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Sample records for high power gyrotrons

  1. Improved Collectors for High Power Gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Singh, Amarjit; Read, Michael; Borchard, Phillipp; Neilson, Jeff

    2009-05-20

    High power gyrotrons are used for electron cyclotron heating, current drive and parasitic mode suppression in tokamaks for fusion energy research. These devices are crucial for successful operation of many research programs around the world, including the ITER program currently being constructed in France. Recent gyrotron failures resulted from cyclic fatigue of the copper material used to fabricated the collectors. The techniques used to collect the spent beam power is common in many gyrotrons produced around the world. There is serious concern that these tubes may also be at risk from cyclic fatigue. This program addresses the cause of the collector failure. The Phase I program successfully demonstrated feasibility of a mode of operation that eliminates the cyclic operation that caused the failure. It also demonstrated that new material can provide increased lifetime under cyclic operation that could increase the lifetime by more than on order of magnitude. The Phase II program will complete that research and develop a collector that eliminates the fatigue failures. Such a design would find application around the world.

  2. Innovation on high-power long-pulse gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, Alexander; Sakamoto, Keishi; Thumm, Manfred

    2011-12-01

    Progress in the worldwide development of high-power gyrotrons for magnetic confinement fusion plasma applications is described. After technology breakthroughs in research on gyrotron components in the 1990s, significant progress has been achieved in the last decade, in particular, in the field of long-pulse and continuous wave (CW) gyrotrons for a wide range of frequencies. At present, the development of 1 MW-class CW gyrotrons has been very successful; these are applicable for self-ignition experiments on fusion plasmas and their confinement in the tokamak ITER, for long-pulse confinement experiments in the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) and for EC H&CD in the future tokamak JT-60SA. For this progress in the field of high-power long-pulse gyrotrons, innovations such as the realization of high-efficiency stable oscillation in very high order cavity modes, the use of single-stage depressed collectors for energy recovery, highly efficient internal quasi-optical mode converters and synthetic diamond windows have essentially contributed. The total tube efficiencies are around 50% and the purity of the fundamental Gaussian output mode is 97% and higher. In addition, activities for advanced gyrotrons, e.g. a 2 MW gyrotron using a coaxial cavity, multi-frequency 1 MW gyrotrons and power modulation technology, have made progress.

  3. High power millimeter and submillimeter wave lasers and gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temkin, R. J.; Cohn, D. R.; Danly, B. G.; Kreischer, K. E.; Woskoboinikow, P.

    1985-10-01

    High power sources of coherent radiation in the millimeter and submillimeter wavelength range are useful in a number of applications, including plasma heating, plasma diagnostics, radar and communications. Two of the most important sources in this wavelength range are the optically pumped laser and the gyrotron. Major recent advances in both laser and gyrotron research are described. Possible techniques for improving the efficiency and operating characteristics of these devices are also reviewed.

  4. Development of high-power gyrotrons with gradually tapered cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Chaojun; Yu Sheng; Niu Xinjian; Liu Yinghui; Li Hongfu; Li Xiang

    2012-12-15

    In high power gyrotrons, the parasitic modes coupled with the operating mode cannot be avoided in the beam-wave interaction. These parasitic modes will decrease the efficiency of the gyrotrons. The purity of the operating mode affected by different tapers should be carefully studied. The steady-state self-consistent nonlinear theory for gyrotron with gradually tapered cavity is developed in this paper. A steady-state calculation code including 'cold cavity' and 'hot cavity' is designed. By comparison, a time-domain model analysis of gyrotron operation is also studied by particle-in-cell (PIC). It is found that the tapers of gyrotron have different influences on the modes coupling between the operating mode and the parasitic modes. During the study, an example of 94 GHz gyrotron with pure operating mode TE{sub 03} has been designed. The purity of the operating mode in the optimized cavity is up to -77 dB, and in output waveguide of the cavity is up to -76 dB. At the same time, the beam-wave interaction in the designed cavity has been simulated, too. An output power of 120 kW, corresponding to 41.6% efficiency and an oscillation frequency of 94.099 GHz have been achieved with a 50 kV, 6 A helical electron beam at a guiding magnetic field of 3.5485 T. The results show that the power in spurious modes of the optimized cavity may be kept far below than that of the traditional tapered cavity.

  5. High power 303 GHz gyrotron for CTS in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Kasa, J.; Saito, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Kotera, M.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Tanaka, K.; Nishiura, M.

    2015-10-01

    A high-power pulsed gyrotron is under development for 300 GHz-band collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostics in the Large Helical Device (LHD). High-density plasmas in the LHD require a probe wave with power exceeding 100 kW in the sub-terahertz region to obtain sufficient signal intensity and large scattering angles. At the same time, the frequency bandwidth should be less than several tens of megahertz to protect the CTS receiver using a notch filter against stray radiations. Moreover, duty cycles of ~ 10% are desired for the time domain analysis of the CTS spectrum. At present, a 77 GHz gyrotron for electron cyclotron heating is used as a CTS wave source in the LHD. However, the use of such a low-frequency wave suffers from refraction, cutoff and absorption at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. Additionally, the signal detection is severely affected by background noise from electron cyclotron emission. To resolve those problems, high-power gyrotrons in the 300 GHz range have been developed. In this frequency range, avoiding mode competition is critical to realizing high-power and stable oscillation. A moderately over-moded cavity was investigated to isolate a desired mode from neighbouring modes. After successful tests with a prototype tube, the practical one was constructed with a cavity for TE22,2 operation mode, a triode electron gun forming intense laminar electron beams, and an internal mode convertor. We have experimentally confirmed single mode oscillation of the TE22,2 mode at the frequency of 303.3 GHz. The spectrum peak is sufficiently narrow. The output power of 290 kW has been obtained at the moment.

  6. High-harmonic gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, D. B.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.

    1984-08-01

    There is currently much interest in the development of moderate to high power (1 kW - 1 MW) millimeter wave sources. Considered applications are mainly related to radar and communication systems. There are, however, also applications in plasma diagnostics, heating, and the nondestructive testing of dielectrics. The dominant source of high-power, high-frequency radiation has become the gyrotron. Jory et al. (1983) have reported operation of a 60 GHz, CW gyrotron, producing output powers in excess of 200 kW. High power, compact submillimeter-wave sources have become possible by making use of the concept of a high-harmonic gyrotron, in which the magnetic field can be reduced by an order of magnitude. Attention is given to synchronism, negative-mass instability, energy requirements, oscillators, efficiency, high power, dielectric loading, the peniotron, and amplifiers.

  7. Numerical study on a 0.4 THz second harmonic gyrotron with high power

    SciTech Connect

    Chaojun, Lei; Sheng, Yu; Hongfu, Li; Yinghui, Liu; Xinjian, Niu; Qixiang, Zhao

    2013-07-15

    Terahertz and sub-terahertz science and technology are promising topics today. However, it is difficult to obtain high power source of terahertz wave. In this paper, the mode competition and beam-wave interaction in a gradually tapered cavity are studied to achieve high efficiency of a 0.4THz second harmonic gyrotron in practice. In order to attain high power and stable radiation, the TE{sub 32,5} mode is selected as the operating mode of the desired gyrotron to realize single mode oscillation. The issues of studying on the high-order mode gyrotrons are solved effectively by transforming the generalized telegraphist's equations. The efficiency and output power of the gyrotron under different conditions have been calculated by the code, which is based on the transformed equations. Consequently, the results show that single mode second harmonic radiation with power of over 150 kW at frequency of 0.4 THz could be achieved.

  8. Numerical study on a 0.4 THz second harmonic gyrotron with high power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaojun, Lei; Sheng, Yu; Hongfu, Li; Yinghui, Liu; Xinjian, Niu; Qixiang, Zhao

    2013-07-01

    Terahertz and sub-terahertz science and technology are promising topics today. However, it is difficult to obtain high power source of terahertz wave. In this paper, the mode competition and beam-wave interaction in a gradually tapered cavity are studied to achieve high efficiency of a 0.4THz second harmonic gyrotron in practice. In order to attain high power and stable radiation, the TE32,5 mode is selected as the operating mode of the desired gyrotron to realize single mode oscillation. The issues of studying on the high-order mode gyrotrons are solved effectively by transforming the generalized telegraphist's equations. The efficiency and output power of the gyrotron under different conditions have been calculated by the code, which is based on the transformed equations. Consequently, the results show that single mode second harmonic radiation with power of over 150 kW at frequency of 0.4 THz could be achieved.

  9. Present developments and status of electron sources for high power gyrotron tubes and free electron masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumm, M.

    1997-02-01

    Gyrotron oscillators are mainly used as high power mm-wave sources for start-up, electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and diagnostics of magnetically confined plasmas for controlled thermonuclear fusion research. 140 GHz (110 GHz) gyrotrons with output power Pout = 0.55 MW (0.93 MW), pulse length τ = 3.0 s (2.0 s) and efficiency η = 40% (38%) are commercially available. Total efficiencies around 50% have been achieved using single-stage depressed collectors. Diagnostic gyrotrons deliver Pout = 40 kW with τ = 40 μs at frequencies up to 650 GHz ( η≥4%). Recently, gyrotron oscillators have also been successfully used in materials processing, for example sintering of high performance, structural and functional ceramics. Such technological applications require gyrotrons with f≥24 GHz, Pout = 10-100 kW, CW, η≥30%. This paper reports on recent achievements in the development of very high power mm-wave gyrotron oscillators for long pulse or CW operation. In addition a short overview of the present development status of gyrotrons for technological applications, gyroklystron amplifiers, gyro-TWT amplifiers, cyclotron autoresonance masers (CARMs) and free electron masers (FEMs) is given. The most impressive FEM output parameters are: Pout = 2GW, τ = 20 ns, η = 13% at 140 GHz (LLNL) and Pout = 15 kW, τ = 20 μs, η = 5% in the range from 120 to 900 GHz (UCSB). In gyro-devices, magnetron injection guns (MIGs) operating in the temperature limited current regime have thus far been used most successfully. Diode guns as well as triode guns with a modulating anode are employed. Tests of a MIG operated under space-charge limited conditions have been not very successful. Electrostatic CW FEMs are driven by thermionic Pierce guns whereas pulsed high power devices employ many types of accelerators as drivers for example pulse-line accelerators, microtrons and induction or rf linacs, using field and photo emission cathodes.

  10. Simulation tools for computer-aided design and numerical investigations of high-power gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damyanova, M.; Balabanova, E.; Kern, S.; Illy, S.; Sabchevski, S.; Thumm, M.; Vasileva, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2012-03-01

    Modelling and simulation are essential tools for computer-aided design (CAD), analysis and optimization of high-power gyrotrons used as radiation sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and current drive (ECCD) of magnetically confined plasmas in the thermonuclear reactor ITER. In this communication, we present the current status of our simulation tools and discuss their further development.

  11. To the theory of high-power gyrotrons with uptapered resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2010-05-15

    In high-power gyrotrons it is desirable to combine an optimal resonator length with the optimal value of the resonator quality factor. In resonators with the constant radius of the central part, the possibilities of this combination are limited because the quality factor of the resonator sharply increases with its length. Therefore the attempts to increase the length for maximizing the efficiency leads to such increase in the quality factor which makes the optimal current too small. Resonators with slightly uptapered profiles offer more flexibility in this regard. In such resonators, one can separate optimization of the interaction length from optimization of the quality factor because the quality factor determined by diffractive losses can be reduced by increasing the angle of uptapering. In the present paper, these issues are analyzed by studying as a typical high-power 17 GHz gyrotron which is currently under development in Europe for ITER (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ITER). The effect of a slight uptapering of the resonator wall on the efficiency enhancement and the purity of the radiation spectrum in the process of the gyrotron start-up and power modulation are studied. Results show that optimal modification of the shape of a slightly uptapered resonator may result in increasing the gyrotron power from 1052 to 1360 kW.

  12. Optical Spectroscopy of Plasma in a High Power Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, W. E.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Hochman, J. M.; Jaynes, R. L.; Rintamaki, J. I.; Peters, C. W.; Lau, Y. Y.; Spencer, T. A.

    1997-11-01

    Spectroscopic measurements have been performed to characterize the undesired-plasma which exists in a 1-10 MW rectangular-cross-section (RCS) gyrotron. This gyrotron is driven by the Michigan Electron Long Beam Acclerator (MELBA) generator at parameters of: -0.8 MV, 0.1-0.5 kA, and 0.5-1.0 μ sec pulselengths. Optical spectra exhibit strong emission from the hydrogen H-alpha line. The source of hydrogen is believed to be due to water vapor absorbed on surfaces which is ejected and dissociated by electron beam impact. This interpretation is supported by residual gas analyzer (RGA) measurements on the MELBA diode which show increased hydrogen concentration after the shot. Data is being analyzed to investigate possible correlations of plasma optical emission to microwave pulse shortening.

  13. Gyrotrons for High-Power Terahertz Science and Technology at FIR UF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idehara, Toshitaka; Sabchevski, Svilen Petrov

    2016-10-01

    In this review paper, we present the recent progress in the development of a series of gyrotrons at the Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, University of Fukui, that have opened the road to many novel applications in the high-power terahertz science and technology. The current status of the research in this actively developing field is illustrated by the most representative examples in which the developed gyrotrons are used as powerful and frequency-tunable sources of coherent radiation operating in a continuous-wave regime. Among them are high-precision spectroscopic techniques (most notably dynamic nuclear polarization-nuclear magnetic resonance, electron spin resonance, X-ray detected magnetic resonance, and studies of the hyperfine splitting of the energy levels of positronium), treatment and characterization of advanced materials, and new medical technologies.

  14. Formation of a laminar electron flow for 300 GHz high-power pulsed gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Yuusuke; Tatematsu, Yoshinori; Saito, Teruo; Ikeda, Ryosuke; Mudiganti, Jagadish C.; Ogawa, Isamu; Idehara, Toshitaka

    2012-11-15

    This paper describes the design of a triode magnetron injection gun for use in a 200 kW, 300 GHz gyrotron. As power and frequency increase, the performance of the gyrotron becomes quite sensitive to the quality of the electron beam. Formation of a laminar electron flow is essential for the realization of a high quality beam with a small velocity spread. In this study, a new method is developed for a quantitative evaluation of the laminarity and is applied to optimize the electrode design. The laminarity depends not only on conventional design parameters such as the cathode slant angle but also on the spatial distribution of the electric field along the beam trajectory. In the optimized design, the velocity pitch factors, {alpha}, larger than 1.2 are obtained at 65 kV, 10 A with spreads, {Delta}{alpha}, less than 5%.

  15. HIGH POWER LONG PULSE PERFORMANCE OF THE DIII-D GYROTRON INSTALLATION

    SciTech Connect

    J. LOHR; Y.A. GORELOV; R.W. CALLIS; H.J. GRUNLOH; J.J. PEAVY; R.I. PINSKER; D. PONCE; R. PRATER; R.A. ELLIS,III

    2002-05-01

    At DIII-D, five 110 GHz gyrotrons are operating routinely for 2.0 s pulses at generated power levels {ge}750 kW per gyrotron. A sixth gyrotron is being installed, which should bring the generated power level to >4 MW and the injected power to about 3.0 MW. The output power now can be modulated by the plasma control system to fix T{sub e} at a desired value. The system is being used as a tool for control of current diffusion, for current profile control and other experiments leading to advanced tokamak operation.

  16. Feasibility study of a cryogenically cooled window for high-power gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Haste, G.R.; Kimrey, H.D.; Prosise, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    Single-crystal sapphire is currently in use as the material for output windows in high-power microwave tubes, particularly gyrotrons. These windows are currently being cooled by fluorocarbon fluids at near-room temperatures. There are, however, several advantages in operating the window at very low temperatures: less absorption and consequent heating of the window, greater material strength, improved resistance to crack formation, greater thermal conductivity, and reduced thermal expansion. Operation at cryogenic temperatures is shown to be feasible. The output power, which is currently limited by window constraints, could be increased by an order of magnitude or more.

  17. Gyrotron development for space power beaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manheimer, Wallace M.

    1989-01-01

    The use of a gyrotron for space power beaming, especially in the form of a lunar orbiting power station is discussed. The advantages of phased array power beaming, output power, and the design of a quasi-optical gyrotron are discussed.

  18. Quasi-optical converters for high-power gyrotrons: a brief review of physical models, numerical methods and computer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabchevski, S.; Zhelyazkov, I.; Benova, E.; Atanassov, V.; Dankov, P.; Thumm, M.; Arnold, A.; Jin, J.; Rzesnicki, T.

    2006-07-01

    Quasi-optical (QO) mode converters are used to transform electromagnetic waves of complex structure and polarization generated in gyrotron cavities into a linearly polarized, Gaussian-like beam suitable for transmission. The efficiency of this conversion as well as the maintenance of low level of diffraction losses are crucial for the implementation of powerful gyrotrons as radiation sources for electron-cyclotron-resonance heating of fusion plasmas. The use of adequate physical models, efficient numerical schemes and up-to-date computer codes may provide the high accuracy necessary for the design and analysis of these devices. In this review, we briefly sketch the most commonly used QO converters, the mathematical base they have been treated on and the basic features of the numerical schemes used. Further on, we discuss the applicability of several commercially available and free software packages, their advantages and drawbacks, for solving QO related problems.

  19. High-power terahertz-range planar gyrotrons with transverse energy extraction.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, N S; Zotova, I V; Sergeev, A S; Zaslavsky, V Yu; Zheleznov, I V

    2012-03-01

    To increase the output power of terahertz gyrotrons to several hundred kilowatts, we suggest using a planar geometry of interaction space with a sheet electron beam and transverse energy extraction. An advantage of this scheme in comparison with conventional cylindrical geometry is the possibility to ensure effective mode selection over the open transverse coordinate in combination with radiation outcoupling that leads to a substantial reduction of Ohmic losses. Similar to unstable resonators in optics for further growth of the radiation power it is beneficial to introduce waveguide tapering. PMID:22463418

  20. Free-electron masers vs. gyrotrons: prospects for high-power sources at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumm, Manfred

    2002-05-01

    The possible applications of high-power millimeter (mm) and sub-mm waves from free-electron masers (FEMs) and gyro-devices span a wide range of technologies. The plasma physics community has already taken advantage of recent advances in applying high-power mm waves generated by long pulse or continuous wave (CW) gyrotron oscillators and short pulse very high-power FEMs in the areas of RF-plasma production, heating, non-inductive current drive, plasma stabilization and active plasma diagnostics for magnetic confinement thermonuclear fusion research, such as electron cyclotron resonance heating (28-170 GHz), electron cyclotron current drive , collective Thomson scattering , microwave transmission and heat-wave propagation experiments. Continuously frequency tunable FEMs could widen these fields of applications. Another important application of CW gyrotrons is industrial materials processing, e.g. sintering of high-performance functional and structural nanostructured ceramics. Sub-mm wave sources are employed in high-frequency broadband electron paramagnetic resonance and other types of spectroscopy. Future applications which await the development of novel high-power FEM amplifiers and gyro-amplifiers include high-resolution radar ranging and imaging in atmospheric and planetary science as well as deep-space and specialized satellite communications and RF drivers for next-generation high-gradient linear accelerators (supercolliders). The present paper reviews the state-of-the-art and future prospects of these recent applications of gyro-devices and FEMs and compares their specific advantages.

  1. High-power, stable Ka/V dual-band gyrotron traveling-wave tube amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chien-Lun

    2012-05-01

    A dual-band amplifier can reduce the size, cost, and weight of a transmitter in dual-band radar and communication systems. This study proposes and theoretically investigates a gyrotron traveling-wave tube (gyro-TWT) amplifier capable of dual-band operation. Possible oscillations in the coaxial interaction waveguide are stabilized by the lossy inner cylinder. Under stable operating conditions, the gyro-TWT is predicted to provide a peak power of 375 kW with 71 dB saturated gain and 3.8 GHz bandwidth in the Ka-band and a peak power of 150 kW with 35 dB saturated gain and 1.7 GHz bandwidth in the V-band.

  2. Influence of emitter ring manufacturing tolerances on electron beam quality of high power gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagonakis, Ioannis Gr.; Illy, Stefan; Thumm, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    A sensitivity analysis of manufacturing imperfections and possible misalignments of the emitter ring in the gyrotron cathode structure on the electron beam quality has been performed. It has been shown that a possible radial displacement of the emitter ring of the order of few tens of microns can cause dramatic effects on the beam quality and therefore the gyrotron operation. Two different design approaches are proposed in order to achieve an electron beam which is less sensitive to manufacturing imperfections.

  3. Calorimetric Power Measurements of the DIII-D Gyrotron System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelov, I.; Lohr, J.; Callis, R. W.; Cary, W. P.; Ponce, D.; Pinsker, R. I.; Chiu, H.; Baity, F. W.

    2001-10-01

    Gyrotron power measurements are an integral part of rf experiments on DIII-D. The ECH complex at General Atomics is built up from four 110 GHz, 1 MW gyrotrons, one from Communication and Power Industry (CPI) and three from Russia's Gyrotron Company (Gycom). Power measurements are made calorimetrically using the temperature and flow measurements of the gyrotron cooling circuits. Three such circuits are measured on the Gycom gyrotrons: window, MOU and dummy load. Interior cooling circuits are additionally measured on the CPI gyrotron that are very useful when tuning for maximum power and efficiency. Calorimetric signals from each cooling circuit are acquired by computer, where the dissipated energy is calculated with a LabView program. From these calculations, total rf power and efficiency were determined. Thus, calorimetry measurements were effectuated during gyrotron operations to provide the average power of each pulse.

  4. Harmonic gyrotrons operating in high-order symmetric modes

    SciTech Connect

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Kashyn, Dmytro G.; Antonsen, T. M.

    2015-01-05

    It is shown that gyrotrons operating at cyclotron harmonics can be designed for operation in symmetric TE{sub 0,p}-modes. Such operation in fundamental harmonic gyrotrons is possible only at small radial indices (p≤3) because of the severe mode competition with TE{sub 2,p}-modes, which are equally coupled to annular beams as the symmetric modes. At cyclotron harmonics, however, this “degeneracy” of coupling is absent, and there is a region in the parameter space where harmonic gyrotrons can steadily operate in symmetric modes. This fact is especially important for sub-THz and THz-range gyrotrons where ohmic losses limit the power achievable in continuous-wave and high duty cycle regimes.

  5. Influence of the electron velocity spread and the beam width on the efficiency and mode competition in the high-power pulsed gyrotron for 300 GHz band collective Thomson scattering diagnostics in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbrajs, O.; Saito, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.

    2016-09-01

    We present results of a theoretical study of influence of the electron velocity spread and the radial width on the efficiency and mode competition in a 300-kW, 300-GHz gyrotron operating in the T E22 ,2 mode. This gyrotron was developed for application to collective Thomson scattering diagnostics in the large helical device and 300-kW level high power single T E22 ,2 mode oscillation has been demonstrated [Yamaguchi et al., J. Instrum. 10, c10002 (2015)]. Effects of a finite voltage rise time corresponding to the real power supply of this gyrotron are also considered. Simulations tracking eight competing modes show that the electron velocity spread and the finite beam width influence not only the efficiency of the gyrotron operation but also the mode competition scenario during the startup phase. A combination of the finite rise time with the electron velocity spread or the finite beam width affects the mode competition scenario. The simulation calculation reproduces the experimental observation of high power single mode oscillation of the T E22 ,2 mode as the design mode. This gives a theoretical basis of the experimentally obtained high power oscillation with the design mode in a real gyrotron and moreover shows a high power oscillation regime of the design mode.

  6. A Gyrotron-Powered Pellet Accelerator for Tokamak Fueling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, P. B.; Perkins, F. W.

    2006-04-01

    A novel pellet acceleration concept [1] using microwave power from MW gyrotron sources has been developed that could pave the way for high-speed >3 km/s inner-wall pellet injection on ITER-class tokamaks. The concept is based on the principal of a gun, where a high-pressure propellant gas drives the projectile down the barrel. In the proposed concept, the high gas pressure is created by evaporative explosion of a composite ``pusher'' medium attached behind the DT fuel pellet. The pusher consists of micron-sized conducting particles, (Li, Be, C) embedded uniformly in a D2 ice slug with <5% volume concentration, thus facilitating microwave energy absorption by dissipation of eddy currents flowing within the conducting particles only. Microwave power is delivered to the pusher along a waveguide, which also serves as the pellet launch tube. A scaling law predicts that a pellet of mass M accelerated over a distance L reaches a velocity v (PL/M)^1/3, where P is the gyrotron power.pard[1] P. Parks & F. Perkins, US patent application ``Microwave-Powered Pellet Accelerator,'' No. 11/256/662, October 21, 2005.

  7. Development of High-Power, Long-Pulse Gyrotrons and Its Application for High Electron Temperature, EBWH and ECCD Experiments on LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Y.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Nishiura, M.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Takita, Y.; Mutoh, T.; Yamada, H.; Komori, A.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T.; Marushchenko, Nikolai B.; Turkin, Yuri

    2011-12-23

    To sustain plasmas with higher parameters and with longer pulse duration in LHD, ECH system has been upgraded by introducing newly developed 77 GHz gyrotrons. The designed output power and operation duration time are over 1 MW for several seconds and 0.3 MW for continuous operation, respectively. Owing to the upgrade of gyrotrons and improved power supply operation procedure, total injection power of EC-waves to LHD increased up to 3.7 MW at the last LHD experimental campaign in 2010.Application of the high-power 77 GHz EC-waves of 3.4 MW as focused beams to the center of plasma with low line-average electron density of {approx}0.2x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} causes highly steep electron temperature profile and the central electron temperature reached up to 20 keV, which highly exceeds the former record of 15 keV. At higher density region of 1x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, central electron temperature reached 8.6 keV.Additional electron Bernstein wave heatings, O-X-B and slow X-B heatings, using a 77 GHz ECH system caused clear increase in plasma stored energy even for the high-density plasmas over plasma cutoff (>7.35x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}) sustained with NBI. For the O-X-B scenario, the 77 GHz EC-wave was obliquely injected from low-field side in O-mode polarization, aiming at the point where high mode-conversion efficiency was expected. For realizing slow X-B scenario, new inner-vessel mirrors were installed in LHD just close to a helical coil, that is, at the high-field side (HFS) region. Using the inner-vessel mirror, X-mode waves were injected from HFS, showing evident increase in plasma stored energy.Oblique injection of long-pulse 0.77 MW/8 s 77 GHz wave with various N{sub ||} clearly demonstrated ECCD in LHD. The EC-driven current changes its direction with the sign of N{sub ||}, and the highest EC-driven current reached up to 42 kA.

  8. Integrated Design of Undepressed Collector for Low Power Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anil; Goswami, Uttam K.; Poonia, Sunita; Singh, Udaybir; Kumar, Nitin; Alaria, M. K.; Bera, A.; Khatun, Hasina; Sinha, A. K.

    2011-06-01

    A 42 GHz, 200 kW continuous wave (CW) gyrotron, operating at TE03 mode is under development for the electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating of the Indian TOKAMAK system. The gyrotron is made up of an undepressed collector. The undepressed collector is simple to design and cost effective. In this paper, a detailed design study of the undepressed collector for the 42 GHz gyrotron is presented. The EGUN code is used to analyze the spent electron beam trajectory for the maximum spread to reduce the power loading on the collector surface. To achieve wall loading ≤1 kW/cm2, a collector with a length of 800 mm and a radius of 42.5 mm is designed. The design also includes the three magnet systems around the collector for maximum and uniform beam spread. The thermal and the structural analyses are done using the ANSYS code to optimize the collector structure and dimensions with tolerance.

  9. Two-tier calibrated electro-optic sensing system for intense field characterization of high-power W-band gyrotron.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok; Hong, Young-Pyo; Yang, Jong-Won; Lee, Dong-Joon

    2016-05-16

    We present a field-calibrated electro-optic sensing system for measurement of the electric field radiating from a high-power vacuum oscillator at ~95 GHz. The intense electric field is measured in absolute scale via two probe-calibration steps, associated with a photonic heterodyne scheme. First, a micro-electro-optic probe, fabricated to less than one-tenth the oscillation wavelength scale to minimize field-perturbation due to the probe, is placed on the aperture of a field-calculable WR-10 waveguide to calibrate the probe in V/m scale. Then, using this arrangement as a calibrated reference probe at the first-tier position, another probe-bulkier, and thus more robust and sensitive but not accessible to the aperture-is calibrated at the second-tier position away from the waveguide aperture. This two-tier calibrated probe was utilized to diagnose the sub-MV/m scale of intense electric fields and emissions from a high-power W-band gyrotron. The experimental results obtained proved consistent with calculated analytical results-verifying the efficacy of the developed system. PMID:27409877

  10. Development of an Ultra High Frequency Gyrotron with a Pulsed Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Idehara, T.; Kamada, M.; Tsuchiya, H.; Hayashi, T.; Agusu, La; Mitsudo, S.; Ogawa, I.; Manuilov, V. N.; Naito, K.; Yuyama, T.; Jiang, W.; Yatsui, K.

    2006-01-03

    An ultra-high frequency gyrotron is being developed as a THz radiation source by using a pulsed magnet. We have achieved the highest field intensity of 20.2 T. High frequency operation at the second harmonic will achieve 1.01 THz; the corresponding cavity mode is TE6,11,1. On the other hand, an ultra-high power gyrotron with a pulsed magnet is also being developed as a millimeter to submillimeter wave radiation source. The gyrotron is a large orbit gyrotron (LOG) using an intense relativistic electron beam (IREB). A pulsed power generator 'ETIGO-IV' is applied for generation of the IREB. A prototype relativistic LOG was constructed for fundamental operation. The output of the LOG will achieve 144 GHz and 9 MW; the corresponding cavity mode is TE1,4,1. Cavities for 2nd and 4th harmonic operations were designed by numerical simulation for achievement of higher frequency. The progress of development for prototype high frequency gyrotrons with pulsed magnets is presented.

  11. Start-up scenario of a high-power pulsed gyrotron for 300 GHz band collective Thomson scattering diagnostics in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbrajs, O.; Saito, T.; Tatematsu, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We present results of theoretical study of mode competition during the voltage rise of a 300-kW, 300-GHz gyrotron operating in the TE22,2,1 mode. Simulations tracking eight competing modes show that, with a proper choice of the magnetic field, stable excitation of the operating mode can be realized, despite the presence of parasitic modes in the resonator spectrum. A finite voltage rise time, 1 kV/4 ns referred to as the slow voltage rise case, is taken into account to simulate realistically the experimental condition. Simulation results with the finite voltage rise time are in good agreement with the experimental test, in which the gyrotron demonstrated reliable operation at power levels up to 300 kW. Moreover, interesting phenomena are observed. Along with voltage rise, the oscillation manner changes from backward wave oscillation to gyrotron oscillation. In the range of the magnetic field lower than the magnetic field strength at which the TE22,2 mode attains to the maximum power, mode competition with the TE21,2 mode takes place although many other competing modes exist in between the two modes. In addition to the slow voltage rise case, the fast voltage rise case, 10 kV/4 ns, and the instant voltage rise case are considered. For these cases, simulations also predict stable oscillation of the TE22,2 mode with the same power level with the slow voltage rise case. This indicates that stable oscillations of the TE22,2 mode can be obtained in a wide range of the voltage rise time.

  12. Development of gyrotrons for fusion with power exceeding 1 MW over a wide frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariya, T.; Imai, T.; Minami, R.; Numakura, T.; Eguchi, T.; Kato, T.; Endo, Y.; Ichimura, M.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Takahashi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Mutoh, T.; Sakamoto, K.; Idei, H.; Zushi, H.; Nagasaki, K.; Sano, F.; Ono, M.; Mitsunaka, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Megawatt-class gyrotrons covering a wide frequency range (14 GHz-300 GHz) are in increasing demand for nuclear fusion. Recent electron cyclotron heating and electron cyclotron current drive experiments highlight a requirement of megawatt-scale gyrotrons at a relatively lower frequency (14-35 GHz) range of some plasma devices, like GAMMA 10/PDX of the University of Tsukuba, QUEST of Kyushu University, NSTX-U of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and Heliotron J of Kyoto University. Collaborative studies for designing a new 28 GHz/35 GHz dual-frequency gyrotron and a 14 GHz gyrotron have commenced. Operation above 1 MW of 28 GHz/35 GHz dual oscillation was demonstrated experimentally. Further in the design of dual-frequency gyrotron, operations with 2 MW 3 s and 0.4 MW CW (continuous wave) at 28 GHz, and power exceeding 1 MW for 3 s at 34.8 GHz have been shown to be feasible. The 14 GHz gyrotron is expected to operate above 1 MW. We are also developing higher frequency gyrotrons (77-300 GHz). The joint program of National Institute for Fusion Science and the University of Tsukuba developed two new 154 GHz gyrotrons for the large helical device after the demonstration of three 77 GHz gyrotrons. The 154 GHz gyrotrons achieved a maximum output power of 1.25 MW and quasi-CW operation of 0.35 MW for 30 min.

  13. Problem-Oriented Simulation Packages and Computational Infrastructure for Numerical Studies of Powerful Gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damyanova, M.; Sabchevski, S.; Zhelyazkov, I.; Vasileva, E.; Balabanova, E.; Dankov, P.; Malinov, P.

    2016-05-01

    Powerful gyrotrons are necessary as sources of strong microwaves for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) of magnetically confined plasmas in various reactors (most notably ITER) for controlled thermonuclear fusion. Adequate physical models and efficient problem-oriented software packages are essential tools for numerical studies, analysis, optimization and computer-aided design (CAD) of such high-performance gyrotrons operating in a CW mode and delivering output power of the order of 1-2 MW. In this report we present the current status of our simulation tools (physical models, numerical codes, pre- and post-processing programs, etc.) as well as the computational infrastructure on which they are being developed, maintained and executed.

  14. Emittance of short-pulsed high-current ion beams formed from the plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge sustained by high-power millimeter-wave gyrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Razin, S. Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Sidorov, A.; Skalyga, V.

    2014-02-15

    We present experimental results on measuring the emittance of short-pulsed (≤100 μs) high-current (80–100 mA) ion beams of heavy gases (Nitrogen, Argon) formed from a dense plasma of an ECR source of multiply charged ions (MCI) with quasi-gas-dynamic mode of plasma confinement in a magnetic trap of simple mirror configuration. The discharge was created by a high-power (90 kW) pulsed radiation of a 37.5-GHz gyrotron. The normalized emittance of generated ion beams of 100 mA current was (1.2–1.3) π mm mrad (70% of ions in the beams). Comparing these results with those obtained using a cusp magnetic trap, it was concluded that the structure of the trap magnetic field lines does not exert a decisive influence on the emittance of ion beams in the gas-dynamic ECR source of MCI.

  15. On the dependence of the efficiency of a 240 GHz high-power gyrotron on the displacement of the electron beam and on the azimuthal index

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Avramidis, K. A.; Franck, J.; Jelonnek, J.

    2014-01-15

    Two issues in the cavity design for a Megawatt-class, 240 GHz gyrotron are addressed. Those are first, the effect of a misaligned electron beam on the gyrotron efficiency and second, a possible azimuthal instability of the gyrotron. The aforementioned effects are important for any gyrotron operation, but could be more critical in the operation of Megawatt-class gyrotrons at frequencies above 200 GHz, which will be the anticipated requirement of DEMO. The target is to provide some basic trends to be considered during the refinement and optimization of the design. Self-consistent calculations are the base for simulations wherever possible. However, in cases for which self-consistent models were not available, fixed-field results are presented. In those cases, the conservative nature of the results should be kept in mind.

  16. Suppression and nonlinear excitation of parasitic modes in second harmonic gyrotrons operating in a very high order mode

    SciTech Connect

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Pu, Ruifeng; Granatstein, Victor L.

    2015-07-06

    In recent years, there was an active development of high-power, sub-terahertz (sub-THz) gyrotrons for numerous applications. For example, a 0.67 THz gyrotron delivering more than 200 kW with about 20% efficiency was developed. This record high efficiency was achieved because the gyrotron operated in a high-order TE{sub 31,8}-mode with the power of ohmic losses less than 10% of the power of outgoing radiation. That gyrotron operated at the fundamental cyclotron resonance, and a high magnetic field of about 27 T was created by a pulse solenoid. For numerous applications, it is beneficial to use gyrotrons at cyclotron harmonics which can operate in available cryomagnets with fields not exceeding 15 T. However, typically, the gyrotron operation at harmonics faces severe competition from parasitic modes at the fundamental resonance. In the present paper, we consider a similar 0.67 THz gyrotron designed for operation in the same TE{sub 31,8}-mode, but at the second harmonic. We focus on two nonlinear effects typical for interaction between the fundamental and second harmonic modes, viz., the mode suppression and the nonlinear excitation of the mode at the fundamental harmonic by the second harmonic oscillations. Our study includes both the analytical theory and numerical simulations performed with the self-consistent code MAGY. The simulations show that stable second harmonic operation in the TE{sub 31,8} mode is possible with only modest sacrifice of efficiency and power.

  17. Stable, high efficiency gyrotron backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, C. T.; Chang, T. H.; Pao, K. F.; Chu, K. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2007-09-15

    Stability issues have been a major concern for the realization of broadband tunability of the gyrotron backward-wave oscillator (gyro-BWO). Multimode, time-dependent simulations are employed to examine the stability properties of the gyro-BWO. It is shown that the gyro-BWO is susceptible to both nonstationary oscillations and axial mode competition in the course of frequency tuning. Regions of nonstationary oscillations and axial mode competition are displayed in the form of stability maps over wide-ranging parameter spaces. These maps serve as a guide for the identification and optimization of stable windows for broadband tuning. Results indicate that a shorter interaction length provides greater stability without efficiency degradation. These theoretical predictions have been verified in a Ka-band gyro-BWO experiment using both short and long interaction lengths. In the case of a short interaction length, continuous and smooth tunability, in magnetic field and in beam voltage, was demonstrated with the high interaction efficiency reported so far. A maximum 3-dB tuning range of 1.3 GHz with a peak power of 149 kW at 29.8% efficiency was achieved. In a comparative experiment with a longer interaction length, the experimental data are characterized by piecewise-stable tuning curves separated by region(s) of nonstationary oscillations, as predicted by theory.

  18. Stable, high efficiency gyrotron backward-wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, C. T.; Chang, T. H.; Pao, K. F.; Chu, K. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2007-09-01

    Stability issues have been a major concern for the realization of broadband tunability of the gyrotron backward-wave oscillator (gyro-BWO). Multimode, time-dependent simulations are employed to examine the stability properties of the gyro-BWO. It is shown that the gyro-BWO is susceptible to both nonstationary oscillations and axial mode competition in the course of frequency tuning. Regions of nonstationary oscillations and axial mode competition are displayed in the form of stability maps over wide-ranging parameter spaces. These maps serve as a guide for the identification and optimization of stable windows for broadband tuning. Results indicate that a shorter interaction length provides greater stability without efficiency degradation. These theoretical predictions have been verified in a Ka-band gyro-BWO experiment using both short and long interaction lengths. In the case of a short interaction length, continuous and smooth tunability, in magnetic field and in beam voltage, was demonstrated with the high interaction efficiency reported so far. A maximum 3-dB tuning range of 1.3GHz with a peak power of 149kW at 29.8% efficiency was achieved. In a comparative experiment with a longer interaction length, the experimental data are characterized by piecewise-stable tuning curves separated by region(s) of nonstationary oscillations, as predicted by theory.

  19. Gyrotron: an ECH system component

    SciTech Connect

    Loring, C.M.; Eason, H.O.; Kimrey, H.D.; White, T.L.; Jory, H.R.; Evans, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    The gyrotron, or electron-cyclotron maser, in the form of a gyromonotron, is being developed as a source of millimeter wave energy for fusion plasma heating. The characteristics of this high power, high efficiency electron tube are described in terms of the requirements for the beam power supply system, the mechanical support system, the cooling system, the focusing and tuning magnets, and the waveguide system. Requirements of power level and transmission efficiency dictate the use of oversize waveguide. The implications, both to the user and to the interaction mechanisms in the gyrotron, of the use of oversize waveguide are treated. The effects of variations of various operating parameters upon the gyrotron's power output and stability are also discussed. Data from gyrotron development and system operation are used where appropriate.

  20. Effect of electron-cyclotron resonance plasma heating conditions on the low-frequency modulation of the gyrotron power at the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Batanov, G. M.; Borzosekov, V. D.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M. Malakhov, D. V.; Petelin, M. I.; Petrov, A. E.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Skvortsova, N. N.; Stepakhin, V. D.; Kharchev, N. K.

    2015-08-15

    Low-frequency modulation of the gyrotron power at the L-2M stellarator was studied at different modes of plasma confinement. The plasma was heated at the second harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency. The effect of reflection of gyrotron radiation from the region of electron-cyclotron resonance plasma heating, as well as of backscattering of gyrotron radiation from fluctuations of the plasma density, on the modulation of the gyrotron power was investigated.

  1. A review on the sub-THz/THz gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Singh, Udaybir; Bera, Anirban; Sinha, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    A review on the sub-THz/THz gyrotrons is performed in this manuscript. The present development status of gyrotrons can be divided into three streams for the sake of better understanding: 1. low frequency (<35 GHz), medium power (<100 kW), small size and easy to handle gyrotrons for industrial applications, 2. very high power (1 MW or more), medium frequency (100-200 GHz) gyrotrons for plasma fusion applications, 3. low power (few tens of watt to kW), high frequency (>200 GHz) gyrotrons for various innovative applications. In this manuscript, the third stream of gyrotron development is reviewed. In last few decades several innovative applications are searched in sub-THz/THz band where the gyrotrons could be used as an efficient source of RF radiation. The applications of sub-THz/THz gyrotrons including the futuristic scope of the device are also discussed in this article. Further, several criticalities arise in the design and development when the gyrotron operation shifts toward the high frequency band. Various such design and technological challenges are also discussed here. Finally the development status of sub-THz/THz gyrotrons as per the use in various scientific and technological applications is also discussed.

  2. 100 GHz, 1 MW, CW gyrotron study program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Bier, R.; Caplan, M.; Jory, H.

    1983-09-01

    The results of a study program to investigate the feasibility of various approaches in designing a 100 GHz, 1 MW CW gyrotron are presented. A summary is given of the possible configurations for a high average power, high frequency gyrotron, including an historical survey of experimental results which are relevant to the various approaches. A set of basic scaling considerations which enable qualitative comparisons between particular gyrotron interaction circuits is presented. These calculations are important in understanding the role of various electron beam and circuit parameters in achieving a viable gyrotron design. Following these scaling exercises, a series of design calculations is presented for a possible approach in achieving 100 GHz, 1 MW CW. These calculations include analyses of the electron gun and interaction circuit parts of the gyrotron, and a general analysis of other aspects of a high average power, high frequency gyrotron. Scalability of important aspects of the design to other frequencies is also discussed, as well as key technology issues.

  3. Continuous-wave Submillimeter-wave Gyrotrons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong-Tae; Griffin, Robert G.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Joye, Colin D.; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Torrezan, Antonio C.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (DNP/NMR) has emerged as a powerful technique to obtain significant enhancements in spin spectra from biological samples. For DNP in modern NMR systems, a high power continuous-wave source in the submillimeter wavelength range is necessary. Gyrotrons can deliver tens of watts of CW power at submillimeter wavelengths and are well suited for use in DNP/NMR spectrometers. To date, 140 GHz and 250 GHz gyrotrons are being employed in DNP spectrometer experiments at 200 MHz and 380 MHz at MIT. A 460 GHz gyrotron, which has operated with 8 W of CW output power, will soon be installed in a 700 MHz NMR spectrometer. High power radiation with good spectral and spatial resolution from these gyrotrons should provide NMR spectrometers with high signal enhancement through DNP. Also, these tubes operating at submillimeter wavelengths should have important applications in research in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and medicine. PMID:17404605

  4. Experimental study of a high-frequency megawatt gyrotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Kreischer, K.E.; Grimm, T.L.; Guss, W.C.; Mobius, A.W.; Temkin, R.J.

    1990-03-01

    A detailed experimental study of the efficiency and output power of a pulsed gyrotron operating in the TE{sub 16,2,1} mode at 148 GHz has been conducted. A peak efficiency of 30% was achieved at 80 kV and 20 A for an output power of 480 kW. The highest output power of 925 kW, corresponding to an efficiency of 19%, was measured at 120 kV and 40 A. Two cavities with different interaction lengths (6.0{lambda} and 4.2{lambda}) were investigated. In both cases, agreement was found between the theoretical and experimental efficiency for beam currents up to 15--20 A. At higher currents, the experimental efficiency saturated between 20% and 25%, well below the 35%-- 40% predicted by theory. No increase was obtained for modest positive or negative linear tapering of the cavity magnetic field. Measurements indicate that the beam velocity ratio decreases as beam current increases, partially explaining the reduced efficiency at higher currents. Operation in different azimuthal rotations of the cavity modes was also observed. The measured rotation was found to be consistent with the theoretical coupling between the beam and rf field.

  5. Gyrotron Output Power Stabilization by PID Feedback Control of Heater Current and Anode Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutoryan, E. M.; Idehara, T.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Ueda, K.

    2014-12-01

    To provide stable output power of a gyrotron during long operation time the power stabilization was achieved by two schemes with PID feedback control of heater current and anode voltage. It was based on the dependence of the output power on both the anode voltage and the beam current and also on the dependence of the beam current on the gun heater current. Both schemes provided decrease of the power standard deviation to 0.3-0.5%. The comparison between parameters of both schemes is discussed in the paper.

  6. Two-wave regime of operation of the high-harmonic gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Savilov, A. V.; Denisov, G. G.; Kalynov, Yu. K.; Osharin, I. V.

    2015-04-15

    The use of the two-wave co-generation is proposed as a way to decrease the effective Q-factor of the operating near-cutoff wave of the gyrotron. In this two-wave regime, the operating wave represents a “hot” wave mode formed by two partial “cold” modes (near-cutoff and far-from-cutoff ones) coupled on the electron beam. It is shown that the use of this regime can provide a significant decrease of the Ohmic losses in low-relativistic high-harmonic gyrotrons operating in the THz frequency range.

  7. High power millimeter wave source development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T. V.

    1989-01-01

    High power millimeter wave sources for fusion program; ECH source development program strategy; and 1 MW, 140 GHz gyrotron experiment design philosophy are briefly outlined. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  8. Experimental investigation of a coaxial gyrotron oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Advani, Rahul N.

    1999-09-01

    This thesis presents experimental results of a megawatt power level, 140 GHz coaxial gyrotron oscillator. The coaxial gyrotron has the potential to transport very high power electron beams and thus achieve higher microwave output power levels than conventional gyrotrons. A TE21,13 coaxial gyrotron was designed to operate at 95 kV, 76 A. This tube was tested to high power with the first high power Inverted Magnetron Injection Gun (IMIG). The IMIG electron gun was tested to 10 MW (105 kV, 93 A), which is the highest power level for a non-relativistic gyrotron gun. Operation of the coaxial gyrotron oscillator yielded power levels of greater than 1 MW in two different configurations: with the coaxial conductor (at 92kV, 70 A, and 16% efficiency) and without the coaxial conductor (85 kV, 65 A, and 18% efficiency). We also successfully operated this tube in three configurations (empty cavity, radial output, and axial output) with no beam interception. We observed regimes of dominant single mode and multi-mode operation. We also identified electron beam asymmetries and tube alignment as two major issues, which can limit the performance of a coaxial gyrotron. An unexpected source of magnetic field error was found in the magnetization of the stainless steel parts. All these results have led to techniques for improving not only coaxial gyrotrons but also other gyrotron tubes. We also investigated a ferroelectric cathode, which has the potential to achieve higher currents than thermionic cathodes in a simpler, low cost gun. We report the first results on a ferroelectric cathode gun in a magnetron injection gun configuration suitable for use in a gyrotron. It had an annular emitter shape with a diameter of 11.4 cm and a width of 0.25 cm and operated at currents of up to 10 A (1.1 A/cm2) at 8 kV, in 5 μs flat-top pulses. This result (along with the kiloampere beam obtained at Integrated Applied Physics) demonstrate the scalability of ferroelectric cathodes to large diameter

  9. Intense high-frequency gyrotron-based microwave beams for material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hardek, T.W.; Cooke, W.D.; Katz, J.D.; Perry, W.L.; Rees, D.E.

    1997-03-01

    Microwave processing of materials has traditionally utilized frequencies in the 0.915 and 2.45 GHz regions. Microwave power sources are readily available at these frequencies but the relatively long wavelengths can present challenges in uniformly heating materials. An additional difficulty is the poor coupling of ceramic based materials to the microwave energy. Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists, working in conjunction with the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), have assembled a high-frequency demonstration processing facility utilizing gyrotron based RF sources. The facility is primarily intended to demonstrate the unique features available at frequencies as high as 84 GHz. The authors can readily provide quasi-optical, 37 GHz beams at continuous wave (CW) power levels in the 10 kW range. They have also provided beams at 84 GHz at 10 kW CW power levels. They are presently preparing a facility to demonstrate the sintering of ceramics at 30 GHz. This paper presents an overview of the present demonstration processing facility and describes some of the features they have available now and will have available in the near future.

  10. Electron-optical systems for planar gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuilov, V. N.; Zaslavsky, V. Yu.; Ginzburg, N. S.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Kuftin, A. N.; Zotova, I. V.

    2014-02-01

    The methodology of designing an electron-optical system (EOS) that forms sheet helical electron beams (HEBs) for high-power gyrotrons is developed. As an example, we consider the EOS for a 140-GHz gyrotron operated at the first harmonic of the cyclotron frequency with an accelerating voltage of 50 kV, a beam current of 30 A, and a magnetic field compression of 36. A planar geometry of the magnetron-injection gun (MIG) is suggested. The adiabatic theory of MIGs modified for the planar geometry of EOS is used for preliminary estimations of MIG parameters. Numerical simulation of the HEB properties based on the CST STUDIO SUITE 3D code is performed to find the optimal configuration of a planar MIG. The accuracy of the calculated data is discussed. The main factors that affect the HEB quality are considered. It is shown that a sheet HEB with a pitch-factor of 1.3 and velocity spread not exceeding 25%-30% can be formed; this is quite acceptable for high-efficiency operation of modern gyrotrons. Calculation of the beam-wave interaction with the obtained HEB parameters proved that a high output power with a sufficiently good efficiency of about 20% can be reached. Simulations show the feasibility of the experimental implementation of a novel planar EOS and its use in short-wave planar gyrotrons. The developed technique can be used for the study and optimization of planar gyrotrons of different frequency bands and power levels.

  11. Start currents in an overmoded gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeddulla, M.; Nusinovich, G. S.; Antonsen, T. M.

    2003-11-01

    High-power long-pulse millimeter-wave gyrotrons operate in high-order modes. The spectral density of these modes is very high. Therefore, self-excitation conditions can be fulfilled for several modes simultaneously. Correspondingly, in order to determine which mode will be excited first in such a device, the starting currents of competing modes should be calculated much more accurately than in gyrotrons with a rarer spectrum. In the present paper, an existing linear theory is generalized to take into account effects of magnetic field tapering, cavity profile, finite beam thickness, velocity spread and axially dependent beam coupling to the fields of competing modes. Starting currents are calculated for the operating and the most dangerous competing mode in a 140 GHz gyrotron, which is under development at Communication and Power Industries. Calculations show that the radial position of the electron beam plays a critical role in deciding which mode dominates the mode competition.

  12. Design of Matching Optics Unit (MOU) for coaxial ITER gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jianbo; Gantenbein, Gerd; Kern, Stefan; Rzesnicki, Tomasz; Thumm, Manfred

    2011-07-01

    The paper presents the design of a MOU for the coaxial ITER gyrotron. Corrugated waveguides are used to transmit the high power mm-waves generated by gyrotrons to the plasma Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) and Current Drive (CD). The MOU contains two focusing mirrors, which are used to convert the gyrotron output into a Gaussian distribution with optimal parameters to improve the coupling efficiency of the TEM{sub 00} Gaussian distribution to the HE{sub 11} mode of the corrugated wave guide. The calculation results reveal that the coupling efficiency of the Gaussian beam to the HE{sub 11} mode is approximately 96.33%. (author)

  13. Suppression of spurious mode oscillation in mega-watt 77-GHz gyrotron as a high quality probe beam source for the collective Thomson scattering in LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Ogasawara, S.; Kubo, S.; Nishiura, M.; Tanaka, K.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ito, S.; Takita, Y.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Tatematsu, Y.; Saito, T.; Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T.

    2012-10-15

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic requires a strong probing beam to diagnose a bulk and fast ion distribution function in fusion plasmas. A mega-watt gyrotron for electron cyclotron resonance heating is used as a probing beam in the large helical device. Spurious mode oscillations are often observed during the turning on/off phase of the modulation. The frequency spectra of the 77-GHz gyrotron output power have been measured, and then one of the spurious modes, which interferes with the CTS receiver system, is identified as the TE{sub 17,6} mode at the frequency of 74.7 GHz. The mode competition calculation indicates that the increase of the magnetic field strength at the gyrotron resonator can avoid such a spurious mode and excite only the main TE{sub 18,6} mode. The spurious radiation at the 74.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated to be suppressed in the stronger magnetic field than that optimized for the high-power operation.

  14. Suppression of spurious mode oscillation in mega-watt 77-GHz gyrotron as a high quality probe beam source for the collective Thomson scattering in LHD.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, S; Kubo, S; Nishiura, M; Tatematsu, Y; Saito, T; Tanaka, K; Shimozuma, T; Yoshimura, Y; Igami, H; Takahashi, H; Ito, S; Takita, Y; Kobayashi, S; Mizuno, Y; Okada, K; Minami, R; Kariya, T; Imai, T

    2012-10-01

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic requires a strong probing beam to diagnose a bulk and fast ion distribution function in fusion plasmas. A mega-watt gyrotron for electron cyclotron resonance heating is used as a probing beam in the large helical device. Spurious mode oscillations are often observed during the turning on/off phase of the modulation. The frequency spectra of the 77-GHz gyrotron output power have been measured, and then one of the spurious modes, which interferes with the CTS receiver system, is identified as the TE(17,6) mode at the frequency of 74.7 GHz. The mode competition calculation indicates that the increase of the magnetic field strength at the gyrotron resonator can avoid such a spurious mode and excite only the main TE(18,6) mode. The spurious radiation at the 74.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated to be suppressed in the stronger magnetic field than that optimized for the high-power operation.

