% of asphyxia deaths. Almost all occupants dying from asphyxia were involved in rollover crashes and may have been incapacitated by obesity, drug or alcohol intoxication, or blunt force trauma. Compression asphyxia deaths occurred both from vehicle crush with intrusion into the passenger compartment and from ejection of the occupant and subsequent crushing by the vehicle. Positional asphyxia occurred in positions interfering with normal respiration, including inversion. None of the occupants had injury severe enough to result in death at the scene if they had not first died of asphyxia. This study suggests classifying the mechanism of asphyxia for these fatalities may be a challenge to forensic pathologists who seldom see these rare deaths.

  20. Crash protectiveness to occupant injury and vehicle damage: An investigation on major car brands.

    PubMed

    Huang, Helai; Li, Chunyang; Zeng, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    This study sets out to investigate vehicles' crash protectiveness on occupant injury and vehicle damage, which can be deemed as an extension of the traditional crash worthiness. A Bayesian bivariate hierarchical ordered logistic (BVHOL) model is developed to estimate the occupant protectiveness (OP) and vehicle protectiveness (VP) of 23 major car brands in Florida, with considering vehicles' crash aggressivity and controlling external factors. The proposed model not only takes over the strength of the existing hierarchical ordered logistic (HOL) model, i.e. specifying the order characteristics of crash outcomes and cross-crash heterogeneities, but also accounts for the correlation between the two crash responses, driver injury and vehicle damage. A total of 7335 two-vehicle-crash records with 14,670 cars involved in Florida are used for the investigation. From the estimation results, it's found that most of the luxury cars such as Cadillac, Volvo and Lexus possess excellent OP and VP while some brands such as KIA and Saturn perform very badly in both aspects. The ranks of the estimated safety performance indices are even compared to the counterparts in Huang et al. study [Huang, H., Hu, S., Abdel-Aty, M., 2014. Indexing crash worthiness and crash aggressivity by major car brands. Safety Science 62, 339-347]. The results show that the rank of occupant protectiveness index (OPI) is relatively coherent with that of crash worthiness index, but the ranks of crash aggressivity index in both studies is more different from each other. Meanwhile, a great discrepancy between the OPI rank and that of vehicle protectiveness index is found. What's more, the results of control variables and hyper-parameters estimation as well as comparison to HOL models with separate or identical threshold errors, demonstrate the validity and advancement of the proposed model and the robustness of the estimated OP and VP.

  1. The feasibility test of state-of-the-art face detection algorithms for vehicle occupant detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrushin, Andrey; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus; Langnickel, Mirko; Kraetzer, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Vehicle seat occupancy detection systems are designed to prevent the deployment of airbags at unoccupied seats, thus avoiding the considerable cost imposed by the replacement of airbags. Occupancy detection can also improve passenger comfort, e.g. by activating air-conditioning systems. The most promising development perspectives are seen in optical sensing systems which have become cheaper and smaller in recent years. The most plausible way to check the seat occupancy by occupants is the detection of presence and location of heads, or more precisely, faces. This paper compares the detection performances of the three most commonly used and widely available face detection algorithms: Viola- Jones, Kienzle et al. and Nilsson et al. The main objective of this work is to identify whether one of these systems is suitable for use in a vehicle environment with variable and mostly non-uniform illumination conditions, and whether any one face detection system can be sufficient for seat occupancy detection. The evaluation of detection performance is based on a large database comprising 53,928 video frames containing proprietary data collected from 39 persons of both sexes and different ages and body height as well as different objects such as bags and rearward/forward facing child restraint systems.

  2. Occupational light-vehicle use and OHS legislative frameworks: an Australian example.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Rwth; Lamontagne, Anthony D

    2005-01-01

    Occupational light vehicle (OLV) use and associated exposures and hazards in the Australian context are described. Available insurance data indicate that the OLV injury burden, which is greater than that of other work-road users, is growing as OLV use changes incidental to workers' primary occupations and work patterns. Legislation that affects OLV users is reviewed and the shifting of the burden of responsibility for injured or killed OLV users between workers' compensation, motor accident insurance and public health systems is described. Changes to OHS regulatory frameworks are proposed to better address OLV-relevant policy and practice. These issues are relevant for many international jurisdictions.

  3. Cardiac injuries in car occupants in fatal motor vehicle collisions--an autopsy-based study.

    PubMed

    Turk, Elisabeth E; Tsang, Yee-Wah; Champaneri, Anisha; Pueschel, Klaus; Byard, Roger W

    2010-08-01

    Motor vehicle accidents contribute widely to population morbidity and mortality around the world, and cardiac injuries are a major factor determining outcome. Autopsy reports from 380 motor vehicle occupants who died in motor vehicle crashes in Adelaide, Australia, and Hamburg, Germany, over a 6-year period were reviewed, analysing the presence and type of cardiac injuries and their correlation with factors such as crash type, presence of seatbelt/airbag and vehicle speed as well as with the presence of other injuries which might predict the presence of cardiac injuries in a clinical setting. 21.1% had cardiac injuries identified macroscopically autopsy or histology. Cardiac injuries were the only cause of death or contributed to a fatal outcome in 76% of these cases. Sternal fractures and left-sided serial rib fractures were predictive of cardiac injury.

  4. Occupant injury in rollover crashes - Contribution of planar impacts with objects and other vehicles.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Johan; Poplin, Gerald; McMurry, Tim; Crandall, Jeff; Kerrigan, Jason

    2015-12-01

    Planar impacts with objects and other vehicles may increase the risk and severity of injury in rollover crashes. The current study compares the frequency of injury measures (MAIS 2+, 3+, and 4+; fatal; AIS 2+ head and cervical spine; and AIS 3+ head and thorax) as well as vehicle type distribution (passenger car, SUV, van, and light truck), crash kinematics, and occupant demographics between single vehicle single event rollovers (SV Pure) and multiple event rollovers to determine which types of multiple event rollovers can be pooled with SV Pure to study rollover induced occupant injury. Four different types of multiple event rollovers were defined: single and multi-vehicle crashes for which the rollover is the most severe event (SV Prim and MV Prim) and single and multi-vehicle crashes for which the rollover is not the most severe event (SV Non-Prim and MV Non-Prim). Information from real world crashes was obtained from the National Automotive Sampling System - Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) for the period from 1995 through 2011. Belted, contained or partially ejected, adult occupants in vehicles that completed 1-16 lateral quarter turns were assigned to one of the five rollover categories. The results showed that the frequency of injury in non-primary rollovers (SV Non-Prim and MV Non-Prim) involving no more than one roof inversion is substantially greater than in SV Pure, but that this disparity diminishes for crashes involving multiple inversions. It can further be concluded that for a given number of roof inversions, the distribution of injuries and crash characteristics in SV Pure and SV Prim crashes are sufficiently similar for these categories to be considered collectively for purposes of understanding etiologies and developing strategies for prevention.

  5. Neighborhood-level built environment and social characteristics associated with serious childhood motor vehicle occupant injuries.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Glen D; Lu, Xiaoning

    2011-07-01

    The effect of residential neighborhood characteristics on a child's risk of serious motor vehicle traffic occupant injuries was evaluated in New York State, USA, for the years 1993-2003, with particular focus on the effect of neighborhood walkability. Risk increased significantly (p < 0.0001) with decreasing street connectivity and as more workers commuted more than 30 min using means other than public transportation, along with more single-parent households and less college attainment in the neighborhood, regardless of whether New York City was in the study. After adjusting for age, gender and socio-economic community factors, the apparent loss of walkability in a child's neighborhood increases their risk of serious injury as an occupant of a motor vehicle.

  6. Occupational exposure assessment of highway toll station workers to vehicle engine exhaust.

    PubMed

    Belloc-Santaliestra, Miriam; van der Haar, Rudolf; Molinero-Ruiz, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Toll station workers are occupationally exposed to vehicle engine exhaust, a complex mixture of different chemical substances, including carcinogenic compounds. Therefore, a study was carried out on attendants of two highway toll stations to describe their occupational exposure to vehicle engine exhaust, based on a worst-case scenario approach. Personal sampling was conducted during the day shift for all attendants, testing for three groups of chemical substances: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aldehydes (formaldehyde and acrolein). Concentrations of total PAH, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) and formaldehyde content varied between 97.60-336.08 ng/m3, 5.01-40.52 μg/m3, and 0.06-19.13 μg/m3, respectively. No clear relationships could be established between exposure levels and the number of vehicles. Furthermore, no differences were found between truck versus car lanes, or inside versus outside the tollbooth. Not all the detected VOCs were related to vehicle exhaust; some were consistent with the use of cleaning products. The measured concentrations were far below the established occupational exposure limits, but tended to be higher than values reported for outdoor urban environments. There are very few international studies assessing occupational exposures among toll station workers, and this is the first such study to be conducted in Spain. The results suggest that further, more detailed studies are necessary to characterize exposure properly, and ones which include other airborne pollutants, such as ultrafine particles. The comparison of the results to other similar studies was difficult, since no data related to some important exposure determinants have been provided. Therefore, it is recommended that these determinants be considered in future studies.

  7. Head injuries to restrained occupants in single-vehicle pure rollover crashes.

    PubMed

    Mattos, G A; Grzebieta, R H; Bambach, M R; McIntosh, A S

    2013-01-01

    Studies performed previously of seat-belted occupants in real-world passenger vehicle rollover-only crashes have identified the head as one of the body regions most often seriously injured. However, there have been few studies investigating how these head injuries occur in any detail. This study aims to investigate the characteristics and patterns of head injury to seat-belted occupants in real-world rollover-only crashes and to identify possible biomechanical mechanisms responsible for head injury to aid in the development of a dynamic rollover test protocol. National Automotive Sampling System-Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) data were used to generate summary statistics and perform logistic regression analysis of restrained and contained occupants in U.S. pure trip-over rollover crashes. Specific information from selected CDS cases focused on identifying potential mechanisms and patterns of serious head injury and the rollover conditions under which the injury occurred are also presented. Twenty-one percent of seriously injured occupants in pure trip-over rollovers had a serious head injury. On average, occupants seated on the far side of the rollover sustained serious head injuries more frequently and were more likely to receive injuries to the inboard side of the head than near-side occupants. Serious head injuries appear to be decoupled from serious injuries to other body regions except for a relationship found between basal skull fractures and cervical spine fractures. Serious head injuries were sustained by some occupants who had less than 15 cm of roof crush above their seated position. Serious brain injuries appear to occur frequently as a result of loading to the periphery of the head from contact with the roof assembly. Two mechanisms of injury for basal skull fractures in rollover crashes were identified. The injury patterns and locations of contact to the head are sensitive to the seated position of the occupant.

  8. Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) (Orion) Occupant Protection. [Appendices Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie-Gregg, Nancy J.; Gernhardt, Michael L.; Lawrence, Charles; Somers, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    pronounced in the neck flexion, shoulder deflection and chest deflection. Due to the flexibility of the THUMS, the resulting head and chest accelerations tended to lag the Hybrid III acceleration trace and have a lower peak value. The results of the injury metric comparison identified possible injury trends between simulations. Risk of head injury was highest for the lateral simulations. The risk of chest injury was highest for the rear impact. However, neck injury risk was approximately the same for all simulations. The injury metric value for lumbar spine force was highest for the spinal impact. The leg forces were highest for the rear and lateral impacts. The results of this comparison indicate the THUMS model performs in a similar manner as the Hybrid III ATD. The differences in the responses of model and the ATD are primarily due to the flexibility of the THUMS. This flexibility of the THUMS would be a more human like response. Based on the similarity between the two models, the THUMS should be used in further testing to assess risk of injury to the occupant.

  9. Reduced Protection for Belted Occupants in Rear Seats Relative to Front Seats of New Model Year Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Sahraei, Elham; Digges, Kennerly; Marzougui, Dhafer

    2010-01-01

    Effectiveness of the rear seat in protecting occupants of different age groups in frontal crashes for 2000–2009 model years (MY) of vehicles was estimated and compared to 1990–1999 model years of vehicles. The objective was to determine the effectiveness of the rear seat compared to the front seat for various age groups in newer model year vehicles. The double paired comparison method was used to estimate relative effectiveness. For belted adults of the 25–49 age group, the fatality reduction effectiveness of the rear seat compared to the right front seat was 25 % (CI 11% to 36%), in the 1990–1999 model year vehicles. The relative effectiveness was −31% (CI −63% to −5%) for the same population, in the 2000–2009 model year vehicles. For restrained children 0–8 years old, the relative effectiveness was 55% (CI 48% to 61%) when the vehicles were of the 1990–1999 period. The level of effectiveness for this age group was reduced to 25% (CI −4% to 46%) in the 2000–2009 MYs of vehicles. Results for other age groups of belted occupants have followed a similar trend. All belted adult occupants of 25+ years old were significantly less protected in rear seats as compared to right front seats in the 2000–2009 model years of vehicles. For unbelted occupants however, rear seats were still a safer position than front seats, even in the 2000–2009 model years of vehicles. PMID:21050599

  10. Computer-aided human factors analysis of the industrial vehicle driver cabin to improve occupational health.

    PubMed

    Koushik Balaji, K; Alphin, M S

    2016-09-01

    Industrial vehicle operator's solace and safety have gained significant consideration because of the increment in occupational health issues and accidents. The purpose of this work was to amend the design of the excavator driver cabin through human factor analysis. Thirty operators of excavators who were serving as subjects, were interviewed and identified that their wrist, upper arm and trunk were at a higher risk level while operating. Photograph of the operators was taken and the work environment was simulated. RULA (Rapid Upper Limb Assessment) and REBA (Rapid Entire Body Assessment) scoring was made on different simulated work posture of operators using CATIA V5 and UEAT1.8 softwares. Based on overall RULA and REBA scoring, it was found nearly 46% of the operators were operating at a high hazard level and needed investigation immediately, whereas 35% of operators were at a medium risk level and only 19% of operators were operating safely. The individual RULA and REBA scoring proved prevalence of discomfort in wrist, upper arm and trunk while operating. Identifying the optimized conditions to hold the control levers will help to reduce the operator strain. From the design optimization in excavators, the optimal conditions to hold the control lever is found to be 40cm for popliteal height, 60.51 cm for distance from elbow to ground and 15.07º for reach angle from the seat reference point.

  11. Forecasting impact injuries of unrestrained occupants in railway vehicle passenger compartments.

    PubMed

    Xie, Suchao; Zhou, Hui

    2014-01-01

    In order to predict the injury parameters of the occupants corresponding to different experimental parameters and to determine impact injury indices conveniently and efficiently, a model forecasting occupant impact injury was established in this work. The work was based on finite experimental observation values obtained by numerical simulation. First, the various factors influencing the impact injuries caused by the interaction between unrestrained occupants and the compartment's internal structures were collated and the most vulnerable regions of the occupant's body were analyzed. Then, the forecast model was set up based on a genetic algorithm-back propagation (GA-BP) hybrid algorithm, which unified the individual characteristics of the back propagation-artificial neural network (BP-ANN) model and the genetic algorithm (GA). The model was well suited to studies of occupant impact injuries and allowed multiple-parameter forecasts of the occupant impact injuries to be realized assuming values for various influencing factors. Finally, the forecast results for three types of secondary collision were analyzed using forecasting accuracy evaluation methods. All of the results showed the ideal accuracy of the forecast model. When an occupant faced a table, the relative errors between the predicted and experimental values of the respective injury parameters were kept within ± 6.0 percent and the average relative error (ARE) values did not exceed 3.0 percent. When an occupant faced a seat, the relative errors between the predicted and experimental values of the respective injury parameters were kept within ± 5.2 percent and the ARE values did not exceed 3.1 percent. When the occupant faced another occupant, the relative errors between the predicted and experimental values of the respective injury parameters were kept within ± 6.3 percent and the ARE values did not exceed 3.8 percent. The injury forecast model established in this article reduced repeat experiment times

  12. Using in-depth investigations to identify transportation safety issues for wheelchair-seated occupants of motor vehicles.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Lawrence W; Klinich, Kathleen D; Moore, Jamie L; MacWilliams, Joel B

    2010-04-01

    In-depth investigations of motor-vehicle crashes involve detailed inspection, measurement, and photodocumentation of vehicle exterior and interior damage, evidence of belt-restraint use, and evidence of occupant contacts with the vehicle interior. Results of in-depth investigations thereby provide the most objective way to identify current and emerging injury problems and issues in occupant safety and crash protection, and provide important feedback on the real-world performance of the latest restraint-system and vehicle crashworthiness technologies. To provide an objective understanding of real-world transportation safety issues for wheelchair-seated travelers, the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI) has been conducting and assembling data from in-depth investigations of motor-vehicle crashes and non-crash adverse moving-vehicle incidents, such as emergency vehicle braking, turning, and swerving, in which there was at least one vehicle occupant sitting in a wheelchair. The results of 39 investigations involving 42 wheelchair-seated occupants have been assembled and entered into a wheelchair-occupant crash/injury database. In addition, a biomechanical analysis of each case has been performed to identify key safety issues for wheelchair-seated travelers. The wheelchairs of 34 of the 42 occupants who were seated in wheelchairs while traveling in motor vehicles were effectively secured by either a four-point, strap-type tiedown system or a docking securement device, and all but one of these properly secured wheelchairs remained in place during the crash or non-collision event. However, 30 of the 42 occupants were improperly restrained, either because of non-use or incomplete use of available belt restraints, or because the belt restraints were improperly positioned on the occupant's body. Twenty-six of the 42 occupants sustained significant injuries and 10 of these occupants died as a direct result of injuries sustained, or from

  13. Children's hospitals do not acutely respond to high occupancy

    PubMed Central

    Fieldston, Evan S.; Hall, Matthew; Sills, Marion R.; Slonim, Anthony D.; Myers, Angela L.; Cannon, Courtney; Pati, Susmita; Shah, Samir S.

    2010-01-01

    Context High hospital occupancy may lead to overcrowding in emergency departments (ED) and inpatient units, adversely impacting patient care. It is not known how children's hospitals acutely respond to high occupancy. Objective To describe the frequency, direction and magnitude of children's hospitals' acute responses to high occupancy. Design, Setting, and Participants Patients discharged from 39 children's hospitals participating in the Pediatric Health Information System database during 2006 were eligible. Midnight census data were used to construct occupancy levels. Main Outcome Measures Acute response to high occupancy measured by 8 variables, including changes in hospital admissions (4 measures), transfers (2 measures), and length of stay (2 measures). Results Hospitals were frequently at high occupancy, with 28% of midnights at 85–94% occupancy and 42% of midnights at ≥95% occupancy. While half of children's hospitals employed occupancy-mitigating responses, there was variability in responses and magnitudes were small. When occupancy was >95%, no more than 8% of hospitals took steps to reduce admissions, 13% increased transfers out, and up to 58% reduced standardized length of stay. Two-day lag response was more common, but remained of too small a magnitude to make a difference in hospital crowding. Additional modeling techniques also revealed little response. Conclusions We found a low rate of acute response to high occupancy. When there was a response, the magnitude was small. PMID:20403931

  14. Children's hospitals do not acutely respond to high occupancy.

    PubMed

    Fieldston, Evan S; Hall, Matthew; Sills, Marion R; Slonim, Anthony D; Myers, Angela L; Cannon, Courtney; Pati, Susmita; Shah, Samir S

    2010-05-01

    High hospital occupancy may lead to overcrowding in emergency departments and inpatient units, having an adverse impact on patient care. It is not known how children's hospitals acutely respond to high occupancy. The objective of this study was to describe the frequency, direction, and magnitude of children's hospitals' acute responses to high occupancy. Patients who were discharged from 39 children's hospitals that participated in the Pediatric Health Information System database during 2006 were eligible. Midnight census data were used to construct occupancy levels. Acute response to high occupancy was measured by 8 variables, including changes in hospital admissions (4 measures), transfers (2 measures), and length of stay (2 measures). Hospitals were frequently at high occupancy, with 28% of midnights at 85% to 94% occupancy and 42% of midnights at > or =95% occupancy. Whereas half of children's hospitals used occupancy-mitigating responses, there was variability in responses and magnitudes were small. When occupancy was >95%, no more than 8% of hospitals took steps to reduce admissions, 13% increased transfers out, and up to 58% reduced standardized length of stay. Two-day lag response was more common but remained of too small a magnitude to make a difference in hospital crowding. Additional modeling techniques also revealed little response. We found a low rate of acute response to high occupancy. When there was a response, the magnitude was small.

  15. A comparison of injuries, crashes, and outcomes for pediatric rear occupants in traffic motor vehicle collisions.

    PubMed

    Charyk Stewart, Tanya; McClafferty, Kevin; Shkrum, Michael; Comeau, Jean-Louis; Gilliland, Jason; Fraser, Douglas D

    2013-02-01

    This study was initiated was initiated to describe pediatric rear-occupant motor vehicle collision (MVC) injuries, including injury patterns and outcomes as well as characteristics associated with severe injury to the head and abdomen. A retrospective cohort of severely injured (Injury Severity Score [ISS] > 12) pediatric (age <18 years) patients involved in a traffic MVC as a rear occupant and treated at one of two Ontario trauma centers (2001-2010) was studied was studied. Demographic, injury, crash and outcome data were obtained from the trauma registries. Data were statistically compared by two pediatric age groups: children (0-8 years; requiring a child or booster seat) versus adolescents (9-17 years; requiring a lap-shoulder belt). There were 36 children (34%) and 70 adolescents (66%) severely injured as rear occupants in MVCs. Despite similar ISS (p = 0.716) and mortality rates (p = 0.680) between age groups, there were significant differences in injury patterns and risk factors. Children were more likely to have severe head injuries (78% vs. 39%, p < 0.001) associated with a lack of an age-appropriate child restraints (odds ratio [OR], 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-10.8; p = 0.029), middle seating (OR, 6.2; 95% CI, 1.5-26.1; p = 0.013), and side-impact crashes (p = 0.007). Adolescents were more likely to have severe abdominal injuries (23% vs. 6%, p < 0.001) associated with the use of lap-shoulder belts (OR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.1-13.3; p = 0.034), single-vehicle MVCs (p = 0.007), and vehicle extrications (p = 0.035). While safer than the front seat for children, additional study is needed on the restraint systems and the potential for injury to pediatric rear occupants in an MVC. Our data suggest that pediatric age groups differ in injuries, risk factors, and MVC impacts. Recommendations for improved protection of child occupants and preferred seating positions are required. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  16. Simulation of adaptive semi-active magnetorheological seat damper for vehicle occupant blast protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jin-Hyeong; Murugan, Muthuvel; Wereley, Norman M.

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates a lumped-parameter human body model which includes lower leg in seated posture within a quarter-car model for blast injury assessment simulation. To simulate the shock acceleration of the vehicle, mine blast analysis was conducted on a generic land vehicle crew compartment (sand box) structure. For the purpose of simulating human body dynamics with non-linear parameters, a physical model of a lumped-parameter human body within a quarter car model was implemented using multi-body dynamic simulation software. For implementing the control scheme, a skyhook algorithm was made to work with the multi-body dynamic model by running a co-simulation with the control scheme software plug-in. The injury criteria and tolerance levels for the biomechanical effects are discussed for each of the identified vulnerable body regions, such as the relative head displacement and the neck bending moment. The desired objective of this analytical model development is to study the performance of adaptive semi-active magnetorheological damper that can be used for vehicle-occupant protection technology enhancements to the seat design in a mine-resistant military vehicle.

  17. Subjective and objective evaluation of sense of space for vehicle occupants based on anthropometric data.

    PubMed

    Hiamtoe, Pitarn; Steinhardt, Florian; Köhler, Uwe; Bengler, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    At present, the number of the vehicle requirements has been continuously increasing. These requirements can be related to the customer as well as the technical requirements. Among these, the "feeling of space" of the occupants inside the vehicles can be regarded as one of the most important factors. In this respect, the driver and passengers should be able to experience positive feeling of space inside the vehicle. There are numerous factors that can influence the sense of space inside the vehicle. These include geometry (vehicle dimensions), light exposure, ambient lights, colors, material selection and material surface. Depending on the selection, the sense of space can be dramatically influenced by these factors. In general, human feeling is subjective and cannot be measured by any instrument. The measure can nevertheless be carried out by utilizing the method of subjective evaluation. Throughout the experiments, the method of evaluation is developed and the factors which can influence the interior feeling are analyzed. In this process, psychological perception, architectural aspects and anthropometry are considered and knowledge from the other domains is transferred in the form of a multidisciplinary approach. The experiments with an aim to evaluate the overall sense of space in the vehicle are carried out based on the physical mock up of BMW 1 series (E87). The space perception with different interior dimensions and anthropometric data of test persons are also analyzed. The use of Computer Aided Technology was shown by CATIA V5, PCMAN and RAMSIS. The results show a good correlation between the subjective evaluation and the geometric values.

  18. Working in light vehicles--a review and conceptual model for occupational health and safety.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Rwth; Lamontagne, Anthony D; Sim, Malcolm

    2007-09-01

    Occupational light vehicle (OLV) use is the leading cause of work related traumatic deaths in Westernised countries. Previous research has focused primarily on narrow contexts of OLV-use such as corporate fleet vehicles. We have proposed a comprehensive systems model for OLV-use to provide a framework for identifying research needs and proposing policy and practice interventions. This model presents the worker as the locus of injury at the centre of work- and road-related determinants of injury. Using this model, we reviewed existing knowledge and found most studies focused only on company car drivers, neglecting OLV-users in non-traditional employment arrangements and those using other vehicle types. Environmental exposures, work design factors and risk and protective factors for the wider OLV-user population are inadequately researched. Neither road- nor work-related policy appropriately addresses OLV-use, and population surveillance relies largely on inadequate workers compensation insurance data. This review demonstrates that there are significant gaps in understanding the problem of OLV-use and a need for further research integrating public health, insurance and road safety responses. The model provides a framework for understanding the theory of OLV-use OHS and guidance for urgently needed intervention research, policy and practice.

  19. The effects of daylight and daylight saving time on US pedestrian fatalities and motor vehicle occupant fatalities.

    PubMed

    Coate, Douglas; Markowitz, Sara

    2004-05-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of daylight and daylight saving time (DST) on pedestrian and motor vehicle occupant fatalities in the United States. Multivariate analyses of county level data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System for 2-week periods in 1998 and 1999 are used. Results show that full year daylight saving time would reduce pedestrian fatalities by 171 per year, or by 13% of all pedestrian fatalities in the 5:00-10.00 a.m. and in the 4:00-9:00 p.m. time periods. Motor vehicle occupant fatalities would be reduced by 195 per year, or 3%, during the same time periods.

  20. Risk of injury and fatality in single vehicle rollover crashes: danger for the front seat occupant in the "outside arc".

    PubMed

    Jehle, Dietrich; Kuebler, Joseph; Auinger, Peggy

    2007-10-01

    Rollover crashes are responsible for a large portion of motor vehicle occupant injuries and fatalities. To examine if there is an increased risk of injury or death for either front seat occupant depending on the direction the vehicle rolled over. Between 1992 and 2002, crash data were collected and analyzed from the National Accident Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System (NASS/CDS) database of police reported tow-away crashes in the United States. These data were limited to information concerning single vehicle crashes with right or left initial rollover, in which both driver and front seat passenger were present and secured with lap-shoulder belts. The "outside arc" occupant was defined as the occupant who underwent the greatest degree of initial rotational torque during the rollover. Crashes involving sport utility vehicles (SUVs) were further evaluated for risks of injury or death based on the direction of the initial rollover. The location of roof crush and the types of injuries were also analyzed for these rollovers. This weighted database allows for the calculation of mortality and injury prevalence in the population. There was a significantly higher fatality rate for outside arc occupants than inside arc occupants in rollover crashes. The weighted percentage fatality for the occupant on the outside arc for all classes of light passenger vehicles was 0.38%, while the percentage fatality for the occupant on the inside arc was 0.23% (odds ratio [OR], 1.64; p = 0.04). As a subgroup, the SUV class showed a weighted outside arc fatality percentage of 0.23%, while the inside arc fatality percentage was 0.02% (OR, 10.69; p = 0.06). Additionally, in SUVs, the weighted percentage having an Injury Severity Score of 9-75 was 0.99% for the outside arc passengers but only 0.19% for the inside arc passengers (OR, 5.42; p = 0.04). Roof crush was located more commonly on the outside arc of the rollovers than on the inside arc (42% vs. 26.3%; p < 0.01). There was a

  1. Rural and Urban Differences in Passenger-Vehicle-Occupant Deaths and Seat Belt Use Among Adults - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Beck, Laurie F; Downs, Jonathan; Stevens, Mark R; Sauber-Schatz, Erin K

    2017-09-22

    Motor-vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death in the United States. Compared with urban residents, rural residents are at an increased risk for death from crashes and are less likely to wear seat belts. These differences have not been well described by levels of rurality. 2014. Data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were used to identify passenger-vehicle-occupant deaths from motor-vehicle crashes and estimate the prevalence of seat belt use. FARS, a census of U.S. motor-vehicle crashes involving one or more deaths, was used to identify passenger-vehicle-occupant deaths among adults aged ≥18 years. Passenger-vehicle occupants were defined as persons driving or riding in passenger cars, light trucks, vans, or sport utility vehicles. Death rates per 100,000 population, age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population and the proportion of occupants who were unrestrained at the time of the fatal crash, were calculated. BRFSS, an annual, state-based, random-digit-dialed telephone survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. civilian population aged ≥18 years, was used to estimate prevalence of seat belt use. FARS and BRFSS data were analyzed by a six-level rural-urban designation, based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture 2013 rural-urban continuum codes, and stratified by census region and type of state seat belt enforcement law (primary or secondary). Within each census region, age-adjusted passenger-vehicle-occupant death rates per 100,000 population increased with increasing rurality, from the most urban to the most rural counties: South, 6.8 to 29.2; Midwest, 5.3 to 25.8; West, 3.9 to 40.0; and Northeast, 3.5 to 10.8. (For the Northeast, data for the most rural counties were not reported because of suppression criteria; comparison is for the most urban to the second-most rural counties.) Similarly, the proportion of occupants who were unrestrained at the time of the fatal crash

  2. High-performance computers for unmanned vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toms, David; Ettinger, Gil J.

    2005-10-01

    The present trend of increasing functionality onboard unmanned vehicles is made possible by rapid advances in high-performance computers (HPCs). An HPC is characterized by very high computational capability (100s of billions of operations per second) contained in lightweight, rugged, low-power packages. HPCs are critical to the processing of sensor data onboard these vehicles. Operations such as radar image formation, target tracking, target recognition, signal intelligence signature collection and analysis, electro-optic image compression, and onboard data exploitation are provided by these machines. The net effect of an HPC is to minimize communication bandwidth requirements and maximize mission flexibility. This paper focuses on new and emerging technologies in the HPC market. Emerging capabilities include new lightweight, low-power computing systems: multi-mission computing (using a common computer to support several sensors); onboard data exploitation; and large image data storage capacities. These new capabilities will enable an entirely new generation of deployed capabilities at reduced cost. New software tools and architectures available to unmanned vehicle developers will enable them to rapidly develop optimum solutions with maximum productivity and return on investment. These new technologies effectively open the trade space for unmanned vehicle designers.

  3. Educational and Occupational Aspirations of High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNerney, Kristine A.; Coleman, Christy L.

    Shifts in the number of women in the workplace and a greater diversity and prestige level in their work may have an impact on the educational and occupational level to which students aspire. To examine the consequences of this shift, a comparison of the educational and occupational aspirations of high school students with the educational and…

  4. An Injury Severity-, Time Sensitivity-, and Predictability-Based Advanced Automatic Crash Notification Algorithm Improves Motor Vehicle Crash Occupant Triage.

    PubMed

    Stitzel, Joel D; Weaver, Ashley A; Talton, Jennifer W; Barnard, Ryan T; Schoell, Samantha L; Doud, Andrea N; Martin, R Shayn; Meredith, J Wayne

    2016-06-01

    Advanced Automatic Crash Notification algorithms use vehicle telemetry measurements to predict risk of serious motor vehicle crash injury. The objective of the study was to develop an Advanced Automatic Crash Notification algorithm to reduce response time, increase triage efficiency, and improve patient outcomes by minimizing undertriage (<5%) and overtriage (<50%), as recommended by the American College of Surgeons. A list of injuries associated with a patient's need for Level I/II trauma center treatment known as the Target Injury List was determined using an approach based on 3 facets of injury: severity, time sensitivity, and predictability. Multivariable logistic regression was used to predict an occupant's risk of sustaining an injury on the Target Injury List based on crash severity and restraint factors for occupants in the National Automotive Sampling System - Crashworthiness Data System 2000-2011. The Advanced Automatic Crash Notification algorithm was optimized and evaluated to minimize triage rates, per American College of Surgeons recommendations. The following rates were achieved: <50% overtriage and <5% undertriage in side impacts and 6% to 16% undertriage in other crash modes. Nationwide implementation of our algorithm is estimated to improve triage decisions for 44% of undertriaged and 38% of overtriaged occupants. Annually, this translates to more appropriate care for >2,700 seriously injured occupants and reduces unnecessary use of trauma center resources for >162,000 minimally injured occupants. The algorithm could be incorporated into vehicles to inform emergency personnel of recommended motor vehicle crash triage decisions. Lower under- and overtriage was achieved, and nationwide implementation of the algorithm would yield improved triage decision making for an estimated 165,000 occupants annually. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Neuropathology and neurobehavioral alterations in a rat model of traumatic brain injury to occupants of vehicles targeted by underbody blasts.

    PubMed

    Tchantchou, Flaubert; Fourney, William L; Leiste, Ulrich H; Vaughan, Joshua; Rangghran, Parisa; Puche, Adam; Fiskum, Gary

    2017-03-01

    Many victims of blast-induced traumatic brain injury are occupants of military vehicles targeted by land mines. Recently improved vehicle designs protect these individuals against blast overpressure, leaving acceleration as the main force potentially responsible for brain injury. We recently developed a unique rat model of under-vehicle blast-induced hyperacceleration where exposure to acceleration as low as 50G force results in histopathological evidence of diffuse axonal injury and astrocyte activation, with no evidence of neuronal cell death. This study investigated the effects of much higher blast-induced accelerations (1200 to 2800G) on neuronal cell death, neuro-inflammation, behavioral deficits and mortality. Adult male rats were subjected to this range of accelerations, in the absence of exposure to blast overpressure, and evaluated over 28days for working memory (Y maze) and anxiety (elevated plus maze). In addition, brains obtained from rats at one and seven days post-injury were used for neuropathology and neurochemical assays. Sixty seven percent of rats died soon after being subjected to blasts resulting in 2800G acceleration. All rats exposed to 2400G acceleration survived and exhibited transient deficits in working memory and long-term anxiety like behaviors, while those exposed to 1200 acceleration G force only demonstrated increased anxiety. Behavioral deficits were associated with acute microglia/macrophage activation, increased hippocampal neuronal death, and reduced levels of tight junction- and synapse- associated proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that exposure of rats to high underbody blast-induced G forces results in neurologic injury accompanied by neuronal apoptosis, neuroinflammation and evidence for neurosynaptic alterations.

  6. Seatbelt use to save money: Impact on hospital costs of occupants who are involved in motor vehicle crashes.

    PubMed

    Han, Guang-Ming; Newmyer, Ashley; Qu, Ming

    2017-03-01

    Seatbelt use is the single most effective way to save lives in motor vehicle crashes (MVC). However, although safety belt laws have been enacted in many countries, seatbelt usage throughout the world remains below optimal levels, and educational interventions may be needed to further increase seatbelt use. In addition to reducing crash-related injuries and deaths, reduced medical expenditures resulting from seatbelt use are an additional benefit that could make such interventions cost-effective. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to estimate the correlation between seatbelt use and hospital costs of injuries involved in MVC. The data used in this study were from the Nebraska CODES database for motor vehicle crashes that occurred between 2004 and 2013. The hospital cost information and information about other factors were obtained by linking crash reports with hospital discharge data. A multivariable regression model was performed for the association between seatbelt use and hospital costs. Mean hospital costs were significantly lower among motor vehicle occupants using a lap-shoulder seatbelt ($2909), lap-only seatbelt ($2289), children's seatbelt ($1132), or booster ($1473) when compared with those not using any type of seatbelt ($7099). After adjusting for relevant factors, there were still significantly decreased hospital costs for motor vehicle occupants using a lap-shoulder seatbelt (84.7%), lap-only seatbelt (74.1%), shoulder-only seatbelt (40.6%), children's seatbelt (95.9%), or booster (82.8%) compared to those not using a seatbelt. Seatbelt use is significantly associated with reduced hospital costs among injured MVC occupants. The findings in this study will provide important educational information for emergency department nurses who can encourage safety belt use for vehicle occupants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Cadwallader

    2005-01-31

    This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

  8. Specific occupant and collision characteristics are associated with motor vehicle collision-related blunt cerebrovascular artery injury.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ross P; McGwin, Gerald; Melton, Sherry M; Reiff, Donald A; Whitley, David; Rue, Loring W

    2004-01-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular artery injury (BCI) remains difficult to diagnose but is recognized with increasing frequency after motor vehicle collisions (MVCs). Failure to detect this injury in a timely fashion can be devastating. Criteria that can be used to heighten the suspicion of this injury have been suggested; however, more encompassing screening has been recommended. To address this need, we sought to describe occupant, vehicle, and collision characteristics among MVC occupants who sustained a BCI. All cases of BCI identified in the National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System, a national probability sample of passenger vehicles involved in police-reported tow-away MVCs, between 1993 and 2001 were selected. Information on occupant (e.g., demographics, seating position, and restraint use), collision (e.g., collision type and severity), and vehicle characteristics were obtained and summarized using descriptive statistics. Nine-hundred forty individuals with BCI were identified in the Crashworthiness Data System data files. Over half were belted (57.4%) and 82.3% had airbag deployment; 16.2% were partially or completely ejected from the vehicle. Head and thoracic injuries were common (44.4% and 40.8%, respectively); 27.8% sustained a cervical spine fracture and 21.0% sustained a soft-tissue injury to the neck. The mean Injury Severity Score was 33.6. The case fatality rate was 44.5%. The majority of BCI occupants were drivers (76.0%). Among belted occupants, the lap/shoulder was the most commonly attributed as the injury source (61.4%). Among unbelted occupants, frequent injury sources included air bags (15.0%), windshield (13.7%), and other interior objects. With respect to collision characteristics, the average change in velocity (Delta V) was 43.3 km/h. The majority of collisions were frontal (76.2%). This study indicates that BCI is both a rare and lethal injury typified by specific occupant and collision characteristics. These characteristics

  9. High occupational stress and low career satisfaction of Korean surgeons.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sang Hee; Boo, Yoon Jung; Lee, Ji Sung; Han, Hyung Joon; Jung, Cheol Woong; Kim, Chong Suk

    2015-02-01

    Surgery is a demanding and stressful field in Korea. Occupational stress can adversely affect the quality of care, decrease job satisfaction, and potentially increase medical errors. The aim of this study was to investigate the occupational stress and career satisfaction of Korean surgeons. We have conducted an electronic survey of 621 Korean surgeons for the occupational stress. Sixty-five questions were used to assess practical and personal characteristics and occupational stress using the Korean occupational stress scale (KOSS). The mean KOSS score was 49.31, which was higher than the average of Korean occupational stress (45.86) or that of other specialized professions (46.03). Young age, female gender, long working hours, and frequent night duties were significantly related to the higher KOSS score. Having spouse, having hobby and regular exercise decreased the KOSS score. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that long working hours and regular exercise were the independent factors associated with the KOSS score. Less than 50% of surgeons answered that they would become a surgeon again. Most surgeons (82.5%) did not want to recommend their child follow their career. Korean Surgeons have high occupational stress and low level of career satisfaction.

  10. High Altitude Supersonic Decelerator Test Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Brant T.; Blando, Guillermo; Kennett, Andrew; Von Der Heydt, Max; Wolff, John Luke; Yerdon, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project is tasked by NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) to advance the state of the art in Mars entry and descent technology in order to allow for larger payloads to be delivered to Mars at higher altitudes with better accuracy. The project will develop a 33.5 m Do Supersonic Ringsail (SSRS) parachute, 6m attached torus, robotic class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-R), and an 8 m attached isotensoid, exploration class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-E). The SSRS and SIAD-R should be brought to TRL-6, while the SIAD-E should be brought to TRL-5. As part of the qualification and development program, LDSD must perform a Mach-scaled Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) in order to demonstrate successful free flight dynamic deployments at Mars equivalent altitude, of all three technologies. In order to perform these tests, LDSD must design and build a test vehicle to deliver all technologies to approximately 180,000 ft and Mach 4, deploy a SIAD, free fly to approximately Mach 2, deploy the SSRS, record high-speed and high-resolution imagery of both deployments, as well as record data from an instrumentation suite capable of characterizing the technology induced vehicle dynamics. The vehicle must also be recoverable after splashdown into the ocean under a nominal flight, while guaranteeing forensic data protection in an off nominal catastrophic failure of a test article that could result in a terminal velocity, tumbling water impact.

  11. High Altitude Supersonic Decelerator Test Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Brant T.; Blando, Guillermo; Kennett, Andrew; Von Der Heydt, Max; Wolff, John Luke; Yerdon, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project is tasked by NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) to advance the state of the art in Mars entry and descent technology in order to allow for larger payloads to be delivered to Mars at higher altitudes with better accuracy. The project will develop a 33.5 m Do Supersonic Ringsail (SSRS) parachute, 6m attached torus, robotic class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-R), and an 8 m attached isotensoid, exploration class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-E). The SSRS and SIAD-R should be brought to TRL-6, while the SIAD-E should be brought to TRL-5. As part of the qualification and development program, LDSD must perform a Mach-scaled Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) in order to demonstrate successful free flight dynamic deployments at Mars equivalent altitude, of all three technologies. In order to perform these tests, LDSD must design and build a test vehicle to deliver all technologies to approximately 180,000 ft and Mach 4, deploy a SIAD, free fly to approximately Mach 2, deploy the SSRS, record high-speed and high-resolution imagery of both deployments, as well as record data from an instrumentation suite capable of characterizing the technology induced vehicle dynamics. The vehicle must also be recoverable after splashdown into the ocean under a nominal flight, while guaranteeing forensic data protection in an off nominal catastrophic failure of a test article that could result in a terminal velocity, tumbling water impact.

  12. High power battery systems for hybrid vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corson, Donald W.

    Pure electric and hybrid vehicles have differing demands on the battery system of a vehicle. This results in correspondingly different demands on the battery management of a hybrid vehicle. Examples show the differing usage patterns. The consequences for the battery cells and the battery management are discussed. The importance of good thermal management is underlined.

  13. Galaxy halo occupation at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how current and future data on the clustering and number density of z~3 Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) can be used to constrain their relationship to dark matter haloes. We explore a three-parameter model in which the number of LBGs per dark halo scales like a power law in the halo mass: N(M)=(M/M1)S for M>Mmin. Here, Mmin is the minimum mass halo that can host an LBG, M1 is a normalization parameter, associated with the mass above which haloes host more than one observed LBG, and S determines the strength of the mass-dependence. We show how these three parameters are constrained by three observable properties of LBGs: the number density, the large-scale bias and the fraction of objects in close pairs. Given these three quantities, the three unknown model parameters may be estimated analytically, allowing a full exploration of parameter space. As an example, we assume a ΛCDM cosmology and consider the observed properties of a recent sample of spectroscopically confirmed LBGs. We find that the favoured range for our model parameters is Mmin~=(0.4-8)×1010h- 1Msolar, M1~=(6-10)×1012h- 1Msolar, and 0.9<~S<~1.1. The preferred region in Mmin expands by an order of magnitude, and slightly shallower slopes are acceptable if the allowed range of bg is permitted to span all recent observational estimates. We also discuss how the observed clustering of LBGs as a function of luminosity can be used to constrain halo occupation, although because of current observational uncertainties we are unable to reach any strong conclusions. Our methods and results can be used to constrain more realistic models that aim to derive the occupation function N(M) from first principles, and offer insight into how basic physical properties affect the observed properties of LBGs.

  14. Vehicle/guideway interaction for high speed vehicles on flexible guideway

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.T.

    1992-01-01

    Dynamic interactions between vehicles and guideways of a high speed ground transportation system based on magnetically levitated vehicles are studied with an emphasis on the effects of vehicle and guideway parameters. Two dynamic models for vehicles are presented: first, the vehicle is considered as a moving force traveling on a simply-supported single-span or two-span beams with various speeds; and second, the vehicle is considered as a one dimensional model with two-degrees-of-freedom which represents the primary and secondary suspensions of a vehicle with lumped masses, linear springs, and dampings. The Bernoulli-Euler beam equation is used to model the characteristics of a flexible guideway, and the guideway synthesis is based on a model analysis method. A series of analysis has been performed to understand the response characteristics under different loading conditions and provide some benchmark data for verifications of other comprehensive computer programs and some basic design guideline for maglev systems. 16 refs.

  15. Vehicle/guideway interaction for high speed vehicles on flexible guideway

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.T.

    1992-05-01

    Dynamic interactions between vehicles and guideways of a high speed ground transportation system based on magnetically levitated vehicles are studied with an emphasis on the effects of vehicle and guideway parameters. Two dynamic models for vehicles are presented: first, the vehicle is considered as a moving force traveling on a simply-supported single-span or two-span beams with various speeds; and second, the vehicle is considered as a one dimensional model with two-degrees-of-freedom which represents the primary and secondary suspensions of a vehicle with lumped masses, linear springs, and dampings. The Bernoulli-Euler beam equation is used to model the characteristics of a flexible guideway, and the guideway synthesis is based on a model analysis method. A series of analysis has been performed to understand the response characteristics under different loading conditions and provide some benchmark data for verifications of other comprehensive computer programs and some basic design guideline for maglev systems. 16 refs.

  16. Penetrating injury from high-speed motor vehicle collision

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    We present the case history of a post motor vehicle crash victim with lower extremity fractures and decreased blood flow. Emergent Angipgraphy revealed a foreign body which was later operated and removed. The case emphasizes that High-speed motor vehicle accidents commonly lead to penetrating injury from objects within and outside of the vehicle. PMID:26229302

  17. Penetrating injury from high-speed motor vehicle collision.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H

    2015-01-01

    We present the case history of a post motor vehicle crash victim with lower extremity fractures and decreased blood flow. Emergent Angipgraphy revealed a foreign body which was later operated and removed. The case emphasizes that High-speed motor vehicle accidents commonly lead to penetrating injury from objects within and outside of the vehicle.

  18. A high-resolution vehicle emission inventory for China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B.; Zhang, Q.; He, K.; Huo, H.; Yao, Z.; Wang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Developing high resolution emission inventory is an essential task for air quality modeling and management. However, current vehicle emission inventories in China are usually developed at provincial level and then allocated to grids based on various spatial surrogates, which is difficult to get high spatial resolution. In this work, we developed a new approach to construct a high-resolution vehicle emission inventory for China. First, vehicle population at county level were estimated by using the relationship between per-capita GDP and vehicle ownership. Then the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were used to drive the International Vehicle Emission (IVE) model to get monthly emission factors for each county. Finally, vehicle emissions by county were allocated to grids with 5-km horizon resolution by using high-resolution road network data. This work provides a better understanding of spatial representation of vehicle emissions in China and can benefit both air quality modeling and management with improved spatial accuracy.

  19. Concept of a platform-based impact isolation system for protection of wheelchair occupants from injuries in vehicle crashes.

    PubMed

    Balandin, Dmitry V; Bolotnik, Nikolai N; Pilkey, Walter D; Purtsezov, Sergey V; Shaw, C Gregory

    2008-03-01

    To improve the protection of a wheelchair-seated person with disabilities traveling in a vehicle from injuries in a crash, it is proposed to attach the wheelchair to a movable platform separated from the vehicle body by means of a shock isolator. The control of the platform is designed to reduce the occupant's injury risk, as compared with the case of the attachment of the wheelchair directly to the vehicle. The isolator design is based on the minimization of the force transmitted to the wheelchair occupant, provided that the space allowed for the platform to move relative to the vehicle is constrained. The possibility of pre-acting control, when the isolator is engaged for a time prior to the crash, is discussed. Passive tiedown and restraint systems are studied, although it is recognized that active systems could provide even lower injury risks. A multibody model of the platform-based occupied wheelchair is utilized for full-scale simulation of the response of the system to a crash pulse. The simulation shows a noticeable reduction in the injury risk due to the platform and an even greater reduction of injury with pre-acting control.

  20. Danger zone: Men, masculinity and occupational health and safety in high risk occupations.

    PubMed

    Stergiou-Kita, Mary; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Bezo, Randy; Colantonio, Angela; Garritano, Enzo; Lafrance, Marc; Lewko, John; Mantis, Steve; Moody, Joel; Power, Nicole; Theberge, Nancy; Westwood, Eleanor; Travers, Krista

    2015-12-01

    The workplace is a key setting where gender issues and organizational structures may influence occupational health and safety practices. The enactment of dominant norms of masculinity in high risk occupations can be particularly problematic, as it exposes men to significant risks for injuries and fatalities. To encourage multi-disciplinary collaborations and advance knowledge in the intersecting areas of gender studies, men's health, work and workplace health and safety, a national network of thirteen researchers and health and safety stakeholders completed a critical literature review examining the intersection between masculinities and men's workplace health and safety in order to: (i) account for research previously undertaken in this area; (ii) identify themes that may inform our understanding of masculinity and workplace health and safety and; (iii) identify research and practice gaps in relation to men's workplace health and safety. In this paper we present key themes from this review. Recommendations are made regarding: (i) how to define gender; (ii) how to attend to and identify how masculinities may influence workers' identities, perceptions of occupational risks and how institutionalized practices can reinforce norms of masculinity; (iii) the importance of considering how masculinities may intersect with other variables (e.g. historical context, age, class, race, geographical location) and; (iv) the added significance of present-day labour market forces on men's occupational health and safety.

  1. Danger zone: Men, masculinity and occupational health and safety in high risk occupations

    PubMed Central

    Stergiou-Kita, Mary; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Bezo, Randy; Colantonio, Angela; Garritano, Enzo; Lafrance, Marc; Lewko, John; Mantis, Steve; Moody, Joel; Power, Nicole; Theberge, Nancy; Westwood, Eleanor; Travers, Krista

    2016-01-01

    The workplace is a key setting where gender issues and organizational structures may influence occupational health and safety practices. The enactment of dominant norms of masculinity in high risk occupations can be particularly problematic, as it exposes men to significant risks for injuries and fatalities. To encourage multi-disciplinary collaborations and advance knowledge in the intersecting areas of gender studies, men’s health, work and workplace health and safety, a national network of thirteen researchers and health and safety stakeholders completed a critical literature review examining the intersection between masculinities and men’s workplace health and safety in order to: (i) account for research previously undertaken in this area; (ii) identify themes that may inform our understanding of masculinity and workplace health and safety and; (iii) identify research and practice gaps in relation to men’s workplace health and safety. In this paper we present key themes from this review. Recommendations are made regarding: (i) how to define gender; (ii) how to attend to and identify how masculinities may influence workers’ identities, perceptions of occupational risks and how institutionalized practices can reinforce norms of masculinity; (iii) the importance of considering how masculinities may intersect with other variables (e.g. historical context, age, class, race, geographical location) and; (iv) the added significance of present-day labour market forces on men’s occupational health and safety. PMID:27239098

  2. Analysis of the influence of occupation rate of public transit vehicles on mixing traffic flow in a two-lane system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yong-Sheng; Shi, Pei-Ji; Zeng, Qiong; Ma, Chang-Xi; Lin, Fang; Sun, Peng; Yin, Xiao-Ting

    2009-09-01

    Based on the existing classical cellular automaton model of traffic flow, a cellular automaton traffic model with different-maximum-speed vehicles mixed on a single lane is proposed, in which public transit and harbour-shaped bus stops are taken into consideration. Parameters such as length of cellular automaton, operation speed and random slow mechanism are re-demarcated. A harbour-shaped bus stop is set up and the vehicle changing lane regulation is changed. Through computer simulation, the influence of occupation rate of public transit vehicles on mixed traffic flow and traffic capacity is analysed. The results show that a public transport system can ease urban traffic congestion but creates new jams at the same time, and that the influence of occupation rate of public transit vehicles on traffic capacity is considerable. To develop urban traffic, attention should be paid to the occupation rate of public transit vehicles and traffic development in a haphazard way should be strictly avoided.

  3. Relationship between psychostimulant-induced "high" and dopamine transporter occupancy.

    PubMed Central

    Volkow, N D; Wang, G J; Fowler, J S; Gatley, S J; Ding, Y S; Logan, J; Dewey, S L; Hitzemann, R; Lieberman, J

    1996-01-01

    The ability of cocaine to inhibit the dopamine transporter (DAT) appears to be crucial for its reinforcing properties. The potential use of drugs that produce long-lasting inhibition of the DAT as a mean of preventing the "high" and reducing drug-seeking behavior has become a major strategy in medication development. However, neither the relation between the high and DAT inhibition nor the ability to block the high by prior DAT blockade have ever been demonstrated. To evaluate if DAT could prevent the high induced by methylphenidate (MP), a drug which like cocaine inhibits the DAT, we compared the responses in eight non-drug-abusing subjects between the first and the second of two MP doses (0.375 mg/kg, i.v.) given 60 min apart. At 60 min the high from MP has returned to baseline, but 75-80% of the drug remains in brain. Positron-emission tomography and [11C]d-threo-MP were used to estimate DAT occupancies at different times after MP. DAT inhibition by MP did not block or attenuate the high from a second dose of MP given 60 min later, despite a 80% residual transporter occupancy from the first dose. Furthermore some subjects did not perceive a high after single or repeated administration despite significant DAT blockade. These results indicate that DAT occupancy is not sufficient to account for the high, and that for DAT inhibitors to be therapeutically effective, occupancies > 80% may be required. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8816810

  4. High Temperature Power Converters for Military Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-09

    M) MINI-SYMPOSIUM AUGUST 9-11 DEARBORN, MICHIGAN HIGH TEMPERATURE POWER CONVERTERS FOR MILITARY HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES ABSTRACT...SUBTITLE High Temperature Power Converters for Military Hybrid Electric Vehicles 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...public release High Temperature Power Converters for Military Hybrid Electric Vehicles Page 2 of 8 I. INTRODUCTION Today, wide bandgap devices

  5. Quantification of the Design Relationship Between Ground Vehicle Weight and Occupant Safety Under Blast Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    response of a vehicle- sized box to a mine blast . While this simplifies the vehicle to a rigid body, not allowing for underbody deformation, it evaluates...pulse. The vehicle mass varies with prescribed changes to the material density properties, and the mine blast load is estimated using the CONWEP...Structure Surrogate Modeling The vehicle blast model was simulated 100 times with a Latin-hypercube sampling strategy (McKay et al ., 1979) over the four

  6. Occupational Exploration for Small High Schools. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hereford-Unity School District, OR.

    The report describes a program whose primary objectives were to develop a model program wherein the resources of the community college and the secondary school are utilized to expand occupational education opportunities in a manner that related high school education to the world of work, and to provide secondary students with programs of…

  7. Occupational Orientations of Choctaw Indian High School Students in Mississippi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Barbara G.

