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Sample records for high quality microcavities

  1. Analysis of high-quality modes in open chaotic microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, W.; Yamilov, A.; Cao, H.

    2005-08-15

    We present a numerical study of the high-quality modes in two-dimensional dielectric stadium microcavities. Although the classical ray mechanics is fully chaotic in a stadium billiard, all of the high-quality modes show a 'strong scar' around unstable periodic orbits. When the deformation (ratio of the length of the straight segments over the diameter of the half circles) is small, the high-quality modes correspond to whispering-gallery-type trajectories and their quality factors decrease monotonically with increasing deformation. At large deformation, each high-quality mode is associated with multiple unstable periodic orbits. Its quality factor changes nonmonotonically with the deformation, and there exists an optimal deformation for each mode at which its quality factor reaches a local maximum. This unusual behavior is attributed to the interference of waves propagating along different constituent orbits that could minimize light leakage out of the cavity.

  2. Modulation of high quality factors in rolled-up microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yangfu; Li, Shilong; Mei, Yongfeng

    2016-09-01

    We systematically investigate the evolution of resonant modes in a rolled-up microcavity as the overlap length between structural notches increases, which presents a modulation behavior for high Q factors. The resonant modes in the rolled-up microcavity display a deterministic mode chirality, which is well correlated to the Q factor. We derive a two-mode non-Hermitian Hamiltonian to clarify these unusual findings. It reveals that strong resonant interactions of scattered waves between the structural notches are responsible for the high mode chirality (thus high Q factor) and its modulation behavior in rolled-up microcavities.

  3. High quality factor Er-doped Fabry-Perot microcavities by sol-gel processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yigang; Fortes, Luís M.; Chiappini, Andrea; Ferrari, Maurizio; Almeida, Rui M.

    2009-10-01

    An optimized sol-gel process was developed to fabricate 1D photonic bandgap structures. Several erbium-doped Fabry-Perot microcavities were prepared and characterized. The thickest sample contained two Bragg mirrors, each having 12 distributed Bragg reflector periods of alternating silicate glass and titania layers. The total thickness of this sample reached ~12 µm. The Er3+ photoluminescence spectra at 1.5 µm were measured for the microcavities. A quality factor of 250 and an Er3+ photoluminescence enhancement of 96 times at 1.5 µm have been reached. The sol-gel processing details, the crystallization of the titania films and the refractive index of the deposited materials are discussed in detail. The simulated optical spectra of the microcavities were found to agree well with the actually measured curves. These results demonstrate that the present sol-gel processing technique is of potential interest for low cost fabrication of 1D photonic bandgap devices.

  4. Optically induced mode splitting in self-assembled, high quality-factor conjugated polymer microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Braam, Daniel; Kushida, Soh; Niemöller, Robert; Prinz, Günther M.; Saito, Hitoshi; Kanbara, Takaki; Kuwabara, Junpei; Yamamoto, Yohei; Lorke, Axel

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of self-assembled single microspheres. They consist of a recently developed highly fluorescent π-conjugated copolymer and exhibit excellent optical properties with Q-factors up to 104. Under continuous laser irradiation, we observe a splitting of the highly degenerate spherical WGMs into a multiplet of lines. Comparison with the calculated spectral response of a weakly distorted sphere shows that the optical excitation induces a change of the optical path length in the microcavity so that it resembles a prolate spheroid. The separation of the lines is given by the ellipticity and the azimuthal mode number. Measurements in various gaseous environments suggest that the distortion is caused by light induced oxidation of the polymer. Our findings show that photooxidation can be a beneficial mechanism for in-situ tuning of optically active polymer structures. PMID:26781838

  5. Nonlinear optics in high refractive index contrast photonic crystal microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Allan Ralph

    2005-07-01

    This thesis describes theoretical and experimental research on the nonlinear response of high refractive index contrast (HRIC) optical microcavities. An intuitive, numerically efficient model of second harmonic reflection from two dimensional (2D), planar photonic crystals made of sub-wavelength thick, non-centrosymmetric semiconductors is developed. It predicts that appropriate 2D texture can result in orders of magnitude enhancement of the reflected second order signal when harmonic plane waves are used to excite leaky photonic crystal eigenmodes. Local field enhancement in the textured slab, and other physical processes responsible for these enhancements are explained. A different formalism is developed to treat the Kerr-related bistable response of a 3D microcavity coupled to a single mode waveguide. This model predicts that optical bistability should be observed using only milliwatts of power to excite a cavity fabricated in Al0.18 Ga0.82As, having a quality factor of Q = 4000 and a mode volume of 0.05 mum 3. Two-photon absorption is shown to only slightly hinder the performance in Al0.18Ga0.82 As. By including nonresonant downstream reflections in the model, novel hysteresis loops are predicted, and their stability is analyzed. A coupled waveguide-microcavity structure is fabricated by selectively cladding a silicon ridge-Bragg grating waveguide with photoresist. Three-dimensionally localized optical modes are realized with Q values ranging from 200 to 1200, at ˜1.5 mum. Using 100 fs pulses, the transmission spectra of these structures is studied as a function of input power. The output power saturates when the cavity mode and pulse centre frequencies are resonant, and the output exhibits superlinear growth when they are appropriately detuned. These results are explained in terms of the filtering action of the microcavity on the nonlinear spectral distortion of the input pulse as it propagates through the waveguide. PbSe nanocrystals are deposited on a

  6. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, Haider Ahmed, Rajib; Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-23

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2–3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  7. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, Haider; Yetisen, Ali K.; Ahmed, Rajib; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-01

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2-3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  8. Numerical investigation of high-contrast ultrafast all-optical switching in low-refractive-index polymeric photonic crystal nanobeam microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zi-Ming; Zhong, Xiao-Lan; Wang, Chen; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2012-06-01

    With the development of micro- or nano-fabrication technologies, great interest has been aroused in exploiting photonic crystal nanobeam structures. In this article the design of high-quality-factor (Q) polymeric photonic crystal nanobeam microcavities suitable for realizing ultrafast all-optical switching is presented based on the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method. Adopting the pump-probe technique, the ultrafast dynamic response of the all-optical switching in a nanobeam microcavity with a quality factor of 1000 and modal volume of 1.22 (λ/n)3 is numerically studied and a switching time as fast as 3.6 picoseconds is obtained. Our results indicate the great promise of applying photonic crystal nanobeam microcavities to construct integrated ultrafast tunable photonic devices or circuits incorporating polymer materials with large Kerr nonlinearity and ultrafast response speed.

  9. Strong exciton-photon coupling in organic single crystal microcavity with high molecular orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Kaname; Yamashita, Kenichi; Yanagi, Hisao; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2016-08-01

    Strong exciton-photon coupling has been observed in a highly oriented organic single crystal microcavity. This microcavity consists of a thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) single crystal laminated on a high-reflection distributed Bragg reflector. In the TPCO crystal, molecular transition dipole was strongly polarized along a certain horizontal directions with respect to the main crystal plane. This dipole polarization causes significantly large anisotropies in the exciton transition and optical constants. Especially the anisotropic exciton transition was found to provide the strong enhancement in the coupling with the cavity mode, which was demonstrated by a Rabi splitting energy as large as ˜100 meV even in the "half-vertical cavity surface emitting lasing" microcavity structure.

  10. Silicon on-chip bandpass filters for the multiplexing of high sensitivity photonic crystal microcavity biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Hai Zou, Yi; Yang, Chun-Ju; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Wang, Zheng; Tang, Naimei; Chen, Ray T.; Fan, Donglei

    2015-03-23

    A method for the dense integration of high sensitivity photonic crystal (PC) waveguide based biosensors is proposed and experimentally demonstrated on a silicon platform. By connecting an additional PC waveguide filter to a PC microcavity sensor in series, a transmission passband is created, containing the resonances of the PC microcavity for sensing purpose. With proper engineering of the passband, multiple high sensitivity PC microcavity sensors can be integrated into microarrays and be interrogated simultaneously between a single input and a single output port. The concept was demonstrated with a 2-channel L55 PC biosensor array containing PC waveguide filters. The experiment showed that the sensors on both channels can be monitored simultaneously from a single output spectrum. Less than 3 dB extra loss for the additional PC waveguide filter is observed.

  11. Magneto-exciton-polariton condensation in a sub-wavelength high contrast grating based vertical microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.; Brodbeck, S.; Worschech, L.; Kamp, M.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Zhang, B.; Wang, Z.; Deng, H.

    2014-03-03

    We comparably investigate the diamagnetic shift of an uncoupled quantum well exciton with a microcavity exciton-polariton condensate on the same device. The sample is composed of multiple GaAs quantum wells in an AlAs microcavity, surrounded by a Bragg reflector and a sub-wavelength high contrast grating reflector. Our study introduces an independent and easily applicable technique, namely, the measurement of the condensate diamagnetic shift, which directly probes matter contributions in polariton condensates and hence discriminates it from a conventional photon laser.

  12. Analysis of ultra-high sensitivity configuration in chip-integrated photonic crystal microcavity bio-sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Hosseini, Amir; Xu, Xiaochuan; Zhu, Liang; Zou, Yi; Chen, Ray T.

    2014-05-01

    We analyze the contributions of quality factor, fill fraction, and group index of chip-integrated resonance microcavity devices, to the detection limit for bulk chemical sensing and the minimum detectable biomolecule concentration in biosensing. We analyze the contributions from analyte absorbance, as well as from temperature and spectral noise. Slow light in two-dimensional photonic crystals provide opportunities for significant reduction of the detection limit below 1 × 10-7 RIU (refractive index unit) which can enable highly sensitive sensors in diverse application areas. We demonstrate experimentally detected concentration of 1 fM (67 fg/ml) for the binding between biotin and avidin, the lowest reported till date.

  13. The role of group index engineering in series-connected photonic crystal microcavities for high density sensor microarrays.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Zhu, Liang; Chen, Ray T

    2014-04-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient and robust method for series connection of photonic crystal microcavities that are coupled to photonic crystal waveguides in the slow light transmission regime. We demonstrate that group index taper engineering provides excellent optical impedance matching between the input and output strip waveguides and the photonic crystal waveguide, a nearly flat transmission over the entire guided mode spectrum and clear multi-resonance peaks corresponding to individual microcavities that are connected in series. Series connected photonic crystal microcavities are further multiplexed in parallel using cascaded multimode interference power splitters to generate a high density silicon nanophotonic microarray comprising 64 photonic crystal microcavity sensors, all of which are interrogated simultaneously at the same instant of time. PMID:25316921

  14. The role of group index engineering in series-connected photonic crystal microcavities for high density sensor microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yi Zhu, Liang; Chen, Ray T.; Chakravarty, Swapnajit

    2014-04-07

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient and robust method for series connection of photonic crystal microcavities that are coupled to photonic crystal waveguides in the slow light transmission regime. We demonstrate that group index taper engineering provides excellent optical impedance matching between the input and output strip waveguides and the photonic crystal waveguide, a nearly flat transmission over the entire guided mode spectrum and clear multi-resonance peaks corresponding to individual microcavities that are connected in series. Series connected photonic crystal microcavities are further multiplexed in parallel using cascaded multimode interference power splitters to generate a high density silicon nanophotonic microarray comprising 64 photonic crystal microcavity sensors, all of which are interrogated simultaneously at the same instant of time.

  15. Ultra-high Q one-dimensional hybrid PhC-SPP waveguide microcavity with large structure tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Zhang, Lingxuan; Lu, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Weiqiang; Wang, Leiran; Wang, Guoxi; Zhang, Wenfu; Zhao, Wei

    2016-07-01

    A photonic crystal - surface plasmon-polaritons hybrid transverse magnetic mode waveguide based on a one-dimensional optical microcavity is designed to work in the communication band. A Gaussian field distribution in a stepping heterojunction taper is designed by band engineering, and a silica layer compresses the mode field to the subwavelength scale. The designed microcavity possesses a resonant mode with a quality factor of 1609 and a modal volume of 0.01 cubic wavelength. The constant period and the large structure tolerance make it realizable by current processing techniques.

  16. Analysis of ultra-high sensitivity configuration in chip-integrated photonic crystal microcavity bio-sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit Hosseini, Amir; Xu, Xiaochuan; Zhu, Liang; Zou, Yi; Chen, Ray T.

    2014-05-12

    We analyze the contributions of quality factor, fill fraction, and group index of chip-integrated resonance microcavity devices, to the detection limit for bulk chemical sensing and the minimum detectable biomolecule concentration in biosensing. We analyze the contributions from analyte absorbance, as well as from temperature and spectral noise. Slow light in two-dimensional photonic crystals provide opportunities for significant reduction of the detection limit below 1 × 10{sup −7} RIU (refractive index unit) which can enable highly sensitive sensors in diverse application areas. We demonstrate experimentally detected concentration of 1 fM (67 fg/ml) for the binding between biotin and avidin, the lowest reported till date.

  17. Soft lithographic fabrication of high Q polymer microcavity arrays.

    PubMed

    Armani, Andrea M; Srinivasan, Akil; Vahala, Kerry J

    2007-06-01

    As new synthetic, low-loss polymers are developed, polymer optical cavities are experiencing a revolution, in both fabrication design and functionality. Recently, a fabrication technique was developed that enabled planar arrays of polymeric resonators to achieve cavity Q factors greater than 1 million. In the present letter, this molding technique is expanded to fabricate resonators from polymers that have either thermal or UV curing mechanisms. The quality factors and broad band spectrum of these devices are determined at 680, 1300, and 1550 nm. These resonant cavities demonstrate quality factors which are competitive with photonic crystals and microdisk resonators.

  18. Narrowband thermal radiation from closed-end microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kohiyama, Asaka; Shimizu, Makoto; Iguchi, Fumitada; Yugami, Hiroo

    2015-10-07

    High spectral selectivity of thermal radiation is important for achieving high-efficiency energy systems. In this study, intense, narrowband, and low directional absorption/radiation were observed in closed-end microcavity which is a conventional open-end microcavity covered by a semi-transparent thin metal film. The quality factor (Q factor) of optical absorption band strongly depended on the film electrical conductivity. Asymmetric and narrow absorption band with a Q factor of 25 at 1.28 μm was obtained for a 6-nm-thick Au film. Numerical simulations suggest that the formation of a fixed-end mode at the cavity aperture contributes to the narrowband optical absorption. The closed-end microcavity filled with SiO{sub 2} exhibits intense and isotropic thermal radiation over a wide solid angle according to numerical simulation. The narrow and asymmetric absorption spectrum was experimentally confirmed in a model of closed-end microcavity.

  19. Photonic crystal microcavity engineering and high-density bio-patterning for chip-integrated microarray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Chen, Ray T.

    2012-01-01

    While Q ~ 1million has been demonstrated in freely suspended photonic crystal (PC) membranes, the reduced refractive index contrast when PC microcavities are immersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), a typical ambient for biomolecules, reduces Q by more than 2 orders of magnitude. We experimentally demonstrate photonic crystal microcavity based resonant sensors coupled to photonic crystal waveguides in silicon on insulator for chemical and bio-sensing. Linear L-type microcavities are considered. In contrast to cavities with small modes volumes but low quality factors for bio-sensing, we show that increasing the length of the microcavity enhances the quality factor of the resonance by an order of magnitude and also increases the resonance wavelength shift while still retaining compact device characteristics. Q~26,760 and sensitivity down to 7.5ng/ml and ~9pg/mm2 in bio-sensing was experimentally demonstrated in SOI devices for goat anti-rabbit IgG antibodies with Kd~10-6M. The increase in cavity length follows from fundamental engineering limitations in ink-jet printing or microfluidic channels when unique receptor biomolecules are coated on separate adjacent sensors in a microarray.

  20. Strong exciton-photon coupling with colloidal quantum dots in a high-Q bilayer microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giebink, Noel C.; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate evanescently coupled bilayer microcavities with Q-factors exceeding 250 fabricated by a simple spin-coating process. The cavity architecture consists of a slab waveguide lying upon a low refractive index spacer layer supported by a glass substrate. For a lossless guide layer, the cavity Q depends only on the thickness of the low index spacer and in principle can reach arbitrarily high values. We demonstrate the versatility of this approach by constructing cavities with a guide layer incorporating CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots, where we observe strong coupling and hybridization between the 1S(e)-1S3/2(h) and 1S(e)-2S3/2(h) exciton states mediated by the cavity photon. This technique greatly simplifies the fabrication of high-Q planar microcavities for organic and inorganic quantum dot thin films and opens up new opportunities for the study of nonlinear optical phenomena in these materials.

  1. Detection of Single Nanoparticles Using the Dissipative Interaction in a High-Q Microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bo-Qiang; Yu, Xiao-Chong; Zhi, Yanyan; Wang, Li; Kim, Donghyun; Gong, Qihuang; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasensitive optical detection of nanometer-scaled particles is highly desirable for applications in early-stage diagnosis of human diseases, environmental monitoring, and homeland security, but remains extremely difficult due to ultralow polarizabilities of small-sized, low-index particles. Optical whispering-gallery-mode microcavities, which can enhance significantly the light-matter interaction, have emerged as promising platforms for label-free detection of nanoscale objects. Different from the conventional whispering-gallery-mode sensing relying on the reactive (i.e., dispersive) interaction, here we propose and demonstrate to detect single lossy nanoparticles using the dissipative interaction in a high-Q toroidal microcavity. In the experiment, detection of single gold nanorods in an aqueous environment is realized by monitoring simultaneously the linewidth change and shift of the cavity mode. The experimental result falls within the theoretical prediction. Remarkably, the reactive and dissipative sensing methods are evaluated by setting the probe wavelength on and off the surface plasmon resonance to tune the absorption of nanorods, which demonstrates clearly the great potential of the dissipative sensing method to detect lossy nanoparticles. Future applications could also combine the dissipative and reactive sensing methods, which may provide better characterizations of nanoparticles.

  2. Optical microcavity: sensing down to single molecules and atoms.

    PubMed

    Yoshie, Tomoyuki; Tang, Lingling; Su, Shu-Yu

    2011-01-01

    This review article discusses fundamentals of dielectric, low-loss, optical micro-resonator sensing, including figures of merit and a variety of microcavity designs, and future perspectives in microcavity-based optical sensing. Resonance frequency and quality (Q) factor are altered as a means of detecting a small system perturbation, resulting in realization of optical sensing of a small amount of sample materials, down to even single molecules. Sensitivity, Q factor, minimum detectable index change, noises (in sensor system components and microcavity system including environments), microcavity size, and mode volume are essential parameters to be considered for optical sensing applications. Whispering gallery mode, photonic crystal, and slot-type microcavities typically provide compact, high-quality optical resonance modes for optical sensing applications. Surface Bloch modes induced on photonic crystals are shown to be a promising candidate thanks to large field overlap with a sample and ultra-high-Q resonances. Quantum optics effects based on microcavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) would provide novel single-photo-level detection of even single atoms and molecules via detection of doublet vacuum Rabi splitting peaks in strong coupling.

  3. Micro-cavity lasers with large device size for directional emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chang-ling; Li, Peng; Shi, Jian-wei; Feng, Yuan; Hao, Yong-qin; Zhu, Dongda

    2014-10-01

    Optical micro-cavity structures, which can confine light in a small mode volume with high quality factors, have become an important platform not only for optoelectronic applications with densely integrated optical components, but also for fundamental studies such as cavity quantum electrodynamics and nonlinear optical processes. Micro-cavity lasers with directional emission feature are becoming a promising resonator for the compact laser application. In this paper, we presented the limason-shaped cavity laser with large device size, and fabricated this type of micro-cavity laser with quantum cascade laser material. The micro-cavity laser with large device size was fabricated by using InP based InGaAs/InAlAs quantum cascade lasers material at about 10um emitting wavelength, and the micro-cavity lasers with the large device size were manufactured and characterized with light output power, threshold current, and the far-field pattern.

  4. Optofluidic laser array based on stable high-Q Fabry-Pérot microcavities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhou, Chunhua; Zhang, Tingting; Chen, Jingdong; Liu, Shaoding; Fan, Xudong

    2015-10-01

    We report the development of an optofluidic laser array fabricated on a chip using stable plano-concave Fabry-Pérot (FP) microcavities, which are far less susceptible to optical misalignment during device assembly than the commonly used plano-plano FP microcavities. The concave mirrors in our FP microcavities were created by first generating an array of microwells of a few micrometers in depth and a few tens of micrometers in diameter on a fused silica chip using a CO2 laser, followed by coating of distributed Bragg reflection (DBR) layers. The plano-concave FP microcavity had a Q-factor of 5.6 × 10(5) and finesse of 4 × 10(3), over 100 times higher than those for the FP microcavities in existing optofluidic lasers. 1 mM R6G dye in ethanol was used to test the plano-concave FP microcavities, showing an ultralow lasing threshold of only 90 nJ mm(-2), over 10 times lower than that in the corresponding unstable plano-plano FP microcavities formed by the same DBR coatings on the same chip. Simultaneous laser emission from the optofluidic laser array on the chip and single-mode lasing operation were also demonstrated. Our work will lead to the development of optofluidic laser-based biochemical sensors and novel on-chip photonic devices with extremely low lasing thresholds (nJ mm(-2)) and mode volumes (fL).

  5. Label-free detection with high-Q microcavities: a review of biosensing mechanisms for integrated devices

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Optical microcavities that confine light in high-Q resonance promise all of the capabilities required for a successful next-generation microsystem biodetection technology. Label-free detection down to single molecules as well as operation in aqueous environments can be integrated cost-effectively on microchips, together with other photonic components, as well as electronic ones. We provide a comprehensive review of the sensing mechanisms utilized in this emerging field, their physics, engineering and material science aspects, and their application to nanoparticle analysis and biomolecular detection. We survey the most recent developments such as the use of mode splitting for self-referenced measurements, plasmonic nanoantennas for signal enhancements, the use of optical force for nanoparticle manipulation as well as the design of active devices for ultra-sensitive detection. Furthermore, we provide an outlook on the exciting capabilities of functionalized high-Q microcavities in the life sciences. PMID:26918228

  6. High-polarization-discriminating infrared detection using a single quantum well sandwiched in plasmonic micro-cavity.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Li, ZhiFeng; Li, Ning; Chen, XiaoShuang; Chen, PingPing; Shen, XueChu; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Polarimetric imaging has proved its value in medical diagnostics, bionics, remote sensing, astronomy, and in many other wide fields. Pixel-level solid monolithically integrated polarimetric imaging photo-detectors are the trend for infrared polarimetric imaging devices. For better polarimetric imaging performance the high polarization discriminating detectors are very much critical. Here we demonstrate the high infrared light polarization resolving capabilities of a quantum well (QW) detector in hybrid structure of single QW and plasmonic micro-cavity that uses QW as an active structure in the near field regime of plasmonic effect enhanced cavity, in which the photoelectric conversion in such a plasmonic micro-cavity has been realized. The detector's extinction ratio reaches 65 at the wavelength of 14.7 μm, about 6 times enhanced in such a type of pixel-level polarization long wave infrared photodetectors. The enhancement mechanism is attributed to artificial plasmonic modulation on optical propagation and distribution in the plasmonic micro-cavities. PMID:25208580

  7. High-polarization-discriminating infrared detection using a single quantum well sandwiched in plasmonic micro-cavity.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Li, ZhiFeng; Li, Ning; Chen, XiaoShuang; Chen, PingPing; Shen, XueChu; Lu, Wei

    2014-09-11

    Polarimetric imaging has proved its value in medical diagnostics, bionics, remote sensing, astronomy, and in many other wide fields. Pixel-level solid monolithically integrated polarimetric imaging photo-detectors are the trend for infrared polarimetric imaging devices. For better polarimetric imaging performance the high polarization discriminating detectors are very much critical. Here we demonstrate the high infrared light polarization resolving capabilities of a quantum well (QW) detector in hybrid structure of single QW and plasmonic micro-cavity that uses QW as an active structure in the near field regime of plasmonic effect enhanced cavity, in which the photoelectric conversion in such a plasmonic micro-cavity has been realized. The detector's extinction ratio reaches 65 at the wavelength of 14.7 μm, about 6 times enhanced in such a type of pixel-level polarization long wave infrared photodetectors. The enhancement mechanism is attributed to artificial plasmonic modulation on optical propagation and distribution in the plasmonic micro-cavities.

  8. High-Polarization-Discriminating Infrared Detection Using a Single Quantum Well Sandwiched in Plasmonic Micro-Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Li, Zhifeng; Li, Ning; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Chen, Pingping; Shen, Xuechu; Lu, Wei

    2014-09-01

    Polarimetric imaging has proved its value in medical diagnostics, bionics, remote sensing, astronomy, and in many other wide fields. Pixel-level solid monolithically integrated polarimetric imaging photo-detectors are the trend for infrared polarimetric imaging devices. For better polarimetric imaging performance the high polarization discriminating detectors are very much critical. Here we demonstrate the high infrared light polarization resolving capabilities of a quantum well (QW) detector in hybrid structure of single QW and plasmonic micro-cavity that uses QW as an active structure in the near field regime of plasmonic effect enhanced cavity, in which the photoelectric conversion in such a plasmonic micro-cavity has been realized. The detector's extinction ratio reaches 65 at the wavelength of 14.7 μm, about 6 times enhanced in such a type of pixel-level polarization long wave infrared photodetectors. The enhancement mechanism is attributed to artificial plasmonic modulation on optical propagation and distribution in the plasmonic micro-cavities.

  9. Highly efficient two-photon generation from a coherently pumped quantum dot embedded in a microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, J. K.; Pathak, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    We propose two schemes to realize a highly efficient solid-state source of photon pairs using four-wave mixing and stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in a single quantum dot embedded in a microcavity. A resonant continuous-wave laser applied between biexciton and exciton states and a pulsed laser applied between a ground state and exciton state are utilized to facilitate coherent pumping. We show in the case of four-wave mixing that, although the probability of generating two photons in a cavity mode is small without cavity damping, two-photon-resonant emission is enhanced by cavity damping within the strong-coupling regime. For strong continuous-wave laser, a single photon from a pulsed laser and two-photon-resonant transition through a strongly coupled cavity mode lead to a (1+2)-type Raman transition through the generated Autler-Townes doublet. We also discuss the spectrum of the generated photon pair and the photon-photon correlations in the generated photon pair.

  10. Cavity Polaritons in a Single-Crystalline Organic Microcavity Prepared at Room Temperature Using a Simple Solution Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bando, Kazuki; Nagai, Hikaru; Amano, Masamitsu; Kanezashi, Keigo; Kumeta, Shohei; Kondo, Hisao

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a novel method of fabricating high-quality crystalline organic microcavities using a simple solution technique. Anthracene single crystals were grown from solution at room temperature in a gap of ˜200 nm between two joined distributed Bragg reflectors. The method is easier to perform than the conventional melting technique and the crystals have no strain caused by thermal expansion. Clear cavity polariton modes and giant Rabi splitting energies were observed as well as those in the microcavities prepared using the melting technique. The method can be applied to the fabrication of various crystalline organic microcavities.

  11. Strong photocurrent enhancements in highly efficient flexible organic solar cells by adopting a microcavity configuration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kung-Shih; Yip, Hin-Lap; Salinas, José-Francisco; Xu, Yun-Xiang; Chueh, Chu-Chen; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2014-05-28

    Organic solar cells often show inefficient light harvesting due to a short absorption path length limited by the low charge mobility of organic semiconductors. We demonstrate a flexible organic solar cell in a microcavity configuration using a TeO2/Ag semitransparent electrode to confine the optical field within the device with significant performance improvements and reaching a power conversion efficiency of 8.56%.

  12. Mode characteristics and directional emission for square microcavity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue-De; Huang, Yong-Zhen

    2016-06-01

    Square microcavities with high quality factor whispering-gallery-like modes have a series of novel optical properties and can be employed as compact-size laser resonators. In this paper, the mode characteristics of square optical microcavities and the lasing properties of directional-emission square semiconductor microlasers are reviewed for the realization of potential light sources in the photonic integrated circuits and optical interconnects. A quasi-analytical model is introduced to describe the confined modes in square microcavities, and high quality factor whispering-gallery-like modes are predicted by the mode-coupling theory and confirmed by the numerical simulation. An output waveguide directly coupled to the position with weak mode field is used to achieve directional emission and control the lasing mode. Electrically-pumped InP-based directional-emission square microlasers are realized at room temperature, and the lasing spectra agree well with the mode analysis. Different kinds of square microcavity lasers, including dual-mode laser with a tunable interval, single-mode laser with a wide tunable wavelength range, and high-speed direct-modulated laser are also demonstrated experimentally.

  13. Photonic crystal microcavity lasers and laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jiang-Rong

    As a state-of-the-art technology, photonic crystal microcavity lasers have great potentials to resolve many semiconductor laser performance challenges, owing to their compact size, high spontaneous emission factor, and inherent advantages in dimension scalability. This thesis describes efficient numerical analyzing methods for multimode photonic crystal microcavities, including a parallel computing three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method combined with Pade interpolation, point group projection, and vectorial Green's function method. With the help of these analyzing tools, various experimental photonic crystal microcavity devices fabricated in InGaAsP/InP based materials were studies. Room temperature optical pumped InGaAsP suspended membrane photonic crystal microcavity lasers were demonstrated. Their lithographical fine-tuning, above room temperature operations, mode identifications and polarizations were demonstrated. Room temperature continuous wave (CW) optically pumped photonic crystal microcavity lasers at diameter less than 3.2 mum were demonstrated with crystalline alpha-Al 2O3 (sapphire) as a cladding layer to the InGaAsP membrane. The far-field radiation profiles from these microcavity lasers were measured and compared with our numerical modeling predictions. Two electrical injection scenes for photonic crystal microcavity lasers were introduced, together with some preliminary results including the demonstrations of optically pumped lasing of highly doped cavities and cavities with an electrical conduction post underneath. Electrically excited photonic crystal microcavity light emitting diodes (LEDs) were also experimentally demonstrated.

  14. Ba0.9Sr0.1TiO3-based optical microcavities fabricated by chemical solution deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, X. K.; Hu, G. J.; Shang, J. L.; Bao, J.; Chu, J. H.; Dai, N.

    2007-06-01

    Single or coupled optical microcavities have been prepared by inserting one or two dense Ba0.9Sr0.1TiO3 layers, respectively, in the quasiperiodic Ba0.9Sr0.1TiO3 multilayers fabricated based on phase separation. The single microcavities exhibit well-defined resonant modes in the investigated wavelength range with a quality factor no less than 60. The resonant frequency of the mode can be tuned through varying the spinning rate during the spin-coating process to change the thickness of the inserted layer. The mode properties of the coupled microcavities strongly depend on the mismatch parameter of the inserted defect layers. The approach reported here offers a simple, inexpensive, and flexible route for fabricating high quality microcavities.

  15. Plasma Confinement in Glass Microcavities: Dependence of Plasma Properties on Microcavity Geometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, S. H.; Berger, A. G.; Kim, J.-Y.; Park, S.-J.; Eden, J. G.

    2007-10-01

    Arrays of glass microcavities having diameters of 50-200 μm and controllable geometries have been successfully fabricated by micropowder blasting techniques. Anisotropic or isotropic microcavities, including cavities with ellipsoidal geometry have been fabricated in large scale arrays with high resolution and various shapes of microcavities were prepared precisely. Arrays having as much as 1000 microcavities were fabricated on 400 μm thick soda lime glasses and a pair of these glasses was aligned and sealed to form a closed microdischarge cell. The cross-sectional microcavity shape in the discharge cell is designed from the calculation of electric field distribution. Powered by electrodes located outside the microcavity with ac frequencies of 20-100 kHz, the stable, uniform discharges and confinement of plasma in entire microcavity was observed at 300-800 Torr of noble gases. From the spatially-resolved measurement of emission from a microcavity, the device has better plasma confinement and increased emission intensity in higher gas pressures. Discharge performance in various gas or gas mixtures and its dependence on microcavity geometry will be discussed.

  16. High-temperature continuous-wave laser realized in hollow microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhifeng; Zhang, Yuantao; Cui, Xijun; Zhuang, Shiwei; Wu, Bin; Dong, Xin; Zhang, Baolin; Du, Guotong

    2014-11-01

    Recently, an urgent requirement of ultraviolet (UV) semiconductor laser with lower cost and higher performance has motivated our intensive research in zinc oxide (ZnO) material owing to its wide direct band gap and large exciton binding energy. Here, we demonstrate for the first time continuous-wave laser in electrically-pumped hollow polygonal microcavities based on epitaxial ZnO/MgO-core/shell nanowall networks structures, and whispering gallery type resonant modes are responsible for the lasing action. The laser diodes exhibit an ultralow threshold current density (0.27 A/cm2), two or three orders of magnitude smaller than other reported UV-light semiconductor laser diodes to our knowledge. More importantly, the continuous-current-driven diode can achieve lasing up to ~430 K, showing a good temperature tolerance. This study indicates that nano-size injection lasers can be made from epitaxial semiconductor microcavities, which is a considerable advance towards the realization of practical UV coherent light sources, facilitating the existing applications and suggesting new potentials.

  17. High-temperature continuous-wave laser realized in hollow microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhifeng; Zhang, Yuantao; Cui, Xijun; Zhuang, Shiwei; Wu, Bin; Dong, Xin; Zhang, Baolin; Du, Guotong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, an urgent requirement of ultraviolet (UV) semiconductor laser with lower cost and higher performance has motivated our intensive research in zinc oxide (ZnO) material owing to its wide direct band gap and large exciton binding energy. Here, we demonstrate for the first time continuous-wave laser in electrically-pumped hollow polygonal microcavities based on epitaxial ZnO/MgO-core/shell nanowall networks structures, and whispering gallery type resonant modes are responsible for the lasing action. The laser diodes exhibit an ultralow threshold current density (0.27 A/cm2), two or three orders of magnitude smaller than other reported UV-light semiconductor laser diodes to our knowledge. More importantly, the continuous-current-driven diode can achieve lasing up to ~430 K, showing a good temperature tolerance. This study indicates that nano-size injection lasers can be made from epitaxial semiconductor microcavities, which is a considerable advance towards the realization of practical UV coherent light sources, facilitating the existing applications and suggesting new potentials. PMID:25417966

  18. Silicon on-chip side-coupled high-Q micro-cavities for the multiplexing of high sensitivity photonic crystal integrated sensors array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Daquan; Wang, Chunhong; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Bo; Yang, Yujie; Ji, Yuefeng

    2016-09-01

    A novel two-dimensional (2D) silicon (Si) photonic crystal (PC) α-H0-slot micro-cavity with high Q-factor and high sensitivity (S) is presented. Based on the proposed α-H0-Slot micro-cavities, an optimal design of photonic crystal integrated sensors array (PC-ISA) on monolithic silicon on insulator (SOI) is displayed. By using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, the simulation results demonstrate that both large S of 200 nm/RIU (RIU=refractive index unit) and high Q-factor >104 at telecom wavelength range can be achieved simultaneously. And the sensor figure of merit (FOM)>7000 is featured, an order of magnitude improvement over previous 2D PC sensors array. In addition, for the proposed 2D PC-ISA device, each sensor unit is shown to independently shift its resonance wavelength in response to the changes in refractive index (RI) and does not perturb the others. Thus, it is potentially an ideal platform for realizing ultra-compact lab-on-a-chip applications with dense arrays of functionalized spots for multiplexed sensing, and also can be used as an opto-fluidic architecture for performing highly parallel detection of biochemical interactions in aqueous environments.