  15. Linear and nonlinear analysis of a gyro-peniotron oscillator and study of start-up scenario in a high order mode gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeddulla, Muralidhar

    The Cyclotron Resonant Maser (CRM) is a device in which electrons gyrating in an external magnetic field produce coherent EM radiation. A DC electron beam current must be converted to an AC beam current to create RF energy. There are two possible approaches: phase bunching (O-type) and spatial segregation (M-type). In phase bunching, electrons are either accelerated or decelerated depending on when the electrons enter the interaction region, causing phase bunching. The electron bunches are then slowed down by the RF field for energy extraction. Not all electrons lose energy; some even gain energy. In spatial segregation, electrons entering the interaction region at different times are deflected in different directions. With an appropriate spatially varying RF field, all electrons can lose energy leading to very high conversion efficiency. A CRM with a smooth walled cylindrical waveguide interaction cavity and an annular electron beam passing through it can generate very large amount of RF energy. Depending on the electron beam position a gyrotron (O-type device) and a gyro-peniotron (M-type device) are possible. In this work, first, a nonlinear theory to study CRMs with a smooth walled cylindrical waveguide interaction cavity is presented. The nonlinear set of differential equations are linearized to study the starting conditions of the device. A gyro-peniotron operating in the TE0.2 -mode is studied using the theory presented. It is found that a gyro-peniotron operating in a low order mode can be self excited without mode competition from gyrotron modes, leading to the possibility of a very efficient high power RF source. A higher order mode gyro-peniotron experiences severe mode competition from gyrotron modes. The cavity Q required for gyro-peniotron operation is very high, which can lead to excessive heat in the cavity walls due to ohmic losses. Hence, a gyro-peniotron operation seems practical only in low order modes and in short pulses. Second, an existing

  16. Electron-optical systems for planar gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Manuilov, V. N.; Zaslavsky, V. Yu.; Ginzburg, N. S.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Kuftin, A. N.; Zotova, I. V.

    2014-02-15

    The methodology of designing an electron-optical system (EOS) that forms sheet helical electron beams (HEBs) for high-power gyrotrons is developed. As an example, we consider the EOS for a 140-GHz gyrotron operated at the first harmonic of the cyclotron frequency with an accelerating voltage of 50 kV, a beam current of 30 A, and a magnetic field compression of 36. A planar geometry of the magnetron-injection gun (MIG) is suggested. The adiabatic theory of MIGs modified for the planar geometry of EOS is used for preliminary estimations of MIG parameters. Numerical simulation of the HEB properties based on the CST STUDIO SUITE 3D code is performed to find the optimal configuration of a planar MIG. The accuracy of the calculated data is discussed. The main factors that affect the HEB quality are considered. It is shown that a sheet HEB with a pitch-factor of 1.3 and velocity spread not exceeding 25%–30% can be formed; this is quite acceptable for high-efficiency operation of modern gyrotrons. Calculation of the beam-wave interaction with the obtained HEB parameters proved that a high output power with a sufficiently good efficiency of about 20% can be reached. Simulations show the feasibility of the experimental implementation of a novel planar EOS and its use in short-wave planar gyrotrons. The developed technique can be used for the study and optimization of planar gyrotrons of different frequency bands and power levels.

  17. Selective suppression of high order axial modes of the gyrotron backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Pao, K. F.; Fan, C. T.; Chang, T. H.; Chiu, C. C.; Chu, K. R.

    2007-09-15

    Selective suppression of high order axial modes of the gyrotron backward-wave oscillator (gyro-BWO) is investigated in theory and in experiment. The gyro-BWO interaction is much more efficient in a down-tapered interaction structure, while it is also more susceptible to the problem of axial mode competition in such a structure. Because higher order axial modes (at a higher oscillation frequency) penetrate deeper into the interaction structure, application of distributed wall loss at the downstream end of the interaction structure is shown to be effective for selective suppression of these modes with minor effects on the efficiency of the desired fundamental axial mode. A stable gyro-BWO operating in a single mode throughout the entire beam pulse is demonstrated on the basis of this principle. Theoretical and experimental results are found to be in good agreement.

  18. Designing A Mode Converter For Use With A Gyrotron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes process of designing corrugated, circular-cross-section length of waveguide converting input electromagnetic radiation at frequency of 34.5 GHz in TM(11) mode to output radiation in HE(11) mode. TM(11)-mode input radiation supplied by gyrotron generating continuous-wave power of 200 kW at 34.5 GHz in TE(01) mode followed by TE(01)-to-TM(11) mode converter. Together, gyrotron and mode converters constitute prototype high-power transmitter for long-distance free-space communication.

  19. Design and measurement of a TE13 input converter for high order mode gyrotron travelling wave amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Guo; Shu, Guoxiang; Yan, Ran; Wang, Li; Agurgo Balfour, E.; Fu, Hao; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2016-03-01

    A technique to launch a circular TE13 mode to interact with the helical electron beam of a gyrotron travelling wave amplifier is proposed and verified by simulation and cold test in this paper. The high order (HOM) TE13 mode is excited by a broadband Y-type power divider with the aid of a cylindrical waveguide system. Using grooves and convex strips loaded at the lateral planes of the output cylindrical waveguide, the electric fields of the potential competing TE32 and TE71 modes are suppressed to allow the transmission of the dominant TE13 mode. The converter performance for different structural dimensions of grooves and convex strips is studied in detail and excellent results have been achieved. Simulation predicts that the average transmission is ˜-1.8 dB with a 3 dB bandwidth of 7.2 GHz (91.5-98.7 GHz) and port reflection is less than -15 dB. The conversion efficiency to the TE32 and TE71 modes are, respectively, under -15 dB and -24 dB in the operating frequency band. Such an HOM converter operating at W-band has been fabricated and cold tested with the radiation boundary. Measurement from the vector network analyzer cold test and microwave simulations show a good reflection performance for the converter.

  20. Gyrotron gun study report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, J. M.; Attard, A. C.

    1982-09-01

    The purpose of the program was to explore new gyrotron gun configurations and to design a low velocity spread replacement gun for the NRL 35 GHz gyro-TWT. The specific beam forming techniques which were studied were magnetic field reversal, transverse magnetic field kicker, and single anode (diode-like) Magnetron Injection Guns (MIGs). This report contains a summary of our work in each of these areas as well as a description of the new MIG design for the gyro-TWT. Gyrotron oscillators and amplifiers require an entirely different type of electron gun design than those normally used in conventional tube designs. The ideal beam must not only have the proper geometry to maximize the rf interaction with the selected waveguide circuit mode, but also, for maximum efficiency, there are two additional requirements: (1) the transverse velocity of the electrons must exceed the longitudinal velocity by a typical factor of 1.5 to 2 (intermixed helical electron trajectories are allowed); and (2) the spread in the longitudinal velocities must be small (on the order of 10-20% for oscillators, 2-5% for amplifiers). Several methods for producing gyrotron beams have been investigated, and most likely different approaches will be necessary for differing power levels and velocity spread requirements.

  1. Ion Compensation for Space Charge in the Helical Electron Beams of Gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuilov, V. N.; Semenov, V. E.

    2016-06-01

    We solve analytically the problem about ion compensation for the space charge of a helical electron beam in a gyrotron operated in the long-pulse regime. Elementary processes, which take place during ionization of residual gas in the tube under typical pressures of 10-6-10-7 mm Hg, are considered. It is shown that distribution of the space charge is affected mainly by the electrons of the initial beam and slow-moving ions produced by ionization of the residual gas. Steady-state density of ions in the operating space of the gyrotron after the end of the transitional processes is found, as well as the electron density profile in the channel of electron beam transportation. The results obtained allow us to evaluate the pitch-factor variations caused by partial compensations for the potential "sagging" in the gyrotron cavity, thus being useful for analysis of starting currents, efficiency, and mode competition in high-power gyrotrons.

  2. High-frequency gyrotron scattering diagnostic for instability studies on TARA

    SciTech Connect

    Woskoboinikow, P.; Cohn, D.R.; Gerver, M.; Mulligan, W.J.; Post, R.S.; Temkin, R.J.; Trulsen, J.

    1985-05-01

    A 1- to 10-kW,>30-ms pulsed, narrow linewidth (<1 MHz), 137-GHz gyrotron is being fabricated for collective Thomson scattering plasma diagnostics on the TARA tandem mirror experiment. The drift cyclotron loss cone, the axial loss cone, harmonics of these instabilities, and the ion two stream instability in the TARA plugs will be studied with this diagnostic.

  3. 1.5 MW, 110 GHz Gyrotron with a Depressed Collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunmi; Anderson, James; Shapiro, Michael; Jagadishwar, Sirigiri; Temkin, Richard

    2004-11-01

    A 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron is under development for electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating at DIII-D. Research conducted at MIT in short pulse operation is aimed at providing data on the operation of the gyrotron at very high efficiency. The 1.5 MW gyrotron design is based on previous successful results from the 1 MW gyrotrons built by Communication and Power Industries (CPI). A TE_22,6 mode cavity is utilized with an electron beam voltage of 96 kV and a beam current of 40 A. Recently we have successfully run the gyrotron in the axial configuration, and the experimental peak power was 1.44 MW at 37 % efficiency, when operating in the TE_22,6 mode. We have rebuilt this experiment in a configuration which has an internal mode converter and depressed collector, which should enhance the efficiency (> 50 %). The internal mode converter of the TE_22,6 mode to a Gaussian beam consists of an irregular waveguide launcher and four quasi-optical mirrors. A new cavity that provides greatly reduced Ohmic heating on the wall has been designed to enhance the gyrotron efficiency. This cavity will be tested in the next stage of the experiment.

  4. Neutron generator for BNCT based on high current ECR ion source with gyrotron plasma heating.

    PubMed

    Skalyga, V; Izotov, I; Golubev, S; Razin, S; Sidorov, A; Maslennikova, A; Volovecky, A; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Tarvainen, O

    2015-12-01

    BNCT development nowadays is constrained by a progress in neutron sources design. Creation of a cheap and compact intense neutron source would significantly simplify trial treatments avoiding use of expensive and complicated nuclear reactors and accelerators. D-D or D-T neutron generator is one of alternative types of such sources for. A so-called high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source with plasma heating by millimeter wave gyrotron radiation is suggested to be used in a scheme of D-D neutron generator in the present work. Ion source of that type was developed in the Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia). It can produce deuteron ion beams with current density up to 700-800 mA/cm(2). Generation of the neutron flux with density at the level of 7-8·10(10) s(-1) cm(-2) at the target surface could be obtained in case of TiD2 target bombardment with deuteron beam accelerated to 100 keV. Estimations show that it is enough for formation of epithermal neutron flux with density higher than 10(9) s(-1) cm(-2) suitable for BNCT. Important advantage of described approach is absence of Tritium in the scheme. First experiments performed in pulsed regime with 300 mA, 45 kV deuteron beam directed to D2O target demonstrated 10(9) s(-1) neutron flux. This value corresponds to theoretical estimations and proofs prospects of neutron generator development based on high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source. PMID:26302662

  5. Neutron generator for BNCT based on high current ECR ion source with gyrotron plasma heating.

    PubMed

    Skalyga, V; Izotov, I; Golubev, S; Razin, S; Sidorov, A; Maslennikova, A; Volovecky, A; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Tarvainen, O

    2015-12-01

    BNCT development nowadays is constrained by a progress in neutron sources design. Creation of a cheap and compact intense neutron source would significantly simplify trial treatments avoiding use of expensive and complicated nuclear reactors and accelerators. D-D or D-T neutron generator is one of alternative types of such sources for. A so-called high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source with plasma heating by millimeter wave gyrotron radiation is suggested to be used in a scheme of D-D neutron generator in the present work. Ion source of that type was developed in the Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia). It can produce deuteron ion beams with current density up to 700-800 mA/cm(2). Generation of the neutron flux with density at the level of 7-8·10(10) s(-1) cm(-2) at the target surface could be obtained in case of TiD2 target bombardment with deuteron beam accelerated to 100 keV. Estimations show that it is enough for formation of epithermal neutron flux with density higher than 10(9) s(-1) cm(-2) suitable for BNCT. Important advantage of described approach is absence of Tritium in the scheme. First experiments performed in pulsed regime with 300 mA, 45 kV deuteron beam directed to D2O target demonstrated 10(9) s(-1) neutron flux. This value corresponds to theoretical estimations and proofs prospects of neutron generator development based on high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source.

  6. 95 GHz Gyrotron with Ferroelectric Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einat, M.; Pilossof, M.; Ben-Moshe, R.; Hirshbein, H.; Borodin, D.

    2012-11-01

    Ferroelectric cathodes were reported as a feasible electron source for microwave tubes. However, due to the surface plasma emission characterizing this cathode, operation of millimeter wave tubes based on it remains questionable. Nevertheless, the interest in compact high power sources of millimeter waves and specifically 95 GHz is continually growing. In this experiment, a ferroelectric cathode is used as an electron source for a gyrotron with the output frequency extended up to 95 GHz. Power above a 5 kW peak and ˜0.5μs pulses are reported; a duty cycle of 10% is estimated to be achievable.

  7. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE{sub 041}–like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code “CST Particle Studio” has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ∼108 kW with ∼15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE{sub 041}–like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  8. Nonstationary oscillations in gyrotrons revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Kalis, H.

    2015-05-15

    Development of gyrotrons requires careful understanding of different regimes of gyrotron oscillations. It is known that in the planes of the generalized gyrotron variables: cyclotron resonance mismatch and dimensionless current or cyclotron resonance mismatch and dimensionless interaction length complicated alternating sequences of regions of stationary, periodic, automodulation, and chaotic oscillations exist. In the past, these regions were investigated on the supposition that the transit time of electrons through the interaction space is much shorter than the cavity decay time. This assumption is valid for short and/or high diffraction quality resonators. However, in the case of long and/or low diffraction quality resonators, which are often utilized, this assumption is no longer valid. In such a case, a different mathematical formalism has to be used for studying nonstationary oscillations. One example of such a formalism is described in the present paper.

  9. PRACTICAL EXERIENCES WITH THE 6 GYROTRON SYSTEM ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    LOHR,J; CARY,W.P; GORELOV,Y.A; GRUNLOH,H.J; KAJIWARA,K; PEAVY,J.J; PONCE,D; TOOKER,J; CALLIS,R.W

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 The gyrotron installation on the DIII-D tokamak now comprises six 110 GHz gyrotrons in the 1 MW class, three manufactured by CPI[1] and three by Gycom [2]. Two tetrode rectifier/modulator/regulator power supplies were constructed to provide power for the CPI gyrotrons. A second system uses three mod/reg tetrodes connected in parallel, which are fed by a dual parallel tetrode mod/reg to power the Gycom tubes. the windowless evacuated transmission lines are up to 100 m in length, with 80% transmission efficiency. Engineering solutions were developed in specific problematic areas encountered in the development of this complex system, including: Gyrotron instability; high voltage circuit instability; gyrotron conditioning; rf beam forming and coupling to waveguide; output window vacuum seals; material control; launcher mechanics and diagnosis; polarizer mechanics; dummy loads; power measurements; polarization measurements; cooling; calorimetry; and operating controls. The system is in routine operation in support of tokamak experiments, with peak generated power of about 5 MW at 2 s. pulse length and about 3 MW for 5 s. pulses. This presentation focuses on practical lessons learned in the development and operation of these systems.

  10. System using a megawatt class millimeter wave source and a high-power rectenna to beam power to a suspended platform

    DOEpatents

    Caplan, Malcolm; Friedman, Herbert W.

    2005-07-19

    A system for beaming power to a high altitude platform is based upon a high power millimeter gyrotron source, optical transmission components, and a high-power receiving antenna (i.e., a rectenna) capable of rectifying received millimeter energy and converting such energy into useable electrical power.

  11. A 250 GHz Gyrotron with a 3 GHz Tuning Bandwidth for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a novel tunable 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator with >10 W output power over most of a 3 GHz band and >35 W peak power. The tuning bandwidth and power are sufficient to generate a >1 MHz nutation frequency across the entire nitroxide EPR lineshape for cross effect DNP, as well as to excite solid effect transitions utilizing other radicals, without the need for sweeping the NMR magnetic field. Substantially improved tunability is achieved by implementing a long (23 mm) interaction cavity that can excite higher order axial modes by changing either the magnetic field of the gyrotron or the cathode potential. This interaction cavity excites the rotating TE5,2,q mode, and an internal mode converter outputs a high-quality microwave beam with >94% Gaussian content. The gyrotron was integrated into a DNP spectrometer, resulting in a measured DNP enhancement of 54 on the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. PMID:22743211

  12. First Experimental Results from the EU 2 MW Coaxial Cavity Iter Gyrotron Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, T. P.; Alberti, S.; Droz, E.; Fasel, D.; Hogge, J. P.; Jawla, S.; Porte, L.; Siravo, U.; Tran, M. Q.; Albajar, F.; Bonicelli, T.; Benin, P.; Bethuys, S.; Lievin, C.; Cirant, S.; Dumbrajs, O.; Gantenbein, G.; Illy, S.; Jin, J.; Kern, S.; Piosczyk, B.; Rzesnicki, T.; Thumm, M.

    2009-04-01

    The EU is working towards providing 2 MW, coaxial-cavity, CW, 170 GHz gyrotrons for ITER. Their design is based on results from an experimental pre-prototype tube in operation at FZK for several years, having a pulse length of several milliseconds. The first industrial prototype tube is designed for CW operation, but, in a first phase, will be tested out to 1s at the European Gyrotron Test Facility in Lausanne, Switzerland as part of a phased testing/development program (1 s, 60 s, CW). It is known that RF beam profile shaping, stray radiation handling, and collector cooling at these high power levels are three issues for the gyrotron, The gyrotron, magnet and body power supply have been delivered and successfully installed at the test stand, hosted by the CRPP. The main high voltage power supply delivery is delayed, so one of the power supplies dedicated to 3 of 9 gyrotrons in the TCV EC system is being used as a backup power source (all 3 TCV power sources can be interfaced with the test stand). Cathode conditioning began in November 2007 followed by collector conditioning in December. Parasitic low frequency oscillations have not hindered operation, and the tests have progressed to conditioning out to 0.14 s pulses by March 2008. During this period, the perfomance concerning microwave generation has been characterised and the RF beam profile has been measured at several planes to allow reconstruction of the phase and amplitude profile at the gyrotron window and to provide the necessary information permitting proper alignment of the compact RF loads prior to pulse extension. The power will be measured, according to the pulse length, using either a very-short pulse (<0.01 s) load on loan from FZK, or short-pulse (<0.2 s) or long-pulse (CW), spherical, calorimetric loads developped as part of this program by CNR. This paper presents the preliminary results of these operations.

  13. High-Speed Frequency Modulation of a 460-GHz Gyrotron for Enhancement of 700-MHz DNP-NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idehara, T.; Khutoryan, E. M.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Dumbrajs, O.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-09-01

    The high-speed frequency modulation of a 460-GHz Gyrotron FU CW GVI (the official name in Osaka University is Gyrotron FU CW GOI) was achieved by modulation of acceleration voltage of beam electrons. The modulation speed f m can be increased up to 10 kHz without decreasing the modulation amplitude δ f of frequency. The amplitude δ f was increased almost linearly with the modulation amplitude of acceleration voltage Δ V a. At the Δ V a = 1 kV, frequency spectrum width df was 50 MHz in the case of f m < 10 kHz. The frequency modulation was observed as both the variation of the IF frequency in the heterodyne detection system measured by a high-speed oscilloscope and the widths of frequency spectra df measured on a frequency spectrum analyzer. Both results well agree reasonably. When f m exceeds 10 kHz, the amplitude δ f is decreased gradually with increasing f m because of the degradation of the used amplifier in response for high-speed modulation. The experiment was performed successfully for both a sinusoidal wave and triangle wave modulations. We can use the high-speed frequency modulation for increasing the enhancement factor of the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which is one of effective and attractive methods for the high-frequency DNP-NMR spectroscopy, for example, at 700 MHz. Because the sensitivity of NMR is inversely proportional to the frequency, high-speed frequency modulation can compensate the decreasing the enhancement factor in the high-frequency DNP-NMR spectroscopy and keep the factor at high value. In addition, the high-speed frequency modulation is useful for frequency stabilization by a PID control of an acceleration voltage by feeding back of the fluctuation of frequency. The frequency stabilization in long time is also useful for application of a DNP-NMR spectroscopy to the analysis of complicated protein molecules.

  14. A point-like source of extreme ultraviolet radiation based on a discharge in a non-uniform gas flow, sustained by powerful gyrotron radiation of terahertz frequency band

    SciTech Connect

    Glyavin, M. Yu.; Golubev, S. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Litvak, A. G.; Luchinin, A. G.; Razin, S. V.; Sidorov, A. V.; Skalyga, V. A.; Vodopyanov, A. V.

    2014-10-27

    The possibility and prospects of extreme ultraviolet (UV) point-like source development are discussed in the present paper. The UV source is based on the discharge sustained by powerful gyrotron radiation of terahertz (THz) frequency band in non-uniform gas flow injected into vacuum volume through a nozzle with diameter less than 1 mm. Recent developments of THz-band gyrotrons with appropriate power level made such discharges possible. First experimental results on a point-like plasma creation by 100 kW radiation of 0.67 THz gyrotron are presented. The possibility of discharge localization within the area less than 1 mm is demonstrated. The discharge emission within the wavelength range from 112 nm to 650 nm was studied. The measured power of light emission in the range of 112–180 nm was measured to be up to 10 kW.

  15. Numerical design and analysis of parasitic mode oscillations for 95 GHz gyrotron beam tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Singh, Udaybir; Yadav, Vivek; Kumar, Anil; Sinha, A. K.

    2013-05-01

    The beam tunnel, equipped with the high lossy ceramics, is designed for 95 GHz gyrotron. The geometry of the beam tunnel is optimized considering the maximum RF absorption (ideally 100%) and the suppression of parasitic oscillations. The excitation of parasitic modes is a concerning problem for high frequency, high power gyrotrons. Considering the problem of parasitic mode excitation in beam tunnel, a detail analysis is performed for the suppression of these kinds of modes. Trajectory code EGUN and CST Microwave Studio are used for the simulations of electron beam trajectory and electromagnetic analysis, respectively.

  16. Frequency measurements of the gyrotrons used for collective Thomson scattering diagnostics at TEXTOR and ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Woskov, P.; Bindslev, H.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Nielsen, S. K.; Tsakadze, E. L.; Korsholm, S. B.; Scholten, J.; Tito, C.; Westerhof, E.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Leuterer, F.; Monaco, F.; Muenich, M.; Wagner, D.

    2006-10-15

    High resolution frequency measurements of the 110 GHz gyrotron at TEXTOR and the 105 GHz mode of the two-frequency gyrotron (Odissey-1) at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) have been made in support of fast ion collective Thomson scattering diagnostics. Measurements were done by harmonic heterodyne methods using both fast Fourier transform spectroscopy with digital oscilloscopes and fast scanning spectrum analyzers. Accurate frequencies were obtained with a frequency counter. At TEXTOR, at 180 kW forward power the starting frequency was 109.970{+-}0.005 GHz and chirped down as much as 27 MHz depending on the duty factor. At AUG, at 500 kW forward power the frequency started at 104.786 GHz and chirped down 104 MHz, with 90% of the chirp occurring in the first 100 ms. Plasma perturbation of the TEXTOR gyrotron was observed when both ion cyclotron resonance heating antennas and neutral beam injection were operating, producing modulation at 29 and 58 MHz in the gyrotron output. Each gyrotron was observed to have an instrumental measurement limited linewidth of 120 kHz full width at half maximum.

  17. Mutual synchronization of weakly coupled gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rozental, R. M.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Sergeev, A. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Ginzburg, N. S.

    2015-09-15

    The processes of synchronization of two weakly coupled gyrotrons are studied within the framework of non-stationary equations with non-fixed longitudinal field structure. With the allowance for a small difference of the free oscillation frequencies of the gyrotrons, we found a certain range of parameters where mutual synchronization is possible while a high electronic efficiency is remained. It is also shown that synchronization regimes can be realized even under random fluctuations of the parameters of the electron beams.

  18. Photonic-Band-Gap Traveling-Wave Gyrotron Amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, E. A.; Lewis, S. M.; Shapiro, M. A.; Griffin, R. G.; Temkin, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a gyrotron traveling-wave-tube amplifier at 250 GHz that uses a photonic band gap (PBG) interaction circuit. The gyrotron amplifier achieved a peak small signal gain of 38 dB and 45 W output power at 247.7 GHz with an instantaneous −3 dB bandwidth of 0.4 GHz. The amplifier can be tuned for operation from 245–256 GHz. The widest instantaneous −3 dB bandwidth of 4.5 GHz centered at 253.25 GHz was observed with a gain of 24 dB. The PBG circuit provides stability from oscillations by supporting the propagation of transverse electric (TE) modes in a narrow range of frequencies, allowing for the confinement of the operating TE03-like mode while rejecting the excitation of oscillations at nearby frequencies. This experiment achieved the highest frequency of operation for a gyrotron amplifier; at present, there are no other amplifiers in this frequency range that are capable of producing either high gain or high output power. This result represents the highest gain observed above 94 GHz and the highest output power achieved above 140 GHz by any conventional-voltage vacuum electron device based amplifier. PMID:24476286

  19. 28 GHz Gyrotron ECRH on LDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woskov, P. P.; Kesner, J.; Michael, P. C.; Garnier, D. T.; Mauel, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    A 10 kW, CW, 28 GHz gyrotron has been implemented on LDX to increase the plasma density and to more fully explore the potential of high beta plasma stability in a dipole magnetic configuration. This added power represents about a 60% increase in ECRH to a new total of 26.9 kW with sources at 2.45, 6.4, and 10.5 GHz. The 1 Tesla resonances in LDX form small rings encompassing the entire plasma cross-section above and below the floating coil (F-coil) near the dipole axial region. A 32.5 mm diameter TE01 waveguide with a partial Vlasov step cut launches a diverging beam from above the F-coil that depends on internal wall reflections for plasma coupling. Initial gyrotron only plasmas exhibit steep natural profiles with fewer hot electrons than with the other sources. The background scattered radiation suggests that only about half the power is being absorbed with the present launcher.

  20. Initial results for a 170 GHz high power ITER waveguide component test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Timothy; Barker, Alan; Dukes, Carl; Killough, Stephen; Kaufman, Michael; White, John; Bell, Gary; Hanson, Greg; Rasmussen, Dave

    2014-10-01

    A high power microwave test stand is being setup at ORNL to enable prototype testing of 170 GHz cw waveguide components being developed for the ITER ECH system. The ITER ECH system will utilize 63.5 mm diameter evacuated corrugated waveguide and will have 24 >150 m long runs. A 170 GHz 1 MW class gyrotron is being developed by Communications and Power Industries and is nearing completion. A HVDC power supply, water-cooling and control system has been partially tested in preparation for arrival of the gyrotron. The power supply and water-cooling system are being designed to operate for >3600 second pulses to simulate the operating conditions planned for the ITER ECH system. The gyrotron Gaussian beam output has a single mirror for focusing into a 63.5 mm corrugated waveguide in the vertical plane. The output beam and mirror are enclosed in an evacuated duct with absorber for stray radiation. Beam alignment with the waveguide is a critical task so a combination of mirror tilt adjustments and a bellows for offsets will be provided. Analysis of thermal patterns on thin witness plates will provide gyrotron mode purity and waveguide coupling efficiency data. Pre-prototype waveguide components and two dummy loads are available for initial operational testing of the gyrotron. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under Contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  1. Efficient Low-Voltage Operation of a CW Gyrotron Oscillator at 233 GHz

    PubMed Central

    Hornstein, Melissa K.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    The gyrotron oscillator is a source of high average power millimeter-wave through terahertz radiation. In this paper, we report low beam power and high-efficiency operation of a tunable gyrotron oscillator at 233 GHz. The low-voltage operating mode provides a path to further miniaturization of the gyrotron through reduction in the size of the electron gun, power supply, collector, and cooling system, which will benefit industrial and scientific applications requiring portability. Detailed studies of low-voltage operation in the TE2,3,1 mode reveal that the mode can be excited with less than 7 W of beam power at 3.5 kV. During CW operation with 3.5-kV beam voltage and 50-mA beam current, the gyrotron generates 12 W of RF power at 233.2 GHz. The EGUN electron optics code describes the low-voltage operation of the electron gun. Using gun-operating parameters derived from EGUN simulations, we show that a linear theory adequately predicts the low experimental starting currents. PMID:17687412

  2. High-power Ka-band amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, R.

    1993-01-01

    Development of a high-power tube suitable to power a Ka-band (34.5-GHz) antenna transmitter located at the Goldstone, California, tracking station is continuing. The University of Maryland Laboratory for Plasma Research and JPL are conducting a joint effort to test the feasibility of phase locking a second-harmonic gyrotron both by direct injection at the output cavity and by using a priming cavity to bunch the electrons in the beam. This article describes several design options and the results of computer simulation testing.

  3. The Gyrotron: AN Application of the Relativistic Bunching of Electrons to the Generation of Intense Millimeter Microwave Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan, Malcolm

    The cyclotron maser or gyrotron is capable of generating high power microwaves at millimeter wave frequencies for applications in fusion heating, radar astronomy and communications. Analytic and numerical simulation models are developed which describe the behavior of these devices under realistic laboratory conditions including the effects of circuit geometry, beam thermal spread and mode competition. In Chapter 2, a generalized linear theory for the gyrotron is presented in the form of an integro-differential equation which can be solved within various circuit geometries thus describing gyro-amplifiers, gyro-oscillators and gyroklystrons. In Chapter 3 a complete description of a finite size electromagnetic particle simulation model is presented which describes gyrotrons operating in a TE(,mn) waveguide mode. The resulting computer code is a "stretched" version of a 1-3/2 D particle code which apart from modelling transient self-consistent wave beam dynamics includes the essential effects of arbitrary conducting boundaries without requiring a full 2D simulation. The code also allows simultaneous multi-mode interaction. In Chapter 4 simulations and theoretical analysis are made of gyrotron amplifiers operating in the TE(,01) mode to predict bandwidth gain and efficiency with particular attention to the stabilization of absolute instabilities through frequency selective loss. In Chapter 5 the linear eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies of gyrotron oscillators are examined including the effects of beam loading and circuit geometry. Oscillation threshold currents are obtained. The design analysis and predicted efficiencies of gyrotron oscillators operating in the TE(,021) mode with output powers of at least 200 kW are obtained from particle simulations. In Chapter 6 the experimental development of a GHz gyrotron is presented including the design of the magnetron injection gun, circuit, collector and window. Theoretical and numerical predictions of oscillation thresholds and

  4. High-Power Microwave Transmission and Mode Conversion Program

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, Ronald J.

    2015-08-14

    This is a final technical report for a long term project to develop improved designs and design tools for the microwave hardware and components associated with the DOE Plasma Fusion Program. We have developed basic theory, software, fabrication techniques, and low-power measurement techniques for the design of microwave hardware associated gyrotrons, microwave mode converters and high-power microwave transmission lines. Specifically, in this report we discuss our work on designing quasi-optical mode converters for single and multiple frequencies, a new method for the analysis of perturbed-wall waveguide mode converters, perturbed-wall launcher design for TE0n mode gyrotrons, quasi-optical traveling-wave resonator design for high-power testing of microwave components, and possible improvements to the HSX microwave transmission line.

  5. High power test of a wideband diplexer with short-slotted metal half mirrors for electron cyclotron current drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Saigusa, M.; Atsumi, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Nagashima, K.; Oda, Y.; Fukunari, M.; Sakamoto, K.

    2014-02-12

    The wideband high power diplexer has been developed for combining and fast switching of high power millimeter waves generated by a dual frequency gyrotron. The actual diplexer was tested at the frequency band of 170 GHz in low power. After adjusting a resonant frequency of diplexer for the gyrotron frequency, the evacuated wideband diplexer with short-slotted metal half mirrors was tested at an incident power of about 150 kW, a pulse duration of 30 ms and a frequency band of 170.2–170.3 GHz. Any discharge damage was not observed in the diplexer.

  6. Development and Applications of High—Frequency Gyrotrons in FIR FU Covering the sub-THz to THz Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idehara, Toshitaka; Sabchevski, Svilen Petrov

    2012-07-01

    Powerful sources of coherent radiation in the sub-terahertz and in the terahertz frequency range of the electromagnetic spectrum are necessary for a great and continuously expanding number of applications in the physical research and in various advanced technological processes as well as in radars, communication systems, for remote sensing and inspection etc.. In recent years, a spectacular progress in the development of various gyro-devices and in particular of the powerful high frequency (sub-terahertz and terahertz) gyrotron oscillators has demonstrated a remarkable potential for bridging the so-called terahertz power gap and stimulated many novel and prospective applications. In this review paper we outline two series of such devices, namely the Gyrotron FU Series which includes pulsed gyrotrons and Gyrotron FU CW Series which consist of tubes operated in a CW (continuous wave) or long pulse mode, both developed at the FIR FU Center. We present the most remarkable achievements of these devices and illustrate their applications by some characteristic examples. An outlook for the further extension of the Gyrotron FU CW Series is also provided.

  7. A Fully-Sealed Carbon-Nanotube Cold-Cathode Terahertz Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xuesong; Zhu, Weiwei; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Ningsheng; Yan, Yang; Wu, Jianqiang; Shen, Yan; Chen, Jun; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi

    2016-09-01

    Gigahertz to terahertz radiation sources based on cold-cathode vacuum electron technology are pursued, because its unique characteristics of instant switch-on and power saving are important to military and space applications. Gigahertz gyrotron was reported using carbon nanotube (CNT) cold-cathode. It is reported here in first time that a fully-sealed CNT cold-cathode 0.22 THz-gyrotron is realized, typically with output power of 500 mW. To achieve this, we have studied mechanisms responsible for CNTs growth on curved shape metal surface, field emission from the sidewall of a CNT, and crystallized interface junction between CNT and substrate material. We have obtained uniform growth of CNTs on and direct growth from cone-cylinder stainless-steel electrode surface, and field emission from both tips and sidewalls of CNTs. It is essential for the success of a CNT terahertz gyrotron to have such high quality, high emitting performance CNTs. Also, we have developed a magnetic injection electron gun using CNT cold-cathode to exploit the advantages of such a conventional gun design, so that a large area emitting surface is utilized to deliver large current for electron beam. The results indicate that higher output power and higher radiation frequency terahertz gyrotron may be made using CNT cold-cathode electron gun.

  8. A Fully-Sealed Carbon-Nanotube Cold-Cathode Terahertz Gyrotron.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xuesong; Zhu, Weiwei; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Ningsheng; Yan, Yang; Wu, Jianqiang; Shen, Yan; Chen, Jun; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi

    2016-01-01

    Gigahertz to terahertz radiation sources based on cold-cathode vacuum electron technology are pursued, because its unique characteristics of instant switch-on and power saving are important to military and space applications. Gigahertz gyrotron was reported using carbon nanotube (CNT) cold-cathode. It is reported here in first time that a fully-sealed CNT cold-cathode 0.22 THz-gyrotron is realized, typically with output power of 500 mW. To achieve this, we have studied mechanisms responsible for CNTs growth on curved shape metal surface, field emission from the sidewall of a CNT, and crystallized interface junction between CNT and substrate material. We have obtained uniform growth of CNTs on and direct growth from cone-cylinder stainless-steel electrode surface, and field emission from both tips and sidewalls of CNTs. It is essential for the success of a CNT terahertz gyrotron to have such high quality, high emitting performance CNTs. Also, we have developed a magnetic injection electron gun using CNT cold-cathode to exploit the advantages of such a conventional gun design, so that a large area emitting surface is utilized to deliver large current for electron beam. The results indicate that higher output power and higher radiation frequency terahertz gyrotron may be made using CNT cold-cathode electron gun. PMID:27609247

  9. A Fully-Sealed Carbon-Nanotube Cold-Cathode Terahertz Gyrotron

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xuesong; Zhu, Weiwei; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Ningsheng; Yan, Yang; Wu, Jianqiang; Shen, Yan; Chen, Jun; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi

    2016-01-01

    Gigahertz to terahertz radiation sources based on cold-cathode vacuum electron technology are pursued, because its unique characteristics of instant switch-on and power saving are important to military and space applications. Gigahertz gyrotron was reported using carbon nanotube (CNT) cold-cathode. It is reported here in first time that a fully-sealed CNT cold-cathode 0.22 THz-gyrotron is realized, typically with output power of 500 mW. To achieve this, we have studied mechanisms responsible for CNTs growth on curved shape metal surface, field emission from the sidewall of a CNT, and crystallized interface junction between CNT and substrate material. We have obtained uniform growth of CNTs on and direct growth from cone-cylinder stainless-steel electrode surface, and field emission from both tips and sidewalls of CNTs. It is essential for the success of a CNT terahertz gyrotron to have such high quality, high emitting performance CNTs. Also, we have developed a magnetic injection electron gun using CNT cold-cathode to exploit the advantages of such a conventional gun design, so that a large area emitting surface is utilized to deliver large current for electron beam. The results indicate that higher output power and higher radiation frequency terahertz gyrotron may be made using CNT cold-cathode electron gun. PMID:27609247

  10. Experimental Research on a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz Gyrotron with a Smooth Mirror Internal Mode Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tax, D. S.; Mastovsky, I.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.; Torrezan, A. C.

    2010-11-01

    Megawatt gyrotrons are important for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) of fusion plasmas, including ITER. These gyrotrons should operate with high efficiency to reduce the prime power required and to ensure good reliability. The gyrotron efficiency is affected both by the physical principles that govern the device and the performance of components like the internal mode converter (IMC), which must convert the electromagnetic cavity mode into a Gaussian beam. An IMC consisting of a helically-cut launcher and three smooth curved mirrors, which is less susceptible to alignment errors than an IMC using mirrors with phase correcting surfaces, was recently tested on a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz, 3μs pulsed gyrotron operating in the TE22,6 mode, and an output beam with 95.8 ± 0.5 % Gaussian beam content was measured in both hot and cold tests. We are also examining the issue of mode competition in the gyrotron, which can limit the achievable output power and efficiency. The sequence of competing modes excited during the rise time of the voltage pulse has been measured and results are compared with the numerical simulation code MAGY. These results should provide a good test of the accuracy of the code.

  11. Automated Microwave Complex on the Basis of a Continuous-Wave Gyrotron with an Operating Frequency of 263 GHz and an Output Power of 1 kW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyavin, M. Yu.; Morozkin, M. V.; Tsvetkov, A. I.; Lubyako, L. V.; Golubiatnikov, G. Yu.; Kuftin, A. N.; Zapevalov, V. E.; V. Kholoptsev, V.; Eremeev, A. G.; Sedov, A. S.; Malygin, V. I.; Chirkov, A. V.; Fokin, A. P.; Sokolov, E. V.; Denisov, G. G.

    2016-02-01

    We study experimentally the automated microwave complex for microwave spectroscopy and diagnostics of various media, which was developed at the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences in cooperation with GYCOM Ltd. on the basis of a gyrotron with a frequency of 263 GHz and operated at the first gyrofrequency harmonic. In the process of the experiments, a controllable output power of 0 .1 -1 kW was achieved with an efficiency of up to 17 % in the continuous-wave generation regime. The measured radiation spectrum with a relative width of about 10 -6 and the frequency values measured at various parameters of the device are presented. The results of measuring the parameters of the wave beam, which was formed by a built-in quasioptical converter, as well as the data obtained by measuring the heat loss in the cavity and the vacuum output window are analyzed.

  12. A quasi-optical resonant ring for high power millimeter-wave testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.

    1997-08-01

    Gyrotrons of > 1-MW cw power in the 110- to 160-GHz frequency range with HE{sub 11} output beams are being developed for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) of plasmas. Windows are required for gyrotrons and for waveguide transmission systems at the plasma device to provide vacuum isolation and containment. Windows ar difficult to build for these systems because the window dielectric losses increase with frequency and the centrally peaked output power beam concentrates the power deposition near the center. Development and testing of a window independent of gyrotron development is desirable since window failure on a cw gyrotron usually means an expensive reprocessing of the entire tube or possibly even total loss. A quasi-optical resonant ring is being developed for testing of millimeter wave components, windows and low-loss materials at very high power levels using medium power level sources. The resonant ring generates a traveling wave resonance of uniform amplitude along the waveguide that is ideal for testing components and materials. Both smooth-wall TE{sub 01} mode and a corrugated-wall HE{sub 11} mode versions have been constructed. These units use highly oversized waveguide and four miter bends to form a quasi-optical resonant ring. A perforated plate miter bend serves as the input directional coupler. A water-cooled tube array is being designed for a coupler capable high-power cw operation. A theoretical power gain of > 10 is possible using the 63.5 mm HE{sub 11} version at 53 GHz. Low power measurements have been performed to confirm the operation and > 1.5 MW high power tests using a 200 kW gyrotron are expected in the near future.

  13. Observations of Regular Filamentary Plasma Arrays in High-Pressure Gas Breakdown by 1.5 MW, 110 GHz Gyrotron Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidaka, Yoshiteru

    2008-11-01

    Formation of regular two-dimensional plasma filamentary arrays has been observed in long open-shuttered images of air breakdown at atmospheric pressure [Y. Hidaka et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 035003 (2008)]. The breakdown was generated by a focused linearly-polarized Gaussian beam from a 1.5-MW, 110-GHz gyrotron with a 3-microsecond pulse length. Each plasma filament is elongated in the electric field direction and separated roughly one-quarter wavelength from each other in the H-plane. The development of this array structure can be explained as a result of diffraction of the beam around the highly conductive filaments. The diffraction generates a new electric field profile in which a high intensity region emerges about a quarter wavelength upstream from an existing filament. A new plasma filament is likely to appear at the intensified spot. The same process continues and results in the formation of the observed array. Electromagnetic wave simulations that model plasma filaments as metallic posts agree quite well with the hypothesis above. With a nanoseconds-gated ICCD camera, we directly confirmed that only a few rows of the observed array are bright at any one moment, as well as that the light emitting region propagates towards the microwave source. Further experimental breakdown research has been carried out with nitrogen, helium, and SF6 at different pressures. Although each species exhibits qualitatively different structures, in general, a lumpy plasma at high pressures transforms into a more familiar, diffuse plasma as pressure is decreased. The propagation velocity of the ionization front has been also estimated both from the ICCD images and a photodiode array. The velocity is on the order of 10 km/s, and increases as the pressure decreases and the power density increases.

  14. Active heater control and regulation for the Varian VGT-8011 gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, T.E.

    1991-10-01

    The Varian VGT-8011 gyrotron is currently being used in the new 110 GHz 2 MW ECH system installed on D3-D. This new ECH system augments the 60 GHz system which uses Varian VA-8060 gyrotrons. The new 110 GHz system will be used for ECH experiments on D3-D with a pulse width capability of 10 sec. In order to maintain a constant RF outpower level during long pulse operation, active filament-heater control and regulation is required to maintain a constant cathode current. On past D3-D experiments involving the use of Varian VA-8060 gyrotrons for ECH power, significant gyrotron heater-emission depletion was experienced for pulse widths > 300 msec. This decline in heater-emission directly results in gyrotron-cathode current droop. Since RF power from gyrotrons decreases as cathode current decreases, it is necessary to maintain a constant cathode current level during gyrotron pulses for efficient gyrotron operation. Therefore, it was determined that a filament-heater control system should be developed for the Varian VGT-8011 gyrotron which will include cathode-current feed-back. This paper discusses the mechanisms used to regulate gyrotron filament-heater voltage by using cathode-current feed-back. 1 fig.

  15. The 10-100 kW submillimeter gyrotron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spira, S.; Kreischer, K. E.; Temkin, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    High frequency high harmonic gyrotrons; cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM); CARM amplifier schematics; MIT electron gun; and baseline design for the 140 GHz CARM amplifier are briefly reviewed. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  16. The 28 GHZ, 10 KW, CW Gyrotron Generator for the VENUS ECR Ion Source at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, M.; Evans, S.; Jory, H.; Holstein, D.; Rizzo, R.; Beck, P.; Cisto, B.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Collins, D.; Dwinell, R. D.

    2005-03-01

    The VIA-301 Heatwave™ gyrotron generator was specifically designed to meet the requirements of the Venus ECR Ion Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). VENUS (Versatile ECR ion source for NUclear Science) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the RIA (Rare Isotope Accelerator) front end [1]. This VIA-301 Heatwave™ gyrotron system provides 100 watts to 10 kW continuous wave (CW) RF output at 28 GHz. The RF output level is smoothly controllable throughout this entire range. The power can be set and maintained to within 10 watts at the higher power end of the power range and to within 30 watts at the lower power end of the power range. A dual directional coupler, analog conditioning circuitry, and a 12-bit analog input to the embedded controller are used to provide a power measurement accurate to within 2%. The embedded controller completes a feedback loop using an external command set point for desired power output. Typical control-loop-time is on the order of 500 mS. Hard-wired interlocks are provided for personnel safety and for protection of the generator system. In addition, there are software controlled interlocks for protection of the generator from high ambient temperature, high water temperature, and other conditions that would affect the performance of the generator or reduce the lifetime of the gyrotron. Cooling of the gyrotron and power supply is achieved using both water and forced circulation of ambient air. Water-cooling provides about 80% of the cooling requirement. Input power to the generator from the prime power line is less than 60 kW at full power. The Heatwave™ may be operated locally via its front panel or remotely via either RS-232 and/or Ethernet connections. Through the RS-232 the forward power, the reflected power, the

  17. The 28 GHZ, 10 KW, CW Gyrotron Generator for the VENUS ECR Ion Source at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, M.; Evans, S.; Jory, H.; Holstein, D.; Rizzo, R.; Beck, P.; Cisto, B.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.M.; Collins, D.; Dwinell, R.D.

    2005-03-15

    The VIA-301 Heatwave{sup TM} gyrotron generator was specifically designed to meet the requirements of the Venus ECR Ion Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). VENUS (Versatile ECR ion source for NUclear Science) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the RIA (Rare Isotope Accelerator) front end].This VIA-301 Heatwave{sup TM} gyrotron system provides 100 watts to 10 kW continuous wave (CW) RF output at 28 GHz. The RF output level is smoothly controllable throughout this entire range. The power can be set and maintained to within 10 watts at the higher power end of the power range and to within 30 watts at the lower power end of the power range. A dual directional coupler, analog conditioning circuitry, and a 12-bit analog input to the embedded controller are used to provide a power measurement accurate to within 2%. The embedded controller completes a feedback loop using an external command set point for desired power output. Typical control-loop-time is on the order of 500 mS. Hard-wired interlocks are provided for personnel safety and for protection of the generator system. In addition, there are software controlled interlocks for protection of the generator from high ambient temperature, high water temperature, and other conditions that would affect the performance of the generator or reduce the lifetime of the gyrotron. Cooling of the gyrotron and power supply is achieved using both water and forced circulation of ambient air. Water-cooling provides about 80% of the cooling requirement. Input power to the generator from the prime power line is less than 60 kW at full power. The Heatwave{sup TM} may be operated locally via its front panel or remotely via either RS-232 and/or Ethernet connections. Through the RS-232 the forward power, the reflected power

  18. Contributions to resolving issues impeding the operation of high power microwave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyn, Dmytro

    This thesis reports an experimental study aimed at extending high power, high efficiency gyrotron operation to submillimeter wavelengths. A series of experiments carried out both at the University of Maryland and the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Science, succeeded in demonstrating output power at 670 GHz of 180 kilowatts with 20% efficiency (gyrotron voltage was 57 kV and beam current was 16 amperes). The maximum output power achieved in the experiments was 210kW at somewhat higher voltage and current (viz. 58kV and 22A). The achieved output power and efficiency are twice as large as achieved in previous experiments in this frequency range with pulse duration in the range of tens of microseconds. These performance parameters are relevant to a previously proposed application of detecting concealed radioactive materials by air breakdown in a focused beam of sub-millimeter radiation. The 670 GHz gyrotron combined features of two lines of previous experiments: (a) to operate at the required frequency, pulsed solenoids producing 28T magnetic were employed and (b) to obtain high efficiency a very high order mode was used in the gyrotron cavity, as in the experiments with gyrotrons for plasma heating. Evidence of multimode beating was observed in submillimeter output envelope. The excitation of spurious modes, especially during the rise of the gyrotron voltage pulse, was analyzed and the method of avoiding this was proposed which also allows to reduce collector loading in gyrotrons operating in modulated regimes. The present study also includes theoretical analysis of the processes that deepens the understanding of microwave breakdown (arcing) in high power microwave devices. The effect of the dust particles microprotrusions on the device operation was analyzed. These microprotrusions were observed and their negative effects were remedied by careful polishing and machining of the resonator surface. Finally, the generated 670 GHz radiation was

  19. Activities on Realization of High-Power and Steady-State ECRH System and Achievement of High Performance Plasmas in LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ikeda, R.; Tamura, N.; Kobayashi, S.; Ito, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Takita, Y.; Mutoh, T.; Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T.; Idei, H.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.; Felici, F.; Goodman, T.

    2009-11-26

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) has contributed to the achievement of high performance plasma production, high electron temperature plasmas and sustainment of steady-state plasmas in the Large Helical Device (LHD). Our immediate targets of upgrading the ECRH system are 5 MW several seconds and 1 MW longer than one hour power injection into LHD. The improvement will greatly extend the plasma parameter regime. For that purpose, we have been promoting the development and installation of 77 GHz/1-1.5 MW/several seconds and 0.3 MW/CW gyrotrons in collaboration with University of Tsukuba. The transmission lines are re-examined and improved for high and CW power transmission. In the recent experimental campaign, two 77 GHz gyrotrons were operated. One more gyrotron, which was designed for 1.5 MW/2 s output, was constructed and is tested. We have been promoting to improve total ECRH efficiency for efficient gyrotron-power use and efficient plasma heating, e.g. a new waveguide alignment method and mode-content analysis and the feedback control of the injection polarization. In the last experimental campaign, the 77 GHz gyrotrons were used in combination with the existing 84 GHz range and 168 GHz gyrotrons. Multi-frequency ECRH system is more flexible in plasma heating experiments and diagnostics. A lot of experiments have been performed in relation to high electron temperature plasmas by realization of the core electron-root confinement (CERC), electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), Electron Bernstein Wave heating, and steady-state plasma sustainment. Some of the experimental results are briefly described.

  20. Theoretical study on a 0.6 THz third harmonic gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Xuesong; Ma Chunyan; Han Yu; Yan Yang; Lan Ying

    2011-10-15

    A theoretical study on a 0.6 THz third harmonic TE{sub 37} mode gyrotron oscillator is reported in this paper in order to develop a compact, reliable, and high power terahertz radiation source. An output power of 4 kW can be generated in the TE{sub 37} mode (0.6 THz) at a resonant magnetic field of 7.86 T by the gyrotron oscillator operating at 55 kV/2 A with an electron beam radius of 0.32 mm. A magnetron injection gun (MIG) with high compression ratio has been designed. The simulation results of MIG show that the velocity ratio {alpha} is 1.37, and the perpendicular velocity spread and parallel velocity spread are 6.1% and 8.9%, respectively.

  1. Spectral Characteristics of a 140-GHz Long-Pulsed Gyrotron

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong-Tae; Griffin, Robert G.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Joye, Colin D.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Torrezan, Antonio C.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2008-01-01

    Gyrotrons operating in the millimeter and submillimeter wavelength ranges are the promising sources for applications that are requiring good spectral characteristics and a wide range of output power. We report the precise measurement results of gyrotron spectra. Experiments were conducted using a 140-GHz long-pulse gyrotron that is developed for the dynamic nuclear polarization/nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Transient downshift of the frequency by 12 MHz with a time constant of 3 s was observed. After reaching equilibrium, the frequency was maintained within 1 ppm for over 20 s. The coefficient of the frequency change with cavity temperature was −2.0 MHz/K, which shows that fine tuning of the gyrotron frequency is plausible by cavity-temperature control. Frequency pulling by the beam current was observed, but it was shown to be masked by the downward shift of the gyrotron frequency with temperature. The linewidth was measured to be much less than 1 MHz at 60 dB relative to the carrier power [in decibels relative to carrier (dBc)] and 4.3 MHz at 75 dBc, which is the largest dynamic range to date for the measurement of gyrotron linewidth to our knowledge. PMID:19081779

  2. Development of problem-oriented software packages for numerical studies and computer-aided design (CAD) of gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damyanova, M.; Sabchevski, S.; Zhelyazkov, I.; Vasileva, E.; Balabanova, E.; Dankov, P.; Malinov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Gyrotrons are the most powerful sources of coherent CW (continuous wave) radiation in the frequency range situated between the long-wavelength edge of the infrared light (far-infrared region) and the microwaves, i.e., in the region of the electromagnetic spectrum which is usually called the THz-gap (or T-gap), since the output power of other devices (e.g., solid-state oscillators) operating in this interval is by several orders of magnitude lower. In the recent years, the unique capabilities of the sub-THz and THz gyrotrons have opened the road to many novel and future prospective applications in various physical studies and advanced high-power terahertz technologies. In this paper, we present the current status and functionality of the problem-oriented software packages (most notably GYROSIM and GYREOSS) used for numerical studies, computer-aided design (CAD) and optimization of gyrotrons for diverse applications. They consist of a hierarchy of codes specialized to modelling and simulation of different subsystems of the gyrotrons (EOS, resonant cavity, etc.) and are based on adequate physical models, efficient numerical methods and algorithms.