    All sophomores, juniors, and seniors (N=133) in the Bureau of Indian Affairs high school on the Mississippi Choctaw reservation were surveyed for purposes of testing the following hypotheses: (1) the Choctaw subsociety will differ from the larger society in its evaluation of the relative status positions of occupations; (2) the Choctaw youth will…

  8. Vital signs: health burden and medical costs of nonfatal injuries to motor vehicle occupants - United States, 2012.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Gwen; Peterson, Cora; Ederer, David; Florence, Curtis; Haileyesus, Tadesse; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Xu, Likang

    2014-10-10

    Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death and injury in the United States. The purpose of this study was to describe the current health burden and medical and work loss costs of nonfatal crash injuries among vehicle occupants in the United States. CDC analyzed data on emergency department (ED) visits resulting from nonfatal crash injuries among vehicle occupants in 2012 using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System – All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) and the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample (HCUP-NIS). The number and rate of all ED visits for the treatment of crash injuries that resulted in the patient being released and the number and rate of hospitalizations for the treatment of crash injuries were estimated, as were the associated number of hospital days and lifetime medical and work loss costs. In 2012, an estimated 2,519,471 ED visits resulted from nonfatal crash injuries, with an estimated lifetime medical cost of $18.4 billion (2012 U.S. dollars). Approximately 7.5% of these visits resulted in hospitalizations that required an estimated 1,057,465 hospital days in 2012. Nonfatal crash injuries occur frequently and result in substantial costs to individuals, employers, and society. For each motor vehicle crash death in 2012, eight persons were hospitalized, and 100 were treated and released from the ED. Public health practices and laws, such as primary seat belt laws, child passenger restraint laws, ignition interlocks to prevent alcohol impaired driving, sobriety checkpoints, and graduated driver licensing systems have demonstrated effectiveness for reducing motor vehicle crashes and injuries. They might also substantially reduce associated ED visits, hospitalizations, and medical costs.

  9. Investigation of pulmonary contusion extent and its correlation to crash, occupant, and injury characteristics in motor vehicle crashes.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Ashley A; Danelson, Kerry A; Armstrong, Elizabeth G; Hoth, J Jason; Stitzel, Joel D

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary contusion (PC) is a leading injury in blunt chest trauma and is most commonly caused by motor vehicle crashes (MVC). To improve understanding of the relationship between insult and outcome, this study relates PC severity to crash, occupant, and injury parameters in MVCs. Twenty-nine subjects with PC were selected from the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) database, which contains detailed crash and medical information on MVC occupants. Computed tomography scans of these subjects were segmented using a semi-automated protocol to quantify the volumetric percentage of injured tissue in each lung. Techniques were used to quantify the geometry and location of PC, as well as the location of rib fractures. Injury extent including percent PC volume and the number of rib fractures was analyzed and its relation to crash and occupant characteristics was explored. Frontal and near-side crashes composed 72% of the dataset and the near-side door was the component most often associated with PC causation. The number of rib fractures increased with age and fracture patterns varied with crash type. In near-side crashes, occupant weight and BMI were positively correlated with percent PC volume and the number of rib fractures, and the impact severity was positively correlated with percent PC volume in the lung nearest the impact. This study quantified PC morphology in 29 MVC occupants and examined the relationship between injury severity and crash and occupant parameters to better characterize the mechanism of injury. The results of this study may contribute to the prevention, mitigation, and treatment of PC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Occupation and ischemic heart disease in the European Community: a comparative study of occupations at potential high risk.

    PubMed

    Tüchsen, F; Andersen, O; Costa, G; Filakti, H; Marmot, M G

    1996-10-01

    Four longitudinal studies of mortality and morbidity by occupation based on individual record linkage of information and two cross-sectional studies of mortality were compared in order to identify occupations at high risk of ischemic heart disease. In more than one country an increased risk of ischemic heart disease was found in drivers of buses, taxies, and lorries, in bakers, in naval officers and fishermen, in hotel and restaurant workers, in senior police, customs, and other uniformed men, in barbers and hairdressers, in warehouse and wholesale staff, as well as in laboratory assistants and in radio and telegraph operators. Occupations found at high risk in Denmark were also found at high risk in Great Britain and Italy. These occupations may be at genuine high risk. None of these groups work day-work only and several of the groups have psychologically demanding work but unsatisfactory decision authority. Identification of occupations at high risk may help to develop focused preventive strategies.

  11. Paired vehicle occupant analysis indicates age and crash severity moderate likelihood of higher severity injury in second row seated adults in frontal crashes.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, T; Gawarecki, L; Tavakoli, M

    2016-04-01

    The majority of advances in occupant protection systems for motor vehicle occupants have focused on occupants seated in the front row of the vehicle. Recent studies suggest that these systems have resulted in lower injury risk for front row occupants as compared to those in the second row. However, these findings are not universal. In addition, some of these findings result from analyses that compare groups of front and second row occupants exposed to dissimilar crash conditions, raising questions regarding whether they might reflect differences in the crash rather than the front and second row restraint systems. The current study examines factors associated with injury risk for pairs of right front seat and second row occupants in frontal crashes in the United States using paired data analysis techniques. These data indicate that the occupant seated in the front row frequently experiences the more severe injury in the pair, however there were no significant differences in the rate of occurrence of these events and events where the more severe injury occurs in the second row occupant of the pair. A logistic regression indicated that the likelihood of the more severe injury occurring in the second row seated occupant of the pair increased as crash severity increased, consistent with data from anatomic test dummy (ATD) tests. It also indicated that the second row occupant was more likely to have the more severe injury in the pair if that occupant was the older occupant of the pair. These findings suggest that occupant protection systems which focus on providing protection specifically for injuries experienced by older occupants in the second row in higher severity crash conditions might provide the greatest benefit.

  12. Potential Occupant Injury Reduction in Pre-Crash System Equipped Vehicles in the Striking Vehicle of Rear-end Crashes.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Kristofer D; Gabler, Hampton C

    2010-01-01

    To mitigate the severity of rear-end and other collisions, Pre-Crash Systems (PCS) are being developed. These active safety systems utilize radar and/or video cameras to determine when a frontal crash, such as a front-to-back rear-end collisions, is imminent and can brake autonomously, even with no driver input. Of these PCS features, the effects of autonomous pre-crash braking are estimated. To estimate the maximum potential for injury reduction due to autonomous pre-crash braking in the striking vehicle of rear-end crashes, a methodology is presented for determining 1) the reduction in vehicle crash change in velocity (ΔV) due to PCS braking and 2) the number of injuries that could be prevented due to the reduction in collision severity. Injury reduction was only performed for belted drivers, as unbelted drivers have an unknown risk of being thrown out of position. The study was based on 1,406 rear-end striking vehicles from NASS / CDS years 1993 to 2008. PCS parameters were selected from realistic values and varied to examine the effect on system performance. PCS braking authority was varied from 0.5 G's to 0.8 G's while time to collision (TTC) was held at 0.45 seconds. TTC was then varied from 0.3 second to 0.6 seconds while braking authority was held constant at 0.6 G's. A constant braking pulse (step function) and ramp-up braking pulse were used. The study found that automated PCS braking could reduce the crash ΔV in rear-end striking vehicles by an average of 12% - 50% and avoid 0% - 14% of collisions, depending on PCS parameters. Autonomous PCS braking could potentially reduce the number of injured drivers who are belted by 19% to 57%.

  13. Vehicle occupants' exposure to aromatic volatile organic compounds while commuting on an urban-suburban route in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jo, W K; Choi, S J

    1996-08-01

    This study identified in-auto and in-bus exposures to six selected aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for commutes on an urban-suburban route in Korea. A bus-service route was selected to include three segments of Taegu and one suburban segment (Hayang) to satisfy the criteria specified for this study. This study indicates that motor vehicle exhaust and evaporative emissions are major sources of both auto and bus occupants' exposures to aromatic VOCs in both Taegu and Hayang. A nonparametric statistical test (Wilcoxon test) showed that in-auto benzene levels were significantly different from in-bus benzene levels for both urban-segment and suburban-segment commutes. The test also showed that the benzene-level difference between urban-segment and suburban-segment commutes was significant for both autos and buses. An F-test showed the same statistical results for the comparison of the summed in-vehicle concentration of the six target VOCs (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o,m,p-xylenes) as those for the comparison of the in-vehicle benzene concentration. On the other hand, the in-vehicle benzene level only and the sum were not significantly different among the three urban-segment commutes and between the morning and evening commutes. The in-auto VOC concentrations were intermediate between the results for the Los Angeles and Boston. The in-bus VOC concentrations were about one-tenth of the Taipei, Taiwan results.

  14. High-performance work systems and occupational safety.

    PubMed

    Zacharatos, Anthea; Barling, Julian; Iverson, Roderick D

    2005-01-01

    Two studies were conducted investigating the relationship between high-performance work systems (HPWS) and occupational safety. In Study 1, data were obtained from company human resource and safety directors across 138 organizations. LISREL VIII results showed that an HPWS was positively related to occupational safety at the organizational level. Study 2 used data from 189 front-line employees in 2 organizations. Trust in management and perceived safety climate were found to mediate the relationship between an HPWS and safety performance measured in terms of personal-safety orientation (i.e., safety knowledge, safety motivation, safety compliance, and safety initiative) and safety incidents (i.e., injuries requiring first aid and near misses). These 2 studies provide confirmation of the important role organizational factors play in ensuring worker safety.

  15. Numerical simulations of the occupant head response in an infantry vehicle under blunt impact and blast loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Sevagan, Gopinath; Zhu, Feng; Jiang, Binhui; Yang, King H

    2013-07-01

    This article presents the results of a finite element simulation on the occupant head response in an infantry vehicle under two separated loading conditions: (1) blunt impact and (2) blast loading conditions. A Hybrid-III dummy body integrated with a previously validated human head model was used as the surrogate. The biomechanical response of the head was studied in terms of head acceleration due to the impact by a projectile on the vehicle and intracranial pressure caused by blast wave. A series of parametric studies were conducted on the numerical model to analyze the effect of some key parameters, such as seat configuration, impact velocity, and boundary conditions. The simulation results indicate that a properly designed seat and internal surface of the infantry vehicle can play a vital role in reducing the risk of head injury in the current scenarios. Comparison of the kinematic responses under the blunt impact and blast loading conditions reveals that under the current loading conditions, the acceleration pulse in the blast scenario has much higher peak values and frequency than blunt impact case, which may reflect different head response characteristics.

  16. A Bibliometric Analysis of Highly Cited and High Impact Occupational Therapy Publications by American Authors.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Sharon A; Brown, Ted; Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2017-07-01

    A bibliometric analysis was completed of peer-reviewed literature from 1991-2015, written by American occupational therapists, to examine US high impact scholarship with "occupational therapy" and "occupational therapist(s)" used as keywords to search journal articles' publication title, abstract, author details, and keywords. Results included 1,889 journal articles from 1991-2015 published by American occupational therapists as first or corresponding author. Sixty-nine articles attained a TotalCitation2015 ≥ 50 and 151 attained a Citation2015 ≥ 5 indicating that they were the most highly cited literature produced in this period. Although the majority (58%) of this literature was published in occupational therapy-specific journals, 41% was published in interdisciplinary journals. Results illustrate that the volume of highly cited American occupational therapy peer-reviewed literature has grown over the last two decades. There is need for the profession to strategize methods to enhance the publication metrics of occupational therapy-specific journals to reduce the loss of high quality publications to external periodicals.

  17. Advanced Range Safety System for High Energy Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claxton, Jeffrey S.; Linton, Donald F.

    2002-01-01

    The advanced range safety system project is a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the United States Air Force to develop systems that would reduce costs and schedule for safety approval for new classes of unmanned high-energy vehicles. The mission-planning feature for this system would yield flight profiles that satisfy the mission requirements for the user while providing an increased quality of risk assessment, enhancing public safety. By improving the speed and accuracy of predicting risks to the public, mission planners would be able to expand flight envelopes significantly. Once in place, this system is expected to offer the flexibility of handling real-time risk management for the high-energy capabilities of hypersonic vehicles including autonomous return-from-orbit vehicles and extended flight profiles over land. Users of this system would include mission planners of Space Launch Initiative vehicles, space planes, and other high-energy vehicles. The real-time features of the system could make extended flight of a malfunctioning vehicle possible, in lieu of an immediate terminate decision. With this improved capability, the user would have more time for anomaly resolution and potential recovery of a malfunctioning vehicle.

  18. High-powered vehicle drive train

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, C.E.

    1987-09-15

    This patent describes a vehicle comprising: an engine having an infinitely variable transmission operatively coupled for transmitting engine power to the transmission's input shaft with the transmission output shaft being operatively connected to the vehicle's drive wheels. The transmission comprising a planetary drive structure includes a drive ring gear carrying a first gear in engagement with a drive gear on the input shaft for rotation of the drive ring gear with the input shaft, a central sun gear and planetary gear members disposed in the annular space between, and in engagement with the drive ring gear and the sun gear and rotatably supported on a planetary carrier. The carrier is supported for rotation with the transmission output shaft and an infinitely variable toroidal traction roller transmission structure including two parallel toridal transmissions having a central input toric disc structure common to both toroidal transmissions and operatively connected to the input shaft. The output toric discs being mounted on a shaft associated with the sun gear of the planetary drive.

  19. Learning About the Labor Force: Occupational Knowledge Among High School Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFleur, Lois B.; Menke, Ben A.

    1975-01-01

    This study examines and assesses occupational knowledge among 300 high school males in eastern Washington. Interviews of these students about occupations available in their region and about job information they had received indicated that there was little increase in occupational knowledge during the high school years. The author concludes that…

  20. High reduction transaxle for electric vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Kalns, Ilmars

    1987-01-01

    A drivetrain (12) includes a transaxle assembly (16) for driving ground engaging wheels of a land vehicle powered by an AC motor. The transaxle includes a ratio change section having planetary gear sets (24, 26) and brake assemblies (28, 30). Sun gears (60, 62) of the gear sets are directly and continuously connected to an input drive shaft (38) driven by the motor. A first drive (78a) directly and continuously connects a planetary gear carrier (78) of gear sets (24) with a ring gear (68) of gear set (26). A second drive (80a) directly and continuously connects a planetary gear carrier (80) of gear set (26) with a sun gear (64) of a final speed reduction gear set (34) having a planetary gear carrier directly and continuously connected to a differential (22). Brakes (28, 30) are selectively engageable to respectively ground a ring gear 66 of gear set 24 and ring gear 68 of gear set 26.

  1. 78 FR 70415 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Occupant Crash Protection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... require lap/shoulder seat belts for each passenger seating position in all new over-the-road buses, and in new buses other than over-the-road buses with a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) greater than 11,793... require lap/shoulder seat belts for each passenger seating position in: (a) All new over- the-road...

  2. 78 FR 53386 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Occupant Crash Protection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... (by removing knee bolsters) would result in carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) savings between 274-406 metric tons... granting its petition, a 7 pound vehicle weight reduction (by removing knee bolsters) would result in CO 2... the knee bolster, the implication is that if there were no unbelted test, the knee bolster could be...

  3. Open tube guideway for high speed air cushioned vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goering, R. S. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    This invention is a tubular shaped guideway for high-speed air-cushioned supported vehicles. The tubular guideway is split and separated such that the sides of the guideway are open. The upper portion of the tubular guideway is supported above the lower portion by truss-like structural members. The lower portion of the tubular guideway may be supported by the terrain over which the vehicle travels, on pedestals or some similar structure.

  4. Photocopy of drawing. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING MODIFICATIONS, HIGH BAY AREA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING MODIFICATIONS, HIGH BAY AREA. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 79K05424, Seelye Stevenson Value & Knecht, March 1975. TRANSFER AISLE NORTH DOOR,ARCHITECTURAL NORTH ELEVATION AND MISC. DETAILS. Sheet 78 of 207 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  5. Photocopy of drawing. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING MODIFICATIONS, HIGH BAY AREA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING MODIFICATIONS, HIGH BAY AREA. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. File Number 79K05424, Seelye Stevenson Value & Knecht, March 1975. TRANSFER AISLE NORTH DOOR, ARCHITECTURAL AND STRUCTURAL ELEVATIONS, SECTIONS AND DETAILS. Sheet 79 of 207 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  6. A review of serious injuries and deaths among car occupants after motor vehicle crashes in Sweden from 1987 to 1994.

    PubMed

    Boström, L; Wladis, A; Nilsson, B

    2001-01-01

    Car occupants injured in motor vehicle crashes (MVC) are a common problem in emergency departments. The aims of this study were to determine the incidence over time, according to the type of injury, age and sex distribution, mortality rate and geographical differences among all patients admitted to Swedish hospitals because of MVC injuries. Between 1987 and 1994, Swedish hospitals admitted 37,871 persons (51,348 admissions) who had been involved in MVC as drivers or passengers. There were 23,369 men and 14,502 women. The annual frequency of hospital admissions ranged from 5,943 to 7,175. There were 74.8 injured persons admitted per 100,000 of the population each year. Males between 16 and 24 years of age were more commonly involved. Injuries to the head and neck were particularly frequent (39%). Older persons, males, and passengers had a poor survival outcome. The incidence of injured car occupants was significantly higher in sparsly populated areas of Sweden.

  7. The importance of high vehicle power for passenger car emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carslaw, David C.; Williams, Martin L.; Tate, James E.; Beevers, Sean D.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we use a quantile regression technique to explore the emissions characteristics of petrol and diesel passenger cars to reveal the importance of high vehicle power on exhaust emissions. A large database of ≈67,000 passenger cars from vehicle emission remote sensing data was used from surveys from several campaigns around the UK. Most previous remote sensing studies have focused on presenting mean emission estimates by vehicle type over time. However, as shown in the current work, considerably more insight can be gained into vehicle emission characteristics if techniques are used that can describe and model the full distribution of vehicle emissions as a function of important explanatory variables. For post-2000 model year (Euro 3-5) diesel cars it is shown that there is a strong dependence of vehicle specific power for emissions of NOx that was absent in earlier models and is absent for other pollutants such as CO, hydrocarbons and 'smoke'. Furthermore, we also find a stronger dependence on vehicle specific power for older catalyst-equipped petrol vehicles (Euro 1/2) on emissions of NOx that is less important for other emissions such as CO and hydrocarbons. Moreover, it is shown that while the rated maximum power output of petrol cars has remained almost constant over the past 15-20 years, the power output from diesel cars has increased markedly by about 50%. These results suggest that changes to vehicle technology, driving conditions and driver behaviour have become more important determinants of passenger car NOx emissions in recent years and may help explain why urban ambient concentrations of NOx have not decreased as much as anticipated.

  8. Evaluation on the Occupational Information Access System as Used at Churchill High School. A Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinlay, Bruce; Adams, Daniel

    The Occupational Information Access System (OIAS) improves the accessibility of occupational labor market information for career planning. Its operation at Churchill High School is evaluated from several angels: the likes and dislikes of users; the effect of OIAS on users' knowledge of occupational information and on their career plans; why other…

  9. Learning About the Labor Force: Occupational Knowledge Among High School Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFleur, Lois B.; Menke, Ben A.

    Occupational knowledge among high school males from urban and rural areas in eastern Washington was assessed. Over 300 students from a sample of 22 schools were interviewed about occupations present in their region and about job information they had received. Through the use of specially constructed indices (occupational knowledge score, status…

  10. High power battery test methods for hybrid vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, G.L.; Haskins, H.; Heinrich, B.; Sutula, R.

    1997-11-01

    Commonly used EV battery tests are not very suitable for testing hybrid vehicle batteries, which may be primarily intended to supply vehicle acceleration power. The capacity of hybrid vehicle batteries will be relatively small, they will typically operate over a restricted range of states-of-charge, and they may seldom if ever be fully recharged. Further, hybrid propulsion system designs will commonly impose a higher regeneration content than is typical for electric vehicles. New test methods have been developed for use in characterizing battery performance and life for hybrid vehicle use. The procedures described in this paper were developed from the requirements of the government-industry cooperative Partnership for A New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program; however, they are expected to have broad application to the testing of energy storage devices for hybrid vehicles. The most important performance measure for a high power battery is its pulse power capability as a function of state-of-charge for both discharge and regeneration pulses. It is also important to characterize cycle life, although the {open_quote}cycles{close_quote} involved are quite different from the conventional full-discharge, full-recharge cycle commonly used for EV batteries, This paper illustrates in detail several test profiles which have been selected for PNGV battery testing, along with some sample results and lessons learned to date from the use of these test profiles. The relationship between the PNGV energy storage requirements and these tests is described so that application of the test methods can be made to other hybrid vehicle performance requirements as well. The resulting test procedures can be used to characterize the pulse power capability of high power energy storage devices including batteries and ultracapacitors, as well as the life expectancy of such devices, for either power assist or dual mode hybrid propulsion system designs.

  11. Evaluation of kinematics and injuries to restrained occupants in far-side crashes using full-scale vehicle and human body models.

    PubMed

    Arun, Mike W J; Umale, Sagar; Humm, John R; Yoganandan, Narayan; Hadagali, Prasanaah; Pintar, Frank A

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the current study was to perform a parametric study with different impact objects, impact locations, and impact speeds by analyzing occupant kinematics and injury estimations using a whole-vehicle and whole-body finite element-human body model (FE-HBM). To confirm the HBM responses, the biofidelity of the model was validated using data from postmortem human surrogate (PMHS) sled tests. The biofidelity of the model was validated using data from sled experiments and correlational analysis (CORA). Full-scale simulations were performed using a restrained Global Human Body Model Consortium (GHBMC) model seated on a 2001 Ford Taurus model using a far-side lateral impact condition. The driver seat was placed in the center position to represent a nominal initial impact condition. A 3-point seat belt with pretensioner and retractor was used to restrain the GHBMC model. A parametric study was performed using 12 simulations by varying impact locations, impacting object, and impact speed using the full-scale models. In all 12 simulations, the principal direction of force (PDOF) was selected as 90°. The impacting objects were a 10-in.-diameter rigid vertical pole and a movable deformable barrier. The impact location of the pole was at the C-pillar in the first case, at the B-pillar in the second case, and, finally, at the A-pillar in the third case. The vehicle and the GHBMC models were defined an initial velocity of 35 km/h (high speed) and 15 km/h (low speed). Excursion of the head center of gravity (CG), T6, and pelvis were measured from the simulations. In addition, injury risk estimations were performed on head, rib cage, lungs, kidneys, liver, spleen, and pelvis. The average CORA rating was 0.7. The shoulder belt slipped in B- and C-pillar impacts but somewhat engaged in the A-pillar case. In the B-pillar case, the head contacted the intruding struck-side structures, indicating higher risk of injury. Occupant kinematics depended on interaction with

  12. Articulated joint for a high-mobility modular vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesar, Joseph S.; Cohen, Charles J.; Obermark, Jay

    2001-09-01

    This paper describes the development of an articulated link for two mobile, articulated vehicles. The goal of the project is to show enhanced mobility of coupled platforms in an environment with barriers and obstacles. To achieve enhanced mobility, actuated linkages are used to couple the vehicles. The actuated linkages are high strength, hydraulically coupled, two degree-of-freedom devices with a universal coupler mounted on the end. When one platform is mated to a companion platform, the couplers lock, and the pair of vehicles can operate as a single unit. The robotic platform is based on a modified All Terrain Vehicle (ATV), which affords a robust platform with a minimum of cost. The vehicles are controlled using a wireless controller, and can be operated individually in a teleoperative mode, or can be joined and operated as a single unit. The method for link-up is semi-autonomous, meaning that within a certain distance, the two robots can align themselves and move together, locking the couplers on the end of the articulated link. Vehicle position is determined using standard cameras mounted on the platform that use machine vision algorithms to find volumetric position of the couplers quickly.

  13. Analysis and control of high-speed wheeled vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velenis, Efstathios

    In this work we reproduce driving techniques to mimic expert race drivers and obtain the open-loop control signals that may be used by auto-pilot agents driving autonomous ground wheeled vehicles. Race drivers operate their vehicles at the limits of the acceleration envelope. An accurate characterization of the acceleration capacity of the vehicle is required. Understanding and reproduction of such complex maneuvers also require a physics-based mathematical description of the vehicle dynamics. While most of the modeling issues of ground-vehicles/automobiles are already well established in the literature, lack of understanding of the physics associated with friction generation results in ad-hoc approaches to tire friction modeling. In this work we revisit this aspect of the overall vehicle modeling and develop a tire friction model that provides physical interpretation of the tire forces. The new model is free of those singularities at low vehicle speed and wheel angular rate that are inherent in the widely used empirical static models. In addition, the dynamic nature of the tire model proposed herein allows the study of dynamic effects such as transients and hysteresis. The trajectory-planning problem for an autonomous ground wheeled vehicle is formulated in an optimal control framework aiming to minimize the time of travel and maximize the use of the available acceleration capacity. The first approach to solve the optimal control problem is using numerical techniques. Numerical optimization allows incorporation of a vehicle model of high fidelity and generates realistic solutions. Such an optimization scheme provides an ideal platform to study the limit operation of the vehicle, which would not be possible via straightforward simulation. In this work we emphasize the importance of online applicability of the proposed methodologies. This underlines the need for optimal solutions that require little computational cost and are able to incorporate real, unpredictable

  14. The influence of personal protection equipment, occupant body size, and restraint system on the frontal impact responses of Hybrid III ATDs in tactical vehicles.

    PubMed

    Zaseck, Lauren Wood; Orton, Nichole Ritchie; Gruber, Rebekah; Rupp, Jonathan; Scherer, Risa; Reed, Matthew; Hu, Jingwen

    2017-08-18

    Although advanced restraint systems, such as seat belt pretensioners and load limiters, can provide improved occupant protection in crashes, such technologies are currently not utilized in military vehicles. The design and use of military vehicles presents unique challenges to occupant safety-including differences in compartment geometry and occupant clothing and gear-that make direct application of optimal civilian restraint systems to military vehicles inappropriate. For military vehicle environments, finite element (FE) modeling can be used to assess various configurations of restraint systems and determine the optimal configuration that minimizes injury risk to the occupant. The models must, however, be validated against physical tests before implementation. The objective of this study was therefore to provide the data necessary for FE model validation by conducting sled tests using anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs). A secondary objective of this test series was to examine the influence of occupant body size (5th percentile female, 50th percentile male, and 95th percentile male), military gear (helmet/vest/tactical assault panels), seat belt type (3-point and 5-point), and advanced seat belt technologies (pretensioner and load limiter) on occupant kinematics and injury risk in frontal crashes. In total, 20 frontal sled tests were conducted using a custom sled buck that was reconfigurable to represent both the driver and passenger compartments of a light tactical military vehicle. Tests were performed at a delta-V of 30 mph and a peak acceleration of 25 g. The sled tests used the Hybrid III 5th percentile female, 50th percentile male, and 95th percentile male ATDs outfitted with standard combat boots and advanced combat helmets. In some tests, the ATDs were outfitted with additional military gear, which included an improved outer tactical vest (IOTV), IOTV and squad automatic weapon (SAW) gunner with a tactical assault panel (TAP), or IOTV and rifleman with

  15. A high capability teleoperated vehicle for hazardous applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dudar, A.M.; Witherspoon, R.L.

    1995-09-01

    The Robotics Development Group at the Savannah River Site is developing a high performance teleoperated vehicle for use in radioactive and hazardous environments. The three-wheeled vehicle incorporates a highly dexterous 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF), hydraulically-powered manipulator made by Schilling Development, Inc. The teleoperator is called Little MoRT (MObile Radio-controlled Teleoperator) and is a modified version of a commercially available, battery-powered, warehouse vehicle. Little MoRT is controlled remotely by a universal robot controller either through a radio frequency link or a tethered cable. Six video cameras and a microphone provide the operator with audio-visual feedback of the vehicle and its surrounding environment. The vehicle also incorporates a hydraulic power unit consisting of a propane-driven engine for powering the Schilling manipulator. Little MoRT is capable of operating in outdoor as well as indoor environments and is well suited for decontamination and decommissioning activities such as dismantling, sorting, and surveying of radioactive waste.

  16. Occupational Vehicle-related Particulate Exposure and Inflammatory Markers in Trucking Industry Workers

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yueh-Hsiu Mathilda; Garshick, Eric; Hart, Jaime E.; Spiegelman, Donna; Dockery, Douglas W.; Smith, Thomas J.; Laden, Francine

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested an association between particulate air pollution and cardiovascular disease, but the mechanism is still unclear. Objective We examined the association between workplace exposure to vehicle-related particles and cardiovascular disease related systemic inflammatory markers, C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in 137 trucking terminal workers (non-drivers) in the U.S. trucking industry. Methods We visited two large trucking terminals in 2009 and measured vehicle-related elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5μm (PM2.5), for 5 days consecutively at the main work areas. Each participant provided a blood sample and completed a health questionnaire during the sampling period. Individual workplace exposure level was calculated by 12-hr time weighted moving averages based on work shift. The association between each blood marker and exposure to each pollutant during 0-12, 12-24, 24-36, and 36-48 hours before the blood draw was examined by multivariable regression analyses. Results In general, OC and EC had a positive association with sICAM-1, especially for exposure periods 12-24 (lag12-24) and 24-36 (lag24-36) hrs prior to blood draw [β=54.9 (95%CI: 12.3-97.5) for lag12-24 and β=46.5 (95%CI: 21.2-71.8) for lag12-24; change in sICAM-1 (in ng/mL) corresponding to an IQR increase in OC]. A similar pattern was found for EC and PM2.5. We did not find an association between measured pollutants up to 48 hours before blood draw and hs-CRP or IL-6. Conclusion In this group of healthy workers, short-term exposure to vehicle-related air pollutants may be associated with sICAM-1. Our findings may be dependent on the exposure period studied. PMID:27104805

  17. Commercial vehicles and road safety in Pakistan: exploring high-risk attributes among drivers and vehicles.

    PubMed

    Mir, Mohammed Umer; Razzak, Junaid Abdul; Ahmad, Khabir

    2013-01-01

    Road traffic injuries are on the rise in developing countries with a disproportionately high number of crashes involving commercial vehicles. Baseline information on risk factors is necessary to develop targeted prevention programmes. A survey of commercial drivers was conducted at the largest bus and truck station in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Structured interviews elicited information from 857 drivers on their socio-demographics, high-risk driving behaviours, fatigue, use of drugs while driving, vehicle maintenance and health conditions, as well as crash involvement. A binary logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the factors associated with crash involvement in the last five years. Overall, 92 (11.2%) drivers reported having had a road crash in the last 5 years. Factors independently associated with the occurrence of crashes were alcohol use (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.4), poor vehicle maintenance (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.7-7.01) and lack of seat belt use (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.6). The high prevalence of high-risk attributes in the study population indicates a great need for targeted risk prevention.

  18. Effect of vehicle type on the performance of second generation air bags for child occupants.

    PubMed

    Arbogast, Kristy B; Durbin, Dennis R; Kallan, Michael J; Winston, Flaura K

    2003-01-01

    Passenger air bags experienced considerable design modification in the late 1990s, principally to mitigate risks to child passengers. This study utilized Data from the Partners for Child Passenger Safety study, a large-scale child-focused crash surveillance system, to examine the effect of vehicle type on the differential performance of first and second generation air bags on injuries to restrained children in frontal impact crashes. Our results show that the benefit of second-generation air bags was seen in passenger cars - those children exposed to second-generation air bags were half as likely to sustain a serious injury - and minivans. However, in SUVs the data suggest no reduction in injury risk with the new designs. This field data provides crucial real-world experience to the automotive industry as they work towards the next generation of air bag designs.

  19. Effect of Vehicle type on the Performance of Second Generation Air Bags for Child Occupants

    PubMed Central

    Arbogast, Kristy B.; Durbin, Dennis R.; Kallan, Michael J.; Winston, Flaura K.

    2003-01-01

    Passenger air bags experienced considerable design modification in the late 1990s, principally to mitigate risks to child passengers. This study utilized Data from the Partners for Child Passenger Safety study, a large-scale child-focused crash surveillance system, to examine the effect of vehicle type on the differential performance of first and second generation air bags on injuries to restrained children in frontal impact crashes. Our results show that the benefit of second-generation air bags was seen in passenger cars – those children exposed to second-generation air bags were half as likely to sustain a serious injury – and minivans. However, in SUVs the data suggest no reduction in injury risk with the new designs. This field data provides crucial real-world experience to the automotive industry as they work towards the next generation of air bag designs. PMID:12941218

  20. Motor vehicle occupant injuries to children in crash and noncrash events.

    PubMed

    Argan, A; Dunkle, D E

    1982-12-01

    The mechanisms and severity of nonfatal injuries to children in crash and noncrash situations were compared: 82 children (15%) were involved in noncrash events and 466 (85%) were involved in crash events. Younger children (0 to 4 years of age) were more likely to be injured in a noncrash incident. The mechanism of injury was significantly different; 45% of the children injured in a noncrash event were ejected in contrast to 5% of the children injured in a crash event. Although more severe injuries were sustained in crashes, most of the children who were ejected in a noncrash event sustained at least moderate injuries. Use of restraint systems, door lock mechanisms, and appropriate passenger seating locations in the motor vehicle are three simple measures that could attenuate or eliminate noncrash injury.

  1. 40 CFR 600.310-86 - Labeling of high altitude vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Labeling of high altitude vehicles... Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Labeling § 600.310-86 Labeling of high altitude vehicles... altitude vehicles according to § 600.306. (b) A high altitude vehicle may be labeled with a general or...

  2. 40 CFR 600.310-86 - Labeling of high altitude vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Labeling of high altitude vehicles... Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Labeling § 600.310-86 Labeling of high altitude vehicles... altitude vehicles according to § 600.306. (b) A high altitude vehicle may be labeled with a general or...

  3. Inductive High Power Transfer Technologies for Electric Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madzharov, Nikolay D.; Tonchev, Anton T.

    2014-03-01

    Problems associated with "how to charge the battery pack of the electric vehicle" become more important every passing day. Most logical solution currently is the non-contact method of charge, possessing a number of advantages over standard contact methods for charging. This article focuses on methods for Inductive high power contact-less transfer of energy at relatively small distances, their advantages and disadvantages. Described is a developed Inductive Power Transfer (IPT) system for fast charging of electric vehicles with nominal power of 30 kW over 7 to 9 cm air gap.

  4. Design criteria for light high speed desert air cushion vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulnaga, B. E.

    An evaluation is made of the applicability and prospective performance of ACVs in trans-Saharan cargo transport, in view of the unique characteristics of the dry sand environment. The lightweight/high-speed ACV concept envisioned is essentially ground effect aircraftlike, with conventional wheels as a low-speed backup suspension system. A propeller is used in ground effect cruise. Attention is given to the effects on vehicle stability and performance of sandy surface irregularities of the desert topography and of cross-winds from various directions relative to vehicle movement.

  5. Vehicle Detection and Classification from High Resolution Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, L.; Sasikumar, M.

    2014-11-01

    In the past decades satellite imagery has been used successfully for weather forecasting, geographical and geological applications. Low resolution satellite images are sufficient for these sorts of applications. But the technological developments in the field of satellite imaging provide high resolution sensors which expands its field of application. Thus the High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) proved to be a suitable alternative to aerial photogrammetric data to provide a new data source for object detection. Since the traffic rates in developing countries are enormously increasing, vehicle detection from satellite data will be a better choice for automating such systems. In this work, a novel technique for vehicle detection from the images obtained from high resolution sensors is proposed. Though we are using high resolution images, vehicles are seen only as tiny spots, difficult to distinguish from the background. But we are able to obtain a detection rate not less than 0.9. Thereafter we classify the detected vehicles into cars and trucks and find the count of them.

  6. High-resolution mapping of motor vehicle carbon dioxide emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Brian C.; McBride, Zoe C.; Martin, Elliot W.; Harley, Robert A.

    2014-05-01

    A fuel-based inventory for vehicle emissions is presented for carbon dioxide (CO2) and mapped at various spatial resolutions (10 km, 4 km, 1 km, and 500 m) using fuel sales and traffic count data. The mapping is done separately for gasoline-powered vehicles and heavy-duty diesel trucks. Emission estimates from this study are compared with the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) and VULCAN. All three inventories agree at the national level within 5%. EDGAR uses road density as a surrogate to apportion vehicle emissions, which leads to 20-80% overestimates of on-road CO2 emissions in the largest U.S. cities. High-resolution emission maps are presented for Los Angeles, New York City, San Francisco-San Jose, Houston, and Dallas-Fort Worth. Sharp emission gradients that exist near major highways are not apparent when emissions are mapped at 10 km resolution. High CO2 emission fluxes over highways become apparent at grid resolutions of 1 km and finer. Temporal variations in vehicle emissions are characterized using extensive day- and time-specific traffic count data and are described over diurnal, day of week, and seasonal time scales. Clear differences are observed when comparing light- and heavy-duty vehicle traffic patterns and comparing urban and rural areas. Decadal emission trends were analyzed from 2000 to 2007 when traffic volumes were increasing and a more recent period (2007-2010) when traffic volumes declined due to recession. We found large nonuniform changes in on-road CO2 emissions over a period of 5 years, highlighting the importance of timely updates to motor vehicle emission inventories.

  7. F-18 high alpha research vehicle: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.; Regenie, Victoria A.; Flick, Bradley C.

    1994-01-01

    The F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle has proven to be a useful research tool with many unique capabilities. Many of these capabilities are to assist in characterizing flight at high angles of attack, while some provide significant research in their own right. Of these, the thrust vectoring system, the unique ability to rapidly reprogram flight controls, the reprogrammable mission computer, and a reprogrammable onboard excitation system have allowed an increased utility and versatility of the research being conducted. Because of this multifaceted approach to research in the high angle of attack regime, the capabilities of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle were designed to cover as many high alpha technology bases as the program would allow. These areas include aerodynamics, controls, handling qualities, and propulsion.

  8. High occupancy of stream salamanders despite high ranavirus prevalence in a southern appalachians watershed.

    PubMed

    Rothermel, Betsie B; Travis, Emilie R; Miller, Debra L; Hill, Robert L; McGuire, Jessica L; Yabsley, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    The interactive effects of environmental stressors and emerging infectious disease pose potential threats to stream salamander communities and their headwater stream ecosystems. To begin assessing these threats, we conducted occupancy surveys and pathogen screening of stream salamanders (Family Plethodontidae) in a protected southern Appalachians watershed in Georgia and North Carolina, USA. Of the 101 salamanders screened for both chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and Ranavirus, only two exhibited low-level chytrid infections. Prevalence of Ranavirus was much higher (30.4% among five species of Desmognathus). Despite the ubiquity of ranaviral infections, we found high probabilities of site occupancy (≥0.60) for all stream salamander species.

  9. Accurate tracking of high dynamic vehicles with translated GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankshain, Kenneth M.

    The GPS concept and the translator processing system (TPS) which were developed for accurate and cost-effective tracking of various types of high dynamic expendable vehicles are described. A technique used by the translator processing system (TPS) to accomplish very accurate high dynamic tracking is presented. Automatic frequency control and fast Fourier transform processes are combined to track 100 g acceleration and 100 g/s jerk with 1-sigma velocity measurement error less than 1 ft/sec.

  10. High-resolution metabolomics of occupational exposure to trichloroethylene

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Douglas I; Uppal, Karan; Zhang, Luoping; Vermeulen, Roel; Smith, Martyn; Hu, Wei; Purdue, Mark P; Tang, Xiaojiang; Reiss, Boris; Kim, Sungkyoon; Li, Laiyu; Huang, Hanlin; Pennell, Kurt D; Jones, Dean P; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Occupational exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) has been linked to adverse health outcomes including non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and kidney and liver cancer; however, TCE’s mode of action for development of these diseases in humans is not well understood. Methods: Non-targeted metabolomics analysis of plasma obtained from 80 TCE-exposed workers [full shift exposure range of 0.4 to 230 parts-per-million of air (ppma)] and 95 matched controls were completed by ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry. Biological response to TCE exposure was determined using a metabolome-wide association study (MWAS) framework, with metabolic changes and plasma TCE metabolites evaluated by dose-response and pathway enrichment. Biological perturbations were then linked to immunological, renal and exposure molecular markers measured in the same population. Results: Metabolic features associated with TCE exposure included known TCE metabolites, unidentifiable chlorinated compounds and endogenous metabolites. Exposure resulted in a systemic response in endogenous metabolism, including disruption in purine catabolism and decreases in sulphur amino acid and bile acid biosynthesis pathways. Metabolite associations with TCE exposure included uric acid (β = 0.13, P-value = 3.6 × 10−5), glutamine (β = 0.08, P-value = 0.0013), cystine (β = 0.75, P-value = 0.0022), methylthioadenosine (β = −1.6, P-value = 0.0043), taurine (β = −2.4, P-value = 0.0011) and chenodeoxycholic acid (β = −1.3, P-value = 0.0039), which are consistent with known toxic effects of TCE, including immunosuppression, hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Correlation with additional exposure markers and physiological endpoints supported known disease associations. Conclusions: High-resolution metabolomics correlates measured occupational exposure to internal dose and metabolic response, providing insight into molecular mechanisms of exposure

  11. The Benefits of High School Experiences on Growth in Occupational Status in U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kyung-Nyun; Passmore, David L.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated high school graduates' school-to-work transition by considering their post-school occupational skill levels. Using an ordinal growth model analysis, occupational status increased in an arch-shaped curve as the number of years after high school graduation also increased. This growth trajectory was further related to…

  12. The Benefits of High School Experiences on Growth in Occupational Status in U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kyung-Nyun; Passmore, David L.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated high school graduates' school-to-work transition by considering their post-school occupational skill levels. Using an ordinal growth model analysis, occupational status increased in an arch-shaped curve as the number of years after high school graduation also increased. This growth trajectory was further related to…

  13. The association between price of regular-grade gasoline and injury and mortality rates among occupants involved in motorcycle- and automobile-related motor vehicle collisions.

    PubMed

    Hyatt, Eddie; Griffin, Russell; Rue, Loring W; McGwin, Gerald

    2009-09-01

    Motorcyclists have been reported to be more likely to die in a motor vehicle collision (MVC) than automobile occupants. With the recent increase in the pump price of gasoline, it has been reported that people are switching to motorcycles as main modes of transportation. This study evaluated the association between motor vehicle collision-related injury and mortality rates and increases in gasoline prices for occupants of automobiles and riders of motorcycles. There were an estimated 1,270,512 motorcycle MVC and 238,390,853 automobile MVC involved occupants in the U.S. from 1992 to 2007. Higher gasoline prices were associated with increased motorcycle-related injuries and deaths; however, this association no longer remained after accounting for changes in the number of registered vehicles. The current study observed that, while the number of injuries and fatalities in motorcycle-related MVCs increase with increasing gasoline price, rates remained largely unchanged. This suggests that the observed increase in motorcycle-related injuries and fatalities with increasing gasoline price is more a factor of the number of motorcycles on the road rather than operator characteristics.

  14. Functional outcomes of motor vehicle crash head injuries in pediatric and adult occupants.

    PubMed

    Schoell, Samantha L; Weaver, Ashley A; Talton, Jennifer W; Baker, Gretchen; Doud, Andrea N; Barnard, Ryan T; Stitzel, Joel D; Zonfrillo, Mark R

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the study was to develop a disability-based metric for motor vehicle crash (MVC) injuries, with a focus on head injuries, and compare the functional outcomes between the pediatric and adult populations. Disability risk (DR) was quantified using Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores within the National Trauma Data Bank-Research Data System (NTDB-RDS) for the top 95% most frequently occurring Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) 3, 4, and 5 head injuries in NASS-CDS 2000-2011. Pediatric (ages 7-18), adult (19-45), middle-aged (46-65), and older adult (66+) patients with an FIM score available who were alive at discharge and had an AIS 3, 4, or 5 injury were included in the study. The NTDB-RDS contains a truncated form of the FIM instrument, including 3 items (self-feed, locomotion, and verbal expression), each graded on a scale of 1 (full functional dependence) to 4 (full functional independence). Patients within each age group were classified as disabled or not disabled based on the FIM scale. The DR was calculated for each age group by dividing the number of patients who sustained a specific injury and were disabled by the number of patients who sustained the specific injury. To account for the impact of more severe associated coinjuries, a maximum AIS (MAIS) adjusted DR (DRMAIS) was also calculated for each injury. DR and DRMAIS ranged from 0 (0% disability risk) to 1 (100% disability risk). An analysis of the most frequent FIM components associated with disabling MVC head injuries revealed that disability across all 3 items (self-feed, locomotion, and expression) was the most frequent for pediatric and adult patients. Only locomotion was the most frequent for middle-aged and older adults. The mean DRMAIS for MVC head injuries was 35% for pediatric patients, 36% for adults, 38% for middle-aged adults, and 44% for older adults. Further analysis was conducted by grouping the head injuries into 8 groups based on the structure of injury and injury

  15. Crash pulse optimization for occupant protection at various impact velocities.

    PubMed

    Ito, Daisuke; Yokoi, Yusuke; Mizuno, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Vehicle deceleration has a large influence on occupant kinematic behavior and injury risks in crashes, and the optimization of the vehicle crash pulse that mitigates occupant loadings has been the subject of substantial research. These optimization research efforts focused on only high-velocity impact in regulatory or new car assessment programs though vehicle collisions occur over a wide range of velocities. In this study, the vehicle crash pulse was optimized for various velocities with a genetic algorithm. Vehicle deceleration was optimized in a full-frontal rigid barrier crash with a simple spring-mass model that represents the vehicle-occupant interaction and a Hybrid III 50th percentile male multibody model. To examine whether the vehicle crash pulse optimized at the high impact velocity is useful for reducing occupant loading at all impact velocities less than the optimized velocity, the occupant deceleration was calculated at various velocities for the optimized crash pulse determined at a high speed. The optimized vehicle deceleration-deformation characteristics that are effective for various velocities were investigated with 2 approaches. The optimized vehicle crash pulse at a single impact velocity consists of a high initial impulse followed by zero deceleration and then constant deceleration in the final stage. The vehicle deceleration optimized with the Hybrid III model was comparable to that determined from the spring-mass model. The optimized vehicle deceleration-deformation characteristics determined at a high speed did not necessarily lead to an occupant deceleration reduction at a lower velocity. The maximum occupant deceleration at each velocity was normalized by the maximum deceleration determined in the single impact velocity optimization. The resulting vehicle deceleration-deformation characteristic was a square crash pulse. The objective function was defined as the number of injuries, which was the product of the number of collisions at the

  16. Spectrum of high-resolution computed tomography imaging in occupational lung disease.

    PubMed

    Satija, Bhawna; Kumar, Sanyal; Ojha, Umesh Chandra; Gothi, Dipti

    2013-10-01

    Damage to the lungs caused by dusts or fumes or noxious substances inhaled by workers in certain specific occupation is known as occupational lung disease. Recognition of occupational lung disease is especially important not only for the primary worker, but also because of the implications with regard to primary and secondary disease prevention in the exposed co-workers. Although many of the disorders can be detected on chest radiography, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is superior in delineating the lung architecture and depicting pathology. The characteristic radiological features suggest the correct diagnosis in some, whereas a combination of clinical features, occupational history, and radiological findings is essential in establishing the diagnosis in others. In the presence of a history of exposure and consistent clinical features, the diagnosis of even an uncommon occupational lung disease can be suggested by the characteristic described HRCT findings. In this article, we briefly review the HRCT appearance of a wide spectrum of occupational lung diseases.

  17. Exposure to volatile organic compounds for individuals with occupations associated with potential exposure to motor vehicle exhaust and/or gasoline vapor emissions.

    PubMed

    Jo, W K; Song, K B

    2001-03-26

    Workers who work near volatile organic compounds (VOCs) source(s), motor vehicle exhausts and/or gasoline vapor emissions, are suspected to be exposed to highly-elevated VOC levels during their work-time. This study confirmed this suspicion and evaluated the work-time exposure VOCs for traffic police officers, parking garage attendants, service station attendants, roadside storekeepers and underground storekeepers, by measuring the concentrations of six aromatic VOCs in workplace air, or personal air and breath samples. For nearly all target VOCs, the post-work breath concentrations of the workers were slightly or significantly higher than the pre-work breath concentrations, depending on the compound and occupation. Furthermore, both the pre- and post-work breath concentrations of the workers showed elevated levels compared with a control group of college students. The post-work breath concentrations were significantly correlated with the personal air concentrations, while the pre-work breath concentrations were not. Smoking workers were not always exposed to higher aromatic VOC levels than non-smoking workers. The breath and personal air concentrations for all the target compounds were both higher for underground parking garage attendants than for ground-level parking attendants. For all the target compounds except toluene, storekeepers exhibited similar levels of exposure for all store types. Print shopkeepers recorded the highest toluene exposure.

  18. Propulsion of small launch vehicles using high power millimeter waves

    SciTech Connect

    Benford, J.; Myrabo, L.

    1994-12-31

    The use of microwave and millimeter wave beamed energy for propulsion of vehicles in the atmosphere and in space has been under study for at least 35 years. The need for improved propulsion technology is clear: chemical rockets orbit only a few percent of the liftoff mass at a cost of over $3,000/lb. The key advantage of the beamed power approach is to place the heavy and expensive components on the ground or in space, not in the vehicle. This paper, following upon the high power laser propulsion programs, uses a multi-cycle propulsion engine in which the first phase of ascent is based on the air breathing ramjet principle, a repetitive Pulsed Detonation Engine (PDE) which uses a microwave-supported detonation to heat the air working fluid, i.e., propellant. The second phase is a pure beam-heated rocket. The key factor is that high peak power is essential to this pulsed engine. This paper explores this propulsion concept using millimeter waves, the most advantageous part of the spectrum. The authors find that efficient system concepts can be developed for the beam powered launch system and that, while the capital cost may be as high as the earlier orbital transfer concepts, the operating cost is much lower. The vehicle can have payload-to-mass ratios on the order of one and cost (per pound to orbit) two orders of magnitudes less than for chemical rockets. This allows the weight of microwave powered vehicles to be very small, as low as {approximately}100 kg for test devices.

  19. Mortality Risk in Pediatric Motor Vehicle Crash Occupants: Accounting for Developmental Stage and Challenging Abbreviated Injury Scale Metrics.

    PubMed

    Doud, Andrea N; Weaver, Ashley A; Talton, Jennifer W; Barnard, Ryan T; Schoell, Samantha L; Petty, John K; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    Survival risk ratios (SRRs) and their probabilistic counterpart, mortality risk ratios (MRRs), have been shown to be at odds with Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) severity scores for particular injuries in adults. SRRs have been validated for pediatrics but have not been studied within the context of pediatric age stratifications. We hypothesized that children with similar motor vehicle crash (MVC) injuries may have different mortality risks (MR) based upon developmental stage and that these MRs may not correlate with AIS severity. The NASS-CDS 2000-2011 was used to define the top 95% most common AIS 2+ injuries among MVC occupants in 4 age groups: 0-4, 5-9, 10-14, and 15-18 years. Next, the National Trauma Databank 2002-2011 was used to calculate the MR (proportion of those dying with an injury to those sustaining the injury) and the co-injury-adjusted MR (MRMAIS) for each injury within 6 age groups: 0-4, 5-9, 10-14, 15-18, 0-18, and 19+ years. MR differences were evaluated between age groups aggregately, between age groups based upon anatomic injury patterns and between age groups on an individual injury level using nonparametric Wilcoxon tests and chi-square or Fisher's exact tests as appropriate. Correlation between AIS and MR within each age group was also evaluated. MR and MRMAIS distributions of the most common AIS 2+ injuries were right skewed. Aggregate MR of these most common injuries varied between the age groups, with 5- to 9-year-old and 10- to 14-year-old children having the lowest MRs and 0- to 4-year-old and 15- to 18-year-old children and adults having the highest MRs (all P <.05). Head and thoracic injuries imparted the greatest mortality risk in all age groups with median MRMAIS ranging from 0 to 6% and 0 to 4.5%, respectively. Injuries to particular body regions also varied with respect to MR based upon age. For example, thoracic injuries in adults had significantly higher MRMAIS than such injuries among 5- to 9-year-olds and 10- to 14-year

  20. Gender Differences in the Vocational Interests of Youth Considering High Job Growth and Green Energy Occupations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Becky S.

    2012-01-01

    For more than 100 years, vocational psychologists and educational researchers have sought to identify the significant influences shaping occupational interests. This descriptive study used a series of vocational card sort exercises with 139 rural high school youth to identify gender differences in occupational interests toward working in 60 of the…

  1. Self-Efficacy in Relation to Occupational Consideration and Academic Performance in High School Equivalency Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bores-Rangel, Enrique; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Bandura's self-efficacy theory was tested in relation to occupational consideration and academic performance with 35 High School Equivalency Program students from seasonal farmworker backgrounds. Within-individual and aggregate analyses indicated a moderate to strong relationship between extent of consideration of occupational activities and…

  2. The Relationship between Career Variables and Occupational Aspirations and Expectations for Australian High School Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Wendy; Creed, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This study surveyed 925 Australian high school students enrolled in grades 8 through 12 on measures of occupational aspirations, occupational expectations, career status aspirations, and career status expectations; it tested the association between these variables and career maturity, career indecision, career decision-making self-efficacy, and…

  3. The Relationship between Career Variables and Occupational Aspirations and Expectations for Australian High School Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Wendy; Creed, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This study surveyed 925 Australian high school students enrolled in grades 8 through 12 on measures of occupational aspirations, occupational expectations, career status aspirations, and career status expectations; it tested the association between these variables and career maturity, career indecision, career decision-making self-efficacy, and…

  4. Gender Differences in the Vocational Interests of Youth Considering High Job Growth and Green Energy Occupations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Becky S.

    2012-01-01

    For more than 100 years, vocational psychologists and educational researchers have sought to identify the significant influences shaping occupational interests. This descriptive study used a series of vocational card sort exercises with 139 rural high school youth to identify gender differences in occupational interests toward working in 60 of the…

  5. The US market for high-speed maglev vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.; Johnson, L.; Daniels, E.

    1989-01-01

    Recent studies at Argonne National Laboratory have shown that the market for high-speed magnetically levitated vehicles in the US, and in the rest of North America as well, depends strongly on how the technology is implemented. As an upgraded railway technology, it would have important benefits. However, competition with airlines would tend to make the technology uneconomical. Designed as aerospace-type vehicles with special attention to low mass and optimal aerodynamic performance and integrated into airport/airline operations, the technology would complement rather than compete with airlines. The social and economic benefits of maglev technology are discussed, and the economic viability of maglev as an airline/aerospace technology is compared to that as a railroad technology. Governing factors for potential market size and geographic distribution are addressed in detail, and the expected principal routes are described. 8 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Between- and Within-Occupation Inequality: The Case of High-Status Professions*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yu; Killewald, Alexandra; Near, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we present analyses of the roles of education and occupation in shaping trends in income inequality among college-educated workers in the U.S., drawing data from two sources: (1) the 1960–2000 U.S. Censuses and (2) the 2006–2008 three-year American Community Survey. We also examine in detail historical trends in between-occupation and within-occupation income inequality for a small set of high-status professionals, with focused attention on the economic wellbeing of scientists. Our research yields four findings. First, education premiums have increased. Second, both between-occupation and within-occupation inequality increased at about the same rates for college graduates, so that the portion of inequality attributable to occupational differences remained constant. Third, scientists have lost ground relative to other similarly educated professionals. Fourth, trends in within-occupation inequality vary by occupation and education, making any sweeping summary on the roles of education and occupation in the overall increase in income inequality difficult. PMID:26977113

  7. A high energy launcher for Trans Atmospheric Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, Edward

    1987-12-01

    For maximum efficiency Trans Atmospheric Vehicles (TAV's) must have high specific impulse (Isp) propulsion for takeoff and for accelerating after takeoff. This is when the TAV is the heaviest and consequently when the drag and the loss rate of energy to earth's gravity is the greatest. A ground-based horizontal launcher provides a very high effective Isp, and if properly designed, can launch TAV's at ramjet operating speed. It is found that for the acceleration to Mach 5 the average Isp for hydrogen fueled ramjet engines is higher than that for air turbo rocket engines.