  19. Spherical silicon photonic microcavities: From amorphous to polycrystalline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenollosa, R.; Garín, M.; Meseguer, F.

    2016-06-01

    Shaping silicon as a spherical object is not an obvious task, especially when the object size is in the micrometer range. This has the important consequence of transforming bare silicon material in a microcavity, so it is able to confine light efficiently. Here, we have explored the inside volume of such microcavities, both in their amorphous and in their polycrystalline versions. The synthesis method, which is based on chemical vapor deposition, causes amorphous microspheres to have a high content of hydrogen that produces an onionlike distributed porous core when the microspheres are crystallized by a fast annealing regime. This substantially influences the resonant modes. However, a slow crystallization regime does not yield pores, and produces higher-quality-factor resonances that could be fitted to the Mie theory. This allows the establishment of a procedure for obtaining size calibration standards with relative errors of the order of 0.1%.

  20. Ultraspecific and highly sensitive nucleic acid detection by integrating a DNA catalytic network with a label-free microcavity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuqiang; Zhang, David Yu; Yin, Peng; Vollmer, Frank

    2014-05-28

    Nucleic acid detection with label-free biosensors circumvents costly fluorophore functionalization steps associated with conventional assays by utilizing transducers of impressive ultimate detection limits. Despite this technological prowess, molecular recognition at a surface limits the biosensors' sensitivity, specificity, and reusability. It is therefore imperative to integrate novel molecular approaches with existing label-free transducers to overcome those limitations. Here, we demonstrate this concept by integrating a DNA strand displacement circuit with a micron-scale whispering gallery mode (WGM) microsphere biosensor. The integrated biosensor exhibits at least 25-fold improved nucleic acid sensitivity, and sets a new record for label-free microcavity biosensors by detecting 80 pM (32 fmol) of a 22nt oligomer; this improvement results from the catalytic behavior of the circuit. Furthermore, the integrated sensor exhibits extremely high specificity; single nucleotide variants yield 40- to 100-fold lower signal. Finally, the same physical sensor was demonstrated to alternatingly detect 2 different nucleic acid sequences through 5 cycles of detection, showcasing both its reusability and its versatility.

  1. Femtosecond laser 3D fabrication of whispering-gallery-mode microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, HuaiLiang; Sun, HongBo

    2015-11-01

    Whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microcavities with high-quality factors and small volumes have attracted intense interests in the past decades because of their potential applications in various research fields such as quantum information, sensing, and optoelectronics. This leads to rapid advance in a variety of processing technologies that can create high-quality WGM micro- cavities. Due to the unique characteristics of femtosecond laser pulses with high peak intensity and ultrashort pulse duration, femtosecond laser shows the ability to carry out ultrahigh precision micromachining of a variety of transparent materials through nonlinear multiphoton absorption and tunneling ionization. This review paper describes the basic principle of femtosecond laser direct writing, and presents an overview of recent progress concerning femtosecond laser three-dimensional (3D) fabrications of optical WGM microcavities, which include the advances in the fabrications of passive and active WGMs microcavities in a variety of materials such as polymer, glass and crystals, as well as in processing the integrated WGM-microcavity device. Lastly, a summary of this dynamic field with a future perspective is given.

  2. Microcavity structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kustom, R.L.; Grudzien, D.; Feinerman, A.D.

    1994-10-01

    The feasibility of building mm-wave cavities using deep x-ray lithography techniques is being investigated. These cavities could be considered for linac accelerating structures, undulators, free electron lasers, or mm-wave amplifiers. The construction process includes making precision x-ray masks, x-ray exposure of poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA), removal of PMMA, and electroplating a metal. Highly precise two-dimensional features can be machined onto wafers by this technique. The challenge is to fabricate the wafers onto three-dimensional rf structures. Rectangular cavity geometry is best suited to this fabrication technique. Status of wafer manufacture, fabrication and alignment techniques using capillaries bonded in precision grooves, 2{pi}/3 120-GHz linac structures, heat extraction analysis, and beam dynamics in a 5-meter-long 50-MeV linac will be discussed. Measurements made on 10X larger scale models that were built with conventional techniques will also be discussed.

  3. Lasing from all-polymer microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canazza, G.; Scotognella, F.; Lanzani, G.; De Silvestri, S.; Zavelani-Rossi, M.; Comoretto, D.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the laser action in a microcavity where both the dielectric mirrors and the active material have a macromolecular nature, resulting in a full plastic laser device. Distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) are prepared by spin-coating of polyvinylcarbazole and cellulose acetate orthogonal solutions and the active layer consists of a highly fluorescent conjugated polymer poly(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl-co-1,4-benzo-(2,1‧-3)-thiadiazole) (F8BT) spun film. A quality factor in the range 80-180 is achieved and the cavity mode is carefully tuned on the peak of the F8BT amplified spontaneous emission spectrum. Under pulsed optical pumping, laser emission is obtained with a surprisingly low lasing threshold (<20 μJ cm-2) for a full plastic DBR optical cavity. This result opens a simple and cheap way to obtain a new class of polymer lasers.

  4. Sagnac effect in resonant microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Sunada, Satoshi; Harayama, Takahisa

    2006-08-15

    The Sagnac effect in two-dimensional resonant microcavities is studied theoretically and numerically. The frequency shift due to the Sagnac effect occurs as a threshold phenomenon for the angular velocity in a rotating microcavity. Above the threshold, the eigenfunctions of a rotating microcavity become rotating waves while they are standing waves below the threshold.

  5. Microcavity array IR photodetector

    SciTech Connect

    Esman, A K; Kuleshov, V K; Zykov, G L

    2009-12-31

    An original microcavity array IR photodetector is proposed and the sensitivity and response time of its pixels are calculated. A photosensitive element represents a composite silicon microcavity made of two optically coupled closed waveguides on a dielectric substrate whose resonance wave depends on its temperature. This dependence is used to detect IR radiation which heats an absorbing element and the composite microcavity thermally coupled with this element. It is shown that for a spatial resolution of 45 {mu}m, the time response is 30 ms and the sensitivity is 10{sup -3} K at the IR radiation power of {approx} 4.7 x 10{sup -8} W element{sup -1}. (photodetectors)

  6. High reflectance dielectric distributed Bragg reflectors for near ultra-violet planar microcavities: SiO2/HfO2 versus SiO2/SiNx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réveret, F.; Bignet, L.; Zhigang, W.; Lafosse, X.; Patriarche, G.; Disseix, P.; Médard, F.; Mihailovic, M.; Leymarie, J.; Zúñiga-Pérez, J.; Bouchoule, S.

    2016-09-01

    SiO2/SiNx and SiO2/HfO2 distributed Bragg reflectors for the ultra-violet (λ = 360 nm-380 nm) are compared through their structural and optical properties. The SiO2/HfO2 system exhibits a lower interface roughness, higher reflectance, larger stop band, and lower penetration depth than SiO2/SiNx. A cavity quality factor of 3700 at about 360 nm is measured on a passive SiO2/HfO2-based planar microcavity. Compared with values obtained in the literature for the near UV range, the latter is rather large. Micro-reflectance measurements have been performed on a series of passive microcavities with increasing cavity thickness to determine the residual absorption in the SiO2 and HfO2 layers. Absorption coefficients of 30 (k = 0.86 × 10-4) and 160 cm-1 (k = 4.59 × 10-4) near λ ˜ 360 nm have been extracted for SiO2 and HfO2, respectively. Transfer-matrix simulations taking into account the residual absorption show that microcavity quality factors up to 8000 can be expected at 360-380 nm with this material system. Such values are well-suited for the fabrication of UV-vertical cavity surface emitting lasers or microcavity polariton lasers operating at room temperature.

  7. Mechanism of directional emission from a peanut-shaped microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Shu Fangjie; Zou Changling; Sun Fangwen; Xiao Yunfeng

    2011-05-15

    Collimated directional emission is essentially required for an asymmetric resonant cavity. In this paper, we theoretically investigate a type of peanut-shaped microcavity which can support highly directional emission with a beam divergence as small as 2.5 deg. The mechanism of the collimated emission of this type of peanut-shaped microcavity is explained with a short-term ray trajectory. Moreover, the explanations are also confirmed by a numerical wave simulation. This extremely narrow divergence of the emission holds great potential in highly collimated lasing from on-chip microcavities.

  8. Multi-directional ultra-high sensitive pressure sensor based on the integration of optimized double 60° bend waveguides and modified center-defect photonic crystal microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian; Yang, Daquan; Tian, Huiping; Huang, Lijun; Zhang, Pan; Ji, Yuefeng

    2015-06-01

    In the previous work [1], we have proposed a method to realize multi-directional pressure sensor. This follow-up work provides an optimized structure design based on the integration of double 60° bend waveguides and modified center-defect photonic crystal microcavity to further improve sensitivity. By applying two-dimensional finite difference time domain technologies (2D-FDTD) and finite-element methods (FEM), we systematically investigate the variations of optical properties under applied pressure. Linear relationships between the resonant wavelength shift and the applied pressure are obtained in three directions. The ultra-high sensitivities and the low minimum detectable pressure in longitudinal, transverse and upright directions are 39.7 nm/μN and 1.08 nN, 30.20 nm/μN and 1.43 nN, and 0.12 nm/nN and 0.36 nN respectively.

  9. Radiative rate modification in CdSe quantum dot-coated microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Veluthandath, Aneesh V.; Bisht, Prem B.

    2015-12-21

    Whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of the microparticles with spherical or cylindrical symmetry have exceptionally high quality factors and small mode volume. Quantum dots (QDs) are zero dimensional systems with variable band gap as well as luminescent properties with applications in photonics. In this paper, the WGMs have been observed in the luminescence spectra of CdSe QD-coated single silica microspheres. Theoretical estimations of variation of resonance frequency, electric field, and Q-values have been done for a multilayer coating of QDs on silica microspheres. Observed WGMs have been identified for their mode number and polarization using Mie theory. Broadening of modes due to material absorption has been observed. Splitting of WGMs has also been observed due to coherent coupling of counter propagating waves in the microcavity due to the presence of QDs. At room temperature, the time-resolved study indicates the modification of the radiative rate due to coupling of WGMs of the microcavity-QD hybrid system.

  10. Dispersion engineering for vertical microcavities using subwavelength gratings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaorong; Zhang, Bo; Deng, Hui

    2015-02-20

    We show that the energy-momentum dispersion of a vertical semiconductor microcavity can be modified by design using a high-index-contrast subwavelength grating (SWG) as a cavity mirror. We analyze the angular dependence of the reflection phase of the SWG to illustrate the principles of dispersion engineering. We show examples of engineered dispersions such as ones with much reduced or increased energy density of states and one with a double-well-shaped dispersion. This method of dispersion engineering is compatible with maintaining a high cavity quality factor and incorporating fully protected active media inside the cavity, thus enabling the creation of new types of cavity quantum electrodynamics systems. PMID:25763957

  11. Silicon-based one-dimensional photonic crystal microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, San; Qian, Bo; Chen, Kunji; Xu, Jun; Li, Wei; Huang, Xinfan

    2004-12-01

    The layer-by-layer method is employed to prepare a-SiNx:H microcavity structure in a Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) chamber. Measurements of transmittance spectrum of as-grown samples show that the transmittance resonant peak of a cavity mode at 750 nm is introduced into the band gap of one-dimensional photonic crystal distributed Bragg reflectors based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride. Also the PL measurements of a-SiNx:H microcavities are performed. There is a well agreement between the transmittance spectra and the PL of microcavity samples. In order to clarify the microcavity effects on the bulk a-SiNx:H, the PL of a λ/2-thick layer of bulk a-SiNx:H obtained under the same experimental conditions is presented. By comparison, a dramatic narrowing of emission linewidth and enhancement of PL intensity is observed. The wide emission band with 208 nm is strongly narrowed to 17 nm, and the resonant enhancement of the peak PL intensity is about two orders of magnitude with respect to the emission of the λ/2-thick layer of bulk a-SiNx:H. A linewidth of Δλ=17 nm and a quality factor of Q=50 are achieved in our one-dimensional a-SiNx photonic crystal microcavities.

  12. High-Q contacted ring microcavities with scatterer-avoiding “wiggler” Bloch wave supermode fields

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yangyang Popović, Miloš A.

    2014-05-19

    High-Q ring resonators with contacts to the waveguide core provide a versatile platform for various applications in chip-scale optomechanics, thermo-, and electro-optics. We propose and demonstrate azimuthally periodic contacted ring resonators based on multi-mode Bloch matching that support contacts on both the inner and outer radius edges with small degradation to the optical quality factor (Q). Radiative coupling between degenerate modes of adjacent radial spatial order leads to imaginary frequency (Q) splitting and a scatterer avoiding high-Q “wiggler” supermode field. We experimentally measure Qs up to 258 000 in devices fabricated in a silicon device layer on buried oxide undercladding and up to 139 000 in devices fully suspended in air using an undercut step. Wiggler supermodes are true modes of the microphotonic system that offer additional degrees of freedom in electrical, thermal, and mechanical design.

  13. Theory of two-dimensional microcavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Harayama, Takahisa; Sunada, Satoshi; Ikeda, Kensuke S.

    2005-07-15

    We present theoretical models of two-dimensional (2D) microcavity lasers. The relation between stationary lasing modes and resonances or metastable states is elucidated for arbitrary shapes of 2D resonant microcavities.

  14. Interaction between dual cavity modes in a planar photonic microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Elizabeth; Nair, Rajesh V.; Jagatap, B. N.

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically study the interaction between dual cavity modes in a planar photonic microcavity structure in the optical communication wavelength range. The merging and splitting of cavity mode is analysed with realistic microcavity structures. The merging of dual cavity resonance into a single cavity resonance is achieved by changing the number of layers between the two cavities. The splitting of single cavity resonance into dual cavity resonance is obtained with an increase in the reflectivity of mirrors in the front and rear side of the microcavity structure. The threshold condition for the merging and splitting of cavity mode is established in terms of structural parameters. The physical origin of the merging of dual cavity modes into a single cavity resonance is discussed in terms of the electric field intensity distribution in the microcavity structure. The microcavity structure with dual cavity modes is useful for the generation of entangled photon pairs, for achieving the strong-coupling regime between exciton and photon and for high-resolution multi-wavelength filters in optical communication.

  15. Flip-chip light emitting diode with resonant optical microcavity

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Bogart, Katherine H.A.; Fischer, Arthur J.

    2005-11-29

    A flip-chip light emitting diode with enhanced efficiency. The device structure employs a microcavity structure in a flip-chip configuration. The microcavity enhances the light emission in vertical modes, which are readily extracted from the device. Most of the rest of the light is emitted into waveguided lateral modes. Flip-chip configuration is advantageous for light emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on dielectric substrates (e.g., gallium nitride LEDs grown on sapphire substrates) in general due to better thermal dissipation and lower series resistance. Flip-chip configuration is advantageous for microcavity LEDs in particular because (a) one of the reflectors is a high-reflectivity metal ohmic contact that is already part of the flip-chip configuration, and (b) current conduction is only required through a single distributed Bragg reflector. Some of the waveguided lateral modes can also be extracted with angled sidewalls used for the interdigitated contacts in the flip-chip configuration.

  16. Microcavity hydrogen storage. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Teitel, R. J.

    1981-05-01

    In the microcavity storage system, high pressure hydrogen is stored in hollow, glass microspheres, 5 to 150 ..mu..m. This report presents the results of an experimental study to evaluate the performance of commercially available microspheres for this application. Eight grades were evaluated and their characteristics are presented. A substantial fraction of the microsphere beds survived the conditions of storing hydrogen at pressures of 400 atm. establishing that the concept of high pressure hydrogen storage is feasible. Information was gathered on the properties of the survivor microspheres. Processes for their selective recovery are being investigated.

  17. Optical Properties of InGaN Quantum Dots in Monolithic Pillar Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, M.; Sebald, K.; Dartsch, H.; Tessarek, C.; Figge, S.; Kruse, C.; Hommel, D.; Florian, M.; Jahnke, F.; Gutowski, J.

    2011-12-01

    InGaN quantum dots were successfully implemented into fully epitaxially grown nitride-based monolithic microcavities. Measured discrete modes of airpost pillar microcavities prepared out of the planar sample are compared to theoretical simulations based on a vectorial-transfer matrix method. Quality factors of up to 280 have been achieved and the emission of a single quantum dot was traced up to a temperature of 125 K.

  18. Controlled blueshift of the resonant wavelength in porous silicon microcavities using ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mangaiyarkarasi, D.; Breese, M. B. H.; Ow, Y. S.; Vijila, C.

    2006-07-10

    High-energy focused proton beam irradiation has been used to controllably blueshift the resonant wavelength of porous silicon microcavities in heavily doped p-type wafers. Irradiation results in an increased resistivity, hence a locally reduced rate of anodization. Irradiated regions are consequently thinner and of a higher refractive index than unirradiated regions, and the microcavity blueshift arises from a net reduction in the optical thickness of each porous layer. Using this process wafers are patterned on a micrometer lateral scale with microcavities tuned to different resonant wavelengths, giving rise to high-resolution full-color reflection images over the full visible spectrum.

  19. Optical bistability in semiconductor microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Baas, A.; Karr, J.Ph.; Giacobino, E.; Eleuch, H.

    2004-02-01

    We report the observation of polaritonic bistability in semiconductor microcavities in the strong-coupling regime. The origin of bistability is the polariton-polariton interaction, which gives rise to a Kerr-like nonlinearity. The experimental results are in good agreement with a simple model taking transverse effects into account.

  20. Fabrication and optical properties of non-polar III-nitride air-gap distributed Bragg reflector microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Renchun Kako, Satoshi; Arita, Munetaka; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-11

    Using the thermal decomposition technique, non-polar III-nitride air-gap distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) microcavities (MCs) with a single quantum well have been fabricated. Atomic force microscopy reveals a locally smooth DBR surface, and room-temperature micro-photoluminescence measurements show cavity modes. There are two modes per cavity due to optical birefringence in the non-polar MCs, and a systematic cavity mode shift with cavity thickness was also observed. Although the structures consist of only 3 periods (top) and 4 periods (bottom), a quality factor of 1600 (very close to the theoretical value of 2100) reveals the high quality of the air-gap DBR MCs.

  1. Strong light-matter coupling in bulk GaN-microcavities with double dielectric mirrors fabricated by two different methods

    SciTech Connect

    Reveret, F.; Disseix, P.; Vasson, A.; Leymarie, J.; Bejtka, K.; Edwards, P. R.; Martin, R. W.; Chenot, S.; Sellers, I. R.; Duboz, J. Y.; Leroux, M.; Semond, F.

    2010-08-15

    Two routes for the fabrication of bulk GaN microcavities embedded between two dielectric mirrors are described, and the optical properties of the microcavities thus obtained are compared. In both cases, the GaN active layer is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (111) Si, allowing use of selective etching to remove the substrate. In the first case, a three period Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N/AlN Bragg mirror followed by a {lambda}/2 GaN cavity are grown directly on the Si. In the second case, a crack-free 2 {mu}m thick GaN layer is grown, and progressively thinned to a final thickness of {lambda}. Both devices work in the strong coupling regime at low temperature, as evidenced by angle-dependent reflectivity or transmission experiments. However, strong light-matter coupling in emission at room temperature is observed only for the second one. This is related to the poor optoelectronic quality of the active layer of the first device, due to its growth only 250 nm above the Si substrate and its related high defect density. The reflectivity spectra of the microcavities are well accounted for by using transfer matrix calculations.

  2. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing.

    PubMed

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-02-17

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF₂ microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line.

  3. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing.

    PubMed

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF₂ microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line. PMID:26901199

  4. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF2 microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line. PMID:26901199

  5. Fermi resonance in optical microcavities.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chang-Hwan; Yu, Hyeon-Hye; Lee, Ji-Won; Kim, Chil-Min

    2015-04-01

    Fermi resonance is a phenomenon of quantum mechanical superposition, which most often occurs between normal and overtone modes in molecular systems that are nearly coincident in energy. We find that scarred resonances in deformed dielectric microcavities are the very phenomenon of Fermi resonance, that is, a pair of quasinormal modes interact with each other due to coupling and a pair of resonances are generated through an avoided resonance crossing. Then the quantum number difference of a pair of quasinormal modes, which is a consequence of quantum mechanical superposition, equals periodic orbits, whereby the resonances are localized on the periodic orbits. We derive the relation between the quantum number difference and the periodic orbits and confirm it in an elliptic, a rectangular, and a stadium-shaped dielectric microcavity.

  6. Variable deflection response of sensitive CNT-on-fiber artificial hair sensors from CNT synthesis in high aspect ratio microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinker, Keith; Maschmann, Matthew R.; Kondash, Corey; Severin, Benjamin; Phillips, David; Dickinson, Benjamin T.; Reich, Gregory; Baur, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    Crickets, locusts, bats, and many other animals detect changes in their environment with distributed arrays of flow-sensitive hairs. Here we discuss the fabrication and characterization of a relatively new class of pore-based, artificial hair sensors that take advantage of the mechanical properties of structural microfibers and the electromechanical properties of self-aligned carbon nanotube arrays to rapidly transduce changes in low speed air flow. The radially aligned nanotubes are able to be synthesized along the length of the fibers inside the high aspect ratio cavity between the fiber surface and the wall of a microcapillary pore. The growth self-positions the fibers within the capillary and forms a conductive path between detection electrodes. As the hair is deflected, nanotubes are compressed to produce a typical resistance change of 1-5% per m/s of air speed which we believe are the highest sensitivities reported for air velocities less than 10 m/s. The quasi-static response of the sensors to point loads is compared to that from the distributed loads of air flow. A plane wave tube is used to measure their dynamic response when perturbed at acoustic frequencies. Correlation of the nanotube height profile inside the capillary to a diffusion transport model suggests that the nanotube arrays can be controllably tapered along the fiber. Like their biological counterparts, many applications can be envisioned for artificial hair sensors by tailoring their individual response and incorporating them into arrays for detecting spatio-temporal flow patterns over rigid surfaces such as aircraft.

  7. Pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Jing, You Liang; Li, Zhi Feng; Li, Qian; Chen, Xiao Shuang; Chen, Ping Ping; Wang, Han; Li, Meng Yao; Li, Ning; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, plasmonics has been central to the manipulation of photons on the subwavelength scale, and superior infrared imagers have opened novel applications in many fields. Here, we demonstrate the first pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector with a single quantum well integrated between metal patches and a reflection layer. Greater than one order of magnitude enhancement of the peak responsivity has been observed. The significant improvement originates from the highly confined optical mode in the cavity, leading to a strong coupling between photons and the quantum well, resulting in the enhanced photo-electric conversion process. Such strong coupling from the localized surface plasmon mode inside the cavity is independent of incident angles, offering a unique solution to high-performance focal plane array devices. This demonstration paves the way for important infrared optoelectronic devices for sensing and imaging. PMID:27181111

  8. Pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, You Liang; Li, Zhi Feng; Li, Qian; Chen, Xiao Shuang; Chen, Ping Ping; Wang, Han; Li, Meng Yao; Li, Ning; Lu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Recently, plasmonics has been central to the manipulation of photons on the subwavelength scale, and superior infrared imagers have opened novel applications in many fields. Here, we demonstrate the first pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector with a single quantum well integrated between metal patches and a reflection layer. Greater than one order of magnitude enhancement of the peak responsivity has been observed. The significant improvement originates from the highly confined optical mode in the cavity, leading to a strong coupling between photons and the quantum well, resulting in the enhanced photo-electric conversion process. Such strong coupling from the localized surface plasmon mode inside the cavity is independent of incident angles, offering a unique solution to high-performance focal plane array devices. This demonstration paves the way for important infrared optoelectronic devices for sensing and imaging.

  9. The Detection of Helicobacter hepaticus Using Whispering-Gallery Mode Microcavity Optical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Mark E.; O’Brien, Emily C.; Grayek, Emily N.; Hermansen, James K.; Hunt, Heather K.

    2015-01-01

    Current bacterial detection techniques are relatively slow, require bulky instrumentation, and usually require some form of specialized training. The gold standard for bacterial detection is culture testing, which can take several days to receive a viable result. Therefore, simpler detection techniques that are both fast and sensitive could greatly improve bacterial detection and identification. Here, we present a new method for the detection of the bacteria Helicobacter hepaticus using whispering-gallery mode (WGM) optical microcavity-based sensors. Due to minimal reflection losses and low material adsorption, WGM-based sensors have ultra-high quality factors, resulting in high-sensitivity sensor devices. In this study, we have shown that bacteria can be non-specifically detected using WGM optical microcavity-based sensors. The minimum detection for the device was 1 × 104 cells/mL, and the minimum time of detection was found to be 750 s. Given that a cell density as low as 1 × 103 cells/mL for Helicobacter hepaticus can cause infection, the limit of detection shown here would be useful for most levels where Helicobacter hepaticus is biologically relevant. This study suggests a new approach for H. hepaticus detection using label-free optical sensors that is faster than, and potentially as sensitive as, standard techniques. PMID:26262647

  10. Three-Colour Single-Mode Electroluminescence from Alq3 Tuned by Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jia-Min; Ma, Feng-Ying; Liu, Xing-Yuan; Liu, Yun; Chu, Guo-Qiang; Ning, Yong-Qiang; Wang, Li-Jun

    2002-10-01

    Organic metal microcavities were fabricated by using full-reflectivity aluminium film and semi-transparent silver film as cavity mirrors. Unlike conventional organic microcavities, such as the typical structure of glass/DBR/ITO/organic layers/metal mirror, a microcavity with a shorter cavity length was obtained by using two metal mirrors, where DBR is the distributed Bragg reflector consisting of alternate quarter-wave layers of high and low refractive index materials. It is realized that red, green and blue single-mode electroluminescence (EL) from the microcavities with the structure, glass/Ag/TPD/Alq3/Al, are electrically-driven when the thickness of the Alq3 layer changes. Compared to a non-cavity reference sample whose EL spectrum peak is located at 520 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 93 nm, the microcavity devices show apparent cavity effects. The EL spectra of red, green and blue microcavities are peaked at 604 nm, 540 nm and 491 nm, with FWHM of 43 nm, 38 nm and 47 nm, respectively.

  11. Photothermal effects in ultra-precisely stabilized tunable microcavities.

    PubMed

    Brachmann, Johannes F S; Kaupp, Hanno; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2016-09-01

    We study the mechanical stability of a tunable high-finesse microcavity under ambient conditions and investigate light-induced effects that can both suppress and excite mechanical fluctuations. As an enabling step, we demonstrate the ultra-precise electronic stabilization of a microcavity. We then show that photothermal mirror expansion can provide high-bandwidth feedback and improve cavity stability by almost two orders of magnitude. At high intracavity power, we observe self-oscillations of mechanical resonances of the cavity. We explain the observations by a dynamic photothermal instability, leading to parametric driving of mechanical motion. For an optimized combination of electronic and photothermal stabilization, we achieve a feedback bandwidth of 500 kHz and a noise level of 1.1 × 10-13 m rms. PMID:27607722

  12. Photothermal effects in ultra-precisely stabilized tunable microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachmann, Johannes F. S.; Kaupp, Hanno; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Hunger, David

    2016-09-01

    We study the mechanical stability of a tunable high-finesse microcavity under ambient conditions and investigate light-induced effects that can both suppress and excite mechanical fluctuations. As an enabling step, we demonstrate the ultra-precise electronic stabilization of a microcavity. We then show that photothermal mirror expansion can provide high-bandwidth feedback and improve cavity stability by almost two orders of magnitude. At high intracavity power, we observe self-oscillations of mechanical resonances of the cavity. We explain the observations by a dynamic photothermal instability, leading to parametric driving of mechanical motion. For an optimized combination of electronic and photothermal stabilization, we achieve a feedback bandwidth of $500\\,$kHz and a noise level of $1.1 \\times 10^{-13}\\,$m rms.

  13. Single nanoparticle detection using split-mode microcavity Raman lasers.

    PubMed

    Li, Bei-Bei; Clements, William R; Yu, Xiao-Chong; Shi, Kebin; Gong, Qihuang; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2014-10-14

    Ultrasensitive nanoparticle detection holds great potential for early-stage diagnosis of human diseases and for environmental monitoring. In this work, we report for the first time, to our knowledge, single nanoparticle detection by monitoring the beat frequency of split-mode Raman lasers in high-Q optical microcavities. We first demonstrate this method by controllably transferring single 50-nm-radius nanoparticles to and from the cavity surface using a fiber taper. We then realize real-time detection of single nanoparticles in an aqueous environment, with a record low detection limit of 20 nm in radius, without using additional techniques for laser noise suppression. Because Raman scattering occurs in most materials under practically any pump wavelength, this Raman laser-based sensing method not only removes the need for doping the microcavity with a gain medium but also loosens the requirement of specific wavelength bands for the pump lasers, thus representing a significant step toward practical microlaser sensors. PMID:25267618

  14. Extreme output sensitivity to subwavelength boundary deformation in microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Li; Song, Qinghai; Redding, Brandon; Cao, Hui

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate a generic and robust mechanism that leads to an extreme output sensitivity to a deep subwavelength boundary perturbation in wavelength-scale microcavities. A deformation of the cavity boundary on the order of ten-thousandth of a wavelength may flip the output directions by 180∘, corresponding to a variation of 0.1 nm for a 1-μm-radius cavity. Our analysis based on a perturbation theory reveals that such tiny structural change can cause a strong mixing of nearly degenerate cavity resonances with different angular momenta, and their interference is greatly enhanced to have a radical influence on the far-field pattern. Our finding opens the possibility of utilizing carefully designed wavelength-scale microcavities for fast beam steering and high-resolution detection.

  15. Simulation of J-aggregate microcavity photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michetti, Paolo; La Rocca, Giuseppe C.

    2008-05-01

    We have developed a model in order to account for the photoexcitation dynamics of J-aggregate films and strongly coupled J-aggregate microcavities. The J aggregates are described as a disordered Frenkel exciton system in which relaxation occurs due to the presence of a thermal bath of molecular vibrations. The correspondence between the photophysics in J-aggregate films and that in J-aggregate microcavities is obtained by introducing a model polariton wave function mixing cavity photon modes and J-aggregate super-radiant excitons. With the same description of the material properties, we have calculated both absorption and luminescence spectra for the J-aggregate film and the photoluminescence of strongly coupled organic microcavities. The model is able to account for the fast relaxation dynamics in organic microcavities following nonresonant pumping and explains the temperature dependence of the ratio between the upper polariton and the lower polariton luminescence.

  16. Exciton-polariton wakefields in semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terças, H.; Mendonça, J. T.

    2016-02-01

    We consider the excitation of polariton wakefields due to a propagating light pulse in a semiconductor microcavity. We show that two kinds of wakes are possible, depending on the constituents fraction (either exciton or photon) of the polariton wavefunction. The nature of the wakefields (pure excitonic or polaritonic) can be controlled by changing the speed of propagation of the external pump. This process could be used as a diagnostic for the internal parameters of the microcavity.

  17. Label-Free Microcavity Biosensors: Steps towards Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Amarie, Dragos; Glazier, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine has the potential to improve our ability to maintain health and treat disease, while ameliorating continuously rising healthcare costs. Translation of basic research findings to clinical applications within regulatory compliance is required for personalized medicine to become the new foundation for practice of medicine. Deploying even a few of the thousands of potential diagnostic biomarkers identified each year as part of personalized treatment workflows requires clinically efficient biosensor technologies to monitor multiple biomarkers in patients in real time. This paper discusses a critical component of a regulatory system, a microcavity optical biosensor for label-free monitoring of biomolecular interactions at physiologically-relevant concentrations. While most current biosensor research focuses on improving sensitivity, this paper emphasizes other characteristics a biosensor technology requires to be practical in a clinical setting, presenting robust microcavity biosensors which are easy to manufacture and integrate with microfluidics into flexible and redesignable platforms making the microcavity biosensors deployable for continuous monitoring of biomarkers in body fluids in the clinic, in dense 2D random arrays for high-throughput applications like drug-library screening in interactomics, and of the secretory behavior of single cells in the laboratory. PMID:23443397

  18. A two dimensional silicon-based photonic crystal microcavity biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mindy; Fauchet, Philippe M.

    2006-08-01

    The optical properties of photonic bandgap (PBG) structures are highly sensitive to environmental variation. PBG structures thus are an attractive platform for biosensing applications. We experimentally demonstrate a label-free biosensor based on a two-dimensional (2-D) photonic crystal microcavity slab. The microcavity is fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator substrate and integrated with tapered ridge waveguides for light coupling. The Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method is used to model the sensor. The resonance of the microcavity is designed to be around 1.58 μm. In order to capture the target biological materials, the internal surface of the photonic crystal is first functionalized. Binding of the targets is monitored by observing a red shift of the transmission resonance. The magnitude of the shift depends on the amount of material captured by the internal surface. Compared to 1-D PBG biosensors, 2-D devices require a smaller amount of target material and can accommodate larger targets. Experimental results are compared with the predictions obtained from the FDTD simulations.