  3. Progress in producing megawatt gyrotrons for ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) heating

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Hess, C.; Huey, H.; Jongewaard, E.; Jory, H.; Neilson, J.; Pendleton, R.; Tsirulnikov, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Varian is carrying out the development of high-power, CW gyrotrons at frequencies ranging from 100--500 GHz for use in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating of magnetically-confined plasma. Initial test vehicles at 140 GHz have utilized TE{sub 15,2,1} interaction cavities, and have been designed to generate short-pulse (up to 20 ms) power levels of 1 MW and up to 400 kW CW. Recently, short-pulse power levels of 940 kW at 35% efficiency have been obtained and average powers of 200 kW have been achieved at peak powers of 400 kW. Long-pulse testing is currently underway. Initial test have resulted in output levels of 400 kW for pulse durations of 380 ms. Design work on 110 GHz, 500 kW CW gyrotron oscillators has recently been completed and a prototype tube has been assembled and is currently being tested. The design of a 110 GHz, 1 MW CW gyrotron, using a novel output coupling approach, is nearly complete. Fabrication of the first 1 MW CW experimental tube is in progress.

  4. ECH by FEL and gyrotron sources on the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B.W.; Turner, W.C.; Allen, S.L.; Byers, J.A.; Felker, B.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Ferguson, S.W.; Hooper, E.G.; Thomassen, K.I.; Throop, A.L. ); Makowski, M.A. )

    1990-08-09

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at LLNL is studying the physics of intense pulse ECH is a high-density tokamak plasma using a microwave FEL. Related technology development includes the FEL, a windowless quasi-optical transmission system, and other microwave components. Initial plasma experiments have been carried out at 140 GHz with single rf pulses generated using the ETA-II accelerator and the ELF wiggler. Peak power levels up to 0.2 GW and pulse durations up to 10 ns were achieved for injection into the plasma using as untapered wiggler. FEL pulses were transmitted over 33 m from the FEL to MTX using six mirrors mounted in a 50-cm-diam evacuated pipe. Measurements of the microwave beam and transmission through the plasma were carried out. For future rapid pulse experiments at high average power (4 GW peak power, 5kHz pulse rate, and {bar P} > 0.5 MW) using the IMP wiggler with tapered magnetic field, a gyrotron (140 GHz, 400 kW cw or up to 1 MW short pulse) is being installed to drive the FEL input or to directly heat the tokamak plasma at full gyrotron power. Quasi-optic techniques will be used to couple the gyrotron power. For direct plasma heating, the gyrotron will couple into the existing mirror transport system. Using both sources of rf generation, experiments are planned to investigate intense pulse absorption and tokamak physics, such as the ECH of a pellet-fueled plasma and plasma control using localized heating. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  5. Compact millimeter-wave devices: Cherenkov CARM, voltage CARM and high harmonic gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.

    1989-11-01

    The dielectric loaded cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARN) experiments were extremely disappointing. Even with a high quality electron beam, the performance of the device did not improve. The analytical theory of Bragg reflectors was developed. The reflection is found by solving the coupled differential equations by the eigenvalue/eiginvector method.

  6. Optimization of operation of a three-electrode gyrotron with the use of a flow-type calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kharchev, Nikolay K.; Batanov, German M.; Kolik, Leonid V.; Malakhov, Dmitrii V.; Petrov, Aleksandr Ye.; Sarksyan, Karen A.; Skvortsova, Nina N.; Stepakhin, Vladimir D.; Belousov, Vladimir I.; Malygin, Sergei A.; Tai, Yevgenii M.

    2013-01-15

    Results are presented for measurements of microwave power of the Borets-75/0.8 gyrotron with recovery of residual electron energy, which were performed by a flow-type calorimeter. This gyrotron is a part of the ECR plasma heating complex put into operation in 2010 at the L-2M stellarator. The new calorimeter is capable of measuring microwave power up to 0.5 MW. Monitoring of the microwave power makes it possible to control the parameters of the gyrotron power supply unit (its voltage and current) and the magnetic field of the cryomagnet in order to optimize the gyrotron operation and arrive at maximum efficiency.

  7. Optimization of operation of a three-electrode gyrotron with the use of a flow-type calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchev, Nikolay K.; Batanov, German M.; Kolik, Leonid V.; Malakhov, Dmitrii V.; Petrov, Aleksandr Ye.; Sarksyan, Karen A.; Skvortsova, Nina N.; Stepakhin, Vladimir D.; Belousov, Vladimir I.; Malygin, Sergei A.; Tai, Yevgenii M.

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented for measurements of microwave power of the Borets-75/0.8 gyrotron with recovery of residual electron energy, which were performed by a flow-type calorimeter. This gyrotron is a part of the ECR plasma heating complex put into operation in 2010 at the L-2M stellarator. The new calorimeter is capable of measuring microwave power up to 0.5 MW. Monitoring of the microwave power makes it possible to control the parameters of the gyrotron power supply unit (its voltage and current) and the magnetic field of the cryomagnet in order to optimize the gyrotron operation and arrive at maximum efficiency.

  8. Optimization of operation of a three-electrode gyrotron with the use of a flow-type calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Kharchev, Nikolay K; Batanov, German M; Kolik, Leonid V; Malakhov, Dmitrii V; Petrov, Aleksandr Ye; Sarksyan, Karen A; Skvortsova, Nina N; Stepakhin, Vladimir D; Belousov, Vladimir I; Malygin, Sergei A; Tai, Yevgenii M

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented for measurements of microwave power of the Borets-75/0.8 gyrotron with recovery of residual electron energy, which were performed by a flow-type calorimeter. This gyrotron is a part of the ECR plasma heating complex put into operation in 2010 at the L-2M stellarator. The new calorimeter is capable of measuring microwave power up to 0.5 MW. Monitoring of the microwave power makes it possible to control the parameters of the gyrotron power supply unit (its voltage and current) and the magnetic field of the cryomagnet in order to optimize the gyrotron operation and arrive at maximum efficiency.

  9. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Torrezan, Antonio C.; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.; Barnes, Alexander B.

    2012-01-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE11,2 and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE11,2,q. The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within ±0.7% and ±6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:23761938

  10. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Torrezan, Antonio C.; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE11,2 and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE11,2,q. The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within ±0.7% and ±6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:21243088

  11. Infrared Monitoring of 110 GHz Gyrotron Windows at Diii-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelov, Y.; Lohr, J.; Callis, R. W.; Ponce, D.

    2003-02-01

    The combination of low millimeter wave losses and excellent thermal conductivity with good mechanical properties make artificial chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamonds a compelling choice for 1 MW 110 GHz gyrotron windows. Five gyrotrons are currently operating at the DIII-D tokamak. Three Gycom gyrotrons have boron nitride (BN) ceramic windows. Due to temperature increases of the windows up to about 930°C, the pulse duration of these tubes is limited to 2 s for output power near 800 kW. Two Communications and Power Industries (CPI) gyrotrons with diamond windows are also installed and operating. The diamond disks of these windows and the construction of their water-cooling assemblies are different. This paper reviews the infrared (IR) measurements of both types of gyrotron windows, with emphasis on the two diamond designs.

  12. INFRARED MONITORING OF 110GHz GYROTRON WINDOWS AT DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Y. GORELOV; J. LOHR; R.W. CALLIS; D. PONCE

    2002-05-01

    The combination of low millimeter wave losses and excellent thermal conductivity with good mechanical properties make artificial chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamonds a compelling choice for 1 MW 110 GHz gyrotron windows. Five gyrotrons are currently operating at the DIII-D tokamak. Three Gycom gyrotrons have boron nitride (BN) ceramic windows. Due to temperature increases of the windows up to about 930 C, the pulse duration of these tubes is limited to 2 s for output power near 800 kW. Two Communications and Power Industries (CPI) gyrotrons with diamond windows are also installed and operating. The diamond disks of these windows and the construction of their water-cooling assemblies are different. This paper reviews the infrared (IR) measurements of both types of gyrotron windows, with emphasis on the two diamond designs.

  13. Gyrotron transmitting tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An RF transmitting tube for the 20 GHz to 500 GHz range comprises a gyrotron and a multistage depressed collector. A winding provides a magnetic field which acts on spent, spinning or orbiting electrons changing their motion to substantially forward linear motion in a downstream direction. The spent electrons then pass through a focusser into the collector. Nearly all of the electrons injected into the collector will remain within an imaginary envelope as they travel forward toward the end collector plate. The apertures in the collector plates are at least as large in diameter as the envelope at any particular axial position.

  14. 137-GHz gyrotron diagnostic for instability studies in Tara

    SciTech Connect

    Machuzak, J.S.; Woskoboinikow, P.; Mulligan, W.J.; Cohn, D.R.; Gerver, M.; Guss, W.; Mauel, M.; Post, R.S.; Temkin, R.J.

    1986-08-01

    A narrow linewidth (<100 kHz), 1-kW, 137-GHz gyrotron and an efficient TE/sub 03/ to TE/sub 11/ cylindrical waveguide mode converter set (>97% TE/sub 11/ mode output) have been built for collective Thomson scattering diagnostics. The main goal will be to study instability driven ion density fluctuations in the Tara plug such as the drift cyclotron loss cone (DCLC), the axial loss cone (ALC), harmonics of the DCLC and ALC, and the ion two-stream instability. The heterodyne receiver and signal optics have been installed on Tara. Background electron cyclotron emission (ECE) at 139 +- 1.5 GHz after electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in the Tara plug corresponded to equivalent blackbody temperatures of 453 and 70 eV for extraordinary and ordinary emission, respectively. The well-collimated receiver field of view completely through the Tara plug has allowed for excellent polarization discrimination of the ECE. The high-power capability of this gyrotron will allow weak fluctuation levels (n-italic-tilde/n-italic<10/sup -6/) to be detected above this background during ECRH in the plugs.

  15. Final Report for "Gyrotron Design and Evaluation using New Particle-in-Cell Capability"

    SciTech Connect

    David N Smithe

    2008-05-28

    ITER will depend on high power CW gyrotrons to deliver power to the plasma at ECR frequencies. However, gyrotrons can suffer from undesirable low frequency oscillations (LFO’s) which are known to interfere with the gun-region diagnostics and data collection, and are also expected to produce undesirable energy and velocity spread in the beam. The origins and processes leading to these oscillations are poorly understood, and existing gyrotron R&D tools, such as static gun solvers and interaction region models, are not designed to look at time-dependant oscillatory behavior. We have applied a time-domain particle-in-cell method to investigate the LFO phenomenon. Our company is at the forefront of smooth-curved-boundary treatment of the electromagnetic fields and particle emission surfaces, and such methods are necessary to simulate the adiabatically trapped and reflected electrons thought to be driving the oscillations. This approach provides the means for understanding, in microscopic detail, the underlying physical processes driving the low-frequency oscillations. In the Phase I project, an electron gun region from an existing gyrotron, known to observe LFO’s, was selected as a proof-of-principle geometry, and was modeled with the curved-geometry time-domain simulation tool, in order to establish the feasibility of simulating LFO physics with this tool on office-scale, and larger, parallel cluster computers. Generally, it was found to be feasible to model the simulation geometry, emission, and magnetic features of the electron gun. Ultimately, the tool will be used to investigate the origins and life cycle within the trapped particle population. This tool also provides the foundations and validation for potential application of the software to numerous other time-dependant beam and rf source problems in the commercial arena.

  16. Perspective gyrotron with mode converter for co- and counter-rotation operating modes

    SciTech Connect

    Chirkov, A. V.; Kuftin, A. N.; Denisov, G. G.

    2015-06-29

    A gyrotron oscillator operating efficiently at modes of both rotations was developed and tested. The gyrotron operation can be switched between two modes: co- and counter rotating ones with respect to electron rotation in a resonance magnetic field. A synthesized mode converter provides output of both waves in the form of two different paraxial wave beams corresponding to direction of the mode rotation. Measured gyrotron power (up to 2 MW), interaction efficiency (34%), and diffraction losses in the mode converter (≈2%) agree well with the design values. The proposed gyrotron scheme alloys principal enhancement in the device parameters—possibility of electronic switching of output wave beam direction and possibility to arrange an effective scheme to provide frequency/phase locking of a gyrotron-oscillator.

  17. Perspective gyrotron with mode converter for co- and counter-rotation operating modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirkov, A. V.; Denisov, G. G.; Kuftin, A. N.

    2015-06-01

    A gyrotron oscillator operating efficiently at modes of both rotations was developed and tested. The gyrotron operation can be switched between two modes: co- and counter rotating ones with respect to electron rotation in a resonance magnetic field. A synthesized mode converter provides output of both waves in the form of two different paraxial wave beams corresponding to direction of the mode rotation. Measured gyrotron power (up to 2 MW), interaction efficiency (34%), and diffraction losses in the mode converter (≈2%) agree well with the design values. The proposed gyrotron scheme alloys principal enhancement in the device parameters—possibility of electronic switching of output wave beam direction and possibility to arrange an effective scheme to provide frequency/phase locking of a gyrotron-oscillator.

  18. Antenna decoupling requirements in a gyrotron collective Thomson scattering diagnostic (CTS) (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Orsitto, F.; Tartari, U.

    1995-01-01

    The required rejection ratio of the stray light in a CTS, respect to the launching power is investigated, for obtaining useful signal-to-noise ratio. This problem is faced considering the central gyrotron frequency {ital f}{sub 0}, as well as the in-band stray light raising from the spurious mode of the gyrotron and amplified cyclotron emission (the so-called gyrotron noise), falling into the scattered light spectrum. The statistical nature of the gyrotron noise in the scattering band is important because the required decoupling is obtained using the S/N formula where the fluctuation of the plasma radiation and the gyrotron noise fluctuation appears. It turns out that the total decoupling required at {ital f}{sub 0} is of the order of or greater than 80 dB, while in the scattering band could be less than 40 dB. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  19. Antenna decoupling requirements in a gyrotron collective Thomson scattering diagnostic (CTS)

    SciTech Connect

    Orsitto, F.; Tartari, U.

    1995-02-01

    The required rejection ratio of the stray light in a CTS, respect to the launching power is investigated, for obtaining useful signal-to-noise ratio. This problem is faced considering the central gyrotron frequency {ital f}{sub 0}, as well as the in-band stray light raising from the spurious mode of the gyrotron and amplified cyclotron emission (the so-called gyrotron noise), falling into the scattered light spectrum. The statistical nature of the gyrotron noise in the scattering band is important because the required decoupling is obtained using the S/N formula where the fluctuation of the plasma radiation and the gyrotron noise fluctuation appears. It turns out that the total decoupling required at {ital f}{sub 0} is of the order of or greater than 80 dB, while in the scattering band could be less than 40 dB. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  20. Progress on Gyrotrons for ITER and Future Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumm, Manfred K.

    2009-11-01

    The prototype of the Japan 170 GHz ITER gyrotron holds the energy and efficiency world record of 2.88 GJ (0.8 MW, 3600 s, 57%) with 55% efficiency at 1 MW, 800 s, whereas the Russian 170 GHz ITER prototype tube achieved 0.83 MW with a pulse duration of 203 s at 48% efficiency and 1 MW at 116 s and 52%. The record parameters of the European megawatt-class 140 GHz gyrotron for the Stellarator Wendelstein W7-X are: 0.92 MW output power at 1800 s pulse duration, almost 45% efficiency and 97.5% Gaussian mode purity. All these gyrotrons employ a cylindrical cavity, a quasi-optical output coupler, a synthetic diamond window and a single-stage depressed collector (SDC) for energy recovery. In coaxial cavities the existence of the longitudinally corrugated inner conductor reduces the problems of mode competition and limiting current, thus allowing one to use even higher order modes with lower Ohmic attenuation than in cylindrical cavities. Synthetic diamond windows with a transmission capability of 2 MW, continuous wave (CW) are feasible. In order to keep the number of the required gyrotrons and magnets as low as possible, to reduce the costs of the ITER 26 MW, 170 GHz ECRH system and to allow compact upper launchers for plasma stabilization, 2 MW mm-wave power per gyrotron tube is desirable. The FZK pre-prototype tube for an EU 170 GHz, 2 MW ITER gyrotron has achieved 1.8 MW at 28% efficiency (without depressed collector). Design studies for a 4 MW 170 GHz coaxial-cavity gyrotron with two synthetic diamond output windows and two 2 MW mm-wave output beams for future fusion reactors are currently being performed at FZK. The availability of sources with fast frequency tunability (several GHz s-1, tuning in 1.5-2.5% steps for about ten different frequencies) would permit the use of a simple, fixed, non-steerable mirror antenna for local current drive (ECCD) experiments and plasma stabilization. GYCOM in Russia develops in collaboration with IPP Garching and FZK an industrial

  1. NRL quasioptical gyrotron program. Final report, November 1, 1991--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Fliflet, A.

    1997-06-01

    The quasioptical gyrotron (QOG) has been under development as a high power, tunable source for tokamak plasma heating applications. Given the critical importance of source efficiency for large-scale ESCH applications, understanding the causes of the low QOG efficiency and finding ways of improving it became a top priority for the current NRL program. The importance of the present work is that is represents new insight into the factors controlling the efficiency of quasioptical gyrotrons. The author has demonstrated that the technique of mode priming provides a method for improving efficiency via enhanced mode detuning and leads to more stable single-mode operation of highly over-moded resonators. The latter feature is an important consideration for output coupler and rf transmission system optimization and can make the QOG less sensitive to external influences such as window reflections. He has shown that a prebunching resonator is readily implemented in the quasioptical configuration. It is relatively free of the problems of spurious modes and cross-talk which plague over-moded prebunching cavities in conventional gyrotrons. The observation of almost 18% efficiency represents a doubling of the previous best single-mode results. Further improvements are expected from the optimization of start-up conditions and the study of the effects of the second harmonic interaction.

  2. Start current analysis of a 140 GHz CPI gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeddulla, M.; Nusinovich, G. S.; Antonsen, T. M.

    2003-12-01

    In a gyrotron, it is difficult to accurately predict in advance where the resonant interaction between the electrons and outgoing radiation stops. For accurately calculating the start currents for the interacting modes, the exit coordinate has to be fixed where the resonant interaction stops. This paper discusses the difficulty in fixing the exit coordinates for studying start currents in an overmoded gyrotron. Start currents are studied for the operating and the most dangerous parasitic mode of a 140 GHz gyrotron being developed by Communication and Power Industries (CPI). Calculations show that the start currents vary over considerably large values with varying exit coordinates that can cause difficulties in predicting which mode dominates the mode competition.

  3. Suppression of parasitic space-charge oscillations in a gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louksha, O. I.; Piosczyk, B.; Sominski, G. G.; Thumm, M.; Samsonov, D. B.

    2006-10-01

    We study the influence of nonuniform electric and magnetic fields in the helical-beam compression region on the low-frequency parasitic space-charge oscillations for a moderate-power (˜ 100 kW) 4-mm gyrotron. Suppression of the oscillations is achieved by optimization of both the cathode-unit geometry in the magnetron-injector gun and the magnetic-field distribution in the region near the cavity input. The obtained data are evidence of possible effective operation of the gyrotron at elevated pitch-factor values α > 1.5 even for emitters with no highest emission uniformity (δje ≈ 30%).

  4. Reflections in gyrotrons with radial output: Consequences for the ITER coaxial gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbrajs, O.; Nusinovich, G. S.; Piosczyk, B.

    2004-12-01

    A theory describing the influence of reflections on operation of gyrotrons with radial output is presented. The theory is used for evaluating the effect of reflections on the operation of the 170 GHz ITER coaxial cavity gyrotron, which is under development in cooperation between EUROATOM Associations (CRPP Lausanne, FZK Karlsruhe, and HUT Helsinki) together with European tube industry (Thales Electron Devices, Velizy, France). It is shown that for optimally chosen external magnetic field value and electron beam radius, possible reflections do not change the final steady-state operation, which corresponds to generation of a 2.2 MW millimeter-wave power. The effect of deviation of the magnetic field and the beam radius from optimal values on the device operation is also studied.

  5. Systematic cavity design approach for a multi-frequency gyrotron for DEMO and study of its RF behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaria, P. C.; Avramidis, K. A.; Franck, J.; Gantenbein, G.; Illy, S.; Pagonakis, I. Gr.; Thumm, M.; Jelonnek, J.

    2016-09-01

    High frequency (>230 GHz) megawatt-class gyrotrons are planned as RF sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive in DEMOnstration fusion power plants (DEMOs). In this paper, for the first time, a feasibility study of a 236 GHz DEMO gyrotron is presented by considering all relevant design goals and the possible technical limitations. A mode-selection procedure is proposed in order to satisfy the multi-frequency and frequency-step tunability requirements. An effective systematic design approach for the optimal design of a gradually tapered cavity is presented. The RF-behavior of the proposed cavity is verified rigorously, supporting 920 kW of stable output power with an interaction efficiency of 36% including the considerations of realistic beam parameters.

  6. Upgraded Waveguide Components for New 1.2 and 1.5 MW Gyrotrons on the DIII-D Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelov, Y. A.; Doane, J. L.; Cengher, M.; Lohr, J.; Ponce, D.

    2012-10-01

    The present gyrotron system on the DIII-D tokamak comprises 110 GHz gyrotrons in the 1 MW class with designed pulse lengths of 10 s. The system is being upgraded with two types of depressed collector gyrotrons producing 1.2 MW at 110 GHz and 1.5 MW at 117.5 GHz, for which waveguide components having higher power ratings will be required. New power monitors and polarizers have been designed and fabricated, which are capable of operating for 10 s pulses at the higher power levels. This presentation reports an analysis of the component heat loading to obtain a thermal equilibrium. Using this equilibrium, a stress strain analysis was performed to calculate life expectancies. The calculations take into account the temperature dependence of the heat transfer coefficient in the component coolant channels. Although the high heat load components required upgrading, the waveguide lines themselves have adequate margins for the expected power and pulse length. A summary of the thermal capabilities of other components will also be presented.

  7. Commissioning a Megawatt-class Gyrotron with Collector Potential Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohr, J.; Cengher, M.; Gorelov, Y. A.; Ponce, D.; Prater, R.

    2013-10-01

    A 110 GHz depressed collector gyrotron has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. The commissioning process rapidly achieved operation at full parameters, 45 A and 94 kV total voltage, with 29 kV depression. Although short pulse, 2 ms, factory testing demonstrated 1.2 MW at 41% electrical efficiency, long pulse testing at DIII-D achieved only 33% efficiency at full power parameters, for pulse lengths up to 10 s. Maximum generated power was ~950 kW, considerably below the 1.2 MW target. During attempts to increase the power at 5 s pulse length, it was noted that the collector cooling water was boiling. This led to the discovery that 14 of the 160 cooling channels in the collector had been blocked by braze material during manufacture of the tube. The locations of blocked channels were identified using infrared imaging of the outside of the collector during rapid changes in the cooling water temperature. Despite these difficulties, the rf beam itself was of very high quality and the stray rf found calorimetrically in the Matching Optics Unit, which couples the Gaussian rf beam to the waveguide, was only 2% of the generated power, about half that of our previous best quality high power beam. Details of the power measurements and collector observations will be presented. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  8. 110 GHz, 1 MW Gyrotron Design Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauffman, Steve; Felch, Kevin; Borchard, Philipp; Cahalan, Pat; Chu, Sam; Dubrule, Craig

    1999-11-01

    Communications and Power Industries has incorporated a number of design changes into its most recent series of 110 GHz 1 MW gyrotrons, for use in ECH and ECCD experiments on the DIII-D tokamak. Two development gyrotrons previously installed at DIII-D used a modulating-anode electron gun design and output windows consisting of double-disk face-cooled sapphire on one system and an edge-cooled CVD diamond disk on the other. Three new systems presently in fabrication and test employ (a) a single-anode electron gun to avoid excitation of spurious modes during turn-on and turn-off and to simplify power supply requirements, (b) a modified TE_22,6 cavity to reduce competition from neighboring modes, (c) a two inch aperture edge-cooled CVD diamond window to allow transmission of a 1 MW Gaussian output beam, (d) a superconducting magnet system with a cryo-cooler to reduce liquid helium consumption, and (e) a number of internal and external plumbing simplifications to make cooling system connections more straightforward. Initial test results, if available, will be presented.

  9. TWANG-PIC, a novel gyro-averaged one-dimensional particle-in-cell code for interpretation of gyrotron experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Braunmueller, F. Tran, T. M.; Alberti, S.; Genoud, J.; Hogge, J.-Ph.; Tran, M. Q.; Vuillemin, Q.

    2015-06-15

    A new gyrotron simulation code for simulating the beam-wave interaction using a monomode time-dependent self-consistent model is presented. The new code TWANG-PIC is derived from the trajectory-based code TWANG by describing the electron motion in a gyro-averaged one-dimensional Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach. In comparison to common PIC-codes, it is distinguished by its computation speed, which makes its use in parameter scans and in experiment interpretation possible. A benchmark of the new code is presented as well as a comparative study between the two codes. This study shows that the inclusion of a time-dependence in the electron equations, as it is the case in the PIC-approach, is mandatory for simulating any kind of non-stationary oscillations in gyrotrons. Finally, the new code is compared with experimental results and some implications of the violated model assumptions in the TWANG code are disclosed for a gyrotron experiment in which non-stationary regimes have been observed and for a critical case that is of interest in high power gyrotron development.

  10. 23 GHz ferroelectric electron gun based gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Moshe, R.; Einat, M.

    2011-04-01

    Ferroelectric cathodes have been explored as an alternative electron source for microwave tubes. Past experiments have demonstrated operation at frequencies of 2-10 GHz. Since the ferroelectric cathode is based on surface plasma, the relatively high energy spread limits the tube operation frequency. Hence, the possibility to obtain higher frequencies remained questionable. In this experimental work a gyrotron oscillator was designed with the operation frequency increased toward that of millimeter waves. A cylindrical tube with a cutoff frequency of ˜22 GHz was integrated to a ferroelectric electron gun. Pulses of ˜0.5 μs duration with a frequency of 23 GHz were obtained.

  11. Three dimensional simulations of the LANL large orbit gyrotron using ISIS on the Connection Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Kares, R.J.; Thomas, V.A.; Jones, M.E.

    1994-12-31

    The fully three dimensional electromagnetic curvilinear PIC code ISIS is used on the CM5 supercomputer to simulate the operation of the Large Orbit Gyrotron (LOG) high power microwave source which is current under development at Los Alamos. This source consists of a vane resonator magnetron-type geometry with a rotating annular electron beam in a cusp magnetic field and represents a formidable intrinsically three dimensional computational problem. Animations of beam dynamics and microwave generation in the device will be presented. Comparison with results from the LANL LOG experiment will also be discussed.

  12. Analyses of advanced concepts in multi-stage gyro-amplifiers and startup in high power gyro-oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr V.

    Gyrotrons are well recognized sources of high-power coherent electromagnetic radiation. The power that gyrotrons can radiate in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wavelength regions exceeds the power of classical microwave tubes by many orders of magnitude. In this work, the author considers some problems related to the operation of gyro-devices and methods of their solution. In particular, the self-excitation conditions for parasitic backward waves and effect of distributed losses on the small-signal gain of gyro-TWTs are analyzed. The corresponding small-signal theory describing two-stage gyro-traveling-wave tubes (gyro-TWTs) with the first stage having distributed losses is presented. The theory is illustrated by using it for the description of operation of a Ka-band gyro-TWT designed at the Naval Research Laboratory. Also, the results of nonlinear studies of this tube are presented and compared with the ones obtained by the use of MAGY, a multi-frequency, self-consistent code developed at the University of Maryland. An attempt to build a large signal theory of gyro-TWTs with tapered geometry and magnetic field profile is made and first results are obtained for a 250 GHz gyro-TWT. A comparative small-signal analysis of conventional four-cavity and three-stage clustered-cavity gyroklystrons is performed. The corresponding point-gap models for these devices are presented. The efficiency, gain, bandwidth and gain-bandwidth product are analyzed for each scheme. Advantages of the clustered-cavity over the conventional design are discussed. The startup scenarios in high-power gyrotrons and the most important physical effects associated with them are considered. The work presents the results of startup simulations for a 140 GHz, MW-class gyrotron developed by Communications and Power Industries (CPI) for electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and current drive experiments on the "Wendelstein 7-X" stellarator plasma. Also presented are the results for a 110 GHz, 1

  13. Nonlinear theory for a terahertz gyrotron with a special cross-section interaction cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Xuesong; Han Yu; Yan Yang; Lan Ying

    2012-05-15

    The fully numerical nonlinear theory for a gyrotron with a special cross-section interaction cavity has been developed in this paper. In this theory, the analytical solution to different modes in the special cross-section interaction cavity is replaced by the numerical solution based on electromagnetic simulation results. A 0.4 THz third harmonic gyrotron with an azimuthally corrugated interaction cavity has been investigated by using this theory and simulation results show that this approach has a significant advantage of developing high harmonic terahertz gyrotrons.

  14. Initial Testing of a 140 GHz 1 MW Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauffman, Stephen; Felch, Kevin; Blank, Monica; Borchard, Philipp; Cahalan, Pat; Chu, Sam; Jory, Howard

    2001-10-01

    CPI has completed the fabrication of a 140 GHz 1 MW CW gyrotron to be used on the W7-X stellarator at IPP Greifswald. Testing of the initial build of this gyrotron had just begun when this abstract was prepared, and was expected to finish in September, at which time a planned rebuild of the device was scheduled to begin. This poster will summarize the gyrotron design, present results of initial testing, and outline any design changes planned as a consequence of these results. This gyrotron's design employs a number of advanced features, including a diode electron gun for simplified operation, a single-stage depressed collector to enhance overall efficiency, a CVD diamond output window, an internal mode converter that converts the excited TE28,7 cavity mode to a Gaussian output beam, and a high-voltage layout that locates all external high voltage below the superconducting magnet system without requiring an oil tank for insulation. Similar features are being used for an 84 GHz 500 kW system being built for the KSTAR tokamak program and for a 110 GHz 1.5 MW system being designed in collaboration with MIT, UMd, UW, GA, and Calabazas Creek Research with funding provided by DOE.

  15. Free-Space Power Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center organized a workshop on technology availability for free-space power transmission (beam power). This document contains a collection of viewgraph presentations that describes the effort by academia, industry, and the national laboratories in the area of high-frequency, high-power technology applicable to free-space power transmission systems. The areas covered were rectenna technology, high-frequency, high-power generation (gyrotrons, solar pumped lasers, and free electron lasers), and antenna technology.

  16. Millimeter-wave, megawatt gyrotron development for ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) heating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jory, H.; Felch, K.; Hess, C.; Huey, H.; Jongewaard, E.; Neilson, J.; Pendleton, R.; Tsirulnikov, M. )

    1990-09-17

    To address the electron cyclotron heating requirements of planned fusion experiments such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), Varian is developing gyrotrons at frequencies ranging from 100--300 GHz with output power capabilities up to 1 MW CW. Experimental gyrotrons have been built at frequencies between 100--140 GHz, and a study program has addressed the critical elements of designing 280--300 GHz gyrotrons capable of generating CW power levels up to 1 MW. Initial test vehicles at 140 GHz have utilized TE{sub 15,2,1} interaction cavities, and have been designed to generate short-pulse (up to 20 ms) power levels of 1 MW and up to 400 kW CW. Recently, short-pulse power levels of 1040 kW at 38% efficiency have been obtained and average powers of 200 kW have been achieved. Long-pulse operation has been extended to pulse durations of 0.5 seconds at power levels of 400 kW. Gyrotron oscillators capable of generating output powers of 500 kW CW at a frequency of 110 GHz have recently been designed and a prototype is currently being tested. Design work for a 1 MW CW gyrotron at 110 GHz, is in progress. The 1 MW CW tube will employ an output coupling approach where the microwave output is separated from the microwave output. 15 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Optimal parameters of gyrotrons with weak electron-wave interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyavin, M. Yu.; Oparina, Yu. S.; Savilov, A. V.; Sedov, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    In low-power gyrotrons with weak electron-wave interaction, there is a problem of determining the optimal length of the operating cavity, which is found as a result of a tradeoff between the enhancement of the electron efficiency and the increase in the Ohmic loss share with increasing cavity length. In fact, this is the problem of an optimal ratio between the diffraction and Ohmic Q-factors of the operating gyrotron mode, which determines the share of the radiated rf power lost in the cavity wall. In this paper, this problem is studied on the basis of a universal set of equations, which are appropriate for a wide class of electron oscillators with low efficiencies of the electron-wave interaction.

  18. The 110 GHz Gyrotron Installation on DIII--D: Status and Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohr, John; Ponce, Dan; Callis, R. W.; Popov, L.; Zerbini, M.; Cahalan, P.

    1997-11-01

    The 110 GHz installation on DIII--D consists of two gyrotrons each of which operates at generated power levels between 0.5 and 1.0 MW for pulse lengths up to 2.0 s. The gyrotrons are connected to DIII--D by windowless evacuated transmission lines. The greatest experience to date has been accumulated with the Gycom Centaur gyrotron, a diode tube which has been operated reliably at generated rf power levels in excess of 0.80 MW for pulse durations of 2.0 s. This tube has been modulated at 100% depth at frequencies up to 1 kHz. The second gyrotron is a Communications and Power Industries model VGT-8011A, a triode geometry, which is in initial testing. For this gyrotron, collector power loading has been measured, the beam steering has been set and pulse/power extension is in progress. DIII--D tests of the system performance are ongoing and initial tokamak experiments on transport, H--mode physics and scaling have begun.

  19. Design considerations in achieving 1 MW CW operation with a whispering-gallery-mode gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Feinstein, J.; Hess, C.; Huey, H.; Jongewaard, E.; Jory, H.; Neilson, J.; Pendleton, R.; Pirkle, D.; Zitelli, L. )

    1989-09-01

    Varian is developing high-power, CW gyrotrons at frequencies in the range 100 GHz to 150 GHz, for use in electron cyclotron heating applications. Early test vehicles have utilized a TE{sub 15,2,1} interaction cavity, have achieved short-pulse power levels of 820 kW and average power levels of 80 kW at 140 GHz. Present tests are aimed at reaching 400 kW under CW operating conditions and up to 1 MW for short pulse durations. Work is also underway on modifications to the present design that will enable power levels of up to 1 MW CW to be achieved. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Simulation of transient behavior in a pulse-line-driven gyrotron oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, A. T.; Lin, Chih-Chien; Yang, Z. H.; Chu, K. R.; Fliflet, A. W.

    1988-04-01

    Results are reported for a set of slow-time-scale single-mode and fast-time-scale single-mode and multimode simulations of the transient-mode excitation phenomena in a short-pulse high-peak-power Ka-band gyrotron oscillator experiment. Both the slow- and fast-time-scale single-mode simulations are generally in good agreement with each other and, within experimental uncertainties, with the experimental observations of the time dependence and magnetic-field dependence of 35-GHz emission in the TE62 mode. However, the multimode simulations suggest the presence of mode suppression, mode beating, and other nonlinear multimode phenomena that could not easily be observed in the experiment, and generally agree less well with the experimental measurements than the single-mode simulations. The multimode simulations also suggest that steady-state behavior may not be obtainable with the highly time-dependent voltage waveform employed in the experiment, and indicate the importance of carrying out future high-voltage gyrotron experiments with less highly transient voltage waveforms.

  1. Design of the Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) system by using 170-GHz gyrotron in the KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min; Kim, Sun-Ho; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Lee, Kyu-Dong; Wang, Son-Jong

    2014-10-01

    The physics of energetic ions is one of the primary subjects to be understood toward the realization of a nuclear fusion power plant. Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) offers the possibility to diagnose the fast ions and the alpha particles in burning plasmas. Spatially- and temporally-resolved one-dimensional velocity distributions of the fast ions can be obtained from the scattered radiation with fewer geometric constraints by utilizing millimeter waves from a high-power gyrotron as a probe beam. We studied the feasibility of CTS fast-ion measurements in the KSTAR by calculating the spectral density functions. Based on that, we suggest a design for the CTS system that uses the currently-operating 170-GHz gyrotron for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) in the KSTAR. The CTS system is presented as two subsystems: the antenna system and the heterodyne receiver system. The design procedure for an off-axis ellipsoidal mirror is described, and the CTS system requirements are discussed.

  2. Time-domain self-consistent theory of frequency-locking regimes in gyrotrons with low-Q resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Sergeev, A. S.; Zotova, I. V.

    2015-03-15

    A time-domain theory of frequency-locking gyrotron oscillators with low-Q resonators has been developed. The presented theory is based on the description of wave propagation by a parabolic equation taking into account the external signal by modification of boundary conditions. We show that the developed model can be effectively used for simulations of both single- and multi-mode operation regimes in gyrotrons driven by an external signal. For the case of low-Q resonators typical for powerful gyrotrons, the external signal can influence the axial field profile inside the interaction space significantly and, correspondingly, the value of the electron orbital efficiency.

  3. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell modeling of terahertz gyrotrons with cylindrical and planar configurations of the interaction space

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslavsky, V. Yu.; Ginzburg, N. S.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Zheleznov, I. V.; Zotova, I. V.

    2013-04-15

    We perform 3D particle-in-cell simulations of terahertz gyrotrons with two different configurations of the interaction space. For a gyrotron with conventional cylindrical configuration of the interaction cavity, we demonstrate reasonable agreement between simulations and experimental results, including output frequency, structure of the higher-order operating mode (TE{sub 17,4}), output power, and ohmic losses. For a novel planar gyrotron scheme with transverse energy extraction, a possibility of further increasing the oversized factor with the single-mode operation regime retained is shown. Frequency detuning by mechanical variation of the gap between waveguide plates is also demonstrated.

  4. Precision characterization of gyrotron window materials. Final report, September 1, 1995--April 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, J.M.; Jones, C.R.

    1998-03-03

    An optical resonator has been constructed to measure dielectric properties of materials at millimeter wavelengths. The objectives are the identification and loss measurements of window materials for high power gyrotrons. The source of radiation is from a backward wave oscillator (BWO) with enhanced power, good stability, and spectral purity. The measurement technique is based on the application of a high Q Fabry-Perot resonator which provides a means of determining the difference in the reciprocal Q-factors with high accuracy. Initial loss measurements at 150 GHz at room temperature are performed on sapphire. Preliminary loss tangent results on sapphire is found to be around 10{sup {minus}4} and are reported here. Work is in progress to develop a system which will scan the resonance rapidly to produce a measurement in less than a minute and to measure the loss as a function of temperature.

  5. Experimental tests of a 263 GHz gyrotron for spectroscopic applications and diagnostics of various media

    SciTech Connect

    Glyavin, M. Yu. Denisov, G. G.; Zapevalov, V. E.; Chirkov, A. V.; Fokin, A. P.; Kholoptsev, V. V.; Kuftin, A. N.; Luchinin, A. G.; Golubyatnikov, G. Yu.; Malygin, V. I.; Morozkin, M. V.; Manuilov, V. N.; Proyavin, M. D.; Sedov, A. S.; Tsvetkov, A. I.; Sokolov, E. V.; Tai, E. M.

    2015-05-15

    A 263 GHz continuous-wave (CW) gyrotron was developed at the IAP RAS for future applications as a microwave power source in Dynamic Nuclear Polarization / Nuclear magnetic resonance (DNP/NMR) spectrometers. A new experimental facility with a computerized control was built to test this and subsequent gyrotrons. We obtained the maximum CW power up to 1 kW in the 15 kV/0.4 A operation regime. The power about 10 W, which is sufficient for many spectroscopic applications, was realized in the low current 14 kV/0.02 A regime. The possibility of frequency tuning by variation of the coolant temperature about 4 MHz/1 °C was demonstrated. The spectral width of the gyrotron radiation was about 10{sup −6}.

  6. Experimental Study of a 200-300 GHZ Megawatt Gyrotron Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Terry L.

    A detailed experimental study is presented of a pulsed megawatt gyrotron oscillator operating in the 200-300 GHz range whose design is consistent with continuous operation for ECRH of fusion plasmas. A cylindrical waveguide cavity over 20 free space wavelengths in diameter was designed to limit ohmic wall losses in the copper cavity to less than 2 kW/cm^2. The frequency spacing between TE waveguide modes in this highly overmoded cavity is less than 2%. The cavity is positioned at the peak magnetic field of a 14 T Bitter magnet. Two different radii beams produced by magnetron injection guns (MIGs) were used to excite the cavity. The large and small MIG guns produced annular beams of 0.75 cm and 0.45 cm radius respectively. The guns operate with beam currents approaching 60 A and voltages as high as 100 kV. The voltage is produced by a line-type modulator with a pulse length of 3 mu s at a repetition rate of up to 4 Hz. Experimental results have shown that megawatt power levels can be generated in CW gyrotron oscillators at 200-300 GHz with efficiencies approaching 20%. The emission is single mode, single frequency with a single rotation which can easily be mode converted for transmission. No multimoding was observed at the high powers and efficiencies. The highest power reached with the large MIG gun was 0.97 MW at 230 GHz in the TE_{34,6} mode with an efficiency of 18% and beam parameters of 59 A and 90 kV. This was the peak efficiency which was also obtained at 290 GHz in the TE_{41,8 } mode with a power of 0.89 MW and beam parameters of 54 A and 93 kV. The highest power reached with the small MIG gun was 0.78 MW at 280 GHz in the TE _{25,13} mode with an efficiency of 17% and beam parameters of 51 A and 92 kV. The small MIG gun peak efficiency was also 18% at 0.72 MW, 290 GHz in the TE_{25,14} mode. Efficiencies obtained in this experiment are about half of less highly overmoded gyrotrons. Analysis of the experiment shows mode competition is the main cause of the

  7. Experimental study of a 200--300 GHz megawatt gyrotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, T.L.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study is presented of a pulsed megawatt gyrotron oscillator operating in the 200-300 GHz range whose design is consistent with continuous operation for ECRH of fusion plasmas. A cylindrical waveguide cavity over 20 free space wavelengths in diameter was designed to limit ohmic wall losses in the copper cavity to < 2 kW/cm[sup 2]. The frequency spacing between TE waveguide modes in this highly overmoded cavity is < 2%. The cavity is positioned at the peak magnetic field of a 14 T Bitter magnet. Two different radii beams produced by magnetron injection guns (MIGs) were used to excite the cavity. The large and small MIG guns produced annual beams of 0.75 cm and 0.45 cm radius. The guns operate with beam currents approaching 60 A and voltages as high as 100 kV. The voltage is produced by a line-type modulator with a pulse length of 3 [mu]s at a repetition rate of up to 4 Hz. Megawatt power levels can be generated in CW gyrotron oscillators at 200-300 GHz with efficiencies approaching 20%. The emission is single mode, single frequency with a single rotation which can easily be mode converted for transmission. No multimoding was observed at the high powers and efficiencies. The highest power reached with the large MIG gun was 0.97 MW at 230 GHz in the TE[sub 34,6] mode with an efficiency of 18% and beam parameters of 59 A and 90kV. This was the peak efficiency which was also obtained at 290 GHz in the TE[sub 41,8] mode with a power of 0.89 MW and beam parameters of 54 A and 93 kV. The highest power with the small MIG gun was 0.78 MW at 280 GHz in the TE[sub 25,13] mode with an efficiency of 17% and beam parameters of 51 A and 92 kV. The small MIG gun peak efficiency was 18% at 0.72 MW, 290 GHz in the TE[sub 25,14] mode. Efficiencies are about half of less highly overmoded gyrotrons. Mode competition is the main cause of the low efficiency, with voltage depression, beam thickness and velocity spread contributing only a fraction to the decrease.

  8. Influence of intense equilibrium self-fields on the cyclotron maser instability in high-current gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Han S.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    1986-08-01

    The linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations are used to investigate the influence of intense equilibrium self-fields on the cyclotron maser instability. A uniform density (n̂b) electron beam propagates parallel to an applied axial magnetic field B0êz with average axial velocity βbc. The particle trajectories are calculated including the influence of the radial self-electric field and the azimuthal self-magnetic field. Moreover, the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations are analyzed for body-wave perturbations localized to the beam interior, assuming electromagnetic perturbations about the equilibrium distribution function f0b=(n̂b/2pπ⊥) ×δ(p⊥-γbmV⊥) ×δ(pz-γbmβbc). Near the beam axis (ω2pbr2/c2≪1), it is found that the transverse electron motion is biharmonic, with oscillatory components at the frequencies ω+b and ω-b defined by ω±b =(ωcb/2) ×{1±[1-(2ω2pb/ω2cb) ×(1-β2b)]1/2}. Similarly, the electromagnetic dispersion relation for waves propagating parallel to B0êz exhibits two types of resonance conditions: a high-frequency resonance (HFR) corresponding to ω-kβbc=ω+b, and a low-frequency resonance (LFR) corresponding to ω-kβbc=ω-b. Both the HFR branch and the LFR branch exhibit instability, with detailed stability properties depending on the value of the self-field parameter s=ω2pb/ω2cb. Moreover, the LFR branch is entirely caused by self-field effects, whereas the HFR branch represents a generalization of the conventional cyclotron maser mode to include self-field effects. The full dispersion relation is analyzed numerically, and the real oscillation frequency ωr=Re ω and growth rate ωi=Im ω are calculated for both types of modes over a wide range of system parameters s, β⊥, βb, and kc/ωcb. Analytic estimates are made of the cyclotron maser growth properties in circumstances where β2⊥γ2z/2 is treated as a small parameter. [Here, γz=(1-β2b)-1/2. ] It is found that the maximum growth rate is given by ωi=(2γ2z)-1

  9. Nonlinear study of mode locking in a quasi-optical gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; McCurdy, Alan H.

    1996-10-01

    Nonlinear, time-dependent multimode calculations have been carried out to study mode locking in quasi-optical gyrotron oscillators. The calculations are based on the rate equation model of modal growth and saturation. The slow-time formalism is used for particle motion and both the time varying electric and magnetic fields are included. It is found that radiation pulses of width 400 ps can be generated in nonlinear regime. The gyrotron features an open resonator of length 100 cm formed by a pair of spherical mirrors and a single pencil electron beam guided by external magnetic field in transverse direction to the axis of symmetry of the cavity. The strong current modulation is provided at frequency of 300 MHz, the nominal model spacing between two odd modes in such a cavity. Eight odd modes are found to be locked to generate extremely short radiation pulses. Application for short pulse radiation in millimeter and submillimeter wavelength range include radar, plasma diagnosis, time domain metrology and communication systems. Parametric dependencies investigated include static magnetic field, beam current and beam voltage, as well as the drive signal amplitudes and frequencies. The work is geared towards support of a proof of principle experiment to generate high power radiation pulses of short duration via synchronous mode locking.

  10. Corrugated Waveguide and Directional Coupler for CW 250-GHz Gyrotron DNP Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Woskov, Paul P.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hornstein, Melissa K.; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    A 250-GHz corrugated transmission line with a directional coupler for forward and backward power monitoring has been constructed and tested for use with a 25-W continuous-wave gyrotron for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. The main corrugated line (22-mm internal diameter, 2.4-m long) connects the gyrotron output to the DNP probe input. The directional coupler, inserted approximately midway, is a four-port crossed waveguide beamsplitter design. Two beamsplitters, a quartz plate and ten-wire array, were tested with output coupling of 2.5% (−16 dB) at 250.6 GHz and 1.6% (−18 dB), respectively. A pair of mirrors in the DNP probe transferred the gyrotron beam from the 22-mm waveguide to an 8-mm helically corrugated waveguide for transmission through the final 0.58-m distance inside the NMR magnet to the sample. The transmission-line components were all cold tested with a 248 ± 4-GHz radiometer. A total insertion loss of 0.8 dB was achieved for HE11 -mode propagation from the gyrotron to the sample with only 1% insertion loss for the 22-mm-diameter waveguide. A clean Gaussian gyrotron beam at the waveguide output and reliable forward power monitoring were achieved for many hours of continuous operation. PMID:17901907

  11. Experimental demonstration of a high-power slow wave electron cyclotron maser utilizing corrugated metal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, K.; Ogura, K.; Kurashina, K; Kim, W.; Watanabe, Tsuguhiro; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.

    1994-12-31

    High-power microwave (HPM) sources based on electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) such as gyrotrons are fast wave devices and velocity component of electron beam perpendicular to guiding magnetic field is the origin of HPM. HPM sources based on Cherenkove mechanism are slow wave devices and can be driven by a beam without initial perpendicular velocity. The authors present here the experimental result that seems to be the first demonstration of high-power slow wave electron cyclotron maser (ECM) consisting of a large diameter sinusoidally corrugated metal waveguide driven by a beam with predominant parallel velocity. The designed size parameters of slow wave structure (SWS) are as follows: average radius 30 mm, corrugation pitch 3.4 mm, its amplitude h = 1.7 mm and total length 238 mm. They use an annular beam with radius 26.3 mm, energy 55 keV, current 200 A in their experiment. Expected Cherenkov oscillation frequency of TM01 mode is 20 GHz. The observed high-power microwaves can be quantitatively explained by a backward wave oscillation with Cherenkov mechanism enhanced by positive feedback of anomalous Doppler slow cyclotron wave. In conclusion, the slow wave ECM presented here will be a competitive candidate against gyrotrons for generating multi-MW millimeter microwaves available in fusion plasma research.

  12. Initial high-power testing of the ATF (Advanced Toroidal Facility) ECH (electron cyclotron heating) system

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Kimrey, H.D. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a moderate aspect ratio torsatron that will utilize 53.2 GHz 200 kW Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) to produce nearly current-free target plasmas suitable for subsequent heating by strong neutral beam injection. The initial configuration of the ECH system from the gyrotron to ATF consists of an optical arc detector, three bellows, a waveguide mode analyzer, two TiO/sub 2/ mode absorbers, two 90/sup 0/ miter bends, two waveguide pumpouts, an insulating break, a gate valve, and miscellaneous straight waveguide sections feeding a launcher radiating in the TE/sub 02/ mode. Later, a focusing Vlasov launcher will be added to beam the ECH power to the saddle point in ATF magnetic geometry for optimum power deposition. The ECH system has several unique features; namely, the entire ECH system is evacuated, the ECH system is broadband, forward power is monitored by a newly developed waveguide mode analyzer, phase correcting miter bends will be employed, and the ECH system will be capable of operating short pulse to cw. Initial high-power tests show that the overall system efficiency is 87%. The waveguide mode analyzer shows that the gyrotron mode output consists of 13% TE/sub 01/, 82.6% TE/sub 02/, 2.5% TE/sub 03/, and 1.9% TE/sub 04/. 4 refs.

  13. Dependence of the gyrotron efficiency on the azimuthal index of non-symmetric modes

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Nusinovich, G. S.; Antonsen, T. M.

    2014-06-15

    Development of MW-class gyrotrons for future controlled fusion reactors requires careful analysis of the stability of high efficiency operation in very high-order modes. In the present paper, this problem is analyzed in the framework of the non-stationary self-consistent theory of gyrotrons. Two approaches are used: the one based on the wave envelope representation of the resonator field and the second one based on representation of this field as a superposition of eigenmodes, whose fields are determined by a self-consistent set of equations. It is shown that at relatively low beam currents, when the maximum efficiency can be realized in the regime of soft self-excitation, the operation in the desired mode is stable even in the case of a very dense spectrum of competing modes. At higher currents, the maximum efficiency can be realized in the regimes with hard self-excitation; here the operation in the desired mode can be unstable because of the presence of some competing modes with low start currents. Two 170 GHz European gyrotrons for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor are considered as examples. In the first one, which is the 2 MW gyrotron with a coaxial resonator, the stability of operation in a chosen TE{sub 34,19}-mode in the presence of two sideband modes with almost equidistant spectrum is analyzed and the region of magnetic fields in which the oscillations of the central mode are stable is determined. The operation of the second gyrotron, which is the 1 MW gyrotron with a cylindrical cavity currently under development in Europe, is studied by using the wave envelope approach. It is shown that high efficiency operation of this gyrotron in the TE{sub 32,9}-mode should be stable.

  14. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kasugai, A.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.; Doane, J.; Olstad, R.; Henderson, M.

    2011-06-01

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20°-40° from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

  15. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Kajiwara, K; Oda, Y; Kasugai, A; Kobayashi, N; Sakamoto, K; Doane, J; Olstad, R; Henderson, M

    2011-06-01

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20°-40° from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

  16. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kasugai, A.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.; Doane, J.; Olstad, R.; Henderson, M.

    2011-06-15

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20 deg. - 40 deg. from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

  17. CHARACTERISTICS OF DIAMOND WINDOWS ON THE 1 MW, 110 GHz GYROTRON SYSTEMS ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    Y.A. GORELOV; J. LOHR; R.W. CALLIS; D. PONCE

    2002-08-01

    Diamond disks made using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique are now in common use as gyrotron output windows. The low millimeter wave losses and excellent thermal conductivity of diamond have made it possible to use such windows in gyrotrons with {approx}1 MW output power and pulse length up to and greater than 10 s. A ubiquitous characteristic of diamond gyrotron windows is the presence of apparent hot spots in the infrared images registered during rf pulses. Many of these spots are co-located with bright points seen in visible video images. The spots do not seem to compromise the integrity of the windows. Analysis of the infrared observations on several different gyrotrons operating at the DIII-D tokamak are reported.

  18. Investigations and advanced concepts on gyrotron interaction modeling and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramidis, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    In gyrotron theory, the interaction between the electron beam and the high frequency electromagnetic field is commonly modeled using the slow variables approach. The slow variables are quantities that vary slowly in time in comparison to the electron cyclotron frequency. They represent the electron momentum and the high frequency field of the resonant TE modes in the gyrotron cavity. For their definition, some reference frequencies need to be introduced. These include the so-called averaging frequency, used to define the slow variable corresponding to the electron momentum, and the carrier frequencies, used to define the slow variables corresponding to the field envelopes of the modes. From the mathematical point of view, the choice of the reference frequencies is, to some extent, arbitrary. However, from the numerical point of view, there are arguments that point toward specific choices, in the sense that these choices are advantageous in terms of simulation speed and accuracy. In this paper, the typical monochromatic gyrotron operation is considered, and the numerical integration of the interaction equations is performed by the trajectory approach, since it is the fastest, and therefore it is the one that is most commonly used. The influence of the choice of the reference frequencies on the interaction simulations is studied using theoretical arguments, as well as numerical simulations. From these investigations, appropriate choices for the values of the reference frequencies are identified. In addition, novel, advanced concepts for the definitions of these frequencies are addressed, and their benefits are demonstrated numerically.