  8. Occupational Exploration at Ontario Junior High School: 8th Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Gene; And Others

    The document contains 47 activities for Grade 8. The contents include the following areas: questionnaires; work vocabularies; employment seeking procedures--employment ads, application forms, resumes, job interviews, and resume preparation advice; a 24-page unit presenting occupational information in relation to career choice and job application…

  9. Occupational Exploration at Ontario Junior High School: 8th Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Gene; And Others

    The document contains 47 activities for Grade 8. The contents include the following areas: questionnaires; work vocabularies; employment seeking procedures--employment ads, application forms, resumes, job interviews, and resume preparation advice; a 24-page unit presenting occupational information in relation to career choice and job application…

  10. Study on High Efficient Electric Vehicle Wireless Charging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. X.; Liu, Z. Z.; Zeng, H.; Qu, X. D.; Hou, Y. J.

    2016-08-01

    Electric and unmanned is a new trend in the development of automobile, cable charging pile can not meet the demand of unmanned electric vehicle. Wireless charging system for electric vehicle has a high level of automation, which can be realized by unmanned operation, and the wireless charging technology has been paid more and more attention. This paper first analyses the differences in S-S (series-series) and S-P (series-parallel) type resonant wireless power supply system, combined with the load characteristics of electric vehicle, S-S type resonant structure was used in this system. This paper analyses the coupling coefficient of several common coil structure changes with the moving distance of Maxwell Ansys software, the performance of disc type coil structure is better. Then the simulation model is established by Simulink toolbox in Matlab, to analyse the power and efficiency characteristics of the whole system. Finally, the experiment platform is set up to verify the feasibility of the whole system and optimize the system. Based on the theoretical and simulation analysis, the higher charging efficiency is obtained by optimizing the magnetic coupling mechanism.

  11. Association between the high risk occupations and bladder cancer in Iran: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Khoubi, Jamshid; Pourabdian, Siamak; Mohebbi, Iraj; Tajvidi, Mina; Zaroorian, Omid; Giahi, Omid

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this work was to identify the high-risk occupations in Iran and to re-inspect occupations that were related to bladder cancer. In the study, 300 patients suffering from bladder cancer and 500 control individuals were interviewed. Demographic information, occupational history, and history of exposure to chemical compounds such as aromatic amines for each participant were collected. ORs and 95% CIs were calculated using unconditional logistic regression for each occupation. There was a significantly increased risk of bladder cancer among truck and bus drivers (OR = 11.3), skilled agricultural, forestry and fishery workers (OR = 6.0), metal industry workers (OR = 6.0), domestic housekeepers (OR = 5.9), and construction workers (OR = 3.8). The study showed a strong correlation between truck and bus drivers, skilled agricultural, forestry and fishery workers, metal industry workers, domestic housekeepers, as well as construction workers and the increased risk of bladder cancer in these occupations.

  12. Vehicle having hydraulic and power steering systems using a single high pressure pump

    DOEpatents

    Bartley, Bradley E.; Blass, James R.; Gibson, Dennis H.

    2001-06-22

    A vehicle comprises a plurality of wheels attached to a vehicle housing. Also attached to the vehicle housing is a power steering system, including a fluid flow circuit, which is operably coupled to a number of the wheels. An internal combustion engine attached to the vehicle housing is connected to a hydraulically actuated system that includes a high pressure pump. An outlet of the high pressure pump is in fluid communication with the fluid flow circuit.

  13. High density propellant for single stage to orbit vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, J. J.; Masters, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    Mixed mode propulsion concepts are studied for advanced, single stage earth orbital transportation systems (SSTO) for use in the post-1990 time period. These propulsion concepts are based on the sequential and/or parallel use of high density impulse and high specific impulse propellants in a single stage to increase vehicle performance and reduce dry weight. Specifically, the mixed mode concept utilizes two propulsion systems with two different fuels (mode 1 and mode 2) with liquid oxygen as a common oxidizer. Mode 1 engines would burn a high bulk density fuel for lift-off and early ascent to minimize performance penalties associated with carrying fuel tankage to orbit. Mode 2 engines will complete orbital injection utilizing liquid hydrogen as the fuel.

  14. Propulsion of small launch vehicles using high power millimeter waves

    SciTech Connect

    Benford, J.; Myrabo, L.

    1994-12-31

    High power microwaves have been proposed for propulsion of vehicles and projectiles in the atmosphere and in space. The requirements in terms of high power microwave technology have not been examined in any detail. The need for improved propulsion technology is clear: chemical rockets orbit only a few percent of the liftoff mass at a cost of about 3,000$/lb. The key advantage of any beamed power approach is in placing the heavy and expensive components on the ground or in space. The authors propose a system with uses a two-stage propulsion method in which the first phase of ascent is based on the ramjet principle, a repetitive Pulsed Detonation Engine which uses a microwave-supported detonation to heat the air fuel. The second phase is a pure rocket. This paper explores this propulsion concept using millimeter waves, the most advantageous part of the spectrum. They find that efficient system concepts can be developed: the vehicle can have payload-to-mass ratios on the order of one and cost per pound to orbit one or two orders of magnitude less that chemical rockets.

  15. Preferential Nucleosome Occupancy at High Values of DNA Helical Rise

    PubMed Central

    Pedone, Francesco; Santoni, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Nucleosomes are the basic structural units of eukaryotic chromatin and play a key role in the regulation of gene expression. Nucleosome formation depends on several factors, including properties of the sequence itself, but also physical constraints and epigenetic factors such as chromatin-remodelling enzymes. In this view, a sequence-dependent approach is able to capture a general tendency of a region to bind a histone octamer. A reference data set of positioned nucleosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to study the role of DNA helical rise in histone–DNA interaction. Genomic sequences were transformed into arrays of helical rise values by a tetranucleotide code and then turned into profiles of mean helical rise values. These profiles resemble maps of nucleosome occupancy, suggesting that intrinsic histone–DNA interactions are linked to helical rise. The obtained results show that preferential nucleosome occupancy occurs where the mean helical rise reaches its largest values. Mean helical rise profiles obtained by using maps of positioned nucleosomes of the Drosophila melanogaster and Plasmodium falciparum genomes, as well as Homo sapiens chromosome 20 confirm that nucleosomes are mainly located where the mean helical rise reaches its largest values. PMID:22233711

  16. Effects of High Octane Ethanol Blends on Four Legacy Flex-Fuel Vehicles, and a Turbocharged GDI Vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, John F; West, Brian H; Huff, Shean P

    2015-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting engine and vehicle research to investigate the potential of high-octane fuels to improve fuel economy. Ethanol has very high research octane number (RON) and heat of vaporization (HoV), properties that make it an excellent spark ignition engine fuel. The prospects of increasing both the ethanol content and the octane number of the gasoline pool has the potential to enable improved fuel economy in future vehicles with downsized, downsped engines. This report describes a small study to explore the potential performance benefits of high octane ethanol blends in the legacy fleet. There are over 17 million flex-fuel vehicles (FFVs) on the road today in the United States, vehicles capable of using any fuel from E0 to E85. If a future high-octane blend for dedicated vehicles is on the horizon, the nation is faced with the classic chicken-and-egg dilemma. If today’s FFVs can see a performance advantage with a high octane ethanol blend such as E25 or E30, then perhaps consumer demand for this fuel can serve as a bridge to future dedicated vehicles. Experiments were performed with four FFVs using a 10% ethanol fuel (E10) with 88 pump octane, and a market gasoline blended with ethanol to make a 30% by volume ethanol fuel (E30) with 94 pump octane. The research octane numbers were 92.4 for the E10 fuel and 100.7 for the E30 fuel. Two vehicles had gasoline direct injected (GDI) engines, and two featured port fuel injection (PFI). Significant wide open throttle (WOT) performance improvements were measured for three of the four FFVs, with one vehicle showing no change. Additionally, a conventional (non-FFV) vehicle with a small turbocharged direct-injected engine was tested with a regular grade of gasoline with no ethanol (E0) and a splash blend of this same fuel with 15% ethanol by volume (E15). RON was increased from 90.7 for the E0 to 97.8 for the E15 blend. Significant wide open throttle and thermal efficiency performance

  17. High performance modeling of atmospheric re-entry vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Alexandre; Scalabrin, Leonardo C.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2012-02-01

    Re-entry vehicles designed for space exploration are usually equipped with thermal protection systems made of ablative material. In order to properly model and predict the aerothermal environment of the vehicle, it is imperative to account for the gases produced by ablation processes. In the case of charring ablators, where an inner resin is pyrolyzed at a relatively low temperature, the composition of the gas expelled into the boundary layer is complex and may lead to thermal chemical reactions that cannot be captured with simple flow chemistry models. In order to obtain better predictions, an appropriate gas flow chemistry model needs to be included in the CFD calculations. Using a recently developed chemistry model for ablating carbon-phenolic-in-air species, a CFD calculation of the Stardust re-entry at 71 km is presented. The code used for that purpose has been designed to take advantage of the nature of the problem and therefore remains very efficient when a high number of chemical species are involved. The CFD result demonstrates the need for such chemistry model when modeling the flow field around an ablative material. Modeling of the nonequilibrium radiation spectra is also presented, and compared to the experimental data obtained during Stardust re-entry by the Echelle instrument. The predicted emission from the CN lines compares quite well with the experimental results, demonstrating the validity of the current approach.

  18. A novel propulsion method for high- Tc superconducting maglev vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guangtong; Wang, Jiasu; Wang, Suyu; Liu, Minxian; Jing, Hua; Lu, Yiyun; Lin, Qunxu

    2008-01-01

    High-Tc superconducting (HTS) maglev is considered as a perfect transportation type because of its unique inherent stability. A direct current (DC) linear motor using the permanent magnet guideway (PMG) as the stator and the on-board coil as the rotor instead of the present inductive or synchronous alternate current (AC) linear motor which has an economic disadvantage due to the necessity to lay primary coil along the guideway is proposed in this paper. In order to modulate the magnetic field under the PMG, an inverse E shape ferromagnetic device (IESFD) core is designed. The possible winding method for the on-board coil is listed, and the analytical result shows that a considerable net ampere force and thus the propulsion force can be generated by this special structure. The influence of the concentrated effect of the IESFD on the maglev performance of HTS bulk is studied by a numerical program, and the results show that the levitation force with the IESFD is 90% of that without. It is also indicated that the load capability and lateral performance of the maglev vehicle combined this propulsion method can be improved thanks to the attractive effect between the IESFD and PMG. The cost of the HTS maglev vehicle will be remarkably reduced and then shorten the distance to practical application with this propulsion method.

  19. Factors Predictive of the Range of Occupations Considered by African American Juniors and Seniors in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lease, Suzanne H.

    2006-01-01

    This study assesses factors predictive of the range of possible occupations considered by 166 African American high school students. There are no differences in the number of African American representative occupations (those in which 13.5% or more employees were African American) considered compared to nonrepresentative occupations (those with…

  20. Pursuing Post-Secondary Education in the Host Country and the Occupational Attainment of Highly Educated Immigrants to Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamuti-Trache, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the occupational attainment of highly educated adult immigrants by employing a secondary analysis of three waves of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada that provide data on immigrant arrivals in 2000-2001. Occupational attainment is described in terms of matching immigrants' pre-migration occupation with the main…

  1. Pursuing Post-Secondary Education in the Host Country and the Occupational Attainment of Highly Educated Immigrants to Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamuti-Trache, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the occupational attainment of highly educated adult immigrants by employing a secondary analysis of three waves of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada that provide data on immigrant arrivals in 2000-2001. Occupational attainment is described in terms of matching immigrants' pre-migration occupation with the main…

  2. A novel CCR2 antagonist inhibits atherogenesis in apoE deficient mice by achieving high receptor occupancy.

    PubMed

    Bot, Ilze; Ortiz Zacarías, Natalia V; de Witte, Wilhelmus E A; de Vries, Henk; van Santbrink, Peter J; van der Velden, Daniël; Kröner, Mara J; van der Berg, Dirk-Jan; Stamos, Dean; de Lange, Elizabeth C M; Kuiper, Johan; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2017-12-01

    CC Chemokine Receptor 2 (CCR2) and its endogenous ligand CCL2 are involved in a number of diseases, including atherosclerosis. Several CCR2 antagonists have been developed as potential therapeutic agents, however their in vivo clinical efficacy was limited. In this report, we aimed to determine whether 15a, an antagonist with a long residence time on the human CCR2, is effective in inhibiting the development of atherosclerosis in a mouse disease model. First, radioligand binding assays were performed to determine affinity and binding kinetics of 15a on murine CCR2. To assess the in vivo efficacy, western-type diet fed apoE(-/-) mice were treated daily with 15a or vehicle as control. Treatment with 15a reduced the amount of circulating CCR2(+) monocytes and the size of the atherosclerotic plaques in both the carotid artery and the aortic root. We then showed that the long pharmacokinetic half-life of 15a combined with the high drug concentrations ensured prolonged CCR2 occupancy. These data render 15a a promising compound for drug development and confirms high receptor occupancy as a key parameter when targeting chemokine receptors.

  3. Laboratory testing of high energy density capacitors for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A. F.

    1991-10-01

    Laboratory tests of advanced, high energy density capacitors in the Battery Test Laboratory of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory have been performed to investigate their suitability for load-leveling the battery in an electric vehicle. Two types of devices were tested- 3 V, 70 Farad, spiral wound, carbon-based, single cell devices and 20 V, 3. 5 Farad, mixed-oxide, multi-cell bipolar devices. The energy density of the devices, based on energy stored during charge to the rated voltage, was found to be 1-2 W/kg, which agreed well with that claimed by the manufacturers. Constant power discharge tests were performed at power densities up to 1500 W/kg. Discharges at higher power densities could have been performed had equipment been available to maintain constant power during discharges of less than one second. It was found that the capacitance of the devices were rate dependent with the rate dependency of the carbon-based devices being higher than that of the mixed-oxide devices. The resistance of both types of devices were relatively low being 20-30 milliohms. Testing done in the study showed that the advanced high energy density capacitors can be charged and discharged over cycles which approximate the duty cycle that would be encountered if the devices are used to load-level the battery in an electric vehicle. Thermal tests of the advanced capacitors in an insulated environment using the PSFUDS cycle showed the devices do not overheat with their temperatures increasing only 4-5 C for tests that lasted 5-7 hours.

  4. Vehicle detection from very-high-resolution (VHR) aerial imagery using attribute belief propagation (ABP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Li, Ying; Zhang, Li; Huang, Yuchun

    2016-10-01

    With the popularity of very-high-resolution (VHR) aerial imagery, the shape, color, and context attribute of vehicles are better characterized. Due to the various road surroundings and imaging conditions, vehicle attributes could be adversely affected so that vehicle is mistakenly detected or missed. This paper is motivated to robustly extract the rich attribute feature for detecting the vehicles of VHR imagery under different scenarios. Based on the hierarchical component tree of vehicle context, attribute belief propagation (ABP) is proposed to detect salient vehicles from the statistical perspective. With the Max-tree data structure, the multi-level component tree around the road network is efficiently created. The spatial relationship between vehicle and its belonging context is established with the belief definition of vehicle attribute. To effectively correct single-level belief error, the inter-level belief linkages enforce consistency of belief assignment between corresponding components at different levels. ABP starts from an initial set of vehicle belief calculated by vehicle attribute, and then iterates through each component by applying inter-level belief passing until convergence. The optimal value of vehicle belief of each component is obtained via minimizing its belief function iteratively. The proposed algorithm is tested on a diverse set of VHR imagery acquired in the city and inter-city areas of the West and South China. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can detect vehicle efficiently and suppress the erroneous effectively. The proposed ABP framework is promising to robustly classify the vehicles from VHR Aerial imagery.

  5. High-power batteries for use in hybrid vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellner, Christian; Newman, John

    The idea of hybrid vehicles is not a recent development; as early as the 1960s, several have companies attempted to develop bipolar lead/acid batteries for hybrid-electric vehicles [J.L. Arias, J.J. Rowlett, E.D. Drake, Journal of Power Sources, 40 (1993) 63-73.]. Hybrid vehicles have the potential to increase fuel economy by using a primary engine operating at a constant power to supply average power requirements and a surge power unit for peak power demands and to recover braking energy. To date, no detailed system optimization analysis has been performed for hybrid vehicles. This study combines a simplified version of the lithium-ion battery model developed by Doyle [C.M. Doyle, Design and simulation of lithium rechargeable batteries, Dissertation, Fall, 1995.] with a vehicle model that determines battery-power requirements for a given driving cycle. Batteries are designed for either the highest vehicle mileage or minimal acceptable battery dimensions. Hybrid vehicles have the potential to more than double mileage as compared to conventional vehicles, and have a limited electric vehicle range. The battery goals of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) are investigated and often found to be differing with actual requirements. Specifically, PNGV overstates power and especially energy requirements for load-leveling devices and calls for unnecessary demands on the development of alternate technologies. The role of the driving cycle was investigated and found to be relatively unimportant as long as it contains several essential features. The important parameters in the driving cycle are the time of discharge and the maximum current (or power) level. This study suggests that a combination of both a vehicle model and a battery model is required to determine the complex interaction between hybrid-vehicle weight and battery power.

  6. 75 FR 25927 - Vehicle/Track Interaction Safety Standards; High-Speed and High Cant Deficiency Operations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ... the vehicles and the track over which they operate must be considered within a systems approach that... Transportation Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Parts 213 and 238 Vehicle/Track Interaction Safety... Administration 49 CFR Parts 213 and 238 RIN 2130-AC09 Vehicle/Track Interaction Safety Standards; High-Speed and...

  7. Evaluation of a high visibility enforcement project focused on passenger vehicles interacting with commercial vehicles.

    PubMed

    Thomas, F Dennis; Blomberg, Richard D; Peck, Raymond C; Cosgrove, Linda A; Salzberg, Philip M

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, Washington State applied NHTSA's High Visibility Enforcement model used in the Click It or Ticket seat belt campaign in an attempt to reduce unsafe driving behaviors around commercial motor vehicles (CMVs). The program was called Ticketing Aggressive Cars and Trucks (TACT). This paper details the methods used to evaluate the program's effectiveness and the results of the evaluation. Four high-crash interstate highway corridors, each approximately 25 miles in length, were selected. Two of these corridors received TACT media messages and increased enforcement over an 18-month period while two comparison corridors did not receive any increased media or enforcement. A total of 4,737 contacts were made with drivers during the two enforcement waves, and 72% of these contacts led to a citation. Drivers at the intervention sites who said they saw or heard any of the TACT messages increased from 17.7% in the pre period to a high of 67.3% in the post periods. Drivers at the intervention sites also reported increased exposure to the core message of leaving more space when passing trucks (14% pre to 40% post period). The percentage of drivers who said they leave more room when passing trucks than when passing cars rose from 16% in the pre period to 24% in the post period at the intervention sites, while comparison sites showed no change. Over 150 hours of video recorded by law enforcement officers in unmarked vehicles were utilized to examine violation rates and severity of violations before and after the intervention campaigns. Statistical analyses showed that violation rates were reduced significantly at the intervention sites (between 23% and 46%), while remaining constant at the comparison sites. Analyses of the video data also showed that the seriousness of the residual violations at the intervention sites decreased. Overall, the evaluation results provide a consistent picture of the effectiveness of the TACT pilot project. Success was demonstrated at every step

  8. Education through Occupations in American High Schools. Volume I. Approaches to Integrating Academic and Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grubb, W. Norton, Ed.

    This book contains the following papers examining approaches to integrating high school vocational and academic curricula in U.S. high schools to provide education through occupations: "Resolving the Paradox of the High School" (W. Norton Grubb); "'The Cunning Hand, the Cultured Mind': Sources of Support for Curriculum…

  9. Education through Occupations in American High Schools. Volume I. Approaches to Integrating Academic and Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grubb, W. Norton, Ed.

    This book contains the following papers examining approaches to integrating high school vocational and academic curricula in U.S. high schools to provide education through occupations: "Resolving the Paradox of the High School" (W. Norton Grubb); "'The Cunning Hand, the Cultured Mind': Sources of Support for Curriculum…

  10. Orbital transfer vehicle engine technology high velocity ratio diffusing crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-12-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  11. Orbital Transfer Vehicle Engine Technology High Velocity Ratio Diffusing Crossover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-01-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  12. Association of Resident Fatigue and Distress With Occupational Blood and Body Fluid Exposures and Motor Vehicle Incidents

    PubMed Central

    West, Colin P.; Tan, Angelina D.; Shanafelt, Tait D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of resident physicians' distress on their personal safety. Participants and Methods We conducted a prospective, longitudinal cohort study of internal medicine residents at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Participants completed surveys quarterly from July 1, 2007, through July 31, 2011, during their training period. Frequency of self-reported blood and body fluid (BBF) exposures and motor vehicle incidents was recorded. Associations of validated measures of quality of life, burnout, symptoms of depression, fatigue, and sleepiness with a subsequently reported BBF exposure or motor vehicle incident were determined using generalized estimating equations for repeated measures. Results Data were provided by 340 of 384 eligible residents (88.5%). Of the 301 participants providing BBF exposure data, 23 (7.6%) reported having at least 1 BBF exposure during the study period. Motor vehicle incidents were reported by 168 of 300 respondents (56.0%), including 34 (11.3%) reporting a motor vehicle crash and 130 (43.3%) reporting a near-miss motor vehicle crash. Other than the low personal accomplishment domain of burnout, distress and fatigue at one time point exhibited no statistically significant associations with BBF exposure in the subsequent 3 months. However, diminished quality of life, burnout, positive screening for depression, fatigue, and sleepiness were each associated with statistically significantly increased odds of reporting a motor vehicle incident in the subsequent 3 months. Conclusion Exposures to BBF are relatively uncommon among internal medicine residents in current training environments. Motor vehicle incidents, however, remain common. Our results confirm the importance of fatigue and sleepiness to resident safety concerns. In addition, higher levels of distress may be contributory factors to motor vehicle crashes and other related incidents. Interventions designed to address both fatigue and distress may be needed to

  13. Occupation and adult gliomas.

    PubMed

    Carozza, S E; Wrensch, M; Miike, R; Newman, B; Olshan, A F; Savitz, D A; Yost, M; Lee, M

    2000-11-01

    Lifetime job histories from a population-based, case-control study of gliomas diagnosed among adults in the San Francisco Bay area between August 1991 and April 1994 were evaluated to assess occupational risk factors. Occupational data for 476 cases and 462 controls were analyzed, with adjustment for age, gender, education, and race. Imprecise increased risks were observed for physicians and surgeons (odds ratio (OR) = 3.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7, 17.6), artists (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 0.5, 6.5), foundry and smelter workers (OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 0.5, 13.1), petroleum and gas workers (OR = 4.9, 95% CI: 0.6, 42.2), and painters (OR = 1.6, 95% CI: 0.5, 4.9). Legal and social service workers, shippers, janitors, motor vehicle operators, and aircraft operators had increased odds ratios only with longer duration of employment. Physicians and surgeons, foundry and smelter workers, petroleum and gas workers, and painters showed increased risk for both astrocytic and nonastrocytic tumors. Artists and firemen had increased risk for astrocytic tumors only, while messengers, textile workers, aircraft operators, and vehicle manufacturing workers showed increased risk only for nonastrocytic tumors. Despite study limitations, including small numbers for many of the occupational groups, a high percentage of proxy respondents among cases, and lack of specific exposure information, associations were observed for several occupations previously reported to be at higher risk for brain tumors generally and gliomas specifically.

  14. Control of a high beta maneuvering reentry vehicle using dynamic inversion.

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, Alfred Chapman

    2005-05-01

    The design of flight control systems for high performance maneuvering reentry vehicles presents a significant challenge to the control systems designer. These vehicles typically have a much higher ballistic coefficient than crewed vehicles like as the Space Shuttle or proposed crew return vehicles such as the X-38. Moreover, the missions of high performance vehicles usually require a steeper reentry flight path angle, followed by a pull-out into level flight. These vehicles then must transit the entire atmosphere and robustly perform the maneuvers required for the mission. The vehicles must also be flown with small static margins in order to perform the required maneuvers, which can result in highly nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics that frequently transition from being aerodynamically stable to unstable as angle of attack increases. The control system design technique of dynamic inversion has been applied successfully to both high performance aircraft and low beta reentry vehicles. The objective of this study was to explore the application of this technique to high performance maneuvering reentry vehicles, including the basic derivation of the dynamic inversion technique, followed by the extension of that technique to the use of tabular trim aerodynamic models in the controller. The dynamic inversion equations are developed for high performance vehicles and augmented to allow the selection of a desired response for the control system. A six degree of freedom simulation is used to evaluate the performance of the dynamic inversion approach, and results for both nominal and off nominal aerodynamic characteristics are presented.

  15. Spectrum of high-resolution computed tomography imaging in occupational lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Satija, Bhawna; Kumar, Sanyal; Ojha, Umesh Chandra; Gothi, Dipti

    2013-01-01

    Damage to the lungs caused by dusts or fumes or noxious substances inhaled by workers in certain specific occupation is known as occupational lung disease. Recognition of occupational lung disease is especially important not only for the primary worker, but also because of the implications with regard to primary and secondary disease prevention in the exposed co-workers. Although many of the disorders can be detected on chest radiography, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is superior in delineating the lung architecture and depicting pathology. The characteristic radiological features suggest the correct diagnosis in some, whereas a combination of clinical features, occupational history, and radiological findings is essential in establishing the diagnosis in others. In the presence of a history of exposure and consistent clinical features, the diagnosis of even an uncommon occupational lung disease can be suggested by the characteristic described HRCT findings. In this article, we briefly review the HRCT appearance of a wide spectrum of occupational lung diseases. PMID:24604929

  16. Vehicle-mounted high-power microwave systems and health risk communication in a deployed environment.

    PubMed

    Westhoff, John L; Roberts, Brad J; Erickson, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Vehicle-mounted high-power microwave systems have been developed to counter the improvised explosive device threat in southwest Asia. Many service members only vaguely comprehend the nature of these devices and the nonionizing radio frequency (RF) radiation they emit. Misconceptions about the health effects of RF radiation have the potential to produce unnecessary anxiety. We report an incident in which concern for exposure to radiation from a high-power microwave device thought to be malfunctioning led to an extensive field investigation, multiple evaluations by clinicians in theater, and subsequent referrals to an Occupational Health clinic upon return from deployment. When acute exposure to RF does occur, the effects are thermally mediated and immediately perceptible--limiting the possibility of injury. Unlike ionizing radiation, RF radiation is not known to cause cancer and the adverse health effects are not cumulative. Medical officers counseling service members concerned about potential RF radiation exposure should apply established principles of risk communication, attend to real and perceived risks, and enlist the assistance of technical experts to properly characterize an exposure when appropriate.

  17. A high performance pneumatic braking system for heavy vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jonathan I.; Cebon, David

    2010-12-01

    Current research into reducing actuator delays in pneumatic brake systems is opening the door for advanced anti-lock braking algorithms to be used on heavy goods vehicles. However, these algorithms require the knowledge of variables that are impractical to measure directly. This paper introduces a sliding mode braking force observer to support a sliding mode controller for air-braked heavy vehicles. The performance of the observer is examined through simulations and field testing of an articulated heavy vehicle. The observer operated robustly during single-wheel vehicle simulations, and provided reasonable estimates of surface friction from test data. The effect of brake gain errors on the controller and observer are illustrated, and a recursive least squares estimator is derived for the brake gain. The estimator converged within 0.3 s in simulations and vehicle trials.

  18. Determinants of the occupational environment and heavy vehicle crashes in Western Australia: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Meuleners, Lynn; Fraser, Michelle L; Govorko, Matthew H; Stevenson, Mark R

    2017-02-01

    To determine the association between a heavy vehicle driver's work environment, including fatigue-related characteristics, and the risk of a crash in Western Australia. This case-control study included 100 long-haul heavy vehicle drivers who were involved in a police-reported crash in WA and 100 long-haul heavy vehicle drivers recruited from WA truck stops, who were not involved in a crash in the previous 12 months. Driver demographics and driving details, work environment, vehicle and sleep-related characteristics were obtained using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Drivers were tested for obstructive sleep apnoea using an overnight diagnostic device. Conditional multiple logistic regression analysis was undertaken to determine work environment-related factors associated with crash involvement. After accounting for potential confounders, driving a heavy vehicle with an empty load was associated with almost a three-fold increased crash risk compared to carrying general freight (adjusted OR: 2.93, 95% CI: 1.17-7.34). Driving a rigid heavy vehicle was associated with a four-fold increased risk of crashing compared to articulated heavy vehicles (adjusted OR: 4.08, 95% CI: 1.13-14.68). The risk of crashing was almost five times higher when driving more than 50% of the trip between midnight and 5.59am (adjusted OR: 4.86, 95% CI: 1.47-16.07). Furthermore, the risk of crashing significantly increased if the time since the last break on the index trip was greater than 2h (adjusted OR: 2.18, 95% CI: 1.14-4.17). Drivers with more than 10 years driving experience were 52% less likely to be involved in a crash (adjusted OR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.23-0.99). The results provide support for an association between a driver's work environment, fatigue-related factors, and the risk of heavy vehicle crash involvement. Greater attention needs to be paid to the creation of a safer work environment for long distance heavy vehicle drivers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  19. Factors Related to the Occupations of Nebraska Farm Male High School Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahler, Alan Arnold

    To investigate the relationships of selected factors to the occupations of male Nebraska farm high school graduates during the time period of 1954 through 1958, data were obtained from the permanent records of 1,120 graduates from 69 randomly selected Nebraska high schools. Chi-square and product-moment techniques were used to analyze…

  20. Bridging the Skills Gap. Working Paper Part II: High Technology and Related Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Christine E.

    This part of a 2-part working paper identifies and describes major occupational groups that are characteristic of high technology manufacturing and service industries as well as employment sectors that use high technology products in their provision of goods and services. The paper is based on a review of a wide range of employment projections…

  1. Brief Report: A Growth Mixture Model of Occupational Aspirations of Individuals with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, In Heok; Rojewski, Jay W.

    2013-01-01

    A previous longitudinal study of the occupational aspirations of individuals with high-incidence disabilities revealed multiple longitudinal patterns for individuals with learning disabilities or emotional-behavioral disorders. Growth mixture modeling was used to determine whether individuals in these two high-incidence disabilities groups (N =…

  2. Brief Report: A Growth Mixture Model of Occupational Aspirations of Individuals with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, In Heok; Rojewski, Jay W.

    2013-01-01

    A previous longitudinal study of the occupational aspirations of individuals with high-incidence disabilities revealed multiple longitudinal patterns for individuals with learning disabilities or emotional-behavioral disorders. Growth mixture modeling was used to determine whether individuals in these two high-incidence disabilities groups (N =…

  3. Work-related fatal motor vehicle traffic crashes: Matching of 2010 data from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries and the Fatality Analysis Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Byler, Christen; Kesy, Laura; Richardson, Scott; Pratt, Stephanie G; Rodríguez-Acosta, Rosa L

    2016-07-01

    Motor vehicle traffic crashes (MVTCs) remain the leading cause of work-related fatal injuries in the United States, with crashes on public roadways accounting for 25% of all work-related deaths in 2012. In the United States, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) provides accurate counts of fatal work injuries based on confirmation of work relationship from multiple sources, while the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) provides detailed data on fatal MVTCs based on police reports. Characterization of fatal work-related MVTCs is currently limited by data sources that lack either data on potential risk factors (CFOI) or work-relatedness confirmation and employment characteristics (FARS). BLS and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) collaborated to analyze a merged data file created by BLS using CFOI and FARS data. A matching algorithm was created to link 2010 data from CFOI and FARS using date of incident and other case characteristics, allowing for flexibility in variables to address coding discrepancies. Using the matching algorithm, 953 of the 1044 CFOI "Highway" cases (91%) for 2010 were successfully linked to FARS. Further analysis revealed systematic differences between cases identified as work-related by both systems and by CFOI alone. Among cases identified as work-related by CFOI alone, the fatally-injured worker was considerably more likely to have been employed outside the transportation and warehousing industry or transportation-related occupations, and to have been the occupant of a vehicle other than a heavy truck. This study is the first step of a collaboration between BLS, NHTSA, and NIOSH to improve the completeness and quality of data on fatal work-related MVTCs. It has demonstrated the feasibility and value of matching data on fatal work-related traffic crashes from CFOI and FARS. The results will lead to

  4. Study on high reliability safety valve for railway vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Chen, Ruikun; Zhang, Shixi; Xu, BuDu

    2017-09-01

    Now, the realization of most of the functions of the railway vehicles rely on compressed air, so the demand for compressed air is growing higher and higher. This safety valve is a protection device for pressure limitation and pressure relief in an air supply system of railway vehicles. I am going to introduce the structure, operating principle, research and development process of the safety valve designed by our company in this document.

  5. A High Accuracy Hybrid Navigation System for Unmanned Underwater Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Hideo; Numajima, Toru; Sugimoto, Sueo

    The development of small, light weight, low power navigation system for guidance of both tethered and autonomous Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (UUV) is required in applications such as deep salvage, oil and gas well head and pipe line laying and maintenance, etc. All have stringent position requirements in order to define target locations followings the initial find, minimize search time for return missions, as well as support of autopilot functions. In these applications mainly an accurate Sonar Doppler Velocity Log (DVL) was used for Inertial Navigation System (INS) error corrections. But the settlement of DVL is not affordable to various UUV so that not convenient to low cost and small UUV. In this paper we propose a new algorithm for combining the low cost but highly accurate INS with Water Screw Speed (WSS) of the UUV efficiently. In order to evaluate our algorithm we produced the data acquisition system and after several experimental run, we simulated this algorithm searching the error correlation time and noise variance of these estimations.

  6. Calibration of GPS based high accuracy speed meter for vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yin; Sun, Qiao; Du, Lei; Yu, Mei; Bai, Jie

    2015-02-01

    GPS based high accuracy speed meter for vehicles is a special type of GPS speed meter which uses Doppler Demodulation of GPS signals to calculate the speed of a moving target. It is increasingly used as reference equipment in the field of traffic speed measurement, but acknowledged standard calibration methods are still lacking. To solve this problem, this paper presents the set-ups of simulated calibration, field test signal replay calibration, and in-field test comparison with an optical sensor based non-contact speed meter. All the experiments were carried out on particular speed values in the range of (40-180) km/h with the same GPS speed meter. The speed measurement errors of simulated calibration fall in the range of +/-0.1 km/h or +/-0.1%, with uncertainties smaller than 0.02% (k=2). The errors of replay calibration fall in the range of +/-0.1% with uncertainties smaller than 0.10% (k=2). The calibration results justify the effectiveness of the two methods. The relative deviations of the GPS speed meter from the optical sensor based noncontact speed meter fall in the range of +/-0.3%, which validates the use of GPS speed meter as reference instruments. The results of this research can provide technical basis for the establishment of internationally standard calibration methods of GPS speed meters, and thus ensures the legal status of GPS speed meters as reference equipment in the field of traffic speed metrology.

  7. Validation of a Simulation Process for Assessing the Response of a Vehicle and Its Occupants to an Explosive Threat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    et al , 1999] for modeling blast events. In this paper the Eulerian solver of LS - DYNA is employed for simulating the soil – explosive – air...occupant. A Blast Event Simulation sysTem (BEST) has been developed for facilitating the easy use of the LS - DYNA solvers for conducting a...integrated with the LS - DYNA commercial code. The CTH hydrocode [McGlaun et al , 1990; Bell and Hertel, 1994] has been developed by Sandia National

  8. Farm Tractors, Occupational Therapy, and Four-Wheel Drive: Transforming a Military Vehicle into a Cultural Icon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iarocci, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The armed forces of World War II employed unprecedented numbers of mechanical transport vehicles, precipitating a spike in demand for automotive manufactures. Eager to capture a share of the less certain postwar automobile marketplace, defense contractors such as Willys-Overland pursued a diverse range of product development and advertising…

  9. Farm Tractors, Occupational Therapy, and Four-Wheel Drive: Transforming a Military Vehicle into a Cultural Icon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iarocci, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The armed forces of World War II employed unprecedented numbers of mechanical transport vehicles, precipitating a spike in demand for automotive manufactures. Eager to capture a share of the less certain postwar automobile marketplace, defense contractors such as Willys-Overland pursued a diverse range of product development and advertising…

  10. What Goes into High Educational and Occupational Achievement? Education, Brains, Hard Work, Networks, and Other Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wai, Jonathan; Rindermann, Heiner

    2017-01-01

    There are many factors that go into high educational and occupational achievement, including hard work, motivation, and luck. But how important is talent? Specifically, how likely were global innovators and leaders intellectually talented or gifted when younger? This paper reviews retrospective data on multiple US samples (Total N = 11,745),…

  11. The Relationship of High School Curriculum Tracks to Degree Attainment and Occupational Earnings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Edward C., Jr.; Zirkle, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between high school curriculum tracks and student achievement outcomes through the consideration of degree attainment and occupational earnings. Data pertaining to graduates were analyzed through the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) 1997 dataset. This study investigated the…

  12. A Study of Factors Associated with the Vocational Development of High School Agricultural Occupations Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byler, Bennie L.; Hemp, Paul E.

    Among the most crucial problems facing young people today are decisions in the process of vocational development. This study was designed to determine if there are differences in certain aspects of vocational development among the groups of high school agriculture students who plan to enter on-farm agricultural occupations, those who plan to enter…

  13. Educational and Occupational Aspirations and Expectations of Galveston High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Harold B.

    The study surveyed the educational and occupational status orientations of 914 Anglo, Black, and Mexican American high school sophomores and seniors in Galveston, Texas. Responses were compared by sex, age, ethnicity, grade level, and school program in which enrolled (general, academic, or vocational). A 4-way analysis of variance procedure using…

  14. Occupational Preparation in the Natural Resources: A Suggested High School Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortensen, James H.

    This curriculum guide was developed to provide a model plan to help public high schools and area vocational-technical schools to initiate, or evaluate and improve, natural resource occupational preparation programs. It offers a curriculum plan which can be modified to meet particular needs and objectives which are career education oriented. This…

  15. Education through Occupations in American High Schools. Volume II. The Challenges of Implementing Curriculum Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grubb, W. Norton, Ed.

    This book contains the following papers examining the challenges of integrating high school vocational and academic curricula to provide education through occupations: "Components of a Complex Reform" (W. Norton Grubb); "Integrating Vocational and Academic Education: Lessons from Early Innovators" (Kimberly Ramsey et al.);…

  16. Development Patterns of Occupational Aspirations in Adolescents with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojewski, Jay W.; Lee, In Heok; Gregg, Noel; Gemici, Sinan

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzed the longitudinal development of occupational aspiration prestige scores over a 12-year period (Grade 8 to 8 years postsecondary) to better understand this aspect of career choice from adolescence into adulthood for people with high-incidence disabilities. A curvilinear trajectory was detected where aspirations increased during…

  17. Gender Inequality among Japanese High School Teachers: Women Teachers' Resistance to Gender Bias in Occupational Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyajima, Tomomi

    2008-01-01

    This study explores gender inequality in the occupational culture of Japanese high school teachers with special focus on women teachers' resistance to gender-biased practices. It examines the effectiveness of official and informal teacher training programmes in raising awareness of gender issues. Through an ethnographic case study conducted in…

  18. Educational and Occupational Aspirations and Expectations of Galveston High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Harold B.

    The study surveyed the educational and occupational status orientations of 914 Anglo, Black, and Mexican American high school sophomores and seniors in Galveston, Texas. Responses were compared by sex, age, ethnicity, grade level, and school program in which enrolled (general, academic, or vocational). A 4-way analysis of variance procedure using…

  19. Development Patterns of Occupational Aspirations in Adolescents with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojewski, Jay W.; Lee, In Heok; Gregg, Noel; Gemici, Sinan

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzed the longitudinal development of occupational aspiration prestige scores over a 12-year period (Grade 8 to 8 years postsecondary) to better understand this aspect of career choice from adolescence into adulthood for people with high-incidence disabilities. A curvilinear trajectory was detected where aspirations increased during…

  20. FACTORS RELATED TO THE OCCUPATIONS OF IOWA FARM MALE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROBINSON, TED RICHARD

    QUESTIONNAIRES SENT TO 8,281 MALE GRADUATES OF 189 IOWA HIGH SCHOOLS FROM 1950 TO 1954 INVESTIGATED THE RELATIONSHIP OF SELECTED GEOGRAPHICAL, ENVIRONMENTAL, EDUCATIONAL, AND SOCIOECONOMIC FACTORS TO THE OCCUPATIONS OF THE GRADUATES. THE FINAL POPULATION OF THE STUDY WAS 6,107 GRADUATES COMPOSED OF THOSE WHO HAD ENROLLED IN SIX OR MORE SEMESTERS…

  1. Identification of High Growth Occupations. Job Corps Vocational Education Offerings Review. Documentation Report No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Job Corps.

    As part of a multiphased evaluation of vocational training provided by the Job Corps in fiscal year 1982, a study examined Job Corps practices for identifying high growth occupations. At least for the present, national projections are the main source of information available to Job Corps planners for use in assessing future vocational training…

  2. Educational and Occupational Goals: Male versus Female Black High School Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawkins, Marvin P.

    1980-01-01

    Findings suggest that among Black high school seniors, there are no sex-related differences in aspirations and expectations for educational advancement. There are significant differences, however, in occupational goals and career values. These differences are not explained away when students' social class, academic aptitude, and community size are…

  3. Gender Inequality among Japanese High School Teachers: Women Teachers' Resistance to Gender Bias in Occupational Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyajima, Tomomi

    2008-01-01

    This study explores gender inequality in the occupational culture of Japanese high school teachers with special focus on women teachers' resistance to gender-biased practices. It examines the effectiveness of official and informal teacher training programmes in raising awareness of gender issues. Through an ethnographic case study conducted in…

  4. Education through Occupations in American High Schools. Volume II. The Challenges of Implementing Curriculum Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grubb, W. Norton, Ed.

    This book contains the following papers examining the challenges of integrating high school vocational and academic curricula to provide education through occupations: "Components of a Complex Reform" (W. Norton Grubb); "Integrating Vocational and Academic Education: Lessons from Early Innovators" (Kimberly Ramsey et al.);…

  5. Marine Related Occupations: A Primer for High School Students. Insight 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    This publication is divided into five parts. The first part provides the aims and objectives of the booklet. These include assisting high school students to discover the career opportunities in marine-related occupations and to prepare for some of the jobs listed in the booklet. Section two contains resource information: publications,…

  6. High School, Occupational Choice, and Sex Equity. Working Paper: 1303-02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofferth, Sandra L.

    A study examined the differential effects of experiences prior to labor force entry, primarily in high school, on the later sex-typicality of occupations and earnings of non-college-bound men and women. The study analyzed data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of the Labor Market Experiences of Young Men and Women. (These surveys lnvolved…

  7. Advanced thermoplastic composites: An attractive new material for usage in highly loaded vehicle components

    SciTech Connect

    Mehn, R.; Seidl, F.; Peis, R.; Heinzmann, D.; Frei, P.

    1995-10-01

    Beside the lightweight potential and further well known advantages of advanced composite materials, continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastics employed in vehicle structural parts especially offer short manufacturing cycle times and an additional economically viable manufacturing process. Presenting a frame structure concept for two highly loaded vehicle parts, a safety seat and a side door, numerous features concerning the choice of suitable composite materials, design aspects, investigations to develop a thermoforming technique, mature for a series production of vehicle parts, are discussed.

  8. Minimisation of the explosion shock wave load onto the occupants inside the vehicle during trinitrotoluene charge blast.

    PubMed

    Krzystała, Edyta; Mężyk, Arkadiusz; Kciuk, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elaborate identification method of crew overload as a result of trinitrotoluene charge explosion under the military wheeled vehicle. During the study, an experimental military ground research was carried out. The aim of this research was to verify the mine blast resistance of the prototype wheeled vehicle according to STANG 4569 as well as the anti-explosive seat. Within the work, the original methodology was elaborated along with a prototype research statement. This article presents some results of the experimental research, thanks to which there is a possibility to estimate the crew's lives being endangered in an explosion through the measurement of acceleration as well as the pressure on the chest, head and internal organs. On the basis of our acceleration results, both effectiveness and infallibility of crew protective elements along with a blast mitigation seat were verified.

  9. Reduced Order Modeling for Rapid Simulation of Blast Events of a Military Ground Vehicle and Its Occupants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-12

    Tabiei, A., and Nilakantan, G., “Reduction of Acceleration Induced Injuries from Mine Blasts Under Infantry Vehicles”, 6th European LS - DYNA Users...Chandra, et al . UNCLASSIFIED Page 2 of 12 finite element techniques equivalent to the LS - Dyna [4,5] full finite element ground vehicle model. - The...Chandra, et al . UNCLASSIFIED Page 6 of 12 Figure 15: Mine Blast Force An important advantage of this method is that the force can be

  10. High pressure injection injuries: a serious occupational hazard.

    PubMed

    Mrvos, R; Dean, B S; Krenzelok, E P

    1987-01-01

    High pressure injection equipment such as airless paint sprayers, high pressure grease guns, and fuel injection apparatus constitute a serious safety hazard resulting in significant morbidity. These devices are capable of delivering contaminants such as paint, solvents, and grease at pressures ranging from 600-12,000 psi. This allows the substance to penetrate through a minute skin wound and to spread widely through fascial planes and tendon sheaths and to produce significant vascular compression and systemic toxicity. High pressure injection injuries frequently result in amputation. Fifty-five suspected high pressure injection injury cases were evaluated. Twenty were determined to be actual injection injuries from equipment producing pressures in the range of 1,500-12,000 psi. The injected contaminants included latex paint, mineral spirits, and concrete sealer. Fourteen injuries involved digits. Digital amputation was necessary in three patients. Hospital admissions averaged 6.5 days. Successful management of these cases involves awareness of the impending problem and rapid referral of the patient to an emergency department and to a competent orthopedic or plastic surgeon.

  11. Impact of organization on occupational injury risk: evidence from high-speed railway construction.

    PubMed

    Bena, Antonella; Berchialla, Paola; Debernardi, Maria Luisa; Pasqualini, Osvaldo; Farina, Elena; Costa, Giuseppe

    2011-06-01

    The construction industry is at the top of the list of priorities for surveillance and research, although it is often difficult to perform detailed analysis of the risk factors. In mid-2002, construction work started on the Torino to Novara high-speed railway line. A Regional Epidemiological Observatory developed a standardized data collection system that provided a rare opportunity for researchers in Italy to analyze risk factors for occupational injury in a large cohort of workers involved in a single major construction project. The aim of this study is to describe the characteristics of a cohort of workers employed at construction sites of the high-speed Torino to Novara railway between 2003 and 2005, analyze the main determinants of occupational injury risk and estimate incidence rates. Frequency rates of occupational injury were calculated by characteristics of workers and firms and relative risks were estimated using a Poisson model. Annual injury incidence decreased over the period and was higher than the Italian construction industry rate. The risk was highest among workers performing the least skilled jobs and with the shortest contracts. Moreover the risk was higher in large enterprises. Although calculated within a specific context, the results provide information applicable to all construction sites. The high risk of occupational injury associated with short-term contracts suggests, at such large and long-term construction sites, to engage workers on a permanent basis for the duration of the construction project. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Analysis of hydrogen vehicles with cryogenic high pressure storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S. M.; Berry, G. D.

    1998-06-19

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LIQ) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH2). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). This paper shows an evaluation of the applicability of the insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles. The paper shows an evaluation of evaporative losses and insulation requirements and a description of the current experimental plans for testing insulated pressure vessels. The results show significant advantages to the use of insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles.

  13. Aerodynamic braking of high speed ground transportation vehicles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marte, J. E.; Marko, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    The drag effectiveness of aerodynamic brakes arranged in series on a train-like vehicle was investigated. Fixed- and moving-model testing techniques were used in order to determine the importance of proper vehicle-ground interference simulation. Fixed-model tests were carried out on a sting-mounted model: alone; with a fixed ground plane; and in proximity to an image model. Moving-model tests were conducted in a vertical slide-wire facility with and without a ground plane. Results from investigations of one brake configuration are presented which show the effect of the number of brakes in the set and of spacing between brakes.

  14. The F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle: A High-Angle-of-Attack Testbed Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regenie, Victoria; Gatlin, Donald; Kempel, Robert; Matheny, Neil

    1992-01-01

    The F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle is the first thrust-vectoring testbed aircraft used to study the aerodynamics and maneuvering available in the poststall flight regime and to provide the data for validating ground prediction techniques. The aircraft includes a flexible research flight control system and full research instrumentation. The capability to control the vehicle at angles of attack up to 70 degrees is also included. This aircraft was modified by adding a pitch and yaw thrust-vectoring system. No significant problems occurred during the envelope expansion phase of the program. This aircraft has demonstrated excellent control in the wing rock region and increased rolling performance at high angles of attack. Initial pilot reports indicate that the increased capability is desirable although some difficulty in judging the size and timing of control inputs was observed. The aircraft, preflight ground testing and envelope expansion flight tests are described.

  15. Defeating the Active Shooter: Applying Facility Upgrades in Order to Mitigate the Effects of Active Shooters in High Occupancy Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    SHOOTER: APPLYING FACILITY UPGRADES IN ORDER TO MITIGATE THE EFFECTS OF ACTIVE SHOOTERS IN HIGH OCCUPANCY FACILITIES by Charles E. Ergenbright...SUBTITLE Defeating the Active Shooter: Applying Facility Upgrades in Order to Mitigate the Effects of Active Shooters in High Occupancy Facilities 5...facility upgrades capable of mitigating the deadly effects of Active Shooters. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Active Shooter, Mitigation, Facility Upgrades, Victim

  16. High-resolution mapping of vehicle emissions in China in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B.; Huo, H.; Zhang, Q.; Yao, Z. L.; Wang, X. T.; Yang, X. F.; Liu, H.; He, K. B.

    2014-09-01

    This study is the first in a series of papers that aim to develop high-resolution emission databases for different anthropogenic sources in China. Here we focus on on-road transportation. Because of the increasing impact of on-road transportation on regional air quality, developing an accurate and high-resolution vehicle emission inventory is important for both the research community and air quality management. This work proposes a new inventory methodology to improve the spatial and temporal accuracy and resolution of vehicle emissions in China. We calculate, for the first time, the monthly vehicle emissions for 2008 in 2364 counties (an administrative unit one level lower than city) by developing a set of approaches to estimate vehicle stock and monthly emission factors at county-level, and technology distribution at provincial level. We then introduce allocation weights for the vehicle kilometers traveled to assign the county-level emissions onto 0.05° × 0.05° grids based on the China Digital Road-network Map (CDRM). The new methodology overcomes the common shortcomings of previous inventory methods, including neglecting the geographical differences between key parameters and using surrogates that are weakly related to vehicle activities to allocate vehicle emissions. The new method has great advantages over previous methods in depicting the spatial distribution characteristics of vehicle activities and emissions. This work provides a better understanding of the spatial representation of vehicle emissions in China and can benefit both air quality modeling and management with improved spatial accuracy.

  17. High throughput phenotyping using an unmanned aerial vehicle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field trials are expensive and labor-intensive to carry out. Strategies to maximize data collection from these trials will improve research efficiencies. We have purchased a small unmanned aerial vehicle (AEV) to collect digital images from field plots. The AEV is remote-controlled and can be guided...

  18. Navigation and Hazard Avoidance for High-Speed Unmanned Ground Vehicles in Rough Terrain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-07

    Potential Field Navigation of High Speed Vehicles on Rough Terrain,” Robotica , Vol. 25, No. 4, pp 409-424, July 2007 Udengaard, M., and Iagnemma, K...Navigation of Unmanned Ground Vehicles on Uneven Terrain using Potential Fields," to appear in Robotica , 2007 [16] Spenko, M., Kuroda, Y., Dubowsky, S

  19. Occupational exposures to new dry cleaning solvents: High-flashpoint hydrocarbons and butylal

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, Diana M.; Whittaker, Stephen G.; Lee, Eun Gyung; Roberts, Jennifer; Streicher, Robert; Nourian, Fariba; Gong, Wei; Broadwater, Kendra

    2017-01-01

    The dry cleaning industry is moving away from using perchloroethylene. Occupational exposures to two alternative dry cleaning solvents, butylal and high-flashpoint hydrocarbons, have not been well characterized. We evaluated four dry cleaning shops that used these alternative solvents. The shops were staffed by Korean- and Cantonese-speaking owners, and Korean-, Cantonese-, and Spanish-speaking employees. Because most workers had limited English proficiency we used language services in our evaluations. In two shops we collected personal and area air samples for butylal. We also collected air samples for formaldehyde and butanol, potential hydrolysis products of butylal. Because there are no occupational exposure limits for butylal, we assessed employee health risks using control banding tools. In the remaining two shops we collected personal and area air samples for high-flashpoint hydrocarbon solvents. In all shops the highest personal airborne exposures occurred when workers loaded and unloaded the dry cleaning machines and pressed dry cleaned fabrics. The air concentrations of formaldehyde and butanol in the butylal shops were well below occupational exposure limits. Likewise, the air concentrations of high-flashpoint hydrocarbons were also well below occupational exposure limits. However, we saw potential skin exposures to these chemicals. We provided recommendations on appropriate work practices and the selection and use of personal protective equipment. These recommendations were consistent with those derived using control banding tools for butylal. However, there is insufficient toxicological and health information to determine the safety of butylal in occupational settings. Independent evaluation of the toxicological properties of these alternative dry cleaning solvents, especially butylal, is urgently needed. PMID:27105306

  20. Occupational exposures to new dry cleaning solvents: High-flashpoint hydrocarbons and butylal.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, Diana M; Whittaker, Stephen G; Lee, Eun Gyung; Roberts, Jennifer; Streicher, Robert; Nourian, Fariba; Gong, Wei; Broadwater, Kendra

    2016-10-02

    The dry cleaning industry is moving away from using perchloroethylene. Occupational exposures to two alternative dry cleaning solvents, butylal and high-flashpoint hydrocarbons, have not been well characterized. We evaluated four dry cleaning shops that used these alternative solvents. The shops were staffed by Korean- and Cantonese-speaking owners, and Korean-, Cantonese-, and Spanish-speaking employees. Because most workers had limited English proficiency we used language services in our evaluations. In two shops we collected personal and area air samples for butylal. We also collected air samples for formaldehyde and butanol, potential hydrolysis products of butylal. Because there are no occupational exposure limits for butylal, we assessed employee health risks using control banding tools. In the remaining two shops we collected personal and area air samples for high-flashpoint hydrocarbon solvents. In all shops the highest personal airborne exposures occurred when workers loaded and unloaded the dry cleaning machines and pressed dry cleaned fabrics. The air concentrations of formaldehyde and butanol in the butylal shops were well below occupational exposure limits. Likewise, the air concentrations of high-flashpoint hydrocarbons were also well below occupational exposure limits. However, we saw potential skin exposures to these chemicals. We provided recommendations on appropriate work practices and the selection and use of personal protective equipment. These recommendations were consistent with those derived using control banding tools for butylal. However, there is insufficient toxicological and health information to determine the safety of butylal in occupational settings. Independent evaluation of the toxicological properties of these alternative dry cleaning solvents, especially butylal, is urgently needed.