  19. Mid-infrared silicon-on-sapphire waveguide coupled photonic crystal microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yi E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com Chen, Ray T. E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com; Chakravarty, Swapnajit E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com

    2015-08-24

    We experimentally demonstrate a photonic crystal (PC) microcavity side coupled to a W1.05 photonic crystal waveguide fabricated in silicon-on-sapphire working in mid-IR regime at 3.43 μm. Using a fixed wavelength laser source, propagation characteristics of PC waveguides without microcavity are characterized as a function of lattice constant to determine the light line position, stop gap, and guided mode transmission behavior. The resonance of an L21 PC microcavity coupled to the W1.05 PCW in the guided mode transmission region is then measured by thermal tuning of the cavity resonance across the source wavelength. Resonance quality factor ∼3500 is measured from the temperature dependency curve.

  20. Ensuring High Quality Research Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Bob

    This paper discusses ensuring high quality research services that meet client needs, based on experiences at the Research and Information Services of the Ontario Legislative Library (Canada). The first section is an introduction that provides an overview of the Research and Information Services and summarizes factors related to quality control.…

  1. Bi-material crystalline whispering gallery mode microcavity structure for thermo-opto-mechanical stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itobe, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Mizumoto, Yuta; Kangawa, Hiroi; Kakinuma, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2016-05-01

    We fabricated a calcium fluoride (CaF2) whispering gallery mode (WGM) microcavity with a computer controlled ultra-precision cutting process. We observed a thermo-opto-mechanical (TOM) oscillation in the CaF2 WGM microcavity, which may influence the stability of the optical output when the cavity is employed for Kerr comb generation. We studied experimentally and numerically the mechanism of the TOM oscillation and showed that it is strongly dependent on cavity diameter. In addition, our numerical study suggests that a microcavity structure fabricated with a hybrid material (i.e. CaF2 and silicon), which is compatible with an ultra-high Q and high thermal conductivity, will allow us to reduce the TOM oscillation and stabilize the optical output.

  2. Proposal for high-speed and high-fidelity electron-spin initialization in a negatively charged quantum dot coupled to a microcavity in a weak external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Arka; Lin Ziliang; Faraon, Andrei; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2010-08-15

    We describe a proposal for fast electron-spin initialization in a negatively charged quantum dot coupled to a microcavity without the need for a strong magnetic field. We employ two-photon excitation to access trion states that are spin forbidden by one-photon excitation. Our simulation shows a maximum initialization speed of 1.3 GHz and maximum fidelity of 99.7% with realistic system parameters.

  3. Fabrication of Silica Ultra High Quality Factor Microresonators

    PubMed Central

    Maker, Ashley J.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2012-01-01

    Whispering gallery resonant cavities confine light in circular orbits at their periphery.1-2 The photon storage lifetime in the cavity, quantified by the quality factor (Q) of the cavity, can be in excess of 500ns for cavities with Q factors above 100 million. As a result of their low material losses, silica microcavities have demonstrated some of the longest photon lifetimes to date1-2. Since a portion of the circulating light extends outside the resonator, these devices can also be used to probe the surroundings. This interaction has enabled numerous experiments in biology, such as single molecule biodetection and antibody-antigen kinetics, as well as discoveries in other fields, such as development of ultra-low-threshold microlasers, characterization of thin films, and cavity quantum electrodynamics studies.3-7 The two primary silica resonant cavity geometries are the microsphere and the microtoroid. Both devices rely on a carbon dioxide laser reflow step to achieve their ultra-high-Q factors (Q>100 million).1-2,8-9 However, there are several notable differences between the two structures. Silica microspheres are free-standing, supported by a single optical fiber, whereas silica microtoroids can be fabricated on a silicon wafer in large arrays using a combination of lithography and etching steps. These differences influence which device is optimal for a given experiment. Here, we present detailed fabrication protocols for both types of resonant cavities. While the fabrication of microsphere resonant cavities is fairly straightforward, the fabrication of microtoroid resonant cavities requires additional specialized equipment and facilities (cleanroom). Therefore, this additional requirement may also influence which device is selected for a given experiment. Introduction An optical resonator efficiently confines light at specific wavelengths, known as the resonant wavelengths of the device. 1-2 The common figure of merit for these optical resonators is the quality

  4. Tuning a microcavity-coupled terahertz laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Bianchi, Vezio; Li, Lianhe; Zhu, Jingxuan; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A.; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2015-12-01

    Tunable oscillators are a key component of almost all electronic and photonic systems. Yet, a technology capable of operating in the terahertz (THz)-frequency range and fully suitable for widescale implementation is still lacking. This issue is significantly limiting potential THz applications in gas sensing, high-resolution spectroscopy, hyper-spectral imaging, and optical communications. The THz quantum cascade laser is arguably the most promising solution in terms of output power and spectral purity. In order to achieve reliable, repeatable, and broad tunability, here we exploit the strong coupling between two different cavity mode concepts: a distributed feedback one-dimensional photonic resonator (providing gain) and a mechanically actuated wavelength-size microcavity (providing tuning). The result is a continuously tunable, single-mode emitter covering a 162 GHz spectral range, centered on 3.2 THz. Our source has a few tens of MHz resolution, extremely high differential efficiency, and unprecedented compact and simple design architecture. By unveiling the large potential that lies in this technique, our results provide a robust platform for radically different THz systems exploiting broadly tunable semiconductor lasers.

  5. Tuning a microcavity-coupled terahertz laser

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Bianchi, Vezio; Vitiello, Miriam S.; Li, Lianhe; Zhu, Jingxuan; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A.; Tredicucci, Alessandro

    2015-12-28

    Tunable oscillators are a key component of almost all electronic and photonic systems. Yet, a technology capable of operating in the terahertz (THz)-frequency range and fully suitable for widescale implementation is still lacking. This issue is significantly limiting potential THz applications in gas sensing, high-resolution spectroscopy, hyper-spectral imaging, and optical communications. The THz quantum cascade laser is arguably the most promising solution in terms of output power and spectral purity. In order to achieve reliable, repeatable, and broad tunability, here we exploit the strong coupling between two different cavity mode concepts: a distributed feedback one-dimensional photonic resonator (providing gain) and a mechanically actuated wavelength-size microcavity (providing tuning). The result is a continuously tunable, single-mode emitter covering a 162 GHz spectral range, centered on 3.2 THz. Our source has a few tens of MHz resolution, extremely high differential efficiency, and unprecedented compact and simple design architecture. By unveiling the large potential that lies in this technique, our results provide a robust platform for radically different THz systems exploiting broadly tunable semiconductor lasers.

  6. A surface acoustic wave biosensor for interrogation of single tumour cells in microcavities.

    PubMed

    Senveli, Sukru U; Ao, Zheng; Rawal, Siddarth; Datar, Ram H; Cote, Richard J; Tigli, Onur

    2016-01-01

    In this study, biological cells are sensed and characterized with surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices utilising microcavities. After tumour cells in media are transported to and trapped in microcavities, the proposed platform uses SAW interaction between the substrate and the cells to extract their mechanical stiffness based on the ultrasound velocity. Finite element method (FEM) analysis and experimental results show that output phase information is an indicator of the stiffness modulus of the trapped cells. Small populations of various types of cells such as MCF7, MDA-MB-231, SKBR3, and JJ012 were characterized and characteristic moduli were estimated for each cell population. Results show that high frequency stiffness modulus is a possible biomarker for aggressiveness of the tumour and that microcavity coupled SAW devices are a good candidate for non-invasive interrogation of single cells.

  7. Magneto-optical responses of microcavity-integrated graphene photonic crystals in the infrared spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi-Ghaleh, Reza; Sattari, Maryam

    2016-09-01

    The magneto-optical responses and photonic band gap properties of the microcavity-integrated graphene photonic crystals were numerically studied. The structure consists of a graphene sheet embedded between two mirror symmetric Bragg reflectors, under the influence of an external static magnetic field. The properties of the microcavity resonance mode were investigated, considering the right- and left-handed circular polarization transmission coefficients and their phases, together with the Faraday rotation angle and ellipticity of the output light. The effects of the repetition number of the Bragg reflectors, thickness of the microcavity central layer and refractive indices of the graphene adjacent layers were considered. The obtained results revealed that a pure linear polarized output light with no ellipticity and high transmittance enhanced Faraday rotation can be achieved. These results can be utilized in designing a variety of graphene based photonic devices and magneto-optical integrated elements, such as miniaturized isolators or circulators.

  8. Microcavity-Integrated Carbon Nanotube Photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuang; Ma, Ze; Wu, Gongtao; Wei, Nan; Huang, Le; Huang, Huixin; Liu, Huaping; Wang, Sheng; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2016-07-26

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered to be highly promising nanomaterials for multiwavelength, room-temperature infrared detection applications. Here, we demonstrate a single-tube diode photodetector monolithically integrated with a Fabry-Pérot microcavity. A ∼6-fold enhanced optical absorption can be achieved, because of the confined effect of the designed optical mode. Furthermore, taking advantage of Van-Hove-singularity band structures in CNTs, we open the possibility of developing chirality-specific (n,m) CNT-film-based signal detectors. Utilizing a concept of the "resonance and off-resonance" cavity, we achieved cavity-integrated chirality-sorted CNT-film detectors working at zero bias and resonance-allowed mode, for specific target signal detection. The detectors exhibited a higher suppression ratio until a power density of 0.07 W cm(-2) and photocurrent of 5 pA, and the spectral full width at half-maximum is ∼33 nm at a signal wavelength of 1200 nm. Further, with multiple array detectors aiming at different target signals integrated on a chip, a multiwavelength signal detector system can be expected to have applications in the fields of monitoring, biosensing, color imaging, signal capture, and on-chip or space information transfers. The approach can also bring other nanomaterials into on-chip or information optoelectronics, regardless of the available doping polarity. PMID:27379375

  9. Microcavity-Integrated Carbon Nanotube Photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuang; Ma, Ze; Wu, Gongtao; Wei, Nan; Huang, Le; Huang, Huixin; Liu, Huaping; Wang, Sheng; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2016-07-26

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered to be highly promising nanomaterials for multiwavelength, room-temperature infrared detection applications. Here, we demonstrate a single-tube diode photodetector monolithically integrated with a Fabry-Pérot microcavity. A ∼6-fold enhanced optical absorption can be achieved, because of the confined effect of the designed optical mode. Furthermore, taking advantage of Van-Hove-singularity band structures in CNTs, we open the possibility of developing chirality-specific (n,m) CNT-film-based signal detectors. Utilizing a concept of the "resonance and off-resonance" cavity, we achieved cavity-integrated chirality-sorted CNT-film detectors working at zero bias and resonance-allowed mode, for specific target signal detection. The detectors exhibited a higher suppression ratio until a power density of 0.07 W cm(-2) and photocurrent of 5 pA, and the spectral full width at half-maximum is ∼33 nm at a signal wavelength of 1200 nm. Further, with multiple array detectors aiming at different target signals integrated on a chip, a multiwavelength signal detector system can be expected to have applications in the fields of monitoring, biosensing, color imaging, signal capture, and on-chip or space information transfers. The approach can also bring other nanomaterials into on-chip or information optoelectronics, regardless of the available doping polarity.

  10. Open-access microcavities for chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallance, Claire; Trichet, Aurelien A. P.; James, Dean; Dolan, Philip R.; Smith, Jason M.

    2016-07-01

    The recent development of open-access optical microcavities opens up a number of intriguing possibilities in the realm of chemical sensing. We provide an overview of the different possible sensing modalities, with examples of refractive index sensing, optical absorption measurements, and optical tracking and trapping of nanoparticles. The extremely small mode volumes within an optical microcavity allow very small numbers of molecules to be probed: our current best detection limits for refractive index and absorption sensing are around 105 and 102 molecules, respectively, with scope for further improvements in the future.

  11. Optically active silica and polymeric materials for microcavity lasers and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armani, A. M.; Deka, N.; Mehrabani, S.; Shi, C.; Maker, A.; Lee, M.; Kovach, A.; Gungor, E.; Kuo, K.; Diep, V.

    2015-03-01

    Silica and silica-doped high quality factor (Q) optical resonators have demonstrated ultra-low threshold lasers based on numerous mechanisms (eg rare earth dopants, Raman). To date, the key focus has been on maintaining a high Q, as that determines the lasing threshold and linewidth. However, equally important criteria are lasing efficiency and wavelength. These parameters are governed by the material, not the cavity Q. Therefore, to fully address this challenge, it is necessary to develop new materials. We have synthesized a suite of silica and polymeric materials with nanoparticle and rare-earth dopants to enable the development of microcavity lasers with emission from the near-IR to the UV. Additionally, the efficiencies and thresholds of many of these devices surpass the previous work. Specifically, the silica sol-gel lasers are co- and tri-doped with metal nanoparticles (eg Ti, Al) and rare-earth materials (eg Yb, Nb, Tm) and are fabricated using conventional micro/nanofabrication methods. The intercalation of the metal in the silica matrix reduces the clustering of the rare-earth ions and reduces the phonon energy of the glass, improving efficiency and overall device performance. Additionally, the silica Raman gain coefficient is enhanced due to the inclusion of the metal nanoparticles, which results in a lower threshold and a higher efficiency silica Raman laser. Finally, we have synthesized several polymer films doped with metal (eg Au, Ag) nanoparticles and deposited them on the surface of our microcavity devices. By pumping on the plasmonic resonant wavelength of the particle, we are able to achieve plasmonic-enhanced upconversion lasing.

  12. Electrically-detected ESR in silicon nanostructures inserted in microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Bagraev, Nikolay; Danilovskii, Eduard; Gets, Dmitrii; Klyachkin, Leonid; Kudryavtsev, Andrey; Kuzmin, Roman; Malyarenko, Anna; Gehlhoff, Wolfgang; Mashkov, Vladimir; Romanov, Vladimir

    2014-02-21

    We present the first findings of the new electrically-detected electron spin resonance technique (EDESR), which reveal the point defects in the ultra-narrow silicon quantum wells (Si-QW) confined by the superconductor δ- barriers. This technique allows the ESR identification without application of an external cavity, as well as a high frequency source and recorder, and with measuring the only response of the magnetoresistance, with internal GHz Josephson emission within frameworks of the normal-mode coupling (NMC) caused by the microcavities embedded in the Si-QW plane.

  13. Modified Photoluminescence by Silicon-Based One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, San; Qian, Bo; Wei, Jun-Wei; Chen, Kun-Ji; Xu, Jun; Li, Wei; Huang, Xin-Fan

    2005-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) from one-dimensional photonic band structures is investigated. The doped photonic crystal with microcavities are fabricated by using alternating hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H/a-SiNy:H) layers in a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) chamber. It is observed that microcavities strongly modify the PL spectra from active hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNz:H) thin film. By comparison, the wide emission band width 208 nm is strongly narrowed to 11 nm, and the resonant enhancement of the peak PL intensity is about two orders of magnitude with respect to the emission of the λ/2-thick layer of a-SiNz:H. A linewidth of Δλ = 11 nm and a quality factor of Q = 69 are achieved in our one-dimensional a-SiNz photonic crystal microcavities. Measurements of transmittance spectra of the as-grown samples show that the transmittance resonant peak of a cavity mode at 710 nm is introduced into the band gap of one-dimensional photonic crystal distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), which further verifies the microcavity effects.

  14. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.

    1993-01-01

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  15. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  16. Vertical Microcavity Organic Light-emitting Field-effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongsheng; Lin, Jie; Song, Li; Lu, Qipeng; Zhu, Wanbin; Liu, Xingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Organic light-emitting field-effect transistors (OLEFETs) are regarded as a novel kind of device architecture for fulfilling electrical-pumped organic lasers. However, the realization of OLEFETs with high external quantum efficiency (EQE) and high brightness simultaneously is still a tough task. Moreover, the design of the resonator structure in LED is far from satisfactory. Here, OLEFETs with EQE of 1.5% at the brightness of 2600 cdm−2, and the corresponding ON/OFF ratio and current efficiency reaches above 104 and 3.1 cdA−1, respectively, were achieved by introducing 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN) as a charge generation layer. Moreover, a vertical microcavity based on distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and Ag source/drain electrodes is successfully introduced into the high performance OLEFETs, which results in electroluminescent spectrum linewidth narrowing from 96 nm to 6.9 nm. The results manifest the superiority of the vertical microcavity as an optical resonator in OLEFETs, which sheds some light on achieving the electrically pumped organic lasers. PMID:26986944

  17. Vertical Microcavity Organic Light-emitting Field-effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongsheng; Lin, Jie; Song, Li; Lu, Qipeng; Zhu, Wanbin; Liu, Xingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Organic light-emitting field-effect transistors (OLEFETs) are regarded as a novel kind of device architecture for fulfilling electrical-pumped organic lasers. However, the realization of OLEFETs with high external quantum efficiency (EQE) and high brightness simultaneously is still a tough task. Moreover, the design of the resonator structure in LED is far from satisfactory. Here, OLEFETs with EQE of 1.5% at the brightness of 2600 cdm(-2), and the corresponding ON/OFF ratio and current efficiency reaches above 10(4) and 3.1 cdA(-1), respectively, were achieved by introducing 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN) as a charge generation layer. Moreover, a vertical microcavity based on distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and Ag source/drain electrodes is successfully introduced into the high performance OLEFETs, which results in electroluminescent spectrum linewidth narrowing from 96 nm to 6.9 nm. The results manifest the superiority of the vertical microcavity as an optical resonator in OLEFETs, which sheds some light on achieving the electrically pumped organic lasers. PMID:26986944

  18. Formation of a suspended lipid membrane on a microcavity covered by a thin SiO2 layer with a nanohole array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Aya; Kashimura, Yoshiaki; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Sumitomo, Koji

    2014-01-01

    To provide a platform for a nanobiodevice, we fabricated microcavities on a Si/SiO2 substrate covered by a thin SiO2 layer with nanohole arrays that we call a pepper shaker substrate. Fluorescence and atomic force microscopy images showed that the structure of the pepper shaker substrate improved both the probability of membrane sealing over the microcavities by rupturing giant unilameller vesicles and the lifetime of the lipid membrane suspended over the microcavities. The success of this study reveals the potential for fabricating an artificial cell array as a tool for the functional and high throughput analysis of membrane proteins.

  19. Drag effects in a system of electrons and microcavity polaritons

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Oleg L.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2010-09-15

    The theory of the drag effects in the system of spatially separated electrons and excitons in coupled quantum wells (QWs) embedded in an optical microcavity is developed. It is shown that at low temperature an electron current induces the polariton flow, therefore, a transport of photons along the cavity. However, the electron current dragged by the polariton flow is strongly suppressed below polariton superfluid transition temperature and hence, the strong suppression of the induced electron current indicates the superfluidity of polaritons. Therefore, the transport properties of polaritons can be investigated by measuring the current or voltage in the electron subsystem. At high temperatures, we study the exciton-electron drag effects. At high-temperatures regime, from one hand, the existence of the electric current in an electron QW induces the exciton flow in the other QW, from the other hand, the electron current in one QW induces the exciton flow in the other QW via the drag of excitons by the electrons. The drag coefficients for the polariton-electron systems are calculated and analyzed. We discuss the possible experimental observation of the drag effects in the system of electrons and microcavity polaritons, that also allow to observe the cavity polaritons superfluidity.

  20. Planar microcavity-integrated hot-electron photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Kai; Zhan, Yaohui; Giannini, Vincenzo; Li, Xiaofeng

    2016-05-01

    Hot-electron photodetectors are attracting increasing interest due to their capability in below-bandgap photodetection without employing classic semiconductor junctions. Despite the high absorption in metallic nanostructures via plasmonic resonance, the fabrication of such devices is challenging and costly due to the use of high-dimensional sub-wavelength nanostructures. In this study, we propose a planar microcavity-integrated hot-electron photodetector (MC-HE PD), in which the TCO/semiconductor/metal (TCO: transparent conductive oxide) structure is sandwiched between two asymmetrically distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and a lossless buffer layer. Finite-element simulations demonstrate that the resonant wavelength and the absorption efficiency of the device can be manipulated conveniently by tailoring the buffer layer thickness and the number of top DBR pairs. By benefitting from the largely increased electric field at the resonance frequency, the absorption in the metal can reach 92%, which is a 21-fold enhancement compared to the reference without a microcavity. Analytical probability-based electrical calculations further show that the unbiased responsivity can be up to 239 nA mW-1, which is more than an order of magnitude larger than that of the reference. Furthermore, the MC-HE PD not only exhibits a superior photoelectron conversion ability compared to the approach with corrugated metal, but also achieves the ability to tune the near infrared multiband by employing a thicker buffer layer.

  1. Finite element method analysis of surface acoustic wave devices with microcavities for detection of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senveli, Sukru U.; Tigli, Onur

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces the use of finite element method analysis tools to investigate the use of a Rayleigh type surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor to interrogate minute amounts of liquids trapped in microcavities placed on the delay line. Launched surface waves in the ST-X quartz substrate couple to the liquid and emit compressional waves. These waves form a resonant cavity condition and interfere with the surface waves in the substrate. Simulations show that the platform operates in a different mechanism than the conventional mass loading of SAW devices. Based on the proposed detection mechanism, it is able to distinguish between variations of 40% and 90% glycerin based on phase relations while using liquid volumes smaller than 10 pl. Results from shallow microcavities show high correlation with sound velocity parameter of the liquid whereas deeper microcavities display high sensitivities with respect to glycerin concentration. Simulated devices yield a maximum sensitivity of -0.77°/(% glycerin) for 16 μm wavelength operation with 8 μm deep, 24 μm wide, and 24 μm long microcavities.

  2. Solution processing of microcavity for BioMEMS application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Vu Nam; Ukita, Yoshiaki; Takamura, Yuzuru; Mitani, Tadaoki; Shimoda, Tatsuya; Dung Dang, Thi My; Chien Dang, Mau

    2014-09-01

    Compared to the conventional silicon-based technology, the solution process appears to be a revolution in the field of micro/nanofabrication due to its advantages of high efficiency in material and energy consumption and the use of low cost material. In this paper, we introduce a new approach to fabricate BioMEMS devices using this novel technology to make microcavity. Zirconium oxide patterns were formed on the silicon substrate simply by spin coating its precursor and thermal imprinting technique. We used poly-propylene carbonate (PPC) for the sacrificial material due to its unique pyrolysis property. The PPC was coated on the ZrO patterns and excess film was etched by oxygen plasma but retaining PPC structure between the lines of ZrO pattern. Then another ZrO layer was coated to encapsulate the PPC. The final microcavity structures were obtained by just baking the substrate by pyrolyzing the PPC. The obtained results show the approach’s prospect of becoming an ideal alternative for the current BioMEMS micro/nanofabrication technologies

  3. Antenna-coupled microcavities for terahertz emission

    SciTech Connect

    Madéo, J. Todorov, Y.; Sirtori, C.

    2014-01-20

    We have investigated the capacitive coupling between dipolar antennas and metal-dielectric-metal wire microcavities with strong sub-wavelength confinement in the terahertz region. The coupling appears in reflectivity measurements performed on arrays of antenna-coupled elements, which display asymmetric Fano lineshapes. The experimental data are compared to a temporal coupled-mode theory and finite elements electromagnetic simulations. We show that the Fano interferences correspond to coupling between a subradiant mode (microcavity) and a superradiant mode (antennas). This phenomenon allows one to enhance and control the radiative coupling of the strongly confined mode with the vacuum. These concepts are very useful for terahertz optoelectronic devices based on deep-sub-wavelength active regions.

  4. Millisecond Photon Lifetime in a Slow-Light Microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huet, V.; Rasoloniaina, A.; Guillemé, P.; Rochard, P.; Féron, P.; Mortier, M.; Levenson, A.; Bencheikh, K.; Yacomotti, A.; Dumeige, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Optical microcavities with ultralong photon storage times are of central importance for integrated nanophotonics. To date, record quality (Q ) factors up to 1011 have been measured in millimetric-size single-crystal whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators, and 1010 in silica or glass microresonators. We show that, by introducing slow-light effects in an active WGM microresonator, it is possible to enhance the photon lifetime by several orders of magnitude, thus circumventing both fabrication imperfections and residual absorption. The slow-light effect is obtained from coherent population oscillations in an erbium-doped fluoride glass microsphere, producing strong dispersion of the WGM (group index ng˜106). As a result, a photon lifetime up to 2.5 ms at room temperature has been measured, corresponding to a Q factor of 3 ×1012 at 1530 nm. This system could yield a new type of optical memory microarray with ultralong storage times.

  5. Stark effect induced microcavity polariton solitons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W L; Wu, X M; Wang, F; Ma, R; Li, X F; Rao, Y J

    2015-06-15

    This paper proposes a way of generating polariton solitons (PSs) in a semiconductor microcavity using Stark effect as the trigger mechanism. A Stark pulse performing as the writing beam is used to excite non-resonant fluctuations of polariton, which finally evolves into bright PSs. It is found that a branch of PS solutions versus pump parameters could be found through optimizing parameters of the Stark pulse, and polarization of the generated PS is dependent on the writing beam. PMID:26193554

  6. Nanoscale microcavity sensor for single particle detection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mindy R; Fauchet, Philippe M

    2007-11-15

    Recently we demonstrated a biosensor based on a two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavity for detection of proteins. We present a theoretical and experimental study of a modified structure for single particle detection. With an active sensing volume of approximately 0.15 microm(3), the device is capable of detecting approximately 1 fg of matter. Its performance is tested with latex spheres with sizes that fall in the size range of a variety of viruses. PMID:18026281

  7. Strain monitoring of bismaleimide composites using embedded microcavity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Amardeep; Anandan, Sudharshan; Yuan, Lei; Watkins, Steve E.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Xiao, Hai; Phan, Nam

    2016-03-01

    A type of extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) fiber optic sensor, i.e., the microcavity strain sensor, is demonstrated for embedded, high-temperature applications. The sensor is fabricated using a femtosecond (fs) laser. The fs-laser-based fabrication makes the sensor thermally stable to sustain operating temperatures as high as 800°C. The sensor has low sensitivity toward the temperature as compared to its response toward the applied strain. The performance of the EFPI sensor is tested in an embedded application. The host material is carbon fiber/bismaleimide (BMI) composite laminate that offer thermally stable characteristics at high ambient temperatures. The sensor exhibits highly linear response toward the temperature and strain. Analytical work done with embedded optical-fiber sensors using the out-of-autoclave BMI laminate was limited until now. The work presented in this paper offers an insight into the strain and temperature interactions of the embedded sensors with the BMI composites.

  8. Transient dual-energy lasing in a semiconductor microcavity

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Feng-Kuo; Xie, Wei; Lee, Yi-Shan; Lin, Sheng-Di; Lai, Chih Wei

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate sequential lasing at two well-separated energies in a highly photoexcited planar microcavity at room temperature. Two spatially overlapped lasing states with distinct polarization properties appear at energies more than 5 meV apart. Under a circularly polarized nonresonant 2 ps pulse excitation, a sub-10-ps transient circularly polarized high-energy (HE) state emerges within 10 ps after the pulse excitation. This HE state is followed by a pulsed state that lasts for 20–50 ps at a low energy (LE) state. The HE state is highly circularly polarized as a result of a spin-preserving stimulated process, while the LE state shows a significantly reduced circular polarization because of a diminishing spin imbalance. PMID:26477277

  9. A porous silicon optical microcavity for sensitive bacteria detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha; Huang, Jianfeng; Cai, Lintao

    2011-10-01

    A porous silicon microcavity (PSM) is highly sensitive to subtle interface changes due to its high surface area, capillary condensation ability and a narrow resonance peak (~10 nm). Based on the well-defined optical properties of a PSM, we successfully fabricated a bacteria detection chip for molecular or subcellular analysis by surface modification using undecylenic acid (UA), and the specific recognition binding of vancomycin to the D-alanyl-D-alanine of bacteria. The red shift of the PSM resonance peak showed a good linear relationship with bacteria concentration ranging from 100 to 1000 bacteria ml - 1 at the level of relative standard deviation of 0.994 and detection limit of 20 bacteria ml - 1. The resulting PSM sensors demonstrated high sensitivity, good reproducibility, fast response and low cost for biosensing.

  10. Cavity polaritons in an organic single-crystalline rubrene microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchimoto, Yuta; Nagai, Hikaru; Amano, Masamitsu; Bando, Kazuki; Kondo, Hisao

    2014-06-01

    We fabricated a single-crystalline rubrene microcavity using a simple solution technique and observed cavity polaritons in the microcavity at room temperature (RT). Large Rabi splitting energies were obtained from dispersion of the cavity polaritons. Furthermore, photoluminescence from the cavity polaritons was observed at RT. The findings will be of importance for the application of cavity polaritons.

  11. Study of two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavities filled with polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmerkhi, A.; Bouchemat, M.; Bouchemat, T.; Paraire, N.

    2010-11-01

    We present numerical study of microcavity biosensor in photonic crystal (PC) with triangular lattice of air holes patterned perpendicularly to an InP-based confining heterostructure. The microcavity is formed by varying the radius of one air hole. The 2D finite difference time domain (FDTD) method algorithm (fullwave simulator) is used to compute the light transmission efficiency and the quality factor (Q) when the refractive index (RI) filled in the air holes of water and polymer. The detected spectrum has a Lorentzian line shape, and the peak occurs when the PC cavity is at resonance. The resonance wavelength of this cavity will shift accordingly due to the variation of RI. The polymer filling of photonic crystal holes can be used to measure gas, fluids, biolayers, or bound chemical.

  12. Integrated vertical microcavity using a nano-scale deformation for strong lateral confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, Lijian Ding, Fei Stöferle, Thilo Knoll, Armin Jan Offrein, Bert Mahrt, Rainer F.

    2013-12-09

    We report on the realization of a solid state Fabry-Pérot-like microcavity that uses a small Gaussian-shaped deformation inside the cavity to achieve strong lateral photon confinement on the order of the wavelength. Cavities with a mode volume V < 0.4 μm{sup 3} and a quality factor Q > 1000 are fabricated by means of focused ion beam milling, removing the necessity for etched sidewalls as required for micropillar cavities. Perylene-diimide dye doped polystyrene was embedded in the microcavity and probed by time-resolved microphotoluminescence. A Purcell enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate by a factor of 3.5 has been observed at room temperature.

  13. High-quality-factor planar optical cavities with laterally stopped, slowed, or reversed light.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Steven J; Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Capasso, Federico

    2016-08-01

    In a planar optical cavity, the resonance frequencies increase as a function of in-plane wavevector according to a standard textbook formula. This has well-known consequences in many different areas of optics, from the shifts of etalon peaks at non-normal angles, to the properties of transverse modes in laser diodes, to the effective mass of microcavity photons, and so on. However, this standard formula is valid only when the reflection phase of each cavity mirror is approximately independent of angle. There is a certain type of mirror-a subwavelength dielectric grating near a guided mode resonance-with not only a strongly angle-dependent reflection phase, but also very high reflectance and low losses. Simulations show that by using such mirrors, high-quality-factor planar cavities can be designed that break all these textbook rules, leading to resonant modes that are slow, stopped or even backward-propagating in the in-plane direction. In particular, we demonstrate experimentally high-Q planar cavities whose resonance frequency is independent of in-plane wavevector-i.e., the resonant modes have zero in-plane group velocity, for one polarization but both in-plane directions. We discuss potential applications in various fields including lasers, quantum optics, and exciton-polariton condensation. PMID:27505803

  14. Spin–orbit coupling of light in asymmetric microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Ma, L. B.; Li, S. L.; Fomin, V. M.; Hentschel, M.; Götte, J. B.; Yin, Y.; Jorgensen, M. R.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2016-01-01

    When spinning particles, such as electrons and photons, undergo spin–orbit coupling, they can acquire an extra phase in addition to the well-known dynamical phase. This extra phase is called the geometric phase (also known as the Berry phase), which plays an important role in a startling variety of physical contexts such as in photonics, condensed matter, high-energy and space physics. The geometric phase was originally discussed for a cyclically evolving physical system with an Abelian evolution, and was later generalized to non-cyclic and non-Abelian cases, which are the most interesting fundamental subjects in this area and indicate promising applications in various fields. Here, we enable optical spin–orbit coupling in asymmetric microcavities and experimentally observe a non-cyclic optical geometric phase acquired in a non-Abelian evolution. Our work is relevant to fundamental studies and implies promising applications by manipulating photons in on-chip quantum devices. PMID:26987401

  15. Coherence expansion and polariton condensate formation in a semiconductor microcavity.

    PubMed

    Belykh, V V; Sibeldin, N N; Kulakovskii, V D; Glazov, M M; Semina, M A; Schneider, C; Höfling, S; Kamp, M; Forchel, A

    2013-03-29

    The dynamics of the expansion of the first order spatial coherence g(1) for a polariton system in a high-Q GaAs microcavity was investigated on the basis of Young's double slit experiment under 3 ps pulse excitation at the conditions of polariton Bose-Einstein condensation. It was found that in the process of condensate formation the coherence expands with a constant velocity of about 10(8)  cm/s. The measured coherence is smaller than that in a thermal equilibrium system during the growth of condensate density and well exceeds it at the end of condensate decay. The onset of spatial coherence is governed by polariton relaxation while condensate amplitude and phase fluctuations are not suppressed.

  16. Tunable polaritonic molecules in an open microcavity system

    SciTech Connect

    Dufferwiel, S.; Li, Feng Giriunas, L.; Walker, P. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Krizhanovskii, D. N.; Trichet, A. A. P.; Smith, J. M.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2015-11-16

    We experimentally demonstrate tunable coupled cavities based upon open access zero-dimensional hemispherical microcavities. The modes of the photonic molecules are strongly coupled with quantum well excitons forming a system of tunable polaritonic molecules. The cavity-cavity coupling strength, which is determined by the degree of modal overlap, is controlled through the fabricated centre-to-centre distance and tuned in-situ through manipulation of both the exciton-photon and cavity-cavity detunings by using nanopositioners to vary the mirror separation and angle between them. We demonstrate micron sized confinement combined with high photonic Q-factors of 31 000 and lower polariton linewidths of 150 μeV at resonance along with cavity-cavity coupling strengths between 2.5 meV and 60 μeV for the ground cavity state.

  17. Intensity modulated SMF cascaded tapers with a hollow core PCF based microcavity for curvature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dass, Sumit; Narayan Dash, Jitendra; Jha, Rajan

    2016-03-01

    We propose a highly sensitive curvature sensor based on cascaded single mode fiber (SMF) tapers with a microcavity. The microcavity is created by splicing a small piece of hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) at the end of an SMF to obtain a sharp interference pattern. Experimental results show that two SMF tapers enhance the curvature sensitivity of the system and by changing the tapering parameters of the second taper, the curvature sensitivity of the system can be tailored, together with the fringe contrast of the interference pattern. A maximum curvature sensitivity of 10.4 dB/m-1 is observed in the curvature range 0 to 1 m-1 for a second taper diameter of 18 μm. The sensing setup is highly stable and shows very low temperature sensitivity. As the interrogation is intensity based, a low cost optical power meter can be utilized to determine the curvature.