  19. Investigations and advanced concepts on gyrotron interaction modeling and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Avramidis, K. A.

    2015-12-15

    In gyrotron theory, the interaction between the electron beam and the high frequency electromagnetic field is commonly modeled using the slow variables approach. The slow variables are quantities that vary slowly in time in comparison to the electron cyclotron frequency. They represent the electron momentum and the high frequency field of the resonant TE modes in the gyrotron cavity. For their definition, some reference frequencies need to be introduced. These include the so-called averaging frequency, used to define the slow variable corresponding to the electron momentum, and the carrier frequencies, used to define the slow variables corresponding to the field envelopes of the modes. From the mathematical point of view, the choice of the reference frequencies is, to some extent, arbitrary. However, from the numerical point of view, there are arguments that point toward specific choices, in the sense that these choices are advantageous in terms of simulation speed and accuracy. In this paper, the typical monochromatic gyrotron operation is considered, and the numerical integration of the interaction equations is performed by the trajectory approach, since it is the fastest, and therefore it is the one that is most commonly used. The influence of the choice of the reference frequencies on the interaction simulations is studied using theoretical arguments, as well as numerical simulations. From these investigations, appropriate choices for the values of the reference frequencies are identified. In addition, novel, advanced concepts for the definitions of these frequencies are addressed, and their benefits are demonstrated numerically.

  20. High Power Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert; Tverdokhlebov, Sergery; Manzella, David

    1999-01-01

    The development of Hall thrusters with powers ranging from tens of kilowatts to in excess of one hundred kilowatts is considered based on renewed interest in high power. high thrust electric propulsion applications. An approach to develop such thrusters based on previous experience is discussed. It is shown that the previous experimental data taken with thrusters of 10 kW input power and less can be used. Potential mass savings due to the design of high power Hall thrusters are discussed. Both xenon and alternate thruster propellant are considered, as are technological issues that will challenge the design of high power Hall thrusters. Finally, the implications of such a development effort with regard to ground testing and spacecraft intecrati'on issues are discussed.

  1. CSTI High Capacity Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Jerry M.

    1989-01-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY-86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase 1 of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY-88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA's new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed.

  2. CSTI high capacity power

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed.

  3. 250 GHz CW Gyrotron Oscillator for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in Biological Solid State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hornstein, Melissa K.; Kreischer, Kenneth E.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Woskov, Paul P.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator, a critical component of an integrated system for magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments at 9T, corresponding to 380 MHz 1H frequency. The 250 GHz gyrotron is the first gyro-device designed with the goal of seamless integration with an NMR spectrometer for routine DNP-enhanced NMR spectroscopy and has operated under computer control for periods of up to 21 days with a 100% duty cycle. Following a brief historical review of the field, we present studies of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) using DNP-enhanced multidimensional NMR. These results include assignment of active site resonances in [U-13C,15N]-bR and demonstrate the utility of DNP for studies of membrane proteins. Next, we review the theory of gyro-devices from quantum mechanical and classical viewpoints and discuss the unique considerations that apply to gyrotron oscillators designed for DNP experiments. We then characterize the operation of the 250 GHz gyrotron in detail, including its long-term stability and controllability. We have measured the spectral purity of the gyrotron emission using both homodyne and heterodyne techniques. Radiation intensity patterns from the corrugated waveguide that delivers power to the NMR probe were measured using two new techniques to confirm pure mode content: a thermometric approach based on the temperature-dependent color of liquid crystalline media applied to a substrate and imaging with a pyroelectric camera. We next present a detailed study of the mode excitation characteristics of the gyrotron. Exploration of the operating characteristics of several fundamental modes reveals broadband continuous frequency tuning of up to 1.8 GHz as a function of the magnetic field alone, a feature that may be exploited in future tunable gyrotron designs. Oscillation of the 250 GHz gyrotron at the second harmonic of cyclotron resonance begins at extremely low beam currents (as low

  4. Continuously Tunable 250 GHz Gyrotron with a Double Disk Window for DNP-NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jawla, Sudheer; Ni, Qing Zhe; Barnes, Alexander; Guss, William; Daviso, Eugenio; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert; Temkin, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and experimental results from the rebuild of a 250 GHz gyrotron used for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy on a 380 MHz spectrometer. Tuning bandwidth of approximately 2 GHz is easily achieved at a fixed magnetic field of 9.24 T and a beam current of 95 mA producing an average output power of >10 W over the entire tuning band. This tube incorporates a double disk output sapphire window in order to maximize the transmission at 250.58 GHz. DNP Signal enhancement of >125 is achieved on a 13C-Urea sample using this gyrotron. PMID:23539422

  5. Design of 95 GHz, 2 MW Gyrotron for Communication and Security Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Singh, Udaybir; Singh, T. P.; Sinha, A. K.

    2011-02-01

    The design and the numerical simulation of the 95 GHz, 2 MW gyrotron for various kinds of communication, sensing and security applications is presented. The gyrotron is designed for the TE24,8 operating mode. Various in-house developed and commercially available computer codes are used for the design purpose. A 4.25 MW electron gun is designed for the 2 MW of output power. The mode selection, cold cavity and the beam-wave interaction analysis are discussed for the design of weakly tapered open resonator type of interaction cavity. The parametric analysis of the interaction cavity and the electron gun is also presented.

  6. Real-time, T-ray imaging using a sub-terahertz gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seong-Tae; Torrezan, Antonio C.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrated real-time, active, T-ray imaging using a 0.46 THz gyrotron capable of producing 16 W in continuous wave operation and a pyroelectric array camera with 124-by-124 pixels. An expanded Gaussian beam from the gyrotron was used to maintain the power density above the detection level of the pyroelectric array over the area of the irradiated object. Real-time imaging at a video rate of 48 Hz was achieved through the use of the built-in chopper of the camera. Potential applications include fast scanning for security purposes and for quality control of dry or frozen foods.

  7. 60 GHz gyrotron development program. Quarterly report No. 6, October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Shively, J.F.; Cheng, M.K.; Evans, S.E.; Grant, T.J.; Stone, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop a microwave oscillator capable of producing 200 kW of CW output power at 60 GHz. The use of cyclotron resonance interaction is being pursued. The design, procurement and construction phases of this program are discussed. Progress on gyrotron behavior studies being performed at 28 GHz are also discussed.

  8. Transmission Line for 258 GHz Gyrotron DNP Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdashov, Alexandr A.; Belousov, Vladimir I.; Chirkov, Alexey V.; Denisov, Gregory G.; Korchagin, Vyacheslav V.; Kornishin, Sergey Yu.; Tai, Evgeny M.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design and test results of the transmission line for liquid-state (LS) and solid-state (SS) DNP spectrometers with the second-harmonic 258.6 GHz gyrotron at the Institute of the Biophysical Chemistry Center of Goethe University (Frankfurt). The 13-meter line includes a mode converter, HE11 waveguides, 4 mitre bends, a variable polarizer-attenuator, directional couplers, a water-flow calorimeter and a mechanical switch. A microwave power of about 15 W was obtained in the pure HE11 mode at the spectrometer inputs.

  9. New high power coherent radiation sources. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, P.; Coffey, T.

    1984-01-09

    In recent years, there has been considerable renewed interest in the development of novel devices for the production of high power coherent electromagnetic radiation. This interest has been motivated largely by the realization that, with existing technology, certain processes utilizing relativistic electron beams can produce coherent electromagnetic radiation at power levels far in excess of those achieved by conventional electron devices. This paper will review the current status of this rapidly developing field, with emphasis on two generic devices. The major thrust in the recent development of electron beam driven radiation sources has been directed towards achieving shorter wavelengths, greater power and higher efficiencies. Shortly after the development of such successful sources as the magnetron, kylstron and various traveling wave devices, it became clear that, in their original form, they were limited in their ability to produce high levels of radiation efficiently at short wavelengths. To circumvent the inherent limitations of these conventional coherent radiation sources, many new concepts and mechanisms, as well as variations on conventional concepts, were proposed. This paper is concerned primarily with two devices which are, relatively speaking, newcomers to the list of coherent classical radiation sources. They are the free electron laser and the cyclotron resonance maser (CRM); one well known type of CRM is the gyrotron.

  10. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1983-12-29

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  11. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  12. W-band TE01 gyrotron backward-wave oscillator with distributed loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T. H.; Yu, C. F.; Hung, C. L.; Yeh, Y. S.; Hsiao, M. C.; Shin, Y. Y.

    2008-07-01

    Distributed wall loss is proposed to enhance the stability and tunability of a W-band TE01 gyrotron backward-wave oscillator (gyro-BWO). Simulation results reveal that loss effectively suppresses the unwanted transverse modes as well as the high-order axial modes (HOAMs) without degrading the performance of a gyro-BWO that operates at the fundamental axial mode. Linear and nonlinear codes are used to calculate the interaction properties. The effects of the distributed loss on the starting currents of all of the modes of interest are discussed in depth. The interacting structure is optimized for stability. The calculated peak output power is 102kW, corresponding to an efficiency of 20%. The 3dB tuning bandwidth is 1.8GHz, centered at 94.0GHz when using 5A and 100kV electron beam.

  13. High-power klystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siambis, John G.; True, Richard B.; Symons, R. S.

    1994-05-01

    Novel emerging applications in advanced linear collider accelerators, ionospheric and atmospheric sensing and modification and a wide spectrum of industrial processing applications, have resulted in microwave tube requirements that call for further development of high power klystrons in the range from S-band to X-band. In the present paper we review recent progress in high power klystron development and discuss some of the issues and scaling laws for successful design. We also discuss recent progress in electron guns with potential grading electrodes for high voltage with short and long pulse operation via computer simulations obtained from the code DEMEOS, as well as preliminary experimental results. We present designs for high power beam collectors.

  14. The 110 GHz Gyrotron System on DIII-D: Gyrotron Tests and Physics Results

    SciTech Connect

    J. Lohr; P. Calahan; R.W. Callis; T.S. Chu; J.S. deGrassie; I. Gorelov; H. Ikezi; R.A. Legg; T.C. Luce; C.C. Petty; D. Ponce; R. Prater; D.J. Schuster; S.E. Tsimring

    1999-12-01

    The DIII-D tokamak has installed a system with three gyrotrons at the 1 MW level operating at 110 GHz. Physics experiments on electron cyclotron current drive, heating, and transport have been performed. Good efficiency has been achieved both for on-axis and off-axis current drive with relevance for control of the current density profile leading to advanced regimes of tokamak operation, although there is a difference between off-axis ECCD efficiency inside and outside the magnetic axis. Heating efficiency is excellent and electron temperatures up to 10 keV have been achieved. The gyrotron system is versatile, with poloidal scan and control of the polarization of the injected rf beam. Phase correcting mirrors form a Gaussian beam and focus it into the waveguide. Both perpendicular and oblique launch into the tokamak have been used. Three different gyrotron designs are installed and therefore unique problems specific to each have been encountered, including parasitic oscillations, mode hops during modulation and polarization control problems. Two of the gyrotrons suffered damage during operations, one due to filament failure and one due to a vacuum leak. The repairs and subsequent testing will be described. The transmission system uses evacuated, windowless waveguide and the three gyrotrons have output windows of three different materials. One gyrotron uses a diamond window and generates a Gaussian beam directly. The development of the system and specific tests and results from each of the gyrotrons will be presented. The DIII-D project has committed to an upgrade of the system, which will add three gyrotrons in the 1 MW class, all using diamond output windows, to permit operation at up to ten seconds per pulse at one megawatt output for each gyrotron.

  15. High power density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellemoine, Frederique

    2013-12-01

    In the context of new generation rare isotope beam facilities based on high-power heavy-ion accelerators and in-flight separation of the reaction products, the design of the rare isotope production targets is a major challenge. In order to provide high-purity beams for science, high resolution is required in the rare isotope separation. This demands a small beam spot on the production target which, together with the short range of heavy ions in matter, leads to very high power densities inside the target material. This paper gives an overview of the challenges associated with this high power density, discusses radiation damage issues in targets exposed to heavy ion beams, and presents recent developments to meet some of these challenges through different projects: FAIR, RIBF and FRIB which is the most challenging. Extensive use of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been made at all facilities to specify critical target parameters and R&D work at FRIB successfully retired two major risks related to high-power density and heavy-ion induced radiation damage.

  16. High Power Cryogenic Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Smith

    2011-08-01

    The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

  17. Experimental observation of the effect of aftercavity interaction in a depressed collector gyrotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, E. M.; Shapiro, M. A.; Sirigiri, J. R.; Temkin, R. J.

    2007-09-15

    This paper presents the experimental observation of the effect of an aftercavity interaction (ACI) in a depressed collector gyrotron oscillator. The gyrotron generates an output power of 1.5 MW at 110 GHz in 3 {mu}s pulses with a 96 kV and 40 A electron beam and has a single-stage depressed collector. The ACI arises from an unintended cyclotron resonant interaction between the microwave beam traveling out from the cavity and the gyrating electron beam. The interaction occurs in the uptaper of the launcher, immediately downstream from the cavity, where the magnetic field is slightly lower than its value in the cavity region. The ACI results in a reduction in efficiency since the electron beam tends to extract power from the wave. There is also a broadening of the spent beam energy profile, which reduces the effectiveness of the depressed collector and in turn limits the overall efficiency of a gyrotron. Measurements of the maximum depression voltage of the collector vs beam current at 96 kV are compared with simulations from the MAGY code [M. Botton et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 26, 882 (1998)]. Excellent agreement is obtained between theory and experiment but only if the ACI is included. In the present experiment, it is estimated that the observed efficiency of 50% would have been about 60% in the absence of the ACI. These results verify the role of the ACI in reducing the efficiency of the gyrotron interaction.

  18. A Two Frequency 1.5 MW Gyrotron Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tax, David; Guss, William; Shapiro, Michael; Temkin, Richard; Rock, Ben; Vernon, Ronald; Neilson, Jeffrey

    2012-10-01

    Megawatt gyrotrons are an important microwave source for electron cyclotron heating and current drive (ECH/ECCD) in fusion plasmas due to their ability to produce megawatts of power at millimeter wave frequencies. The MIT gyrotron operates nominally at 96 kV and 40 A with 3 μs pulses and has previously demonstrated 1.5 MW of output power with > 50 % efficiency at 110 GHz with a depressed collector. A new cavity has been designed for 1.5 MW operation at two distinct frequencies: 110 GHz in the TE22,6 mode and 124.5 GHz in the TE24,7 mode. A new internal mode converter (IMC) consisting of a dimpled wall launcher and four smooth curved mirrors has also been designed and was optimized for both modes. Simulations of the IMC indicate that > 98 % Gaussian beam content could be achieved for each mode. Cold test results for the components will be presented as well as the current status of the hot test experiment.

  19. High power connection system

    DOEpatents

    Schaefer, Christopher E.; Beer, Robert C.; McCall, Mark D.

    2000-01-01

    A high power connection system adapted for automotive environments which provides environmental and EMI shielding includes a female connector, a male connector, and a panel mount. The female connector includes a female connector base and a snap fitted female connector cover. The male connector includes a male connector base and a snap fitted male connector cover. The female connector base has at least one female power terminal cavity for seatably receiving a respective female power terminal. The male connector base has at least one male power terminal cavity for seatably receiving a respective male power terminal. The female connector is covered by a cover seal and a conductive shroud. A pair of lock arms protrude outward from the front end of the male connector base, pass through the panel mount and interface with a lever of a lever rotatably connected to the shroud to thereby mechanically assist mating of the male and female connectors. Safety terminals in the male and female connectors provide a last-to-connect-first-to-break connection with an HVIL circuit.

  20. High Power Switching Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hower, P. L.; Kao, Y. C.; Carnahan, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    Improved switching transistors handle 400-A peak currents and up to 1,200 V. Using large diameter silicon wafers with twice effective area as D60T, form basis for D7 family of power switching transistors. Package includes npn wafer, emitter preform, and base-contact insert. Applications are: 25to 50-kilowatt high-frequency dc/dc inverters, VSCF converters, and motor controllers for electrical vehicles.

  1. Gyrotron Performance on the 110 GHZ Installation at the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelov, I.; Lohr, J.M.; Ponce, D.; Callis, R.W.; Ikezi, H.; Legg, R.A.; Tsimring, S.E.

    1999-06-01

    The 110 GHz gyrotron system on the DIII-D tokamak comprises three different gyrotrons in the 1 MW class. The individual gyrotron characteristics and the operational experience with the system are described.

  2. Design of a Second Harmonic Double-Beam Continuous Wave Gyrotron with Operating Frequency of 0.79 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuilov, V. N.; Glyavin, M. Yu; Sedov, A. S.; Zaslavsky, V. Yu; Idehara, T.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the most essential steps of a design study of a novel second harmonic gyrotron operating in CW (continuous wave) regime at a frequency of 0.79 THz and an output power of 1-100 W. It is based on a novel idea for suppression of the parasitic modes using a double-beam electron-optical system (EOS). It includes a triode magnetron injection gun (MIG), which forms two high-quality helical electron beams (HEB). Different schemes, namely one with two generating beams and another with one generating and one absorbing beam, have been investigated and compared. It has been shown that the scheme with two generating beams is more advantageous since it allows an effective suppression of the parasitic modes and a stable single-mode operation at the second harmonic resonance. A MIG which is appropriate for the realization of the latter scheme has been optimized using numerical codes for computer-aided design (CAD). It forms beams with practically equal pitch factors and moderate velocity spread. The construction of the gun is not sensitive to small misalignments and shifts of the electrodes and the magnetic field. Among the most promising characteristics of the presented design are an improved mode selection and a stable single-mode generation at currents that are two to three times higher than the currents in the single-beam (i.e., conventional) gyrotrons.

  3. Operation of the 118 GHz very long pulse Gyrotron for the ECRH experiment on Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbos, C.; Bouquey, F.; Clary, J.; Giruzzi, G.; Jung, M.; Lennholm, M.; Magne, R.; Petit, T.; Portafaix, Ch.; Roux, D.; Segui, J. L.; Zou, X.; Giguet, E.; Lievin, Ch.; Alberti, S.; Hogge, J. P.; Thumm, M.

    2003-02-01

    An ECRH (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating) system capable of delivering 2.4 MW CW is presently under development at CEA (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique) Cadarache, for the Tore Supra experiment, to provide plasma heating and current drive by Electron Cyclotron Resonance interaction. The generator is planned to consist of six gyrotrons TH 1506B developed thanks to a collaboration between TED (Thales Electron Devices) and European laboratories; the gyrotrons are specified to provide RF waves with a frequency of 118 GHz and a unit power of 400 kW (500 kW) for a pulse length up to 600 s (5 s). At present, one prototype and one series tube are installed , which were first tested on dummy loads and then on plasma, individually and together. Even though the specification was not fulfilled, a record pulse of 300 kW during 110 s was achieved by the series gyrotron; the pulse was stopped by a strong degassing within the tube, due to the overheating of the internal mirror box. This seems to be the consequence of spurious frequencies generated in the injector. New upgraded tubes will be developed by TED and the next gyrotron is planned to be delivered during summer 2003. At the end of 2001, 800 kW generated by the two existing gyrotrons were coupled to the plasma, using various polarisations and injection angles allowed by the mobile mirrors of the antenna; the power was modulated at frequencies between 2 Hz and 25 Hz, on both tubes. As a result, about 50 ECRH pulses have successfully been coupled to the plasma, leading to a first comparison of theoretical deposition profiles with the experimental profiles observed through the ECE diagnostic.

  4. Mode suppression means for gyrotron cavities

    DOEpatents

    Chodorow, Marvin; Symons, Robert S.

    1983-08-09

    In a gyrotron electron tube of the gyro-klystron or gyro-monotron type, having a cavity supporting an electromagnetic mode with circular electric field, spurious resonances can occur in modes having noncircular electric field. These spurious resonances are damped and their frequencies shifted by a circular groove in the cavity parallel to the electric field.

  5. Application of Fusion Gyrotrons to Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woskov, P.; Einstein, H.; Oglesby, K.

    2013-10-01

    The potential size of geothermal energy resources is second only to fusion energy. Advances are needed in drilling technology and heat reservoir formation to realize this potential. Millimeter-wave (MMW) gyrotrons and related technologies developed for fusion energy research could contribute to enabling EGS. Directed MMW energy can be used to advance rock penetration capabilities, borehole casing, and fracking. MMWs are ideally suited because they can penetrate through small particulate extraction plumes, can be efficiently guided long distances in borehole dimensions, and continuous megawatt sources are commercially available. Laboratory experiments with a 10 kW, 28 GHz CPI gyrotron have shown that granite rock can be fractured and melted with power intensities of about 1 kW/cm2 and minute exposure times. Observed melted rock MMW emissivity and estimated thermodynamics suggest that penetrating hot, hard crystalline rock formations may be economic with fusion research developed MMW sources. Supported by USDOE, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Impact Technologies, LLC.

  6. High power arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goelz, T. M.; Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Kurtz, H. L.; Schrade, H. O.

    1992-01-01

    In this period a new mass flow controller was brought into the gas supply system, so that the upper limit for the mass flow rate could be increased up to 500 mg/s with hydrogen. A maximum specific impulse of 1500 s could be achieved with the high powered arcjet (HIPARC) at an efficiency of slightly better than 20 percent. Different nozzle throat diameters had been tested. The 100 kilo-watt input power limit was reached with the 4 mm nozzle throat diameter at a mass flow rate of 400 mg/s. Tests were carried out with different cathode gaps and with three different cathodes. In addition measurements of pressure and gas temperature were taken in the feed line in order to determine the pressure drop in the propellant injectors.

  7. High voltage power supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruitberg, A. P.; Young, K. M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high voltage power supply is formed by three discrete circuits energized by a battery to provide a plurality of concurrent output signals floating at a high output voltage on the order of several tens of kilovolts. In the first two circuits, the regulator stages are pulse width modulated and include adjustable ressistances for varying the duty cycles of pulse trains provided to corresponding oscillator stages while the third regulator stage includes an adjustable resistance for varying the amplitude of a steady signal provided to a third oscillator stage. In the first circuit, the oscillator, formed by a constant current drive network and a tuned resonant network included a step up transformer, is coupled to a second step up transformer which, in turn, supplies an amplified sinusoidal signal to a parallel pair of complementary poled rectifying, voltage multiplier stages to generate the high output voltage.

  8. HIGH POWER PULSED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Singer, S.; Neher, L.K.

    1957-09-24

    A high powered, radio frequency pulse oscillator is described for generating trains of oscillations at the instant an input direct voltage is impressed, or immediately upon application of a light pulse. In one embodiment, the pulse oscillator comprises a photo-multiplier tube with the cathode connected to the first dynode by means of a resistor, and adjacent dynodes are connected to each other through adjustable resistors. The ohmage of the resistors progressively increases from a very low value for resistors adjacent the cathode to a high value adjacent the plate, the last dynode. Oscillation occurs with this circuit when a high negative voltage pulse is applied to the cathode and the photo cathode is bombarded. Another embodiment adds capacitors at the resistor connection points of the above circuit to increase the duration of the oscillator train.

  9. Selective mode suppression in a W-band second harmonic coaxial-waveguide gyrotron backward-wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, C. L.; Syu, M. F.; Yang, M. T.; Chen, K. L.

    2012-07-01

    A gyrotron backward-wave oscillator (gyro-BWO) encounters increasingly severe mode competition problems during development toward the goal of higher power at high frequencies. A coaxial interaction waveguide with distributed losses is proposed to enhance the stability and frequency tunability of a W-band second harmonic gyro-BWO. The losses of the inner and outer cylinders complement each other and effectively stabilize all of the competing modes while having minor effects on the operating mode. Under stable operating conditions, the W-band second harmonic coaxial gyro-BWO has a predicted peak output power of 71 kW with a magnetic tuning bandwidth of 1.0 GHz.

  10. High Power Density Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    With the growing concerns of global warming, the need for pollution-free vehicles is ever increasing. Pollution-free flight is one of NASA's goals for the 21" Century. , One method of approaching that goal is hydrogen-fueled aircraft that use fuel cells or turbo- generators to develop electric power that can drive electric motors that turn the aircraft's propulsive fans or propellers. Hydrogen fuel would likely be carried as a liquid, stored in tanks at its boiling point of 20.5 K (-422.5 F). Conventional electric motors, however, are far too heavy (for a given horsepower) to use on aircraft. Fortunately the liquid hydrogen fuel can provide essentially free refrigeration that can be used to cool the windings of motors before the hydrogen is used for fuel. Either High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) or high purity metals such as copper or aluminum may be used in the motor windings. Superconductors have essentially zero electrical resistance to steady current. The electrical resistance of high purity aluminum or copper near liquid hydrogen temperature can be l/lOO* or less of the room temperature resistance. These conductors could provide higher motor efficiency than normal room-temperature motors achieve. But much more importantly, these conductors can carry ten to a hundred times more current than copper conductors do in normal motors operating at room temperature. This is a consequence of the low electrical resistance and of good heat transfer coefficients in boiling LH2. Thus the conductors can produce higher magnetic field strengths and consequently higher motor torque and power. Designs, analysis and actual cryogenic motor tests show that such cryogenic motors could produce three or more times as much power per unit weight as turbine engines can, whereas conventional motors produce only 1/5 as much power per weight as turbine engines. This summer work has been done with Litz wire to maximize the current density. The current is limited by the amount of heat it

  11. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Minich, Roger W.

    1988-01-01

    A device (10) for producing high-powered and coherent microwaves is described. The device comprises an evacuated, cylindrical, and hollow real cathode (20) that is driven to inwardly field emit relativistic electrons. The electrons pass through an internally disposed cylindrical and substantially electron-transparent cylindrical anode (24), proceed toward a cylindrical electron collector electrode (26), and form a cylindrical virtual cathode (32). Microwaves are produced by spatial and temporal oscillations of the cylindrical virtual cathode (32), and by electrons that reflex back and forth between the cylindrical virtual cathode (32) and the cylindrical real cathode (20).

  12. High Power Coax Window

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M. L.; Dudas, A.; Sah, R.; Elliott, T. S.; Rimmer, R. A.; Stirbet, M. S.

    2010-05-23

    A su­per­con­duct­ing RF (SRF) power cou­pler ca­pa­ble of han­dling 500 kW CW RF power is re­quired for pre­sent and fu­ture stor­age rings and linacs. There are over 35 cou­pler de­signs for SRF cav­i­ties rang­ing in fre­quen­cy from 325 to 1500 MHz. Cou­pler win­dows vary from cylin­ders to cones to disks, and RF power cou­plers are lim­it­ed by the abil­i­ty of ce­ram­ic win­dows to with­stand the stress­es due to heat­ing and me­chan­i­cal flex­ure. We pro­pose a novel ro­bust co-ax­i­al SRF cou­pler de­sign which uses com­pressed win­dow tech­nol­o­gy. This tech­nol­o­gy will allow the use of high­ly ther­mal­ly con­duc­tive ma­te­ri­als for cryo­genic win­dows. Using com­pressed win­dow tech­niques on disk co-ax­i­al win­dows will make sig­nif­i­cant im­prove­ments in the power han­dling of SRF cou­plers. We pre­sent the bench test re­sults of two win­dow as­sem­blies back to back, as well as in­di­vid­u­al win­dow VSWR in EIA3.125 coax. A vac­u­um test as­sem­bly was made and the win­dows baked out at 155C. The pro­cess­es used to build win­dows is scal­able to larg­er di­am­e­ter coax and to high­er power lev­els.

  13. High power coaxial ubitron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkcum, Adam J.

    In the ubitron, also known as the free electron laser, high power coherent radiation is generated from the interaction of an undulating electron beam with an electromagnetic signal and a static periodic magnetic wiggler field. These devices have experimentally produced high power spanning the microwave to x-ray regimes. Potential applications range from microwave radar to the study of solid state material properties. In this dissertation, the efficient production of high power microwaves (HPM) is investigated for a ubitron employing a coaxial circuit and wiggler. Designs for the particular applications of an advanced high gradient linear accelerator driver and a directed energy source are presented. The coaxial ubitron is inherently suited for the production of HPM. It utilizes an annular electron beam to drive the low loss, RF breakdown resistant TE01 mode of a large coaxial circuit. The device's large cross-sectional area greatly reduces RF wall heat loading and the current density loading at the cathode required to produce the moderate energy (500 keV) but high current (1-10 kA) annular electron beam. Focusing and wiggling of the beam is achieved using coaxial annular periodic permanent magnet (PPM) stacks without a solenoidal guide magnetic field. This wiggler configuration is compact, efficient and can propagate the multi-kiloampere electron beams required for many HPM applications. The coaxial PPM ubitron in a traveling wave amplifier, cavity oscillator and klystron configuration is investigated using linear theory and simulation codes. A condition for the dc electron beam stability in the coaxial wiggler is derived and verified using the 2-1/2 dimensional particle-in-cell code, MAGIC. New linear theories for the cavity start-oscillation current and gain in a klystron are derived. A self-consistent nonlinear theory for the ubitron-TWT and a new nonlinear theory for the ubitron oscillator are presented. These form the basis for simulation codes which, along

  14. Analysis of cavity and window for THz gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Alaria, Mukesh Kumar; Mukherjee, P.; Rao, R.R.; Sinha, A.K. E-mail: aksinha@ceeri.ernet.in

    2011-07-01

    In this paper study of cavity and window has been carried out using Ansoft HFSS for Terahertz Gyrotron. Eigen mode analysis of the cavity has been carried out at 1 THz. An idea about the operating modes in the cavity of the Gyrotron and obtained the simulated Eigen frequency and field pattern of the modes. The design of window for 1 THz Gyrotron has also been carried out using HFSS. The simulated results have also been compared with ST microwave studio. (author)

  15. On optimization of sub-THz gyrotron parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2012-10-15

    The theory is developed describing how the optimization of gyrotron parameters should be done taking into account two effects deteriorating the gyrotron efficiency: the spread in electron velocities and the spread in the guiding center radii. The paper starts from qualitative analysis of the problem. This simplified theory is used for making some estimates for a specific gyrotron design. The same design is then studied by using more accurate numerical methods. Results of the latter treatment agree with former qualitative predictions.

  16. Start-Up Scenario in Gyrotrons with a Nonstationary Microwave-Field Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Yeddulla, M.; Antonsen, T. M., Jr.; Vlasov, A. N.

    2006-03-01

    Megawatt class gyrotrons operate in very high-order modes. Therefore, control of a gyrotron oscillator’s start-up is important for excitation of the desired mode in the presence of the many undesired modes. Analysis of such scenario using the self-consistent code MAGY [M. Botton , IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 26,ITPSBD0093-3813 882 (1998)10.1109/27.700860] reveals that during start-up not only mode amplitudes vary in time, but also their axial structure can be time dependent. Simulations done for a 1.5 MW gyrotron show that the excitation of a single operating TE22,6 mode can exhibit a sort of intermittency when, first, it is excited as a mode whose axial structure extends outside the interaction cavity, then it ceases and then reappears as a mode mostly localized in the cavity. This phenomenon makes it necessary to analyze start-up scenarios in such gyrotrons with the use of codes that account for the possible evolution of field profiles.

  17. High power, high frequency component test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Krawczonek, Walter

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has available a high frequency, high power laboratory facility for testing various components of aerospace and/or terrestrial power systems. This facility is described here. All of its capabilities and potential applications are detailed.

  18. High power beam analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharon, Oren

    2014-02-01

    In various modern scientific and industrial laser applications, beam-shaping optics manipulates the laser spot size and its intensity distribution. However the designed laser spot frequently deviates from the design goal due to real life imperfections and effects, such as: input laser distortions, optical distortion, heating, overall instabilities, and non-linear effects. Lasers provide the ability to accurately deliver large amounts of energy to a target area with very high accuracy. Thus monitoring beam size power and beam location is of high importance for high quality results and repeatability. Depending on the combination of wavelength, beam size and pulse duration , laser energy is absorbed by the material surface, yielding into processes such as cutting, welding, surface treatment, brazing and many other applications. This article will cover the aspect of laser beam measurements, especially at the focal point where it matters the most. A brief introduction to the material processing interactions will be covered, followed by fundamentals of laser beam propagation, novel measurement techniques, actual measurement and brief conclusions.

  19. APPLICATIONS OF NEW TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF HIGH POWER MILLIMETER WAVES TO MAGNETIC FUSION RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    J. LOHR

    2002-08-01

    Although research on magnetically confined fusion plasmas has been carried out for a half century, for most of this time control of the temperature, density and current density profiles has been limited and transient. Now, high power long pulse gyrotron systems with excellent reliability are coming on line, which can provide non-inductively driven currents and electron heating leading to higher plasma performance and continuous operation in reactor relevant regimes. The precision of the location at which heating and current drive are applied has also made it possible to suppress certain classes of plasma instabilities. Basic physics of electron cyclotron current drive and heating are understood and these new technological capabilities are being exploited in magnetic confinement devices worldwide.

  20. Time domain analysis of a gyrotron traveling wave amplifier with misaligned electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiushi Peng, Shuyuan; Luo, Jirun

    2014-08-15

    This article develops a time-domain theory to study the beam-wave interaction in gyrotron traveling wave amplifier (gyro-TWA) with a misaligned electron beam. The effects of beam misalignment on the TE{sub 01} mode gyro-TWA operating at the fundamental are discussed. Numerical results show that the effect of misalignment is less obvious when the input power is larger, and the influences of misalignment on the stable gain and the stable time are basically opposite.

  1. Frequency tunable gyrotron using backward-wave components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T. H.; Idehara, T.; Ogawa, I.; Agusu, L.; Kobayashi, S.

    2009-03-01

    We report a frequency tunable scheme for the gyrotron at millimeter/submillimeter regime. Unlike the step-tunable type where oscillation frequencies change discretely, this scheme continuously adjusts the oscillation frequency as the magnetic field varies. It is a hybrid system, taking the advantages of the backward-wave interaction and the converter-free output structure. The characteristics of backward-wave interaction will be shown. A proof of principle experiment was conducted with a scaled cavity. The result shows the oscillation frequency smoothly transitions over a wide range of 6 GHz from 134 to 140 GHz. With proper design this mechanism is capable of producing medium output power with broad frequency tunability up to the terahertz region.

  2. Gyrotron Beam Heating of Ceramic Coatings and Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliflet, A. W.; Bruce, R. W.; Gold, S. H.; Fischer, R. P.; Kinkead, A. K.; Manheimer, W.; Lewis, D., III; Kurihara, L.; Ganguly, S.

    2000-10-01

    A focussed Gaussian beam generated by an 83-GHz, 15-kW CW Gycom gyrotron is being applied to the processing of ceramic materials at the Naval Research Laboratory. Available microwave power densities of >1 kW/cm^2 enable rapid, localized heating of ceramic coatings and joints, provided adequate microwave-material coupling is achieved. This paper describes theoretical and experimental studies of microwave beam coupling to and propagation in multi-component ceramic systems, such as reactive metal brazes (mixtures of ceramic and metal powders), corresponding to joints and coating configurations. The absorption coefficient for typical braze materials has been calculated using the Effective Medium Approximation. Minimization of reflection (important in a single-pass beam system) using a matching plate and beam polarization effects will be discussed, as well as the results of experiments designed to enhance heating rates based on these effects.

  3. Theoretical and experimental study of the space-charge oscillations in the electron-optical system of a relativistic gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Ilyakov, E. V. Kulagin, I. S.; Manuilov, V. N.; Movshevich, B. Z.

    2011-12-15

    A theoretical and experimental study of the oscillations of a space-charge cloud in a magnetron-injection gun of a powerful relativistic gyrotron has been performed. The charge storage occurs via electron-beam magnetic compression of the reflection of a part of the electrons having the highest transverse velocities from a magnetic mirror. It has been established that at high values of the compression coefficient the beam loses its stability that finally leads to the appearance of the beam current modulation at the frequency of the longitudinal oscillations of an electron beam in an adiabatic trap. According to the numerical simulations, the energy spread in the formed beam under these conditions reaches 4.6%, which is higher by an order of magnitude than that due to the space-charge effect in the beam transported along the metal tube.

  4. Development of a 2-MW, CW Coaxial Gyrotron at 70 GHz and Test Facility for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogge, J. P.; Alberti, S.; Arnold, A.; Bariou, D.; Benin, P.; Bonicelli, T.; Bruschi, A.; Chavan, R.; Cirant, S.; Dumbrajs, O.; Fasel, D.; Gandini, F.; Giguet, E.; Goodman, T.; Heidinger, R.; Henderson, M.; Illy, S.; Jin, J.; Lievin, C.; Magne, R.; Marmillod, P.; Mondino, P. L.; Perez, A.; Piosczyk, B.; Porte, L.; Rzesnicki, T.; Santinelli, M.; Thumm, M.; Tran, M. Q.; Yovchev, I.

    2005-01-01

    In ITER, EC heating and current drive (H&CD) is foreseen not only as a principal auxiliary system for plasma heating and as assist for plasma start-up, but is considered essential in meeting the key requirement of neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) stabilisation, by localized current drive. In the reference ECH design, ITER requires a total of 20 MW/CW power at 170 GHz using gyrotrons with a unit power of 1 MW. A higher power per unit (2 MW/gyrotron) would result in a strong reduction of the cost of the whole ECRH system, and would also relax the room constraints on the launcher antenna design. In view of the capability of coaxial cavity gyrotrons demonstrated with short pulse experiments at FZK, the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) has started in 2003 the development of an industrial 170 GHz 2 MW/CW coaxial cavity gyrotron, in a collaborative effort between European research associations CRPP/EPFL, FZK, TEKES and Thals Electron Devices (TED). The development plan includes three steps to reach successively 2 MW/1s, 2 MW/60s and finally 2 MW/CW operation. The procurement of the first prototype is in progress and it scheduled to be delivered during the first quarter of 2006. The experimental tests of the prototypes will be carried out at CRPP/EPFL, where an ITER relevant test facility is presently under construction and will be achieved during the second half of 2005. The test facility is designed to be flexible enough, allowing the possible commissioning of tubes with different characteristics, as well the tests of the launcher antenna at full performances.

  5. High-Efficiency Power Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor); Wintucky, Edwin G. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    One or more embodiments of the present invention pertain to an all solid-state microwave power module. The module includes a plurality of solid-state amplifiers configured to amplify a signal using a low power stage, a medium power stage, and a high power stage. The module also includes a power conditioner configured to activate a voltage sequencer (e.g., bias controller) when power is received from a power source. The voltage sequencer is configured to sequentially apply voltage to a gate of each amplifier and sequentially apply voltage to a drain of each amplifier.

  6. High-Efficiency Power Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N (Inventor); Wintucky, Edwin G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    One or more embodiments of the present invention pertain to an all solid-state microwave power module. The module includes a plurality of solid-state amplifiers configured to amplify a signal using a low power stage, a medium power stage, and a high power stage. The module also includes a power conditioner configured to activate a voltage sequencer (e.g., bias controller) when power is received from a power source. The voltage sequencer is configured to sequentially apply voltage to a gate of each amplifier and sequentially apply voltage to a drain of each amplifier.

  7. G-band harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling-wave amplifier with a mode-selective circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y. S.; Chen, Chang-Hong; Wang, Z. W.; Kao, B. H.; Chen, Chien-Hsiang; Lin, T. Y.; Guo, Y. W.

    2014-12-15

    Harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling-wave amplifiers (gyro-TWAs) permit for magnetic field reduction and frequency multiplication. A high-order-mode harmonic multiplying gyro-TWA with large circuit dimensions and low ohmic loss can achieve a high average power. By amplifying a fundamental harmonic TE{sub 01} drive wave, the second harmonic component of the beam current initiates a TE{sub 02} wave to be amplified. Wall losses can suppress some competing modes because they act as an effective sink of the energy of the modes. However, such wall losses do not suppress all competing modes as the fields are contracted in the copper section in the gyro-TWA. An improved mode-selective circuit, using circular waveguides with the specified radii, can provide the rejection points within the frequency range to suppress the competing modes. The simulated results reveal that the mode-selective circuit can provide an attenuation of more than 10 dB to suppress the competing modes (TE{sub 21}, TE{sub 51}, TE{sub 22}, and TE{sub 03}). A G-band second harmonic multiplying gyro-TWA with the mode-selective circuit is predicted to yield a peak output power of 50 kW at 198.8 GHz, corresponding to a saturated gain of 55 dB at an interaction efficiency of 10%. The full width at half maximum bandwidth is 5 GHz.

  8. Calculating the interaction of a high power 83 GHz beam with ceramic tubes for material processing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliflet, Arne; Bruce, Ralph; Bruce, Robert; Gold, Steven; Lewis, David, III

    2004-11-01

    The high power millimeter-wave beams that can be generated by CW gyrotrons represent a promising energy source for rapid, high-temperature processing of materials. A program is under way at the Naval Research Laboratory to investigate the heating of ceramic tubes and cylinders using an 83 GHz beam for joining and sintering applications. In this presentation we discuss the scattering and absorption of microwave power by a workpiece consisting of concentric ceramic tubes and the resulting temperature profile. The analysis is complicated by the temperature dependence of the dielectric properties, an effect that can dramatically alter the microwave coupling during the heating process. In the process under investigation the tubes are rotated to promote azimuthally uniform heating so that only the radial dependence of the dielectric properties need be included.

  9. 60-GHz gyrotron-development program. Quarterly report No. 9, July-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Shively, J.F.; Felch, K.L.; Jory, H.R.; Morwood, R.C.; Spang, S.T.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop a microwave oscillator capable of producing 200 kW CW power at 60 GHz. Tests on the first experimental tube were completed. At an rf pulse duration of 60 ms a peak rf output power of 86 kW was measured at an average power of 10.3 kW. A collector heating problem above the well cooled region of the collector was identified. The second experimental tube tested confirmed the over 200 kW peak output power design of the 60 GHz gyrotron.

  10. Experimental results of the 140 GHz, 1 MW long-pulse gyrotron for W7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppenburg, K.; Arnold, A.; Borie, E.; Dammertz, G.; Giguet, E.; Heidinger, R.; Illy, S.; Kuntze, M.; Le Cloarec, G.; Legrand, F.; Leonhardt, W.; Lievin, C.; Neffe, G.; Piosczyk, B.; Schmid, M.; Thumm, M.

    2003-02-01

    Gyrotrons at high frequency with high output power are mainly developed for microwave heating and current drive in plasmas for thermonuclear fusion. For the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X now under construction at IPP Greifswald, Germany, a 10 MW ECRH system is foreseen. A 1 MW, 140 GHz long-pulse gyrotron has been designed and a pre-prototype (Maquette) has been constructed and tested in an European collaboration between FZK Karlsruhe, CRPP Lausanne, IPF Suttgart, IPP Greifswald, CEA Cadarache and TED Vélizy [1]. The cylindrical cavity is designed for operating in the TE28,8 mode. It is a standard tapered cavity with linear input downtaper and a non-linear uptaper. The diameter of the cylindrical part is 40.96 mm. The transitions between tapers and straight section are smoothly rounded to avoid mode conversion. The TE28,8-cavity mode is transformed to a Gaussian TEM0,0 output mode by a mode converter consisting of a rippled-wall waveguide launcher followed by a three mirror system. The output window uses a single, edge cooled CVD-diamond disk with an outer diameter of 106 mm, a window aperture of 88 mm and a thickness of 1.8 mm corresponding to four half wavelengths. The collector is at ground potential, and a depression voltage for energy recovery can be applied to the cavity and to the first two mirrors. Additional normal-conducting coils are employed to the collector in order to produce an axial magnetic field for sweeping the electron beam with a frequency of 7 Hz. A temperature limited magnetron injection gun without intermediate anode ( diode type ) is used. In short pulse operation at the design current of 40 A an output power of 1 MW could be achieved for an accelerating voltage of 82 kV without depression voltage and with a depression voltage of 25 kV an output power of 1.15 MW at an accelerating voltage of 84 kV has been measured. For these values an efficiency of 49% was obtained. At constant accelerating voltages, the output power did not change up to

  11. A method for suppression of spurious fundamental-harmonic waves in gyrotrons operating at the second cyclotron harmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalynov, Yu. K.; Osharin, I. V.; Savilov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    A typical problem of gyrotrons operating at high harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency is the suppression of parasitic near-cutoff waves excited at lower harmonics. In this paper, a method for a significant improvement of the selectivity of the second-harmonic gyrotrons is proposed. This method is based on the use of quasi-regular cavities with short irregularities, which provide different effects on the process of excitation of the operating second-harmonic wave and the spurious fundamental-harmonic wave by the electron beam.

  12. Development program for a 200 kW, CW gyrotron. Quarterly report No. 4, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Tancredi, J.J.; Caplan, M.; Sandoval, J.J.; Weiss, W.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this program is the design and development of a millimeter-wave device to produce 200 kW of continuous-wave power at 60 GHz. The device, which will be a gyrotron oscillator, will be compatible with power delivery to an electron-cyclotron plasma. Smooth control of rf power output over a 17 db range is required, and the device should be capable of operation into a severe time-varyinng rf load mismatch.

  13. High power phase shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, B.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Makarov, A.; Solyak, N.; Terechkine, I.; Wildman, D.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    One of the approaches to power distribution system of a superconducting proton linac under discussion at FNAL requires development of a fast-action, megawatt-range phase shifter. Using a couple of this kind of devices with a waveguide hybrid junction can allow independent control of phase and amplitude of RF power at the input of each superconducting cavity, which will result in significant saving in number of klystrons and modulators required for the accelerator. A prototype of a waveguide version of the shifter that uses Yttrium-Iron Garnet (YIG) blocks was developed and tested. This report presents design concept of the device, and main results of simulation and proof-of-principle tests.

  14. Single foreplane high power rectenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alden, A.; Ohno, T.

    1992-05-01

    A dual polarization rectenna capable of high power handling is described. It consists of contiguous dipoles and rectification units on a single substrate. High efficiencies comparable to previous linear and multiplane dual polarization devices have been achieved.

  15. High Power Proton Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the capabilities and challenges of high intensity proton accelerators, such as J-PARC, Fermilab MI, SNS, ISIS, PSI, ESS (in the future) and others. The presentation will focus on lessons learned, new concepts, beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate them.

  16. TRANSISTOR HIGH VOLTAGE POWER SUPPLY

    DOEpatents

    Driver, G.E.

    1958-07-15

    High voltage, direct current power supplies are described for use with battery powered nuclear detection equipment. The particular advantages of the power supply described, are increased efficiency and reduced size and welght brought about by the use of transistors in the circuit. An important feature resides tn the employment of a pair of transistors in an alternatefiring oscillator circuit having a coupling transformer and other circuit components which are used for interconnecting the various electrodes of the transistors.

  17. High-power microwave transmission and mode conversion program. Progress report, June 15, 1993--June 15, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, R.J.; Lorbeck, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: (1) Quasi-optical converter design for Varian gyrotron SN 4.1; (2) Quasi-optical converter cold-test measurement; (3) Modification of geometrical-optics synthesized surfaces; (4)Diffraction synthesis; (5) Tapered dimpled launcher; (6) Work on Vlasov converter system for Varian gyrotron SN 4.1R; (7) Analysis of gyrotron spurious modes; (8) MIT code benchmarking; (9) Development of low-power efficiency test for Vlasov converters; (10) Investigation of optimal beam waist size and mode content for injection into a circular and rectangular corrugated waveguides; (11) The effect of corrugations on reduction of the fields at the wall of waveguides; (12) Shipping of a microwave scanner to Varian and further microwave scanner development; and (13) Code transferred to Varian.

  18. A 0.33-THz second-harmonic frequency-tunable gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng-Di, Li; Chao-Hai, Du; Xiang-Bo, Qi; Li, Luo; Pu-Kun, Liu

    2016-02-01

    Dynamics of the axial mode transition process in a 0.33-THz second-harmonic gyrotron is investigated to reveal the physical mechanism of realizing broadband frequency tuning in an open cavity circuit. A new interaction mechanism about propagating waves, featured by wave competition and wave cooperation, is presented and provides a new insight into the beam-wave interaction. The two different features revealed in the two different operation regions of low-order axial modes (LOAMs) and high-order axial modes (HOAMs) respectively determine the characteristic of the overall performance of the device essentially. The device performance is obtained by the simulation based on the time-domain nonlinear theory and shows that using a 12-kV/150-mA electron beam and TE-3,4 mode, the second harmonic gyrotron can generate terahertz radiations with frequency-tuning ranges of about 0.85 GHz and 0.60 GHz via magnetic field and beam voltage tuning, respectively. Additionally, some non-stationary phenomena in the mode startup process are also analyzed. The investigation in this paper presents guidance for future developing high-performance frequency-tunable gyrotrons toward terahertz applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61471007, 61531002, 61522101, and 11275206) and the Seeding Grant for Medicine and Information Science of Peking University, China (Grant No. 2014-MI-01).

  19. Dynamic nuclear polarization at 9 T using a novel 250 GHz gyrotron microwave source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, V. S.; Farrar, C. T.; Hornstein, M. K.; Mastovsky, I.; Vieregg, J.; Bryant, J.; Eléna, B.; Kreischer, K. E.; Temkin, R. J.; Griffin, R. G.

    2003-02-01

    In this communication, we report enhancements of nuclear spin polarization by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in static and spinning solids at a magnetic field strength of 9 T (250 GHz for g=2 electrons, 380 MHz for 1H). In these experiments, 1H enhancements of up to 170±50 have been observed in 1- 13C-glycine dispersed in a 60:40 glycerol/water matrix at temperatures of 20 K; in addition, we have observed significant enhancements in 15N spectra of unoriented pf1-bacteriophage. Finally, enhancements of ˜17 have been obtained in two-dimensional 13C- 13C chemical shift correlation spectra of the amino acid U- 13C, 15N-proline during magic angle spinning (MAS), demonstrating the stability of the DNP experiment for sustained acquisition and for quantitative experiments incorporating dipolar recoupling. In all cases, we have exploited the thermal mixing DNP mechanism with the nitroxide radical 4-amino-TEMPO as the paramagnetic dopant. These are the highest frequency DNP experiments performed to date and indicate that significant signal enhancements can be realized using the thermal mixing mechanism even at elevated magnetic fields. In large measure, this is due to the high microwave power output of the 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator used in these experiments.

  20. Dynamic nuclear polarization at 9 T using a novel 250 GHz gyrotron microwave source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, V. S.; Farrar, C. T.; Hornstein, M. K.; Mastovsky, I.; Vieregg, J.; Bryant, J.; Eléna, B.; Kreischer, K. E.; Temkin, R. J.; Griffin, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    In this communication, we report enhancements of nuclear spin polarization by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in static and spinning solids at a magnetic field strength of 9 T (250 GHz for g = 2 electrons, 380 MHz for 1H). In these experiments, 1H enhancements of up to 170 ± 50 have been observed in 1- 13C-glycine dispersed in a 60:40 glycerol/water matrix at temperatures of 20 K; in addition, we have observed significant enhancements in 15N spectra of unoriented pf1-bacteriophage. Finally, enhancements of ˜17 have been obtained in two-dimensional 13C- 13C chemical shift correlation spectra of the amino acid U- 13C, 15N-proline during magic angle spinning (MAS), demonstrating the stability of the DNP experiment for sustained acquisition and for quantitative experiments incorporating dipolar recoupling. In all cases, we have exploited the thermal mixing DNP mechanism with the nitroxide radical 4-amino-TEMPO as the paramagnetic dopant. These are the highest frequency DNP experiments performed to date and indicate that significant signal enhancements can be realized using the thermal mixing mechanism even at elevated magnetic fields. In large measure, this is due to the high microwave power output of the 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator used in these experiments.

  1. Dynamic nuclear polarization at 9T using a novel 250GHz gyrotron microwave source

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, V.S.; Farrar, C.T.; Hornstein, M.K.; Mastovsky, I.; Vieregg, J.; Bryant, J.; Eléna, B.; Kreischer, K.E.; Temkin, R.J.; Griffin, R.G.

    2010-01-01

    In this communication, we report enhancements of nuclear spin polarization by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in static and spinning solids at a magnetic field strength of 9T (250 GHz for g = 2 electrons, 380 MHz for 1H). In these experiments, 1H enhancements of up to 170 ± 50 have been observed in 1-13C-glycine dispersed in a 60:40 glycerol/water matrix at temperatures of 20 K; in addition, we have observed significant enhancements in 15N spectra of unoriented pf1-bacteriophage. Finally, enhancements of ~17 have been obtained in two-dimensional 13C–13C chemical shift correlation spectra of the amino acid U-13C, 15N-proline during magic angle spinning (MAS), demonstrating the stability of the DNP experiment for sustained acquisition and for quantitative experiments incorporating dipolar recoupling. In all cases, we have exploited the thermal mixing DNP mechanism with the nitroxide radical 4-amino-TEMPO as the paramagnetic dopant. These are the highest frequency DNP experiments performed to date and indicate that significant signal enhancements can be realized using the thermal mixing mechanism even at elevated magnetic fields. In large measure, this is due to the high microwave power output of the 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator used in these experiments. PMID:12615147

  2. Dynamic nuclear polarization at 9T using a novel 250GHz gyrotron microwave source.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, V S; Farrar, C T; Hornstein, M K; Mastovsky, I; Vieregg, J; Bryant, J; Eléna, B; Kreischer, K E; Temkin, R J; Griffin, R G

    2003-02-01

    In this communication, we report enhancements of nuclear spin polarization by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in static and spinning solids at a magnetic field strength of 9T (250 GHz for g=2 electrons, 380 MHz for 1H). In these experiments, 1H enhancements of up to 170+/-50 have been observed in 1-13C-glycine dispersed in a 60:40 glycerol/water matrix at temperatures of 20K; in addition, we have observed significant enhancements in 15N spectra of unoriented pf1-bacteriophage. Finally, enhancements of approximately 17 have been obtained in two-dimensional 13C-13C chemical shift correlation spectra of the amino acid U-13C, 15N-proline during magic angle spinning (MAS), demonstrating the stability of the DNP experiment for sustained acquisition and for quantitative experiments incorporating dipolar recoupling. In all cases, we have exploited the thermal mixing DNP mechanism with the nitroxide radical 4-amino-TEMPO as the paramagnetic dopant. These are the highest frequency DNP experiments performed to date and indicate that significant signal enhancements can be realized using the thermal mixing mechanism even at elevated magnetic fields. In large measure, this is due to the high microwave power output of the 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator used in these experiments.

