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Sample records for high pressure freezing

  1. Transmission electron microscopy of thin sections of Drosophila: high-pressure freezing and freeze-substitution.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Kent L; Sharp, David J; Rickoll, Wayne

    2012-04-01

    The state of the art in fine-structure preservation for thin sectioning can be achieved by using fast-freezing technology followed by freeze substitution and embedding in resin. Samples prepared by high-pressure freezing are estimated to be "fixed" in 20-50 msec. Fast freezing also freezes every cell component regardless of its chemistry. Once frozen, tissues can be processed in a variety of ways before viewing in the electron microscope; here we describe only freeze substitution. In freeze substitution, cells are dehydrated at very low temperatures and cell water is replaced with organic solvent at -80°C to -90°C. At this temperature, large molecules such as proteins are immobilized, yet smaller molecules such as water (ice) can be dissolved and replaced with organic solvents, e.g., acetone. The ideal way to do freeze substitution is with a dedicated freeze-substitution device such as the Leica AFS2 system. These devices allow programming of the times and temperatures needed. Alternatively, if this equipment is not available, freeze substitution can still be performed using items commonly found around the laboratory, as is described here. This protocol is useful for preparing thin sections of Drosophila when the best possible preservation of ultrastructure and antigenicity is required.

  2. Tandem High-pressure Freezing and Quick Freeze Substitution of Plant Tissues for Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bobik, Krzysztof; Dunlap, John R.; Burch-Smith, Tessa M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1940s transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been providing biologists with ultra-high resolution images of biological materials. Yet, because of laborious and time-consuming protocols that also demand experience in preparation of artifact-free samples, TEM is not considered a user-friendly technique. Traditional sample preparation for TEM used chemical fixatives to preserve cellular structures. High-pressure freezing is the cryofixation of biological samples under high pressures to produce very fast cooling rates, thereby restricting ice formation, which is detrimental to the integrity of cellular ultrastructure. High-pressure freezing and freeze substitution are currently the methods of choice for producing the highest quality morphology in resin sections for TEM. These methods minimize the artifacts normally associated with conventional processing for TEM of thin sections. After cryofixation the frozen water in the sample is replaced with liquid organic solvent at low temperatures, a process called freeze substitution. Freeze substitution is typically carried out over several days in dedicated, costly equipment. A recent innovation allows the process to be completed in three hours, instead of the usual two days. This is typically followed by several more days of sample preparation that includes infiltration and embedding in epoxy resins before sectioning. Here we present a protocol combining high-pressure freezing and quick freeze substitution that enables plant sample fixation to be accomplished within hours. The protocol can readily be adapted for working with other tissues or organisms. Plant tissues are of special concern because of the presence of aerated spaces and water-filled vacuoles that impede ice-free freezing of water. In addition, the process of chemical fixation is especially long in plants due to cell walls impeding the penetration of the chemicals to deep within the tissues. Plant tissues are therefore particularly challenging, but

  3. Tandem high-pressure freezing and quick freeze substitution of plant tissues for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bobik, Krzysztof; Dunlap, John R; Burch-Smith, Tessa M

    2014-10-13

    Since the 1940s transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been providing biologists with ultra-high resolution images of biological materials. Yet, because of laborious and time-consuming protocols that also demand experience in preparation of artifact-free samples, TEM is not considered a user-friendly technique. Traditional sample preparation for TEM used chemical fixatives to preserve cellular structures. High-pressure freezing is the cryofixation of biological samples under high pressures to produce very fast cooling rates, thereby restricting ice formation, which is detrimental to the integrity of cellular ultrastructure. High-pressure freezing and freeze substitution are currently the methods of choice for producing the highest quality morphology in resin sections for TEM. These methods minimize the artifacts normally associated with conventional processing for TEM of thin sections. After cryofixation the frozen water in the sample is replaced with liquid organic solvent at low temperatures, a process called freeze substitution. Freeze substitution is typically carried out over several days in dedicated, costly equipment. A recent innovation allows the process to be completed in three hours, instead of the usual two days. This is typically followed by several more days of sample preparation that includes infiltration and embedding in epoxy resins before sectioning. Here we present a protocol combining high-pressure freezing and quick freeze substitution that enables plant sample fixation to be accomplished within hours. The protocol can readily be adapted for working with other tissues or organisms. Plant tissues are of special concern because of the presence of aerated spaces and water-filled vacuoles that impede ice-free freezing of water. In addition, the process of chemical fixation is especially long in plants due to cell walls impeding the penetration of the chemicals to deep within the tissues. Plant tissues are therefore particularly challenging, but

  4. The initial freezing temperature of foods at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Guignon, B; Torrecilla, J S; Otero, L; Ramos, A M; Molina-García, A D; Sanz, P D

    2008-04-01

    The Pure water (P,T)-phase diagram is known in the form of empirical equations or tables from nearly a century as a result of Bridgman's work. However, few data are available on other aqueous systems probably due to the difficulty of high-pressure measurements. As an alternative, six approaches are presented here to obtain the food phase diagrams in the range of pressure 0.1-210 MPa. Both empirical and theoretical methods are described including the use of an artificial neural network (ANN). Experimental freezing points obtained at the laboratory of the authors and from literature are statistically compared to the calculated ones. About 400 independent freezing data points of aqueous solutions, gels, and foods are analysed. A polynomial equation is the most accurate and simple method to describe the entire melting curve. The ANN is the most versatile model, as only one model allows the calculation of the initial freezing point of all the aqueous systems considered. Robinson and Stokes' equation is successfully extended to the high pressures domain with an average prediction error of 0.4 degrees C. The choice of one approach over the others depends mainly on the availability of experimental data, the accuracy required and the intended use for the calculated data.

  5. High-pressure freezing and freeze substitution of Arabidopsis for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Austin, Jotham R

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of electron microscopy ultrastructural studies are to examine cellular architecture and relate the cell's structural machinery to dynamic functional roles. This aspiration is difficult to achieve if specimens have not been adequately preserved in a "living state"; hence specimen preparation is of the utmost importance for the success of any electron micrographic study. High-pressure freezing (HPF)/freeze substitution (FS) has long been recognized as the primer technique for the preservation of ultrastructure in biological samples. In most cases a basic HPF/freeze substitution protocol is sufficient to obtain superior ultrastructural preservation and structural contrast, which allows one to use more advanced microscopy techniques such as 3D electron tomography. However, for plant tissues, which have a thick cell wall, large water-filled vacuoles, and air spaces (all of which are detrimental to cryopreservation), these basic HPF/FS protocols often yield undesirable results. In particular, ice crystal artifacts and the staining of membrane systems are often poorly or negatively stained, which make 3D segmentation of a tomogram difficult. To overcome these problems, various aspects of the HPF/FS protocol can be altered, including the cryo-filler(s) used, freeze substitution cocktail, and the resin infiltration process. This chapter will describe these modifications for the preparation of plant tissues for routine electron microscopic studies, immunocytochemistry, and 3D tomographic electron imaging.

  6. Feasibility of high pressure freezing with freeze substitution after long-term storage in chemical fixatives.

    PubMed

    Venter, Chantelle; Van Der Merwe, Christiaan Frederick; Oberholzer, Hester Magdalena; Bester, Megan Jean; Taute, Helena

    2013-09-01

    Fixation of biological samples is an important process especially related to histological and ultrastructural studies. Chemical fixation was the primary method of fixing tissue for transmission electron microscopy for many years, as it provides adequate preservation of the morphology of cells and organelles. High pressure freezing (HPF) and freeze substitution (FS) is a newer alternative method that rapidly freezes non-cryoprotected samples that are then slowly heated in the FS medium, allowing penetration of the tissue to insure adequate fixation. This study addresses several issues related to tissue preservation for electron microscopy. Using mice liver tissue as model the difference between samples fixed chemically or with HPF immediately after excision, or stored before chemical or HPF fixation were tested with specific focus on the nuclear membrane. Findings are that immediate HPF is the method of choice compared to chemical fixation. Of the chemical fixatives, immediate fixation with 2.5% glutaraldehyde (GA)/formaldehyde (FA) is the best in preserving membrane morphology, 2.5% GA can be used as alternative for stored and then chemically processed samples, with 10% formalin being suitable as a storage medium only if followed by HPF fixation. Overall, storage leads to lower ultrastructural preservation, but HPF with FS can minimize these artifacts relative to other processing protocols.

  7. Inner ear tissue preservation by rapid freezing: Improving fixation by high-pressure freezing and hybrid methods

    PubMed Central

    Bullen, A.; Taylor, R.R.; Kachar, B.; Moores, C.; Fleck, R.A.; Forge, A.

    2014-01-01

    In the preservation of tissues in as ‘close to life’ state as possible, rapid freeze fixation has many benefits over conventional chemical fixation. One technique by which rapid freeze-fixation can be achieved, high pressure freezing (HPF), has been shown to enable ice crystal artefact-free freezing and tissue preservation to greater depths (more than 40 μm) than other quick-freezing methods. Despite increasingly becoming routine in electron microscopy, the use of HPF for the fixation of inner ear tissue has been limited. Assessment of the quality of preservation showed routine HPF techniques were suitable for preparation of inner ear tissues in a variety of species. Good preservation throughout the depth of sensory epithelia was achievable. Comparison to chemically fixed tissue indicated that fresh frozen preparations exhibited overall superior structural preservation of cells. However, HPF fixation caused characteristic artefacts in stereocilia that suggested poor quality freezing of the actin bundles. The hybrid technique of pre-fixation and high pressure freezing was shown to produce cellular preservation throughout the tissue, similar to that seen in HPF alone. Pre-fixation HPF produced consistent high quality preservation of stereociliary actin bundles. Optimising the preparation of samples with minimal artefact formation allows analysis of the links between ultrastructure and function in inner ear tissues. PMID:25016142

  8. Inner ear tissue preservation by rapid freezing: improving fixation by high-pressure freezing and hybrid methods.

    PubMed

    Bullen, A; Taylor, R R; Kachar, B; Moores, C; Fleck, R A; Forge, A

    2014-09-01

    In the preservation of tissues in as 'close to life' state as possible, rapid freeze fixation has many benefits over conventional chemical fixation. One technique by which rapid freeze-fixation can be achieved, high pressure freezing (HPF), has been shown to enable ice crystal artefact-free freezing and tissue preservation to greater depths (more than 40 μm) than other quick-freezing methods. Despite increasingly becoming routine in electron microscopy, the use of HPF for the fixation of inner ear tissue has been limited. Assessment of the quality of preservation showed routine HPF techniques were suitable for preparation of inner ear tissues in a variety of species. Good preservation throughout the depth of sensory epithelia was achievable. Comparison to chemically fixed tissue indicated that fresh frozen preparations exhibited overall superior structural preservation of cells. However, HPF fixation caused characteristic artefacts in stereocilia that suggested poor quality freezing of the actin bundles. The hybrid technique of pre-fixation and high pressure freezing was shown to produce cellular preservation throughout the tissue, similar to that seen in HPF alone. Pre-fixation HPF produced consistent high quality preservation of stereociliary actin bundles. Optimising the preparation of samples with minimal artefact formation allows analysis of the links between ultrastructure and function in inner ear tissues. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of high pressure freezing (HPF) on denaturation of natural actomyosin extracted from prawn (Metapenaeus ensis).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lina; Sun, Da-Wen; Zhu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Zhihang

    2017-08-15

    Effects of protein denaturation caused by high pressure freezing, involving Pressure-Factors (pressure, time) and Freezing-Factors (temperature, phase transition, recrystallization, ice crystal types), are complicated. In the current study, the conformation and functional changes of natural actomyosin (NAM) under pressure assisted freezing (PAF, (100,150,300,400,500MPa)P-20°C/25min), pressure shift freezing (PSF, (200MPa)P-20°C/25min), and immersion freezing ((0.1MPa)P-20°C/5min) after pressure was released to 0.1MPa, as compared to normal immersion freezing process (IF, (0.1MPa)P-20°C/30min). Results indicated that PSF ((200MPa)P-20°C/30min) could reduce the denaturation of frozen NAM and a pressure of 300MPa was the critical point to induce such a denaturation. During the periods of B→D in PSF or B→C→D in PAF, the generation and growth of ice crystals played an important role on changing the secondary and tertiary structure of the treated NAM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. High-pressure freezing of soybean nodules leads to an improved preservation of ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Studer, D; Hennecke, H; Müller, M

    1992-09-01

    High-pressure freezing of chemically untreated nodules of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.), in sharp contrast to chemical fixation and prefixation, appears to preserve the ultrastructure close to the native state. This is supported by the observation that the peribacteroid membrane of high-pressure-frozen samples is tightly wrapped around the bacteroids, a finding that is fully consistent with the current views on the physiology of oxygen and metabolite transport between plant cytosol and bacteroids. In soybean root nodules, the plant tissue and the enclosed bacteria are so dissimilar that conventional aldehyde-fixation procedures are unable to preserve the overall native ultrastructure. This was demonstrated by high-pressure freezing of nodules that had been pre-fixed in glutaraldehyde at various buffer molalities: no buffer strength tested preserved all ultrastructural aspects that could be seen after high-pressure freezing of chemically untreated nodules.

  11. High Pressure Freezing/Freeze Substitution Fixation Improves the Ultrastructural Assessment of Wolbachia Endosymbiont – Filarial Nematode Host Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kerstin; Beatty, Wandy L.; Weil, Gary J.; Fischer, Peter U.

    2014-01-01

    Background Wolbachia α-proteobacteria are essential for growth, reproduction and survival for many filarial nematode parasites of medical and veterinary importance. Endobacteria were discovered in filarial parasites by transmission electron microscopy in the 1970’s using chemically fixed specimens. Despite improvements of fixation and electron microscopy techniques during the last decades, methods to study the Wolbachia/filaria interaction on the ultrastructural level remained unchanged and the mechanisms for exchange of materials and for motility of endobacteria are not known. Methodology/Principal Finding We used high pressure freezing/freeze substitution to improve fixation of Brugia malayi and its endosymbiont, and this led to improved visualization of different morphological forms of Wolbachia. The three concentric, bilayer membranes that surround the endobacterial cytoplasm were well preserved. Vesicles with identical membrane structures were identified close to the endobacteria, and multiple bacteria were sometimes enclosed within a single outer membrane. Immunogold electron microscopy using a monoclonal antibody directed against Wolbachia surface protein-1 labeled the membranes that enclose Wolbachia and Wolbachia-associated vesicles. High densities of Wolbachia were observed in the lateral chords of L4 larvae, immature, and mature adult worms. Extracellular Wolbachia were sometimes present in the pseudocoelomic cavity near the developing female reproductive organs. Wolbachia-associated actin tails were not observed. Wolbachia motility may be explained by their residence within vacuoles, as they may co-opt the host cell’s secretory pathway to move within and between cells. Conclusions/Significance High pressure freezing/freeze substitution significantly improved the preservation of filarial tissues for electron microscopy to reveal membranes and sub cellular structures that could be crucial for exchange of materials between Wolbachia and its host. PMID

  12. High-pressure freezing for scanning transmission electron tomography analysis of cellular organelles.

    PubMed

    Walther, Paul; Schmid, Eberhard; Höhn, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Using an electron microscope's scanning transmission mode (STEM) for collection of tomographic datasets is advantageous compared to bright field transmission electron microscopic (TEM). For image formation, inelastic scattering does not cause chromatic aberration, since in STEM mode no image forming lenses are used after the beam has passed the sample, in contrast to regular TEM. Therefore, thicker samples can be imaged. It has been experimentally demonstrated that STEM is superior to TEM and energy filtered TEM for tomography of samples as thick as 1 μm. Even when using the best electron microscope, adequate sample preparation is the key for interpretable results. We adapted protocols for high-pressure freezing of cultivated cells from a physiological state. In this chapter, we describe optimized high-pressure freezing and freeze substitution protocols for STEM tomography in order to obtain high membrane contrast.

  13. The Use of High Pressure Freezing and Freeze Substitution to Study Host-Pathogen Interactions in Fungal Diseases of Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mims, C. W.; Celio, Gail J.; Richardson, Elizabeth A.

    2003-12-01

    This article reports on the use of high pressure freezing followed by freeze substitution (HPF/FS) to study ultrastructural details of host pathogen interactions in fungal diseases of plants. The specific host pathogen systems discussed here include a powdery mildew infection of poinsettia and rust infections of daylily and Indian strawberry. The three pathogens considered here all attack the leaves of their hosts and produce specialized hyphal branches known as haustoria that invade individual host cells without killing them. We found that HPF/FS provided excellent preservation of both haustoria and host cells for all three host pathogen systems. Preservation of fungal and host cell membranes was particularly good and greatly facilitated the detailed study of host pathogen interfaces. In some instances, HPF/FS provided information that was not available in samples prepared for study using conventional chemical fixation. On the other hand, we did encounter various problems associated with the use of HPF/FS. Examples included freeze damage of samples, inconsistency of fixation in different samples, separation of plant cell cytoplasm from cell walls, breakage of cell walls and membranes, and splitting of thin sections. However, we believe that the outstanding preservation of ultrastructural details afforded by HPF/FS significantly outweighs these problems and we highly recommend the use of this fixation protocol for future studies of fungal host-plant interactions.

  14. Recent progress in freeze-fracturing of high-pressure frozen samples.

    PubMed

    Walther, P

    2003-10-01

    Pancreatic tissue, bacteria and lipid vesicles were high-pressure frozen and freeze-fractured. In addition to the normal holder, a new type of high-pressure freezing holder was used that is particularly suitable for suspensions. This holder can take up an EM grid that has been dipped in the suspension and clamped in between two low-mass copper platelets, as used for propane-jet freezing. Both the standard and the new suspension holder allowed us to make cryo-fractures without visible ice crystal damage. High-pressure frozen rat pancreas tissue samples were cryo-fractured and cryo-sectioned with a new type diamond knife in the microtome of a freeze-etching device. The bulk fracture faces and blockfaces were investigated in the frozen-hydrated state by use of a cryo-stage in an in-lens SEM. Additional structures can be made visible by controlled sublimation of ice ('etching'), leading to a better understanding of the three-dimensional organization of organelles, such as the endoplasmic reticulum. With this approach, relevant biological structures can be investigated with a few nanometre resolution in a near life-like state, preventing the artefacts associated with conventional fixation techniques.

  15. Size and location of ice crystals in pork frozen by high-pressure-assisted freezing as compared to classical methods.

    PubMed

    Martino, M N; Otero, L; Sanz, P D; Zaritzky, N E

    1998-11-01

    In high-pressure-assisted freezing, samples are cooled under pressure (200 MPa) to - 20 °C without ice formation then pressure is released (0.1 MPa) and the high super-cooling reached (approx. 20 °C), promotes uniform and rapid ice nucleation. The size and location of ice crystals in large meat pieces (Longissimus dorsi pork muscle) as a result of high-pressure-assisted freezing were compared to those obtained by air-blast and liquid N(2). Samples from the surface and centre of the frozen muscle were histologically analysed using an indirect technique (isothermal-freeze fixation). Air-blast and cryogenic fluid freezing, having thermal gradients, showed non-uniform ice crystal distributions. High-pressure-assisted frozen samples, both at the surface and at the central zones, showed similar, small-sized ice crystals. This technique is particularly useful for freezing large pieces of food when uniform ice crystal sizes are required.

  16. Vitrification of thick samples for soft X-ray cryo-tomography by high pressure freezing.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Allon; Kapishnikov, Sergey; Shimoni, Eyal; Cordes, Sandra; Guttmann, Peter; Schneider, Gerd; Elbaum, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Soft X-ray cryo-microscopy (cryo-XT) offers an ideal complement to electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM). Cryo-XT is applicable to samples more than an order of magnitude thicker than cryo-EM, albeit at a more modest resolution of tens of nanometers. Furthermore, the natural contrast obtained in the "water-window" by differential absorption by organic matter vs water yields detailed images of organelles, membranes, protein complexes, and other cellular components. Cryo-XT is thus ideally suited for tomography of eukaryotic cells. The increase in sample thickness places more stringent demands on sample preparation, however. The standard method for cryo-EM, i.e., plunging to a cryogenic fluid such as liquid ethane, is no longer ideally suited to obtain vitrification of thick samples for cryo-XT. High pressure freezing is an alternative approach, most closely associated with freeze-substitution and embedding, or with electron cryo-microscopy of vitreous sections (CEMOVIS). We show here that high pressure freezing can be adapted to soft X-ray tomography of whole vitrified samples, yielding a highly reliable method that avoids crystallization artifacts and potentially offers improved imaging conditions in samples not amenable to plunge-freezing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Combination of Chemical Fixation Procedures with High Pressure Freezing and Freeze Substitution Preserves Highly Labile Tissue Ultrastructure for Electron Tomography Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sosinsky, Gina E.; Crum, John; Jones, Ying Z.; Lanman, Jason; Smarr, Benjamin; Terada, Masako; Martone, Maryann E.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Johnson, John E.; Ellisman, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of electron tomography as a tool for three dimensional structure determination of cells and tissues has brought its own challenges for the preparation of thick sections. High pressure freezing in combination with freeze substitution provides the best method for obtaining the largest volume of well-preserved tissue. However, for deeply embedded, heterogeneous, labile tissues needing careful dissection, such as brain, the damage due to anoxia and excision before cryofixation is significant. We previously demonstrated that chemical fixation prior to high pressure freezing preserves fragile tissues and produces superior tomographic reconstructions compared to equivalent tissue preserved by chemical fixation alone. Here, we provide further characterization of the technique, comparing the ultrastructure of Flock House Virus infected DL1 insect cells that were 1) high pressure frozen without fixation, 2) high pressure frozen following fixation, and 3) conventionally prepared with aldehyde fixatives. Aldehyde fixation prior to freezing produces ultrastructural preservation superior to that obtained through chemical fixation alone that is close to that obtained when cells are fast frozen without fixation. We demonstrate using a variety of nervous system tissues, including neurons that were injected with a fluorescent dye and then photooxidized, that this technique provides excellent preservation compared to chemical fixation alone and can be extended to selectively stained material where cryofixation is impractical. PMID:17962040

  18. Impact of high pressure freezing on DH5alpha Escherichia coli and red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Suppes, Galen J; Egan, Susan; Casillan, Alfred J; Wei Chan, Kok; Seckar, Bill

    2003-10-01

    The impact of high pressure and freezing on survivability of Escherichia coli and human red blood cells was evaluated to determine the utility of high-pressure transitions for preserving living cells. Based on microscopy and survivability, high pressures did not directly impact physical damage to living cells. E. coli studies showed that increased cell death is due to indirect phenomena with decreasing survivability at increasingly high pressures and exposure times. Pressurization rates up to 1.4kbar/min had negligible effects relative to exposures of >5min at high pressures.Both glycine and control of pH near 7.0 were successful in reducing the adverse impacts of high pressure. Survivability increased from <1% at 5min exposure to 2.1kbar of pressure to typical values >20%. The combination of glycine and the buffer salt led to even further improvements in survivability. Pressure changes were used to traverse temperature and pressures consistent with Ice I and Ice III phase boundaries of pure water.

  19. The use of filter membranes for high-pressure freezing of cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Morphew, M K; McIntosh, J R

    2003-10-01

    Rapid freezing of cells and tissues, followed by freeze-substitution fixation and plastic embedding, has become a highly reliable method for preparing samples for imaging in the electron microscope. High-pressure freezing is an efficient means of immobilizing suspensions of yeasts, thick pellets of mammalian cells, or small (< 0.5 mm) pieces of plant or animal tissue. Monolayers of cultured mammalian cells that are too thick for efficient immobilization by other modes of rapid freezing have also been successfully preserved by this method. Monolayer cultures are often important because they can be imaged by light microscopy (LM) both before and after their preparation for electron microscopy (EM). Additionally, some monolayer cultures serve as model systems for physiological processes, so it is important that cells under study can grow on a substrate that is both physiologically appropriate and convenient for EM processing. Here we describe a reliable method for preparing mammalian cell monolayers (PtK1 and polarized MDCK) for EM. Our protocol results in good preservation of cellular ultrastructure, it is a useful companion to studies of cell physioloy and, with some limitation, is suitable for correlative LM and EM.

  20. On optimizing high-pressure freezing: from heat transfer theory to a new microbiopsy device.

    PubMed

    Shimoni, E; Müller, M

    1998-12-01

    High-pressure freezing (HPF) is currently the only method which enables adequate cryoimmobilization of biological samples thick enough to describe the bulk of the sample. In the current state of HPF instrumentation and preparation methods, the technique has not yet reached its full potential. While suspensions can be prepared easily for HPF, tissue preparation is restricted by the need to compromise between different requirements and difficulties. (i) In order to achieve optimal freezing quality, very thin samples are required. (ii) There is mechanical difficulty in cutting such thin samples without distorting the organization of the tissue. (iii) The cutting and the succeeding preparation steps of small samples require long handling times (minutes), which may result in physiological and hence structural alterations. Computerized heat transfer simulations are presented which confirm that the efficiency of heat extraction from cylindrical samples contained within thin-walled metal tubes is higher than from standard flat discoid samples sandwiched between relatively thick aluminium platelets. Based on this fact, we developed a prototype of a new microbiopsy device which enables the quick excision of such cylinders of soft tissues. The device utilizes sharp gold needles of an inner diameter of 200 microm and wall thickness of 50 microm. The frozen sample contained in the soft gold needle permits all the manipulations needed for conventional cryo-preparation techniques for electron microscopy (e.g. cryo-sectioning, freeze-fracturing, freeze-substitution).

  1. High-pressure freezing and low-temperature processing of plant tissue samples for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Karahara, Ichirou; Kang, Byung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Use of electron tomography methods improves image resolution of transmission electron microscopy especially in the z-direction, enabling determination of complicated 3D structures of organelles and cytoskeleton arrays. The increase in resolution necessitates preservation of cellular structures close to the native states with minimum artifacts. High-pressure freezing (HPF) that immobilizes molecules in the cell instantaneously has been used to avoid damages caused by convention chemical fixation. Despite the advantages of HPF, cells could still be damaged during dissection prior to HPF. Therefore, it is critical to isolate cells/tissues of interest quickly and carefully. The samples frozen by HPF are often processed by freeze substitution (FS), and FS should be carried out under appropriate conditions. Here we describe dissection, HPF, and FS methods that we have utilized to prepare plant samples for electron tomography/immuno-electron microscopy.

  2. Fast high-pressure freezing of protein crystals in their mother liquor

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, Anja; Warmer, Martin; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Wagner, Armin; Zouni, Athina; Glöckner, Carina; Reimer, Rudolph; Hohenberg, Heinrich; Meents, Alke

    2012-01-01

    High-pressure freezing (HPF) is a method which allows sample vitrification without cryoprotectants. In the present work, protein crystals were cooled to cryogenic temperatures at a pressure of 210 MPa. In contrast to other HPF methods published to date in the field of cryocrystallography, this protocol involves rapid sample cooling using a standard HPF device. The fast cooling rates allow HPF of protein crystals directly in their mother liquor without the need for cryoprotectants or external reagents. HPF was first attempted with hen egg-white lysozyme and cubic insulin crystals, yielding good to excellent diffraction quality. Non-cryoprotected crystals of the membrane protein photosystem II have been successfully cryocooled for the first time. This indicates that the presented HPF method is well suited to the vitrification of challenging systems with large unit cells and weak crystal contacts. PMID:22505429

  3. High pressure and freezing temperature effect on quality and microbial inactivation of cured pork carpaccio.

    PubMed

    Realini, C E; Guàrdia, M D; Garriga, M; Pérez-Juan, M; Arnau, J

    2011-07-01

    The effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP: 0, 400, and 600 MPa) and freezing temperature (-15° vs. -35°C) were evaluated on the quality and microbial inactivation of cured pork carpaccio. Samples treated with HHP resulted in lighter and yellower color, higher Chroma, shear force, scores for pink color, cooked and gel appearance, incidence of iridescence, lower scores for brightness and raw meat appearance and lower levels of lactic acid bacteria and psychrotrophs during shelf life compared with untreated samples (P<0.05). Treating carpaccio at -35°C resulted in a darker color and a more tender carpaccio with a higher rating for crumbliness and lower rating for fibrousness and chewiness compared with -15°C (P<0.05). While HHP is effective in microbial inactivation and shelf life extension of pork carpaccio, product quality may be decreased due to lower tenderness and poorer appearance. However, HHP in combination with low freezing temperature can be used successfully to deliver high quality pork carpaccio with extended shelf life to the ready-to-eat market.

  4. A novel method for high-pressure freezing of adherent cells for frozen hydrated sectioning and CEMOVIS.

    PubMed

    Mesman, R J

    2013-09-01

    With the development of Cryo Electron Microscopy Of Vitreous Sections (CEMOVIS), imaging cells in a close to native state has become a reality. However with the commonly used carriers for high-pressure freezing and cryo-sectioning, adherent grown cells either need to be detached from their substrate. Here a new method is presented for high-pressure freezing adherent growing cells for frozen-hydrated sectioning and CEMOVIS. Cells are cultured on golden grids, containing a carbon coated Formvar film, and frozen on a membrane carrier which provides the grids with the structural support needed to withstand the strain of trimming and cryo-sectioning. This method was successfully tested for the two different types of high-pressure freezers, those using a pressure chamber (HPM010, EMHPF, Wohlwend Compact 01/02, HPM100) and those directly pressurizing the sample (EMPact series).

  5. Conventional freezing plus high pressure-low temperature treatment: Physical properties, microbial quality and storage stability of beef meat.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pedro P; Sanz, Pedro D; Molina-García, Antonio D; Otero, Laura; Guignon, Bérengère; Vaudagna, Sergio R

    2007-12-01

    Meat high-hydrostatic pressure treatment causes severe decolouration, preventing its commercialisation due to consumer rejection. Novel procedures involving product freezing plus low-temperature pressure processing are here investigated. Room temperature (20°C) pressurisation (650MPa/10min) and air blast freezing (-30°C) are compared to air blast freezing plus high pressure at subzero temperature (-35°C) in terms of drip loss, expressible moisture, shear force, colour, microbial quality and storage stability of fresh and salt-added beef samples (Longissimus dorsi muscle). The latter treatment induced solid water transitions among ice phases. Fresh beef high pressure treatment (650MPa/20°C/10min) increased significantly expressible moisture while it decreased in pressurised (650MPa/-35°C/10min) frozen beef. Salt addition reduced high pressure-induced water loss. Treatments studied did not change fresh or salt-added samples shear force. Frozen beef pressurised at low temperature showed L, a and b values after thawing close to fresh samples. However, these samples in frozen state, presented chromatic parameters similar to unfrozen beef pressurised at room temperature. Apparently, freezing protects meat against pressure colour deterioration, fresh colour being recovered after thawing. High pressure processing (20°C or -35°C) was very effective reducing aerobic total (2-log(10) cycles) and lactic acid bacteria counts (2.4-log(10) cycles), in fresh and salt-added samples. Frozen+pressurised beef stored at -18°C during 45 days recovered its original colour after thawing, similarly to just-treated samples while their counts remain below detection limits during storage.

  6. Cartilage ultrastructure after high pressure freezing, freeze substitution, and low temperature embedding. I. Chondrocyte ultrastructure--implications for the theories of mineralization and vascular invasion

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Electron microscopic examination of epiphyseal cartilage tissue processed by high pressure freezing, freeze substitution, and low temperature embedding revealed a substantial improvement in the preservation quality of intracellular organelles by comparison with the results obtained under conventional chemical fixation conditions. Furthermore, all cells throughout the epiphyseal plate, including the terminal chondrocyte adjacent to the region of vascular invasion, were found to be structurally integral. A zone of degenerating cells consistently observed in cartilage tissue processed under conventional chemical fixation conditions was not apparent. Hence, it would appear that cell destruction in this region occurs during chemical processing and is not a feature of cartilage tissue in the native state. Since these cells are situated in a region where tissue calcification is taking place, the implication is that the onset and progression of cartilage calcification are, at least partially, controlled by the chondrocytes themselves. The observation that the terminal cell adjacent to the zone of vascular invasion is viable has important implications in relation to the theory of vascular invasion. This may now require reconceptualization to accommodate the possibility that active cell destruction may be a precondition for vascular invasion. PMID:6707090

  7. A rapid microbiopsy system to improve the preservation of biological samples prior to high-pressure freezing.

    PubMed

    Vanhecke, D; Graber, W; Herrmann, G; Al-Amoudi, A; Eggli, P; Studer, D

    2003-10-01

    A microbiopsy system for fast excision and transfer of biological specimens from donor to high-pressure freezer was developed. With a modified, commercially available, Promag 1.2 biopsy gun, tissue samples can be excised with a size small enough (0.6 mm x 1.2 mm x 0.3 mm) to be easily transferred into a newly designed specimen platelet. A self-made transfer unit allows fast transfer of the specimen from the needle into the specimen platelet. The platelet is then fixed in a commercially available specimen holder of a high-pressure freezing machine (EM PACT, Leica Microsystems, Vienna, Austria) and frozen therein. The time required by a well-instructed (but not experienced) person to execute all steps is in the range of half a minute. This period is considered short enough to maintain the excised tissue pieces close to their native state. We show that a range of animal tissues (liver, brain, kidney and muscle) are well preserved. To prove the quality of freezing achieved with the system, we show vitrified ivy leaves high-pressure frozen in the new specimen platelet.

  8. Comparison of the ultrastructure of conventionally fixed and high pressure frozen/freeze substituted root tips of Nicotiana and Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Giddings, T. H. Jr; Staehelin, L. A.; Sack, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    To circumvent the limitations of chemical fixation (CF) and to gain more reliable structural information about higher plant tissues, we have cryofixed root tips of Nicotiana and Arabidopsis by high pressure freezing (HPF). Whereas other freezing techniques preserve tissue to a relatively shallow depth, HPF in conjunction with freeze substitution (FS) resulted in excellent preservation of entire root tips. Compared to CF, in tissue prepared by HPF/FS: (1) the plasmalemma and all internal membranes were much smoother and often coated on the cytoplasmic side by a thin layer of stained material, (2) the plasmalemma was appressed to the cell wall, (3) organelle profiles were rounder, (4) the cytoplasmic, mitochondrial, and amyloplast matrices were denser, (5) vacuoles contained electron dense material, (6) microtubules appeared to be more numerous and straighter, with crossbridges observed between them, (7) cisternae of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) were wider and filled with material, (8) Golgi intercisternal elements were more clearly resolved and were observed between both Golgi vesicles and cisternae, and (9) larger vesicles were associated with Golgi stacks. This study demonstrates that HPF/FS can be used to successfully preserve the ultrastructure of relatively large plant tissues without the use of intracellular cryoprotectants.

  9. Comparison of the ultrastructure of conventionally fixed and high pressure frozen/freeze substituted root tips of Nicotiana and Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Giddings, T. H. Jr; Staehelin, L. A.; Sack, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    To circumvent the limitations of chemical fixation (CF) and to gain more reliable structural information about higher plant tissues, we have cryofixed root tips of Nicotiana and Arabidopsis by high pressure freezing (HPF). Whereas other freezing techniques preserve tissue to a relatively shallow depth, HPF in conjunction with freeze substitution (FS) resulted in excellent preservation of entire root tips. Compared to CF, in tissue prepared by HPF/FS: (1) the plasmalemma and all internal membranes were much smoother and often coated on the cytoplasmic side by a thin layer of stained material, (2) the plasmalemma was appressed to the cell wall, (3) organelle profiles were rounder, (4) the cytoplasmic, mitochondrial, and amyloplast matrices were denser, (5) vacuoles contained electron dense material, (6) microtubules appeared to be more numerous and straighter, with crossbridges observed between them, (7) cisternae of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) were wider and filled with material, (8) Golgi intercisternal elements were more clearly resolved and were observed between both Golgi vesicles and cisternae, and (9) larger vesicles were associated with Golgi stacks. This study demonstrates that HPF/FS can be used to successfully preserve the ultrastructure of relatively large plant tissues without the use of intracellular cryoprotectants.

  10. High-pressure freezing and freeze-substitution fixation reveal the ultrastructure of immature and mature spermatozoa of the plant-parasitic nematode Trichodorus similis (Nematoda; Triplonchida; Trichodoridae).

    PubMed

    Lak, Behnam; Yushin, Vladimir V; Slos, Dieter; Claeys, Myriam; Decraemer, Wilfrida; Bert, Wim

    2015-10-01

    The spermatozoa from testis and spermatheca of the plant-parasitic nematode Trichodorus similis Seinhorst, 1963 (Nematoda; Triplonchida; Trichodoridae) were studied with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), being the first study on spermatogenesis of a representative of the order Triplonchida and important to unravel nematode sperm evolution. Comprehensive results could only be obtained using high-pressure freezing (HPF) and freeze-substitution instead of chemical fixation, demonstrating the importance of cryo-fixation for nematode ultrastructural research. The spermatozoa from the testis (immature spermatozoa) are unpolarized cells covered by numerous filopodia. They contain a centrally-located nucleus without a nuclear envelope, surrounded by mitochondria. Specific fibrous bodies (FB) as long parallel bundles of filaments occupy the peripheral cytoplasm. No structures resembling membranous organelles (MO), as found in the sperm of many other nematodes, were observed in immature spermatozoa of T. similis. The spermatozoa from the uterus (mature or activated spermatozoa) are bipolar cells with an anterior pseudopod and posterior main cell body (MCB), which include a nucleus, mitochondria and MO appearing as large vesicles with finger-like invaginations of the outer cell membrane, or as large vesicles connected to the inner cell membrane. The peripheral MO open to the exterior via pores. In the mature sperm, neither FBs nor filopodia were observed. An important feature of T. similis spermatozoa is the late formation of MO; they first appear in mature spermatozoa. This pattern of MO formation is known for several other orders of the nematode class Enoplea: Enoplida, Mermithida, Dioctophymatida, Trichinellida but has never been observed in the class Chromadorea.

  11. Melting and Freezing of Metals Under the High Pressures of Planetary Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geballe, Zachary Michael

    The goal of this thesis is to help improve models of the evolution of cores of the Earth and other planets, and to improve understanding of melting transitions of metals in general. First, I present laboratory studies of high-pressure melting and near-melting phase transitions of two metals. The epsilon-to-B2 phase boundary of FeSi is constrained to 30 +/- 2 GPa with no measurable pressure-dependence from 1200 +/- 200 to 2300 +/- 200 K using x-ray diffraction in laser heated diamond anvil cells. The miscibility of Si in crystalline Fe likely increases at this transition due to the increasing effective ionic radius of Si, evidenced by the coordination change documented here. The result is that silicon is even more miscible in iron in the cores of Mercury and Mars than shown previously. Solid-solid transitions are also documented in AuGa2 from cubic (fluorite-type) to denser phases above 5.5 GPa and 600 K, in close proximity to the reversal in melting curve from negative slope to positive slope, which is also documented here. The change in melting curve therefore seems to be primarily driven by the crystallographic transitions and not the electronic transitions thought to occur at low temperatures. All transitions described here are reversed in the experiments, revealing hysteresis that ranges from 90 K to less than 15 K, and from 7 GPa to less than 2 GPa. This complexity, along with other complexities seen here and in other studies, suggest the need for new experimental techniques to make unambiguous measurements of a variety of equilibrium properties at melting and near melting. To improve future laboratory studies of melting at high pressure, I analyze several varieties of dynamic heating experiments. Laser heating experiments on metals in diamond anvil cells are shown to be at least 5 times less sensitive (and sometimes > 100 times less sensitive) to the latent heat of melting than suggested by published experimental data from pulsed-heating and continuous

  12. Reappraisal of potassium permanganate oxidation applied to Lowicryl K4M embedded tissues processed by high pressure freezing/freeze substitution, with special reference to differential staining of the zymogen granules of rat gastric chief cells.

    PubMed

    Sawaguchi, A; Ide, S; Kawano, J; Nagaike, R; Oinuma, T; Tojo, H; Okamoto, M; Suganuma, T

    1999-12-01

    The high pressure freezing/freeze substitution technique is known to yield a deep vitreous freezing of tissues. Combination of this technique with Lowicryl K4M embedding allows us histochemical studies of dynamic cellular processes with improved structural preservation. The disadvantage of Lowicryl K4M embedding is its poor electron density in electron microscopy. To address this problem, we examined the effects of KMnO4 oxidation applied to Lowicryl K4M embedded rat gastric glands processed by high pressure freezing. The KMnO4 oxidation-uranyl acetate-lead citrate sequence succeeded not only in contrast enhancement of cellular components, but also in differential staining of the zymogen granules of rat gastric chief cells. This technique could be applied to semi-thin sections of Lowicryl K4M embedded rat gastric glands. The KMnO4 oxidation-toluidine blue staining provided sufficient contrast with regard to the zymogen granules. Various experiments used in this study verified that the KMnO4 oxidation plays an essential role in the differential staining of the zymogen granules. Combined use of the KMnO4 oxidation with phospholipase A2-immunostaining demonstrated that gold labeling was localized to the zymogen granules without the loss of immunolabeling. Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis revealed some manganese depositions on the zymogen granules. It is highly anticipated that the KMnO4 oxidation will become a useful tool for histochemical investigations combined with cryofixation/freeze substitution and low temperature embedding techniques.

  13. Microaspiration for high-pressure freezing: a new method for ultrastructural preservation of fragile and sparse tissues for TEM and electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Auer, Manfred; Triffo, W.J.; Palsdottir, H.; McDonald, K.L.; Inman, J.L.; Bissell, M.J.; Raphael, R.M.; Auer, M.; Lee, J.K.

    2008-02-13

    High-pressure freezing is the preferred method to prepare thick biological specimens for ultrastructural studies. However, the advantages obtained by this method often prove unattainable for samples that are difficult to handle during the freezing and substitution protocols. Delicate and sparse samples are difficult to manipulate and maintain intact throughout the sequence of freezing, infiltration, embedding, and final orientation for sectioning and subsequent TEM imaging. An established approach to surmount these difficulties is the use of cellulose microdialysis tubing to transport the sample. With an inner diameter of 200 micrometers, the tubing protects small and fragile samples within the thickness constraints of high-pressure freezing, and the tube ends can be sealed to avoid loss of sample. Importantly, the transparency of the tubing allows optical study of the specimen at different steps in the process. Here, we describe the use of a micromanipulator and microinjection apparatus to handle and position delicate specimens within the tubing. We report two biologically significant examples that benefit from this approach, 3D cultures of mammary epithelial cells and cochlear outer hair cells. We illustrate the potential for correlative light and electron microscopy as well as electron tomography.

  14. Improved ultrastructural preservation of rat ciliary body after high pressure freezing and freeze substitution: a perspective view based upon comparison with tissue processed according to a conventional protocol or by osmium tetroxide/microwave fixation.

    PubMed

    Eggli, E S; Graber, W

    1994-09-01

    Conventional fixation of the delicate, highly folded rat ciliary body and its iridial extension, as well as of vitreal structures, is associated with the induction of a number of artifacts, thus limiting the reliability of morphological interpretations. Improved ultrastructural preservation may be achieved by microwave heating in combination with osmium tetroxide fixation. This protocol, although simple and cheap, yields results, particularly with respect to the extracellular matrix compartment between inner and outer ciliary epithelial cells, which are not greatly inferior to those obtained by implementing the sophisticated high pressure freezing and freeze substitution technique. The latter affords good to very good ultrastructural preservation of epithelium and stromal components, such as blood vessels, neural elements, smooth muscle cells, fibrocytes, and free cells, up to a depth of 50-100 microns from the tissue surface. Its superiority over osmium tetroxide/microwave fixation is revealed in the cytoplasmic, intraorganellar, and vitreal matrix compartments, which incur no obvious losses.

  15. Freezing resistance of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. X.; Lu, L. C.; Wang, S. D.; Zhao, P. Q.; Gong, C. C.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of freeze-thaw cycle on the mechanical properties of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement was investigated in the present study. The visual examination was conducted to evaluate the surface damage. The deterioration considering the weight loss, modulus loss of relative dynamic elastic and strength loss of mortar were also investigated. The morphology of hydration products were analysed by SEM. Compared with ordinary Portland cement and sulphoaluminate cement, the frost resistance of high iron phosphoraluminate cement is better. Hydration products of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement contain sheet crystals, and a lot of gel form a dense three-dimensional network structure, which results in a lower porosity. Different from ordinary Portland cement, the hydration product of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement does not contain Ca(OH)2, and low alkalinity reduces its osmotic pressure. The lower porosity and osmotic pressure are the two main reasons which causes in the higher frost resistance of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement.

  16. Effect of temperature, high pressure and freezing/thawing of dry-cured ham slices on dielectric time domain reflectometry response.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Celorio, Marc; Garcia-Gil, Núria; Gou, Pere; Arnau, Jacint; Fulladosa, Elena

    2015-02-01

    Dielectric Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) is a useful technique for the characterization and classification of dry-cured ham according to its composition. However, changes in the behavior of dielectric properties may occur depending on environmental factors and processing. The effect of temperature, high pressure (HP) and freezing/thawing of dry-cured ham slices on the obtained TDR curves and on the predictions of salt and water contents when using previously developed predictive models, was evaluated in three independent experiments. The results showed that at temperatures below 20 °C there is an increase of the predicted salt content error, being more important in samples with higher water content. HP treatment caused a decrease of the reflected signal intensity due to the major mobility of available ions promoting an increase of the predicted salt content. Freezing/thawing treatment caused an increase of the reflected signal intensity due to the microstructural damages and the loss of water and ions, promoting a decrease of the predicted salt content.

  17. High-Pressure Freezing, Crystal Structure Studies and Si-CF3 Bond Polarizability of Trimethyl(trifluoromethyl)silane (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    Base, 10 E. Saturn Boulevard, Building 8451, CA 93524, USA A R T I C L E I N F O Article history: Received 8 May 2008 Received in revised form 14 July ...2008 Accepted 15 July 2008 Available online 29 July 2008 Keywords: Ruppert reagent High pressure X-rays Crystal structure Intermolecular interactions...Group Met. Chem. 24 (2001) 315–350. [8] K. Klatte , D. Christen, I. Merke, W. Stahl, H. Oberhammer, J. Phys. Chem. A 109 (2005) 8438–8442. [9] H

  18. Macromolecular differentiation of Golgi stacks in root tips of Arabidopsis and Nicotiana seedlings as visualized in high pressure frozen and freeze-substituted samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staehelin, L. A.; Giddings, T. H. Jr; Kiss, J. Z.; Sack, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    The plant root tip represents a fascinating model system for studying changes in Golgi stack architecture associated with the developmental progression of meristematic cells to gravity sensing columella cells, and finally to "young" and "old", polysaccharide-slime secreting peripheral cells. To this end we have used high pressure freezing in conjunction with freeze-substitution techniques to follow developmental changes in the macromolecular organization of Golgi stacks in root tips of Arabidopsis and Nicotiana. Due to the much improved structural preservation of all cells under investigation, our electron micrographs reveal both several novel structural features common to all Golgi stacks, as well as characteristic differences in morphology between Golgi stacks of different cell types. Common to all Golgi stacks are clear and discrete differences in staining patterns and width of cis, medial and trans cisternae. Cis cisternae have the widest lumina (approximately 30 nm) and are the least stained. Medial cisternae are narrower (approximately 20 nm) and filled with more darkly staining products. Most trans cisternae possess a completely collapsed lumen in their central domain, giving rise to a 4-6 nm wide dark line in cross-sectional views. Numerous vesicles associated with the cisternal margins carry a non-clathrin type of coat. A trans Golgi network with clathrin coated vesicles is associated with all Golgi stacks except those of old peripheral cells. It is easily distinguished from trans cisternae by its blebbing morphology and staining pattern. The zone of ribosome exclusion includes both the Golgi stack and the trans Golgi network. Intercisternal elements are located exclusively between trans cisternae of columella and peripheral cells, but not meristematic cells. In older peripheral cells only trans cisternae exhibit slime-related staining. Golgi stacks possessing intercisternal elements also contain parallel rows of freeze-fracture particles in their trans

  19. Macromolecular differentiation of Golgi stacks in root tips of Arabidopsis and Nicotiana seedlings as visualized in high pressure frozen and freeze-substituted samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staehelin, L. A.; Giddings, T. H. Jr; Kiss, J. Z.; Sack, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    The plant root tip represents a fascinating model system for studying changes in Golgi stack architecture associated with the developmental progression of meristematic cells to gravity sensing columella cells, and finally to "young" and "old", polysaccharide-slime secreting peripheral cells. To this end we have used high pressure freezing in conjunction with freeze-substitution techniques to follow developmental changes in the macromolecular organization of Golgi stacks in root tips of Arabidopsis and Nicotiana. Due to the much improved structural preservation of all cells under investigation, our electron micrographs reveal both several novel structural features common to all Golgi stacks, as well as characteristic differences in morphology between Golgi stacks of different cell types. Common to all Golgi stacks are clear and discrete differences in staining patterns and width of cis, medial and trans cisternae. Cis cisternae have the widest lumina (approximately 30 nm) and are the least stained. Medial cisternae are narrower (approximately 20 nm) and filled with more darkly staining products. Most trans cisternae possess a completely collapsed lumen in their central domain, giving rise to a 4-6 nm wide dark line in cross-sectional views. Numerous vesicles associated with the cisternal margins carry a non-clathrin type of coat. A trans Golgi network with clathrin coated vesicles is associated with all Golgi stacks except those of old peripheral cells. It is easily distinguished from trans cisternae by its blebbing morphology and staining pattern. The zone of ribosome exclusion includes both the Golgi stack and the trans Golgi network. Intercisternal elements are located exclusively between trans cisternae of columella and peripheral cells, but not meristematic cells. In older peripheral cells only trans cisternae exhibit slime-related staining. Golgi stacks possessing intercisternal elements also contain parallel rows of freeze-fracture particles in their trans

  20. Heat of freezing for supercooled water: measurements at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Will; Kostinski, Alexander; Szedlak, Anthony; Johnson, Alexandria

    2011-06-16

    Unlike reversible phase transitions, the amount of heat released upon freezing of a metastable supercooled liquid depends on the degree of supercooling. Although terrestrial supercooled water is ubiquitous and has implications for cloud dynamics and nucleation, measurements of its heat of freezing are scarce. We have performed calorimetric measurements of the heat released by freezing water at atmospheric pressure as a function of supercooling. Our measurements show that the heat of freezing can be considerably below one predicted from a reversible hydrostatic process. Our measurements also indicate that the state of the resulting ice is not fully specified by the final pressure and temperature; the ice is likely to be strained on a variety of scales, implying a higher vapor pressure. This would reduce the vapor gradient between supercooled water and ice in mixed phase atmospheric clouds. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Effects of pressure-shift freezing and pressure-assisted thawing on sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) quality.

    PubMed

    Tironi, V; LeBail, A; de Lamballerie, M

    2007-09-01

    Effects of pressure-shift freezing and/or pressure-assisted thawing on the quality of sea bass muscle were evaluated and compared with conventional (air-blast) frozen and thawed samples. Microstructural analysis showed a marked decrease of muscle cell damage for pressure-assisted frozen samples. According to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), protein extractability, and SDS-PAGE results, high-pressure treatment (200 MPa) produced a partial denaturation with aggregation and insolubilization of the myosin, as well as alterations of the sarcoplasmic proteins. Only small differences between high-pressure processes (freezing or/and thawing) were registered. High-pressure-treated systems led to a decrease of water holding capacity but differences between high-pressure and conventional methods disappeared after cooking. Muscle color showed important alterations due to high-pressure treatments (increasing L* and b*).

  2. Automatic segmentation of high pressure frozen and freeze-substituted mouse retina nuclei from FIB-SEM tomograms.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thai V; Kizilyaprak, Caroline; Spehner, Danièle; Humbel, Bruno M; Schultz, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    Focused Ion Beam milling combined with Scanning Electron Microscopy is a powerful tool to determine the 3-D organization of whole cells and tissue at an isotropic resolution of 3-5nm. This opens the possibility to quantify several cellular parameters and to provide detailed phenotypic information in normal or disease states. Here we describe Biocomputing methods to extract in an automated way characteristic features of mouse rod photoreceptor nuclei such as the shape and the volume of the nucleus; the proportion of heterochromatin; the number, density and distribution of nuclear pore complexes (NPC). Values obtained on five nuclei show that the number of NPC (348±8) is the most conserved feature. Nuclei in higher eukaryotes show large variations in size and rod nuclei are amongst the smallest reported (32±3μm(3)). Despite large species- and cell-type-specific variations in size, the density of NPC (about 15/μm(2)) is highly conserved.