  1. Correlates of hopelessness in the high suicide risk police occupation

    PubMed Central

    Violanti, John M.; Andrew, Michael E.; Mnatsakanova, Anna; Hartley, Tara A.; Fekedulegn, Desta; Burchfiel, Cecil M.

    2015-01-01

    Police officers are chronically exposed to work stress. We examined specific stressors that may be associated with hopelessness, a possible risk factor for suicide in this high suicide risk population. The study included 378 officers (276 men and 102 women) with complete data. Analysis of variance was used to estimate mean levels of hopelessness scores as associated with stress, adjusted for age, gender, and race/ ethnicity. Posttraumatic symptoms were tested as a modifier of the association between stress and hopelessness. Increasing stress of administrative practices and lack of support were significantly associated with increasing hopelessness among officers (p < .006 – hopelessness range: 1.64–2.65; and p < .001 – hopelessness range 1.60–2.80, respectively). Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms significantly modified the association between lack of organizational support and hopelessness (p < .010) with significant association only among individuals with higher PTSD symptoms (p < .001). Results suggest that hopelessness is associated with specific stressors in police work, and this is modified by posttraumatic symptomatology. PMID:26752981

  2. Case-control study of high risk occupations for bladder cancer in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Dryson, Evan; 't Mannetje, Andrea; Walls, Chris; McLean, Dave; McKenzie, Fiona; Maule, Milena; Cheng, Soo; Cunningham, Chris; Kromhout, Hans; Boffetta, Paolo; Blair, Aaron; Pearce, Neil

    2008-03-15

    We conducted a nationwide case-control study of bladder cancer in adult New Zealanders to identify occupations that may contribute to the risk of bladder cancer in the New Zealand population. A total of 213 incident cases of bladder cancer (age 25-70 years) notified to the New Zealand Cancer Registry during 2003 and 2004, and 471 population controls, were interviewed face-to-face. The questionnaire collected demographic information and a full occupational history. The relative risks for bladder cancer associated with ever being employed in particular occupations and industries were calculated by unconditional logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, smoking and socio-economic status. Estimates were subsequently semi-Bayes adjusted to account for the large number of occupations and industries being considered. An elevated bladder cancer risk was observed for hairdressers (odds ratio (OR) 9.15 95% Confidence Interval (95%CI) 1.60-62.22), and sewing machinists (OR 3.07 95%CI 1.35-6.96). Significantly increased risks were not observed for several other occupations that have been reported in previous studies, including sales assistants (OR 1.03 95%CI 0.64-1.67), painters and paperhangers (OR 1.42 95%CI 0.56-3.60), sheet metal workers (OR 0.39, 95%CI 0.15-1.00), printing trades workers (OR 1.11 95%CI 0.41-3.05) and truck drivers (OR 1.36 95%CI 0.60-3.09), although the elevated odds ratios for painters, printers and truck drivers are consistent with excesses observed in other studies. Nonsignificantly increased risks were observed for tailors and dressmakers (OR 2.84 95%CI 0.62-13.05), rubber and plastics products machine operators (OR 2.82 95%CI 0.75-10.67), building workers (OR 2.15, 95%CI 0.68-6.73), and female market farmers and crop growers (OR 2.05 95%CI 0.72-5.83). In conclusion, this study has confirmed that hairdressers and sewing machinists are high risk occupations for bladder cancer in New Zealand, and has identified several other occupations and industries

  3. Analysis of Electric Vehicle DC High Current Conversion Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Bai, Jing-fen; Lin, Fan-tao; Lu, Da

    2017-05-01

    Based on the background of electric vehicles, it is elaborated the necessity about electric energy accurate metering of electric vehicle power batteries, and it is analyzed about the charging and discharging characteristics of power batteries. It is needed a DC large current converter to realize accurate calibration of power batteries electric energy metering. Several kinds of measuring methods are analyzed based on shunts and magnetic induction principle in detail. It is put forward power batteries charge and discharge calibration system principle, and it is simulated and analyzed ripple waves containing rate and harmonic waves containing rate of power batteries AC side and DC side. It is put forward suitable DC large current measurement methods of power batteries by comparing different measurement principles and it is looked forward the DC large current measurement techniques.

  4. High Strength P/M Gears for Vehicle Transmissions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-30

    as compared to wrought or forged steel parts. [1, 2] P/M gears are increasingly being used in powered hand tools, gear pumps, and as accessory...components in automotive transmissions. However, P/M steel gears are not used currently for power transmission applications due to performance...wear resistance, and therefore applications in vehicle power transmissions have been limited only to minimally loaded components. [6-16] Ausform

  5. Post-Occupancy Evaluation (POE) Methodologies for School Facilities: A Case Study of the V. Sue Cleveland High School Post Occupancy Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Marcel; Larroque, Andre; Maniktala, Nate

    2012-01-01

    The New Mexico Public School Facilities Authority (NMPSFA) is the agency responsible for administering state-funded capital projects for schools statewide. Post occupancy evaluation (POE) is the tool selected by NMPSFA for measuring project outcomes. The basic POE process for V. Sue Cleveland High School (VSCHS) consisted of a series of field…

  6. Post-Occupancy Evaluation (POE) Methodologies for School Facilities: A Case Study of the V. Sue Cleveland High School Post Occupancy Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Marcel; Larroque, Andre; Maniktala, Nate

    2012-01-01

    The New Mexico Public School Facilities Authority (NMPSFA) is the agency responsible for administering state-funded capital projects for schools statewide. Post occupancy evaluation (POE) is the tool selected by NMPSFA for measuring project outcomes. The basic POE process for V. Sue Cleveland High School (VSCHS) consisted of a series of field…

  7. Health and Wellbeing of Occupants in Highly Energy Efficient Buildings: A Field Study.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Peter; Tappler, Peter; Munoz, Ute; Damberger, Bernhard; Wanka, Anna; Kundi, Michael; Hutter, Hans-Peter

    2017-03-19

    Passive houses and other highly energy-efficient buildings need mechanical ventilation. However, ventilation systems in such houses are regarded with a certain degree of skepticism by parts of the public due to alleged negative health effects. Within a quasi-experimental field study, we investigated if occupants of two types of buildings (mechanical vs. natural ventilation) experience different health, wellbeing and housing satisfaction outcomes and if associations with indoor air quality exist. We investigated 123 modern homes (test group: with mechanical ventilation; control group: naturally ventilated) built in the years 2010 to 2012 in the same geographic area and price range. Interviews of occupants based on standardized questionnaires and measurements of indoor air quality parameters were conducted twice (three months after moving in and one year later). In total, 575 interviews were performed (respondents' mean age 37.9 ± 9 years in the test group, 37.7 ± 9 years in the control group). Occupants of the test group rated their overall health status and that of their children not significantly higher than occupants of the control group at both time points. Adult occupants of the test group reported dry eyes statistically significantly more frequently compared to the control group (19.4% vs. 12.5%). Inhabitants of energy-efficient, mechanically ventilated homes rated the quality of indoor air and climate significantly higher. Self-reported health improved more frequently in the mechanically ventilated new homes (p = 0.005). Almost no other significant differences between housing types and measuring time points were observed concerning health and wellbeing or housing satisfaction. Associations between vegetative symptoms (dizziness, nausea, headaches) and formaldehyde concentrations as well as between CO₂ levels and perceived stale air were observed. However, both associations were independent of the type of ventilation. In summary, occupants of the

  8. Health and Wellbeing of Occupants in Highly Energy Efficient Buildings: A Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Peter; Tappler, Peter; Munoz, Ute; Damberger, Bernhard; Wanka, Anna; Kundi, Michael; Hutter, Hans-Peter

    2017-01-01

    Passive houses and other highly energy-efficient buildings need mechanical ventilation. However, ventilation systems in such houses are regarded with a certain degree of skepticism by parts of the public due to alleged negative health effects. Within a quasi-experimental field study, we investigated if occupants of two types of buildings (mechanical vs. natural ventilation) experience different health, wellbeing and housing satisfaction outcomes and if associations with indoor air quality exist. We investigated 123 modern homes (test group: with mechanical ventilation; control group: naturally ventilated) built in the years 2010 to 2012 in the same geographic area and price range. Interviews of occupants based on standardized questionnaires and measurements of indoor air quality parameters were conducted twice (three months after moving in and one year later). In total, 575 interviews were performed (respondents’ mean age 37.9 ± 9 years in the test group, 37.7 ± 9 years in the control group). Occupants of the test group rated their overall health status and that of their children not significantly higher than occupants of the control group at both time points. Adult occupants of the test group reported dry eyes statistically significantly more frequently compared to the control group (19.4% vs. 12.5%). Inhabitants of energy-efficient, mechanically ventilated homes rated the quality of indoor air and climate significantly higher. Self-reported health improved more frequently in the mechanically ventilated new homes (p = 0.005). Almost no other significant differences between housing types and measuring time points were observed concerning health and wellbeing or housing satisfaction. Associations between vegetative symptoms (dizziness, nausea, headaches) and formaldehyde concentrations as well as between CO2 levels and perceived stale air were observed. However, both associations were independent of the type of ventilation. In summary, occupants of the

  9. Status of hydrodynamic technology as related to model tests of high speed marine vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. A.; Savitsky, D.; Stevens, M. J.; Balquet, R. J.; Muller-Graf, B.; Murakami, T.; Prokohorov, S. D.; Vanoossanen, P.

    1981-07-01

    The High Speed Marine Vehicle Panel of the 16th International Towing Tank Conference prepared hydrodynamic technology status reports related to model tank tests of SWATH, semidisplacement round bilge hulls, planing hulls, semisubmerged hydrofoils, surface effect ships, and air cushion vehicles. Each status report, plus the results of an initial survey of worldwide towing tanks conducting model experiments of high speed vessels, are contained herein. Hydrodynamic problems related to model testing and the full-scale extrapolation of the data for these vehicle types are also presented.

  10. Maxillofacial and ocular injuries in motor vehicle crashes.

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Christopher Noel

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Injuries from motor vehicle crashes constitute a leading cause of death in the young and a high degree of morbidity and mortality in all age groups. Facial trauma has been consistently shown to be the single most common injury to the occupants of vehicles involved in crashes. This has been confirmed by more recent studies which have demonstrated a continuing high incidence of facial fractures amongst belted drivers. Airbags have been advocated as a supplemental restraint system. However, their deployment can cause injury particularly if the driver is of short stature, unrestrained or out of position within the vehicle. METHODS: The Crash Injury Research Engineering Network (CIREN) project aims to correlate the injuries received by occupants in vehicle crashes with the biomechanics of vehicle deformation. All cases of facial injury which presented to the University of Michigan Medical Center, USA in 1999 were retrospectively evaluated with reference to the methods of occupant restraint and to the correlation between the injuries sustained and vehicle deformation. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The case analysis confirmed the value of airbags to the safety of vehicle occupants but reinforced the conclusion that they must still be considered supplemental restraint systems. New generation airbags will minimise the risk of injury even to small stature or out of position occupants as they will prevent deployment in situations where they may have an adverse effect. PMID:15140296

  11. Highly cited articles in environmental and occupational health, 1919-1960.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek R

    2009-01-01

    Although numerous lists of "citation classics" have been compiled across a variety of scientific fields, few have included articles from environmental and occupational health (EOH). This investigation sought to identify and analyze the most highly cited articles ever published in the Journal of Industrial Hygiene (1919-1935), the Journal of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology (1936-1949), the Archives of Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Medicine (1950), the American Medical Association (A.M.A.) Archives of Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Medicine (1950-1954), and the A.M.A. Archives of Industrial Health (1955-1960). Regularly cited topics included metal fume fever and various studies of beryllium, whereas the most highly cited article of all was a 1957 paper describing the control of heat casualties at military training centers. Interestingly, the most highly cited articles were not the oldest, and nor were they written as literature reviews. Overall, this study suggests that although some citation patterns in EOH reflect those of other disciplines, the trend is not uniform and EOH itself appears to have some distinctive bibliometric characteristics.

  12. High performance nickel-cadmium cells for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornu, Jean-Pierre

    A new concept of a cadmium electrode associated with a lighter nickel structure, a multi-cell module technology, allows the proposal of a very promisig alternative power source for electric vehicle (EV) batteries, the usable specific energy being 31% of the theoretical value. Every characteristic of this Ni-Cd module (i.e., specific energy and power, energy and power density, energy efficiency, life and reliability) gives the best performing EV battery, to date. Thus, with the efficient support of two major French car manufacturers and the French government, SAFT will launch, during Spring '95, the first pilot line of EV Ni-Cd module manufacturing.

  13. Visual Through Infrared: Modeling Components and Methodologies for Estimating High Fidelity Ground Vehicle Signatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    Visual Through Infrared: Mo deling Comp onents and Metho dologies for Estimating High Fidelity Ground Vehicle Signatures William R. Reynolds...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Visual Through Infrared: Mo deling Comp onents and Metho dologies for Estimating High Fidelity Ground Vehicle...for each pixel is the weighted sum of the reflections from the surrounding hemisphere of spatially differentiated pixels of the calibrated panoramic

  14. Relationship between dopamine transporter occupancy and methylphenidate induced high in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Fowler, J.S. |

    1996-05-01

    The inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT) by cocaine has been shown to be indispensable for its reinforcing properties. The development of drugs that inibit the DAT has become a major target to prevent cocaine`s effects. However prevention of the {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} by DAT inhibitors has never been demonstrated. This study evaluates the ability to block methylphenidate (MP), a DAT inhibitor drug with similar reinforcing properties to cocaine, induced {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} by prior DAT inhibition. It uses PET and [{sup 11}C]d-threo-methylphenidate to measure the relationship between DAT occupancy prior to administration of MP and the intensity of the subjective perception of the {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} in 8 controls. MP (0.375 mg/kg iv) which was administered as a single injection and also as two sequential doses given 60 minutes apart significantly reduced the ratio of the distribution volume for [{sup 11}C]d-threo-methylphenidate in striatum to that in cerebellum from a baseline of 2.83 {plus_minus} 0.2 to 1.29 {plus_minus} 0.1 at 7 minutes and to 1.37 {plus_minus} 0.2 at 60 minutes after a single injection of MP and to 1.14 {plus_minus} 0.1 at 7 minutes after the second of two sequential MP doses. This corresponds to a DAT occupancy by MP of 84% {plus_minus} 7 at 7 minutes and of 77% {plus_minus} 6 at 60 minutes after a single injection of MP and of 93% {plus_minus} 7 at 7 after the second of two sequential MP doses. The subjective perception of {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} experienced after the second injection of MP was of a similar magnitude to that experienced after the first injection of MP was of a similar magnitude to that experienced after the first injection, in spite of the very different starting DAT occupancies (0 and 77%, respectively). DAT occupancy was not correlated with the {open_quotes}high{close_quotes}; and one subject with 100% DAT occupancy did not perceive the {open_quotes}high{close_quotes}.

  15. High Penetration of Electrical Vehicles in Microgrids: Threats and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khederzadeh, Mojtaba; Khalili, Mohammad

    2014-10-01

    Given that the microgrid concept is the building block of future electric distribution systems and electrical vehicles (EVs) are the future of transportation market, in this paper, the impact of EVs on the performance of microgrids is investigated. Demand-side participation is used to cope with increasing demand for EV charging. The problem of coordination of EV charging and discharging (with vehicle-to-grid (V2G) functionality) and demand response is formulated as a market-clearing mechanism that accepts bids from the demand and supply sides and takes into account the constraints put forward by different parts. Therefore, a day-ahead market with detailed bids and offers within the microgrid is designed whose objective is to maximize the social welfare which is the difference between the value that consumers attach to the electrical energy they buy plus the benefit of the EV owners participating in the V2G functionality and the cost of producing/purchasing this energy. As the optimization problem is a mixed integer nonlinear programming one, it is decomposed into one master problem for energy scheduling and one subproblem for power flow computation. The two problems are solved iteratively by interfacing MATLAB with GAMS. Simulation results on a sample microgrid with different residential, commercial and industrial consumers with associated demand-side biddings and different penetration level of EVs support the proposed formulation of the problem and the applied methods.

  16. Identifying high-risk small business industries for occupational safety and health interventions.

    PubMed

    Okun, A; Lentz, T J; Schulte, P; Stayner, L

    2001-03-01

    Approximately one-third (32%) of U.S. workers are employed in small business industries (those with 80% of workers in establishments with fewer than 100 employees), and approximately 53 million persons in private industry work in small business establishments. This study was performed to identify small business industries at high risk for occupational injuries, illnesses, and fatalities. Small business industries were identified from among all three- and four-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes and ranked using Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data by rates and numbers of occupational injuries, illnesses, and fatalities. Both incidence rates and number of injury, illness, and fatality cases were evaluated. The 253 small business industries identified accounted for 1,568 work-related fatalities (34% of all private industry). Transportation incidents and violent acts were the leading causes of these fatalities. Detailed injury and illness data were available for 105 small business industries, that accounted for 1,476,400 work-related injuries, and 55,850 occupational illnesses. Many of the small business industries had morbidity and mortality rates exceeding the average rates for all private industry. The highest risk small business industries, based on a combined morbidity and mortality index, included logging, cut stone and stone products, truck terminals, and roofing, siding, and sheet metal work. Identification of high-risk small business industries indicates priorities for those interested in developing targeted prevention programs.

  17. Contribution of Occupation to High Doses of Light-Intensity Activity and Cardiovascular Risk Factors among Mexican American Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Jennifer L.; Kohl, Harold W.; Salinas, Jennifer J.; McCormick, Joseph B.; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    Background The association between light-intensity activity and cardiovascular disease risk is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of light-intensity activity with census-based occupational activity classifications and cardiovascular risk factors among Mexican American adults. Methods 118 Mexican American adults (68.6% female) provided cross-sectional accelerometer and biological data. Self-reported occupations were classified by activity level (sedentary, low, moderate). Participants were classified as At-Risk for BMI, glucose, triglycerides, HDL, blood pressure, waist circumference, and percent body fat. Results Participants engaged in > 5 hours of light-intensity activity on average, and those in sedentary occupations engaged in fewer light-intensity activity minutes than low-active or moderately active workers (P < .001). Self-reported occupation explained 14% of the variation in light-intensity activity (P < .001). Participants in moderately active occupations were at increased risk for high %body fat than other workers (P = .01), but no other associations between occupation and cardiovascular risk were detected. Conclusion Early work in physical activity underscored the importance of occupational activity. This study presents evidence of a dose-response association for light-intensity activity by occupational category such that workers in sedentary occupations had less light-intensity activity than employees in more active occupations. Future research on how light-intensity activity derived from occupation may reduce the risk of chronic disease will contribute to improved interventions as light-intensity activity participation may be more feasible than meeting current physical activity guidelines. PMID:24368819

  18. Contribution of occupation to high doses of light-intensity activity and cardiovascular risk factors among Mexican American adults.

    PubMed

    Gay, Jennifer L; Kohl, Harold W; Salinas, Jennifer J; McCormick, Joseph B; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P

    2014-09-01

    The association between light-intensity activity and cardiovascular disease risk is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of light-intensity activity with census-based occupational activity classifications and cardiovascular risk factors among Mexican American adults. 118 Mexican American adults (68.6% female) provided cross-sectional accelerometer and biological data. Self-reported occupations were classified by activity level (sedentary, low, moderate). Participants were classified as At-Risk for BMI, glucose, triglycerides, HDL, blood pressure, waist circumference, and percent body fat. Participants engaged in > 5 hours of light-intensity activity on average, and those in sedentary occupations engaged in fewer light-intensity activity minutes than low-active or moderately active workers (P < .001). Self-reported occupation explained 14% of the variation in light-intensity activity (P < .001). Participants in moderately active occupations were at increased risk for high %body fat than other workers (P = .01), but no other associations between occupation and cardiovascular risk were detected. Early work in physical activity underscored the importance of occupational activity. This study presents evidence of a dose-response association for light-intensity activity by occupational category such that workers in sedentary occupations had less light-intensity activity than employees in more active occupations. Future research on how light-intensity activity derived from occupation may reduce the risk of chronic disease will contribute to improved interventions as light-intensity activity participation may be more feasible than meeting current physical activity guidelines.

  19. Experimental Analysis on High Performance Unmanned Surface Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gongyu; Yang, Songlin; Qi, Minghao; Zhou, Shenjie; Zhang, Sheng

    This paper is based on a green energy USV model which is designed and built by ourselves. In this paper, we conducted a series of roll decay tests on the USV model under different loads and tilt angles. According to the characteristics of USV hull we established the corresponding mathematical model. We analyzed the experimental data through an identification program with optimization. In the process of the swing we got some curves including roll angle and roll angular velocity, at the same time we found the changes of the hydrodynamic derivatives. Eventually, the processed data was analyzed and the related hydrodynamic coefficients were acquired. The research for unmanned vehicle motion and its method in this paper would improve the basic technical support for USV airworthiness, and put forward the improvement method of reference of sea worthiness.

  20. A new vehicle emission inventory for China with high spatial and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B.; Huo, H.; Zhang, Q.; Yao, Z. L.; Wang, X. T.; Yang, X. F.; Liu, H.; He, K. B.

    2013-12-01

    This study is the first in a series of papers that aim to develop high-resolution emission databases for different anthropogenic sources in China. Here we focus on on-road transportation. Because of the increasing impact of on-road transportation on regional air quality, developing an accurate and high-resolution vehicle emission inventory is important for both the research community and air quality management. This work proposes a new inventory methodology to improve the spatial and temporal accuracy and resolution of vehicle emissions in China. We calculate, for the first time, the monthly vehicle emissions (CO, NMHC, NOx, and PM2.5) for 2008 in 2364 counties (an administrative unit one level lower than city) by developing a set of approaches to estimate vehicle stock and monthly emission factors at county-level, and technology distribution at provincial level. We then introduce allocation weights for the vehicle kilometers traveled to assign the county-level emissions onto 0.05° × 0.05° grids based on the China Digital Road-network Map (CDRM). The new methodology overcomes the common shortcomings of previous inventory methods, including neglecting the geographical differences between key parameters and using surrogates that are weakly related to vehicle activities to allocate vehicle emissions. The new method has great advantages over previous methods in depicting the spatial distribution characteristics of vehicle activities and emissions. This work provides a better understanding of the spatial representation of vehicle emissions in China and can benefit both air quality modeling and management with improved spatial accuracy.

  1. High-risk occupations for breast cancer in the Swedish female working population.

    PubMed Central

    Pollán, M; Gustavsson, P

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to estimate, for the period 1971 through 1989, occupation-specific risks of breast cancer among Swedish women employed in 1970. METHODS: Age-period standardized incidence ratios were computed. Log-linear Poisson models were fitted, with geographical area and town size taken into account. Risks were further adjusted for major occupational group, used as a proxy for socioeconomic status. Risk estimators were also calculated for women reporting the same occupation in 1960 and 1970. RESULTS: Most elevated risks among professionals, managers, and clerks were reduced when intragroup comparisons were carried out, indicating the confounding effect of socioeconomic status. Excess risks were found for pharmacists, teachers of theoretical subjects, schoolmasters, systems analysts and programmers, telephone operators, telegraph and radio operators, metal platers and coaters, and hairdressers and beauticians, as well as for women working in 1960 and 1970 as physicians, religious workers, social workers, bank tellers, cost accountants, and telephonists. CONCLUSIONS: While the high risks observed among professional, administrative, and clerical workers might be related to lower birth rates and increased case detection, excess risks found for telephone workers and for hairdressers and beauticians deserve further attention. PMID:10358678

  2. High-risk occupations for breast cancer in the Swedish female working population.

    PubMed

    Pollán, M; Gustavsson, P

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate, for the period 1971 through 1989, occupation-specific risks of breast cancer among Swedish women employed in 1970. Age-period standardized incidence ratios were computed. Log-linear Poisson models were fitted, with geographical area and town size taken into account. Risks were further adjusted for major occupational group, used as a proxy for socioeconomic status. Risk estimators were also calculated for women reporting the same occupation in 1960 and 1970. Most elevated risks among professionals, managers, and clerks were reduced when intragroup comparisons were carried out, indicating the confounding effect of socioeconomic status. Excess risks were found for pharmacists, teachers of theoretical subjects, schoolmasters, systems analysts and programmers, telephone operators, telegraph and radio operators, metal platers and coaters, and hairdressers and beauticians, as well as for women working in 1960 and 1970 as physicians, religious workers, social workers, bank tellers, cost accountants, and telephonists. While the high risks observed among professional, administrative, and clerical workers might be related to lower birth rates and increased case detection, excess risks found for telephone workers and for hairdressers and beauticians deserve further attention.

  3. Modeling, control design, and performance evaluation of high speed ground vehicle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Faye, I.; Kortum, W.; Schwartz, W. )

    1989-01-01

    The interest in developing high speed ground transportation systems is one reason for directing attention to the modeling and simulation of the dynamic behavior of vehicle systems. Rail-guided vehicles; i.e., conventional railways, advanced railway systems, or magnetically levitated trains, represent the practical implementation of such ground transportation systems. One computer program that is well suited for the analysis of rail-guided vehicles is the multibody program MEDYNA. This paper demonstrates the application of MEDYNA for control law design and to performance evaluation of such advanced vehicles. A brief description is made of the modeling requirements of magnetically levitated systems, along with a summary of some of the related capabilities and computational methods of MEDNYA. As a case study, analysis of a vehicle based on the German Transrapid system is presented. System matrices of a simplified vehicle model are established and control design is performed with the aid of MATLAB. Performance evaluation is studied with a complex model of the Transrapid vehicle and elastic guideways.

  4. Delivering high quality hip fracture rehabilitation: the perspective of occupational and physical therapy practitioners.

    PubMed

    Leland, Natalie E; Lepore, Michael; Wong, Carin; Chang, Sun Hwa; Freeman, Lynn; Crum, Karen; Gillies, Heather; Nash, Paul

    2017-01-23

    The majority of post-acute hip fracture rehabilitation in the US is delivered in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs). Currently, there are limited guidelines that equip occupational and physical therapy practitioners with a summary of what constitutes evidence-based high quality rehabilitation. Thus, this study aimed to identify rehabilitation practitioners' perspectives on the practices that constitute high quality hip fracture rehabilitation. Focus groups were conducted with 99 occupational and physical therapy practitioners working in SNFs in southern California. Purposive sampling of facilities was conducted to capture variation in key characteristics known to impact care delivery for this patient population (e.g., financial resources, staffing, and patient case-mix). Questions aimed to elicit practitioners' perspectives on high quality hip fracture rehabilitation practices. Each session was audio-recorded and transcribed. Data were systematically analyzed using a modified grounded theory approach. Seven themes emerged: objectives of care; first 72 h; positioning, pain, and precautions; use of standardized assessments; episode of care practices; facilitating insight into progress; and interdisciplinary collaboration. Clinical guidelines are critical tools to facilitate clinical decision-making and achieve desired patient outcomes. The findings of this study highlight the practitioners' perspective on what constitutes high quality hip fracture rehabilitation. This work provides critical information to advance the development of stakeholder-driven rehabilitation clinical guidelines. Future research is needed to verify the findings from other stakeholders (e.g., patients), ensure the alignment of our findings with current evidence, and develop measures for evaluating their delivery and relationship to desired outcomes. Implications for Rehabilitation This study highlights occupational and physiotherapy therapy practitioners' perspectives on the cumulative best

  5. The research of road and vehicle information extraction algorithm based on high resolution remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tingting; Gu, Lingjia; Ren, Ruizhi; Cao, Qiong

    2016-09-01

    With the rapid development of remote sensing technology, the spatial resolution and temporal resolution of satellite imagery also have a huge increase. Meanwhile, High-spatial-resolution images are becoming increasingly popular for commercial applications. The remote sensing image technology has broad application prospects in intelligent traffic. Compared with traditional traffic information collection methods, vehicle information extraction using high-resolution remote sensing image has the advantages of high resolution and wide coverage. This has great guiding significance to urban planning, transportation management, travel route choice and so on. Firstly, this paper preprocessed the acquired high-resolution multi-spectral and panchromatic remote sensing images. After that, on the one hand, in order to get the optimal thresholding for image segmentation, histogram equalization and linear enhancement technologies were applied into the preprocessing results. On the other hand, considering distribution characteristics of road, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and normalized difference water index (NDWI) were used to suppress water and vegetation information of preprocessing results. Then, the above two processing result were combined. Finally, the geometric characteristics were used to completed road information extraction. The road vector extracted was used to limit the target vehicle area. Target vehicle extraction was divided into bright vehicles extraction and dark vehicles extraction. Eventually, the extraction results of the two kinds of vehicles were combined to get the final results. The experiment results demonstrated that the proposed algorithm has a high precision for the vehicle information extraction for different high resolution remote sensing images. Among these results, the average fault detection rate was about 5.36%, the average residual rate was about 13.60% and the average accuracy was approximately 91.26%.

  6. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  7. Investigating the Mobility of Light Autonomous Tracked Vehicles using a High Performance Computing Simulation Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negrut, Dan; Mazhar, Hammad; Melanz, Daniel; Lamb, David; Jayakumar, Paramsothy; Letherwood, Michael; Jain, Abhinandan; Quadrelli, Marco

    2012-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the physics-based simulation of light tracked vehicles operating on rough deformable terrain. The focus is on small autonomous vehicles, which weigh less than 100 lb and move on deformable and rough terrain that is feature rich and no longer representable using a continuum approach. A scenario of interest is, for instance, the simulation of a reconnaissance mission for a high mobility lightweight robot where objects such as a boulder or a ditch that could otherwise be considered small for a truck or tank, become major obstacles that can impede the mobility of the light autonomous vehicle and negatively impact the success of its mission. Analyzing and gauging the mobility and performance of these light vehicles is accomplished through a modeling and simulation capability called Chrono::Engine. Chrono::Engine relies on parallel execution on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) cards.

  8. Investigating the Mobility of Light Autonomous Tracked Vehicles using a High Performance Computing Simulation Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negrut, Dan; Mazhar, Hammad; Melanz, Daniel; Lamb, David; Jayakumar, Paramsothy; Letherwood, Michael; Jain, Abhinandan; Quadrelli, Marco

    2012-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the physics-based simulation of light tracked vehicles operating on rough deformable terrain. The focus is on small autonomous vehicles, which weigh less than 100 lb and move on deformable and rough terrain that is feature rich and no longer representable using a continuum approach. A scenario of interest is, for instance, the simulation of a reconnaissance mission for a high mobility lightweight robot where objects such as a boulder or a ditch that could otherwise be considered small for a truck or tank, become major obstacles that can impede the mobility of the light autonomous vehicle and negatively impact the success of its mission. Analyzing and gauging the mobility and performance of these light vehicles is accomplished through a modeling and simulation capability called Chrono::Engine. Chrono::Engine relies on parallel execution on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) cards.

  9. Exploratory study of a novel low occupancy vertex detector architecture based on high precision timing for high luminosity particle colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orel, Peter; Varner, Gary S.; Niknejadi, Pardis

    2017-06-01

    Vertex detectors provide space-time coordinates for the traversing charged particle decay products closest to the interaction point. Resolving these increasingly intense particle fluences at high luminosity particle colliders, such as SuperKEKB, is an ever growing challenge. This results in a non-negligible occupancy of the vertex detector using existing low material budget techniques. Consequently, new approaches are being studied that meet the vertexing requirements while lowering the occupancy. In this paper, we introduce a novel vertex detector architecture. Its design relies on an asynchronous digital pixel matrix in combination with a readout based on high precision time-of-flight measurement. Denoted the Timing Vertex Detector (TVD), it consists of a binary pixel array, a transmission line for signal collection, and a readout ASIC. The TVD aims to have a spatial resolution comparable to the existing Belle2 vertex detector. At the same time it offers a reduced occupancy by a factor of ten while decreasing the channel count by almost three orders of magnitude. Consequently, reducing the event size from about 1 MB/event to about 5.9 kB/event.

  10. On-demand high-capacity ride-sharing via dynamic trip-vehicle assignment.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Mora, Javier; Samaranayake, Samitha; Wallar, Alex; Frazzoli, Emilio; Rus, Daniela

    2017-01-17

    Ride-sharing services are transforming urban mobility by providing timely and convenient transportation to anybody, anywhere, and anytime. These services present enormous potential for positive societal impacts with respect to pollution, energy consumption, congestion, etc. Current mathematical models, however, do not fully address the potential of ride-sharing. Recently, a large-scale study highlighted some of the benefits of car pooling but was limited to static routes with two riders per vehicle (optimally) or three (with heuristics). We present a more general mathematical model for real-time high-capacity ride-sharing that (i) scales to large numbers of passengers and trips and (ii) dynamically generates optimal routes with respect to online demand and vehicle locations. The algorithm starts from a greedy assignment and improves it through a constrained optimization, quickly returning solutions of good quality and converging to the optimal assignment over time. We quantify experimentally the tradeoff between fleet size, capacity, waiting time, travel delay, and operational costs for low- to medium-capacity vehicles, such as taxis and van shuttles. The algorithm is validated with ∼3 million rides extracted from the New York City taxicab public dataset. Our experimental study considers ride-sharing with rider capacity of up to 10 simultaneous passengers per vehicle. The algorithm applies to fleets of autonomous vehicles and also incorporates rebalancing of idling vehicles to areas of high demand. This framework is general and can be used for many real-time multivehicle, multitask assignment problems.

  11. On-demand high-capacity ride-sharing via dynamic trip-vehicle assignment

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Mora, Javier; Samaranayake, Samitha; Wallar, Alex; Frazzoli, Emilio; Rus, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Ride-sharing services are transforming urban mobility by providing timely and convenient transportation to anybody, anywhere, and anytime. These services present enormous potential for positive societal impacts with respect to pollution, energy consumption, congestion, etc. Current mathematical models, however, do not fully address the potential of ride-sharing. Recently, a large-scale study highlighted some of the benefits of car pooling but was limited to static routes with two riders per vehicle (optimally) or three (with heuristics). We present a more general mathematical model for real-time high-capacity ride-sharing that (i) scales to large numbers of passengers and trips and (ii) dynamically generates optimal routes with respect to online demand and vehicle locations. The algorithm starts from a greedy assignment and improves it through a constrained optimization, quickly returning solutions of good quality and converging to the optimal assignment over time. We quantify experimentally the tradeoff between fleet size, capacity, waiting time, travel delay, and operational costs for low- to medium-capacity vehicles, such as taxis and van shuttles. The algorithm is validated with ∼3 million rides extracted from the New York City taxicab public dataset. Our experimental study considers ride-sharing with rider capacity of up to 10 simultaneous passengers per vehicle. The algorithm applies to fleets of autonomous vehicles and also incorporates rebalancing of idling vehicles to areas of high demand. This framework is general and can be used for many real-time multivehicle, multitask assignment problems. PMID:28049820

  12. Low cost, compact high efficiency, traction motor for electric vehicles/hybrid electric vehicles. Final report for the period September 1998 - December 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Jerry; Kessinger, Roy

    2000-04-28

    This final report details technical accomplishments for Phase I of the ''Low Cost, Compact High Efficiency, Traction Motor for Electric Vehicles/Hybrid Electric Vehicles'' program. The research showed that the segmented-electromagnetic array (SEMA) technology combined with an Integrated Motion Module (IMM) concept is highly suited for electric vehicles. IMMs are essentially mechatronic systems that combine the motor, sensing, power electronics, and control functions for a single axis of motion into a light-weight modular unit. The functional integration of these components makes possible significant reductions in motor/alternator size, weight, and cost, while increasing power density and electromechanical conversion efficiency.

  13. Taking Over Control From Highly Automated Vehicles in Complex Traffic Situations: The Role of Traffic Density.

    PubMed

    Gold, Christian; Körber, Moritz; Lechner, David; Bengler, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of traffic density and verbal tasks on takeover performance in highly automated driving. In highly automated vehicles, the driver has to occasionally take over vehicle control when approaching system limits. To ensure safety, the ability of the driver to regain control of the driving task under various driving situations and different driver states needs to be quantified. Seventy-two participants experienced takeover situations requiring an evasive maneuver on a three-lane highway with varying traffic density (zero, 10, and 20 vehicles per kilometer). In a between-subjects design, half of the participants were engaged in a verbal 20-Questions Task, representing speaking on the phone while driving in a highly automated vehicle. The presence of traffic in takeover situations led to longer takeover times and worse takeover quality in the form of shorter time to collision and more collisions. The 20-Questions Task did not influence takeover time but seemed to have minor effects on the takeover quality. For the design and evaluation of human-machine interaction in takeover situations of highly automated vehicles, the traffic state seems to play a major role, compared to the driver state, manipulated by the 20-Questions Task. The present results can be used by developers of highly automated systems to appropriately design human-machine interfaces and to assess the driver's time budget for regaining control. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  14. [Anthropo-ecological aspects of occupational health and various biochemical approaches to the problem of its evaluation in workers in high risk occupations].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnitskiĭ, I P; Ponomarenko, V A

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of occupational health of man, interpreted as the process of maintenance and development of regulatory properties of the body and his physical, psychic and social well-being, which provide high reliability of his professional activities, professional longevity and maximal lifetime. The paper discusses the main areas of biochemical investigations to evaluate occupational health of the flying personnel, which include identification of correlates between biochemical or immune changes and pathological or premorbid states, that reduce tolerance to environmental effects, as well as study of functional specificities related to the reserves and mechanisms of implementation of adaptive capabilities of the human body. It gives detailed biochemical data derived from pilots with neurotic problems and biochemical indicators of stress tolerance measured during exposure to +Gz acceleration, angular acceleration, hyperthermia, hypoxia, and exercise.

  15. High voltage bus and auxiliary heater control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Murty, Balarama Vempaty

    2000-01-01

    A control system for an electric or hybrid electric vehicle includes a vehicle system controller and a control circuit having an electric immersion heater. The heater is electrically connected to the vehicle's high voltage bus and is thermally coupled to a coolant loop containing a heater core for the vehicle's climate control system. The system controller responds to cabin heat requests from the climate control system by generating a pulse width modulated signal that is used by the control circuit to operate the heater at a duty cycle appropriate for the amount of cabin heating requested. The control system also uses the heater to dissipate excess energy produced by an auxiliary power unit and to provide electric braking when regenerative braking is not desirable and manual braking is not necessary. The control system further utilizes the heater to provide a safe discharge of a bank of energy storage capacitors following disconnection of the battery or one of the high voltage connectors used to transmit high voltage operating power to the various vehicle systems. The control circuit includes a high voltage clamping circuit that monitors the voltage on the bus and operates the heater to clamp down the bus voltage when it exceeds a pre-selected maximum voltage. The control system can also be used to phase in operation of the heater when the bus voltage exceeds a lower threshold voltage and can be used to phase out the auxiliary power unit charging and regenerative braking when the battery becomes fully charged.

  16. A telescopic cinema sound camera for observing high altitude aerospace vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Dan

    2014-09-01

    Rockets and other high altitude aerospace vehicles produce interesting visual and aural phenomena that can be remotely observed from long distances. This paper describes a compact, passive and covert remote sensing system that can produce high resolution sound movies at >100 km viewing distances. The telescopic high resolution camera is capable of resolving and quantifying space launch vehicle dynamics including plume formation, staging events and payload fairing jettison. Flight vehicles produce sounds and vibrations that modulate the local electromagnetic environment. These audio frequency modulations can be remotely sensed by passive optical and radio wave detectors. Acousto-optic sensing methods were primarily used but an experimental radioacoustic sensor using passive micro-Doppler radar techniques was also tested. The synchronized combination of high resolution flight vehicle imagery with the associated vehicle sounds produces a cinema like experience that that is useful in both an aerospace engineering and a Hollywood film production context. Examples of visual, aural and radar observations of the first SpaceX Falcon 9 v1.1 rocket launch are shown and discussed.

  17. High voltage bus and auxiliary heater control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Murty, B.V.

    2000-03-21

    A control system for an electric or hybrid electric vehicle includes a vehicle system controller and a control circuit having an electric immersion heater. The heater is electrically connected to the vehicle's high voltage bus and is thermally coupled to a coolant loop containing a heater core for the vehicle's climate control system. The system controller responds to cabin heat requests from the climate control system by generating a pulse width modulated signal that is used by the control circuit to operate the heater at a duty cycle appropriate for the amount of cabin heating requested. The control system also uses the heater to dissipate excess energy produced by an auxiliary power unit and to provide electric braking when regenerative braking is not desirable and manual braking is not necessary. The control system further utilizes the heater to provide a safe discharge of a bank of energy storage capacitors following disconnection of the battery or one of the high voltage connectors used to transmit high voltage operating power to the various vehicle systems. The control circuit includes a high voltage clamping circuit that monitors the voltage on the bus and operates the heater to clamp down the bus voltage when it exceeds a pre-selected maximum voltage. The control system can also be used to phase in operation of the heater when the bus voltage exceeds a lower threshold voltage and can be used to phase out the auxiliary power unit charging and regenerative braking when the battery becomes fully charged.

  18. Real time, high accuracy, relative state estimation for multiple vehicle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Walton Ross

    2000-10-01

    This dissertation presents the development, implementation, and test results from a new instrumentation package for relative navigation between moving vehicles. The instrumentation package on each vehicle is composed of a GPS (Global Positioning System) receiver, an IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit), a wireless communication system, and a modular computer system. The GPS places all vehicles into the same inertial reference frame and provides a common clock allowing synchronization among all instrument packages. The IMU tracks the high frequency motion of the vehicle alleviating the need for a fixed base station. The wireless communication system communicates GPS code and carrier phase measurements and computed state estimates from each vehicle at a rate fast enough to capture the dynamic changes in the vehicles. This data representing both GPS and IMU measurements from each vehicle is fused together on each vehicle to produce position, velocity and attitude estimates relative to the other vehicles. This capability to estimate relative motion without a base station appears unique. Furthermore, the application of fusion algorithms to address this new estimation problem is unique. The use of carrier phase provides very accurate relative measurements. In constructing carrier phase measurement, the integer number of wave lengths between vehicles must be resolved. Although there exist integer resolution schemes, these algorithms are ad hoe. The scheme presented here is based on generating the conditional probability of the hypothesis of each integer given the measurement sequence. This nonlinear filter is an elegant and novel contribution. The entire system is tested in real time in an experiment intended to validate the measurement accuracy. The system built using the algorithms designed in this dissertation is capable of estimating relative range to less than 5 cm. RMS, relative roll and pitch to less than 0.2 degrees RMS, and relative yaw to less than 0.7 degrees RMS

  19. Development of an advanced high-temperature fastener system for advanced aerospace vehicle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kull, F. R.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a program to develop a lightweight high temperature reusable fastening system for aerospace vehicle thermal protection system applications are documented. This feasibility program resulted in several fastener innovations which will meet the specific needs of the heat shield application. Three systems were designed from Hayes 188 alloy and tested by environmental exposure and residual mechanical properties. The designs include a clinch stud with a collar retainer, a weld stud with a split ring retainer, and a caged stud with a collar retainer. The results indicated that a lightweight, reusable, high temperature fastening system can be developed for aerospace vehicle application.

  20. In-vehicle nitrogen dioxide concentrations in road tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Ashley N.; Boulter, Paul G.; Roddis, Damon; McDonough, Liza; Patterson, Michael; Rodriguez del Barco, Marina; Mattes, Andrew; Knibbs, Luke D.

    2016-11-01

    There is a lack of knowledge regarding in-vehicle concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) during transit through road tunnels in urban environments. Furthermore, previous studies have tended to involve a single vehicle and the range of in-vehicle NO2 concentrations that vehicle occupants may be exposed to is not well defined. This study describes simultaneous measurements of in-vehicle and outside-vehicle NO2 concentrations on a route through Sydney, Australia that included several major tunnels, minor tunnels and busy surface roads. Tests were conducted on nine passenger vehicles to assess how vehicle characteristics and ventilation settings affected in-vehicle NO2 concentrations and the in-vehicle-to-outside vehicle (I/O) concentration ratio. NO2 was measured directly using a cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) technique that gave a high temporal and spatial resolution. In the major tunnels, transit-average in-vehicle NO2 concentrations were lower than outside-vehicle concentrations for all vehicles with cabin air recirculation either on or off. However, markedly lower I/O ratios were obtained with recirculation on (0.08-0.36), suggesting that vehicle occupants can significantly lower their exposure to NO2 in tunnels by switching recirculation on. The highest mean I/O ratios for NO2 were measured in older vehicles (0.35-0.36), which is attributed to older vehicles having higher air exchange rates. The results from this study can be used to inform the design and operation of future road tunnels and modelling of personal exposure to NO2.

  1. A High Power Solid State Circuit Breaker for Military Hybrid Electric Vehicle Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Electric Vehicle Applications Page 2 of 8 Silicon MOSFETs, SiC MOSFETs, and IGBTs are all worth considering with regard to extremely fast...over IGBTs for minimizing the steady- state conduction loss, since the IGBT static losses become quite large at high currents and voltages. MOSFETs...high voltage, high current, and high temperature environments. COMPARISON OF SWITCH TECHNOLOGIES We first compared SiC MOSFET, Si IGBT , and Si

  2. Coupled Fluids-Radiation Analysis of a High-Mass Mars Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant; Allen, Gary; Tang, Chun; Brown, Jim

    2011-01-01

    The NEQAIR line-by-line radiation code has been incorporated into the DPLR Navier-Stokes flow solver such that the NEQAIR subroutines are now callable functions of DPLR. The coupled DPLR-NEQAIR code was applied to compute the convective and radiative heating rates over high-mass Mars entry vehicles. Two vehicle geometries were considered - a 15 m diameter 70-degree sphere cone configuration and a slender, mid-L/D vehicle with a diameter of 5 m called an Ellipsled. The entry masses ranged from 100 to 165 metric tons. Solutions were generated for entry velocities ranging from 6.5 to 9.1 km/s. The coupled fluids-radiation solutions were performed at the peak heating location along trajectories generated by the Traj trajectory analysis code. The impact of fluids-radiation coupling is a function of the level of radiative heating and the freestream density and velocity. For the high-mass Mars vehicles examined in this study, coupling effects were greatest for entry velocities above 8.5 km/s where the surface radiative heating was reduced by up 17%. Generally speaking, the Ellipsled geometry experiences a lower peak radiative heating rate but a higher peak turbulent convective heating rate than the MSL-based vehicle.

  3. High-frequency Audiometry Hearing on Monitoring of Individuals Exposed to Occupational Noise: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Antonioli, Cleonice Aparecida Silva; Momensohn-Santos, Teresa Maria; Benaglia, Tatiana Aparecida Silva

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  The literature reports on high-frequency audiometry as one of the exams used on hearing monitoring of individuals exposed to high sound pressure in their work environment, due to the method́s greater sensitivity in early identification of hearing loss caused by noise. The frequencies that compose the exam are generally between 9 KHz and 20KHz, depending on the equipment. Objective  This study aims to perform a retrospective and secondary systematic revision of publications on high-frequency audiometry on hearing monitoring of individuals exposed to occupational noise. Data Synthesis  This systematic revision followed the methodology proposed in the Cochrane Handbook, focusing on the question: “Is High-frequency Audiometry more sensitive than Conventional Audiometry in the screening of early hearing loss individuals exposed to occupational noise?” The search was based on PubMed data, Base, Web of Science (Capes), Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (BVS), and in the references cited in identified and selected articles. The search resulted in 6059 articles in total. Of these, only six studies were compatible with the criteria proposed in this study. Conclusion  The performed meta-analysis does not definitively answer the study's proposed question. It indicates that the 16 KHz high frequency audiometry (HFA) frequency is sensitive in early identification of hearing loss in the control group (medium difference (MD = 8.33)), as well as the 4 KHz frequency (CA), this one being a little less expressive (MD = 5.72). Thus, others studies are necessary to confirm the HFA importance for the early screening of hearing loss on individuals exposed to noise at the workplace. PMID:27413413

  4. High-frequency Audiometry Hearing on Monitoring of Individuals Exposed to Occupational Noise: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Antonioli, Cleonice Aparecida Silva; Momensohn-Santos, Teresa Maria; Benaglia, Tatiana Aparecida Silva

    2016-07-01

    The literature reports on high-frequency audiometry as one of the exams used on hearing monitoring of individuals exposed to high sound pressure in their work environment, due to the method́s greater sensitivity in early identification of hearing loss caused by noise. The frequencies that compose the exam are generally between 9 KHz and 20KHz, depending on the equipment. This study aims to perform a retrospective and secondary systematic revision of publications on high-frequency audiometry on hearing monitoring of individuals exposed to occupational noise. This systematic revision followed the methodology proposed in the Cochrane Handbook, focusing on the question: "Is High-frequency Audiometry more sensitive than Conventional Audiometry in the screening of early hearing loss individuals exposed to occupational noise?" The search was based on PubMed data, Base, Web of Science (Capes), Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (BVS), and in the references cited in identified and selected articles. The search resulted in 6059 articles in total. Of these, only six studies were compatible with the criteria proposed in this study. The performed meta-analysis does not definitively answer the study's proposed question. It indicates that the 16 KHz high frequency audiometry (HFA) frequency is sensitive in early identification of hearing loss in the control group (medium difference (MD = 8.33)), as well as the 4 KHz frequency (CA), this one being a little less expressive (MD = 5.72). Thus, others studies are necessary to confirm the HFA importance for the early screening of hearing loss on individuals exposed to noise at the workplace.

  5. Chronic intermittent high altitude exposure, occupation, and body mass index in workers of mining industry.

    PubMed

    Esenamanova, Marina K; Kochkorova, Firuza A; Tsivinskaya, Tatyana A; Vinnikov, Denis; Aikimbaev, Kairgeldy

    2014-09-01

    The obesity and overweight rates in population exposed to chronic intermittent exposure to high altitudes are not well studied. The aim of the retrospective study was to evaluate whether there are differences in body mass index in different occupation groups working in intermittent shifts at mining industry at high altitude: 3800-4500 meters above sea level. Our study demonstrated that obesity and overweight are common in workers of high altitude mining industry exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia. The obesity rate was lowest among miners as compared to blue- and white-collar employees (9.5% vs. 15.6% and 14.7%, p=0.013). Obesity and overweight were associated with older age, higher rates of increased blood pressure (8.79% and 5.72% vs. 1.92%), cholesterol (45.8% and 45.6% vs. 32.8%) and glucose (4.3% and 1.26% vs. 0.57%) levels as compared to normal body mass index category (p<0.0001 for all). There were differences in patterns of cholesterol and glucose levels in men and women employees according to occupation type. In conclusion, obesity and overweight rates are prevalent and associated with increase in blood pressure, cholesterol, and glucose levels in workers of mining industry exposed to intermittent high-altitude hypoxia. Therefore, assessment and monitoring of body mass index seems to be essential in those who live and work at high altitudes to supply the correct nutrition, modify risk factors, and prevent related disorders.

  6. Lincoln Laboratory demonstrates highly accurate vehicle localization under adverseweather conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-24

    rely on optics to ‘see’ lane markings, road surface maps, and surrounding infrastructure to orient themselves. Optical systems work well in fair ...in fair weather conditions. The use of a subsurface map reduces the need for continual modifications to high-resolution road maps. Fusing GPS, lidar

  7. High Speed Lunar Navigation for Crewed and Remotely Piloted Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, L.; Allan, M.; To, V.; Utz, H.; Wojcikiewicz, W.; Chautems, C.

    2010-01-01

    Increased navigation speed is desirable for lunar rovers, whether autonomous, crewed or remotely operated, but is hampered by the low gravity, high contrast lighting and rough terrain. We describe lidar based navigation system deployed on NASA's K10 autonomous rover and to increase the terrain hazard situational awareness of the Lunar Electric Rover crew.

  8. Cage occupancies in the high pressure structure H methane hydrate: A neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Tulk, Christopher A; Klug, Dennis D; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F; Karotsis, Georgios; Guthrie, Malcolm; Molaison, Jamie J; Pradhan, Neelam

    2012-01-01

    A neutron diffraction study was performed on the CD{sub 4}: D{sub 2}O structure H clathrate hydrate to refine its CD{sub 4} fractional cage occupancies. Samples of ice VII and hexagonal (sH) methane hydrate were produced in a Paris-Edinburgh press and in situ neutron diffraction data collected. The data were analyzed with the Rietveld method and yielded average cage occupancies of 3.1 CD{sub 4} molecules in the large 20-hedron (5{sup 12}6{sup 8}) cages of the hydrate unit cell. Each of the pentagonal dodecahedron (5{sup 12}) and 12-hedron (4{sup 3}5{sup 6}6{sup 3}) cages in the sH unit cell are occupied with on average 0.89 and 0.90 CD{sub 4} molecules, respectively. This experiment avoided the co-formation of Ice VI and sH hydrate, this mixture is more difficult to analyze due to the proclivity of ice VI to form highly textured crystals, and overlapping Bragg peaks of the two phases. These results provide essential information for the refinement of intermolecular potential parameters for the water methane hydrophobic interaction in clathrate hydrates and related dense structures.

  9. Cage occupancies in the high pressure structure H methane hydrate: A neutron diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulk, C. A.; Klug, D. D.; dos Santos, A. M.; Karotis, G.; Guthrie, M.; Molaison, J. J.; Pradhan, N.

    2012-02-01

    A neutron diffraction study was performed on the CD4 : D2O structure H clathrate hydrate to refine its CD4 fractional cage occupancies. Samples of ice VII and hexagonal (sH) methane hydrate were produced in a Paris-Edinburgh press and in situ neutron diffraction data collected. The data were analyzed with the Rietveld method and yielded average cage occupancies of 3.1 CD4 molecules in the large 20-hedron (51268) cages of the hydrate unit cell. Each of the pentagonal dodecahedron (512) and 12-hedron (435663) cages in the sH unit cell are occupied with on average 0.89 and 0.90 CD4 molecules, respectively. This experiment avoided the co-formation of Ice VI and sH hydrate, this mixture is more difficult to analyze due to the proclivity of ice VI to form highly textured crystals, and overlapping Bragg peaks of the two phases. These results provide essential information for the refinement of intermolecular potential parameters for the water-methane hydrophobic interaction in clathrate hydrates and related dense structures.