  3. Effect of electron beam misalignments on the gyrotron efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2013-07-15

    The theory describing the operation of gyrotrons with tilted and shifted electron beams has been developed. Effects of the tilt and shift are studied for a 1 MW, 170 GHz gyrotron, which is presently under development in Europe for electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating and current drive in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. It is shown that one should expect significant deterioration of gyrotron operation in such gyrotrons when the tilt angle exceeds 0.4°–0.5° and the parallel shift of the beam axis with respect to the axis of a microwave circuit is larger than 0.4–0.5 mm. At the same time, simultaneous tilting and shifting in a proper manner can mitigate this deteriorating effect.

  4. Gyrotron cavity resonator with an improved value of Q

    DOEpatents

    Stone, David S.; Shively, James F.

    1982-10-26

    A gyrotron cavity resonator is connected smoothly and directly to an output waveguide with a very gradually tapered wall so that values of external Q lower than twice the diffraction limit are obtainable.

  5. High power solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, H.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings discuss the following subjects: trends in materials processing with laser radiation; slabs and high power systems; glasses and new crystals; solid state lasers at HOYA Corp.; lamps, resonators and transmission; glasses as active materials for high average power solid state lasers; flashlamp pumped GGG-crystals; alexandrite lasers; designing telescope resonators; mode operation of neodymium: YAG lasers; intracavity frequency doubling with KTP crystal and thermal effects in cylinder lasers.

  6. High average power pockels cell

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    A high average power pockels cell is disclosed which reduces the effect of thermally induced strains in high average power laser technology. The pockels cell includes an elongated, substantially rectangular crystalline structure formed from a KDP-type material to eliminate shear strains. The X- and Y-axes are oriented substantially perpendicular to the edges of the crystal cross-section and to the C-axis direction of propagation to eliminate shear strains.

  7. Citizens protest high power lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, J.

    1980-04-01

    Survey report:Following an extensive public hearing in New York State concerning the health effects and safety of high voltage power lines, negotiations to establish a research program on the biological effects of the power lines' 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields have been concluded. The aim will be to determine the potential health risks to people who live and work along high voltage rights-of-way. The $5,000,000 program will be designed and administered by three New York State agencies: the Public Service Commission, the Dept. of Health, and the Power Authority. (3 photos)

  8. Superconducting magnets for 110-150 GHz gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baze, J.-M.; Lesmond, C.; Lottin, J.-C.; Capitain, J.-J.; Lafon, D.; Magne, R.; Bonnet, P.; Bourquard, A.; Bresson, D.; Lacaze, A.

    1994-07-01

    Seven superconducting focusing magnets have been constructed for vertical gyrotrons devoted to the plasma heating of the tokomak Tore Supra. The performances in magnetic field strength, profile and homogeneity are spread over a large range so as to suit gyrotrons of microwave frequencies extending from 110 GHz to 150 GHz. The cryostats have a low consumption in cryogenic fluids which insure a one week autonomy.

  9. High power ferrite microwave switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardash, I.; Roschak, N. K.

    1975-01-01

    A high power ferrite microwave switch was developed along with associated electronic driver circuits for operation in a spaceborne high power microwave transmitter in geostationary orbit. Three units were built and tested in a space environment to demonstrate conformance to the required performance characteristics. Each unit consisted of an input magic-tee hybrid, two non-reciprocal latching ferrite phase shifters, an out short-slot 3 db quadrature coupler, a dual driver electronic circuit, and input logic interface circuitry. The basic mode of operation of the high power ferrite microwave switch is identical to that of a four-port, differential phase shift, switchable circulator. By appropriately designing the phase shifters and electronic driver circuits to operate in the flux-transfer magnetization mode, power and temperature insensitive operation was achieved. A list of the realized characteristics of the developed units is given.

  10. Possible standoff detection of ionizing radiation using high-power THz electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Sprangle, Phillip; Romero-Talamas, Carlos A.; Rodgers, John; Pu, Ruifeng; Kashyn, Dmytro G.; Antonsen, Thomas M., Jr.; Granatstein, Victor L.

    2012-06-01

    Recently, a new method of remote detection of concealed radioactive materials was proposed. This method is based on focusing high-power short wavelength electromagnetic radiation in a small volume where the wave electric field exceeds the breakdown threshold. In the presence of free electrons caused by ionizing radiation, in this volume an avalanche discharge can then be initiated. When the wavelength is short enough, the probability of having even one free electron in this small volume in the absence of additional sources of ionization is low. Hence, a high breakdown rate will indicate that in the vicinity of this volume there are some materials causing ionization of air. To prove this concept a 0.67 THz gyrotron delivering 200-300 kW power in 10 microsecond pulses is under development. This method of standoff detection of concealed sources of ionizing radiation requires a wide range of studies, viz., evaluation of possible range, THz power and pulse duration, production of free electrons in air by gamma rays penetrating through container walls, statistical delay time in initiation of the breakdown in the case of low electron density, temporal evolution of plasma structure in the breakdown and scattering of THz radiation from small plasma objects. Most of these issues are discussed in the paper.

  11. High Power Amplifier and Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Johnny; Stride, Scot; Harvey, Wayne; Haque, Inam; Packard, Newton; Ng, Quintin; Ispirian, Julie Y.; Waian, Christopher; Janes, Drew

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses the creation of a high-voltage power supply (HVPS) that is able to contain voltages up to -20 kV, keep electrical field strengths to below 200 V/mil (approximately equal to 7.87 kV/mm), and can provide a 200-nanosecond rise/fall time focus modulator swinging between cathode potential of 16.3 kV and -19.3 kV. This HVPS can protect the 95-GHz, pulsed extended interaction klystron (EIK) from arcs/discharges from all sources, including those from within the EIK fs vacuum envelope. This innovation has a multi-winding pulse transformer design, which uses new winding techniques to provide the same delays and rise/fall times (less than 10 nanoseconds) at different potential levels ranging from -20 kV to -16 kV. Another feature involves a high-voltage printed-wiring board that was corona-free at -20 kV DC with a 3- kV AC swing. The corona-free multilayer high-voltage board is used to simulate fields of less than 200 V/mil (approximately equal to 7.87 kV/mm) at 20 kV DC. Drive techniques for the modulator FETs (field-effect transistors) (four to 10 in a series) were created to change states (3,000-V swing) without abrupt steps, while still maintaining required delays and transition times. The packing scheme includes a potting mold to house a ten-stage modulator in the space that, in the past, only housed a four-stage modulator. Problems keeping heat down were solved using aluminum oxide substrate in the high-voltage section to limit temperature rise to less than 10 while withstanding -20 kV DC voltage and remaining corona-free.

  12. Integrated high power VCSEL systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moench, Holger; Conrads, Ralf; Gronenborn, Stephan; Gu, Xi; Miller, Michael; Pekarski, Pavel; Pollmann-Retsch, Jens; Pruijmboom, Armand; Weichmann, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    High power VCSEL systems are a novel laser source used for thermal treatment in industrial manufacturing. These systems will be applied in many applications, which have not used a laser source before. This is enabled by the unique combination of efficiency, compactness and robustness. High power VCSEL system technology encompasses elements far beyond the VCSEL chip itself: i.e. heat sinks, bonding technology and integrated optics. This paper discusses the optimization of these components and processes specifically for building high-power laser systems with VCSEL arrays. New approaches help to eliminate components and process steps and make the system more robust and easier to manufacture. New cooler concepts with integrated electrical and mechanical interfaces have been investigated and offer advantages for high power system design. The bonding process of chips on sub-mounts and coolers has been studied extensively and for a variety of solder materials. High quality of the interfaces as well as good reliability under normal operation and thermal cycling have been realized. A viable alternative to soldering is silver sintering. The very positive results which have been achieved with a variety of technologies indicate the robustness of the VCSEL chips and their suitability for high power systems. Beam shaping micro-optics can be integrated on the VCSEL chip in a wafer scale process by replication of lenses in a polymer layer. The performance of VCSEL arrays with integrated collimation lenses has been positively evaluated and the integrated chips are fully compatible with all further assembly steps. The integrated high power systems make the application even easier and more robust. New examples in laser material processing and pumping of solid state lasers are presented.

  13. High power switching and other high power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundersen, Martin

    1992-09-01

    High power thyratrons and devices such as high power microwave sources have cathode-related performance limits. Research is described of a simple, robust 'super-emissive' cathode that produces greater than 10,000 A/sq cm from a macroscopic area (approx. 1 sq cm), and operates with a low pressure (approx. 0.1 torr), spatially uniform glow plasma (density greater than 1015 cu cm). The cathode also can operate as a hollow cathode, and is at the heart of the operation of the pseudospark and back-lighted thyratron. The physics of this hollow and super-emissive cathode is very rich. The hollow cathode geometry traps electrons in the hollow cathode backspace. The lifetime of these electrons enables them to ionize a spatially homogeneous high density glow, and this hollow cathode mode of operation is responsible for certain types of electron and ion beam behavior. A plasma cathode sheath that is formed during this phase leads to super-emissive behavior, which is responsible for high current emission. Super-emissive cathode thyratron-type switches (with higher peak current, voltage, di/dt) being developed for pulsed power switching of lasers, accelerators, high current and high coulomb transfer, Marx bank operation, transfer of technology to commercial applications, high current electron beams, and millimeter wave generation (1 to 100 GHz) are described.

  14. Pulsed high-power beams

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, L.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1988-06-01

    The marriage of induction linac technology with nonlinear magnetic modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It is now possible to produce short-pulse electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients approaching 1-MeV/m, and with power efficiencies exceeding 50%. A 70-Mev, 3-kA induction accelerator (ETA II) constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory incorporates the pulse technology concepts that have evolved over the past several years. The ETA II is a linear induction accelerator and provides a test facility for demonstration of the high-average-power components and high-brightness sources used in such accelerators. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak-power capability, repetition rates exceeding 1 kHz, and excellent reliability. 6 figs.

  15. High-Average Power Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David H.; Power, John G.; /Argonne

    2012-09-05

    There has been significant progress in the development of high-power facilities in recent years yet major challenges remain. The task of WG4 was to identify which facilities were capable of addressing the outstanding R&D issues presently preventing high-power operation. To this end, information from each of the facilities represented at the workshop was tabulated and the results are presented herein. A brief description of the major challenges is given, but the detailed elaboration can be found in the other three working group summaries.

  16. Design considerations for a 100 kW c-w, 140 GHz gyrotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Bier, R.; Fox, L.; Huey, H.; Ives, L.; Jory, H.; Spang, S.

    1984-01-01

    A gyrotron oscillator capable of generating 100 kW of c-w power is currently under development at Varian. The tube is being designed for operation in the TE/sup 0//sub 031/ cavity mode with the electron beam located at the second radial electric field maximum in the cavity. The electron beam will be produced by a magnetron injection gun and the 56 kG magnetic field required for 140 GHz operation will be provided by a superconducting magnet. Initial design calculations for the important elements of the tube are reported and the various technology issues of the tube design are discussed.

  17. 60 GHz gyrotron development program. Quarterly report No. 15, January-March 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Shively, J.F.; Bier, R.E.; Caplan, M.; Choi, E.K.; Craig, L.J.; Evans, S.J.; Felch, K.L.; Fox, L.J.; Hu, G.; Huey, H.E.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop a microwave oscillator capable of producing 200 kW of CW power at 60 GHz. Additional calculations for stepped cavity designs are reported. The work on collector fatigue improvement has continued. Window work has stressed the implementation of an FC-75 chilling system and the thermal imaging system for viewing the window temperature. Extensive measurements were made on the output window of the 56 GHz CW gyrotron using three systems. Further investigations of three water load approaches are described.

  18. Helically corrugated waveguide gyrotron traveling wave amplifier using a thermionic cathode electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, A. W.; He, W.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Ronald, K.; Whyte, C. G.; Young, A. R.; Robertson, C. W.; Rafferty, E. G.; Thomson, J.

    2007-06-01

    Experimental operation of a gyrotron traveling wave amplifier with a helically corrugated waveguide using a thermionic cathode electron gun is presented. The coupling between the second harmonic cyclotron mode of the gyrating electron beam and the radiation occurred in the region of near infinite phase velocity over a broad frequency band. With an axis-encircling electron beam of pitch factor of 185keV, and current of 6.0A, the amplifier achieved an output power of 220kW, saturated gain of 24dB, saturated bandwidth of 8.4to10.4GHz, and an interaction efficiency of 20%.

  19. Design of 28 GHz, 200 kW Gyrotron for ECRH Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Vivek; Singh, Udaybir; Kumar, Nitin; Kumar, Anil; Deorani, S. C.; Sinha, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design of 28 GHz, 200 kW gyrotron for Indian TOKAMAK system. The paper reports the designs of interaction cavity, magnetron injection gun and RF window. EGUN code is used for the optimization of electron gun parameters. TE03 mode is selected as the operating mode by using the in-house developed code GCOMS. The simulation and optimization of the cavity parameters are carried out by using the Particle-in-cell, three dimensional (3-D)-electromagnetic simulation code MAGIC. The output power more than 250 kW is achieved.

  20. High power fast ramping power supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Marneris,I.; Bajon, E.; Bonati, R.; Sandberg, J.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-05-04

    Hundred megawatt level fast ramping power converters to drive proton and heavy ion machines are under research and development at accelerator facilities in the world. This is a leading edge technology. There are several topologies to achieve this power level. Their advantages and related issues will be discussed.

  1. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-08-08

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined.

  2. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, StewarT.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  3. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  4. High power neutron production targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S.

    1996-06-01

    The author describes issues of concern in the design of targets and associated systems for high power neutron production facilities. The facilities include uses for neutron scattering, accelerator driven transmutation, accelerator production of tritium, short pulse spallation sources, and long pulse spallation sources. Each of these applications requires a source with different design needs and consequently different implementation in practise.

  5. High power microwave simulator development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, James

    1987-12-01

    Emerging applications for high power microwaves in defense necessitate the development of reliable GW level sources for simulation of effects. For broadband variable frequency survey work, the vircator (virtual cathode oscillator) was developed; this is a tunable RF source operating from the upper X band to below the L band range. For narrowband fixed frequency studies, a special magnetron was developed.

  6. A Stable 0.2-THz Coaxial-Waveguide Gyrotron Traveling-Wave-Tube Amplifier with Distributed Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, C. L.; Yeh, Y. S.; Chang, T. H.; Fang, R. S.

    2016-08-01

    For high-power operation, a THz gyrotron traveling-wave-tube (gyro-TWT) amplifier must operate in a high-order waveguide mode to enlarge the transverse dimension of an interaction waveguide. However, a gyro-TWT amplifier operating in a high-order waveguide mode is susceptible to spurious oscillations. To improve the device stability, in this study, we investigate the possibility of using a coaxial waveguide with distributed losses as the interaction structure. For the same required attenuation, all threatening oscillating modes can be suppressed using different combinations of losses of inner and outer cylinders. This provides flexibility in designing distributed losses when considering the ohmic loading of the interaction structure. We predict that the 0.2-THz gyro-TWT can stably produce a peak power of 14 kW with an efficiency of 23 %, a 3-dB bandwidth of 3.5 GHz, and a saturated gain of 50 dB for a 20-kV 3-A electron beam with a 5 % velocity spread and 1.0 velocity ratio.

  7. High voltage power transistor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hower, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    Design considerations, fabrication procedures, and methods of evaluation for high-voltage power-transistor development are discussed. Technique improvements such as controlling the electric field at the surface and perserving lifetimes in the collector region which have advanced the state of the art in high-voltage transistors are discussed. These improvements can be applied directly to the development of 1200 volt, 200 ampere transistors.

  8. NTM stabilization by alternating O-point EC current drive using a high-power diplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasparek, W.; Doelman, N.; Stober, J.; Maraschek, M.; Zohm, H.; Monaco, F.; Eixenberger, H.; Klop, W.; Wagner, D.; Schubert, M.; Schütz, H.; Grünwald, G.; Plaum, B.; Munk, R.; Schlüter, K. H.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-12-01

    At the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade, experiments to stabilize neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) by electron cyclotron (EC) heating and current drive in the O-points of the magnetic islands were performed. For the first time, injection into the O-points of the revolving islands was performed via a fast directional switch, which toggled the EC power between two launchers synchronously to the island rotation. The switching was performed by a resonant diplexer employing a sharp resonance in the transfer function, and a small frequency modulation of the feeding gyrotron around the slope of the resonance. Thus, toggling of the power between the two outputs of the diplexer connected to two articulating launchers was possible. Phasing and control of the modulation were performed via a set of Mirnov coils and appropriate signal processing. In the paper, technological issues, the design of the diplexer, the tracking of the diplexer resonance to the gyrotron frequency, the generation and processing of control signals for the gyrotron, and the typical performance concerning switching contrast and efficiency are discussed. The plasma scenario is described, and plasma experiments are presented, where the launchers scanned the region of the resonant surface continuously and also where the launchers were at a fixed position near to the q  =  1.5-surface. In the second case, complete stabilization of a 3/2 NTM could be reached. These experiments are also seen as a technical demonstration for the applicability of diplexers in large-scale ECRH systems.

  9. Hybrid high power femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resan, Bojan

    2016-03-01

    There is a growing demand for ultrafast laser systems with high average power and repetition rate. We present two hybrid master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) architectures employing variety of available technologies to achieve 100 W average power femtosecond pulses. We achieved 120 W 820 fs pulses using solid-state oscillator and fiber amplifiers and chirped pulse amplification (CPA) technique (10 μJ pulse energy at 10 MHz and 100 μJ at 400 kHz). In the second experiment, we achieved 160 W 800 fs pulses in a compact system without the standard CPA using solidstate oscillator and single crystal fiber amplifiers. As currently every component experiences some limitations, it is a challenge to choose the optimal architecture with associated components to achieve a desired combination of laser output parameters.

  10. First and second harmonic ECRH experience at gyrotron frequencies at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B.

    1987-11-01

    Plasma heating of electrons in both mirror machines and tokamaks, using mm wave gyrotron sources, have been carried out in many experiments in recent years. The technology for both sources and mode-preserving waveguide transmission systems is well developed at power levels of 200 kW. At LLNL electron heating at 28 GHz in the TMX-U tandem mirror has been used to create hot electrons required for a thermal barrier (potential well). TMX-U, and other devices operating at lower frequency and power (10 GHz, few kW), routinely generates electron populations with mean energies of 100 to 500 keV and densities in the low to mid 10/sup 11/ cm/sup -3/ range. Radial pressure profiles vary from peaked-on-axis to hollow and are dependent on the mod-B resonance surfaces. Experiments on the axisymmetric mirror SM-1 have shown improved heating efficiency using multiple frequencies with narrow frequency separation. The importance of rf diffusion in determining electron confinement has been shown in CONSTANCE B. Fokker-Planck and particle orbit models have been useful for understanding the importance of cavity heating for creating runaway electrons, the sensitivity of hot electron production to cold plasma, the reduction of electron lifetime by rf diffusion, and the effect of multiple frequencies on heating stochasticity. Potential wells generated in plasmas with large fractions of mirror-trapped electrons have been measured in TMX-U. These offer prospects for enhanced confinement of highly stripped ions. 11 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Theory and experiment of a 94 GHz gyrotron traveling-wave amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H. H.; McDermott, D. B.; Hirata, Y.; Barnett, L. R.; Domier, C. W.; Hsu, H. L.; Chang, T. H.; Tsai, W. C.; Chu, K. R.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2004-05-01

    Experimental results are presented on the first W-band gyrotron Traveling-Wave Tube (gyro-TWT) developed to exploit the 94 GHz atmospheric window for long-range, high-resolution radar applications. The gyro-TWT is designed to operate in the higher order TE01 mode and is driven by a 100 kV, 5 A electron beam with a pitch angle of v⊥/vz=1 and velocity spread of Δvz/vz=5%. Large-signal simulations predict 140 kW output power at 92 GHz with 28% efficiency, 50 dB saturated gain, and 5% bandwidth. The stability of the amplifier against spurious oscillations has been checked with linear codes. To suppress the potential gyro-BWO interactions involving the TE02, TE11, and TE21 modes, the interaction circuit with a cutoff frequency of 91 GHz has been loaded with loss so that the single-path, cold-circuit attenuation is 90 dB at 93 GHz. A coaxial input coupler with 3% bandwidth is employed with a predicted and measured coupling of 1 dB and 2 dB, respectively. The operating voltage is limited to below 75 kV because of oscillations encountered at higher voltages in this initial embodiment. Preliminary test at Vb=60 kV and Ib=3.7 A yielded 59 kW saturated output power at 92.2 GHz with 42 dB gain, 26.6% efficiency, and a 3 dB bandwidth of 1.2 GHz (1.3%).

  12. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  13. High power gas laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Leland, Wallace T.; Stratton, Thomas F.

    1981-01-01

    A high power output CO.sub.2 gas laser amplifier having a number of sections, each comprising a plurality of annular pumping chambers spaced around the circumference of a vacuum chamber containing a cold cathode, gridded electron gun. The electron beam from the electron gun ionizes the gas lasing medium in the sections. An input laser beam is split into a plurality of annular beams, each passing through the sections comprising one pumping chamber.

  14. Plasma Physics Challenges of MM-to-THz and High Power Microwave Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booske, John

    2007-11-01

    Homeland security and military defense technology considerations have stimulated intense interest in mobile, high power sources of millimeter-wave to terahertz regime electromagnetic radiation, from 0.1 to 10 THz. While sources at the low frequency end, i.e., the gyrotron, have been deployed or are being tested for diverse applications such as WARLOC radar and active denial systems, the challenges for higher frequency sources have yet to be completely met for applications including noninvasive sensing of concealed weapons and dangerous agents, high-data-rate communications, and high resolution spectroscopy and atmospheric sensing. The compact size requirements for many of these high frequency sources requires miniscule, micro-fabricated slow wave circuits with high rf ohmic losses. This necessitates electron beams with not only very small transverse dimensions but also very high current density for adequate gain. Thus, the emerging family of mm-to-THz e-beam-driven vacuum electronics devices share many of the same plasma physics challenges that currently confront ``classic'' high power microwave (HPM) generators [1] including bright electron sources, intense beam transport, energetic electron interaction with surfaces and rf air breakdown at output windows. Multidimensional theoretical and computational models are especially important for understanding and addressing these challenges. The contemporary plasma physics issues, recent achievements, as well as the opportunities and outlook on THz and HPM will be addressed. [1] R.J. Barker, J.H. Booske, N.C. Luhmann, and G.S. Nusinovich, Modern Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Power Electronics (IEEE/Wiley, 2005).

  15. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.

    1993-01-01

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  16. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  17. High Power Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2004-04-12

    FEL Oscillators have been around since 1977 providing not only a test bed for the physics of Free Electron Lasers and electron/photon interactions but as a workhorse of scientific research. The characteristics that have driven the development of these sources are the desire for high peak and average power, high pulse energies, wavelength tunability, timing flexibility, and wavelengths that are unavailable from more conventional laser sources. User programs have been performed using such sources encompassing medicine, biology, solid state research, atomic and molecular physics, effects of non-linear fields, surface science, polymer science, pulsed laser vapor deposition, to name just a few. Recently the incorporation of energy recovery systems has permitted extension of the average power capabilities to the kW level and beyond. Development of substantially higher power systems with applications in defense and security is believed feasible with modest R&D efforts applied to a few technology areas. This paper will discuss at a summary level the physics of such devices, survey existing and planned facilities, and touch on the applications that have driven the development of these popular light sources.

  18. Phase locking and bandwidth in a gyrotron oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, P. E.; Granatstein, V. L.; Carmel, Y.

    1993-06-01

    For imaging radar and for satellite and space communication (e.g. NASA's deep space network), it is important that the bandwidth be as large as possible. Here we derive a formalism for computing the phase locking bandwidth that can be achieved in a gyrotron oscillator while varying the beam voltage. As an example, a second harmonic TE02/03 gyrotron is considered. For this device, the effective bandwidth can be increased by a factor of about 3 compared with the fixed voltage case by allowing the beam voltage to change together with the input locking signal.

  19. Phase locking and bandwidth in a gyrotron oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, P. E.; Granatstein, V. L.; Carmel, Y.

    1993-01-01

    For imaging radar and for satellite and space communication (e.g. NASA's deep space network), it is important that the bandwidth be as large as possible. Here we derive a formalism for computing the phase locking bandwidth that can be achieved in a gyrotron oscillator while varying the beam voltage. As an example, a second harmonic TE02/03 gyrotron is considered. For this device, the effective bandwidth can be increased by a factor of about 3 compared with the fixed voltage case by allowing the beam voltage to change together with the input locking signal.

  20. High voltage DC power supply

    DOEpatents

    Droege, T.F.

    1989-12-19

    A high voltage DC power supply having a first series resistor at the output for limiting current in the event of a short-circuited output, a second series resistor for sensing the magnitude of output current, and a voltage divider circuit for providing a source of feedback voltage for use in voltage regulation is disclosed. The voltage divider circuit is coupled to the second series resistor so as to compensate the feedback voltage for a voltage drop across the first series resistor. The power supply also includes a pulse-width modulated control circuit, having dual clock signals, which is responsive to both the feedback voltage and a command voltage, and also includes voltage and current measuring circuits responsive to the feedback voltage and the voltage developed across the second series resistor respectively. 7 figs.

  1. High voltage DC power supply

    DOEpatents

    Droege, Thomas F.

    1989-01-01

    A high voltage DC power supply having a first series resistor at the output for limiting current in the event of a short-circuited output, a second series resistor for sensing the magnitude of output current, and a voltage divider circuit for providing a source of feedback voltage for use in voltage regulation is disclosed. The voltage divider circuit is coupled to the second series resistor so as to compensate the feedback voltage for a voltage drop across the first series resistor. The power supply also includes a pulse-width modulated control circuit, having dual clock signals, which is responsive to both the feedback voltage and a command voltage, and also includes voltage and current measuring circuits responsive to the feedback voltage and the voltage developed across the second series resistor respectively.

  2. 60 GHz gyrotron development program. Quarterly report No. 8, April-June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Shively, J.F.; Evans, S.J.; Felch, K.L.; Grant, T.J.; Jory, H.R.; Morwood, R.C.; Stone, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop a microwave oscillator designed to produce 200 kW of CW output power at 60 GHz. Neither tunability nor bandwidth is considered an important parameter in the design but efficiency is. Mode purity in the output waveguide is not a requirement for the device, but the circular electric mode is considered desirable because of its low loss properties. Initial tests of X-1 were completed. At a pulse duration of 265 ..mu..s a peak output power of 150 kW wass measured. A body heating phenomenon was identified as a drift tube oscillation. The second experimental tube incorporating a cathode in an optimized location and a water cooled anode is available for test after test set debugging. The third experimental tube incorporating a modified drift tube is under construction. A CW gyrotron is also under construction. Quotes for a spare superconducting solenoid magnet system have been received. Debugging of the test set, using X-1 as a load, is continuing. A variety of waveguide components have been completed. The gyrotron behavior investigation is continuing. The arcing and crowbar, new cathode material, parameter space, rf output stability, low level starting and efficiency investigations were completed during the quarter.

  3. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  4. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-03-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  5. High average power solid state laser power conditioning system

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkraus, R.F.

    1987-03-03

    The power conditioning system for the High Average Power Laser program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is described. The system has been operational for two years. It is high voltage, high power, fault protected, and solid state. The power conditioning system drives flashlamps that pump solid state lasers. Flashlamps are driven by silicon control rectifier (SCR) switched, resonant charged, (LC) discharge pulse forming networks (PFNs). The system uses fiber optics for control and diagnostics. Energy and thermal diagnostics are monitored by computers.

  6. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, B.; McDaniel, M.R.

    1993-03-23

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counter bores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counter bores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  7. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, Brian; McDaniel, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counterbores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counterbores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  8. Improved Programmable High-Voltage Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castell, Karen; Rutberg, Arthur

    1994-01-01

    Improved dc-to-dc converter functions as programmable high-voltage power supply with low-power-dissipation voltage regulator on high-voltage side. Design of power supply overcomes deficiencies of older designs. Voltage regulation with low power dissipation provided on high-voltage side.

  9. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-04-02

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization.

  10. Stability study of a gyrotron-traveling-wave amplifier based on a lossy dielectric-loaded mode-selective circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Du Chaohai; Liu Pukun

    2009-07-15

    The millimeter microwave source of gyrotron-traveling-wave amplifier (gyro-TWT) is capable of generating high power coherent radiation in a broad bandwidth, while its performance is severely deteriorated by the stability problems. This paper focuses on modeling and the stability analysis of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Ka-band TE{sub 01} mode gyro-TWT based on an interaction circuit alternately loaded with lossy ceramic shells and metal rings. The propagation characteristics of the interaction circuit is analyzed first, based on which the boundary impedance method is employed to build an equivalent uniform lossy circuit. Then the stability of the interaction system is studied using linear and nonlinear theories. The analysis reveals that, due to the special waveguide structure and the dielectric loss, the propagation characteristics of the complex waveguide are similar to that of a uniform lossy circuit. The analysis of the absolute instabilities characterizes the roles the forward-backward-wave components played. The study indicates that the lowest threshold current of the absolute instabilities is higher than the operating current, which brings the system high stability. The reliability of the analysis is proved by the consistency between the analysis and the NRL experimental results.

  11. Highly efficient welding power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thommes, J. M.

    1980-09-01

    The results and findings of an energy efficient welding power development project are presented. The power source developed is to be used for electric arc welding processes in which 3.5 trillion Btu of energy can be saved annually. The power source developed incorporates the use of switch mode power supply techniques in order to convert industrial supply mains to appropriate welding voltages and currents. A series capacitor switch mode power circuit was the circuit technique chosen in order to optimize energy efficiency, costs, reliability, size/weight, and welding performance. Test results demonstrated an effective efficiency (taking into account idle power consumption) of 80 to 91 percent for the energy efficient power source while the conventional types of power sources tested ranged from 41 to 74 percent efficiency. Line power factor was also improved for the energy efficient power source. Field tests indicated additional refinements of weld process performance and power source audible noise emission reduction could be beneficial.

  12. High Power, High Voltage Electric Power System for Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aintablian, Harry; Kirkham, Harold; Timmerman, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the 30 KW, 600 V MRHE power subsystem. Descriptions of the power subsystem elements, the mode of power transfer, and power and mass estimates are presented. A direct-drive architecture for electric propulsion is considered which reduces mass and complexity. Solar arrays with concentrators are used for increased efficiency. Finally, the challenges due to the environment of a hypothetical lunar mission as well as due to the advanced technologies considered are outlined.

  13. Beam-wave interaction behavior of a 35 GHz metal PBG cavity gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2014-09-15

    The RF behavior of a 35 GHz photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating in TE{sub 041}-like mode has been presented to demonstrate its single mode operation capability. In this PBG cavity gyrotron, the conventional tapered cylindrical cavity is replaced by a metal PBG cavity as its RF interaction structure. The beam-wave interaction behavior has been explored using time dependent multimode nonlinear analysis as well as through 3D PIC simulation. Metal PBG cavity is treated here similar to that of a conventional cylindrical cavity for the desired mode confinement. The applied DC magnetic field profile has been considered uniform along the PBG cavity length both in analysis as well as in simulation. Electrons energy and phase along the interaction length of the PBG cavity facilitates bunching mechanism as well as energy transfer phenomena from the electron beam to the RF field. The RF output power for the TE{sub 041}-like design mode as well as nearby competing modes have been estimated and found above to 100 kW in TE{sub 041}-like mode with ∼15% efficiency. Results obtained from the analysis and the PIC simulation are found in agreement within 8% variation, and also it supports the single mode operation, as the PBG cavity does not switch into other parasitic modes in considerably large range of varying DC magnetic field, contrary to the conventional cylindrical cavity interaction structure.

  14. Operational Characteristics of a 14-W 140-GHz Gyrotron for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Joye, Colin D.; Griffin, Robert G.; Hornstein, Melissa K.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Kreischer, Kenneth E.; Rosay, Melanie; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2006-01-01

    The operating characteristics of a 140-GHz 14-W long pulse gyrotron are presented. The device is being used in dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (DNP/NMR) spectroscopy experiments. The gyrotron yields 14 W peak power at 139.65 GHz from the TE(0,3) operating mode using a 12.3-kV 25-mA electron beam. Additionally, up to 12 W peak has been observed in the TE(2,3) mode at 136.90 GHz. A series of mode converters transform the TE(0,3) operating mode to the TE(1,1) mode. Experimental results are compared with nonlinear simulations and show reasonable agreement. The millimeter-wave output beam was imaged in a single shot using a pyroelectric camera. The mode patterns matched reasonably well to theory for both the TE(0,1) mode and the TE(1,1) mode. Repeatable mode patterns were obtained at intervals ranging from 0.8 s apart to 11 min apart at the output of the final mode converter. PMID:17431442

  15. High power thrust vector actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittock, M. J.

    1993-06-01

    Modern missile programs are frequently favoring electro-mechanical (EM) thrust vector actuation (TVA) over hydraulic for a variety of reasons. However, actuation system performance requirements are not relaxed for EM systems. Thus the development of EM systems with greater power output is required. The configuration of EM actuator studied consists of a DC brushless motor driving a spur gear train, which drives a ballscrew that converts rotary motion to rectilinear motion. This design produces an actuator with high levels of performance in a compact mechanical package. Design for manufacturability and assembly (DFMA) was part of the design process, resulting in an actuator that can be assembled easily and will operate reliably. This paper will discuss the mechanical details of the resultant actuator and report test results on a prototype derivative.

  16. Development of High Power Electron Beam Measuring and Analyzing System for Microwave Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, C. J.; Wu, X. L.; Li, Q. S.; Li, C. S.

    The measurement and analysis of high power electron beam during its formation and transmission are the basic scientific problems and key techniques for the development of high performance microwave vacuum electron devices, which are widely used in the fields of military weapon, microwave system and scientific instruments. In this paper, the dynamic parameters measurement and analysis system being built in Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) recently are introduced. The instrument are designed to determine the cross-section, the current density, and the energy resolution of the high power electron beam during its formation and transmission process, which are available both for the electron gun and the electron optics system respectively. Then the three dimension trajectory images of the electron beam can be rebuilt and display with computer controlled data acquisition and processing system easily. Thus, much more complicated structures are considered and solved completely to achieve its detection and analysis, such as big chamber with 10-6 Pa high vacuum system, the controlled detector movement system in axis direction with distance of 600 mm inside the vacuum chamber, the electron beam energy analysis system with high resolution of 0.5%, and the electron beam cross-section and density detector using the YAG: Ce crystal and CCD imaging system et al. At present, the key parts of the instrument have been finished, the cross-section experiment of the electron beam have been performed successfully. Hereafter, the instrument will be used to measure and analyze the electron beam with the electron gun and electron optics system for the single beam and multiple beam klystron, gyrotron, sheet beam device, and traveling wave tube etc. thoroughly.

  17. Application of high power lasers to space power and propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nored, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The transmission of laser power over long distances for applications such as direct conversion to propulsive thrust or electrical power is considered. Factors discussed include: problems inherent in transmitting, propagating, and receiving the laser beam over long ranges; high efficiency, closed-cycle, continuous wave operation; advancement of CO2 laser technology; and compatibility with photovoltaic power conversion devices.

  18. Optics assembly for high power laser tools

    DOEpatents

    Fraze, Jason D.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2016-06-07

    There is provided a high power laser rotational optical assembly for use with, or in high power laser tools for performing high power laser operations. In particular, the optical assembly finds applications in performing high power laser operations on, and in, remote and difficult to access locations. The optical assembly has rotational seals and bearing configurations to avoid contamination of the laser beam path and optics.

  19. High power laser apparatus and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A high-power, continuous-wave laser was designed for use in power transmission and energy-collecting systems, and for producing incoherent light for pumping a laser material. The laser has a high repetitive pulsing rate per unit time, resulting in a high-power density beam. The laser is composed of xenon flash tubes powered by fast-charging capacitors flashed in succession by a high-speed motor connected to an automobile-type distributor.

  20. High power ion thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, Vincent K.; Patterson, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The ion thruster is one of several forms of space electric propulsion being considered for use on future SP-100-based missions. One possible major mission ground rule is the use of a single Space Shuttle launch. Thus, the mass in orbit at the reactor activation altitude would be limited by the Shuttle mass constraints. When the spacecraft subsystem masses are subtracted from this available mass limit, a maximum propellant mass may be calculated. Knowing the characteristics of each type of electric thruster allows maximum values of total impulse, mission velocity increment, and thrusting time to be calculated. Because ion thrusters easily operate at high values of efficiency (60 to 70%) and specific impulse (3000 to 5000 sec), they can impart large values of total impulse to a spacecraft. They also can be operated with separate control of the propellant flow rate and exhaust velocity. This paper presents values of demonstrated and projected performance of high power ion thrusters used in an analysis of electric propulsion for an SP-100 based mission.

  1. The Electron-Optical System of a Gyrotron with an Operating Frequency of 263 GHz for Spectroscopic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuftin, A. N.; Manuilov, V. N.

    2016-07-01

    We describe specific features of modeling numerically the operation of magnetron-injection guns, which form high-quality helical electron beams in gyrotrons operated in the short-wave part of the millimeter-wave band (at a wavelength of 1 mm). As an example, we consider the gun of a gyrotron having an operating frequency of 263 GHz designed for spectroscopic research. It is shown that there are good reasons to perform calculations and optimization of the magnetroninjection un in two steps. At the first step, a simplest two-dimensional model can be used, which allows only for the influence of the field of the electrodes and the intrinsic space charge of the beam on the beam parameters. At the second, final stage one should allow for such factors as roughness of the emitting surface and thermal velocities of electrons. The electron distribution function in oscillatory velocities and the coefficient of electron reflection from the magnetic mirror should be calculated. It is demonstrated that the magnetron-injection gun, which is optimized by the method presented, is sufficiently universal and can be operated both at the first and second cyclotron-frequency harmonics. This opens up the possibility of developing gyrotrons for spectroscopy applications at frequencies of 263 and 526 GHz, respectively, which are required for biological and medical research.

  2. Dynamic nuclear polarization by frequency modulation of a tunable gyrotron of 260 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Dongyoung; Soundararajan, Murari; Cuanillon, Philippe; Braunmueller, Falk; Alberti, Stefano; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    An increase in Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) signal intensity is obtained with a tunable gyrotron producing frequency modulation around 260 GHz at power levels less than 1 W. The sweep rate of frequency modulation can reach 14 kHz, and its amplitude is fixed at 50 MHz. In water/glycerol glassy ice doped with 40 mM TEMPOL, the relative increase in the DNP enhancement was obtained as a function of frequency-sweep rate for several temperatures. A 68 % increase was obtained at 15 K, thus giving a DNP enhancement of about 80. By employing λ / 4 and λ / 8 polarizer mirrors, we transformed the polarization of the microwave beam from linear to circular, and achieved an increase in the enhancement by a factor of about 66% for a given power.

  3. 60-GHz-gyrotron development program. Quarterly report No. 13, July-September 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Shively, J.F.; Caplan, M.; Choi, E.K.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop a microwave oscillator capable of producing 200 kW of CW power at 60 GHz. A CW experimental tube, X-5, which incorporated a thinner double disc output window to improve window bandwidth, and some modifications to the drift tunnel and cavity coupling proven to be successful in earlier pulse tube tests produced 123 kW of CW output power at 60 GHz before rf load coolant boiling and tube window failure terminated tests. A water load of new design has been constructed and will be used in conjunction with a 56 GHz gyrotron next quarter. Alternative window designs are being explored and developed.

  4. Experiments on a Ku-band gyrotron traveling-wave-tube amplifier with a tapered waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sang Wook; Lee, Han Seul; Jang, Kwang Ho; Choi, Jin Joo; So, Joon Ho

    2015-09-01

    A Ku-band gyrotron traveling-wave-tube (gyro-TWT) amplifier was investigated. To obtain a wide operating bandwidth, we used a two-stage tapered rectangular waveguide interaction circuit. An electron beam of 27 keV and 3.56 A was produced from a double-anode magnetron-injection-gun (MIG). The measured frequency bandwidth over 10 dB gain in the linear operation region was found to be 18%. The gyro-TWT's saturated output power was 14.9 kW at 14.4 GHz, corresponding to a saturated output power gain of 27.4 dB and an efficiency of 15.5%. The measured experimental results were in agreement with those of non-linear numerical simulations.

  5. High Power Photodetectors for Space Communications Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.

    1995-01-01

    High power photodetectors in coplanar waveguide and distributed traveling-wave structures have been under development for communications applications. The distributed photodetectors demonstrated 70percent efficiency with a linear response up to 25 mW of optical power input.

  6. High voltage-high power components for large space power distribution systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    Space power components including a family of bipolar power switching transistors, fast switching power diodes, heat pipe cooled high frequency transformers and inductors, high frequency conduction cooled transformers, high power-high frequency capacitors, remote power controllers and rotary power transfer devices were developed. Many of these components such as the power switching transistors, power diodes and the high frequency capacitor are commercially available. All the other components were developed to the prototype level. The dc/dc series resonant converters were built to the 25 kW level.

  7. High power RF solid state power amplifier system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high frequency, solid state power amplifier system includes a plurality of input multiple port splitters for receiving a high-frequency input and for dividing the input into a plurality of outputs and a plurality of solid state amplifier units. Each amplifier unit includes a plurality of amplifiers, and each amplifier is individually connected to one of the outputs of multiport splitters and produces a corresponding amplified output. A plurality of multiport combiners combine the amplified outputs of the amplifiers of each of the amplifier units to a combined output. Automatic level control protection circuitry protects the amplifiers and maintains a substantial constant amplifier power output.

  8. Optical spectroscopy of plasma in high power microwave pulse shortening experiments driven by a microsecond electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, W.E.; Gilgenbach, R.M.; Hochman, J.M.; Jaynes, R.L.; Rintamaki, J.I.; Peters, C.W.; Vollers, D.E.; Lau, Y.Y.; Spencer, T.A.

    1998-12-31

    Spectroscopic measurements have been performed to characterize the undesired plasma in a multi-megawatt coaxial gyrotron and a rectangular-cross-section (RCS) gyrotron. These gyrotrons are driven by the Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator (MELBA) at parameters: V = {minus}800 kV, I{sub tube} = 0.3 kA, and pulselengths of 0.5--1 {micro}s. Pulse shortening typically limits the highest ({approximately}10 MW) microwave power pulselength to 100--200 ns. Potential explanations of pulse shortening are being investigated, particularly plasma production inside the cavity and at the e-beam collector. The source of this plasma is believed to be due to water vapor absorbed on surfaces which is ejected, dissociated, and ionized by electron beam impact. Plasma H-{alpha} line radiation has been characterized in both time-integrated and temporally-resolved measurements and correlated with microwave power and microwave cutoff. Measurements from a residual gas analyzer (RGA) will be used to support this interpretation. Experiments involving RF plasma cleaning of the coaxial cavity are planned.

  9. Self-consistent non-stationary theory of the gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbrajs, Olgierd; Nusinovich, Gregory S.

    2016-08-01

    For a long time, the gyrotron theory was developed assuming that the transit time of electrons through the interaction space is much shorter than the cavity fill time. Correspondingly, it was assumed that during this transit time, the amplitude of microwave oscillations remains constant. A recent interest to such additional effects as the after-cavity interaction between electrons and the outgoing wave in the output waveguide had stimulated some studies of the beam-wave interaction processes over much longer distances than a regular part of the waveguide which serves as a cavity in gyrotrons. Correspondingly, it turned out that the gyrotron theory free from the assumption about constant amplitude of microwave oscillations during the electron transit time should be developed. The present paper contains some results obtained in the framework of such theory. The main attention is paid to modification of the boundary between the regions of oscillations with constant amplitude and automodulation in the plane of normalized parameters characterizing the external magnetic field and the beam current. It is shown that the theory free from the assumption about the frozen wave amplitude during the electron transit time predicts some widening of the region of automodulation.

  10. High-Power Electromagnetic Thruster Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Mikellides, Pavlos G.

    2001-01-01

    High-power electromagnetic thrusters have been proposed as primary in-space propulsion options for several bold new interplanetary and deep-space missions. As the lead center for electric propulsion, the NASA Glenn Research Center designs, develops, and tests high-power electromagnetic technologies to meet these demanding mission requirements. Two high-power thruster concepts currently under investigation by Glenn are the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster and the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT).

  11. Operation of high power converters in parallel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Inouye, L. Y.

    1993-01-01

    High power converters that are used in space power subsystems are limited in power handling capability due to component and thermal limitations. For applications, such as Space Station Freedom, where multi-kilowatts of power must be delivered to user loads, parallel operation of converters becomes an attractive option when considering overall power subsystem topologies. TRW developed three different unequal power sharing approaches for parallel operation of converters. These approaches, known as droop, master-slave, and proportional adjustment, are discussed and test results are presented.

  12. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert J.; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reports on the development of a high power 780 nm laser suitable for space applications of laser cooling. A possible solution is to use frequency doubling of high power 1560 nm telecom lasers. The presentation shows a diagram of the frequency conversion, and a graph of the second harmonic generation in one crystal, and the use of the cascading crystals. Graphs show the second harmonic power as a function of distance between crystals, second harmonic power vs. pump power, tunability of laser systems.

  13. Possibilities for Continuous Frequency Tuning in Terahertz Gyrotrons with Nontunable Electrodynamic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratman, V. L.; Savilov, A. V.; Chang, T. H.

    2016-02-01

    Large ohmic losses in the cavities of terahertz gyrotrons may lead to the overlapping of the axial mode spectra. In a number of gyrotron experiments, this effect has been used to provide a fairly broadband frequency tuning by changing appropriately the operating magnetic field and/or accelerating voltage of the gyrotron. Similar to the systems with nonfixed axial structure of the RF electromagnetic field and low diffraction quality, which are due to weak reflections of the operating wave from the collector end of the electrodynamic system, this changing leads to a monotonic change in the axial index of the operating wave and transition from the gyrotron regime to the gyro-BWO regime. According to a theoretical comparison of these two methods performed on the basis of generalization of self-consistent gyrotron equations with allowance for variations in the axial electron momenta, low-reflection systems can provide a higher efficiency and monotonicity of the frequency tuning.

  14. Research on a 170 GHz, 2 MW coaxial cavity gyrotron with inner-outer corrugation

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Shenyong; Yu, Sheng; Li, Hongfu

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, a coaxial cavity gyrotron with inner-outer corrugation is researched. The electron kineto-equations and the first order transmission line equations of the gyrotron are derived from Lorentz force equation and the transmission line theory, respectively. And then, a 2 MW, 170 GHz coaxial cavity gyrotron with inner-outer corrugation is designed. By means of numerical calculation, the beam-wave interaction of the coaxial cavity gyrotron with inner-outer corrugation is investigated. Results show that the efficient and the outpower of the gyrotron are 42.3% and 2.38 MW, respectively.

  15. Test facilities for high power electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Vetrone, Robert H.; Grisnik, Stanley P.; Myers, Roger M.; Parkes, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Electric propulsion has applications for orbit raising, maneuvering of large space systems, and interplanetary missions. These missions involve propulsion power levels from tenths to tens of megawatts, depending upon the application. General facility requirements for testing high power electric propulsion at the component and thrust systems level are defined. The characteristics and pumping capabilities of many large vacuum chambers in the United States are reviewed and compared with the requirements for high power electric propulsion testing.

  16. Photoconductive switching for high power microwave generation

    SciTech Connect

    Pocha, M.D.; Hofer, W.W.

    1990-10-01

    Photoconductive switching is a technology that is being increasingly applied to generation of high power microwaves. Two primary semiconductors used for these devices are silicon and gallium arsenide. Diamond is a promising future candidate material. This paper discusses the important material parameters and switching modes, critical issues for microwave generation, and future directions for this high power, photoconductive switching technology.

  17. High power laser perforating tools and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2014-04-22

    ystems devices and methods for the transmission of 1 kW or more of laser energy deep into the earth and for the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems, devices and methods for the laser perforation of a borehole in the earth. These systems can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perforate such boreholes.

  18. High efficiency solar photovoltaic power module concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.

    1978-01-01

    The investigation of a preliminary concept for high efficiency solar power generation in space is presented. The concept was a synergistic combination of spectral splitting, tailored bandgap cells, high concentration ratios, and cool cell areas.

  19. Extension of high Te regime with upgraded ECRH system in the LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Mutoh, T.; Nagaoka, K.; Murakami, S.; Osakabe, M.; Yamada, I.; Nakano, H.; Yokoyama, M.; Ido, T.; Shimizu, A.; Seki, R.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Kariya, T.; Minami, R.; Imai, T.; LHD experiment Group

    2014-02-01

    Enhancement of the output power per gyrotron has been planned in the Large Helical Device (LHD). Three 77-GHz gyrotrons with an output power of more than 1 MW have been operated. In addition, a high power gyrotron with the frequency of 154 GHz (1 MW/5 s, 0.5 MW/CW) was newly installed in 2012 and the total injection power of ECRH reached 4.6 MW. The operational regime of ECRH plasma on the LHD has been extended due to the upgraded ECRH system such as the central electron temperature Te0 = 13.5 keV with ne = 1×1019m-3. In the LHD, an electron-internal-transport barrier (e-ITB) related to the production of high Te plasmas has been realized by strongly centre-focused ECRH. The electron thermal confinement clearly improved inside the e-ITB. The radial electric field was measured using the heavy ion beam probe. The formation of the positive Er was observed in the core region, which well agreed with the prediction of the neoclassical transport theory. The energy confinement characteristics have been investigated in the ECRH plasmas. It was found that higher plasma stored energy and lower radiation power was realized in the outward configuration. The plasma stored energy of 530 kJ with ne = 3.2×1019m-3, which is the 1.7 times larger than the previous record in the ECRH plasma in the LHD, has been successfully achieved.

  20. High temperature power electronics for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Baumann, Eric D.; Myers, Ira T.; Overton, Eric

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature electronics program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating materials research, development and testing of high temperature power components, and integration of the developed components and devices into a demonstrable 200 C power system, such as inverter. An overview of the program and a description of the in-house high temperature facilities along with experimental data obtained on high temperature materials are presented.

  1. High Density Power Converters for Photovoltaic Power Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwan, Rahul

    In typical photovoltaic systems, PV cells are connected in series to achieve high output voltages, which decreases conduction losses and helps the downstream power electronics operate at higher efficiencies. A series connection means that the current through the string is limited by the worst case cell, substring, or module, which can result in suboptimal operation of the rest of the string. Given how even small shading can have a large effect on performance, there has been growing interest in the use of distributed power management architectures to mitigate losses from variation in PV systems. In particular, partial power processing converters have gained traction as a means to improve the performance of PV arrays with small, distributed converters that configure in parallel with PV cells. These converters can use low voltage components, only process a fraction of the total power allowing them to achieve higher efficiencies and power density and also have higher reliability. This work details the design and operation of a partial power processing converter implemented as a Resonant Switched Capacitor (ReSC) converter. An integrated circuit (IC) is designed in 0.18 mum CMOS process. Operation at high frequencies (20-50 MHz) allows high levels of integration with air core inductors directly attached to the die through a gold bump, solder reflow process. Test results for the IC are presented with power density and efficiency metrics. The IC is then used as a partial power processing converter to implement equalization with a specially constructed PV panel. The converter is shown to mitigate power loss due to mismatch.

  2. The NASA CSTI High Capacity Power Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, J.; Dudenhoefer, J.; Juhasz, A.; Schwarze, G.; Patterson, R.; Ferguson, D.; Schmitz, P.; Vandersande, J.

    1992-01-01

    The elements of the Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) High Capacity Power Project include Systems Analysis, Stirling Power Conversion, Thermoelectric Power Conversion, Thermal Management, Power Management, Systems Diagnostics, Environmental Interactions, and Material/Structural Development. The overall project will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems compatible with the SP-100 reactor which facilitates operation during lunar and planetary day/night cycles as well as allowing spacecraft operation at any attitude or distance from the sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the project elements are presented, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

  3. Capacitors for aircraft high power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. D.

    1980-04-01

    This report describes an exploratory program conducted to develop reliable lightweight pulse discharge capacitors for airborne application. The specific duty was a 1 minute burst every 2hours, and both low (50pps) and high (300pps) repetition rate service was to be considered. The energy density goals were 400 to 1100 J/kg with a 20 microsec capacitor current pulse width. A five layer polysulfone/kraft paper dielectric was selected for high rate service, while polyvinylidene fluoride/kraft paper was chosen for the low rate service. Both mineral oil and dioctylphthalate fluids were used. Tension controlled winding was used to eliminate failure producing folds. Reduced temperature drying further reduced wrinkles. Special filtration, purification, and cleaning produced very high resistivity fluids free from particles. A highly instrumented test bay accurately simulated a pulse forming network environment and allowed detailed and accurate testing. The best single section high rate results were 550 J/kg at 100,000 - 1,000,000 shot life at double the specified duty, while the best low rate results were slightly higher. Case weight minimization was stuided, and three prototype lightweight cases were built. Several techniques for smoothing rough capacitor foils were examined, and a flame technique was selected as being most easily implemented. Problems of terminating extended foils were examined, and a flame-spray method selected as most practical.