  3. An Equipment to Measure the Freezing Point of Soils under Higher Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dayan; Guan, Hui; Wen, Zhi; Ma, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Soil freezing point is the highest temperature at which ice can be presented in the system and soil can be referred to as frozen. The freezing temperature of soil is an important parameter for solving many practical problems in civil engineering, such as evaluation of soil freezing depth, prediction of soil heaving, force of soil suction, etc. However, as the freezing temperature is always affected by many factors like soil particle size, mineral composition, water content and the external pressure endured by soils, to measure soil freezing point is a rather difficult task until now, not to mention the soil suffering higher pressure. But recently, with the artificial freezing technology widely used in the excavation of deep underground space, the frozen wall thickness is a key factor to impact the security and stability of deep frozen wall. To determine the freeze wall thickness, the location of the freezing front must be determined firstly, which will deal with the determination of the soil freezing temperature. So how to measure the freezing temperature of soil suffering higher pressure is an important problem to be solved. This paper will introduce an equipment which was developed lately by State Key Laboratory of Frozen Soil Engineering to measure the freezing-point of soils under higher pressure. The equipment is consisted of cooling and keeping temperature system, temperature sensor and data collection system. By cooling and keeping temperature system, not only can we make the higher pressure soil sample's temperature drop to a discretionary minus temperature, but also keep it and reduce the heat exchange of soil sample with the outside. The temperature sensor is the key part to our measurement, which is featured by high precision and high sensitivity, what is more important is that the temperature sensor can work in a higher pressure condition. Moreover, the major benefit of this equipment is that the soil specimen's loads can be loaded by any microcomputer

  4. Electron Tomographic Analysis of Somatic Cell Plate Formation in Meristematic Cells of Arabidopsis Preserved by High-Pressure FreezingW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Seguí-Simarro, José M.; Austin, Jotham R.; White, Erin A.; Staehelin, L. Andrew

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the process of somatic-type cytokinesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) meristem cells with a three-dimensional resolution of ∼7 nm by electron tomography of high-pressure frozen/freeze-substituted samples. Our data demonstrate that this process can be divided into four phases: phragmoplast initials, solid phragmoplast, transitional phragmoplast, and ring-shaped phragmoplast. Phragmoplast initials arise from clusters of polar microtubules (MTs) during late anaphase. At their equatorial planes, cell plate assembly sites are formed, consisting of a filamentous ribosome-excluding cell plate assembly matrix (CPAM) and Golgi-derived vesicles. The CPAM, which is found only around growing cell plate regions, is suggested to be responsible for regulating cell plate growth. Virtually all phragmoplast MTs terminate inside the CPAM. This association directs vesicles to the CPAM and thereby to the growing cell plate. Cell plate formation within the CPAM appears to be initiated by the tethering of vesicles by exocyst-like complexes. After vesicle fusion, hourglass-shaped vesicle intermediates are stretched to dumbbells by a mechanism that appears to involve the expansion of dynamin-like springs. This stretching process reduces vesicle volume by ∼50%. At the same time, the lateral expansion of the phragmoplast initials and their CPAMs gives rise to the solid phragmoplast. Later arriving vesicles begin to fuse to the bulbous ends of the dumbbells, giving rise to the tubulo-vesicular membrane network (TVN). During the transitional phragmoplast stage, the CPAM and MTs disassemble and then reform in a peripheral ring phragmoplast configuration. This creates the centrifugally expanding peripheral cell plate growth zone, which leads to cell plate fusion with the cell wall. Simultaneously, the central TVN begins to mature into a tubular network, and ultimately into a planar fenestrated sheet (PFS), through the removal of membrane via clathrin

  5. Theoretical and experimental studies on freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit as methods to measure osmotic pressure of aqueous polyethylene glycol and bovine serum albumin solutions.

    PubMed

    Kiyosawa, Keitaro

    2003-05-01

    For survival in adverse environments where there is drought, high salt concentration or low temperature, some plants seem to be able to synthesize biochemical compounds, including proteins, in response to changes in water activity or osmotic pressure. Measurement of the water activity or osmotic pressure of simple aqueous solutions has been based on freezing point depression or vapor pressure deficit. Measurement of the osmotic pressure of plants under water stress has been mainly based on vapor pressure deficit. However, differences have been noted for osmotic pressure values of aqueous polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit. For this paper, the physicochemical basis of freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit were first examined theoretically and then, the osmotic pressure of aqueous ethylene glycol and of PEG solutions were measured by both freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit in comparison with other aqueous solutions such as NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions. The results showed that: (1) freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit share theoretically the same physicochemical basis; (2) theoretically, they are proportional to the molal concentration of the aqueous solutions to be measured; (3) in practice, the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, and raffinose solutions increase in proportion to their molal concentrations and there is little inconsistency between those measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit; (4) the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous ethylene glycol and PEG solutions measured by freezing point depression differed from the values measured by vapor pressure deficit; (5) the osmotic pressure of aqueous BSA solution measured by freezing point depression differed slightly from that measured by vapor pressure deficit.

  6. Negative Pressures Produced in an Artificial Osmotic Cell by Extracellular Freezing 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jian Jun; Steudle, Ernst; Beck, Erwin

    1989-01-01

    A rigid artificial osmotic cell has been constructed using reverse osmosis membranes that were supported by metal grids from both sides to yield a high elastic modulus of the system. The cell could be subjected to changes of external water potential either by evaporation or by application of hypertonic solutions so that negative internal pressures or tensions (i.e. pressures smaller than atmospheric) could be built up. Negative pressures were also obtained by freeze-induced dehydration when the cell was cooled to −1.5°C and ice was formed on the outer surface. Tensions of up to −0.7 megapascals (−7 bars) could be established in the different types of experiments. Smaller tensions could be kept in the cell for several hours. Cavitations caused the pressure to increase instantaneously to values of about −0.1 megapascals (relative to atmospheric pressure) as theoretically expected. Cavitations could be reversed by pressurizing the system. The cell could be cooled to subzero temperatures while the cell solution was under tension. Intracellular freezing could be easily detected from an instantaneous increase in pressure. When the membrane was not supported by a grid from the inside (analogous to the situation in plant cells), no tensions could be built up in the system. The results support the idea of the incidence of negative pressures during freezing, if the wall is sufficiently rigid to prevent cell collapse and if the membrane does not separate from the cell wall. PMID:16667200

  7. From Dynamic Live Cell Imaging to 3D Ultrastructure: Novel Integrated Methods for High Pressure Freezing and Correlative Light-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Tosch, Valérie; Hentsch, Didier; Koch, Marc; Kessler, Pascal; Schwab, Yannick; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2010-01-01

    Background In cell biology, the study of proteins and organelles requires the combination of different imaging approaches, from live recordings with light microscopy (LM) to electron microscopy (EM). Methodology To correlate dynamic events in adherent cells with both ultrastructural and 3D information, we developed a method for cultured cells that combines confocal time-lapse images of GFP-tagged proteins with electron microscopy. With laser micro-patterned culture substrate, we created coordinates that were conserved at every step of the sample preparation and visualization processes. Specifically designed for cryo-fixation, this method allowed a fast freezing of dynamic events within seconds and their ultrastructural characterization. We provide examples of the dynamic oligomerization of GFP-tagged myotubularin (MTM1) phosphoinositides phosphatase induced by osmotic stress, and of the ultrastructure of membrane tubules dependent on amphiphysin 2 (BIN1) expression. Conclusion Accessible and versatile, we show that this approach is efficient to routinely correlate functional and dynamic LM with high resolution morphology by EM, with immuno-EM labeling, with 3D reconstruction using serial immuno-EM or tomography, and with scanning-EM. PMID:20140253

  8. An improved high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry method for determination of chlorophylls and their derivatives in freeze-dried and hot-air-dried Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tsai Hua; Chen, Chia Ju; Chen, Bing Huei

    2011-10-30

    Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz, a traditional Chinese herb possessing antioxidant and anti-cancer activities, has been reported to contain functional components like carotenoids and chlorophylls. However, the variety and amount of chlorophylls remain uncertain. The objectives of this study were to develop a high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-APCI-MS) method for determination of chlorophylls and their derivatives in hot-air-dried and freeze-dried R. nasutus. An Agilent Eclipse XDB-C18 column and a gradient mobile phase composed of methanol/N,N-dimethylformamide (97:3, v/v), acetonitrile and acetone were employed to separate internal standard zinc-phthalocyanine plus 12 cholorophylls and their derivatives within 21 min, including chlorophyll a, chlorophyll a', hydroxychlorophyll a, 15-OH-lactone chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, chlorophyll b', hydroxychlorophyll b, pheophytin a, pheophytin a', hydroxypheophytin a, hydroxypheophytin a' and pheophytin b in hot-air-dried R. nasutus with flow rate at 1 mL/min and detection at 660 nm. But, in freeze-dried R. nasutus, only 4 chlorophylls and their derivatives, including chlorophyll a, chlorophyll a', chlorophyll b and pheophytin a were detected. Zinc-phthalocyanine was found to be an appropriate internal standard to quantify all the chlorophyll compounds. After quantification by HPLC-DAD, both chlorophyll a and pheophytin a were the most abundant in hot-air-dried R. nasutus, while in freeze-dried R. nasutus, chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b dominated.

  9. Effects of Pressure-shift Freezing on the Structural and Physical Properties of Gelatin Hydrogel Matrices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeongsoo; Gil, Hyung Bae; Min, Sang-Gi; Lee, Si-Kyung; Choi, Mi-Jung

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of the gelatin concentration (10-40%, w/v), freezing temperatures (from -20℃ to -50℃) and freezing methods on the structural and physical properties of gelatin matrices. To freeze gelatin, the pressure-shift freezing (PSF) is being applied at 0.1 (under atmospheric control), 50 and 100 MPa, respectively. The freezing point of gelatin solutions decrease with increasing gelatin concentrations, from -0.2℃ (10% gelatin) to -6.7℃ (40% gelatin), while the extent of supercooling did not show any specific trends. The rheological properties of the gelatin indicate that both the storage (G') and loss (G") moduli were steady in the strain amplitude range of 0.1-10%. To characterize gelatin matrices formed by the various freezing methods, the ice crystal sizes which were being determined by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are affected by the gelatin concentrations. The ice crystal sizes are affected by gelatin concentrations and freezing temperature, while the size distributions of ice crystals depend on the freezing methods. Smaller ice crystals are being formed with PSF rather than under the atmospheric control where the freezing temperature is above -40℃. Thus, the results of this study indicate that the PSF processing at a very low freezing temperature (-50℃) offers a potential advantage over commercial atmospheric freezing points for the formation of small ice crystals.

  10. Effects of Pressure-shift Freezing on the Structural and Physical Properties of Gelatin Hydrogel Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeongsoo; Gil, Hyung Bae; Min, Sang-Gi; Lee, Si-Kyung; Choi, Mi-Jung

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of the gelatin concentration (10-40%, w/v), freezing temperatures (from -20℃ to -50℃) and freezing methods on the structural and physical properties of gelatin matrices. To freeze gelatin, the pressure-shift freezing (PSF) is being applied at 0.1 (under atmospheric control), 50 and 100 MPa, respectively. The freezing point of gelatin solutions decrease with increasing gelatin concentrations, from -0.2℃ (10% gelatin) to -6.7℃ (40% gelatin), while the extent of supercooling did not show any specific trends. The rheological properties of the gelatin indicate that both the storage (G') and loss (G") moduli were steady in the strain amplitude range of 0.1-10%. To characterize gelatin matrices formed by the various freezing methods, the ice crystal sizes which were being determined by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are affected by the gelatin concentrations. The ice crystal sizes are affected by gelatin concentrations and freezing temperature, while the size distributions of ice crystals depend on the freezing methods. Smaller ice crystals are being formed with PSF rather than under the atmospheric control where the freezing temperature is above -40℃. Thus, the results of this study indicate that the PSF processing at a very low freezing temperature (-50℃) offers a potential advantage over commercial atmospheric freezing points for the formation of small ice crystals. PMID:26760743

  11. Maple Sap Uptake, Exudation, and Pressure Changes Correlated with Freezing Exotherms and Thawing Endotherms 1

    PubMed Central

    Tyree, Melvin T.

    1983-01-01

    Sap flow rates and sap pressure changes were measured in dormant sugar maple trees (Acer saccharum Marsh.). In the forest, sap flow rates and pressure changes were measured from tap holes drilled into tree trunks in mature trees and sap flow rates were measured from the base of excised branches. Excised branches were also brought into the laboratory where air temperature could be carefully controlled in a refrigerated box and sap flow rates and sap pressures were measured from the cut base of the branches. Under both forest and laboratory conditions, sap uptake occurred as the wood temperature declined but much more rapid sap uptake correlated with the onset of the freezing exotherm. When sap pressures were measured under conditions of negligible volume displacement, the sap pressure rapidly fell to −60 to −80 kilopascals at the start of the freezing exotherm. The volume of water uptake and the rate of uptake depended on the rate of freezing. A slow freezing rate correlated with a large volume of water uptake, a fast freezing rate induced a smaller volume of water uptake. The volume of water uptake ranged from 0.02 to 0.055 grams water per gram dry weight of sapwood. The volume of water exuded after thawing was usually less than the volume of uptake so that after several freezing and thawing cycles the sapwood water content increased from 0.7 to 0.8 grams water per gram dry weight. These results are discussed in terms of a physical model of the mechanism of maple sap uptake and exudation first proposed by P. E. R. O'Malley. The proposed mechanism of sap uptake is by vapor distillation in air filled wood fiber lumina during the freezing of minor branches. Gravity and pressurized air bubbles (compressed during freezing) cause sap flow from the canopy down the tree after the thaw. PMID:16663208

  12. Maple sap uptake, exudation, and pressure changes correlated with freezing exotherms and thawing endotherms.

    PubMed

    Tyree, M T

    1983-10-01

    Sap flow rates and sap pressure changes were measured in dormant sugar maple trees (Acer saccharum Marsh.). In the forest, sap flow rates and pressure changes were measured from tap holes drilled into tree trunks in mature trees and sap flow rates were measured from the base of excised branches. Excised branches were also brought into the laboratory where air temperature could be carefully controlled in a refrigerated box and sap flow rates and sap pressures were measured from the cut base of the branches.Under both forest and laboratory conditions, sap uptake occurred as the wood temperature declined but much more rapid sap uptake correlated with the onset of the freezing exotherm. When sap pressures were measured under conditions of negligible volume displacement, the sap pressure rapidly fell to -60 to -80 kilopascals at the start of the freezing exotherm. The volume of water uptake and the rate of uptake depended on the rate of freezing. A slow freezing rate correlated with a large volume of water uptake, a fast freezing rate induced a smaller volume of water uptake. The volume of water uptake ranged from 0.02 to 0.055 grams water per gram dry weight of sapwood. The volume of water exuded after thawing was usually less than the volume of uptake so that after several freezing and thawing cycles the sapwood water content increased from 0.7 to 0.8 grams water per gram dry weight.These results are discussed in terms of a physical model of the mechanism of maple sap uptake and exudation first proposed by P. E. R. O'Malley. The proposed mechanism of sap uptake is by vapor distillation in air filled wood fiber lumina during the freezing of minor branches. Gravity and pressurized air bubbles (compressed during freezing) cause sap flow from the canopy down the tree after the thaw.

  13. New expressions to describe solution nonideal osmotic pressure, freezing point depression, and vapor pressure.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, G D; Zimmerman, R J; Cantu, C; Cameron, I L

    1992-12-01

    New empirical expressions for osmotic pressure, freezing point depression, and vapor pressure are proposed based on the concepts of volume occupancy and (or) hydration force. These expressions are in general inverse relationships in comparison to the standard ideal expressions for the same properties. The slopes of the new equations are determined by the molecular weight of the solute and known constants. The accuracy and precision of the molecular weights calculated from the slope are identical and approximately 1% for the experiments reported here. The nonideality of all three colligative expressions is described by a dimensionless constant called the solute-solvent interaction parameter I. The results on sucrose have the same I = 0.26 for all three solution properties. The nonideality parameter I increased from 0.26 on sucrose to 1.7 on hemoglobin to successfully describe the well-known nonideal response of macromolecules.

  14. Effect of nanoscale confinement on freezing of modified water at room temperature and ambient pressure.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sanket; Kamath, Ganesh; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S

    2014-06-06

    Understanding the phase behavior of confined water is central to fields as diverse as heterogeneous catalysis, corrosion, nanofluidics, and to emerging energy technologies. Altering the state points (temperature, pressure, etc.) or introduction of a foreign surface can result in the phase transformation of water. At room temperature, ice nucleation is a very rare event and extremely high pressures in the GPa-TPa range are required to freeze water. Here, we perform computer experiments to artificially alter the balance between electrostatic and dispersion interactions between water molecules, and demonstrate nucleation and growth of ice at room temperature in a nanoconfined environment. Local perturbations in dispersive and electrostatic interactions near the surface are shown to provide the seed for nucleation (nucleation sites), which lead to room temperature liquid-solid phase transition of confined water. Crystallization of water occurs over several tens of nanometers and is shown to be independent of the nature of the substrate (hydrophilic oxide vs. hydrophobic graphene and crystalline oxide vs. amorphous diamond-like carbon). Our results lead us to hypothesize that the freezing transition of confined water can be controlled by tuning the relative dispersive and electrostatic interaction. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  16. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  17. Vapor pressure and freezing point osmolality measurements applied to a volatile screen.

    PubMed

    Draviam, E J; Custer, E M; Schoen, I

    1984-12-01

    This is a report of a rapid and precise screening procedure, developed for the determination of ethanol in serum using osmolality measurements. The osmolality of the patient is determined by freezing point method (freezing point osmometry) and dew point (water vapor pressure osmometry) method. The difference between freezing point osmolality and vapor pressure osmolality (delta osm) is due to the presence of volatiles in the serum, because the volatiles are not measured by vapor pressure osmometry. The amount of ethanol (mg/dL) in serum is estimated by multiplying delta osm by a factor of 4.2. As a comparison method, ethanol also is measured by a spectrophotometric alcohol dehydrogenase method. In addition, a significant difference between an osmometric alcohol assayed value and enzymatic spectrophotometric measurement indicates the presence of volatiles, other than ethanol. In addition to ethanol there is a linear relationship between osmolality and isopropanol or methanol when added in vitro to serum.

  18. Reappraisal of disparities between osmolality estimates by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit methods.

    PubMed

    Winzor, Donald J

    2004-02-15

    As a response to recent expression of concern about possible unreliability of vapor pressure deficit measurements (K. Kiyosawa, Biophys. Chem. 104 (2003) 171-188), the results of published studies on the temperature dependence of the osmotic pressure of aqueous polyethylene glycol solutions are shown to account for the observed discrepancies between osmolality estimates obtained by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit osmometry--the cause of the concern.

  19. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure What Is High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a common disease in ... the heart, kidneys, brain, and eyes. Types of High Blood Pressure There are two main types of high blood ...

  20. Analysis of freeze-thaw embolism in conifers. The interaction between cavitation pressure and tracheid size.

    PubMed

    Pittermann, Jarmila; Sperry, John S

    2006-01-01

    Ice formation in the xylem sap produces air bubbles that under negative xylem pressures may expand and cause embolism in the xylem conduits. We used the centrifuge method to evaluate the relationship between freeze-thaw embolism and conduit diameter across a range of xylem pressures (Px) in the conifers Pinus contorta and Juniperus scopulorum. Vulnerability curves showing loss of conductivity (embolism) with Px down to -8 MPa were generated with versus without superimposing a freeze-thaw treatment. In both species, the freeze-thaw plus water-stress treatment caused more embolism than water stress alone. We estimated the critical conduit diameter (Df) above which a tracheid will embolize due to freezing and thawing and found that it decreased from 35 microm at a Px of -0.5 MPa to 6 microm at -8 MPa. Further analysis showed that the proportionality between diameter of the air bubble nucleating the cavitation and the diameter of the conduit (kL) declined with increasingly negative Px. This suggests that the bubbles causing cavitation are smaller in proportion to tracheid diameter in narrow tracheids than in wider ones. A possible reason for this is that the rate of dissolving increases with bubble pressure, which is inversely proportional to bubble diameter (La Place's law). Hence, smaller bubbles shrink faster than bigger ones. Last, we used the empirical relationship between Px and Df to model the freeze-thaw response in conifer species.

  1. Contact freezing observed with a high speed video camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Nadine; Koch, Michael; Kiselev, Alexei; Leisner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Freezing of supercooled cloud droplets on collision with ice nucleating particle (INP) has been considered as one of the most effective heterogeneous freezing mechanisms. Potentially, it could play an important role in rapid glaciation of a mixed phase cloud especially if coupled with ice multiplication mechanism active at moderate subzero temperatures. The necessary condition for such coupling would be, among others, the presence of very efficient INPs capable of inducing ice nucleation of the supercooled drizzle droplets in the temperature range of -5°C to -20°C. Some mineral dust particles (K-feldspar) and biogenic INPs (pseudomonas bacteria, birch pollen) have been recently identified as such very efficient INPs. However, if observed with a high speed video (HSV) camera, the contact nucleation induced by these two classes of INPs exhibits a very different behavior. Whereas bacterial INPs can induce freezing within a millisecond after initial contact with supercooled water, birch pollen need much more time to initiate freezing. The mineral dust particles seem to induce ice nucleation faster than birch pollen but slower than bacterial INPs. In this contribution we show the HSV records of individual supercooled droplets suspended in an electrodynamic balance and colliding with airborne INPs of various types. The HSV camera is coupled with a long-working-distance microscope, allowing us to observe the contact nucleation of ice at very high spatial and temporal resolution. The average time needed to initiate freezing has been measured depending on the INP species. This time do not necessarily correlate with the contact freezing efficiency of the ice nucleating particles. We discuss possible mechanisms explaining this behavior and potential implications for future ice nucleation research.

  2. High blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000468.htm High blood pressure To use the sharing features on this page, ... body. Hypertension is the term used to describe high blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are given as two numbers. ...

  3. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) A ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  4. High blood pressure medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertension - medicines ... blood vessel diseases. You may need to take medicines to lower your blood pressure if lifestyle changes ... blood pressure to the target level. WHEN ARE MEDICINES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE USED Most of the ...

  5. Reduced pressure ice fog technique for controlled ice nucleation during freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sajal M; Bhugra, Chandan; Pikal, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    A method to achieve controlled ice nucleation during the freeze-drying process using an ice fog technique was demonstrated in an earlier report. However, the time required for nucleation was about 5 min, even though only one shelf was used, which resulted in Ostwald ripening (annealing) in some of the vials that nucleated earlier than the others. As a result, the ice structure was not optimally uniform in all the vials. The objective of the present study is to introduce a simple variation of the ice fog method whereby a reduced pressure in the chamber is utilized to allow more rapid and uniform freezing which is also potentially easier to scale up. Experiments were conducted on a lab scale freeze dryer with sucrose as model compound at different concentration, product load, and fill volume. Product resistance during primary drying was measured using manometric temperature measurement. Specific surface area of the freeze-dried cake was also determined. No difference was observed either in average product resistance or specific surface area for the different experimental conditions studied, indicating that with use of the reduced pressure ice fog technique, the solutions nucleated at very nearly the same temperature (-10 degrees C). The striking feature of the "Reduced Pressure Ice Fog Technique" is the rapid ice nucleation (less than a minute) under conditions where the earlier procedure required about 5 min; hence, effects of variable Ostwald ripening were not an issue.

  6. High blood pressure - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007329.htm High blood pressure - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure (hypertension) is an increase in the force of ...

  7. High Blood Pressure Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure Prevention Steps You Can Take You can take steps to prevent high blood pressure by adopting these healthy lifestyle habits. Follow a ...

  8. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) Small Text Medium Text Large Text Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) YESTERDAY Hypertension is a silent killer because it ...

  9. Freezing and Melting of 3D Complex Plasma Structures under Microgravity Conditions Driven by Neutral Gas Pressure Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, S. A.; Klumov, B. A.; Huber, P.; Thomas, H. M.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Molotkov, V. I.; Lipaev, A. M.; Naumkin, V. N.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.; Malentschenko, Yu.; Volkov, S.

    2011-05-20

    Freezing and melting of large three-dimensional complex plasmas under microgravity conditions is investigated. The neutral gas pressure is used as a control parameter to trigger the phase changes: Complex plasma freezes (melts) by decreasing (increasing) the pressure. The evolution of complex plasma structural properties upon pressure variation is studied. Theoretical estimates allow us to identify the main factors responsible for the observed behavior.

  10. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... En Español Who is at risk? How is high blood pressure treated? Understanding your blood pressure: What do the ...

  11. High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Health Information Center High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy What Is High Blood Pressure? Blood pressure is ... Are the Effects of High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy? Although many pregnant women with high blood pressure ...

  12. Fast membrane osmometer as alternative to freezing point and vapor pressure osmometry.

    PubMed

    Grattoni, Alessandro; Canavese, Giancarlo; Montevecchi, Franco Maria; Ferrari, Mauro

    2008-04-01

    Osmometry is an essential technique for solution analysis and the investigation of chemical and biological phenomena. Commercially available osmometers rely on the measurements of freezing point, vapor pressure, and osmotic pressure of solutions. Although vapor pressure osmometry (VPO) and freezing point osmometry (FPO) can perform rapid and inexpensive measurements, they are indirect techniques, which rely on thermodynamic assumptions, which limit their applicability. While membrane osmometry (MO) provides a potentially unlimited direct measurement of osmotic pressure and solution osmolality, the conventional technique is often time-consuming and difficult to operate. In the present work, a novel membrane osmometer is presented. The instrument significantly reduces the conventional MO measurement time and is not subject to the limitations of VPO and FPO. For this paper, the osmotic pressure of aqueous sucrose solutions was collected in a molality range 0-5.5, by way of demonstration of the new instrument. When compared with data found in the literature, the experimental data were generally in good agreement. However, differences among results from the three techniques were observed.

  13. Flux-freezing breakdown in high-conductivity magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Eyink, Gregory; Vishniac, Ethan; Lalescu, Cristian; Aluie, Hussein; Kanov, Kalin; Bürger, Kai; Burns, Randal; Meneveau, Charles; Szalay, Alexander

    2013-05-23

    The idea of 'frozen-in' magnetic field lines for ideal plasmas is useful to explain diverse astrophysical phenomena, for example the shedding of excess angular momentum from protostars by twisting of field lines frozen into the interstellar medium. Frozen-in field lines, however, preclude the rapid changes in magnetic topology observed at high conductivities, as in solar flares. Microphysical plasma processes are a proposed explanation of the observed high rates, but it is an open question whether such processes can rapidly reconnect astrophysical flux structures much greater in extent than several thousand ion gyroradii. An alternative explanation is that turbulent Richardson advection brings field lines implosively together from distances far apart to separations of the order of gyroradii. Here we report an analysis of a simulation of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence at high conductivity that exhibits Richardson dispersion. This effect of advection in rough velocity fields, which appear non-differentiable in space, leads to line motions that are completely indeterministic or 'spontaneously stochastic', as predicted in analytical studies. The turbulent breakdown of standard flux freezing at scales greater than the ion gyroradius can explain fast reconnection of very large-scale flux structures, both observed (solar flares and coronal mass ejections) and predicted (the inner heliosheath, accretion disks, γ-ray bursts and so on). For laminar plasma flows with smooth velocity fields or for low turbulence intensity, stochastic flux freezing reduces to the usual frozen-in condition.

  14. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  15. Step by step manipulation of the CryoCapsule with HPM high pressure freezers.

    PubMed

    Heiligenstein, Xavier; Hurbain, Ilse; Delevoye, Cédric; Salamero, Jean; Antony, Claude; Raposo, Graca

    2014-01-01

    The CryoCapsule is a tool dedicated to correlative light to electron microscopy experiments. Focused on simplifying the specimen manipulation throughout the entire workflow from live-cell imaging to freeze substitution following cryofixation by high pressure freezing, we introduce here a step by step procedure to use the CryoCapsule either with the high pressure freezing machines: HPM010 or the HPM100.

  16. Summer Freezing Resistance: A Critical Filter for Plant Community Assemblies in Mediterranean High Mountains.

    PubMed

    Pescador, David S; Sierra-Almeida, Ángela; Torres, Pablo J; Escudero, Adrián

    2016-01-01

    Assessing freezing community response and whether freezing resistance is related to other functional traits is essential for understanding alpine community assemblages, particularly in Mediterranean environments where plants are exposed to freezing temperatures and summer droughts. Thus, we characterized the leaf freezing resistance of 42 plant species in 38 plots at Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain) by measuring their ice nucleation temperature, freezing point (FP), and low-temperature damage (LT50), as well as determining their freezing resistance mechanisms (i.e., tolerance or avoidance). The community response to freezing was estimated for each plot as community weighted means (CWMs) and functional diversity (FD), and we assessed their relative importance with altitude. We established the relationships between freezing resistance, growth forms, and four key plant functional traits (i.e., plant height, specific leaf area, leaf dry matter content (LDMC), and seed mass). There was a wide range of freezing resistance responses and more than in other alpine habitats. At the community level, the CWMs of FP and LT50 responded negatively to altitude, whereas the FD of both traits increased with altitude. The proportion of freezing-tolerant species also increased with altitude. The ranges of FP and LT50 varied among growth forms, and only leaf dry matter content was negatively correlated with freezing-resistance traits. Summer freezing events represent important abiotic filters for assemblies of Mediterranean high mountain communities, as suggested by the CWMs. However, a concomitant summer drought constraint may also explain the high freezing resistance of species that thrive in these areas and the lower FD of freezing resistance traits at lower altitudes. Leaves with high dry matter contents may maintain turgor at lower water potential and enhance drought tolerance in parallel to freezing resistance. This adaptation to drought seems to be a general prerequisite for plants

  17. Summer Freezing Resistance: A Critical Filter for Plant Community Assemblies in Mediterranean High Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Pescador, David S.; Sierra-Almeida, Ángela; Torres, Pablo J.; Escudero, Adrián

    2016-01-01

    Assessing freezing community response and whether freezing resistance is related to other functional traits is essential for understanding alpine community assemblages, particularly in Mediterranean environments where plants are exposed to freezing temperatures and summer droughts. Thus, we characterized the leaf freezing resistance of 42 plant species in 38 plots at Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain) by measuring their ice nucleation temperature, freezing point (FP), and low-temperature damage (LT50), as well as determining their freezing resistance mechanisms (i.e., tolerance or avoidance). The community response to freezing was estimated for each plot as community weighted means (CWMs) and functional diversity (FD), and we assessed their relative importance with altitude. We established the relationships between freezing resistance, growth forms, and four key plant functional traits (i.e., plant height, specific leaf area, leaf dry matter content (LDMC), and seed mass). There was a wide range of freezing resistance responses and more than in other alpine habitats. At the community level, the CWMs of FP and LT50 responded negatively to altitude, whereas the FD of both traits increased with altitude. The proportion of freezing-tolerant species also increased with altitude. The ranges of FP and LT50 varied among growth forms, and only leaf dry matter content was negatively correlated with freezing-resistance traits. Summer freezing events represent important abiotic filters for assemblies of Mediterranean high mountain communities, as suggested by the CWMs. However, a concomitant summer drought constraint may also explain the high freezing resistance of species that thrive in these areas and the lower FD of freezing resistance traits at lower altitudes. Leaves with high dry matter contents may maintain turgor at lower water potential and enhance drought tolerance in parallel to freezing resistance. This adaptation to drought seems to be a general prerequisite for plants

  18. Aspirated High Pressure Compressor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Std. Z39.18 A proved for Public Release Distribution Unlimited ABSTRACT (continued from Blockl4) within 0.5 percentage points . High response static...attention was given to the design of the instrumentation to obtain efficiency measurements within 0.5 percentage points . High response static pressure...prior empirical knowledge [3]. 0.5 percentage points . High response static pressure The new proposition addressed here is that aspiration offers

  19. Microautoradiography of Water-Soluble Compounds in Plant Tissue after Freeze-Drying and Pressure Infiltration with Epoxy Resin

    PubMed Central

    Vogelmann, Thomas C.; Dickson, Richard E.

    1982-01-01

    It is difficult to retain and localize radioactive, water-soluble compounds within plant cells. Existing techniques retain water-soluble compounds with varying rates of efficiency and are limited to processing only a few samples at one time. We developed a modified pressure infiltration technique for the preparation of microautoradiographs of 14C-labeled, water-soluble compounds in plant tissue. Samples from cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh.) labeled with 14C were excised, quick frozen in liquid N2, freeze-dried at −50°C, and pressure-infiltrated with epoxy resin without intermediate solvents or prolonged incubation times. The technique facilitates the mass processing of samples for microautoradiography, gives good cellular retention of labeled water-soluble compounds, and is highly reproducible. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16662542

  20. Modeling conductive heat transfer during high-pressure thawing processes: determination of latent heat as a function of pressure.

    PubMed

    Denys, S; Van Loey, A M; Hendrickx, M E

    2000-01-01

    A numerical heat transfer model for predicting product temperature profiles during high-pressure thawing processes was recently proposed by the authors. In the present work, the predictive capacity of the model was considerably improved by taking into account the pressure dependence of the latent heat of the product that was used (Tylose). The effect of pressure on the latent heat of Tylose was experimentally determined by a series of freezing experiments conducted at different pressure levels. By combining a numerical heat transfer model for freezing processes with a least sum of squares optimization procedure, the corresponding latent heat at each pressure level was estimated, and the obtained pressure relation was incorporated in the original high-pressure thawing model. Excellent agreement with the experimental temperature profiles for both high-pressure freezing and thawing was observed.

  1. High-pressure microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, K.

    2015-03-01

    When using appropriate materials and microfabrication techniques, with the small dimensions the mechanical stability of microstructured devices allows for processes at high pressures without loss in safety. The largest area of applications has been demonstrated in green chemistry and bioprocesses, where extraction, synthesis and analyses often excel at high densities and high temperatures. This is accessible through high pressures. Capillary chemistry has been used since long but, just like in low-pressure applications, there are several potential advantages in using microfluidic platforms, e.g., planar isothermal set-ups, large local variations in geometries, dense form factors, small dead volumes and precisely positioned microstructures for control of reactions, catalysis, mixing and separation. Other potential applications are in, e.g., microhydraulics, exploration, gas driven vehicles, and high-pressure science. From a review of the state-of-art and frontiers of high pressure microfluidics, the focus will be on different solutions demonstrated for microfluidic handling at high pressures and challenges that remain.

  2. Prevention of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Prevention of High Blood Pressure Healthy lifestyle habits, proper use of medicines, and ... prevent high blood pressure or its complications. Preventing High Blood Pressure Onset Healthy lifestyle habits can help prevent high ...

  3. Arginine and proline applied as food additives stimulate high freeze tolerance in larvae of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Koštál, Vladimír; Korbelová, Jaroslava; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Moos, Martin; Šimek, Petr

    2016-08-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an insect of tropical origin. Its larval stage is evolutionarily adapted for rapid growth and development under warm conditions and shows high sensitivity to cold. In this study, we further developed an optimal acclimation and freezing protocol that significantly improves larval freeze tolerance (an ability to survive at -5°C when most of the freezable fraction of water is converted to ice). Using the optimal protocol, freeze survival to adult stage increased from 0.7% to 12.6% in the larvae fed standard diet (agar, sugar, yeast, cornmeal). Next, we fed the larvae diets augmented with 31 different amino compounds, administered in different concentrations, and observed their effects on larval metabolomic composition, viability, rate of development and freeze tolerance. While some diet additives were toxic, others showed positive effects on freeze tolerance. Statistical correlation revealed tight association between high freeze tolerance and high levels of amino compounds involved in arginine and proline metabolism. Proline- and arginine-augmented diets showed the highest potential, improving freeze survival to 42.1% and 50.6%, respectively. Two plausible mechanisms by which high concentrations of proline and arginine might stimulate high freeze tolerance are discussed: (i) proline, probably in combination with trehalose, could reduce partial unfolding of proteins and prevent membrane fusions in the larvae exposed to thermal stress (prior to freezing) or during freeze dehydration; (ii) both arginine and proline are exceptional among amino compounds in their ability to form supramolecular aggregates which probably bind partially unfolded proteins and inhibit their aggregation under increasing freeze dehydration. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. High Pressure Biomass Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Pradeep K

    2016-07-29

    According to the Billion Ton Report, the U.S. has a large supply of biomass available that can supplement fossil fuels for producing chemicals and transportation fuels. Agricultural waste, forest residue, and energy crops offer potential benefits: renewable feedstock, zero to low CO2 emissions depending on the specific source, and domestic supply availability. Biomass can be converted into chemicals and fuels using one of several approaches: (i) biological platform converts corn into ethanol by using depolymerization of cellulose to form sugars followed by fermentation, (ii) low-temperature pyrolysis to obtain bio-oils which must be treated to reduce oxygen content via HDO hydrodeoxygenation), and (iii) high temperature pyrolysis to produce syngas (CO + H2). This last approach consists of producing syngas using the thermal platform which can be used to produce a variety of chemicals and fuels. The goal of this project was to develop an improved understanding of the gasification of biomass at high pressure conditions and how various gasification parameters might affect the gasification behavior. Since most downstream applications of synags conversion (e.g., alcohol synthesis, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis etc) involve utilizing high pressure catalytic processes, there is an interest in carrying out the biomass gasification at high pressure which can potentially reduce the gasifier size and subsequent downstream cleaning processes. It is traditionally accepted that high pressure should increase the gasification rates (kinetic effect). There is also precedence from coal gasification literature from the 1970s that high pressure gasification would be a beneficial route to consider. Traditional approach of using thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) or high-pressure themogravimetric analyzer (PTGA) worked well in understanding the gasification kinetics of coal gasification which was useful in designing high pressure coal gasification processes. However

  5. Analysis of Freeze-Thaw Embolism in Conifers. The Interaction between Cavitation Pressure and Tracheid Size1

    PubMed Central

    Pittermann, Jarmila; Sperry, John S.

    2006-01-01

    Ice formation in the xylem sap produces air bubbles that under negative xylem pressures may expand and cause embolism in the xylem conduits. We used the centrifuge method to evaluate the relationship between freeze-thaw embolism and conduit diameter across a range of xylem pressures (Px) in the conifers Pinus contorta and Juniperus scopulorum. Vulnerability curves showing loss of conductivity (embolism) with Px down to −8 MPa were generated with versus without superimposing a freeze-thaw treatment. In both species, the freeze-thaw plus water-stress treatment caused more embolism than water stress alone. We estimated the critical conduit diameter (Df) above which a tracheid will embolize due to freezing and thawing and found that it decreased from 35 μm at a Px of −0.5 MPa to 6 μm at −8 MPa. Further analysis showed that the proportionality between diameter of the air bubble nucleating the cavitation and the diameter of the conduit (kL) declined with increasingly negative Px. This suggests that the bubbles causing cavitation are smaller in proportion to tracheid diameter in narrow tracheids than in wider ones. A possible reason for this is that the rate of dissolving increases with bubble pressure, which is inversely proportional to bubble diameter (La Place's law). Hence, smaller bubbles shrink faster than bigger ones. Last, we used the empirical relationship between Px and Df to model the freeze-thaw response in conifer species. PMID:16377751

  6. High pressure furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Donald E.

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  7. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Donald E.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  8. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, D.E.

    1992-07-14

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

  9. High pressure furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, D.E.

    1993-09-14

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum)). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 19 figures.

  10. Pressure-induced collapse of ice clathrate and hexagonal ice mixtures formed by freezing.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Ove; Johari, G P

    2009-09-21

    We report thermal conductivity kappa measurements of the pressure-induced collapse of two mixtures of ice and tetrahydrofuran (THF) clathrate hydrate formed by freezing aqueous solutions, THF23 H(2)O and THF20 H(2)O, one containing twice as much excess water than the other. On pressurizing, kappa of the solid mixture first decreases at the onset pressure of approximately 0.8 GPa, as occurs for collapse of pure ice, reaches a local minimum at a pressure of approximately 1.0 GPa, and then increases as occurs for the collapse of the pure clathrate THF17 H(2)O. This shows that in the apparently homogeneous mixture, the ice and the clathrate collapse as if the two were in a mechanically mixed state. The manner in which the clathrate aggregate can arrange in the solid indicates that ice occupies the interstitial space in the tightly packed aggregates and H(2)O molecules belonging to the lattice of one form hydrogen bond with that of the other, a feature that is preserved in their collapsed states. On decompression, the original clathrate is partially recovered in the THF20 H(2)O mixture, but the collapsed ice does not transform to the low density amorph. We surmise that on irreversible transformation to the original clathrate, the aggregates expand. Any pressure thus exerted on the small domains of the collapsed ice with a hydrogen bonded interface with the clathrate aggregates could prevent it from transforming to the low density amorph. Measurements of kappa are useful in investigating structural collapse of crystals when dilatometry is unable to do so, as kappa seems to be more sensitive to pressure-induced changes than the volume.

  11. HIGH PRESSURE GAS REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Ramage, R.W.

    1962-05-01

    A gas regulator operating on the piston and feedback principle is described. The device is particularly suitable for the delicate regulation of high pressure, i.e., 10,000 psi and above, gas sources, as well as being perfectly adaptable for use on gas supplies as low as 50 psi. The piston is adjustably connected to a needle valve and the movement of the piston regulates the flow of gas from the needle valve. The gas output is obtained from the needle valve. Output pressure is sampled by a piston feedback means which, in turn, regulates the movement of the main piston. When the output is other than the desired value, the feedback system initiates movement of the main piston to allow the output pressure to be corrected or to remain constant. (AEC)

  12. High-freezing-point fuels used for aviation turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.

    1979-01-01

    Broadened-specification aviation fuels could be produced from a greater fraction of crude source material with improvements in fuel supply and price. These fuels, particularly those with increased final boiling temperatures, would have higher freezing temperatures than current aviation turbine fuels. The higher-freezing-point fuels can be substituted in the majority of present commercial flights, since temperature data indicate that in-flight fuel temperatures are relatively mild. For the small but significant fraction of commercial flights where low fuel temperatures make higher freezing-point fuel use unacceptable, adaptations to the fuel or fuel system may be made to accommodate this fuel. Several techniques are discussed. Fuel heating is the most promising concept. One simple system design uses existing heat rejection from the fuel-lubricating oil cooler, another uses an engine-driven generator for electrical heating. Both systems offer advantages that outweigh the obvious penalties.

  13. High freezing point fuels used for aviation turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.

    1979-01-01

    Broadened-specification aviation fuels could be produced from a greater fraction of crude source material with improvements in fuel supply and price. These fuels, particularly those with increased final boiling temperatures, would have higher freezing temperatures than current aviation turbine fuels. For the small but significant fraction of commercial flights where low fuel temperatures make higher freezing-point fuel use unacceptable, adaptations to the fuel or fuel system may be made to accommodate this fuel. Several techniques are discussed. Fuel heating is the most promising concept. One simple design uses existing heat rejection from the fuel-lubricating oil cooler, another uses an engine-driven generator for electrical heating.

  14. Living with High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With High Blood Pressure If you have high blood pressure, the best thing to do is to talk ... help you track your blood pressure. Pregnancy Planning High blood pressure can cause problems for mother and baby. High ...

  15. Cryogenic High Pressure Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  16. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  17. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom

  18. HIGH PRESSURE DIES

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, W.B.

    1960-05-31

    A press was invented for subjecting specimens of bismuth, urania, yttria, or thoria to high pressures and temperatures. The press comprises die parts enclosing a space in which is placed an electric heater thermally insulated from the die parts so as not to damage them by heat. The die parts comprise two opposed inner frustoconical parts and an outer part having a double frustoconical recess receiving the inner parts. The die space decreases in size as the inner die parts move toward one another against the outer part and the inner parts, though very hard, do not fracture because of the mode of support provided by the outer part.

  19. Modeling the Freezing of SN in High Temperature Furnaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brush, Lucien

    1999-01-01

    Presently, crystal growth furnaces are being designed that will be used to monitor the crystal melt interface shape and the solutal and thermal fields in its vicinity during the directional freezing of dilute binary alloys, To monitor the thermal field within the solidifying materials, thermocouple arrays (AMITA) are inserted into the sample. Intrusive thermocouple monitoring devices can affect the experimental data being measured. Therefore, one objective of this work is to minimize the effect of the thermocouples on the data generated. To aid in accomplishing this objective, two models of solidification have been developed. Model A is a fully transient, one dimensional model for the freezing of a dilute binary alloy that is used to compute temperature profiles for comparison with measurements taken from the thermocouples. Model B is a fully transient two dimensional model of the solidification of a pure metal. It will be used to uncover the manner in which thermocouple placement and orientation within the ampoule breaks the longitudinal axis of symmetry of the thermal field and the crystal-melt interface. Results and conclusions are based on the comparison of the models with experimental results taken during the freezing of pure Sn.

  20. Modeling the Freezing of SN in High Temperature Furnaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brush, Lucien

    1999-01-01

    Presently, crystal growth furnaces are being designed that will be used to monitor the crystal melt interface shape and the solutal and thermal fields in its vicinity during the directional freezing of dilute binary alloys, To monitor the thermal field within the solidifying materials, thermocouple arrays (AMITA) are inserted into the sample. Intrusive thermocouple monitoring devices can affect the experimental data being measured. Therefore, one objective of this work is to minimize the effect of the thermocouples on the data generated. To aid in accomplishing this objective, two models of solidification have been developed. Model A is a fully transient, one dimensional model for the freezing of a dilute binary alloy that is used to compute temperature profiles for comparison with measurements taken from the thermocouples. Model B is a fully transient two dimensional model of the solidification of a pure metal. It will be used to uncover the manner in which thermocouple placement and orientation within the ampoule breaks the longitudinal axis of symmetry of the thermal field and the crystal-melt interface. Results and conclusions are based on the comparison of the models with experimental results taken during the freezing of pure Sn.

  1. Drought increases the freezing resistance of high-elevation plants of the Central Chilean Andes.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Almeida, Angela; Reyes-Bahamonde, Claudia; Cavieres, Lohengrin A

    2016-08-01

    Freezing temperatures and summer droughts shape plant life in Mediterranean high-elevation habitats. Thus, the impacts of climate change on plant survival for these species could be quite different to those from mesic mountains. We exposed 12 alpine species to experimental irrigation and warming in the Central Chilean Andes to assess whether irrigation decreases freezing resistance, irrigation influences freezing resistance when plants are exposed to warming, and to assess the relative importance of irrigation and temperature in controlling plant freezing resistance. Freezing resistance was determined as the freezing temperature that produced 50 % photoinactivation [lethal temperature (LT50)] and the freezing point (FP). In seven out of 12 high-Andean species, LT50 of drought-exposed plants was on average 3.5 K lower than that of irrigated plants. In contrast, most species did not show differences in FP. Warming changed the effect of irrigation on LT50. Depending on species, warming was found to have (1) no effect, (2) to increase, or (3) to decrease the irrigation effect on LT50. However, the effect size of irrigation on LT50 was greater than that of warming for almost all species. The effect of irrigation on FP was slightly changed by warming and was sometimes in disagreement with LT50 responses. Our data show that drought increases the freezing resistance of high-Andean plant species as a general plant response. Although freezing resistance increases depended on species-specific traits, our results show that warmer and moister growing seasons due to climate change will seriously threaten plant survival and persistence of these and other alpine species in dry mountains.

  2. Chromium at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Rafael

    2012-02-01

    Chromium has long served as the archetype of spin density wave magnetism. Recently, Jaramillo and collaborators have shown that Cr also serves as an archetype of magnetic quantum criticality. Using a combination of x-ray diffraction and electrical transport measurements at high pressures and cryogenic temperatures in a diamond anvil cell, they have demonstrated that the N'eel transition (TN) can be continuously suppressed to zero, with no sign of a concurrent structural transition. The order parameter undergoes a broad regime of exponential suppression, consistent with the weak coupling paradigm, before deviating from a BCS-like ground state within a narrow but accessible quantum critical regime. The quantum criticality is characterized by mean field scaling of TN and non mean field scaling of the transport coefficients, which points to a fluctuation-induced reconstruction of the critical Fermi surface. A comparison between pressure and chemical doping as means to suppress TN sheds light on different routes to the quantum critical point and the relevance of Fermi surface nesting and disorder at this quantum phase transition. The work by Jaramillo et al. is broadly relevant to the study of magnetic quantum criticality in a physically pure and theoretically tractable system that balances elements of weak and strong coupling. [4pt] [1] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. Wang & T. F. Rosenbaum. Signatures of quantum criticality in pure Cr at high pressure. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107, 13631 (2010). [0pt] [2] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. C. Lang, Z. Islam, G. Srajer, P. B. Littlewood, D. B. McWhan & T. F. Rosenbaum. Breakdown of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer ground state at a quantum phase transition. Nature 459, 405 (2009).

  3. Freeze-drying for morphological control of high performance semi-interpenetrating polymer networks. III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiung, H. J.; Hansen, M. G.; Pater, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using a freeze-drying (solvent removal by sublimation) approach for controlling the morphology of a high-performance semi-IPN is assessed. A high-performance thermoplastic polyimide and commercially available 4,4'-bismaleimide diphenylenemethane were dissolved in a solvent, 1,3,5-trioxane. The solvent was removed from the constituents by freeze-drying. For purposes of comparison, the constituents were dissolved in a high-boiling-point solvent, N,N-dimethylformamide. The solvent was removed from the solution by evaporation. The physical and mechanical properties and phase morphology of the neat resins and composites prepared by freeze-drying and traditional solution methods are presented and compared. It is concluded that the TG is higher and that the magnitude of minor constituent separation is less in the freeze-dry processed materials than for the processed solution.

  4. Design and evaluation of aircraft heat source systems for use with high-freezing point fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasion, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    The objectives were the design, performance and economic analyses of practical aircraft fuel heating systems that would permit the use of high freezing-point fuels on long-range aircraft. Two hypothetical hydrocarbon fuels with freezing points of -29 C and -18 C were used to represent the variation from current day jet fuels. A Boeing 747-200 with JT9D-7/7A engines was used as the baseline aircraft. A 9300 Km mission was used as the mission length from which the heat requirements to maintain the fuel above its freezing point was based.

  5. High pressure capillary connector

    DOEpatents

    Renzi, Ronald F.

    2005-08-09

    A high pressure connector capable of operating at pressures of 40,000 psi or higher is provided. This connector can be employed to position a first fluid-bearing conduit that has a proximal end and a distal end to a second fluid-bearing conduit thereby providing fluid communication between the first and second fluid-bearing conduits. The connector includes (a) an internal fitting assembly having a body cavity with (i) a lower segment that defines a lower segment aperture and (ii) an interiorly threaded upper segment, (b) a first member having a first member aperture that traverses its length wherein the first member aperture is configured to accommodate the first fluid-bearing conduit and wherein the first member is positioned in the lower segment of the internal fitting assembly, and (c) a second member having a second member aperture that traverses its length wherein the second member is positioned in the upper segment of the fitting assembly and wherein a lower surface of the second member is in contact with an upper surface of the first member to assert a compressive force onto the first member and wherein the first member aperture and the second member aperture are coaxial.

  6. What Causes High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can cause high blood pressure. Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system makes angiotensin and ... blood volumes and high blood pressure. Sympathetic Nervous System Activity The sympathetic nervous system has important functions ...

  7. High Blood Pressure Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Web Sites with More Information About High Blood Pressure ...

  8. High blood pressure and diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007483.htm High blood pressure and diet To use the sharing features on ... diet is a proven way to help control high blood pressure . These changes can also help you lose weight ...

  9. High pressure mechanical seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babel, Henry W. (Inventor); Anderson, Raymond H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A relatively impervious mechanical seal is formed between the outer surface of a tube and the inside surface of a mechanical fitting of a high pressure fluid or hydraulic system by applying a very thin soft metal layer onto the outer surface of the hard metal tube and/or inner surface of the hard metal fitting. The thickness of such thin metal layer is independent of the size of the tube and/or fittings. Many metals and alloys of those metals exhibit the requisite softness, including silver, gold, tin, platinum, indium, rhodium and cadmium. Suitably, the coating is about 0.0025 millimeters (0.10 mils) in thickness. After compression, the tube and fitting combination exhibits very low leak rates on the order or 10.sup.-8 cubic centimeters per second or less as measured using the Helium leak test.

  10. High pressure mechanical seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babel, Henry W. (Inventor); Fuson, Phillip L. (Inventor); Chickles, Colin D. (Inventor); Jones, Cherie A. (Inventor); Anderson, Raymond H. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A relatively impervious mechanical seal is formed between the outer surface of a tube and the inside surface of a mechanical fitting of a high pressure fluid or hydraulic system by applying a very thin soft metal layer onto the outer surface of the hard metal tube and/or inner surface of the hard metal fitting, prior to swaging the fitting onto the tube. The thickness of such thin metal layer is independent of the size of the tube and/or fittings. Many metals and alloys of those metals exhibit the requisite softness, including silver, gold, nickel, tin, platinum, indium, rhodium and cadmium. Suitably, the coating is about 0.0025 millimeters (0.10 mils) in thickness. After swaging, the tube and fitting combination exhibits very low leak rates on the order or 10.sup.-8 cubic centimeters per second or less as meaured using the Helium leak test.