  18. Scalable photonic quantum computing assisted by quantum-dot spin in double-sided optical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2013-07-29

    We investigate the possibility of achieving scalable photonic quantum computing by the giant optical circular birefringence induced by a quantum-dot spin in a double-sided optical microcavity as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We construct a deterministic controlled-not gate on two photonic qubits by two single-photon input-output processes and the readout on an electron-medium spin confined in an optical resonant microcavity. This idea could be applied to multi-qubit gates on photonic qubits and we give the quantum circuit for a three-photon Toffoli gate. High fidelities and high efficiencies could be achieved when the side leakage to the cavity loss rate is low. It is worth pointing out that our devices work in both the strong and the weak coupling regimes. PMID:23938640

  19. Scalable photonic quantum computing assisted by quantum-dot spin in double-sided optical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2013-07-29

    We investigate the possibility of achieving scalable photonic quantum computing by the giant optical circular birefringence induced by a quantum-dot spin in a double-sided optical microcavity as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We construct a deterministic controlled-not gate on two photonic qubits by two single-photon input-output processes and the readout on an electron-medium spin confined in an optical resonant microcavity. This idea could be applied to multi-qubit gates on photonic qubits and we give the quantum circuit for a three-photon Toffoli gate. High fidelities and high efficiencies could be achieved when the side leakage to the cavity loss rate is low. It is worth pointing out that our devices work in both the strong and the weak coupling regimes.

  20. Electrically-detected magnetic resonance in semiconductor nanostructures inserted in microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Bagraev, Nikolay; Danilovskii, Eduard; Gets, Dmitrii; Klyachkin, Leonid; Kudryavtsev, Andrey; Kuzmin, Roman; Malyarenko, Anna; Gehlhoff, Wolfgang; Mashkov, Vladimir; Romanov, Vladimir

    2013-12-04

    We present the first findings of the new electrically-detected electron spin resonance technique (EDESR), which reveal the point defects in the ultra-narrow silicon quantum wells (Si-QW) confined by the superconductor δ-barriers. This technique allows the ESR identification without application of an external cavity, as well as a high frequency source and recorder, and with measuring the only response of the magnetoresistance caused by the microcavities embedded in the Si-QW plane.

  1. Surface Plasmons in Fabry-Perot Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Stephen

    2000-05-01

    We have developed a technique for creating a tunable Fabry-Perot microcavity by flattening a tunneling microscope tip to create a mirror which is then opposed to a semitransparent metal-film mirror. The latter is deposited on a glass prism through which light can be directed into the cavity and which transmits light emitted by the cavity. With this arrangement we can reproducibly investigate behavior as the mirror separation is tuned down to contact. The modes usually associated with optical cavities are free-space solutions of Maxwell's equations and are populated by photons. However, in a microscopic cavity we must also consider near-field phenomena such as surface-plasmons at the surfaces of the mirrors. These can be excited by a laser beam incident on the prism at an appropriate angle. Surface-plasmon solutions include coupled modes involving both mirrors, which are radially confined in the microcavity. We are studying interconversion of photons and surface-plasmons and the lifetimes of both types of excitations, in particular as these are modified by cavity quantum electrodynamic effects.

  2. 3D PIC Modeling of Microcavity Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald; Moore, Christopher; Yee, Benjamin; Moorman, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    We present a number of techniques and challenges in simulating the transient behavior of a microcavity discharge. Our microcavities are typically cylindrical with diameters approximately 50 - 100 μm, heights of 50 - 200 μm, pressure near atmospheric, and operate at a few hundred volts. We employ a fully kinetic simulation methodology, the Particle-in-Cell (PIC) method, with interparticle collisions handled via methods based on direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). In particular, we explicitly include kinetic electrons. Some of the challenges we encounter include variations in number densities, external circuit coupling, and time step resolution constraints. By employing dynamic particle weighting (particle weights vary over time by species and location) we can mitigate some of the challenges modeling systems with 107 variations in number densities. Smoothing mechanisms have been used to attempt to mitigate external circuit response. We perform our simulations on hundreds or thousands of processing cores to accommodate the computational work inherent in using relatively small time step sizes (e.g., 50 fs for a 100 ns calculation). In addition, particle weighting issues inherent to three-dimensional low temperature plasma systems will be mentioned. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Optofluidic tunable manipulation of microparticles by integrating graded-index fiber taper with a microcavity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yuan; Zhang, Chenlin; Liu, Qun-Feng; Wu, Yu; Wu, Huijuan; Rao, Yunjiang; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2015-02-01

    We propose and demonstrate optofluidic tunable manipulation of polystyrene microparticles based on the combination of a graded-index fiber (GIF) taper and a microcavity. The tunability on the manipulation length is experimentally explored by changing the balance between the optical force and the microfluidic flow force, as well as by tuning the focus of light emitting from the GIF taper via adjusting the length of an air microcavity. By optimizing the geometric shape of the GIF taper, as well as the flow rate and laser power, a manipulation length of 177 μm is achieved, more than 4 times longer than the state-of-the-art optical fiber tweezers. This method has advantages of high flexibility, ease of fabrication and use, integration with microfluidics and has the potential for optofluidic sensing applications. PMID:25836228

  4. Tuning the Microcavity of Organic Light Emitting Diodes by Solution Processable Polymer-Nanoparticle Composite Layers.

    PubMed

    Preinfalk, Jan B; Schackmar, Fabian R; Lampe, Thomas; Egel, Amos; Schmidt, Tobias D; Brütting, Wolfgang; Gomard, Guillaume; Lemmer, Uli

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we present a simple method to tune and take advantage of microcavity effects for an increased fraction of outcoupled light in solution-processed organic light emitting diodes. This is achieved by incorporating nonscattering polymer-nanoparticle composite layers. These tunable layers allow the optimization of the device architecture even for high film thicknesses on a single substrate by gradually altering the film thickness using a horizontal dipping technique. Moreover, it is shown that the optoelectronic device parameters are in good agreement with transfer matrix simulations of the corresponding layer stack, which offers the possibility to numerically design devices based on such composite layers. Lastly, it could be shown that the introduction of nanoparticles leads to an improved charge injection, which combined with an optimized microcavity resulted in a maximum luminous efficacy increase of 85% compared to a nanoparticle-free reference device.

  5. Efficient single-photon emitters based on Bragg microcavities containing selectively positioned InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Gaisler, V. A. Gaisler, A. V.; Jaroshevich, A. S.; Derebezov, I. A.; Kachanova, M. M.; Zhivodkov, Yu. A.; Gavrilova, T. A.; Medvedev, A. S.; Nenasheva, L. A.; Grachev, K. V.; Sandyrev, V. K.; Kozhuhov, A. S.; Shayahmetov, V. M.; Kalagin, A. K.; Bakarov, A. K.; Dmitriev, D. V.; Toropov, A. I.; Shcheglov, D. V.; Latyshev, A. V.; Aseev, A. L.

    2015-01-15

    A semiconductor Bragg microcavity structure for single photon emitters is designed and implemented. The design provides the efficient current pumping of selectively positioned InAs quantum dots within a micrometer-size aperture, high external quantum yield, and low divergence of the emitted radiation.

  6. Excellence through High-Quality Individualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Richard W.; Klingstedt, Joe Lars

    1988-01-01

    Proposes a strategy employing challenge, functionalism, high-order learning, and originality to achieve high-quality individualization in course work. Asserts that individualized instruction better prepares students to solve problems, make decisions, and produce original ideas. (MM)

  7. Electrical investigations of hybrid OLED microcavity structures with novel encapsulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Stefan; Brückner, Robert; Fröb, Hartmut; Leo, Karl

    2016-04-01

    An electrical driven organic solid state laser is a very challenging goal which is so far well beyond reach. As a step towards realization, we monolithically implemented an Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) into a dielectric, high quality microcavity (MC) consisting of two Distributed Bragg Reectors (DBR). In order to account for an optimal optical operation, the OLED structure has to be adapted. Furthermore, we aim to excite the device not only electrically but optically as well. Different OLED structures with an emission layer consisting of Alq3:DCM (2 wt%) were investigated. The External Quantum Efficiencies (EQE) of this hybrid structures are in the range of 1-2 %, as expected for this material combination. Including metal layers into a MC is complicated and has a huge impact on the device performance. Using Transfer-Matrix-Algorithm (TMA) simulations, the best positions for the metal electrodes are determined. First, the electroluminescence (EL) of the adjusted OLED structure on top of a DBR is measured under nitrogen atmosphere. The modes showed quality factors of Q = 60. After the deposition of the top DBR, the EL is measured again and the quality factors increased up to Q = 600. Considering the two 25-nm-thick-silver contacts a Q-factor of 600 is very high. The realization of a suitable encapsulation method is important. Two approaches were successfully tested. The first method is based on the substitution of a DBR layer with a layer produced via Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). The second method uses a 0.15-mm-thick cover glass glued on top of the DBR with a 0.23-μm-thick single-component glue layer. Due to the working encapsulation, it is possible to investigate the sample under ambient conditions.

  8. Fiber probe microcavities for refractive index and temperature discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Ricardo M.; Warren-Smith, Stephen C.; Becker, Martin; Dellith, Jan; Rothhardt, Manfred; Zibaii, M. I.; Latifi, H.; Marques, Manuel B.; Bartelt, Hartmut; Frazão, Orlando

    2016-05-01

    Fiber probe structures composed of two physical microcavities were created using focused ion beam technology. These structures have a tip-like shape as they were milled in preciously etched tapered fiber tips. The microprobes are then characterized for temperature and refractive index sensing using a signal filtering technique to discriminate signals from distinct microcavities. Using fast Fourier transforms combined with band-pass filters, it is possible to reconstruct the spectra of each cavity independently and thus measure their individual spectral shifts.

  9. Microcavity-embedded, colour-tuneable, transparent organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Hong; Chen, Chang-Wen; Huang, Zheng-Yu; Lin, Wei-Chieh; Lin, Li-Yen; Lin, Francis; Wong, Ken-Tsung; Lin, Hao-Wu

    2014-02-01

    In this work microcavity-capped colour-tuneable SMOSCs are evaluated. By adopting a microcavity-structured cathode with optical spacer layers of different thicknesses fabricated in a Ag/NPB/Ag structure, the transmission spectra of complete devices can be tuned over the entire visible-light region (400-750 nm). The fabricated semitransparent colour-tuneable solar cells show an average efficiency of 4.78% under 1-sun illumination.

  10. Photonic Crystal Microcavities for Quantum Information Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemeier, Jenna Nicole

    Quantum information science and technology is a broad and fascinating field, encompassing diverse research areas such as materials science, atomic physics, superconductors, solid-state physics, and photonics. A goal of this field is to demonstrate the basic functions of information initialization, manipulation, and read-out in systems that take advantage of quantum physics to greatly enhance computing performance capabilities. In a hybrid quantum information network, different systems are used to perform different functions, to best exploit the advantageous properties of each system. For example, matter quantum bits (qubits) can be used for local data storage and manipulation while photonic qubits can be used for long-distance communication between storage points of the network. Our research focuses on the following two solid-state realizations of a matter qubit for the purpose of building such a hybrid quantum network: the electronic spin of a self-assembled indium arsenide quantum dot and the electronic spin of a nitrogen-vacancy defect center in diamond. Light--matter interactions are necessary to transfer the information from the matter qubit to the photonic qubit, and this interaction can be enhanced by embedding the spin system in an optical cavity. We focus on photonic crystal microcavities for this purpose, and we study interactions between the optical cavity modes and incorporated spin systems. To improve the performance of this spin--photon interface, it is important to maximize the coupling strength between the spin and photonic systems and to increase the read-out efficiency of information stored in the cavity. In this thesis, we present our work to deterministically couple a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond to a photonic crystal microcavity in gallium phosphide. This is achieved by nanopositioning a pre-selected diamond nanocrystal in the intensity maximum of the optical cavity mode. We also present an optimized design of a photonic crystal

  11. Pool boiling on surfaces with mini-fins and micro-cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuszko, Robert; Piasecka, Magdalena

    2012-11-01

    The experimental studies presented here focused on pool boiling heat transfer on mini-fin arrays, mini-fins with perforated covering and surfaces with micro-cavities. The experiments were carried out for water and fluorinert FC-72 at atmospheric pressure. Mini-fins of 0.5 and 1 mm in height were uniformly spaced on the base surface. The copper foil with holes of 0.1 mm in diameter (pitch 0.2/0.4 mm), sintered with the fin tips, formed a system of connected perpendicular and horizontal tunnels. The micro-cavities were obtained through spark erosion. The maximal depth of the craters of these cavities was 15 - 30 μm and depended on the parameters of the branding-pen settings. At medium and small heat fluxes, structures with mini-fins showed the best boiling heat transfer performance both for water and FC-72. At medium and high heat fluxes (above 70 kW/m2 for water and 25 kW/m2 for FC-72), surfaces with mini-fins without porous covering and micro-cavities produced the highest heat transfer coefficients. The surfaces obtained with spark erosion require a proper selection of geometrical parameters for particular liquids - smaller diameters of cavities are suitable for liquids with lower surface tension (FC-72).

  12. Multidimensional coherent spectroscopy of a semiconductor microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmer, Brian L.; Passmann, Felix; Gehl, Michael; Khitrova, Galina; Bristow, Alan D.

    2016-03-01

    Multidimensional coherent spectroscopy maps the detuning dependence of the upper (UP) and lower (LP) excitonpolariton branches1 in a wedged microcavity with a single InGaAs quantum well at 5 K. Features on the diagonal correspond to intra-action coherences of the UP and LP branches. Off-diagonal peaks are interaction coherences between the UP and LP branches. With increasing detuning (Δ), all peaks move to higher energy, the exciton-like (EEX) and cavity-like (Eγ) modes swap position and have maximum intensity near the anti-crossing at Δ=0. An isolated biexciton (B) is only seen at Δ<0, separated by a binding energy of approximately 2 meV. For Δ>0, the spectral weight of the off-diagonal features swap, as the LP and B come into resonance. This indicates that the off-diagonal features are sensitive to the interactions including two-quantum contributions and that a situation similar to a Feshbach resonance exists.2 Polarization of two-quantum contributions show spin sensitive two-polariton and new biexciton correlations. The latter likely influence the Feshbach resonance between biexcitons and two-polariton states. The two-quantum signatures also demonstate that biexcitons perturb the light-matter coupling in the microcavity to reduce the mixed two-polariton contributions. Detuning dependence of zero-quantum contributions show Raman-like coherences that are enhanced near zero detuning. Asymmetry of the Raman coherences are indicative of many-body interactions, which also grow stronger as the light-matter interactions are enhanced near zero deuning.

  13. Assuring quality in high-consequence engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, Marcey L.; Kolb, Rachel R.

    2014-03-01

    In high-consequence engineering organizations, such as Sandia, quality assurance may be heavily dependent on staff competency. Competency-dependent quality assurance models are at risk when the environment changes, as it has with increasing attrition rates, budget and schedule cuts, and competing program priorities. Risks in Sandia's competency-dependent culture can be mitigated through changes to hiring, training, and customer engagement approaches to manage people, partners, and products. Sandia's technical quality engineering organization has been able to mitigate corporate-level risks by driving changes that benefit all departments, and in doing so has assured Sandia's commitment to excellence in high-consequence engineering and national service.

  14. Unconventional photon blockade in doubly resonant microcavities with second-order nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerace, Dario; Savona, Vincenzo

    2014-03-01

    It is shown that noncentrosymmetric materials with bulk second-order nonlinear susceptibility can be used to generate strongly antibunched radiation at an arbitrary wavelength, solely determined by the resonant behavior of suitably engineered coupled microcavities. The proposed scheme exploits the unconventional photon blockade of a coherent driving field at the input of a coupled cavity system, where one of the two cavities is engineered to resonate at both fundamental and second harmonic frequencies, respectively. Remarkably, the unconventional blockade mechanism occurs with reasonably low quality factors at both harmonics, and does not require a sharp doubly resonant condition for the second cavity, thus proving its feasibility with current semiconductor technology.

  15. Millisecond Photon Lifetime in a Slow-Light Microcavity.

    PubMed

    Huet, V; Rasoloniaina, A; Guillemé, P; Rochard, P; Féron, P; Mortier, M; Levenson, A; Bencheikh, K; Yacomotti, A; Dumeige, Y

    2016-04-01

    Optical microcavities with ultralong photon storage times are of central importance for integrated nanophotonics. To date, record quality (Q) factors up to 10^{11} have been measured in millimetric-size single-crystal whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators, and 10^{10} in silica or glass microresonators. We show that, by introducing slow-light effects in an active WGM microresonator, it is possible to enhance the photon lifetime by several orders of magnitude, thus circumventing both fabrication imperfections and residual absorption. The slow-light effect is obtained from coherent population oscillations in an erbium-doped fluoride glass microsphere, producing strong dispersion of the WGM (group index n_{g}∼10^{6}). As a result, a photon lifetime up to 2.5 ms at room temperature has been measured, corresponding to a Q factor of 3×10^{12} at 1530 nm. This system could yield a new type of optical memory microarray with ultralong storage times. PMID:27081979

  16. Are high-quality mates always attractive?

    PubMed Central

    Holveck, Marie-Jeanne; Verhulst, Simon; Fawcett, Tim W

    2010-01-01

    Sexual selection theory posits that females should choose mates in a way that maximizes their reproductive success. But what exactly is the optimal choice? Most empirical research is based on the assumption that females seek a male of the highest possible quality (in terms of the genes or resources he can provide), and hence show directional preferences for indicators of male quality. This implies that attractiveness and quality should be highly correlated. However, females frequently differ in what they find attractive. New theoretical and empirical insights provide mounting evidence that a female’s own quality biases her judgement of male attractiveness, such that male quality and attractiveness do not always coincide. A recent experiment in songbirds demonstrated for the first time that manipulation of female condition can lead to divergent female preferences, with low-quality females actively preferring low-quality males over high-quality males. This result is in line with theory on state-dependent mate choice and is reminiscent of assortative mating preferences in humans. Here we discuss the implications of this work for the study of mate preferences. PMID:20714411

  17. Room-temperature light emission from an airbridge double-heterostructure microcavity of Er-doped Si photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; An, Jun-ming; Wu, Yuan-da; Hu, Xiong-wei

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient enhancement of luminescence from two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal photonic crystal (PC) airbridge double-heterostructure microcavity with Er-doped silicon (Si) as light emitters on siliconon-insulator (SOI) wafer at room temperature. A single sharp resonant peak at 1 529.6 nm dominates the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum with the pumping power of 12.5 mW. The obvious red shift and the degraded quality factor (Q-factor) of resonant peak appear with the pumping power increasing, and the maximum measured Q-factor of 4 905 is achieved at the pumping power of 1.5 mW. The resonant peak is observed to shift depending on the structural parameters of PC, which indicates a possible method to control the wavelength of enhanced luminescence for Si-based light emitters based on PC microcavity.

  18. Trapping light into high orbital momentum modes of fiber tapers.

    PubMed

    Strekalov, Dmitry V; Savchenkov, Anatoliy A; Savchenkova, Ekaterina A; Matsko, Andrey B

    2015-08-15

    A tapered cylindrical dielectric optical waveguide acts as a high quality factor white-light cavity providing high field concentration as well as long optical group delay. It is possible to optimize shape of a lossless taper to suppress reflection of the input light and to achieve infinitely high field concentration. These tapers can be used in sensing and optoelectronics applications instead of conventional microcavities. PMID:26274659

  19. GaN hemispherical micro-cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiyun; Feng, Cong; Wang, T.; Choi, H. W.

    2016-01-01

    GaN-based micro-dome optical cavities supported on Si pedestals have been demonstrated by dry etching through gradually shrinking microspheres followed by wet-etch undercutting. Optically pumped whispering-gallery modes (WGMs) have been observed in the near-ultraviolet within the mushroom-like cavities, which do not support Fabry-Pérot resonances. The WGMs blue-shift monotonously as the excitation energies are around the lasing threshold. Concurrently, the mode-hopping effect is observed as the gain spectrum red-shifts under higher excitations. As the excitation energy density exceeds ˜15.1 mJ/cm2, amplified spontaneous emission followed by optical lasing is attained at room temperature, evident from a super-linear increase in emission intensity together with linewidth reduction to ˜0.7 nm for the dominant WGM. Optical behaviors within these WGM microcavities are further investigated using numerical computations and three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations.

  20. Stroing single-photons in microcavities arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Imran M.; Enk, S. J. Van; Kimble, H. J.

    2014-03-01

    Coupling light to arrays of microcavities is one of the most promising avenues to store/delay classical light pulses [F. Krauss, Nat. Phot. 2, 448-450 (2008)]. However, from the perspective of benefiting quantum communication protocols, the same ideas in principle can be extended down to the single-photon (quantum) level as well. Particularly, for the purposes of entanglement purification and quantum repeaters a reliable storage of single photons is needed. We consider in our work [I. M. Mirza, S. Van Enk, H. Kimble JOSA B, 30,10 (2013)] cavities that are coupled through an optical fiber which is assumed to be forming a Markovian bath. For this study two powerful open quantum system techniques, Input-Output theory for cascaded quantum systems and the Quantum Trajectory approach are used in combination. For the confirmation of photon delays the Time-Dependent Spectrum of such a single photon is obtained. Interestingly this leads to a hole-burning effect showing that only certain frequency components in the single photon wavepackets are stored inside the cavities and hence are delayed in time. Since on-demand production of single photons is not an easy task we include in our description the actual generation of the single photon by assuming a single emitter in one the resonators.

  1. Performance enhancement of a photonic crystal microcavity and related localization of evanescent Bloch waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, Andika; Iskandar, Alexander A.; Tjia, May-On

    2011-08-01

    A study is carried out to investigate the possible enhancement of photonic crystal (PC) microcavity performance induced by geometrical and permittivity variations in relation to localization of the associated evanescent Bloch wave. The study is focused on PCs of hexagonally packed dielectric rods. A numerical scheme formulated on the basis of Green's function method with multipole expansion approximation is employed to exhibit explicitly the exponential growth curves of the spontaneous emission rate (F) and quality factor (Q) of the cavity with respect to increasing number of surrounding layers (N), which are characterized by their growth rates kF. While the same exponential growth pattern is found for PCs with different rod parameters, the associated growth rates do show distinct and significant differences, implying that an appropriate choice of the rod parameters may produce a large performance enhancement for the microcavity or achieve the same performance with a largely reduced surrounding layer number. Meanwhile, the corresponding spatial decay constants of the evanescent Bloch waves, represented by its smallest Im(k) in the photonic gap, are calculated by means of the extended plane-wave expansion method. The resulting smallest values of Im(k) show their strong correlation with kF as characterized by their linear relation. The study further demonstrates that a judicious choice of the defect rod parameters may also give rise to a remarkable performance enhancement of the microcavity, even at a reduced number of surrounding rod layers. Remarkably, the [kF,Im(k)] values of all PCs considered are located on the same linear correlation line.

  2. Spin noise amplification and giant noise in optical microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhov, I. I.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Kozlov, G. G.; Zapasskii, V. S.; Kavokin, A. V.; Lagoudakis, P. V.

    2015-06-14

    When studying the spin-noise-induced fluctuations of Kerr rotation in a quantum-well microcavity, we have found a dramatic increase of the noise signal (by more than two orders of magnitude) in the vicinity of anti-crossing of the polariton branches. The effect is explained by nonlinear optical instability of the microcavity giving rise to the light-power-controlled amplification of the polarization noise signal. In the framework of the developed model of built-in amplifier, we also interpret the nontrivial spectral and intensity-related properties of the observed noise signal below the region of anti-crossing of polariton branches. The discovered effect of optically controllable amplification of broadband polarization signals in microcavities in the regime of optical instability may be of interest for detecting weak oscillations of optical anisotropy in fundamental research and for other applications in optical information processing.

  3. Microcavity single virus detection and sizing with molecular sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantham, V. R.; Holler, S.; Kolchenko, V.; Wan, Z.; Arnold, S.

    2013-02-01

    We report the label-free detection and sizing of the smallest individual RNA virus, MS2 by a spherical microcavity. Mass of this virus is ~6 ag and produces a theoretical resonance shift ~0.25 fm upon adsorbing an individual virus at the equator of the bare microcavity, which is well below the r.m.s background noise of 2 fm. However, detection was accomplished with ease (S/N = 8, Q = 4x105) using a single dipole stimulated plasmonic-nanoshell as a microcavity wavelength shift enhancer. Analytical expressions based on the "reactive sensing principle" are developed to extract the radius of the virus from the measured signals. Estimated limit of detection for these experiments was ~0.4 ag or 240 kDa below the size of all known viruses, largest globular and elongated proteins [Phosphofructokinase (345 kDa) and Fibrinogen (390 kDa), respectively].

  4. First results with a microcavity plasma panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, Robert; Ben Moshe, M.; Benhammou, Yan; Chapman, J. Wehrley; Etzion, E; Ferretti, Claudio; Friedman, Dr. Peter S.; Levin, Daniel S.; Silver, Yiftah; Varner Jr, Robert L; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing; Bensimon, R; Davies, Merlin

    2015-01-01

    A new type of gaseous micropattern particle detector based on a closed-cell microcavity plasma panel sensor is reported. The first device was fabricated with 1 x 1 x 2 mm cells. It has shown very clean signals of 0.6-2.5 V amplitude, fast rise time of approximately 2 ns and FWHM of about 2 ns with very uniform signal shapes across all pixels. From initial measurements with beta particles from a radioactive source, a maximum pixel efficiency greater than 95% is calculated, for operation of the detector over a 100 V wide span of high voltages (HV). Over this same HV range, the background rate per pixel was measured to be 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than the rate with which the cell was illuminated by the beta source. Pixel-to-pixel count rate uniformity is within 3% and stable within 3% for many days. The time resolution is 2.4 ns, and a very low cell-to-cell crosstalk has been measured between cells separated by 2 mm. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Characteristics of High-Quality Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jason E.; Gulek, James C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of high-quality teachers who used a structured mathematics program for teaching, namely the Math Achievement Program (MAP[superscript 2]D), which demonstrated significant gains on student achievement as measured by California's Standards Test (CST) in mathematics. Specifically, the…

  6. Investigation on spectral response of micro-cavity structure by symmetrical tapered fiber tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Li, Yang; Yan, Xiaojun; Li, Weidong

    2016-06-01

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a micro-cavity structure made of symmetrical tapered fiber tips. The waist of a conventional fiber taper fabricated from heating and stretching technique is symmetrically cleaved, and the aligned fiber tips with air gap constitute a Fabry-Perot micro-cavity due to the reflection at the tip facet. The spectral responses of such micro-cavity structure have been investigated both in beam propagation models and experiments. The multibeam interference in the micro-cavity and the impact of the waist diameter and cavity length on the spectral response has been successfully demonstrated. And a micro-cavity structure with 45 μm waist diameter was experimentally achieved, the measured spectra agree well with the simulation ones, indicating that the spectral response of the micro-cavity structure is contributed by both the multibeam interference and the Fabry-Perot micro-cavity.

  7. Single-cell bacterium identification with a SOI optical microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardif, M.; Jager, J.-B.; Marcoux, P. R.; Uchiyamada, K.; Picard, E.; Hadji, E.; Peyrade, D.

    2016-09-01

    Photonic crystals and microcavities act as on-chip nano-optical tweezers for identification and manipulation of biological objects. Until now, optical trapping of virus and bacteria has been achieved and their presence in the vicinity of the optical resonator is deduced by the shift in the resonant wavelength. Here, we show trapping and identification of bacteria through a properly tuned silicon on insulator microcavity. Through the spatial and temporal observations of bacteria-cavity interaction, the optical identification of three different kinds of bacteria is demonstrated.

  8. Antenna-coupled microcavities for enhanced infrared photo-detection

    SciTech Connect

    Nga Chen, Yuk; Todorov, Yanko Askenazi, Benjamin; Vasanelli, Angela; Sirtori, Carlo; Biasiol, Giorgio; Colombelli, Raffaele

    2014-01-20

    We demonstrate mid-infrared detectors embedded into an array of double-metal nano-antennas. The antennas act as microcavities that squeeze the electric field into thin semiconductor layers, thus enhancing the detector responsivity. Furthermore, thanks to the ability of the antennas to gather photons from an area larger than the device's physical dimensions, the dark current is reduced without hindering the photo-generation rate. In these devices, the background-limited performance is improved with a consequent increase of the operating temperature. Our results illustrate how the antenna-coupled microcavity concept can be applied to enhance the performances of infrared opto-electronic devices.

  9. Low dimensional GaAs/air vertical microcavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gessler, J.; Steinl, T.; Fischer, J.; Höfling, S.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Mika, A.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.

    2014-02-24

    We report on the fabrication of gallium arsenide (GaAs)/air distributed Bragg reflector microresonators with indium gallium arsenide quantum wells. The structures are studied via momentum resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy which allows us to investigate a pronounced optical mode quantization of the photonic dispersion. We can extract a length parameter from these quantized states whose upper limit can be connected to the lateral physical extension of the microcavity via analytical calculations. Laser emission from our microcavity under optical pumping is observed in power dependent investigations.

  10. Thermomagnetic writing into magnetophotonic microcavities controlling thermal diffusion for volumetric magnetic holography.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Ryosuke; Nakamura, Yuichi; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Goto, Taichi; Lim, Pang Boey; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2016-01-11

    Holographic memory is expected to become a high-capacity data storage. Magnetic volumetric holograms are rewritable holograms that are recorded as magnetization directions through thermomagnetic recording. However, the effective depth of magnetic holograms is limited by thermal diffusion that causes merging of magnetic fringes. In this study, we propose the insertion of heat-sink layers (HSLs) for retaining well-defined magnetic fringes during volumetric writing. Magnetophotonic microcavity media were used for demonstrating the HSL effect, and the structural design principle was established in numerical calculations. The results indicate that deep and clear magnetic fringes and an improvement in the diffraction efficiency can be achieved by the insertion of HSLs.

  11. Acoustic black hole in a stationary hydrodynamic flow of microcavity polaritons.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, H S; Gerace, D; Carusotto, I; Sanvitto, D; Galopin, E; Lemaître, A; Sagnes, I; Bloch, J; Amo, A

    2015-01-23

    We report an experimental study of superfluid hydrodynamic effects in a one-dimensional polariton fluid flowing along a laterally patterned semiconductor microcavity and hitting a micron-sized engineered defect. At high excitation power, superfluid propagation effects are observed in the polariton dynamics; in particular, a sharp acoustic horizon is formed at the defect position, separating regions of sub- and supersonic flow. Our experimental findings are quantitatively reproduced by theoretical calculations based on a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Promising perspectives to observe Hawking radiation via photon correlation measurements are illustrated.

  12. Multi-state lasing in self-assembled ring-shaped green fluorescent protein microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Christof P.; Höfling, Sven; Gather, Malte C.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate highly efficient lasing from multiple photonic states in microcavities filled with self-assembled rings of recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in its solid state form. The lasing regime is achieved at very low excitation energies of 13 nJ and occurs from cavity modes dispersed in both energy and momentum. We attribute the momentum distribution to very efficient scattering of incident light at the surface of the eGFP rings. The distribution of lasing states in energy is induced by the large spectral width of the gain spectrum of recombinant eGFP (FWHM ≅ 25 nm).

  13. Multi-state lasing in self-assembled ring-shaped green fluorescent protein microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, Christof P. Höfling, Sven; Gather, Malte C.

    2014-12-08

    We demonstrate highly efficient lasing from multiple photonic states in microcavities filled with self-assembled rings of recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in its solid state form. The lasing regime is achieved at very low excitation energies of 13 nJ and occurs from cavity modes dispersed in both energy and momentum. We attribute the momentum distribution to very efficient scattering of incident light at the surface of the eGFP rings. The distribution of lasing states in energy is induced by the large spectral width of the gain spectrum of recombinant eGFP (FWHM ≅ 25 nm)

  14. Acoustic Black Hole in a Stationary Hydrodynamic Flow of Microcavity Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. S.; Gerace, D.; Carusotto, I.; Sanvitto, D.; Galopin, E.; Lemaître, A.; Sagnes, I.; Bloch, J.; Amo, A.

    2015-01-01

    We report an experimental study of superfluid hydrodynamic effects in a one-dimensional polariton fluid flowing along a laterally patterned semiconductor microcavity and hitting a micron-sized engineered defect. At high excitation power, superfluid propagation effects are observed in the polariton dynamics; in particular, a sharp acoustic horizon is formed at the defect position, separating regions of sub- and supersonic flow. Our experimental findings are quantitatively reproduced by theoretical calculations based on a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Promising perspectives to observe Hawking radiation via photon correlation measurements are illustrated.

  15. Raman quantum memory based on an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centers coupled to a microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heshami, Khabat; Santori, Charles; Khanaliloo, Behzad; Healey, Chris; Acosta, Victor M.; Barclay, Paul E.; Simon, Christoph

    2014-04-01

    We propose a scheme to realize optical quantum memories in an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond that are coupled to a microcavity. The scheme is based on off-resonant Raman coupling, which allows one to circumvent optical inhomogeneous broadening and store optical photons in the electronic spin coherence. This approach promises a storage time of order 1 s and a time-bandwidth product of order 107. We include all possible optical transitions in a nine-level configuration, numerically evaluate the efficiencies, and discuss the requirements for achieving high efficiency and fidelity.

  16. Polariton condensation phase diagram in wide-band-gap planar microcavities: GaN versus ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamadi, O.; Réveret, F.; Mallet, E.; Disseix, P.; Médard, F.; Mihailovic, M.; Solnyshkov, D.; Malpuech, G.; Leymarie, J.; Lafosse, X.; Bouchoule, S.; Li, F.; Leroux, M.; Semond, F.; Zuniga-Perez, J.