  10. Cage occupancies in the high pressure structure H methane hydrate: a neutron diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Tulk, C A; Klug, D D; dos Santos, A M; Karotis, G; Guthrie, M; Molaison, J J; Pradhan, N

    2012-02-07

    A neutron diffraction study was performed on the CD(4) : D(2)O structure H clathrate hydrate to refine its CD(4) fractional cage occupancies. Samples of ice VII and hexagonal (sH) methane hydrate were produced in a Paris-Edinburgh press and in situ neutron diffraction data collected. The data were analyzed with the Rietveld method and yielded average cage occupancies of 3.1 CD(4) molecules in the large 20-hedron (5(12)6(8)) cages of the hydrate unit cell. Each of the pentagonal dodecahedron (5(12)) and 12-hedron (4(3)5(6)6(3)) cages in the sH unit cell are occupied with on average 0.89 and 0.90 CD(4) molecules, respectively. This experiment avoided the co-formation of Ice VI and sH hydrate, this mixture is more difficult to analyze due to the proclivity of ice VI to form highly textured crystals, and overlapping Bragg peaks of the two phases. These results provide essential information for the refinement of intermolecular potential parameters for the water-methane hydrophobic interaction in clathrate hydrates and related dense structures.

  11. Design Refinement and Modeling Methods for Highly-Integrated Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrez, Sean Michael

    A method for early-stage design of high-speed airplanes is presented based on analysis of vehicle performance, including internal flow in the engine and external flows around the body. Several ways of evaluating vehicle performance are shown, including thrust maps, combustor mode stability concerns, combustor optimization and trajectory optimization. The design performance analysis relies on a routine that computes the thrust of a dual-mode scramjet, which is a geometric-compression (ramjet) engine with a combustor that can operate both subsonically and supersonically. This strategy applies to any internal flow which is predominantly one-dimensional in character. A reduced-order model for mixing and combustion has been developed that is based on non-dimensional scaling of turbulent jets in crossflow and tabulated flamelet chemistry, and is used in conjunction with conventional conservation equations for quasi one-dimensional flow to compute flowpath performance. Thrust is computed by stream-tube momentum analysis. Vehicle lift and drag are computed using a supersonic panel method, developed separately. Comparisons to computational fluid dynamics solutions and experimental data were conducted to determine the validity of the combustion modeling approach, and results of these simulations are shown. Computations for both ram-mode and scram-mode operation are compared to experimental results, and predictions are made for flight conditions of a hypersonic vehicle built around the given flowpath. Trajectory performance of the vehicle is estimated using a collocation method to find the required control inputs and fuel consumption. The combustor is optimized for minimum fuel consumption over a short scram trajectory, and the scram-mode trajectory is optimized for minimum fuel consumption over a space-access-type trajectory. A vehicle design and associated optimized trajectory are shown, and general design principles for steady and efficient operation of vehicles of this

  12. Ultra high temperature ceramics for hypersonic vehicle applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, Rajan; Dumm, Hans Peter; Corral, Erica L.; Loehman, Ronald E.; Kotula, Paul Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    HfB{sub 2} and ZrB{sub 2} are of interest for thermal protection materials because of favorable thermal stability, mechanical properties, and oxidation resistance. We have made dense diboride ceramics with 2 to 20 % SiC by hot pressing at 2000 C and 5000 psi. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows very thin grain boundary phases that suggest liquid phase sintering. Fracture toughness measurements give RT values of 4 to 6 MPam{sup 1/2}. Four-pt flexure strengths measured in air up to 1450 C were as high as 450-500 MPa. Thermal diffusivities were measured to 2000 C for ZrB{sub 2} and HfB{sub 2} ceramics with SiC contents from 2 to 20%. Thermal conductivities were calculated from thermal diffusivities and measured heat capacities. Thermal diffusivities were modeled using different two-phase composite models. These materials exhibit excellent high temperature properties and are attractive for further development for thermal protection systems.

  13. Women's Representation in 60 Occupations from 1972 to 2010: More Women in High-Status Jobs, Few Women in Things-Oriented Jobs

    PubMed Central

    Lippa, Richard A.; Preston, Kathleen; Penner, John

    2014-01-01

    To explore factors associated with occupational sex segregation in the United States over the past four decades, we analyzed U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data for the percent of women employed in 60 varied occupations from 1972 to 2010. Occupations were assessed on status, people-things orientation, and data-ideas orientation. Multilevel linear modeling (MLM) analyses showed that women increasingly entered high-status occupations from 1972 to 2010, but women's participation in things-oriented occupations (e.g., STEM fields and mechanical and construction trades) remained low and relatively stable. Occupations' data-ideas orientation was not consistently related to sex segregation. Because of women's increased participation in high-status occupations, occupational status became an increasingly weak predictor of women's participation rates in occupations, whereas occupations' people-things orientation became an increasingly strong predictor over time. These findings are discussed in relation to theories of occupational sex segregation and social policies to reduce occupational sex segregation. PMID:24788710

  14. Women's representation in 60 occupations from 1972 to 2010: more women in high-status jobs, few women in things-oriented jobs.

    PubMed

    Lippa, Richard A; Preston, Kathleen; Penner, John

    2014-01-01

    To explore factors associated with occupational sex segregation in the United States over the past four decades, we analyzed U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data for the percent of women employed in 60 varied occupations from 1972 to 2010. Occupations were assessed on status, people-things orientation, and data-ideas orientation. Multilevel linear modeling (MLM) analyses showed that women increasingly entered high-status occupations from 1972 to 2010, but women's participation in things-oriented occupations (e.g., STEM fields and mechanical and construction trades) remained low and relatively stable. Occupations' data-ideas orientation was not consistently related to sex segregation. Because of women's increased participation in high-status occupations, occupational status became an increasingly weak predictor of women's participation rates in occupations, whereas occupations' people-things orientation became an increasingly strong predictor over time. These findings are discussed in relation to theories of occupational sex segregation and social policies to reduce occupational sex segregation.

  15. High-Voltage Solid Polymer Batteries for Electric Drive Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Eitouni, Hany; Yang, Jin; Pratt, Russell; Wang, Xiao; Grape, Ulrik

    2014-09-29

    The purpose of this project was for Seeo to develop a high energy lithium based technology with targets of over 500 Wh/l and 325 Wh/kg. Seeo would leverage the work already achieved with its unique proprietary solid polymer DryLyteTM technology in cells which had a specific energy density of 220 Wh/kg. The development work was focused on establishing a dual electrolyte system, coated cathode particle techniques, various types of additives, and different conductive salts. The program had a duration of three years, with Seeo delivering the final cells at the end of 2014 for evaluation by a DOE laboratory.

  16. High angle view of Apollo 14 space vehicle on way to Pad A

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-11-09

    S70-54127 (9 Nov. 1970) --- A high-angle view at Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), showing the Apollo 14 (Spacecraft 110/Lunar Module 8/Saturn 509) space vehicle on the way from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to Pad A. The Saturn V stack and its mobile launch tower sit atop a huge crawler-transporter. The Apollo 14 crewmen will be astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander; Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot; and Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot.

  17. High angle view of Apollo 14 space vehicle on way to Pad A

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-11-09

    S70-54119 (9 Nov. 1970) --- A high-angle view at Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), showing the Apollo 14 (Spacecraft 110/Lunar Module 8/Saturn 509) space vehicle on the way from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to Pad A. The Saturn V stack and its mobile launch tower sit atop a huge crawler-transporter. The Apollo 14 crewmen will be astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander; Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot; and Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot.

  18. Special problems and capabilities of high altitude lighter than air vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessel, P. R.; Petrone, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    Powered LTA vehicles have historically been limited to operations at low altitudes. Conditions exist which may enable a remotely piloted unit to be operated at an altitude near 70,000 feet. Such systems will be launched like high altitude balloons, operate like nonrigid airships, and have mission capabilities comparable to a low altitude stationary satellite. The limited lift available and the stratospheric environment impose special requirements on power systems, hull materials and payloads. Potential nonmilitary uses of the vehicle include communications relay, environmental monitoring and ship traffic control.

  19. Analysis of vehicle rollover dynamics using a high-fidelity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawel Czechowicz, Maciej; Mavros, George

    2014-05-01

    Recent data show that 35% of fatal crashes in sport utility vehicles included vehicle rollover. At the same time, experimental testing to improve safety is expensive and dangerous. Therefore, multi-body simulation is used in this research to improve the understanding of rollover dynamics. The majority of previous work uses low-fidelity models. Here, a complex and highly nonlinear multi-body model with 165 degrees of freedom is correlated to vehicle kinematic and compliance (K&C) measurements. The Magic Formula tyre model is employed. Design of experiment methodology is used to identify tyre properties affecting vehicle rollover. A novel, statistical approach is used to link suspension K&C characteristics with rollover propensity. Research so far reveals that the tyre properties that have the greatest influence on vehicle rollover are friction coefficient, friction variation with load, camber stiffness and tyre vertical stiffness. Key K&C characteristics affecting rollover propensity are front and rear suspension rate, front roll stiffness, front camber gain, front and rear camber compliance and rear jacking force.

  20. Requirements for multidisciplinary design of aerospace vehicles on high performance computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, Robert G.

    1989-01-01

    The design of aerospace vehicles is becoming increasingly complex as the various contributing disciplines and physical components become more tightly coupled. This coupling leads to computational problems that will be tractable only if significant advances in high performance computing systems are made. Some of the modeling, algorithmic and software requirements generated by the design problem are discussed.

  1. Application of high resolution images from unmanned aerial vehicles for hydrology and range science

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A common problem in many natural resource disciplines is the lack of high-enough spatial resolution images that can be used for monitoring and modeling purposes. Advances have been made in the utilization of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in hydrology and rangeland science. By utilizing low fligh...

  2. Preliminary performance estimates of a highly maneuverable remotely piloted vehicle. [computerized synthesis program to assess effects of vehicle and mission parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, W. P., Jr.; Axelson, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    A computerized synthesis program has been used to assess the effects of various vehicle and mission parameters on the performance of a highly maneuverable remotely piloted vehicle (RPV) for the air-to-air combat role. The configuration used in the study is a trapezoidal-wing and body concept, with forward-mounted stabilizing and control surfaces. The study mission consists of an outbound cruise, an acceleration phase, a series of subsonic and supersonic turns, and a return cruise. Performance is evaluated in terms of both the required vehicle weight to accomplish this mission and combat effectiveness as measured by turning and acceleration capability. The report describes the synthesis program, the mission, the vehicle, and the results of sensitivity and trade studies.

  3. Development of Advanced High Strength Steel for Improved Vehicle Safety, Fuel Efficiency and CO2 Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Satendra; Singhai, Mrigandra; Desai, Rahul; Sam, Srimanta; Patra, Pradip Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Global warming and green house gas emissions are the major issues worldwide and their impacts are clearly visible as a record high temperatures, rising sea, and severe `flooding and droughts'. Motor vehicles considered as a major contributor on global warming due to its green house gas emissions. Hence, the automobile industries are under tremendous pressure from government and society to reduce green house gas emission to maximum possible extent. In present work, Dual Phase steel with boron as microalloying is manufactured using thermo-mechanical treatment during hot rolling. Dual phase steel with boron microalloying improved strength by near about 200 MPa than dual phase steel without boron. The boron added dual phase steel can be used for manufacturing stronger and a lighter vehicle which is expected to perform positively on green house gas emissions. The corrosion resistance behavior is also improved with boron addition which would further increase the life cycle of the vehicle even under corrosive atmosphere.

  4. Analysis of possible improvement of acceleration of a high-velocity air-breathing flying vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goonko, Yu. P.; Mazhul, I. I.

    2008-09-01

    Results of parametric calculations of the total aeropropulsive characteristics and characteristics of acceleration of a small-scale high-velocity flying vehicle with an air-breathing engine are presented. Integral parameters of acceleration from the flight Mach number M∞ = 4 to M∞ = 7 are determined, namely, the time required fuel stock, and range. A schematic configuration of the vehicle is considered, which allows studying the basic parameters, such as the forebody shape, the angles of surfaces of compression of the stream captured by the inlet, angles of external aerodynamic surfaces of the airframe, relative planform area of the wing panels, and relative area of the nozzle cross section. A comparative estimate of the effect of these parameters shows that it is possible to improve the characteristics of acceleration of vehicles of the type considered.

  5. Optimum configuration of high-lift aeromaneuvering orbital transfer vehicles in viscous flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, C. B.; Park, C.

    1985-01-01

    The results of an analysis to determine the geometrical configuration of an aeroassisted transfer vehicle with a high lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) are described and the constraints imposed on this type of entry vehicle are considered. The aerodynamic characteristics of three configurations, a flat-plate delta wing, a truncated straight cone, and a truncated bent biconic are compared. The effect of viscosity is included in the analysis which examines the rounding of the sharp leading edges. It is shown that, under the constraints of carrying a given volume in the dead air region, the values of L/D are similar for each configuration and that a small blunt leading edge only slightly affects each vehicle's aerodynamic performance, causing less than a 5 percent drop in L/D. The truncated bent biconic is found to be the only configuration that provides the necessary stabilizing moments.

  6. A torque controlled high speed flywheel energy storage system for peak power transfer in electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Schaible, U.; Szabados, B.

    1994-12-31

    This paper provides a design outline and implementation procedure for a flywheel energy storage system using a high speed interior permanent magnet synchronous machine, torque-controlled through the use of a vector control algorithm. The proposed flywheel energy storage system can be used to meet the peak energy requirements of an electric vehicle during both acceleration and regenerative braking. By supplying the peak energy requirements from a secondary source, the life cycle of the electric vehicle`s batteries may be extended considerably. A torque control algorithm is presented and preliminary implementation through a commercially available microcontroller is described. Preliminary testing of the proposed system has been very promising and has proven that bidirectional peak power transfer can be rapidly accomplished. 4 refs.

  7. Stomach cancer and occupation in Sweden: 1971–89

    PubMed Central

    Aragones, N; Pollan, M; Gustavsson, P

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the relation between gastric cancer and occupation among men and women gainfully employed in 1970 in Sweden for the period 1971–89 and, more specifically, to evaluate whether any excess of incidence of gastric cancer had also occurred among the subcohort of people reporting the same occupation in 1960 and 1970. Methods: In both sexes and cohorts, relative risks adjusted for age, period of diagnosis, and geographical risk area were computed for occupational codes specified at one, two, or three level (occupational sector, occupational group, and occupation, respectively). Relative risks were calculated with all other occupations as reference and then, to take socioeconomic status into account, solely other occupations within the same occupational sector were used. Results: Among men, occupations with increased risk included miners and quarrymen, construction and metal processing workers, supporting the possible causative role of dusty environments in stomach cancer. In men, the results also provide support for increased risks among electrical and mechanical engineers, fishermen, petrol station workers, motor vehicle drivers, butchers and meat preparers, dockers, freight handlers, launderers and dry cleaners. Furthermore, it is worth noting interesting results for women, whose occupational risks have been studied less. Excess risks were found for practical nurses, cashiers, bank employees, engineering and electronic industry workers, food industry, housekeeping and cleaning workers. Due to the many occupations studied, several significant associations may be expected by chance. Conclusions: The study is explorative but provides support for the relations suggested previously between occupational exposure to dusty environments and stomach cancer, together with some new high risk occupations which should be further studied. PMID:11983848

  8. Occupational status moderates the association between current perceived stress and high blood pressure: evidence from the IPC cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wiernik, Emmanuel; Pannier, Bruno; Czernichow, Sébastien; Nabi, Hermann; Hanon, Olivier; Simon, Tabassome; Simon, Jean-Marc; Thomas, Frédérique; Bean, Kathy; Consoli, Silla M; Danchin, Nicolas; Lemogne, Cédric

    2013-03-01

    Although lay beliefs commonly relate high blood pressure (BP) to psychological stress exposure, research findings are conflicting. This study examined the association between current perceived stress and high BP, and explored the potential impact of occupational status on this association. Resting BP was measured in 122 816 adults (84 994 men), aged ≥30 years (mean age±standard deviation: 46.8±9.9 years), without history of cardiovascular and renal disease and not on either psychotropic or antihypertensive drugs. High BP was defined as systolic BP ≥140 mm Hg or diastolic BP ≥90 mm Hg. Perceived stress in the past month was measured with the 4-item perceived stress scale. A total of 33 154 participants (27.0%) had high BP (151±14/90±9 mm Hg). After adjustment for all variables except occupational status, perceived stress was associated with high BP (odds ratio [OR] for a 5-point increase: 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.09). This association was no longer significant after additional adjustment for occupational status (OR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.99-1.04). There was a significant interaction (P<0.001) between perceived stress and occupational status in relation to BP: perceived stress was negatively associated with high BP among individuals of high occupational status (OR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.87-0.96), but positively associated among those of low status (OR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.03-1.17) or unemployed (OR: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.03-1.24). Sensitivity analyses yielded similar results. The association between current perceived stress and BP depends on occupational status. This interaction may account for previous conflicting results and warrants further studies to explore its underlying mechanisms.

  9. The Effects of Occupational Work Adjustment on Factors Leading to High School Drop Out in Rural Northwest Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Angela

    The effect of four Occupational Work Adjustment (OWA) programs on risk factors leading to students dropping out of high school was assessed. Data were gathered from four OWA teachers in high schools in Northwest Ohio; information was provided for 27 individual students and 2 groups of 28 students each for the 1992-93 school year. The following…

  10. The Influence of Selected Family Factors on the Educational and Occupational Aspiration Levels of High School-Aged Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siemens, Leonard B.

    The first in a series of 4 studies based on data collected from 1,844 high school students in Canada, this study examined eleventh and twelfth grade students from 2 rural Manitoba sample areas and from 2 large suburban high schools in metropolitan Winnipeg. This study focused on the educational and occupational aspiration levels and 10 selected…

  11. Determinants of the bronchial response to high molecular weight occupational agents in a dry aerosol form.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, B; Weytjens, K; Cloutier, Y; Ghezzo, H; Malo, J L

    1998-10-01

    In occupational challenge tests with isocyanate vapours, bronchial responsiveness is determined by the total dose rather than the concentration or duration of exposure. Whether the same applies for high molecular weight (HMW) agents in powder form is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether the total dose of HMW agents in powder form is responsible for the immediate reaction documented in specific challenge tests. Included in the study were nine subjects (seven males and two females) with a diagnosis of occupational asthma proved by specific challenge tests carried out on a preliminary visit. Two challenge tests (using a closed-circuit exposure chamber) were performed at an interval of 2 weeks; the concentrations administered in a random order on these two visits were half and double the one that had caused a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) on a preliminary visit. The duration of exposure was adjusted until a significant fall in FEV1 (target of 20%) occurred. The two concentrations obtained were significantly different, by 2.07+/-0.36-fold (SD). The observed durations of exposure leading to a 20% fall in FEV1 on the two visits also differed significantly by 0.46+/-0.32-fold. Consequently, the cumulative efficient doses were not significantly different between the two visits: 12+/-5.4 and 9+/-5 mg x mL(-1) x min(-1), respectively. The corresponding cumulative dose ratio was 0.96+/-0.61. The expected duration of exposure (10.8+/-24 min) was not significantly different from the observed duration (5.4+/-9 min). The mean and 95% confidence interval for the difference in concentration between the two visits was 1.83-fold (1.48-2.21). In conclusion, the total dose rather than the concentration or duration of exposure per se determines bronchial responsiveness to high molecular weight agents in powder form.

  12. High Pressure Air Jet in the Endoscopic Preparation Room: Risk of Noise Exposure on Occupational Health

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lung-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun

    2015-01-01

    After high-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscopes, they are hung to dry in order to prevent residual water droplets impact on patient health. To allow for quick drying and clinical reuse, some endoscopic units use a high pressure air jet (HPAJ) to remove the water droplets on the endoscopes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the excessive noise exposure with the use of HPAJ in endoscopic preparation room and to investigate the risk to occupational health. Noise assessment was taken during 7 automatic endoscopic reprocessors (AERs) and combined with/without HPAJ use over an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA). Analytical procedures of the NIOSH and the ISO for noise-induced hearing loss were estimated to develop analytic models. The peak of the noise spectrum of combined HPAJ and 7 AERs was significantly higher than that of the 7 AERs alone (108.3 ± 1.36 versus 69.3 ± 3.93 dBA, P < 0.0001). The risk of hearing loss (HL > 2.5 dB) was 2.15% at 90 dBA, 11.6% at 95 dBA, and 51.3% at 100 dBA. The odds ratio was 49.1 (95% CI: 11.9 to 203.6). The noise generated by the HPAJ to work over TWA seriously affected the occupational health and safety of those working in an endoscopic preparation room. PMID:25710009

  13. Occupational rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Sublett, J Wesley; Bernstein, David I

    2011-11-01

    Work-related rhinitis, which includes work-exacerbated rhinitis and occupational rhinoconjunctivitis (OR), is two to three times more common than occupational asthma. High molecular weight proteins and low molecular weight chemicals have been implicated as causes of OR. The diagnosis of work-related rhinitis is established based on occupational history and documentation of immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated sensitization to the causative agent if possible. Management of work-related rhinitis is similar to that of other causes of rhinitis and includes elimination or reduction of exposure to causative agents combined with pharmacotherapy. If allergens are commercially available, allergen immunotherapy can be considered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. AN ASSESSMENT OF FLYWHEEL HIGH POWER ENERGY STORAGE TECHNOLOGY FOR HYBRID VEHICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, James Gerald

    2012-02-01

    An assessment has been conducted for the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program to determine the state of the art of advanced flywheel high power energy storage systems to meet hybrid vehicle needs for high power energy storage and energy/power management. Flywheel systems can be implemented with either an electrical or a mechanical powertrain. The assessment elaborates upon flywheel rotor design issues of stress, materials and aspect ratio. Twelve organizations that produce flywheel systems submitted specifications for flywheel energy storage systems to meet minimum energy and power requirements for both light-duty and heavy-duty hybrid applications of interest to DOE. The most extensive experience operating flywheel high power energy storage systems in heavy-duty and light-duty hybrid vehicles is in Europe. Recent advances in Europe in a number of vehicle racing venues and also in road car advanced evaluations are discussed. As a frame of reference, nominal weight and specific power for non-energy storage components of Toyota hybrid electric vehicles are summarized. The most effective utilization of flywheels is in providing high power while providing just enough energy storage to accomplish the power assist mission effectively. Flywheels are shown to meet or exceed the USABC power related goals (discharge power, regenerative power, specific power, power density, weight and volume) for HEV and EV batteries and ultracapacitors. The greatest technical challenge facing the developer of vehicular flywheel systems remains the issue of safety and containment. Flywheel safety issues must be addressed during the design and testing phases to ensure that production flywheel systems can be operated with adequately low risk.

  15. Occupant injury protection in automobile collisions.

    PubMed

    Peters, G A; Peters, B J

    1999-12-01

    Modern technology has produced automotive vehicles that have become both a luxury and a necessity in modern civilization. They have become highly useful, even more varied in form and function, and capable of high speeds on crowded roadways. One unfortunate consequence is the high frequency of accidents and the greater severity of injuries when collisions do occur. In response, modern technology has produced a variety of safety and health features, devices and designs intended for better occupant protection on in high speed vehicles. Injury reduction has become a prime design objective, but there are residual risks, which, as technology evolves, require effective communication to those risk. There can be little risk avoidance behavior without awareness of the hazards and effective communication to the vehicle occupant, as to what could and should be done for self-protection. For example, one out of three drivers apparently fails to understand the function of head restraints, few understand the 'safe zone' posture required for air bags and many believe safety features should be adjusted only for comfort. Some of the current residual injury producing problems in occupant systems are specifically described here in order to illustrate what is needed in terms of both design remedies and health promotion activities.

  16. Problems Involved in an Emergency Method of Guiding a Gliding Vehicle from High Altitudes to a High Key Position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewel, Joseph W., Jr.; Whitten, James B.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine the problems involved in an emergency method of guiding a gliding vehicle from high altitudes to a high key position (initial position) above a landing field. A jet airplane in a simulated flameout condition, conventional ground-tracking radar, and a scaled wire for guidance programming on the radar plotting board were used in the tests. Starting test altitudes varied from 30,000 feet to 46,500 feet, and starting positions ranged 8.4 to 67 nautical miles from the high key. Specified altitudes of the high key were 12,000, 10,000 or 4,000 feet. Lift-drag ratios of the aircraft of either 17, 16, or 6 were held constant during any given flight; however, for a few flights the lift-drag ratio was varied from 11 to 6. Indicated airspeeds were held constant at either 160 or 250 knots. Results from these tests indicate that a gliding vehicle having a lift-drag ratio of 16 and an indicated approach speed of 160 knots can be guided to within 800 feet vertically and 2,400 feet laterally of a high key position. When the lift-drag ratio of the vehicle is reduced to 6 and the indicated approach speed is raised to 250 knots, the radar controller was able to guide the vehicle to within 2,400 feet vertically and au feet laterally of the high key. It was also found that radar stations which give only azimuth-distance information could control the glide path of a gliding vehicle as well as stations that receive azimuth-distance-altitude information, provided that altitude information is supplied by the pilot.

  17. Aortic injuries in newer vehicles.

    PubMed

    Ryb, Gabriel E; Dischinger, Patricia C; Kleinberger, Michael; McGwin, Gerald; Griffin, Russell L

    2013-10-01

    The occurrence of AI was studied in relation to vehicle model year (MY) among front seat vehicular occupants, age≥16 in vehicles MY≥1994, entered in the National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System between 1997 and 2010 to determine whether newer vehicles, due to their crashworthiness improvements, are linked to a lower risk of aortic injuries (AI). MY was categorized as 1994-1997, 1998-2004, or 2005-2010 reflecting the introduction of newer occupant protection technology. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals for the association between AI and MY independent of possible confounders. Analysis was repeated, stratified by frontal and near lateral impacts. AI occurred in 19,187 (0.06%) of the 31,221,007 (weighted) cases, and contributed to 11% of all deaths. AIs were associated with advanced age, male gender, high BMI, near-side impact, rollover, ejection, collision against a fixed object, high ΔV, vehicle mismatch, unrestrained status, and forward track position. Among frontal crashes, MY 98-04 and MY 05-10 showed increased adjusted odds of AI when compared to MY 94-97 [OR 1.84 (1.02-3.32) and 1.99 (0.93-4.26), respectively]. In contrast, among near-side impact crashes, MY 98-04 and MY 05-10 showed decreased adjusted odds of AI [OR 0.50 (0.25-0.99) and 0.27 (0.06-1.31), respectively]. While occupants of newer vehicles experience lower odds of AI in near side impact crashes, a higher AI risk is present in frontal crashes.

  18. The Relationship between Career Maturity and Occupational Plans of High School Juniors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasper, Theodore H., Jr.; Omvig, Clayton P.

    1976-01-01

    This study sought to analyze the relationship between scores obtained from the Career Maturity Inventory (CMI) and the Occupational Plans Questionnaire (OPQ). The sample consisted of 169 eleventh-grade students. Only limited correlation was found between students' career maturity and occupational plans scores. (Author)

  19. Characterizing particulate matter emissions from vehicles: chassis-dynamometer tests using a High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, S.; Zhang, Q.; Forestieri, S.; Kleeman, M.; Cappa, C. D.; Kuwayama, T.

    2012-12-01

    During September of 2011 a suite of real-time instruments was used to sample vehicle emissions at the California Air Resources Board Haagen-Schmidt facility in El Monte, CA. A representative fleet of 8 spark ignition gasoline vehicles, a diesel passenger vehicle, a gasoline direct-injection vehicle and an ultra-low emissions vehicle were tested on a chassis dynamometer. The emissions were sampled into the facility's standard CVS tunnel and diluted to atmospherically relevant levels (5-30 μg/m3) while controlling other factors such as relative humidity or background black carbon particulate loading concentrations. An Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-MS) was among the real-time instruments used and sampled vehicle emissions at 10 second time resolution in order to characterize the non-refractory organic and inorganic particulate matter (PM). PM composition and concentration were tracked throughout the cold start driving cycle which included periods of fast acceleration and high velocity cruise control, meant to recreate typical commuter driving behavior. Variations in inorganic and organic PM composition for a given vehicle throughout the driving cycle as well as for various vehicles with differing emissions loading were characterized. Differences in PM composition for a given vehicle whose emissions are being exposed to differing experimental conditions such as varying relative humidity will also be reported. In conjunction with measurements from a Multi Wavelength Photoacoustic Black Carbon Spectrometer (MWPA-BC) and real-time gas measurements from the CARB facility, we determine the real-time emission ratios of primary organic aerosols (POA) with respect to BC and common combustion gas phase pollutants and compared to different vehicle driving conditions. The results of these tests offer the vehicle emissions community a first time glimpse at the real-time behavior of vehicle PM emissions for a variety of conditions and

  20. High specific energy and specific power aluminum/air battery for micro air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindler, A.; Matthies, L.

    2014-06-01

    Micro air vehicles developed under the Army's Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology program generally need a specific energy of 300 - 550 watt-hrs/kg and 300 -550 watts/kg to operate for about 1 hour. At present, no commercial cell can fulfill this need. The best available commercial technology is the Lithium-ion battery or its derivative, the Li- Polymer cell. This chemistry generally provides around 15 minutes flying time. One alternative to the State-of-the Art is the Al/air cell, a primary battery that is actually half fuel cell. It has a high energy battery like aluminum anode, and fuel cell like air electrode that can extract oxygen out of the ambient air rather than carrying it. Both of these features tend to contribute to a high specific energy (watt-hrs/kg). High specific power (watts/kg) is supported by high concentration KOH electrolyte, a high quality commercial air electrode, and forced air convection from the vehicles rotors. The performance of this cell with these attributes is projected to be 500 watt-hrs/kg and 500 watts/kg based on simple model. It is expected to support a flying time of approximately 1 hour in any vehicle in which the usual limit is 15 minutes.

  1. Biomechanics of under ride motor vehicle crashes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sri; Sances, Anthony; Enz, Bruce; Frieder, Russell

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluates the biomechanical aspects of injuries sustained by occupants of passenger cars during collisions with the trailer portion of a tractor/trailer rig. In such collisions, the occupants of the passenger car often sustain serious injuries when the passenger car passes beneath the trailer. This process by which the car "underrides" the trailer occurs due to the mismatch in height between the lowermost edge of the trailer and the crash mitigation structures in the vehicle. The study outlines a car-to-trailer crash testing methodology used to determine the effectiveness of one potential trailer underride guard in preventing serious injuries to occupants of passenger cars. The results from initial crash tests suggest that occupants of cars that collide with the unguarded sides of trailers are at a high risk of serious injury to the head, neck, and chest due the large intrusion of the roof and roof support structures into the occupant compartment. Testing of a trailer fitted with an underride guard showed that occupants of vehicles that collide with the sides of trailers that have been modified to engage the energy absorbing structures of passenger cars are exposed to a smaller risk of injury.

  2. Multi-point contact of the high-speed vehicle-turnout system dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zunsong

    2013-05-01

    The wheel-rail contact problems, such as the number, location and the track of contact patches, are very important for optimizing the spatial structure of the rails and lowering the vehicle-turnout system dynamics. However, the above problems are not well solved currently because of having the difficulties in how to determine the multi-contact, to preciously present the changeable profiles of the rails and to establish an accurate spatial turnout system dynamics model. Based on a high-speed vehicle-turnout coupled model in which the track is modeled as flexible with rails and sleepers represented by beams, the line tracing extreme point method is introduced to investigate the wheel-rail multiple contact conditions and the key sections of the blade rail, longer nose rail, shorter rail in the switch and nose rail area are discretized to represent the varying profiles of rails in the turnout. The dynamic interaction between the vehicle and turnout is simulated for cases of the vehicle divergently passing the turnout and the multi-point contact is obtained. The tracks of the contact patches on the top of the rails are presented and the wheel-rail impact forces are offered in comparison with the contact patches transference on the rails. The numerical simulation results indicate that the length of two-point contact occurrence of a worn wheel profile and rails is longer than that of the new wheel profile and rails; The two-point contact definitely occurs in the switch and crossing area. Generally, three-point contact doesn't occur for the new rail profile, which is testified by the wheel-rails interpolation distance and the first order derivative function of the tracing line extreme points. The presented research is not only helpful to optimize the structure of the turnout, but also useful to lower the dynamics of the high speed vehicle-turnout system.

  3. Occupational exposure to crystalline silica: estimating the number of workers potentially at high risk in Italy.

    PubMed

    Scarselli, Alberto; Binazzi, Alessandra; Marinaccio, Alessandro

    2008-12-01

    Occupational exposure to free silica is widespread in several economic sectors and is well known to cause silicosis. This study was designed to establish a database of enterprises and workers in industrial sectors involving silica exposure in Italy and to estimate the number of workers potentially at high risk of exposure. The industrial sectors at risk of silica exposure were identified by selecting the industrial sector that employed people who were compensated for silicosis in 2000-2004. The enterprises and the number of workers (blue-collar) potentially at risk of silica exposure were selected from the Italian database of workplaces. The number of workers potentially at high risk of silica exposure, were 28,712. The most involved sectors were: construction, mining and quarrying, metal working, and manufacturing of non-metallic products. Among regions in Italy, some exposure-disease scenarios were cited in literature, particularly in Sardinia, Liguria, and Tuscany. Establishing a database of industries related to silica dust exposure and identifying the number of workers potentially at high risk can be useful to reinforce preventive measures and to control exposure. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Occupational skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Diepgen, Thomas L

    2012-05-01

    Occupational skin diseases are the most commonly reported notifiable occupational diseases. In Germany, 23 596 out of a total of 71 263 reported occupational diseases in 2010 were classified as occupational skin diseases (BK No. 5101: "severe or recurrent skin diseases which have forced the person to discontinue all occupational activities that caused or could cause the development, worsening, or recurrence of the disease"). Contact dermatitis (allergic, irritant) of the hands is the most common skin disease and atopic skin diathesis is often an important co-factor. The number of work-related skin diseases is many times higher than the number of notified occupational dermatoses. This CME article explains the legal framework of occupational diseases, the tasks and obligations of the legal statutory work insurance. Typical allergens and irritants of high risk professions are also presented as are the important steps from diagnosis to compensation. Early prevention of occupational skin diseases is very important to avoid severe chronic hand eczema. Therefore the "dermatologist's report" is crucial. Other occupational dermatoses (outside of BK 5101) are briefly mentioned. In recent years the number of notifications of occupational skin cancer due to occupational UV-irradiation has increased. According to recent epidemiological findings, there is a significant and consistent positive association between occupational UV-irradiation and squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, an important criterion for a new occupational disease is fulfilled. © The Authors • Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  5. Cooperative Health Occupations Assistant Program Core Curriculum, Westinghouse Vocational High School. Curriculum Guide for Grades Eleven and Twelve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago Board of Education, IL.

    The Cooperative Health Occupations Assistants Program (CHOAP) is a two-year program for high school juniors and seniors in the Chicago (Illinois) public school system. CHOAP has three purposes: to acquaint young people with the scope of career opportunities in the health field, to prepare them for entry jobs in the field, and to help students make…

  6. OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION BEYOND THE HIGH SCHOOL IN OKLAHOMA, AN ANALYTICAL STUDY WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR A STATEWIDE SYSTEM FOR MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RONEY, MAURICE W.; BRADEN, PAUL V.

    MAJOR FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF A STATEWIDE STUDY OF EDUCATIONAL SERVICES FOR YOUTH AND ADULTS WHO HAVE LEFT HIGH SCHOOL AND NEED OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION AND SUGGESTIONS FOR A MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM ARE PRESENTED. INFORMATION WAS DERIVED FROM AVAILABLE DATA, CONFERENCES WITH INDUSTRY AND GOVERNMENT PERSONNEL, STUDENT QUESTIONNAIRES, AND…

  7. Using Automatic Item Generation to Meet the Increasing Item Demands of High-Stakes Educational and Occupational Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arendasy, Martin E.; Sommer, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The use of new test administration technologies such as computerized adaptive testing in high-stakes educational and occupational assessments demands large item pools. Classic item construction processes and previous approaches to automatic item generation faced the problems of a considerable loss of items after the item calibration phase. In this…

  8. Predicting Occupational Interests and Choice Aspirations in Portuguese High School Students: A Test of Social Cognitive Career Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lent, Robert W.; Paixao, Maria Paula; da Silva, Jose Tomas; Leitao, Ligia Mexia

    2010-01-01

    The predictive utility of social cognitive career theory's (SCCT) interest and choice models was examined in a sample of 600 Portuguese high school students. Participants completed measures of occupational self-efficacy, outcome expectations, interests, social supports and barriers, and choice consideration across the six Holland (1997) RIASEC…

  9. Predicting Occupational Interests and Choice Aspirations in Portuguese High School Students: A Test of Social Cognitive Career Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lent, Robert W.; Paixao, Maria Paula; da Silva, Jose Tomas; Leitao, Ligia Mexia

    2010-01-01

    The predictive utility of social cognitive career theory's (SCCT) interest and choice models was examined in a sample of 600 Portuguese high school students. Participants completed measures of occupational self-efficacy, outcome expectations, interests, social supports and barriers, and choice consideration across the six Holland (1997) RIASEC…

  10. Perceived stress, sex and occupational status interact to increase the risk of future high blood pressure: the IPC cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wiernik, Emmanuel; Nabi, Hermann; Pannier, Bruno; Czernichow, Sébastien; Hanon, Olivier; Simon, Tabassome; Simon, Jean-Marc; Thomas, Frédérique; Ducolombier, Cyril; Danchin, Nicolas; Limosin, Frédéric; Consoli, Silla M; Lemogne, Cédric

    2014-10-01

    Contrary to lay beliefs, current perceived stress is not consistently associated with the incidence of high blood pressure (BP) in prospective studies, possibly because of moderating factors. The present prospective study examined this association and explored the potential moderating effects of sex or occupational status. The 4-item Perceived Stress Scale was filled at baseline by 19 766 normotensive adults (13 652 men, mean age ± SD: 46.8 ± 9.3 years), without history of cardiovascular and renal disease, and not on either psychotropic or antihypertensive drugs. After a mean follow-up of 5.8 ± 2.1 years, 3774 participants (19.1%) had high BP, defined as having a SBP at least 140 mmHg or a DBP at least 90 mmHg, or using antihypertensive drugs. There was a significant interaction between baseline-perceived stress and sex (P = 0.02) in relation to high BP at follow-up. After adjustment for potential confounders, baseline perceived stress was associated with high BP at follow-up in women [odds ratio 1.20, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.38, P = 0.016). In addition, the interaction between perceived stress and occupational status was significant among women (P = 0.02). Baseline-perceived stress was positively associated with high BP at follow-up among women of medium or low occupational status, with odds ratio suggesting a linear increase of the risk (P = 0.005). Perceived stress may be considered as a risk factor for hypertension in women of lower occupational status. Research addressing the relationships between stress and high BP should systematically look for possible interactions with sex and occupational status.

  11. High Tech. High Technology in Vocational Education. Training Programs for Emerging Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodenstein, Judith, Ed.

    This publication represents the collaborative efforts of vocational educators who are involved in the planning and teaching of high technology training programs. It contains a series of reports and profiles which illustrate the diversity of high technology programs in vocational education institutions and the variety of approaches that can be used…

  12. High Tech. High Technology in Vocational Education. Training Programs for Emerging Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodenstein, Judith, Ed.

    This publication represents the collaborative efforts of vocational educators who are involved in the planning and teaching of high technology training programs. It contains a series of reports and profiles which illustrate the diversity of high technology programs in vocational education institutions and the variety of approaches that can be used…

  13. Aerodynamic configuration development of the highly maneuverable aircraft technology remotely piloted research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingrich, P. B.; Child, R. D.; Panageas, G. N.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic development of the highly maneuverable aircraft technology remotely piloted research vehicle (HiMAT/RPRV) from the conceptual design to the final configuration is presented. The design integrates several advanced concepts to achieve a high degree of transonic maneuverability, and was keyed to sustained maneuverability goals while other fighter typical performance characteristics were maintained. When tests of the baseline configuration indicated deficiencies in the technology integration and design techniques, the vehicle was reconfigured to satisfy the subcritical and supersonic requirements. Drag-due-to-lift levels only 5 percent higher than the optimum were obtained for the wind tunnel model at a lift coefficient of 1 for Mach numbers of up to 0.8. The transonic drag rise was progressively lowered with the application of nonlinear potential flow analyses coupled with experimental data.

  14. High spatial resolution mapping of water quality and bathymetry with an autonomous underwater vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pampalone, Vincenzo; Milici, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    The drone Ecomapper AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) is a rare example of highly technological instrument in the environmental coastal monitoring field. The YSI EcoMapper is a one-man deployable, Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) designed to collect bathymetry and water quality data. The submarine-like vehicle follows a programmed course and employs sensors mounted in the nose to record pertinent information. Once the vehicle has started its mission, it operates independently of the user and utilizes GPS waypoints navigation to complete its programmed course. Throughout the course, the vehicle constantly steers toward the line drawn in the mission planning software (VectorMap), essentially following a more accurate road of coordinates instead of transversing waypoint-to-waypoint. It has been equipped with a Doppler Velocity Log (DVL) to increase its underwater navigation accuracy. Potential EcoMapper applications include baseline environmental mapping in freshwater, estuarine or near-coastal environments, bathymetric mapping, dissolved oxygen studies, event monitoring (algal blooms, storm impacts, low dissolved oxygen), non-point source studies, point-source dispersion mapping, security, search & rescue, inspection, shallow water mapping, thermal dissipation mapping of cooling outfalls, trace-dye studies. The AUV is used in the coastal area of the Augusta Bay (Italy), located in the eastern part of Sicily. Due to the heavy contamination generated by the several chemical and petrochemical industries active in the zone, the harbour was declared a Contaminated Site of National Interest. The ecomapper allows for a simultaneous data collection of water quality and bathymetric data providing a complete environmental mapping system of the Harbour.

  15. Air Intakes for High Speed Vehicles (Prises d’Air pour Vehicules a Grande Vitesse)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Complex Configurations - Recent Progress AGARD AG-309. March 1988 REPORTS (R) Aircraft Dynawics at High Angles of AttackL Experiments and Modelling AGARD...A/I Computational Methods for Aerodynamic Design (Inverse) and Optimization AGARD CP-463, March 1990 Applications of Mesh Generation to Complex 3-D...the air vehicle configuration. Flow field structures are essentially very complex . Over the last two decades there has been a continuous evolution

  16. Real-Time and High-Fidelity Simulation Environment for Autonomous Ground Vehicle Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    simulation for over 20 years • Many key JPL/NASA missions require high- fidelity simulations – Spacecraft missions (Cassini, MER, MSL) – Planetary ...rovers (Pathfinder, MER, MSL, research rovers) • The DARTS lab team created ROAMS for ground vehicle simulations of planetary rovers (http...EDL & Aero-Flight DSENDS Airships Planetary & Terrain models SimScape Simulation framework Dshell Flex & Multibody dynamics DARTS 3D

  17. Real-Time and High-Fidelity Simulation Environment for Autonomous Ground Vehicle Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    over range of urban and off-road scenarios. Moreover, integrated simulation capabilities that are high-fidelity, fast, and have scalable...the loop for a representative TARDEC autonomous vehicle. Leveraging prior work done at JPL for autonomous planetary rovers, the team adapted the JPL’s...ROAMS planetary rover simulations and are representative of moderately firm sandy soil [3]. Figure 2: HMMWV Simulation Model Closed-Chain

  18. Advanced Non-Linear Control Algorithms Applied to Design Highly Maneuverable Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    Advanced non- linear control algorithms applied to design highly maneuverable Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) Vladimir Djapic, Jay A. Farrell...hierarchical such that an ”inner loop” non- linear controller (outputs the appropriate thrust values) is the same for all mission scenarios while a...library of ”outer-loop” non- linear controllers are available to implement specific maneuvering scenarios. On top of the outer-loop is the mission planner

  19. High Temperature (250 deg C) SiC Power Module for Military Hybrid Electrical Vehicle Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-09

    Schottky diodes, SiC JFETs, SiC MOSFETs, and SiC BJTs are now commercially available from multiple companies such as Cree, SemiSouth, Rohm, and...MINI-SYMPOSIUM AUGUST 9-11 DEARBORN, MICHIGAN HIGH TEMPERATURE (250 °C) SIC POWER MODULE FOR MILITARY HYBRID ELECTRICAL VEHICLE APPLICATIONS...performance SiC power modules, HT-2000, for military systems and applications. The HT-2000 series of modules are rated to 1200V, are operational to

  20. The effect of preferred music on mood and performance in a high-cognitive demand occupation.

    PubMed

    Lesiuk, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Mild positive affect has been shown in the psychological literature to improve cognitive skills of creative problem-solving and systematic thinking. Individual preferred music listening offers opportunity for improved positive affect. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of preferred music listening on state-mood and cognitive performance in a high-cognitive demand occupation. Twenty-four professional computer information systems developers (CISD) from a North American IT company participated in a 3-week study with a music/no music/music weekly design. During the music weeks, participants listened to their preferred music "when they wanted, as they wanted." Self-reports of State Positive Affect, State Negative Affect, and Cognitive Performance were measured throughout the 3 weeks. Results indicate a statistically significant improvement in both state-mood and cognitive performance scores. "High-cognitive demand" is a relative term given that challenges presented to individuals may occur on a cognitive continuum from need for focus and selective attention to systematic analysis and creative problem-solving. The findings and recommendations have important implications for music therapists in their knowledge of the effect of music on emotion and cognition, and, as well, have important implications for music therapy consultation to organizations.

  1. Multi-ion occupancy alters gating in high-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    In this study, single-channel recordings of high-conductance Ca(2+)- activated K+ channels from rat skeletal muscle inserted into planar lipid bilayer were used to analyze the effects of two ionic blockers, Ba2+ and Na+, on the channel's gating reactions. The gating equilibrium of the Ba(2+)-blocked channel was investigated through the kinetics of the discrete blockade induced by Ba2+ ions. Gating properties of Na(+)- blocked channels could be directly characterized due to the very high rates of Na+ blocking/unblocking reactions. While in the presence of K+ (5 mM) in the external solution Ba2+ is known to stabilize the open state of the blocked channel (Miller, C., R. Latorre, and I. Reisin. 1987. J. Gen. Physiol. 90:427-449), we show that the divalent blocker stabilizes the closed-blocked state if permeant ions are removed from the external solution (K+ less than 10 microM). Ionic substitutions in the outer solution induce changes in the gating equilibrium of the Ba(2+)-blocked channel that are tightly correlated to the inhibition of Ba2+ dissociation by external monovalent cations. In permeant ion-free external solutions, blockade of the channel by internal Na+ induces a shift (around 15 mV) in the open probability--voltage curve toward more depolarized potentials, indicating that Na+ induces a stabilization of the closed-blocked state, as does Ba2+ under the same conditions. A kinetic analysis of the Na(+)-blocked channel indicates that the closed- blocked state is favored mainly by a decrease in opening rate. Addition of 1 mM external K+ completely inhibits the shift in the activation curve without affecting the Na(+)-induced reduction in the apparent single-channel amplitude. The results suggest that in the absence of external permeant ions internal blockers regulate the permeant ion occupancy of a site near the outer end of the channel. Occupancy of this site appears to modulate gating primarily by speeding the rate of channel opening. PMID:2056305

  2. Basal cell carcinoma in farmers: an occupation group at high risk.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Mateusz; Pazdrowski, Jakub; Golusiński, Paweł; Dańczak-Pazdrowska, Aleksandra; Łuczewski, Łukasz; Marszałek, Sławomir; Majchrzak, Ewa; Golusiński, Wojciech

    2016-04-01

    Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer type worldwide, and 80 % of skin cancers are basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The main risk factor for developing BCC is exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR), particularly high-dose exposure at a young age. Outdoor workers, particularly farmers, are at high risk of developing BCC. However, studies of BCC in this population are scant. To comprehensively evaluate all cases of BCC of the head and neck region treated during the years 2007-2013 at our hospital in Poland, and to compare the tumour characteristics in farmers to non-farmers. Retrospective analysis of 312 patients treated for head and neck BCC during the study period (2007-2013). Most patients (198 cases; 63 %) were males, with 114 females (37 %). Median age was 73 years (range 32-96 years). The most common tumour location was the nose and cheek (114 pts; 37 %) followed by the auricle (82 pts; 26 %), lips (54 pts; 18 %), scalp (26 pts; 8 %), and eye (36 pts; 12 %). The most common disease stage on presentation was stage T2 (104 pts, 33 %), followed by stage T1 (79 pts; 25 %), stage T3 (89 pts; 28 %), and stage T4 (40 pts; 14 %). By occupation, farmers accounted for 33 % of all patients (102 of 312 pts). The most common tumour localisations in the farmer subgroup were the nose and cheek (50 pts; 49 %; p < 0.001; odds ratio [OR] 2.19; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.35-3.57), followed by the auricle (32 pts; 31 %), scalp (16 pts; 16 %), ocular region (3 pts; 3 %), and lips (1 pt; 1 %). Patients in the farmer group were significantly younger than non-farmers (62 vs. 73 years; p < 0.001; OR 0.90, 95 % CI 0.88-0.93). Farmers were significantly more likely to present disease recurrence (27 vs. 12 % of cases; p < 0.001; OR 5.94; 95 % CI 2.86-12.33). The results highlight the increased incidence and risk of recurrence of BCC in farmers. It is therefore necessary to consider enhancing educational programmes and other preventative measures in this occupational group and

  3. Program Formats, Vehicles, and Characters for Junior High School Audiences. Satellite Technology Demonstration, Technical Report No. 0509.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, A. J.; Lonsdale, Helen C.

    The "Time Out" series designed by the Satellite Technology Demonstration (STD) used a variety of formats, vehicles, and characters to explain career concepts to junior high school students. A science fiction set with a futuristic approach, called the Time Control Center (TCC) used vehicles to move forward and backward in time to access a…

  4. Edge-enriched, porous carbon-based, high energy density supercapacitors for hybrid electric vehicles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Jung; Yang, Cheol-Min; Park, Ki Chul; Kaneko, Katsumi; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Noguchi, Minoru; Fujino, Takeshi; Oyama, Shigeki; Endo, Morinobu

    2012-03-12

    Supercapacitors can store and deliver energy by a simple charge separation, and thus they could be an attractive option to meet transient high energy density in operating fuel cells and in electric and hybrid electric vehicles. To achieve such requirements, intensive studies have been carried out to improve the volumetric capacitance in supercapacitors using various types and forms of carbons including carbon nanotubes and graphenes. However, conventional porous carbons are not suitable for use as electrode material in supercapacitors for such high energy density applications. Here, we show that edge-enriched porous carbons are the best electrode material for high energy density supercapacitors to be used in vehicles as an auxiliary powertrain. Molten potassium hydroxide penetrates well-aligned graphene layers vertically and consequently generates both suitable pores that are easily accessible to the electrolyte and a large fraction of electrochemically active edge sites. We expect that our findings will motivate further research related to energy storage devices and also environmentally friendly electric vehicles. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. High-Glass-Transition-Temperature Polyimides Developed for Reusable Launch Vehicle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy; Ardent, Cory P.

    2002-01-01

    Polyimide composites have been traditionally used for high-temperature applications in aircraft engines at temperatures up to 550 F (288 C) for thousands of hours. However, as NASA shifts its focus toward the development of advanced reusable launch vehicles, there is an urgent need for lightweight polymer composites that can sustain 600 to 800 F (315 to 427 C) for short excursions (hundreds of hours). To meet critical vehicle weight targets, it is essential that one use lightweight, high-temperature polymer matrix composites in propulsion components such as turbopump housings, ducts, engine supports, and struts. Composite materials in reusable launch vehicle components will heat quickly during launch and reentry. Conventional composites, consisting of layers of fabric or fiber-reinforced lamina, would either blister or encounter catastrophic delamination under high heating rates above 300 C. This blistering and delamination are the result of a sudden volume expansion within the composite due to the release of absorbed moisture and gases generated by the degradation of the polymer matrix. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Boeing Company (Long Beach, CA) recently demonstrated a successful approach for preventing this delamination--the use of three-dimensional stitched composites fabricated by resin infusion.

  6. A Soft-Switching Inverter for High-Temperature Advanced Hybrid Electric Vehicle Traction Motor Drives

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Jason; Yu, Wensong; Sun, Pengwei; Leslie, Scott; Prusia, Duane; Arnet, Beat; Smith, Chris; Cogan, Art

    2012-03-31

    The state-of-the-art hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) require the inverter cooling system to have a separate loop to avoid power semiconductor junction over temperatures because the engine coolant temperature of 105°C does not allow for much temperature rise in silicon devices. The proposed work is to develop an advanced soft-switching inverter that will eliminate the device switching loss and cut down the power loss so that the inverter can operate at high-temperature conditions while operating at high switching frequencies with small current ripple in low inductance based permanent magnet motors. The proposed tasks also include high-temperature packaging and thermal modeling and simulation to ensure the packaged module can operate at the desired temperature. The developed module will be integrated with the motor and vehicle controller for dynamometer and in-vehicle testing to prove its superiority. This report will describe the detailed technical design of the soft-switching inverters and their test results. The experiments were conducted both in module level for the module conduction and switching characteristics and in inverter level for its efficiency under inductive and dynamometer load conditions. The performance will be compared with the DOE original specification.

  7. A strategy for achieving high reliability for reusable launch vehicles (RLVs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholtis, Joseph A.

    2002-01-01

    Expendable launch vehicles (ELVs) have been used since the early 1960s to put numerous payloads, including humans, into space. Yet, in spite of their widespread use since that time, ELV reliability has not improved much. Why has this been the case? And, more importantly, what might be done to substantially improve the reliability of future reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) to levels needed for commercial viability, i.e., approaching that of the U.S. commercial airline industry? This paper attempts to answer these questions-by reviewing the history of launch vehicles, identifying factors important to their reliability and safety, and in doing so, offering a potential strategy for achieving high RLV reliability. The conclusion reached is that there is every reason to believe that high reliability (~0.99999 per mission) is achievable for future RLVs, if key features to enhance their inherent robustness, forgiveness, and recoverability are considered and integrated into RLV design and operation at the outset. It is hoped that this paper will serve as a catalyst for further discussions intended to ensure that high reliability is realized for RLVs. .

  8. Assessing Training Requirements for High Demand Occupations Suitable for Job Corps. Job Corps Vocational Education Offerings Review. Documentation Report No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Job Corps.