  11. High Blood Pressure - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Well-Being 8 - High Blood Pressure - العربية (Arabic) MP3 Siloam Family Health Center High Blood Pressure - العربية ( ... Being 8 - High Blood Pressure - myanma bhasa (Burmese) MP3 Siloam Family Health Center Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect) ( ...

  12. Controlling your high blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000101.htm Controlling your high blood pressure To use the sharing features on this page, ... JavaScript. Hypertension is another term used to describe high blood pressure. High blood pressure can lead to: Stroke Heart ...

  13. [High Pressure Gas Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quintana, Rolando

    2002-01-01

    Four high-pressure gas tanks, the basis of this study, were especially made by a private contractor and tested before being delivered to NASA Kennedy Space Center. In order to insure 100% reliability of each individual tank the staff at KSC decided to again submit the four tanks under more rigorous tests. These tests were conducted during a period from April 10 through May 8 at KSC. This application further validates the predictive safety model for accident prevention and system failure in the testing of four high-pressure gas tanks at Kennedy Space Center, called Continuous Hazard Tracking and Failure Prediction Methodology (CHTFPM). It is apparent from the variety of barriers available for a hazard control that some barriers will be more successful than others in providing protection. In order to complete the Barrier Analysis of the system, a Task Analysis and a Biomechanical Study were performed to establish the relationship between the degree of biomechanical non-conformities and the anomalies found within the system on particular joints of the body. This relationship was possible to obtain by conducting a Regression Analysis to the previously generated data. From the information derived the body segment with the lowest percentage of non-conformities was the neck flexion with 46.7%. Intense analysis of the system was conducted including Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA), Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), and Barrier Analysis. These analyses resulted in the identification of occurrences of conditions, which may be becoming hazardous in the given system. These conditions, known as dendritics, may become hazards and could result in an accident, system malfunction, or unacceptable risk conditions. A total of 56 possible dendritics were identified. Work sampling was performed to observe the occurrence each dendritic. The out of control points generated from a Weighted c control chart along with a Pareto analysis indicate that the dendritics "Personnel not

  14. High pressure gas metering project

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, L.R.

    1980-07-07

    The initial research and development of a system that uses high pressure helium gas to pressurize vessels over a wide range of pressurization rates, vessel volumes, and maximum test pressures are described. A method of controlling the mass flow rate in a test vessel was developed by using the pressure difference across a capillary tube. The mass flow rate is related to the pressurization rate through a real gas equation of state. The resulting mass flow equation is then used in a control algorithm. Plots of two typical pressurization tests run on a manually operated system are included.

  15. High-pressure neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongwu

    2011-01-10

    This lecture will cover progress and prospect of applications of high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques to Earth and materials sciences. I will first introduce general high-pressure research topics and available in-situ high-pressure techniques. Then I'll talk about high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques using two types of pressure cells: fluid-driven and anvil-type cells. Lastly, I will give several case studies using these techniques, particularly, those on hydrogen-bearing materials and magnetic transitions.

  16. High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the baby. Controlling your blood pressure during pregnancy and getting regular prenatal care are important for ... your baby. Treatments for high blood pressure in pregnancy may include close monitoring of the baby, lifestyle ...

  17. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... is at rest between beats Health care workers write blood pressure numbers with the systolic number above ... available to discuss recent findings and ongoing research projects about health conditions and social determinants that disproportionately ...

  18. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Practice healthy coping techniques, such as muscle relaxation, deep breathing or meditation. Getting regular physical activity and ... blood pressure at home. Practice relaxation or slow, deep breathing. Practice taking deep, slow breaths to help ...

  19. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... can improve your health in other ways. Mastering stress management techniques can lead to other behavior changes — including those that reduce your blood pressure. When looking for ways to manage stress, remember that you have many options. For example: ...

  20. Ice VI freezing of meat: supercooling and ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed

    Molina-García, Antonio D; Otero, Laura; Martino, Miriam N; Zaritzky, Noemí E; Arabas, Jacek; Szczepek, Janusz; Sanz, Pedro D

    2004-03-01

    While "classical" freezing (to ice I) is disruptive to the microstructure of meat, freezing to ice VI has been found to preserve it. Ice VI freeze-substitution microscopy showed no traces of structural alteration on muscle fibres compared with the extensive damage caused by ice I freezing. The different signs of the freezing volume changes associated with these two ice phases is the most likely explanation for the above effects. Ice VI exists only at high pressure (632.4-2216 MPa) but can be formed and kept at room temperature. It was found that its nucleation requires a higher degree of supercooling than ice I freezing does, both for pure water and meat. Monitoring of the freezing process (by temperature and/or pressure measurements) is, thus, essential. The possible applications of ice VI freezing for food and other biological materials and the nucleation behaviour of this ice phase are discussed.

  1. Coupled fluid-thermal analysis of low-pressure sublimation and condensation with application to freeze-drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Arnab

    Freeze-drying is a low-pressure, low-temperature condensation pumping process widely used in the manufacture of bio-pharmaceuticals for removal of solvents by sublimation. The goal of the process is to provide a stable dosage form by removing the solvent in such a way that the sensitive molecular structure of the active substance is least disturbed. The vacuum environment presents unique challenges for understanding and controlling heat and mass transfer in the process. As a result, the design of equipment and associated processes has been largely empirical, slow and inefficient. A comprehensive simulation framework to predict both, process and equipment performance is critical to improve current practice. A part of the dissertation is aimed at performing coupled fluid-thermal analysis of low-pressure sublimation-condensation processes typical of freeze-drying technologies. Both, experimental and computational models are used to first understand the key heat transfer modes during the process. A modeling and computational framework, validated with experiments for analysis of sublimation, water-vapor flow and condensation in application to pharmaceutical freeze-drying is developed. Augmented with computational fluid dynamics modeling, the simulation framework presented here allows to predict for the first time, dynamic product/process conditions taking into consideration specifics of equipment design. Moreover, by applying the modeling framework to process design based on a design-space approach, it has demonstrated that there is a viable alternative to empiricism.

  2. High-temperature, high-pressure optical cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, L. R.; Smith, R.; Harris, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    For measuring the thermal diffusivity of HgCdTe melts by the laser-pulse method, an infrared transparent cell with flat windows of sufficient strength to withstand the high-vapor pressure of mercury had to be developed. Since mercury telluride expands on freezing, certain difficulties arose in returning the cell to room temperature without cracking it. T08 commercial fused silica is used in the construction of the cell, and the cells are transparent for wavelengths from about 3.5 microns in the infrared to 260 nm in the ultraviolet. The construction procedure for the required cells has been laborious. However, the obtained cell has routinely withstood internal pressures in excess of 60 atm at 900 C. Attention is given to the design of the windows, aspects of cell construction, and questions of loading.

  3. The High Pressure Nervous Syndrome and Other High Pressure Effects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Many of the problems of exposing man to a high pressure environment depend overtly on the properties of gases in the gaseous phase--such as the...or to changes in pressure. These are the subject of this chapter. The distinction is an arbitrary one, since both hyperbaric arthralgia and the high

  4. High pressure storage vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiang

    2013-08-27

    Disclosed herein is a composite pressure vessel with a liner having a polar boss and a blind boss a shell is formed around the liner via one or more filament wrappings continuously disposed around at least a substantial portion of the liner assembly combined the liner and filament wrapping have a support profile. To reduce susceptible to rupture a locally disposed filament fiber is added.

  5. Stroke and High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More How High Blood Pressure Can Lead to Stroke Updated:May 3,2017 ... This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  6. Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays

    DOEpatents

    Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Paul, Phillip H.; Schoeniger, Luke

    2002-01-01

    An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

  7. Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays

    DOEpatents

    Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Paul, Phillip H.; Schoeniger, Luke

    2005-11-01

    An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

  8. Managing High Blood Pressure Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Managing High Blood Pressure Medications Updated:Jan 3,2017 When your doctor ... health. This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  9. High Blood Pressure and Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More High Blood Pressure and Women Updated:Dec 14,2016 Pregnancy and ... Women . This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  10. Homogeneous Aerosol Freezing in the Tops of High-Altitude Tropical Cumulonimbus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, E. J.; Ackerman, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations of deep, intense continental tropical convection indicate that when the cloud tops extend more than a few kilometers above the liquid water homogeneous freezing level, ice nucleation due to freezing of entrained aqueous sulfate aerosols generates large concentrations of small crystals (diameters less than approx. equal to 20 micrometers). The small crystals produced by aerosol freezing have the largest impact on cloud-top ice concentration for convective clouds with strong updrafts but relatively low aerosol concentrations. An implication of this result is that cloud-top ice concentrations in high anvil cirrus can be controlled primarily by updraft speeds in the tops of convective plumes and to a lesser extent by aerosol concentrations in the uppermost troposphere. While larger crystals precipitate out and sublimate in subsaturated air below, the population of small crystals can persist in the saturated uppermost troposphere for many hours, thereby prolonging the lifetime of remnants from anvil cirrus in the tropical tropopause layer.

  11. High pressure ices

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Andreas; Ashcroft, N. W.; Hoffmann, Roald

    2012-01-01

    H2O will be more resistant to metallization than previously thought. From computational evolutionary structure searches, we find a sequence of new stable and meta-stable structures for the ground state of ice in the 1–5 TPa (10 to 50 Mbar) regime, in the static approximation. The previously proposed Pbcm structure is superseded by a Pmc21 phase at p = 930 GPa, followed by a predicted transition to a P21 crystal structure at p = 1.3 TPa. This phase, featuring higher coordination at O and H, is stable over a wide pressure range, reaching 4.8 TPa. We analyze carefully the geometrical changes in the calculated structures, especially the buckling at the H in O-H-O motifs. All structures are insulating—chemistry burns a deep and (with pressure increase) lasting hole in the density of states near the highest occupied electronic levels of what might be component metallic lattices. Metallization of ice in our calculations occurs only near 4.8 TPa, where the metallic C2/m phase becomes most stable. In this regime, zero-point energies much larger than typical enthalpy differences suggest possible melting of the H sublattice, or even the entire crystal. PMID:22207625

  12. Medications for High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Medications for High Blood Pressure Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... all their lives. back to top Types of Medications FDA has approved many medications to treat high ...

  13. High pre-freezing dilution improves post-thaw function of ram spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Leahy, T; Marti, J I; Mendoza, N; Pérez-Pé, R; Muiño-Blanco, T; Cebrián-Pérez, J A; Evans, G; Maxwell, W M C

    2010-05-01

    Despite considerable cryobiology research there is no industry standard for the concentration to which ram spermatozoa should be diluted before freezing. Ram semen is highly concentrated and often frozen at a high sperm concentration, necessitating the use of small laparoscopic insemination doses. The aim of this paper was to ascertain the effect of dilution on the integrity of frozen-thawed ram spermatozoa. In the first experiment, spermatozoa were extended with a Tris-buffered diluent before freezing or after thawing to yield a final sperm concentration of 20 x 10(6)/ml, or were not diluted. Motility characteristics, viability and acrosome integrity of spermatozoa were analysed over a 6h incubation period at 37 degrees C. In the second experiment, spermatozoa were either diluted before freezing, subjected to sex-sorting or not diluted before freezing. Thawed spermatozoa were separated into sub-populations using centrifugal counter-current distribution (CCCD) and the profile of partition and functional integrity (viability, chlortetracycline status and Annexin-V binding) in the sub-populations assessed. Dilution before freezing significantly improved post-thaw viability, acrosome integrity and total motility whereas dilution post-thaw decreased viability and motility of spermatozoa. Sperm heterogeneity, as assessed by CCCD profile, was not different for control, diluted and sex-sorted spermatozoa. Analysis of CCCD sub-populations showed the proportion of functional cells (displaying the F-Pattern or no PS translocation) was similar for all sperm types. The results show that ram spermatozoa retain normal function at higher pre-freeze dilution rates than are commonly used in the sheep industry. The application of these findings would result in more practicable and functional artificial insemination doses.

  14. High pressure synthesis gas fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Construction of the high pressure gas phase fermentation system is nearing completion. All non-explosion proof components will be housed separately in a gas-monitored plexiglas cabinet. A gas-monitoring system has been designed to ensure the safety of the operations in case of small or large accidental gas releases. Preliminary experiments investigating the effects of high pressure on Clostridium 1jungdahlii have shown that growth and CO uptake are not negatively affected and CO uptake by an increased total pressure of 100 psig at a syngas partial pressure of 10 psig.

  15. Nanomaterials under high-pressure.

    PubMed

    San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2006-10-01

    The use of high-pressure for the study and elaboration of homogeneous nanostructures is critically reviewed. Size effects, the interaction between nanostructures and guest species or the interaction of the nanosystem with the pressure transmitting medium are emphasized. Phase diagrams and the possibilities opened by the combination of pressure and temperature for the elaboration of new nanomaterials is underlined through the examination of three different systems: nanocrystals, nano-cage materials which include fullerites and group-14 clathrates, and single wall nanotubes. This tutorial review is addressed to scientist seeking an introduction or a panoramic view of the study of nanomaterials under high-pressure.

  16. High-Pressure Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogson, Mark

    1987-09-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The study of solids at high pressure and variable temperature enables development of accurate interatomic potential functions over wide ranges of interatomic distances. A review of the main models used in the determination of these potentials is given in Chapter one. A discussion of phonon frequency as a variable physical parameter reflecting the interatomic potential is given. A high pressure Raman study of inorganic salts of the types MSCN, (M = K,Rb,Cs & NH_4^+ ) and MNO_2, (M = K,Na) has been completed. The studies have revealed two new phases in KNO_2 and one new phase in NaNO _2 at high pressure. The accurate phonon shift data have enabled the determination of the pure and biphasic stability regions of the phases of KNO _2. A discussion of the B1, B2 relationship of univalent nitrites is also given. In the series of thiocyanates studied new phases have been found in all four materials. In both the potassium and rubidium salts two new phases have been detected, and in the ceasium salt one new phase has been detected, all at high pressure, from accurate phonon shift data. These transitions are discussed in terms of second-order mechanisms with space groups suggested for all phases, based on Landau's theory of second-order phase transitions. In the ammonium salt one new phase has been detected. This new phase transition has been interpreted as a second-order transition. The series of molecular crystals CH_3 HgX, (X = Cl,Br & I) has been studied at high pressure and at variable temperature. In Chapter five, their phase behaviour at high pressure is detailed along with the pressure dependencies of their phonon frequencies. In the chloride and the bromide two new phases have been detected. In the bromide one has been detected at high temperature and one at high pressure, and latter being interpreted as the stopping of the methyl rotation. In the chloride one phase has been found at

  17. A study of the impact of freezing on the lyophilization of a concentrated formulation with a high fill depth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinsong; Viverette, Todd; Virgin, Marlin; Anderson, Mitch; Paresh, Dalal

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of freezing on the lyophilization of a concentrated formulation with a high fill depth. A model system consisting of a 15-mL fill of 15% (w/w) sulfobutylether 7-beta-cyclodextrin (SBECD) solution in a 30-mL vial was selected for this study. Various freezing methods including single-step freezing, two-step freezing with a super-cooling holding, annealing, vacuum-induced freezing, changing ice habit using tert-butyl-alcohol (TBA), ice nucleation with silver iodide (AgI), as well as combinations of some of the methods, were used in the lyophilization of this model system. This work demonstrated that the freezing process had a significant impact on primary drying rate and product quality of a concentrated formulation with a high fill depth. Annealing, vacuum-induced freezing, and addition of either TBA or an ice nucleating agent (AgI) to the formulation accelerated the subsequent ice sublimation process. Two-step freezing or addition of TBA improved the product quality by eliminating vertical heterogeneity within the cake. The combination of two-step freezing in conjunction with an annealing step was shown to be a method of choice for freezing in the lyophilization of a product with a high fill depth. In addition to being an effective method of freezing, it is most applicable for scaling up. An alternative approach is to add a certain amount of TBA to the formulation, if the TBA-formulation interaction or regulatory concerns can be demonstrated as not being an issue. An evaluation of vial size performed in this study showed that although utilizing large-diameter vials to reduce the fill depth can greatly shorten the cycle time of a single batch, it will substantially decrease the product throughput in a large-scale freeze-dryer.

  18. High Blood Pressure Increasing Worldwide

    MedlinePlus

    ... other ways to control blood pressure, including healthy lifestyle choices and maintaining a normal weight, Roth said. Murray said some of the factors responsible for the worldwide increase in high blood pressure are unhealthy diets and obesity. In addition, in developing countries, more people are ...

  19. Improved Cryofixation Applicable to Freeze Etching

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, L.; Schmitt, W. W.

    1971-01-01

    Freeze etching of solute model systems (e.g., glycerol or ferritin solutions) demonstrates that cryofixation can introduce serious artifacts due to the segregation of the dissolved or dispersed material from the solvent. Since, in principle, this problem can be reduced by increasing the cooling rate, a new technique has been developed which combines spray freezing with freeze etching. This spray-freeze-etching is applied by first spraying the specimen into a liquid cryomedium. The frozen droplets are then “glued” together with butylbenzene to form a regular freeze-etch specimen, while the temperature of the sample is kept at -85°C. The results obtained by spray-freeze-etching are far superior to those obtained by standard freezing. Our results, using 5% glycerol as a test specimen, are equivalent to those obtained by the high-pressure method (1). The reduction of segregation during freezing makes freeze etching a method applicable for the investigation of solute systems. Furthermore, the study of unicellular organisms or cellular fractions by freeze etching without the use of antifreeze is made possible. Images PMID:4943787

  20. Steam Oxidation at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Carney, Casey

    2013-07-19

    A first high pressure test was completed: 293 hr at 267 bar and 670{degrees}C; A parallel 1 bar test was done for comparison; Mass gains were higher for all alloys at 267 bar than at 1 bar; Longer term exposures, over a range of temperatures and pressures, are planned to provide information as to the commercial implications of pressure effects; The planned tests are at a higher combination of temperatures and pressures than in the existing literature. A comparison was made with longer-term literature data: The short term exposures are largely consistent with the longer-term corrosion literature; Ferritic steels--no consistent pressure effect; Austenitic steels--fine grain alloys less able to maintain protective chromia scale as pressure increases; Ni-base alloys--more mass gains above 105 bar than below. Not based on many data points.

  1. High-pressure optical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    High pressure experimentation may concern intrinsically high pressure phenomena, or it may be used to gain a better understanding of states or processes at one atmosphere. The latter application is probably more prevelant in condensed matter physics. Under this second rubric one may either use high pressure to perturb various electronic energy levels and from this pressure tuning characterize states or processes, or one can use pressure to change a macroscopic parameter in a controlled way, then measure the effect on some molecular property. In this paper, the pressure tuning aspect is emphasized, with a lesser discussion of macroscopic - molecular relationships. In rare earth chelates the efficiency of 4f-4f emission of the rare earth is controlled by the feeding from the singlet and triplet levels of the organic ligand. These ligand levels can be strongly shifted by pressure. A study of the effect of pressure on the emission efficiency permits one to understand the effect of ligand modification at one atmosphere. Photochromic crystals change color upon irradiation due to occupation of a metastable ground state. In thermochromic crystals, raising the temperature accomplishes the same results. For a group of molecular crystals (anils) at high pressure, the metastable state can be occupied at room temperature. The relative displacement of the energy levels at high pressure also inhibits the optical process. Effects on luminescence intensity are shown to be consistent. In the area of microscopic - molecular relationships, the effect of viscosity and dielectric properties on rates of non-radiative (thermal) and radiative emission, and on peak energy for luminescence is demonstrated. For systems which can emit from either of two excited states depending on the interaction with the environment, the effect of rigidity of the medium on the rate of rearrangement of the excited state is shown.

  2. High School Press Pressures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Luella P.

    History shows that the high school press suffers through cycles that reflect economic factors and cultural climates within communities, states, and the nation. The direction of that cycle in the 1960s and early 1970s was toward more open, free-flowing information by a vigorous student press, but those economic and cultural signs now are pointing…

  3. High School Press Pressures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Luella P.

    History shows that the high school press suffers through cycles that reflect economic factors and cultural climates within communities, states, and the nation. The direction of that cycle in the 1960s and early 1970s was toward more open, free-flowing information by a vigorous student press, but those economic and cultural signs now are pointing…

  4. The effect of undissolved air on isochoric freezing.

    PubMed

    Perez, Pedro A; Preciado, Jessica; Carlson, Gary; DeLonzor, Russ; Rubinsky, Boris

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluates the effect of undissolved air on isochoric freezing of aqueous solutions. Isochoric freezing is concerned with freezing in a constant volume thermodynamic system. A possible advantage of the process is that it substantially reduces the percentage of ice in the system at every subzero temperature, relative to atmospheric freezing. At the pressures generated by isochoric freezing, or high pressure isobaric freezing, air cannot be considered an incompressible substance and the presence of undissolved air substantially increases the amount of ice that forms at any subfreezing temperature. This effect is measurable at air volumes as low as 1%. Therefore eliminating the undissolved air, or any separate gaseous phase, from the system is essential for retaining the properties of isochoric freezing. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  6. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

    1993-11-30

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

  7. High pressure synthesis gas fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The construction of the high pressure gas phase fermentation system has been completed. Photographs of the various components of the system are presented, along with an operating procedure for the equipment.

  8. High Blood Pressure and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage. Some women with gestational hypertension eventually develop preeclampsia. Chronic hypertension. Chronic hypertension is high blood pressure ... determine when it began. Chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia. This condition occurs in women with chronic hypertension ...

  9. What Is High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... consistently too high. How your blood pressure and circulatory system work In order to survive and function properly, ... and organs need the oxygenated blood that your circulatory system carries throughout the body. When the heart beats, ...

  10. High Pressure Industrial Water Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In conjunction with Space Shuttle Main Engine testing at Stennis, the Nordberg Water Pumps at the High Pressure Industrial Water Facility provide water for cooling the flame deflectors at the test stands during test firings.

  11. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.

    2000-01-01

    A compact high pressure hydraulic pump having no moving mechanical parts for converting electric potential to hydraulic force. The electrokinetic pump, which can generate hydraulic pressures greater than 2500 psi, can be employed to compress a fluid, either liquid or gas, and manipulate fluid flow. The pump is particularly useful for capillary-base systems. By combining the electrokinetic pump with a housing having chambers separated by a flexible member, fluid flow, including high pressure fluids, is controlled by the application of an electric potential, that can vary with time.

  12. The Freezing Bomb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2010-01-01

    The extreme pressures that are generated when water freezes were traditionally demonstrated by sealing a small volume in a massive cast iron "bomb" and then surrounding it with a freezing mixture of ice and salt. This vessel would dramatically fail by brittle fracture, but no quantitative measurement of bursting pressure was available. Calculation…

  13. The Freezing Bomb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2010-01-01

    The extreme pressures that are generated when water freezes were traditionally demonstrated by sealing a small volume in a massive cast iron "bomb" and then surrounding it with a freezing mixture of ice and salt. This vessel would dramatically fail by brittle fracture, but no quantitative measurement of bursting pressure was available. Calculation…

  14. High pressure-low temperature processing of food proteins.

    PubMed

    Dumay, Eliane; Picart, Laetitia; Regnault, Stéphanie; Thiebaud, Maryse

    2006-03-01

    High pressure-low temperature (HP-LT) processing is of interest in the food field in view of: (i) obtaining a "cold" pasteurisation effect, the level of microbial inactivation being higher after pressurisation at low or sub-zero than at ambient temperature; (ii) limiting the negative impact of atmospheric pressure freezing on food structures. The specific effects of freezing by fast pressure release on the formation of ice I crystals have been investigated on oil in water emulsions stabilized by proteins, and protein gels, showing the formation of a high number of small ice nuclei compared to the long needle-shaped crystals obtained by conventional freezing at 0.1 MPa. It was therefore of interest to study the effects of HP-LT processing on unfolding or dissociation/aggregation phenomena in food proteins, in view of minimizing or controlling structural changes and aggregation reactions, and/or of improving protein functional properties. In the present studies, the effects of HP-LT have been investigated on protein models such as (i) beta-lactoglobulin, i.e., a whey protein with a well known 3-D structure, and (ii) casein micelles, i.e., the main milk protein components, the supramolecular structure of which is not fully elucidated. The effects of HP-LT processing was studied up to 300 MPa at low or sub-zero temperatures and after pressure release, or up to 200 MPa by UV spectroscopy under pressure, allowing to follow reversible structural changes. Pressurisation of approximately 2% beta-lactoglobulin solutions up to 300 MPa at low/subzero temperatures minimizes aggregation reactions, as measured after pressure release. In parallel, such low temperature treatments enhanced the size reduction of casein micelles.

  15. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.; Arnold, Don W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Neyer, David W.

    2003-06-03

    An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based system. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

  16. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.; Arnold, Don W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Neyer, David W.

    2001-01-01

    An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based systems. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (Microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

  17. High-pressure creep tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Lamoureux, J.; Hales, C.

    1986-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine, presently being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy and NASA, uses high-pressure hydrogen as a working fluid; its long-term effects on the properties of alloys are relatively unknown. Hence, creep-rupture testing of wrought and cast high-temperature alloys in high-pressure hydrogen is an essential part of the research supporting the development of the Stirling cycle engine. Attention is given to the design, development, and operation of a 20 MPa hydrogen high-temperature multispecimen creep-rupture possessing high sensitivity. This pressure vessel allows for the simultaneous yet independent testing of six specimens. The results from one alloy, XF-818, are presented to illustrate how reported results are derived from the raw test data.

  18. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-12-17

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  19. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H.; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-01-01

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges. PMID:24297908

  20. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Yinon; Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven; Haspel, Carynelisa

    2014-05-01

    In cold high altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and mid-latitudes, ice partciles that are exposed to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. In this talk we will describe experiements that simulate the atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols. We find that aerosols with high organic content can form highly porous particles (HPA) with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogenous aerosol following ice subliation. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure follwoing ice sublimation. We find that the highly porous aerosol scatter solar light less efficiently than non-porous aerosol particles. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  1. High ice nucleation activity located in blueberry stem bark is linked to primary freeze initiation and adaptive freezing behaviour of the bark.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Hideyuki; Saruwatari, Atsushi; Murakawa, Hiroki; Sekozawa, Yoshihiko; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Price, William S; Ishikawa, Masaya

    2014-07-31

    Controlled ice nucleation is an important mechanism in cold-hardy plant tissues for avoiding excessive supercooling of the protoplasm, for inducing extracellular freezing and/or for accommodating ice crystals in specific tissues. To understand its nature, it is necessary to characterize the ice nucleation activity (INA), defined as the ability of a tissue to induce heterogeneous ice nucleation. Few studies have addressed the precise localization of INA in wintering plant tissues in respect of its function. For this purpose, we recently revised a test tube INA assay and examined INA in various tissues of over 600 species. Extremely high levels of INA (-1 to -4 °C) in two wintering blueberry cultivars of contrasting freezing tolerance were found. Their INA was much greater than in other cold-hardy species and was found to be evenly distributed along the stems of the current year's growth. Concentrations of active ice nuclei in the stem were estimated from quantitative analyses. Stem INA was localized mainly in the bark while the xylem and pith had much lower INA. Bark INA was located mostly in the cell wall fraction (cell walls and intercellular structural components). Intracellular fractions had much less INA. Some cultivar differences were identified. The results corresponded closely with the intrinsic freezing behaviour (extracellular freezing) of the bark, icicle accumulation in the bark and initial ice nucleation in the stem under dry surface conditions. Stem INA was resistant to various antimicrobial treatments. These properties and specific localization imply that high INA in blueberry stems is of intrinsic origin and contributes to the spontaneous initiation of freezing in extracellular spaces of the bark by acting as a subfreezing temperature sensor. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  2. High ice nucleation activity located in blueberry stem bark is linked to primary freeze initiation and adaptive freezing behaviour of the bark

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Hideyuki; Saruwatari, Atsushi; Murakawa, Hiroki; Sekozawa, Yoshihiko; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Price, William S.; Ishikawa, Masaya

    2014-01-01

    Controlled ice nucleation is an important mechanism in cold-hardy plant tissues for avoiding excessive supercooling of the protoplasm, for inducing extracellular freezing and/or for accommodating ice crystals in specific tissues. To understand its nature, it is necessary to characterize the ice nucleation activity (INA), defined as the ability of a tissue to induce heterogeneous ice nucleation. Few studies have addressed the precise localization of INA in wintering plant tissues in respect of its function. For this purpose, we recently revised a test tube INA assay and examined INA in various tissues of over 600 species. Extremely high levels of INA (−1 to −4 °C) in two wintering blueberry cultivars of contrasting freezing tolerance were found. Their INA was much greater than in other cold-hardy species and was found to be evenly distributed along the stems of the current year's growth. Concentrations of active ice nuclei in the stem were estimated from quantitative analyses. Stem INA was localized mainly in the bark while the xylem and pith had much lower INA. Bark INA was located mostly in the cell wall fraction (cell walls and intercellular structural components). Intracellular fractions had much less INA. Some cultivar differences were identified. The results corresponded closely with the intrinsic freezing behaviour (extracellular freezing) of the bark, icicle accumulation in the bark and initial ice nucleation in the stem under dry surface conditions. Stem INA was resistant to various antimicrobial treatments. These properties and specific localization imply that high INA in blueberry stems is of intrinsic origin and contributes to the spontaneous initiation of freezing in extracellular spaces of the bark by acting as a subfreezing temperature sensor. PMID:25082142

  3. High pressure synthesis gas conversion. Task 3: High pressure profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this research project was to build and test a high pressure fermentation system for the production of ethanol from synthesis gas. The fermenters, pumps, controls, and analytical system were procured or fabricated and assembled in our laboratory. This system was then used to determine the effects of high pressure on growth and ethanol production by C. 1jungdahlii. The limits of cell concentration and mass transport relationships were found in CSTR and immobilized cell reactors (ICR). The minimum retention times and reactor volumes were found for ethanol production in these reactors.

  4. Electrochemical studies at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cruanes, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    This research has dealt with the development and application of a methodology that permits electrochemical measurements at high pressure. The initial efforts focused on the design and construction of an electrochemical cell functional at hydrostatic pressures as high as 10 kbar. This cell was equipped with an Ag/AgCl/KCl (0.1M) reference electrode which provides reliable control of the potential at all pressures. The potential of this reference electrode can be considered to be constant with pressure. Measurements of formal potentials (E[degrees][prime]) of several transition-metal complexes vs the Ag/AgCl electrode rendered volumes of reactions whose magnitudes support the prediction of the negligible pressure dependence of the reference electrode. The main systems that have been investigated at high pressure are surface-modified electrodes. The author studied the effect of compression on the dynamics of charge transport in quaternized poly(4-vinylpyridine) (QPVP) films placed on gold electrodes, loaded with potassium ferricyanide, and equilibrated in potassium nitrate. Pressure accomplished the continuous change in the structure of the polymer network. This change causes a pronounced restriction in the propagation of charge and in the motion of mass. This high-pressure methodology has also allowed the spatial characterization of electron transfer events taking place between a gold electrode and ferrocene molecules covalently attached to the end of 1-undodecanethiol chains self-assembled on the electrode surface. The volumes of reaction and activation for the oxidation process are both positive, indicating that a volume expansion is associated with the formation of ferricinium. A model is proposed in which the creation of a vacancy in the self-assembled monolayer, for the accommodation of the ferricinium ion or a charge-compensating anion, is coupled with the electron transfer step.

  5. Electronic phenomena at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    High pressure research is undertaken either to investigate intrinsically high pressure phenomena or in order to get a better understanding of the effect of the chemical environment on properties or processes at one atmosphere. Studies of electronic properties which fall in each area are presented. Many molecules and complexes can assume in the excited state different molecular arrangements and intermolecular forces depending on the medium. Their luminescence emission is then very different in a rigid or a fluid medium. With pressure one can vary the viscosity of the medium by a factor of 10/sup 7/ and thus control the distribution and rate of crossing between the excited state conformations. In rare earth chelates the efficiency of 4f-4f emission of the rare earth is controlled by the feeding from the singlet and triplet levels of the organic ligand. These ligand levels can be strongly shifted by pressure. A study of the effect of pressure on the emission efficiency permits one to understand the effect of ligand chemistry at one atmosphere. At high pressure electronic states can be sufficiently perturbed to provide new ground states. In EDA complexes these new ground states exhibit unusual chemical reactivity and new products.

  6. High pressure neon arc lamp

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  7. High pressure liquid level monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bean, Vern E.; Long, Frederick G.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  8. The Effect of Ozonolysis on the Freezing of Water Catalyzed by High Molecular Weight Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irish, S.; Cantrell, W.

    2006-12-01

    High altitude clouds may be impacted by the products of biomass burning which can be lofted into the upper troposphere through deep convection. Some high molecular weight organic compounds are efficient ice nucleators (e.g. long chain alcohols) while others are not (e.g. long chain alkanes). To further complicate the picture, once in the atmosphere organic compounds may be transformed through oxidation and photochemistry, which could change their characteristics as freezing catalysts. To develop a deeper understanding of these processes, we observed the freezing temperatures of pure water droplets covered by high molecular weight organic compounds before and after exposure to ozone. Oleic acid and oleyl alcohol, which have carbon-carbon double bonds at approximately the same position along the backbone of the molecule, display very different behaviors. The mean freezing temperature for oleic acid is unchanged after exposure to ozone while that for oleyl alcohol increases by approximately 4 K. These changes will be compared to the structure of the film that the compounds form at the water surface. We will also present results of experiments with alkenes.

  9. Anxiety: A Cause of High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions High blood pressure (hypertension) Can anxiety cause high blood pressure? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Anxiety doesn't cause long-term high blood pressure (hypertension). But episodes of anxiety can cause dramatic, ...

  10. High Blood Pressure: Medicines to Help You

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure--Medicines to Help You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... Click here for the Color Version (PDF 533KB) High blood pressure is a serious illness. High blood pressure is ...

  11. High-pressure water facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA Test Operations Group employees, from left, Todd Pearson, Tim Delcuze and Rodney Wilkinson maintain a water pump in Stennis Space Center's high-pressure water facility. The three were part of a group of employees who rode out Hurricane Katrina at the facility and helped protect NASA's rocket engine test complex.

  12. High-pressure water facility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-02-15

    NASA Test Operations Group employees, from left, Todd Pearson, Tim Delcuze and Rodney Wilkinson maintain a water pump in Stennis Space Center's high-pressure water facility. The three were part of a group of employees who rode out Hurricane Katrina at the facility and helped protect NASA's rocket engine test complex.

  13. High-pressure water facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA Test Operations Group employees, from left, Todd Pearson, Tim Delcuze and Rodney Wilkinson maintain a water pump in Stennis Space Center's high-pressure water facility. The three were part of a group of employees who rode out Hurricane Katrina at the facility and helped protect NASA's rocket engine test complex.

  14. High pressure paint gun injuries.

    PubMed

    Booth, C M

    1977-11-19

    Despite their use for the past 20 years the dangers of injuries from high pressure paint guns are not widely known. Two cases treated incorrectly through ignorance in our casualty department resulted in amputation of digits. Paint solvents are far moe damaging than paint of grease injection. All cases should be treated urgently by an experienced surgeon as fairly extensive surgery may be needed.

  15. High Pressure Treatment in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Torres Bello, Edwin Fabian; González Martínez, Gerardo; Klotz Ceberio, Bernadette F.; Rodrigo, Dolores; Martínez López, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP), a non-thermal technology, which typically uses water as a pressure transfer medium, is characterized by a minimal impact on food characteristics (sensory, nutritional, and functional). Today, this technology, present in many food companies, can effectively inactivate bacterial cells and many enzymes. All this makes HHP very attractive, with very good acceptance by consumers, who value the organoleptic characteristics of products processed by this non-thermal food preservation technology because they associate these products with fresh-like. On the other hand, this technology reduces the need for non-natural synthetic additives of low consumer acceptance. PMID:28234332

  16. High Pressure Treatment in Foods.

    PubMed

    Bello, Edwin Fabian Torres; Martínez, Gerardo González; Ceberio, Bernadette F Klotz; Rodrigo, Dolores; López, Antonio Martínez

    2014-08-19

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP), a non-thermal technology, which typically uses water as a pressure transfer medium, is characterized by a minimal impact on food characteristics (sensory, nutritional, and functional). Today, this technology, present in many food companies, can effectively inactivate bacterial cells and many enzymes. All this makes HHP very attractive, with very good acceptance by consumers, who value the organoleptic characteristics of products processed by this non-thermal food preservation technology because they associate these products with fresh-like. On the other hand, this technology reduces the need for non-natural synthetic additives of low consumer acceptance.

  17. High pressure rinsing system comparison

    SciTech Connect

    D. Sertore; M. Fusetti; P. Michelato; Carlo Pagani; Toshiyasu Higo; Jin-Seok Hong; K. Saito; G. Ciovati; T. Rothgeb

    2007-06-01

    High pressure rinsing (HPR) is a key process for the surface preparation of high field superconducting cavities. A portable apparatus for the water jet characterization, based on the transferred momentum between the water jet and a load cell, has been used in different laboratories. This apparatus allows to collected quantitative parameters that characterize the HPR water jet. In this paper, we present a quantitative comparison of the different water jet produced by various nozzles routinely used in different laboratories for the HPR process

  18. High-field/high-pressure ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, T.; Okubo, S.; Ohta, H.

    2017-07-01

    We present a historical review of high-pressure ESR systems with emphasis on our recent development of a high-pressure, high-field, multi-frequency ESR system. Until 2000, the X-band system was almost established using a resonator filled with dielectric materials or a combination of the anvil cell and dielectric resonators. Recent developments have shifted from that in the low-frequency region, such as X-band, to that in multi-frequency region. High-pressure, high-field, multi-frequency ESR systems are classified into two types. First are the systems that use a vector network analyzer or a quasi-optical bridge, which have high sensitivity but a limited frequency region; the second are like our system, which has a very broad frequency region covering the THz region, but lower sensitivity. We will demonstrate the usefulness of our high-pressure ESR system, in addition to its experimental limitations. We also discuss the recent progress of our system and future plans.

  19. Freeze-thaw and high-voltage discharge allow macromolecule uptake into ileal brush-border vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Donowitz, M.; Emmer, E.; McCullen, J.; Reinlib, L.; Cohen, M.E.; Rood, R.P.; Madara, J.; Sharp, G.W.G.; Murer, H.; Malmstrom, K.

    1987-06-01

    High-voltage discharge or one cycle of freeze-thawing are shown to transiently permeabilize rabbit ileal brush-border membrane vesicles to macromolecules. Uptake of the radiolabeled macromolecule dextran, mol wt 70,000, used as a marker for vesicle permeability, was determined by a rapid filtration technique, with uptake defined as substrate associated with the vesicle and releasable after incubation of vesicles with 0.1% saponin. Dextran added immediately after electric shock (2000 V) or at the beginning of one cycle of freeze-thawing was taken up approximately eightfold compared with control. ATP also was taken up into freeze-thawed vesicles, whereas there was no significant uptake into control vesicles. The increase in vesicle permeability was reversible, based on Na-dependent D-glucose uptake being decreased when studied 5 but not 15 min after electric shock, and was not significantly decreased after completion of one cycle of freeze-thawing. In addition, adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and Ca/sup 2 +/-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity were similar in control vesicles and vesicles exposed to high-voltage discharge or freeze-thawing. Also, vesicles freeze-thawed with (/sup 32/P)ATP demonstrated increased phosphorylation compared with nonfrozen vesicles, while freeze-thawing did not alter vesicle protein as judged by Coomassie blue staining. These techniques should allow intestinal membrane vesicles to be used for studies of intracellular control of transport processes, for instance, studies of protein kinase regulation of transport.

  20. High-speed pressure clamp.

    PubMed

    Besch, Stephen R; Suchyna, Thomas; Sachs, Frederick

    2002-10-01

    We built a high-speed, pneumatic pressure clamp to stimulate patch-clamped membranes mechanically. The key control element is a newly designed differential valve that uses a single, nickel-plated piezoelectric bending element to control both pressure and vacuum. To minimize response time, the valve body was designed with minimum dead volume. The result is improved response time and stability with a threefold decrease in actuation latency. Tight valve clearances minimize the steady-state air flow, permitting us to use small resonant-piston pumps to supply pressure and vacuum. To protect the valve from water contamination in the event of a broken pipette, an optical sensor detects water entering the valve and increases pressure rapidly to clear the system. The open-loop time constant for pressure is 2.5 ms for a 100-mmHg step, and the closed-loop settling time is 500-600 micros. Valve actuation latency is 120 micros. The system performance is illustrated for mechanically induced changes in patch capacitance.

  1. Freezing and Pressure-Driven Flow of Solid Helium in Vycor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, James; Herman, Tobias; Beamish, John

    2005-07-01

    The recent torsional oscillator results of Kim and Chan suggest a supersolid phase transition in solid 4He confined in Vycor. We have used a capacitive technique to directly monitor density changes for helium confined in Vycor at low temperature and have used a piezoelectrically driven diaphragm to study the pressure-induced flow of solid helium into the Vycor pores. Our measurements showed no indication of a mass redistribution in the Vycor that could mimic supersolid decoupling and put an upper limit of about 0.003 μm/s on any pressure-induced supersolid flow in the pores of Vycor.

  2. High pressure and high temperature apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Voronov, Oleg A.

    2005-09-13

    A design for high pressure/high temperature apparatus and reaction cell to achieve .about.30 GPa pressure in .about.1 cm volume and .about.100 GPa pressure in .about.1 mm volumes and 20-5000.degree. C. temperatures in a static regime. The device includes profiled anvils (28) action on a reaction cell (14, 16) containing the material (26) to be processed. The reaction cell includes a heater (18) surrounded by insulating layers and screens. Surrounding the anvils are cylindrical inserts and supporting rings (30-48) whose hardness increases towards the reaction cell. These volumes may be increased considerably if applications require it, making use of presses that have larger loading force capability, larger frames and using larger anvils.

  3. High-pressure injection injuries.

    PubMed

    Neal, N C; Burke, F D

    1991-11-01

    A retrospective review of the 11 patients attending the Hand Unit at the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary over the last 5 years with high-pressure injection injuries is presented. The machines and materials that cause these injuries are outlined and the methods of treatment and rehabilitation are described in detail. The study demonstrates the morbidity of high-pressure injection injuries, particularly those inflicted by paint spray guns, and highlights a frequent delay between injury and decompression of the injured part. We wish to emphasize the importance of early diagnosis, referral, exploration and rehabilitation to ensure an optimal outcome, and to point out that failure to refer early is becoming an increasing focus of negligence claims.

  4. High pressure paint gun injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Booth, C M

    1977-01-01

    Despite their use for the past 20 years the dangers of injuries from high pressure paint guns are not widely known. Two cases treated incorrectly through ignorance in our casualty department resulted in amputation of digits. Paint solvents are far moe damaging than paint of grease injection. All cases should be treated urgently by an experienced surgeon as fairly extensive surgery may be needed. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 PMID:589172

  5. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) KidsHealth > For Parents > High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) A ... posture, and medications. continue Long-Term Effects of High Blood Pressure When someone has high blood pressure, the heart ...

  6. Ultra-high temperature isothermal furnace liners (IFLS) for copper freeze point cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussinger, P. M.; Tavener, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    Primary Laboratories use large fixed-point cells in deep calibration furnaces utilizing heat pipes to achieve temperature uniformity. This combination of furnace, heat pipe, and cell gives the smallest of uncertainties. The heat pipe, also known as an isothermal furnace liner (IFL), has typically been manufactured with Alloy 600/601 as the envelope material since the introduction of high temperature IFLs over 40 years ago. Alloy 600/601 is a widely available high temperature material, which is compatible with Cesium, Potassium, and Sodium and has adequate oxidation resistance and reasonable high temperature strength. Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) Alloy 600/Sodium IFLs are rated to 1100°C for approximately 1000 hours of operation (based on creep strength). Laboratories interested in performing calibrations and studies around the copper freezing point (1084.62°C) were frustrated by the 1000 hours at 1100°C limitation and the fact that expensive freeze-point cells were getting stuck and/or crushed inside the IFL. Because of this growing frustration/need, ACT developed an Ultra High Temperature IFL to take advantage of the exceptional high temperature strength properties of Haynes 230.

  7. A high-pressure carbon dioxide gasdynamic laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehn, D. M.

    1973-01-01

    A carbon dioxide gasdynamic laser was operated over a range of reservoir pressure and temperature, test-gas mixture, and nozzle geometry. A significant result is the dominant influence of nozzle geometry on laser power at high pressure. High reservoir pressure can be effectively utilized to increase laser power if nozzle geometry is chosen to efficiently freeze the test gas. Maximum power density increased from 3.3 W/cu cm of optical cavity volume for an inefficient nozzle to 83.4 W/cu cm at 115 atm for a more efficient nozzle. Variation in the composition of the test gas also caused large changes in laser power output. Most notable is the influence of the catalyst (helium or water vapor) that was used to depopulate the lower vibrational state of the carbon dioxide. Water caused an extreme deterioration of laser power at high pressure (100 atm), whereas, at low pressure the laser for the two catalysts approached similar values. It appears that at high pressure the depopulation of the upper laser level of the carbon dioxide by the water predominates over the lower state depopulation, thus destroying the inversion.

  8. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, J.K.

    1989-11-14

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0 to 30 C. 2 figs.

  9. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, John K.

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0.degree. to 30.degree. C.

  10. High pressure synthesis gas fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to build and test a pressure fermentation system for the production of ethanol from synthesis gas. The fermenters, pumps, controls, and analytical system will be procured or fabricated and assembled in our laboratory. This system will then be used to determine the effects of high pressure on growth and ethanol production by clostridium ljungdahlii. The limits of cell concentration and mass transport relationships will be found in continuous stirred tank reactor and immobilized cell reactors. The minimum retention times and reactor volumes will be found for ethanol production in these reactors. Retention times of a few seconds are expected to result from these experiments. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Amygdaloid lesions produced similar contextual fear conditioning disruption in the Carioca high- and low-conditioned freezing rats.

    PubMed

    de Castro Gomes, Vitor; Landeira-Fernandez, J

    2008-10-03

    Rats selectively bred for high or low levels of emotionality represent an important and powerful tool to investigate the role of genetic variables in the occurrence of different anxiety disorders. In the present study, albino rats were selectively bred for differences in defensive freezing behavior in response to contextual cues previously associated with footshock, an animal model of general anxiety disorder. The results indicate that these two new lines of rats, which we refer to as Carioca High-Freezing (CHF) and Carioca Low-Freezing (CLF), show a reliable difference in conditioned freezing after three generations of selection. CHF and CLF rats did not present any differences during baseline or post-shock periods. Males from both lines consistently exhibit more conditioned freezing to contextual cues than females. A second experiment used male rats from the fourth generation to investigate the participation of the amygdala during contextual fear conditioning in the CHF and CLF lines. The results indicate that post-training amygdaloid electrolytic lesions lead to similar disruptions in conditioned freezing behavior in both animal lines.

  12. New High-Performance Droplet Freezing Assay (HP-DFA) for the Analysis of Ice Nuclei with Complex Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert, Anna Theresa; Scheel, Jan Frederik; Helleis, Frank; Klimach, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2016-04-01

    Freezing of water above homogeneous freezing is catalyzed by ice nucleation active (INA) particles called ice nuclei (IN), which can be of various inorganic or biological origin. The freezing temperatures reach up to -1 °C for some biological samples and are dependent on the chemical composition of the IN. The standard method to analyze IN in solution is the droplet freezing assay (DFA) established by Gabor Vali in 1970. Several modifications and improvements were already made within the last decades, but they are still limited by either small droplet numbers, large droplet volumes or inadequate separation of the single droplets resulting in mutual interferences and therefore improper measurements. The probability that miscellaneous IN are concentrated together in one droplet increases with the volume of the droplet, which can be described by the Poisson distribution. At a given concentration, the partition of a droplet into several smaller droplets leads to finely dispersed IN resulting in better statistics and therefore in a better resolution of the nucleation spectrum. We designed a new customized high-performance droplet freezing assay (HP-DFA), which represents an upgrade of the previously existing DFAs in terms of temperature range and statistics. The necessity of observing freezing events at temperatures lower than homogeneous freezing due to freezing point depression, requires high-performance thermostats combined with an optimal insulation. Furthermore, we developed a cooling setup, which allows both huge and tiny temperature changes within a very short period of time. Besides that, the new DFA provides the analysis of more than 750 droplets per run with a small droplet volume of 5 μL. This enables a fast and more precise analysis of biological samples with complex IN composition as well as better statistics for every sample at the same time.

  13. Fundamentals of freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Nail, Steven L; Jiang, Shan; Chongprasert, Suchart; Knopp, Shawn A

    2002-01-01

    --the dominant mechanism of heat transfer in freeze-drying--is inefficient at the pressures used in freeze-drying. Steps should be taken to improve the thermal contact between the product and the shelf of the freeze dryer, such as eliminating metal trays from the drying process. Quantitation of the heat transfer coefficient for the geometry used is a useful way of assessing the impact of changes in the system such as elimination of product trays and changes in the vial. Because heat transfer by conduction through the vapor increases with increasing pressure, the commonly held point of view that "the lower the pressure, the better" is not true with respect to process efficiency. The optimum pressure for a given product is a function of the temperature at which freeze-drying is carried out, and lower pressures are needed at low product temperatures. The controlling resistance to mass transfer is almost always the resistance of the partially dried solids above the submination interface. This resistance can be minimized by avoiding fill volumes of more than about half the volume of the container. The development scientist should also recognize that very high concentrations of solute may not be appropriate for optimum freeze-drying, particularly if the resistance of the dried product layer increases sharply with concentration. Although the last 10 years has seen the publication of a significant body of literature of great value in allowing development scientists and engineers to "work smarter," there is still much work needed in both the science and the technology of freeze-drying. Scientific development is needed for improving analytical methodology for characterization of frozen systems and freeze-dried solids. A better understanding of the relationship between molecular mobility and reactivity is needed to allow accurate prediction of product stability at the intended storage temperature based on accelerated stability at higher temperatures. This requires that the temperature

  14. High Pressure Electrolyzer System Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, Kevin; Coloza, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    This report documents the continuing efforts to evaluate the operational state of a high pressure PEM based electrolyzer located at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This electrolyzer is a prototype system built by General Electric and refurbished by Hamilton Standard (now named Hamilton Sunstrand). It is capable of producing hydrogen and oxygen at an output pressure of 3000 psi. The electrolyzer has been in storage for a number of years. Evaluation and testing was performed to determine the state of the electrolyzer and provide an estimate of the cost for refurbishment. Pressure testing was performed using nitrogen gas through the oxygen ports to ascertain the status of the internal membranes and seals. It was determined that the integrity of the electrolyzer stack was good as there were no appreciable leaks in the membranes or seals within the stack. In addition to the integrity testing, an itemized list and part cost estimate was produced for the components of the electrolyzer system. An evaluation of the system s present state and an estimate of the cost to bring it back to operational status was also produced.

  15. Silicon nanowires under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuejian

    2009-03-01

    Silicon nanowires (Si NWs), one-dimensional single crystalline, have recently drawn extensive attention, thanks to their robust applications in electrical and optical devices as well as in the strengthening of diamond/SiC superhard composites. Here, we conducted high-pressure synchrotron diffraction experiments in a diamond anvil cell to study phase transitions and compressibility of Si NWs. Our results revealed that the onset pressure for the Si I-II transformation in Si NWs is approximately 2.0 GPa lower than previously determined values for bulk Si, a trend that is consistent with the analysis of misfit in strain energy. The bulk modulus of Si-I NWs derived from the pressure-volume measurements is 123 GPa, which is comparable to that of Si-V NWs but 25% larger than the reported values for bulk silicon. The reduced compressibility in Si NWs indicates that the unique wire-like structure in nanoscale plays vital roles in the elastic behavior of condensed matter..

  16. Improved high pressure turbine shroud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bessen, I. I.; Rigney, D. V.; Schwab, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A new high pressure turbine shroud material has been developed from the consolidation of prealloyed powders of Ni, Cr, Al and Y. The new material, a filler for cast turbine shroud body segments, is called Genaseal. The development followed the identification of oxidation resistance as the primary cause of prior shroud deterioration, since conversion to oxides reduces erosion resistance and increases spalling under thermal cycled engine conditions. The NICrAlY composition was selected in preference to NIAL and FeCRALY alloys, and was formulated to a prescribed density range that offers suitable erosion resistance, thermal conductivity and elastic modulus for improved behavior as a shroud.