    2016-03-01

    The polariton condensation phase diagram is compared in GaN and ZnO microcavities grown on mesa-patterned silicon substrate. Owing to a common platform, these microcavities share similar photonic properties with large quality factors and low photonic disorder, which makes it possible to determine the optimal spot diameter and to realize a thorough phase diagram study. Both systems have been investigated under the same experimental conditions. The experimental results and the subsequent analysis reveal clearly that longitudinal optical phonons have no influence in the thermodynamic region of the condensation phase diagram, while they allow a strong (slight) decrease of the polariton lasing threshold in the trade-off zone (kinetic region). Phase diagrams are compared with numerical simulations using Boltzmann equations, and are in satisfactory agreement. A lower polariton lasing threshold has been measured at low temperature in the ZnO microcavity, as is expected due to a larger Rabi splitting. This study highlights polariton relaxation mechanisms and their importance in polariton lasing.

  17. Plasmon coupled Fabry-Perot lasing enhancement in graphene/ZnO hybrid microcavity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jitao; Jiang, Mingming; Xu, Chunxiang; Wang, Yueyue; Lin, Yi; Lu, Junfeng; Shi, Zengliang

    2015-01-01

    The response of graphene surface plasmon (SP) in the ultraviolet (UV) region and the realization of short-wavelength semiconductor lasers not only are two hot research areas of great academic and practical significance, but also are two important issues lacked of good understanding. In this work, a hybrid Fabry-Perot (F-P) microcavity, comprising of monolayer graphene covered ZnO microbelt, was constructed to investigate the fundamental physics of graphene SP and the functional extension of ZnO UV lasing. Through the coupling between graphene SP modes and conventional optical microcavity modes of ZnO, improved F-P lasing performance was realized, including the lowered lasing threshold, the improved lasing quality and the remarkably enhanced lasing intensity. The underlying mechanism of the improved lasing performance was proposed based on theoretical simulation and experimental characterization. The results are helpful to design new types of optic and photoelectronic devices based on SP coupling in graphene/semiconductor hybrid structures. PMID:25786359

  18. Q-factor of (In,Ga)N containing III-nitride microcavity grown by multiple deposition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Gačević, Ž. Calleja, E.; Réveret, F.

    2013-12-21

    A 3λ/2 (In,Ga)N/GaN resonant cavity, designed for ∼415 nm operation, is grown by molecular beam epitaxy and is sandwiched between a 39.5-period (In,Al)N/GaN distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), grown on c-plane GaN-on-sapphire pseudo-substrate by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and an 8-period SiO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} DBR, deposited by electron beam evaporation. Optical characterization reveals an improvement in the cavity emission spectral purity of approximately one order of magnitude due to resonance effects. The combination of spectrophotometric and micro-reflectivity measurements confirms the strong quality (Q)-factor dependence on the excitation spot size. We derive simple analytical formulas to estimate leak and residual absorption losses and propose a simple approach to model the Q-factor and to give a quantitative estimation of the weight of cavity disorder. The model is in good agreement with both transfer-matrix simulation and the experimental findings. We point out that the realization of high Q-factor (In,Ga)N containing microcavities on GaN pseudo-substrates is likely to be limited by the cavity disorder.

  19. Exciton condensation in microcavities under three-dimensional quantization conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kochereshko, V. P. Platonov, A. V.; Savvidis, P.; Kavokin, A. V.; Bleuse, J.; Mariette, H.

    2013-11-15

    The dependence of the spectra of the polarized photoluminescence of excitons in microcavities under conditions of three-dimensional quantization on the optical-excitation intensity is investigated. The cascade relaxation of polaritons between quantized states of a polariton Bose condensate is observed.

  20. Decreased sleep quality in high myopia children.

    PubMed

    Ayaki, Masahiko; Torii, Hidemasa; Tsubota, Kazuo; Negishi, Kazuno

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate sleep quality in myopic children and adults. This cross sectional study surveyed 486 participants aged from 10 to 59 years with refractive errors using a questionnaire containing the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Children (< 20 years) in the high myopia group exhibited the poorest PSQI scores (P < 0.01), while the adults showed no such correlations. Subscales of PSQI and HADS in children disclosed that the high myopia groups had the shortest sleep duration (P < 0.01), worst subjective sleep scores (P < 0.001), and latest bedtime (P < 0.05). Regression analyses in children significantly correlated myopic errors with PSQI (P < 0.05), sleep duration (P < 0.01), and bedtime (P < 0.01). Sleep efficacy (P < 0.05) and daytime dysfunction (P < 0.05) were significantly better in contact-lens users compared to the respective non-user groups across all participants. In conclusion, sleep quality in children was significantly correlated with myopic error, with the high myopia group worst affected. PMID:27650408

  1. Decreased sleep quality in high myopia children

    PubMed Central

    Ayaki, Masahiko; Torii, Hidemasa; Tsubota, Kazuo; Negishi, Kazuno

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate sleep quality in myopic children and adults. This cross sectional study surveyed 486 participants aged from 10 to 59 years with refractive errors using a questionnaire containing the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Children (< 20 years) in the high myopia group exhibited the poorest PSQI scores (P < 0.01), while the adults showed no such correlations. Subscales of PSQI and HADS in children disclosed that the high myopia groups had the shortest sleep duration (P < 0.01), worst subjective sleep scores (P < 0.001), and latest bedtime (P < 0.05). Regression analyses in children significantly correlated myopic errors with PSQI (P < 0.05), sleep duration (P < 0.01), and bedtime (P < 0.01). Sleep efficacy (P < 0.05) and daytime dysfunction (P < 0.05) were significantly better in contact-lens users compared to the respective non-user groups across all participants. In conclusion, sleep quality in children was significantly correlated with myopic error, with the high myopia group worst affected. PMID:27650408

  2. Enhancement of the blue photoluminescence intensity for the porous silicon with HfO2 filling into microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ran; Du, Xianghao; Sun, Weideng; Han, Zuyin; Wu, Zhengran

    2015-01-01

    With HfO2 filled into the microcavities of the porous single-crystal silicon, the blue photoluminescence was greatly enhanced at room temperature. On one hand, HfO2 contributes to the light emission with the transitions of the defect levels for oxygen vacancy. On the other hand, the special filling-into-microcavities structure of HfO2 leads to the presence of ferroelectricity, which greatly enhances the blue emission from porous silicon. Since both HfO2 and Si are highly compatible with Si-based electronic industry, combined the low-cost and convenient process, the HfO2-filled porous Si shows a promising application prospect. PMID:26503804

  3. Near-field radiative heat transfer between two parallel SiO{sub 2} plates with and without microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ijiro, T.; Yamada, N.

    2015-01-12

    Near-to-far-field radiative heat transfer between two macroscopic SiO{sub 2} plates—with and without microcavities—was observed using a highly precise and accurate optical gap-measurement method. The experiments, conducted near 300 K, measured heat transfer as a function of gap separation from 1.0 μm to 50 μm and also as a function of temperature differences between 4.1 and 19.5 K. The gap-dependent heat flux was in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the effects of microcavities on the plate surfaces were clearly observed and significant enhancement of near-field radiative heat transfer was confirmed between gold-coated microcavities with narrow vacuum separation.

  4. High quality factor indium oxide mechanical microresonators

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolomé, Javier Cremades, Ana; Piqueras, Javier

    2015-11-09

    The mechanical resonance behavior of as-grown In{sub 2}O{sub 3} microrods has been studied in this work by in-situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) electrically induced mechanical oscillations. Indium oxide microrods grown by a vapor–solid method are naturally clamped to an aluminum oxide ceramic substrate, showing a high quality factor due to reduced energy losses during mechanical vibrations. Quality factors of more than 10{sup 5} and minimum detectable forces of the order of 10{sup −16} N/Hz{sup 1/2} demonstrate their potential as mechanical microresonators for real applications. Measurements at low-vacuum using the SEM environmental operation mode were performed to study the effect of extrinsic damping on the resonators behavior. The damping coefficient has been determined as a function of pressure.

  5. Observation of the local field distribution in photonic crystal microcavity by SNOM technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidykovski, Anton I.; Lebedev, Oleg V.; Dolgova, Tatyana V.; Kazantsev, D. V.; Fedyanin, Andrew A.

    2002-11-01

    The spatial distribution of the local optical field at the cleavage of photonic crystal smicrocavity has been obtained by the scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM). The localization of optical radiation at microcavity resonant wavelength in the vicinity of the λ/2 spacer layer is demonstrated. Samples of photonic crystal microcavity are prepared from silicon wafer by electrochemical etching technique. The wavelength of the microcavity mode is optimized for resonance with wavelengths of lasers. The image of the spatial distribution of optical field at the cleaved edge of the facing vertically microcavity is observed. Sample is pumped through external single-mode fiber perpendicularly to the microcavity. SNOM operates in the collection mode with the apertureless tip. We observe the localization of the resonant optical field in microcavity but we do not reveal such localization of the radiation at the non-resonant wavelength.

  6. Ultrastrong exciton-photon coupling in single and coupled organic microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Bramante, Rosemary; Valle, Brent; Singer, Kenneth; Khattab, Tawfik; Williams, Jarrod; Twieg, Robert

    2015-03-01

    We have demonstrated ultrastrong light-matter coupling in organic planar microcavities composed of a neat glassy organic dye film between two metallic (aluminum) mirrors in a half-cavity configuration. Such cavities are characterized by Q factors around 10. Tuning the thickness of the organic layer enables the observation of the ultrastrong coupling regime. Via reflectivity measurements, we observe a very large Rabi splitting around 1.227 eV between upper and lower polariton branches at room temperature, and we detect polariton emission from the lower polariton branch via photoluminescence measurements. The large splitting is due to the large oscillator strength of the neat dye glass, and to the match of the low-Q cavity spectral width to the broad absorption width of the dye film material. We also study the interaction between excitonic states of neat glassy organic dye and cavity modes within coupled microcavity structures. The high-reflectivity mirrors are formed from distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR), which are multilayer films fabricated using the coextrusion process, containing alternating layers of high (SAN25, n =1.57) and low (Dyneon THV 220G, n =1.37) refractive index dielectric polymers. Nonlinear optical measurements will be discussed. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation Center for Layered Polymer Systems (CLiPS) under Grant Number DMR-0423914.

  7. SERS-active ZnO/Ag hybrid WGM microcavity for ultrasensitive dopamine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Junfeng; Xu, Chunxiang; Nan, Haiyan; Zhu, Qiuxiang; Qin, Feifei; Manohari, A. Gowri; Wei, Ming; Zhu, Zhu; Shi, Zengliang; Ni, Zhenhua

    2016-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a potential neuro modulator in the brain which influences a variety of motivated behaviors and plays a key role in life science. A hybrid ZnO/Ag microcavity based on Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM) effect has been developed for ultrasensitive detection of dopamine. Utilizing this effect of structural cavity mode, a Raman signal of R6G (5 × 10-3 M) detected by this designed surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-active substrate was enhanced more than 10-fold compared with that of ZnO film/Ag substrate. Also, this hybrid microcavity substrate manifests high SERS sensitivity to rhodamine 6 G and detection limit as low as 10-12 M to DA. The Localized Surface Plasmons of Ag nanoparticles and WGM-enhanced light-matter interaction mainly contribute to the high SERS sensitivity and help to achieve a lower detection limit. This designed SERS-active substrate based on the WGM effect has the potential for detecting neurotransmitters in life science.

  8. Tunable open-access microcavities for on-chip cavity quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, C. A.; Melnyk, A.; Ramp, H.; Bitarafan, M. H.; Vick, D.; LeBlanc, L. J.; Davis, J. P.; DeCorby, R. G.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the development of on-chip microcavities and show their potential as a platform for cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. Microcavity arrays were formed by the controlled buckling of SiO2/Ta2O5 Bragg mirrors and exhibit a reflectance-limited finesse of 3500 and mode volumes as small as 35 λ 3 . We show that the cavity resonance can be thermally tuned into alignment with the D2 transition of 87Rb and outline two methods for providing atom access to the cavity. Owing to their small mode volume and high finesse, these cavities exhibit single-atom cooperativities as high as C 1 = 65 . A unique feature of the buckled-dome architecture is that the strong-coupling parameter g 0 / κ is nearly independent of the cavity size. Furthermore, strong coupling should be achievable with only modest improvements in mirror reflectance, suggesting that these monolithic devices could provide a robust and scalable solution to the engineering of light-matter interfaces.

  9. A guide to highly effective quality programs.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, John; Fifer, Joe

    2010-01-01

    To dramatically improve quality while decreasing costs, hospitals should: ensure all executives are vocal and visible supporters of quality improvement; focus the board of directors on quality as a strategic priority; strategically target quality resources to improve care for the majority of patients; use the finance system as the foundation for automated quality reporting; form a strong alliance between the CFO and chief quality officer, with each playing a leadership role in the quality program; rely on a well-executed quality program to improve efficiency and decrease the cost of care. PMID:20088475

  10. Unidirectional resonance modes supported by secondary islands in a microcavity comprised of two half-ellipses

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jinhyung; Rim, Sunghwan; Cho, Jinhang; Kim, Chil-Min

    2011-03-15

    We propose a simple and robust mechanism to achieve unidirectional emission in a microcavity comprised of two half-ellipses. The microcavity has two geometrical parameters, two eccentricities, which permit a control of the directional emissions. For the microcavity with two small eccentricities, the positions of secondary islands near primary islands in the survival probability distributions determine the directionality of emissions. We obtain the optimized values of the eccentricities for unidirectional emission.

  11. High-Q/V Monolithic Diamond Microdisks Fabricated with Quasi-isotropic Etching.

    PubMed

    Khanaliloo, Behzad; Mitchell, Matthew; Hryciw, Aaron C; Barclay, Paul E

    2015-08-12

    Optical microcavities enhance light-matter interactions and are essential for many experiments in solid state quantum optics, optomechanics, and nonlinear optics. Single crystal diamond microcavities are particularly sought after for applications involving diamond quantum emitters, such as nitrogen vacancy centers, and for experiments that benefit from diamond's excellent optical and mechanical properties. Light-matter coupling rates in experiments involving microcavities typically scale with Q/V, where Q and V are the microcavity quality-factor and mode-volume, respectively. Here we demonstrate that microdisk whispering gallery mode cavities with high Q/V can be fabricated directly from bulk single crystal diamond. By using a quasi-isotropic oxygen plasma to etch along diamond crystal planes and undercut passivated diamond structures, we create monolithic diamond microdisks. Fiber taper based measurements show that these devices support TE- and TM-like optical modes with Q > 1.1 × 10(5) and V < 11(λ/n) (3) at a wavelength of 1.5 μm. PMID:26134379

  12. Detecting single DNA molecule interactions with optical microcavities (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2015-09-01

    as the detection of less than 1 kDa intercalating small molecules[1]. [1] M. D. Baaske, M. R. Foreman, and F. Vollmer, "Single molecule nucleic acid interactions monitored on a label-free microcavity biosensing platform," Nature Nanotechnology, vol. 9, pp. 933-939, 2014. [2] Y. Wu, D. Y. Zhang, P. Yin, and F. Vollmer, "Ultraspecific and Highly Sensitive Nucleic Acid Detection by Integrating a DNA Catalytic Network with a Label-Free Microcavity," Small, vol. 10, pp. 2067-2076, 2014. [3] M. R. Foreman, W.-L. Jin, and F. Vollmer, "Optimizing Detection Limits in Whispering Gallery Mode Biosensing," Optics Express, vol. 22, pp. 5491-5511, 2014. [4] M. A. Santiago-Cordoba, S. V. Boriskina, F. Vollmer, and M. C. Demirel, "Nanoparticle-based protein detection by optical shift of a resonant microcavity," Applied Physics Letters, vol. 99, Aug 2011. [5] M. R. Foreman and F. Vollmer, "Theory of resonance shifts of whispering gallery modes by arbitrary plasmonic nanoparticles," New Journal of Physics, vol. 15, p. 083006, Aug 2013. [6] M. R. Foreman and F. Vollmer "Level repulsion in hybrid photonic-plasmonic microresonators for enhanced biodetection" Phys. Rev. A 88, 023831 (2013).

  13. An economical route to high quality lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, J.P.; Hahn, S.K.; Kwon, S.H.; Min, W.

    1996-12-01

    The current rends in the automotive and industrial markets toward more efficient engines, longer drain intervals, and lower emissions all contribute to placing increasingly stringent performance requirements on lubricants. The demand for higher quality synthetic and non-conventional basestocks is expected to grow at a much faster rate than that of conventional lube basestocks to meet these higher performance standards. Yukong Limited has developed a novel technology (the Yukong UCO Lube Process) for the economic production of high quality, high-viscosity-index lube basestocks from a fuels hydrocracker unconverted oil stream. A pilot plant based on this process has been producing oils for testing purposes since May 1994. A commercial facility designed to produce 3,500 BPD of VHVI lube basestocks cane on-stream at Yukong`s Ulsan refinery in October 1995. The Badger Technology Center of Raytheon Engineers and Constructors assisted Yukong during the development of the technology and prepared the basic process design package for the commercial facility. This paper presents process aspects of the technology and comparative data on investment and operating costs. Yukong lube basestock product properties and performance data are compared to basestocks produced by conventional means and by lube hydrocracking.

  14. Fabry-Perot Microcavity Modes in Single GaP/GaNP Core/Shell Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolsky, Alexander; Stehr, Jan E; Sukrittanon, Supanee; Kuang, Yanjin; Tu, Charles W; Chen, Weimin M; Buyanova, Irina A

    2015-12-16

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) are attracting increasing interest as nanobuilding blocks for optoelectronics and photonics. A novel material system that is highly suitable for these applications are GaNP NWs. In this article, we show that individual GaP/GaNP core/shell nanowires (NWs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates can act as Fabry-Perot (FP) microcavities. This conclusion is based on results of microphotoluminescence (μ-PL) measurements performed on individual NWs, which reveal periodic undulations of the PL intensity that follow an expected pattern of FP cavity modes. The cavity is concluded to be formed along the NW axis with the end facets acting as reflecting mirrors. The formation of the FP modes is shown to be facilitated by an increasing index contrast with the surrounding media. Spectral dependence of the group refractive index is also determined for the studied NWs. The observation of the FP microcavity modes in the GaP/GaNP core/shell NWs can be considered as a first step toward achieving lasing in this quasidirect bandgap semiconductor in the NW geometry.

  15. Light-matter interaction in a microcavity-controlled graphene transistor.

    PubMed

    Engel, Michael; Steiner, Mathias; Lombardo, Antonio; Ferrari, Andrea C; Löhneysen, Hilbert V; Avouris, Phaedon; Krupke, Ralph

    2012-06-19

    Graphene has extraordinary electronic and optical properties and holds great promise for applications in photonics and optoelectronics. Demonstrations including high-speed photodetectors, optical modulators, plasmonic devices, and ultrafast lasers have now been reported. More advanced device concepts would involve photonic elements such as cavities to control light-matter interaction in graphene. Here we report the first monolithic integration of a graphene transistor and a planar, optical microcavity. We find that the microcavity-induced optical confinement controls the efficiency and spectral selection of photocurrent generation in the integrated graphene device. A twenty-fold enhancement of photocurrent is demonstrated. The optical cavity also determines the spectral properties of the electrically excited thermal radiation of graphene. Most interestingly, we find that the cavity confinement modifies the electrical transport characteristics of the integrated graphene transistor. Our experimental approach opens up a route towards cavity-quantum electrodynamics on the nanometre scale with graphene as a current-carrying intra-cavity medium of atomic thickness.

  16. Quality assurance and high count rate

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    A high count rate can distort the expected linear relation between the charge spectrum generated in a semiconductor gamma-ray detector and that recorded in the pulse-height analyzer. The busy time of the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is accurately compensated for in commercial analyzers by extending the live counting time. As fast successive-approximation ADCs have become more generally used (note that 10{mu}s fixed digitizing time for 8192 channels is equivalent to an 800-MHz Wilkinson ADC), the resolution times of the other components in the counting system have become relatively more important limitations of the throughput of the total system and also more important sources of nonlinearity, which lead to biased measurements. A loss-free counting technique (LFC) has been developed which gives an undistorted spectrum and zero dead time so that decay equations can be solved. Tests of an LFC system have shown that, with systematic calibration, the system can give stable values in practice for a reference spectrum up to at least 100 kHz. To obtain higher quality data with confidence, quality control test are needed.

  17. Room temperature continuous wave operation in a photonic crystal microcavity laser with a single layer of InAs/InP self-assembled quantum wires.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Luis Javier; Alén, Benito; Prieto, Ivan; Fuster, David; González, Luisa; González, Yolanda; Dotor, María Luisa; Postigo, Pablo Aitor

    2009-08-17

    We present continuous wave laser emission in a photonic crystal microcavity operating at 1.5 microm at room temperature. The structures have been fabricated in an InP slab including a single layer of self-assembled InAs/InP quantum wires (QWrs) as active material. Laser emission in air suspended membranes with thresholds of effective optical pump power of 22 microW and quality factors up to 55000 have been measured.

  18. Effective thermal resistance of a photonic crystal microcavity.

    PubMed

    Haret, L-D; Ghrib, A; Checoury, X; Cazier, N; Han, Z; El Kurdi, M; Sauvage, S; Boucaud, P

    2014-02-01

    We present a simple method to accurately measure the effective thermal resistance of a photonic crystal microcavity. The cavity is embedded between two Schottky contacts forming a metal-semiconductor-metal device. The photocarriers circulating in the device provide a local temperature rise that can be dominated by Joule effect under certain conditions. We show that the effective thermal resistance (R(th)) can be experimentally deduced from the spectral shift of the cavity resonance wavelength measured at different applied bias. We deduce a value of R(th)1.6×10(4) KW(-1) for a microcavity on silicon-on-insulator, which is in good agreement with 3D thermal modeling by finite elements. PMID:24487839

  19. Microcavity-array superhydrophobic surfaces: Limits of the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Oliveira, M. R. S.; Spirin, R.; Teixeira, F. S.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I. G.

    2013-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces formed of microcavities can be designed with specific desired advancing and receding contact angles using a new model described by us in prior work. Here, we discuss the limits of validity of the model, and explore the application of the model to surfaces fabricated with small cavities of radius 250 nm and with large cavities of radius 40 μm. The Wenzel model is discussed and used to calculate the advancing and receding contact angles for samples for which our model cannot be applied. We also consider the case of immersion of a sample containing microcavities in pressurized water. A consideration that then arises is that the air inside the cavities can be dissolved in the water, leading to complete water invasion into the cavities and compromising the superhydrophobic character of the surface. Here, we show that this effect does not destroy the surface hydrophobia when the surface is subsequently removed from the water.

  20. Nonlinear resonance-assisted tunneling induced by microcavity deformation

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hojeong; Shin, Younghoon; Moon, Songky; Lee, Sang-Bum; Yang, Juhee; An, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    Noncircular two-dimensional microcavities support directional output and strong confinement of light, making them suitable for various photonics applications. It is now of primary interest to control the interactions among the cavity modes since novel functionality and enhanced light-matter coupling can be realized through intermode interactions. However, the interaction Hamiltonian induced by cavity deformation is basically unknown, limiting practical utilization of intermode interactions. Here we present the first experimental observation of resonance-assisted tunneling in a deformed two-dimensional microcavity. It is this tunneling mechanism that induces strong inter-mode interactions in mixed phase space as their strength can be directly obtained from a separatrix area in the phase space of intracavity ray dynamics. A selection rule for strong interactions is also found in terms of angular quantum numbers. Our findings, applicable to other physical systems in mixed phase space, make the interaction control more accessible. PMID:25759322

  1. Applications of Optical Microcavity Resonators in Analytical Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, James H.; Bailey, Ryan C.

    2016-06-01

    Optical resonator sensors are an emerging class of analytical technologies that use recirculating light confined within a microcavity to sensitively measure the surrounding environment. Bolstered by advances in microfabrication, these devices can be configured for a wide variety of chemical or biomolecular sensing applications. We begin with a brief description of optical resonator sensor operation, followed by discussions regarding sensor design, including different geometries, choices of material systems, methods of sensor interrogation, and new approaches to sensor operation. Throughout, key developments are highlighted, including advancements in biosensing and other applications of optical sensors. We discuss the potential of alternative sensing mechanisms and hybrid sensing devices for more sensitive and rapid analyses. We conclude with our perspective on the future of optical microcavity sensors and their promise as versatile detection elements within analytical chemistry.

  2. Applications of Optical Microcavity Resonators in Analytical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wade, James H; Bailey, Ryan C

    2016-06-12

    Optical resonator sensors are an emerging class of analytical technologies that use recirculating light confined within a microcavity to sensitively measure the surrounding environment. Bolstered by advances in microfabrication, these devices can be configured for a wide variety of chemical or biomolecular sensing applications. We begin with a brief description of optical resonator sensor operation, followed by discussions regarding sensor design, including different geometries, choices of material systems, methods of sensor interrogation, and new approaches to sensor operation. Throughout, key developments are highlighted, including advancements in biosensing and other applications of optical sensors. We discuss the potential of alternative sensing mechanisms and hybrid sensing devices for more sensitive and rapid analyses. We conclude with our perspective on the future of optical microcavity sensors and their promise as versatile detection elements within analytical chemistry.

  3. Design and analysis of photonic crystal micro-cavity based optical sensor platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Amit Kumar; Dutta, Hemant Sankar; Pal, Suchandan

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the design of a two-dimensional photonic crystal micro-cavity based integrated-optic sensor platform is proposed. The behaviour of designed cavity is analyzed using two-dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. The structure is designed by deliberately inserting some defects in a photonic crystal waveguide structure. Proposed structure shows a quality factor (Q) of about 1e5 and the average sensitivity of 500nm/RIU in the wavelength range of 1450 - 1580 nm. Sensing technique is based on the detection of shift in upper-edge cut-off wavelength for a reference signal strength of -10 dB in accordance with the change in refractive index of analyte.

  4. Behavior of three modes of decay channels and their self-energies of elliptic dielectric microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyu-Won; Kim, Jaewan; Jeong, Kabgyun

    2016-09-01

    The Lamb shift (self-energy) of an elliptic dielectric microcavity is studied. We show that the size of the Lamb shift, which is a small energy shift due to the system-environment coupling in the quantum regime, is dependent on the geometry of the boundary conditions. It shows a global transition depending on the eccentricity of the ellipsis. These transitions can be classified into three types of decay channels known as whispering-gallery modes, stable-bouncing-ball modes, and unstable-bouncing-ball modes. These modes are manifested through the Poincaré surface of section with the Husimi distribution function in classical phase space. It is found that the similarity (measured in Bhattacharyya distance) between the Husimi distributions below critical lines of two different modes increases as the difference of their self-energies decreases when the quality factors of the modes are on the same order of magnitude.

  5. Effect of physisorption and chemisorption of water on resonant modes of rolled-up tubular microcavities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Both blue- and redshifts of resonant modes are observed in the rolled-up Y2O3/ZrO2 tubular microcavity during a conformal oxide coating process. Our investigation based on spectral analyses suggests that there are two competitive processes during coating: desorption of both chemically and physically absorbed water molecules and increase of the tube wall thickness. The redshift is due to the increase of the wall thickness and corresponding light confinement enhancement. On the other hand, desorption of water molecules by heating leads to a blueshift. The balance of these two factors produces the observed bi-directional shift of the modes while they both contribute to promoted quality factor after coating. PMID:24344644

  6. High Image Quality Laser Color Printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Kimitoshi; Morimoto, Yoshinori

    1989-07-01

    A laser color printer has been developed to depict continuous tone color images on a photographic color film or color paper with high resolution and fidelity. We have used three lasers, He-Cd (441.6 nm), Ar4+ (514.5 nm), and He-Ne (632.8 nm) for blue, green, and red exposures. We have employed a drum scanner for two dimensional scanning. The maximum resolution of our system is 40 c/mm (80 lines/mm) and the accuracy of density reproduction is within 1.0 when measured in color difference, where most observers can not distinguish the difference. The scanning artifacts and noise are diminished to a visually negligible level. The image quality of output images compares well to that of actual color photographs, and is suitable for photographic image simulations.

  7. Method for synthesis of high quality graphene

    DOEpatents

    Lanzara, Alessandra; Schmid, Andreas K.; Yu, Xiaozhu; Hwang, Choonkyu; Kohl, Annemarie; Jozwiak, Chris M.

    2012-03-27

    A method is described herein for the providing of high quality graphene layers on silicon carbide wafers in a thermal process. With two wafers facing each other in close proximity, in a first vacuum heating stage, while maintained at a vacuum of around 10.sup.-6 Torr, the wafer temperature is raised to about 1500.degree. C., whereby silicon evaporates from the wafer leaving a carbon rich surface, the evaporated silicon trapped in the gap between the wafers, such that the higher vapor pressure of silicon above each of the wafers suppresses further silicon evaporation. As the temperature of the wafers is raised to about 1530.degree. C. or more, the carbon atoms self assemble themselves into graphene.

  8. Coupling polariton quantum boxes in sub-wavelength grating microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Zhaorong; Deng, Hui; Brodbeck, Sebastian; Kamp, Martin; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven

    2015-02-02

    We report the construction of decoupled, coupled, and quasi-one dimensional polariton systems from zero dimensional polariton quantum boxes using microcavities with sub-wavelength gratings as the top mirror. By designing the tethering patterns around the suspended sub-wavelength gratings, we control the coupling between individual quantum boxes through different optical potentials. Energy levels and real-space or momentum space distributions of the confined modes were measured, which agreed well with simulations.

  9. Gallium nitride microcavities formed by photoenhanced wet oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, L.-H.; Lu, C.-Y.; Wu, W.-H.; Wang, S.-L.

    2005-10-17

    We report the formation of gallium nitride (GaN) microcavities by manipulating a photoenhanced oxidation rate difference between the polar and nonpolar crystallographic planes of GaN. When immersed in a buffered acetic (CH{sub 3}COOH) electrolyte of pH{approx}6.2 at room temperature, it is shown that the photo-oxidation can proceed at a rate that is one order of magnitude slower on the nonpolar plane of {l_brace}1100{r_brace}{sub GaN} than on the polar plane of {l_brace}0001{r_brace}{sub GaN} due to the reduced surface field action. Gallium nitride microcavities bounded by optically smooth {l_brace}1100{r_brace} and {l_brace}1103{r_brace} facets can thus be preferentially formed on the c-plane sapphire substrate after dissolving the oxide layer. The optical properties of these GaN hexagonal cavities reveal characteristic peaks of whispering gallery modes in resonance with the GaN band edge emission spectrum. A typical cavity Q factor of 10{sup 3} is observed in these GaN microcavities due to a reduced optical scattering loss in the wet chemical reaction process.

  10. Nonlinear novel oscillation of polaritons in the optical microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongchang; Zhou, Xiangfa; Guo, Guangcan; Zhou, Xingxiang; Pu, Han; Zhou, Zhengwei

    2014-03-01

    As a kind of new state of matter, Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in a dilute gas of trapped atoms is able to exhibit quantum phenomena on macroscopic scales. Recently, BEC of microcavity polaritons had been experimentally demonstrated. As a kind of bosonic quasi-particle which generates from the strong light-matter coupling, the polariton can be manipulated by the external laser field, and it provides a platform to simulate strongly correlated many-body models in the photon-coupled microcavity array. In this talk we present a scheme for simulating the nonlinear tunneling between two bosonic condensations in the microcavity system. Due to the controllability of the polariton, the effective nonlinear tunneling between two condensates of polaritons can be easily induced by the external controlling fields. In our work, a kind of two modes polariton model is derived, in which nonlinear tunneling strength depends on the difference of the particles in such two kinds of modes. We investigate the mean-field behaviors for such kind of double-mode polariton model, and we find that it is analogous to the model of the pendulum with variable pendulum length. Furthermore, some novel oscillation modes are revealed.

  11. Air-core microcavities and metal-dielectric filters - building blocks for optofluidic microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Trevor Warren

    This thesis describes a study on two optical devices intended to be building blocks for the creation of integrated optical/microfluidic lab-on-a-chip systems. First, arrays of curved-mirror dome-shaped microcavities were fabricated by buckling self-assembly of a-Si/SiO2 multilayers. This novel technique employs controlled, stress-induced film delamination to form highly symmetric cavities with minimal roughness defects or geometrical imperfections. Measured cavity heights were in good agreement with predictions from elastic buckling theory. Also, the measured finesse (> 103) and quality factor (> 104 in the 1550-nm range) were close to reflectance-limited predictions, indicating low defects and roughness. Hermite- and Laguerre-Gaussian modes were observable, indicating a high degree of cylindrical symmetry. In the second part of the research, transmittance in periodic metal-dielectric multilayer structures was studied. Metal-dielectric stacks have many potential applications in optofluidic microsystems, including as transmission filters, superlenses, and substrates for surface plasmon sensors. In this work, we showed that potential transmittance theory provides a good method for describing the tunneling of photons through metal-dielectric stacks, for both Fabry-Perot and surface plasmon resonances. This approach explains the well-known fact that for a given thickness of metal, subdividing the metal into several thin films can increase the maximum transmittance. Conditions for admittance matching of dielectric-metal-dielectric unit cells to an external air medium were explored for Fabry-Perot based tunneling, revealing that thicker metal films require higher-index dielectrics for optimal admittance matching. It was also shown for the first time that potential transmittance theory can be used to predict the maximum possible transmittance in surface-plasmon-mediated tunneling. In a subsequent study, potential transmittance was used to derive an expression for

  12. Whispering gallery modes in a spherical microcavity with a photoluminescent shell

    SciTech Connect

    Grudinkin, S. A. Dontsov, A. A.; Feoktistov, N. A.; Baranov, M. A.; Bogdanov, K. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Golubev, V. G.

    2015-10-15

    Whispering-gallery mode spectra in optical microcavities based on spherical silica particles coated with a thin photoluminescent shell of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide are studied. The spectral positions of the whispering-gallery modes for spherical microcavities with a shell are calculated. The dependence of the spectral distance between the TE and TM modes on the shell thickness is examined.

  13. A fiber inclinometer using a fiber microtaper with an air-gap microcavity fiber interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhongyao; Gang, Tingting; Hu, Manli; Qiao, Xueguang; Liu, Nan; Rong, Qiangzhou

    2016-04-01

    A micro-inclinometer is proposed and demonstrated experimentally; the device consists of a micro-fiber taper followed by an air-gap microcavity. A part of the core mode can couple to cladding modes via the taper. These cladding modes and residual core modes transmitted to downstream of the Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer. A fraction of these modes are reflected back to the SMF by two surfaces of the FP cavity and eventually recoupled to the leading-in SMF, resulting in a well-defined interference spectrum. The fringe contrast of the interferometer is highly sensitive to fiber bending with direction-independence and thus is capable of measuring tilt angles in high resolution. In addition, the interference wavelength always remains unchanged during the fiber bending.