    As part of a multiphase study of Job Corps vocational education offerings and outcomes during fiscal year 1982, a study examined Job Corps efforts and procedures for identifying high growth occupations. Using input from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, researchers identified high growth occupations for which the Job Corps is either currently…

  9. Research flight-control system development for the F-18 high alpha research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahle, Joseph W.; Powers, Bruce; Regenie, Victoria; Chacon, Vince; Degroote, Steve; Murnyak, Steven

    1991-01-01

    The F-18 high alpha research vehicle was recently modified by adding a thrust vectoring control system. A key element in the modification was the development of a research flight control system integrated with the basic F-18 flight control system. Discussed here are design requirements, system development, and research utility of the resulting configuration as an embedded system for flight research in the high angle of attack regime. Particular emphasis is given to control system modifications and control law features required for high angle of attack flight. Simulation results are used to illustrate some of the thrust vectoring control system capabilities and predicted maneuvering improvements.

  10. Motor vehicle driver death and high state maximum speed limits: 1991-1993.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Grover K; Bradshaw, Benjamin S

    2008-09-01

    To measure the association between motor vehicle crash (MVC) driver death and high state maximum speed limits. This study used a case-control design and assessed driver deaths from three major types of MVCs: non-collision; collision with motor vehicles in transit; and collision with stationary objects. The study period was 1991-1993. For each type of crash, case subject populations of fatally injured drivers were obtained from the U.S. Department of Transportation Fatality Analysis Reporting System. Four control subject populations, each associated with a different cause of death, were obtained from a U.S. national death certificate database (the causes of death were unintentional poisoning, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, drowning, and diabetes mellitus). Subjects were considered exposed if the state in which they crashed (for cases) or died (for controls) had a maximum speed limit greater than 55 mph. Each of the three case subject populations was compared against each of the four control subject populations. Odds ratios (ORs) were adjusted for age and gender. For non-collision driver death, ORs ranged from 3.06 to 6.56, depending on the year and control group; all the ORs were significant. For collision with motor vehicles in transit driver death, ORs ranged from 1.12 to 2.22; all the ORs were significant. For collision with stationary objects driver death, ORs ranged from 0.87 to 1.83. There was a moderately strong and significant association between non-collision driver death and high state maximum speed limits. For collision with motor vehicles in transit driver death, the association was somewhat milder but still consistent. For collision with stationary objects driver death, the presence of an association was unclear. During 1991-1993, the effects of high state maximum speed limits may have been different for different types of MVCs.

  11. Investigations of Crashes Involving Pregnant Occupants

    PubMed Central

    Klinich, Kathleen DeSantis; Schneider, Lawrence W.; Moore, Jamie L.; Pearlman, Mark D.

    2000-01-01

    Case reports of 16 crashes involving pregnant occupants are presented that illustrate the main conclusions of a crash-investigation program that includes 42 crashes investigated to date. Some unusual cases that are exceptions to the overall trends are also described. The study indicates a strong association between adverse fetal outcome and both crash severity and maternal injury. Proper restraint use, with and without airbag deployment, generally leads to acceptable fetal outcomes in lower severity crashes, while it does not affect fetal outcome in high-severity crashes. Compared to properly restrained pregnant occupants, improperly restrained occupants have a higher risk of adverse fetal outcome in lower severity crashes, which comprise the majority of all motor-vehicle collisions. PMID:11558095

  12. Emission Factors for High-Emitting Vehicles Based on On-Road Measurements of Individual Vehicle Exhaust with a Mobile Measurement Platform.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Suk; Kozawa, Kathleen; Fruin, Scott; Mara, Steve; Hsu, Ying-Kuang; Jakober, Chris; Winer, Arthur; Herner, Jorn

    2011-10-01

    Fuel-based emission factors for 143 light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) and 93 heavy-duty diesel trucks (HDDTs) were measured in Wilmington, CA using a zero-emission mobile measurement platform (MMP). The frequency distributions of emission factors of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and particle mass with aerodynamic diameter below 2.5 μm (PM2.5) varied widely, whereas the average of the individual vehicle emission factors were comparable to those reported in previous tunnel and remote sensing studies as well as the predictions by Emission Factors (EMFAC) 2007 mobile source emission model for Los Angeles County. Variation in emissions due to different driving modes (idle, low- and high-speed acceleration, low- and high-speed cruise) was found to be relatively small in comparison to intervehicle variability and did not appear to interfere with the identification of high emitters, defined as the vehicles whose emissions were more than 5 times the fleet-average values. Using this definition, approximately 5% of the LDGVs and HDDTs measured were high emitters. Among the 143 LDGVs, the average emission factors of NOx, black carbon (BC), PM2.5, and ultrafine particle (UFP) would be reduced by 34%, 39%, 44%, and 31%, respectively, by removing the highest 5% of emitting vehicles, whereas CO emission factor would be reduced by 50%. The emission distributions of the 93 HDDTs measured were even more skewed: approximately half of the NOx and CO fleet-average emission factors and more than 60% of PM2.5, UFP, and BC fleet-average emission factors would be reduced by eliminating the highest-emitting 5% HDDTs. Furthermore, high emissions of BC, PM2.5, and NOx tended to cluster among the same vehicles. [Box: see text].

  13. Emission factors for high-emitting vehicles based on on-road measurements of individual vehicle exhaust with a mobile measurement platform.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Suk; Kozawa, Kathleen; Fruin, Scott; Mara, Steve; Hsu, Ying-Kuang; Jakober, Chris; Winer, Arthur; Herner, Jorn

    2011-10-01

    Fuel-based emission factors for 143 light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) and 93 heavy-duty diesel trucks (HDDTs) were measured in Wilmington, CA using a zero-emission mobile measurement platform (MMP). The frequency distributions of emission factors of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), and particle mass with aerodynamic diameter below 2.5 microm (PM2.5) varied widely, whereas the average of the individual vehicle emission factors were comparable to those reported in previous tunnel and remote sensing studies as well as the predictions by Emission Factors (EMFAC) 2007 mobile source emission model for Los Angeles County. Variation in emissions due to different driving modes (idle, low- and high-speed acceleration, low- and high-speed cruise) was found to be relatively small in comparison to intervehicle variability and did not appear to interfere with the identification of high emitters, defined as the vehicles whose emissions were more than 5 times the fleet-average values. Using this definition, approximately 5% of the LDGVs and HDDTs measured were high emitters. Among the 143 LDGVs, the average emission factors of NO(x), black carbon (BC), PM2.5, and ultrafine particle (UFP) would be reduced by 34%, 39%, 44%, and 31%, respectively, by removing the highest 5% of emitting vehicles, whereas CO emission factor would be reduced by 50%. The emission distributions of the 93 HDDTs measured were even more skewed: approximately half of the NO(x) and CO fleet-average emission factors and more than 60% of PM2.5, UFP, and BC fleet-average emission factors would be reduced by eliminating the highest-emitting 5% HDDTs. Furthermore, high emissions of BC, PM2.5, and NO(x) tended to cluster among the same vehicles.

  14. Aero-thermo-dynamic analysis of the Spaceliner-7.1 vehicle in high altitude flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuppardi, Gennaro; Morsa, Luigi; Sippel, Martin; Schwanekamp, Tobias

    2014-12-01

    SpaceLiner, designed by DLR, is a visionary, extremely fast passenger transportation concept. It consists of two stages: a winged booster, a vehicle. After separation of the two stages, the booster makes a controlled re-entry and returns to the launch site. According to the current project, version 7-1 of SpaceLiner (SpaceLiner-7.1), the vehicle should be brought at an altitude of 75 km and then released, undertaking the descent path. In the perspective that the vehicle of SpaceLiner-7.1 could be brought to altitudes higher than 75 km, e.g. 100 km or above and also for a speculative purpose, in this paper the aerodynamic parameters of the SpaceLiner-7.1 vehicle are calculated in the whole transition regime, from continuum low density to free molecular flows. Computer simulations have been carried out by three codes: two DSMC codes, DS3V in the altitude interval 100-250 km for the evaluation of the global aerodynamic coefficients and DS2V at the altitude of 60 km for the evaluation of the heat flux and pressure distributions along the vehicle nose, and the DLR HOTSOSE code for the evaluation of the global aerodynamic coefficients in continuum, hypersonic flow at the altitude of 44.6 km. The effectiveness of the flaps with deflection angle of -35 deg. was evaluated in the above mentioned altitude interval. The vehicle showed longitudinal stability in the whole altitude interval even with no flap. The global bridging formulae verified to be proper for the evaluation of the aerodynamic coefficients in the altitude interval 80-100 km where the computations cannot be fulfilled either by CFD, because of the failure of the classical equations computing the transport coefficients, or by DSMC because of the requirement of very high computer resources both in terms of the core storage (a high number of simulated molecules is needed) and to the very long processing time.

  15. Dynamic and Static High Temperature Resistant Ceramic Seals for X- 38 re-Entry Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handrick, Karin E.; Curry, Donald M.

    2002-01-01

    In a highly successful partnership, NAS A, ESA, DLR (German Space Agency) and European industry are building the X-38, V201 re-entry spacecraft, the prototype of the International Space Station's Crew Return Vehicle (CRV). This vehicle would serve both as an ambulance for medical emergencies and as an evacuation vehicle for the Space Station. The development of essential systems and technologies for a reusable re-entry vehicle is a first for Europe, and sharing the development of an advanced re-entry spacecraft with foreign partners is a first for NASA. NASA, in addition to its subsystem responsibilities, is performing overall X-38 vehicle system engineering and integration, will launch V201 on the Space Shuttle, deliver flight data for post-flight analysis and assessment and is responsible for development and manufacture of structural vehicle components and thermal protection (TPS) tiles. The major European objective for cooperation with NASA on X-38 was to establish a clear path through which key technologies needed for future space transportation systems could be developed and validated at affordable cost and with controlled risk. Europe has taken the responsibility to design and manufacture hot control surfaces like metallic rudders and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) body flaps, thermal protection systems such as CMC leading edges, the CMC nose cap and -skirt, insulation, landing gears and elements of the V201 primary structure. Especially hot control surfaces require extremely high temperature resistant seals to limit hot gas ingestion and transfer of heat to underlying low-temperature structures to prevent overheating of these structures and possible loss of the vehicle. Complex seal interfaces, which have to fulfill various, tight mission- and vehicle-related requirements exist between the moveable ceramic body flaps and the bottom surface of the vehicle, between the rudder and fin structure and the ceramic leading edge panel and TPS tiles. While NASA

  16. Occupational Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Library ▸ Asthma Library ▸ Occupational asthma TTR Share | Occupational Asthma This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, MD, FAAAAI Occupational asthma has become the most common work-related lung ...

  17. A High-Power Wireless Charging System Development and Integration for a Toyota RAV4 Electric Vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Onar, Omer C; Seiber, Larry Eugene; White, Cliff P; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan; Campbell, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Several wireless charging methods are underdevelopment or available as an aftermarket option in the light-duty automotive market. However, there are not many studies detailing the vehicle integrations, particularly a complete vehicle integration with higher power levels. This paper presents the development, implementation, and vehicle integration of a high-power (>10 kW) wireless power transfer (WPT)-based electric vehicle (EV) charging system for a Toyota RAV4 vehicle. The power stages of the system are introduced with the design specifications and control systems including the active front-end rectifier with power factor correction (PFC), high frequency power inverter, high frequency isolation transformer, coupling coils, vehicle side full-bridge rectifier and filter, and the vehicle battery. The operating principles of the control, communications, and protection systems are also presented in addition to the alignment and the driver interface system. The physical limitations of the system are also defined that would prevent the system operating at higher levels. The experiments are carried out using the integrated vehicle and the results obtained to demonstrate the system performance including the stage-by-stage efficiencies with matched and interoperable primary and secondary coils.

  18. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of a Full Vehicle with High Performance Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, R. J.; Gu, L.; Tho, C. H.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    2001-01-01

    Multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) of a full vehicle under the constraints of crashworthiness, NVH (Noise, Vibration and Harshness), durability, and other performance attributes is one of the imperative goals for automotive industry. However, it is often infeasible due to the lack of computational resources, robust simulation capabilities, and efficient optimization methodologies. This paper intends to move closer towards that goal by using parallel computers for the intensive computation and combining different approximations for dissimilar analyses in the MDO process. The MDO process presented in this paper is an extension of the previous work reported by Sobieski et al. In addition to the roof crush, two full vehicle crash modes are added: full frontal impact and 50% frontal offset crash. Instead of using an adaptive polynomial response surface method, this paper employs a DOE/RSM method for exploring the design space and constructing highly nonlinear crash functions. Two NMO strategies are used and results are compared. This paper demonstrates that with high performance computing, a conventionally intractable real world full vehicle multidisciplinary optimization problem considering all performance attributes with large number of design variables become feasible.

  19. Vehicle extraction from high-resolution satellite image using template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natt, Dehchaiwong; Cao, Xiaoguang

    2015-12-01

    The process of vehicle examination by using satellite images is complicated and cumbersome process. At the present, the high definition satellite images are being used, however, the images of the vehicles can be seen as just a small point which is difficult to separate it out from the background that the image details are not sufficient to identify small objects. In this research, the techniques for the process of vehicle examination by using satellite images were applied by using image data from Pléiades which is the satellite image with high resolution of 0.40 m. The objective of this research is to study and develop the device for data extracting from satellite images, and the received data would be organized and created as Geospatial information by the concept of the picture matching with a pattern matching or Template Matching developed with Matlab program and Sum of Absolute Difference method collaborated with Neural Network technique in order to help evaluating pattern matching between template images of cars and cars' images which were used to examine from satellite images. The result obtained from the comparison with template data shows that data extraction accuracy is greater than 90%, and the extracted data can be imported into Geospatial information database. Moreover, the data can be displayed in Geospatial information Software, and it also can be searched by quantity condition and satellite image position.

  20. Concept Design of High Power Solar Electric Propulsion Vehicles for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David J.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Hojnicki, Jeffrey S.; Manzella, David H.; Falck, Robert D.; Cikanek, Harry A., III; Klem, Mark D.; Free, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Human exploration beyond low Earth orbit will require enabling capabilities that are efficient, affordable and reliable. Solar electric propulsion (SEP) has been proposed by NASA s Human Exploration Framework Team as one option to achieve human exploration missions beyond Earth orbit because of its favorable mass efficiency compared to traditional chemical propulsion systems. This paper describes the unique challenges associated with developing a large-scale high-power (300-kWe class) SEP vehicle and design concepts that have potential to meet those challenges. An assessment of factors at the subsystem level that must be considered in developing an SEP vehicle for future exploration missions is presented. Overall concepts, design tradeoffs and pathways to achieve development readiness are discussed.

  1. High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle/High-Mobility Trailer (HMMWV/ HMT) Brake Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    motor vehicle shall be (c) Trucks and truck tractors having equipped with brakes acting on all three or more axles need not have wheels, except: brakes...the case of a three - system when movement in the line is axle truck or truck tractor manufac- anticipated. Brake tubing is intended tured before March...this section, a full service brake appli- hi aing orore axles cation is considered to be made when hicles having three or more axles . the service brake

  2. Cardiovascular training effects in fighter pilots induced by occupational high G exposure.

    PubMed

    Newman, David G; Callister, Robin

    2008-08-01

    A fundamental difference in the cardiovascular response to acceleration between a group of fighter pilots (FP) and a group of non-pilots (NP) has been demonstrated previously. This study investigated the longitudinal effects of repetitive occupational +Gz exposure on the cardiovascular response to acceleration. There were 6 FP and 6 NP subjects who underwent rapid +75 degrees head-up tilt (HUT) on two separate occasions. The FP group were tested after a non-flying period of 5 wk (Test 1), and tested again after a period of repetitive exposure to high +Gz missions (Test 2). The NP group did not fly at all between Test 1 and Test 2. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), and total peripheral resistance (TPR) were all determined non-invasively. SV was determined using impedance cardiography and calculated via the Kubicek equation. For each variable, resting values and the response to tilt for both HUT tests within and between each group were compared. In the FP group, resting MAP was higher (86 mmHg) in Test 2 compared with Test 1 (78 mmHg). Between groups, FP resting MAP was only different from the NP resting MAP in Test 2. The FP HR response to HUT increased significantly between the two tests. These findings suggest a +Gz-induced cardiovascular training effect in the FP group. Repetitive exposure to +Gz results in an increased resting MAP and an elevated HR response to tilt, which may provide benefits to operational fighter pilots.

  3. NASA Occupant Protection Standards Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Jeffrey T.; Gernhardt, Michael A.; Lawrence, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Current National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) occupant protection standards and requirements are based on extrapolations of biodynamic models, which were based on human tests performed under pre-Space Shuttle human flight programs where the occupants were in different suit and seat configurations than is expected for the Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) and Commercial Crew programs. As a result, there is limited statistical validity to the occupant protection standards. Furthermore, the current standards and requirements have not been validated in relevant spaceflight suit, seat configurations or loading conditions. The objectives of this study were to develop new standards and requirements for occupant protection and rigorously validate these new standards with sub-injurious human testing. To accomplish these objectives we began by determining which critical injuries NASA would like to protect for. We then defined the anthropomorphic test device (ATD) and the associated injury metrics of interest. Finally, we conducted a literature review of available data for the Test Device for Human Occupant Restraint New Technology (THOR-NT) ATD to determine injury assessment reference values (IARV) to serve as a baseline for further development. To better understand NASA s environment, we propose conducting sub-injurious human testing in spaceflight seat and suit configurations with spaceflight dynamic loads, with a sufficiently high number of subjects to validate no injury during nominal landing loads. In addition to validate nominal loads, the THOR-NT ATD will be tested in the same conditions as the human volunteers, allowing correlation between human and ATD responses covering the Orion nominal landing environment and commercial vehicle expected nominal environments. All testing will be conducted without the suit and with the suit to ascertain the contribution of the suit to human and ATD responses. In addition to the testing campaign proposed, additional

  4. Analysis of D2 dopamine receptor occupancy with quantitative SPET using the high-affinity ligand [123I]epidepride: resolving conflicting findings.

    PubMed

    Erlandsson, Kjell; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Mulligan, Rachel S; Ell, Peter J; Cunningham, Vincent J; Pilowsky, Lyn S

    2003-07-01

    Recent studies of limbic cortical dopamine D(2) receptor occupancy by clozapine using high-affinity PET and SPET radioligands have produced conflicting findings. It has been suggested that these divergent findings are due to between-study differences in the method used to estimate D(2) receptor-binding potential. We compared different methods for estimating striatal and temporal cortical D(2) receptor occupancy with high-affinity tracers. In vivo experimental SPET data, obtained with [(123)I]epidepride were analysed with reference tissue kinetic modeling and with the ratio method, applied to data corresponding to short (60 min) and long (240 min) acquisition times. Dopamine D(2) receptor occupancy by the atypical antipsychotic drug risperidone was evaluated. Simulation experiments were also performed, comparing occupancy values obtained for different receptor densities in relation to different data acquisition times. The simulation results revealed that previously published data regarding errors in occupancy estimation by analysis of time activity data acquired for 60 min cannot be extrapolated to studies performed over 240 min. The ratio method provided accurate temporal cortical D(2) receptor occupancy values when applied to data from a late time period, but underestimated the occupancy with earlier data. In striatum, both the late data ratio method and reference tissue kinetic modeling using all data underestimated D(2) receptor occupancy. However, more accurate analyses of striatal D(2) occupancy still showed selective limbic/cortical occupancy by risperidone. Our results substantiate the previous [(123)I]epidepride findings of high temporal cortical occupancy by other atypical antipsychotic drugs and suggest that a potential source of conflicting findings might be short scanning times imposed by [(11)C]FLB 457, leading to underestimation of temporal cortical D(2) receptor occupancy by this method.

  5. Occupational asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Asthma - occupational exposure; Irritant-induced reactive airways disease Images Spirometry Respiratory system References Lemiere C, Vandenplas O. Occupational allergy and asthma. In: Adkinson NF Jr., Bochner ...

  6. PLUG-IN HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE AND HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE EMISSIONS UNDER FTP AND US06 CYCLES AT HIGH, AMBIENT, AND LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Seidman, M.R.; Markel, T.

    2008-01-01

    The concept of a Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) is to displace consumption of gasoline by using electricity from the vehicle’s large battery pack to power the vehicle as much as possible with minimal engine operation. This paper assesses the PHEV emissions and operation. Currently, testing of vehicle emissions is done using the federal standard FTP4 cycle on a dynamometer at ambient (75°F) temperatures. Research was also completed using the US06 cycle. Furthermore, research was completed at high (95°F) and low (20°F) temperatures. Initial dynamometer testing was performed on a stock Toyota Prius under the standard FTP4 cycle, and the more demanding US06 cycle. Each cycle was run at 95°F, 75°F, and 20°F. The testing was repeated with the same Prius retrofi tted with an EnergyCS Plug-in Hybrid Electric system. The results of the testing confi rm that the stock Prius meets Super-Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements under current testing procedures, while the PHEV Prius under current testing procedures were greater than Super-Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements, but still met Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements. Research points to the catalyst temperature being a critical factor in meeting emission requirements. Initial engine emissions pass through with minimal conversion until the catalyst is heated to typical operating temperatures of 300–400°C. PHEVs also have trouble maintaining the minimum catalyst temperature throughout the entire test because the engine is turned off when the battery can support the load. It has been observed in both HEVs and PHEVs that the catalyst is intermittently unable to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, which causes further emission releases. Research needs to be done to combat the initial emission spikes caused by a cold catalyst. Research also needs to be done to improve the reduction of nitrogen oxides by the catalyst system.

  7. The Design and Construction of a Battery Electric Vehicle Propulsion System - High Performance Electric Kart Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burridge, Mark; Alahakoon, Sanath

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents an electric propulsion system designed specifically to meet the performance specification for a competition racing kart application. The paper presents the procedure for the engineering design, construction and testing of the electric powertrain of the vehicle. High performance electric Go-Kart is not an established technology within Australia. It is expected that this work will provide design guidelines for a high performance electric propulsion system with the capability of forming the basis of a competitive electric kart racing formula for Australian conditions.

  8. Effect of surface catalycity on high-altitude aerothermodynamics of reentry vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanova, A. N.; Kashkovsky, A. V.; Bondar, Ye. A.

    2016-10-01

    This work is aimed at the development of surface chemistry models for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method applicable to non-equilibrium high-temperature flows about reentry vehicles. Probabilities of the surface processes dependent on individual properties of each particular molecule are determined from the macroscopic reaction rate data. Two different macroscopic finite rate sets are used for construction of DSMC surface recombination models. The models are implemented in the SMILE++ software system for DSMC computations. A comparison with available experimental data is performed. Effects of surface recombination on the aerothermodynamics of a blunt body at high-altitude reentry conditions are numerically studied with the DSMC method.

  9. Effective Thermal Conductivity of High Temperature Insulations for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran

    1999-01-01

    An experimental apparatus was designed to measure the effective thermal conductivity of various high temperature insulations subject to large temperature gradients representative of typical launch vehicle re-entry aerodynamic heating conditions. The insulation sample cold side was maintained around room temperature, while the hot side was heated to temperatures as high as 1800 degrees Fahrenheit. The environmental pressure was varied from 0.0001 to 760 torr. All the measurements were performed in a dry gaseous nitrogen environment. The effective thermal conductivity of Saffil, Q-Fiber felt, Cerachrome, and three multi-layer insulation configurations were measured.

  10. Exploring consumer functioning in High Dependency Units and Psychiatric Intensive Care Units: Implications for mental health occupational therapy.

    PubMed

    Evatt, Mary; Scanlan, Justin Newton; Benson, Hannah; Pace, Catherine; Mouawad, Arianne

    2016-10-01

    Consumers admitted to High Dependency Units (HDUs) or Psychiatric Intensive Care Units (PICUs) experience very significant functional difficulties. These can make it challenging to deliver targeted occupational therapy interventions. This study was established to analyse previously collected data to better understand consumer functioning in HDUs and PICUs. The Hyperacute Screening Tool (HST) includes descriptors of increasing functional skills in three domains of functioning (task performance, social performance and task initiation). Data were extracted from 360 HSTs from 70 individuals admitted to a male HDU and a PICU in a mental health facility in metropolitan Sydney and analysed using the Rasch analysis program Facets. The hierarchy of category descriptors in each domain of the HST was correctly ordered, suggesting that the pattern of regaining functional abilities in the HST is accurate. Results suggested that there may be some conceptual overlap between adjacent categories and that the pattern of regaining functional abilities as described in the HST may not be applicable to a minority of individuals. This study provides the first description of functional abilities of consumers admitted to an HDU and PICU. Results were used to develop an initial conceptualisation of 'stages' of regaining functional abilities and a set of initial guidelines to support targeted occupational therapy interventions. This study will contribute to a better understanding of the functional abilities of individuals admitted to HDUs and PICUs and will support the development of optimal occupational therapy interventions in these settings. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  11. A Near-Term, High-Confidence Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, William J.; Talay, Theodore A.

    2009-01-01

    The use of well understood, legacy elements of the Space Shuttle system could yield a near-term, high-confidence Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle that offers significant performance, reliability, schedule, risk, cost, and work force transition benefits. A side-mount Shuttle-Derived Vehicle (SDV) concept has been defined that has major improvements over previous Shuttle-C concepts. This SDV is shown to carry crew plus large logistics payloads to the ISS, support an operationally efficient and cost effective program of lunar exploration, and offer the potential to support commercial launch operations. This paper provides the latest data and estimates on the configurations, performance, concept of operations, reliability and safety, development schedule, risks, costs, and work force transition opportunities for this optimized side-mount SDV concept. The results presented in this paper have been based on established models and fully validated analysis tools used by the Space Shuttle Program, and are consistent with similar analysis tools commonly used throughout the aerospace industry. While these results serve as a factual basis for comparisons with other launch system architectures, no such comparisons are presented in this paper. The authors welcome comparisons between this optimized SDV and other Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle concepts.

  12. High-Mileage Light-Duty Fleet Vehicle Emissions: Their Potentially Overlooked Importance.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Gary A; Stedman, Donald H; Burgard, Daniel A; Atkinson, Oscar

    2016-05-17

    State and local agencies in the United States use activity-based computer models to estimate mobile source emissions for inventories. These models generally assume that vehicle activity levels are uniform across all of the vehicle emission level classifications using the same age-adjusted travel fractions. Recent fuel-specific emission measurements from the SeaTac Airport, Los Angeles, and multi-year measurements in the Chicago area suggest that some high-mileage fleets are responsible for a disproportionate share of the fleet's emissions. Hybrid taxis at the airport show large increases in carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and oxide of nitrogen emissions in their fourth year when compared to similar vehicles from the general population. Ammonia emissions from the airport shuttle vans indicate that catalyst reduction capability begins to wane after 5-6 years, 3 times faster than is observed in the general population, indicating accelerated aging. In Chicago, the observed, on-road taxi fleet also had significantly higher emissions and an emissions share that was more than double their fleet representation. When compounded by their expected higher than average mileage accumulation, we estimate that these small fleets (<1% of total) may be overlooked as a significant emission source (>2-5% of fleet emissions).

  13. A Highly Reliable and Cost-Efficient Multi-Sensor System for Land Vehicle Positioning.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Xu, Qimin; Li, Bin; Song, Xianghui

    2016-05-25

    In this paper, we propose a novel positioning solution for land vehicles which is highly reliable and cost-efficient. The proposed positioning system fuses information from the MEMS-based reduced inertial sensor system (RISS) which consists of one vertical gyroscope and two horizontal accelerometers, low-cost GPS, and supplementary sensors and sources. First, pitch and roll angle are accurately estimated based on a vehicle kinematic model. Meanwhile, the negative effect of the uncertain nonlinear drift of MEMS inertial sensors is eliminated by an H∞ filter. Further, a distributed-dual-H∞ filtering (DDHF) mechanism is adopted to address the uncertain nonlinear drift of the MEMS-RISS and make full use of the supplementary sensors and sources. The DDHF is composed of a main H∞ filter (MHF) and an auxiliary H∞ filter (AHF). Finally, a generalized regression neural network (GRNN) module with good approximation capability is specially designed for the MEMS-RISS. A hybrid methodology which combines the GRNN module and the AHF is utilized to compensate for RISS position errors during GPS outages. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed solution, road-test experiments with various scenarios were performed. The experimental results illustrate that the proposed system can achieve accurate and reliable positioning for land vehicles.

  14. A high-resolution NO x emission factor model for North American motor vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rakesh B.; Sloan, James J.

    Criteria air contaminant inventories in Canada show that approximately 60% of NO x is produced from the transportation sector alone. NO 2, which is present at higher levels in the winter than in the summer, has been identified as the main pollutant responsible for non-traumatic deaths and hospitalization in Canadian cities. Therefore, accurate emission estimates of vehicle-generated NO x are needed, especially at the micro-scale level. The MOBILE emission model, which is widely used in Canada, provides only aggregated emission factors at very low resolution. Many studies have shown that MOBILE emission data are unreliable for many applications—particularly for air-quality modelling. In contrast to the aggregated nature of the MOBILE data, the new disaggregated model, MicroFacNO x, uses time-dependent site-specific vehicle fleet information to calculate emission factors at high spatial and temporal resolution. MicroFacNO x evaluation in a range of traffic fleet and meteorological conditions shows very encouraging results. Sensitivity analyses of the model reveal that its results depend on traffic fleet composition, speed and ambient temperature. MicroFacNO x results are suitable for use in human exposure assessment and by city planners in decision making for growth management. The effect of vehicle-related NO x on ozone in the vicinity of a large urban area is a good example of an unsolved problem that would benefit from the MicroFacNO x modelling approach.

  15. Ride performance of a high speed rail vehicle using controlled semi active suspension system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Anil

    2017-05-01

    The rail-wheel interaction in a rail vehicle running at high speed results in large amplitude vibration of carbody that deteriorates the ride comfort of travellers. The role of suspension system is crucial to provide an acceptable level of ride performance. In this context, an existing rail vehicle is modelled in vertical, pitch and roll motions of carbody and bogies. Additionally, nonlinear stiffness and damping parameters of passive suspension system are defined based on experimental data. In the secondary vertical suspension system, a magneto-rheological (MR) damper is included to improve the ride quality and comfort. The parameters of MR damper depend on the current, amplitude and frequency of excitations. At different running speeds, three semi-active suspension strategies with MR damper are analysed for periodic track irregularity and the resulting performance indices are juxtaposed with the nonlinear passive suspension system. The disturbance rejection and force tracking damper controller algorithms are applied to control the desired force of MR damper. This study reveals that the vertical vibrations of a vehicle can be reduced significantly by using the proposed semi-active suspension strategies. Moreover, it naturally results in improved ride quality and passenger’s comfort in comparison to the existing passive system.

  16. Driving Performance After Self-Regulated Control Transitions in Highly Automated Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Alexander; Stanton, Neville A

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to explore whether driver-paced, noncritical transitions of control may counteract some of the aftereffects observed in the contemporary literature, resulting in higher levels of vehicle control. Research into control transitions in highly automated driving has focused on urgent scenarios where drivers are given a relatively short time span to respond to a request to resume manual control, resulting in seemingly scrambled control when manual control is resumed. Twenty-six drivers drove two scenarios with an automated driving feature activated. Drivers were asked to read a newspaper or monitor the system and relinquish or resume control from the automation when prompted by vehicle systems. Driving performance in terms of lane positioning and steering behavior was assessed for 20 seconds post resuming control to capture the resulting level of control. It was found that lane positioning was virtually unaffected for the duration of the 20-second time span in both automated conditions compared to the manual baseline when drivers resumed manual control; however, significant increases in the standard deviation of steering input were found for both automated conditions compared to baseline. No significant differences were found between the two automated conditions. The results indicate that when drivers self-paced the transfer back to manual control they exhibit less of the detrimental effects observed in system-paced conditions. It was shown that self-paced transitions could reduce the risk of accidents near the edge of the operational design domain. Vehicle manufacturers must consider these benefits when designing contemporary systems.

  17. A Highly Reliable and Cost-Efficient Multi-Sensor System for Land Vehicle Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu; Xu, Qimin; Li, Bin; Song, Xianghui

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel positioning solution for land vehicles which is highly reliable and cost-efficient. The proposed positioning system fuses information from the MEMS-based reduced inertial sensor system (RISS) which consists of one vertical gyroscope and two horizontal accelerometers, low-cost GPS, and supplementary sensors and sources. First, pitch and roll angle are accurately estimated based on a vehicle kinematic model. Meanwhile, the negative effect of the uncertain nonlinear drift of MEMS inertial sensors is eliminated by an H∞ filter. Further, a distributed-dual-H∞ filtering (DDHF) mechanism is adopted to address the uncertain nonlinear drift of the MEMS-RISS and make full use of the supplementary sensors and sources. The DDHF is composed of a main H∞ filter (MHF) and an auxiliary H∞ filter (AHF). Finally, a generalized regression neural network (GRNN) module with good approximation capability is specially designed for the MEMS-RISS. A hybrid methodology which combines the GRNN module and the AHF is utilized to compensate for RISS position errors during GPS outages. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed solution, road-test experiments with various scenarios were performed. The experimental results illustrate that the proposed system can achieve accurate and reliable positioning for land vehicles. PMID:27231917

  18. Highly Reusable Space Transportation System Concept Evaluation (The Argus Launch Vehicle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olds, John R.; Bellini, Peter X.

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a conceptual design study that was performed in support of NASA's recent Highly Reusable Space Transportation study. The Argus concept uses a Maglifter magnetic-levitation sled launch assist system to accelerate it to a takeoff ground speed of 800 fps on its way to delivering a payload of 20,000 lb. to low earth orbit. Main propulsion is provided by two supercharged ejector rocket engines. The vehicle is autonomous and is fully reusable. A conceptual design exercise determined the vehicle gross weight to be approximately 597,250 lb. and the dry weight to be 75,500 lb. Aggressive weight and operations cost assumptions were used throughout the design process consistent with a second-generation reusable system that might be deployed in 10-15 years. Drawings, geometry, and weight of the concept are included. Preliminary development, production, and operations costs along with a business scenario assuming a price-elastic payload market are also included. A fleet of three Argus launch vehicles flying a total of 149 flights per year is shown to have a financial internal rate of return of 28%. At $169/lb., the recurring cost of Argus is shown to meet the study goal of $100/lb.-$200/lb., but optimum market price results in only a factor of two to five reduction compared to today's launch systems.

  19. High nucleosome occupancy is encoded at X-linked gene promoters in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, Sevinç; Lubling, Yaniv; Segal, Eran; Lieb, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    We mapped nucleosome occupancy by paired-end Illumina sequencing in C. elegans embryonic cells, adult somatic cells, and a mix of adult somatic and germ cells. In all three samples, the nucleosome occupancy of gene promoters on the X chromosome differed from autosomal promoters. While both X and autosomal promoters exhibit a typical nucleosome-depleted region upstream of transcript start sites and a well-positioned +1 nucleosome, X-linked gene promoters on average exhibit higher nucleosome occupancy relative to autosomal promoters. We show that the difference between X and autosomes does not depend on the somatic dosage compensation machinery. Instead, the chromatin difference at promoters is partly encoded by DNA sequence, because a model trained on nucleosome sequence preferences from S. cerevisiae in vitro data recapitulate nearly completely the experimentally observed difference between X and autosomal promoters. The model predictions also correlate very well with experimentally determined occupancy values genome-wide. The nucleosome occupancy differences observed on X promoters may bear on mechanisms of X chromosome dosage compensation in the soma, and chromosome-wide repression of X in the germline. PMID:21177966

  20. High Altitude Long Endurance Air Vehicle Analysis of Alternatives and Technology Requirements Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickol, Craig L.; Guynn, Mark D.; Kohout, Lisa L.; Ozoroski, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a variety of High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) conceptual designs for two operationally useful missions (hurricane science and communications relay) and compare their performance and cost characteristics. Sixteen potential HALE UAV configurations were initially developed, including heavier-than-air (HTA) and lighter-than-air (LTA) concepts with both consumable fuel and solar regenerative (SR) propulsion systems. Through an Analysis of Alternatives (AoA) down select process, the two leading consumable fuel configurations (one each from the HTA and LTA alternatives) and an HTA SR configuration were selected for further analysis. Cost effectiveness analysis of the consumable fuel configurations revealed that simply maximizing vehicle endurance can lead to a sub-optimum system solution. An LTA concept with a hybrid propulsion system (solar arrays and a hydrogen-air proton exchange membrane fuel cell) was found to have the best mission performance; however, an HTA diesel-fueled wing-body-tail configuration emerged as the preferred consumable fuel concept because of the large size and technical risk of the LTA concept. The baseline missions could not be performed by even the best HTA SR concept. Mission and SR technology trade studies were conducted to enhance understanding of the potential capabilities of such a vehicle. With near-term technology SR-powered HTA vehicles are limited to operation in favorable solar conditions, such as the long days and short nights of summer at higher latitudes. Energy storage system specific energy and solar cell efficiency were found to be the key technology areas for enhancing HTA SR performance.

  1. LNG Vehicle High-Pressure Fuel System and ''Cold Energy'' Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    powers,Charles A.; Derbidge, T. Craig

    2001-03-27

    A high-pressure fuel system for LNG vehicles with direct-injection natural gas engines has been developed and demonstrated on a heavy-duty truck. A new concept for utilizing the ''cold energy'' associated with LNG vehicles to generate mechanical power to drive auxiliary equipment (such as high-pressure fuel pumps) has also been developed and demonstrated in the laboratory. The high-pressure LNG fuel system development included the design and testing of a new type of cryogenic pump utilizes multiple chambers and other features to condense moderate quantities of sucked vapor and discharge supercritical LNG at 3,000 to 4,000 psi. The pump was demonstrated on a Class 8 truck with a Westport high-pressure direct-injection Cummins ISX engine. A concept that utilizes LNG's ''cold energy'' to drive a high-pressure fuel pump without engine attachments or power consumption was developed. Ethylene is boiled and superheated by the engine coolant, and it is cooled and condensed by rejecting h eat to the LNG. Power is extracted in a full-admission blowdown process, and part of this power is applied to pump the ethylene liquid to the boiler pressure. Tests demonstrated a net power output of 1.1. hp at 1.9 Lbm/min of LNG flow, which is adequate to isentropically pump the LNG to approximately 3,400 psi..

  2. Sex-Stereotyping in High School Students' Perceptions of Self and Peers on Personality Trait and Occupational Scales. Working Paper #4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowallis, Trudy; And Others

    Rural high school students tend to stereotype according to sex when rating their peers on personality trait and occupational measures. The research differed from previous studies in which participants have been required to rate the typical or ideal male and female or to rate an occupation according to how masculine or feminine it seemed to them.…

  3. Preface to the special section on human factors and automation in vehicles: designing highly automated vehicles with the driver in mind.

    PubMed

    Merat, Natasha; Lee, John D

    2012-10-01

    This special section brings together diverse research regarding driver interaction with advanced automotive technology to guide design of increasingly automated vehicles. Rapidly evolving vehicle automation will likely change cars and trucks more in the next 5 years than the preceding 50, radically redefining what it means to drive. This special section includes 10 articles from European and North American researchers reporting simulator and naturalistic driving studies. Little research has considered the consequences of fully automated driving, with most focusing on lane-keeping and speed control systems individually. The studies reveal two underlying design philosophies: automate driving versus support driving. Results of several studies, consistent with previous research in other domains, suggest that the automate philosophy can delay driver responses to incidents in which the driver has to intervene and take control from the automation. Understanding how to orchestrate the transfer or sharing of control between the system and the driver, particularly in critical incidents, emerges as a central challenge. Designers should not assume that automation can substitute seamlessly for a human driver, nor can they assume that the driver can safely accommodate the limitations of automation. Designers, policy makers, and researchers must give careful consideration to what role the person should have in highly automated vehicles and how to support the driver if the driver is to be responsible for vehicle control. As in other domains, driving safety increasingly depends on the combined performance of the human and automation, and successful designs will depend on recognizing and supporting the new roles of the driver.

  4. Fatal occupational injuries of women, Texas 1975-84.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, H; Honchar, P A; Suarez, L

    1987-01-01

    A review of Texas death certificates for 1975-84 identified 348 cases of fatal occupational injuries of civilian females. Homicides accounted for 53 per cent and motor vehicle-related injuries accounted for 26 per cent of the deaths. Injuries from firearms caused 70 per cent of the homicides. One hundred thirty-three deaths occurred to women employed in the retail trade industry; of these, 77 per cent resulted from homicide. Women workers in gasoline service stations, food-bakery-and-dairy stores, and eating-and-drinking places had especially high risks of homicide. Texas female heavy-truck drivers had the highest fatal-injury rate, with motor-vehicle-related injuries causing 89 per cent of their deaths. These results indicate that effective strategies to prevent fatal occupational injuries of Texas women will need to address the problems of workplace violence and the hazards posed by motor vehicles. PMID:3674251

  5. Fatal occupational injuries of women, Texas 1975-84.

    PubMed

    Davis, H; Honchar, P A; Suarez, L

    1987-12-01

    A review of Texas death certificates for 1975-84 identified 348 cases of fatal occupational injuries of civilian females. Homicides accounted for 53 per cent and motor vehicle-related injuries accounted for 26 per cent of the deaths. Injuries from firearms caused 70 per cent of the homicides. One hundred thirty-three deaths occurred to women employed in the retail trade industry; of these, 77 per cent resulted from homicide. Women workers in gasoline service stations, food-bakery-and-dairy stores, and eating-and-drinking places had especially high risks of homicide. Texas female heavy-truck drivers had the highest fatal-injury rate, with motor-vehicle-related injuries causing 89 per cent of their deaths. These results indicate that effective strategies to prevent fatal occupational injuries of Texas women will need to address the problems of workplace violence and the hazards posed by motor vehicles.

  6. On-vehicle emission measurement of a light-duty diesel van at various speeds at high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Yin, Hang; Ge, Yunshan; Yu, Linxiao; Xu, Zhenxian; Yu, Chenglei; Shi, Xuejiao; Liu, Hongkun

    2013-12-01

    As part of the research on the relationship between the speed of a vehicle operating at high altitude and its contaminant emissions, an on-vehicle emission measurement of a light-duty diesel van at the altitudes of 1000 m, 2400 m and 3200 m was conducted. The test vehicle was a 2.8 L turbocharged diesel Ford Transit. Its settings were consistent in all experiments. Regulated gaseous emissions, including CO, HC and NOx, together with particulate matter was measured at nine speeds ranged from 10 km h-1 to 90 km h-1 with 10 km h-1 intervals settings. At each speed, measurement lasted for at least 120 s to ensure the sufficiency and reliability of the collected data. The results demonstrated that at all altitudes, CO and HC emissions decreased as the vehicle speed increased. However both NOx and PM increased with vehicle speed. In terms of the effects of altitude, an increase in CO, HC and PM was observed with the rising of altitude at each vehicle speed. NOx behaved different: emission of NOx initially increased as the vehicle was raised from 1000 m to 2400 m, but it decreased when the vehicle was further elevated to 3200 m.

  7. A lane-level LBS system for vehicle network with high-precision BDS/GPS positioning.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chi; Guo, Wenfei; Cao, Guangyi; Dong, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, research on vehicle network location service has begun to focus on its intelligence and precision. The accuracy of space-time information has become a core factor for vehicle network systems in a mobile environment. However, difficulties persist in vehicle satellite positioning since deficiencies in the provision of high-quality space-time references greatly limit the development and application of vehicle networks. In this paper, we propose a high-precision-based vehicle network location service to solve this problem. The major components of this study include the following: (1) application of wide-area precise positioning technology to the vehicle network system. An adaptive correction message broadcast protocol is designed to satisfy the requirements for large-scale target precise positioning in the mobile Internet environment; (2) development of a concurrence service system with a flexible virtual expansion architecture to guarantee reliable data interaction between vehicles and the background; (3) verification of the positioning precision and service quality in the urban environment. Based on this high-precision positioning service platform, a lane-level location service is designed to solve a typical traffic safety problem.

  8. A Lane-Level LBS System for Vehicle Network with High-Precision BDS/GPS Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chi; Guo, Wenfei; Cao, Guangyi; Dong, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, research on vehicle network location service has begun to focus on its intelligence and precision. The accuracy of space-time information has become a core factor for vehicle network systems in a mobile environment. However, difficulties persist in vehicle satellite positioning since deficiencies in the provision of high-quality space-time references greatly limit the development and application of vehicle networks. In this paper, we propose a high-precision-based vehicle network location service to solve this problem. The major components of this study include the following: (1) application of wide-area precise positioning technology to the vehicle network system. An adaptive correction message broadcast protocol is designed to satisfy the requirements for large-scale target precise positioning in the mobile Internet environment; (2) development of a concurrence service system with a flexible virtual expansion architecture to guarantee reliable data interaction between vehicles and the background; (3) verification of the positioning precision and service quality in the urban environment. Based on this high-precision positioning service platform, a lane-level location service is designed to solve a typical traffic safety problem. PMID:25755665

  9. Occupancy dynamics in a tropical bird community: unexpectedly high forest use by birds classified as non-forest species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruiz-Gutierrez, Viviana; Zipkin, Elise F.; Dhondt, Andre A.

    2010-01-01

    1. Worldwide loss of biodiversity necessitates a clear understanding of the factors driving population declines as well as informed predictions about which species and populations are at greatest risk. The biggest threat to the long-term persistence of populations is the reduction and changes in configuration of their natural habitat. 2. Inconsistencies have been noted in the responses of populations to the combined effects of habitat loss and fragmentation. These have been widely attributed to the effects of the matrix habitats in which remnant focal habitats are typically embedded. 3. We quantified the potential effects of the inter-patch matrix by estimating occupancy and colonization of forest and surrounding non-forest matrix (NF). We estimated species-specific parameters using a dynamic, multi-species hierarchical model on a bird community in southwestern Costa Rica. 4. Overall, we found higher probabilities of occupancy and colonization of forest relative to the NF across bird species, including those previously categorized as open habitat generalists not needing forest to persist. Forest dependency was a poor predictor of occupancy dynamics in our study region, largely predicting occupancy and colonization of only non-forest habitats. 5. Our results indicate that the protection of remnant forest habitats is key for the long-term persistence of all members of the bird community in this fragmented landscape, including species typically associated with open, non-forest habitats. 6.Synthesis and applications. We identified 39 bird species of conservation concern defined by having high estimates of forest occupancy, and low estimates of occupancy and colonization of non-forest. These species survive in forest but are unlikely to venture out into open, non-forested habitats, therefore, they are vulnerable to the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation. Our hierarchical community-level model can be used to estimate species-specific occupancy dynamics for focal

  10. Multidisciplinary High-Fidelity Analysis and Optimization of Aerospace Vehicles. Part 2; Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, J. L.; Weston, R. P.; Samareh, J. A.; Mason, B. H.; Green, L. L.; Biedron, R. T.

    2000-01-01

    An objective of the High Performance Computing and Communication Program at the NASA Langley Research Center is to demonstrate multidisciplinary shape and sizing optimization of a complete aerospace vehicle configuration by using high-fidelity finite-element structural analysis and computational fluid dynamics aerodynamic analysis in a distributed, heterogeneous computing environment that includes high performance parallel computing. A software system has been designed and implemented to integrate a set of existing discipline analysis codes, some of them computationally intensive, into a distributed computational environment for the design of a high-speed civil transport configuration. The paper describes both the preliminary results from implementing and validating the multidisciplinary analysis and the results from an aerodynamic optimization. The discipline codes are integrated by using the Java programming language and a Common Object Request Broker Architecture compliant software product. A companion paper describes the formulation of the multidisciplinary analysis and optimization system.

  11. Robust, nonlinear, high angle-of-attack control design for a supermaneuverable vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Richard J.

    1993-01-01

    High angle-of-attack flight control laws are developed for a supermaneuverable fighter aircraft. The methods of dynamic inversion and structured singular value synthesis are combined into an approach which addresses both the nonlinearity and robustness problems of flight at extreme operating conditions. The primary purpose of the dynamic inversion control elements is to linearize the vehicle response across the flight envelope. Structured singular value synthesis is used to design a dynamic controller which provides robust tracking to pilot commands. The resulting control system achieves desired flying qualities and guarantees a large margin of robustness to uncertainties for high angle-of-attack flight conditions. The results of linear simulation and structured singular value stability analysis are presented to demonstrate satisfaction of the design criteria. High fidelity nonlinear simulation results show that the combined dynamics inversion/structured singular value synthesis control law achieves a high level of performance in a realistic environment.

  12. Job Cluster for Manufacturing Occupations at the High School Level. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton. Div. of Vocational Education.

    A project was designed to develop curricula in manufacturing occupations for grades 9 through 12, and to test, modify, reproduce, and disseminate the results. To enhance the dimensions of the operation a committee from Fairleigh Dickinson University and the New Jersey State Department of Education staff was formed to ensure effective achievement…

  13. Study Behaviors of High-Risk Occupational Students in the Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandiford, Janice R.

    The author of this study collected data from occupational students in a large urban community college. All students were participating in a vocational skills laboratory (SAIL) supported by state funding. The Study Behavior Inventory (SBI) was administered to 100 students and demographic data was collected. Individual reports for each student…

  14. Learning How: After-School Occupational Skills Training for High School Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabato, Ann S.

    1973-01-01

    The best salesmen for New York City's After-School Occupational Skills Program are the students themselves, who have obtained valuable work experience, skill development, and in many cases good jobs as a result of the training received from the program in a very large number of different work areas. (SA)

  15. Improving Occupational Orientation Programs for Junior High School Students in Metropolitan Areas. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needham, Raymond; Binnie, Arthur

    Participants representing 18 western states and 37 cities attended an inservice institute designed to (1) identify trends, (2) examine current innovative programs, (3) look at roadblock programs, and (4) develop impact plans to cause improvement in occupational programs in the participants' home cities and states. Participants, including…

  16. Appending High-Resolution Elevation Data to GPS Speed Traces for Vehicle Energy Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, E.; Burton, E.; Duran, A.; Gonder, J.

    2014-06-01

    Accurate and reliable global positioning system (GPS)-based vehicle use data are highly valuable for many transportation, analysis, and automotive considerations. Model-based design, real-world fuel economy analysis, and the growing field of autonomous and connected technologies (including predictive powertrain control and self-driving cars) all have a vested interest in high-fidelity estimation of powertrain loads and vehicle usage profiles. Unfortunately, road grade can be a difficult property to extract from GPS data with consistency. In this report, we present a methodology for appending high-resolution elevation data to GPS speed traces via a static digital elevation model. Anomalous data points in the digital elevation model are addressed during a filtration/smoothing routine, resulting in an elevation profile that can be used to calculate road grade. This process is evaluated against a large, commercially available height/slope dataset from the Navteq/Nokia/HERE Advanced Driver Assistance Systems product. Results will show good agreement with the Advanced Driver Assistance Systems data in the ability to estimate road grade between any two consecutive points in the contiguous United States.

  17. High Temperature Propulsion System Structural Seals for Future Space Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; DeMange, Jeffrey J.

    2004-01-01

    High temperature, dynamic structural seals are required in advanced hypersonic engines to seal the perimeters of movable engine ramps for efficient, safe operation in high heat flux environments at temperatures from 2000 to 2500 F. NASA GRC became involved in the development of high temperature structural seals in the late 1980 s and early 1990 s during the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) program. Researchers at GRC carried out an in-house program to develop seals for the NASP hypersonic engine and oversaw industry efforts for airframe and propulsion system seal development for this vehicle. The figure shows one of the seal locations in the NASP engine. Seals were needed along the edges of movable panels in the engine to seal gaps between the panels and adjacent engine sidewalls. Seals developed during the NASP program met many requirements but fell short of leakage, durability, and resiliency goals. Due to program termination the seals could not be adequately matured. To overcome these shortfalls, GRC is currently developing advanced seals and seal preloading devices for the hypersonic engines of future space vehicles as part of NASA s Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program.

  18. The Feasibility of Linear Motors and High-Energy Thrusters for Massive Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stull, M. A.

    A combination of two propulsion technologies, superconducting linear motors using ambient magnetic fields and high- energy particle beam thrusters, may make it possible to develop massive aerospace vehicles the size of aircraft carriers. If certain critical thresholds can be attained, linear motors can enable massive vehicles to fly within the atmosphere and can propel them to orbit. Thrusters can do neither, because power requirements are prohibitive. However, unless superconductors having extremely high critical current densities can be developed, the interplanetary magnetic field is too weak for linear motors to provide sufficient acceleration to reach even nearby planets. On the other hand, high-energy thrusters can provide adequate acceleration using a minimal amount of reaction mass, at achievable levels of power generation. If the requirements for linear motor propulsion can be met, combining the two modes of propulsion could enable huge nuclear powered spacecraft to reach at least the inner planets of the solar system, the asteroid belt, and possibly Jupiter, in reasonably short times under continuous acceleration, opening them to exploration, resource development and colonization.

  19. [Determinants of occupational injuries in the construction of the "high speed train" Bologna-Florence].

    PubMed

    Pavone, Venere Leda Mara; Lisi, Catiuscia; Cinti, Danilo; Cervino, Daniela; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Forastiere, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    to study determinants of occupational injuries in tunnel construction using data from the surveillance system which had been implemented in order to monitor accidents during the construction of the "high speed train tracks in the Italian Regions Emilia-Romagna and Tuscany. retrospective cohort study. 16 sites for the construction of 14 tunnels of the high speed railway-tract Bologna-Firenze, in Italy. 1,602 workers (of 3,000 employed in the underground tunnelling), aged 18 - 67 years, operating during excavation with traditional method in 1999-2002. A total of 549 injuries occurred among 385 workers. The number of worked hours were used as time at risk. incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals for all injuries, serious injuries and first injuries were considered in separate multiple regression analyses (Poisson). residence, task and working phase were taken into consideration. An increased risk was found for younger workers, for carpenters (IRR "all-events" = 2.33; 95% CI=1.85-2.94; IRR" first-events" = 2.12; 95% CI 1.62-2.77) and miners (IRR "all-events" = 1.76; 95% CI 1.39-2.24; IRR"first-events" = 1.71; 95% CI 1.30-2.24) vs. machinery operators. Construction of inverted arch turns out to have an incidence rate ratio three times higher than digging out (IRR "all-events" = 2.79; 95% CI 2.27-3.43; IRR "firsts-event = 2.98; 95% CI 2.33-3.81). The probability of "serious" injuries (>30 days) is higher for miners (IRR=2.45; 95% CI 1.65-3.64) and for carpenters (IRR=2.31; 95% CI 1.53-3.49). this study pointed out to indicate some determinants (age, task and work phase) of injuries in tunneling about which little had been published previously. These results are useful for addressing preventive measures, for control and prevention activities and point to the need to explore the effect of experience and to study, through a case crossover design, transient working and individual risk factors for traumatic injury within these working sites.

  20. Multidisciplinary High-Fidelity Analysis and Optimization of Aerospace Vehicles. Part 1; Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, J. L.; Townsend, J. C.; Salas, A. O.; Samareh, J. A.; Mukhopadhyay, V.; Barthelemy, J.-F.