  17. Electokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.

    2000-01-01

    A compact high pressure hydraulic system having no moving parts for converting electric potential to hydraulic force and for manipulating fluids. Electro-osmotic flow is used to provide a valve and means to compress a fluid or gas in a capillary-based system. By electro-osmotically moving an electrolyte between a first position opening communication between a fluid inlet and outlet and a second position closing communication between the fluid inlet and outlet the system can be configured as a valve. The system can also be used to generate forces as large as 2500 psi that can be used to compress a fluid, either a liquid or a gas.

  18. Nano Materials Under High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Karmakar, S.; Garg, Nandini; Sharma, Surinder M.

    2010-12-01

    Materials comprising of units or particles of the size of a few nano-meters have significantly different high pressure behavior than their bulk counterparts. This is abundantly elucidated in our studies on transition metals encapsulated in carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes filled with Argon also show that it affects the behavior of tubes as well as argon. Studies on nano-crystalline Si displays an interesting crystalline-amorphous reversible transition, unique of its kind in elemental solids. We also demonstrate that in some cases of nanocrystalline samples, a phase perceived to be an intermediate-transient may be actually realized.

  19. Activity coefficients and free energies of nonionic mixed surfactant solutions from vapor-pressure and freezing-point osmometry.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Jennifer A; Ray, Gargi Basu; Leaist, Derek G

    2011-05-19

    The thermodynamic properties of mixed surfactant solutions are widely investigated, prompted by numerous practical applications of these systems and by interest in molecular association and self-organization. General techniques for measuring thermodynamic activities, such as isopiestic equilibration, are well-established for multicomponent solutions. Surprisingly, these techniques have not yet been applied to mixed surfactant solutions, despite the importance of the free energy for micelle stability. In this study, equations are developed for the osmotic coefficients of solutions of nonionic surfactant A + nonionic surfactant B. A mass-action model is used, with virial equations for the activity coefficients of the micelles and free surfactant monomer species. The equations are fitted to osmotic coefficients of aqueous decylsulfobetaine + dodecylsulfobetaine solutions measured by vapor-pressure and freezing-point osmometry. Equilibrium constants for mixed-micelle formation are calculated from the free monomer concentrations at the critical micelle concentrations. The derived activity coefficients of the micelles and free monomers indicate large departures from ideal solution behavior, even for dilute solutions of the surfactants. Stoichiometric activity coefficients of the total surfactant components are evaluated by Gibbs-Duhem integration of the osmotic coefficients. Relatively simple colligative property measurements hold considerable promise for free energy studies of multicomponent surfactant solutions.

  20. Considerations for osmolality measurement under elevated pCO(2): comparison of vapor pressure and freezing point osmometry.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, A E; deZengotita, V M; Miller, W M

    2000-01-20

    Osmolality increases with pCO(2) in bioreactors with pH control, and it has been shown that osmolality compensation by decreasing the basal NaCl concentration partially mitigates the adverse effects of elevated pCO(2) on animal cell growth, protein production, and glycosylation. Thus, measurement of osmolality is important for a complete characterization of the culture environment under elevated pCO(2). However, osmolality measurement may be compromised by CO(2) evolution. Freezing point depression and vapor pressure depression osmometry were directly compared for the measurement of osmolality in samples at elevated pCO(2) (up to 250 mmHg) and at a variety of pH values (6.7-7.5). More extensive degassing may be expected with the vapor pressure osmometer due to the smaller sample volume and larger surface area employed. However, both types of osmometer yielded similar results for all pCO(2) and pH values studied. Moreover, the measured values agreed with osmolality values calculated using a semi-empirical model. Further analysis showed that, while sample degassing may result in a large decrease in pCO(2), there is little associated decrease in osmolality. The great majority of total CO(2) in solution is present as bicarbonate (HCO(3)(-)). Although a small amount of HCO(3)(-) is converted to CO(2) to compensate for CO(2) evolution, further depletion of HCO(3)(-) is inhibited by the associated increase in medium pH and by the need for HCO(3)(-) to maintain charge neutrality in solution. This explanation is consistent with the observed similarity in osmolality values for the two types of osmometer. It was also observed that osmolality did not change in samples that were frozen at -20 degrees C for up to 1 year.

  1. Summer freezing resistance decreased in high-elevation plants exposed to experimental warming in the central Chilean Andes.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Almeida, Angela; Cavieres, Lohengrin A

    2010-05-01

    Alpine habitats have been proposed as particularly sensitive to climate change. Shorter snow cover could expose high-elevation plants to very low temperatures, increasing their risk of suffering damage by freezing, hence decreasing their population viability. In addition, a longer and warmer growing season could affect the hardening process on these species. Thus, understanding the ability of these species to withstand freezing events under warmer conditions is essential for predicting how alpine species may respond to future climate changes. Here we assessed the freezing resistance of 11 species from the central Chilean Andes by determining their low temperature damage (LT(50)) and freezing point (FP) after experimental warming in the field. Plants were exposed during two growing seasons to a passive increase in the air temperature using open top chambers (OTCs). OTCs increased by ca. 3 K the mean air and soil daytime temperatures, but had smaller effects on freezing temperatures. Leaf temperature of the different species was on average 5.5 K warmer inside OTCs at midday. While LT(50) of control plants ranged from -9.9 to -22.4, that of warmed plants ranged from -7.4 to -17.3 degrees C. Overall, high-Andean species growing inside OTCs increased their LT(50) ca. 4 K, indicating that warming decreased their ability to survive severe freezing events. Moreover, plants inside OTCs increased the FP ca. 2 K in some studied species, indicating that warming altered processes of ice crystal formation. Resistance of very low temperatures is a key feature of high-elevation species; our results suggest that current climate warming trends will seriously threaten the survival of high-elevation plants by decreasing their ability to withstand severe freezing events.

  2. High pressure apparatus for magnetization measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Uwatoko, Y.; Hotta, T.; Mori, H.

    1997-10-01

    A hydrostatic high pressure micro cell for studying heavy-fermion materials in a commercial magnetometer is developed. Experiments of pressures up to 10 kbar and temperature range 2 K {le} T {le} 300 K have been carried out. The sensitivity of measurement of under high pressure is as same as ambient pressure one within experimental error.

  3. High-alcohol-drinking rats exhibit persistent freezing responses to discrete cues following Pavlovian fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Rorick, Linda M; Finn, Peter R; Steinmetz, Joseph E

    2003-09-01

    We previously reported that high-alcohol-drinking (HAD) rats exhibited selective deficits in active avoidance learning and that those deficits were partially reversed by moderate doses of ethanol under certain training conditions [Pharmacol. Biochem. Behav. 75 (2003) 89]. In that study, we hypothesized that HAD deficits resulted from exaggerated fear in the conditioning context and that the anxiolytic properties of ethanol, along with prior exposure to the conditioning apparatus, were responsible for the facilitated avoidance learning that was observed in HAD rats following moderate doses of ethanol. The current study was designed to test whether HAD rats exhibit behaviors consistent with increased fear in aversive learning contexts. We used a standard Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm to assess behavioral freezing in HAD (HAD-1 and HAD-2) and low-alcohol-drinking (LAD; LAD-1 and LAD-2) rats. No significant differences were observed between HAD-1 and HAD-2 or between LAD-1 and LAD-2 rats, indicating that the replicate lines performed similarly in this study. Both HAD and LAD rats exhibited robust fear conditioning during training. Although no differences were observed between HAD and LAD rats during fear training, HAD rats failed to extinguish freezing behavior in response to the discrete tone conditional stimulus during subsequent fear retention tests. Thus, HAD rats demonstrated prolonged cue-elicited fear that was resistant to extinction.

  4. High pressure inactivation of Pseudomonas in black truffle - comparison with Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballestra, Patricia; Verret, Catherine; Cruz, Christian; Largeteau, Alain; Demazeau, Gerard; El Moueffak, Abdelhamid

    2010-03-01

    Pseudomonas is one of the most common genera in black Perigord truffle. Its inactivation by high pressure (100-500 MPa/10 min) applied on truffles at sub-zero or low temperatures was studied and compared with those of Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth. Pressurization of truffles at 300 MPa/4 °C reduced the bacterial count of Pseudomonas by 5.3 log cycles. Higher pressures of 400 or 500 MPa, at 4 °C or 20 °C, allowed us to slightly increase the level of destruction to the value of ca. 6.5 log cycles but did not permit us to completely inactivate Pseudomonas. The results showed a residual charge of about 10 CFU/g. Pressure-shift freezing of truffles, which consists in applying a pressure of 200 MPa/-18 °C for 10 min and then quickly releasing this pressure to induce freezing, reduced the population of Pseudomonas by 3.3 log cycles. The level of inactivation was higher than those obtained with conventional freezing. Endogenous Pseudomonas in truffle was shown to be more resistant to high pressure treatments than P. fluorescens used for inoculation of broths.

  5. Metastable superheated ice in liquid-water inclusions under high negative pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.

    1967-01-01

    In some microscopic inclusions (consisting of aqueous liquid and vapor) in minerals, freezing eliminates the vapor phase because of greater volume occupied by the resulting ice. When vapor fails to nucleate again on partial melting, the resulting negative pressure (hydrostatic tension) inside the inclusions permits the existence of ice I crystals under reversible, metastable equilibrium, at temperatures as high as +6.5??C and negative pressures possibly exceeding 1000 bars.

  6. Synthesis of high-performance Li2FeSiO4/C composite powder by spray-freezing/freeze-drying a solution with two carbon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Yukiko; Iwase, Hiroaki; Shida, Kenji; Liao, Jinsun; Fukui, Takehisa; Matsuda, Motohide

    2017-09-01

    Li2FeSiO4 is a promising cathode active material for lithium-ion batteries due to its high theoretical capacity. Spray-freezing/freeze-drying, a practical process reported for the synthesis of various ceramic powders, is applied to the synthesis of Li2FeSiO4/C composite powders and high-performance Li2FeSiO4/C composite powders are successfully synthesized by using starting solutions containing both Indian ink and glucose as carbon sources followed by heating. The synthesized composite powders have a unique structure, composed of Li2FeSiO4 nanoparticles coated with a thin carbon layer formed by the carbonization of glucose and carbon nanoparticles from Indian ink. The carbon layer enhances the electrochemical reactivity of the Li2FeSiO4, and the carbon nanoparticles play a role in the formation of electron-conducting paths in the cathode. The composite powders deliver an initial discharge capacity of 195 and 137 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C and 1 C, respectively, without further addition of conductive additive. The discharge capacity at 1 C is 72 mAh g-1 after the 100th cycle, corresponding to approximately 75% of the capacity at the 2nd cycle.

  7. Method of producing a high pressure gas

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.

    2006-07-18

    A method of producing a high pressure gas is disclosed and which includes providing a container; supplying the container with a liquid such as water; increasing the pressure of the liquid within the container; supplying a reactant composition such as a chemical hydride to the liquid under pressure in the container and which chemically reacts with the liquid to produce a resulting high pressure gas such as hydrogen at a pressure of greater than about 100 pounds per square inch of pressure; and drawing the resulting high pressure gas from the container.

  8. Optical calibration of pressure sensors for high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A F; Gregoryanz, E; Zaug, J M; Crowhurst, J C

    2004-10-04

    We present the results of Raman scattering measurements of diamond ({sup 12}C) and of cubic boron nitride (cBN), and fluorescence measurements of ruby, Sm:YAG, and SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Sm{sup 2+} in the diamond anvil cell (DAC) at high pressures and temperatures. These measurements were accompanied by synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements on gold. We have extended the room-temperature calibration of Sm:YAG in a quasihydrostatic regime up to 100 GPa. The ruby scale is shown to systematically underestimate pressure at high pressures and temperatures compared with all other sensors. On this basis, we propose a new high-temperature ruby pressure scale that should be valid to at least 100 GPa and 850 K. Historically, the accurate determination of pressure at high temperature and ultrahigh pressure has been extremely difficult. In fact, the lack of a general pressure scale nullifies, to a significant extent, the great innovations that have been made in recent years in DAC experimental techniques [1]. Now, more than ever a scale is required whose accuracy is comparable with that of the experimental data. Since pressure in the DAC is dependent on temperature (due to thermal pressure and also to changes in the properties of the materials that constitute the DAC) such a scale requires quantitative, and separate measurements of pressure and temperature.

  9. High-pressure microhydraulic actuator

    DOEpatents

    Mosier, Bruce P [San Francisco, CA; Crocker, Robert W [Fremont, CA; Patel, Kamlesh D [Dublin, CA

    2008-06-10

    Electrokinetic ("EK") pumps convert electric to mechanical work when an electric field exerts a body force on ions in the Debye layer of a fluid in a packed bed, which then viscously drags the fluid. Porous silica and polymer monoliths (2.5-mm O.D., and 6-mm to 10-mm length) having a narrow pore size distribution have been developed that are capable of large pressure gradients (250-500 psi/mm) when large electric fields (1000-1500 V/cm) are applied. Flowrates up to 200 .mu.L/min and delivery pressures up to 1200 psi have been demonstrated. Forces up to 5 lb-force at 0.5 mm/s (12 mW) have been demonstrated with a battery-powered DC-DC converter. Hydraulic power of 17 mW (900 psi@ 180 uL/min) has been demonstrated with wall-powered high voltage supplies. The force and stroke delivered by an actuator utilizing an EK pump are shown to exceed the output of solenoids, stepper motors, and DC motors of similar size, despite the low thermodynamic efficiency.

  10. Electrical Transport Experiments at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S

    2009-02-11

    High-pressure electrical measurements have a long history of use in the study of materials under ultra-high pressures. In recent years, electrical transport experiments have played a key role in the study of many interesting high pressure phenomena including pressure-induced superconductivity, insulator-to-metal transitions, and quantum critical behavior. High-pressure electrical transport experiments also play an important function in geophysics and the study of the Earth's interior. Besides electrical conductivity measurements, electrical transport experiments also encompass techniques for the study of the optoelectronic and thermoelectric properties of materials under high pressures. In addition, electrical transport techniques, i.e., the ability to extend electrically conductive wires from outside instrumentation into the high pressure sample chamber have been utilized to perform other types of experiments as well, such as high-pressure magnetic susceptibility and de Haas-van Alphen Fermi surface experiments. Finally, electrical transport techniques have also been utilized for delivering significant amounts of electrical power to high pressure samples, for the purpose of performing high-pressure and -temperature experiments. Thus, not only do high-pressure electrical transport experiments provide much interesting and valuable data on the physical properties of materials extreme compression, but the underlying high-pressure electrical transport techniques can be used in a number of ways to develop additional diagnostic techniques and to advance high pressure capabilities.

  11. Freeze-thaw and high-voltage discharge allow macromolecule uptake into ileal brush-border vesicles.

    PubMed

    Donowitz, M; Emmer, E; McCullen, J; Reinlib, L; Cohen, M E; Rood, R P; Madara, J; Sharp, G W; Murer, H; Malmstrom, K

    1987-06-01

    High-voltage discharge or one cycle of freeze-thawing are shown to transiently permeabilize rabbit ileal brush-border membrane vesicles to macromolecules. Uptake of the radiolabeled macromolecule dextran, mol wt 70,000, used as a marker for vesicle permeability, was determined by a rapid filtration technique, with uptake defined as substrate associated with the vesicle and releasable after incubation of vesicles with 0.1% saponin. Dextran added immediately after electric shock (2,000 V) or at the beginning of one cycle of freeze-thawing was taken up approximately eightfold compared with control; with both techniques, the concentration of dextran after being taken up into the vesicles was similar to that in the incubation medium, suggesting attainment of equilibrium. ATP also was taken up into freeze-thawed vesicles, whereas there was no significant uptake into control vesicles. The increase in vesicle permeability was reversible, based on Na-dependent D-glucose uptake being decreased when studied 5 but not 15 min after electric shock, and was not significantly decreased after completion of one cycle of freeze-thawing. In addition, adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity were similar in control vesicles and vesicles exposed to high-voltage discharge or freeze-thawing. Also, vesicles freeze-thawed with [32P]ATP demonstrated increased phosphorylation compared with nonfrozen vesicles, while freeze-thawing did not alter vesicle protein as judged by Coomassie blue staining. These techniques should allow intestinal membrane vesicles to be used for studies of intracellular control of transport processes, for instance, studies of protein kinase regulation of transport.

  12. High-pressure cryogenic seals for pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buggele, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    This investigation of the problems associated with reliably containing gaseous helium pressurized to 1530 bars (22 500 psi) between 4.2 K and 150 K led to the following conclusions: (1) common seal designs used in existing elevated-temperature pressure vessels are unsuitable for high-pressure cryogenic operation, (2) extrusion seal-ring materials such as Teflon, tin, and lead are not good seal materials for cryogenic high-pressure operation; and (3) several high-pressure cryogenic seal systems suitable for large-pressure vessel applications were developed; two seals required prepressurization, and one seal functioned repeatedly without any prepressurization. These designs used indium seal rings, brass or 304 stainless-steel anvil rings, and two O-rings of silicone rubber or Kel-F.

  13. High blood pressure and eye disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000999.htm High blood pressure and eye disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure can damage blood vessels in the retina . The ...

  14. Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aneurysm More Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure Infographic Updated:Oct 31,2016 View a downloadable version of this infographic High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  15. Feedthrough Seal For High-Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R.; Mullins, O.; Smith, D.; Teasley, G.

    1984-01-01

    Combination of ceramic and plastic withstands many depressurizations. Stack of washers surrounds leadthrough electrode. Under pressure washers expand to fill leadthrough hole in high-pressure vessel. Seal thus formed withstands 20 or more pressurization/depressurization cycles. Seal composed of neoprene, polytetrafluoroethylene, nylon and high-purity, high-density commercial alumina ceramic.

  16. Two-dimensional thermal analysis for freezing of plant and animal cells by high-speed microscopic IR camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morikawa, Junko; Hashimoto, Toshimasa; Hayakawa, Eita; Uemura, Hideyuki

    2003-04-01

    Using a high speed IR camera for temperature sensor is a powerful new tool for thermal analysis in the cell scale biomaterials. In this study, we propose a new type of two-dimensional thermal analysis by means of a high speed IR camera with a microscopic lens, and applied it to the analysis of freezing of plant and animal cells. The latent heat on the freezing of super cooled onion epidermal cell was randomly observed by a unit cell size, one by one, under a cooling rate of 80degC/min with a spatial resolution of 7.5m. The freezing front of ice formation and the thermal diffusion behavior of generated latent heat were analyzed. As a result it was possible to determine simultaneously the intercellular/intracellular temperature distribution, the growing speed of freezing front in a single cell, and the thermal diffusion in the freezing process of living tissue. A new measuring system presented here will be significant in a transient process of biomaterials. A newly developed temperature wave methods for the measurement of in-plane thermal diffusivity was also applied to the cell systems.

  17. Emerging techniques for assisting and accelerating food freezing processes: A review of recent research progresses.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lina; Sun, Da-Wen; Zhu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Zi

    2017-03-04

    Freezing plays an important role in food preservation and the emergence of rapid freezing technologies can be highly beneficial to the food industry. This paper reviews some novel food freezing technologies, including high-pressure freezing (HPF), ultrasound-assisted freezing (UAF), electrically disturbed freezing (EF) and magnetically disturbed freezing (MF), microwave-assisted freezing (MWF), and osmo-dehydro-freezing (ODF). HPF and UAF can initiate ice nucleation rapidly, leading to uniform distribution of ice crystals and the control of their size and shape. Specifically, the former is focused on increasing the degree of supercooling, whereas the latter aims to decrease it. Direct current electric freezing (DC-EF) and alternating current electric freezing (AC-EF) exhibit different effects on ice nucleation. DC-EF can promote ice nucleation and AC-EF has the opposite effect. Furthermore, ODF has been successfully used for freezing various vegetables and fruit. MWF cannot control the nucleation temperature, but can decrease supercooling degree, thus decreasing the size of ice crystals. The heat and mass transfer processes during ODF have been investigated experimentally and modeled mathematically. More studies should be carried out to understand the effects of these technologies on food freezing process.

  18. Freeze-thawing behaviour of highly concentrated aqueous alkali chloride-glucose systems.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, K; Motegi, A; Murase, N

    2001-01-01

    The freeze-thawing behaviour of highly concentrated aqueous alkali chloride-glucose systems was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In the aqueous NaCl-glucose solution system, single or double glass transitions followed by the corresponding devitrification exotherms were observed during rewarming. In the aqueous KCl-glucose solution system, on the other hand, a single glass transition followed by an exotherm was observed during rewarming. The presence of double glass transitions observed for a certain composition of the aqueous NaCl-glucose solution was taken as an evidence for the liquid-liquid immiscibility at low temperatures. Two kinds of crystallisation accompanied by exotherms during rewarming were identified by X-ray diffraction as ice and ice/NaCl x 2H(2)O, or ice/KCl eutectic component.

  19. Freeze frame analysis on high speed cinematography of Nd/YAG laser explosions in ocular tissues.

    PubMed

    Vernon, S A; Cheng, H

    1986-05-01

    High speed colour cinematography at 400 frames per second was used to photograph both single and train burst Nd/YAG laser applications in ox eyes at threshold energy levels. Measurements of the extent and speed of particle scatter and tissue distortion from the acoustic transient were made from a sequential freeze frame analysis of the films. Particles were observed to travel over 8 mm from the site of Nd/YAG application 20 milliseconds after a single pulse at initial speeds in excess of 20 km/h. The use of train bursts of pulses was seen to increase the number of particles scattered and project the wavefront of particles further from the point of laser application.

  20. Freezing tolerance and avoidance in high tropical Andean plants: Is it equally represented in species with different plant height?

    PubMed

    Squeo, F A; Rada, F; Azocar, A; Goldstein, G

    1991-05-01

    Freezing tolerance and avoidance were studied in several different sized species of the tropical high Andes (4200 m) to determine whether there was a relationship between plant height and cold resistance mechanisms. Freezing injury and supercooling capacity were determined in ground level plants (i.e. cushions, small rosettes and a perennial herb), intermediate height plants (shrubs and perennial herbs) and arborescent forms (i.e. giant rosettes and small trees). All ground-level plants showed tolerance as the main mechanism of resistance to cold temperatures. Arborescent forms showed avoidance mechanisms mainly through supercooling, while intermediate plants exhibited both. Insulation mechanisms to avoid low temperatures were present in the two extreme life-forms. We suggest that a combination of freezing tolerance and avoidance by insulation is least expensive and is a more secure mechanism for high tropical mountain plants than supercooling alone.

  1. High-quality YBa2Cu3O(7-x) ceramics prepared from freeze-dried nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Toshimichi; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Hiraki, Akio

    1991-07-01

    Using fine powders prepared by a freeze-drying process of a nitrate solution, a YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor has been successfully formed in a ceramic plate. The other processes employed are two heat treatments, a flash decomposition of the freeze-dried nitrates, and a subsequent calcination. It has been found that the formation of high-quality ceramics requires about 10 percent of the Cu nitrate to be added to the stoichiometric nitrate solution as a starting material to the freeze-drying process. The ceramics thus obtained have the characteristics of a very dense structure with large grains and exhibit magnetic properties as a high-Tc superconductor as good as those of a monocrystalline YBa2Cu3O(7-x).

  2. Behavior of Plain Concrete of a High Water-Cement Ratio after Freeze-Thaw Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Huai-Shuai; Yi, Ting-Hua; Song, Yu-Pu

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study of plain concrete specimens of water-cement ratio 0.55, subjected to 0, 15, 25, 40, 50 and 75 cycles of freeze-thaw was completed. The dynamic modulus of elasticity (DME), weight loss, compressive strength, tensile strength, flexural strength, cleavage strength and stress-strain relationships of plain concrete specimens suffering from freeze-thaw cycles were measured. The experimental results showed that the strength decreased as the freeze-thaw cycles were repeated. A concise mathematic formula between DME, weight loss, mechanical properties and number of freeze-thaw cycles was also established. The influences of freeze-thaw cycles on the DME, weight loss and mechanical properties were analyzed. The experimental results serve as a reference for the maintenance, design and life prediction of dams, hydraulic structures, offshore structures, concrete roads and bridges in cold regions.

  3. High-Pressure Lightweight Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; McKechnie, Timothy; Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy; Smirnov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Returning samples of Martian soil and rock to Earth is of great interest to scientists. There were numerous studies to evaluate Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission architectures, technology needs, development plans, and requirements. The largest propulsion risk element of the MSR mission is the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). Along with the baseline solid-propellant vehicle, liquid propellants have been considered. Similar requirements apply to other lander ascent engines and reaction control systems. The performance of current state-ofthe- art liquid propellant engines can be significantly improved by increasing both combustion temperature and pressure. Pump-fed propulsion is suggested for a single-stage bipropellant MAV. Achieving a 90-percent stage propellant fraction is thought to be possible on a 100-kg scale, including sufficient thrust for lifting off Mars. To increase the performance of storable bipropellant rocket engines, a high-pressure, lightweight combustion chamber was designed. Iridium liner electrodeposition was investigated on complex-shaped thrust chamber mandrels. Dense, uniform iridium liners were produced on chamber and cylindrical mandrels. Carbon/carbon composite (C/C) structures were braided over iridium-lined mandrels and densified by chemical vapor infiltration. Niobium deposition was evaluated for forming a metallic attachment flange on the carbon/ carbon structure. The new thrust chamber was designed to exceed state-of-the-art performance, and was manufactured with an 83-percent weight savings. High-performance C/Cs possess a unique set of properties that make them desirable materials for high-temperature structures used in rocket propulsion components, hypersonic vehicles, and aircraft brakes. In particular, more attention is focused on 3D braided C/Cs due to their mesh-work structure. Research on the properties of C/Cs has shown that the strength of composites is strongly affected by the fiber-matrix interfacial bonding, and that weakening

  4. Prediction of ice content in biological model solutions when frozen under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Guignon, B; Aparicio, C; Otero, L; Sanz, P D

    2009-01-01

    High pressure is, at least, as effective as cryoprotective agents (CPAs) and are used for decreasing both homogenous nucleation and freezing temperatures. This fact gives rise to a great variety of possible cryopreservation processes under high pressure. They have not been optimized yet, since they are relatively recent and are mainly based on the pressure-temperature phase diagram of pure water. Very few phase diagrams of biological material are available under pressure. This is owing to the lack of suitable equipment and to the difficulties encountered in carrying out the measurements. Different aqueous solutions of salt and CPAs as biological models are studied in the range of 0 degrees C down to -35 degrees C, 0.1 up to 250 MPa, and 0-20% w/w total solute concentration. The phase transition curves of glycerol and of sodium chloride with either glycerol or sucrose in aqueous solutions are determined in a high hydrostatic pressure vessel. The experimental phase diagrams of binary solutions were well described by a third-degree polynomial equation. It was also shown that Robinson and Stokes' equation at high pressure succeeds in predicting the phase diagrams of both binary and ternary solutions. The solute cryoconcentration and the ice content were calculated as a function of temperature and pressure conditions during the freezing of a binary solution. This information should provide a basis upon which high-pressure cryopreservation processes may be performed and the damages derived from ice formation evaluated. (c) 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol.

  5. Manufacturing Diamond Under Very High Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    A process for manufacturing bulk diamond has been made practical by the invention of the High Pressure and Temperature Apparatus capable of applying the combination of very high temperature and high pressure needed to melt carbon in a sufficiently large volume. The apparatus includes a reaction cell wherein a controlled static pressure as high as 20 GPa and a controlled temperature as high as 5,000 C can be maintained.

  6. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to achieve target blood pressure goals with treatment. Overweight You are more likely to develop prehypertension or high blood pressure if you’re overweight or obese . The terms “overweight” and “obese” refer ...

  7. Epithelial dominant expression of antifreeze proteins in cunner suggests recent entry into a high freeze-risk ecozone.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Rod S; Fletcher, Garth L

    2013-01-01

    Most marine teleost fishes residing in a high freeze-risk ecozone, such as the coastal waters of Newfoundland during winter, avoid freezing by secreting high concentrations of antifreeze proteins (AFP) into their blood plasma where they can bind to and prevent the growth of ice that enter the fish. Cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus), which overwinter in such shallow waters are the only known exception. Although this species does produce type I AFP, the plasma levels are too low to be of value as a freeze protectant. Southern and Northern blot analyses carried out in this study establish that the cunner AFP genes belong to a multigene family that is predominantly expressed in external epithelia (skin and gill filaments). These results support the hypothesis that the survival of cunner in icy waters is attributable in part to epithelial AFP that help block ice propagation into their interior milieu. In contrast to the cunner, heterospecifics occupying the same habitat have greater freeze protection because they produce AFP in the liver for export to the plasma as well as in external epithelia. Since the external epithelia would be the first tissue to come into contact with ice it is possible that one of the earliest steps involved in the evolution of freeze resistant fish could have been the expression of AFP in tissues such as the skin. We suggest that this epithelial-dominant AFP expression represents a primitive stage in AFP evolution and propose that cunner began to inhabit "freeze-risk ecozones" more recently than heterospecifics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. High blood pressure in women.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, D A; Oparil, S

    1997-01-01

    There is a sexual dimorphism in blood pressure of humans and experimental animals: males tend to have higher blood pressure than females with functional ovaries, while ovariectomy or menopause tends to abolish the sexual dimorphism and cause females to develop a "male" pattern of blood pressure. Hypertensive male laboratory animals tend to have NaCl-sensitive blood pressure, while females are NaCl resistant unless their ovaries are removed, in which case NaCl sensitivity appears. The hormonal basis of NaCl sensitivity of blood pressure and of the sexual dimorphism of hypertension remains to be defined. Synthetic estrogens and progestins, as found in oral contraceptives, tend to elevate blood pressure, while naturally occurring estrogens lower it, or have no effect. Hypertension increases cardiovascular risk in women, as well as men, although the benefits of antihypertensive treatment have been more difficult to demonstrate in women. In the population of the United States, women are more aware of their hypertension, more likely to be treated medically, and more likely to have their blood pressure controlled.

  9. High pressure pulsed capillary viscometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.; Walowitt, J. A.; Pan, C. H. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted in order to establish the feasibility of a multichamber pulsed-capillary viscometer. The initial design incorporated a piston, ram, and seals which produced measured pulses up to 30,000 psi in the closed chamber system. Pressure pulses from one to ten milliseconds were investigated in a system volume of 1 cuin. Four test fluids: a MIL-L-7808, a 5P4E polyphenyl ether, a MIL-L-23699A, and a synthetic hydrocarbon were examined in the test pressure assembly. The pressure-viscosity coefficient and viscosity delay time were determined for the MIL-L-7808 lubricant tested.

  10. Characteristics of High-Impact Long-Duration Freezing Rain Events over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCray, Christopher; Gyakum, John; Atallah, Eyad

    2017-04-01

    While even short periods of freezing rain can be hazardous, the most severe economic and public health impacts tend to occur when it persists for many hours. Predicting the precise and often fragile temperature stratification necessary for freezing rain to persist remains an important forecast challenge. To better elucidate the conditions responsible for the most severe impacts, we concentrate on surface observations of long-duration (6 or more hours) freezing rain events over North America from 1979-2015. Furthermore, we analyze cases in which multiple stations observe long-duration events simultaneously. Following these cases over successive days allows us to generate maps of freezing rain "tracks" which are then categorized by their geographic distributions. We then analyze the conditions that lead to the occurrence of freezing rain for each of these categories. The climatology of long-duration freezing rain events is largely controlled by a combination of synoptic patterns and local terrain effects, which help to maintain or replenish cold air at the surface. As with freezing rain in general, long-duration events occur most frequently from southeastern Canada into the northeastern United States, with a maximum in the St. Lawrence River Valley of Quebec. An examination of the longest-duration events at each station shows a broader geographic distribution, with local maxima in the frequency of 18+ h events over Oklahoma and surrounding states in the South Central United States (SCUS) - a region with relatively low annual freezing rain frequencies. Classification of individual events shows us that in many instances, the SCUS and northeastern North America are impacted by long-duration freezing rain during the same cases. Indeed, the category responsible for the greatest number of freezing rain observations over the largest area is one which begins in the SCUS (often Texas or Oklahoma), with freezing rain occurring over a broad southwest-northeast swath (2-3000 km

  11. Exploring high-density baryonic matter: Maximum freeze-out density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randrup, Jørgen; Cleymans, Jean

    2016-08-01

    The hadronic freeze-out line is calculated in terms of the net baryon density and the energy density instead of the usual T and μB. This analysis makes it apparent that the freeze-out density exhibits a maximum as the collision energy is varied. This maximum freeze-out density has μ_i{B} = 400 - 500 MeV, which is above the critical value, and it is reached for a fixed-target bombarding energy of 20-30GeV/ N well within the parameters of the proposed NICA collider facility.

  12. Effects of High-Pressure, Microbial Transglutaminase and Glucono-δ-Lactone on the Aggregation Properties of Skim Milk

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Yoon; Choi, Mi-Jung; Cho, Hyung-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The object in this study is to investigate the effects of high pressure and freezing processes on the curdling of skim milk depending on the presence of transglutaminase (TGase) and glucono-δ-lactone (GdL). Skim milk was treated with atmospheric freezing (AF), high pressure (HP), pressure-shift freezing (PSF) and high pressure sub-zero temperature (HPST) processing conditions. After freezing and pressure processing, these processed milk samples were treated with curdling agents, such as TGase and GdL. Pressurized samples (HP, PSF and HPST) had lower lightness than that of the control. In particular, PSF had the lowest lightness (p<0.05). Likewise, the PSF proteins were the most insoluble regardless of whether they were activated by TGase and GdL, indicating the highest rate of protein aggregation (p<0.05). Furthermore, the TGase/GdL reaction resulted in thick bands corresponding to masses larger than 69 kDa, indicating curdling. Casein bands were the weakest in PSF-treated milk, revealing that casein was prone to protein aggregation. PSF also had the highest G' value among all treatments after activation by TGase, implying that PSF formed the hardest curd. However, adding GdL decreased the G' values of the samples except HPST-treated samples. Synthetically, the PSF process was advantageous for curdling of skim milk. PMID:27433104

  13. Membrane associated qualitative differences in cell ultrastructure of chemically and high pressure cryofixed plant cells.

    PubMed

    Zechmann, Bernd; Müller, Maria; Zellnig, Günther

    2007-06-01

    Membrane contrast can sometimes be poor in biological samples after high pressure freezing (HPF) and freeze substitution (FS). The addition of water to the FS-medium has been shown to improve membrane contrast in animal tissue and yeast. In the present study we tested the effects of 1% and 5% water added to the FS-medium (2% osmium with 0.2% uranyl acetate in anhydrous acetone) on the quality and visibility of membranes in high pressure frozen leaf samples of Cucurbita pepo L. plants and compared them to chemically fixed cells (3% glutaraldehyde post-fixed with 1% osmium tetroxide). The addition of water to the FS-medium drastically decreased the amounts of well preserved cells and did not significantly improve the quality nor visibility of membranes. In samples that were freeze substituted in FS-media containing 1% and 5% water the width of thylakoid membranes was found to be significantly increased of about 20% and the perinuclear space was up to 76% wider in comparison to what was found in samples which were freeze substituted without water. No differences were found in the thickness of membranes between chemically and cryofixed cells that were freeze substituted in the FS-medium without water. Nevertheless, in chemically fixed cells the intrathylakoidal space was about 120% wider than in cryofixed cells that were freeze substituted with or without water. The present results demonstrate that the addition of water to the FS-medium does not improve membrane contrast but changes the width of thylakoid membranes and the perinuclear space in the present plant material. The addition of water to the FS-medium is therefore not as essential for improved membrane contrast in the investigated plant samples as it was observed in cells of animal tissues and yeast cells.

  14. TINA, a new fully automated high-performance droplet freezing assay coupled to a customized infrared detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert, Anna Theresa; Lamneck, Mark; Gurk, Christian; Helleis, Frank; Klimach, Thomas; Scheel, Jan Frederik; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2017-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is frequently investigated by simultaneously cooling a defined number of droplets of equal volume in droplet freezing assays. In 1971, Gabor Vali established the quantitative assessment of ice nuclei active at specific temperatures for many droplet freezing assays. Since then, several instruments have been developed, and various modifications and improvements have been made. However, for quantitative analysis of ice nuclei, the current known droplet freezing assays are still limited by either small droplet numbers, large droplet volumes, inadequate separation of the single droplets, which can result in mutual interferences, or imprecise temperature control within the system. Here, we present the Twin Ice Nucleation Assay (TINA), which represents an improvement of the until now existing droplet freezing assays in terms of temperature range and statistics. Above all, we developed a distinct detection system for freezing events in droplet freezing assays, where the temperature gradient of each single droplet is tracked individually by infrared cameras coupled to a self-written software. In the fully automated setup, ice nucleation can be studied in two independently cooled, customized aluminum blocks run by a high-performance thermostat. We developed a cooling setup, which allows both huge and tiny temperature changes within a very short period of time, combined with an optimal insulation. Hence, measurements can be performed at temperatures down to -55 °C (218 K) and at cooling rates up to 3 K min-1. Besides that, TINA provides the analysis of nearly 1000 droplets per run with various droplet volumes between 1 µL and 50 µL. This enables a fast and more precise analysis of biological samples with complex IN composition as well as better statistics for every sample at the same time.

  15. Optical calibration of pressure sensors for high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Gregoryanz, Eugene

    2005-05-01

    We present the results of Raman-scattering measurements of diamond ({sup 12}C) and of cubic boron nitride, and fluorescence measurements of ruby, Sm:yttrium aluminum garnet (Sm:YAG), and SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Sm{sup 2+} in the diamond anvil cell at high pressures and temperatures. These measurements were accompanied by synchrotron x-ray-diffraction measurements on gold. We have extended the room-temperature calibration of Sm:YAG in a quasihydrostatic regime up to 100 GPa. The ruby scale is found to systematically underestimate pressure at high pressures and temperatures compared with all the other sensors. On this basis, we propose an alternative high-temperature ruby pressure scale that is valid to at least 100 GPa and 850 K.

  16. High pressure synthesis gas conversion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this research project is to build and test a high pressure fermentation system for the production of ethanol from synthesis gas. The fermenters, pumps, controls, and analytical system were procured or fabricated and assembled in our laboratory. This system was then used to determine the effects of high pressure on growth and ethanol production by Clostridium ljungdahlii. The limits of cell concentration and mass transport relationships were found in CSTR and immobilized cell reactors (ICR). The minimum retention times and reactor volumes were found for ethanol production in these reactors. A maximum operating pressure of 150 psig has been shown to be possible for C. ljungdahlli with the medium of Phillips et al. This medium was developed for atmospheric pressure operation in the CSTR to yield maximum ethanol concentrations and thus is not best for operation at elevated pressures. It is recommended that a medium development study be performed for C. ljungdahlii at increased pressure. Cell concentration, gas conversion and product concentration profiles were presented for C. ljungdahlii as a function of gas flow rate, the variable which affects bacterium performance the most. This pressure was chosen as a representative pressure over the 0--150 psig operating pressure range for the bacterium. Increased pressure negatively affected ethanol productivity probably due to the fact that medium composition was designed for atmospheric pressure operation. Medium development at increased pressure is necessary for high pressure development of the system.

  17. High Precision Pressure Measurement with a Funnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Arias, T.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2008-01-01

    A simple experimental device for high precision differential pressure measurements is presented. Its working mechanism recalls that of a hydraulic press, where pressure is supplied by insufflating air under a funnel. As an application, we measure air pressure inside a soap bubble. The soap bubble is inflated and connected to a funnel which is…

  18. High Precision Pressure Measurement with a Funnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Arias, T.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2008-01-01

    A simple experimental device for high precision differential pressure measurements is presented. Its working mechanism recalls that of a hydraulic press, where pressure is supplied by insufflating air under a funnel. As an application, we measure air pressure inside a soap bubble. The soap bubble is inflated and connected to a funnel which is…

  19. Metallicity of boron carbides at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekura, Haruhiko; Shirai, Koun; Yanase, Akira

    2010-03-01

    Electronic structure of semiconducting boron carbide at high pressure has been theoretically investigated, because of interests in the positive pressure dependence of resistivity, in the gap closure, and in the phase transition. The most simplest form B12(CCC) is assumed. Under assumptions of hydrostatic pressure and neglecting finite-temperature effects, boron carbide is quite stable at high pressure. The crystal of boron carbide is stable at least until a pressure higher than previous experiments showed. The gap closure occurs only after p=600 GPa on the assumption of the original crystal symmetry. In the low pressure regime, the pressure dependence of the energy gap almost diminishes, which is an exceptional case for semiconductors, which could be one of reasons for the positive pressure dependence of resistivity. A monotonous increase in the apex angle of rhombohedron suggests that the covalent bond continues to increase. The C chain inserted in the main diagonal of rhombohedral structure is the chief reason of this stability.

  20. High-pressure fiber optic acoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhengyu; Deng, Jiangdong; Peng, Wei; Pickrell, Gary R.; Wang, Anbo

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes a diaphragm-based external Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) fiber acoustic sensor with pressure-isolation structure. The structure minimizes the crosstalk generated by environmental pressure while enables considerable amount of acoustic signal power being delivered to the sensor, which allows the sensor to work in high-pressure environment. The detailed analysis on sensor design, pressure isolation and sensor fabrication as well as sensor performance are presented.

  1. NETL- High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-08

    NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Facility is a unique resource within the National Laboratories system. It provides the test capabilities needed to evaluate new combustion concepts for high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen and natural gas turbines. These concepts will be critical for the next generation of ultra clean, ultra efficient power systems.

  2. NETL- High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Facility is a unique resource within the National Laboratories system. It provides the test capabilities needed to evaluate new combustion concepts for high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen and natural gas turbines. These concepts will be critical for the next generation of ultra clean, ultra efficient power systems.

  3. Principles and application of high pressure-based technologies in the food industry.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, V M Bala; Martínez-Monteagudo, Sergio I; Gupta, Rockendra

    2015-01-01

    High pressure processing (HPP) has emerged as a commercially viable food manufacturing tool that satisfies consumers' demand for mildly processed, convenient, fresh-tasting foods with minimal to no preservatives. Pressure treatment, with or without heat, inactivates pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, yeast, mold, viruses, and also spores and extends shelf life. Pressure treatment at ambient or chilled temperatures has minimal impact on product chemistry. The product quality and shelf life are often influenced more by storage conditions and packaging material barrier properties than the treatment itself. Application of pressure reduces the thermal exposure of the food during processing, thereby protecting a variety of bioactive compounds. This review discusses recent scientific advances of high pressure technology for food processing and preservation applications such as pasteurization, sterilization, blanching, freezing, and thawing. We highlight the importance of in situ engineering and thermodynamic properties of food and packaging materials in process design. Current and potential future promising applications of pressure technology are summarized.

  4. Substrate-Dependence of the Freezing Dynamics of Supercooled Water Films: A High-Speed Optical Microscope Study.

    PubMed

    Pach, Elzbieta; Rodríguez, Laura; Verdaguer, Albert

    2017-09-18

    The freezing of supercooled water films on silicon-based surfaces was investigated using a high-speed camera coupled to an optical microscope. We were able to study in detail the two phases or stages in during water freezing; the first stage, faster, when dendritic grow occurs co-planar with the cold surface of the substrate and the second stage, slower, when the ice formed on the surface grows vertically until all the film is frozen. Several differentiated processes were identified during the freezing: two dimensional dendrite growing on the substrate interface, vertical dendrite growing, formation and evolution of ice domains, trapping of air bubbles in ice and freezing of the water film surface. We found all this process to be dependent on the supercooling temperature and the substrate used. Dendrite/ice front growing was found to be dependent on thermal properties of the substrate but could not to be unequivocally related to them. Finally for low supercooling it was observed a direct relationship between the morphology of the dendrites formed in the first stage, which depends on the substrate and the roughness and shape of the surface of the ice, when frozen of the film was completed.

  5. CHRONOBIOLOGY OF HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

    PubMed Central

    Cornélissen, G.; Halberg, F.; Bakken, E. E.; Wang, Z.; Tarquini, R.; Perfetto, F.; Laffi, G.; Maggioni, C.; Kumagai, Y.; Homolka, P.; Havelková, A.; Dušek, J.; Svačinová, H.; Siegelová, J.; Fišer, B.

    2008-01-01

    BIOCOS, the project aimed at studying BIOlogical systems in their COSmos, has obtained a great deal of expertise in the fields of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) monitoring and of marker rhythmometry for the purposes of screening, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. Prolonging the monitoring reduces the uncertainty in the estimation of circadian parameters; the current recommendation of BIOCOS requires monitoring for at least 7 days. The BIOCOS approach consists of a parametric and a non-parametric analysis of the data, in which the results from the individual subject are being compared with gender- and age-specified reference values in health. Chronobiological designs can offer important new information regarding the optimization of treatment by timing its administration as a function of circadian and other rhythms. New technological developments are needed to close the loop between the monitoring of blood pressure and the administration of antihypertensive drugs. PMID:19122770

  6. Stability of buffer-free freeze-dried formulations: A feasibility study of a monoclonal antibody at high protein concentrations.

    PubMed

    Garidel, Patrick; Pevestorf, Benjamin; Bahrenburg, Sven

    2015-11-01

    We studied the stability of freeze-dried therapeutic protein formulations over a range of initial concentrations (from 40 to 160 mg/mL) and employed a variety of formulation strategies (including buffer-free freeze dried formulations, or BF-FDF). Highly concentrated, buffer-free liquid formulations of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been shown to be a viable alternative to conventionally buffered preparations. We considered whether it is feasible to use the buffer-free strategy in freeze-dried formulations, as an answer to some of the known drawbacks of conventional buffers. We therefore conducted an accelerated stability study (24 weeks at 40 °C) to assess the feasibility of stabilizing freeze-dried formulations without "classical" buffer components. Factors monitored included pH stability, protein integrity, and protein aggregation. Because the protein solutions are inherently self-buffering, and the system's buffer capacity scales with protein concentration, we included highly concentrated buffer-free freeze-dried formulations in the study. The tested formulations ranged from "fully formulated" (containing both conventional buffer and disaccharide stabilizers) to "buffer-free" (including formulations with only disaccharide lyoprotectant stabilizers) to "excipient-free" (with neither added buffers nor stabilizers). We evaluated the impacts of varying concentrations, buffering schemes, pHs, and lyoprotectant additives. At the end of 24 weeks, no change in pH was observed in any of the buffer-free formulations. Unbuffered formulations were found to have shorter reconstitution times and lower opalescence than buffered formulations. Protein stability was assessed by visual inspection, sub-visible particle analysis, protein monomer content, charge variants analysis, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. All of these measures found the stability of buffer-free formulations that included a disaccharide stabilizer comparable to buffer

  7. Multicomponent fuel vaporization at high pressures.

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, D. J.; O'Rourke, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    We extend our multicomponent fuel model to high pressures using a Peng-Robinson equation of state, and implement the model into KIVA-3V. Phase equilibrium is achieved by equating liquid and vapor fugacities. The latent heat of vaporization and fuel enthalpies are also corrected for at high pressures. Numerical simulations of multicomponent evaporation are performed for single droplets for a diesel fuel surrogate at different pressures.

  8. High tolerance to repeated cycles of freezing and thawing in different Trichinella nativa isolates.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Rebecca K; Handeland, Kjell; Kapel, Christian M O

    2008-10-01

    Trichinella nativa is the most frequent Trichinella species in arctic wildlife and also the predominating species seen in Norwegian fauna. The adaptation of T. nativa to a cold climate is reflected by the well-documented freeze tolerance of its muscle larvae. The ability of the larvae to survive repeated freezing and thawing events has not however been elucidated and was investigated in the present study, using an Alaskan isolate and two isolates from coastal and inland Norway, respectively. Each T. nativa isolate was inoculated in foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and the muscle tissue obtained after 20 weeks was minced and divided into freezer bags. In the initial part of the study, the bags were exposed to either continuous freezing (-5 degrees C) for up to 7 weeks or freezing (-5 degrees C) for up to 7 weeks with seven overnight (+21 degrees C) thawing events. Once a week a bag was removed from each group, the meat was digested and muscle larvae isolated. In vitro assessment of larval viability was carried out based on larval motility (active vs non-active) and morphology, coiled (alive) or C-shaped (dead). Larval infectivity was subsequently bioassayed in mice, administering 500 larvae per mouse. The mice were euthanised 4 weeks post inoculation, the muscle digested and larvae per gram (lpg) and reproductive capacity index (RCI) were calculated. During the second part of the study, some of the minced fox muscle, exposed to the initial freeze protocol, was stored for a further 23 weeks at -18 degrees C prior to in vitro and in vivo assessment of larval viability and infectivity. The study demonstrated that Trichinella isolates originating from carnivores from higher northern latitudes expressed highest tolerance to freezing and that temperature fluctuations around freezing point, for up to 7 weeks, had little effect on larval infectivity. A negative effect of the initial repeated freeze-thaw events could be demonstrated once the larvae were exposed to longer periods of

  9. Farinose flavonoids are associated with high freezing tolerance in fairy primrose (Primula malacoides) plants.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, Ryutaro; Galis, Ivan; Tanakamaru, Shigemi

    2014-02-01

    The deposition of surface (farinose) flavonoids on aerial parts of some Primula species is a well-documented but poorly understood phenomenon. Here, we show that flavonoid deposition on the leaves and winter buds may contribute strongly to preventing freezing damage in these plants. The ice nucleation temperature of fairy primrose (Primula malacoides) leaves covered with natural flavone was approximately 6 °C lower compared to those that had their flavone artificially removed. Additionally, farinose flavonoids on the leaves reduced subsequent electrolyte leakage (EL) from the cells exposed to freezing temperatures. Interestingly, exogenous application of flavone at 4 mg/g fresh weight to P. malacoides leaves, which had the original flavone mechanically removed, restored freezing tolerance, and diminished EL from the cells to pretreatment values. Our results suggest that farinose flavonoids may function as mediators of freezing tolerance in P. malacoides, and exogenous application of flavone could be used to reduce freezing damage during sudden but predictable frost events in other plant species. © 2013 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  10. High frequency dynamic pressure calibration technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, P. A.; Zasimowich, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    A high frequency dynamic calibration technique for pressure transducers has been developed using a siren pressure generator (SPG). The SPG is an inlet-area-modulated device generating oscillating waveforms with dynamic pressure amplitudes up to 58.6 kPa (8.5 psi) in a frequency range of 1 to 10 kHz. A description of the generator, its operating characteristics and instrumentation used for pressure amplitude and frequency measurements is given. Waveform oscillographs and spectral analysis of the pressure transducers' output signals are presented.

  11. High frequency dynamic pressure calibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, P. A.; Zasimowich, R. F.

    A high frequency dynamic calibration technique for pressure transducers has been developed using a siren pressure generator (SPG). The SPG is an inlet-area-modulated device generating oscillating waveforms with dynamic pressure amplitudes up to 58.6 kPa (8.5 psi) in a frequency range of 1 to 10 kHz. A description of the generator, its operating characteristics and instrumentation used for pressure amplitude and frequency measurements is given. Waveform oscillographs and spectral analysis of the pressure transducers' output signals are presented.

  12. Fuel droplet burning rates at high pressures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canada, G. S.; Faeth, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    Combustion of methanol, ethanol, propanol-1, n-pentane, n-heptane, and n-decane was observed in air under natural convection conditions, at pressures up to 100 atm. The droplets were simulated by porous spheres, with diameters in the range from 0.63 to 1.90 cm. The pressure levels of the tests were high enough so that near-critical combustion was observed for methanol and ethanol. Due to the high pressures, the phase-equilibrium models of the analysis included both the conventional low-pressure approach as well as high-pressure versions, allowing for real gas effects and the solubility of combustion-product gases in the liquid phase. The burning-rate predictions of the various theories were similar, and in fair agreement with the data. The high-pressure theory gave the best prediction for the liquid-surface temperatures of ethanol and propanol-1 at high pressure. The experiments indicated the approach of critical burning conditions for methanol and ethanol at pressures on the order of 80 to 100 atm, which was in good agreement with the predictions of both the low- and high-pressure analysis.

  13. Elastomers Compatible With High-Pressure Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jon W.

    1987-01-01

    Compatibility increased by fluorination. Report describes experiments aimed at improving compatibility of some fluorinated elastomers with high-pressure oxygen. Such elastomers needed for seals, gaskets, and positive-expulsion devices used with high-pressure oxygen. Oxygen - compatibility tests carried out on five elastomers chosen on the basis of literature survey.

  14. High Blood Pressure Often Undiagnosed, Untreated

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. More Health News on: Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Stroke Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Stroke ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated ...