  14. Integrating Quality into the Textile and Apparel High School Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Deborah J. C.; Kadolph, Sara J.; Cosbey, Sarah; Hillery, Julie; Haar, Sherry; Day, Marla; Keiser, Sandra; Brandes, Kendra

    2001-01-01

    Explains the importance of quality assurance in high school textiles and apparel instruction. Describes educational activities that integrate quality assurance concepts (teamwork, continuous improvement, customer focus, and empowerment). (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  15. Gaussian-optics-based optical modeling and characterization of a Fabry-Perot microcavity for sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dagang; Lin, Rongming; Wang, Weijun

    2005-08-01

    A generalized study has been carried out on the modeling of a Fabry-Perot microcavity for sensing applications. Different analytical models on transmission characteristics of a Fabry-Perot microcavity are established by using plane-wave-based techniques, such as the Macleod characteristic matrix technique, the transfer matrix technique, and Smith's technique. A novel Gaussian-optics-based model for a Fabry-Perot microcavity illuminated by a laser beam is then developed and validated. The influence of laser beam waist on microcavity optical response is investigated, and the required minimal beam waist size is explored to ensure a useful optical response for sensing applications that can be accurately predicted by plane-wave optics. Also, the perturbations of microcavity performance induced by different types of microcavity mirror imperfections are discussed, based on the novel optical model. The prototype of the proposed Fabry-Perot microcavity for sensing applications has been successfully fabricated and characterized.

  16. Strong photoluminescence of the porous silicon with HfO{sub 2}-filled microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Ran; Wu, Zhengran; Du, Xianghao; Han, Zuyin; Sun, Weideng

    2015-06-22

    Greatly enhanced blue emission was observed at room temperature in the single-crystal silicon with HfO{sub 2} filled into its microcavities. The broad blue band light was emitted from both the HfO{sub 2} dielectric and the porous Si. The ferroelectricity of HfO{sub 2} enhances the blue emission from Si by its filling into the microcaivities. At the same time, HfO{sub 2} contributes to the light emission for the transitions of the defect levels for oxygen vacancy. The observation of greatly enhanced blue light emission of the porous Si filled with HfO{sub 2} dielectric is remarkable as both HfO{sub 2} and Si are highly compatible with Si-based electronic industry.

  17. Looking through the mirror: optical microcavity-mirror image photonic interaction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Xifré-Pérez, E; García de Abajo, F J; Meseguer, F

    2012-05-01

    Although science fiction literature and art portray extraordinary stories of people interacting with their images behind a mirror, we know that they are not real and belong to the realm of fantasy. However, it is well known that charges or magnets near a good electrical conductor experience real attractive or repulsive forces, respectively, originating in the interaction with their images. Here, we show strong interaction between an optical microcavity and its image under external illumination. Specifically, we use silicon nanospheres whose high refractive index makes well-defined optical resonances feasible. The strong interaction produces attractive and repulsive forces depending on incident wavelength, cavity-metal separation and resonance mode symmetry. These intense repulsive photonic forces warrant a new kind of optical levitation that allows us to accurately manipulate small particles, with important consequences for microscopy, optical sensing and control of light by light at the nanoscale. PMID:22565747

  18. Looking through the mirror: optical microcavity-mirror image photonic interaction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Xifré-Pérez, E; García de Abajo, F J; Meseguer, F

    2012-05-01

    Although science fiction literature and art portray extraordinary stories of people interacting with their images behind a mirror, we know that they are not real and belong to the realm of fantasy. However, it is well known that charges or magnets near a good electrical conductor experience real attractive or repulsive forces, respectively, originating in the interaction with their images. Here, we show strong interaction between an optical microcavity and its image under external illumination. Specifically, we use silicon nanospheres whose high refractive index makes well-defined optical resonances feasible. The strong interaction produces attractive and repulsive forces depending on incident wavelength, cavity-metal separation and resonance mode symmetry. These intense repulsive photonic forces warrant a new kind of optical levitation that allows us to accurately manipulate small particles, with important consequences for microscopy, optical sensing and control of light by light at the nanoscale.

  19. Thermomagnetic writing into magnetophotonic microcavities controlling thermal diffusion for volumetric magnetic holography.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Ryosuke; Nakamura, Yuichi; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Goto, Taichi; Lim, Pang Boey; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2016-01-11

    Holographic memory is expected to become a high-capacity data storage. Magnetic volumetric holograms are rewritable holograms that are recorded as magnetization directions through thermomagnetic recording. However, the effective depth of magnetic holograms is limited by thermal diffusion that causes merging of magnetic fringes. In this study, we propose the insertion of heat-sink layers (HSLs) for retaining well-defined magnetic fringes during volumetric writing. Magnetophotonic microcavity media were used for demonstrating the HSL effect, and the structural design principle was established in numerical calculations. The results indicate that deep and clear magnetic fringes and an improvement in the diffraction efficiency can be achieved by the insertion of HSLs. PMID:26832282

  20. Far off-resonant coupling between photonic crystal microcavity and single quantum dot with resonant excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Banihashemi, Mehdi; Ahmadi, Vahid; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Kojima, Takanori; Kojima, Kazunobu; Noda, Susumu

    2013-12-16

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate that with sub-nanowatt coherent s-shell excitation of a single InAs quantum dot, off-resonant coupling of 4.1 nm is possible between L3 photonic crystal microcavity and the quantum dot at 50 K. This resonant excitation reduces strongly the effect of surrounding charges to quantum dot, multiexciton complexes and pure dephasing. It seems that this far off-resonant coupling is the result of increased number of acoustical phonons due to high operating temperature of 50 K. The 4.1 nm detuning is the largest amount for this kind of coupling.

  1. Hybrid quantum gates between flying photon and diamond nitrogen-vacancy centers assisted by optical microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Lu Long, Gui

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid quantum gates hold great promise for quantum information processing since they preserve the advantages of different quantum systems. Here we present compact quantum circuits to deterministically implement controlled-NOT, Toffoli, and Fredkin gates between a flying photon qubit and diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers assisted by microcavities. The target qubits of these universal quantum gates are encoded on the spins of the electrons associated with the diamond NV centers and they have long coherence time for storing information, and the control qubit is encoded on the polarizations of the flying photon and can be easily manipulated. Our quantum circuits are compact, economic, and simple. Moreover, they do not require additional qubits. The complexity of our schemes for universal three-qubit gates is much reduced, compared to the synthesis with two-qubit entangling gates. These schemes have high fidelities and efficiencies, and they are feasible in experiment. PMID:26271899

  2. Theory of Microcavity Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, L. J.; Dodabalapur, A.; Jordan, R. H.; Slusher, R. E.

    1996-03-01

    We adapt the theory of Schubert and coworkers footnote N. E. J. Hunt, E. F. Schubert and G. J. Zydzik, Appl. Phys. Lett. 63, 391 (1993). for resonant cavity inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to evaluate analogous organic devices for various display applications. The theory is used to calculate angular distribution of intensity and color, as well as to investigate optimizing light output from organic LEDs. Our results agree well with experimental measurements on microcavity devices we have fabricated from hydroxyquinolinealuminum (Alq) and doped Alq emitters.

  3. Generation of hyper-entangled photon pairs in coupled microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portolan, S.; Einkemmer, L.; Vörös, Z.; Weihs, G.; Rabl, P.

    2014-06-01

    We propose and theoretically analyze a new scheme for generating hyper-entangled photon pairs (EPPs) in a system of polaritons in coupled planar microcavities. Starting from a microscopic model, we evaluate the relevant parametric scattering processes and numerically simulate the phonon-induced noise background under continuous-wave excitation. Our results show that, compared to other polariton entanglement proposals, our scheme enables the generation of photon pairs that are entangled in both the path and polarization degrees of freedom, and simultaneously leads to a strong reduction in the photoluminescence noise background. This can significantly improve the fidelity of the EPPs under realistic experimental conditions.

  4. Spontaneous emission from semiconductor nanocrystals in coupled spherical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovich, Yu. P.; Gerlach, M.; Bradley, A. L.; Donegan, J. F.; Boland, J.; Connolly, T.; Przyjalgowski, M.; Ryder, A.; Gaponik, N.; Rogach, A. L.

    2005-02-01

    We report on the coherent coupling of whispering gallery modes (WGM) in a photonic molecule formed from two melamine-formaldehyde spherical microcavities coated with a thin shell of light-emitting CdTe nanocrystals (NCs). Utilizing different excitation conditions the splitting of the WGM resonances originating from bonding and anti-bonding branches of the photonic states is observed and fine structure consisting of very sharp peaks resulting from lifting of the WGM degeneracy has been detected. Time-resolved measurements showed a slight increase in the spontaneous emission rate of NCs in a photonic molecule when compared to the spontaneous emission rate for NCs coating a single microsphere.

  5. Ring-shaped polariton lasing in pillar microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kalevich, V. K. Afanasiev, M. M.; Lukoshkin, V. A.; Kavokin, K. V.; Tsintzos, S. I.; Savvidis, P. G.; Kavokin, A. V.

    2014-03-07

    Optically generated exciton-polaritons in cylindric semiconductor pillar microcavity with embedded GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells demonstrate a clear polariton lasing regime. When exciting in the center of the pillar, we detect a ring-shaped emission, where the peak of intensity can be separated from the excitation spot by more than 10 μm. The spatial coherence of the ring emission is verified by interferometry measurements. These observations are interpreted by drift of the exciton polariton condensate away from the excitation spot due to its repulsion from the exciton reservoir and by its spatial confinement by the pillar boundary.

  6. Resonant self-pulsations in coupled nonlinear microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Victor; Biancalana, Fabio

    2011-04-15

    A different point of view on the phenomenon of self-pulsations is presented, which shows that they are a balanced state formed by two counteracting processes: beating of modes and bistable switching. A structure based on two coupled nonlinear microcavities provides a generic example of a system with enhanced ability to support this phenomenon. The specific design of such a structure in the form of multilayered media is proposed, and the coupled-mode theory is applied to describe its dynamical properties. It is emphasized that the frequency of self-pulsations is related to the frequency splitting between resonant modes and can be adjusted over a broad range.

  7. High Efficiency, Illumination Quality OLEDs for Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Shiang; James Cella; Kelly Chichak; Anil Duggal; Kevin Janora; Chris Heller; Gautam Parthasarathy; Jeffery Youmans; Joseph Shiang

    2008-03-31

    The goal of the program was to demonstrate a 45 lumen per watt white light device based upon the use of multiple emission colors through the use of solution processing. This performance level is a dramatic extension of the team's previous 15 LPW large area illumination device. The fundamental material system was based upon commercial polymer materials. The team was largely able to achieve these goals, and was able to deliver to DOE a 90 lumen illumination source that had an average performance of 34 LPW a 1000 cd/m{sup 2} with peak performances near 40LPW. The average color temperature is 3200K and the calculated CRI 85. The device operated at a brightness of approximately 1000cd/m{sup 2}. The use of multiple emission colors particularly red and blue, provided additional degrees of design flexibility in achieving white light, but also required the use of a multilayered structure to separate the different recombination zones and prevent interconversion of blue emission to red emission. The use of commercial materials had the advantage that improvements by the chemical manufacturers in charge transport efficiency, operating life and material purity could be rapidly incorporated without the expenditure of additional effort. The program was designed to take maximum advantage of the known characteristics of these material and proceeded in seven steps. (1) Identify the most promising materials, (2) assemble them into multi-layer structures to control excitation and transport within the OLED, (3) identify materials development needs that would optimize performance within multilayer structures, (4) build a prototype that demonstrates the potential entitlement of the novel multilayer OLED architecture (5) integrate all of the developments to find the single best materials set to implement the novel multilayer architecture, (6) further optimize the best materials set, (7) make a large area high illumination quality white OLED. A photo of the final deliverable is shown. In

  8. Generation of high-quality petawatt pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mourou, G; Bado, Philippe

    1991-01-01

    CPA sources need a front-end capable of generating very short seed pulses. To meet this requirement, present CPA sources rely on actively modelocked solid-state oscillators used in conjunction with non-linear fiber stages. This approach generates pulses with a residual frequency chirp, resulting in a limited peak-to-background intensity contrast ratio. The availability of an oscillator capable of producing directly (i.e. without fiber stage) picosecond or sub-picosecond pulses would significantly improve the quality of CPA sources. We have pursued different approaches to replace the standard modelocked oscillator front-end. In an initial phase, we investigated the possible use of Additive Pulse Modelocking (APM) color-center lasers as oscillators for CPA Nd:glass sources. Lately we have developed a Ti:Sapphire modelocked oscillator operating in the one-micron range. In order to generate pulses with very high peak to background contrast ratio, we have built a non-linear coupled-cavity oscillator generating 200-fs pulses. This color-center laser operates in the 1.5--1.6 micron range. A diagram of the oscillator is shown in Fig. 1. The laser is pumped with a modelocked Nd:YAG source. Both KCl and NaCl crystals were tested as gain media. NaCl was found to have a larger tuning range and to generate a higher average power (up to 150 mW). When synchronously mode-locked, the color-center generates pulses in the 10--20 ps range. Once interferometrically coupled to non-linear external-cavity, this oscillator produces very short pulses (85 to 260 fs). This oscillator was first operated with a 2 mm birefringent plate. 85 fs, near transform-limited pulses were generated at 1.54 micron. As the laser was tuned to longer wavelength, the pulse duration increased, as well as the bandwidth-duration product. With a 4 mm birefringent plate, 125 fs, transform-limited pulses were generated over the full tuning range.

  9. All-optical diode based on dipole modes of Kerr microcavity in asymmetric L-shaped photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Bulgakov, E N; Sadreev, A F

    2014-04-01

    A design of all-optical diode in L-shaped photonic crystal waveguide is proposed that uses the multistability of single nonlinear Kerr microcavity with two dipole modes. Asymmetry of the waveguide is achieved through different couplings of the dipole modes with the left and right legs of the waveguide. Using coupled mode theory we demonstrate an extremely high transmission contrast. The direction of optical diode transmission can be controlled by power or frequency of injected light. The theory agrees with the numerical solution of the Maxwell equations.

  10. Whispering gallery mode emission from a composite system of CdTe nanocrystals and a spherical microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovich, Y. P.; Yang, L.; McCabe, E. M.; Donegan, J. F.; Perova, T.; Moore, A.; Gaponik, N.; Rogach, A.

    2003-11-01

    We have studied the optical properties of a novel quantum dot-microcavity system consisting of CdTe nanocrystals attached to a melamine formaldehyde latex microsphere. The spheres were studied using conventional and confocal microscopy, the confocal system revealed defects in some spheres. The coupling between the emission of the nanocrystals and the spherical cavity modes was realized. Periodic very narrow peaks of the emission spectra corresponding to the whispering gallery modes were detected with strong emission into selected modes at a high pump intensity.

  11. Vertical Single-Crystalline Organic Nanowires on Graphene: Solution-Phase Epitaxy and Optical Microcavities.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian-Yao; Xu, Hongjun; Wang, Jing Jing; Winters, Sinéad; Motta, Carlo; Karademir, Ertuğrul; Zhu, Weigang; Varrla, Eswaraiah; Duesberg, Georg S; Sanvito, Stefano; Hu, Wenping; Donegan, John F

    2016-08-10

    Vertically aligned nanowires (NWs) of single crystal semiconductors have attracted a great deal of interest in the past few years. They have strong potential to be used in device structures with high density and with intriguing optoelectronic properties. However, fabricating such nanowire structures using organic semiconducting materials remains technically challenging. Here we report a simple procedure for the synthesis of crystalline 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl) anthracene (BPEA) NWs on a graphene surface utilizing a solution-phase van der Waals (vdW) epitaxial strategy. The wires are found to grow preferentially in a vertical direction on the surface of graphene. Structural characterization and first-principles ab initio simulations were performed to investigate the epitaxial growth and the molecular orientation of the BPEA molecules on graphene was studied, revealing the role of interactions at the graphene-BPEA interface in determining the molecular orientation. These free-standing NWs showed not only efficient optical waveguiding with low loss along the NW but also confinement of light between the two end facets of the NW forming a microcavity Fabry-Pérot resonator. From an analysis of the optical dispersion within such NW microcavities, we observed strong slowing of the waveguided light with a group velocity reduced to one-tenth the speed of light. Applications of the vertical single-crystalline organic NWs grown on graphene will benefit from a combination of the unique electronic properties and flexibility of graphene and the tunable optical and electronic properties of organic NWs. Therefore, these vertical organic NW arrays on graphene offer the potential for realizing future on-chip light sources. PMID:27438189

  12. Simulation of fiber communication systems with semiconductor microcavity lasers as light transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongdong; Shen, Guangdi; Zhang, Cunshan; Lin, ShiMing; Cao, Jie; Wang, Shou-Wu

    1996-09-01

    We have simulated fiber communication systems with the semiconductor micro-cavity lasers as light transmitters using rate equations. When the spontaneous emission factor of micro-cavity equals 0.1 and the lasers are modulated by 10 Gbit/s numerical codes, we have obtained both the received eye diagram after they transmit 60 kilometers and the relations of the unit area of the eye diagram with the transmission distance. It will provide theoretical value for the application of the micro-cavity lasers in optical communication.

  13. Composite modulation of Fano resonance in plasmonic microstructures by electric-field and microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Wu, Chenyun; Yang, Hong; Hu, Xiaoyong Gong, Qihuang

    2014-11-03

    Composite modulation of Fano resonance by using electric-field and microcavity simultaneously is realized in a plasmonic microstructure, which consists of a gold nanowire grating inserted into a Fabry-Perot microcavity composited of a liquid crystal layer sandwiched between two indium tin oxide layers. The Fano resonance wavelength varies with the applied voltage and the microcavity resonance. A large shift of 48 nm in the Fano resonance wavelength is achieved when the applied voltage is 20 V. This may provide a new way for the study of multi-functional integrated photonic circuits and chips based on plasmonic microstructures.

  14. Composite modulation of Fano resonance in plasmonic microstructures by electric-field and microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Hu, Xiaoyong; Wu, Chenyun; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-11-01

    Composite modulation of Fano resonance by using electric-field and microcavity simultaneously is realized in a plasmonic microstructure, which consists of a gold nanowire grating inserted into a Fabry-Perot microcavity composited of a liquid crystal layer sandwiched between two indium tin oxide layers. The Fano resonance wavelength varies with the applied voltage and the microcavity resonance. A large shift of 48 nm in the Fano resonance wavelength is achieved when the applied voltage is 20 V. This may provide a new way for the study of multi-functional integrated photonic circuits and chips based on plasmonic microstructures.

  15. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy in a microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocco, Michele

    2007-06-01

    The combination of nonlinear spectroscopy and cavity QED is a stimulating field of research [see, for example, S. M. Spillane et al., Nature 415, 621 (2002)]. In this work, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) taking place within a microcavity with parallel mirrors, is studied. The interest stems from the fact that CARS is a powerful nonlinear spectroscopic technique, particularly useful in imaging of microscopic samples [A. Zumbusch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 4142 (1999)]. The theory of CARS microscopy applied to a sample placed within the microcavity is developed and the calculated CARS power in comparison with its free-space value shows the characteristic oscillation between inhibition and enhancement. If d and lambda indicate the cavity spacing and the anti-Stokes wavelength, inhibition is then found for d smaller than lambda and becomes complete only for microscope objectives operated in dry conditions. It is also found that the first enhancement at d=lambda is more relevant for microscopes with smaller numerical apertures. Higher numerical apertures, instead, reveal weaker cavity effects as a consequence of the larger collection efficiency.

  16. 36 CFR 910.31 - High architectural quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false High architectural quality... architectural quality. Development must maintain a uniformly high standard of architecture, representative of the best contemporary design and planning concepts. Great care and sensitivity must be shown in...

  17. Quality Assurance Strategy for Existing Homes. Final Quality Management Primer for High Performing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Del Bianco, M.; Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wood, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guide is designed to help Building America (BA) teams understand quality management and its role in transitioning from conventional to high performance home building and remodeling. It explains what quality means, the value of quality management systems, the unique need for QMS when building high performing homes, and the first steps to a implementing a comprehensive QMS. This document provides a framework and context for BA teams when they encounter builders and remodelers.

  18. Quality Assurance Strategy for Existing Homes: Final Quality Management Primer for High Performing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Del Bianco, M.; Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wood, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guide is designed to help Building America (BA) Teams understand quality management and its role in transitioning from conventional to high performance home building and remodeling. It explains what quality means, the value of quality management systems, the unique need for QMS when building high performing homes, and the first steps to a implementing a comprehensive QMS. This document provides a framework and context for BA teams when they encounter builders and remodelers.

  19. Inequality in Preschool Quality? Community-Level Disparities in Access to High-Quality Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassok, Daphna; Galdo, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, unequal access to high-quality preschool has emerged as a growing public policy concern. Because of data limitations, it is notoriously difficult to measure disparities in access to early learning opportunities across communities and particularly challenging to quantify gaps in access to "high-quality" programs. Research…

  20. Effective multidisciplinary working: the key to high-quality care.

    PubMed

    Ndoro, Samuel

    This article explores multidisciplinary team working, inter-disciplinary, trans-disciplinary and effective collaborative practice in order to provide high-quality patient care. It discusses different views on collaboration, some of the issues around cross-discipline and multi-agency working and concerns around promoting 'high-quality' care. It also discusses the importance of evidence-based practice in multidisciplinary teams. Issues around good-quality care, clinical governance and the audit cycle in MDTs are addressed. The article highlights the importance of the 6Cs (care, compassion, competence, communication, courage and commitment) in MDTs if quality care is to be achieved. The article also explores advantages and limitations of multidisciplinary team working, trans-disciplinary working and inter-professional working in developing and delivering high-quality patient-centred care. Further research is needed on how clinical audits can help to improve how MDTs function in order improve the quality of service provided to clients.

  1. Light manipulation with Bacteriorhodopsin membrane self-assembled on high-Q photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2008-03-01

    Resonant photonic structures such as ring resonators and photonic crystal nanocavities interact evanescently with biological material assembled on a reflecting interface. Quality (Q-) factors ˜10^6 and sub-wavelength modal (V-) volumes significantly enhance the interaction so that tuning of microcavity resonances by only few molecules is feasible. Since only few constituents are required, the molecular-photonic interface can be fashioned from self-organizing principles that govern interaction of organic and biological polymers. We demonstrate this bottom-up approach with photochromic Bacteriorhodopsin membrane which we self-assemble on various microcavities. The hybrid molecular-photonic architectures exhibit high Q/V-values and are sensitive to photoinduced molecular transitions and other non-linearities which we utilize for demonstrations of all-optical switching, routing and molecular analysis.

  2. Microcavity design for low threshold polariton condensation with ultrashort optical pulse excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Poellmann, C.; Leierseder, U.; Huber, R.; Galopin, E.; Lemaître, A.; Amo, A.; Bloch, J.; Ménard, J.-M.

    2015-05-28

    We present a microcavity structure with a shifted photonic stop-band to enable efficient non-resonant injection of a polariton condensate with spectrally broad femtosecond pulses. The concept is demonstrated theoretically and confirmed experimentally for a planar GaAs/AlGaAs multilayer heterostructure pumped with ultrashort near-infrared pulses while photoluminescence is collected to monitor the optically injected polariton density. As the excitation wavelength is scanned, a regime of polariton condensation can be reached in our structure at a consistently lower fluence threshold than in a state-of-the-art conventional microcavity. Our microcavity design improves the polariton injection efficiency by a factor of 4, as compared to a conventional microcavity design, when broad excitation pulses are centered at a wavelength of λ = 740 nm. Most remarkably, this improvement factor reaches 270 when the excitation wavelength is centered at 750 nm.

  3. Optical devices and methods employing nanoparticles, microcavities, and semicontinuous metal films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Robert L. (Inventor); Shalaev, Vladimir M. (Inventor); Smith, Harold V. (Inventor); Sarychev, Andrey K. (Inventor); Ying, Z. Charles (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An optical sensing enhancing material (and corresponding method of making) comprising: a medium, the medium comprising a plurality of aggregated nanoparticles comprising fractals; and a microcavity, wherein the medium is located in a vicinity of the microcavity. Also an optical sensor and sensing method comprising: providing a doped medium, the medium comprising a plurality of aggregated nanoparticles comprising fractals, with the material; locating the doped medium in the vicinity of a microcavity; exciting the doped medium with a light source; and detecting light reflected from the doped medium. Also an optical sensing enhancing material comprising a medium, the medium comprising a semicontinuous metal film of randomly distributed metal particles and their clusters at approximately their percolation threshold. The medium preferably additionally comprises a microcavity/microresonator. Also devices and methods employing such material.

  4. Light diffusing effects of nano and micro-structures on OLED with microcavity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Doo-Hee; Shin, Jin-Wook; Joo, Chul Woong; Lee, Jonghee; Park, Seung Koo; Moon, Jaehyun; Cho, Nam Sung; Chu, Hye Yong; Lee, Jeong-Ik

    2014-10-20

    We examined the light diffusing effects of nano and micro-structures on microcavity designed OLEDs. The results of FDTD simulations and experiments showed that the pillar shaped nano-structure was more effective than the concave micro-structure for light diffusing of microcavity OLEDs. The sharp luminance distribution of the microcavity OLED was changed to near Lambertian luminance distribution by the nano-structure, and light diffusing effects increased with the height of the nano-structure. Furthermore, the nano-structure has advantages including light extraction of the substrate mode, reproducibility of manufacturing process, and minimizing pixel blur problems in an OLED display panel. The nano-structure is a promising candidate for a light diffuser, resolving the viewing angle problems in microcavity OLEDs.

  5. Preparation of a nonlinear coherent state of the mechanical resonator in an optomechanical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Zhu, Jia-Pei; Li, Gao-Xiang

    2016-06-13

    We propose a scheme for generation of a nonlinear coherent state (NCS) of a mechanical resonator (MR) in an optomechanical micro-cavity, in which a two-level quantum dot (QD) and the microcavity are respectively driven by a strong laser and a weak laser. This microcavity can be engineered within a photonic band-gap (PBG) material. By properly tuning the frequency of the weak driving field, two-photon blockade phenomenon occurs. The QD-cavity subsystem can evolve into a dark state due to the damping of the microcavity and the elimination of the decay rate of the QD at selected frequencies in the PBG material. In this situation, the phonon mode of the MR can be prepared into a NCS, which is a non-classical state and possesses the sub-Poisson statistics. We also demonstrate the Wigner function of the NCS, which negativity implies its non-classicality. PMID:27410375

  6. Raman scattering enhancement in photon-plasmon resonance mediated metal-dielectric microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddala, Sriram; Dwivedi, Vindesh K.; Vijaya Prakash, G.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2013-12-01

    Here, we report the photon-plasmon interaction scheme and enhanced field strengths resulted into the amplification of phonon in a novel microcavity. A metal-dielectric microcavity, with unified cavity photonic mode and localized surface plasmon resonances, is visualized by impregnating the gold nanoparticles into the deep see-through nano-sized pores of porous silicon microcavity. The intense optical field strengths resulting from the photon-plasmon interactions are probed by both resonant and non-resonant Raman scattering experiments. Due to photon-plasmon-phonon interaction mechanism, several orders of enhancement in the intensity of scattered Raman Stokes photon (at 500 cm-1) are observed. Our metal nanoparticle-microcavity hybrid system shows the potential to improve the sensing figure of merit as well as the applications of plasmonics for optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and related technologies.

  7. Raman scattering enhancement in photon-plasmon resonance mediated metal-dielectric microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Guddala, Sriram; Narayana Rao, D. E-mail: dnrsp@uohyd.ernet.in; Dwivedi, Vindesh K.; Vijaya Prakash, G.

    2013-12-14

    Here, we report the photon-plasmon interaction scheme and enhanced field strengths resulted into the amplification of phonon in a novel microcavity. A metal-dielectric microcavity, with unified cavity photonic mode and localized surface plasmon resonances, is visualized by impregnating the gold nanoparticles into the deep see-through nano-sized pores of porous silicon microcavity. The intense optical field strengths resulting from the photon-plasmon interactions are probed by both resonant and non-resonant Raman scattering experiments. Due to photon-plasmon-phonon interaction mechanism, several orders of enhancement in the intensity of scattered Raman Stokes photon (at 500 cm{sup −1}) are observed. Our metal nanoparticle-microcavity hybrid system shows the potential to improve the sensing figure of merit as well as the applications of plasmonics for optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and related technologies.

  8. Synchronous characterization of semiconductor microcavity laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T. Lippi, G. L.

    2015-06-15

    We report on a high-resolution double-channel imaging method used to synchronously map the intensity- and optical-frequency-distribution of a laser beam in the plane orthogonal to the propagation direction. The synchronous measurement allows us to show that the laser frequency is an inhomogeneous distribution below threshold, but that it becomes homogeneous across the fundamental Gaussian mode above threshold. The beam’s tails deviations from the Gaussian shape, however, are accompanied by sizeable fluctuations in the laser wavelength, possibly deriving from manufacturing details and from the influence of spontaneous emission in the very low intensity wings. In addition to the synchronous spatial characterization, a temporal analysis at any given point in the beam cross section is carried out. Using this method, the beam homogeneity and spatial shape, energy density, energy center, and the defects-related spectrum can also be extracted from these high-resolution pictures.

  9. Synchronous characterization of semiconductor microcavity laser beam.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Lippi, G L

    2015-06-01

    We report on a high-resolution double-channel imaging method used to synchronously map the intensity- and optical-frequency-distribution of a laser beam in the plane orthogonal to the propagation direction. The synchronous measurement allows us to show that the laser frequency is an inhomogeneous distribution below threshold, but that it becomes homogeneous across the fundamental Gaussian mode above threshold. The beam's tails deviations from the Gaussian shape, however, are accompanied by sizeable fluctuations in the laser wavelength, possibly deriving from manufacturing details and from the influence of spontaneous emission in the very low intensity wings. In addition to the synchronous spatial characterization, a temporal analysis at any given point in the beam cross section is carried out. Using this method, the beam homogeneity and spatial shape, energy density, energy center, and the defects-related spectrum can also be extracted from these high-resolution pictures.

  10. Synchronous characterization of semiconductor microcavity laser beam.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Lippi, G L

    2015-06-01

    We report on a high-resolution double-channel imaging method used to synchronously map the intensity- and optical-frequency-distribution of a laser beam in the plane orthogonal to the propagation direction. The synchronous measurement allows us to show that the laser frequency is an inhomogeneous distribution below threshold, but that it becomes homogeneous across the fundamental Gaussian mode above threshold. The beam's tails deviations from the Gaussian shape, however, are accompanied by sizeable fluctuations in the laser wavelength, possibly deriving from manufacturing details and from the influence of spontaneous emission in the very low intensity wings. In addition to the synchronous spatial characterization, a temporal analysis at any given point in the beam cross section is carried out. Using this method, the beam homogeneity and spatial shape, energy density, energy center, and the defects-related spectrum can also be extracted from these high-resolution pictures. PMID:26133832

  11. Boiler for generating high quality vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H.; Marto, P. J.; Joslyn, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Boiler supplies vapor for use in turbines by imparting a high angular velocity to the liquid annulus in heated rotating drum. Drum boiler provides a sharp interface between boiling liquid and vapor, thereby, inhibiting the formation of unwanted liquid droplets.

  12. Exciton-like electromagnetic excitations in non-ideal microcavity supercrystals.

    PubMed

    Rumyantsev, Vladimir; Fedorov, Stanislav; Gumennyk, Kostyantyn; Sychanova, Marina; Kavokin, Alexey

    2014-11-06

    We study localized photonic excitations in a quasi-two-dimensional non-ideal binary microcavity lattice with use of the virtual crystal approximation. The effect of point defects (vacancies) on the excitation spectrum is investigated by numerical modelling. We obtain the dispersion and the energy gap of the electromagnetic excitations which may be considered as Frenkel exciton-like quasiparticles and analyze the dependence of their density of states on the defect concentrations in a microcavity supercrystal.

  13. Total quality management: A management philosophy for providing high quality construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Paul D.

    Total Quality Management (TQM) is not a new concept. Only recently (within the past ten years or so) have American companies started to realize the potential of TQM as a means of ensuring high quality products and services. With this realization has come implementation in manufacturing and service companies. A commercial construction company, like any other business, must provide a top quality finished product to its customer if it intends to stay in business. TQM is one way to work to that end. This report explores the quality problems facing my fictitious construction company, which I believe are fairly typical among the commercial construction industry, existing management methods, and the TQM method to ensure top quality production. It will be shown why I believe TQM or a variation thereof is the best method for controlling the quality of products and service during the construction process. Under the philosophy of TQM, we build quality into the finished product.

  14. Highly Integrated Quality Assurance – An Empirical Case

    SciTech Connect

    Drake Kirkham; Amy Powell; Lucas Rich

    2011-02-01

    Highly Integrated Quality Assurance – An Empirical Case Drake Kirkham1, Amy Powell2, Lucas Rich3 1Quality Manager, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 M/S 6122, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6122 2Quality Engineer, RPS Program, Idaho National Laboratory 3Quality Engineer, RPS Program, Idaho National Laboratory Contact: Voice: (208) 533-7550 Email: Drake.Kirkham@inl.gov Abstract. The Radioisotope Power Systems Program of the Idaho National Laboratory makes an empirical case for a highly integrated Quality Assurance function pertaining to the preparation, assembly, testing, storage and transportation of 238Pu fueled radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Case data represents multiple campaigns including the Pluto/New Horizons mission, the Mars Science Laboratory mission in progress, and other related projects. Traditional Quality Assurance models would attempt to reduce cost by minimizing the role of dedicated Quality Assurance personnel in favor of either functional tasking or peer-based implementations. Highly integrated Quality Assurance adds value by placing trained quality inspectors on the production floor side-by-side with nuclear facility operators to enhance team dynamics, reduce inspection wait time, and provide for immediate, independent feedback. Value is also added by maintaining dedicated Quality Engineers to provide for rapid identification and resolution of corrective action, enhanced and expedited supply chain interfaces, improved bonded storage capabilities, and technical resources for requirements management including data package development and Certificates of Inspection. A broad examination of cost-benefit indicates highly integrated Quality Assurance can reduce cost through the mitigation of risk and reducing administrative burden thereby allowing engineers to be engineers, nuclear operators to be nuclear operators, and the cross-functional team to operate more efficiently. Applicability of this case

  15. Simple and rapid CD4 testing based on large-field imaging system composed of microcavity array and two-dimensional photosensor.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Tatsuya; Sugamura, Yuriko; Hosokawa, Masahito; Yoshino, Tomoko; Lim, Tae-Kyu; Harada, Manabu; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2015-05-15

    This study presents a novel method for CD4 testing based on one-shot large-field imaging. The large-field imaging system was fabricated by a microcavity array and a two-dimensional (2D) photosensor within the desk-top-sized instrument. The microcavity array was employed to separate leukocytes from whole blood based on differences in the size of leukocytes and other blood cells. The large-field imaging system with lower side irradiation enabled acquisition of cell signatures with high signal-to-noise ratio, because the metallic substrate of the microcavity array obstructed excessive excitation light. In this setting, dual-color imaging of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells was achieved within the entire image area (64 mm(2)) in 2s. The practical performance of the large-field imaging system was demonstrated by determining the CD4/CD8 ratio in a few microliter of control whole blood as small as those obtained by a finger prick. The CD4/CD8 ratios measured using the large-field imaging system correlated well with those measured by microscopic analysis. These results indicate that our proposed system provides a simple and rapid CD4 testing for the application of HIV/AIDS treatment.