  4. High power ultrashort pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.

    1994-10-07

    Small scale terawatt and soon even petawatt (1000 terawatt) class laser systems are made possible by application of the chirped-pulse amplification technique to solid-state lasers combined with the availability of broad bandwidth materials. These lasers make possible a new class of high gradient accelerators based on the large electric fields associated with intense laser-plasma interactions or from the intense laser field directly. Here, we concentrate on the laser technology to produce these intense pulses. Application of the smallest of these systems to the production of high brightness electron sources is also introduced.

  5. HIGH AVERAGE POWER OPTICAL FEL AMPLIFIERS.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, ILAN, DAYRAN, D.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-08-21

    Historically, the first demonstration of the optical FEL was in an amplifier configuration at Stanford University [l]. There were other notable instances of amplifying a seed laser, such as the LLNL PALADIN amplifier [2] and the BNL ATF High-Gain Harmonic Generation FEL [3]. However, for the most part FELs are operated as oscillators or self amplified spontaneous emission devices. Yet, in wavelength regimes where a conventional laser seed can be used, the FEL can be used as an amplifier. One promising application is for very high average power generation, for instance FEL's with average power of 100 kW or more. The high electron beam power, high brightness and high efficiency that can be achieved with photoinjectors and superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) combine well with the high-gain FEL amplifier to produce unprecedented average power FELs. This combination has a number of advantages. In particular, we show that for a given FEL power, an FEL amplifier can introduce lower energy spread in the beam as compared to a traditional oscillator. This properly gives the ERL based FEL amplifier a great wall-plug to optical power efficiency advantage. The optics for an amplifier is simple and compact. In addition to the general features of the high average power FEL amplifier, we will look at a 100 kW class FEL amplifier is being designed to operate on the 0.5 ampere Energy Recovery Linac which is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Collider-Accelerator Department.

  6. High Power Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering based light sources. We demonstrate up to 36x average power enhancement of frequency doubled sub-millijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  7. High-power picosecond laser pulse recirculation.

    PubMed

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high-power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering-based light sources. We demonstrate up to 40x average power enhancement of frequency-doubled submillijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  8. High-power picosecond laser pulse recirculation.

    PubMed

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high-power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering-based light sources. We demonstrate up to 40x average power enhancement of frequency-doubled submillijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses. PMID:20596201

  9. Power processing units for high power solar electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Robert H.; Das, Radhe S.; Krauthamer, Stanley

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation of high-power processing units (PPUs) for multimegawatt solar electric propulsion (SEP) vehicles using advanced ion thrusters is presented. Significant savings of scale are possible for PPUs used to supply power to ion thrusters operating at 0.1 to 1.5 MWe per thruster. The PPU specific mass is found to be strongly sensitive to variations in the ion thruster's power per thruster and moderately sensitive to variations in the thruster's screen voltage due to varying the I(sp) of the thruster. Each PPU consists of a dc-to-dc converter to increase the voltage from the 500 V dc of the photovoltaic power system to the 5 to 13 kV dc required by the ion thrusters.

  10. Magnetron injection gun for a broadband gyrotron backward-wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C. P.; Chang, T. H.; Chen, N. C.; Yeh, Y. S.

    2009-07-01

    The magnetron injection gun is capable of generating relativistic electron beam with high velocity ratio and low velocity spread for a gyrotron backward-wave oscillator (gyro-BWO). However, the velocity ratio (α) varies drastically against both the magnetic field and the beam voltage, which significantly limits the tuning bandwidth of a gyro-BWO. This study remedies this drawback by adding a variable trim field to adjust the magnetic compression ratio when changing the operating conditions. Theoretical results obtained by employing a two-dimensional electron gun code (EGUN) demonstrate a constant velocity ratio of 1.5 with a low axial velocity spread of 6% from 3.4-4.8 Tesla. These results are compared with a three-dimensional particle-tracing code (computer simulation technology, CST). The underlying physics for constant α will be discussed in depth.

  11. High voltage photovoltaic power converter

    DOEpatents

    Haigh, Ronald E.; Wojtczuk, Steve; Jacobson, Gerard F.; Hagans, Karla G.

    2001-01-01

    An array of independently connected photovoltaic cells on a semi-insulating substrate contains reflective coatings between the cells to enhance efficiency. A uniform, flat top laser beam profile is illuminated upon the array to produce electrical current having high voltage. An essentially wireless system includes a laser energy source being fed through optic fiber and cast upon the photovoltaic cell array to prevent stray electrical signals prior to use of the current from the array. Direct bandgap, single crystal semiconductor materials, such as GaAs, are commonly used in the array. Useful applications of the system include locations where high voltages are provided to confined spaces such as in explosive detonation, accelerators, photo cathodes and medical appliances.

  12. NASA GRC High Power Electromagnetic Thruster Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Pensil, Eric J.

    2004-01-01

    High-power electromagnetic thrusters have been proposed as primary in-space propulsion options for several bold new interplanetary and deep-space missions. As the lead center for electric propulsion, the NASA Glenn Research Center designs, develops, and tests high-power electromagnetic technologies to meet these demanding mission requirements. Two high-power thruster concepts currently under investigation by Glenn are the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster and the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT). This paper describes the MPD thruster and the test facility.

  13. High Power Co-Axial Coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M.; Dudas, A.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Guo, Jiquan; Williams, R. Scott

    2013-12-01

    A very high power Coax RF Coupler (MW-Level) is very desirable for a number of accelerator and commercial applications. For example, the development of such a coupler operating at 1.5 GHz may permit the construction of a higher-luminosity version of the Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) being planned at JLab. Muons, Inc. is currently funded by a DOE STTR grant to develop a 1.5-GHz high-power doublewindowcoax coupler with JLab (about 150 kW). Excellent progress has been made on this R&D project, so we propose an extension of this development to build a very high power coax coupler (MW level peak power and a max duty factor of about 4%). The dimensions of the current coax coupler will be scaled up to provide higher power capability.

  14. High-efficiency solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, Robert E. (Inventor); Cheng, Sheng (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency solid state power amplifier (SSPA) for specific use in a spacecraft is provided. The SSPA has a mass of less than 850 g and includes two different X-band power amplifier sections, i.e., a lumped power amplifier with a single 11-W output and a distributed power amplifier with eight 2.75-W outputs. These two amplifier sections provide output power that is scalable from 11 to 15 watts without major design changes. Five different hybrid microcircuits, including high-efficiency Heterostructure Field Effect Transistor (HFET) amplifiers and Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters have been developed for use within the SSPA. A highly efficient packaging approach enables the integration of a large number of hybrid circuits into the SSPA.

  15. Frequency multiplied harmonic gyrotron-traveling-wave-tube amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.J.; Ganguly, A.K.; Armstrong, C.M. )

    1994-06-01

    Numerical simulations of a [ital W]-band two-stage tapered, frequency multiplied gyrotron- traveling-wave-tube amplifier are reported. Unlike conventional harmonic gyrodevices, a drive signal at the fundamental harmonic frequency is injected in the first stage for beam modulation, and amplified output radiation is extracted from the third harmonic cyclotron resonance interaction. Numerical results show that broadband millimeter wave radiation is obtained with an efficiency of 10%--15%, a gain of [similar to]30 dB, and an instantaneous bandwidth of [similar to]10% at a center frequency of 95 GHz for [Delta][ital v][sub [ital z

  16. Computer simulation of phase locking multi-cavity relativistic gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, A. T.; Yang, Z. H.; Lin, Chih-Chien

    1989-07-01

    A particle-in-cell model has been employed to investigate the phase-locking phenomenon of multi-cavity relativistic gyrotron oscillators. Simulation results show that a prebunched beam causes the output wave to overshoot, which in turn prolongs the time for establishing phase locking. The beam axial velocity spread is observed to reduce the locking bandwidth. The phenomenon of priming or injection seeding is simulated. The phase locked time depends on the growth rate of the oscillator and the amount of inject frequency deviation from the locking boundary.

  17. Suppression of the Oscillatory Modes of a Space Charge in the Magnetron Injection Guns of Technological Gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyavin, M. Yu.; Kuntsevich, A. D.; Manuilov, V. N.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of based on the PIC method numerical simulation of the dynamic processes of trapping of electrons into the adiabatic trap of a technological gyrotron for different configurations of the electric and magnetic fields in the electron beam formation region. The electrode geometry providing a low reflection coefficient of the magnetic mirror to suppress oscillatory modes in the space-charge cloud and ensure the stability of the electron beam with a high fraction of oscillatory energy in such a system has been found.

  18. High-Speed, high-power, switching transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnahan, D.; Ohu, C. K.; Hower, P. L.

    1979-01-01

    Silicon transistor rate for 200 angstroms at 400 to 600 volts combines switching speed of transistors with ruggedness, power capacity of thyristor. Transistor introduces unique combination of increased power-handling capability, unusally low saturation and switching losses, and submicrosecond switching speeds. Potential applications include high power switching regulators, linear amplifiers, chopper controls for high frequency electrical vehicle drives, VLF transmitters, RF induction heaters, kitchen cooking ranges, and electronic scalpels for medical surgery.

  19. Coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guolin; Shu Ting; Yuan Chengwei; Zhang Jun; Yang Jianhua; Jin Zhenxing; Yin Yi; Wu Dapeng; Zhu Jun; Ren Heming; Yang Jie

    2010-12-15

    The coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves is a promising technique for the development of high power microwave technologies, as it can enhance the output capacities of presently studied devices. According to the investigations on the spatial filtering method and waveguide filtering method, the hybrid filtering method is proposed for the coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves. As an example, a specific structure is designed for the coupling output of S/X/X band three-channel high power microwaves and investigated with the hybrid filtering method. In the experiments, a pulse of 4 GW X band beat waves and a pulse of 1.8 GW S band microwave are obtained.

  20. Coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guolin; Shu, Ting; Yuan, Chengwei; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Jianhua; Jin, Zhenxing; Yin, Yi; Wu, Dapeng; Zhu, Jun; Ren, Heming; Yang, Jie

    2010-12-01

    The coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves is a promising technique for the development of high power microwave technologies, as it can enhance the output capacities of presently studied devices. According to the investigations on the spatial filtering method and waveguide filtering method, the hybrid filtering method is proposed for the coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves. As an example, a specific structure is designed for the coupling output of S/X/X band three-channel high power microwaves and investigated with the hybrid filtering method. In the experiments, a pulse of 4 GW X band beat waves and a pulse of 1.8 GW S band microwave are obtained.

  1. High power density carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.; Johnsen, R.; Doyon, J.; Allen, J.

    1996-12-31

    Carbonate fuel cell is a highly efficient and environmentally clean source of power generation. Many organizations worldwide are actively pursuing the development of the technology. Field demonstration of multi-MW size power plant has been initiated in 1996, a step toward commercialization before the turn of the century, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) is planning to introduce a 2.85MW commercial fuel cell power plant with an efficiency of 58%, which is quite attractive for distributed power generation. However, to further expand competitive edge over alternative systems and to achieve wider market penetration, ERC is exploring advanced carbonate fuel cells having significantly higher power densities. A more compact power plant would also stimulate interest in new markets such as ships and submarines where space limitations exist. The activities focused on reducing cell polarization and internal resistance as well as on advanced thin cell components.

  2. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Miller, John L.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.; Zapata, Luis E.

    1994-01-01

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse.

  3. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Miller, J.L.; Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.; Zapata, L.E.

    1994-02-08

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse. 7 figures.

  4. Spacecraft high-voltage power supply construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. F.; Stern, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The design techniques, circuit components, fabrication techniques, and past experience used in successful high-voltage power supplies for spacecraft flight systems are described. A discussion of the basic physics of electrical discharges in gases is included and a design rationale for the prevention of electrical discharges is provided. Also included are typical examples of proven spacecraft high-voltage power supplies with typical specifications for design, fabrication, and testing.

  5. High Voltage Power Transmission for Wind Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young il

    The high wind speeds and wide available area at sea have recently increased the interests on offshore wind farms in the U.S.A. As offshore wind farms become larger and are placed further from the shore, the power transmission to the onshore grid becomes a key feature. Power transmission of the offshore wind farm, in which good wind conditions and a larger installation area than an onshore site are available, requires the use of submarine cable systems. Therefore, an underground power cable system requires unique design and installation challenges not found in the overhead power cable environment. This paper presents analysis about the benefit and drawbacks of three different transmission solutions: HVAC, LCC/VSC HVDC in the grid connecting offshore wind farms and also analyzed the electrical characteristics of underground cables. In particular, loss of HV (High Voltage) subsea power of the transmission cables was evaluated by the Brakelmann's theory, taking into account the distributions of current and temperature.

  6. Optical power splitter for splitting high power light

    DOEpatents

    English, Jr., Ronald E.; Christensen, John J.

    1995-01-01

    An optical power splitter for the distribution of high-power light energy has a plurality of prisms arranged about a central axis to form a central channel. The input faces of the prisms are in a common plane which is substantially perpendicular to the central axis. A beam of light which is substantially coaxial to the central axis is incident on the prisms and at least partially strikes a surface area of each prism input face. The incident beam also partially passes through the central channel.

  7. Optical power splitter for splitting high power light

    DOEpatents

    English, R.E. Jr.; Christensen, J.J.

    1995-04-18

    An optical power splitter for the distribution of high-power light energy has a plurality of prisms arranged about a central axis to form a central channel. The input faces of the prisms are in a common plane which is substantially perpendicular to the central axis. A beam of light which is substantially coaxial to the central axis is incident on the prisms and at least partially strikes a surface area of each prism input face. The incident beam also partially passes through the central channel. 5 figs.

  8. New, rugged, high power Cockcroft-Walton power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.; Behrsing, G.; Hazelton, E.; Hearn, W.; Lancaster, H.

    1981-03-01

    A ten foot (3 m), ten-stage air-insulated Crockcroft-Walton power supply designed and built at LBL has been tested to 900 kV at the SuperHILAC. Operating at 80 kHz, the power supply features low ripple, moderate stored energy, 10 ma average current, and no bouncer requirement for pulsed loads. Other system features include: inexpensive generating voltmeters and a capacitive pick off for monitoring and regulation in lieu of costly resistance dividers, home-made semiconductor rectifier modules, excellent component protection against sparking, and easy maintenance. This report describes design, construction, and testing of the high voltage system.

  9. Cryogenic silicon photoconductive power switches for high-power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Petr, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The silicon photoconductive power switch (PCPS) is an attractive switch technology because it is capable of switching extremely large energy pulses of short duration with good efficiency and precise timing control. At high operating frequencies, there are enormous advantages to be gained by operating at liquid nitrogen temperatures. For example, the mechanical properties of silicon at 77K are such that its power-dissipation limit due to stress fracture is an order of magnitude higher than at 300K. Also, its thermal conductivity is improved at lower temperatures. Another important characteristic of 77K silicon is that its optical absorption depth at 1.06um extends out to 13cm, as compared to 0.1cm at 300K. Important aspects of operating a cryogenic silicon PCPS at high average power levels are addressed here. Electrical and optical properties of silicon at both 77K and 300K are developed, along with its thermomechanical properties when switching high peak and average power. In addition, experimental data concerning PCPS electrical-switching characteristics, optical trigger uniformity, and thermal stress response during conduction are presented. Finally, a system study compares the silicon PCPS to the thyratron.

  10. Theory, Design and Operation of a High-Power Second - Gyro-Twt Amplifier.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinsong

    1995-01-01

    Based on the cyclotron resonance maser (CRM) instability, the gyrotron traveling wave tube (gyro-TWT) amplifier is an efficient high power microwave and millimeter wave coherent radiation source. As evidenced in previous experiments, gyro-TWTs, however, can be very susceptible to spontaneous oscillations, and their output powers have thus been limited to relatively low levels. In this dissertation work, thorough theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to demonstrate and confirm a novel "marginal stability design" (MSD) concept that a harmonic gyro-TWT amplifier is more stable to spontaneous oscillation than a fundamental harmonic gyro-TWT amplifier. Since their interactions are, in general, weaker and allow higher levels of electron beam current, harmonic gyro-TWTs can yield, in principle, a significantly higher RF output power than a fundamental gyro-TWT. The study results also show that a magnetron injection gun (MIG) type electron beam is applicable to harmonic gyro-TWTs. A complete analytic linear theory employing Laplace transforms and a three dimensional nonlinear theory using a slow time-scale formalism are developed in Chapt. 2 for the general CRM interaction to address the issue of stability. Two designs were developed to demonstrate the MSD procedure. The design and development of the proof -of-principle experiment are discussed in Chapt. 3. The accompanying cold test results indicate that all the components have met their respective design goals. The RF diagnostic circuit employed to characterize the gyro-TWT amplifier is also described. Chapter 4 presents the hot-test results of the second-harmonic TE_{21} gyro-TWT amplifier experiment in which an 80 kV, 20 A MIG beam with alpha(equivupsilon _|/upsilon_|) = 1 was used to generate a peak RF output power of 207 kW in Ku-band with an efficiency of 12.9%. In addition, the saturated gain is 16 dB, the small signal gain is 22 dB, the measured bandwidth is 2.1%, and the amplifier was zero

  11. The NASA CSTI High Capacity Power Project

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.; Dudenhoefer, J.; Juhasz, A.; Schwarze, G.; Patterson, R.; Ferguson, D.; Titran, R.; Schmitz, P.; Vandersande, J.

    1994-09-01

    The SP-100 Space Nuclear Power Program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop technology for military and civil applications. Starting in 1986, NASA has funded a technology program to maintain the momentum of promising aerospace technology advancement started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the changes for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for a wide range of future space applications. The elements of the CSTI High Capacity Power Project include Systems Analysis, Stirling Power Conversion, Thermoelectric Power Conversion, Thermal Management, Power Management, Systems Diagnostics, Environmental Interactions, and Material/Structural Development. Technology advancement in all elements is required to provide the growth capability, high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall project with develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems compatible with the SP-100 reactor which facilitates operation during lunar and planetary day/night cycles as well as allowing spacecraft operation at any attitude or distance from the sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the project elements will be presented, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

  12. The NASA CSTI high capacity power project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, J.; Dudenhoefer, J.; Juhasz, A.; Schwarze, G.; Patterson, R.; Ferguson, D.; Titran, R.; Schmitz, P.; Vandersande, J.

    1992-01-01

    The SP-100 Space Nuclear Power Program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop technology for military and civil applications. Starting in 1986, NASA has funded a technology program to maintain the momentum of promising aerospace technology advancement started during Phase 1 of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for a wide range of future space applications. The elements of the Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) High Capacity Power Project include Systems Analysis, Stirling Power Conversion, Thermoelectric Power Conversion, Thermal Management, Power Management, Systems Diagnostics, Environmental Interactions, and Material/Structural Development. Technology advancement in all elements is required to provide the growth capability, high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall project will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems compatible with the SP-100 reactor which facilitates operation during lunar and planetary day/night cycles as well as allowing spacecraft operation at any attitude or distance from the sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the project elements will be presented, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

  13. Small high cooling power space cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T. V.; Raab, J.; Durand, D.; Tward, E.

    2014-01-29

    The small High Efficiency pulse tube Cooler (HEC) cooler, that has been produced and flown on a number of space infrared instruments, was originally designed to provide cooling of 10 W @ 95 K. It achieved its goal with >50% margin when limited by the 180 W output ac power of its flight electronics. It has also been produced in 2 stage configurations, typically for simultaneously cooling of focal planes to temperatures as low as 35 K and optics at higher temperatures. The need for even higher cooling power in such a low mass cryocooler is motivated by the advent of large focal plane arrays. With the current availability at NGAS of much larger power cryocooler flight electronics, reliable long term operation in space with much larger cooling powers is now possible with the flight proven 4 kg HEC mechanical cooler. Even though the single stage cooler design can be re-qualified for those larger input powers without design change, we redesigned both the linear and coaxial version passive pulse tube cold heads to re-optimize them for high power cooling at temperatures above 130 K while rejecting heat to 300 K. Small changes to the regenerator packing, the re-optimization of the tuned inertance and no change to the compressor resulted in the increased performance at 150 K. The cooler operating at 290 W input power achieves 35 W@ 150 K corresponding to a specific cooling power at 150 K of 8.25 W/W and a very high specific power of 72.5 W/Kg. At these powers the cooler still maintains large stroke, thermal and current margins. In this paper we will present the measured data and the changes to this flight proven cooler that were made to achieve this increased performance.

  14. Small high cooling power space cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. V.; Raab, J.; Durand, D.; Tward, E.

    2014-01-01

    The small High Efficiency pulse tube Cooler (HEC) cooler, that has been produced and flown on a number of space infrared instruments, was originally designed to provide cooling of 10 W @ 95 K. It achieved its goal with >50% margin when limited by the 180 W output ac power of its flight electronics. It has also been produced in 2 stage configurations, typically for simultaneously cooling of focal planes to temperatures as low as 35 K and optics at higher temperatures. The need for even higher cooling power in such a low mass cryocooler is motivated by the advent of large focal plane arrays. With the current availability at NGAS of much larger power cryocooler flight electronics, reliable long term operation in space with much larger cooling powers is now possible with the flight proven 4 kg HEC mechanical cooler. Even though the single stage cooler design can be re-qualified for those larger input powers without design change, we redesigned both the linear and coaxial version passive pulse tube cold heads to re-optimize them for high power cooling at temperatures above 130 K while rejecting heat to 300 K. Small changes to the regenerator packing, the re-optimization of the tuned inertance and no change to the compressor resulted in the increased performance at 150 K. The cooler operating at 290 W input power achieves 35 W@ 150 K corresponding to a specific cooling power at 150 K of 8.25 W/W and a very high specific power of 72.5 W/Kg. At these powers the cooler still maintains large stroke, thermal and current margins. In this paper we will present the measured data and the changes to this flight proven cooler that were made to achieve this increased performance.

  15. Silver based batteries for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpinski, A. P.; Russell, S. J.; Serenyi, J. R.; Murphy, J. P.

    The present status of silver oxide-zinc technology and applications has been described by Karpinski et al. [A.P. Karpinski, B. Makovetski, S.J. Russell, J.R. Serenyi, D.C. Williams, Silver-Zinc: status of technology and applications, Journal of Power Sources, 80 (1999) 53-60], where the silver-zinc couple is still the preferred choice where high specific energy/energy density, coupled with high specific power/power density are important for high-rate, weight or size/configuration sensitive applications. Perhaps the silver oxide cathode can be considered one of the most versatile electrode materials. When coupled with other anodes and corresponding electrolyte management system, the silver electrode provides for a wide array of electrochemical systems that can be tailored to meet the most demanding, high power requirements. Besides zinc, the most notable include cadmium, iron, metal hydride, and hydrogen electrode for secondary systems, while primary systems include lithium and aluminum. Alloys including silver are also available, such as silver chloride, which when coupled with magnesium or aluminum are primarily used in many seawater applications. The selection and use of these couples is normally the result of a trade-off of many factors. These include performance, safety, risk, reliability, and cost. When high power is required, silver oxide-zinc, silver oxide-aluminum, and silver oxide-lithium are the most energetic. For moderate performance (i.e., lower power), silver oxide-zinc or silver-cadmium would be the system of choice. This paper summarizes the suitability of the silver-based couples, with an emphasis on the silver-zinc system, as primary or rechargeable power sources for high energy/power applications.

  16. Technology for satellite power conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, D. P.; Gouker, M. A.; Summers, C.; Gallagher, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for satellite electromagnetic energy transfer and power conversion at millimeter and infrared wavelengths are discussed. The design requirements for rectenna receiving elements are reviewed for both coherent radiation sources and Earth thermal infrared emission. Potential power transmitters including gyrotrons, free electron lasers, and CO2 lasers are assessed along with the rectification properties of metal-oxide metal diode power converters.

  17. High-Power, High-Temperature Superconductor Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.

    2005-01-01

    Since the first discovery of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) 10 years ago, the most promising areas for their applications in microwave systems have been as passive components for communication systems. Soon after the discovery, experiments showed that passive microwave circuits made from HTS material exceeded the performance of conventional devices for low-power applications and could be 10 times as small or smaller. However, for superconducting microwave components, high-power microwave applications have remained elusive until now. In 1996, DuPont and Com Dev Ltd. developed high-power superconducting materials and components for communication applications under a NASA Lewis Research Center cooperative agreement, NCC3-344 "High Power High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) Technology Development." The agreement was cost shared between the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Technology Reinvestment Program Office and the two industrial partners. It has the following objectives: 1) Material development and characterization for high-power HTS applications; 2) Development and validation of generic high-power microwave components; 3) Development of a proof-of-concept model for a high-power six-channel HTS output multiplexer.

  18. Development program for a 200-kW, CW gyrotron. Quarterly report No. 5, July-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Tancredi, J.J.; Caplan, M.; Adler, E.A.; Sandoval, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    During this report period, the electrical design of the CW tube was completed. The mechanical design of a collector, capable of providing diagnostic data of the spent beam in S/N 1 was completed. Cold tests of variations of a scaled, X-band cavity were correlated with the calculated results of a cavity computer code. Parts for the magnetron injection gun were placed on order and gun tooling was designed. A subcontract was placed for a superconducting solenoid. A 3 MW power supply was dismantled, packaged and shipped from the Kwajalein Missile Range to storage at Hughes, for use in CW testing at a later date. During the latter part of this report period, a specific interim goal was imposed by ORNL, to provide for a demonstration of a 200 kW, 60 GHz gyrotron capable of 100 ms pulses, by December 31, 1981. The imposition of this interim goal has led to establishing a modified gyrotron design, based on a considerably smaller collector than that required for a CW tube.

  19. Tapered fiber based high power random laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanwei; Du, Xueyuan; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Xu, Xiaojun

    2016-04-18

    We propose a novel high power random fiber laser (RFL) based on tapered fiber. It can overcome the power scaling limitation of RFL while maintaining good beam quality to a certain extent. An output power of 26.5 W has been achieved in a half-open cavity with one kilometer long tapered fiber whose core diameter gradually changes from 8 μm to 20 μm. The steady-state light propagation equations have been modified by taking into account the effective core area to demonstrate the tapered RFL through numerical calculations. The numerical model effectively describes the power characteristics of the tapered fiber based RFL, and both the calculating and experimental results show higher power exporting potential compared with the conventional single mode RFL. PMID:27137338

  20. New applications for high average power beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neau, E. L.; Turman, B. N.; Patterson, E. L.

    1993-06-01

    The technology base formed by the development of high peak power simulators, laser drivers, FEL's, and ICF drivers from the early 60's through the late 80's is being extended to high average power short-pulse machines with the capabilities of supporting new types of manufacturing processes and performing new roles in environmental cleanup applications. This paper discusses a process for identifying and developing possible commercial applications, specifically those requiring very high average power levels of hundreds of kilowatts to perhaps megawatts. The authors discuss specific technology requirements and give examples of application development efforts. The application development work is directed at areas that can possibly benefit from the high specific energies attainable with short pulse machines.

  1. CLIC RF High Power Production Testing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Syratchev, I.; Riddone, G.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    The CLIC Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) is a passive microwave device in which bunches of the drive beam interact with the impedance of the periodically loaded waveguide and generate RF power for the main linac accelerating structure. The demands on the high power production ({approx} 150 MW) and the needs to transport the 100 A drive beam for about 1 km without losses, makes the PETS design rather unique and the operation very challenging. In the coming year, an intense PETS testing program will be implemented. The target is to demonstrate the full performance of the PETS operation. The testing program overview and test results available to date are presented.

  2. A high-power xenon dimer excilamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomaev, M. I.; Skakun, V. S.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shitts, D. V.

    2006-06-01

    A high-power sealed-off excilamp operating on xenon dimers excited by a barrier discharge and emitting in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range (λ ˜ 172 nm) has been designed, constructed, and tested. The lamp comprises six quartz tubes (emitters) and has a total radiating surface area of 20 × 20 = 400 cm2. The average output power density radiated from the surface of each emitter exceeds 120 mW/cm2. The total output power of the excilamp immediately upon discharge ignition exceeds 50 W.

  3. High Flux Isotope Reactor power upgrade status

    SciTech Connect

    Rothrock, R.B.; Hale, R.E.; Cheverton, R.D.

    1997-03-01

    A return to 100-MW operation is being planned for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Recent improvements in fuel element manufacturing procedures and inspection equipment will be exploited to reduce hot spot and hot streak factors sufficiently to permit the power upgrade without an increase in primary coolant pressure. Fresh fuel elements already fabricated for future use are being evaluated individually for power upgrade potential based on their measured coolant channel dimensions.

  4. Advances in industrial high-power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlueter, Holger

    2005-03-01

    Four major types of laser sources are used for material processing. Excluding Excimer lasers, this paper focuses on advances in High Power CO2 lasers, Solid State Lasers and Diode Lasers. Because of their unrivaled cost to brightness relationship the fast axial flow CO2 laser remains unrivaled for flat-sheet laser cutting. Adding approximately a kW of output power ever four years, this laser type has been propelling the entire sheet metal fabrication industry for the last two decades. Very robust, diffusion cooled annular discharge CO2 lasers with 2kW output power have enabled robot mounted lasers for 3D applications. Solid State Lasers are chosen mainly because of the option of fiber delivery. Industrial applications still rely on lamp-pumped Nd:YAG lasers with guaranteed output powers of 4.5 kW at the workpiece. The introduction of the diode pumped Thin Disc Laser 4.5 kW laser enables new applications such as the Programmable Focus Optics. Pumping the Thin Disc Laser requires highly reliable High Power Diode Lasers. The necessary reliability can only be achieved in a modern, automated semiconductor manufacturing facility. For Diode Lasers, electro-optical efficiencies above 65% are as important as the passivation of the facets to avoid Burn-In power degradation.

  5. Optimizing the design of very high power, high performance converters

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R J; Tiagha, E A; Ganetis, G; Nawrocky, R J

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes how various technologies are used to achieve the desired performance in a high current magnet power converter system. It is hoped that the discussions of the design approaches taken will be applicable to other power supply systems where stringent requirements in stability, accuracy and reliability must be met.

  6. Review of High Power Pulse Transformer Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Tan, Xiaohua

    Vacuum devices generally work under high power pulse voltage of order 103 V to 106 V, and this pulse voltage could be generated by high power pulse transformer. Relatively, pulse transformer has the advantages of compact structure and excellent repetitiveness. It is expected of short rise-time, wide pulse-width and high energy transferring efficiency in most applications. Aiming at this purpose, it is feasible to select magnetic core with high permeability and high saturation magnetic flux density, use closed core and take some special measures to diminish leakage inductance in the making-process. This paper is a brief summary of high power pulse transformer design. In this paper, the principle, types and characteristics specification of high power pulse transformer are presented, and the design methods of electrical, magnetic and structure parameters are summarized. The methods of shortening rise time, diminishing droop and expanding output pulse-width (electrical parameter design), testing magnetic core materials (magnetic parameter design) and minimizing leakage inductance (structure parameter design) are emphasized.

  7. High power diode laser Master Oscillator-Power Amplifier (MOPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, John R.; Mouroulis, P.; Wicks, G.

    1994-01-01

    High power multiple quantum well AlGaAs diode laser master oscillator - power amplifier (MOPA) systems were examined both experimentally and theoretically. For two pass operation, it was found that powers in excess of 0.3 W per 100 micrometers of facet length were achievable while maintaining diffraction-limited beam quality. Internal electrical-to-optical conversion efficiencies as high as 25 percent were observed at an internal amplifier gain of 9 dB. Theoretical modeling of multiple quantum well amplifiers was done using appropriate rate equations and a heuristic model of the carrier density dependent gain. The model gave a qualitative agreement with the experimental results. In addition, the model allowed exploration of a wider design space for the amplifiers. The model predicted that internal electrical-to-optical conversion efficiencies in excess of 50 percent should be achievable with careful system design. The model predicted that no global optimum design exists, but gain, efficiency, and optical confinement (coupling efficiency) can be mutually adjusted to meet a specific system requirement. A three quantum well, low optical confinement amplifier was fabricated using molecular beam epitaxial growth. Coherent beam combining of two high power amplifiers injected from a common master oscillator was also examined. Coherent beam combining with an efficiency of 93 percent resulted in a single beam having diffraction-limited characteristics. This beam combining efficiency is a world record result for such a system. Interferometric observations of the output of the amplifier indicated that spatial mode matching was a significant factor in the less than perfect beam combining. Finally, the system issues of arrays of amplifiers in a coherent beam combining system were investigated. Based upon experimentally observed parameters coherent beam combining could result in a megawatt-scale coherent beam with a 10 percent electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency.

  8. The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Boyce

    2006-01-01

    Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

  9. High power infrared QCLs: advances and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2012-01-01

    QCLs are becoming the most important sources of laser radiation in the midwave infrared (MWIR) and longwave infrared (LWIR) regions because of their size, weight, power and reliability advantages over other laser sources in the same spectral regions. The availability of multiwatt RT operation QCLs from 3.5 μm to >16 μm with wall plug efficiency of 10% or higher is hastening the replacement of traditional sources such as OPOs and OPSELs in many applications. QCLs can replace CO2 lasers in many low power applications. Of the two leading groups in improvements in QCL performance, Pranalytica is the commercial organization that has been supplying the highest performance QCLs to various customers for over four year. Using a new QCL design concept, the non-resonant extraction [1], we have achieved CW/RT power of >4.7 W and WPE of >17% in the 4.4 μm - 5.0 μm region. In the LWIR region, we have recently demonstrated QCLs with CW/RT power exceeding 1 W with WPE of nearly 10 % in the 7.0 μm-10.0 μm region. In general, the high power CW/RT operation requires use of TECs to maintain QCLs at appropriate operating temperatures. However, TECs consume additional electrical power, which is not desirable for handheld, battery-operated applications, where system power conversion efficiency is more important than just the QCL chip level power conversion efficiency. In high duty cycle pulsed (quasi-CW) mode, the QCLs can be operated without TECs and have produced nearly the same average power as that available in CW mode with TECs. Multiwatt average powers are obtained even in ambient T>70°C, with true efficiency of electrical power-to-optical power conversion being above 10%. Because of the availability of QCLs with multiwatt power outputs and wavelength range covering a spectral region from ~3.5 μm to >16 μm, the QCLs have found instantaneous acceptance for insertion into multitude of defense and homeland security applications, including laser sources for infrared

  10. The NASA CSTI High Capacity Power Program

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil applications. During 1986 and 1987, the NASA Advanced Technology Program was responsible for maintaining the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In 1988, the NASA Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA advanced technology project, and provides a bridge to the NASA exploration technology programs. The elements of CSTI high capacity power development include conversion systems - Stirling and thermoelectric, thermal management, power management, system diagnostics, and environmental interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to provide the growth capability, high reliability and 7 to 10 years lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems while minimizing the impact of day/night operation as well as attitudes and distance from the Sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the program elements will be discussed, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

  11. High-Performance Power-Semiconductor Packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, David; Hansen, Irving; Berman, Albert

    1989-01-01

    A 600-V, 50-A transistor and 1,200-V, 50-A diode in rugged, compact, lightweight packages intended for use in inverter-type power supplies having switching frequencies up to 20 kHz. Packages provide low-inductance connections, low loss, electrical isolation, and long-life hermetic seal. Low inductance achieved by making all electrical connections to each package on same plane. Also reduces high-frequency losses by reducing coupling into inherent shorted turns in packaging material around conductor axes. Stranded internal power conductors aid conduction at high frequencies, where skin effect predominates. Design of packages solves historical problem of separation of electrical interface from thermal interface of high-power semiconductor device.

  12. Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen-Tuong, V.; Dylla, H.F. III

    1997-11-04

    An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost. 5 figs.

  13. Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen-Tuong, Viet; Dylla, III, Henry Frederick

    1997-01-01

    An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost.

  14. High-frequency-link based power electronics in power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sree, Hari

    Power quality has become a serious concern to many utility customers in recent times. Among the many power quality problems, voltage sags are one of the most common and most mischievous, affecting industrial and commercial customers. They are primarily caused by power system faults at the transmission and distribution level, and thus, are mostly unavoidable. Their effect depends on the equipment sensitivities to the magnitude and duration of these sags and each can cost an industry up to few million dollars. To counter these limitations, many solutions at the customer end have been proposed which include Constant Voltage Transformers (CVT's), UPS and line frequency transformer based Dynamic Voltage Restorer (DVR). These approaches have their respective limitations with regard to capabilities, size and cost. This research proposes a new approach to mitigating these voltage sags involving the use of high frequency transformer link. Suitable switching logic and control strategies have been implemented. The proposed approach in a one-phase application is verified with computer simulations and by a hardware proof-of-concept prototype. Application to three-phase system is verified through simulations. Application of high frequency transformers in other utility applications such as active filters and static compensators is also looked at.

  15. Extension of high Te regime with upgraded electron cyclotron resonance heating system in the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Mutoh, T.; Nagaoka, K.; Murakami, S.; Osakabe, M.; Yamada, I.; Nakano, H.; Yokoyama, M.; Ido, T.; Shimizu, A.; Seki, R.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Kariya, T.; Minami, R.; Imai, T.; Marushchenko, N. B.; Turkin, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Enhancement of the output power per gyrotron has been planned in the Large Helical Device (LHD). Three 77-GHz gyrotrons with an output power of more than 1 MW have been operated. In addition, a high power gyrotron with the frequency of 154 GHz (1 MW/5 s, 0.5 MW/CW) was newly installed in 2012, and the total injection power of Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) reached 4.6 MW. The operational regime of ECRH plasma on the LHD has been extended due to the upgraded ECRH system such as the central electron temperature of 13.5 keV with the line-averaged electron density ne_fir = 1 × 1019 m-3. The electron thermal confinement clearly improved inside the electron internal transport barrier, and the electron thermal diffusivity reached neoclassical level. The global energy confinement time increased with increase of ne_fir. The plasma stored energy of 530 kJ with ne_fir = 3.2 × 1019 m-3, which is 1.7 times larger than the previous record in the ECRH plasma in the LHD, has been successfully achieved.

  16. Extension of high T{sub e} regime with upgraded electron cyclotron resonance heating system in the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H. Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Mutoh, T.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Yamada, I.; Nakano, H.; Yokoyama, M.; Ido, T.; Shimizu, A.; Seki, R.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; and others

    2014-06-15

    Enhancement of the output power per gyrotron has been planned in the Large Helical Device (LHD). Three 77-GHz gyrotrons with an output power of more than 1 MW have been operated. In addition, a high power gyrotron with the frequency of 154 GHz (1 MW/5 s, 0.5 MW/CW) was newly installed in 2012, and the total injection power of Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) reached 4.6 MW. The operational regime of ECRH plasma on the LHD has been extended due to the upgraded ECRH system such as the central electron temperature of 13.5 keV with the line-averaged electron density n{sub e-fir} = 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. The electron thermal confinement clearly improved inside the electron internal transport barrier, and the electron thermal diffusivity reached neoclassical level. The global energy confinement time increased with increase of n{sub e-fir}. The plasma stored energy of 530 kJ with n{sub e-fir} = 3.2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, which is 1.7 times larger than the previous record in the ECRH plasma in the LHD, has been successfully achieved.

  17. Technology development for high power induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1985-06-11

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

  18. High voltage solar cell power generating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, E., Jr.; Opjorden, R. W.; Hoffman, A. C.

    1974-01-01

    A laboratory solar power system regulated by on-panel switches has been delivered for operating high power (3 kW), high voltage (15,000 volt) loads (communication tubes, ion thrusters). The modular system consists of 26 solar arrays, each with an integral light source and cooling system. A typical array contains 2,560 series-connected cells. Each light source consists of twenty 500-watt tungsten iodide lamps providing plus or minus 5 percent uniformity at one solar constant. An array temperature of less than 40 C is achieved using an infrared filter, a water-cooled plate, a vacuum hold-down system, and air flushing.

  19. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  20. E3000 High Power SADM development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamford, Steve G.; McMahon, Paul

    2003-09-01

    Astrium UK has been actively involved in the study, design, development, manufacture and test of Solar Array Drive Mechanisms (SADMs) and Bearing and Power Transfer Assemblies (BAPTAs) since the early 1970s having delivered 105 of these mechanisms to 22 spacecraft programs. As a result Astrium UK has accumulated in excess of 700 years of failure free SADM operation in-orbit. During that period power transfer requirements have grown steadily from below 1kW to 9.9kW and beyond. With this increase in power handling capability comes the associated problem of handling and dissipating the heat being generated within the SADM. The Eurostar 2000 family of SADMs were designed to handle up to 5.6kW for the E2000 family of spacecraft but the High Power SADM was conceived to meet the needs of the much bigger Eurostar 3000 family of spacecraft that could potentially grow to 15kW.

  1. High efficiency low cost solar cell power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.; Blocker, W.

    1978-01-01

    A concept for generating high-efficiency, low-cost, solar-cell power is outlined with reference to solar cell parameters, optical concentrators, and thermal control procedures. A design for a 12.5-kw power module for space operation is discussed noting the optical system, spectrum splitter, light conversion system, cell cooling, power conditioner, and tracking mechanism. It is found that for an unconcentrated array, efficiency approaches 60% when ten or more bandgaps are used. For a 12-band system, a computer program distributed bandgaps for maximum efficiency and equal cell currents. Rigid materials and thin films have been proposed for optical components and prisms, gratings, and dichroic mirrors have been recommended for spectrum splitting. Various radiator concepts are noted including that of Weatherston and Smith (1960) and Hedgepeth and Knapp (1978). The concept may be suitable for the Solar Power Satellite.

  2. Ionospheric Stimulation By High Power Radio Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, S.; Nishino, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Sato, S.; Tanikawa, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Wong, A. Y.

    1999-01-01

    We have performed an experiment to artificially stimulate the ionosphere using higher power radio waves at the HIPAS (High Power Auroral Stimulation) facility in Alaska. A radio transmission of 2.85 MHz was made at 80 MW (ERP). Diagnostics were made at the other site located 35 km from the transmission site. The results of cross-correlating the excited HF wave and observed with an 8 channel, 30 MHz scanning cosmic radio noise absorption records revealed the excited height of 90 km. Also atmospheric pressure waves observed on the ground show evident propagation of pressure waves which are generated in the ionosphere by the high-power HF wave. The results determine the excitation height of 90 km in the ionosphere and show evidence of the pressure wave coupling between the ionosphere and the lower atmosphere for periods of 10 min

  3. Power Budget Analysis for High Altitude Airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Elliott, James R.; King, Glen C.

    2006-01-01

    The High Altitude Airship (HAA) has various potential applications and mission scenarios that require onboard energy harvesting and power distribution systems. The energy source considered for the HAA s power budget is solar photon energy that allows the use of either photovoltaic (PV) cells or advanced thermoelectric (ATE) converters. Both PV cells and an ATE system utilizing high performance thermoelectric materials were briefly compared to identify the advantages of ATE for HAA applications in this study. The ATE can generate a higher quantity of harvested energy than PV cells by utilizing the cascaded efficiency of a three-staged ATE in a tandem mode configuration. Assuming that each stage of ATE material has the figure of merit of 5, the cascaded efficiency of a three-staged ATE system approaches the overall conversion efficiency greater than 60%. Based on this estimated efficiency, the configuration of a HAA and the power utility modules are defined.

  4. High-average-power exciplex laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentis, M.

    The LUX high-average-power high-PRF exciplex laser (EL) system being developed at the Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Marseille is characterized, and some preliminary results are presented. The fundamental principles and design criteria of ELs are reviewed, and the LUX components are described and illustrated, including a closed-circuit subsonic wind tunnel and a 100-kW-average power 1-kHz-PRF power pulser providing avalanche-discharge preionization by either an electron beam or an X-ray beam. Laser energy of 50 mJ has been obtained at wavelength 308 nm in the electron-beam mode (14.5 kV) using a 5300/190/10 mixture of Ne/Xe/HCl at pressure 1 bar.

  5. Low-voltage harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling-wave amplifier in G band

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y. S.; Guo, Y. W.; Kao, B. H.; Chen, C. H.; Wang, Z. W.; Hung, C. L.; Chang, T. H.

    2015-12-15

    Harmonic multiplying operation in a gyrotron traveling-wave amplifier (gyro-TWA) permits for magnetic field reduction and frequency multiplication. Lowering a beam voltage is an important step toward miniaturization of a harmonic multiplying gyro-TWA. However, the additional degree of freedom that is provided by the multitude cyclotron harmonics in a low-voltage harmonic multiplying gyro-TWA still easily generates various competing modes. An improved mode-selective circuit, using circular waveguides with various radii, can provide the rejection points within the frequency range to suppress competing modes. Simulated results reveal that the mode-selective circuit can provide an attenuation of more than 14 dB to suppress the competing modes. Furthermore, the performance of the gyro-TWA is analyzed for studying the sensitivity of the saturated output power and full width at half maximum bandwidth of the gyro-TWA to the beam voltage and the magnetic field. A stable low-voltage harmonic multiplying gyro-TWA with the mode-selective circuit is predicted to yield a peak output power of 24 kW at 200.4 GHz, corresponding to a saturated gain of 56 dB at an interaction efficiency of 20%. The full width at half maximum bandwidth is 3.0 GHz.

  6. Mechanisms of amplification of ultrashort electromagnetic pulses in gyrotron traveling wave tube with helically corrugated waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Sergeev, A. S.; Zaslavsky, V. Yu.; Zheleznov, I. V.; Samsonov, S. V.; Mishakin, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    A time-domain self consistent theory of a gyrotron traveling wave tube with a helically corrugated operating waveguide has been developed. Based on this model, the process of short pulse amplification was studied in regimes of grazing and intersection of the dispersion curves of the electromagnetic wave and the electron beam. In the first case, the possibility of amplification without pulse form distortion was demonstrated for the pulse spectrum width of the order of the gain bandwidth. In the second case, when the electrons' axial velocity was smaller than the wave's group velocity, it was shown that the slippage of the incident signal with respect to the electron beam provides feeding of the signal by "fresh" electrons without initial modulation. As a result, the amplitude of the output pulse can exceed the amplitude of its saturated value for the case of the grazing regime, and, for optimal parameters, the peak output power can be even larger than the kinetic power of the electron beam.

  7. Mechanisms of amplification of ultrashort electromagnetic pulses in gyrotron traveling wave tube with helically corrugated waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, N. S. Zaslavsky, V. Yu.; Zotova, I. V.; Sergeev, A. S.; Zheleznov, I. V.; Samsonov, S. V.; Mishakin, S. V.

    2015-11-15

    A time-domain self consistent theory of a gyrotron traveling wave tube with a helically corrugated operating waveguide has been developed. Based on this model, the process of short pulse amplification was studied in regimes of grazing and intersection of the dispersion curves of the electromagnetic wave and the electron beam. In the first case, the possibility of amplification without pulse form distortion was demonstrated for the pulse spectrum width of the order of the gain bandwidth. In the second case, when the electrons' axial velocity was smaller than the wave's group velocity, it was shown that the slippage of the incident signal with respect to the electron beam provides feeding of the signal by “fresh” electrons without initial modulation. As a result, the amplitude of the output pulse can exceed the amplitude of its saturated value for the case of the grazing regime, and, for optimal parameters, the peak output power can be even larger than the kinetic power of the electron beam.

  8. Continuous high-power gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.

    1979-01-01

    High power gas laser concepts are discussed with emphasis on the role that fluid mechanics has played in their development. Consideration is given to three types of systems: gasdynamic lasers, HF supersonic diffusion lasers, and electric discharge lasers. Flow effects and aerodynamic windows in such lasers are briefly described. Future directions of research are outlined.

  9. CHALLENGES FACING HIGH POWER PROTON ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the challenges of high power proton accelerators such as SNS, J-PARC, etc., and what we have learned from recent experiences. Beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate beam loss will also be discussed.

  10. Targets for high power neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.

    1980-01-01

    Stopping high-power, long-pulse beams is fast becoming an engineering challenge, particularly in neutral beam injectors for heating magnetically confined plasmas. A brief review of neutral beam target technology is presented along with heat transfer calculations for some selected target designs.

  11. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR HIGH POWER HADRON BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will describe developments in the beam diagnostics which support the understanding and operation of high power hadron accelerators. These include the measurement of large dynamic range transverse and longitudinal beam profiles, beam loss detection, and non-interceptive diagnostics.

  12. Gyrotron beam generation with helical magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. H.; Sedlak, C. A.

    1983-08-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation into the basic properties of a new type of electron gun for generating high transverse velocity beams, the bifilar helix - Pierce gun or H-gun. The H-gun differs significantly from presently used magnetron injection guns (MIGs) in that first a laminar, low transverse velocity beam is formed and then transverse velocity is imparted by propagating the beam through the magnetic field of a bifilar helix. In order to evaluate the H-gun, an analytic and computational study was conducted to examine the relationships between the magnetic fields (axial and helical), and the beam properties after existing the helical field. The effects of the helix field entrance profile, the helix-axial field gyroresonance, and helix field gradients have been taken into account in the investigation. Based on the results of this research, conditions have been specified which will produce a high transverse velocity beam with low axial velocity spread. In particular, it has been found that an adiabatic helix entrance profile can provide a flexible means of generating high quality beams for gyro-devices.

  13. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  14. High power Ka band TWT amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Golkowski, C.; Ivers, J.D.; Nation, J.A.; Wang, P.; Schachter, L.

    1999-07-01

    Two high power 35 GHz TWT amplifiers driven by a relativistic pencil, 850 kV, 200A electron beam have been assembled and tested. The first had a dielectric slow wave structure and was primarily used to develop diagnostics, and to gain experience in working with high power systems in Ka band. The source of the input power for the amplifier was a magnetron producing a 30 kW, 200ns long pulse of which 10 kW as delivered to the experiment. The 30 cm long dielectric (Teflon) amplifier produced output power levels of about 1 MW with a gain of about 23 dB. These results are consistent with expectations from PIC code simulations for this arrangement. The second amplifier, which is a single stage disk loaded slow wave structure, has been designed. It consists of one hundred uniform cells with two sets of ten tapered calls at the ends to lower the reflection coefficient. The phase advance per cell is {pi}/2. The amplifier passband extends from 28 to 40 GHz. It is designed to increase the output power to about 20 MW. The amplifier is in construction and will be tested in the near future. Details of the design of both systems will be provided and initial results from the new amplifier presented.

  15. Structural and Microwave Properties of Silica Xerogel Glass-Ceramic Sintered by Sub-millimeter Wave Heating using a Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aripin, H.; Mitsudo, S.; Prima, E. S.; Sudiana, I. N.; Tani, S.; Sako, K.; Fujii, Y.; Saito, T.; Idehara, T.; Sano, S.; Sunendar, B.; Sabchevski, S.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we present and discuss experimental results from a microwave sintering of silica glass-ceramics, produced from amorphous silica xerogel extracted from sago waste ash. As a radiation source for a microwave heating a sub-millimeter wave gyrotron (Gyrotron FU CW I) with an output frequency of 300 GHz has been used. The powders of the amorphous silica xerogel have been dry pressed and then sintered at temperatures ranging from 300 °C to 1200 °C. Microwave absorbing properties of the sintered samples were investigated by measuring the dielectric constant, the dielectric loss, and the reflection loss at different frequencies in the interval from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. Furthermore, the characteristics of the formation process for producing silica glass-ceramics were studied using a Raman Spectroscopy and a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that the samples sintered at 1200 °C are characterized by lower reflection losses and a better transparency due to the formation of a fully crystallized silica glass- ceramic at sufficiently high temperature.

  16. Design Studies on Gyrotron for ECRH in KSTAR^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Saeyoung; Huh, Jin Woo; Kim, Hyoung Suk; Lee, Myoung-Jae; Song, Ho Young

    1996-11-01

    Korean National Fusion Project has started to carry out tokamak physics experiment for the Korean Superconducting Tokamak Research (KSTAR). Its current plan is scheduled to build the superconducting research reactor by the year 2002. Initial design parameters are of the major radius between 1.6 and 2.0 m and the minor radius between 0.5 and 1.0 m with plasma current between 2.0 and 5.0 MA. The toroidal field at the plasma center is about 4 tesla. Institute for Advanced Engineering (IAE) will concentrate on design studies of ECRH and gyrotron component development. Some detail plans will be presented. * Work supported by KBSI and KAERI. On leave at Ajou Univ. from NRL.

  17. Gain/bandwidth predictions for travelling-wave gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, A. J.

    1980-10-01

    Small signal gain computations based on a Pierce description of the traveling-wave gyrotron have been performed for cases involving beam voltages in the range 70-300 kV. Interactions at both the first and the second harmonics of the cyclotron resonance frequency have been considered in order to identify a range of operating parameters for the gyro-traveling-wave amplifier configuration which will potentially produce gain and bandwidth figures of significance to radar and communication systems operating at millimeter-wave frequencies. It is shown that when operated fundamentally and well away from cutoff, the gyro-traveling-wave amplifier can be magnetically tuned over a wide frequency range, with instantaneous bandwidths in the range 4-8% depending on the beam voltage; at voltages in excess of 200 kV, instantaneous bandwidths approaching 10% can be achieved.

  18. Stepwise frequency tuning of a gyrotron backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.H.; Chen, S.H.

    2005-01-01

    The gyrotron backward-wave oscillator (gyro-BWO) features broadband tunability, but ragged tuning curves are frequently observed experimentally. Accordingly, a Ka-band gyro-BWO experiment with external circuit mismatch was conducted to examine its tuning properties at two reflected strengths: one is slightly mismatched (15 dB reflection) and the other can be categorized as matched (30 dB reflection). Stepwise frequency tunings by varying the magnetic field, the beam voltage, and the beam current were observed under mismatched conditions. A self-locking model was introduced using the concept of injection-locking, where the output and reinjected signals tend to form a stable phase relation, favoring certain discrete oscillation frequencies. The observed frequencies agree closely with the calculated frequencies. Smooth tuning curves were also obtained, revealing a remedy for the stepwise tuning of a gyro-BWO.