    2000-01-01

    An objective of the High Performance Computing and Communication Program at the NASA Langley Research Center is to demonstrate multidisciplinary shape and sizing optimization of a complete aerospace vehicle configuration by using high-fidelity, finite element structural analysis and computational fluid dynamics aerodynamic analysis in a distributed, heterogeneous computing environment that includes high performance parallel computing. A software system has been designed and implemented to integrate a set of existing discipline analysis codes, some of them computationally intensive, into a distributed computational environment for the design of a highspeed civil transport configuration. The paper describes the engineering aspects of formulating the optimization by integrating these analysis codes and associated interface codes into the system. The discipline codes are integrated by using the Java programming language and a Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) compliant software product. A companion paper presents currently available results.

  1. Orbit transfer vehicle engine technology program. Task B-6 high speed turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Bearing types were evaluated for use on the Orbit Transfer Vehicle (OTV) high pressure fuel pump. The high speed, high load, and long bearing life requirements dictated selection of hydrostatic bearings as the logical candidate for this engine. Design and fabrication of a bearing tester to evaluate these cryogenic hydrostatic bearings was then conducted. Detailed analysis, evaluation of bearing materials, and design of the hydrostatic bearings were completed resulting in fabrication of Carbon P5N and Kentanium hydrostatic bearings. Rotordynamic analyses determined the exact bearing geometry chosen. Instrumentation was evaluated and data acquisition methods were determined for monitoring shaft motion up to speeds in excess of 200,000 RPM in a cryogenic atmosphere. Fabrication of all hardware was completed, but assembly and testing was conducted outside of this contract.

  2. Optical molecular fluorescence determination of ultra-trace beryllium in occupational and environmental samples using highly alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Adams, Lori; Agrawal, Anoop; Cronin, John P; Ashley, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Exposures to beryllium (Be), even at extremely low levels, can cause severe health effects in a percentage of those exposed; consequently, occupational exposure limits (OELs) promulgated for this element are the lowest established for any element. This work describes the advantages of using highly alkaline dye solutions for determination of Be in occupational hygiene and environmental samples by means of an optical molecular fluorescence technique after sample extraction in 1-3% (w˖w(-1)) aqueous ammonium bifluoride (NH4HF2). Improved attributes include the ability to further enhance the detection limits of Be in extraction solutions of high acidity with minimal dilution, which is particularly beneficial when NH4HF2 solutions of higher concentration are used for extraction of Be from soil samples. Significant improvements in Be method detection limits (MDLs) are obtained at levels many-fold below those reported previously for this methodology. Notably, MDLs for Be of <0.01 ng l(-1) / 0.1 ng per sample have been attained, which are superior to MDLs routinely reported for this element by means of the most widely used ultra-trace elemental measurement technique, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Very low MDLs for Be are essential in consideration of reductions in OELs for this element in workplace air by health organizations and regulatory agencies in the USA and internationally. Applications of enhanced Be measurements to air filter samples, surface wipe samples, soils and newly-designed occupational air sampler inserts are illustrated.

  3. Injury risk for rear-seated occupants in small overlap crashes.

    PubMed

    Arbogast, Kristy B; Locey, Caitlin M; Hammond, Rachel; Belwadi, Aditya

    2013-01-01

    Small overlap crashes, where the primary crash engagement is outboard from the longitudinal energy absorbing structures of the vehicle, have received recent interest as a crash dynamic that results in high likelihood of injury. Previous analyses of good performing vehicles showed that 24% of crashes with AIS 3+ injuries to front seat occupants were small overlap crashes. However, similar evaluations have not been conducted for those rear seated. Vehicle dynamics suggest that rear seat occupants may be at greater risk due to lack of lateral seating support and a steering wheel to hold, making them more sensitive to lateral movement seen in these crashes. Thus, the objective was to calculate injury risk for rear-seated occupants in small overlap collisions. AIS 2+ and AIS 3+ injury risk was calculated from NASS-CDS data from 2000-2011. Inclusion criteria were vehicles of model year 2000 or later, with CDC codes of "FL" or "FR", and an occupant in the second or third row. AIS2+ injury risk was 5.1%, and AIS3+ injury risk was 2.4%. Of note, half of the occupants were <15 years of age indicating rear seat protection should emphasize the young. Occupants seated near side were nearly three times as likely to sustain an AIS2+ injury than occupants seated far side. Particular attention should be paid to the prominence of head injuries in this crash dynamic and consideration given to their mitigation. Additional research should determine whether countermeasures being implemented for front seat occupants can be beneficial to rear seat occupants.

  4. Construction and performance of a high voltage zinc bromine battery in an electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, D.H.; Dickinson, B.; Arikara, M.; Prabhu, M.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the design, construction, testing and installation of a 391 volt, 35 kWh zinc bromine battery in an electric vehicle. This research project, was referred to as the Endura Project and it resulted in the construction of the highest voltage zinc bromine battery ever to be used in an electric vehicle. The zinc bromine battery is a high energy density battery that utilizes low cost materials (predominantly polyethylene plastic). It has a relatively high energy density (60 to 70 Wh/kg of battery weight) and is modular in its construction. It utilizes a water cooling loop and normally operates between 32 and 45 C. The Endura project constructed a state of the art zinc bromine battery, used an advanced charging system, and an advanced AC propulsion system. These components were integrated in a Geo Prizm and used to compete in the APS Electric 500 in Phoenix, AZ (3rd place, 3/94), the World Clean Air Rally in LA (1st Place, 4/94) and the 1994 American Tour de Sol (2nd Place 5/94).

  5. A high power spiral wound lead-acid battery for hybrid electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.B.; Sexton, E.D.

    1997-12-01

    Optima Batteries, Inc. is currently in development of a high power (660 W/kg) spiral wound lead-acid 6V battery with a nominal capacity of 15 Ah. Its exceptional power and excellent thermal characteristics make it a promising choice for hybrid electric vehicle applications. The hybrid electric vehicle presents a new and unique challenge for energy storage systems. The batteries require high power for acceleration and hill climbing and good charge acceptance for regenerative braking and overall energy efficiency. Since the on board auxiliary power unit results in much lower demands for battery energy capacity, lead-acid batteries fit quite well into these performance requirements. Many of the remaining challenges involve the development of battery management systems which must function to maintain the battery pack at peak performance and achieve an economical cycle life. Related to the issue of battery management is information about conditions that may cause damage or unbalance of the pack. Experiments are described investigating the effects of extreme cell reversal on battery capacity and cycle life. The results demonstrate the amazing robustness of the lead-acid battery for tolerating over discharge.

  6. Study on Vibration Reduction Design of Suspended Equipment of High Speed Railway Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu; Gong, Dao; Zhou, Jinsong

    2016-09-01

    The design methods of the under-chassis equipment of a high speed railway vehicle based on dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) theory and vibration isolation theory are proposed, respectively. A detailed rigid-flexible coupled dynamic model of a high speed railway vehicle which includes car body flexibility and the excitation of the suspended equipment is established. The vibrations of the car body and the suspension equipment with the proposed design methods are studied. Results show that the elastic vibration of the car body can be decreased effectively by mounting the under-chassis equipment with elastic suspension. Comparing with vibration isolation theory, the method based on DVA theory is more effective for suppressing the car body flexible vibration, but it will increase the vibration of the equipment to a certain extent. The method based on vibration isolation theory can reduce the vibration of both the car body and the equipment at the same time. Therefore, the design method should be selected appropriately according to the specific requirement.

  7. Test Methodology for Protection of Vehicle Occupants against Anti-Vehicular Landmine Effects (Methodologie d’essais pour la protection des occupants de vehicules contre les effets des mines terrestres anti-vehicules)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    Figure 3.5: The Lower Limb [ Tortora , 2003]. Figure 3.6 shows the medial view of the right foot. The tarsal bones (in the ankle) are the calcaneus...Anatomy (Modified from [ Tortora , 1984]). When a landmine detonates under a vehicle, the movement of the structure on which the foot rests (floor...referred to [ Tortora , 2003]. 3.6.1.1 The Auditory System The auditory system (ear), shown in Figure 3.18, is the most susceptible body region to

  8. Aerodynamics of road vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Hucho, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    This introduction to aerodynamic aspects of motor vehicle design will be of use both to vehicle designers and students of automobile engineering. Content covers vehicle systems, ventilation and aerodynamic design to reduce drag and increase stability of cars, commercial vehicles and PSVs. Topics considered include automobile aerodynamics; some fundamentals of fluid mechanics; performance of cars and light vans; aerodynamic drag of passenger cars; driving stability in sidewinds; operation, safety and comfort; high-performance vehicle aerodynamics; commercial vehicles; engine cooling systems; heating, ventilation and air conditioning of motor vehicles; wind tunnels for automobile aerodynamics; measuring and testing techniques; and numerical methods for computation of flow around road vehicles.

  9. Absolute Dating of Strath Terraces along the Western High Plains Reveals Complicated History of Occupation and Incision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, M. A.; Anderson, R. S.; Gray, H. J.; Mahan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Gravel-capped strath terraces are preserved along the western High Plains, adjacent to the Colorado Front Range. Terrace elevations appear to connect across the landscape, representing previous levels of the Denver Basin during fluvial exhumation. In this tectonically quiescent region, climatically-driven fluctuations in sediment supply are often interpreted to drive terrace occupation and basin exhumation. We dated a series of strath terraces near Boulder, CO using 10Be/26Al cosmogenic radionuclides (CRNs) and optically stimulated luminescence. Results reveal: (1) a long history of fluvial occupation (0.5-1.0 Myr duration), with recent (<120 ka) fluvial abandonment of the highest surface; (2) a brief occupation of a narrow spillway, abandoned at 97.0 ± 4.2 ka, preserved because the stream was subsequently pirated; and (3) a long period of fluvial occupation of a lower terrace, recorded by the deposition of distinct gravel packages at 50-75 ka and 40.5 ± 5.0 ka. In conjunction with absolute dating on nearby terraces, our study indicates the system is more complex than originally thought. Ages are not consistent among terraces of similar elevations deposited by different stream systems. The link between terrace age and climate is not straightforward, as terraces can be occupied through several glacial-interglacial cycles. When a surface is abandoned, incision to the next level appears to occur quite rapidly through the soft Cretaceous shales. Long-term incision rates may be derived from elevations and ages of high preserved surfaces, but such incision rates reflect long periods of no vertical erosion punctuated with short periods of rapid incision. Such interpretations would not be possible without paired CRNs or combination with other geochronologic techniques. This study therefore represents a cautionary tale for the interpretation of tectonic or climatic processes and process rates from single-method dating of fluvial terraces.

  10. A Morphing Radiator for High-Turndown Thermal Control of Crewed Space Exploration Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cognata, Thomas J.; Hartl, Darren J.; Sheth, Rubik; Dinsmore, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft designed for missions beyond low earth orbit (LEO) face a difficult thermal control challenge, particularly in the case of crewed vehicles where the thermal control system (TCS) must maintain a relatively constant internal environment temperature despite a vastly varying external thermal environment and despite heat rejection needs that are contrary to the potential of the environment. A thermal control system may be required to reject a higher heat load to warm environments and a lower heat load to cold environments, necessitating a relatively high turndown ratio. A modern thermal control system is capable of a turndown ratio of on the order of 12:1, but crew safety and environment compatibility have constrained these solutions to massive multi-loop fluid systems. This paper discusses the analysis of a unique radiator design that employs the behavior of shape memory alloys (SMAs) to vary the turndown of, and thus enable, a single-loop vehicle thermal control system for space exploration vehicles. This design, a morphing radiator, varies its shape in response to facesheet temperature to control view of space and primary surface emissivity. Because temperature dependence is inherent to SMA behavior, the design requires no accommodation for control, instrumentation, or power supply in order to operate. Thermal and radiation modeling of the morphing radiator predict a turndown ranging from 11.9:1 to 35:1 independent of TCS configuration. Coupled thermal-stress analyses predict that the desired morphing behavior of the concept is attainable. A system level mass analysis shows that by enabling a single loop architecture this design could reduce the TCS mass by between 139 kg and 225 kg. The concept has been demonstrated in proof-of-concept benchtop tests.

  11. A Morphing Radiator for High-Turndown Thermal Control of Crewed Space Exploration Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cognata, Thomas J.; Hardtl, Darren; Sheth, Rubik; Dinsmore, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft designed for missions beyond low earth orbit (LEO) face a difficult thermal control challenge, particularly in the case of crewed vehicles where the thermal control system (TCS) must maintain a relatively constant internal environment temperature despite a vastly varying external thermal environment and despite heat rejection needs that are contrary to the potential of the environment. A thermal control system is in other words required to reject a higher heat load to warm environments and a lower heat load to cold environments, necessitating a quite high turndown ratio. A modern thermal control system is capable of a turndown ratio of on the order of 12:1, but for crew safety and environment compatibility these are massive multi-loop fluid systems. This paper discusses the analysis of a unique radiator design which employs the behavior of shape memory alloys (SMA) to vary the turndown of, and thus enable, a single-loop vehicle thermal control system for space exploration vehicles. This design, a morphing radiator, varies its shape in response to facesheet temperature to control view of space and primary surface emissivity. Because temperature dependence is inherent to SMA behavior, the design requires no accommodation for control, instrumentation, nor power supply in order to operate. Thermal and radiation modeling of the morphing radiator predict a turndown ranging from 11.9:1 to 35:1 independent of TCS configuration. Stress and deformation analyses predict the desired morphing behavior of the concept. A system level mass analysis shows that by enabling a single loop architecture this design could reduce the TCS mass by between 139 kg and 225 kg. The concept is demonstrated in proof-of-concept benchtop tests.

  12. Deflectometric analysis of high volume injection molds for production of occupational eye wear.

    PubMed

    Speck, Alexis; Zelzer, Benedikt; Speich, Marco; Börret, Rainer; Langenbucher, Achim; Eppig, Timo

    2013-12-01

    Most of the protective eye wear devices currently on the market are manufactured on simple polycarbonate shields, produced by injection molding techniques. Despite high importance of optical quality, injection molds are rarely inspected for surface quality before or during the manufacturing process. Quality degradation is mainly monitored by optical testing of the molded parts. The purpose of this work was to validate a non-contact deflectometric measurement technique for surface and shape analysis of injection molds to facilitate deterministic surface quality control and to monitor minor conformity of the injection mold with the design data. The system is based on phase-measuring deflectometry with a operating measurement field of 80×80 mm(2) (±18° slope), a lateral resolution of 60μm and a local sensitivity of some nanometers. The calibration was tested with a calibration normal and a reference sphere. The results were crosschecked against a measurement of the same object with a tactile coordinate measuring machine. Eight injection molds for production of safety goggles with radii of +58mm (convex) and -60mm (concave) were measured in this study. The molds were separated into two groups (cavity 1 and 2 of the tool with different polishing techniques) and measured to test whether the measurement tool could extract differences. The analysis was performed on difference height between the measured surface and the spherical model. The device could derive the surface change due to polishing and discriminate between both polishing techniques, on the basis of the measured data. The concave nozzle sides of the first group (cavity 1) showed good shape conformity. In comparison, the nozzle sides of the second group (cavity 2) showed local deviations from design data up to 14.4μm. Local form variations of about 5μm occurred in the field of view. All convex ejector sides of both groups (cavity 1 and 2) showed rotational symmetric errors and the molds were measured in

  13. High incidence of occupational exposures among healthcare workers in Erbil, Iraq.

    PubMed

    Hosoglu, Salih; Ahmad, Zana; Tahseen, Mohammed Sami; Diyar, Zehra; Selbes, Sami; Çolak, Ali

    2014-10-15

    The current status of percutaneous injury and mucous exposures (PMEs) of hospital workers and factors associated with the injuries have not been studied in Iraq. This study aimed to evaluate the epidemiology of PMEs with blood or body fluids that leads serious risks for healthcare workers (HCWs). An analytic, cross-sectional survey study was conducted among HCWs in Erbil city center, Iraq. The study was performed at sevenhospitals, and 177 participants were included. The dependent variable was the occurrence of PMEs in the last year, and the independent variables were age, sex, occupation of HCWs, working site, and work duration. A total of 177 HCW participants included 57 nurses/midwives (32.2%), 59 doctors (33.3%), 27 laboratory workers (15.3%), and 34 paramedics/multipurpose workers (19.2%) from seven hospitals. The study concluded that 67.8% of the participants reported at least one occupational PME in the last year. In all, 13.3/person/year PME incidents were reported for nurses, 9.74/person/year for paramedics/multipurpose workers, 6.71/person/year for doctors, and 3.37/person/year laboratory workers. The mean number of PME incidents was 8.91/person/year. HCWs showed 85.0% compliance with wearing mask in risky situations. The most dangerous action for occupational exposure was blood taking (39.0%). In the univariate analysis, none of the investigated variables were found to be significantly related to PME. Occupational injuries and exposures in Iraqi HCWs are extremely common; awareness about protection is not sufficient. Nurses were found to be the highest risk group among HCWs. Preventive actions should be taken to avoid infection.

  14. Spatially distributed smart skin seat sensor for high-resolution real-time occupant position tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, James E., Jr.; Burke, Shawn E.

    1999-07-01

    A 2D spatially distributed smart skin sensor for real-time seat occupant position sensing is presented. The sensor exploits principles of spatial aperture shading of distributed transducers such as piezo-electric polymers and resistors, which are used as the active sensing medium. An example application is presented in which the sensor is used to report passenger position to an automobile air bag control system. The real-time data is used to modulate airbag deployment energies, mitigating passenger injury.

  15. Middle Palaeolithic human occupation of the high altitude region of Hovk-1, Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinhasi, R.; Gasparian, B.; Nahapetyan, S.; Bar-Oz, G.; Weissbrod, L.; Bruch, A. A.; Hovsepyan, R.; Wilkinson, K.

    2011-12-01

    Charting the timing of human occupation in the mountainous regions of the Caucasus during the Last Interglacial/Glacial periods is of particular interest to the understanding of past human adaptive and behavioural plasticity and capacity. In this paper we analyse palaeoenvironmental, faunal, and archaeological data gathered during 2006-2009 excavations of the Palaeolithic cave site of Hovk-1, Armenia, in order to address whether human presence in this cave correlates with episodes of mild climate and certain environmental and ecological conditions that were favourable to huminin occupation in such a region. In the second part of the paper we evaluate the implications of our results in understanding the nature of human presence in other mountainous regions such as the Alps and its potential implications for Palaeolithic research. Our analysis demonstrates that hominins occupied Hovk-1 Cave during milder climatic phases of the Last Interglacial sensu lato (MIS 5d-c) and Last Glacial (late MIS 4/early MIS 3) periods when the area surrounding the cave was an open meadow environment. The stratigraphic Units with noticeable traces of hominin occupation (Units 4, 5 & 8) contrast with others in the lack of cave bear fauna and suggest an inverse correlation between human and cave bear occupational phases in Hovk-1. We speculate that human groups visited this region to hunt specific prey species that prevailed in this habitat (such as the bezoar goat). However, the assemblages of large mammals from Hovk-1 do not provide any clear anthropogenic signal and therefore highlight the difficulty of teasing apart natural and cultural formation processes.

  16. Adjustable high emittance gap filler. [reentry shielding for space shuttle vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, D. B.; Stewart, D. A.; Smith, M.; Estrella, C. A.; Goldstein, H. E. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A flexible, adjustable refractory filler is disclosed for filling gaps between ceramic tiles forming the heat shield of a space shuttle vehicle, to protect its aluminum skin during atmospheric reentry. The easily installed and replaced filler consists essentially of a strip of ceramic cloth coated, at least along both its longitudinal edges with a room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber compound with a high emittance colored pigment. The filler may have one or more layers as the gap width requires. Preferred materials are basket weave aluminoborosilicate cloth, and a rubber compounded with silicon tetraboride as the emittance agent and finely divided borosilicate glass containing about 7.5% B2O3 as high temperature binder. The filler cloth strip or tape is cut to proper width and length, inserted into the gap, and fastened with previously applied drops of silicone rubber adhesive.

  17. A novel series connected batteries state of high voltage safety monitor system for electric vehicle application.

    PubMed

    Jiaxi, Qiang; Lin, Yang; Jianhui, He; Qisheng, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Batteries, as the main or assistant power source of EV (Electric Vehicle), are usually connected in series with high voltage to improve the drivability and energy efficiency. Today, more and more batteries are connected in series with high voltage, if there is any fault in high voltage system (HVS), the consequence is serious and dangerous. Therefore, it is necessary to monitor the electric parameters of HVS to ensure the high voltage safety and protect personal safety. In this study, a high voltage safety monitor system is developed to solve this critical issue. Four key electric parameters including precharge, contact resistance, insulation resistance, and remaining capacity are monitored and analyzed based on the equivalent models presented in this study. The high voltage safety controller which integrates the equivalent models and control strategy is developed. By the help of hardware-in-loop system, the equivalent models integrated in the high voltage safety controller are validated, and the online electric parameters monitor strategy is analyzed and discussed. The test results indicate that the high voltage safety monitor system designed in this paper is suitable for EV application.

  18. A Novel Series Connected Batteries State of High Voltage Safety Monitor System for Electric Vehicle Application

    PubMed Central

    Jiaxi, Qiang; Lin, Yang; Jianhui, He; Qisheng, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Batteries, as the main or assistant power source of EV (Electric Vehicle), are usually connected in series with high voltage to improve the drivability and energy efficiency. Today, more and more batteries are connected in series with high voltage, if there is any fault in high voltage system (HVS), the consequence is serious and dangerous. Therefore, it is necessary to monitor the electric parameters of HVS to ensure the high voltage safety and protect personal safety. In this study, a high voltage safety monitor system is developed to solve this critical issue. Four key electric parameters including precharge, contact resistance, insulation resistance, and remaining capacity are monitored and analyzed based on the equivalent models presented in this study. The high voltage safety controller which integrates the equivalent models and control strategy is developed. By the help of hardware-in-loop system, the equivalent models integrated in the high voltage safety controller are validated, and the online electric parameters monitor strategy is analyzed and discussed. The test results indicate that the high voltage safety monitor system designed in this paper is suitable for EV application. PMID:24194677

  19. Impact of reformulated ethanol-gasoline blends on high-emitting vehicles.

    PubMed

    Schifter, I; Díaz, L; González, Uriel

    2013-01-01

    In-use vehicles which are high emitters (HEVs) make a large contribution to the emissions inventory. It is not known, however, whether HEVs share common emissions characteristics, and particularly the effect of ethanol blends. We study this by first examining laboratory measurements of exhaust and evaporative emissions on ethanol blends containing 21%, 26% and 30% aromatics, and a reference fuel formulated with methyl-tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). Switching from MTBE to ethanol fuels on HEVs shows no effect on the total emissions of regulated pollutants, but 1,3-butadiene emissions would increased substantially while the emissions of total carbonyls would not be affected except in the case of acetaldehyde, which would increase with EtOH. The ozone-forming potential of exhaust and evaporative emissions would be less using the EtOH blends and specific reactivity will not be incremented. Lowering the vapour pressure of the gasoline and increasing the proportions of alkylate and isomerate in the composition produces an ethanol-blended fuel with lower environmental impact both in normal vehicles and HEVs.

  20. Forebody Aerodynamics of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle with Actuated Forebody Strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Murri, Daniel G.

    2001-01-01

    Extensive pressure measurements and off-surface flow visualization were obtained on the forebody and strakes of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) equipped with actuated forebody strakes. Forebody yawing moments were obtained by integrating the circumferential pressures on the forebody and strakes. Results show that large yawing moments can be generated with forebody strakes. At a 50 deg-angle-of-attack, deflecting one strake at a time resulted in a forebody yawing moment control reversal for small strake deflection angles. However, deflecting the strakes differentially about a 20 deg symmetric strake deployment eliminated the control reversal and produced a near linear variation of forebody yawing moment with differential strake deflection. At an angle of attack of 50 deg and for 0 deg and 20 deg symmetric strake deployments, a larger forebody yawing moment was generated by the forward fuselage (between the radome and the apex of the leading-edge extensions) than on the radome where the actuated forebody strakes were located. Cutouts on the flight vehicle strakes that were not on the wind tunnel models are believed to be responsible for deficits in the suction peaks on the flight radome pressure distributions and differences in the forebody yawing moments.

  1. Preliminary comparison of high-range resolution signatures of moving and stationary ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, David C.; Oppenheimer, Michael W.; Kahler, Bart; Keaffaber, Brett L.; Williams, Robert L.

    2002-08-01

    High-Range Resolution (HRR) radar modes have become increasingly important in the past few years due to the ability to form focused range profiles of moving targets with enhanced target-to-clutter ratios via Doppler filtering and/or clutter cancellation. To date, much research has been performed on using HRR radar profiles of both moving and stationary ground targets for Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) and Feature-Aided Tracking (FAT) applications. However, little work evaluating the correlation between moving versus stationary HRR profiles has been reported. This paper presents analytical comparisons between HRR profiles generated from a moving vehicle and profiles formed from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of the identical stationary vehicle. The moving target HRR profiles are formed by integrating range-Doppler target images detected from clutter suppressed phase history data. The stationary target HRR profiles are formed from SAR imagery target chips by segmenting the target from clutter and reversing the image formation process. The purpose of this research is to identify which features, such as profile peaks, peak intensity, electrical length, among others, are common to profiles of the same target type and class and at the same imaging geometry.

  2. Forebody Aerodynamics of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle with Actuated Forebody Strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Murri, Daniel G.

    2003-01-01

    Extensive pressure measurements and off-surface flow visualization were obtained on the forebody and strakes of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) equipped with actuated forebody strakes. Forebody yawing moments were obtained by integrating the circumferential pressures on the forebody and strakes. Results show that large yawing moments can be generated with forebody strakes. At a 50 -angle-of-attack, deflecting one strake at a time resulted in a forebody yawing moment control reversal for small strake deflection angles. However, deflecting the strakes differentially about a 20 symmetric strake deployment eliminated the control reversal and produced a near linear variation of forebody yawing moment with differential strake deflection. At an angle of attack of 50 and for 0 and 20 symmetric strake deployments, a larger forebody yawing moment was generated by the forward fuselage (between the radome and the apex of the leading-edge extensions) than on the radome where the actuated forebody strakes were located. Cutouts on the flight vehicle strakes that were not on the wind tunnel models are believed to be responsible for deficits in the suction peaks on the flight radome pressure distributions and differences in the forebody yawing moments.

  3. Analysis and Testing of High Temperature Fibrous Insulation for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran

    1999-01-01

    Analytical models were developed to model the heat transfer through high-temperature fibrous insulation used in metallic thermal protection systems on reusable launch vehicles. The optically thick approximation was used to simulate radiation heat transfer through the insulation. Different models for gaseous conduction and solid conduction in the fibers, and for combining the various modes of heat transfer into a local, volume-averaged, thermal conductivity were considered. The governing heat transfer equations were solved numerically, and effective thermal conductivities were calculated from the steady-state results. An experimental apparatus was developed to measure the apparent thermal conductivity of insulation subjected to pressures, temperatures and temperature gradients representative of re-entry conditions for launch vehicles. The apparent thermal conductivity of an alumina fiber insulation was measured at nominal densities of 24, 48 and 96 kg/cu m. Data were obtained at environmental pressures from 10(exp 4) to 760 torr, with the insulation cold side maintained at room temperature and its hot side temperature varying up to 1000 C. The experimental results were used to evaluate the analytical models. The best analytical model resulted in effective thermal conductivity predictions that were within 8% of experimental results.

  4. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for High-Throughput Phenotyping and Agronomic Research

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yeyin; Thomasson, J. Alex; Murray, Seth C.; Pugh, N. Ace; Rooney, William L.; Shafian, Sanaz; Rajan, Nithya; Rouze, Gregory; Morgan, Cristine L. S.; Neely, Haly L.; Rana, Aman; Bagavathiannan, Muthu V.; Henrickson, James; Bowden, Ezekiel; Valasek, John; Olsenholler, Jeff; Bishop, Michael P.; Sheridan, Ryan; Putman, Eric B.; Popescu, Sorin; Burks, Travis; Cope, Dale; Ibrahim, Amir; McCutchen, Billy F.; Baltensperger, David D.; Avant, Robert V.; Vidrine, Misty; Yang, Chenghai

    2016-01-01

    Advances in automation and data science have led agriculturists to seek real-time, high-quality, high-volume crop data to accelerate crop improvement through breeding and to optimize agronomic practices. Breeders have recently gained massive data-collection capability in genome sequencing of plants. Faster phenotypic trait data collection and analysis relative to genetic data leads to faster and better selections in crop improvement. Furthermore, faster and higher-resolution crop data collection leads to greater capability for scientists and growers to improve precision-agriculture practices on increasingly larger farms; e.g., site-specific application of water and nutrients. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have recently gained traction as agricultural data collection systems. Using UAVs for agricultural remote sensing is an innovative technology that differs from traditional remote sensing in more ways than strictly higher-resolution images; it provides many new and unique possibilities, as well as new and unique challenges. Herein we report on processes and lessons learned from year 1—the summer 2015 and winter 2016 growing seasons–of a large multidisciplinary project evaluating UAV images across a range of breeding and agronomic research trials on a large research farm. Included are team and project planning, UAV and sensor selection and integration, and data collection and analysis workflow. The study involved many crops and both breeding plots and agronomic fields. The project’s goal was to develop methods for UAVs to collect high-quality, high-volume crop data with fast turnaround time to field scientists. The project included five teams: Administration, Flight Operations, Sensors, Data Management, and Field Research. Four case studies involving multiple crops in breeding and agronomic applications add practical descriptive detail. Lessons learned include critical information on sensors, air vehicles, and configuration parameters for both. As the first

  5. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for High-Throughput Phenotyping and Agronomic Research.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yeyin; Thomasson, J Alex; Murray, Seth C; Pugh, N Ace; Rooney, William L; Shafian, Sanaz; Rajan, Nithya; Rouze, Gregory; Morgan, Cristine L S; Neely, Haly L; Rana, Aman; Bagavathiannan, Muthu V; Henrickson, James; Bowden, Ezekiel; Valasek, John; Olsenholler, Jeff; Bishop, Michael P; Sheridan, Ryan; Putman, Eric B; Popescu, Sorin; Burks, Travis; Cope, Dale; Ibrahim, Amir; McCutchen, Billy F; Baltensperger, David D; Avant, Robert V; Vidrine, Misty; Yang, Chenghai

    2016-01-01

    Advances in automation and data science have led agriculturists to seek real-time, high-quality, high-volume crop data to accelerate crop improvement through breeding and to optimize agronomic practices. Breeders have recently gained massive data-collection capability in genome sequencing of plants. Faster phenotypic trait data collection and analysis relative to genetic data leads to faster and better selections in crop improvement. Furthermore, faster and higher-resolution crop data collection leads to greater capability for scientists and growers to improve precision-agriculture practices on increasingly larger farms; e.g., site-specific application of water and nutrients. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have recently gained traction as agricultural data collection systems. Using UAVs for agricultural remote sensing is an innovative technology that differs from traditional remote sensing in more ways than strictly higher-resolution images; it provides many new and unique possibilities, as well as new and unique challenges. Herein we report on processes and lessons learned from year 1-the summer 2015 and winter 2016 growing seasons-of a large multidisciplinary project evaluating UAV images across a range of breeding and agronomic research trials on a large research farm. Included are team and project planning, UAV and sensor selection and integration, and data collection and analysis workflow. The study involved many crops and both breeding plots and agronomic fields. The project's goal was to develop methods for UAVs to collect high-quality, high-volume crop data with fast turnaround time to field scientists. The project included five teams: Administration, Flight Operations, Sensors, Data Management, and Field Research. Four case studies involving multiple crops in breeding and agronomic applications add practical descriptive detail. Lessons learned include critical information on sensors, air vehicles, and configuration parameters for both. As the first and

  6. Trajectory Optimization and Conceptual Study of Small Test Vehicles for Hypersonic Engine Using High-Altitude Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Takenaka, Youichi; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Sawai, Shujiro

    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA announced a long-term vision recently. In the vision, JAXA aims to develop hypersonic aircrafts. A pre-cooled turbojet engine has great potential as one of newly developed hypersonic air-breathing engines. We also expect the engine to be installed in space transportation vehicles in future. For combustion test in real flight condition of the engines, JAXA has an experimental plan with a small test vehicle falling from a high-altitude balloon. This paper applies numerical analysis and optimization techniques to conceptual designs of the test vehicle in order to obtain the best configuration and trajectory that can achieve the flight test. The results show helpful knowledge when we design prototype vehicles.

  7. Trajectory Optimization and Conceptual Study of Small Test Vehicles for a Hypersonic Engine Using a High-Altitude Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Takenaka, Youichi; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Sawai, Shujiro

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA, announced a long-term vision recently. In the vision, JAXA aims to develop hypersonic aircrafts. A pre-cooled turbojet engine has great potential as one of newly developed hypersonic airbreathing engines. We also expect the engine to be installed in space transportation vehicles in the future. For combustion test in the real flight conditions of the engines, JAXA has an experimental plan where a small test vehicle is released from a high-altitude balloon. This paper applies numerical analysis and optimization techniques to conceptual designs of the test vehicle in order to obtain the best configuration and trajectory for the flight test. The results show helpful knowledge for designing prototype vehicles.

  8. Vehicle capture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacke, Kenneth L.

    1998-12-01

    Primex Aerospace Company, under contract with the U.S. Army Armament Research Development & Engineering Center (ARDEC), has developed a portable vehicle capture system for use at vehicle checkpoints. Currently when a vehicle does not stop at a checkpoint, there are three possible reactions: let the vehicle go unchallenged, pursue the vehicle or stop the vehicle with lethal force. This system provides a non-lethal alternative that will stop and contain the vehicle. The system is completely portable with the heaviest component weighing less than 120 pounds. It can be installed with no external electrical power or permanent anchors required. In its standby mode, the system does not impede normal traffic, but on command erects a barrier in less than 1.5 seconds. System tests have been conducted using 5,100 and 8.400 pound vehicles, traveling at speeds up to 45 mph. The system is designed to minimize vehicle damage and occupant injury, typically resulting in deceleration forces of less than 2.5 gs on the vehicle. According to the drivers involved in tests at 45 mph, the stopping forces feel similar to a panic stop with the vehicle brakes locked. The system is completely reusable and be rapidly reset.

  9. Towards cooperative guidance and control of highly automated vehicles: H-Mode and Conduct-by-Wire.

    PubMed

    Flemisch, Frank Ole; Bengler, Klaus; Bubb, Heiner; Winner, Hermann; Bruder, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a general ergonomic framework of cooperative guidance and control for vehicles with an emphasis on the cooperation between a human and a highly automated vehicle. In the twenty-first century, mobility and automation technologies are increasingly fused. In the sky, highly automated aircraft are flying with a high safety record. On the ground, a variety of driver assistance systems are being developed, and highly automated vehicles with increasingly autonomous capabilities are becoming possible. Human-centred automation has paved the way for a better cooperation between automation and humans. How can these highly automated systems be structured so that they can be easily understood, how will they cooperate with the human? The presented research was conducted using the methods of iterative build-up and refinement of framework by triangulation, i.e. by instantiating and testing the framework with at least two derived concepts and prototypes. This article sketches a general, conceptual ergonomic framework of cooperative guidance and control of highly automated vehicles, two concepts derived from the framework, prototypes and pilot data. Cooperation is exemplified in a list of aspects and related to levels of the driving task. With the concept 'Conduct-by-Wire', cooperation happens mainly on the guidance level, where the driver can delegate manoeuvres to the automation with a specialised manoeuvre interface. With H-Mode, a haptic-multimodal interaction with highly automated vehicles based on the H(orse)-Metaphor, cooperation is mainly done on guidance and control with a haptically active interface. Cooperativeness should be a key aspect for future human-automation systems. Especially for highly automated vehicles, cooperative guidance and control is a research direction with already promising concepts and prototypes that should be further explored. The application of the presented approach is every human-machine system that moves and includes high

  10. The Public Health Reach of High Fluoride Vehicles: Examples of Innovative Approaches.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Marisol; Wolff, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Fluorides and sealants have been shown to reduce caries in populations, making fluoride interventions a large part of the dental public health effort. Although public health programs have traditionally focused on fluoride vehicles delivering less than 1,000 ppm of fluoride, more recent efforts have shifted toward the use of high fluoride vehicles such as varnishes and prescription toothpastes. In the USA, states are developing innovative strategies to increase access to dental services by using primary care medical providers to deliver early preventive services as part of well-child care visits. Currently, Medicaid programs in 43 states reimburse medical providers for preventive services including varnish application. Still, there is uncertainty about the cost-effectiveness of such interventions. In many resource-strained environments, with shortages of dental health care providers, lack of fluoridated water and lower dental awareness, it is necessary to develop sustainable programs utilizing already established programs, like primary school education, where caries prevention may be set as a priority. Dental caries among the elderly is an ongoing complex problem. The 5,000-ppm F toothpaste may be a reasonable approach for developing public health programs where root caries control is the main concern. Fluoride varnish and high concentration fluoride toothpaste are attractive because they can easily be incorporated into well-child visits and community-based geriatric programs. Additional research on the effectiveness and costs associated with population-based programs of this nature for high risk groups is needed, especially in areas where a community-based fluoride delivery program is not available. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. High power valve regulated lead-acid batteries for new vehicle requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinidad, Francisco; Sáez, Francisco; Valenciano, Jesús

    The performance of high power VRLA ORBITAL™ batteries is presented. These batteries have been designed with isolated cylindrical cells, providing high reliability to the recombination process, while maintaining, at the same time, a very high compression (>80 kPa) over the life of the battery. Hence, the resulting VRLA modules combine a high rate capability with a very good cycle performance. Two different electrochemically active material compositions have been developed: high porosity and low porosity for starting and deep cycle applications, respectively (depending on the power demand and depth of discharge). Although, the initial performance of the starting version is higher, after a few cycles the active material of the deep cycle version is fully developed, and this achieves the same high rate capability. Both types are capable of supplying the necessary reliability for cranking at the lowest temperature (-40°C). Specific power of over 500 W/kg is achievable at a much lower cost than for nickel-metal hydride systems. Apart from the initial performance, an impressive behaviour of the cycling version has been found in deep cycle applications, due to the highly compressed and high density active material. When submitted to continuous discharge-charge cycles at 75% (IEC 896-2 specification) and 100% (BCI deep cycle) DoD, it has been found that the batteries are still healthy after more than 1000 and 700 cycles, respectively. However, it has been proven that the application of an IUi algorithm (up to 110% of overcharging) with a small constant current charging period at the end of the charge is absolutely necessary to achieve the above results. Without the final boosting period, the cycle life of the battery could be substantially shortened. The high specific power and reliability observed in the tests carried out, would allow ORBITAL™ batteries to comply with the more demanding requirements that are being introduced in conventional and future hybrid electric

  12. Occupational Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    When choosing a career, jobseekers often want to know which occupations offer the best prospects. Generally, occupations that have rapid job growth, many new jobs, or many job openings--and good wages--promise better opportunities. This paper shows how employment in particular occupations is projected to change from 2010 to 2020. It presents…

  13. Methods and Materials for Teaching Occupational Survival Skills. Phase III: Influences of the Occupational Survival Skills Modules on the Attainment of Skills and Attitudes toward Employment of Selected High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, James A.

    The Occupational Survival Skills (OSS) Modules were designed to offer high school students an opportunity to develop skills applicable to a wide range of jobs in the work world and to develop positive attitudes, perceptions, and motivations toward work. The primary purpose of this study was to describe and interpret the influence of the OSS…

  14. High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) longitudinal controller: Design, analyses, and simulation resultss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, Aaron J.; Hoffler, Keith D.; Proffitt, Melissa S.; Brown, Philip W.; Phillips, Michael R.; Rivers, Robert A.; Messina, Michael D.; Carzoo, Susan W.; Bacon, Barton J.; Foster, John F.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the design, analysis, and nonlinear simulation results (batch and piloted) for a longitudinal controller which is scheduled to be flight-tested on the High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The HARV is an F-18 airplane modified for and equipped with multi-axis thrust vectoring. The paper includes a description of the facilities, a detailed review of the feedback controller design, linear analysis results of the feedback controller, a description of the feed-forward controller design, nonlinear batch simulation results, and piloted simulation results. Batch simulation results include maximum pitch stick agility responses, angle of attack alpha captures, and alpha regulation for full lateral stick rolls at several alpha's. Piloted simulation results include task descriptions for several types of maneuvers, task guidelines, the corresponding Cooper-Harper ratings from three test pilots, and some pilot comments. The ratings show that desirable criteria are achieved for almost all of the piloted simulation tasks.

  15. Continuous high order sliding mode controller design for a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Zong, Qun; Su, Rui; Tian, Bailing

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates the problem of tracking control with uncertainties for a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (FAHV). In order to overcome the analytical intractability of this model, an Input-Output linearization model is constructed for the purpose of feedback control design. Then, the continuous finite time convergence high order sliding mode controller is designed for the Input-Output linearization model without uncertainties. In addition, a nonlinear disturbance observer is applied to estimate the uncertainties in order to compensate the controller and disturbance suppression, where disturbance observer and controller synthesis design is obtained. Finally, the synthesis of controller and disturbance observer is used to achieve the tracking for the velocity and altitude of the FAHV and simulations are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the control strategies.

  16. Validation of the F-18 high alpha research vehicle flight control and avionics systems modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chacon, Vince; Pahle, Joseph W.; Regenie, Victoria A.

    1990-01-01

    The verification and validation process is a critical portion of the development of a flight system. Verification, the steps taken to assure the system meets the design specification, has become a reasonably understood and straightforward process. Validation is the method used to ensure that the system design meets the needs of the project. As systems become more integrated and more critical in their functions, the validation process becomes more complex and important. The tests, tools, and techniques which are being used for the validation of the high alpha research vehicle (HARV) turning vane control system (TVCS) are discussed and the problems and their solutions are documented. The emphasis of this paper is on the validation of integrated system.

  17. Feasibility of Large High-Powered Solar Electric Propulsion Vehicles: Issues and Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capadona, Lynn A.; Woytach, Jeffrey M.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Manzella, David H.; Christie, Robert J.; Hickman, Tyler A.; Schneidegger, Robert J.; Hoffman, David J.; Klem, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Human exploration beyond low Earth orbit will require the use of enabling technologies that are efficient, affordable, and reliable. Solar electric propulsion (SEP) has been proposed by NASA s Human Exploration Framework Team as an option to achieve human exploration missions to near Earth objects (NEOs) because of its favorable mass efficiency as compared to traditional chemical systems. This paper describes the unique challenges and technology hurdles associated with developing a large high-power SEP vehicle. A subsystem level breakdown of factors contributing to the feasibility of SEP as a platform for future exploration missions to NEOs is presented including overall mission feasibility, trip time variables, propellant management issues, solar array power generation, array structure issues, and other areas that warrant investment in additional technology or engineering development.

  18. In-flight flow visualization characteristics of the NASA F-18 high alpha research vehicle at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Delfrate, John H.; Richwine, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Surface and off-surface flow visualization techniques were used to visualize the 3-D separated flows on the NASA F-18 high alpha research vehicle at high angles of attack. Results near the alpha = 25 to 26 deg and alpha = 45 to 49 deg are presented. Both the forebody and leading edge extension (LEX) vortex cores and breakdown locations were visualized using smoke. Forebody and LEX vortex separation lines on the surface were defined using an emitted fluid technique. A laminar separation bubble was also detected on the nose cone using the emitted fluid technique and was similar to that observed in the wind tunnel test, but not as extensive. Regions of attached, separated, and vortical flow were noted on the wing and the leading edge flap using tufts and flow cones, and compared well with limited wind tunnel results.

  19. Investigation on occupant ejection in high severity rear impact based on post mortem human subject sled tests.

    PubMed

    Petit, Philippe; Luet, Carole; Potier, Pascal; Vallancien, Guy

    2011-11-01

    Occupant protection in rear impact involves two competing challenges. On one hand, allowing a deformation of the seat would act as an energy absorber in low severity impacts and would consequently decrease the risk of neck injuries. However, on the other hand, large deformations of the seat may increase the likelihood of occupant ejection in high severity cases. Green et al. 1987 analyzed a total of 919 accidents in Great Britain. They found that occupant ejection resulted in a risk of severe injuries and fatalities between 3.6 and 4.5 times higher than those cases where no ejection was observed. The sample included single front, side and rear impacts as well as multiple impacts and rollover. The rate of belt use in the sample was 50%. While this analysis included all forms of impact scenarios, nevertheless, it highlights the relative injury severity of occupant ejection. Extensive literature search has found no full-scale rear impact tests involving Post Mortem Human Subjects (PMHS) conducted in a laboratory environment and resulting in ejection. This paper describes a total of 10 sled tests conducted on 3 belted PMHS using a simplified seat design composed of rigid plates assembled such that the angular and linear stiffness of the seatback (including the foam) was modeled. The initial angular position and the range of motion of the seatback, the size of the PMHS, the slack length of the seatbelt, the angular stiffness of the seatback, and the use of headrest were varied in the test matrix while the pulse was kept constant (triangular acceleration with a peak of 17 G at 30 ms and a duration of 95 ms). In the test series, the tests were not run randomly but the likelihood of occupant ejection was increased systematically until ejection occurred. PMHS seat ejection was observed only for the 95th percentile, initially positioned with a seatback angle relative to the vertical equal to 22°, a range of seatback angular motion equal to 44° and no headrest. Repeating

  20. Challenges in Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Photogrammetry for Archaeological Mapping at High Elevations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. A.; Wernke, S.

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), especially multi-rotor vehicles, are becoming ubiquitous and their appeal for generating photogrammetry-based maps has grown. The options are many and costs have plummeted in last five years; however, many challenges persist with their deployment. We mapped the archaeological site Maw­chu Llacta, a settlement in the southern highlands of Peru (Figure 1). Mawchu Llacta is a planned colonial town built over a major Inka-era center in the high-elevation grasslands at ~4,000m asl. The "general resettlement of Indians" was a massive forced resettlement program, for which very little local-level documentation exists. Mawachu Llacta's excellently preserved architecture includes >500 buildings and hundreds of walls spread across ~13h posed significant mapping challenges. Many environmental factors impact UAV deployment. The air pressure at 4,100 m asl is dramatically lower than at sea level. The dry season diurnal temperature differentials can vary from 7°C to 22°C daily. High and hot conditions frequently occur from late morning to early afternoon. Reaching Mawchu Llacta requires hiking 4km with 400m of vertical gain over steep and rocky terrain. There is also no on-site power or secure storage. Thus, the UAV must be packable. FAA regulations govern US UAV deployments, but regulations were less stringent in Peru. However, ITAR exemptions and Peruvian customs requirements were required. The Peruvian government has established an importation and approval process that entails leaving the UAV at customs, while obtaining the necessary government approvals, both of which can be problematic. We have deployed the Aurora Flight Sciences Skate fixed wing ßUAV, an in-house fixed wing UAV based on the Skywalker X-5 flying wing, and a tethered 9 m3 capacity latex meteorological weather balloon. Development of an autonomous blimp/balloon has been ruled-out. A 3DR Solo is being assessed for excavation mapping.

  1. Large-Area, Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Neutron Detector for Vehicle-Mounted Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Martin, Christopher S.; Athanasiades, Athanasios; Regmi, Murari; Vazquez-Flores, Gerson J.; Davenport, Stephen; King, Nicholas S.; Lyons, Tom

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a large-area, low-cost, high-efficiency neutron detector for vehicle-mounted operation. The detector, which has overall dimensions 12.7 cm x 91.4 cm x 102 cm (5”x36”x40”), a sensitive area equal to 0.85 m2 (1320 in2), and weight of 110 kg (242 lbs), employs an array of 90 boron-coated straw (BCS) detectors. PTI has also developed electronics to minimize cost and space while providing low-noise signal conditioning for both neutron and gamma detection channels, as well as low energy Bluetooth communication with handheld devices. Extremely low power consumption allows continuous use for 225 hours (-.10 days) using three AAA lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. We present radiological, mechanical, and environmental tests, collected from four full-scale prototypes. Outdoor neutron-counting tests with a moderated 252Cf source 2 m away from the center of the detector face showed an average detection rate of 5.5 cps/ng with a standard deviation of 0.09 cps/ng over the four individual detector measurements. Measurements showed a gamma rejection ratio of 1.0 x 10-8, and gamma absolute rejection ratio (GARRn) of 0.93. The prototypes were also operated successfully onboard a moving vehicle for high-speed tests and a long-range 1433-mile, two-day road trip from Houston, TX, USA, to Laurel, MD, USA. Using auxiliary DARPA SIGMA equipment, the GPS, timestamp, gamma and neutron data were transmitted over the cellular network with 10 Hz resolution to a server and real-time tracking website. Mechanical impact and electrostatic discharge testing produced no spurious counts in either the neutron or gamma channels. Ambient environmental temperature testing showed less than ±1% response variation over the range from -30°C to +55°C.

  2. Benefits of High Performance Computing in the Design of Lightweight Army Vehicle Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-13

    materials in the applications of military vehicle chassis components has the potential of significantly reducing vehicle weight and improves its...weight reduction of 33% as compared to that made from all steel construction. The shapes of the hybrid composite control arms were tailored to produce...project to explore chassis weight reduction for military vehicles (HMMWV). With the advent of super computing, the automotive industry can exploit

  3. High-intensity, occupation-specific training in a series of firefighters during phase II cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dunlei; Berbarie, Rafic F.

    2013-01-01

    Six male firefighters who were referred to phase II cardiac rehabilitation after coronary revascularization participated in a specialized regimen of high-intensity, occupation-specific training (HIOST) that simulated firefighting tasks. During each session, the electrocardiogram, heart rate, and blood pressure were monitored, and the patients were observed for adverse symptoms. No patient had to discontinue HIOST because of adverse arrhythmias or symptoms. For physicians who must make decisions about return to work, the information collected over multiple HIOST sessions might be more thorough and conclusive than the information gained during a single treadmill exercise stress test (the recommended evaluation method). PMID:23543963

  4. Occupational cancer in Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Merler, E; Vineis, P; Alhaique, D; Miligi, L

    1999-01-01

    This article is a discussion of occupational cancer in Italy. The introduction provides the necessary context of Italian industrialization and occupational health regulation. This is followed by a review of Italian epidemiologic studies of occupational cancer risks considered in terms of relative measures of risk and attributable risk of carcinogenic agents or exposure circumstances. We attempt to establish the number of workers exposed to carcinogens in Italy and the intensity of their exposures. Finally, the Italian system of compensation for occupational cancer is discussed. Several cohort and case-control studies have addressed the issue of occupational risks, mostly among male workers. The results of these studies suggest that the growing incidence of and mortality by mesothelioma is explained by the widespread and intense exposure to asbestos in some Italian industrial settings. A high attributable risk of lung tumors among male populations in industrial areas of northern Italy is explained by occupational exposures. However, insufficient data are available for clear definition of the extent and intensity of occupational exposure to carcinogenic substances. In Italy, we must prioritize and maximize resources in occupational cancer epidemiology and revitalize the role of national institutions. Recent legislation has established new regulations on the handling of carcinogenic substances in industrial settings, a new list of occupational diseases, and a national registry of mesothelioma linked to asbestos exposure. These legislative changes are expected to have positive effects. PMID:10350509

  5. Real-Time and High-Fidelity Simulation Environment for Autonomous Ground Vehicle Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Jonathan; Myint, Steven; Kuo, Calvin; Jain, Abhi; Grip, Havard; Jayakumar, Paramsothy; Overholt, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a collaborative project between U.S. Army TARDEC and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to develop a unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) simulation model using the ROAMS vehicle modeling framework. Besides modeling the physical suspension of the vehicle, the sensing and navigation of the HMMWV vehicle are simulated. Using models of urban and off-road environments, the HMMWV simulation was tested in several ways, including navigation in an urban environment with obstacle avoidance and the performance of a lane change maneuver.

  6. Real-Time and High-Fidelity Simulation Environment for Autonomous Ground Vehicle Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Jonathan; Myint, Steven; Kuo, Calvin; Jain, Abhi; Grip, Havard; Jayakumar, Paramsothy; Overholt, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a collaborative project between U.S. Army TARDEC and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to develop a unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) simulation model using the ROAMS vehicle modeling framework. Besides modeling the physical suspension of the vehicle, the sensing and navigation of the HMMWV vehicle are simulated. Using models of urban and off-road environments, the HMMWV simulation was tested in several ways, including navigation in an urban environment with obstacle avoidance and the performance of a lane change maneuver.

  7. High-Alpha Handling Qualities Flight Research on the NASA F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, Keith D.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Bahm, Catherine; Davidson, John B.; Bacon, Barton J.; Murphy, Patrick C.; Ostroff, Aaron J.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    1996-01-01

    A flight research study of high-angle-of-attack handling qualities has been conducted at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center using the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The objectives were to create a high-angle-of-attack handling qualities flight database, develop appropriate research evaluation maneuvers, and evaluate high-angle-of-attack handling qualities guidelines and criteria. Using linear and nonlinear simulations and flight research data, the predictions from each criterion were compared with the pilot ratings and comments. Proposed high-angle-of-attack nonlinear design guidelines and proposed handling qualities criteria and guidelines developed using piloted simulation were considered. Recently formulated time-domain Neal-Smith guidelines were also considered for application to high-angle-of-attack maneuvering. Conventional envelope criteria were evaluated for possible extension to the high-angle-of-attack regime. Additionally, the maneuvers were studied as potential evaluation techniques, including a limited validation of the proposed standard evaluation maneuver set. This paper gives an overview of these research objectives through examples and summarizes result highlights. The maneuver development is described briefly, the criteria evaluation is emphasized with example results given, and a brief discussion of the database form and content is presented.

  8. Thermostructural applications of heat pipes for cooling leading edges of high-speed aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J.; Glass, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Heat pipes have been considered for use on wing leading edge for over 20 years. Early concepts envisioned metal heat pipes cooling a metallic leading edge. Several superalloy/sodium heat pipes were fabricated and successfully tested for wing leading edge cooling. Results of radiant heat and aerothermal testing indicate the feasibility of using heat pipes to cool the stagnation region of shuttle-type space transportation systems. The test model withstood a total seven radiant heating tests, eight aerothermal tests, and twenty-seven supplemental radiant heating tests. Cold-wall heating rates ranged from 21 to 57 Btu/sq ft-s and maximum operating temperatures ranged from 1090 to 1520 F. Follow-on studies investigated the application of heat pipes to cool the stagnation regions of single-stage-to-orbit and advanced shuttle vehicles. Results of those studies indicate that a 'D-shaped' structural design can reduce the mass of the heat-pipe concept by over 44 percent compared to a circular heat-pipe geometry. Simple analytical models for heat-pipe startup from the frozen state (working fluid initially frozen) were adequate to approximate transient, startup, and steady-state heat-pipe performance. Improvement in analysis methods has resulted in the development of a finite-element analysis technique to predict heat-pipe startup from the frozen state. However, current requirements of light-weight design and reliability suggest that metallic heat pipes embedded in a refractory composite material should be used. This concept is the concept presently being evaluated for NASP. A refractory-composite/heat-pipe-cooled wing leading edge is currently being considered for the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). This concept uses high-temperature refractory-metal/lithium heat pipes embedded within a refractory-composite structure and is significantly lighter than an actively cooled wing leading edge because it eliminates the need for active cooling during ascent and descent. Since the

  9. Blast resistant vehicle seat

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B

    2013-02-12

    Disclosed are various seats for vehicles particularly military vehicles that are susceptible to attack by road-bed explosive devices such as land mines or improvised explosive devices. The seats often have rigid seat shells and may include rigid bracing for rigidly securing the seat to the chassis of the vehicle. Typically embodiments include channels and particulate media such as sand disposed in the channels. A gas distribution system is generally employed to pump a gas through the channels and in some embodiments the gas is provided at a pressure sufficient to fluidize the particulate media when an occupant is sitting on the seat.