  16. Can high quality cane be delivered to the mill economically

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cane quality is becoming increasingly important to the Louisiana sugarcane industry, with some processors offering premiums for high quality cane. Using a Cameco® 3500, we tested ground speeds of 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5 mph and fan speeds of 650, 850, and 1050 rpm. Ground speed had no effect on can...

  17. High quality transparent conducting oxide thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Duenow, Joel N.; Barnes, Teresa; Coutts, Timothy J.

    2012-08-28

    A transparent conducting oxide (TCO) film comprising: a TCO layer, and dopants selected from the elements consisting of Vanadium, Molybdenum, Tantalum, Niobium, Antimony, Titanium, Zirconium, and Hafnium, wherein the elements are n-type dopants; and wherein the transparent conducting oxide is characterized by an improved electron mobility of about 42 cm.sup.2/V-sec while simultaneously maintaining a high carrier density of .about.4.4e.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3.

  18. Parametric scattering of microcavity polaritons into ghost branches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajac, Joanna M.; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Polaritons of defined momentum and energy are excited resonantly on the lower polariton branch of a planar semiconductor microcavity in the strong coupling regime, and the spectrally and momentum resolved emission is analyzed. We observe ghost branches from scattering within the lower polariton branch, as well as from scattering to the middle polariton branch, showing the nonlinear mixing between different branches. Extending the theoretical treatment of spontaneous parametric luminescence developed in Ciuti et al. [Phys. Rev. B 63, 041303 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevB.63.041303], the eigenmodes of the driven polariton system and its photoluminescence are modeled. A quantitative agreement with the measured branch positions and a qualitative agreement with the branch intensities is found.

  19. Significant photoinduced Kerr rotation achieved in semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherbunin, R. V.; Vladimirova, M.; Kavokin, K. V.; Mikhailov, A. V.; Kopteva, N. E.; Lagoudakis, P. G.; Kavokin, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    Giant Kerr rotation and ellipticity are observed and investigated in an asymmetric planar microcavity with a quantum well in the active region. Rotation angle of the polarization plane as well as ellipticity were determined from time- and frequency-resolved measurements of the Stokes vector components of reflected light. It was found that in a small range of the cavity mode detunings the polarized pump pulse creates a large splitting of the lower polariton branch while leaving its linewidth almost the same. This fact gives a possibility to observe at such detunings the Kerr rotation angle and ellipticity, close to their extremes. A theoretical analysis shows that the decisive role in reaching extreme polarization rotation angles is played by the structure asymmetry. Comprehensive analysis of the polarization state of the light in this regime shows that both renormalization of the exciton energy and the saturation of the excitonic resonance contribute to the observed optical nonlinearities.

  20. Exciton-polariton patterns in coherently pumped semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Albrecht; Egorov, Oleg A.; Lederer, Falk

    2014-06-01

    We theoretically study spatially periodic exciton-polariton patterns in a semiconductor microcavity coherently driven by an optical pump. Patterns grow spontaneously in a uniformly pumped cavity above a certain threshold (Turing instability). By means of a perturbation analysis in the vicinity of this bifurcation point, we determine the conditions for pattern formation and predict their properties. The shape of those patterns depends strongly on the detuning of the pump frequency from the system's resonances. For instance, near the bottom of the lower branch of the polariton dispersion relation, a hexagonal pattern is the most favorable periodic solution similar to pattern formation in optical cavities endowed with a defocusing Kerr nonlinearity. Towards the excitonic resonance, the influence of the upper polariton branch becomes important giving rise to a diversity of other solutions, such as roll, labyrinthine, and honeycomb patterns. Our numerical simulations reveal patterns with point and line defects and the formation of disordered patterns of a soliton gas.

  1. Dark solitons in a spinor microcavity-polariton condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting-Wei; Jheng, Shih-Da; Hsieh, Wen-Feng; Cheng, Szu-Cheng

    2016-10-01

    Dark solitons of a two-component condensate occurring in nonresonantly-pumped microcavity polaritons (spinor MPCs) with integer vorticities, referred to as integer dark solitons (IDSs), can be excited by a laser beam with tunable polarization and power. We investigate the physical properties of stationary IDSs in a pure spinor MPCs without defects. From the excitations of a IDS, we show that the soliton is stable when the pump power is higher than a critical value. When the pump polarization is in favor of one component, we find that the critical pump power for the stabilization becomes higher. The stable IDS exists below a critical pump polarization. A stable phase diagram of IDSs in terms of the pump condition, i.e., pump polarization and power, is thus obtained.

  2. Nonequilibrium and nonlinear defect states in microcavity-polariton condensates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting-Wei; Jheng, Shih-Da; Hsieh, Wen-Feng; Cheng, Szu-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The nonequilibrium and nonlinear defect modes (NNDMs), localized by a defect in a nonequilibrium microcavity-polariton condensate (MPC), are studied. There are three analytic solutions of NNDMs in a point defect: the bright NNDM, a bound state with two dark solitons for an attractive potential, and a gray soliton bound by a defect for a repulsive potential. We find that the stable NNDMs in a nonequilibrium MPC are the bright NNDM and gray soliton bound by a defect. The bright NNDM, which has the hyperbolic cotangent form, is a bright localized state existing in a uniform MPC. The bright NNDM is a unique state occurring in a nonequilibrium MPC that has pump-dissipation and repulsive-nonlinearity characters. No such state can exist in an equilibrium system with repulsive nonlinearity. PMID:27300887

  3. Strong exciton-photon coupling in open semiconductor microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Dufferwiel, S.; Fras, F.; Walker, P. M.; Li, F.; Giriunas, L.; Makhonin, M. N.; Wilson, L. R.; Skolnick, M. S.; Krizhanovskii, D. N.; Trichet, A.; Smith, J. M.; Clarke, E.

    2014-05-12

    We present a method to implement 3-dimensional polariton confinement with in-situ spectral tuning of the cavity mode. Our tunable microcavity is a hybrid system consisting of a bottom semiconductor distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) with a cavity containing quantum wells (QWs) grown on top and a dielectric concave DBR separated by a micrometer sized gap. Nanopositioners allow independent positioning of the two mirrors and the cavity mode energy can be tuned by controlling the distance between them. When close to resonance, we observe a characteristic anticrossing between the cavity modes and the QW exciton demonstrating strong coupling. For the smallest radii of curvature concave mirrors of 5.6 μm and 7.5 μm, real-space polariton imaging reveals submicron polariton confinement due to the hemispherical cavity geometry.

  4. Hybrid polaritons in a resonant inorganic/organic semiconductor microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Höfner, M. Sadofev, S.; Henneberger, F.; Kobin, B.; Hecht, S.

    2015-11-02

    We demonstrated the strong coupling regime in a hybrid inorganic-organic microcavity consisting of (Zn,Mg)O quantum wells and ladder-type oligo(p-phenylene) molecules embedded in a polymer matrix. A Fabry-Pérot cavity is formed by an epitaxially grown lower ZnMgO Bragg reflector and a dielectric mirror deposited atop of the organic layer. A clear anticrossing behavior of the polariton branches related to the Wannier-Mott and Frenkel excitons, and the cavity photon mode with a Rabi-splitting reaching 50 meV, is clearly identified by angular-dependent reflectivity measurements at low temperature. By tailoring the structural design, an equal mixing with weights of about 0.3 for all three resonances is achieved for the middle polariton branch at an incidence angle of about 35°.

  5. Photoinduced Transformations in Bacteriorhodopsin Membrane Monitored with Optical Microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Topolancik, Juraj; Vollmer, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Photoinduced molecular transformations in a self-assembled bacteriorhodpsin (bR) monolayer are monitored by observing shifts in the near-infrared resonant wavelengths of linearly polarized modes circulating in a microsphere cavity. We quantify the molecular polarizability change upon all-trans to 13-cis isomerization and deprotonation of the chromophore retinal (∼−57 Å3) and determine its orientation relative to the bR membrane (∼61°). Our observations establish optical microcavities as a sensitive off-resonant spectroscopic tool for probing conformations and orientations of molecular self-assemblies and for measuring changes of molecular polarizability at optical frequencies. We provide a general estimate of the sensitivity of the technique and discuss possible applications. PMID:17208972

  6. Two-component polariton condensate in an optical microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-Chang; Zhou, Xiang-Fa; Guo, Guang-Can; Zhou, Xingxiang; Pu, Han; Zhou, Zheng-Wei

    2014-05-01

    We present a scheme for engineering the extended two-component Bose-Hubbard model using polariton condensate supported by an optical microcavity. Compared to the usual two-component Bose-Hubbard model with only Kerr nonlinearity, our model includes a nonlinear tunneling term which depends on the number difference of the particle in the two modes. In the mean-field treatment, this model is an analog to a nonrigid pendulum with a variable pendulum length whose sign can be also changed. We study the dynamic and ground-state properties of this model and show that there exists a first-order phase transition as the strength of the nonlinear tunneling rate is varied. Furthermore, we propose a scheme to obtain the polariton condensate wave function.

  7. Coherent coupling of molecular resonators with a microcavity mode

    PubMed Central

    Shalabney, A.; George, J.; Hutchison, J.; Pupillo, G.; Genet, C.; Ebbesen, T. W.

    2015-01-01

    The optical hybridization of the electronic states in strongly coupled molecule–cavity systems have revealed unique properties, such as lasing, room temperature polariton condensation and the modification of excited electronic landscapes involved in molecular isomerization. Here we show that molecular vibrational modes of the electronic ground state can also be coherently coupled with a microcavity mode at room temperature, given the low vibrational thermal occupation factors associated with molecular vibrations, and the collective coupling of a large ensemble of molecules immersed within the cavity-mode volume. This enables the enhancement of the collective Rabi-exchange rate with respect to the single-oscillator coupling strength. The possibility of inducing large shifts in the vibrational frequency of selected molecular bonds should have immediate consequences for chemistry. PMID:25583259

  8. Nonequilibrium and nonlinear defect states in microcavity-polariton condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting-Wei; Jheng, Shih-Da; Hsieh, Wen-Feng; Cheng, Szu-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The nonequilibrium and nonlinear defect modes (NNDMs), localized by a defect in a nonequilibrium microcavity-polariton condensate (MPC), are studied. There are three analytic solutions of NNDMs in a point defect: the bright NNDM, a bound state with two dark solitons for an attractive potential, and a gray soliton bound by a defect for a repulsive potential. We find that the stable NNDMs in a nonequilibrium MPC are the bright NNDM and gray soliton bound by a defect. The bright NNDM, which has the hyperbolic cotangent form, is a bright localized state existing in a uniform MPC. The bright NNDM is a unique state occurring in a nonequilibrium MPC that has pump-dissipation and repulsive-nonlinearity characters. No such state can exist in an equilibrium system with repulsive nonlinearity.

  9. Fabrication of high quality ferromagnetic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weides, M.; Tillmann, K.; Kohlstedt, H.

    2006-05-01

    We present ferromagnetic Nb/Al2O3/Ni60Cu40/Nb Josephson junctions (SIFS) with an ultrathin Al2O3 tunnel barrier. The junction fabrication was optimized regarding junction insulation and homogeneity of current transport. Using ion-beam-etching and anodic oxidation we defined and insulated the junction mesas. The additional 2 nm thin Cu-layer below the ferromagnetic NiCu (SINFS) lowered interface roughness and ensured very homogeneous current transport. A high yield of junctional devices with jc spreads less than 2% was obtained.

  10. Management of data quality of high level waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-12

    Over the past 10 years, the Hanford Site has been transitioning from nuclear materials production to Site cleanup operations. High-level waste characterization at the Hanford Site provides data to support present waste processing operations, tank safety programs, and future waste disposal programs. Quality elements in the high-level waste characterization program will be presented by following a sample through the data quality objective, sampling, laboratory analysis and data review process. Transition from production to cleanup has resulted in changes in quality systems and program; the changes, as well as other issues in these quality programs, will be described. Laboratory assessment through quality control and performance evaluation programs will be described, and data assessments in the laboratory and final reporting in the tank characterization reports will be discussed.

  11. High-Q CMOS-integrated photonic crystal microcavity devices.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Karan K; Orcutt, Jason S; Tehar-Zahav, Ofer; Sternberg, Zvi; Bafrali, Reha; Meade, Roy; Ram, Rajeev J

    2014-01-01

    Integrated optical resonators are necessary or beneficial in realizations of various functions in scaled photonic platforms, including filtering, modulation, and detection in classical communication systems, optical sensing, as well as addressing and control of solid state emitters for quantum technologies. Although photonic crystal (PhC) microresonators can be advantageous to the more commonly used microring devices due to the former's low mode volumes, fabrication of PhC cavities has typically relied on electron-beam lithography, which precludes integration with large-scale and reproducible CMOS fabrication. Here, we demonstrate wavelength-scale polycrystalline silicon (pSi) PhC microresonators with Qs up to 60,000 fabricated within a bulk CMOS process. Quasi-1D resonators in lateral p-i-n structures allow for resonant defect-state photodetection in all-silicon devices, exhibiting voltage-dependent quantum efficiencies in the range of a few 10 s of %, few-GHz bandwidths, and low dark currents, in devices with loaded Qs in the range of 4,300-9,300; one device, for example, exhibited a loaded Q of 4,300, 25% quantum efficiency (corresponding to a responsivity of 0.31 A/W), 3 GHz bandwidth, and 30 nA dark current at a reverse bias of 30 V. This work demonstrates the possibility for practical integration of PhC microresonators with active electro-optic capability into large-scale silicon photonic systems.

  12. High-Q CMOS-integrated photonic crystal microcavity devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Karan K.; Orcutt, Jason S.; Tehar-Zahav, Ofer; Sternberg, Zvi; Bafrali, Reha; Meade, Roy; Ram, Rajeev J.

    2014-02-01

    Integrated optical resonators are necessary or beneficial in realizations of various functions in scaled photonic platforms, including filtering, modulation, and detection in classical communication systems, optical sensing, as well as addressing and control of solid state emitters for quantum technologies. Although photonic crystal (PhC) microresonators can be advantageous to the more commonly used microring devices due to the former's low mode volumes, fabrication of PhC cavities has typically relied on electron-beam lithography, which precludes integration with large-scale and reproducible CMOS fabrication. Here, we demonstrate wavelength-scale polycrystalline silicon (pSi) PhC microresonators with Qs up to 60,000 fabricated within a bulk CMOS process. Quasi-1D resonators in lateral p-i-n structures allow for resonant defect-state photodetection in all-silicon devices, exhibiting voltage-dependent quantum efficiencies in the range of a few 10 s of %, few-GHz bandwidths, and low dark currents, in devices with loaded Qs in the range of 4,300-9,300 one device, for example, exhibited a loaded Q of 4,300, 25% quantum efficiency (corresponding to a responsivity of 0.31 A/W), 3 GHz bandwidth, and 30 nA dark current at a reverse bias of 30 V. This work demonstrates the possibility for practical integration of PhC microresonators with active electro-optic capability into large-scale silicon photonic systems.

  13. High-Q CMOS-integrated photonic crystal microcavity devices

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Karan K.; Orcutt, Jason S.; Tehar-Zahav, Ofer; Sternberg, Zvi; Bafrali, Reha; Meade, Roy; Ram, Rajeev J.

    2014-01-01

    Integrated optical resonators are necessary or beneficial in realizations of various functions in scaled photonic platforms, including filtering, modulation, and detection in classical communication systems, optical sensing, as well as addressing and control of solid state emitters for quantum technologies. Although photonic crystal (PhC) microresonators can be advantageous to the more commonly used microring devices due to the former's low mode volumes, fabrication of PhC cavities has typically relied on electron-beam lithography, which precludes integration with large-scale and reproducible CMOS fabrication. Here, we demonstrate wavelength-scale polycrystalline silicon (pSi) PhC microresonators with Qs up to 60,000 fabricated within a bulk CMOS process. Quasi-1D resonators in lateral p-i-n structures allow for resonant defect-state photodetection in all-silicon devices, exhibiting voltage-dependent quantum efficiencies in the range of a few 10 s of %, few-GHz bandwidths, and low dark currents, in devices with loaded Qs in the range of 4,300–9,300; one device, for example, exhibited a loaded Q of 4,300, 25% quantum efficiency (corresponding to a responsivity of 0.31 A/W), 3 GHz bandwidth, and 30 nA dark current at a reverse bias of 30 V. This work demonstrates the possibility for practical integration of PhC microresonators with active electro-optic capability into large-scale silicon photonic systems. PMID:24518161

  14. Estimation of Purcell factor from mode-splitting spectra in an optical microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Oezdemir, Sahin Kaya; Zhu Jiangang; He, Lina; Yang, Lan

    2011-03-15

    We investigate scattering process in an ultrahigh-Q optical microcavity coupled to subwavelength scatterers by introducing splitting quality Q{sub sp}, a dimensionless parameter defined as the ratio of the scatterer-induced mode splitting to the total loss of the coupled system. A simple relation is introduced to directly estimate the Purcell factor from single-shot measurement of transmission spectrum of scatterer-coupled cavity. Experiments with polystyrene (PS) and gold (Au) nanoparticles, erbium ions, and Influenza A virions show that Purcell-factor-enhanced preferential funneling of scattering into the cavity mode takes place regardless of the scatterer type. Experimentally determined highest Q{sub sp} for single PS and Au nanoparticles are 9.4 and 16.19 corresponding to Purcell factors with lower bounds of 353 and 1049, respectively. The highest observed Q{sub sp} was 31.2 for an ensemble of Au particles. These values are the highest Q{sub sp} and Purcell factors reported up to date.

  15. High quality factor, fully switchable terahertz superconducting metasurface

    SciTech Connect

    Scalari, G. Maissen, C.; Faist, J.; Cibella, S.; Leoni, R.

    2014-12-29

    We present a complementary THz metasurface realised with Niobium thin film which displays a quality factor Q = 54 and a fully switchable behaviour as a function of the temperature. The switching behaviour and the high quality factor are due to a careful design of the metasurface aimed at maximising the ohmic losses when the Nb is above the critical temperature and minimising the radiative coupling. The superconductor allows the operation of the cavity with high Q and the use of inductive elements with a high aspect ratio. Comparison with three dimensional finite element simulations highlights the crucial role of the inductive elements and of the kinetic inductance of the Cooper pairs in achieving the high quality factor and the high field enhancement.

  16. Concrete Waste Recycling Process for High Quality Aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikura, Takeshi; Fujii, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-15

    Large amount of concrete waste generates during nuclear power plant (NPP) dismantling. Non-contaminated concrete waste is assumed to be disposed in a landfill site, but that will not be the solution especially in the future, because of decreasing tendency of the site availability and natural resources. Concerning concrete recycling, demand for roadbeds and backfill tends to be less than the amount of dismantled concrete generated in a single rural site, and conventional recycled aggregate is limited of its use to non-structural concrete, because of its inferior quality to ordinary natural aggregate. Therefore, it is vital to develop high quality recycled aggregate for general uses of dismantled concrete. If recycled aggregate is available for high structural concrete, the dismantling concrete is recyclable as aggregate for industry including nuclear field. Authors developed techniques on high quality aggregate reclamation for large amount of concrete generated during NPP decommissioning. Concrete of NPP buildings has good features for recycling aggregate; large quantity of high quality aggregate from same origin, record keeping of the aggregate origin, and little impurities in dismantled concrete such as wood and plastics. The target of recycled aggregate in this development is to meet the quality criteria for NPP concrete as prescribed in JASS 5N 'Specification for Nuclear Power Facility Reinforced Concrete' and JASS 5 'Specification for Reinforced Concrete Work'. The target of recycled aggregate concrete is to be comparable performance with ordinary aggregate concrete. The high quality recycled aggregate production techniques are assumed to apply for recycling for large amount of non-contaminated concrete. These techniques can also be applied for slightly contaminated concrete dismantled from radiological control area (RCA), together with free release survey. In conclusion: a technology on dismantled concrete recycling for high quality aggregate was developed

  17. Realization of high quality production schedules: Structuring quality factors via iteration of user specification processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamazaki, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an architecture for realizing high quality production schedules. Although quality is one of the most important aspects of production scheduling, it is difficult, even for a user, to specify precisely. However, it is also true that the decision as to whether a scheduler is good or bad can only be made by the user. This paper proposes the following: (1) the quality of a schedule can be represented in the form of quality factors, i.e. constraints and objectives of the domain, and their structure; (2) quality factors and their structure can be used for decision making at local decision points during the scheduling process; and (3) that they can be defined via iteration of user specification processes.

  18. A Procedure for High Resolution Satellite Imagery Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Mattia; De Vendictis, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Data products generated from High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) are routinely evaluated during the so-called in-orbit test period, in order to verify if their quality fits the desired features and, if necessary, to obtain the image correction parameters to be used at the ground processing center. Nevertheless, it is often useful to have tools to evaluate image quality also at the final user level. Image quality is defined by some parameters, such as the radiometric resolution and its accuracy, represented by the noise level, and the geometric resolution and sharpness, described by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). This paper proposes a procedure to evaluate these image quality parameters; the procedure was implemented in a suitable software and tested on high resolution imagery acquired by the QuickBird, WorldView-1 and Cartosat-1 satellites. PMID:22412312

  19. Quality of life and the high-dependency unit.

    PubMed

    Brooks, N

    2000-02-01

    This study was designed to identify and measure the patients' perspective of the concept quality of life within the context of a high-dependency unit (HDU). Data were collected in two phases. In phase one, 55 patients were interviewed, which resulted in the concept clarification of quality of life as: physical, social, psychological and family/friends. In phase two, 51 patients undertook quality-of-life assessment using validated instruments the Quality of Life Index (Ferrans & Powers 1985) and the Global Quality of Life Scale (Hyland & Sodergren 1997). Post-HDU patients demonstrated improvements upon pre-admission scores in both instruments (the social domain in the quality of life index being the exception), although this only reached statistical significance P<0.05 in the overall index score and within the domains of health and family. When exploring variables of age and severity of illness (Apache 2 score, Knaus et al. 1980) it was the people who were older and physiologically compromised to an increased extent (P<0.05) who demonstrated higher levels of satisfaction with their resulting quality of life. This study has been successful in providing patients with an opportunity to participate more actively in service evaluation and has identified the need for future evaluation of HDUs to move beyond physiological measures, to incorporate the impact that illness leading to admission to an HDU has upon the patients' ability to function and their resulting quality of life. PMID:10790712

  20. Developing Visions of High-Quality Mathematics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munter, Charles

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces an interview-based instrument that was created for the purposes of characterizing the visions of high-quality mathematics instruction of teachers, principals, mathematics coaches, and district leaders and tracking changes in those visions over time. The instrument models trajectories of perceptions of high-quality…

  1. Physical analysis of the response properties of porous silicon microcavity biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chao; Rong, Guoguang; Xu, Junteng; Pan, Shengfei; Zhu, Yongxin

    2012-04-01

    Porous silicon possesses great potential in developing label-free biosensors of high sensitivity. In this work, a well-tuned resonant structure or microcavity is fabricated, and based on it, an intensity-interrogated sensing technique is thoroughly investigated. Using glucose as a target, this method is demonstrated to be advantageous in lowering detection limit while achieving high reliability. In this experiment the limit is extended from approximately 7×10-4RIU to 7×10-5RIU, compared with the redshift method. We also elaborate the physical mechanisms in the sensing process, which give rise to the aberration of reflectivity variation when different procedures (i.e. dynamic vs. static) are executed. It is postulated to be caused by concentration profile change in diffusion boundary layer in response to flow rate difference. We also find that the response time keeps a steady low value before ramping up in extremely low concentration sensing schemes. We arbitrarily cut the response time vs. concentration curve into two regimes, which are dominated by relatively high adsorption rate and slow mass diffusion. In the last part, tailing effect is investigated and eliminated by increasing flow rate. The theory will be instructive in achieving optimum results in operations where physisorption in the porous material plays an important role.

  2. Process to Continuously Melt, Refine and Cast High Quality Steel

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to conduct research and development targeted at designing a revolutionary steelmaking process. This process will deliver high quality steel from scrap to the casting mold in one continuous process and will be safer, more productive, and less capital intensive to build and operate than conventional steelmaking. The new process will produce higher quality steel faster than traditional batch processes while consuming less energy and other resources.

  3. Silicon photonic crystal microarrays for high throughput label-free detection of lung cancer cell line lysates with sensitivity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Gemmill, Robert M.; Chen, Ray T.

    2013-03-01

    Detection of biomolecules on microarrays based on label-free on-chip optical biosensors is very attractive since this format avoids complex chemistries caused by steric hindrance of labels. Application areas include the detection of cancers and allergens, and food-borne pathogens to name a few. We have demonstrated photonic crystal microcavity biosensors with high sensitivity down to 1pM concentrations (67pg/ml). High sensitivities were achieved by slow light engineering which reduced the radiation loss and increased the stored energy in the photonic crystal microcavity resonance mode. Resonances with high quality factor Q~26,760 in liquid ambient, coupled with larger optical mode volumes allowed enhanced interaction with the analyte biomolecules which resulted in sensitivities down to 10 cells per micro-liter to lung cancer cell lysates. The specificity of detection was ensured by multiplexed detections from multiple photonic crystal microcavities arrayed on the arms of a multimode interference power splitter. Specific binding interactions and control experiments were performed simultaneously at the same instant of time with the same 60 microliter sample volume. Specificity is further ensured by sandwich assay methods in the multiplexed experiment. Sandwich assay based amplification increased the sensitivity further resulting in the detection of lung cancer cell lysates down to concentrations of 2 cells per micro-liter. The miniaturization enabled by photonic crystal biosensors coupled with waveguide interconnected layout thus offers the potential of high throughput proteomics with high sensitivity and specificity.

  4. Quality of service on high-speed data networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Ezio; Antonelli, Ferruccio

    1995-02-01

    Since the beginning of this century the issue of `quality' has been gaining increasing importance in a number of fields of human activities. For telecommunication services, too, the quality perceived by customers has been taken into account early on as an issue of strategic importance. Whilst for telephony the Quality of Service (QoS) has been already investigated and identified in terms of parameters and related test methodology, the situation for high speed data services (i.e. CBDS/SMDS, Frame Relay, etc.), provided by means of high speed network based on Asynchronous Transfer Moe (ATM) or Metropolitan Area Network technologies, can still be considered `under study'. There is a death of experience not only in terms of measurement instruments and procedures, but also in terms of knowledge of the relationship between the QoS provided at a network level and the quality perceived by the user on his or her terminal. The complexity of the equipment involved in setting up an end-to-end solution based on high speed data communications makes the problems of knowledge and supply of quality very hard to solve. Starting from the experience gained in carrying out high- speed network field trials based on Metropolitan Area Networks and, more recently, on ATM technology, the paper mainly deals with the problem of defining, measuring and then offering a specific QoS. First, the issue of what the user expects from the `high-speed network' is addressed. This analysis is carried out trying to gather what is peculiar to high-speed data communications from the user standpoint. Next, the focus is on how to cope with the requirements due to users' expectations, while carefully considering the basic principles of quality. Finally, a solution is proposed, starting from the experience gained from high speed networks installed in Italy.

  5. Development of L-lactate dehydrogenase biosensor based on porous silicon resonant microcavities as fluorescence enhancers.

    PubMed

    Jenie, S N Aisyiyah; Prieto-Simon, Beatriz; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-12-15

    The up-regulation of L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), an intracellular enzyme present in most of all body tissues, is indicative of several pathological conditions and cellular death. Herein, we demonstrate LDH detection using porous silicon (pSi) microcavities as a luminescence-enhancing optical biosensing platform. Non-fluorescent resazurin was covalently attached onto the pSi surface via thermal hydrocarbonisation, thermal hydrosylilation and acylation. Each surface modification step was confirmed by means of FTIR and the optical shifts of the resonance wavelength of the microcavity. Thermal hydrocarbonisation also afforded excellent surface stability, ensuring that the resazurin was not reduced on the pSi surface. Using a pSi microcavity biosensor, the fluorescence signal upon detection of LDH was amplified by 10 and 5-fold compared to that of a single layer and a detuned microcavity, respectively, giving a limit of detection of 0.08 U/ml. The biosensor showed a linear response between 0.16 and 6.5 U/ml, covering the concentration range of LDH in normal as well as damaged tissues. The biosensor was selective for LDH and did not produce a signal upon incubation with another NAD-dependant enzyme L-glutamic dehydrogenase. The use of the pSi microcavity as a sensing platform reduced reagent usage by 30% and analysis time threefold compared to the standard LDH assay in solution.

  6. Scalable quantum computing based on stationary spin qubits in coupled quantum dots inside double-sided optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-12-01

    Quantum logic gates are the key elements in quantum computing. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving a scalable and compact quantum computing based on stationary electron-spin qubits, by using the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We design the compact quantum circuits for implementing universal and deterministic quantum gates for electron-spin systems, including the two-qubit CNOT gate and the three-qubit Toffoli gate. They are compact and economic, and they do not require additional electron-spin qubits. Moreover, our devices have good scalability and are attractive as they both are based on solid-state quantum systems and the qubits are stationary. They are feasible with the current experimental technology, and both high fidelity and high efficiency can be achieved when the ratio of the side leakage to the cavity decay is low.

  7. Scalable quantum computing based on stationary spin qubits in coupled quantum dots inside double-sided optical microcavities.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-12-18

    Quantum logic gates are the key elements in quantum computing. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving a scalable and compact quantum computing based on stationary electron-spin qubits, by using the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We design the compact quantum circuits for implementing universal and deterministic quantum gates for electron-spin systems, including the two-qubit CNOT gate and the three-qubit Toffoli gate. They are compact and economic, and they do not require additional electron-spin qubits. Moreover, our devices have good scalability and are attractive as they both are based on solid-state quantum systems and the qubits are stationary. They are feasible with the current experimental technology, and both high fidelity and high efficiency can be achieved when the ratio of the side leakage to the cavity decay is low.

  8. Scalable quantum computing based on stationary spin qubits in coupled quantum dots inside double-sided optical microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-01-01

    Quantum logic gates are the key elements in quantum computing. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving a scalable and compact quantum computing based on stationary electron-spin qubits, by using the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We design the compact quantum circuits for implementing universal and deterministic quantum gates for electron-spin systems, including the two-qubit CNOT gate and the three-qubit Toffoli gate. They are compact and economic, and they do not require additional electron-spin qubits. Moreover, our devices have good scalability and are attractive as they both are based on solid-state quantum systems and the qubits are stationary. They are feasible with the current experimental technology, and both high fidelity and high efficiency can be achieved when the ratio of the side leakage to the cavity decay is low. PMID:25518899

  9. Providing high-quality care in primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Geneau, Robert; Grande, Claudio Del; Denis, Jean-Louis; Hudon, Éveline; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Bonin, Lucie; Duplain, Réjean; Goudreau, Johanne; Hogg, William

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To gain a deeper understanding of how primary care (PC) practices belonging to different models manage resources to provide high-quality care. Design Multiple-case study embedded in a cross-sectional study of a random sample of 37 practices. Setting Three regions of Quebec. Participants Health care professionals and staff of 5 PC practices. Methods Five cases showing above-average results on quality-of-care indicators were purposefully selected to contrast on region, practice size, and PC model. Data were collected using an organizational questionnaire; the Team Climate Inventory, which was completed by health care professionals and staff; and 33 individual interviews. Detailed case histories were written and thematic analysis was performed. Main findings The core common feature of these practices was their ongoing effort to make trade-offs to deliver services that met their vision of high-quality care. These compromises involved the same 3 areas, but to varying degrees depending on clinic characteristics: developing a shared vision of high-quality care; aligning resource use with that vision; and balancing professional aspirations and population needs. The leadership of the physician lead was crucial. The external environment was perceived as a source of pressure and dilemmas rather than as a source of support in these matters. Conclusion Irrespective of their models, PC practices’ pursuit of high-quality care is based on a vision in which accessibility is a key component, balanced by appropriate management of available resources and of external environment expectations. Current PC reforms often create tensions rather than support PC practices in their pursuit of high-quality care. PMID:24829023

  10. Statistics of chaotic resonances in an optical microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Lippolis, Domenico; Li, Ze-Yang; Jiang, Xue-Feng; Gong, Qihuang; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2016-04-01

    Distributions of eigenmodes are widely concerned in both bounded and open systems. In the realm of chaos, counting resonances can characterize the underlying dynamics (regular vs chaotic), and is often instrumental to identify classical-to-quantum correspondence. Here, we study, both theoretically and experimentally, the statistics of chaotic resonances in an optical microcavity with a mixed phase space of both regular and chaotic dynamics. Information on the number of chaotic modes is extracted by counting regular modes, which couple to the former via dynamical tunneling. The experimental data are in agreement with a known semiclassical prediction for the dependence of the number of chaotic resonances on the number of open channels, while they deviate significantly from a purely random-matrix-theory-based treatment, in general. We ascribe this result to the ballistic decay of the rays, which occurs within Ehrenfest time, and importantly, within the time scale of transient chaos. The present approach may provide a general tool for the statistical analysis of chaotic resonances in open systems.