  15. Laser techniques in high-pressure geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Bell, P. M.; Mao, H. K.

    1987-01-01

    Laser techniques in conjunction with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study high-pressure properties of materials important to a wide range of problems in earth and planetary science. Spontaneous Raman scattering of crystalline and amorphous solids at high pressure demonstrates that dramatic changes in structure and bonding occur on compression. High-pressure Brillouin scattering is sensitive to the pressure variations of single-crystal elastic moduli and acoustic velocities. Laser heating techniques with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study phase transitions, including melting, under deep-earth conditions. Finally, laser-induced ruby fluorescence has been essential for the development of techniques for generating the maximum pressures now possible with the diamond-anvil cell, and currently provides a calibrated in situ measure of pressure well above 100 gigapascals.

  16. Laser techniques in high-pressure geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Bell, P. M.; Mao, H. K.

    1987-01-01

    Laser techniques in conjunction with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study high-pressure properties of materials important to a wide range of problems in earth and planetary science. Spontaneous Raman scattering of crystalline and amorphous solids at high pressure demonstrates that dramatic changes in structure and bonding occur on compression. High-pressure Brillouin scattering is sensitive to the pressure variations of single-crystal elastic moduli and acoustic velocities. Laser heating techniques with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study phase transitions, including melting, under deep-earth conditions. Finally, laser-induced ruby fluorescence has been essential for the development of techniques for generating the maximum pressures now possible with the diamond-anvil cell, and currently provides a calibrated in situ measure of pressure well above 100 gigapascals.

  17. High pressure hypervelocity electrothermal wind tunnel performance study and subscale tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizkalla, Oussama F.; Chinitz, Wallace; Witherspoon, F. D.; Burton, Rodney L.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of a Mach 10 to 20, high pressure electrothermal wind tunnel was assessed. A heater based on a continuous high power electric arc discharge capable of heating air to temperatures above 10,000 K and pressures of 15,000 atm is the key element of this wind tunnel. Results of analytical study indicate that the facility is capable of simulation conditions suitable for hypervelocity airbreathing propulsion testing up to Mach 16. In this case simulation was limited by pressure containment, high nozzle throat heat flux rates, and chemical freezing in the nozzle. The high total pressure capability improved the recombination chemistry in the facility nozzle as chemical equilibrium prevailed to the freezing point. Steady arc discharges were observed with liquid nitrogen flowing into the arc chamber during tests based on the two millisecond test facility. The measured steady pressure in the arc chamber was 4559 psi, which is two times greater than maximum total pressure obtainable in conventional arc heaters.

  18. High pressure hypervelocity electrothermal wind tunnel performance study and subscale tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizkalla, Oussama F.; Chinitz, Wallace; Witherspoon, F. D.; Burton, Rodney L.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of a Mach 10 to 20, high pressure electrothermal wind tunnel was assessed. A heater based on a continuous high power electric arc discharge capable of heating air to temperatures above 10,000 K and pressures of 15,000 atm is the key element of this wind tunnel. Results of analytical study indicate that the facility is capable of simulation conditions suitable for hypervelocity airbreathing propulsion testing up to Mach 16. In this case simulation was limited by pressure containment, high nozzle throat heat flux rates, and chemical freezing in the nozzle. The high total pressure capability improved the recombination chemistry in the facility nozzle as chemical equilibrium prevailed to the freezing point. Steady arc discharges were observed with liquid nitrogen flowing into the arc chamber during tests based on the two millisecond test facility. The measured steady pressure in the arc chamber was 4559 psi, which is two times greater than maximum total pressure obtainable in conventional arc heaters.

  19. High-resolution, high-pressure NMR studies of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, J; Ballard, L; Nash, D

    1998-01-01

    Advanced high-resolution NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional NMR techniques, combined with high pressure capability, represents a powerful new tool in the study of proteins. This contribution is organized in the following way. First, the specialized instrumentation needed for high-pressure NMR experiments is discussed, with specific emphasis on the design features and performance characteristics of a high-sensitivity, high-resolution, variable-temperature NMR probe operating at 500 MHz and at pressures of up to 500 MPa. An overview of several recent studies using 1D and 2D high-resolution, high-pressure NMR spectroscopy to investigate the pressure-induced reversible unfolding and pressure-assisted cold denaturation of lysozyme, ribonuclease A, and ubiquitin is presented. Specifically, the relationship between the residual secondary structure of pressure-assisted, cold-denatured states and the structure of early folding intermediates is discussed. PMID:9649405

  20. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  1. High-pressure minerals in shocked meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomioka, Naotaka; Miyahara, Masaaki

    2017-09-01

    Heavily shocked meteorites contain various types of high-pressure polymorphs of major minerals (olivine, pyroxene, feldspar, and quartz) and accessory minerals (chromite and Ca phosphate). These high-pressure minerals are micron to submicron sized and occur within and in the vicinity of shock-induced melt veins and melt pockets in chondrites and lunar, howardite-eucrite-diogenite (HED), and Martian meteorites. Their occurrence suggests two types of formation mechanisms (1) solid-state high-pressure transformation of the host-rock minerals into monomineralic polycrystalline aggregates, and (2) crystallization of chondritic or monomineralic melts under high pressure. Based on experimentally determined phase relations, their formation pressures are limited to the pressure range up to 25 GPa. Textural, crystallographic, and chemical characteristics of high-pressure minerals provide clues about the impact events of meteorite parent bodies, including their size and mutual collision velocities and about the mineralogy of deep planetary interiors. The aim of this article is to review and summarize the findings on natural high-pressure minerals in shocked meteorites that have been reported over the past 50 years.

  2. Combustion of liquid sprays at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, A. J.; Faeth, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    The combustion of pressure atomized fuel sprays in high pressure stagnant air was studied. Measurements were made of flame and spray boundaries at pressures in the range 0.1-9 MPa for methanol and n-pentane. At the higher test pressure levels, critical phenomena are important. The experiments are compared with theoretical predictions based on a locally homogeneous two-phase flow model. The theory correctly predicted the trends of the data, but underestimates flame and spray boundaries by 30-50 percent, indicating that slip is still important for the present experiments (Sauter mean diameters of 30 microns at atmospheric pressure under cold flow conditions). Since the sprays are shorter at high pressures, slip effects are still important even though the density ratio of the phases approach one another as the droplets heat up. The model indicates the presence of a region where condensed water is present within the spray and provides a convenient means of treating supercritical phenomena.

  3. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, T. C.; Morgan, J. P.; Marchant, N. J.; Bolton, S. M.

    A high precision pressure transducer system for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank is presented. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in a battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on-board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum fluorescent display.

  4. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    DOEpatents

    Piper, Thomas C.; Morgan, John P.; Marchant, Norman J.; Bolton, Steven M.

    1994-01-01

    A high precision pressure transducer system for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in an battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum florescent display.

  5. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    DOEpatents

    Piper, T.C.; Morgan, J.P.; Marchant, N.J.; Bolton, S.M.

    1994-04-26

    A high precision pressure transducer system is described for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in an battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum fluorescent display. 2 figures.

  6. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Radar: Measurements at High Latitudes and of Surface Freeze/Thaw State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Michael; Dunbar, Scott; Chen, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for a late 2014 launch date. The mission will use both active radar and passive radiometer instruments at L-Band in order to achieve the science objectives of measuring soil moisture and land surface freeze-thaw state. To achieve requirements for a wide swath at sufficiently high resolution for both active and passive channels, an instrument architecture that uses a large rotating reflector is employed. In this paper, focus will be placed on the radar design. The radar will employ synthetic-aperture processing to achieve a "moderate" resolution dual-pol product over a 1000 km swath. Because the radar is operating continuously, very frequent temporal coverage will be achieved at high latitudes. This data will be used to produce a surface freeze/thaw state data product.

  7. High-pressure mechanical instability in rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.D.; Brace, W.F.

    1969-01-01

    At a confining pressure of a few kilobars, deformation of many sedimentary rocks, altered mafic rocks, porous volcanic rocks, and sand is ductile, in that instabilities leading to audible elastic shocks are absent. At pressures of 7 to 10 kilobars, however, unstable faulting and stick-slip in certain of these rocks was observed. This high pressure-low temperature instability might be responsible for earthquakes in deeply buried sedimentary or volcanic sequences.

  8. High-pressure cryogenic seals for pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buggle, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    Problems associated with maintaining high pressures at cryogenic temperatures in pressure vessels are investigated. The goals were to identify the appropriate materials and design for a seal intended for cryogenic applications at pressures up to 4,080 bars (60,000 psi), and to examine the factors affecting the seal performance. The method employed and the apparatus used in a series of experimental seal system tests, and the test results are described in detail. It is concluded that the common seal designs and extrusion seal-ring materials such as Teflon, tin, and lead are not suitable. However, new seal systems developed using indium seal rings, brass or 304 stainless steel anvil rings, and two 0-rings of silicone rubber or Kel-F did prove suitable.

  9. Carbon in iron phases under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Skorodumova, N. V.; Belonoshko, A. B.; Johansson, B.; Ahuja, R.

    2005-11-01

    The influence of carbon impurities on the properties of iron phases (bcc, hcp, dhcp, fcc) has been studied using the first-principles projector augmented-wave (PAW) method for a wide pressure range. It is shown that the presence of ~6 at. % of interstitial carbon has a little effect on the calculated structural sequence of the iron phases under high pressure. The bcc -> hcp transition both for pure iron and iron containing carbon takes place around 9 GPa. According to the enthalpies comparison, the solubility of carbon into the iron solid is decreased by high pressure. The coexistence of iron carbide (Fe3C) + pure hcp Fe is most stable phase at high pressure compared with other phases. Based on the analysis of the pressure-density dependences for Fe3C and hcp Fe, we suggest that there might be some fraction of iron carbide present in the core.

  10. High Pressure Solution Kinetics of Metal Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suvachittanont, Surapong

    1983-01-01

    Describes use of activation volumes derived from the effect of pressure reaction rates in aiding the understanding of reaction mechanism. Topics discussed include determination and interpretation of activation volumes, high pressure equipment/techniques, and application of activation volumes in mechanistic elucidation of several inorganic…

  11. High Pressure Solution Kinetics of Metal Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suvachittanont, Surapong

    1983-01-01

    Describes use of activation volumes derived from the effect of pressure reaction rates in aiding the understanding of reaction mechanism. Topics discussed include determination and interpretation of activation volumes, high pressure equipment/techniques, and application of activation volumes in mechanistic elucidation of several inorganic…

  12. How Is High Blood Pressure Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... secondary high blood pressure, he or she will work to treat the other condition or change the medicine suspected of causing your ... when the medications they are taking do not work well for them or another medical condition is leading to uncontrolled blood pressure. Health care ...

  13. High gas pressure effects on yeast.

    PubMed

    Espinasse, V; Perrier-Cornet, J-M; Marecat, A; Gervais, P

    2008-11-01

    Dried microorganisms are particularly resistant to high hydrostatic pressure effects. However, exposure to high pressures of nitrogen proved to be effective in inactivating dried yeasts. In this study, we tried to elucidate this mechanism on Saccharomyces cerevisiae. High-pressure treatments were performed using different inert gases at 150 MPa and 25 degrees C with holding time values up to 12 months. The influence of cell hydration was also investigated. For fully hydrated cells, pressurized gases had little specific effect: cell inactivation was mainly due to compression effects. However, dried cells were sensitive to high pressure of gases. In this latter case, two inactivation kinetics were observed. For holding time up to 1 h, the inactivation rate increased to 4 log and was linked to a loss of membrane integrity and the presence of damage on the cell wall. In such case cell inactivation would be due to gas sorption and desorption phenomena which would rupture dried cells during a fast pressure release. Gas sorption would occur in cell lipid phases. For longer holding times, the inactivation rate increased more slightly due to compression effects and/or to a slower gas sorption. Water therefore played a key role in cell sensitivity to fast gas pressure release. Two hypotheses were proposed to explain this phenomenon: the rigidity of vitrified dried cells and the presence of glassy solid phases which would favor intracellular gas expansion. Our results showed that dried microorganisms can be ruptured and inactivated by a fast pressure release with gases.

  14. Small, high-pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.; Sutton, R.

    1977-01-01

    A high pressure, liquid hydrogen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested to a maximum speed of 9739 rad/s and a maximum pump discharge pressure of 2861 N/sq. cm. The approaches used in the analysis and design of the turbopump are described, and fabrication methods are discussed. Data obtained from gas generator tests, turbine performance calibration, and turbopump testing are presented.

  15. Thermophysical properties of parahydrogen from the freezing liquid line to 5000 R for pressures to 10000 psia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, R. D.; Weber, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    The tables include entropy, enthalpy, internal energy, density, volume, speed of sound, specific heat, thermal conductivity, viscosity, thermal diffusivity, Prandtl number, and the dielectric constant for 65 isobars. Quantities of special utility in heat transfer and thermodynamic calculations are also included in the isobaric tables. In addition to the isobaric tables, tables for the saturated vapor and liquid are given, which include all of the above properties, plus the surface tension. Tables for the P-T of the freezing liquid, index of refraction, and the derived Joule-Thomson inversion curve are also presented.

  16. High pressure study of acetophenone azine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X. D.; Ding, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. M.

    2009-02-01

    High pressure Raman spectra of acetophenone azine (APA) have been measured up to 17.7 GPa with a diamond anvil cell. Two crystalline-to-crystalline phase transformations are found at pressures about 3.6 and 5.8 GPa. A disappearance of external modes and the C-H vibration at pressures higher than 8.7 GPa suggests that the sample undergoes a phase transition to amorphous or orientationally disordered (plastic) state, and the amorphization was completed at about 12.1 GPa. The disordered state is unstable and, then, a polymerization transformation reaction occurs with a further pressure increase. After the pressure has been released, the polymerization state can remain at the ambient condition, indicating that the virgin crystalline state is not recovered. The results show that the phenomenon underlying the pressure induced phase transition of APA may involve profound changes in the coordination environments of the symmetric aromatic azine.

  17. Raman Study of SWNT Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswaran, U.; Rao, A. M.; Richter, E.; Eklund, P. C.; Smalley, R. E.

    1998-03-01

    A gasketed Merrill-Bassett-type diamond anvil cell was used for high pressure Raman measurements at room temperature. A 4:1 methanol-ethanol mixture served as the pressure transmitting medium. The radial mode (denoted as R, occuring at 186 cm-1 at 1 bar) and tangential modes (designated T_1, T_2, and T_3, located, respectively, at 1550, 1567, and 1593 cm-1 at 1 bar) were recorded for several representative pressures. With increasing pressure, both the R and T modes shift to higher frequencies with gradual weakening of intensity and broadening of linewidth. The radial mode disappears around ~ 2 GPa whereas the tangential modes, albeit weak in intensity, persist until 5.2 GPa. The decrease in Raman intensity under pressure can be attributed to a loss of resonance, since the strong Raman signals observed at ambient pressure have been interpreted as due a resonance with the electronic bands [1]. The R and T mode frequencies are fit to quadratic function of pressure i.e., ω=ω(0)+aP+bP^2 where `a' represents the linear pressure shift of the mode frequency which is proportional to the mode Gruneisen parameter. The linear pressure coefficient for the R mode is found to be nearly twice that of the high frequency T mode. A. M. Rao et al., Science 275, 187, 1997

  18. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.

    2015-03-24

    The work concentrates on few important tasks in enabling techniques for search of superconducting compressed hydrogen compounds and pure hydrogen, investigation of mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity, and exploring new superconducting materials. Along that route we performed several challenging tasks, including discovery of new forms of polyhydrides of alkali metal Na at very high pressures. These experiments help us to establish the experimental environment that will provide important information on the high-pressure properties of hydrogen-rich compounds. Our recent progress in RIXS measurements opens a whole field of strongly correlated 3d materials. We have developed a systematic approach to measure major electronic parameters, like Hubbard energy U, and charge transfer energy Δ, as function of pressure. This technique will enable also RIXS studies of magnetic excitations in iridates and other 5d materials at the L edge, which attract a lot of interest recently. We have developed new magnetic sensing technique based on optically detected magnetic resonance from NV centers in diamond. The technique can be applied to study superconductivity in high-TC materials, to search for magnetic transitions in strongly correlated and itinerant magnetic materials under pressure. Summary of Project Activities; development of high-pressure experimentation platform for exploration of new potential superconductors, metal polyhydrides (including newly discovered alkali metal polyhydrides), and already known superconductors at the limit of static high-pressure techniques; investigation of special classes of superconducting compounds (high-Tc superconductors, new superconducting materials), that may provide new fundamental knowledge and may prove important for application as high-temperature/high-critical parameter superconductors; investigation of the pressure dependence of superconductivity and magnetic/phase transformations in 3d transition metal compounds, including

  19. Design, Implementation, Simulation, and Visualization of a Highly Efficient RIM Microfluidic Mixer for Rapid Freeze-Quench of Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bryan; Mahmud, Goher; Soh, Siowling; Kim, Sun Hee; Page, Taylor; O’Halloran, Thomas V.; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.; Hoffman, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid freeze-quench (RFQ) trapping of short-lived reaction intermediates for spectroscopic study plays an important role in the characterization of biological reactions. Recently there has been considerable effort to achieve submillisecond reaction deadtimes. We present here a new, robust, high-velocity microfluidic mixer that enables such rapid freeze-quenching. It is a based on the mixing method of two impinging jets commonly used in reaction injection molding (RIM) of plastics. This method achieves efficient mixing by inducing chaotic flow at relatively low Reynolds numbers (Re =140). We present the first mathematical simulation and microscopic visualization of mixing in such RFQ micromixers, the results of which show that the impinging solutions efficiently mix within the mixing chamber. These tests, along with a practical demonstration in a RFQ setup that involves copper wheels, show this new mixer can in practice provide reaction deadtimes as low as 100 microseconds. PMID:22180701

  20. Design, Implementation, Simulation, and Visualization of a Highly Efficient RIM Microfluidic Mixer for Rapid Freeze-Quench of Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Bryan; Mahmud, Goher; Soh, Siowling; Kim, Sun Hee; Page, Taylor; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Grzybowski, Bartosz A; Hoffman, Brian M

    2011-02-11

    Rapid freeze-quench (RFQ) trapping of short-lived reaction intermediates for spectroscopic study plays an important role in the characterization of biological reactions. Recently there has been considerable effort to achieve submillisecond reaction deadtimes. We present here a new, robust, high-velocity microfluidic mixer that enables such rapid freeze-quenching. It is a based on the mixing method of two impinging jets commonly used in reaction injection molding (RIM) of plastics. This method achieves efficient mixing by inducing chaotic flow at relatively low Reynolds numbers (Re =140). We present the first mathematical simulation and microscopic visualization of mixing in such RFQ micromixers, the results of which show that the impinging solutions efficiently mix within the mixing chamber. These tests, along with a practical demonstration in a RFQ setup that involves copper wheels, show this new mixer can in practice provide reaction deadtimes as low as 100 microseconds.

  1. Raman spectroscopy of triolein under high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tefelski, D. B.; Jastrzębski, C.; Wierzbicki, M.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Rostocki, A. J.; Wieja, K.; Kościesza, R.

    2010-03-01

    This article presents results of the high pressure Raman spectroscopy of triolein. Triolein, a triacylglyceride (TAG) of oleic acid, is an unsaturated fat, present in natural oils such as olive oil. As a basic food component and an energy storage molecule, it has considerable importance for food and fuel industries. To generate pressure in the experiment, we used a high-pressure cylindrical chamber with sapphire windows, presented in (R.M. Siegoczyński, R. Kościesza, D.B. Tefelski, and A. Kos, Molecular collapse - modification of the liquid structure induced by pressure in oleic acid, High Press. Res. 29 (2009), pp. 61-66). Pressure up to 750 MPa was applied. A Raman spectrometer in "macro"-configuration was employed. Raman spectroscopy provides information on changes of vibrational modes related to structural changes of triolein under pressure. Interesting changes in the triglyceride C‒H stretching region at 2650-3100 cm-1 were observed under high-pressures. Changes were also observed in the ester carbonyl (C˭ O) stretching region 1700-1780 cm-1 and the C‒C stretching region at 1050-1150 cm-1. The overall luminescence of the sample decreased under pressure, making it possible to set longer spectrum acquisition time and obtain more details of the spectrum. The registered changes suggest that the high-pressure solid phase of triolein is organized as β-polymorphic, as was reported in (C. Akita, T. Kawaguchi, and F. Kaneko, Structural study on polymorphism of cis-unsaturated triacylglycerol: Triolein, J. Phys. Chem. B 110 (2006), pp. 4346-4353; E. Da Silva and D. Rousseau, Molecular order and thermodynamics of the solid-liquid transition in triglycerides via Raman spectroscopy, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10 (2008), pp. 4606-4613) (with temperature-induced phase transitions). The research has shown that Raman spectroscopy in TAGs under pressure reveals useful information about its structural changes.

  2. On estimating freezing times during tissue rapid freezing.

    PubMed

    Jones, G J

    1984-12-01

    For the study of morphological changes that are associated with fast physiological processes, it is important to know the times at which the surface regions of specimens are frozen during rapid freezing. A simple physical model has been used to estimate the freezing times and the cooling rates at 10 micron depths in specimens. The calculations indicate that cooling rates in excess of 4 X 10(4) K s-1 are associated with freezing times of less than 0.5 ms. Using the same model, experimental measurements of freezing times at much larger depths have been extrapolated to a depth of 10 micron, the times obtained are 0.1-0.6 ms for freezing by rapid immersion in cryogenic liquids, and 0.1 ms or less for freezing on a metal block. It is concluded that the delay time between contact with a cryogenic source and specimen freezing is less than 0.5 ms. The uncertainty in the time of freezing may be larger than this, because of an uncertainty of about +/- 0.5 ms in determining the exact time of contact and, for freeze fracture studies, because of an uncertainty of up to 0.5 ms due to imprecision in the depth of fracture. At the same time it is estimated that the time during which freezing takes place may be as high as 250 microseconds, which can be taken as an upper limit for the resolution time for rapid freezing.

  3. High concentration of phosphorus is a distinctive feature of myelin. An X-ray elemental microanalysis study using freeze-fracture scanning electron microscopy of rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Maria João; Águas, Artur P

    2015-07-01

    We have used rat sciatic nerves submitted to freezing and freeze-fracture to determine the elemental composition of small domains of the peripheral nerve studied at high resolution by scanning electron microscopy. We found that myelin of Schwann cells is unique in its high content in phosphorus (P) that was more than 10 times higher than P measured in any other cells. This high concentration in P makes myelin chemistry suitable of monitoring at the subcellular level using the herein described methodology.

  4. Preeclampsia and High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... thrombophilia , or lupus • are obese •had in vitro fertilization What are the risks for my baby if ... blood cells. Hypertension: High blood pressure. In Vitro Fertilization: A procedure in which an egg is removed ...

  5. Design of high pressure waterjet nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazzoleni, Andre P.

    1994-01-01

    The Hydroblast Research Cell at Marshall Space Flight Center is used to investigate the use of high pressure waterjets to strip paint, grease, adhesive and thermal spray coatings from various substrates. Current methods of cleaning often use ozone depleting chemicals (ODC) such as chlorinated solvents. High pressure waterjet cleaning has proven to be a viable alternative to the use of solvents. A popular method of waterjet cleaning involves the use of a rotating, multijet, high pressure water nozzle which is robotically controlled. This method enables rapid cleaning of a large area, but problems such as incomplete coverage and damage to the substrate from the waterjet have been observed. This report summarizes research consisting of identifying and investigating the basic properties of rotating, multijet, high pressure water nozzles, and how particular designs and modes of operation affect such things as stripping rate, standoff distance and completeness of coverage. The study involved computer simulations, an extensive literature review, and experimental studies of different nozzle designs.

  6. Preeclampsia and High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... mellitus , thrombophilia , or lupus • are obese •had in vitro fertilization What are the risks for my baby if ... red blood cells. Hypertension: High blood pressure. In Vitro Fertilization: A procedure in which an egg is removed ...

  7. High Pressure Waterjet Cutting Industrial Needs Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-25

    Report No. LO High Pressure Waterjet Cutting Industrial Needs Survey N Contract Number N00140-88-C-RC21 I John Klavuhn and Bruce Baker Metalworking...NO. NO ACCESSION NO. Washington, DC 20360-5100 1I TITLE (Include Security Classification) High Pressure Waterjet Cutting Industrial Needs Survey 12...block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP FIELD__ GROUP____UB-GROUP Waterjet cutting , abrasive waterjet cutting ’. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if

  8. Ultra High Pressure (UHP) Technology (BRIEFING SLIDES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-25

    AFRL-RX-TY-TP-2008-4600 POSTPRINT ULTRA HIGH PRESSURE ( UHP ) TECHNOLOGY (BRIEFING SLIDES) Patrick D. Sullivan Air Force Research...Since the discovery of the unprecedented effectiveness of 1500 psi Ultra High Pressure ( UHP ) technology in September of 2002 , AFRL scientists and... engineers have sought to increase Aircraft Rescue Fire Fighting (ARFF) performance by moving to higher flow rates to obtain greater throw distance and

  9. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Harkins, B.D.; Ward, M.E.

    1998-09-22

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 5 figs.

  10. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Harkins, Bruce D.; Ward, Michael E.

    1998-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  11. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Harkins, Bruce D.; Ward, Michael E.

    1999-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the reinforcing member and having a strengthening member wrapped around the refractory material. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  12. Elasticity of orthoenstatite at high-pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Chen, B.; Zhao, J.; Yan, J.

    2011-12-01

    Orthoenstatite is an abundant yet complex mineral in Earth's upper mantle. Despite its abundance, the properties of orthopyroxene at high pressure remain ambiguous (e.g., Zhang et al. 2011; Jahn 2008; Kung et al. 2004). We explored select properties of a synthetic powdered orthoenstatite (Mg0.8757Fe0.13)2Si2O6 sample by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nuclear resonance inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) as a function of pressure in a neon pressure medium at 300 K. The XRD measurements were carried out at beamline 12.2.2 of the Advanced Light Source (Berkeley, CA), and the sample was studied up to 34 GPa. NRIXS measurements were carried out at sector 3ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source (Chicago, IL) in the pressure range of 3 to 17 GPa. From the raw NRIXS data, the partial phonon density of states (DOS) was derived (e.g., Sturhahn 2004). The volume (or pressure) dependence of several properties, such as the Lamb-Mössbauer factor, mean force constant, specific heat, vibrational entropy, and vibrational kinetic energy were determined from the DOS. We will discuss our results from these combined studies and the implications for Earth's upper mantle. References Zhang, D., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and Y. Xiao (2011): Local structure variations observed in orthoenstatite at high-pressures. American Mineralogist, in press. Jahn, S. (2008) High-pressure phase transitions in MgSiO3 orthoenstatite studied by atomistic computer simulation. American Mineralogist, 93(4), 528-532. Kung, J., Li, B., Uchida, T., Wang, Y., Neuville, D., and Liebermann, R. (2004) In situ measurements of sound velocities and densities across the orthopyroxene high-pressure clinopyroxene transition in MgSiO3 at high pressure. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 147(1), 27-44. Sturhahn, W. (2004): Nuclear Resonant Spectroscopy. J. Phys. Condens. Matter, 16, S497-S530.

  13. High pressure optical combustion probe

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, S.D.; Richards, G.A.

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center has developed a combustion probe for monitoring flame presence and heat release. The technology involved is a compact optical detector of the OH radical`s UV fluorescence. The OH Monitor/Probe is designed to determine the flame presence and provide a qualitative signal proportional to the flame intensity. The probe can be adjusted to monitor a specific volume in the combustion zone to track spatial fluctuations in the flame. The probe is capable of nanosecond time response and is usually slowed electronically to fit the flame characteristics. The probe is a sapphire rod in a stainless steel tube which may be inserted into the combustion chamber and pointed at the flame zone. The end of the sapphire rod is retracted into the SS tube to define a narrow optical collection cone. The collection cone may be adjusted to fit the experiment. The fluorescence signal is collected by the sapphire rod and transmitted through a UV transmitting, fused silica, fiber optic to the detector assembly. The detector is a side window photomultiplier (PMT) with a 310 run line filter. A Hamamatsu photomultiplier base combined with a integral high voltage power supply permits this to be a low voltage device. Electronic connections include: a power lead from a modular DC power supply for 15 VDC; a control lead for 0-1 volts to control the high voltage level (and therefore gain); and a lead out for the actual signal. All low voltage connections make this a safe and easy to use device while still delivering the sensitivity required.

  14. Correction for solute/solvent interaction extends accurate freezing point depression theory to high concentration range.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, G D; Keener, C R; Cameron, I L

    1994-12-01

    The authors describe empirical corrections to ideally dilute expressions for freezing point depression of aqueous solutions to arrive at new expressions accurate up to three molal concentration. The method assumes non-ideality is due primarily to solute/solvent interactions such that the correct free water mass Mwc is the mass of water in solution Mw minus I.M(s) where M(s) is the mass of solute and I an empirical solute/solvent interaction coefficient. The interaction coefficient is easily derived from the constant in the linear regression fit to the experimental plot of Mw/M(s) as a function of 1/delta T (inverse freezing point depression). The I-value, when substituted into the new thermodynamic expressions derived from the assumption of equivalent activity of water in solution and ice, provides accurate predictions of freezing point depression (+/- 0.05 degrees C) up to 2.5 molal concentration for all the test molecules evaluated; glucose, sucrose, glycerol and ethylene glycol. The concentration limit is the approximate monolayer water coverage limit for the solutes which suggests that direct solute/solute interactions are negligible below this limit. This is contrary to the view of many authors due to the common practice of including hydration forces (a soft potential added to the hard core atomic potential) in the interaction potential between solute particles. When this is recognized the two viewpoints are in fundamental agreement.

  15. Systematics of kinetic freeze-out properties in high energy collisions from STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Lokesh

    2014-11-01

    The main aim of the RHIC Beam Energy Scan (BES) program is to explore the QCD phase diagram which includes search for a possible QCD critical point and the phase boundary between QGP and hadronic phase. We report the collision energy and centrality dependence of kinetic freeze-out properties from the measured mid-rapidity (| y | < 0.1) light hadrons (pions, kaons, protons and their anti-particles) for Au + Au collisions at the center-of-mass energy √{sNN} = 7.7 , 11.5 , 19.6 , 27 , and 39 GeV. The STAR detector, with a large uniform acceptance and excellent particle identification is used in the data collection and analysis. The kinetic freeze-out temperature Tkin and average collective velocity < β > parameters are extracted from blast-wave fits to the identified hadron spectra and systematically compared with the results from other collision energies including those at AGS, SPS and LHC. It is found that all results fall into an anti-correlation band in the 2-dimensional (Tkin, < β >) distribution: the largest value of collective velocity and lowest temperature is reached in the most central collisions at the highest collision energy. The energy dependence of these freeze-out parameters is discussed.

  16. Raman scattering spectroscopic study of n-pentane under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Erwei; Zheng, Haifei

    2005-05-01

    The Raman spectroscopy of n-pentane was investigated in a Moissanite anvil cell from 0.07 GPa to 4.77 GPa at ambient temperature. The result shows that the CH3 symmetric stretching vibration (2877 cm(-1)) and asymmetric stretching vibration (2964 cm(-1)), the CH2 symmetric stretching vibration (2856 cm(-1)) and asymmetric stretching vibration (2935 cm(-1)), and -(CH2)n- in-phase twist mode (1303 cm(-1)) shifted to higher wavenumbers almost linearly with increasing pressure. Around 2.4 GPa an abrupt visible change took place, indicating a sort of phenomenon of freezing due to over-pressurization. In the pressure range of 2.84 to 4.77 GPa a high-pressure phase transition may occur in the crystallized n-pentane. By determining pressure with the method of solid-liquid coexistence, we concluded that the equilibrium freezing pressure of n-pentane is 1.90 +/- 0.05 GPa at 27 degrees C.

  17. Endocrine and metabolic function in male Carioca High-conditioned Freezing rats.

    PubMed

    Mousovich-Neto, F; Lourenço, A L; Landeira-Fernandez, J; Corrêa da Costa, V M

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize Carioca High-conditioned Freezing rats (CHF) regarding their endocrine and metabolic backgrounds. We found an increase in serum corticosterone (CTRL: 96.7 ± 21.65 vs CHF: 292.0 ± 4 0.71 ng/ml) and leptin (CTRL: 9.5 ± 1.51 vs CHF: 19.2 ± 4.32 ng/ml). Serum testosterone (CTRL: 3.3 ± 0.29 vs CHF: 2.0 ± 0.28 ng/ml) and T3 (CTRL: 52.4 ± 2.74 vs CHF: 42.7 ± 2.94 ng/dl) were decreased in the CHF group, but serum TSH and T4 were unaffected. Body weight and food intake were unchanged, nevertheless retroperitoneal fat (CTRL: 2.2 ± 0.24 vs CHF: 4.8 ± 0.64 g) and epididymal fat (CTRL: 2.6 ± 0.20 vs CHF: 4.8 ± 0.37 g) depot weights were around 2-fold higher in CHF animals. BAT weight was similar in both groups. Serum triglycerides (CTRL: 41.4 ± 6.03 vs CHF: 83.2 ± 17.09 mg/dl) and total cholesterol (CTRL: 181.6 ± 5.61 vs CHF: 226.4 ± 13.04 mg/dl) were higher in the CHF group. Fasting glycemia (CTRL: 68.7 ± 3.04 vs CHF: 82.3 ± 2.99 mg/dl) was also higher in the CHF group, however glucose tolerance test response and serum insulin levels were similar between the groups. Oxygen consumption (CTRL: 10.5 ± 0.40 vs CHF: 7.9 ± 0.58 VO2ml/min/kg(0.75)) and BAT D2 activity (CTRL: 0.7 ± 0.17 vs CHF: 0.3 ± 0.04 fmolT4/min/mg ptn) were lower in the CHF group. Our data show that anxiety could impair endocrine and metabolic functions and may contribute to the development of metabolic diseases.

  18. Freezing adhesion molecules in a state of high-avidity binding blocks eosinophil migration

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Leukocyte extravasation is mediated by multiple interactions of adhesive surface structures with ligands on endothelial cells and matrix components. The functional role of beta 1 (CD29) integrins (or very late antigen [VLA] proteins) in eosinophil migration across polycarbonate filters was examined under several in vitro conditions. Eosinophil migration induced by the chemoattractant C5a or platelet- activating factor was fully inhibited by monoclonal antibody (mAb) 8A2, a recently characterized "activating" CD29 mAb. However, inhibition by mAb 8A2 was observed only under filter conditions that best reflected the in vivo situation, i.e., when the eosinophils migrated over filters preincubated with the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibronectin (FN), or when the filters were covered with confluent monolayers of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). When bare untreated filters were used, mAb 8A2 had no effect, whereas the C5a- directed movement was prevented by CD18 mAb. Studies with alpha-subunit (CD49)-specific mAbs indicated that the integrins VLA-4 and -5 mediated migration across FN-preincubated filters, and VLA-2, -4, -5, and -6 were involved in eosinophil migration through filters covered with HUVEC. In contrast with the activating CD29 mAb 8A2, a combination of blocking CD49 mAbs or the nonactivating but blocking CD29 mAb AIIB2 failed to inhibit completely eosinophil migration over FN-preincubated or HUVEC-covered filters. mAb 8A2 stimulated binding to FN but not to HUVEC. Moreover, eosinophil migration over FN-preincubated or HUVEC- covered filters was significantly inhibited by anti-connecting segment 1 (CS-1) mAbs, as well as the soluble CS-1 peptide (unlike migration across bare untreated filters). Thus, inhibition of eosinophil migration by mAb 8A2 depended upon the presence of ECM proteins and not upon the presence of HUVEC per se. In conclusion, "freezing" adhesion receptors of the beta 1 integrin family into their high

  19. Structural behaviour of YGa under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Sekar, M. Shekar, N. V. Chandra Sahu, P. Ch.; Babu, R.

    2014-04-24

    High pressure X-ray diffraction studies on rare-earth gallide YGa was carried up to a pressure of ∼ 33 GPa using rotating anode x-ray source in an angle dispersive mode. YGa exhibits CrB (B33) type orthorhombic structure (space group Cmcm) at ambient pressure. It undergoes a reversible structural phase transition from orthorhombic to tetragonal structure at ∼ 8.8 GPa. Both the phases coexist up to the highest pressure studied. The zero pressure bulk modulus and its derivative for parent phase have been estimated to be B{sub o} = 60 ± 3 GPa, B{sub o}' = 4.6 ± 1.5.

  20. Pressure sensor for high-temperature liquids

    DOEpatents

    Forster, George A.

    1978-01-01

    A pressure sensor for use in measuring pressures in liquid at high temperatures, especially such as liquid sodium or liquid potassium, comprises a soft diaphragm in contact with the liquid. The soft diaphragm is coupled mechanically to a stiff diaphragm. Pressure is measured by measuring the displacment of both diaphragms, typically by measuring the capacitance between the stiff diaphragm and a fixed plate when the stiff diaphragm is deflected in response to the measured pressure through mechanical coupling from the soft diaphragm. Absolute calibration is achieved by admitting gas under pressure to the region between diaphragms and to the region between the stiff diaphragm and the fixed plate, breaking the coupling between the soft and stiff diaphragms. The apparatus can be calibrated rapidly and absolutely.

  1. Fluid hydrogen at high density - Pressure ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, Didier; Chabrier, Gilles

    1992-01-01

    The Helmholtz-free-energy model for nonideal mixtures of hydrogen atoms and molecules by Saumon and Chabrier (1991) is extended to describe dissociation and ionization in similar mixtures in chemical equilibrium. A free-energy model is given that describes partial ionization in the pressure and temperature ionization region. The plasma-phase transition predicted by the model is described for hydrogen mixtures including such components as H2, H, H(+), and e(-). The plasma-phase transition has a critical point at Tc = 15,300 K and Pc = 0.614 Mbar, and thermodynamic instability is noted in the pressure-ionization regime. The pressure dissociation and ionization of fluid hydrogen are described well with the model yielding information on the nature of the plasma-phase transition. The model is shown to be valuable for studying dissociation and ionization in astrophysical objects and in high-pressure studies where pressure and temperature effects are significant.

  2. Sample injector for high pressure liquid chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.; Neyer, David W.

    2001-01-01

    Apparatus and method for driving a sample, having a well-defined volume, under pressure into a chromatography column. A conventional high pressure sampling valve is replaced by a sample injector composed of a pair of injector components connected in series to a common junction. The injector components are containers of porous dielectric material constructed so as to provide for electroosmotic flow of a sample into the junction. At an appropriate time, a pressure pulse from a high pressure source, that can be an electrokinetic pump, connected to the common junction, drives a portion of the sample, whose size is determined by the dead volume of the common junction, into the chromatographic column for subsequent separation and analysis. The apparatus can be fabricated on a substrate for microanalytical applications.

  3. High pressure studies of potassium perchlorate

    DOE PAGES

    Pravica, Michael; Wang, Yonggang; Sneed, Daniel; ...

    2016-07-29

    Two experiments are reported on KClO4 at extreme conditions. A static high pressure Raman study was first conducted to 18.9 GPa. Evidence for at least two new phases was observed: one between 2.4 and 7.7 GPa (possibly sluggish), and the second near 11.7 GPa. Then, the X-ray induced decomposition rate of potassium perchlorate (KClO4 hv→ KCl + 2O2) was studied up to 15.2 GPa. The time-dependent growth of KCl and O2 was monitored. The decomposition rate slowed at higher pressures. As a result, we present the first direct evidence for O2 crystallization at higher pressures, demonstrating that O2 molecules aggregatemore » at high pressure.« less

  4. High pressure studies of potassium perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Wang, Yonggang; Sneed, Daniel; Reiser, Sharissa; White, Melanie

    2016-07-29

    Two experiments are reported on KClO4 at extreme conditions. A static high pressure Raman study was first conducted to 18.9 GPa. Evidence for at least two new phases was observed: one between 2.4 and 7.7 GPa (possibly sluggish), and the second near 11.7 GPa. Then, the X-ray induced decomposition rate of potassium perchlorate (KClO4 hv→ KCl + 2O2) was studied up to 15.2 GPa. The time-dependent growth of KCl and O2 was monitored. The decomposition rate slowed at higher pressures. As a result, we present the first direct evidence for O2 crystallization at higher pressures, demonstrating that O2 molecules aggregate at high pressure.

  5. Polymerization of formic acid under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A.F.; Manaa, M.R.; Zaug, J.M.; Gee, R.H.; Fried, L.E.; Montgomery, W.B.

    2010-07-19

    We report Raman, infrared, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, along with ab initio calculations on formic acid (FA) under pressure up to 50 GPa. We find an infinite chain Pna2{sub 1} structure to be a high-pressure phase at room temperature. Our data indicate the symmetrization and a partially covalent character of the intrachain hydrogen bonds above approximately 20 GPa. Raman spectra and XRD patterns indicate a loss of long-range order at pressures above 40 GPa, with a large hysteresis upon decompression. We attribute this behavior to a three-dimensional polymerization of FA.

  6. Efficient High-Pressure State Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, Kenneth G.; Miller, Richard S.; Bellan, Josette

    1997-01-01

    A method is presented for a relatively accurate, noniterative, computationally efficient calculation of high-pressure fluid-mixture equations of state, especially targeted to gas turbines and rocket engines. Pressures above I bar and temperatures above 100 K are addressed The method is based on curve fitting an effective reference state relative to departure functions formed using the Peng-Robinson cubic state equation Fit parameters for H2, O2, N2, propane, methane, n-heptane, and methanol are given.

  7. High pressure oxygen utilization by NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belles, F. E.

    1973-01-01

    Although NASA is not one of the country's major oxygen consumers, it uses oxygen under severe conditions including very high flow rates and pressure. Materials for such applications must be carefully selected for compatibility, because susceptibility to ignition increases as operating pressure is raised. Much work is needed, however to define the selection criteria. Some of the work in this area that is being performed under sponsorship of NASA's Aerospace Safety Research and Data Institute (ASRDI) is described.

  8. Efficient High-Pressure State Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, Kenneth G.; Miller, Richard S.; Bellan, Josette

    1997-01-01

    A method is presented for a relatively accurate, noniterative, computationally efficient calculation of high-pressure fluid-mixture equations of state, especially targeted to gas turbines and rocket engines. Pressures above I bar and temperatures above 100 K are addressed The method is based on curve fitting an effective reference state relative to departure functions formed using the Peng-Robinson cubic state equation Fit parameters for H2, O2, N2, propane, methane, n-heptane, and methanol are given.

  9. (High-pressure structural studies of promethium)

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, R.G.

    1988-11-15

    The primary object of the foreign travel was to carry out collaborative high-pressure structural studies at the European Institute for Transuranium Elements (EITU), Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany. These studies reestablished previous collaborative investigations by ORNL and EITU that have been very productive scientifically during the past few years. The study during the present travel period was limited to a structural study of promethium metal under pressure.

  10. High Temperature Dynamic Pressure Measurements Using Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Meredith, Roger D.; Chang, Clarence T.; Savrun, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Un-cooled, MEMS-based silicon carbide (SiC) static pressure sensors were used for the first time to measure pressure perturbations at temperatures as high as 600 C during laboratory characterization, and subsequently evaluated in a combustor rig operated under various engine conditions to extract the frequencies that are associated with thermoacoustic instabilities. One SiC sensor was placed directly in the flow stream of the combustor rig while a benchmark commercial water-cooled piezoceramic dynamic pressure transducer was co-located axially but kept some distance away from the hot flow stream. In the combustor rig test, the SiC sensor detected thermoacoustic instabilities across a range of engine operating conditions, amplitude magnitude as low as 0.5 psi at 585 C, in good agreement with the benchmark piezoceramic sensor. The SiC sensor experienced low signal to noise ratio at higher temperature, primarily due to the fact that it was a static sensor with low sensitivity.

  11. Effects of high pressure, subzero temperature, and pH on survival of Listeria monocytogenes in buffer and smoked salmon.

    PubMed

    Ritz, M; Jugiau, F; Federighi, M; Chapleau, N; de Lamballerie, M

    2008-08-01

    High pressure processing is a novel food preservation technology, applied for over 15 years in the food industry to inactivate spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms. Many studies have shown the differential resistance of bacterial cells to high pressure. Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterium able to grow at refrigerated temperature and to survive for a long time in minimally processed foods such as raw smoked fish. The freezing process does not cause significant decline of L. monocytogenes. The phase diagram of water under pressure permits a pressure treatment under subzero temperature, without the disadvantages of freezing for food quality. The aim of this study was to estimate if combined effects of pressure and subzero temperature could increase the destruction of L. monocytogenes in buffer and in smoked salmon. We investigated effects of high pressure processing (100, 150, and 200 MPa) combined with subzero temperatures (-10, -14, and -18 degrees C) and pH (7.0 and 4.5). Results showed that the most effective high-pressure treatment to inactivate L. monocytogenes was 200 MPa, -18 degrees C, and pH 4.5. The relevance of pressure holding time and the synergistic effect of pressure coupled with the subzero temperature to inactivate bacteria are highlighted. Modifications of physical properties (color and texture) were a lightening of color and an increase of toughness, which might be accepted by consumers, since safety is increased.

  12. Single Molecule Raman Spectroscopy Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuanxi; Dlott, Dana

    2014-06-01

    Pressure effects on surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra of Rhdoamine 6G adsorbed on silver nanoparticle surfaces was studied using a confocal Raman microscope. Colloidal silver nanoparticles were treated with Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and its isotopically substituted partner, R6G-d4. Mixed isotopomers let us identify single-molecule spectra, since multiple-molecule spectra would show vibrational transitions from both species. The nanoparticles were embedded into a poly vinyl alcohol film, and loaded into a diamond anvil cell for the high-pressure Raman scattering measurement. Argon was the pressure medium. Ambient pressure Raman scattering spectra showed few single-molecule spectra. At moderately high pressure ( 1GPa), a surprising effect was observed. The number of sites with observable spectra decreased dramatically, and most of the spectra that could be observed were due to single molecules. The effects of high pressure suppressed the multiple-molecule Raman sites, leaving only the single-molecule sites to be observed.

  13. Thermal Transport at Static High-Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pangilinan, G. I.; Ladouceur, H. D.; Russell, T. P.

    2000-03-01

    Static properties and dynamic processes at high pressures and high temperatures are critically dependent on thermal properties of materials. Measurements of thermal properties at high pressures have only slowly developed through the years. Here we present a novel method, utilizing gem anvil cells, to measure specific heat, thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity. The method involves launching a thermal wave in a sample. Subsequently, a localized sensor measures the temporal behavior of the temperature at a fixed point downstream in the material. A pulsed laser is used to deliver the heating pulse, while time-resolved fluorescence from a ruby sphere is used to measure the temperature. The thermal properties are inferred from the temporal behavior of the temperature and the heat conduction equations with appropriate boundary conditions. The thermal properties of table salt (NaCl) are obtained using this method. Impact to current and future high-pressure research, including materials science and geophysics will be addressed.

  14. A high-temperature wideband pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Progress in the development of a pressure transducer for measurement of the pressure fluctuations in the high temperature environment of a jet exhaust is reported. A condenser microphone carrier system was adapted to meet the specifications. A theoretical analysis is presented which describes the operation of the condenser microphone in terms of geometry, materials, and other physical properties. The analysis was used as the basis for design of a prototype high temperature microphone. The feasibility of connecting the microphone to a converter over a high temperature cable operating as a half-wavelength transmission line was also examined.

  15. Crystal structures at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Wendel Alexander

    2000-10-01

    The diamond anvil cell (DAC) is a unique instrument that can generate pressures equivalent to those inside planetary interiors (pressures on the order of 1 million atmospheres) under sustained conditions. When combined with a bright source of collimated x-rays, the DAC can be used to probe the structure of materials in-situ at ultra-high pressures. An understanding of the high-pressure structure of materials is important in determining what types of processes may take place in the Earth at great depths. Motivated by previous studies showing that xenon becomes metallic at pressures above ˜1 megabar (100 GPa), we examined the stable structures and reactivity of xenon at pressures approaching that of the core-mantle boundary in the Earth. Our findings indicate the transformation of xenon from face-centered cubic (fcc) to hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structures is kinetically hindered at room temperature, with the equilibrium fcc--hcp phase boundary at 21 (+/-3) gigapascals, a pressure lower than was previously thought. Additionally, we find no tendency on the part of xenon to form a metal alloy with iron or platinum to at least 100 to 150 gigapascals, making it unlikely that the Earth's core serves as a reservoir for primordial xenon. Measurements of the compressibility of natural (Mg.75,Fe .25)2SiO4 gamma-spinel at pressures of the Earth's transition zone yield a pressure derivative of the bulk modulus K0 ' = 6.3 (+/-0.3). As gamma-spinel is considered to be a dominant mineral phase of the transition-zone of the Earth's mantle (400--670 km depth), the relatively high value of K0' for gamma-spinel may help explain the rapid increase with depth of seismic velocities through the transition zone. The thermodynamics, mechanisms and kinetics of pressure-induced amorphization are not well understood. We report here new studies indicating little or no entropy difference between the crystalline and glassy states of Ca(OH) 2 (portlandite). Additional work on the pressure

  16. High pressure, high current, low inductance, high reliability sealed terminals

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN; McKeever, John W [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-03-23

    The invention is a terminal assembly having a casing with at least one delivery tapered-cone conductor and at least one return tapered-cone conductor routed there-through. The delivery and return tapered-cone conductors are electrically isolated from each other and positioned in the annuluses of ordered concentric cones at an off-normal angle. The tapered cone conductor service can be AC phase conductors and DC link conductors. The center core has at least one service conduit of gate signal leads, diagnostic signal wires, and refrigerant tubing routed there-through. A seal material is in direct contact with the casing inner surface, the tapered-cone conductors, and the service conduits thereby hermetically filling the interstitial space in the casing interior core and center core. The assembly provides simultaneous high-current, high-pressure, low-inductance, and high-reliability service.

  17. Estimation of high-resolution near-surface freeze/thaw state by the integration of microwave and thermal infrared remote sensing data on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tianjie; Shi, Jiancheng; Hu, Tongxi; Zhao, Lin; Zou, Defu; Wang, Tianxing; Ji, Dabin; Li, Rui; Wang, Pingkai

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate how the complementarity between microwave and thermal infrared remote sensing can be exploited for a high-resolution near-surface freeze/thaw state estimation. The basic idea is to establish a feasible relationship between the microwave-derived freeze/thaw state and thermal infrared observations. A quantitative freeze/thaw index from microwave observations at 18.7 and 36.5 GHz is innovatively defined and is assumed to be linearly correlated with land surface temperature from thermal infrared observations. Thus, a linear regression method is proposed and verified to be effective over a multiscale network of Naqu of the Tibetan Plateau. In order to demonstrate the potentiality of the proposed method, it is implemented in the entire Tibetan Plateau. It is found that the linear relationship is quite reliable for most areas and can obtain a high-resolution near-surface soil freeze/thaw state with integrated information from microwave and thermal infrared remote sensing. The validation of the high-resolution freeze/thaw state against soil temperature measured at active layer monitoring sites along the Qinghai-Tibet Highway illustrates a moderate accuracy over a decade scale. This study provides new insights for high-resolution freeze/thaw mapping beyond the Soil Moisture Active Passive mission.

  18. High pressure and high temperature behaviour of ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Thakar, Nilesh A.; Bhatt, Apoorva D.; Pandya, Tushar C.

    2014-04-24

    The thermodynamic properties with the wurtzite (B4) and rocksalt (B1) phases of ZnO under high pressures and high temperatures have been investigated using Tait's Equation of state (EOS). The effects of pressures and temperatures on thermodynamic properties such as bulk modulus, thermal expansivity and thermal pressure are explored for both two structures. It is found that ZnO material gradually softens with increase of temperature while it hardens with the increment of the pressure. Our predicted results of thermodynamics properties for both the phases of ZnO are in overall agreement with the available data in the literature.

  19. Curved and conformal high-pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, Paul F.; Kuczek, Andrzej E.; Zhao, Wenping

    2016-10-25

    A high-pressure vessel is provided. The high-pressure vessel may comprise a first chamber defined at least partially by a first wall, and a second chamber defined at least partially by the first wall. The first chamber and the second chamber may form a curved contour of the high-pressure vessel. A modular tank assembly is also provided, and may comprise a first mid tube having a convex geometry. The first mid tube may be defined by a first inner wall, a curved wall extending from the first inner wall, and a second inner wall extending from the curved wall. The first inner wall may be disposed at an angle relative to the second inner wall. The first mid tube may further be defined by a short curved wall opposite the curved wall and extending from the second inner wall to the first inner wall.