  19. High-Power, High-Thrust Ion Thruster (HPHTion)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Peter Y.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in high-power photovoltaic technology have enabled the possibility of reasonably sized, high-specific power solar arrays. At high specific powers, power levels ranging from 50 to several hundred kilowatts are feasible. Ion thrusters offer long life and overall high efficiency (typically greater than 70 percent efficiency). In Phase I, the team at ElectroDynamic Applications, Inc., built a 25-kW, 50-cm ion thruster discharge chamber and fabricated a laboratory model. This was in response to the need for a single, high-powered engine to fill the gulf between the 7-kW NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) system and a notional 25-kW engine. The Phase II project matured the laboratory model into a protoengineering model ion thruster. This involved the evolution of the discharge chamber to a high-performance thruster by performance testing and characterization via simulated and full beam extraction testing. Through such testing, the team optimized the design and built a protoengineering model thruster. Coupled with gridded ion thruster technology, this technology can enable a wide range of missions, including ambitious near-Earth NASA missions, Department of Defense missions, and commercial satellite activities.

  20. High power bipolar lead-acid batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, Gerald; Attia, Alan

    1991-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), with interest in advanced energy storage systems, is involved in the development of a unique lead acid battery design. This battery utilizes the same combination of lead and lead dioxide active materials present in the automobile starting battery. However, it can provide 2 to 10 times the power while minimizing volume and weight. The typical starting battery is described as a monopolar type using one current collector for both the positive and negative plate of adjacent cells. Specific power as high as 2.5 kW/kg was projected for 30 second periods with as many as 2000 recharge cycles.

  1. Scaling blackbody laser to high powers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Lasers pumped by solar heated blackbody cavities have potential for multimegawatt power beaming in space. There are two basic types of blackbody lasers; cavity pumped and transfer system. The transfer system is judged to be more readily scalable to high power. In this system, either N2 or CO is heated by the blackbody cavity then transferred into the laser cavity where CO2 is injected. The N2-CO2 system was demonstrated, but probably has lower efficiency than the CO-CO system. The characteristics of potential transfer laser systems are outlined.

  2. High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier (HEMPA) Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. Herbert

    2004-01-01

    This paper will focus on developing an exotic switching technique that enhances the DC-to-RF conversion efficiency of microwave power amplifiers. For years, switching techniques implemented in the 10 kHz to 30 MHz region have resulted in DC-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 90-95-percent. Currently amplifier conversion efficiency, in the 2-3 GHz region approaches, 10-20-percent. Using a combination of analytical modeling and hardware testing, a High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier was built that demonstrated conversion efficiencies four to five times higher than current state of the art.

  3. High Power MPD Thruster Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Strzempkowski, Eugene; Pencil, Eric

    2004-01-01

    High power magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters are being developed as cost effective propulsion systems for cargo transport to lunar and Mars bases, crewed missions to Mars and the outer planets, and robotic deep space exploration missions. Electromagnetic MPD thrusters have demonstrated, at the laboratory level, the ability to process megawatts of electrical power while providing significantly higher thrust densities than electrostatic electric propulsion systems. The ability to generate higher thrust densities permits a reduction in the number of thrusters required to perform a given mission, and alleviates the system complexity associated with multiple thruster arrays. The specific impulse of an MPD thruster can be optimized to meet given mission requirements, from a few thousand seconds with heavier gas propellants up to 10,000 seconds with hydrogen propellant. In support of programs envisioned by the NASA Office of Exploration Systems, Glenn Research Center is developing and testing quasi-steady MW-class MPD thrusters as a prelude to steady state high power thruster tests. This paper provides an overview of the GRC high power pulsed thruster test facility, and presents preliminary performance data for a quasi-steady baseline MPD thruster geometry.

  4. High-power, high-intensity laser propagation and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, Phillip; Hafizi, Bahman

    2014-05-15

    This paper presents overviews of a number of processes and applications associated with high-power, high-intensity lasers, and their interactions. These processes and applications include: free electron lasers, backward Raman amplification, atmospheric propagation of laser pulses, laser driven acceleration, atmospheric lasing, and remote detection of radioactivity. The interrelated physical mechanisms in the various processes are discussed.

  5. MULTIPULSE - high resolution and high power in one TDEM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tianyou; Hodges, Greg; Miles, Philip

    2015-09-01

    An airborne time domain electromagnetic (TEM) system with high resolution and great depth of exploration is desired for geological mapping as well as for mineral exploration. The MULTIPULSE technology enables an airborne TEM system to transmit a high power pulse (a half-sine, for instance) and one or multiple low power pulse(s) (trapezoid or square) within a half-cycle. The high power pulse ensures good depth of exploration and the low power pulse allows a fast transmitter current turn off and earlier off-time measurement thus providing higher frequency signals, which allows higher near-surface resolution and better sensitivity to weak conductors. The power spectrum of the MULTIPULSE waveform comprising a half-sine and a trapezoid pulse clearly shows increased power in the higher frequency range (> ~2.3 kHz) compared to that of a single half-sine waveform. The addition of the low power trapezoid pulse extends the range of the sensitivity 10-fold towards the weak conductors, expanding the geological conductivity range of a system and increasing the scope of its applications. The MULTIPULSE technology can be applied to standard single-pulse airborne TEM systems on both helicopter and fixed-wing. We field tested the HELITEM MULTIPULSE system over a wire-loop in Iroquois Falls, demonstrating the different sensitivity of the high and low power pulses to the overburden and the wire-loop. We also tested both HELITEM and GEOTEM MULTIPULSE systems over a layered oil sand geologic setting in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada. The results show comparable shallow geologic resolution of the MULTIPULSE to that of the RESOLVE system while maintaining superior depth of exploration, confirming the increased geological conductivity range of a system employing MULTIPULSE compared to the standard single-pulse systems.

  6. High average power linear induction accelerator development

    SciTech Connect

    Bayless, J.R.; Adler, R.J.

    1987-07-01

    There is increasing interest in linear induction accelerators (LIAs) for applications including free electron lasers, high power microwave generators and other types of radiation sources. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed LIA technology in combination with magnetic pulse compression techniques to achieve very impressive performance levels. In this paper we will briefly discuss the LIA concept and describe our development program. Our goals are to improve the reliability and reduce the cost of LIA systems. An accelerator is presently under construction to demonstrate these improvements at an energy of 1.6 MeV in 2 kA, 65 ns beam pulses at an average beam power of approximately 30 kW. The unique features of this system are a low cost accelerator design and an SCR-switched, magnetically compressed, pulse power system. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  7. High power density solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-10-12

    A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O (LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

  8. High power performance limits of fiber components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holehouse, Nigel; Magné, Julien; Auger, Mathieu

    2015-03-01

    High power combiners are essential for practical fiber lasers, recent developments in pump technology has increased the available brightness and power of pumps significantly, enabling multi kW lasers and pushing combiner designs to new limits. I will present the challenges, measurements and some solutions to these issues. Traditional calculations for combiners underestimate the issues associated with the `tails' of the pump NA distribution, losses in fully filled combiners increase rapidly as pump NA blooms, and subsequent heating effects dominate the combiner's power handling. Acrylate coated pump fibers are reaching their limits and devices and measurements on double clad pump combiners with losses <0.05dB, will be presented enabling multi kW operation, The use of triple clad fibers in the gain section will discussed as a solution for multi kW applications. Results on ultra-low background loss FBG's will be presented, along with developed measurement techniques.

  9. High thermal power density heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.F.

    1980-10-01

    Heat from a high temperature heat pipe is transferred through a vacuum or a gap filled with electrically nonconducting gas to a cooler heat pipe. The first heat pipe is used to cool the nuclear reactor while the second heat pipe is connected thermally and electrically to a thermionic converter. If the receiver requires greater thermal power density, geometries are used with larger heat pipe areas for transmitting and receiving energy than the area for conducting the heat to the thermionic converter. In this way the heat pipe capability for increasing thermal power densities compensates for the comparatively low thermal power densities through the electrically non-conducting gap between the two heat pipes.

  10. High-altitude solar power platform

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, M.D.; Bower, M.V.

    1992-04-01

    Solar power is a preeminent alternative to conventional aircraft propulsion. With the continued advances in solar cells, fuel cells, and composite materials technology, the solar powered airplane is no longer a simple curiosity constrained to flights of several feet in altitude or minutes of duration. A high altitude solar powered platform (HASPP) has several potential missions, including communications and agriculture. In remote areas, a HASPP could be used as a communication link. In large farming areas, a HASPP could perform remote sensing of crops. The impact of HASPP in continuous flight for one year on agricultural monitoring mission is presented. This mission provides farmers with near real-time data twice daily from an altitude which allows excellant resolution on water conditions, crop diseases, and insect infestation. Accurate, timely data will enable farmers to increase their yield and efficiency. A design for HASPP for the foregoing mission is presented. In the design power derived from solar cells covering the wings is used for propulsion, avionics, and sensors. Excess power produced midday will be stored in fuel cells for use at night to maintain altitude and course.

  11. High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

    2012-05-14

    UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

  12. High power THz sources for nonlinear imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekavec, Patrick F.; Kozlov, Vladimir G.

    2014-02-01

    Many biological and chemical compounds have unique absorption features in the THz (0.1 - 10 THz) region, making the use of THz waves attractive for imaging in defense, security, biomedical imaging, and monitoring of industrial processes. Unlike optical radiation, THz frequencies can pass through many substances such as paper, clothing, ceramic, etc. with little attenuation. The use of currently available THz systems is limited by lack of highpower, sources as well as sensitive detectors and detector arrays operating at room temperature. Here we present a novel, high power THz source based on intracavity downconverison of optical pulses. The source delivers 6 ps pulses at 1.5 THz, with an average power of >300 μW and peak powers >450 mW. We propose an imaging method based on frequency upconverison that is ideally suited to use the narrow bandwidth and high peak powers produced by the source. By upconverting the THz image to the infrared, commercially available detectors can be used for real time imaging.

  13. High power THz sources for nonlinear imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tekavec, Patrick F.; Kozlov, Vladimir G.

    2014-02-18

    Many biological and chemical compounds have unique absorption features in the THz (0.1 - 10 THz) region, making the use of THz waves attractive for imaging in defense, security, biomedical imaging, and monitoring of industrial processes. Unlike optical radiation, THz frequencies can pass through many substances such as paper, clothing, ceramic, etc. with little attenuation. The use of currently available THz systems is limited by lack of highpower, sources as well as sensitive detectors and detector arrays operating at room temperature. Here we present a novel, high power THz source based on intracavity downconverison of optical pulses. The source delivers 6 ps pulses at 1.5 THz, with an average power of >300 μW and peak powers >450 mW. We propose an imaging method based on frequency upconverison that is ideally suited to use the narrow bandwidth and high peak powers produced by the source. By upconverting the THz image to the infrared, commercially available detectors can be used for real time imaging.

  14. On life assessment of high reliability high power optical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuanjian; Chu, Peter

    2014-09-01

    High data rate and long range free space lasercom links require multi-watt optical transmitter power, which creates a need for high power redundancy switches to ensure high payload reliability. A high power optical switch (HPOS) with less than 0.15 dB loss and capable of switching more than 40 watts of optical power in a single mode fiber has been previously demonstrated in the Transformational Satellite Communication System program. Prototype switches, in either 1x2 or 2x2 configuration, have been subjected to pyro-shock test, vibration test, and vacuum operation. These switches showed no performance degradation as a result of these tests. Three prototypes went through 60,000 35-watt switching cycles and over 30 million low power switching cycles, and the switches showed no mechanical failure. The HPOS life is about 3.2 million switching cycles with a definition of 3-dB degradation in on/off extinction ratio, which is well suited for space applications.

  15. High power, high efficiency diode pumped Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Yaakov; Fromzel, Viktor; Zhang, Jun; Dahan, Asaf; Ter-Gabrielyan, Nikolay; Pattnaik, Radha K.; Dubinskii, Mark

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a high power high efficiency Raman fiber laser pumped directly by a laser diode module at 976 nm. 80 Watts of CW power were obtained at a wavelength of 1020 nm with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 53%. When working quasi-CW, at a duty cycle of 30%, 85 W of peak power was produced with an efficiency of 60%. A commercial graded-index (GRIN) core fiber acts as the Raman fiber in a power oscillator configuration, which includes spectral selection to prevent generation of the 2nd Stokes. In addition, significant brightness enhancement of the pump beam is attained due to the Raman gain distribution profile in the GRIN fiber. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest power Raman fiber laser directly pumped by laser diodes, which also exhibits a record efficiency for such a laser. In addition, it is the highest power Raman fiber laser (regardless of pumping source) demonstrated based on a GRIN fiber.

  16. Industrial Applications of High Power Ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patist, Alex; Bates, Darren

    Since the change of the millennium, high-power ultrasound has become an alternative food processing technology applicable to large-scale commercial applications such as emulsification, homogenization, extraction, crystallization, dewatering, low-temperature pasteurization, degassing, defoaming, activation and inactivation of enzymes, particle size reduction, extrusion, and viscosity alteration. This new focus can be attributed to significant improvements in equipment design and efficiency during the late 1990 s. Like most innovative food processing technologies, high-power ultrasonics is not an off-the-shelf technology, and thus requires careful development and scale-up for each and every application. The objective of this chapter is to present examples of ultrasonic applications that have been successful at the commercialization stage, advantages, and limitations, as well as key learnings from scaling up an innovative food technology in general.

  17. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  18. Feedthrough terminal for high-power cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1982-05-28

    A feedthrough terminal for a high power electrochemical storage cell providing low resistance coupling to the conductive elements therein while isolating the terminal electrode from the highly corrosive environment within the cell is disclosed. A large diameter, cylindrical copper electrode is enclosed in a stainless steel tube with a BN powder feedthrough seal maintained around the stainless steel tube by means of facing insulative bushings and an outer sleeve. One end of the copper conductor is silver-brazed directly to a flat, butterfly bus bar within the cell, with the adjacent end of the surrounding outer feedthrough sleeve welded to the bus bar. A threaded seal is fixedly positioned on a distal portion of the stainless steel tube immediately adjacent the distal insulative bushing so as to compress the feedthrough seal in tight fitting relation around the stainless steel tube in providing a rugged, leak-proof electrical feedthrough terminal for the power cell.

  19. New high power linacs and beam physics

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Gray, E.R.; Nath, S.; Crandall, K.R.; Hasegawa, K.

    1997-08-01

    New high-power proton linacs must be designed to control beam loss, which can lead to radioactivation of the accelerator. The threat of beam loss is increased significantly by the formation of beam halo. Numerical simulation studies have identified the space-charge interactions, especially those that occur in rms mismatched beams, as a major concern for halo growth. The maximum-amplitude predictions of the simulation codes must be subjected to independent tests to confirm the validity of the results. Consequently, the authors compare predictions from the particle-core halo models with computer simulations to test their understanding of the halo mechanisms that are incorporated in the computer codes. They present and discuss scaling laws that provide guidance for high-power linac design.

  20. Crystal fibers for high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Florea, C.; Gibson, D.; Peele, J.; Askins, C.; Shaw, B.; Bowman, S.; O'Connor, S.; Bayya, S.; Aggarwal, I.; Sanghera, J. S.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we present our recent progress in developing single crystal fibers for high power single frequency fiber lasers. The optical, spectral and morphological properties as well as the loss and gain measured from these crystal fibers drawn by Laser Heated Pedestal Growth (LHPG) system are also discussed. Results on application of various cladding materials on the crystal core and the methods of fiber end-face polishing are also presented.

  1. Low-order-mode harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling-wave amplifier in W band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Y. S.; Hung, C. L.; Chang, T. H.; Chen, C. H.; Yang, S. J.; Lai, C. H.; Lin, T. Y.; Lo, Y. C.; Hong, J. W.

    2012-09-01

    Harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling-wave amplifiers (gyro-TWAs) allow for magnetic field reduction and frequency multiplication. To avoid absolute instabilities, this work proposes a W-band harmonic multiplying gyro-TWA operating at low-order modes. By amplifying a fundamental harmonic TE11 drive wave, the second harmonic component of the beam current initiates a TE21 wave to be amplified. Absolute instabilities in the gyro-TWA are suppressed by shortening the interaction circuit and increasing wall losses. Simulation results reveal that compared with Ka-band gyro-TWTs, the lower wall losses effectively suppress absolute instabilities in the W-band gyro-TWA. However, a global reflective oscillation occurs as the wall losses decrease. Increasing the length or resistivity of the lossy section can reduce the feedback of the oscillation to stabilize the amplifier. The W-band harmonic multiplying gyro-TWA is predicted to yield a peak output power of 111 kW at 98 GHz with an efficiency of 25%, a saturated gain of 26 dB, and a bandwidth of 1.6 GHz for a 60 kV, 7.5 A electron beam with an axial velocity spread of 8%.

  2. Design of Beam Tunnel for 42 GHz, 200 kW Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Alaria, Mukesh K.; Singh, Udaybir; Bera, A.; Singh, T. P.; Sinha, A. K.

    2010-05-01

    A beam tunnel for a 42 GHz, 200 kW gyrotron for an Indian TOKAMAK system has been designed. The initial design of the beam tunnel has been carried out on the basis of the required electron beam parameters at the interaction cavity and the electron beam simulation of the magnetron injection gun. The design optimization of the beam tunnel has been done with the help of 3-D simulation software CST-Microwave Studio. In the simulation, the absorption, the reflection and the transmission of RF power by the beam tunnel have been analyzed. Three different lossy ceramics, Al2O3-SiC, AlN-SiC and BeO-SiC have been investigated during the simulation. The simulation results obtained with CST-Microwave Studio have been validated with another 3-D simulation software HFSS. The Q value of the beam tunnel for different ceramic material has also been analyzed to investigate the parasitic mode excitation in the beam tunnel.

  3. Gate Drive For High Speed, High Power IGBTs

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.N.; Cassel, R.L.; de Lamare, J.E.; Pappas, G.C.; /SLAC

    2007-06-18

    A new gate drive for high-voltage, high-power IGBTs has been developed for the SLAC NLC (Next Linear Collider) Solid State Induction Modulator. This paper describes the design and implementation of a driver that allows an IGBT module rated at 800A/3300V to switch up to 3000A at 2200V in 3{micro}S with a rate of current rise of more than 10000A/{micro}S, while still being short circuit protected. Issues regarding fast turn on, high de-saturation voltage detection, and low short circuit peak current will be presented. A novel approach is also used to counter the effect of unequal current sharing between parallel chips inside most high-power IGBT modules. It effectively reduces the collector-emitter peak current, and thus protects the IGBT from being destroyed during soft short circuit conditions at high di/dt.

  4. High peak power diode stacks for high energy lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, Viorel C.; Vethake, Thilo; Jiang, John; Roff, Robert; Shih, Ming; Duck, Richard; Bauer, Marc; Mite, Roberto; Boucke, Konstantin; Treusch, Georg

    2015-02-01

    High energy solid state lasers are being developed for fusion experiments and other research applications where high energy per pulse is required but the repetition rate is rather low, around 10Hz. We report our results on high peak power diode laser stacks used as optical pumps for these lasers. The stacks are based on 10 mm bars with 4 mm cavity length and 55% fill factor, with peak power exceeding 500 W per bar. These bars are stacked and mounted on a cooler which provides backside cooling and electrical insulation. Currently we mount 25 bars per cooler for a nominal peak power of 12.5 kW, but in principle the mounting scheme can be scaled to a different number of devices depending on the application. Pretesting of these bars before soldering on the cooler enables us to select devices with similar wavelength and thus we maintain tight control of the spectral width (FWHM less than 6 nm). Fine adjustments of the centroid wavelength can be done by means of temperature of the cooling fluid or bias current. The available wavelength range spans from 880 nm to 1000 nm, and the wavelength of the entire assembly of stacks can be controlled to within 0.5 nm of the target value, which makes these stacks suitable for pumping a variety of gain media. The devices are fast axis collimated, with over 95% power being collimated in 6 mrad (full angle). The slow axis divergence is 9° (full angle) for 95% power content.

  5. The future of high power laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poprawe, Reinhart; Loosen, Peter; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter

    2007-05-01

    High Power Lasers have been used for years in corresponding applications. Constantly new areas and new processes have been demonstrated, developed and transferred to fruitful use in industry. With the advent of diode pumped solid state lasers in the multi-kW-power regime at beam qualities not far away from the diffraction limit, a new area of applicability has opened. In welding applications speeds could be increased and systems could be developed with higher efficiently leading also to new perspectives for increased productivity, e.g. in combined processing. Quality control is increasingly demanded by the applying industries, however applications still are rare. Higher resolution of coaxial process control systems in time and space combined with new strategies in signal processing could give rise to new applications. The general approach described in this paper emphasizes the fact, that laser applications can be developed more efficiently, more precisely and with higher quality, if the laser radiation is tailored properly to the corresponding application. In applying laser sources, the parameter ranges applicable are by far wider and more flexible compared to heat, mechanical or even electrical energy. The time frame ranges from several fs to continuous wave and this spans approximately 15 orders of magnitude. Spacewise, the foci range from several µm to cm and the resulting intensities suitable for materials processing span eight orders of magnitude from 10 3 to 10 11 W/cm2. In addition to space (power, intensity) and time (pulse) the wavelength can be chosen as a further parameter of optimization. As a consequence, the resulting new applications are vast and can be utilized in almost every market segment of our global economy (Fig. 1). In the past and only partly today, however, this flexibility of laser technology is not exploited in full in materials processing, basically because in the high power regime the lasers with tailored beam properties are not

  6. High power RF klystrons for linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, G. T.

    1984-05-01

    Design criteria and operating experience for two klystrons of differing power are described. A one-dimensional large signal code was used to design the tubes. Calculated operating parameters obtained from this code are presented. Based on standard klystron experience at SLAC high voltage breakdown, instabilities and RF window breakdown were expected to be problem areas. Current experience in these areas on the tube designs are summarized. In the case of the SLC klystron 50 MW at rated average power has been obtained at 315 kV with an efficiency of 45%. The fault rate has been found to be as low as one fault per 8 hour shift. The first 150 MW klystron had a conventional output cavity and produced 105 MW at the design beam voltage of 450 kV. At 475 kV a power of 122 MW with an efficiency of 43% were obtained. Design changes to obtain higher power and efficiency are incorporated in the second 150 MW tube and projections are made for future tubes.

  7. Piezoelectric transformer and modular connections for high power and high voltage power supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez Carazo, Alfredo (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A modular design for combining piezoelectric transformers is provided for high voltage and high power conversion applications. The input portions of individual piezoelectric transformers are driven for a single power supply. This created the vibration and the conversion of electrical to electrical energy from the input to the output of the transformers. The output portions of the single piezoelectric transformers are combining in series and/or parallel to provide multiple outputs having different rating of voltage and current.

  8. High-Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Williams H.

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency power amplifier that operates in the S band (frequencies of the order of a few gigahertz) utilizes transistors operating under class-D bias and excitation conditions. Class-D operation has been utilized at lower frequencies, but, until now, has not been exploited in the S band. Nominally, in class D operation, a transistor is switched rapidly between "on" and "off" states so that at any given instant, it sustains either high current or high voltage, but not both at the same time. In the ideal case of zero "on" resistance, infinite "off" resistance, zero inductance and capacitance, and perfect switching, the output signal would be a perfect square wave. Relative to the traditional classes A, B, and C of amplifier operation, class D offers the potential to achieve greater power efficiency. In addition, relative to class-A amplifiers, class-D amplifiers are less likely to go into oscillation. In order to design this amplifier, it was necessary to derive mathematical models of microwave power transistors for incorporation into a larger mathematical model for computational simulation of the operation of a class-D microwave amplifier. The design incorporates state-of-the-art switching techniques applicable only in the microwave frequency range. Another major novel feature is a transmission-line power splitter/combiner designed with the help of phasing techniques to enable an approximation of a square-wave signal (which is inherently a wideband signal) to propagate through what would, if designed in a more traditional manner, behave as a more severely band-limited device (see figure). The amplifier includes an input, a driver, and a final stage. Each stage contains a pair of GaAs-based field-effect transistors biased in class D. The input signal can range from -10 to +10 dBm into a 50-ohm load. The table summarizes the performances of the three stages

  9. High Energy Density Sciences with High Power Lasers at SACLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Ryosuke

    2013-10-01

    One of the interesting topics on high energy density sciences with high power lasers is creation of extremely high pressures in material. The pressures of more than 0.1 TPa are the energy density corresponding to the chemical bonding energy, resulting in expectation of dramatic changes in the chemical reactions. At pressures of more than TPa, most of material would be melted on the shock Hugoniot curve. However, if the temperature is less than 1eV or lower than a melting point at pressures of more than TPa, novel solid states of matter must be created through a pressured phase transition. One of the interesting materials must be carbon. At pressures of more than TPa, the diamond structure changes to BC and cubic at more than 3TPa. To create such novel states of matter, several kinds of isentropic-like compression techniques are being developed with high power lasers. To explore the ``Tera-Pascal Science,'' now we have a new tool which is an x-ray free electron laser as well as high power lasers. The XFEL will clear the details of the HED states and also efficiently create hot dense matter. We have started a new project on high energy density sciences using an XFEL (SACLA) in Japan, which is a HERMES (High Energy density Revolution of Matter in Extreme States) project.

  10. The repetitive high energy pulsed power module

    SciTech Connect

    Harjes, H.C.; Reed, K.W.; Buttram, M.T.; Turman, B.N.; Neau, E.L.; Martinez, L.; Adcock, J.; Weinbrecht, E.A.; Mann, G.A.; Morgan, F.A.; Laderach, G.E.; Pena, G.; Butler, M.; Schneider, L.X.; Wavrik, R.W.; Penn, K.J.; Weber, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    High average power magnetic pulse compression systems are being considered for use in several applications. One of the key issues in the design of a pulsed power driver for these applications is component reliability, efficiency, and lifetime. In the Repetitive High Energy Pulsed Power (RHEPP) module, pulse compression is done exclusively with magnetic switches (saturable reactors) because such switches have the potential of performing efficiently and reliably for >10{sup 10} shots. The objective of the RHEPP project is to explore the feasibility of using magnetic pulse compression technology in continuous high average power applications. The RHEPP system consists of a compressor which drives a linear induction voltage adder with a diode load. Prime power for the module is supplied by a 600 kW, 120 Hz, alternator (furnished by Westinghouse Electric Corporation). At present, construction and initial testing in a bipolar mode of the first two stages of the compressor has been completed. This system has operated for a total of 332 minutes (4.8 {times} 10{sup 6} pulses) at full power (600 kW) with an efficiency of 94+/{minus}3%. The first stage magnetic switch (MS1) has a pulse compression factor of 8.4 (4.2 ms to 500 {mu}s time to peak). It has two, parallel connected, 67 turn copper coils and a 760 kg core of 2 mil silicon steel with a magnetic cross sectional area of 0. 065 m{sup 2}. The second stage magnetic switch (MS2) has a pulse compression factor of 3 (500 {mu}s to 170 {mu}s). It has two, parallel connected, 36 turn copper coils and a 361 kg core of field annealed 2605CO Metglas with a magnetic area of 0.019 m{sup 2}. A discussion of RHEPP compressor design effort and its baseline design is given. In addition, initial results from the operation of the first two stages are presented. 11 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. High-power LEDs for plant cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Duchovskis, Pavelas; Bliznikas, Zenius; Breive, Kestutis; Ulinskaite, Raimonda; Brazaityte, Ausra; Novickovas, Algirdas; Zukauskas, Arturas; Shur, Michael S.

    2004-10-01

    We report on high-power solid-state lighting facility for cultivation of greenhouse vegetables and on the results of the study of control of photosynthetic activity and growth morphology of radish and lettuce imposed by variation of the spectral composition of illumination. Experimental lighting modules (useful area of 0.22 m2) were designed based on 4 types of high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with emission peaked in red at the wavelengths of 660 nm and 640 nm (predominantly absorbed by chlorophyll a and b for photosynthesis, respectively), in blue at 455 nm (phototropic function), and in far-red at 735 nm (important for photomorphology). Morphological characteristics, chlorophyll and phytohormone concentrations in radish and lettuce grown in phytotron chambers under lighting with different spectral composition of the LED-based illuminator and under illumination by high pressure sodium lamps with an equivalent photosynthetic photon flux density were compared. A well-balanced solid-state lighting was found to enhance production of green mass and to ensure healthy morphogenesis of plants compared to those grown using conventional lighting. We observed that the plant morphology and concentrations of morphologically active phytohormones is strongly affected by the spectral composition of light in the red region. Commercial application of the LED-based illumination for large-scale plant cultivation is discussed. This technology is favorable from the point of view of energy consumption, controllable growth, and food safety but is hindered by high cost of the LEDs. Large scale manufacturing of high-power red AlInGaP-based LEDs emitting at 650 nm and a further decrease of the photon price for the LEDs emitting in the vicinity of the absorption peak of chlorophylls have to be achieved to promote horticulture applications.

  12. Transportable high-energy high-power generator.

    PubMed

    Novac, B M; Smith, I R; Senior, P; Parker, M; Louverdis, G

    2010-05-01

    High-power applications sometimes require a transportable, simple, and robust gigawatt pulsed power generator, and an analysis of various possible approaches shows that one based on a twin exploding wire array is extremely advantageous. A generator based on this technology and used with a high-energy capacitor bank has recently been developed at Loughborough University. An H-configuration circuit is used, with one pair of diagonally opposite arms each comprising a high-voltage ballast inductor and the other pair exploding wire arrays capable of generating voltages up to 300 kV. The two center points of the H configuration provide the output to the load, which is coupled through a high-voltage self-breakdown spark gap, with the entire autonomous source being housed in a metallic container. Experimentally, a load resistance of a few tens of Ohms is provided with an impulse of more than 300 kV, having a rise time of about 140 ns and a peak power of over 1.7 GW. Details of the experimental arrangement and typical results are presented and diagnostic measurements of the current and voltage output are shown to compare well with theoretical predictions based on detailed numerical modeling. Finally, the next stage toward developing a more powerful and energetic transportable source is outlined. PMID:20515165

  13. Millimeter wave technology IV and radio frequency power sources; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 21, 22, 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltse, James C.; Coleman, James T.

    1987-01-01

    The present conference on mm-wave technology and radio-frequency power sources discusses topics in the fields of vacuum devices, mm-wave antennas and transmission lines, mm-wave systems and subsystems, and mm-wave techniques and components. Attention is given to recent experiments with planar orotrons, a high peak power X-band gyroklystron for linear supercolliders, cathode-driven crossed-field amplifiers, multi-MW quasi-optical gyrotrons, the radiation coupling of interinjection-locked oscillators, air-to-air mm-wave communications, mm-wave active and passive sensors for terrain mapping, and mm-wave components for electronically controllable antennas.

  14. Optimized VCSELs for high-power arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moench, Holger; Kolb, Johanna S.; Engelhardt, Andreas P.; Gerlach, Philipp; Jaeger, Roland; Pollmann-Retsch, Jens; Weichmann, Ulrich; Witzigmann, Bernd

    2014-02-01

    High-power VCSEL systems with multi kilowatt output power require a good electro-optical efficiency at the point of operation i.e. at elevated temperature. The large number of optimization parameters can be structured in a way that separates system and assembly considerations from the minimization of electrical and optical losses in the epitaxially grown structure. Temperature dependent functions for gain parameters, internal losses and injection efficiency are derived from a fit to experimental data. The empirical description takes into account diameter dependent effects like current spreading or temperature dependent ones like voltage drops over hetero-interfaces in the DBR mirrors. By evaluating experimental measurements of the light output and voltage characteristics over a large range of temperature and diameter, wafer-characteristic parameters are extracted allowing to predict the performance of VCSELs made from this material in any array and assembly configuration. This approach has several beneficial outcomes: Firstly, it gives a general description of a VCSEL independent of its geometry, mounting and detuning, secondly, insights into the structure and the underlying physics can be gained that lead to the improvement potential of the structure and thirdly the performance of the structure in arrays and modules can be predicted. Experimental results validate the approach and demonstrate the significantly improved VCSEL efficiency and the benefit in high power systems.

  15. High-power LED package requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Frank; Martin, Paul S.; Harbers, Gerard

    2004-01-01

    Power LEDs have evolved from simple indicators into illumination devices. For general lighting applications, where the objective is to light up an area, white LED arrays have been utilized to serve that function. Cost constraints will soon drive the industry to provide a discrete lighting solution. Early on, that will mean increasing the power densities while quantum efficiencies are addressed. For applications such as automotive headlamps & projection, where light needs to be tightly collimated, or controlled, arrays of die or LEDs will not be able to satisfy the requirements & limitations defined by etendue. Ultimately, whether a luminaire requires a small source with high luminance, or light spread over a general area, economics will force the evolution of the illumination LED into a compact discrete high power package. How the customer interfaces with this new package should be an important element considered early on in the design cycle. If an LED footprint of adequate size is not provided, it may prove impossible for the customer, or end user, to get rid of the heat in a manner sufficient to prevent premature LED light output degradation. Therefore it is critical, for maintaining expected LED lifetime & light output, that thermal performance parameters be defined, by design, at the system level, which includes heat sinking methods & interface materials or methdology.

  16. Deformable mirror for high power laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrň; a, Libor; Sarbort, Martin; Hola, Miroslava

    2015-01-01

    The modern trend in high power laser applications such as welding, cutting and surface hardening lies in the use of solid-state lasers. The output beam of these lasers is characterized by a Gaussian intensity distribution. However, the laser beams with different intensity distributions, e.g. top-hat, are preferable in various applications. In this paper we present a new type of deformable mirror suitable for the corresponding laser beam shaping. The deformation of the mirror is achieved by an underlying array of actuators and a pressurized coolant that also provides the necessary cooling. We describe the results of the surface shape measurement using a 3D scanner for different settings of actuators. Further, we show the achieved intensity distributions measured by a beam profiler for a low power laser beam reflected from the mirror.

  17. Industrial application of high power disk lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockmann, Rüdiger; Havrilla, David

    2008-02-01

    Laser welding has become one of the fastest growing areas for industrial laser applications. The increasing cost effectiveness of the laser process is enabled by the development of new highly efficient laser sources, such as the Disk laser, coupled with decreasing cost per Watt. TRUMPF introduced the Disk laser several years ago, and today it has become the most reliable laser tool on the market. The excellent beam quality and output powers of up to 10 kW enable its application in the automotive industry as well as in the range of thick plate welding, such as heavy construction and ship building. This serves as an overview of the most recent developments on the TRUMPF Disk laser and its industrial applications like cutting, welding, remote welding and hybrid welding, too. The future prospects regarding increased power and even further improved productivity and economics are presented.

  18. Digitally Controlled High Availability Power Supply

    SciTech Connect

    MacNair, David; /SLAC

    2008-09-25

    This paper reports the design and test results on novel topology, high-efficiency, and low operating temperature, 1,320-watt power modules for high availability power supplies. The modules permit parallel operation for N+1 redundancy with hot swap capability. An embedded DSP provides intelligent start-up and shutdown, output regulation, general control and fault detection. PWM modules in the DSP drive the FET switches at 20 to 100 kHz. The DSP also ensures current sharing between modules, synchronized switching, and soft start up for hot swapping. The module voltage and current have dedicated ADCs (>200 kS/sec) to provide pulse-by-pulse output control. A Dual CAN bus interface provides for low cost redundant control paths. Over-rated module components provide high reliability and high efficiency at full load. Low on-resistance FETs replace conventional diodes in the buck regulator. Saturable inductors limit the FET reverse diode current during switching. The modules operate in a two-quadrant mode, allowing bipolar output from complimentary module groups. Controllable, low resistance FETs at the input and output provide fault isolation and allow module hot swapping.

  19. Economic comparison of power factor correction by capacitors and high power factor/high-efficiency motors

    SciTech Connect

    Slack, K.D.; Capehart, B.L.

    1998-12-01

    The traditional approach to power factor correction in a facility is to add capacitors to individual loads such as motors and fluorescent lighting circuits, to add a capacitor bank with switching to a major distribution panel, or to add a capacitor bank with switching to the power input panel from the utility lines. Recently it has been shown that careful selection of high-efficiency motors for a facility can result in new motors with a significantly higher power factor than the motors they replaced. This article compares and discusses the cost-effectiveness of installing capacitors on individual motors with the cost-effectiveness of installing high-efficiency, high power factor motors.

  20. The JLab high power ERL light source

    SciTech Connect

    G.R. Neil; C. Behre; S.V. Benson; M. Bevins; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; J. Coleman; L.A. Dillon-Townes; D. Douglas; H.F. Dylla; R. Evans; A. Grippo; D. Gruber; J. Gubeli; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; M.J. Kelley; L. Merminga; J. Mammosser; W. Moore; N. Nishimori; E. Pozdeyev; J. Preble; R. Rimmer; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; C. Tennant; R. Walker; G.P. Williams and S. Zhang

    2005-03-19

    A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on an Energy-Recovered, (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160 MeV electron beam and an average current of 10 mA in 75 MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches. These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz {approx} half cycle pulse whose average brightness is > 5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20 W of average power extracted[1]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100 fs pulses with >200 W of average power. The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [2]: up to 10 kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14 microns in 400 fs pulses at up to 74.85 MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300-1000 nm light at up to 3 kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10 microseconds long at high repetition rates to continuous operation. The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser deposition and ablation, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the system and discuss some of the discoveries we have made

  1. Microstructured fibers for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, J. C.; Petrovich, M. N.; Hayes, J. R.; Finazzi, V.; Poletti, F.; Amezcua, R.; Broderick, N. G. R.; Richardson, D. J.; Monro, T. M.; Salter, P. L.; Proudley, G.; O'Driscoll, E. J.

    2005-10-01

    Fiber delivery of intense laser radiation is important for a broad range of application sectors, from medicine through to industrial laser processing of materials, and offers many practical system design and usage benefits relative to free space solutions. Optical fibers for high power transmission applications need to offer low optical nonlinearity and high damage thresholds. Single-mode guidance is also often a fundamental requirement for the many applications in which good beam quality is critical. In recent years, microstructured fiber technology has revolutionized the dynamic field of optical fibers, bringing with them a wide range of novel optical properties. These fibers, in which the cladding region is peppered with many small air holes, are separated into two distinct categories, defined by the way in which they guide light: (1) index-guiding holey fibers (HFs), in which the core is solid and light is guided by a modified form of total internal reflection, and (2) photonic band-gap fibers (PBGFs) in which guidance in a hollow core can be achieved via photonic band-gap effects. Both of these microstructured fiber types offer attractive qualities for beam delivery applications. For example, using HF technology, large-mode-area, pure silica fibers with robust single-mode guidance over broad wavelength ranges can be routinely fabricated. In addition, the ability to guide light in an air-core within PBGFs presents obvious power handling advantages. In this paper we review the fundamentals and current status of high power, high brightness, beam delivery in HFs and PBGFs, and speculate as to future prospects.

  2. High power time domain terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graber, Benjamin

    Terahertz (THz) has become a strong area for scientific research and commercial application in recent years. This research group has redesigned and optimized a THz photoconductive antenna, which currently operates with approximately 10x the power of a commercial antenna. It has been determined by this research that the THz signal emitted from a photoconductive antenna consists of coherent and incoherent signals. In addition to the improvement of the THz photoconductive antenna, I have optimized an electro optic THz detection system by characterizing the field dependency of an electro optic crystal, which enabled me to estimate the THz electric field strength. The high power THz source and optimized detection system were combined into a high power, high resolution time domain THz spectrometer. This spectrometer was used to conduct original measurements of the THz spectrum of water vapor, ionized air, and various chemical vapor including explosives. Most of these measurements were only possible with our improved THz spectrometer. In order to understand ionized air, an additional study was carried out to explore the ionization of several gases (e.g. N2, O2, Ar, CO2, and water vapor) which were ionized by radioactive isotopes. This unique study found that in addition to dose rate, the gamma energy of the radioactive isotopes and the sequential ionization levels of gases affect the equilibrium ion densities of these gases. This effect was especially pronounced for argon gas. The study of ion dynamics in gases has lead to the development of a prototype for stand-off detection and identification of radioactive isotopes. This prototype, despite being simple in design, can detect isotopes faster and more cheaply than a conventional gamma ray spectrometer. Throughout this thesis research I have successfully developed a high power, high resolution terahertz spectrometer and demonstrated that with the spectrometer I could identify characteristic resonances of water vapor, some

  3. Power management systems for sediment microbial fuel cells in high power and continuous power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Conrad Koble

    The objective of this dissertation was to develop power management systems (PMS) for sediment microbial fuel cells (SFMCs) for high power and continuous applications. The first part of this dissertation covers a new method for testing the performance of SMFCs. This device called the microbial fuel cell tester was developed to automatically test power generation of PMS. The second part focuses on a PMS capable of delivering high power in burst mode. This means that for a small amount of time a large amount of power up to 2.5 Watts can be delivered from a SMFC only generating mW level power. The third part is aimed at developing a multi-potentiostat laboratory tool that measures the performance at fixed cell potentials of microbial fuel cells so that I can optimize them for use with the PMS. This tool is capable of controlling the anode potential or cathode potential and measuring current of six separate SMFCs simultaneously. By operating multiple potentiostats, I was able to run experiments that find ideal operating conditions for the sediment microbial fuel cells, and also I can optimize the power management system for these conditions. The fourth part of the dissertation is targeting a PMS that was able to operate a sensor continuously which was powered by an SMFC. In pervious applications involving SMFCs, the PMS operated in batch mode. In this PMS, the firmware on the submersible ultrasonic receiver (SUR) was modified for use with my PMS. This integration of PMS and SUR allowed for the continuous operation of the SUR without using a battery. Finally, the last part of the dissertation recommends a scale-up power management system to overcome the linearity scale up issue of SMFCs as future work. Concluding remarks are also added to summarize the goal and focus of this dissertation.

  4. Low power, scalable multichannel high voltage controller

    DOEpatents

    Stamps, James Frederick; Crocker, Robert Ward; Yee, Daniel Dadwa; Dils, David Wright

    2006-03-14

    A low voltage control circuit is provided for individually controlling high voltage power provided over bus lines to a multitude of interconnected loads. An example of a load is a drive for capillary channels in a microfluidic system. Control is distributed from a central high voltage circuit, rather than using a number of large expensive central high voltage circuits to enable reducing circuit size and cost. Voltage is distributed to each individual load and controlled using a number of high voltage controller channel switches connected to high voltage bus lines. The channel switches each include complementary pull up and pull down photo isolator relays with photo isolator switching controlled from the central high voltage circuit to provide a desired bus line voltage. Switching of the photo isolator relays is further controlled in each channel switch using feedback from a resistor divider circuit to maintain the bus voltage swing within desired limits. Current sensing is provided using a switched resistive load in each channel switch, with switching of the resistive loads controlled from the central high voltage circuit.

  5. Low power, scalable multichannel high voltage controller

    DOEpatents

    Stamps, James Frederick; Crocker, Robert Ward; Yee, Daniel Dadwa; Dils, David Wright

    2008-03-25

    A low voltage control circuit is provided for individually controlling high voltage power provided over bus lines to a multitude of interconnected loads. An example of a load is a drive for capillary channels in a microfluidic system. Control is distributed from a central high voltage circuit, rather than using a number of large expensive central high voltage circuits to enable reducing circuit size and cost. Voltage is distributed to each individual load and controlled using a number of high voltage controller channel switches connected to high voltage bus lines. The channel switches each include complementary pull up and pull down photo isolator relays with photo isolator switching controlled from the central high voltage circuit to provide a desired bus line voltage. Switching of the photo isolator relays is further controlled in each channel switch using feedback from a resistor divider circuit to maintain the bus voltage swing within desired limits. Current sensing is provided using a switched resistive load in each channel switch, with switching of the resistive loads controlled from the central high voltage circuit.

  6. Hybrid high power femtosecond laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunov, V. I.; Petrov, V. V.; Pestryakov, E. V.; Kirpichnikov, A. V.

    2006-01-01

    Design of a high-power femtosecond laser system based on hybrid chirped pulse amplification (CPA) technique developed by us is presented. The goal of the hybrid principle is the use of the parametric and laser amplification methods in chirped pulse amplifiers. It makes it possible to amplify the low-cycle pulses with a duration of <= fs to terawatt power with a high contrast and high conversion efficiency of the pump radiation. In a created system the Ti:Sapphire laser with 10 fs pulses at 810 nm and output energy about 1-3 nJ will be used like seed source. The oscillator pulses were stretched to duration of about 500 ps by an all-reflective grating stretcher. Then the stretched pulses are injected into a nondegenerate noncollinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) on the two BBO crystals. After amplification in NOPA the residual pump was used in a bow-tie four pass amplifier with hybrid active medium (based on Al II0 3:Ti 3+ and BeAl IIO 4:Ti 3+ crystals). The final stage of the amplification system consists of two channels, namely NIR (820 nm) and short-VIS (410 nm). Numerical simulation has shown that the terawatt level of output power can be achieved also in a short-VIS channel at the pumping of the double-crystal BBO NOPA by the radiation of the fourth harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm. Experimentally parametric amplification in BBO crystals of 30-50 fs pulses were investigated and optimized using SPIDER technique and single-shot autocomelator for the realization of shortest duration 40 fs.

  7. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Dolan, James T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang

    2000-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  8. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Dymond, Jr., Lauren E.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Grimm, William G.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Ola, Samuel A.; Simpson, James E.; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  9. Harmonic mode competition in a terahertz gyrotron backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, S. H.; Chiu, C. C.; Chang, P. C.; Wu, K. L.; Chu, K. R.

    2012-10-15

    Electron cyclotron maser interactions at terahertz (THz) frequencies require a high-order-mode structure to reduce the wall loss to a tolerable level. To generate THz radiation, it is also essential to employ cyclotron harmonic resonances to reduce the required magnetic field strength to a value within the capability of the superconducting magnets. However, much weaker harmonic interactions in a high-order-mode structure lead to serious mode competition problems. The current paper addresses harmonic mode competition in the gyrotron backward wave oscillator (gyro-BWO). We begin with a comparative study of the mode formation and oscillation thresholds in the gyro-BWO and gyromonotron. Differences in linear features result in far fewer 'windows' for harmonic operation of the gyro-BWO. Nonlinear consequences of these differences are examined in particle simulations of the multimode competition processes in the gyro-BWO, which shed light on the competition criteria between modes of different as well as the same cyclotron harmonic numbers. The viability of a harmonic gyro-BWO is assessed on the basis of the results obtained.

  10. High power radio frequency attenuation device

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Quentin A.; Miller, Harold W.

    1984-01-01

    A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

  11. Photovoltaics for high capacity space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, Dennis J.

    1988-01-01

    The anticipated energy requirements of future space missions will grow by factors approaching 100 or more, particularly as a permanent manned presence is established in space. The advances that can be expected in solar array performance and lifetime, when coupled with advanced, high energy density storage batteries and/or fuel cells, will continue to make photovoltaic energy conversion a viable power generating option for the large systems of the future. The specific technologies required to satisfy any particular set of power requirements will vary from mission to mission. Nonetheless, in almost all cases the technology push will be toward lighter weight and higher efficiency, whether of solar arrays of storage devices. This paper will describe the content and direction of the current NASA program in space photovoltaic technology. The paper will also discuss projected system level capabilities of photovoltaic power systems in the context of some of the new mission opportunities under study by NASA, such as a manned lunar base, and a manned visit to Mars.

  12. Photovoltaics for high capacity space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, Dennis J.

    1988-01-01

    The anticipated energy requirements of future space missions will grow by factors approaching 100 or more, particularly as a permanent manned presence is established in space. The advances that can be expected in solar array performance and lifetime, when coupled with advanced, high energy density storage batteries and/or fuel cells, will continue to make photovoltaic energy conversion a viable power generating option for the large systems of the future. The specific technologies required to satisfy any particular set of power requirements will vary from mission to mission. Nonetheless, in almost all cases the technology push will be toward lighter weight and higher efficiency, whether of solar arrays or storage devices. This paper will describe the content and direction of the current NASA program in space photovoltaic technology. The paper will also discuss projected system level capabilities of photovoltaic power systems in the context of some of the new mission opportunities under study by NASA, such as a manned lunar base, and a manned visit to Mars.

  13. Recent progress in high power ultrafast MIXSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfieri, C. G. E.; Waldburger, D.; Link, S. M.; Gini, E.; Golling, M.; Tilma, B. W.; Mangold, M.; Keller, U.

    2016-03-01

    The modelocked integrated external-cavity surface emitting laser (MIXSEL) is the most compact technology of ultrafast semiconductor disk laser, combining in the same epitaxial structure an active region and a saturable absorber for stable and self-starting passive modelocking in a linear straight cavity. Here we present the first MIXSEL structure able to produce sub-300-fs pulses at an average output power of 235 mW and 3.35 GHz pulse repetition rate, resulting in a record-high peak power of 240 W. At 10 GHz repetition rate the same MIXSEL generated 279-fs pulses with 310 mW of average output power. An optimized antireflection coating for dispersion minimization together with a reduced field enhancement inside the structure enabled the sensible improvement and the record performances of this novel MIXSEL. Furthermore, thanks to the development of suitable saturable absorbers with fast recovery dynamics and low saturation fluence, we demonstrate the first entirely MOVPE-grown MIXSEL.

  14. High-power, light-weight power conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmour, A. S., Jr.

    1991-12-01

    After a review of light-weight transformer efforts in the US, a weight analysis is carried out. From basic transformer relations and geometrical considerations it is shown how transformer specific power should scale with power and frequency. The result compares well with design results for frequency scaling but not for power scaling. After refinements for variations of voltage, cooling technique, power (while voltage is held constant) and current density, an algorithm is presented that agrees well with the results of adiabatic transformer designs and with vapor cooled transformer designs. Transformer specific powers as low as 0.01 kg/kW are predicted at an operating frequency of 20 kHz. Caution is advised in the use of the algorithm because few of the transformers with which the algorithm is compared have actually been considered. The SDI/AF/NASA megawatt converter program is discussed, and results of Phase I are summarized.

  15. Gyrotron Development in the EU for Present Fusion Experiments and for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Thumm, M.; Alberti, S.; Hogge, J.-P.; Tran, M. Q.; Yovchev, I.; Arnold, A.; Bariou, D.; Giguet, E.; Lievin, C.; Dammertz, G.; Illy, S.; Jin, J.; Piosczyk, B.; Prinz, O.; Rzesnicki, T.; Yang, X.; Darbos, C.; Magne, R.; Gantenbein, G.

    2006-01-03

    The long term strategy of the EU in the field of gyrotrons in fusion plasma applications is based on two approaches: R and D in laboratories to develop advanced concepts and industrial development of state-of-the-art tubes for use in present experiments like TCV, Tore Supra (118 GHz, 0.5 MW, CW) and W7-X (140 GHz, 1 MW, CW). The results from these two approaches are then applied to the development of a coaxial cavity gyrotron operating at 170 GHz and delivering 2 MW-CW for the electron cyclotron wave system of ITER. This paper will recall the main achievements of this program and will outline the present status of the 170 GHz coaxial cavity gyrotron development.

  16. High Power Microwaves for Accelerator Applications*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshfield, J. L.

    2004-05-01

    Realization of a future high-energy electron-positron collider rests upon many technological advancements, among which are high-power microwave amplifiers, and rf pulse compressors. In one scenario for the 0.5 TeV NLC, each linac requires about 1000, 75 MW, 11.4 GHz amplifiers furnishing peak powers of 75 MW in 1.6 mcs pulses at 120 Hz pps. Pulse compression to 0.4 mcs would result in a total rf peak power of over 400 GW. After a decade of intense development, SLAC has evidently reached the amplifier goal with the XP3 PPM klystron. Dual-mode double-delay-line pulse compression has demonstrated 4:1 compression to a peak output of 500 MW. These achievements help provide technological justification for NLC. Further justification rests with NLC's capability for a subsequent energy upgrade to 1.0-1.5 TeV. Nascent microwave technologies for the energy upgrade are discussed. These include an X-band magnicon, with double the output of a SLAC klystron: peak and average powers are predicted to reach 155 MW and 60 kW. Each magnicon could replace two SLAC klystrons, and operate with twice the pulse width. Therefore, an 8:1 pulse compressor is required. Active, efficient, rf pulse compression, with switching during the rf pulse could be provided by an externally-varied semiconductor, plasma, or ferroelectric switching element. Demonstration of an X-band magnicon, and of 10:1 X-band pulse compression using plasma switches is described. Prospects for higher efficiency rf pulse compression using ferroelectric switching elements is also described. A scenario for obtaining an energy upgrade to 2.0 TeV is outlined, based on use of 34-GHz technology in the inner halves of each linac. This option rests upon development of a 34-GHz magnicon amplifier, first results with which are described. *Sponsored by DoE, Division of High Energy Physics.

  17. Developing a portable high-power microwave (HPM) prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Gene

    1993-07-01

    Certain high power microwave (HPM) applications require output power in the range of only a few hundred megawatts effective radiated power (ERP) in a portable configuration. This paper describes a portable HPM device prototype that was developed, demonstrated, and evaluated.

  18. Fibrous zinc anodes for high power batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. Gregory

    This paper introduces newly developed solid zinc anodes using fibrous material for high power applications in alkaline and large size zinc-air battery systems. The improved performance of the anodes in these two battery systems is demonstrated. The possibilities for control of electrode porosity and for anode/battery design using fibrous materials are discussed in light of experimental data. Because of its mechanical integrity and connectivity, the fibrous solid anode has good electrical conductivity, mechanical stability, and design flexibility for controlling mass distribution, porosity and effective surface area. Experimental data indicated that alkaline cells made of such anodes can have a larger capacity at high discharging currents than commercially available cells. It showed even greater improvement over commercial cells with a non-conventional cell design. Large capacity anodes for a zinc-air battery have also been made and have shown excellent material utilization at various discharge rates. The zinc-air battery was used to power an electric bicycle and demonstrated good results.