  10. Development of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) based high altitude balloon (HAB) platform for active aerosol sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lateran, S.; Sedan, M. F.; Harithuddin, A. S. M.; Azrad, S.

    2016-10-01

    The knowledge on the abundance and diversity of the minute particles or aerosols in the earth's stratosphere is still in its infancy as aerosol sampling at high-altitude still possess a lot of challenges. Thus far, high-altitude aerosol sampling has been conducted mostly using manned flights, which requires enormous financial and logistical resources. There had been researches for the utilisation of high altitude balloon (HAB) for active and passive aerosol samplings within the stratosphere. However, the gathered samples in the payload were either brought down by controlling the balloon air pressure or were just dropped with a parachute to slow the descend speed in order to reduce the impact upon landing. In most cases, the drop location of the sample are unfavorable such as in the middle of the sea, dense foliage, etc. Hence a system that can actively sample aerosols at high-altitude and improve the delivery method in terms of quality and reliability using unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is designed and tested in this study.

  11. High occupational physical activity and risk of ischaemic heart disease in women: the interplay with physical activity during leisure time.

    PubMed

    Allesøe, Karen; Holtermann, Andreas; Aadahl, Mette; Thomsen, Jane F; Hundrup, Yrsa A; Søgaard, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that physically demanding work is a risk factor for heart disease among men, especially those with low or moderate physical activity during leisure time. Among women, present evidence is inconclusive. The design was a prospective cohort study. This investigation in the Danish Nurse Cohort Study included 12,093 female nurses aged 45-64 years, who answered a self-report questionnaire on physical activity at work and during leisure time, known risk factors for ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and occupational factors at baseline in 1993. Information on the 15-year incidence of IHD was obtained by individual linkage in the National Register of Hospital Discharges to 2008. During follow-up 580 participants were hospitalised with IHD. A significant interaction between occupational and leisure time physical activity was found with the lowest risk of IHD among nurses with the combination of moderate physical activity at work and vigorous physical activity during leisure time. Compared to this group high physical activity at work was associated with a higher risk of IHD at all levels of physical activity during leisure time increasing from hazard ratio 1.75 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-2.80) among nurses with vigorous physical activity during leisure time to 2.65 (95% CI 1.44-4.88) among nurses being sedentary during leisure time. This study among Danish nurses suggests that high physical activity at work is a risk factor for IHD among women. Vigorous physical activity during leisure time lowered but did not completely counteract the adverse effect of occupational physical activity on risk of IHD. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  12. Injuries to Occupants of U.S. Army High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles in Rollover Accidents, 1989-2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-02

    the ASMIS data base (field values are indicated in parentheses): Type of Protective Equipment ( seatbelt ), Protective Equipment Available (yes), and...abstracted from the ASMIS administrative data base of accident reports filed with the USACR / SC. These accident reports did not capture physical ...personal protective equipment (PPE) identified and cataloged in the HMMWV investigation, including restraint systems, seatbelts , and turret gunner

  13. Occupational Infection in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Jeong, Jae Sim

    2010-01-01

    Occupational infection is a human disease caused by work-associated exposure to microbial agents through human and environmental contact. According to the literature, occupational infection was the third leading cause of occupational disease (861 cases, 8.0%), and health care, agricultural, forestry, and fishery workers were risk groups in Korea. In addition, most high-risk groups have not been protected by workers' compensation, which could lead to underestimation of the exact spectrum and magnitude of the problem, and may also result in a lack of development and implementation of occupational infection management. Through a review of national guidelines and documentations on prevention and control of occupational infection, a management strategy would promote adherence to worker safety regulations if it is explicit with regard to the agent and mode of infection in each of the high-risk groups. PMID:21258592

  14. Novel vehicle based on cubosomes for ophthalmic delivery of flurbiprofen with low irritancy and high bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Han, Shun; Shen, Jin-qiu; Gan, Yong; Geng, Hai-ming; Zhang, Xin-xin; Zhu, Chun-liu; Gan, Li

    2010-08-01

    To develop a novel vehicle based on cubosomes as an ophthalmic drug delivery system for flurbiprofen (FB) to reduce ocular irritancy and improve bioavailability. FB-loaded cubosomes were prepared using hot and high-pressure homogenization. Cubosomes were then characterized by particle size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, particle morphology, inner cubic structure and in vitro release. Corneal permeation was evaluated using modified Franz-type cells. Ocular irritation was then evaluated using both the Draize method and histological examination. The ocular pharmacokinetics of FB was determined using microdialysis. The particle size of each cubosome formulation was about 150 nm. A bicontinuous cubic phase of cubic P-type was determined using cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) observation and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis. In vitro corneal permeation study revealed that FB formulated in cubosomes exhibited 2.5-fold (F1) and 2.0-fold (F2) increase in P(app) compared with FB PBS. In the ocular irritation test, irritation scores for each group were less than 2, indicating that all formulations exhibited excellent ocular tolerance. Histological examination revealed that neither the structure nor the integrity of the cornea was visibly affected after incubation with FB cubosomes. The AUC of FB administered as FB cubosome F2 was 486.36+/-38.93 ng.mL(-1).min.microg(-1), which was significantly higher than that of FB Na eye drops (P<0.01). Compared with FB Na eye drops, the T(max) of FB cubosome F2 was about 1.6-fold higher and the MRT was also significantly longer (P<0.001). This novel low-irritant vehicle based on cubosomes might be a promising system for effective ocular drug delivery.

  15. Influences of aerodynamic loads on hunting stability of high-speed railway vehicles and parameter studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiao-Hui; Wu, Han; Lai, Jiang; Sheng, Hong-Zhi

    2014-12-01

    The influences of steady aerodynamic loads on hunting stability of high-speed railway vehicles were investigated in this study. A mechanism is suggested to explain the change of hunting behavior due to actions of aerodynamic loads: the aerodynamic loads can change the position of vehicle system (consequently the contact relations), the wheel/rail normal contact forces, the gravitational restoring forces/moments and the creep forces/moments. A mathematical model for hunting stability incorporating such influences was developed. A computer program capable of incorporating the effects of aerodynamic loads based on the model was written, and the critical speeds were calculated using this program. The dependences of linear and nonlinear critical speeds on suspension parameters considering aerodynamic loads were analyzed by using the orthogonal test method, the results were also compared with the situations without aerodynamic loads. It is shown that the most dominant factors affecting linear and nonlinear critical speeds are different whether the aerodynamic loads considered or not. The damping of yaw damper is the most dominant influencing factor for linear critical speeds, while the damping of lateral damper is most dominant for nonlinear ones. When the influences of aerodynamic loads are considered, the linear critical speeds decrease with the rise of crosswind velocity, whereas it is not the case for the nonlinear critical speeds. The variation trends of critical speeds with suspension parameters can be significantly changed by aerodynamic loads. Combined actions of aerodynamic loads and suspension parameters also affect the critical speeds. The effects of such joint action are more obvious for nonlinear critical speeds.

  16. High Energy Density and High Temperature Multilayer Capacitor Films for Electric Vehicle Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treufeld, Imre; Song, Michelle; Zhu, Lei; Baer, Eric; Snyder, Joe; Langhe, Deepak

    2015-03-01

    Multilayer films (MLFs) with high energy density and high temperature capability (>120 °C) have been developed at Case Western Reserve University. Such films offer a potential solution for electric car DC-link capacitors, where high ripple currents and high temperature tolerance are required. The current state-of-the-art capacitors used in electric cars for converting DC to AC use biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP), which can only operate at temperatures up to 85 °C requiring an external cooling system. The polycarbonate (PC)/poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) MLFs have a higher permittivity compared to that of BOPP (2.3), leading to higher energy density. They have good mechanical stability and reasonably low dielectric losses at 120 °C. Nonetheless, our preliminary dielectric measurements show that the MLFs exhibit appreciable dielectric losses (20%) at 120 °C, which would, despite all the other advantages, make them not suitable for practical applications. Our preliminary data showed that dielectric losses of the MLFs at 120 °C up to 400 MV/m and 1000 Hz originate mostly from impurity ionic conduction. This work is supported by the NSF PFI/BIC Program (IIP-1237708).

  17. Basic Simulation Environment for Highly Customized Connected and Autonomous Vehicle Kinematic Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Linguo; Cai, Baigen; ShangGuan, Wei; Wang, Jian; Wang, Huashen

    2017-01-01

    To enhance the reality of Connected and Autonomous Vehicles (CAVs) kinematic simulation scenarios and to guarantee the accuracy and reliability of the verification, a four-layer CAVs kinematic simulation framework, which is composed with road network layer, vehicle operating layer, uncertainties modelling layer and demonstrating layer, is proposed in this paper. Properties of the intersections are defined to describe the road network. A target position based vehicle position updating method is designed to simulate such vehicle behaviors as lane changing and turning. Vehicle kinematic models are implemented to maintain the status of the vehicles when they are moving towards the target position. Priorities for individual vehicle control are authorized for different layers. Operation mechanisms of CAVs uncertainties, which are defined as position error and communication delay in this paper, are implemented in the simulation to enhance the reality of the simulation. A simulation platform is developed based on the proposed methodology. A comparison of simulated and theoretical vehicle delay has been analyzed to prove the validity and the creditability of the platform. The scenario of rear-end collision avoidance is conducted to verify the uncertainties operating mechanisms, and a slot-based intersections (SIs) control strategy is realized and verified in the simulation platform to show the supports of the platform to CAVs kinematic simulation and verification. PMID:28832518

  18. A high speed telemetry data link for an autonomous roving vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cipolle, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    A data link system used on a prototype autonomous roving vehicle is described. This system provides a means of acquiring, formatting, and transmitting information on board the vehicle to a controlling computer. Included is a statement of requirements and the design philosophy. Additionally, interfacing with the rover systems is discussed, along with the overall performance of the telemetry link.

  19. Basic Simulation Environment for Highly Customized Connected and Autonomous Vehicle Kinematic Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Chai, Linguo; Cai, Baigen; ShangGuan, Wei; Wang, Jian; Wang, Huashen

    2017-08-23

    To enhance the reality of Connected and Autonomous Vehicles (CAVs) kinematic simulation scenarios and to guarantee the accuracy and reliability of the verification, a four-layer CAVs kinematic simulation framework, which is composed with road network layer, vehicle operating layer, uncertainties modelling layer and demonstrating layer, is proposed in this paper. Properties of the intersections are defined to describe the road network. A target position based vehicle position updating method is designed to simulate such vehicle behaviors as lane changing and turning. Vehicle kinematic models are implemented to maintain the status of the vehicles when they are moving towards the target position. Priorities for individual vehicle control are authorized for different layers. Operation mechanisms of CAVs uncertainties, which are defined as position error and communication delay in this paper, are implemented in the simulation to enhance the reality of the simulation. A simulation platform is developed based on the proposed methodology. A comparison of simulated and theoretical vehicle delay has been analyzed to prove the validity and the creditability of the platform. The scenario of rear-end collision avoidance is conducted to verify the uncertainties operating mechanisms, and a slot-based intersections (SIs) control strategy is realized and verified in the simulation platform to show the supports of the platform to CAVs kinematic simulation and verification.

  20. Low cost, compact, and high efficiency traction motor for electric and hybrid electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ehsani, Mark

    2002-10-07

    A new motor drive, the switched reluctance motor drive, has been developed for hybrid-electric vehicles. The motor drive has been designed, built and tested in the test bed at a near vehicle scale. It has been shown that the switched reluctance motor drive is more suitable for traction application than any other motor drive.

  1. Control method for high-pressure hydrogen vehicle fueling station dispensers

    DOEpatents

    Kountz, Kenneth John; Kriha, Kenneth Robert; Liss, William E.

    2006-06-13

    A method for quick filling a vehicle hydrogen storage vessel with hydrogen, the key component of which is an algorithm used to control the fill process, which interacts with the hydrogen dispensing apparatus to determine the vehicle hydrogen storage vessel capacity.

  2. A robust and high precision optimal explicit guidance scheme for solid motor propelled launch vehicles with thrust and drag uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Arnab; Padhi, Radhakant; Mallaram, Sanjeev; Mallikarjuna Rao, G.; Manickavasagam, M.

    2016-10-01

    A new nonlinear optimal and explicit guidance law is presented in this paper for launch vehicles propelled by solid motors. It can ensure very high terminal precision despite not having the exact knowledge of the thrust-time curve apriori. This was motivated from using it for a carrier launch vehicle in a hypersonic mission, which demands an extremely narrow terminal accuracy window for the launch vehicle for successful initiation of operation of the hypersonic vehicle. The proposed explicit guidance scheme, which computes the optimal guidance command online, ensures the required stringent final conditions with high precision at the injection point. A key feature of the proposed guidance law is an innovative extension of the recently developed model predictive static programming guidance with flexible final time. A penalty function approach is also followed to meet the input and output inequality constraints throughout the vehicle trajectory. In this paper, the guidance law has been successfully validated from nonlinear six degree-of-freedom simulation studies by designing an inner-loop autopilot as well, which enhances confidence of its usefulness significantly. In addition to excellent nominal results, the proposed guidance has been found to have good robustness for perturbed cases as well.

  3. Experience with Ada on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle flight test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regenie, Victoria A.; Earls, Michael; Le, Jeanette; Thomson, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Considerable experience has been acquired with Ada at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility during the on-going High Alpha Technology Program. In this program, an F-18 aircraft has been highly modified by the addition of thrust-vectoring vanes to the airframe. In addition, substantial alteration was made in the original quadruplex flight control system. The result is the High Alpha Research Vehicle. An additional research flight control computer was incorporated in each of the four channels. Software for the research flight control computer was written Ada. To date, six releases of this software have been flown. This paper provides a detailed description of the modifications to the research flight control system. Efficient ground-testing of the software was accomplished by using simulations that used the Ada for portions of their software. These simulations are also described. Modifying and transferring the Ada flight software to the software simulation configuration has allowed evaluation of this language. This paper also discusses such significant issues in using Ada as portability, modifiability, and testability as well as documentation requirements.

  4. Experience with Ada on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle Flight Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regenie, Victoria A.; Earls, Michael; Le, Jeanette; Thomson, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Considerable experience was acquired with Ada at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility during the on-going High Alpha Technology Program. In this program, an F-18 aircraft was highly modified by the addition of thrust-vectoring vanes to the airframe. In addition, substantial alteration was made in the original quadruplex flight control system. The result is the High Alpha Research Vehicle. An additional research flight control computer was incorporated in each of the four channels. Software for the research flight control computer was written in Ada. To date, six releases of this software have been flown. This paper provides a detailed description of the modifications to the research flight control system. Efficient ground-testing of the software was accomplished by using simulations that used the Ada for portions of their software. These simulations are also described. Modifying and transferring the Ada for flight software to the software simulation configuration has allowed evaluation of this language. This paper also discusses such significant issues in using Ada as portability, modifiability, and testability as well as documentation requirements.

  5. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Aircraft High-Lift Components with Vehicle Sketch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Erik D.

    2016-01-01

    Vehicle Sketch Pad (OpenVSP) is a parametric geometry modeler that has been used extensively for conceptual design studies of aircraft, including studies using higher-order analysis. OpenVSP can model flap and slat surfaces using simple shearing of the airfoil coordinates, which is an appropriate level of complexity for lower-order aerodynamic analysis methods. For three-dimensional analysis, however, there is not a built-in method for defining the high-lift components in OpenVSP in a realistic manner, or for controlling their complex motions in a parametric manner that is intuitive to the designer. This paper seeks instead to utilize OpenVSP's existing capabilities, and establish a set of best practices for modeling high-lift components at a level of complexity suitable for higher-order analysis methods. Techniques are described for modeling the flap and slat components as separate three-dimensional surfaces, and for controlling their motion using simple parameters defined in the local hinge-axis frame of reference. To demonstrate the methodology, an OpenVSP model for the Energy-Efficient Transport (EET) AR12 wind-tunnel model has been created, taking advantage of OpenVSP's Advanced Parameter Linking capability to translate the motions of the high-lift components from the hinge-axis coordinate system to a set of transformations in OpenVSP's frame of reference.

  6. Validating high-resolution California coastal flood modeling with Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) is a numerical modeling scheme used to predict coastal flooding due to sea level rise and storms influenced by climate change, currently in use in central California and in development for Southern California (Pt. Conception to the Mexican border). Using a framework of circulation, wave, analytical, and Bayesian models at different geographic scales, high-resolution results are translated as relevant hazards projections at the local scale that include flooding, wave heights, coastal erosion, shoreline change, and cliff failures. Ready access to accurate, high-resolution coastal flooding data is critical for further validation and refinement of CoSMoS and improved coastal hazard projections. High-resolution Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) provides an exceptional data source as appropriately-timed flights during extreme tides or storms provide a geographically-extensive method for determining areas of inundation and flooding extent along expanses of complex and varying coastline. Landward flood extents are numerically identified via edge-detection in imagery from single flights, and can also be ascertained via change detection using additional flights and imagery collected during average wave/tide conditions. The extracted flooding positions are compared against CoSMoS results for similar tide, water level, and storm-intensity conditions, allowing for robust testing and validation of CoSMoS and providing essential feedback for supporting regional and local model improvement.

  7. SERUM CYTOKERATIN 18 AND CYTOKINE ELEVATIONS SUGGEST A HIGH PREVALENCE OF OCCUPATIONAL LIVER DISEASE IN HIGHLY EXPOSED ELASTOMER/POLYMER WORKERS

    PubMed Central

    Cave, Matt; Falkner, Keith Cameron; Henry, Latasha; Costello, Brittany; Gregory, Bonnie; McClain, Craig J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Cytokeratin 18 (CK18) is a novel serologic biomarker for occupational liver disease. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of CK18 elevation in elastomer/polymer workers exposed to acrylonitrile, 1,3 butadiene, and styrene. Methods 82 chemical workers were evaluated. CK18 was determined by ELISA and pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured by multi-analyte chemiluminescent detection. Results 39% (32 of 82) had elevated CK18 levels which were not explained by alcohol or obesity, except in potentially 4 cases. The pattern of CK18 elevation was consistent with toxicant-associated steatohepatitis (TASH) in the majority of cases (78%). TNFα, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, and PAI-1 were increased in these workers compared to those with normal CK18 levels. Conclusions These results suggest a high prevalence of occupational liver disease and TASH in elastomer/polymer workers with elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:21915069

  8. Occupational Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Ramugondo, Elelwani L.

    2015-01-01

    Occupational consciousness refers to ongoing awareness of the dynamics of hegemony and recognition that dominant practices are sustained through what people do every day, with implications for personal and collective health. The emergence of the construct in post-apartheid South Africa signifies the country’s ongoing struggle with negotiating long-standing dynamics of power that were laid down during colonialism, and maintained under black majority rule. Consciousness, a key component of the new terminology, is framed from post-colonial perspectives – notably work by Biko and Fanon – and grounded in the philosophy of liberation, in order to draw attention to continuing unequal intersubjective relations that play out through human occupation. The paper also draws important links between occupational consciousness and other related constructs, namely occupational possibilities, occupational choice, occupational apartheid, and collective occupation. The use of the term ‘consciousness’ in sociology, with related or different meanings, is also explored. Occupational consciousness is then advanced as a critical notion that frames everyday doing as a potentially liberating response to oppressive social structures. This paper advances theorizing as a scholarly practice in occupational science, and could potentially expand inter or transdisciplinary work for critical conceptualizations of human occupation. PMID:26549984

  9. Occupational Consciousness.

    PubMed

    Ramugondo, Elelwani L

    2015-10-02

    Occupational consciousness refers to ongoing awareness of the dynamics of hegemony and recognition that dominant practices are sustained through what people do every day, with implications for personal and collective health. The emergence of the construct in post-apartheid South Africa signifies the country's ongoing struggle with negotiating long-standing dynamics of power that were laid down during colonialism, and maintained under black majority rule. Consciousness, a key component of the new terminology, is framed from post-colonial perspectives - notably work by Biko and Fanon - and grounded in the philosophy of liberation, in order to draw attention to continuing unequal intersubjective relations that play out through human occupation. The paper also draws important links between occupational consciousness and other related constructs, namely occupational possibilities, occupational choice, occupational apartheid, and collective occupation. The use of the term 'consciousness' in sociology, with related or different meanings, is also explored. Occupational consciousness is then advanced as a critical notion that frames everyday doing as a potentially liberating response to oppressive social structures. This paper advances theorizing as a scholarly practice in occupational science, and could potentially expand inter or transdisciplinary work for critical conceptualizations of human occupation.

  10. A new semi-active safety control strategy for high-speed railway vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin; Xu, Zhengguo; Sun, Youxian

    2015-12-01

    This paper focuses on the safety of railway vehicles. A new semi-active control strategy is proposed based on the skyhook control theory. In view of the main railway vehicle safety performance indicators, the new control strategy aims at reducing the derailment coefficient of railway vehicles by restraining the lateral vibrations of the bogie and the wheelset. Furthermore, to evaluate the improvement of the safety performance brought about by the new control strategy, a complete railway vehicle model is established using the ADAMS/Rail software package. In further co-simulations, five conventional control methods are compared with the proposed approach under the same conditions. Co-simulation results indicate that the new control strategy is effective in improving the safety performance of railway vehicles.

  11. High-fat petrolatum-based moisturizers and prevention of work-related skin problems in wet-work occupations.

    PubMed

    Mygind, Karen; Sell, Lea; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann; Jepsen, Karen Frydendall

    2006-01-01

    The study presented is a randomized, controlled intervention study with the purpose of implementing an evidence-based skin disease prevention programme. The hypothesis explored in this article is whether a high-fat petrolatum-based moisturizer can be an alternative to protective gloves in wet-work occupations. The study population was all gut cleaners in Danish swine slaughterhouses, and data were collected by telephone interviews using a standardized questionnaire - The Nordic Occupational Skin Questionnaire (NOSQ-2002). At baseline, 644 (88%) gut cleaners responded and at 1-year follow-up 622 (72%). 135 gut cleaners in the intervention and 277 in the comparison group responded at both telephone interviews. In the intervention group, the eczema frequency was reduced significantly. Detailed analyses revealed that protective gloves are the overall most effective protective means and did not indicate that a high-fat moisturizer could be an alternative. Furthermore, the most extensive improvements could not be explained by combinations of protective behaviour but was found among those who had received information on, and was having discussions on prevention of skin problems. This only applied to the intervention group. A continuous focus on prevention of skin problems with information and discussions on the shop floor therefore seemed to be most important for reducing skin problems.

  12. Can noise cause high blood pressure? Occupational risk in paper industry.

    PubMed

    Sancini, A; Caciari, T; Rosati, M V; Samperi, I; Iannattone, G; Massimi, R; Loreti, B; Scala, B; Sacco, C; Tomei, F; Tomei, G

    2014-01-01

    The authors hypothesize cardiovascular effects in paper industry workers exposed to noise. The study included 72 paper industry workers exposed to noise and two control groups not exposed to noise. The workers completed a questionnaire and underwent a medical examination, measurement of blood pressure, electrocardiogram, blood tests, audiometry and measurement of noise exposure. The workers exposed to noise, all hearing impaired, were compared with not exposed and showed: significant increase of mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure values (p<0.001), higher frequency of hypertension, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (p<0.01 and p<0.001) and electrocardiografic abnormalities (p<0.05), significant reduction of blood pressure response in orthostatism (p<0.005). Our results suggest that for the workers of the paper industry the noise is an occupational risk factor for cardiovascular effects.

  13. Fusing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Imagery with High Resolution Hydrologic Modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivoni, E. R.; Pierini, N.; Schreiner-McGraw, A.; Anderson, C.; Saripalli, S.; Rango, A.

    2013-12-01

    After decades of development and applications, high resolution hydrologic models are now common tools in research and increasingly used in practice. More recently, high resolution imagery from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) that provide information on land surface properties have become available for civilian applications. Fusing the two approaches promises to significantly advance the state-of-the-art in terms of hydrologic modeling capabilities. This combination will also challenge assumptions on model processes, parameterizations and scale as land surface characteristics (~0.1 to 1 m) may now surpass traditional model resolutions (~10 to 100 m). Ultimately, predictions from high resolution hydrologic models need to be consistent with the observational data that can be collected from UAVs. This talk will describe our efforts to develop, utilize and test the impact of UAV-derived topographic and vegetation fields on the simulation of two small watersheds in the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts at the Santa Rita Experimental Range (Green Valley, AZ) and the Jornada Experimental Range (Las Cruces, NM). High resolution digital terrain models, image orthomosaics and vegetation species classification were obtained from a fixed wing airplane and a rotary wing helicopter, and compared to coarser analyses and products, including Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR). We focus the discussion on the relative improvements achieved with UAV-derived fields in terms of terrain-hydrologic-vegetation analyses and summer season simulations using the TIN-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator (tRIBS) model. Model simulations are evaluated at each site with respect to a high-resolution sensor network consisting of six rain gauges, forty soil moisture and temperature profiles, four channel runoff flumes, a cosmic-ray soil moisture sensor and an eddy covariance tower over multiple summer periods. We also discuss prospects for the fusion of high resolution models with novel

  14. Data security in occupational health.

    PubMed

    Damrongsak, Mantana; Brown, Kathleen C

    2008-10-01

    Occupational health nurses are increasingly using computer systems in the delivery of efficient, high-quality occupational health services. However, potential breaches in data security are posing more risks to these data systems. The purpose of this article is to address concerns related to data security in occupational health nursing. Occupational health nurses must protect the personal health information of employees by proactively developing methods to ensure data security.

  15. Spectrum of high resolution computed tomography findings in occupational lung disease: experience in a tertiary care institute.

    PubMed

    Bhawna, Satija; Ojha, U C; Kumar, Sanyal; Gupta, Rajiv; Gothi, Dipti; Pal, R S

    2013-01-01

    To study the spectrum of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in occupational lung disease in industrial workers and to assess the utility of International classification of HRCT for occupational and environmental respiratory diseases (ICHOERD). Retrospective analysis of radiological data (radiographs and computed tomography chest scans) gathered over a period of 3 years (January 2010- December 2012) of industrial workers in an organised sector who presented with respiratory complaints. The HRCT findings were evaluated using ICHOERD. There were 5 females and 114 males in the study, with a mean age of 49 years. These workers were exposed to different harmful agents including silica, asbestos, cotton dust, metal dust, iron oxide, organic dust, rubber fumes, plastic fumes, acid fumes, and oil fumes. There were 10 smokers in the study. The radiograph of chest was normal in 53 patients. 46% of these normal patients (21.8% of total) demonstrated positive findings on HRCT. When the radiograph was abnormal, HRCT provided more accurate information and excluded the other diagnosis. The HRCT findings were appropriately described using the ICHOERD. Bronchiectasis was the most common finding (44.5%) with mild central cylindrical bronchiectasis as the most common pattern. Pleural thickening was seen in 41 patients (34.5%). Enlarged hilar or mediastinal lymphnodes were seen in 10 patients (8.4%) with egg-shell calcification in 1 patient exposed to silica. Bronchogenic carcinoma was seen in 1 patient exposed to asbestos. Occupational lung disease is a common work related condition in industrial workers even in the organized sector. Though chest radiograph is the primary diagnostic tool, HRCT is the undisputed Gold Standard for evaluation of these patients. Despite the disadvantage of radiation exposure, low dose CT may serve as an important tool for screening and surveillance. The ICHOERD is a powerful and reliable tool not only for diagnosis, but also for

  16. Spectrum of High Resolution Computed Tomography Findings in Occupational Lung Disease: Experience in a Tertiary Care Institute

    PubMed Central

    Bhawna, Satija; Ojha, U. C.; Kumar, Sanyal; Gupta, Rajiv; Gothi, Dipti; Pal, R. S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the spectrum of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in occupational lung disease in industrial workers and to assess the utility of International classification of HRCT for occupational and environmental respiratory diseases (ICHOERD). Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of radiological data (radiographs and computed tomography chest scans) gathered over a period of 3 years (January 2010- December 2012) of industrial workers in an organised sector who presented with respiratory complaints. The HRCT findings were evaluated using ICHOERD. Results: There were 5 females and 114 males in the study, with a mean age of 49 years. These workers were exposed to different harmful agents including silica, asbestos, cotton dust, metal dust, iron oxide, organic dust, rubber fumes, plastic fumes, acid fumes, and oil fumes. There were 10 smokers in the study. The radiograph of chest was normal in 53 patients. 46% of these normal patients (21.8% of total) demonstrated positive findings on HRCT. When the radiograph was abnormal, HRCT provided more accurate information and excluded the other diagnosis. The HRCT findings were appropriately described using the ICHOERD. Bronchiectasis was the most common finding (44.5%) with mild central cylindrical bronchiectasis as the most common pattern. Pleural thickening was seen in 41 patients (34.5%). Enlarged hilar or mediastinal lymphnodes were seen in 10 patients (8.4%) with egg-shell calcification in 1 patient exposed to silica. Bronchogenic carcinoma was seen in 1 patient exposed to asbestos. Conclusions: Occupational lung disease is a common work related condition in industrial workers even in the organized sector. Though chest radiograph is the primary diagnostic tool, HRCT is the undisputed Gold Standard for evaluation of these patients. Despite the disadvantage of radiation exposure, low dose CT may serve as an important tool for screening and surveillance. The ICHOERD is a powerful and

  17. Unmanned air vehicle flow separation control using dielectric barrier discharge plasma at high wind speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Huang, Yong; Wang, WanBo; Wang, XunNian; Li, HuaXing

    2014-06-01

    The present paper described an experimental investigation of separation control of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) at high wind speeds. The plasma actuator was based on Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) and operated in a steady manner. The flow over a wing of UAV was performed with smoke flow visualization in the ϕ0.75 m low speed wind tunnel to reveal the flow structure over the wing so that the locations of plasma actuators could be optimized. A full model of the UAV was experimentally investigated in the ϕ3.2 m low speed wind tunnel using a six-component internal strain gauge balance. The effects of the key parameters, including the locations of the plasma actuators, the applied voltage amplitude and the operating frequency, were obtained. The whole test model was made of aluminium and acted as a cathode of the actuator. The results showed that the plasma acting on the surface of UAV could obviously suppress the boundary layer separation and reduce the model vibration at the high wind speeds. It was found that the maximum lift coefficient of the UAV was increased by 2.5% and the lift/drag ratio was increased by about 80% at the wind speed of 100 m/s. The control mechanism of the plasma actuator at the test configuration was also analyzed.

  18. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Produce High-Resolution Seasonally-Relevant Imagery for Classifying Wetland Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcaccio, J. V.; Markle, C. E.; Chow-Fraser, P.

    2015-08-01

    With recent advances in technology, personal aerial imagery acquired with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has transformed the way ecologists can map seasonal changes in wetland habitat. Here, we use a multi-rotor (consumer quad-copter, the DJI Phantom 2 Vision+) UAV to acquire a high-resolution (< 8 cm) composite photo of a coastal wetland in summer 2014. Using validation data collected in the field, we determine if a UAV image and SWOOP (Southwestern Ontario Orthoimagery Project) image (collected in spring 2010) differ in their classification of type of dominant vegetation type and percent cover of three plant classes: submerged aquatic vegetation, floating aquatic vegetation, and emergent vegetation. The UAV imagery was more accurate than available SWOOP imagery for mapping percent cover of submergent and floating vegetation categories, but both were able to accurately determine the dominant vegetation type and percent cover of emergent vegetation. Our results underscore the value and potential for affordable UAVs (complete quad-copter system < 3,000 CAD) to revolutionize the way ecologists obtain imagery and conduct field research. In Canada, new UAV regulations make this an easy and affordable way to obtain multiple high-resolution images of small (< 1.0 km2) wetlands, or portions of larger wetlands throughout a year.

  19. Computational analysis of forebody tangential slot blowing on the high alpha research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken

    1994-01-01

    Current and future fighter aircraft can maneuver in the high-angle-of-attack flight regime while flying at low subsonic and transonic freestream Mach numbers. However, at any flight speed, the ability of the vertical tails to generate yawing moment is limited in high-angle-of-attack flight. Thus, any system designed to provide the pilot with additional side force and yawing moment must work in both low subsonic and transonic flight. However, previous investigations of the effectiveness of forebody tangential slot blowing in generating the desired control forces and moments have been limited to the low subsonic freestream flow regime. In order to investigate the effectiveness of tangential slot blowing in transonic flight, a computational fluid dynamics analysis was carried out during the grant period. Computational solutions were obtained at three different freestream Mach numbers and at various jet mass flow ratios. All results were obtained using the isolated F/A-18 forebody grid geometry at 30.3 degrees angle of attack. One goal of the research was to determine the effect of freestream Mach number on the effectiveness of forebody tangential slot blowing in generating yawing moment. The second part of the research studied the force onset time lag associated with blowing. The time required for the yawing moment to reach a steady-state value from the onset of blowing may have an impact on the implementation of a pneumatic system on a flight vehicle.

  20. Gender specific analysis of occupational diseases of the low back caused by carrying, lifting or extreme trunk flexion—use of a prevention index to identify occupations with high prevention needs

    PubMed Central

    Thiede, Markus; Liebers, Falk; Seidler, Andreas; Gravemeyer, Stefan; Latza, Ute

    2014-01-01

    Background Gender specific analysis of the occupational disease of the lumbar spine caused by carrying, lifting, or extreme trunk flexion in Germany (OD No.2108) with the aim to identify areas of focus for prevention and research with a prevention index (PI). Methods Data from the German Statutory Accident Insurance stratified by gender are shown. Results From 2002 until 2009 there were 2,877 confirmed cases of an OD No. 2108 (40.1% male and 59.1% female). The PI indicated the highest prevention need for female nursing/midwifery associate professionals and male building frame and related trades workers. Patient transfer and working in extremely bent posture were the most frequent exposures. Conclusions The identified occupations with high need for prevention among men come from nearly all major occupational groups whereas women cluster in occupational groups from the health and care sectors. Am. J. Ind. Med. 57:233–244, 2014. © 2013 The Authors. American Journal of Industrial Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24243091

  1. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M

    1995-01-01

    Many toxic compounds found in air emissions may induce bronchoconstriction. In the workplace, workers are exposed to these compounds, often in much higher concentrations. Some of these compounds act as sensitizers. Of these, some compounds induce asthma by producing specific IgE antibodies to the compound or its protein conjugate, while others induce asthma through yet unidentified immunologic mechanisms. Some compounds, when inhaled in high concentrations, act as irritants and produce bronchoconstriction probably by inducing acute airway inflammation. The latter condition is called Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome (RADS) or irritant-induced asthma. Occupational asthma is an excellent model to study the pathogenesis and the natural history of adult onset asthma because the responsible agent can be identified, complete avoidance is possible, and exposure can be measured or estimated. PMID:8549481

  2. A study on model fidelity for model predictive control-based obstacle avoidance in high-speed autonomous ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiechao; Jayakumar, Paramsothy; Stein, Jeffrey L.; Ersal, Tulga

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the level of model fidelity needed in order for a model predictive control (MPC)-based obstacle avoidance algorithm to be able to safely and quickly avoid obstacles even when the vehicle is close to its dynamic limits. The context of this work is large autonomous ground vehicles that manoeuvre at high speed within unknown, unstructured, flat environments and have significant vehicle dynamics-related constraints. Five different representations of vehicle dynamics models are considered: four variations of the two degrees-of-freedom (DoF) representation as lower fidelity models and a fourteen DoF representation with combined-slip Magic Formula tyre model as a higher fidelity model. It is concluded that the two DoF representation that accounts for tyre nonlinearities and longitudinal load transfer is necessary for the MPC-based obstacle avoidance algorithm in order to operate the vehicle at its limits within an environment that includes large obstacles. For less challenging environments, however, the two DoF representation with linear tyre model and constant axle loads is sufficient.

  3. TCM exemptions to promote alternative-fuel vehicles: The good, the bad, and the ugly

    SciTech Connect

    Mintz, M.

    1994-02-01

    This document consists of viewgraphs from a presentation on transportation control measures (TCM) to facilitate the use of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFV). Types of TCMs that pertain to AFV exemptions are: parking fees and restrictions, high occupancy vehicle lanes, fuel taxes, and possibly congestion pricing and time-of-day and day-of-week restrictions. The degree to which these measures will impact AFV production by the year 2010 is predicted.

  4. The Effect of High-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Occupational Stress among Health Care Workers: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young In; Kim, Hyungjin; Han, Doug Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration to alleviate symptoms of treatment-resistant depression. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of rTMS treatment on alleviating occupational stress by evaluating clinical symptoms and quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG). Methods Twenty-four health care workers were randomized to receive 12 sessions of active or sham rTMS delivered to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Each session consisted of 32 trains of 10 Hz repetitive TMS delivered in 5-second trains at 110% of the estimated prefrontal cortex threshold. Before and after the intervention, the Korean version of the occupational stress inventory (K-OSI), Beck's depression inventory (BDI), and Beck's anxiety inventory (BAI) were administered and EEG was performed using a 21-channel digital EEG system. Results After TMS, the average scores for the affective responses to stressors on the personal strain questionnaire (PSQ) subscale of K-OSI and BDI decreased significantly for the active-TMS group compared to the sham-TMS group. Also, the active-TMS group showed a significantly greater decrease in relative alpha in the F3 electrode and a significantly greater increase in the F4 electrode. Conclusion High-frequency rTMS on the left DLPFC had stress-relieving and mood-elevating effects in health care workers, likely by stimulating the left frontal lobe. PMID:27909453

  5. The Effect of High-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Occupational Stress among Health Care Workers: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young In; Kim, Sun Mi; Kim, Hyungjin; Han, Doug Hyun

    2016-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration to alleviate symptoms of treatment-resistant depression. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of rTMS treatment on alleviating occupational stress by evaluating clinical symptoms and quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG). Twenty-four health care workers were randomized to receive 12 sessions of active or sham rTMS delivered to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Each session consisted of 32 trains of 10 Hz repetitive TMS delivered in 5-second trains at 110% of the estimated prefrontal cortex threshold. Before and after the intervention, the Korean version of the occupational stress inventory (K-OSI), Beck's depression inventory (BDI), and Beck's anxiety inventory (BAI) were administered and EEG was performed using a 21-channel digital EEG system. After TMS, the average scores for the affective responses to stressors on the personal strain questionnaire (PSQ) subscale of K-OSI and BDI decreased significantly for the active-TMS group compared to the sham-TMS group. Also, the active-TMS group showed a significantly greater decrease in relative alpha in the F3 electrode and a significantly greater increase in the F4 electrode. High-frequency rTMS on the left DLPFC had stress-relieving and mood-elevating effects in health care workers, likely by stimulating the left frontal lobe.

  6. Development of a high temporal-spatial resolution vehicle emission inventory based on NRT traffic data and its impact on air pollution in Beijing - Part 1: Development and evaluation of vehicle emission inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, B. Y.; Wu, L.; Mao, H. J.; Gong, S. L.; He, J. J.; Zou, C.; Song, G. H.; Li, X. Y.; Wu, Z.

    2015-10-01

    As the ownership of vehicles and frequency of utilization increase, vehicle emissions have become an important source of air pollution in Chinese cities. An accurate emission inventory for on-road vehicles is necessary for numerical air quality simulation and the assessment of implementation strategies. This paper presents a bottom-up methodology based on the local emission factors, complemented with the widely used emission factors of Computer Programme to Calculate Emissions from Road Transport (COPERT) model and near real time (NRT) traffic data on road segments to develop a high temporal-spatial resolution vehicle emission inventory (HTSVE) for the urban Beijing area. To simulate real-world vehicle emissions accurately, the road has been divided into segments according to the driving cycle (traffic speed) on this road segment. The results show that the vehicle emissions of NOx, CO, HC and PM were 10.54 × 104, 42.51 × 104 and 2.13 × 104 and 0.41 × 104 Mg, respectively. The vehicle emissions and fuel consumption estimated by the model were compared with the China Vehicle Emission Control Annual Report and fuel sales thereafter. The grid-based emissions were also compared with the vehicular emission inventory developed by the macro-scale approach. This method indicates that the bottom-up approach better estimates the levels and spatial distribution of vehicle emissions than the macro-scale method, which relies on more information. Additionally, the on-road vehicle emission inventory model and control effect assessment system in Beijing, a vehicle emission inventory model, was established based on this study in a companion paper (He et al., 2015).

  7. 78 FR 16051 - Vehicle/Track Interaction Safety Standards; High-Speed and High Cant Deficiency Operations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... their entirety. To address the modern railroad operating environment, the final rule included standards...: Serve as practical standards with sound physical and mathematical bases; account for a range of vehicle... This final rule provides that vehicles with minor variations in their physical properties (such...

  8. Injuries to Pregnant Occupants in Automotive Crashes

    PubMed Central

    Klinich, Kathleen DeSantis; Schneider, Lawrence W.; Moore, Jamie L.; Pearlman, Mark D.

    1998-01-01

    Injuries unique to pregnant occupants involved in motor-vehicle crashes include placental abruption, uterine rupture or laceration, and direct fetal injury. The mechanisms and characteristics of these injuries are discussed using examples from a literature review and from recent investigations of crashes involving pregnant occupants. In addition, a review of the relationship between the pregnant driver and automotive restraints and the steering wheel illustrates how injury potential may differ from the non-pregnant occupant.

  9. High Voltage EEE Parts for EMA/EHA Applications on Manned Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Trent; Young, David

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is an assessment of high voltage electronic components required for high horsepower electric thrust vector control (TVC) systems for human spaceflight launch critical application. The scope consists of creating of a database of available Grade 1 electrical, electronic and electromechanical (EEE) parts suited to this application, a qualification path for potential non-Grade 1 EEE parts that could be used in these designs, and pathfinder testing to validate aspects of the proposed qualification plan. Advances in the state of the art in high power electric power systems enable high horsepower electric actuators, such as the electromechnical actuator (EMA) and the electro-hydrostatic actuator (EHA), to be used in launch vehicle TVC systems, dramaticly reducing weight, complexity and operating costs. Designs typically use high voltage insulated gate bipolar transistors (HV-IGBT). However, no Grade 1 HV-IGBT exists and it is unlikely that market factors alone will produce such high quality parts. Furthermore, the perception of risk, the lack of qualification methodoloy, the absence of manned space flight heritage and other barriers impede the adoption of commercial grade parts onto the critical path. The method of approach is to identify high voltage electronic component types and key parameters for parts currently used in high horsepower EMA/EHA applications, to search for higher quality substitutes and custom manufacturers, to create a database for these parts, and then to explore ways to qualify these parts for use in human spaceflight launch critical application, including grossly derating and possibly treating hybrid parts as modules. This effort is ongoing, but results thus far include identification of over 60 HV-IGBT from four manufacturers, including some with a high reliability process flow. Voltage ranges for HV-IGBT have been identified, as has screening tests used to characterize HV-IGBT. BSI BS ISO 21350 Space systems Off

  10. Does influence at work modify the relation between high occupational physical activity and risk of heart disease in women?

    PubMed

    Allesøe, Karen; Holtermann, Andreas; Rugulies, Reiner; Aadahl, Mette; Boyle, Eleanor; Søgaard, Karen

    2017-07-01

    To investigate whether influence at work modifies the association between demanding and strenuous occupational physical activity (OPA) and risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). A sample of 12,093 nurses aged 45-64 years from the Danish Nurse Cohort Study was followed for 20.6 years by individual linkage to incident IHD in the Danish National Patient Registry. Information on OPA, influence at work, other occupational factors and known risk factors for IHD was collected by self-report in 1993. During follow-up 869 nurses were hospitalised with incident IHD. Nurses exposed to strenuous OPA and low influence at work had a 46% increased risk of IHD [hazard ratio (HR) 1.46 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-2.09)] compared to the reference group of nurses with moderate OPA and high influence at work. Nurses exposed to strenuous OPA and high influence at work were not at an increased risk of IHD [HR 1.10 (95% CI 0.59-2.06)]. An additive hazards model showed there were 18.0 (95% CI -0.01 to 36.0) additional cases of IHD per 10,000 person years among nurses with strenuous OPA and low influence at work compared to nurses with moderate OPA and high influence at work. A detrimental additive interaction between strenuous OPA and low influence at work that could explain the additional cases of IHD among nurses with strenuous OPA and low influence at work was indicated. The findings suggest that high influence at work may buffer some of the adverse effects of strenuous OPA on risk of IHD.

  11. High-resolution simulation of link-level vehicle emissions and concentrations for air pollutants in a traffic-populated eastern Asian city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaojun; Wu, Ye; Huang, Ruikun; Wang, Jiandong; Yan, Han; Zheng, Yali; Hao, Jiming

    2016-08-01

    Vehicle emissions containing air pollutants created substantial environmental impacts on air quality for many traffic-populated cities in eastern Asia. A high-resolution emission inventory is a useful tool compared with traditional tools (e.g. registration data-based approach) to accurately evaluate real-world traffic dynamics and their environmental burden. In this study, Macau, one of the most populated cities in the world, is selected to demonstrate a high-resolution simulation of vehicular emissions and their contribution to air pollutant concentrations by coupling multimodels. First, traffic volumes by vehicle category on 47 typical roads were investigated during weekdays in 2010 and further applied in a networking demand simulation with the TransCAD model to establish hourly profiles of link-level vehicle counts. Local vehicle driving speed and vehicle age distribution data were also collected in Macau. Second, based on a localized vehicle emission model (e.g. the emission factor model for the Beijing vehicle fleet - Macau, EMBEV-Macau), this study established a link-based vehicle emission inventory in Macau with high resolution meshed in a temporal and spatial framework. Furthermore, we employed the AERMOD (AMS/EPA Regulatory Model) model to map concentrations of CO and primary PM2.5 contributed by local vehicle emissions during weekdays in November 2010. This study has discerned the strong impact of traffic flow dynamics on the temporal and spatial patterns of vehicle emissions, such as a geographic discrepancy of spatial allocation up to 26 % between THC and PM2.5 emissions owing to spatially heterogeneous vehicle-use intensity between motorcycles and diesel fleets. We also identified that the estimated CO2 emissions from gasoline vehicles agreed well with the statistical fuel consumption in Macau. Therefore, this paper provides a case study and a solid framework for developing high-resolution environment assessment tools for other vehicle-populated cities

  12. Thermal Evaluation of a High-Voltage Ultracapacitor Module for Vehicle Applications (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Lustbader, J.; King, C.; Gonder, J.; Keyser, M.; Pesaran, A.

    2008-07-15

    The objectives of this paper are: (1) identify thermal issues of ultracapacitor cells and modules over a range of vehicle duty cycles to understand and minimize thermal impacts; and (2) identify improvements for ultracapacitor thermal management.

  13. Concepts, technology, and operations for a quick response, highly maneuverable launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabris, E. A.; Freeman, D. C., Jr.; Martin, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results from the NASA orbit-on-demand study are used to identify major technology issues for development of a quick response vehicle. Reasonable vehicles are found to require significant advances in propulsion, structures, materials, and flight mechanics technology. Vehicle concepts using normal growth technology predicted for the 1990s are compromised by expendable hardware or by unmanageable size and complexity. Operational analyses of the vertical-launch and horizontal-launch takeoff vehicles show that the latter have more inherent operational utility. The supply of liquid hydrogen propellant at alternate sites is a major issue; however, propane may be a viable option for at least one concept. Propellant for orbital maneuvering significantly increases gross weight for many of the concepts. This increase is greater for horizontal-takeoff systems becasue of their larger orbiters.

  14. MANPRINT Evaluation of the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle-Heavy Variant (HMMWV-HV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    knuckle injuries. Attaching and discon- necting the safety strap slows the operator’s ingress or egress. The sharp edges also cause numerous hand...seating position include: Vehicle B02, Cracked right front of hood during cross-country driving. Vehicle BOI, Hit low stump with right front tire... crack in stairwell and vent not putting enough cool air. Dust everywhere. Fan doesn’t work. Eat dust all day. The ambulance gets extremely hot in the

  15. Improving Recapitalization Planning: Toward a Fleet Management Model for the High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    the modified VaRooM model yielded concrete information to guide deci- sions about the optimal timing of, and cost trade-offs associated with, HMMWV...the links among age, usage, and costs of Army vehicles has been relatively scarce, the idea of adapting an existing vehicle replacement model for...CAA study is notable for its illustration of how a fleet-manage- ment optimization model can yield more-specific recommendations for RECAP. But again

  16. Multi-temporal high resolution monitoring of debris-covered glaciers using unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraaijenbrink, Philip; Immerzeel, Walter; de Jong, Steven; Shea, Joseph; Pellicciotti, Francesca; Meijer, Sander; Shresta, Arun

    2016-04-01

    Debris-covered glaciers in the Himalayas are relatively unstudied due to the difficulties in fieldwork caused by the inaccessible terrain and the presence of debris layers, which complicate in situ measurements. To overcome these difficulties an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) has been deployed multiple times over two debris covered glaciers in the Langtang catchment, located in the Nepalese Himalayas. Using differential GPS measurements and the Structure for Motion algorithm the UAV imagery was processed into accurate high-resolution digital elevation models and orthomosaics for both pre- and post-monsoon periods. These data were successfully used to estimate seasonal surface flow and mass wasting by using cross-correlation feature tracking and DEM differencing techniques. The results reveal large heterogeneity in mass loss and surface flow over the glacier surfaces, which are primarily caused by the presence of surface features such as ice cliffs and supra-glacial lakes. Accordingly, we systematically analyze those features using an object-based approach and relate their characteristics to the observed dynamics. We show that ice cliffs and supra-glacial lakes are contributing to a significant portion of the melt water of debris covered glaciers and we conclude that UAVs have great potential in understanding the key surface processes that remain largely undetected by using satellite remote sensing.

  17. Robust/optimal temperature profile control of a high-speed aerospace vehicle using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vivek; Padhi, Radhakant; Balakrishnan, S N

    2007-07-01

    An approximate dynamic programming (ADP)-based suboptimal neurocontroller to obtain desired temperature for a high-speed aerospace vehicle is synthesized in this paper. A 1-D distributed parameter model of a fin is developed from basic thermal physics principles. "Snapshot" solutions of the dynamics are generated with a simple dynamic inversion-based feedback controller. Empirical basis functions are designed using the "proper orthogonal decomposition" (POD) technique and the snapshot solutions. A low-order nonlinear lumped parameter system to characterize the infinite dimensional system is obtained by carrying out a Galerkin projection. An ADP-based neurocontroller with a dual heuristic programming (DHP) formulation is obtained with a single-network-adaptive-critic (SNAC) controller for this approximate nonlinear model. Actual control in the original domain is calculated with the same POD basis functions through a reverse mapping. Further contribution of this paper includes development of an online robust neurocontroller to account for unmodeled dynamics and parametric uncertainties inherent in such a complex dynamic system. A neural network (NN) weight update rule that guarantees boundedness of the weights and relaxes the need for persistence of excitation (PE) condition is presented. Simulation studies show that in a fairly extensive but compact domain, any desired temperature profile can be achieved starting from any initial temperature profile. Therefore, the ADP and NN-based controllers appear to have the potential to become controller synthesis tools for nonlinear distributed parameter systems.

  18. An Overview of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Wilson, R. Joseph; Flick, Bradley C.; Rood, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle. The three flight phases of the program are introduced, along with the specific goals and data examples taken during each phase. The aircraft configuration and systems needed to perform the disciplinary and inter-disciplinary research are discussed. The specific disciplines involved with the flight research are introduced, including aerodynamics, controls, propulsion, systems, and structures. Decisions that were made early in the planning of the aircraft project and the results of those decisions are briefly discussed. Each of the three flight phases corresponds to a particular aircraft configuration, and the research dictated the configuration to be flown. The first phase gathered data with the baseline F-18 configuration. The second phase was the thrust-vectoring phase. The third phase used a modified forebody with deployable nose strakes. Aircraft systems supporting these flights included extensive instrumentation systems, integrated research flight controls using flight control hardware and corresponding software, analog interface boxes to control forebody strakes, a thrust-vectoring system using external post-exit vanes around axisymmetric nozzles, a forebody vortex control system with strakes, and backup systems using battery-powered emergency systems and a spin recovery parachute.

  19. High-resolution sensing for precision agriculture: from Earth-observing satellites to unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, Matthew F.; Houborg, Rasmus; Lucieer, Arko

    2016-10-01

    With global population projected to approach 9 billion by 2050, it has been estimated that a 40% increase in cereal production will be required to satisfy the worlds growing nutritional demands. Any such increases in agricultural productivity are likely to occur within a system that has limited room for growth and in a world with a climate that is different from that of today. Fundamental to achieving food and water security, is the capacity to monitor the health and condition of agricultural systems. While space-agency based satellites have provided the backbone for earth observation over the last few decades, many developments in the field of high-resolution earth observation have been advanced by the commercial sector. These advances relate not just to technological developments in the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), but also the advent of nano-satellite constellations that offer a radical shift in the way earth observations are now being retrieved. Such technologies present opportunities for improving our description of the water, energy and carbon cycles. Efforts towards developing new observational techniques and interpretative frameworks are required to provide the tools and information needed to improve the management and security of agricultural and related sectors. These developments are one of the surest ways to better manage, protect and preserve national food and water resources. Here we review the capabilities of recently deployed satellite systems and UAVs and examine their potential for application in precision agriculture.

  20. Analytical aerodynamic model of a high alpha research vehicle wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Jichang; Garrett, Frederick, Jr.; Hoffman, Eric; Stalford, Harold

    1990-01-01

    A 6 DOF analytical aerodynamic model of a high alpha research vehicle is derived. The derivation is based on wind-tunnel model data valid in the altitude-Mach flight envelope centered at 15,000 ft altitude and 0.6 Mach number with Mach range between 0.3 and 0.9. The analytical models of the aerodynamics coefficients are nonlinear functions of alpha with all control variable and other states fixed. Interpolation is required between the parameterized nonlinear functions. The lift and pitching moment coefficients have unsteady flow parts due to the time range of change of angle-of-attack (alpha dot). The analytical models are plotted and compared with their corresponding wind-tunnel data. Piloted simulated maneuvers of the wind-tunnel model are used to evaluate the analytical model. The maneuvers considered are pitch-ups, 360 degree loaded and unloaded rolls, turn reversals, split S's, and level turns. The evaluation finds that (1) the analytical model is a good representation at Mach 0.6, (2) the longitudinal part is good for the Mach range 0.3 to 0.9, and (3) the lateral part is good for Mach numbers between 0.6 and 0.9. The computer simulations show that the storage requirement of the analytical model is about one tenth that of the wind-tunnel model and it runs twice as fast.