  20. Fluid hydrogen at high density - Pressure dissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, Didier; Chabrier, Gilles

    1991-01-01

    A model for the Helmholtz free energy of fluid hydrogen at high density and high temperature is developed. This model aims at describing both pressure and temperature dissociation and ionization and bears directly on equations of state of partially ionized plasmas, as encountered in astrophysical situations and high-pressure experiments. This paper focuses on a mixture of hydrogen atoms and molecules and is devoted to the study of the phenomenon of pressure dissociation at finite temperatures. In the present model, the strong interactions are described with realistic potentials and are computed with a modified Weeks-Chandler-Andersen fluid perturbation theory that reproduces Monte Carlo simulations to better than 3 percent. Theoretical Hugoniot curves derived from the model are in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  1. Fluid hydrogen at high density - Pressure dissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, Didier; Chabrier, Gilles

    1991-01-01

    A model for the Helmholtz free energy of fluid hydrogen at high density and high temperature is developed. This model aims at describing both pressure and temperature dissociation and ionization and bears directly on equations of state of partially ionized plasmas, as encountered in astrophysical situations and high-pressure experiments. This paper focuses on a mixture of hydrogen atoms and molecules and is devoted to the study of the phenomenon of pressure dissociation at finite temperatures. In the present model, the strong interactions are described with realistic potentials and are computed with a modified Weeks-Chandler-Andersen fluid perturbation theory that reproduces Monte Carlo simulations to better than 3 percent. Theoretical Hugoniot curves derived from the model are in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  2. High pressure electrical insulated feed thru connector

    DOEpatents

    Oeschger, Joseph E.; Berkeland, James E.

    1979-11-13

    A feed-thru type hermetic electrical connector including at least one connector pin feeding through an insulator block within the metallic body of the connector shell. A compression stop arrangement coaxially disposed about the insulator body is brazed to the shell, and the shoulder on the insulator block bears against this top in a compression mode, the high pressure or internal connector being at the opposite end of the shell. Seals between the pin and an internal bore at the high pressure end of the insulator block and between the insulator block and the metallic shell at the high pressure end are hermetically brazed in place, the first of these also functioning to transfer the axial compressive load without permitting appreciable shear action between the pin and insulator block.

  3. High pressure chemistry of substituted acetylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Chellappa, Raja; Dattelbaum, Dana; Sheffield, Stephen; Robbins, David

    2011-01-25

    High pressure in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments were performed on substituted polyacetylenes: tert-butyl acetylene [TBA: (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}-C{triple_bond}CH] and ethynyl trimethylsilane [ETMS: (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}-Si{triple_bond}CH] to investigate pressure-induced chemical reactions. The starting samples were the low temperature crystalline phases which persisted metastably at room temperature and polymerized beyond 11 GPa and 26 GPa for TBA and ETMS respectively. These reaction onset pressures are considerably higher than what we observed in the shockwave studies (6.1 GPa for TBA and 6.6 GPa for ETMS). Interestingly, in the case of ETMS, it was observed with fluid ETMS as starting sample, reacts to form a semi-crystalline polymer (crystalline domains corresponding to the low-T phase) at pressures less than {approx}2 GPa. Further characterization using vibrational spectroscopy is in progress.

  4. Phonon Drag Dislocations at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, W.G.

    1999-10-19

    Phonon drag on dislocations is the dominant process which determines the flow stress of metals at elevated temperatures and at very high plastic deformation rates. The dependence of the phonon drag on pressure or density is derived using a Mie-Grueneisen equation of state. The phonon drag is shown to increase nearly linearly with temperature but to decrease with density or pressure. Numerical results are presented for its variation for shock-loaded copper and aluminum. In these cases, density and temperature increase simultaneously, resulting in a more modest net increase in the dislocation drag coefficient. Nevertheless, phonon drag increases by more than an order of magnitude during shock deformations which approach melting. Since the dependencies of elastic moduli and of the phonon drag coefficient on pressure and temperature are fundamentally different, the effect of pressure on the constitutive law for plastic deformation can not simply be accounted for by its effect on the elastic shear modulus.

  5. Hydrogen at high pressure and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W J

    1999-09-30

    Hydrogen at high pressures and temperatures is challenging scientifically and has many real and potential applications. Minimum metallic conductivity of fluid hydrogen is observed at 140 GPa and 2600 K, based on electrical conductivity measurements to 180 GPa (1.8 Mbar), tenfold compression, and 3000 K obtained dynamically with a two-stage light-gas gun. Conditions up to 300 GPa, sixfold compression, and 30,000 K have been achieved in laser-driven Hugoniot experiments. Implications of these results for the interior of Jupiter, inertial confinement fusion, and possible uses of metastable solid hydrogen, if the metallic fluid could be quenched from high pressure, are discussed.

  6. High pressure freon decontamination of remote equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    A series of decontamination tests using high pressure FREON 113 was conducted in the 200 Area of the Hanford site. The intent of these tests was to evaluate the effectiveness of FREON 113 in decontamination of manipulator components, tools, and equipment items contaminated with mixed fission products. The test results indicated that high pressure FREON 113 is very effective in removing fissile material from a variety of objects and can reduce both the quantity and the volume of the radioactive waste material presently being buried.

  7. Superelastic carbon spheres under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meifen; Guo, Junjie; Xu, Bingshe

    2013-03-01

    We report a superelastic deformation behavior of carbon spheres by the in situ Raman spectroscopy in a high-pressure diamond anvil cell. The carbon spheres produced by arc discharging in toluene have a mean diameter of 200 nm and an onion-like multilayer graphitic structure. We find that the elastic coefficients, during both the compression and decompression processes, remain a constant up to 10 GPa, indicating a superior high-pressure structural stability. Such superelastic behavior is related to the isotropic and concentric configuration of carbon spheres and provides additional insight into improving the microscopic mechanical properties of small-scale particles.

  8. High pressure water jet cutting and stripping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David T.; Babai, Majid K.

    1991-01-01

    High pressure water cutting techniques have a wide range of applications to the American space effort. Hydroblasting techniques are commonly used during the refurbishment of the reusable solid rocket motors. The process can be controlled to strip a thermal protective ablator without incurring any damage to the painted surface underneath by using a variation of possible parameters. Hydroblasting is a technique which is easily automated. Automation removes personnel from the hostile environment of the high pressure water. Computer controlled robots can perform the same task in a fraction of the time that would be required by manual operation.

  9. High pressure water jet mining machine

    DOEpatents

    Barker, Clark R.

    1981-05-05

    A high pressure water jet mining machine for the longwall mining of coal is described. The machine is generally in the shape of a plowshare and is advanced in the direction in which the coal is cut. The machine has mounted thereon a plurality of nozzle modules each containing a high pressure water jet nozzle disposed to oscillate in a particular plane. The nozzle modules are oriented to cut in vertical and horizontal planes on the leading edge of the machine and the coal so cut is cleaved off by the wedge-shaped body.

  10. Exotic stable cesium polynitrides at high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Feng; Han, Yunxia; Liu, Hanyu; Yao, Yansun

    2015-01-01

    New polynitrides containing metastable forms of nitrogen are actively investigated as potential high-energy-density materials. Using a structure search method based on the CALYPSO methodology, we investigated the stable stoichiometries and structures of cesium polynitrides at high pressures. Along with the CsN3, we identified five new stoichiometric compounds (Cs3N, Cs2N, CsN, CsN2, and CsN5) with interesting structures that may be experimentally synthesizable at modest pressures (i.e., less than 50 GPa). Nitrogen species in the predicted structures have various structural forms ranging from single atom (N) to highly endothermic molecules (N2, N3, N4, N5, N6) and chains (N∞). Polymeric chains of nitrogen were found in the high-pressure C2/c phase of CsN2. This structure contains a substantially high content of single N-N bonds that exceeds the previously known nitrogen chains in pure forms, and also exhibit metastability at ambient conditions. We also identified a very interesting CsN crystal that contains novel N44− anion. To our best knowledge, this is the first time a charged N4 species being reported. Results of the present study suggest that it is possible to obtain energetic polynitrogens in main-group nitrides under high pressure. PMID:26581175

  11. Exotic stable cesium polynitrides at high pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Peng, Feng; Han, Yunxia; Liu, Hanyu; ...

    2015-11-19

    New polynitrides containing metastable forms of nitrogen are actively investigated as potential high energy-density materials. Using a structure search method based on the CALYPSO methodology, we investigated the stable stoichiometries and structures of cesium polynitrides at high pressures. Along with the CsN3, we identified five new stoichiometric compounds (Cs3N, Cs2N, CsN, CsN2, and CsN5) with interesting structures that may be experimentally synthesizable at modest pressures (i.e., less than 50 GPa). Nitrogen species in the predicted structures have various structural forms ranging from single atom (N) to highly endothermic molecules (N2, N3 , N4, N5, N6) and chains (N∞). Polymeric chainsmore » of nitrogen were found in the high-pressure C2/c phase of CsN2. This structure contains a substantially high content of single N-N bonds that exceeds the previously known nitrogen chains in pure forms, and also exhibit metastability at ambient conditions. We also identified a very interesting CsN crystal that contains novel N44- anion. In conclusion, to our best knowledge, this is the first time a charged N4 species being reported. Results of the present study suggest that it is possible to obtain energetic polynitrogens in main-group nitrides under high pressure.« less

  12. Introduction to High-Pressure Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dera, Przemyslaw

    To a common person pressure is just one of the parameters that describe a thermodynamic state. We all hear about it in everyday weather forecasts, and most of us do not associate it with anything particularly unique. Probably the most intuitive idea of the effect of high-pressure comes from movies, where submarine sinking to the bottom of the ocean is gradually crushed by the surrounding water, until its hull implodes. Why, then hundreds of scientists throughout the world spent their lifelong careers studying high-pressure phenomena? Despite all the developments in experimental technologies and instrumentation, modern scientist has very few tools that allow him or her to "grab" two atoms and bring them, in a very controllable way, closer together. Being able to achieve this task means the ability to directly probe interatomic interaction potentials and can cause transformations as dramatic as turning of a common gas into solid metal. Before the reader delves into more advanced topics described later in this book, this introductory chapter aims to explain several elementary, but extremely important concepts in high-pressure science. We will start with a brief discussion of laboratory devices used to produce pressure, address the issue of hydrostaticity, elastic and plastic compression, and will conclude with a short discussion of unique effects of anisotropic stress.

  13. High pressure effects on allergen food proteins.

    PubMed

    Somkuti, Judit; Smeller, László

    2013-12-15

    There are several proteins, which can cause allergic reaction if they are inhaled or ingested. Our everyday food can also contain such proteins. Food allergy is an IgE-mediated immune disorder, a growing health problem of great public concern. High pressure is known to affect the structure of proteins; typically few hundred MPa pressure can lead to denaturation. That is why several trials have been performed to alter the structure of the allergen proteins by high pressure, in order to reduce its allergenicity. Studies have been performed both on simple protein solutions and on complex food systems. Here we review those allergens which have been investigated under or after high pressure treatment by methods capable of detecting changes in the secondary and tertiary structure of the proteins. We focus on those allergenic proteins, whose structural changes were investigated by spectroscopic methods under pressure in correlation with the observed allergenicity (IgE binding) changes. According to this criterion we selected the following allergen proteins: Mal d 1 and Mal d 3 (apple), Bos d 5 (milk), Dau c 1 (carrot), Gal d 2 (egg), Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 (peanut), and Gad m 1 (cod). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Raman study of opal at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, G.; Wang, S.; Mao, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    More commonly known for their beauty and lore as gemstones, opals are also intriguing geological materials which may have potential for materials science applications. Opal lacks a definite crystalline structure, and is composed of an amorphous packing of hydrated silica (SiO2) spheroids, which provides us with a unique nano-scaled mineraloid with properties unlike those of other amorphous materials like glass. Opals from different localities were studied at high pressure using a diamond anvil cell to apply pressure and Raman spectroscopy to look at changes in bonding as pressure was increased. We first tested different samples from Virgin Valley, NV, Spencer, ID, Juniper Ridge, OR, and Australia, which contain varying amounts of water at ambient conditions, using Raman spectroscopy to determine if they were opal-CT (semicrystalline cristobalite-trydimite volcanic origin) or opal-A (amorphous sedimentary origin). We then used x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell to see how their bonding and structure changed under compression and to determine what effect water content had on their high pressure behavior. Comparison of our results on opal to other high pressure studies of amorphous materials like glass has implications from a geological and materials science standpoint.

  15. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTON KINETICS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano Orsino

    2005-03-30

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) initiative to improve the efficiency of coal-fired power plants and reduce the pollution generated by these facilities, DOE has funded the High-Pressure Coal Combustion Kinetics (HPCCK) Projects. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted on selected pulverized coals at elevated pressures with the specific goals to provide new data for pressurized coal combustion that will help extend to high pressure and validate models for burnout, pollutant formation, and generate samples of solid combustion products for analyses to fill crucial gaps in knowledge of char morphology and fly ash formation. Two series of high-pressure coal combustion experiments were performed using SRI's pressurized radiant coal flow reactor. The first series of tests characterized the near burner flame zone (NBFZ). Three coals were tested, two high volatile bituminous (Pittsburgh No.8 and Illinois No.6), and one sub-bituminous (Powder River Basin), at pressures of 1, 2, and 3 MPa (10, 20, and 30 atm). The second series of experiments, which covered high-pressure burnout (HPBO) conditions, utilized a range of substantially longer combustion residence times to produce char burnout levels from 50% to 100%. The same three coals were tested at 1, 2, and 3 MPa, as well as at 0.2 MPa. Tests were also conducted on Pittsburgh No.8 coal in CO2 entrainment gas at 0.2, 1, and 2 MPa to begin establishing a database of experiments relevant to carbon sequestration techniques. The HPBO test series included use of an impactor-type particle sampler to measure the particle size distribution of fly ash produced under complete burnout conditions. The collected data have been interpreted with the help of CFD and detailed kinetics simulation to extend and validate devolatilization, char combustion and pollutant model at elevated pressure. A global NOX production sub-model has been proposed. The submodel reproduces the performance of the detailed chemical reaction

  16. Design guide for high pressure oxygen systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C.; Pohl, H. O.; Chaffee, N. H.; Guy, W. W.; Allton, C. S.; Johnston, R. L.; Castner, W. L.; Stradling, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    A repository for critical and important detailed design data and information, hitherto unpublished, along with significant data on oxygen reactivity phenomena with metallic and nonmetallic materials in moderate to very high pressure environments is documented. This data and information provide a ready and easy to use reference for the guidance of designers of propulsion, power, and life support systems for use in space flight. The document is also applicable to designs for industrial and civilian uses of high pressure oxygen systems. The information presented herein are derived from data and design practices involving oxygen usage at pressures ranging from about 20 psia to 8000 psia equal with thermal conditions ranging from room temperatures up to 500 F.

  17. Too Many Americans Have High Blood Pressure, Doctors Warn

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_163468.html Too Many Americans Have High Blood Pressure, Doctors Warn With February designated National Heart Month, ... physicians warns that too many Americans struggle with high blood pressure. High blood pressure is a major risk factor ...

  18. Advanced Diagnostics for High Pressure Spray Combustion.

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, Scott A.; Manin, Julien Luc; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2014-06-01

    The development of accurate predictive engine simulations requires experimental data to both inform and validate the models, but very limited information is presently available about the chemical structure of high pressure spray flames under engine- relevant conditions. Probing such flames for chemical information using non- intrusive optical methods or intrusive sampling techniques, however, is challenging because of the physical and optical harshness of the environment. This work details two new diagnostics that have been developed and deployed to obtain quantitative species concentrations and soot volume fractions from a high-pressure combusting spray. A high-speed, high-pressure sampling system was developed to extract gaseous species (including soot precursor species) from within the flame for offline analysis by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A high-speed multi-wavelength optical extinction diagnostic was also developed to quantify transient and quasi-steady soot processes. High-pressure sampling and offline characterization of gas-phase species formed following the pre-burn event was accomplished as well as characterization of gas-phase species present in the lift-off region of a high-pressure n-dodecane spray flame. For the initial samples discussed in this work several species were identified, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); however, quantitative mole fractions were not determined. Nevertheless, the diagnostic developed here does have this capability. Quantitative, time-resolved measurements of soot extinction were also accomplished and the novel use of multiple incident wavelengths proved valuable toward characterizing changes in soot optical properties within different regions of the spray flame.

  19. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V.; Errandonea, D.

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  20. Magnetic freezing of confined water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangyu; Zhang, Weiwei; Dong, Huijuan

    2010-10-07

    We report results from molecular dynamic simulations of the freezing transition of liquid water in the nanoscale hydrophobic confinement under the influence of a homogeneous external magnetic field of 10 T along the direction perpendicular to the parallel plates. A new phase of bilayer crystalline ice is obtained at an anomalously high freezing temperature of 340 K. The water-to-ice translation is found to be first order. The bilayer ice is built from alternating rows of hexagonal rings and rhombic rings parallel to the confining plates, with a large distortion of the hydrogen bonds. We also investigate the temperature shifts of the freezing transition due to the magnetic field. The freezing temperature, below which the freezing of confined water occurs, shifts to a higher value as the magnetic field enhances. Furthermore, the temperature of the freezing transition of confined water is proportional to the denary logarithm of the external magnetic field.

  1. Influences of changing freeze-thaw seasons on evapotranspiration in northern high latitudes and associated uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Kimball, J. S.; Kim, Y.; McDonald, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    Seasonal landscape transitions between predominantly frozen and thawed conditions are analogous to a biospheric and hydrologic on/off switch, with marked differences in evapotranspiration (ET) and other biological activity between largely dormant winter and active summer conditions. We investigated changes in freeze-thaw (FT) seasons and ET from 1983 to 2006, and their connections in the northern cryosphere by analyzing independent satellite remote sensing derived FT and ET records. We also inspected the impact of uncertainty in the FT record on the investigated connections between the seasonal FT dynamics and ET. Our findings show that the northern cryosphere has experienced advancing (-2.5 days/decade; P =0.005) and lengthening (3.5 days/decade; P =0.007) non-frozen season trends over the 24-year period, coinciding with an upward trend (6.4 mm/yr/decade; P = 0.014) in regional mean annual ET over the same period. Regional average timing of spring primary thaw and the annual non-frozen period are highly correlated with regional annual ET ( |r|≥0.75; P < 0.001), with corresponding impacts to annual ET of approximately 0.6% day-1 and 0.5% day-1, respectively. The impact of primary fall freeze timing on ET is relatively minor compared to primary spring thaw timing. Earlier onset of the non-frozen season generally promotes annual ET in colder areas, but appears to suppress summer ET by increasing drought stress in the southernmost parts of the domain where water supply is the leading constraint to ET. The cumulative effect of future freeze-thaw changes on ET in the region will largely depend on future changes of large-scale atmosphere circulations and rates of vegetation disturbance and adaptation to continued warming. Uncertainty in FT generally weakens the correlations between annual ET and the seasonal FT dynamics. Impacts of uncertainty in FT on the relationship between annual ET and primary spring thaw are more evident in higher latitudes than in lower

  2. Material Composite Behavior Under High-Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conil, N.; Kavner, A.

    2004-12-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction techniques under relevant pressure and temperature conditions provide unique information about phase stability, elasticity and deformation behavior of Earth materials. Often samples consist of a calibrated standard intermixed with the material of interest. Accurate measurements of equation of state are based on two assumptions: that the equation of state of the calibrant is known precisely, and that the pressures of these two materials are the same. However, except under strict conditions of hydrostaticity, pressures are not necessary equal. To provide a detailed examination of the pressure relationship in the diamond anvil cell sample chamber, we analyzed two standard materials mixed together in a controlled geometry. Our samples consisted of unidirectional Al2O3 ceramic fibers ( ˜ 1μ m diameter) distributed in an Al metal matrix. This was ideal because both materials are existing high-pressure standards and the oxide/metal mixture is similar to many experiments. We conducted room temperature radial x-ray diffraction experiments using a diamond anvil cell at the X17C beamline at National Synchrotron Light Source. We studied two different fiber orientations with respect to the diamond anvil cell compression axis: one with fibers oriented vertically and the second, horizontally. In each case we measured the d-spacing of lattice planes as a function of rotation angle between principle stress axes and diffraction geometry. From these data, we calculated pressure and supported differential stress of both Al and Al2O3. We found that geometry plays an important role in determining the relative pressure and strength behavior of the two materials. At comparable pressures, in the vertical fibers case, PAl ˜ 8.7 GPa, PAl2O3 ˜ 10.2 GPa and in the horizontal fibers case, PAl ˜ 9.6 GPa when PAl2O3 ˜ 10.2 GPa. Thus, when the fibers are oriented vertically, aluminum pressure is always smaller than alumina pressure; whereas in the horizontal case

  3. Stability of xenon oxides at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiang; Jung, Daniel Y; Oganov, Artem R; Glass, Colin W; Gatti, Carlo; Lyakhov, Andriy O

    2013-01-01

    Xenon, which is quite inert under ambient conditions, may become reactive under pressure. The possibility of the formation of stable xenon oxides and silicates in the interior of the Earth could explain the atmospheric missing xenon paradox. Using an ab initio evolutionary algorithm, we predict the existence of thermodynamically stable Xe-O compounds at high pressures (XeO, XeO(2) and XeO(3) become stable at pressures above 83, 102 and 114 GPa, respectively). Our calculations indicate large charge transfer in these oxides, suggesting that large electronegativity difference and high pressure are the key factors favouring the formation of xenon compounds. However, xenon compounds cannot exist in the Earth's mantle: xenon oxides are unstable in equilibrium with the metallic iron occurring in the lower mantle, and xenon silicates are predicted to decompose spontaneously at all mantle pressures (<136 GPa). However, it is possible that xenon atoms may be retained at defects in mantle silicates and oxides.

  4. Sounding experiments of high pressure gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Biele, Joachim K.

    1998-07-10

    A high pressure discharge experiment (200 MPa, 5{center_dot}10{sup 21} molecules/cm{sup 3}, 3000 K) has been set up to study electrically induced shock waves. The apparatus consists of the combustion chamber (4.2 cm{sup 3}) to produce high pressure gas by burning solid propellant grains to fill the electrical pump chamber (2.5 cm{sup 3}) containing an insulated coaxial electrode. Electrical pump energy up to 7.8 kJ at 10 kV, which is roughly three times of the gas energy in the pump chamber, was delivered by a capacitor bank. From the current-voltage relationship the discharge develops at rapidly decreasing voltage. Pressure at the combustion chamber indicating significant underpressure as well as overpressure peaks is followed by an increase of static pressure level. These data are not yet completely understood. However, Lorentz forces are believed to generate pinching with subsequent pinch heating, resulting in fast pressure variations to be propagated as rarefaction and shock waves, respectively. Utilizing pure axisymmetric electrode initiation rather than often used exploding wire technology in the pump chamber, repeatable experiments were achieved.

  5. Nanoshells as a high-pressure gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempere, Jacques; van den Broeck, Nick; Putteneers, Katrijn; Silvera, Isaac

    2012-02-01

    Nanoshells, consisting of multiple spherical layers, have an extensive list of applications, usually performing the function of a probe. We add a new application to this list in the form of a high-pressure gauge in a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC). In a DAC, where high pressures are reached by pressing two diamonds together, existing gauges fail at higher pressures because of calibration difficulties and obscuring effects in the diamonds. The nanoshell gauge does not face this issue since its optical spectrum can be engineered by altering the thickness of its layers. Furthermore their properties are measured by broad band optical transmission spectroscopy leading to a very large signal-to-noise ratio even in the multi-megabar pressure regime where ruby measurements become challenging. Theoretical calculations based on the Maxwell equations in a spherical geometry combined with the Vinet equation of state show that a three-layer geometry (SiO2-Au-SiO2) indeed has a measurable pressure-dependent optical response desirable for gauges.

  6. A possible origin of EL6 chondrites from a high temperature-high pressure solar gas

    SciTech Connect

    Blander, M.; Unger, L.; Pelton, A.; Eriksson, G.

    1994-05-01

    Condensates from a gas of ``solar`` composition were calculated to investigate the origins of EL6 chondrites using a free energy minimization program with a data base for the thermodynamic properties of multicomponent molten silicates as well as for other liquids solids, solid solutions and gaseous species. Because of high volatility of silicon and silica, the high silicon content of metal (2.6 mole %) can only be produced at pressures 10{sup {minus}2} atm at temperatures above 1475 K. At 100--500 atm, a liquid silicate phase crystallizes at a temperature where the silicon content of the metal, ferrosilite content of the enstatite and albite concentration in the plagioclase are close to measured values. In pyrometallurgy, liquid silicates are catalysts for reactions in which Si-O-Si bridging bonds are broken or formed. Thus, one attractive mode for freezing in the compositions of these three phases is disappearance of fluxing liquid. If the plagioclase can continue to react with the nebula without a liquid phase, lower pressures of 10{sup {minus}1} to 1 atm might be possible. Even if the nebula is more reducing than a solar gas, the measured properties of EL6 chondrites might be reconciled with only slightly lower pressures (less than 3X lower). The temperatures would be about the same as indicated in our calculations since the product of the silicon content of the metal and the square of the ferrosilite content of the enstatite constitute a cosmothermometer for the mineral assemblage in EL6 chondrites.

  7. High temperature pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Caines, Michael J.

    1983-01-01

    A pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide is provided to which one end may be attached a transducer and at the other end a high temperature material for continuous ultrasonic testing of the material. The ultrasonic signal is coupled from the waveguide into the material through a thin, dry copper foil.

  8. High pressure studies of planetary matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.

    1989-06-01

    Those materials which are of greatest interest to the physics of the deep planetary interiors are Fe, H/sub 2/, He and the Ices. These are sufficiently diverse and intensively studied to offer an overview of present day high pressure research. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Hurricane risk mitigation - High Pressure Gas Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A worker pours concrete as part of a nitrogen risk mitigation project at the High Pressure Gas Facility at Stennis Space Center. The concrete slab will provide the foundation needed to place new pumps at the site and is part of ongoing hurricane-related mitigation work at Stennis.

  10. High Pressure Inactivation of HAV within Mussels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The potential of hepatitis A virus (HAV) to be inactivated within Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) by high pressure processing was evaluated. HAV was bioaccumulated within mussels to approximately 6-log10 PFU by exposure of mussels to HAV-contamina...

  11. Hurricane risk mitigation - High Pressure Gas Facility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-07-29

    A worker pours concrete as part of a nitrogen risk mitigation project at the High Pressure Gas Facility at Stennis Space Center. The concrete slab will provide the foundation needed to place new pumps at the site and is part of ongoing hurricane-related mitigation work at Stennis.

  12. A study on ice crystal formation behavior at intracellular freezing of plant cells using a high-speed camera.

    PubMed

    Ninagawa, Takako; Eguchi, Akemi; Kawamura, Yukio; Konishi, Tadashi; Narumi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Intracellular ice crystal formation (IIF) causes several problems to cryopreservation, and it is the key to developing improved cryopreservation techniques that can ensure the long-term preservation of living tissues. Therefore, the ability to capture clear intracellular freezing images is important for understanding both the occurrence and the IIF behavior. The authors developed a new cryomicroscopic system that was equipped with a high-speed camera for this study and successfully used this to capture clearer images of the IIF process in the epidermal tissues of strawberry geranium (Saxifraga stolonifera Curtis) leaves. This system was then used to examine patterns in the location and formation of intracellular ice crystals and to evaluate the degree of cell deformation because of ice crystals inside the cell and the growing rate and grain size of intracellular ice crystals at various cooling rates. The results showed that an increase in cooling rate influenced the formation pattern of intracellular ice crystals but had less of an effect on their location. Moreover, it reduced the degree of supercooling at the onset of intracellular freezing and the degree of cell deformation; the characteristic grain size of intracellular ice crystals was also reduced, but the growing rate of intracellular ice crystals was increased. Thus, the high-speed camera images could expose these changes in IIF behaviors with an increase in the cooling rate, and these are believed to have been caused by an increase in the degree of supercooling.

  13. High pressure luminescence probes in polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    High pressure luminescence has proved to be a very powerful tool for characterizing crystalline solids and liquids. Two problems involving glassy polymers are analyzed. In the first problem the excited states of azulene and its derivatives are used to probe intermolecular interactions in PMMA and PS. In the second problem the change in emission intensity with pressure from two excimer states of polyvinylcarbazole as a pure polymer and in dilute solution in polystyrene (PS), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyisoliutylene (PIB) is studied. The relative emission from the two states depends strongly on the possibility for motion of polymer segments. The observations are related to the proximity to the glass transition.

  14. Efficient High Pressure MixtureState Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K. G.; Miller, R. S.; Bellan, J.

    1996-01-01

    A method is presented for an accurate noniterative, computationally efficient calculation of high pressure fluid mixture equations of state, especially targeted to gas turbines and rocket engines. Pressures above 1 bar and temperatures above 100 K are addressed. The method is based on curve fitting an effective reference state relative to departure funcitons formed using the Peng-Robinson cubic state equation. Fit parameters for H(sub 2), O(sub 2), N(sub 2), propane, n-heptane and methanol are given.

  15. Submarine High Pressure Dehydrator Performance Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-07

    Hatala of September 1985. Prepared for NAVSEA 05N under contract number N00024-33-C-2111. 13. General Dynamics Corporation, High Pressure Air Filtration...Cooling Water Pump Gear Ratio ............... 4:1 Cooling Water Pump Full Load Speed .......... 3500 rpm Water Pump TDH @ 3400 RPM & 15 GPM...Temperature Monitor Thomas A. Edison, Inc. 12-1/2" x 7-1/4" x 9" 25 lbs. Motor Electro Dynamic 2𔄁-1/16" x 2𔃾-1/4" x 2𔃻-1/4" 1150 lbs. S Pressure

  16. (Ultra) high pressure homogenization for continuous high pressure sterilization of pumpable foods - a review.

    PubMed

    Georget, Erika; Miller, Brittany; Callanan, Michael; Heinz, Volker; Mathys, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial spores have a strong resistance to both chemical and physical hurdles and create a risk for the food industry, which has been tackled by applying high thermal intensity treatments to sterilize food. These strong thermal treatments lead to a reduction of the organoleptic and nutritional properties of food and alternatives are actively searched for. Innovative hurdles offer an alternative to inactivate bacterial spores. In particular, recent technological developments have enabled a new generation of high pressure homogenizer working at pressures up to 400 MPa and thus, opening new opportunities for high pressure sterilization of foods. In this short review, we summarize the work conducted on (ultra) high pressure homogenization (U)HPH to inactivate endospores in model and food systems. Specific attention is given to process parameters (pressure, inlet, and valve temperatures). This review gathers the current state of the art and underlines the potential of UHPH sterilization of pumpable foods while highlighting the needs for future work.

  17. (Ultra) High Pressure Homogenization for Continuous High Pressure Sterilization of Pumpable Foods – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Georget, Erika; Miller, Brittany; Callanan, Michael; Heinz, Volker; Mathys, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial spores have a strong resistance to both chemical and physical hurdles and create a risk for the food industry, which has been tackled by applying high thermal intensity treatments to sterilize food. These strong thermal treatments lead to a reduction of the organoleptic and nutritional properties of food and alternatives are actively searched for. Innovative hurdles offer an alternative to inactivate bacterial spores. In particular, recent technological developments have enabled a new generation of high pressure homogenizer working at pressures up to 400 MPa and thus, opening new opportunities for high pressure sterilization of foods. In this short review, we summarize the work conducted on (ultra) high pressure homogenization (U)HPH to inactivate endospores in model and food systems. Specific attention is given to process parameters (pressure, inlet, and valve temperatures). This review gathers the current state of the art and underlines the potential of UHPH sterilization of pumpable foods while highlighting the needs for future work. PMID:25988118

  18. Apparatus for testing high pressure injector elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, William Neill (Inventor); Scott, Ewell M. (Inventor); Forbes, John C. (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for testing and evaluating the spray pattern of high pressure fuel injector elements for use in supplying fuel to combustion engines is presented. Prior art fuel injector elements were normally tested by use of low pressure apparatuses which did not provide a purge to prevent mist from obscuring the injector element or to prevent frosting of the view windows; could utilize only one fluid during each test; and had their viewing ports positioned one hundred eighty (180 deg) apart, thus preventing optimum use of laser diagnostics. The high pressure fluid injector test apparatus includes an upper hub, an upper weldment or housing, a first clamp and stud/nut assembly for securing the upper hub to the upper weldment, a standoff assembly within the upper weldment, a pair of window housings having view glasses within the upper weldment, an injector block assembly and purge plate within the upper weldment for holding an injector element to be tested and evaluated, a lower weldment or housing, a second clamp and stud/nut assembly for securing the lower weldment to the upper weldment, a lower hub, a third clamp and stud/nut assembly for securing the lower hub to the lower weldment, mechanisms for introducing fluid under high pressure for testing an injector element, and mechanisms for purging the apparatus to prevent frosting of view glasses within the window housings and to permit unobstructed viewing of the injector element.

  19. Amorphous boron nitride at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durandurdu, Murat

    2016-06-01

    The pressure-induced phase transformation in hexagonal boron nitrite and amorphous boron nitrite is studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The hexagonal-to-wurtzite phase transformation is successfully reproduced in the simulation with a transformation mechanism similar to one suggested in experiment. Amorphous boron nitrite, on the other hand, gradually transforms to a high-density amorphous phase with the application of pressure. This phase transformation is irreversible because a densified amorphous state having both sp3 and sp2 bonds is recovered upon pressure release. The high-density amorphous state mainly consists of sp3 bonds and its local structure is quite similar to recently proposed intermediate boron nitrite phases, in particular tetragonal structure (P42/mnm), rather than the known the wurtzite or cubic boron nitrite due to the existence of four membered rings and edge sharing connectivity. On the basis of this finding we propose that amorphous boron nitrite might be best candidate as a starting structure to synthesize the intermediate phase(s) at high pressure and temperature (probably below 800 °C) conditions.

  20. Apparatus for testing high pressure injector elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, William Neill (Inventor); Scott, Ewell M. (Inventor); Forbes, John C. (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for testing and evaluating the spray pattern of high pressure fuel injector elements for use in supplying fuel to combustion engines is presented. Prior art fuel injector elements were normally tested by use of low pressure apparatuses which did not provide a purge to prevent mist from obscuring the injector element or to prevent frosting of the view windows; could utilize only one fluid during each test; and had their viewing ports positioned one hundred eighty (180 deg) apart, thus preventing optimum use of laser diagnostics. The high pressure fluid injector test apparatus includes an upper hub, an upper weldment or housing, a first clamp and stud/nut assembly for securing the upper hub to the upper weldment, a standoff assembly within the upper weldment, a pair of window housings having view glasses within the upper weldment, an injector block assembly and purge plate within the upper weldment for holding an injector element to be tested and evaluated, a lower weldment or housing, a second clamp and stud/nut assembly for securing the lower weldment to the upper hub, a third clamp and stud/nut assembly for securing the lower hub to the lower weldment, mechanisms for introducing fluid under high pressure for testing an injector element, and mechanisms for purging the apparatus to prevent frosting of view glasses within the window housings and to permit unobstructed viewing of the injector element.

  1. Small, high-pressure liquid oxygen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.; Sutton, R.

    1977-01-01

    A small, high-pressure, liquid oxygen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested. The pump was of a single-stage, centrifugal type; power to the pump was supplied by a single-stage, partial emission, axial-impulse turbine. Design conditions included an operating speed of 70,000 rpm, pump discharge pressure of 2977 N/sq cm (4318 psia), and a pump flowrate of 16.4 kg/s (36.21 lb/sec). The turbine was propelled by LO2/LH2 combustion products at 1041 K (1874 R) inlet temperature, and at a design pressure ratio of 1.424. The approaches used in the detail analysis and design of the turbopump are described, and fabrication methods are discussed. Data obtained from gas generator tests, turbine performance calibration, and turbopump testing are presented.

  2. Small, high-pressure, liquid oxygen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.

    1978-01-01

    A small, high-pressure, LOX turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested. The pump was of a single-stage, centrifugal type; power to the pump was supplied by a single-stage, partial-admission, axial-impulse turbine. Design conditions included an operating speed of 7330 rad/sec (70,000 rpm) pump discharge pressure of 2977 N/sq cm (4318 psia), and a pump flowrate of 16.4 kg/s (36.21 lb/sec). The turbine was propelled by LOX/LH2 combustion products at 1041 K (1874 R) inlet temperature, and at a design pressure ratio of 1.424. Test data obtained with the turbopump are presented and mechanical performance is discussed.

  3. Zeeman Effect in Ruby at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Ioana

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a versatile fiber-coupled system for magneto-optical spectroscopy measurements at high pressure. The system is based on a miniature Cu-alloy Diamond Anvil Cell (from D'Anvils, Ltd) fitted with a custom-designed He gas-actuated membrane for in-situ pressure control, and coupled with a He transfer cryostat incorporating a superconducting magnet (from Quantum Designs). This system allows optical measurements (Raman, photoluminescence, reflectivity) within wide ranges of pressures (up to 100GPa), temperatures (4.2-300K) and magnetic fields (0-9T). We employ this system to examine the effect of pressure and non-hydrostatic stress on the Zeeman split d-d transitions of Cr^3+ in ruby (Al2O3: Cr^3+). We determine the effect of pressure and non-hydrostaticity on the trigonal crystal field in this material, and discuss the use of the Zeman-split ruby fluorescence as a possible probe for deviatoric stresses in diamond anvil cell experiments.

  4. High-pressure oxidation of ethane

    DOE PAGES

    Hashemi, Hamid; Jacobsen, Jon G.; Rasmussen, Christian T.; ...

    2017-05-02

    Here, ethane oxidation at intermediate temperatures and high pressures has been investigated in both a laminar flow reactor and a rapid compression machine (RCM). The flow-reactor measurements at 600–900 K and 20–100 bar showed an onset temperature for oxidation of ethane between 700 and 825 K, depending on pressure, stoichiometry, and residence time. Measured ignition delay times in the RCM at pressures of 10–80 bar and temperatures of 900–1025 K decreased with increasing pressure and/or temperature. A detailed chemical kinetic model was developed with particular attention to the peroxide chemistry. Rate constants for reactions on the C2H5O2 potential energy surfacemore » were adopted from the recent theoretical work of Klippenstein. In the present work, the internal H-abstraction in CH3CH2OO to form CH2CH2OOH was treated in detail. Modeling predictions were in good agreement with data from the present work as well as results at elevated pressure from literature. The experimental results and the modeling predictions do not support occurrence of NTC behavior in ethane oxidation. Even at the high-pressure conditions of the present work where the C2H5 + O2 reaction yields ethylperoxyl rather than C2H4 + HO2, the chain branching sequence CH3CH2OO → CH2CH2OOH → +O2 OOCH2CH2OOH → branching is not competitive, because the internal H-atom transfer in CH3CH2OO to CH2CH2OOH is too slow compared to thermal dissociation to C2H4 and HO2.« less

  5. High Pressure Behavior of FeOOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M. M.; Gleason, A. E.; Mao, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the stability and properties of simple hydroxides at high pressures and temperatures offers an important first step toward quantifying more complex hydrogen-bearing compounds relevant to the Earth's interior. We focus on iron-oxy-hydroxides because they may be an important Fe and water bearing component in the deep Earth. Goethite (α-FeOOH) transforms to a high-pressure phase, ɛ-FeOOH, which is isostructural with δ-AlOOH, a material which may transport hydrogen to the core-mantle boundary. Here we present XES spectroscopy data of powder samples of synthesized alpha-FeOOH, beta-FeOOH and gamma-FeOOH monitoring their electronic spin transition. The samples was loaded into a Beryllium gasket, where a 50 micron hole served as the sample chamber with 300 micron culet diamond paired with a beveled 150 micron diamond in a diamond-anvil cell (DAC) without a pressure transmitting medium. Pressure was determined using ruby fluorescence (Mao et al. 1978). Using the incident X-ray energy centered at 11.3 KeV from the Advanced Photon Source, beam line HPCAT 16-ID-D, we measured Fe K-β 13 emission to pressures greater than 73 GPa. For alpha-FeOOH, we saw a clear shift in the main peak to lower energy, and an increasingly diminishing K beta prime peak intensity, indicating the sample was undergoing an electronic spin transition. The K beta prime peak completely disappeared at a pressure greater than 73 GPa. Beta-FeOOH showed no evidence of the beginnings of a spin transition, while gamma- FeOOH underwent an incomplete transition.

  6. Topaz and Kyanite Luminescence Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bannon, E. F., III; Williams, Q. C.

    2014-12-01

    The luminescence spectra of Cr3+ in heat-treated topaz Al2SiO4(OH,F)2 and natural kyanite Al2SiO5 were measured from 650 - 800 nm in a hydrostatic environment up to pressures of 15 GPa. The R1 and R2 peaks of topaz shift at average rates of 0.30 nm/GPa and 0.22 nm/GPa, respectively, implying that the deformation of the Cr3+ octahedra increases with pressure. Three peaks are fit under each R line of topaz at both room and high pressure, and these peaks are associated with different Al sites into which the Cr substitutes. The shift of the R lines in topaz under pressure is remarkably linear, which appears to be a general feature of many Cr3+-bearing oxides: the underlying cause of this linearity may lie in anharmonic coupling with lattice vibrations. In this context, we also characterize the frequency shifts of two vibronic peaks within topaz. The R1 and R2 peaks of kyanite shift at 0.37 nm/GPa and 0.88 nm/GPa respectively. Two peaks are fit under R1 and three peaks are fit under R2 of kyanite at both room and high pressure; this result is also consistent with three different Cr3+ sites in this material. The R lines in kyanite are notably optically anisotropic, depending strongly on crystallographic orientation: this is most strongly manifested in the R2 peak. The Cr3+ luminescence in these materials provides a sensitive probe of pressure-dependent shifts in the local geometry of the Al-sites in these materials, which are analyzed in the context of previous single-crystal x-ray diffraction measurements.

  7. High-pressure oxygen impact tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raniere, F. D.; Hood, G. A.; Marker, H. E.

    1972-01-01

    To extend the compatibility evaluation of candidate materials in oxygen, a high-pressure oxygen impact tester has been designed, developed, and installed at NASA/MSFC, Huntsville, Alabama. The tester has an operating range from ambient to 69,000 newton/sq m (10,000 psig) pressures and from the normal boiling point of liquid oxygen to 394 K (121 C) temperatures. The tester was designed to deliver 97.63 joules (72 ft-lb) of impact energy; however, variable height and weight can be achieved for threshold analysis. The system is completely remote and highly automated to furnish safe, reliable operation. High-frequency, fast-response instrumentation capabilities are provided to ensure maximum information output with the hope of minimizing the number of tests required for material acceptance.

  8. Metallic and superconducting gallane under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guoying; Wang, Hui; Bergara, Aitor; Li, Yinwei; Liu, Guangtao; Ma, Yanming

    2011-08-01

    Using our newly developed particle swarm optimization algorithm on crystal structural prediction, we characterized the pressure-induced structural transition sequence of gallane (GaH3). As has been observed in alane (AlH3), enthalpy calculations reveal that the Pm3¯n structure of GaH3 becomes stable above 160 GPa, below which it is unstable with respect to elemental decomposition. Interestingly, the Pm3¯n structure is metallic, and the application of the Allen-Dynes modified McMillan equation reveals a high superconducting transition temperature (Tc), which reaches 86 K at 160 GPa and increases with decreasing pressure (Tc = 102 K at 120 GPa). Our band structure calculations demonstrate that GaH3 within the Pm3¯n structure is a highly ionic solid, where the ionicity of H atoms plays an important role in the predicted high temperature superconductivity.

  9. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP): Radar Measurements at High Latitudes and of Freeze/Thaw State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Michael; Dunbar, Scott; Chen, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for a late 2014 launch date. The mission will use both active radar and passive radiometer instruments at L-Band. In order to achieve a wide swath at sufficiently high resolution for both active and passive channels, an instrument architecture that uses a large rotating reflector is employed. In this paper, a focus will be places on the radar design and associated data products at high latitudes. The radar will employ synthetic-aperture processing to achieve a "moderate" resolution dual-pol product over a 1000 km swath. Because the radar is operating continuously, very frequent temporal coverage will be achieved at high latitudes. This data will be used, among other things, to produce a surface freeze/thaw state data product.

  10. Exotic stable cesium polynitrides at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Feng; Han, Yunxia; Liu, Hanyu; Yao, Yansun

    2015-11-19

    New polynitrides containing metastable forms of nitrogen are actively investigated as potential high energy-density materials. Using a structure search method based on the CALYPSO methodology, we investigated the stable stoichiometries and structures of cesium polynitrides at high pressures. Along with the CsN3, we identified five new stoichiometric compounds (Cs3N, Cs2N, CsN, CsN2, and CsN5) with interesting structures that may be experimentally synthesizable at modest pressures (i.e., less than 50 GPa). Nitrogen species in the predicted structures have various structural forms ranging from single atom (N) to highly endothermic molecules (N2, N3 , N4, N5, N6) and chains (N). Polymeric chains of nitrogen were found in the high-pressure C2/c phase of CsN2. This structure contains a substantially high content of single N-N bonds that exceeds the previously known nitrogen chains in pure forms, and also exhibit metastability at ambient conditions. We also identified a very interesting CsN crystal that contains novel N44- anion. In conclusion, to our best knowledge, this is the first time a charged N4 species being reported. Results of the present study suggest that it is possible to obtain energetic polynitrogens in main-group nitrides under high pressure.

  11. Sleep Deprivation: A Cause of High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... High blood pressure (hypertension) Is it true that sleep deprivation can cause high blood pressure? Answers from ... be linked to increased blood pressure. People who sleep five hours or less a night may be ...

  12. Picosecond High Pressure Gas Switch experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cravey, W.R.; Freytag, E.K.; Goerz, D.A.; Poulsen, P.; Pincosy, P.A.

    1993-08-01

    A high Pressure Gas Switch has been developed and tested at LLNL. Risetimes on the order of 200 picoseconds have been observed at 1 kHz prf and 1 atmosphere pressures. Calculations show that switching closure times on the order of tens of picoseconds can be achieved at higher pressures and electric fields. A voltage hold-off of 1 MV/cm has been measured at 10 atmospheres and several MV/cm appears possible with the HPGS. With such high electric field levels, energy storage of tens of Joules in a reasonably sized package is achievable. Initial HPGS performance has been characterized using the WASP pulse generator at LLNL. A detailed description of the switch used for initial testing is given. Switch recovery times of 1-ms have been measured at 1 atmosphere. Data on the switching uniformity, voltage hold-off recovery, and pulse repeatability, is presented. In addition, a physics switch model is described and results are compared with experimental data. Modifications made to the WASP HV pulser in order to drive the HPGS will also be discussed. Recovery times of less than 1 ms were recorded without gas flow in the switch chambers. Low pressure synthetic air was used as the switch dielectric. Longer recovery times were required when it was necessary to over-voltage the switch.

  13. Strain engineered pyrochlore at high pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Rittman, Dylan R.; Turner, Katlyn M.; Park, Sulgiye; ...

    2017-05-22

    Strain engineering is a promising method for next-generation materials processing techniques. Here, we use mechanical milling and annealing followed by compression in diamond anvil cell to tailor the intrinsic and extrinsic strain in pyrochlore, Dy2Ti2O7 and Dy2Zr2O7. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray pair distribution function analysis, and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize atomic order over short-, medium-, and long-range spatial scales, respectively, under ambient conditions. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were further employed to interrogate the material in situ at high pressure. High-pressure behavior is found to depend on the species and concentration of defects in the sample at ambient conditions.more » Overall, we show that defects can be engineered to lower the phase transformation onset pressure by ~50% in the ordered pyrochlore Dy2Ti2O7, and lower the phase transformation completion pressure by ~20% in the disordered pyrochlore Dy2Zr2O7. Lastly, these improvements are achieved without significantly sacrificing mechanical integrity, as characterized by bulk modulus.« less

  14. Is sodium a superconductor under high pressure?

    PubMed

    Tutchton, Roxanne; Chen, Xiaojia; Wu, Zhigang

    2017-01-07

    Superconductivity has been predicted or measured for most alkali metals under high pressure, but the computed critical temperature (Tc) of sodium (Na) at the face-centered cubic (fcc) phase is vanishingly low. Here we report a thorough, first-principles investigation of superconductivity in Na under pressures up to 260 GPa, where the metal-to-insulator transition occurs. Linear-response calculations and density functional perturbation theory were employed to evaluate phonon distributions and the electron-phonon coupling for bcc, fcc, cI16, and tI19 Na. Our results indicate that the maximum electron-phonon coupling parameter, λ, is 0.5 for the cI16 phase, corresponding to a theoretical peak in the critical temperature at Tc≈1.2 K. When pressure decreases or increases from 130 GPa, Tc drops quickly. This is mainly due to the lack of p-d hybridization in Na even at 260 GPa. Since current methods based on the Eliashberg and McMillian formalisms tend to overestimate the Tc (especially the peak values) of alkali metals, we conclude that under high pressure-before the metal-to-insulator transition at 260 GPa-superconductivity in Na is very weak, if it is measurable at all.

  15. Nucleation and droplet growth at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luijten, Carlo Cornelis Maria

    Homogeneous nucleation, the first stage of droplet formation in the absence of foreign particles, usually takes place in the presence of one or more supercritical carrier gases. The present work aimed at a systematic investigation of the effects of carrier gas pressure on nucleation and droplet growth. Using the so-called nucleation pulse method, nucleation and droplet growth can be separated in time, which facilitates quantitative study of these processes using Constant Angle Mie Scattering and light extinction. The method was implemented in a modified shock tube, using gas dynamic principles to create the pulse. In this way, nucleation and growth rates were measured as a function of temperature, pressure, and composition. Composition measurement at high pressure was achieved along two different routes. Water vapour concentrations were determined using a commercial humidity sensor, after calibration with total pressure as an independent parameter. Gas chromatography was used to determine hydrocarbon concentrations, after pressure reduction of the mixture over a thermostatic capillary tube. Using the above analysis techniques, nucleation and droplet growth experiments were performed for several vapour-gas mixtures, at pressures between 1 and 40 bar. Mixtures with a varying degree of interaction were selected, to allow for a systematic investigation of carrier gas influence. Besides these binary mixtures, the first quantitative nucleation and growth rates for- multicomponent-natural gas were obtained. Theoretical models for both nucleation and droplet growth were adapted to take into account the presence of a carrier gas, under condition of small carrier gas solubility. The main effects involved are the increase of saturated vapour density and decrease of surface tension with pressure. On the basis of our experiments, these effects were demonstrated to play important and counteracting roles in high pressure nucleation. Using Density Functional Theory, both effects

  16. Recent Developments in Novel Freezing and Thawing Technologies Applied to Foods.

    PubMed

    Xiao-Fei, Wu; Zhang, Min; Adhikari, Benu; Sun, Jincai

    2016-02-06

    This article reviews the recent developments in novel freezing and thawing technologies applied to foods. These novel technologies improve the quality of frozen and thawed foods and are energy efficient. The novel technologies applied to freezing include pulsed electric field pre-treatment, ultra-low temperature, ultra-rapid freezing, ultra-high pressure and ultrasound. The novel technologies applied to thawing include ultra-high pressure, ultrasound, high voltage electrostatic field (HVEF) and radio frequency. Ultra-low temperature and ultra-rapid freezing promote the formation and uniform distribution of small ice crystals throughout frozen foods. Ultra-high pressure and ultrasound assisted freezing are non-thermal methods and shorten the freezing time and improve product quality. Ultra-high pressure and HVEF thawing generate high heat transfer rates and accelerate the thawing process. Ultrasound and radio frequency thawing can facilitate thawing process by volumetrically generating heat within frozen foods. It is anticipated that these novel technologies will be increasingly used in food industries in the future.

  17. High pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, Christian G.; Sakaji, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    A gradient mixer which effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum "band-broadening".

  18. High-pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, C.G.; Sakaji, R.H.

    1982-09-08

    A gradient mixer effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum band-broadening.

  19. Water solubility in pyrope at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookherjee, M.; Karato, S.-

    2006-12-01

    To address how much water is stored within the Earth's mantle, we need to understand the water solubility in the nominally anhydrous minerals. Much is known about olivine and pyroxene. Garnet is another important component, approaching 40% by volume in the transition zone. Only two studies on water solubility in pyrope at high-pressures exist which contradict each other. Lu and Keppler (1997) observed increase in water solubility in a natural pyrope up to 200 ppm wt of water, till 10 GPa. They concluded that the proton is located in the interstitial site. Withers et al. (1998) on the contrary, observed increasing water content in Mg-rich pyrope till 6 GPa, then sudden decrease of water, beyond detection, at 7 GPa. Based on infrared spectra, Withers et al. (1998), concluded hydrogarnet (Si^{4+} replaced by 4H+ to form O4H4) substitution in synthetic magnesium rich pyrope. They argued that at high pressure owing to larger volume, hydrogarnet substitution is unstable and water is expelled out of garnet. In transition zone conditions, however, majorite garnet seems to contain around 600-700 ppm wt of water (Bolfan-Casanova et al. 2000; Katayama et al. 2003). The cause for such discrepancy is not clear and whether garnet could store a significant amount of water at mantle condition is unconstrained. In order to understand the solubility mechanism of water in pyrope at high-pressure, we have conducted high- pressure experiments on naturally occurring single crystals of pyrope garnet (from Arizona, Aines and Rossman, 1984). To ascertain water-saturated conditions, we use olivine single-crystal as an internal standard. Preliminary results indicate that natural pyrope is capable of dissolving water at high-pressures, however, water preferentially enters olivine than in pyrope. We are undertaking systematic study to estimate the solubility of water in pyrope as a function of pressure. This will enable us to develop solubility models to understand the defect mechanisms

  20. High-pressure structures of yttrium hydrides

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Lu -Lu; Sun, Hui -Juan; Wang, C. Z.; ...