  19. High-Power Ion Thruster Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Matossian, J. N.

    1996-01-01

    Performance data are presented for the NASA/Hughes 30-cm-diam 'common' thruster operated over the power range from 600 W to 4.6 kW. At the 4.6-kW power level, the thruster produces 172 mN of thrust at a specific impulse of just under 4000 s. Xenon pressure and temperature measurements are presented for a 6.4-mm-diam hollow cathode operated at emission currents ranging from 5 to 30 A and flow rates of 4 sccm and 8 sccm. Highly reproducible results show that the cathode temperature is a linear function of emission current, ranging from approx. 1000 C to 1150 C over this same current range. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements obtained from a 30-cm-diam thruster are presented, suggesting that LIF could be a valuable diagnostic for real-time assessment of accelerator-arid erosion. Calibration results of laminar-thin-film (LTF) erosion badges with bulk molybdenum are presented for 300-eV xenon, krypton, and argon sputtering ions. Facility-pressure effects on the charge-exchange ion current collected by 8-cm-diam and 30-cm-diam thrusters operated on xenon propellant are presented to show that accel current is nearly independent of facility pressure at low pressures, but increases rapidly under high-background-pressure conditions.

  20. High power, electrically tunable quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slivken, Steven; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2016-02-01

    Mid-infrared laser sources (3-14 μm wavelengths) which have wide spectral coverage and high output power are attractive for many applications. This spectral range contains unique absorption fingerprints of most molecules, including toxins, explosives, and nerve agents. Infrared spectroscopy can also be used to detect important biomarkers, which can be used for medical diagnostics by means of breath analysis. The challenge is to produce a broadband midinfrared source which is small, lightweight, robust, and inexpensive. We are currently investigating monolithic solutions using quantum cascade lasers. A wide gain bandwidth is not sufficient to make an ideal spectroscopy source. Single mode output with rapid tuning is desirable. For dynamic wavelength selection, our group is developing multi-section laser geometries with wide electrical tuning (hundreds of cm-1). These devices are roughly the same size as a traditional quantum cascade lasers, but tuning is accomplished without any external optical components. When combined with suitable amplifiers, these lasers are capable of multi-Watt single mode output powers. This manuscript will describe our current research efforts and the potential for high performance, broadband electrical tuning with the quantum cascade laser.

  1. Early history of high-power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, George W.

    2002-02-01

    This paper gives the history of the invention and development of early high power lasers, to which the author contributed and had personal knowledge. The earliest hint that a high power laser could be built came from the electric CO2-N2-He laser of Javan. It happened that the director of the Avco-Everett Research Laboratory had written his Ph.D. dissertation on the deactivation of the vibrational excitation of N2 in an expanding flow under Edward Teller, then at Columbia Univ. The director then started an in-house project to determine if gain could be achieved in a mixture similar to Javan's by means of a shock tunnel where a shock heated mixture of N2, CO2, and He gas was expanded through a supersonic nozzle into a cavity. This concept was named by the author as the gasdynamic laser (GDL). The paper traces the history of the initial gain measurements, the Mark II laser, the RASTA laser, the Tri-Service laser, its troubles and solutions, the United Technology's XLD gasdynamic laser, and their ALL laser. The history of the coastal Crusader will also be mentioned. Also discussed are the early experiments on a combustion-driven chemical laser, and its subsequent rejection by the director.

  2. Digitally Controlled High Availability Power Supply

    SciTech Connect

    MacNair, David; /SLAC

    2009-05-07

    This paper will report on the test results of a prototype 1320 watt power module for a high availability power supply. The module will allow parallel operation for N+1 redundancy with hot swap capability. The two quadrant output of each module allows pairs of modules to provide a 4 quadrant (bipolar) operation. Each module employs a novel 4 FET buck regulator arranged in a bridge configuration. Each side of the bridge alternately conducts through a small saturable ferrite that limits the reverse current in the FET body diode during turn off. This allows hard switching of the FETs with low switching losses. The module is designed with over-rated components to provide high reliability and better then 97% efficiency at full load. The modules use a Microchip DSP for control, monitoring, and fault detection. The switching FETS are driven by PWM modules in the DSP at 60 KHz. A Dual CAN bus interface provides for low cost redundant control paths. The DSP will also provide current sharing between modules, synchronized switching, and soft start up for hot swapping. The input and output of each module have low resistance FETs to allow hot swapping and isolation of faulted units.

  3. High Power ECR Ion Thruster Discharge Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Carpenter, Christian; Williams, George W.

    2006-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) based ion thrusters with carbon based ion optics can potentially satisfy lifetime requirements for long duration missions (approximately 10 years) because grid erosion and cathode insert depletion issues are virtually eliminated. Though the ECR plasma discharge has been found to typically operate at slightly higher discharge losses than conventional DC ion thrusters (for high total thruster power applications), the discharge power fraction is small (less than 1 percent at 25 kW). In this regard, the benefits of increased life, low discharge plasma potentials, and reduced complexity are welcome tradeoffs for the associated discharge efficiency decrease. Presented here are results from discharge characterization of a large area ECR plasma source for gridded ion thruster applications. These measurements included load matching efficacy, bulk plasma properties via Langmuir probe, and plasma uniformity as measured using current probes distributed at the exit plane. A high degree of plasma uniformity was observed (flatness greater than 0.9). Additionally, charge state composition was qualitatively evaluated using emission spectroscopy. Plasma induced emission was dominated by xenon ion lines. No doubly charged xenon ions were detected.

  4. High-Power Options for LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    The LANSCE linear accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory has a long history of successful beam operations at 800 kW. We have recently studied options for restoration of high-power operations including approaches for increasing the performance to multi-MW levels. In this paper we will discuss the results of this study including the present limitations of the existing accelerating structures at LANSCE, and the high-voltage and RF systems that drive them. Several options will be discussed and a preferred option will be presented that will enable the first in a new generation of scientific facilities for the materials community. The emphasis of this new facility is 'Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes' (MaRIE) which will be used to discover and design the advanced materials needed to meet 21st century national security and energy security challenges.

  5. 14 CFR 101.25 - Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. 101.25 Section 101.25 Aeronautics and Space... OPERATING RULES MOORED BALLOONS, KITES, AMATEUR ROCKETS AND UNMANNED FREE BALLOONS Amateur Rockets § 101.25 Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. When...

  6. 14 CFR 101.25 - Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. 101.25 Section 101.25 Aeronautics and Space... OPERATING RULES MOORED BALLOONS, KITES, AMATEUR ROCKETS AND UNMANNED FREE BALLOONS Amateur Rockets § 101.25 Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. When...

  7. 14 CFR 101.25 - Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. 101.25 Section 101.25 Aeronautics and Space... OPERATING RULES MOORED BALLOONS, KITES, AMATEUR ROCKETS AND UNMANNED FREE BALLOONS Amateur Rockets § 101.25 Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. When...

  8. 14 CFR 101.25 - Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. 101.25 Section 101.25 Aeronautics and Space... OPERATING RULES MOORED BALLOONS, KITES, AMATEUR ROCKETS AND UNMANNED FREE BALLOONS Amateur Rockets § 101.25 Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. When...

  9. 14 CFR 101.25 - Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. 101.25 Section 101.25 Aeronautics and Space... OPERATING RULES MOORED BALLOONS, KITES, AMATEUR ROCKETS AND UNMANNED FREE BALLOONS Amateur Rockets § 101.25 Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. When...

  10. 60-GHz gyrotron development program alternate frequency study

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, S.J.; Nordquist, A.L.; Wendell, G.E.

    1981-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to take a preliminary look at what the considerations are when scaling the frequency of a gyrotron oscillator a few percent from an existing design. To minimize construction costs, it would be most advantageous to keep all parts the same and operate only with slightly different voltages and magnetic fields. There are two tube parts that must be changed for any frequency modification: the tube output window and the oscillation cavity. This study assumed that the output window and the cavity would be scaled in dimensions for best operation at the new frequency. The main thrust of the study was to examine the feasibility of using the 60 GHz gun (K-8060) and magnet (VYW-8060) for operation at 56 and 52 GHz, and the 28 GHz gun (K-8000) and magnet (VYW-8000) for operation at 26 and 30 GHz. All work was done using Varian computer gun codes and hand calculations. It must be mentioned that these results are only a guideline and that a final design would need some further fine tuning.

  11. Sintering of advanced ceramics using a 30-GHz, 10-kW, CW industrial gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Link, G.; Feher, L.; Boehme, R.; Weisenburger, A. ); Thumm, M. Univ. of Karlsruhe . Inst. of Microwaves and Electronics); Ritzhaupt-Kleissl, H.J. )

    1999-04-01

    At the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany, a compact gyrotron system was established in 1994 to investigate technological applications in the field of high-temperature materials processing by means of millimeter-wave (mm-wave) radiation. Besides the improvement of the system design, research activities are mainly engaged in studies on debindering and sintering of various types of advanced structural and functional ceramics. Due to volumetric heating and enhanced sintering kinetics, the application of microwaves allows one to shorten the processing rime and therefore reduce energy consumption. Besides these effects, microwave technology gives the unique possibility of influencing the microstructure and physical properties of the ceramic materials. This paper will discuss the benefits of the mm-wave technology with respect to sintering of structural ceramics, such as TiO[sub 2]-ZrO[sub 2]-MgO multicomponent ceramics, nanocrystalline oxide ceramics, and Si[sub 3]N[sub 4], as well as lead-zirconate-titanate piezoceramics as one of the most interesting classes of functional ceramics.

  12. High-Voltage, High-Power Gaseous Electronics Switch For Electric Grid Power Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerer, Timothy J.

    2014-05-01

    We are developing a high-voltage, high-power gas switch for use in low-cost power conversion terminals on the electric power grid. Direct-current (dc) power transmission has many advantages over alternating current (ac) transmission, but at present the high cost of ac-dc power interconversion limits the use of dc. The gas switch we are developing conducts current through a magnetized cold cathode plasma in hydrogen or helium to reach practical current densities > 1 A/cm2. Thermal and sputter damage of the cathode by the incident ion flux is a major technical risk, and is being addressed through use of a ``self-healing'' liquid metal cathode (eg, gallium). Plasma conditions and cathode sputtering loss are estimated by analyzing plasma spectral emission. A particle-in-cell plasma model is used to understand various aspects of switch operation, including the conduction phase (where plasma densities can exceed 1013 cm-3), the switch-open phase (where the high-voltage must be held against gas breakdown on the left side of Paschen's curve), and the switching transitions (especially the opening process, which is initiated by forming an ion-matrix sheath adjacent to a control grid). The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000298.

  13. High-temperature alloys for high-power thermionic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Kwang S.; Jacobson, D.L.; D'cruz, L.; Luo, Anhua; Chen, Bor-Ling.

    1990-08-01

    The need for structural materials with useful strength above 1600 k has stimulated interest in refractory-metal alloys. Tungsten possesses an extreme high modulus of elasticity as well as the highest melting temperature among metals, and hence is being considered as one of the most promising candidate materials for high temperature structural applications such as space nuclear power systems. This report is divided into three chapters covering the following: (1) the processing of tungsten base alloys; (2) the tensile properties of tungsten base alloys; and (3) creep behavior of tungsten base alloys. Separate abstracts were prepared for each chapter. (SC)

  14. Collective backscattering of gyrotron radiation by small-scale plasma density fluctuations in large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Kharchev, Nikolay; Batanov, German; Petrov, Alexandr; Sarksyan, Karen; Skvortsova, Nina; Tanaka, Kenji; Kubo, Shin; Igami, Hiroe; Azuma, Yoshifumi; Tsuji-Iio, Shunji

    2008-10-15

    A version of the collective backscattering diagnostic using gyrotron radiation for small-scale turbulence is described. The diagnostic is used to measure small-scale (k{sub s}{approx_equal}34 cm{sup -1}) plasma density fluctuations in large helical device experiments on the electron cyclotron heating of plasma with the use of 200 kW 82.7 GHz heating gyrotron. A good signal to noise ratio during plasma production phase was obtained, while contamination of stray light increased during plasma build-up phase. The effect of the stray radiation was investigated. The available quasioptical system of the heating system was utilized for this purpose.

  15. Numerical Simulation of MIG for 42 GHz, 200 kW Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Udaybir; Bera, Anirban; Kumar, Narendra; Purohit, L. P.; Sinha, Ashok K.

    2010-06-01

    A triode type magnetron injection gun (MIG) of a 42 GHz, 200 kW gyrotron for an Indian TOKAMAK system is designed by using the commercially available code EGUN. The operating voltages of the modulating anode and the accelerating anode are 29 kV and 65 kV respectively. The operating mode of the gyrotron is TE03 and it is operated in fundamental harmonic. The simulated results of MIG obtained with the EGUN code are validated with another trajectory code TRAK.

  16. Stable coaxial-waveguide gyrotron backward-wave oscillator with distributed losses

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, C. L.

    2010-10-15

    This study analyzes the performance of a coaxial-waveguide gyrotron backward-wave oscillator (gyro-BWO) operating at the fundamental harmonic by considering mode competition, which may be attributed to higher-order axial modes and competing transverse modes. In the coaxial waveguide with a short length and uniform cross section, the threshold currents of the higher-order axial modes are substantially higher than the operating current. Additionally, when the beam voltage or the magnetic field is adjusted, the oscillation that neighbors the minimum start-oscillation current of a transverse mode has a positive-k{sub z} field profile, and is excited near the cutoff frequency. As a result, the distributed wall losses at the downstream end of the interaction structure effectively damp the positive-k{sub z} field, and raise significantly the minimum start-oscillation currents of the competing transverse modes. This study also investigates how the parameters, including lossy section length, outer wall resistivity, inner wall resistivity, and ratio of the outer radius to the inner radius, affect the start-oscillation currents of the competing transverse modes in order to obtain stable operation conditions in the frequency tuning range. As is forecasted, when using a 15 A electron beam, the Ka-band coaxial gyro-BWO produces an output power of 137 kW and 3 dB bandwidth of 4.2% by magnetic tuning and an output power of 145 kW and 3dB bandwidth of 2.0% by beam voltage tuning.

  17. High-Power Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.

    2001-01-01

    High-power electromagnetic thrusters have been proposed as primary in-space propulsion options for several of the bold new interplanetary and deep space missions envisioned by the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Strategic Enterprise. As the lead center for electric propulsion, the NASA Glenn Research Center is actively involved in the design, development, and testing of high-power electromagnetic technologies to meet these demanding mission requirements. One concept of particular interest is the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster, shown schematically in the preceding figure. In its basic form, the MPD thruster consists of a central cathode surrounded by a concentric cylindrical anode. A high-current arc is struck between the anode and cathode, which ionizes and accelerates a gas (plasma) propellant. In the self-field version of the thruster, an azimuthal magnetic field generated by the current returning through the cathode interacts with the radial discharge current flowing through the plasma to produce an axial electromagnetic body force, providing thrust. In applied field-versions of the thruster, a magnetic field coil surrounding the anode is used to provide additional radial and axial magnetic fields that can help stabilize and accelerate the plasma propellant. The following figure shows an experimental megawatt-class MPD thruster developed at Glenn. The MPD thruster is fitted inside a magnetic field coil, which in turn is mounted on a thrust stand supported by thin metal flexures. A calibrated position transducer is used to determine the force provided by the thruster as a function of thrust stand displacement. Power to the thruster is supplied by a 250-kJ capacitor bank, which provides up to 30- MW to the thruster for a period of 2 msec. This short period of time is sufficient to establish thruster performance similar to steady-state operation, and it allows a number of thruster designs to be quickly and economically evaluated. In concert

  18. High Power Flex-Propellant Arcjet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.

    2011-01-01

    implied nearly frozen flow in the nozzle and yielded performance ranges of 800-1100 sec for hydrogen and 400-600 sec for ammonia. Inferred thrust-to-power ratios were in the range of 30-10 lbf/MWe for hydrogen and 60-20 lbf/MWe for ammonia. Successful completion of this test series represents a fundamental milestone in the progression of high power arcjet technology, and it is hoped that the results may serve as a reliable touchstone for the future development of MW-class regeneratively-cooled flex-propellant plasma rockets.

  19. Frequency stable high power lasers in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of a laser heterodyne gravity wave antenna that would operate in solar orbit with a one million kilometer path length is discussed. Laser technology that would be appropriate for operation of this space-based gravity wave detector is also discussed. The rapid progress in diode laser coupled with the energy storage and potentially sub-Hertz linewidths of solid state lasers, and the possibility of efficient frequency conversion by nonlinear optical techniques defines a technology that is appropriate for laser interferometry in space. The present status of diode-laser-pumped, solid state lasers is summarized and future progress is projected in areas of linewidth control, high average power, operating efficiency, and operational lifetimes that are essential for space-based applications.

  20. Modulation instability in high power laser amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Rubenchik, Alexander M; Turitsyn, Sergey K; Fedoruk, Michail P

    2010-01-18

    The modulation instability (MI) is one of the main factors responsible for the degradation of beam quality in high-power laser systems. The so-called B-integral restriction is commonly used as the criteria for MI control in passive optics devices. For amplifiers the adiabatic model, assuming locally the Bespalov-Talanov expression for MI growth, is commonly used to estimate the destructive impact of the instability. We present here the exact solution of MI development in amplifiers. We determine the parameters which control the effect of MI in amplifiers and calculate the MI growth rate as a function of those parameters. The safety range of operational parameters is presented. The results of the exact calculations are compared with the adiabatic model, and the range of validity of the latest is determined. We demonstrate that for practical situations the adiabatic approximation noticeably overestimates MI. The additional margin of laser system design is quantified.

  1. High power phase conjugated solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.; Zapata, L.E.; Hermann, M.R.

    1994-07-01

    Three laser systems that are being developed for use in x-ray generation which incorporate SBS phase conjugate mirrors are described. A 25J/pulse Nd:glass laser is being developed for commercial proximity print x-ray lithography; a 0.5J/pulse, 1.3 kHz pulse repetition frequency laser is being built for soft x-ray projection lithography; and a 1 kJ/pulse laser driver for a table top x-ray laser has been designed. The results of prototypical experimental investigations are presented and the basic design principles for high average power phase conjugated laser systems shared by each of these lasers are discussed.

  2. Multiphoton imaging with high peak power VECSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkhanov, Shamil; Quarterman, Adrian H.; Swift, Samuel; Praveen, Bavishna B.; Smyth, Conor J. C.; Wilcox, Keith G.

    2016-03-01

    Multiphoton imaging (MMPI) has become one of thee key non-invasive light microscopy techniques. This technique allows deep tissue imaging with high resolution and less photo-damage than conventional confocal microscopy. MPI is type of laser-scanning microscopy that employs localized nonlinear excitation, so that fluorescence is excited only with is scanned focal volume. For many years, Ti: sapphire femtosecond lasers have been the leading light sources for MPI applications. However, recent developments in laser sources and new types of fluorophores indicate that longer wavelength excitation could be a good alternative for these applications. Mode-locked VECSEELs have the potential to be low cost, compact light sources for MPI systems, with the additional advantage of broad wavelength coverage through use of different semiconductor material systems. Here, we use a femtosecond fibber laser to investigate the effect average power and repetition rate has on MPI image quality, to allow us to optimize our mode-locked VVECSELs for MPI.

  3. High power solid state laser modulator

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Ball, Don G.; Cook, Edward G.

    2004-04-27

    A multi-stage magnetic modulator provides a pulse train of .+-.40 kV electrical pulses at a 5-7 kHz repetition rate to a metal vapor laser. A fractional turn transformer steps up the voltage by a factor of 80 to 1 and magnetic pulse compression is used to reduce the pulse width of the pulse train. The transformer is fabricated utilizing a rod and plate stack type of construction to achieve a high packing factor. The pulses are controlled by an SCR stack where a plurality of SCRs are electrically connected in parallel, each SCR electrically connected to a saturable inductor, all saturable inductors being wound on the same core of magnetic material for enhanced power handling characteristics.

  4. Facet engineering of high power single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Levi, Moshe; Shamay, Moshe; Tesler, Renana; Rappaport, Noam; Don, Yaroslav; Karni, Yoram; Schnitzer, Itzhak; Sicron, Noam; Shusterman, Sergey

    2011-03-01

    The ever increasing demand for high-power, high-reliability operation of single emitters at 9xx nm wavelengths requires the development of laser diodes with improved facet regions immune to both catastrophic and wear-out failure modes. In our study, we have evaluated several laser facet definition technologies in application to 90 micron aperture single emitters in asymmetric design (In)GaAs/AlGaAs based material emitting at 915, 925 and 980nm. A common epitaxy and emitter design makes for a straightforward comparison of the facet technologies investigated. Our study corroborates a clear trend of increasing difficulty in obtaining reliable laser operation from 980nm down to 915nm. At 980nm, one can employ dielectric facet passivation with a pre-clean cycle delivering a device lifetime in excess of 3,000 hours at increasing current steps. At 925nm, quantum-well intermixing can be used to define non-absorbing mirrors giving good device reliability, albeit with a large efficiency penalty. Vacuum cleaved emitters have delivered excellent reliability at 915nm, and can be expected to perform just as well at 925 and 980nm. Epitaxial regrowth of laser facets is under development and has yet to demonstrate an appreciable reliability improvement. Only a weak correlation between start-of-life catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD) levels and reliability was established. The optimized facet design has delivered maximum powers in excess of 19 MW/sq.cm (rollover limited) and product-grade 980nm single emitters with a slope efficiency of >1 W/A and a peak efficiency of >60%. The devices have accumulated over 1,500 hours of CW operation at 11W. A fiber-coupled device emits 10W ex-fiber with 47% efficiency.

  5. Design Considerations for High Temperature Power Inductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    2005-01-01

    A uniform B-field approximation model is used to develop design formulas for single-layer wound, toroidal core, ac power inductors that must handle a specified current. Such a geometry is well suited for high temperature, high frequency inductors, where removal of heat from the core becomes critical. Explicit expressions are derived for core radii, core and winding volumes, winding turns and core permeability as functions of a dimensional scaling ratio (S). A limit on the maximum allowed core B-field leads to the result that the minimum core volume is proportional to the permeability, which has a lower bound. Plots versus S are provided for a specific case, to show that good designs can be picked in the overlap regions around the minima in mass and overall size, where the mass and size are relatively flat. Data to 250 C are presented for an MPP core based inductor to show that a quasi-linear, high temperature inductor can be constructed with available materials. A similar development is applied to a toroidal air-core geometry, showing that for the same ratings, such an inductor is considerably bigger and more massive, at least in the single-layer version.

  6. High Power High Efficiency Ka-Band Power Combiners for Solid-State Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Jon C.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Chevalier, Christine T.

    2006-01-01

    Wide-band power combining units for Ka-band are simulated for use as MMIC amplifier applications. Short-slot couplers as well as magic-tees are the basic elements for the combiners. Wide bandwidth (5 GHz) and low insertion (approx.0.2 dB) and high combining efficiencies (approx.90 percent) are obtained.

  7. Electric Power Demand and Emerging Technology in Highly-sophisticated Electric Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Satoshi; Hikita, Masayuki

    In the last few years, the increase of the electric power demand has been remarkable, especially in Asia district. In such trend, the electric power system of Japan has been supplied with high quality, high reliability and highly-stabilized electric power. This is supported by highly-sophisticated electric power system which prides oneself on high voltage and large capacity. In this paper, outlines of these technologies are described. And, newest technology trends such as electric power liberalization, innovation of dispersed power source, effective utilization of natural energy are also explained. In addition, the global standards are important to make the technological level of Japan to be the world one in future.

  8. High average power switching in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hofer, W.W.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1992-06-01

    Diamond has many properties which make it ideal for a high power solid-state switch. The crystal structure of diamond is relatively well characterized. It is a semiconductor with a band-gap of 5.5 eV at 300{degree}K. The high band-gap of diamond results in a small dark current compared to Si or GaAs. As a result the breakdown field or holding voltage is very high, 1--10 MV/cm. The electron and hole mobility are approximately 2000 cm{sup 2}/v-sec. At room temperature, diamond has the highest thermal conductivity of any solid, 20 W/{degree}K -cm, about five times that of copper. This is ideal for switching because heat dissipation and thermal runaway problems are greatly mitigated. Our switch concept uses a low current (high power on-off switch. Steady advancements in CVD polycrystalline and single crystal diamond help make this possible.

  9. High average power switching in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hofer, W.W. ); Schoenbach, K.H. )

    1992-06-01

    Diamond has many properties which make it ideal for a high power solid-state switch. The crystal structure of diamond is relatively well characterized. It is a semiconductor with a band-gap of 5.5 eV at 300[degree]K. The high band-gap of diamond results in a small dark current compared to Si or GaAs. As a result the breakdown field or holding voltage is very high, 1--10 MV/cm. The electron and hole mobility are approximately 2000 cm[sup 2]/v-sec. At room temperature, diamond has the highest thermal conductivity of any solid, 20 W/[degree]K -cm, about five times that of copper. This is ideal for switching because heat dissipation and thermal runaway problems are greatly mitigated. Our switch concept uses a low current (high power on-off switch. Steady advancements in CVD polycrystalline and single crystal diamond help make this possible.

  10. 60 GHz gyrotron development program. Final report, April 1979-June 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Shively, J.F.; Bier, R.E.; Caplan, M.; Cheng, M.K.; Choi, E.; Conner, C.C.; Craig, L.J.; Evans, S.J.; Evers, S.J.; Felch, K.L.

    1986-01-01

    The original objective of this program was to develop a microwave amplifier or oscillator capable of producing 200 kW CW power output at 110 GHz. The use of cyclotron resonance interaction was pursued, and the design phases of this effort are discussed. Later, however, the program's objective was changed to develop a family of oscillators capable of producing 200 kw of peak output power at 60 GHz. Gyrotron behavior studies were performed at 28 GHz to obtain generic design information as quickly as possible. The first experimental device at 60 GHz produced over 200 kw of peak power at a pulse duration of 20 ..mu..s. Heating problems and mode interference were encountered. The second experimental tube incorporated an optimized gun location but also suffered from mode interference. The third experimental tube included modifications that reduced mode interference. It demonstrated 200 kw of peak output at 100 ms pulse duration. The fourth experimental tube, which used an older rf circuit design but in a CW configuration, produced 71.5 kW CW. The fifth experimental tube incorporated a thinner double-disc output window which improved window bandwidth and reduced window loss. This tube also incorporated modifications to the drift tunnel and cavity coupling, which had proven successful in the third experimental pulse tube tests. It produced 123 kW of CW output power at 60 GHz rf load coolant boiling and tube window failure terminated the tests. A new waterload was designed and constructed, and alternative window designs were explored. A secondary task of developing a 56 GHz CW tube produced in excess of 100 kW CW at this alternate frequency. Testing of the sixth experimental tube resulted in operation at CW output power in the range of 200 to 206 kW for an hour. Output mode purity of the seventh experimental tube was measured at 95% TE/sub 02/. The tube was operated for about forty-five minutes with CW power output over 200 kW.

  11. Method and apparatus for improved high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre

    2013-11-05

    A high power impulse magnetron sputtering apparatus and method using a vacuum chamber with a magnetron target and a substrate positioned in the vacuum chamber. A field coil being positioned between the magnetron target and substrate, and a pulsed power supply and/or a coil bias power supply connected to the field coil. The pulsed power supply connected to the field coil, and the pulsed power supply outputting power pulse widths of greater that 100 .mu.s.

  12. On reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is an ionized physical vapor deposition (IPVD) technique that is particularly promising for reactive sputtering applications. However, there are few issues that have to be resolved before the full potential of this technique can be realized. Here we give an overview of the key experimental findings for the reactive HiPIMS discharge. An increase in the discharge current is commonly observed with increased partial pressure of the reactive gas or decreased repetition pulse frequency. There are somewhat conflicting claims regarding the hysteresis effect in the reactive HiPIMS discharge as some report reduction or elimination of the hysteresis effect while others claim a feedback control is essential. The ion energy distribution of the metal ion and the atomic ion of the reactive gas are similar and extend to very high energies while the ion energy distribution of the working gas and the molecular ion of the reactive gas are similar and are much less energetic.

  13. High power linear pulsed beam annealer

    DOEpatents

    Strathman, Michael D.; Sadana, Devendra K.; True, Richard B.

    1983-01-01

    A high power pulsed electron beam is produced in a system comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid, focus ring, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube is maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring and to thereby eliminate space charge. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube and imparts motion on electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. The curvature of the tube is selected so there is no line of sight between the cathode and a target holder positioned within a second drift tube spaced coaxially from the curved tube. The second tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage that decelerates the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube and compresses the electron beam to the area of the target. The target holder can be adjusted to position the target where the cross section of the beam matches the area of the target.

  14. Measurement of Radiation Frequency of Gyrotron by GaAs Schottky Barrier Diodes Coupled with Thin-Film Slot Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kosuke; Furuya, Takashi; Tachiki, Takashi; Uchida, Takashi; Idehara, Toshitaka; Yasuoka, Yoshizumi

    2010-03-01

    Thin-film slot-antenna-coupled GaAs Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) used at the 180 GHz band were fabricated by microfabrication techniques, and the radiation frequency of a gyrotron at the University of Fukui (Gyrotron FU CW IV) was measured. In second-harmonic mixing using a local oscillator (LO) wave of 88.0899 GHz, an intermediate frequency (IF) signal of 102.8 MHz was observed and the radiation frequency of the gyrotron was found to be 176.077 GHz.

  15. A Spectrometer for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance at High Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, L. R.; Gerfen, G. J.; Bellew, B. F.; Bryant, J. A.; Hall, D. A.; Inati, S. J.; Weber, R. T.; Un, S.; Prisner, T. F.; McDermott, A. E.; Fishbein, K. W.; Kreischer, K. E.; Temkin, R. J.; Singel, D. J.; Griffin, R. G.

    A high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)/electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer operating at 211 MHz for 1H and 140 GHz for g= 2 paramagnetic centers (5 T static field) is described. The salient feature of the instrument is a cyclotron-resonance maser (gyrotron) which generates high-frequency, high-power microwave radiation. This gyrotron, which under conventional operation produces millisecond pulses at kilowatt powers, has been adapted to operate at ˜100 W for 1 to 20 s pulses and in the continuous wave mode at the 10 W power level. Experiments combining DNP with magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance were performed on samples consisting of 2% by weight of the free radical BDPA doped into polystyrene. Room-temperature DNP enhancement factors of 10 for 1H and 40 for 13C were obtained in the NMR-MAS spectra. Static DNP NMR has also been performed on samples containing nitroxides dissolved in water:glycerol solvent mixtures. Enhancements of approximately 200 have been obtained for low-temperature (14 K) 1H NMR. A pulsed/CW EPR spectrometer operating at 140 GHz has been developed in conjunction with the DNP spectrometer. Microwave sources include Gunn-diode oscillators which provide low-power (20 mW) radiation, and the gyrotron, which has been used to deliver higher power levels in pulsed experiments. Results using this spectrometer are presented for continuous-wave and echo-detected EPR, electron spin-echo-envelope modulation (ESEEM), and Fourier-transform EPR.

  16. Performance history and upgrades for the DIII-D gyrotron complex

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, J.; Anderson, J. P.; Cengher, M.; Ellis, R. A.; Gorelov, Y. A.; Kolemen, E.; Lambot, T.; Murakami, D. D.; Myrabo, L.; Noraky, S.; Parkin, K. L.; Ponce, D.; Torrezan, A.

    2015-03-12

    The gyrotron installation on the DIII-D tokamak has been in operation at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron resonance since the mid-1990s. Prior to that a large installation of ten 60 GHz tubes was operated at the fundamental resonance. The system has been upgraded regularly and is an everyday tool for experiments on DIII-D.

  17. A comparative study on the modeling of dynamic after-cavity interaction in gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramidis, K. A.; Ioannidis, Z. C.; Kern, S.; Samartsev, A.; Pagonakis, I. Gr.; Tigelis, I. G.; Jelonnek, J.

    2015-05-01

    There are cases where gyrotron interaction simulations predict dynamic After-Cavity Interaction (ACI). In dynamic ACI, a mode is excited by the electron beam at a dominant frequency in the gyrotron cavity and, at the same time, this mode is also interacting with the beam at a different frequency in the non-linear uptaper after the cavity. In favor of dynamic ACI being a real physical effect, there are some experimental findings that could be attributed to it, as well as some physical rationale indicating the possibility of a mode being resonant with the beam at different frequencies in different regions. However, the interaction codes used in dynamic ACI prediction up to now are based on simplifications that put questions on their capability of correctly simulating this effect. In this work, the shortcomings of the usual simplifications with respect to dynamic ACI modeling, namely, the trajectory approach and the single-frequency boundary condition, are identified. Extensive simulations of dynamic ACI cases are presented, using several "in-house" as well as commercial codes. We report on the comparison and the assessment of different modeling approaches and their results and we discuss whether, in some cases, dynamic ACI can be a numerical artifact or not. Although the possibility of existence of dynamic ACI in gyrotrons is not disputed, it is concluded that the widely used trajectory approach for gyrotron interaction modeling is questionable for simulating dynamic ACI and can lead to misleading results.

  18. Concept of electric propulsion realization for high power space tug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenkov, L. E.; Semenkin, A. V.; Solodukhin, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Popular at the beginning of the Space Age, ambitious projects aimed at Moon, Mars, and other space objects exploration, have returned with new technology and design level. High power space tug with electric propulsion system (EPS) is mainly considered as a transport vehicle for such missions. Modern high power space tugs projects as well as their spacecraft (SC) power and propulsion systems are reviewed in the paper. The main technologies and design solutions needed for high-power EPS realization are considered.

  19. Anode arc motion in high power arcjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, W. J.; O'Hair, E. A.; Hatfield, L. L.; Kristiansen, M.; Mankins, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    The long-term operational lifetime of most medium to high power arcjets is currently limited by the rapid deterioration of the arcjet electrodes. To a large extent, the rate of this deterioration is related to the motion of the arc discharge on the electrode surfaces. This paper details a series of experiments aimed at studying the temporal behavior of dc arcs on a water-cooled radially-segmented 30 kW class arcjet anode. The experimental anode used for these tests was made of copper, and was divided into four equivalent radial segments which were electrically isolated with aluminum oxide gaskets. The current carried by each segment was measured independently using four calibrated resistive shunts, and was analyzed by digital computer. The tests were limited to nitrogen propellant over a current range of 100-250 A dc. Results show that for the range of total currents considered here, the current distribution in the segmented arcjet anode is generally asymmetric, exhibiting random fluctuations over a wide range of frequencies.

  20. Anode arc motion in high power arcjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, W. J.; O'Hair, E. A.; Hatfield, L. L.; Kristiansen, M.; Mankins, J. S.

    1992-07-01

    The long-term operational lifetime of most medium to high power arcjets is currently limited by the rapid deterioration of the arcjet electrodes. To a large extent, the rate of this deterioration is related to the motion of the arc discharge on the electrode surfaces. This paper details a series of experiments aimed at studying the temporal behavior of dc arcs on a water-cooled radially-segmented 30 kW class arcjet anode. The experimental anode used for these tests was made of copper, and was divided into four equivalent radial segments which were electrically isolated with aluminum oxide gaskets. The current carried by each segment was measured independently using four calibrated resistive shunts, and was analyzed by digital computer. The tests were limited to nitrogen propellant over a current range of 100-250 A dc. Results show that for the range of total currents considered here, the current distribution in the segmented arcjet anode is generally asymmetric, exhibiting random fluctuations over a wide range of frequencies.

  1. The SPES High Power ISOL production target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrighetto, A.; Corradetti, S.; Ballan, M.; Borgna, F.; Manzolaro, M.; Scarpa, D.; Monetti, A.; Rossignoli, M.; Silingardi, R.; Mozzi, A.; Vivian, G.; Boratto, E.; De Ruvo, L.; Sattin, N.; Meneghetti, G.; Oboe, R.; Guerzoni, M.; Margotti, A.; Ferrari, M.; Zenoni, A.; Prete, G.

    2016-11-01

    SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is a facility under construction at INFN-LNL (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro), aimed to produce intense neutron-rich radioactive ion beams (RIBs). These will be obtained using the ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) method, bombarding a uranium carbide target with a proton beam of 40MeV energy and currents up to 200μA. The target configuration was designed to obtain a high number of fissions, up to 1013 per second, low power deposition and fast release of the produced isotopes. The exotic isotopes generated in the target are ionized, mass separated and re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10AMeV and higher, for masses in the region of A = 130 amu , with an expected rate on the secondary target up to 109 particles per second. In this work, recent results on the R&D activities regarding the SPES RIB production target-ion source system are reported.

  2. Complete low power controller for high voltage power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, R.; Blanar, G.

    1997-12-31

    The MHV100 is a custom CMOS integrated circuit, developed for the AMS experiment. It provides complete control for a single channel high voltage (HV) generator and integrates all the required digital communications, D to A and A to D converters, the analog feedback loop and output drivers. This chip has been designed for use in both distributed high voltage systems or for low cost single channel high voltage systems. The output voltage and current range is determined by the external components.

  3. Design concept and performance considerations for fast high power semiconductor switching for high repetition rate and high power excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tatsumi; Kakizaki, Kouji; Takagi, Shigeyuki; Satoh, Saburoh; Shinohe, Takashi; Ohashi, Hiromichi; Endo, Fumihiko; Okamura, Katsuya; Ishii, Akira; Teranishi, Tsuneharu; Yasuoka, Koichi

    1997-07-01

    A semiconductor switching power supply has been developed, in which a novel structure semiconductor device, metal-oxide-semiconductor assisted gate-triggered thyristor (MAGT) was incorporated with a single stage magnetic pulse compression circuit (MPC). The MAGT was specially designed to directly replace thyratrons in a power supply for a high repetition rate laser. Compared with conventional high power semiconductor switching devices, it was designed to enable a fast switching, retaining a high blocking voltage and to extremely reduce the transient turn-on power losses, enduring a higher peak current. A maximum peak current density of 32 kA/cm2 and a current density risetime rate di/dt of 142 kA/(cm2×μs) were obtained at the chip area with an applied anode voltage of 1.5 kV. A MAGT switching unit connecting 32 MAGTs in series was capable of switching on more than 25 kV-300 A at a repetition rate of 5 kHz, which, coupled with the MPC, was equivalent to the capability of a high power thyratron. A high repetition rate and high power XeCl excimer laser was excited by the power supply. The results confirmed the stable laser operation of a repetition rate of up to 5 kHz, the world record to our knowledge. An average output power of 0.56 kW was obtained at 5 kHz where the shortage of the total discharge current was subjoined by a conventional power supply with seven parallel switching thyratrons, simultaneously working, for the MAGT power supply could not switch a greater current than that switched by one thyratron. It was confirmed by those excitations that the MAGT unit with the MPC could replace a high power commercial thyratron directly for excimer lasers. The switching stability was significantly superior to that of the thyratron in a high repetition rate region, judging from the discharge current wave forms. It should be possible for the MAGT unit, in the future, to directly switch the discharge current within a rise time of 0.1 μs with a magnetic assist.

  4. Operation of high power converters in parallel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Inouye, L. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Three different unequal power sharing approaches for parallel operation of converters - droop, master-slave, and proportional adjustment - are discussed. The approaches have been incorporated in the breadboard dc-dc converter units used in the space station power management and distribution dc test bed at the Lewis Research Center, where the system operation has been verified.

  5. High-power converters for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. N.; Cooper, Randy

    1991-01-01

    Phase 1 was a concept definition effort to extend space-type dc/dc converter technology to the megawatt level with a weight of less than 0.1 kg/kW (220 lb./MW). Two system designs were evaluated in Phase 1. Each design operates from a 5 kV stacked fuel cell source and provides a voltage step-up to 100 kV at 10 A for charging capacitors (100 pps at a duty cycle of 17 min on, 17 min off). Both designs use an MCT-based, full-bridge inverter, gaseous hydrogen cooling, and crowbar fault protection. The GE-CRD system uses an advanced high-voltage transformer/rectifier filter is series with a resonant tank circuit, driven by an inverter operating at 20 to 50 kHz. Output voltage is controlled through frequency and phase shift control. Fast transient response and stability is ensured via optimal control. Super-resonant operation employing MCTs provides the advantages of lossless snubbing, no turn-on switching loss, use of medium-speed diodes, and intrinsic current limiting under load-fault conditions. Estimated weight of the GE-CRD system is 88 kg (1.5 cu ft.). Efficiency of 94.4 percent and total system loss is 55.711 kW operating at 1 MW load power. The Maxwell system is based on a resonance transformer approach using a cascade of five LC resonant sections at 100 kHz. The 5 kV bus is converted to a square wave, stepped-up to a 100 kV sine wave by the LC sections, rectified, and filtered. Output voltage is controlled with a special series regulator circuit. Estimated weight of the Maxwell system is 83.8 kg (4.0 cu ft.). Efficiency is 87.2 percent and total system loss is 146.411 kW operating at 1 MW load power.

  6. High-power converters for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. N.; Cooper, Randy

    1991-06-01

    Phase 1 was a concept definition effort to extend space-type dc/dc converter technology to the megawatt level with a weight of less than 0.1 kg/kW (220 lb./MW). Two system designs were evaluated in Phase 1. Each design operates from a 5 kV stacked fuel cell source and provides a voltage step-up to 100 kV at 10 A for charging capacitors (100 pps at a duty cycle of 17 min on, 17 min off). Both designs use an MCT-based, full-bridge inverter, gaseous hydrogen cooling, and crowbar fault protection. The GE-CRD system uses an advanced high-voltage transformer/rectifier filter is series with a resonant tank circuit, driven by an inverter operating at 20 to 50 kHz. Output voltage is controlled through frequency and phase shift control. Fast transient response and stability is ensured via optimal control. Super-resonant operation employing MCTs provides the advantages of lossless snubbing, no turn-on switching loss, use of medium-speed diodes, and intrinsic current limiting under load-fault conditions. Estimated weight of the GE-CRD system is 88 kg (1.5 cu ft.). Efficiency of 94.4 percent and total system loss is 55.711 kW operating at 1 MW load power. The Maxwell system is based on a resonance transformer approach using a cascade of five LC resonant sections at 100 kHz. The 5 kV bus is converted to a square wave, stepped-up to a 100 kV sine wave by the LC sections, rectified, and filtered. Output voltage is controlled with a special series regulator circuit. Estimated weight of the Maxwell system is 83.8 kg (4.0 cu ft.). Efficiency is 87.2 percent and total system loss is 146.411 kW operating at 1 MW load power.

  7. Extension of high T{sub e} regime with upgraded ECRH system in the LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Mutoh, T.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Yamada, I.; Nakano, H.; Yokoyama, M.; Ido, T.; Shimizu, A.; Seki, R.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; and others

    2014-02-12

    Enhancement of the output power per gyrotron has been planned in the Large Helical Device (LHD). Three 77-GHz gyrotrons with an output power of more than 1 MW have been operated. In addition, a high power gyrotron with the frequency of 154 GHz (1 MW/5 s, 0.5 MW/CW) was newly installed in 2012 and the total injection power of ECRH reached 4.6 MW. The operational regime of ECRH plasma on the LHD has been extended due to the upgraded ECRH system such as the central electron temperature T{sub e0} = 13.5 keV with n{sub e} = 1×10{sup 19}m{sup −3}. In the LHD, an electron-internal-transport barrier (e-ITB) related to the production of high T{sub e} plasmas has been realized by strongly centre-focused ECRH. The electron thermal confinement clearly improved inside the e-ITB. The radial electric field was measured using the heavy ion beam probe. The formation of the positive E{sub r} was observed in the core region, which well agreed with the prediction of the neoclassical transport theory. The energy confinement characteristics have been investigated in the ECRH plasmas. It was found that higher plasma stored energy and lower radiation power was realized in the outward configuration. The plasma stored energy of 530 kJ with n{sub e} = 3.2×10{sup 19}m{sup −3}, which is the 1.7 times larger than the previous record in the ECRH plasma in the LHD, has been successfully achieved.

  8. High-power semiconductor separate-confinement double heterostructure lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, I S

    2010-10-15

    The review is devoted to high-power semiconductor lasers. Historical reference is presented, physical and technological foundations are considered, and the concept of high-power semiconductor lasers is formulated. Fundamental and technological reasons limiting the optical power of a semiconductor laser are determined. The results of investigations of cw and pulsed high-power semiconductor lasers are presented. Main attention is paid to inspection of the results of experimental studies of single high-power semiconductor lasers. The review is mainly based on the data obtained in the laboratory of semiconductor luminescence and injection emitters at the A.F. Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute. (review)

  9. Laboratory Astrophysics on High Power Lasers and Pulsed Power Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A

    2002-02-05

    Over the past decade a new genre of laboratory astrophysics has emerged, made possible by the new high energy density (HED) experimental facilities, such as large lasers, z-pinch generators, and high current particle accelerators. (Remington, 1999; 2000; Drake, 1998; Takabe, 2001) On these facilities, macroscopic collections of matter can be created in astrophysically relevant conditions, and its collective properties measured. Examples of processes and issues that can be experimentally addressed include compressible hydrodynamic mixing, strong shock phenomena, radiative shocks, radiation flow, high Mach-number jets, complex opacities, photoionized plasmas, equations of state of highly compressed matter, and relativistic plasmas. These processes are relevant to a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as supernovae and supernova remnants, astrophysical jets, radiatively driven molecular clouds, accreting black holes, planetary interiors, and gamma-ray bursts. These phenomena will be discussed in the context of laboratory astrophysics experiments possible on existing and future HED facilities.

  10. Advanced high-power transfer through rotary interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, P.

    1984-01-01

    A roll-ring design that is uniquely suited for rotary signal/power transfer in space applications is described. Two high-power configurations of the roll ring were developed. Present lab-proven hardware is available with power transfer capability of 2 kW at 200 amps and higher power units with 100-kW capability are in the design stage. Theoretical analysis indicated that power levels of kW are possible.

  11. Thermoelectric Powered High Temperature Wireless Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucukkomurler, Ahmet

    This study describes use of a thermoelectric power converter to transform waste heat into electrical energy to power an RF receiver and transmitter, for use in harsh environment wireless temperature sensing and telemetry. The sensing and transmitting module employs a DS-1820 low power digital temperature sensor to perform temperature to voltage conversion, an ATX-34 RF transmitter, an ARX-34 RF receiver module, and a PIC16f84A microcontroller to synchronize data communication between them. The unit has been tested in a laboratory environment, and promising results have been obtained for an actual automotive wireless under hood temperature sensing and telemetry implementation.

  12. High power densities from high-temperature material interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) and metallic-fluid heat pipes (MFHPs) offer important and unique advantages in terrestrial and space energy processing. And they are well suited to serve together synergistically. TEC and MFHPs operate through working-fluid vaporization, condensation cycles that accept great thermal power densities at high temperatures. TEC and MFHPs have apparently simple, isolated performance mechanisms that are somewhat similar. And they also have obviously difficult, complected material problems that again are somewhat similar. Intensive investigation reveals that aspects of their operating cycles and material problems tend to merge: high-temperature material effects determine the level and lifetime of performance. Simplified equations verify the preceding statement for TEC and MFHPs. Material properties and interactions exert primary influences on operational effectiveness. And thermophysicochemical stabilities dictate operating temperatures which regulate the thermoemissive currents of TEC and the vaporization flow rates of MFHPs. Major high-temperature material problems of TEC and MFHPs have been solved. These solutions lead to productive, cost-effective applications of current TEC and MFHPs - and point to significant improvements with anticipated technological gains.

  13. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Rob; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the power frequencies for the doubled fiber laser. It includes information on the 780 nm laser, second harmonic generation in one crystal, cascading crystals, the tenability of laser systems, laser cooling, and directions for future work.

  14. Advances in bonding technology for high power diode laser bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingwei; Li, Xiaoning; Hou, Dong; Feng, Feifei; Liu, Yalong; Liu, Xingsheng

    2015-02-01

    Due to their high electrical-optical conversion efficiency, compact size and long lifetime, high power diode lasers have found increased applications in many fields. As the improvement of device technology, high power diode laser bars with output power of tens or hundreds watts have been commercially available. With the increase of high current and output power, the reliability and lifetime of high power diode laser bars becomes a challenge, especially under harsh working conditions and hard-pulse operations. The bonding technology is still one of the bottlenecks of the advancement of high power diode laser bars. Currently, materials used in bonding high power diode laser bars are commonly indium and goldtin solders. Experimental and field application results indicates that the lifetime and reliability of high power diode laser bars bonded by gold-tin solder is much better than that bonded by indium solder which is prone to thermal fatigue, electro-migration and oxidization. In this paper, we review the bonding technologies for high power diode laser bars and present the advances in bonding technology for single bars, horizontal bar arrays and vertical bar stacks. We will also present the challenges and issues in bonding technology for high power diode laser bars and discuss some approaches and strategies in addressing the challenges and issues.

  15. Test Results From a High Power Linear Alternator Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.; Hervol, David S.; Gardner, Brent G.

    2010-01-01

    Stirling cycle power conversion is an enabling technology that provides high thermodynamic efficiency but also presents unique challenges with regard to electrical power generation, management, and distribution. The High Power Linear Alternator Test Rig (HPLATR) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio is a demonstration test bed that simulates electrical power generation from a Stirling engine driven alternator. It implements the high power electronics necessary to provide a well regulated DC user load bus. These power electronics use a novel design solution that includes active rectification and power factor control, active ripple suppression, along with a unique building block approach that permits the use of high voltage or high current alternator designs. This report describes the HPLATR, the test program, and the operational results.

  16. Test Results from a High Power Linear Alternator Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.; Hervol, David S.; Gardner, Brent G.

    2010-01-01

    Stirling cycle power conversion is an enabling technology that provides high thermodynamic efficiency but also presents unique challenges with regard to electrical power generation, management, and distribution. The High Power Linear Alternator Test Rig (HPLATR) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH is a demonstration test bed that simulates electrical power generation from a Stirling engine driven alternator. It implements the high power electronics necessary to provide a well regulated DC user load bus. These power electronics use a novel design solution that includes active rectification and power factor control, active ripple suppression, along with a unique building block approach that permits the use of high voltage or high current alternator designs. This presentation describes the HPLATR, the test program, and the operational results.

  17. POWOW: A Modular, High Power Spacecraft Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A robust space infrastructure encompasses a broad range of mission needs along with an imperative to reduce costs of satellites meeting those needs. A critical commodity for science, commercial and civil satellites is power at an affordable cost. The POWOW (POwer WithOut Wires) spacecraft concept was created to provide, at one end of the scale, multi-megawatts of power yet also be composed of modules that can meet spacecraft needs in the kilowatt range. With support from the NASA-sponsored Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology Program, the POWOW spacecraft concept was designed to meet Mars mission needs - while at the same time having elements applicable to a range of other missions. At Mars, the vehicle would reside in an aerosynchronous orbit and beam power to a variety of locations on the surface. It is the purpose of this paper to present the latest concept design results. The Space Power Institute along with four companies: Able Engineering, Inc., Entech, Inc., Primex Aerospace Co., and TECSTAR have produced a modular, power-rich electrically propelled spacecraft design that meets these requirements. In addition, it also meets a range of civil and commercial needs. The spacecraft design is based on multijunction Ill-V solar cells, the new Stretched Lens Aurora (SLA) module, a lightweight array design based on a multiplicity of 8 kW end-of-life subarrays and electric thrusters. The solar cells have excellent radiation resistance and efficiencies above 30%. The SLA has a concentration ratio up to 15x while maintaining an operating temperature of 80 C. The design of the 8 kW array building block will be presented and its applicability to commercial and government missions will be discussed. Electric propulsion options include Hall, MPD and ion thrusters of various power levels and trade studies have been conducted to define the most advantageous options. The present baseline spacecraft design providing 900 kW using technologies expected to be

  18. High-voltage, high-power, solid-state remote power controllers for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Two general types of remote power controller (RPC) that combine the functions of a circuit breaker and a switch were developed for use in direct-current (dc) aerospace systems. Power-switching devices used in these designs are the relatively new gate-turnoff thyristor (GTO) and poweer metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET). The various RPC's can switch dc voltages to 1200 V and currents to 100 A. Seven different units were constructed and subjected to comprehensive laboratory and thermal vacuum testing. Two of these were dual units that switch both positive and negative voltages simultaneously. The RPC's using MOSFET's have slow turnon and turnoff times to limit voltage spiking from high di/dt. The GTO's have much faster transition times. All RPC's have programmable overload tripout and microsecond tripout for large overloads. The basic circuits developed can be used to build switchgear limited only by the ratings of the switching device used.

  19. High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier: From the Lab to Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III; Bell, Joseph L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the beginnings of space travel, various microwave power amplifier designs have been employed. These included Class-A, -B, and -C bias arrangements. However, shared limitation of these topologies is the inherent high total consumption of input power associated with the generation of radio frequency (RF)/microwave power. The power amplifier has always been the largest drain for the limited available power on the spacecraft. Typically, the conversion efficiency of a microwave power amplifier is 10 to 20%. For a typical microwave power amplifier of 20 watts, input DC power of at least 100 watts is required. Such a large demand for input power suggests that a better method of RF/microwave power generation is required. The price paid for using a linear amplifier where high linearity is unnecessary includes higher initial and operating costs, lower DC-to-RF conversion efficiency, high power consumption, higher power dissipation and the accompanying need for higher capacity heat removal means, and an amplifier that is more prone to parasitic oscillation. The first use of a higher efficiency mode of power generation was described by Baxandall in 1959. This higher efficiency mode, Class-D, is achieved through distinct switching techniques to reduce the power losses associated with switching, conduction, and gate drive losses of a given transistor.

  20. High power single-frequency Innoslab amplifier.

    PubMed

    Han, Ke-Zhen; Ning, Jian; Zhang, Bai-Tao; Wang, Yi-Ran; Zhang, Hai-Kun; Nie, Hong-Kun; Sun, Xiao-Li; He, Jing-Liang

    2016-07-10

    A laser diode array (LDA) end-pumped continuous-wave single-frequency Innoslab amplifier has been demonstrated. The Gaussian ray bundle method was used to model the light propagation in the Innoslab amplifier for the first time to the best of our knowledge. With discrete reflectors, the maximum output of 60 W with a linewidth of 44 MHz was achieved under the pump power of 245 W, corresponding to the optical-optical efficiency of 24.5%. The beam quality factor M2 at the output power of 51 W in the horizontal and vertical direction was measured to be 1.4 and 1.3, respectively. The long-term power instability in 2 h was less than 0.25%. PMID:27409308