    2017-07-14

    In this study, the crystal structures of YH3 and YH4 at high pressure (100–250 GPa) have been explored using a genetic algorithm combined with first-principles calculations. New structures of YH3 with space group symmetries of P21/m and I4/mmm were predicted. The electronic structures and the phonon dispersion properties of various YH3 and YH4 structures at different temperatures and pressures were investigated. Among YH3 phases, the P21/m structure of YH3 was found to have a relatively high superconducting transformation temperature T c of 19 K at 120 GPa, which is reduced to 9 K at 200 GPa. Other YH3 structures havemore » much lower T cs. Compared with YH3, the T c of the YH4 compound is much higher, i.e. 94 K at 120 GPa and 55 K at 200 GPa.« less

  1. Novel chemistry of matter under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Maosheng

    2015-03-01

    The periodicity of the elements and the non-reactivity of the inner-shell electrons are two related principles of chemistry, rooted in the atomic shell structure. Within compounds, Group I elements, for example, invariably assume the +1 oxidation state, and their chemical properties differ completely from those of the p-block elements. These general rules govern our understanding of chemical structures and reactions. Using first principles calculations, we demonstrate that under high pressure, the above doctrines can be broken. We show that both the inner shell electrons and the outer shell empty orbitals of Cs and other elements can involve in chemical reactions. Furthermore, we show that the quantized orbitals of the enclosed interstitial space may play the same role as atomic orbitals, an unprecedented view that led us to a unified theory for the recently observed high-pressure electride phenomenon.

  2. Cavity closure arrangement for high pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Amtmann, Hans H.

    1981-01-01

    A closure arrangement for a pressure vessel such as the pressure vessel of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor wherein a liner is disposed within a cavity penetration in the reactor vessel and defines an access opening therein. A closure is adapted for sealing relation with an annular mounting flange formed on the penetration liner and has a plurality of radially movable locking blocks thereon having outer serrations adapted for releasable interlocking engagement with serrations formed internally of the upper end of the penetration liner so as to effect high strength closure hold-down. In one embodiment, ramping surfaces are formed on the locking block serrations to bias the closure into sealed relation with the mounting flange when the locking blocks are actuated to locking positions.

  3. High pressure injection injuries: an overview.

    PubMed

    Fialkov, J A; Freiberg, A

    1991-01-01

    Injuries resulting from the use of high pressure injectors and spray guns are relatively rare; however, the potential tissue damage caused by the injury as well as the extent of the injury itself may go unrecognized by the primary physician. The purpose of this paper is to inform the emergency physician of the nature and standard management of this type of injury. A basic understanding of the pathophysiology of the high pressure injection injury (HPII) is essential in avoiding the mistakes in management that have been reported in the literature. The emergency management of the HPII includes: evaluation and immobilization, tetanus and antimicrobial prophylaxis, supportive and resuscitative measures, analgesia, and minimizing the time to definitive surgical treatment.

  4. Diagnostics of a High Pressure Helium Microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Koleva, Ivanka; Economou, Demetre; Donnelly, Vincent

    2004-09-01

    Gas and plasma diagnostics were performed in a slot-type DC microplasma (200 microns gap) discharge at high pressures. The gas temperature in a helium discharge was estimated by adding small quantities of nitrogen (<100 ppm) into the gas feed. Specific rotational bands of the N2 second positive system were carefully selected to avoid interference with emission from He atoms and He2 excimer. At 250 Torr pressure and 200 mA/cm2 current density, the gas temperature was Tg = 350 +/- 25 K. The measured gas temperature was almost independent (to within experimental uncertainty) of pressure (in the range of 150 Torr - 600 Torr), and current density (in the range of 100 mA/cm2 - 400 mA/cm2). These measurements were consistent with a simple heat transfer model. Spatially resolved measurements of electron temperature were also performed using trace rare gas optical emission actinometry (TRG-OES). These measurements are greatly complicated by collisional quenching at the high operating pressures. Electron density and electron temperature profiles was deduced by comparing emission intensities from the Paschen 2px (x = 1-10) manifold of Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe trace gases. Results suggested that the electron temperature peaks in the cathode sheath region, while the plasma density peaks away from the cathode sheath. A self-consistent fluid model of a DC helium microdischarge was in agreement with the experimental data. The model was used to study the dependence of discharge characteristics on operating conditions (pressure, gap spacing, current density, etc.).

  5. Small, high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.; Warren, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    A high pressure, low capacity, liquid hydrogen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested. The design configuration of the turbopump is summarized and the results of the analytical and test efforts are presented. Approaches used to pin point the cause of poor suction performance with the original design are described and performance data are included with an axial inlet design which results in excellent suction capability.

  6. Modeling High Pressure Micro Hollow Cathode Discharges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    calculations in glow discharge in argon and neon . A Monte Carlo simulation of the ions and Grant 033083 – Final report 7 the fast neutrals generated...in high pressure xenon or in rare gas mixtures containing xenon are of interest in the context of UV and VUV generation. Numerical experiments on...The shape of the calculated characteristic is similar to those measured by Schoenbach et al1 in argon and by Moselhy and Schoenbach9 in xenon . There

  7. High pressure hydrogen time projection chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K.

    1983-01-01

    We describe a high pressure hydrogen gas time projection chamber which consists of two cylindrical drift regions each 45 cm in diameter and 75 cm long. Typically, at 15 atm of H/sub 2/ with 2 kV/cm drift field and 7 kV on the 35..mu.. sense wires, the drift velocity is about 0.5 cm/..mu..sec and the spatial resolution +-200..mu...

  8. Amorphization of Serpentine at High Pressure and High Temperature

    PubMed

    Irifune; Kuroda; Funamori; Uchida; Yagi; Inoue; Miyajima

    1996-06-07

    Pressure-induced amorphization of serpentine was observed at temperatures of 200° to 300°C and pressures of 14 to 27 gigapascals with a combination of a multianvil apparatus and synchrotron radiation. High-pressure phases then crystallized rapidly when the temperature was increased to 400°C. These results suggest that amorphization of serpentine is an unlikely mechanism for generating deep-focus earthquakes, as the temperatures of subducting slabs are significantly higher than those of the rapid crystallization regime.

  9. Structures of xenon oxides at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worth, Nicholas; Pickard, Chris; Needs, Richard; Dewaele, Agnes; Loubeyre, Paul; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-03-01

    For many years, it was believed that noble gases such as xenon were entirely inert. It was only in 1962 that Bartlett first synthesized a compound of xenon. Since then, a number of other xenon compounds, including oxides, have been synthesized. Xenon oxides are unstable under ambient conditions but have been predicted to stabilize under high pressure. Here we present the results of a combined theoretical and experimental study of xenon oxides at pressures of 80-100 GPa. We have synthesized new xenon oxides at these pressures and they have been characterized with X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Calculations were performed with a density-functional theory framework. We have used the ab-initio random structure searching (AIRSS) method together with a data-mining technique to determine the stable compounds in the xenon-oxygen system in this pressure range. We have calculated structural and optical properties of these phases, and a good match between theoretical and experimental results has been obtained. Funding for computational research provided by the engineering and physical sciences research council (EPSRC; UK). Computing resources provided by Cambridge HPC and HECToR. X-ray diffraction experiments performed at ESRF.

  10. 7 CFR 58.219 - High pressure pumps and lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High pressure pumps and lines. 58.219 Section 58.219....219 High pressure pumps and lines. High pressure lines may be cleaned-in-place and shall be of such construction that dead ends, valves and the high pressure pumps can be disassembled for hand cleaning. The...

  11. 7 CFR 58.219 - High pressure pumps and lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High pressure pumps and lines. 58.219 Section 58.219....219 High pressure pumps and lines. High pressure lines may be cleaned-in-place and shall be of such construction that dead ends, valves and the high pressure pumps can be disassembled for hand cleaning. The...

  12. Engine having a high pressure hydraulic system and low pressure lubricating system

    DOEpatents

    Bartley, Bradley E.; Blass, James R.; Gibson, Dennis H.

    2000-01-01

    An engine includes a high pressure hydraulic system having a high pressure pump and at least one hydraulically-actuated device attached to an engine housing. A low pressure engine lubricating system is attached to the engine housing and includes a circulation conduit fluidly connected to an outlet from the high pressure pump.

  13. Sulfidation kinetics of dolomite at high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Misro, S.K.; Jadhav, R.; Gupta, H.; Agnihotri, R.; Chauk, S.; Fan, L.S.

    1999-07-01

    Kinetic studies of the dolomite sulfidation reaction are carried out at high pressure (15 atm) and high temperature (600--900 C) in a differential bed flow-through reactor. The dolomite particles are exposed to simulated coal gas environments and the extent of conversion determined. Experiments are carried out to determine the influence of total pressure, reaction temperature and partial pressure of H{sub 2}S on the extent of fully calcined dolomite (FCD) sulfidation. Based on the grain theory it is found that towards the later stages of the reaction the FCD sulfidation is product layer diffusion controlled. The reaction is found to be first order with respect to H{sub 2}S partial pressure. A low apparent activation energy of 4.6 kcal/gmol for the product layer diffusion controlled reaction is attributed to the presence of porous MgO along with the low porosity CaS product layer. A comparison of the performance of dolomite and limestone as sorbents for desulfurization shows that dolomite is a better sorbent with higher conversions even at higher CO{sub 2} partial pressures. The high pressure sulfidation kinetic data obtained in this study would be useful in understanding and optimizing the in-gasifier H{sub 2}S capture using dolomite sorbents.

  14. Efficacy of cumulative high-frequency rTMS on freezing of gait in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Su; Hyuk Chang, Won; Cho, Jin Whan; Youn, Jinyoung; Kim, Yun Kwan; Woong Kim, Sun; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Freezing of gait (FOG) affects mobility and balance seriously. Few reports have investigated the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on FOG in Parkinson’s disease (PD). We investigated the efficacy of high-frequency rTMS for the treatment of FOG in PD. Methods: Seventeen patients diagnosed with PD were recruited in a randomized, double-blinded, cross-over study. We applied high frequency rTMS (90% of resting motor threshold, 10 Hz, 1,000 pulses) over the lower leg primary motor cortex of the dominant hemisphere (M1-LL) for five sessions in a week. We also administered alternative sham stimulation with a two-week wash out period. The primary outcomes were measured before, immediately after, and one week after the intervention using the Standing Start 180° Turn Test (SS-180) with video analysis and the Freezing of Gait Questionnaire (FOG-Q). The secondary outcome measurements consisted of Timed Up and Go (TUG) tasks and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale part III (UPDRS-III). Motor cortical excitability was also evaluated. Results: There were significant improvements in the step required to complete the SS-180 and FOG-Q in the rTMS condition compared to the sham condition, and the effects continued for a week. The TUG and UPDRS-III also showed significant ameliorations over time in the rTMS condition. The MEP amplitude at 120% resting motor threshold and intracortical facilitation also increased after real rTMS condition. Conclusions: High frequency rTMS over the M1-LL may serve as an add-on therapy for improving FOG in PD. PMID:26409410

  15. Freezing temperatures of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O mixtures: Implications for polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Naihui

    1994-01-01

    The freezing temperatures of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O mixtures were systematically documented. Nitric acid was found to affect freezing significantly. Measurements show that nitric acid can cause substantial supercooling over a broad composition range. However, some ternary compositions, like to those in polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), have high freezing temperatures. The freezing of PSC particles could be controlled by the temperature and vapor pressure of both nitric acid and water in a non-linear way. Formation of polar stratospheric clouds may be forecasted on the basic of conditions of temperature and vapor contents of water and nitric acid.

  16. Freezing temperatures of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O mixtures: Implications for polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Naihui

    1994-01-01

    The freezing temperatures of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O mixtures were systematically documented. Nitric acid was found to affect freezing significantly. Measurements show that nitric acid can cause substantial supercooling over a broad composition range. However, some ternary compositions, like to those in polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), have high freezing temperatures. The freezing of PSC particles could be controlled by the temperature and vapor pressure of both nitric acid and water in a non-linear way. Formation of polar stratospheric clouds may be forecasted on the basic of conditions of temperature and vapor contents of water and nitric acid.

  17. Very high-pressure orogenic garnet peridotites

    PubMed Central

    Liou, J. G.; Zhang, R. Y.; Ernst, W. G.

    2007-01-01

    Mantle-derived garnet peridotites are a minor component in many very high-pressure metamorphic terranes that formed during continental subduction and collision. Some of these mantle rocks contain trace amounts of zircon and micrometer-sized inclusions. The constituent minerals exhibit pre- and postsubduction microstructures, including polymorphic transformation and mineral exsolution. Experimental, mineralogical, petrochemical, and geochronological characterizations using novel techniques with high spatial, temporal, and energy resolutions are resulting in unexpected discoveries of new phases, providing better constraints on deep mantle processes. PMID:17519341

  18. A high frequency silicon pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahng, S. K.; Gross, C.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical and design considerations as well as fabrication and experimental work involved in the development of high-frequency silicon pressure sensors with an ultra-small diaphragm are discussed. A sensor is presented with a rectangular diaphragm of 0.0127 cm x 0.0254 cm x 1.06 micron; the sensor has a natural frequency of 625 kHz and a sensitivity of 0.82 mv/v-psi. High-frequency results from shock tube testing and low-frequency (less than 50 kHz) comparison with microphones are given.

  19. Dissociation of methane under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guoying; Oganov, Artem R; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Hui; Li, Peifang; Li, Yinwei; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Zou, Guangtian

    2010-10-14

    Methane is an extremely important energy source with a great abundance in nature and plays a significant role in planetary physics, being one of the major constituents of giant planets Uranus and Neptune. The stable crystal forms of methane under extreme conditions are of great fundamental interest. Using the ab initio evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction, we found three novel insulating molecular structures with P2(1)2(1)2(1), Pnma, and Cmcm space groups. Remarkably, under high pressure, methane becomes unstable and dissociates into ethane (C(2)H(6)) at 95 GPa, butane (C(4)H(10)) at 158 GPa, and further, carbon (diamond) and hydrogen above 287 GPa at zero temperature. We have computed the pressure-temperature phase diagram, which sheds light into the seemingly conflicting observations of the unusually low formation pressure of diamond at high temperature and the failure of experimental observation of dissociation at room temperature. Our results support the idea of diamond formation in the interiors of giant planets such as Neptune.

  20. High-Pressure Trocar Insertion Technique

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Harry; Conti Ribeiro, Sergio; Rasmussen, Carsten; Rosenberg, Jay

    1999-01-01

    Background: The majority of laparoscopic complications occur at the time of Veress needle and trocar insertion. Although not very frequent, they increase the morbidity and mortality of both diagnostic and operative laparoscopic procedures. Alternative techniques of trocar insertion have been described but have not completely eliminated the risk of injury. Technique: After Veress needle insertion and establishment of pneumoperitoneum to 25 to 30 mm Hg, insertion of a short trocar is performed in the deepest part of the umbilicus without elevation of the anterior abdominal wall. The result is a parietal peritoneal puncture directly beneath the umbilicus. The high-pressure setting used during initial insertion of the trocar is lowered as soon as safe abdominal entry is documented. Experience: The trocar insertion technique described above was performed in 3041 procedures. No vascular injury occurred. There were two bowel perforations. No complications related to the increased intra-abdominal pressure were observed. Conclusion: The high-pressure abdominal entry technique has the advantage of reducing intra-abdominal trocar-related injuries without requiring additional instrumentation or additional training. PMID:10323169

  1. Dietary spermidine for lowering high blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Andreas; Schroeder, Sabrina; Pendl, Tobias; Harger, Alexandra; Stekovic, Slaven; Schipke, Julia; Magnes, Christoph; Schmidt, Albrecht; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Dammbrueck, Christopher; Gross, Angelina S; Herbst, Viktoria; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Pietrocola, Federico; Pieber, Thomas R; Sigrist, Stephan J; Linke, Wolfgang A; Mühlfeld, Christian; Sadoshima, Junichi; Dengjel, Joern; Kiechl, Stefan; Kroemer, Guido; Sedej, Simon; Madeo, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Loss of cardiac macroautophagy/autophagy impairs heart function, and evidence accumulates that an increased autophagic flux may protect against cardiovascular disease. We therefore tested the protective capacity of the natural autophagy inducer spermidine in animal models of aging and hypertension, which both represent major risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease. Dietary spermidine elicits cardioprotective effects in aged mice through enhancing cardiac autophagy and mitophagy. In salt-sensitive rats, spermidine supplementation also delays the development of hypertensive heart disease, coinciding with reduced arterial blood pressure. The high blood pressure-lowering effect likely results from improved global arginine bioavailability and protection from hypertension-associated renal damage. The polyamine spermidine is naturally present in human diets, though to a varying amount depending on food type and preparation. In humans, high dietary spermidine intake correlates with reduced blood pressure and decreased risk of cardiovascular disease and related death. Altogether, spermidine represents a cardio- and vascular-protective autophagy inducer that can be readily integrated in common diets. PMID:28118075

  2. Effects of freezing and thawing processes on the quality of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fillets.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, E; Chapleau, N; de Lamballerie, M; Lebail, A

    2007-06-01

    High-pressure processing is finding a growing interest in the food industry. Among the advantages of this emerging process is the ability to favorably freeze and thaw food. This study aims at comparing the effect of different freezing and thawing processes on the quality of Atlantic salmon fillets. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) samples were frozen by Pressure-Shift Freezing (PSF, 200 MPa, -18 degrees C) and Air-Blast Freezing (ABF, -30 degrees C, 4 m/s). Samples were stored 1 mo at -20 degrees C and then subjected to different thawing treatments: Air-Blast Thawing (ABT, 4 degrees C, 4 m/s), Immersion Thawing (IMT, 20 degrees C), and Pressure-Assisted Thawing (PAT, 200 MPa, 20 degrees C). Changes in texture, color, and drip loss were investigated. The toughness of the PSF samples was higher than that of the ABF sample. The modification of color was more important during high-pressure process than during the conventional process. The PSF process reduced thawing drip compared with ABF. The presence of small ice crystals in the pressure-shift frozen sample is probably the major reason leading to the reduced drip volumes. The freezing process was generally much more influent on quality parameters than the thawing process. These results show the interaction between freezing and thawing processes on selected quality parameters.

  3. Establishment of an Australian high pressure standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, J. K. L.

    2005-12-01

    A controlled-clearance pressure standard has been established at the National Measurement Institute of Australia as a high pressure standard for the realization of the national scale up to 200 MPa. The area of the piston was determined by comparison with a 25 mm diameter piston cylinder assembly that was measured dimensionally and the distortion coefficient was found by calculation and experiment. The controlled-clearance piston gauge was used to calibrate a 100 MPa piston cylinder unit with results agreed to 10 × 10-6 with calibration done at LNE. This 100 MPa unit was used in a regional key comparison with agreement to within 20 × 10-6 of the reference value.

  4. High stored energy of metallic glasses induced by high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Yang, Z. Z.; Ma, T.; Sun, Y. T.; Yin, Y. Y.; Gong, Y.; Gu, L.; Wen, P.; Zhu, P. W.; Long, Y. W.; Yu, X. H.; Jin, C. Q.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2017-03-01

    Modulating energy states of metallic glasses (MGs) is significant in understanding the nature of glasses and controlling their properties. In this study, we show that high stored energy can be achieved and preserved in bulk MGs by high pressure (HP) annealing, which is a controllable method to continuously alter the energy states of MGs. Contrary to the decrease in enthalpy by conventional annealing at ambient pressure, high stored energy can occur and be enhanced by increasing both annealing temperature and pressure. By using double aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, it is revealed that the preserved high energy, which is attributed to the coupling effect of high pressure and high temperature, originates from the microstructural change that involves "negative flow units" with a higher atomic packing density compared to that of the elastic matrix of MGs. The results demonstrate that HP-annealing is an effective way to activate MGs into higher energy states, and it may assist in understanding the microstructural origin of high energy states in MGs.

  5. Filament wound pressure vessels - Effects of using liner tooling of low pressure vessels for high pressure vessels development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Krishna M.

    High performance pressure vessels have been recently demanded for aerospace and defense applications. Filament wound pressure vessels consist of a metallic thin liner, which also acts as a mandrel, and composite/epoxy overwrap. Graphite/epoxy overwrapped vessels have been developed to obtain the performance ratio, PV/W, as high as one million inches. Under very high pressure the isotropic metallic liner deforms elasto-plastically, and orthotropic composite fibers deform elastically. Sometimes, for the development of ultra high pressure vessels, composite pressure vessels industry uses the existing liner tooling developed for low burst pressure capacity composite vessels. This work presents the effects of various design variables including the low pressure liner tooling for the development of the high burst pressure capacity Brilliant Pebbles helium tanks. Advance stress analysis and development of an ultra high pressure helium tank.

  6. Nonicosahedral boron allotrope synthesized at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvashova, Irina; Bykova, Elena; Bykov, Maxim; Prakapenka, Vitali; Glazyrin, Konstantin; Mezouar, Mohamed; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia

    2017-05-01

    Theoretical predictions of pressure-induced phase transformations often become long-standing enigmas because of limitations of contemporary available experimental possibilities. Hitherto the existence of a nonicosahedral boron allotrope has been one of them. Here we report on a nonicosahedral boron allotrope, which we denoted as ζ -B, with the orthorhombic α -Ga-type structure (space group Cmce) synthesized in a diamond-anvil cell at extreme high-pressure high-temperature conditions (115 GPa and 2100 K). The structure of ζ -B was solved using single-crystal synchrotron x-ray diffraction and its compressional behavior was studied in the range of very high pressures (115-135 GPa). Experimental validation of theoretical predictions reveals the degree of our up-to-date comprehension of condensed matter and promotes further development of solid-state physics and chemistry.

  7. Highly Loaded Low Pressure Turbine (LPT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Milt; Dalsania, Vithal

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate aspirated and non-aspirated aerodynamics on highly loaded LPT design. The objective is to increase stage loading by 30 to 50 percent without loss of efficiency for an existing low pressure turbine design. A study conducted on a NASA highly loaded multistage fan drive turbine (NASA CR-1964) indicated that end-wall bleed at the hub is a more significant parameter compared to aspirated airfoil. Based on this study, a 3-stage LPT is redesigned to 2-stage LIT with and without end-wall bleed. Both aerodynamic design and mechanical design are completed. In addition to end-wall bleed, exit guide vanes are designed with aspirated airfoils to reduce the losses. The LPT is redesigned with all constraints necessary for practical application. The benefit of the high-performance, highly loaded LPT shows up in reduced stage and part count, reduced size and weight, and reduced cost.

  8. 30 CFR 57.13021 - High-pressure hose connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false High-pressure hose connections. 57.13021... Air and Boilers § 57.13021 High-pressure hose connections. Except where automatic shutoff valves are...-pressure hose lines of 3/4-inch inside diameter or larger, and between high-pressure hose lines of...

  9. 30 CFR 57.13021 - High-pressure hose connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false High-pressure hose connections. 57.13021... Air and Boilers § 57.13021 High-pressure hose connections. Except where automatic shutoff valves are...-pressure hose lines of 3/4-inch inside diameter or larger, and between high-pressure hose lines of...

  10. 30 CFR 57.13021 - High-pressure hose connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false High-pressure hose connections. 57.13021... Air and Boilers § 57.13021 High-pressure hose connections. Except where automatic shutoff valves are...-pressure hose lines of 3/4-inch inside diameter or larger, and between high-pressure hose lines of...

  11. 30 CFR 57.13021 - High-pressure hose connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false High-pressure hose connections. 57.13021... Air and Boilers § 57.13021 High-pressure hose connections. Except where automatic shutoff valves are...-pressure hose lines of 3/4-inch inside diameter or larger, and between high-pressure hose lines of...

  12. 30 CFR 57.13021 - High-pressure hose connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High-pressure hose connections. 57.13021... Air and Boilers § 57.13021 High-pressure hose connections. Except where automatic shutoff valves are...-pressure hose lines of 3/4-inch inside diameter or larger, and between high-pressure hose lines of...

  13. 7 CFR 58.219 - High pressure pumps and lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... pressure pump shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standard for Homogenizers and Pumps of the Plunger Type. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High pressure pumps and lines. 58.219 Section 58.219....219 High pressure pumps and lines. High pressure lines may be cleaned-in-place and shall be of...

  14. 7 CFR 58.219 - High pressure pumps and lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... pressure pump shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standard for Homogenizers and Pumps of the Plunger Type. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High pressure pumps and lines. 58.219 Section 58.219....219 High pressure pumps and lines. High pressure lines may be cleaned-in-place and shall be of...

  15. 7 CFR 58.219 - High pressure pumps and lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... pressure pump shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standard for Homogenizers and Pumps of the Plunger Type. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High pressure pumps and lines. 58.219 Section 58.219....219 High pressure pumps and lines. High pressure lines may be cleaned-in-place and shall be of...

  16. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of inundation and Freeze /Thaw states in Alaska Using High Resolution ALOS PALSAR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarderakhsh, M.; McDonald, K. C.; Schroeder, R.; Steiner, N.; Podest, E.

    2013-12-01

    Monitoring freeze -thaw transitions and mapping the extent and dynamics of wetlands in high latitudes are critical to enhancing our knowledge about the biogeochemical transitions, carbon dynamics and prediction of boreal-arctic ecosystem. The upcoming Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission, scheduled for launch in October 2014, will have an L-band active / passive sensor package which will allow determination of soil moisture and the timing of landscape seasonal freeze/thaw states across the globe. In line with these ongoing efforts, this study aims to monitor inundation and Freeze and Thaw states in Alaska using Advanced Land Observing Satellite Phased Array L-Band SAR (ALOS PALSAR) ScanSAR observations. Four years of PALSAR measurements from 2007 to 2010 were acquired over the state of Alaska. Although wide-swath ScanSAR products, offer increased temporal coverage relative to standard narrow-beam SAR datasets, , they have a high variation of radar backscatter in across track because of the large swath width. We investigate the effect of incidence angle on radiometrically calibrated and terrain corrected ScanSAR data as a function of land surface (vegetation and roughness) and moisture content. These effects and their seasonal variation are used in classifiying inundated areas. The wetlands extent and inundation dynamics are crucial as they are an important component of the carbon cycle in Arctic regions. We apply pixel-based and object oriented-based classification methods to derive inundation maps during the thaw season. The dynamic inundation maps then are developed at 100m resolution. JERS and PALSAR Fine Beam mode based static wetlands map and Landsat Based land cover data (NLCD) are used to train and assess the classification at high resolution along with other ancillary data sets. The inundated areas obtained from wetland classification are then used to separate from other land cover types in F/T algorithm. We use a model based on Lambert's cosine

  17. High Pressure Microwave Powered UV Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekic, M.; Frank, J. D.; Popovic, S.; Wood, C. H.

    1997-10-01

    Industrial microwave powered (*electrodeless*) light sources have been limited to quiescent pressures of 300 Torr of buffer gas and metal- halide fills. Recently developed multi-atmospheric electronegative bu lb fills (noble gas-halide excimers, metal halide) require electric field s for ionization that are often large multiples of the breakdown voltage for air. For these fills an auxiliary ignition system is necessary. The most successful scheme utilizes a high voltage pulse power supply and a novel field emission source. Acting together they create localized condition of pressure reduction and high free electron density. This allows the normal microwave fields to drive this small region into avalanche, ignite the bulb, and heat the plasma to it's operating poin t Standard diagnostic techniques of high density discharges are inapplicable to the excimer bulbs, because of the ionic molecular exci ted state structure and absence of self-absorption. The method for temperature determination is based on the equilibrium population of certain vibrational levels of excimer ionic excited states. Electron d ensity was determined from the measurements of Stark profiles of H_β radiation from a small amount of hydrogen mixed with noble gas and halogens. At the present time, high pressure (Te 0.5eV, ne 3 x 10^17 cm-3) production bulbs produce over 900W of radiation in a 30nm band, centered at 30nm. Similarly, these prototypes when loaded with metal-halide bulb fills produce 1 kW of radiation in 30nm wide bands, centered about the wavelength of interest.

  18. Menopause and High Blood Pressure: What's the Connection?

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure (hypertension) Is there a connection between menopause and high blood pressure? Answers from Shannon K. ... Tommaso, M.D. Blood pressure generally increases after menopause. Some doctors think this increase suggests that hormonal ...

  19. LHDAC setup for high temperature and high pressure studies

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Nishant N. Meenakshi, S. Sharma, Surinder M.

    2014-04-24

    A ytterbium fibre laser (λ = 1.07 μm) based laser heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) facility has been recently set up at HP and SRPD, BARC for simultaneous high temperature and high pressure investigation of material properties. Synthesis of GaN was carried out at pressure of ∼9 GPa and temperature of ∼1925 K in a Mao-Bell type diamond anvil cell (DAC) using the LHDAC facility. The retrieved sample has been characterized using our laboratory based micro Raman setup.

  20. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems. 192.621 Section 192.621 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... STANDARDS Operations § 192.621 Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems....

  1. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Operations § 192.621 Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems. (a) No person may operate a segment of a high pressure distribution system at a pressure that exceeds the... segment of a distribution system otherwise designed to operate at over 60 p.s.i. (414 kPa) gage, unless...

  2. High pressure phase transitions in lawsonite at simultaneous high pressure and temperature: A single crystal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bannon, E. F., III; Vennari, C.; Beavers, C. C. G.; Williams, Q. C.

    2015-12-01

    Lawsonite (CaAl2Si2O7(OH)2.H2O) is a hydrous mineral with a high overall water content of ~11.5 wt.%. It is a significant carrier of water in subduction zones to depths greater than ~150 km. The structure of lawsonite has been extensively studied under room temperature, high-pressure conditions. However, simultaneous high-pressure and high-temperature experiments are scarce. We have conducted synchrotron-based simultaneous high-pressure and temperature single crystal experiments on lawsonite up to a maximum pressure of 8.4 GPa at ambient and high temperatures. We used a natural sample of lawsonite from Valley Ford, California (Sonoma County). At room pressure and temperature lawsonite crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with Cmcm symmetry. Room temperature compression indicates that lawsonite remains in the orthorhombic Cmcm space group up to ~9.0 GPa. Our 5.0 GPa crystal structure is similar to the room pressure structure, and shows almost isotropic compression of the crystallographic axes. Unit cell parameters at 5.0 GPa are a- 5.7835(10), b- 8.694(2), and c- 13.009(3). Single-crystal measurements at simultaneous high-pressure and temperature (e.g., >8.0 GPa and ~100 oC) can be indexed to a monoclinic P-centered unit cell. Interestingly, a modest temperature increase of ~100 oC appears to initiate the orthorhombic to monoclinic phase transition at ~0.6-2.4 GPa lower than room temperature compression studies have shown. There is no evidence of dehydration or H atom disorder under these conditions. This suggests that the orthorhombic to monoclinic transition could be kinetically impeded at 298 K, and that monoclinic lawsonite could be the dominant water carrier through much of the depth range of upper mantle subduction processes.

  3. High-pressure promoted combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor); Stoltzfus, Joel M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    In the preferred embodiment of the promoted combusiton chamber disclosed herein, a thick-walled tubular body that is capable of withstanding extreme pressures is arranged with removable upper and lower end closures to provide access to the chamber for dependently supporting a test sample of a material being evaluated in the chamber. To facilitate the real-time analysis of a test sample, several pressure-tight viewing ports capable of withstanding the simulated environmental conditions are arranged in the walls of the tubular body for observing the test sample during the course of the test. A replaceable heat-resistant tubular member and replaceable flame-resistant internal liners are arranged to be fitted inside of the chamber for protecting the interior wall surfaces of the combustion chamber during the evaluation tests. Inlet and outlet ports are provided for admitting high-pressure gases into the chamber as needed for performing dynamic analyses of the test sample during the course of an evaluation test.

  4. High-pressure Raman study of Terephthalonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, DongFei; Zhang, KeWei; Song, MingXing; Zhai, NaiCui; Sun, ChengLin; Li, HaiBo

    2017-02-01

    The in situ high-pressure Raman spectra of Terephthalonitrile (TPN) have been investigated from ambient to 12.6 GPa at room temperature. All the fundamental vibrational modes of TPN at ambient were assigned based on the first-principle calculations. A detailed Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that TPN underwent a phase transition at 5.3 GPa. The frequencies of the TPN Raman peaks increase with increasing the pressure which can be attributed to the reduction in the interatomic distances and the escalation of effective force constants. The intensity of the C-C-C ring-out-plane deformation mode increases gradually as the frequency remains almost constant during the compression which can be explained by the existence of π-π interactions in TPN molecules. Additionally, the pressure-induced structural changes of TPN on the Fermi resonance between the C ≡ N out-of-plane vibration mode and the C - CN out-of-plane vibration mode have been analyzed.

  5. High-pressure transformations in xenon hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Sanloup, Chrystèle; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2002-01-01

    A high-pressure investigation of the Xe⋅H2O chemical system was conducted by using diamond-anvil cell techniques combined with in situ Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron x-ray diffraction, and laser heating. Structure I xenon clathrate was observed to be stable up to 1.8 GPa, at which pressure it transforms to a new Xe clathrate phase stable up to 2.5 GPa before breaking down to ice VII plus solid xenon. The bulk modulus and structure of both phases were determined: 9 ± 1 GPa for Xe clathrate A with structure I (cubic, a = 11.595 ± 0.003 Å, V = 1,558.9 ± 1.2 Å3 at 1.1 GPa) and 45 ± 5 GPa for Xe clathrate B (tetragonal, a = 8.320 ± 0.004 Å, c = 10.287 ± 0.007 Å, V = 712.1 ± 1.2 Å3 at 2.2 GPa). The extended pressure stability field of Xe clathrate structure I (A) and the discovery of a second Xe clathrate (B) above 1.8 GPa have implications for xenon in terrestrial and planetary interiors. PMID:11756690

  6. High blood pressure in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Riley, Margaret; Bluhm, Brian

    2012-04-01

    High blood pressure in children and adolescents is a growing health problem that is often overlooked by physicians. Normal blood pressure values for children and adolescents are based on age, sex, and height, and are available in standardized tables. Prehypertension is defined as a blood pressure in at least the 90th percentile, but less than the 95th percentile, for age, sex, and height, or a measurement of 120/80 mm Hg or greater. Hypertension is defined as blood pressure in the 95th percentile or greater. A secondary etiology of hypertension is much more likely in children than in adults, with renal parenchymal disease and renovascular disease being the most common. Overweight and obesity are strongly correlated with primary hypertension in children. A history and physical examination are needed for all children with newly diagnosed hypertension to help rule out underlying medical disorders. Children with hypertension should also be screened for other risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia, and should be evaluated for target organ damage with a retinal examination and echocardiography. Hypertension in children is treated with lifestyle changes, including weight loss for those who are overweight or obese; a healthy, low-sodium diet; regular physical activity; and avoidance of tobacco and alcohol. Children with symptomatic hypertension, secondary hypertension, target organ damage, diabetes, or persistent hypertension despite nonpharmacologic measures should be treated with antihypertensive medications. Thiazide diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta blockers, and calcium channel blockers are safe, effective, and well tolerated in children.

  7. Conformable pressure vessel for high pressure gas storage

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Lavender, Curt A.; Newhouse, Norman L.; Yeggy, Brian C.

    2016-01-12

    A non-cylindrical pressure vessel storage tank is disclosed. The storage tank includes an internal structure. The internal structure is coupled to at least one wall of the storage tank. The internal structure shapes and internally supports the storage tank. The pressure vessel storage tank has a conformability of about 0.8 to about 1.0. The internal structure can be, but is not limited to, a Schwarz-P structure, an egg-crate shaped structure, or carbon fiber ligament structure.

  8. Atmospheric freeze drying for the reduction of powder electrostatics of amorphous, low density, high surface area pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, K P; Cai, Z; Schmerler, P; Williams, R O

    2013-02-01

    Amorphous itraconazole (ITZ) was prepared by Thin Film Freezing (TFF) utilizing 1,4-dioxane as the solvent with subsequent solvent removal via conventional tray lyophilization (ITZ LYO) or atmospheric freeze drying (ITZ AFD). ITZ AFD was prepared under various drying conditions to assess the influence of drying parameters on powder properties. XRD analysis confirmed all products were amorphous and DSC analysis revealed both drying processes resulted in the formation of the nematic mesophase of ITZ. SEM revealed a larger pore size and agglomerate size with fewer fine particles (i.e. less than 10 microns in diameter) for ITZ AFD compared to ITZ LYO. Residual solvent analysis revealed a primary drying temperature of -10°C resulted in residual solvent levels above the acceptable limits set by the International Conference on Harmonization as a result of microcollapse. Primary drying temperatures of less than -10°C resulted in acceptable residual solvent levels. The extent of microcollapse did not alter the macrostructure of the resulting powder. Powder flowability was determined to be similar for ITZ AFD and ITZ LYO based on Carr's index and the Hausner ratio, as well as by dynamic angle of repose. All powders displayed poor flowability. Chargeability measurements demonstrated a lower charge transfer for ITZ AFD powders compared to ITZ LYO due to a combination of factors including differences in residual solvent level, particle size, pore size, surface area, and fine particles content. The reduction in chargeability as a result of AFD is highly desirable because it allows for improved powder handling and use post-production.

  9. Association between oxidative stress and contextual fear conditioning in Carioca high- and low-conditioned freezing rats.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Waseem; Gomes, Vitor de Castro; Pinton, Simone; Batista Teixeira da Rocha, Joao; Landeira-Fernandez, J

    2013-05-28

    We recently reported two novel breeding lines of rats known as Carioca high-and low-conditioned freezing (CHF and CLF), based on defensive freezing responses to contextual cues previously associated with electric footshock. The anxiety-like profile of these animals from the 7th generation was tested in the elevated plus maze. The results indicated that CHF animals presented a significantly more "anxious" phenotype compared with CLF animals. Animals from the 12th generation were used to evaluate the oxidative stress status of the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) were evaluated using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA; a sensor of reactive oxygen species [ROS]), and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), an early marker of lipid peroxidation, were assessed. The results indicated that free radical concentrations and MDA levels were significantly higher in all three brain structures in CHF rats compared with CLF rats. Our data also showed that the hippocampus had the highest reactive species and MDA concentrations compared with the cortex and cerebellum in CHF rats. Animals from the 16th generation were used to evaluate the antioxidant enzyme activity of catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) within these three brain structures. The results indicated that CAT activity was lower in the cortex and hippocampus in CHF rats compared with CLF rats. No significant difference was observed in the cerebellum. The enzymatic activity of GPx was significantly decreased in all three structures in CHF rats compared with CLF rats. The hippocampus exhibited the highest GPx activity compared with the other two brain structures. These findings suggest the involvement of a redox system in these two bidirectional lines, and the hippocampus might be one of the prime brain structures involved in this state of oxidative stress imbalance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTION KINETICS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Guenther, Ph.D.

    2003-01-28

    SRI has completed the NBFZ test program, made modification to the experimental furnace for the HPBO test. The NBFZ datasets provide the information NEA needs to simulate the combustion and fuel-N conversion with detailed chemical reaction mechanisms. BU has determined a linear swell of 1.55 corresponding to a volumetric increase of a factor of 3.7 and a decrease in char density by the same factor. These results are highly significant, and indicate significantly faster burnout at elevated pressure due to the low char density and large diameter.

  11. High-Pressure Oxygen Test Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.; Key, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    The relevance of impact sensitivity testing to the development of the space shuttle main engine is discussed in the light of the special requirements for the engine. The background and history of the evolution of liquid and gaseous oxygen testing techniques and philosophy is discussed also. The parameters critical to reliable testing are treated in considerable detail, and test apparatus and procedures are described and discussed. Materials threshold sensitivity determination procedures are considered and a decision logic diagram for sensitivity threshold determination was plotted. Finally, high-pressure materials sensitivity test data are given for selected metallic and nonmetallic materials.

  12. Purification using high pressure molten aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sample, Vivek M.; Cassada, William A.

    A novel technique has been developed to separate eutectic forming elements using a continuous supply of high pressure molten aluminum. In this continuous process, enriched liquid in the mushy zone is selectively expelled from the solidifying mold through a permeable membrane. The fraction of expelled liquid and the level of purification attained can be controlled in real time. Applications of this technique for refining smelter grade aluminum as well as recycling aluminum scrap are being explored. Unique aspects and advantages of the process will be discussed.

  13. A picosecond high pressure gas switch

    SciTech Connect

    Cravey, W.R.; Poulsen, P.P.; Pincosy, P.A.

    1992-06-01

    Work is being done to develop a high pressure gas switch (HPGS) with picosecond risetimes for UWB applications. Pulse risetimes on the order of 200 picoseconds have been observed at 1 kHz prf and 1 atmosphere. Calculations show that switching closure times on the order of tens of picoseconds can be achieved at high pressures and higher electric fields. A voltage hold-off of 1 MV/cm has been measured at 10 atmospheres and several MV/cm appears possible with the HPGS. With these high electric field levels, energy storage of tens of Joules in a reasonably sized package is achievable. Initial HPGS performance has been characterized on the WASP pulse generator at LLNL. A detailed description of the switch used for initial testing is given. Switch recovery times of 1-ms have been measured at 1 atmosphere. Data on the switching uniformity, voltage hold-off recovery, and pulse repeatability, is presented. In addition, a physics switch model is described and results are compared with lab data.

  14. [Hypertensive urgency or high blood pressure variability?

    PubMed

    Rodionov, A V

    2017-01-01

    Hypertensive urgency (HU) is a common reason particularly for elderly patients to seek medical advice. Severe asymptomatic hypertension and situational high blood pressure (BP) in patients with its high variability is frequently taken as HU. The use of short-acting antihypertensive drugs is not only indicated in these situations, but it may also increase the risk of cardiovascular events (CVE). Over the past decade, increased BP variability is an independent predictor for a higher risk of CVE. Among the major groups of antihypertensive drugs, there are calcium antagonists, mainly amlodipine, which has the greatest potential to reduce BP variability. Thus, calcium antagonists can be considered as first-line drugs for patients with high BP variability.

  15. The acoustic velocity, refractive index, and equation of state of liquid ammonia dihydrate under high pressure and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunli; Wu, Xiaoxin; Huang, Fengxian; Zhou, Qiang; Li, Fangfei; Cui, Qiliang

    2012-09-14

    High-pressure and high-temperature Brillouin scattering studies have been performed on liquid of composition corresponding to the ammonia dihydrate stoichiometry (NH(3)·2H(2)O) in a diamond anvil cell. Using the measured Brillouin frequency shifts from 180° back- and 60° platelet-scattering geometries, the acoustic velocity, refractive index, density, and adiabatic bulk modulus have been determined under pressure up to freezing point along the 296, 338, 376, and 407 K isotherms. Along these four isotherms, the acoustic velocities increase smoothly with increasing pressure but decrease with the increased temperature. However, the pressure dependence of the refractive indexes on the four isotherms exhibits a change in slope around 1.5 GPa. The bulk modulus increases linearly with pressure and its slope, dB/dP, decreases from 6.83 at 296 K to 4.41 at 407 K. These new datasets improve our understanding of the pressure- and temperature-induced molecular structure changes in the ammonia-water binary system.

  16. Construction from a single parent of baker's yeast strains with high freeze tolerance and fermentative activity in both lean and sweet doughs.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, S; Ouchi, K

    1994-10-01

    From a freeze-tolerant baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), 2,333 spore clones were obtained. To improve the leavening ability in lean dough of the parent strain, we selected 555 of the high-maltose-fermentative spore clones by using a method in which a soft agar solution containing maltose and bromocresol purple was overlaid on yeast colonies. By measuring the gassing power in the dough, we selected 66 spore clones with a good leavening ability in lean dough and a total of 694 hybrids were constructed by crossing them. Among these hybrids, we obtained 50 novel freeze-tolerant strains with good leavening ability in all lean, regular, and sweet doughs comparable to that of commercial baker's yeast. Hybrids with improved leavening ability or freeze tolerance compared with the parent yeast and commercial baker's yeasts were also obtained. These results suggest that hybridization between spore clones derived from a single parent strain is effective for improving the properties of baker's yeasts.

  17. Method transfer from high-pressure liquid chromatography to ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography. II. Temperature and pressure effects.

    PubMed

    Åsberg, Dennis; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Leśko, Marek; Cavazzini, Alberto; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2015-07-03

    The importance of the generated temperature and pressure gradients in ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) are investigated and compared to high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The drug Omeprazole, together with three other model compounds (with different chemical characteristics, namely uncharged, positively and negatively charged) were used. Calculations of the complete temperature profile in the column at UHPLC conditions showed, in our experiments, a temperature difference between the inlet and outlet of 16 °C and a difference of 2 °C between the column center and the wall. Through van't Hoff plots, this information was used to single out the decrease in retention factor (k) solely due to the temperature gradient. The uncharged solute was least affected by temperature with a decrease in k of about 5% while for charged solutes the effect was more pronounced, with k decreases up to 14%. A pressure increase of 500 bar gave roughly 5% increase in k for the uncharged solute, while omeprazole and the other two charged solutes gave about 25, 20 and 15% increases in k, respectively. The stochastic model of chromatography was applied to estimate the dependence of the average number of adsorption/desorption events (n) and the average time spent by a molecule in the stationary phase (τs) on temperature and pressure on peak shape for the tailing, basic solute. Increasing the temperature yielded an increase in n and decrease in τs which resulted in less skew at high temperatures. With increasing pressure, the stochastic modeling gave interesting results for the basic solute showing that the skew of the peak increased with pressure. The conclusion is that pressure effects are more pronounced for both retention and peak shape than the temperature effects for the polar or charged compounds in our study.

  18. High blood pressure and visual sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, Alvin; Samples, John R.

    2003-09-01

    The study had two main purposes: (1) to determine whether the foveal visual sensitivities of people treated for high blood pressure (vascular hypertension) differ from the sensitivities of people who have not been diagnosed with high blood pressure and (2) to understand how visual adaptation is related to standard measures of systemic cardiovascular function. Two groups of middle-aged subjects-hypertensive and normotensive-were examined with a series of test/background stimulus combinations. All subjects met rigorous inclusion criteria for excellent ocular health. Although the visual sensitivities of the two subject groups overlapped extensively, the age-related rate of sensitivity loss was, for some measures, greater for the hypertensive subjects, possibly because of adaptation differences between the two groups. Overall, the degree of steady-state sensitivity loss resulting from an increase of background illuminance (for 580-nm backgrounds) was slightly less for the hypertensive subjects. Among normotensive subjects, the ability of a bright (3.8-log-td), long-wavelength (640-nm) adapting background to selectively suppress the flicker response of long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cones was related inversely to the ratio of mean arterial blood pressure to heart rate. The degree of selective suppression was also related to heart rate alone, and there was evidence that short-term changes of cardiovascular response were important. The results suggest that (1) vascular hypertension, or possibly its treatment, subtly affects visual function even in the absence of eye disease and (2) changes in blood flow affect retinal light-adaptation processes involved in the selective suppression of the flicker response from LWS cones caused by bright, long-wavelength backgrounds.

  19. High-pressure coal fuel processor development

    SciTech Connect

    Greenhalgh, M.L.

    1992-11-01

    The objective of Subtask 1.1 Engine Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of ignition and stable combustion of directly injected, 3,000 psi, low-Btu gas with glow plug ignition assist at diesel engine compression ratios. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the combustion performance of synthesized low-Btu coal gas in a single-cylinder test engine combustion rig located at the Caterpillar Technical Center engine lab in Mossville, Illinois. The objective of Subtask 1.2 Fuel Processor Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of air-blown, fixed-bed, high-pressure coal fuel processing at up to 3,000 psi operating pressure, incorporating in-bed sulfur and particulate capture. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the performance of bench-scale processors located at Coal Technology Corporation (subcontractor) facilities in Bristol, Virginia. These two subtasks were carried out at widely separated locations and will be discussed in separate sections of this report. They were, however, independent in that the composition of the synthetic coal gas used to fuel the combustion rig was adjusted to reflect the range of exit gas compositions being produced on the fuel processor rig. Two major conclusions resulted from this task. First, direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize these low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risks associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept.

  20. Towards an Improved Algorithm for Estimating Freeze-Thaw Dates of a High Latitude Lake Using Texture Analysis of SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uppuluri, A. V.; Jost, R. J.; Luecke, C.; White, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    Analyzing the freeze-thaw dates of high latitude lakes is an important part of climate change studies. Due to the various advantages provided by the use of SAR images, with respect to remote monitoring of small lakes, SAR image analysis is an obvious choice to estimate lake freeze-thaw dates. An important property of SAR images is its texture. The problem of estimating freeze-thaw dates can be restated as a problem of classifying an annual time series of SAR images based on the presence or absence of ice. We analyzed a few algorithms based on texture to improve the estimation of freeze-thaw dates for small lakes using SAR images. We computed the Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) for each image and extracted ten different texture features from the GLCM. We used these texture features (namely, Energy, Contrast, Correlation, Homogeneity, Entropy, Autocorrelation, Dissimilarity, Cluster Shade, Cluster Prominence and Maximum Probability as previously used in studies related to the texture analysis of SAR sea ice imagery) as input to a group of classification algorithms to find the most accurate classifier and set of texture features that can help to decide the presence or absence of ice on the lake. The accuracy of the estimated freeze-thaw dates is dependent on the accuracy of the classifier. It is considered highly difficult to differentiate between open water (without wind) and the first day of ice formed on the lake (due to the similar mean backscatter values) causing inaccuracy in calculating the freeze date. Similar inaccuracy in calculating the thaw date arise due to the close backscatter values of water (with wind) and later stages of ice on the lake. Our method is promising but requires further research in improving the accuracy of the classifiers and selecting the input features.

  1. Synergistic and Antagonistic Effects of Combined Subzero Temperature and High Pressure on Inactivation of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Marwen; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; Gervais, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The combined effects of subzero temperature and high pressure on the inactivation of Escherichia coli K12TG1 were investigated. Cells of this bacterial strain were exposed to high pressure (50 to 450 MPa, 10-min holding time) at two temperatures (−20°C without freezing and 25°C) and three water activity levels (aw) (0.850, 0.992, and ca. 1.000) achieved with the addition of glycerol. There was a synergistic interaction between subzero temperature and high pressure in their effects on microbial inactivation. Indeed, to achieve the same inactivation rate, the pressures required at −20°C (in the liquid state) were more than 100 MPa less than those required at 25°C, at pressures in the range of 100 to 300 MPa with an aw of 0.992. However, at pressures greater than 300 MPa, this trend was reversed, and subzero temperature counteracted the inactivation effect of pressure. When the amount of water in the bacterial suspension was increased, the synergistic effect was enhanced. Conversely, when the aw was decreased by the addition of solute to the bacterial suspension, the baroprotective effect of subzero temperature increased sharply. These results support the argument that water compression is involved in the antimicrobial effect of high pressure. From a thermodynamic point of view, the mechanical energy transferred to the cell during the pressure treatment can be characterized by the change in volume of the system. The amount of mechanical energy transferred to the cell system is strongly related to cell compressibility, which depends on the water quantity in the cytoplasm. PMID:16391037

  2. Stable magnesium peroxide at high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Lobanov, Sergey S.; Zhu, Qiang; Holtgrewe, Nicholas; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Oganov, Artem R.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    Rocky planets are thought to comprise compounds of Mg and O as these are among the most abundant elements, but knowledge of their stable phases may be incomplete. MgO is known to be remarkably stable to very high pressure and chemically inert under reduced condition of the Earth’s lower mantle. However, in exoplanets oxygen may be a more abundant constituent. Here, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction in laser-heated diamond anvil cells, we show that MgO and oxygen react at pressures above 96 GPa and T = 2150 K with the formation of I4/mcm MgO2. Raman spectroscopy detects the presence of a peroxide ion (O22−) in the synthesized material as well as in the recovered specimen. Likewise, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy confirms that the recovered sample has higher oxygen content than pure MgO. Our finding suggests that MgO2 may be present together or instead of MgO in rocky mantles and rocky planetary cores under highly oxidized conditions. PMID:26323635

  3. Stable Lithium Argon compounds under high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofeng; Hermann, Andreas; Peng, Feng; Lv, Jian; Wang, Yanchao; Wang, Hui; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    High pressure can fundamentally alter the bonding patterns of chemical elements. Its effects include stimulating elements thought to be “inactive” to form unexpectedly stable compounds with unusual chemical and physical properties. Here, using an unbiased structure search method based on CALYPSO methodology and density functional total energy calculations, the phase stabilities and crystal structures of Li−Ar compounds are systematically investigated at high pressure up to 300 GPa. Two unexpected LimArn compounds (LiAr and Li3Ar) are predicted to be stable above 112 GPa and 119 GPa, respectively. A detailed analysis of the electronic structure of LiAr and Li3Ar shows that Ar in these compounds attracts electrons and thus behaves as an oxidizing agent. This is markedly different from the hitherto established chemical reactivity of Ar. Moreover, we predict that the P4/mmm phase of Li3Ar has a superconducting transition temperature of 17.6 K at 120 GPa. PMID:26582083

  4. High pressure-resistant nonincendive emulsion explosive

    DOEpatents

    Ruhe, Thomas C.; Rao, Pilaka P.

    1994-01-01

    An improved emulsion explosive composition including hollow microspheres/bulking agents having high density and high strength. The hollow microspheres/bulking agents have true particle densities of about 0.2 grams per cubic centimeter or greater and include glass, siliceous, ceramic and synthetic resin microspheres, expanded minerals, and mixtures thereof. The preferred weight percentage of hollow microspheres/bulking agents in the composition ranges from 3.0 to 10.0 A chlorinated paraffin oil, also present in the improved emulsion explosive composition, imparts a higher film strength to the oil phase in the emulsion. The emulsion is rendered nonincendive by the production of sodium chloride in situ via the decomposition of sodium nitrate, a chlorinated paraffin oil, and sodium perchlorate. The air-gap sensitivity is improved by the in situ formation of monomethylamine perchlorate from dissolved monomethylamine nitrate and sodium perchlorate. The emulsion explosive composition can withstand static pressures to 139 bars and dynamic pressure loads on the order of 567 bars.

  5. High Pressure Hydrogen from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Typical approximations employed in first-principles simulations of high-pressure hydrogen involve the neglect of nuclear quantum effects (NQE) and the approximate treatment of electronic exchange and correlation, typically through a density functional theory (DFT) formulation. In this talk I'll present a detailed analysis of the influence of these approximations on the phase diagram of high-pressure hydrogen, with the goal of identifying the predictive capabilities of current methods and, at the same time, making accurate predictions in this important regime. We use a path integral formulation combined with density functional theory, which allows us to incorporate NQEs in a direct and controllable way. In addition, we use state-of-the-art quantum Monte Carlo calculations to benchmark the accuracy of more approximate mean-field electronic structure calculations based on DFT, and we use GW and hybrid DFT to calculate the optical properties of the solid and liquid phases near metallization. We present accurate predictions of the metal-insulator transition on the solid, including structural and optical properties of the molecular phase. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by LDRD Grant No. 13-LW-004.

  6. Pressure Distribution Over Airfoils at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, L J; Dryden, H L

    1927-01-01

    This report deals with the pressure distribution over airfoils at high speeds, and describes an extension of an investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of certain airfoils which was presented in NACA Technical Report no. 207. The results presented in report no. 207 have been confirmed and extended to higher speeds through a more extensive and systematic series of tests. Observations were also made of the air flow near the surface of the airfoils, and the large changes in lift coefficients were shown to be associated with a sudden breaking away of the flow from the upper surface. The tests were made on models of 1-inch chord and comparison with the earlier measurements on models of 3-inch chord shows that the sudden change in the lift coefficient is due to compressibility and not to a change in the Reynolds number. The Reynolds number still has a large effect, however, on the drag coefficient. The pressure distribution observations furnish the propeller designer with data on the load distribution at high speeds, and also give a better picture of the air-flow changes.

  7. High-pressure structures of yttrium hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lu-Lu; Sun, Hui-Juan; Wang, C. Z.; Lu, Wen-Cai

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the crystal structures of YH3 and YH4 at high pressure (100-250 GPa) have been explored using a genetic algorithm combined with first-principles calculations. New structures of YH3 with space group symmetries of P21/m and I4/mmm were predicted. The electronic structures and the phonon dispersion properties of various YH3 and YH4 structures at different temperatures and pressures were investigated. Among YH3 phases, the P21/m structure of YH3 was found to have a relatively high superconducting transformation temperature T c of 19 K at 120 GPa, which is reduced to 9 K at 200 GPa. Other YH3 structures have much lower T cs. Compared with YH3, the T c of the YH4 compound is much higher, i.e. 94 K at 120 GPa and 55 K at 200 GPa.

  8. Synthesis of sodium polyhydrides at high pressures

    DOE PAGES

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kim, Duck Young; Stavrou, Elissaios; ...

    2016-07-28

    Archetypal ionic NaH is the only known compound of sodium and hydrogen. Application of high pressure is known to promote states with higher atomic coordination, but extensive searches for polyhydrides with unusual stoichiometry have had only limited success in spite of several theoretical predictions. Here we report the first observation of the formation of polyhydrides of Na (NaH3 and NaH7) above 40 GPa and 2,000 K. Moreover, we combine synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and theoretical random structure searching, which both agree on the stable structures and compositions. Our results support the formationmore » of multicenter bonding in a material with unusual stoichiometry. These results are applicable to the design of new energetic solids and high-temperature superconductors based on hydrogen-rich materials.« less

  9. Food processing by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazutaka

    2017-04-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) process, as a nonthermal process, can be used to inactivate microbes while minimizing chemical reactions in food. In this regard, a HHP level of 100 MPa (986.9 atm/1019.7 kgf/cm(2)) and more is applied to food. Conventional thermal process damages food components relating color, flavor, and nutrition via enhanced chemical reactions. However, HHP process minimizes the damages and inactivates microbes toward processing high quality safe foods. The first commercial HHP-processed foods were launched in 1990 as fruit products such as jams, and then some other products have been commercialized: retort rice products (enhanced water impregnation), cooked hams and sausages (shelf life extension), soy sauce with minimized salt (short-time fermentation owing to enhanced enzymatic reactions), and beverages (shelf life extension). The characteristics of HHP food processing are reviewed from viewpoints of nonthermal process, history, research and development, physical and biochemical changes, and processing equipment.

  10. Model of current enhancement at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.S.; Melendez, R.E.

    1983-04-05

    A model is proposed to account for the phenomenon of net current enhancement at high pressures recently observed on the Experimental Test Accelerator. The proposed mechanism involves energetic secondary electrons (delta rays) which are pushed forward by the self-magnetic field of the electron beam. For high current beams, the forward delta ray current can build up to a significant fraction of the beam current. Analytic calculations of the steady-state solution as well as the rate of buildup of the delta ray current are presented in this paper. In addition, numerical results from a nonlocal Boltzmann code, NUTS, are presented. The analytic and numerical results have many features which are in qualitative agreement with the experiments, but quantitative discrepancies still exist.

  11. Synthesis of sodium polyhydrides at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kim, Duck Young; Stavrou, Elissaios; Muramatsu, Takaki; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Pickard, Chris J.; Needs, Richard J.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-07-01

    The only known compound of sodium and hydrogen is archetypal ionic NaH. Application of high pressure is known to promote states with higher atomic coordination, but extensive searches for polyhydrides with unusual stoichiometry have had only limited success in spite of several theoretical predictions. Here we report the first observation of the formation of polyhydrides of Na (NaH3 and NaH7) above 40 GPa and 2,000 K. We combine synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and theoretical random structure searching, which both agree on the stable structures and compositions. Our results support the formation of multicenter bonding in a material with unusual stoichiometry. These results are applicable to the design of new energetic solids and high-temperature superconductors based on hydrogen-rich materials.

  12. Synthesis of sodium polyhydrides at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kim, Duck Young; Stavrou, Elissaios; Muramatsu, Takaki; Mao, Ho-kwang; Pickard, Chris J.; Needs, Richard J.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-07-28

    Archetypal ionic NaH is the only known compound of sodium and hydrogen. Application of high pressure is known to promote states with higher atomic coordination, but extensive searches for polyhydrides with unusual stoichiometry have had only limited success in spite of several theoretical predictions. Here we report the first observation of the formation of polyhydrides of Na (NaH3 and NaH7) above 40 GPa and 2,000 K. Moreover, we combine synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and theoretical random structure searching, which both agree on the stable structures and compositions. Our results support the formation of multicenter bonding in a material with unusual stoichiometry. These results are applicable to the design of new energetic solids and high-temperature superconductors based on hydrogen-rich materials.

  13. Synthesis of sodium polyhydrides at high pressures

    PubMed Central

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kim, Duck Young; Stavrou, Elissaios; Muramatsu, Takaki; Mao, Ho-kwang; Pickard, Chris J.; Needs, Richard J.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-01-01

    The only known compound of sodium and hydrogen is archetypal ionic NaH. Application of high pressure is known to promote states with higher atomic coordination, but extensive searches for polyhydrides with unusual stoichiometry have had only limited success in spite of several theoretical predictions. Here we report the first observation of the formation of polyhydrides of Na (NaH3 and NaH7) above 40 GPa and 2,000 K. We combine synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and theoretical random structure searching, which both agree on the stable structures and compositions. Our results support the formation of multicenter bonding in a material with unusual stoichiometry. These results are applicable to the design of new energetic solids and high-temperature superconductors based on hydrogen-rich materials. PMID:27464650

  14. FREEZING AND THAWING RESISTANCE OF CONCRETE WITH INITIAL CRACK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Hideki; Hayashi, Hiroshi; Saiki, Yusuke; Sando, Koichi; Koga, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Motoyuki

    Freezing and thawing resistance of concrete with an initial crack was investigated. The specimens were classified into plane concrete, fiber reinforced concrete, and reinforced concrete. In the tests of plane concrete with an initial crack, the crack grows seriously by the frozen expansion pressure of the water infiltrated into the crack, though the concrete material had high resistance to freezing and thawing. In the experimental results of fiber reinforced concrete, the long polypropylene fiber was useful to prevent the spalling of concrete cover, though the crack growth was not prevented. Moreover, in the experimental results of reinforced concrfete, it was shown that the crack growth was effectively prevented by steel reinforcing bar.

  15. Evolution of Titan's High-Pressure Ice layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, C.; Kalousova, K.

    2016-12-01

    Constraints on the present interior structure of Titan come from the gravity science experiment onboard the Cassini spacecraft and from the interpretation of the Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) wave observed by the Huygens probe [1, 2]. From the surface to the center, Titan would be composed of 4 layers: an icy crust, a global salty ocean, a layer of high-pressure ice (HP ice) and a core made of hydrated silicates [2, 3, 4]. The presence of a large amount of 40Ar in Titan's atmosphere argues for a geologically recent exchange process between the silicate core, where 40Ar is produced by the decay of 40K, and the atmosphere. Argon must then be able to be transported from the silicate core to the surface. This study investigates how volatiles can be transported through the HP ice layer.Recent numerical simulations [5] have demonstrated that the dynamics of the HP ice layer is controlled by convection processes in a two-phase material (water and high-pressure ice). The silicate / HP ice interface is maintained at the melting temperature, which might allow for the incorporation of volatiles such as 40Ar into the convecting HP ice. Above the hot thermal boundary layer, the temperature of the convecting HP ice is below the melting temperature, except for the upwelling plumes when they approach the cold thermal boundary layer. The upper part of the HP ice layer is at the melting point and permeable for water transport, providing a path for the transfer of volatiles trapped in the ice towards the ocean.Scaling laws are inferred from the numerical simulations [5]. They are then used to model the evolution of the HP ice layer. Specifically, we look at the effect of (i) ice viscosity, (ii) heat flux at the silicate/HP ice interface, and (iii) presence of anti-freeze compounds in the ocean, on the thickness of the HP ice layer. In addition, our results provide insights on possible resurfacing processes that could explain the geologically young age of Titan's surface. This work

  16. Rheological assessment of nanofluids at high pressure high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjirakat, Anoop; Sadr, Reza

    2013-11-01

    High pressure high temperature (HPHT) fluids are commonly encountered in industry, for example in cooling and/or lubrications applications. Nanofluids, engineered suspensions of nano-sized particles dispersed in a base fluid, have shown prospective as industrial cooling fluids due to their enhanced rheological and heat transfer properties. Nanofluids can be potentially utilized in oil industry for drilling fluids and for high pressure water jet cooling/lubrication in machining. In present work rheological characteristics of oil based nanofluids are investigated at HPHT condition. Nanofluids used in this study are prepared by dispersing commercially available SiO2 nanoparticles (~20 nm) in a mineral oil. The basefluid and nanofluids with two concentrations, namely 1%, and 2%, by volume, are considered in this investigation. The rheological characteristics of base fluid and the nanofluids are measured using an industrial HPHT viscometer. Viscosity values of the nanofluids are measured at pressures of 100 kPa to 42 MPa and temperatures ranging from 25°C to 140°C. The viscosity values of both nanofluids as well as basefluid are observed to have increased with the increase in pressure. Funded by Qatar National Research Fund (NPRP 08-574-2-239).

  17. Electron microscopy of high pressure frozen samples: bridging the gap between cellular ultrastructure and atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Studer, Daniel; Humbel, Bruno M; Chiquet, Matthias

    2008-11-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has provided most of what is known about the ultrastructural organization of tissues, cells, and organelles. Due to tremendous advances in crystallography and magnetic resonance imaging, almost any protein can now be modeled at atomic resolution. To fully understand the workings of biological "nanomachines" it is necessary to obtain images of intact macromolecular assemblies in situ. Although the resolution power of electron microscopes is on the atomic scale, in biological samples artifacts introduced by aldehyde fixation, dehydration and staining, but also section thickness reduces it to some nanometers. Cryofixation by high pressure freezing circumvents many of the artifacts since it allows vitrifying biological samples of about 200 mum in thickness and immobilizes complex macromolecular assemblies in their native state in situ. To exploit the perfect structural preservation of frozen hydrated sections, sophisticated instruments are needed, e.g., high voltage electron microscopes equipped with precise goniometers that work at low temperature and digital cameras of high sensitivity and pixel number. With them, it is possible to generate high resolution tomograms, i.e., 3D views of subcellular structures. This review describes theory and applications of the high pressure cryofixation methodology and compares its results with those of conventional procedures. Moreover, recent findings will be discussed showing that molecular models of proteins can be fitted into depicted organellar ultrastructure of images of frozen hydrated sections. High pressure freezing of tissue is the base which may lead to precise models of macromolecular assemblies in situ, and thus to a better understanding of the function of complex cellular structures.

  18. New developments in high pressure x-ray spectroscopy beamline at High Pressure Collaborative Access Team

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y. M. Chow, P.; Boman, G.; Bai, L. G.; Rod, E.; Bommannavar, A.; Kenney-Benson, C.; Sinogeikin, S.; Shen, G. Y.

    2015-07-15

    The 16 ID-D (Insertion Device - D station) beamline of the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source is dedicated to high pressure research using X-ray spectroscopy techniques typically integrated with diamond anvil cells. The beamline provides X-rays of 4.5-37 keV, and current available techniques include X-ray emission spectroscopy, inelastic X-ray scattering, and nuclear resonant scattering. The recent developments include a canted undulator upgrade, 17-element analyzer array for inelastic X-ray scattering, and an emission spectrometer using a polycapillary half-lens. Recent development projects and future prospects are also discussed.

  19. Stable xenon nitride at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Feng; Wang, Yanchao; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Yunwei; Ma, Yanming

    2015-09-01

    Nitrides in many ways are fascinating since they often appear as superconductors, high-energy density, and hard materials. Though there exist a large variety of nitrides, noble gas nitrides are missing in nature. Pursuit of noble gas nitrides has therefore become the subject of topical interests, but remains as a great challenge since molecular nitrogen (N2, a major form of nitrogen) and noble gases are both inert systems and do not interact at normal conditions. We show through a first-principles swarm-structure search that high pressure enables a direct interaction of N2 and xenon (Xe) above 146 GPa. The resultant Xe nitride has a peculiar stoichiometry of XeN6, possessing a high-energy density of approximately 2.4 kJg -1, rivaling that of the modern explosives. Structurally, XeN6 is intriguing with the appearance of chaired N6 hexagons and unusually high 12-coordination of Xe bonded with N. Our work opens up the possibility of achieving Xe nitride with superior high-energy density whose formation is long sought as impossible.

  20. High-pressure coal fuel processor development

    SciTech Connect

    Greenhalgh, M.L. )

    1992-12-01

    Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

  1. High pressure FAST of nanocrystalline barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Fraga, Martin B.; Delplanque, Jean -Pierre; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Monson, Todd C.

    2016-06-01

    Here, this work studies the microstructural evolution of nanocrystalline (<1 µm) barium titanate (BaTiO3), and presents high pressure in field-assisted sintering (FAST) as a robust methodology to obtain >100 nm BaTiO3 compacts. Using FAST, two commercial ~50 nm powders were consolidated into compacts of varying densities and grain sizes. Microstructural inhomogeneities were investigated for each case, and an interpretation is developed using a modified Monte Carlo Potts (MCP) simulation. Two recurrent microstructural inhomogeneities are highlighted, heterogeneous grain growth and low-density regions, both ubiqutously present in all samples to varying degrees. In the worst cases, HGG presents an area coverage of 52%. Because HGG is sporadic but homogenous throughout a sample, the catalyst (e.g., the local segregation of species) must be, correspondingly, distributed in a homogenous manner. MCP demonstrates that in such a case, a large distance between nucleating abnormal grains is required—otherwise abnormal grains prematurely impinge on each other, and their size is not distinguishable from that of normal grains. Compacts sintered with a pressure of 300 MPa and temperatures of 900 °C, were 99.5% dense and had a grain size of 90±24 nm. These are unprecedented results for commercial BaTiO3 powders or any starting powder of 50 nm particle size—other authors have used 16 nm lab-produced powder to obtain similar results.

  2. High pressure FAST of nanocrystalline barium titanate

    DOE PAGES

    Fraga, Martin B.; Delplanque, Jean -Pierre; Yang, Nancy; ...

    2016-06-01

    Here, this work studies the microstructural evolution of nanocrystalline (<1 µm) barium titanate (BaTiO3), and presents high pressure in field-assisted sintering (FAST) as a robust methodology to obtain >100 nm BaTiO3 compacts. Using FAST, two commercial ~50 nm powders were consolidated into compacts of varying densities and grain sizes. Microstructural inhomogeneities were investigated for each case, and an interpretation is developed using a modified Monte Carlo Potts (MCP) simulation. Two recurrent microstructural inhomogeneities are highlighted, heterogeneous grain growth and low-density regions, both ubiqutously present in all samples to varying degrees. In the worst cases, HGG presents an area coverage ofmore » 52%. Because HGG is sporadic but homogenous throughout a sample, the catalyst (e.g., the local segregation of species) must be, correspondingly, distributed in a homogenous manner. MCP demonstrates that in such a case, a large distance between nucleating abnormal grains is required—otherwise abnormal grains prematurely impinge on each other, and their size is not distinguishable from that of normal grains. Compacts sintered with a pressure of 300 MPa and temperatures of 900 °C, were 99.5% dense and had a grain size of 90±24 nm. These are unprecedented results for commercial BaTiO3 powders or any starting powder of 50 nm particle size—other authors have used 16 nm lab-produced powder to obtain similar results.« less

  3. [High blood pressure and physical exercise].

    PubMed

    Sosner, P; Gremeaux, V; Bosquet, L; Herpin, D

    2014-06-01

    High blood pressure is a frequent pathology with many cardiovascular complications. As highlighted in guidelines, the therapeutic management of hypertension relies on non-pharmacological measures, which are diet and regular physical activity, but both patients and physicians are reluctant to physical activity prescription. To acquire the conviction that physical activity is beneficial, necessary and possible, we can take into account some fundamental and clinical studies, as well as the feedback of our clinical practice. Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and hypertension contributes to increase this risk. Conversely, regular practice of physical activity decreases very significantly the risk by up to 60%. The acute blood pressure changes during exercise and post-exercise hypotension differs according to the dynamic component (endurance or aerobic and/or strength exercises), but the repetition of the sessions leads to the chronic hypotensive benefit of physical activity. Moreover, physical activity prescription must take into account the assessment of global cardiovascular risk, the control of the hypertension, and the opportunities and desires of the patient in order to promote good adherence and beneficial lifestyle change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Engineering Model of High Pressure Moist Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    The article deals with the moist air equation of state. There are equations of state discussed in the article, i.e. the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases, the model of an ideal mixture of real gases and the model based on the virial equation of state. The evaluation of sound speed based on the ideal mixture concept is mentioned. The sound speed calculated by the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases is compared with the sound speed calculated by using the model based on the concept of an ideal mixture of real gases. The comparison of enthalpy end entropy based on the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases and the model of an ideal mixture of real gases is performed. It is shown that the model of an ideal mixture of real gases deviates from the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases only in the case of high pressure. An impossibility of the definition of partial pressure in the mixture of real gases is discussed, where the virial equation of state is used.

  5. High pressure FAST of nanocrystalline barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Fraga, Martin B.; Delplanque, Jean -Pierre; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Monson, Todd C.

    2016-06-01

    Here, this work studies the microstructural evolution of nanocrystalline (<1 µm) barium titanate (BaTiO3), and presents high pressure in field-assisted sintering (FAST) as a robust methodology to obtain >100 nm BaTiO3 compacts. Using FAST, two commercial ~50 nm powders were consolidated into compacts of varying densities and grain sizes. Microstructural inhomogeneities were investigated for each case, and an interpretation is developed using a modified Monte Carlo Potts (MCP) simulation. Two recurrent microstructural inhomogeneities are highlighted, heterogeneous grain growth and low-density regions, both ubiqutously present in all samples to varying degrees. In the worst cases, HGG presents an area coverage of 52%. Because HGG is sporadic but homogenous throughout a sample, the catalyst (e.g., the local segregation of species) must be, correspondingly, distributed in a homogenous manner. MCP demonstrates that in such a case, a large distance between nucleating abnormal grains is required—otherwise abnormal grains prematurely impinge on each other, and their size is not distinguishable from that of normal grains. Compacts sintered with a pressure of 300 MPa and temperatures of 900 °C, were 99.5% dense and had a grain size of 90±24 nm. These are unprecedented results for commercial BaTiO3 powders or any starting powder of 50 nm particle size—other authors have used 16 nm lab-produced powder to obtain similar results.

  6. How to Prevent High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider will use a gauge, a stethoscope or electronic sensor, and a blood pressure cuff. For most ... pressure. Stress management techniques include exercising, listening to music, focusing on something calm or peaceful, and meditating. ...

  7. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  8. Windowless High-Pressure Solar Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K. N. R.

    1985-01-01

    Obscuration by reaction products eliminated. Chemical reactor heated by Sunlight employs rocket technology to maintain internal pressure. Instead of keeping chamber tightly closed, pressure maintained by momentum balance between incoming and outgoing materials. Windowless solar reactor admits concentrated Sunlight through exhaust aperture. Pressure in reactor maintained dynamically.

  9. High-pressure phase behavior of binary mixtures of octacosane and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, M.A.; Seckner, A.J.; Yogan, T.J.

    1984-11-01

    The high-pressure fluid phase behavior of binary mixtures of octacosane and CO/sub 2/ is experimentally investigated. Solubilities of octacosane in supercritical CO/sub 2/ and mixture molar volumes are determined for isotherms of 34.7, 45.4, 50.2, and 52.0/sup 0/C over a range of pressures from 80 to 325 atm. The solubility data are obtained by two different experimental techniques. The pressure-temperature projection of the two branches of the three-phase solid-liquid-gas freezing point depression curve is also determined. The octacosane-CO/sub 2/ LCEP is determined as 32.2/sup 0/ C and 72.6 atm. The UCEP, which is at a pressure greater than 650 atm, could not be determined due to the pressure limitation of the experimental apparatus. Phase diagram constructions are used qualitatively to explain the observed phase behavior and to provide information on the expected phase behavior of the octacosane-CO/sub 2/ system at pressures higher than those experimentally investigated.

  10. Very high temperature silicon on silicon pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Anthony D.; Nunn, Timothy A.; Briggs, Stephen A.; Ned, Alexander

    1992-01-01

    A silicon on silicon pressure sensor has been developed for use at very high temperatures (1000 F). The design principles used to fabricate the pressure sensor are outlined and results are presented of its high temperature performance.

  11. A Nutritional Strategy for the Treatment of High Blood Pressure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podell, Richard N.

    1984-01-01

    Some physicians wonder if high blood pressure can be controlled without the use of drugs and their potential side effects. Current findings concerning nutrition and high blood pressure are presented. (RM)

  12. High blood pressure - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about high blood pressure; Hypertension - what to ask your doctor ... problems? What medicines am I taking to treat high blood pressure? Do they have any side effects? What should ...

  13. High Blood Pressure, Afib and Your Risk of Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More High Blood Pressure, AFib and Your Risk of Stroke Updated:Aug ... have a stroke for the first time have high blood pressure . And an irregular atrial heart rhythm — a condition ...

  14. A Nutritional Strategy for the Treatment of High Blood Pressure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podell, Richard N.

    1984-01-01

    Some physicians wonder if high blood pressure can be controlled without the use of drugs and their potential side effects. Current findings concerning nutrition and high blood pressure are presented. (RM)

  15. High Blood Pressure, Afib and Your Risk of Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More High Blood Pressure, Afib and Your Risk of Stroke Updated:Sep ... have a stroke for the first time have high blood pressure . And an irregular atrial heart rhythm — a condition ...

  16. High-pressure NMR reveals close similarity between cold and alcohol protein denaturation in ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Vajpai, Navratna; Nisius, Lydia; Wiktor, Maciej; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2013-01-29

    Proteins denature not only at high, but also at low temperature as well as high pressure. These denatured states are not easily accessible for experiment, because usually heat denaturation causes aggregation, whereas cold or pressure denaturation occurs at temperatures well below the freezing point of water or pressures above 5 kbar, respectively. Here we have obtained atomic details of the pressure-assisted, cold-denatured state of ubiquitin at 2,500 bar and 258 K by high-resolution NMR techniques. Under these conditions, a folded, native-like and a disordered state exist in slow exchange. Secondary chemical shifts show that the disordered state has structural propensities for a native-like N-terminal β-hairpin and α-helix and a nonnative C-terminal α-helix. These propensities are very similar to the previously described alcohol-denatured (A-)state. Similar to the A-state, (15)N relaxation data indicate that the secondary structure elements move as independent segments. The close similarity of pressure-assisted, cold-denatured, and alcohol-denatured states with native and nonnative secondary elements supports a hierarchical mechanism of folding and supports the notion that similar to alcohol, pressure and cold reduce the hydrophobic effect. Indeed, at nondenaturing concentrations of methanol, a complete transition from the native to the A-state can be achieved at ambient temperature by varying the pressure from 1 to 2,500 bar. The methanol-assisted pressure transition is completely reversible and can also be induced in protein G. This method should allow highly detailed studies of protein-folding transitions in a continuous and reversible manner.

  17. DNS of High Pressure Supercritical Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Shao Teng; Raman, Venkatramanan

    2016-11-01

    Supercritical flows have always been important to rocket motors, and more recently to aircraft engines and stationary gas turbines. The purpose of the present study is to understand effects of differential diffusion on reacting scalars using supercritical isotropic turbulence. Focus is on fuel and oxidant reacting in the transcritical region where density, heat capacity and transport properties are highly sensitive to variations in temperature and pressure. Reynolds and Damkohler number vary as a result and although it is common to neglect differential diffusion effects if Re is sufficiently large, this large variation in temperature with heat release can accentuate molecular transport differences. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) for one step chemistry reaction between fuel and oxidizer are used to examine the differential diffusion effects. A key issue investigated in this paper is if the flamelet progress variable approach, where the Lewis number is usually assumed to be unity and constant for all species, can be accurately applied to simulate supercritical combustion.

  18. Low energy high pressure miniature screw valve

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.; Spletzer, Barry L.

    2006-12-12

    A low energy high pressure screw valve having a valve body having an upper portion and a lower portion, said lower portion of said valve body defining an inlet flow passage and an outlet flow passage traversing said valve body to a valve seat, said upper portion of said valve body defining a cavity at said valve seat, a diaphragm restricting flow between said upper portion of said valve body and said lower portion, said diaphragm capable of engaging said valve seat to restrict fluid communication between said inlet passage and said outlet passage, a plunger within said cavity supporting said diaphragm, said plunger being capable of engaging said diaphragm with said valve seat at said inlet and outlet fluid passages, said plunger being in point contact with a drive screw having threads engaged with opposing threads within said upper portion of said valve body such engagement allowing motion of said drive screw within said valve body.

  19. Safety improvements in high pressure thermal machines

    SciTech Connect

    Otters, J.L.

    1988-02-09

    In a thermal machine of the type including a machine body having a main axis extending between a thermal end and a work end, a working fluid at relatively high pressure in a working fluid chamber defined in the body and a displacer element reciprocable within the chamber for subjecting the fluid to a thermodynamic cycle in cooperation with a reciprocable work piston, the improvement is described comprising outer shell means enclosing the machine body for maintaining a substantially sealed atmosphere about the machine body, and diffuser means arranged between the machine body and the outer shell means for diffusing a shock wave traveling towards the outer shell means resulting from explosive failure of the machine body and for shielding the outer shell means against fragments projected upon such failure.

  20. High Pressure Quick Disconnect Particle Impact Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) performed particle impact testing to determine whether there is a particle impact ignition hazard in the quick disconnects (QDs) in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) on the International Space Station (ISS). Testing included standard supersonic and subsonic particle impact tests on 15-5 PH stainless steel, as well as tests performed on a QD simulator. This paper summarizes the particle impact tests completed at WSTF. Although there was an ignition in Test Series 4, it was determined the ignition was caused by the presence of a machining imperfection. The sum of all the test results indicates that there is no particle impact ignition hazard in the ISS ECLSS QDs. KEYWORDS: quick disconnect, high pressure, particle impact testing, stainless steel

  1. Ceramic high pressure gas path seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liotta, G. C.

    1987-01-01

    Stage 1 ceramic shrouds (high pressure turbine gas path seal) were developed for the GE T700 turbine helicopter engine under the Army/NASA Contract NAS3-23174. This contract successfully proved the viability and benefits of a Stage 1 ceramic shroud for production application. Stage 1 ceramic shrouds were proven by extensive component and engine testing. This Stage 1 ceramic shroud, plasma sprayed ceramic (ZrOs-BY2O3) and bond coating (NiCrAlY) onto a cast metal backing, offers significant engine performance improvement. Due to the ceramic coating, the amount of cooling air required is reduced 20% resulting in a 0.5% increase in horsepower and a 0.3% decrease in specific fuel consumption. This is accomplished with a component which is lower in cost than the current production shroud. Stage 1 ceramic shrouds will be introduced into field service in late 1987.

  2. Condensed matter at high shock pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Holmes, N.C.; Mitchell, A.C.; Radousky, H.B.; Hamilton, D.

    1985-07-12

    Experimental techniques are described for shock waves in liquids: Hugoniot equation-of-state, shock temperature and emission spectroscopy, electrical conductivity, and Raman spectroscopy. Experimental data are reviewed and presented in terms of phenomena that occur at high densities and temperatures in shocked He, Ar, N/sub 2/, CO, SiO/sub 2/-aerogel, H/sub 2/O, and C/sub 6/H/sub 6/. The superconducting properties of Nb metal shocked to 100 GPa (1 Mbar) and recovered intact are discussed in terms of prospects for synthesizing novel, metastable materials. Ultrahigh pressure data for Cu is reviewed in the range 0.3 to 6TPa (3 to 60 Mbar). 56 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Urea and deuterium mixtures at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M. Husband, R. J.; Frantzana, A. D.; Loveday, J. S.; Bull, C. L.; Klotz, S.

    2015-03-28

    Urea, like many network forming compounds, has long been known to form inclusion (guest-host) compounds. Unlike other network formers like water, urea is not known to form such inclusion compounds with simple molecules like hydrogen. Such compounds if they existed would be of interest both for the fundamental insight they provide into molecular bonding and as potential gas storage systems. Urea has been proposed as a potential hydrogen storage material [T. A. Strobel et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 478, 97 (2009)]. Here, we report the results of high-pressure neutron diffraction studies of urea and D{sub 2} mixtures that indicate no inclusion compound forms up to 3.7 GPa.

  4. High-pressure behavior of hydrous phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookherjee, M.; Tsuchiya, J.; Hermann, A.; Speziale, S.

    2016-12-01

    One of the most distinguishing features of the Earth is its surface water, which is a crucial component in making it a habitable planet. How this water is partitioned among the various reservoirs within the Earth's interior is of considerable interest to the Solid Earth Sciences community. In convergent plate margins such as subduction zone, the hydrous phases in the subducting slabs deliver water into the Earth's interior. Upon reaching greater depths, depending on the limits of their thermodynamic stability, the hydrous phases dehydrate, releasing water. A fraction of water is released back into the hydrosphere through arc volcanism. Recent estimates show that the worldwide flux of water from subducting slabs amounts to about one ocean mass over the age of the Earth. The water in the Earth's interior is stored in several distinct forms: as aqueous fluids; hydrous silicate melts; nominally anhydrous phases; grain boundaries, and various hydrous phases. Among these multiple hosts, hydrous phases are particularly important because they influence solid earth processes in the crust and mantle. The thermodynamic stability of hydrous phases dictates how efficiently they transport and store water in the Earth's interior. Their presence severely affects the onset of melting. Hydrous phases that are likely to be stable at higher pressures are often not recorded in natural samples. It is possible that these hydrous phases are not sampled by melts that arise from depths that are shallower than where high-pressure hydrous phases may occur. It is also possible that these hydrous phases do not survive exhumation. In addition, many hydrous phases might have limited thermal stability. High-pressure experiments and first-principles simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) have been crucial in enhancing our understanding of hydrous phases that are likely to be present in the Earth's mantle and subduction zones. In this study, we present DFT results and compare them with

  5. Digital valve for high pressure high flow applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Lewis, Derek; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Hall, Jeffery L.

    2016-04-01

    To address the challenges, which are involved with the development of flow control valves that can meet high demand requirements such as high pressure, high flow rate, limited power and limited space, the authors have conceived a novel design configuration. This design consists of a digitalized flow control valve with multipath and multistage pressure reduction structures. Specifically, the valve is configured as a set of parallel flow paths from the inlet to the outlet. A choke valve controls the total flow rate by digitally opening different paths or different combination of the paths. Each path is controlled by a poppet cap valve basically operated in on-off states. The number of flow states is 2N where N is the number of flow paths. To avoid erosion from sand in the fluid and high speed flow, the seal area of the poppet cap valve is located at a distance from the flow inlet away from the high speed flow and the speed is controlled to stay below a predefined erosion safe limit. The path is a multistage structure composed of a set of serial nozzles-expansion chambers that equally distribute the total pressure drop to each stage. The pressure drop of each stage and, therefore, the flow speed at the nozzles and expansion chambers is controlled by the number of stages. The paths have relatively small cross section and could be relatively long for large number of stages and still fit in a strict annular space limit. The paper will present the design configuration, analysis and preliminary test results.

  6. System design for buried high-pressure/high-temperature pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    A pipeline expands or contracts when temperatures or pressures vary from the conditions at the time the pipeline was installed. Buried pipelines operating at high temperatures and pressures experience extreme compressive loads. Because radial expansion is limited by soil restraint, buried pipelines expand axially. High axial forces combined with imperfections in the seabed may overstress the pipeline or result in upheaval buckling. Methods to control expansion and upheaval buckling were investigated for the design of a buried high-pressure/high temperature (HP/HT) sour-gas flowline in Mobile Bay, Alabama. After investigating conventional and unconventional methods, the decision was made to use expansion loops over the length of the pipeline to protect the risers and reduce axial force in the middle of the pipeline. Expansion loops and doglegs act as springs to absorb pipeline expansion. Methods were investigated to prevent soil from accumulating around the buried expansion loops. Commercially available concrete dog houses used to protect pipelines and expansion loops from dropped objects were not suitable for burial, and fabrication of custom concrete housing was expensive. Fabrication of a steel enclosure was the solution chosen. A mathematical model based on internal-design guidelines and ultimate soil friction was used to determine placement and size of the expansion loops.

  7. Effect of high pressure on mesophilic lactic fermentation streptococci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reps, A.; Kuźmicka, M.; Wiśniewska, K.

    2008-07-01

    The research concerned the effect of high pressure on mesophilic lactic fermentation streptococci, present in two cheese-making commercial inocula produced by Christian-Hansen. Water solutions of inocula were pressurized at 50-800 MPa, at room temperature, for 30-120 min. Pressurization at 50-100 MPa slightly increased or reduced the number of lactic streptococci, depending on the inoculum and pressurization time. Pressurization at 200 MPa caused a reduction in the number of streptococci by over 99.9%, whereas the pressure of 400 MPa and above almost completely inactivated streptococci. Pressurization also reduced the dynamics of microorganism growth and acidification, to the degree depending on the pressure.

  8. High rate internal pressurization of the human eye to determine dynamic rupture pressure.

    PubMed

    Bisplinghoff, Jill A; McNally, Craig; Yang, Siyang; Herring, Ian P; Brozoski, Fred T; Duma, Stefan M

    2008-01-01

    Over 1.9 million people suffer from eye injuries in the United States, occurring from automobile accidents, sports related impacts, and military combat. The purpose of the current study is to analyze the rupture pressure of human eyes using a high rate pressurization system. Internal pressure was dynamically induced into the eye with a drop tower pressurization system. The rupture pressure was measured with a small pressure sensor inserted into the optic nerve. A total of 10 human eye dynamic pressure tests were performed to determine rupture pressure and to compare the results with previous data. It was found that the average high rate rupture pressure of human eyes is 0.89+/- 0.25 MPa. In comparing these data with previous studies, it is concluded that as the loading rate increases the rupture pressure also increases.

  9. Potential of satellite-based land emissivity estimates for the detection of high-latitude freeze and thaw states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Satya; Norouzi, Hamid; Azarderakhsh, Marzi; Blake, Reginald; Khanbilvardi, Reza

    2017-03-01

    Reliable detection of freeze and thaw (FT) states is crucial for the terrestrial water cycle, biogeochemical transitions, carbon and methane feedback to the atmosphere, and for the surface energy budget and its associated impacts on the global climate system. This paper is novel in that for the first time a unique approach to examine the potential of passive microwave remotely sensed land emissivity and its added values of being free from the atmospheric effects and being sensitive to surface characteristics is being applied to the detection of FT states for latitudes north of 35°N. Since accurate characterizations of the soil state are highly dependent on land cover types, a novel threshold-based approach specific to different land cover types is proposed for daily FT detection from the use of 3 years (August 2012 to July 2015) of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-2 land emissivity estimates. Ground-based soil temperature observations are used as reference to develop threshold values for FT states. Preliminary evaluation of the proposed approach with independent ground observations over Alaska for the year 2015 shows that the use of land emissivity estimates for high-latitude FT detection is promising.

  10. 77 FR 37712 - High Pressure Steel Cylinders From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... COMMISSION High Pressure Steel Cylinders From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed... imports of high pressure steel cylinders from China, provided for in subheading 7311.00.00 of the... following notification of preliminary determinations by Commerce that imports of high pressure...

  11. What about African Americans and High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... whites. • Heredity —A tendency to have high blood pressure runs in families. • Age — In general, the older you get, the greater your chance of developing high blood pressure. • Sex — Men tend to develop high blood pressure ...

  12. Metabolic Activity of Bacteria at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2008-12-01

    Over the last 20 years, there has been increasing evidence for the presence of a large number of microbes in the oceanic subsurface. Such a habitat has a very low energy input because it is deprived of light. A few meters below the sediment surface, conditions are already anoxic in most cases, sulfate reduction and/or methanogenesis becoming thus the primary respiratory reactions of organic matter. Neither the fate of methanogenesis, nor the fate of Dissimilatory Metal-Reduction (DMR) has been investigated so far as a function of pressure. For this reason, we measured experimentally the pressure limits of microbial anaerobic energetic metabolism. In practice, we measured in situ the kinetics of selenite respiration by the bacterial model Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) between 0 and 150 MPa at 30°C. MR-1 stationary-phase cells were used in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium amended with lactate as an additional electron donor and sodium selenite as an electron acceptor. In situ measurements were performed by X- ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy in both a diamond-anvil cell and an autoclave. A red precipitate of amorphous Se(0) was virtually observed at any pressure to 150 MPa. A progressive reduction of selenite Se(IV) into selenium Se(0) was also observed in the evolution of XANES spectra with time. All kinetics between 0.1 and 150 MPa can be adjusted to a first order kinetic law. MR-1 respires all available selenite up to 60 MPa. Above 60 MPa, the respiration yield decreases linearly as a function of pressure and reaches 0 at 155 ±5 MPa. This indicates that selenite respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 stops at about 155 MPa, whereas its growth is arrested at 50 MPa. Hence, the present results show that the respiration of selenium by the strain MR-1 occurs efficiently up to 60 MPa and 30°C, i.e. from the surface of a continental sediment to an equivalent depth of about 2 km, or beneath a 5-km water column and

  13. Electrical resistivity of iron at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, L.; Seagle, C.; Fei, Y.; Shahar, A.

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of thermal conductivity of iron under high-pressure and temperature conditions is crucial to understand the heat transport and the thermal evolution of planetary interior. However, measurements of thermal conductivity at high pressure and temperature are challenging and experimental data are limited. In this study, we report the measured electrical resistivity of iron at high pressure and temperature. The data are then translated to thermal conductivity through Wiedemann-Franz law. A four-probe method was employed to measure the resistances of a cylindrical wire during heating cycles at high pressure. Experiments at 5, 7 and 13 GPa were performed on an iron wire sample by using a multi-anvil apparatus at the Geophysical Laboratory. At 5, 7 and 13 GPa, the measured electrical resistivity of iron at room temperature are 9.06 mΩ-cm (bcc phase), 8.85 mΩ-cm (bcc phase) and 12.72 mΩ-cm (hcp phase), respectively. The results are in a good agreement with reported room-temperature data. The kinks in electrical resistivity associated with the phase transitions of iron were clearly observed in each run. At 5 and 7 GPa, kinks in the electrical resistivity can be noticed at 677 oC and 652 oC, respectively, due to the bcc to fcc phase transition. At 5 GPa and 1687 oC, melting led to a discontinuous change in electrical resistivity. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity for bcc, fcc, and hcp iron are well constrained from these measurements. The hcp iron displays the strongest temperature dependence compared with that of the bcc and fcc phases. Our results provide critical thermodynamic parameters to constrain heat transport in the planetary cores.

  14. Probing Hydrogen Diffusion under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bove, L. E.; Klotz, S.; Strassle, T.; Saitta, M.

    2012-12-01

    The study of the microscopic mechanism governing hydrogen and hydrogen-based liquids (as water, ammonia and methane) diffusion is crucial for a variety of scientific issues spanning most of natural sciences. As an example, characterizing hydrogen diffusion in a confined medium, like in porous systems or zeolites, is fundamental in problems relating to environment, hydrogen storage and industrial applications [1]. The presence of water diffusion in the minerals of the Earth's mantle have strong incidence on the processes governing volcanic eruptions and intermediate-depth seismicity. As last example, knowing in details the microscopic dynamics of hydrogen-based simple liquids under extreme conditions is essential in order to interpret observations and develop models of planet interiors [2]. On the other hand, water and other simple hydrogen-based liquids have always been key systems in the development of modern condensed-matter physics, because of their simple electronic structure and the peculiar properties deriving from the hydrogen-bond network. Their high compressibility and chemical reactivity have made these systems very challenging to study experimentally under static high P-T conditions. In the last few years, a large effort has been undertaken by several groups around the world [2] to extend the static and dynamic techniques to high temperatures and pressures, a program in which our group has been actively involved [3-6]. However, while the structure of water and other hydrogenated liquids of geological interest, is now known up to almost 20 GPa, the study of their transport properties greatly lags behind. We have recently developed a new large-volume gasket-anvil ensemble for the Paris-Edinburgh press based on a novel toroidal design [7], which allows to perform quasi elastic neutron scattering measurements on hydrogen based liquids up to one order of magnitude higher pressures (5 GPa) respect to what was achievable with standard methods [8]. The large

  15. Freeze/Thaw-Induced Embolism: Probability of Critical Bubble Formation Depends on Speed of Ice Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sevanto, Sanna; Holbrook, N. Michele; Ball, Marilyn C.

    2012-06-06

    Bubble formation in the conduits of woody plants sets a challenge for uninterrupted water transportation from the soil up to the canopy. Freezing and thawing of stems has been shown to increase the number of air-filled (embolized) conduits, especially in trees with large conduit diameters. Despite numerous experimental studies, the mechanisms leading to bubble formation during freezing have not been addressed theoretically. We used classical nucleation theory and fluid mechanics to show which mechanisms are most likely to be responsible for bubble formation during freezing and what parameters determine the likelihood of the process. Our results confirm the common assumption that bubble formation during freezing is most likely due to gas segregation by ice. If xylem conduit walls are not permeable to the salts expelled by ice during the freezing process, osmotic pressures high enough for air seeding could be created. The build-up rate of segregated solutes in front of the ice-water interface depends equally on conduit diameter and freezing velocity. Therefore, bubble formation probability depends on these variables. The dependence of bubble formation probability on freezing velocity means that the experimental results obtained for cavitation threshold conduit diameters during freeze/thaw cycles depend on the experimental setup; namely sample size and cooling rate. The velocity dependence also suggests that to avoid bubble formation during freezing trees should have narrow conduits where freezing is likely to be fast (e.g., branches or outermost layer of the xylem). Avoidance of bubble formation during freezing could thus be one piece of the explanation why xylem conduit size of temperate and boreal zone trees varies quite systematically.

  16. Freeze/Thaw-Induced Embolism: Probability of Critical Bubble Formation Depends on Speed of Ice Formation

    DOE PAGES

    Sevanto, Sanna; Holbrook, N. Michele; Ball, Marilyn C.

    2012-06-06

    Bubble formation in the conduits of woody plants sets a challenge for uninterrupted water transportation from the soil up to the canopy. Freezing and thawing of stems has been shown to increase the number of air-filled (embolized) conduits, especially in trees with large conduit diameters. Despite numerous experimental studies, the mechanisms leading to bubble formation during freezing have not been addressed theoretically. We used classical nucleation theory and fluid mechanics to show which mechanisms are most likely to be responsible for bubble formation during freezing and what parameters determine the likelihood of the process. Our results confirm the common assumptionmore » that bubble formation during freezing is most likely due to gas segregation by ice. If xylem conduit walls are not permeable to the salts expelled by ice during the freezing process, osmotic pressures high enough for air seeding could be created. The build-up rate of segregated solutes in front of the ice-water interface depends equally on conduit diameter and freezing velocity. Therefore, bubble formation probability depends on these variables. The dependence of bubble formation probability on freezing velocity means that the experimental results obtained for cavitation threshold conduit diameters during freeze/thaw cycles depend on the experimental setup; namely sample size and cooling rate. The velocity dependence also suggests that to avoid bubble formation during freezing trees should have narrow conduits where freezing is likely to be fast (e.g., branches or outermost layer of the xylem). Avoidance of bubble formation during freezing could thus be one piece of the explanation why xylem conduit size of temperate and boreal zone trees varies quite systematically.« less

  17. Freeze/Thaw-Induced Embolism: Probability of Critical Bubble Formation Depends on Speed of Ice Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sevanto, Sanna; Holbrook, N. Michele; Ball, Marilyn C.

    2012-01-01

    Bubble formation in the conduits of woody plants sets a challenge for uninterrupted water transportation from the soil up to the canopy. Freezing and thawing of stems has been shown to increase the number of air-filled (embolized) conduits, especially in trees with large conduit diameters. Despite numerous experimental studies, the mechanisms leading to bubble formation during freezing have not been addressed theoretically. We used classical nucleation theory and fluid mechanics to show which mechanisms are most likely to be responsible for bubble formation during freezing and what parameters determine the likelihood of the process. Our results confirm the common assumption that bubble formation during freezing is most likely due to gas segregation by ice. If xylem conduit walls are not permeable to the salts expelled by ice during the freezing process, osmotic pressures high enough for air seeding could be created. The build-up rate of segregated solutes in front of the ice-water interface depends equally on conduit diameter and freezing velocity. Therefore, bubble formation probability depends on these variables. The dependence of bubble formation probability on freezing velocity means that the experimental results obtained for cavitation threshold conduit diameters during freeze/thaw cycles depend on the experimental setup; namely sample size and cooling rate. The velocity dependence also suggests that to avoid bubble formation during freezing trees should have narrow conduits where freezing is likely to be fast (e.g., branches or outermost layer of the xylem). Avoidance of bubble formation during freezing could thus be one piece of the explanation why xylem conduit size of temperate and boreal zone trees varies quite systematically. PMID:22685446

  18. Effects of high pressure in liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Michel; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-08-01

    All the experimental parameters that the chromatographers are used to consider as constant (the column length and its diameter, the particle size, the column porosities, the phase ratio, the column hold-up volume, the pressure gradient along the column, the mobile phase density and its viscosity, the diffusion coefficients, the equilibrium constants, the retention factors, the efficiency parameters) depend on pressure to some extent. While this dependence is negligible as long as experiments, measurements, and separations are carried out under conventional pressures not exceeding a few tens of megapascal, it is no longer so when the inlet pressure becomes much larger and exceeds 100 MPa. Equations are developed to determine the extent of the influence of pressure on all these parameters and to account for it. The results obtained are illustrated with graphics. The essential results are that (1) many parameters depend on the inlet pressure, hence on the flow rate; (2) the apparent reproducibility of parameters as simple as the retention factor will be poor if measurements are carried out at different flow rates, unless due corrections are applied to the results; (3) the influence of the temperature on the equilibrium constants should be studied under constant inlet pressure rather than at a constant flow rate, to minimize the coupling effect of pressure and temperature through the temperature dependence of the viscosity; and (4) while reproducibility of results obtained at constant pressure and flow rate will not be affected, method development becomes far more complex because of the pressure dependence of everything.

  19. High Pressure Rotary Shaft Sealing Mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Dietle, Lannie; Gobeli, Jeffrey D.

    2001-05-08

    A laterally translatable pressure staged rotary shaft sealing mechanism having a seal housing with a shaft passage therein being exposed to a fluid pressure P1 and with a rotary shaft being located within the shaft passage. At least one annular laterally translatable seal carrier is provided. First and second annular resilient sealing elements are supported in axially spaced relation by the annular seal carriers and have sealing relation with the rotary shaft. The seal housing and at least one seal carrier define a first pressure staging chamber exposed to the first annular resilient sealing element and a second pressure staging chamber located between and exposed to the first and second annular resilient sealing elements. A first fluid is circulated to the first pressure chamber at a pressure P1, and a second staging pressure fluid is circulated to the second pressure chamber at a fraction of pressure P1 to achieve pressure staging, cooling of the seals. Seal placement provides hydraulic force balancing of the annular seal carriers.

  20. Investigation on Thawing and Freezing Processes Using High-frequency Ground Penetrating Radar in Amdo catchment, Central Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yingzhao; Zubrzycki, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    We have applied 250MHz ground penetrating radar (GPR) to investigate subsurface thawing and freezing processes in Amdo catchment, central Tibetan Plateau. Also, the topography and geography environments were surveyed to better understand the regional thaw/freeze cycles. Generally, the GPR images clearly illustrated the development of thawing and freezing events, which would be learned from the CMP soundings and reflection profiles. Our results showed that a strong lower EM velocity of upper layers was detected in the thawing conditions, while a rather higher velocity could be monitored in the frozen grounds, which was mainly based on the large contrast in dielectric permittivity between liquid water and ice. In addition, on the north-facing slopes, the EM velocity was smaller than that of sunny slopes in thawing and freezing periods on the whole, which illustrated that the average soil moisture in the upper subsurface was higher in north-facing slopes than the opposite side. Furthermore, during the thawing periods, both of the velocity and thawing depth decreased as the slope became deeper on the south-facing slope basically; on the shade side, the velocity increased slightly when the slope got sharper, but the thawed depth had no obvious trend. As for the freezing periods, both the velocity and frozen depth were not found clear tendency on both sides. Moreover, the subsurface thawing and freezing developments were significantly affected by local surface environments (e.g, stream, grassland or bare soil) though in similar topographic conditions. In all, the non-invasive GPR technique allowed the interpretation of spatial and temporal thaw/freeze processes, which played an important role on hydrothermal regimes in cold regions.