  11. Dissipative soliton protocols in semiconductor microcavities at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, D. V.; Savenko, I. G.; Flayac, H.; Rosanov, N. N.

    2015-08-01

    We consider exciton polaritons in a semiconductor microcavity with a saturable absorber in the growth direction of the heterostructure. This feature promotes additional nonlinear losses of the system with the emergence of bistability of the condensate particles number on the nonresonant (electrical or optical) excitation intensity. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new type of bright spatial dissipative exciton-polariton soliton which emerges in the equilibrium between the regions with different particle density. We develop protocols of soliton creation and destruction. The switch to a solitonlike behavior occurs if the cavity is exposed by a short strong laser pulse with certain energy and duration. We estimate the characteristic times of soliton switch on and off and the time of return to the initial cycle. In particular, we demonstrate surprising narrowing of the spatial profile of the soliton and its vanishing at certain temperature due to interaction of the system with the thermal bath of acoustic phonons. We also address the role of polariton-polariton interaction (Kerr-like nonlinearity) on formation of dissipative solitons and show that the soliton may exist both in its presence and its absence.

  12. Statistics of chaotic resonances in an optical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Lippolis, Domenico; Li, Ze-Yang; Jiang, Xue-Feng; Gong, Qihuang; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2016-04-01

    Distributions of eigenmodes are widely concerned in both bounded and open systems. In the realm of chaos, counting resonances can characterize the underlying dynamics (regular vs chaotic), and is often instrumental to identify classical-to-quantum correspondence. Here, we study, both theoretically and experimentally, the statistics of chaotic resonances in an optical microcavity with a mixed phase space of both regular and chaotic dynamics. Information on the number of chaotic modes is extracted by counting regular modes, which couple to the former via dynamical tunneling. The experimental data are in agreement with a known semiclassical prediction for the dependence of the number of chaotic resonances on the number of open channels, while they deviate significantly from a purely random-matrix-theory-based treatment, in general. We ascribe this result to the ballistic decay of the rays, which occurs within Ehrenfest time, and importantly, within the time scale of transient chaos. The present approach may provide a general tool for the statistical analysis of chaotic resonances in open systems. PMID:27176237

  13. Photonic confinement in laterally structured metal-organic microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Mischok, Andreas Brückner, Robert; Sudzius, Markas; Reinhardt, Christoph; Lyssenko, Vadim G.; Fröb, Hartmut; Leo, Karl

    2014-08-04

    We investigate the formation of optical modes in organic microcavities with an incorporated perforated silver layer. The metal leads to a formation of Tamm-plasmon-polaritons and thus separates the sample into metal-free or metal-containing areas, supporting different resonances. This mode splitting is exploited to confine photons in elliptic holes and triangular cuts, forming distinctive standing wave patterns showing the strong lateral confinement. A comparison with a Maxwell-Bloch based rate equation model clearly shows the nonlinear transition into the lasing regime. The concentration of the electric field density and inhibition of lateral loss channels in turn decreases the lasing threshold by up to one order of magnitude, to 0.1 nJ. By spectroscopic investigation of such a triangular wedge, we observe the transition from the unperturbed cavity state to a strongly confined complex transversal mode. Such a structured silver layer can be utilized in future for charge carrier injection in an electrically driven organic solid state laser.

  14. Statistics of chaotic resonances in an optical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Lippolis, Domenico; Li, Ze-Yang; Jiang, Xue-Feng; Gong, Qihuang; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2016-04-01

    Distributions of eigenmodes are widely concerned in both bounded and open systems. In the realm of chaos, counting resonances can characterize the underlying dynamics (regular vs chaotic), and is often instrumental to identify classical-to-quantum correspondence. Here, we study, both theoretically and experimentally, the statistics of chaotic resonances in an optical microcavity with a mixed phase space of both regular and chaotic dynamics. Information on the number of chaotic modes is extracted by counting regular modes, which couple to the former via dynamical tunneling. The experimental data are in agreement with a known semiclassical prediction for the dependence of the number of chaotic resonances on the number of open channels, while they deviate significantly from a purely random-matrix-theory-based treatment, in general. We ascribe this result to the ballistic decay of the rays, which occurs within Ehrenfest time, and importantly, within the time scale of transient chaos. The present approach may provide a general tool for the statistical analysis of chaotic resonances in open systems.

  15. Organic light-emitting diode microcavities from transparent conducting metal oxide photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Puzzo, Daniel P; Helander, Michael G; O'Brien, Paul G; Wang, Zhibin; Soheilnia, Navid; Kherani, Nazir; Lu, Zhenghong; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2011-04-13

    We report herein on the integration of novel transparent and conducting one-dimensional photonic crystals that consist of periodically alternating layers of spin-coated antimony-doped tin oxide nanoparticles and sputtered tin-doped indium oxide into organic light emitting diode (OLED) microcavities. The large refractive index contrast between the layers due the porosity of the nanoparticle layer led to facile fabrication of dielectric mirrors with intense and broadband reflectivity from structures consisting of only five bilayers. Because our photonic crystals are easily amenable to large scale OLED fabrication and simultaneously selectively reflective as well as electronically conductive, such materials are ideally suited for integration into OLED microcavities. In such a device, the photonic crystal, which represents a direct drop-in replacement for typical ITO anodes, is capable of serving two necessary functions: (i) as one partially reflecting mirror of the optical microcavity; and (ii) as the anode of the diode.

  16. Numerical analysis of pulse signal restoration by stochastic resonance in a buckled microcavity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Heng; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan; Wang, Zhaolu; Han, Jing

    2016-04-20

    A novel scheme is proposed to restore weak pulse signals immersed in noise by stochastic resonance based on photothermal-effect-induced optical bistability in a buckled dome microcavity. The bistable properties of the dome microcavity are analyzed with different initial detuning wavelengths and effective cavity lengths, and bistable transmission can be obtained for input powers in submilliwatt range. A theoretical model is derived to interpret the nonlinear process of pulse signal recovery through double-well potential theory. The cross-correlation coefficient between output signals and pure input pulses is calculated to quantitatively analyze the influence of noise intensity on stochastic resonance. A cross-correlation gain of 7 is obtained, and the noise-hidden signal can be recovered effectively though the buckled dome microcavity with negligible distortion. The simulation results show the potential of using this structure to restore low-level or noise-hidden pulse signals in all-optical integrated systems. PMID:27140110

  17. External pumping of hybrid nanostructures in microcavity with Frenkel and Wannier-Mott excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovskiy, O. A.; Agranovich, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    The exciton-exciton interaction in hybrid nanostructures with resonating Frenkel and Wannier-Mott excitons was investigated in many publications. In microcavity the hybrid nanostructures can be exposed to different types of optical pumping, the most common one being pumping through one of the microcavity side. However, not investigated and thus never been discussed the hybrid excitons generation by pumping of confined quantum wells from the side of empty microcavity without nanostructures in a wave guided configuration. Here, we consider the hybrid excitations in cavity with organic and inorganic quantum wells and with different types of pumping from external source. The frequency dependence for intensity of excitations in hybrid structure is also investigated. The results may be used for search of most effective fluorescence and relaxation processes. The same approach may be used when both quantum wells are organic or inorganic.

  18. Fabry-Perot microcavity sensor for H2-breath-test analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenti, Maria Antonietta; De Sario, Marco; Petruzzelli, V.; D'Orazio, Antonella; Prudenzano, Francesco; de Ceglia, Domenico; Scalora, Michael

    2007-10-01

    Leak detection of hydrogen for medical purposes, based on the monitoring of the optical response of a simple Fabry-Perot microcavity, is proposed to investigate either the occurrence of lactose intolerance, or lactose malabsorption condition. Both pathologic conditions result in bacterial overgrowth in the intestine, which causes increased spontaneous emission of H2 in the human breath. Two sensitivity figures of merit are introduced to inspect changes in the sensor response, and to relate the microcavity response to a pathologic condition, which is strictly related to a different level of exhaled hydrogen. Different sensor configurations using a metal-dielectric microcavity are reported and discussed in order to make the most of the well-known ability of palladium to spontaneously absorb hydrogen.

  19. Non-Hermitian Hamiltonian and Lamb shift in circular dielectric microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyu-Won; Kim, Jaewan; Jeong, Kabgyun

    2016-06-01

    We study the normal modes and quasi-normal modes (QNMs) in circular dielectric microcavities through non-Hermitian Hamiltonian, which come from the modifications due to system-environment coupling. Differences between the two types of modes are studied in detail, including the existence of resonances tails. Numerical calculations of the eigenvalues reveal the Lamb shift in the microcavity due to its interaction with the environment. We also investigate relations between the Lamb shift and quantized angular momentum of the whispering gallery mode as well as the refractive index of the microcavity. For the latter, we make use of the similarity between the Helmholtz equation and the Schrödinger equation, in which the refractive index can be treated as a control parameter of effective potential. Our result can be generalized to other open quantum systems with a potential term.

  20. Superfluidity and collective properties of excitonic polaritons in gapped graphene in a microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Oleg L.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Ziegler, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    We predict the formation and superfluidity of polaritons in an optical microcavity formed by excitons in gapped graphene embedded there and microcavity photons. The Rabi splitting related to the creation of an exciton in a graphene layer in the presence of the band gap is obtained. It is demonstrated that the Rabi splitting decreases when the energy gap increases, while the larger value of the dielectric constant of the microcavity gives a smaller value for the Rabi splitting. The analysis of collective excitations as well as the sound velocity is presented. We show that the superfluid density ns and temperature of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition Tc are decreasing functions of the energy gap.

  1. Realization of Plasmonic Microcavity with Full Transverse and Longitudinal Mode Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ju; Chen, Yue-Gang; Gan, Lin; Xiao, Ting-Hui; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) manipulation is of vital importance to construct ultracompact integrated micro/nano-optical devices and systems. Here we report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a SPP microcavity with full transverse and longitudinal mode selection and control on the surface of gold film. The designed microcavity supports the fundamental and first-order transverse modes of Gaussian mode beam with controllable longitudinal modes, respectively. The transverse mode is determined by two holographic mirrors made from deliberately designed groove patterns via the surface electromagnetic wave holography methodology, while the longitudinal mode is determined by the length of cavity. Both numerical simulations and leaky-wave SPP mode observations confirm the realization of full mode selection in the fabricated cavity. Our work opens up a powerful way to fully explore longitudinal and transverse mode control in SPP microcavities, which will be beneficial for light-matter interaction enhancement, construction of novel SPP nanolaser and microlaser, optical sensing, and optical information processing.

  2. Fabrication of Single-Photon Sources by Use of Pyramidal Quantum-Dot Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rülke, Daniel; Reinheimer, C.; Schaadt, D. M.; Kalt, H.; Hetterich, M.

    In recent years the interest in single-photon emitters for quantum-optical applications is strongly increasing. For this purpose, we have investigated In(Ga)As quantum-dots (QDs) embedded in reversed pyramidal GaAs microcavities (Fig. 52.1a). Even though it has been shown recently, that such cavities can act as high-Q optical resonators [1], our focus has been on the directional radiation of the QD emission due to reflection at the facets of the reversed pyramids. With QDs embedded close to the vertex of the four facets and a base angle adaptable between 35° and 55° the pyramids can be perceived as a kind of retroreflector. Since the QD layer is inserted near the tip of the predicted reversed pyramid during molecular-beam epitaxial (MBE) growth, the average number of QDs inside the cavity can be reduced to one, depending on the size of the pyramid and density of QDs. The pyramidal cavities are shaped after MBE growth by a wet-chemical etching process with a solution of H3PO4, H2O2 and H2O [2, 3].

  3. Near-infrared exciton-polaritons in strongly coupled single-walled carbon nanotube microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Arko; Tropf, Laura; Zakharko, Yuriy; Zaumseil, Jana; Gather, Malte C.

    2016-10-01

    Exciton-polaritons form upon strong coupling between electronic excitations of a material and photonic states of a surrounding microcavity. In organic semiconductors the special nature of excited states leads to particularly strong coupling and facilitates condensation of exciton-polaritons at room temperature, which may lead to electrically pumped organic polariton lasers. However, charge carrier mobility and photo-stability in currently used materials is limited and exciton-polariton emission so far has been restricted to visible wavelengths. Here, we demonstrate strong light-matter coupling in the near infrared using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a polymer matrix and a planar metal-clad cavity. By exploiting the exceptional oscillator strength and sharp excitonic transition of (6,5) SWCNTs, we achieve large Rabi splitting (>110 meV), efficient polariton relaxation and narrow band emission (<15 meV). Given their high charge carrier mobility and excellent photostability, SWCNTs represent a promising new avenue towards practical exciton-polariton devices operating at telecommunication wavelengths.

  4. Enhanced photoconductivity and fine response tuning in nanostructured porous silicon microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urteaga, R.; Marín, O.; Acquaroli, L. N.; Comedi, D.; Schmidt, J. A.; Koropecki, R. R.

    2009-05-01

    We used light confinement in optical microcavities to achieve a strong enhancement and a precise wavelength tunability of the electrical photoconductance of nanostructured porous silicon (PS). The devices consist of a periodic array of alternating PS layers, electrochemically etched to have high and low porosities - and therefore distinct dielectric functions. A central layer having a doubled thickness breaks up the symmetry of the one-dimensional photonic structure, producing a resonance in the photonic band gap that is clearly observed in the reflectance spectrum. The devices were transferred to a glass coated with a transparent SnO2 electrode, while an Al contact was evaporated on its back side. The electrical conductance was measured as a function of the photon energy. A strong enhancement of the conductance is obtained in a narrow (17nm FWHM) band peaking at the resonance. We present experimental results of the angular dependence of this photoconductance peak energy, and propose an explanation of the conductivity behaviour supported by calculations of the internal electromagnetic field. These devices are promising candidates for finely tuned photoresistors with potential application as chemical sensors and biosensors.

  5. Cooling of Electronically-Excited He2 Molecules in a Microcavity Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Rui; Houlahan, Thomas J., Jr.; Eden, J. Gary

    2016-06-01

    Helium dimers in the d3Σ+u excited electronic state with potential energy >24 eV and radiative lifetime of 25 ns have been generated in a microcavity plasma jet and rotationally cooled by supersonic expansion in vacuum. The dynamic process of cooling is recorded by imaging the axis of expansion onto the slit of Czerny-Turner spectrometer, yielding spatial-temporal spectrograms of d3Σ+u→b3Πg (v', v'')=(0, 0) emission. Analysis of the data shows the spatial-temporal evolution of the rotational temperature to be a damped sinusoid that reaches a minimum value of 100K. This reproducible behavior is attributed to the reflection of electrons from a virtual cathode located downstream of the nozzle and indicates that the spatially-averaged electron density is 108 cm-3. We present this observed rotational temperature oscillation during the supersonic cooling process as an example of the potential of our supersonic microplasma expansion as a tool to explore physical dynamics in diatomic molecules having high excitation energies and small lifetimes.

  6. Near-infrared exciton-polaritons in strongly coupled single-walled carbon nanotube microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Arko; Tropf, Laura; Zakharko, Yuriy; Zaumseil, Jana; Gather, Malte C.

    2016-01-01

    Exciton-polaritons form upon strong coupling between electronic excitations of a material and photonic states of a surrounding microcavity. In organic semiconductors the special nature of excited states leads to particularly strong coupling and facilitates condensation of exciton-polaritons at room temperature, which may lead to electrically pumped organic polariton lasers. However, charge carrier mobility and photo-stability in currently used materials is limited and exciton-polariton emission so far has been restricted to visible wavelengths. Here, we demonstrate strong light-matter coupling in the near infrared using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a polymer matrix and a planar metal-clad cavity. By exploiting the exceptional oscillator strength and sharp excitonic transition of (6,5) SWCNTs, we achieve large Rabi splitting (>110 meV), efficient polariton relaxation and narrow band emission (<15 meV). Given their high charge carrier mobility and excellent photostability, SWCNTs represent a promising new avenue towards practical exciton-polariton devices operating at telecommunication wavelengths. PMID:27721454

  7. Designing High Quality Research in Special Education: Group Experimental Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gersten, Russell; Lloyd, John Wills; Baker, Scott

    This paper, a result of a series of meetings of researchers, discusses critical issues related to the conduct of high-quality intervention research in special education using experimental and quasi-experimental designs that compare outcomes for different groups of students. It stresses the need to balance design components that satisfy laboratory…

  8. Novel, high-quality surface plasmon resonance microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Thariani, Rahber; Yager, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance microscope capable of high-quality speckle-free imaging has been designed that uses a laser as a source. An inexpensive acoustic transducer is used to reduce speckle and other image artifacts arising from the use of illumination from an inexpensive laser pointer. The microscope is described and operation of the system demonstrated.

  9. High-quality Health Information Provision for Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hong-Sheng; Ma, Jing-Jian; Li, Mu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: High-quality information provision can allow stroke patients to effectively participate in healthcare decision-making, better manage the stroke, and make a good recovery. In this study, we reviewed information needs of stroke patients, methods for providing information to patients, and considerations needed by the information providers. Data Sources: The literature concerning or including information provision for patients with stroke in English was collected from PubMed published from 1990 to 2015. Study Selection: We included all the relevant articles on information provision for stroke patients in English, with no limitation of study design. Results: Stroke is a major public health concern worldwide. High-quality and effective health information provision plays an essential role in helping patients to actively take part in decision-making and healthcare, and empowering them to effectively self-manage their long-standing chronic conditions. Different methods for providing information to patients have their relative merits and suitability, and as a result, the effective strategies taken by health professionals may include providing high-quality information, meeting patients’ individual needs, using suitable methods in providing information, and maintaining active involvement of patients. Conclusions: It is suggested that to enable stroke patients to access high-quality health information, greater efforts need to be made to ensure patients to receive accurate and current evidence-based information which meets their individual needs. Health professionals should use suitable information delivery methods, and actively involve stroke patients in information provision. PMID:27569241

  10. [Spectrum characterization and fine structure of copper phthalocyanine-doped TiO2 microcavities].

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-lin; Zhang, Xin-yi; Zhong, Ju-hua; Zhu, Yi-hua; He, Bo; Wei, Shi-qiang

    2007-10-01

    Copper phthalocyanine-doped TiO2 microcavities were fabricated by chemistry method. Their spectrum characterization was studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, and their fine structure was analyzed by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The results show that there is interaction of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and TiO2 microcavities after TiO2 microcavities was doped with CuPc. For example, there is absorption at 900.76 cm(-1) in FTIR spectra, and the "red shift" of both OH vibration at 3392.75 cm(-1) and CH vibration at 2848.83 cm(-1). There exist definite peak shifts and intensity changes in infrared absorption in the C-C or C-N vibration in the planar phthalocyanine ring, the winding vibration of C-H inside and C-N outside plane of benzene ring. In Raman spectrum, there are 403.4, 592.1 and 679.1 cm(-1) characterized peaks of TiO2 in CuPc-doped TiO2 microcavities, but their wave-numbers show shifts to anatase TiO2. The vibration peaks at 1586.8 and 1525.6 cm(-1) show that there exists the composite material of CuPc and TiO2. These changes are related to the plane tropism of the molecule structure of copper phthalocyanine. XAFS showed tetrahedron TiO4 structure of Ti in TiO2 microcavities doped with copper phthalocyanine, and the changes of inner "medial distances" and the surface structure of TiO2 microcavities.

  11. Method for producing high quality thin layer films on substrates

    DOEpatents

    Strongin, Myron; Ruckman, Mark; Strongin, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    A method for producing high quality, thin layer films of inorganic compounds upon the surface of a substrate is disclosed. The method involves condensing a mixture of preselected molecular precursors on the surface of a substrate and subsequently inducing the formation of reactive species using high energy photon or charged particle irradiation. The reactive species react with one another to produce a film of the desired compound upon the surface of the substrate.

  12. Method for producing high quality thin layer films on substrates

    DOEpatents

    Strongin, M.; Ruckman, M.; Strongin, D.

    1994-04-26

    A method for producing high quality, thin layer films of inorganic compounds upon the surface of a substrate is disclosed. The method involves condensing a mixture of preselected molecular precursors on the surface of a substrate and subsequently inducing the formation of reactive species using high energy photon or charged particle irradiation. The reactive species react with one another to produce a film of the desired compound upon the surface of the substrate. 4 figures.

  13. Highly qualified does not equal high quality: A study of urban stakeholders' perceptions of quality in science teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Rommel Joseph

    By employing qualitative methods, this study sought to determine the perceptions that urban stakeholders hold about what characteristics should distinguish a high school science teacher whom they would consider to demonstrate high quality in science teaching. A maximum variation sample of six science teachers, three school administrators, six parents and six students from a large urban public school district were interviewed using semi-structured, in-depth interview techniques. From these data, a list of observable characteristics which urban stakeholders hold as evidence of high quality in science teaching was generated. Observational techniques were utilized to determine the extent to which six urban high school science teachers, who meet the NCLB Act criteria for being "highly qualified", actually possessed the characteristics which these stakeholders hold as evidence of high quality in science teaching. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyze the data set. The findings suggest that urban stakeholders perceive that a high school science teacher who demonstrates high quality in science teaching should be knowledgeable about their subject matter, their student population, and should be resourceful; should possess an academic background in science and professional experience in science teaching; should exhibit professionalism, a passion for science and teaching, and a dedication to teaching and student learning; should be skillful in planning and preparing science lessons and in organizing the classroom, in presenting the subject matter to students, in conducting a variety of hands-on activities, and in managing a classroom; and should assess whether students complete class goals and objectives, and provide feedback about grades for students promptly. The findings further reveal that some of the urban high school science teachers who were deemed to be "highly qualified", as defined by the NCLB Act, engaged in practices that threatened quality in science

  14. Output polarization characteristics of a GaN microcavity diode polariton laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Aniruddha; Baten, Md Zunaid; Iorsh, Ivan; Frost, Thomas; Kavokin, Alexey; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2016-07-01

    We report the steady state output polarization characteristics of GaN-based microcavity polariton lasers operated with electrical injection at room temperature. The output is unpolarized below the nonlinear threshold injection current and is linearly polarized above it with a maximum degree of polarization of ˜22 % . The results have been analyzed theoretically, and the calculated results are in agreement with the measured data. We have also measured the polarization-resolved output light current characteristics, wherein a distinct lowering of the non-linear threshold is observed in one device. This is interpreted in terms of spatially inhomogeneous lifting of degeneracy and polarization splitting in the microcavity.

  15. An All Fiber Intrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer Based on an Air-Microcavity

    PubMed Central

    Jáuregui-Vázquez, Daniel; Estudillo-Ayala, Julián M.; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; Vargas-Rodríguez, Everardo; Sierra-Hernández, Juan M.; Hernández-García, Juan C.; Mata-Chávez, Ruth I.

    2013-01-01

    In this work an Intrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (IFPI) based on an air-microcavity is presented. Here the air microcavity, with silica walls, is formed at a segment of a hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF), which is fusion spliced with a single mode fiber (SMF). Moreover, the spectral response of the IFPI is experimentally characterized and some results are provided. Finally, the viability to use the IFPI to implement a simple, compact size, and low cost refractive index sensor is briefly analyzed. PMID:23673676

  16. Optical properties of a silicon-nanocrystal-based-microcavity prepared by evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grün, M.; Miska, P.; Devaux, X.; Rinnert, H.; Vergnat, M.

    2011-06-01

    A silicon-based microcavity constituted by a SiO/SiO 2 multilayer and Si/SiO 2 Bragg mirrors was prepared by the evaporation technique. We give details about the microcavity realization process. The optical properties of the Si nanocrystals, obtained by the thermal dissociation of the SiO layers, were analyzed by continuous-wave and angle-resolved photoluminescence (PL) experiments. The results show a strong anisotropy of the light emitted by the silicon nanocrystals for a cavity constituted by mirrors with only two distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR).

  17. Strong coupling and polariton lasing in Te based microcavities embedding (Cd,Zn)Te quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Rousset, J.-G. Piętka, B.; Król, M.; Mirek, R.; Lekenta, K.; Szczytko, J.; Borysiuk, J.; Suffczyński, J.; Kazimierczuk, T.; Goryca, M.; Smoleński, T.; Kossacki, P.; Nawrocki, M.; Pacuski, W.

    2015-11-16

    We report on properties of an optical microcavity based on (Cd,Zn,Mg)Te layers and embedding (Cd,Zn)Te quantum wells. The key point of the structure design is the lattice matching of the whole structure to MgTe, which eliminates the internal strain and allows one to embed an arbitrary number of unstrained quantum wells in the microcavity. We evidence the strong light-matter coupling regime already for the structure containing a single quantum well. Embedding four unstrained quantum wells results in further enhancement of the exciton-photon coupling and the polariton lasing in the strong coupling regime.

  18. Hydrostatic pressure sensor based on micro-cavities developed by the catastrophic fuse effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingues, M. F.; Paixão, T.; Mesquita, E.; Alberto, N.; Antunes, P.; Varum, H.; André, P. S.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, an optical fiber hydrostatic pressure sensor based in Fabry-Perot micro-cavities is presented. These micro structures were generated by the recycling of optical fiber previously damaged by the fiber fuse effect, resulting in a cost effective solution when compared with the traditional methods used to produce similar micro-cavities. The developed sensor was tested for pressures ranging from 20.0 to 190.0 cmH2O and a sensitivity of 53.7 +/- 2.6 pm/cmH2O for hydrostatic pressures below to 100 cmH2O was achieved.

  19. An all fiber intrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer based on an air-microcavity.

    PubMed

    Jáuregui-Vázquez, Daniel; Estudillo-Ayala, Julián M; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; Vargas-Rodríguez, Everardo; Sierra-Hernández, Juan M; Hernández-García, Juan C; Mata-Chávez, Ruth I

    2013-01-01

    In this work an Intrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (IFPI) based on an air-microcavity is presented. Here the air microcavity, with silica walls, is formed at a segment of a hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF), which is fusion spliced with a single mode fiber (SMF). Moreover, the spectral response of the IFPI is experimentally characterized and some results are provided. Finally, the viability to use the IFPI to implement a simple, compact size, and low cost refractive index sensor is briefly analyzed. PMID:23673676

  20. Detection of High Quality Rainfall Data to Improve Flood Resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, T. C.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Schertzer, D. J.; Lovejoy, S.

    2012-12-01

    European flood management systems require reliable rainfall statistics, e.g. the Intensity-duration-Frequency curves for shorter and shorter durations and for a larger and larger range of return periods. Preliminary studies showed that the number of floods depends on the quality of available data, e.g. the time resolution quality. These facts suggest that a particular attention should be paid to the rainfall data quality in order to adequately investigate flood risk aiming to achieve flood resilience. The potential consequences of changes in measuring and recording techniques have been somewhat discussed in the literature with respect to a possible introduction of artificial inhomogeneities in time series. In this direction, we developed a first version of a SERQUAL procedure to automatically detect the effective time resolution of highly mixed data. We show that most of the rainfall time series have a lower recording frequency than that is assumed. This question is particularly important for operational hydrology, because an error on the effective recording high frequency introduces biases in the corresponding statistics. It is therefore essential to quantify the quality of the rainfall time series before their use. Due to the fact that the multiple scales and possible scaling behaviour of hydrological data are particularly important for many applications, including flood resilience research, this paper first investigates the sensitivity of the scaling estimates and methods to the deficit of short duration rainfall data, and consequently propose a few simple criteria for a reliable evaluation of the data quality. The SERQUAL procedure enable us to extract high quality sub-series from longer time series that will be much more reliable to calibrate and/or validate short duration quantiles and hydrological models.

  1. Hyper CNOT and Hyper Bell-State Analysis Assisted by Quantum Dots in Double-Side Optical Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yong; Deng, Yun; Li, Hui-Ran; Luo, Ming-Xing

    2016-03-01

    There are many important works about the construction of universal quantum logic gates which are key elements in quantum computation. However, most of them focus on quantum transformations on the same degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems. We propose a CNOT gate performed on the polarization DOF and spatial mode DOF of one photon system assisted by a quantum dot in double-side optical microcavities. This hyper CNOT gate is implemented by using spin selective photon reflection from the cavity, without auxiliary spatial modes or polarization modes. This interface can also be used to construct a hyper photonic Bell-state analyzer. The high fidelities of the hyper CNOT gates may be achieved with low side leakage and cavity loss.

  2. Teleportation of a Toffoli gate among distant solid-state qubits with quantum dots embedded in optical microcavities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shi; Cui, Wen-Xue; Wang, Dong-Yang; Bai, Cheng-Hua; Guo, Qi; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2015-01-01

    Teleportation of unitary operations can be viewed as a quantum remote control. The remote realization of robust multiqubit logic gates among distant long-lived qubit registers is a key challenge for quantum computation and quantum information processing. Here we propose a simple and deterministic scheme for teleportation of a Toffoli gate among three spatially separated electron spin qubits in optical microcavities by using local linear optical operations, an auxiliary electron spin, two circularly-polarized entangled photon pairs, photon measurements, and classical communication. We assess the feasibility of the scheme and show that the scheme can be achieved with high average fidelity under the current technology. The scheme opens promising perspectives for constructing long-distance quantum communication and quantum computation networks with solid-state qubits. PMID:26225781

  3. A robust scheme for implementing optimal economical phase-covariant quantum cloning with quantum-dot spins in optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Zhao; Ji, Yan-Qiang; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2014-03-01

    We present a scheme to implement an optimal symmetric 1→2 economical phase-covariant quantum cloning machine (EPCCM) with quantum dot (QD) spins in optical microcavities by using a photon as a data bus. The EPCCM copies deterministically the quantum states on southern or northern Bloch hemisphere from one QD spin to two with an optimal fidelity. By analyzing the fidelity of quantum cloning we confirm that it is robust against the dissipation caused by cavity decay, side leakage and dipole decay. For a strong coupling regime, the cloning fidelity approaches a stable optimal bound. Even in a weak coupling regime, it can also achieve a satisfactory high value close to the optimal bound.

  4. Effective preparation of the N-dimension spin Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state with quantum dots embedded in microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yi-Hao; Xia, Yan; Lu, Pei-Min; Song, Jie

    2016-07-01

    We propose a scheme for preparation of the N-dimension spin Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state by exploiting quantum dots (QDs) embedded in microcavities. Numerically analysed results show that with the spin-selective photon reflection from the cavity, we can complete the scheme assisted by one polarized photon with high fidelity and 100% successful probability in principle. Furthermore, the set-up is just composed of simple linear optical elements, delay lines and conventional photon detectors, which are feasible with existing experimental technology. Moreover, QDs have numerous admirable features in weak-coupling regime, which are practicable in realistic cavity quantum electrodynamics system shown by previous numerical simulations and experiments. Therefore, our scheme might be realized in near future.

  5. Teleportation of a Toffoli gate among distant solid-state qubits with quantum dots embedded in optical microcavities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shi; Cui, Wen-Xue; Wang, Dong-Yang; Bai, Cheng-Hua; Guo, Qi; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2015-01-01

    Teleportation of unitary operations can be viewed as a quantum remote control. The remote realization of robust multiqubit logic gates among distant long-lived qubit registers is a key challenge for quantum computation and quantum information processing. Here we propose a simple and deterministic scheme for teleportation of a Toffoli gate among three spatially separated electron spin qubits in optical microcavities by using local linear optical operations, an auxiliary electron spin, two circularly-polarized entangled photon pairs, photon measurements, and classical communication. We assess the feasibility of the scheme and show that the scheme can be achieved with high average fidelity under the current technology. The scheme opens promising perspectives for constructing long-distance quantum communication and quantum computation networks with solid-state qubits.

  6. Coupling of a single diamond nanocrystal to a whispering-gallery microcavity: Photon transport benefitting from Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Chun; Xiao, Yun-Feng; Li, Bei-Bei; Jiang, Xue-Feng; Li, Yan; Gong, Qihuang

    2011-07-01

    We study the Rayleigh scattering induced by a diamond nanocrystal in a whispering-gallery-microcavity-waveguide coupling system and find that it plays a significant role in the photon transportation. On the one hand, this study provides insight into future solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics aimed at understanding strong-coupling physics. On the other hand, benefitting from this Rayleigh scattering, effects such as dipole-induced transparency and strong photon antibunching can occur simultaneously. As a potential application, this system can function as a high-efficiency photon turnstile. In contrast to B. Dayan [ScienceSCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1152261 319, 1062 (2008)], the photon turnstiles proposed here are almost immune to the nanocrystal’s azimuthal position.

  7. Coupling of a single diamond nanocrystal to a whispering-gallery microcavity: Photon transport benefitting from Rayleigh scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yongchun; Xiao Yunfeng; Li Beibei; Jiang Xuefeng; Li Yan; Gong Qihuang

    2011-07-15

    We study the Rayleigh scattering induced by a diamond nanocrystal in a whispering-gallery-microcavity-waveguide coupling system and find that it plays a significant role in the photon transportation. On the one hand, this study provides insight into future solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics aimed at understanding strong-coupling physics. On the other hand, benefitting from this Rayleigh scattering, effects such as dipole-induced transparency and strong photon antibunching can occur simultaneously. As a potential application, this system can function as a high-efficiency photon turnstile. In contrast to B. Dayan et al. [Science 319, 1062 (2008)], the photon turnstiles proposed here are almost immune to the nanocrystal's azimuthal position.

  8. Teleportation of a Toffoli gate among distant solid-state qubits with quantum dots embedded in optical microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shi; Cui, Wen-Xue; Wang, Dong-Yang; Bai, Cheng-Hua; Guo, Qi; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2015-01-01

    Teleportation of unitary operations can be viewed as a quantum remote control. The remote realization of robust multiqubit logic gates among distant long-lived qubit registers is a key challenge for quantum computation and quantum information processing. Here we propose a simple and deterministic scheme for teleportation of a Toffoli gate among three spatially separated electron spin qubits in optical microcavities by using local linear optical operations, an auxiliary electron spin, two circularly-polarized entangled photon pairs, photon measurements, and classical communication. We assess the feasibility of the scheme and show that the scheme can be achieved with high average fidelity under the current technology. The scheme opens promising perspectives for constructing long-distance quantum communication and quantum computation networks with solid-state qubits. PMID:26225781

  9. Compact pulley-type microring resonator with high quality factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dong-Po; Lu, Jyun-Hong; Chen, Chii-Chang; Lee, Chien-Chieh; Lin, Chu-En; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2014-11-01

    A pulley-type microring resonator with ultra-small dimensions and ultra-high quality factor on a silicon-on-insulator wafer is fabricated and characterized. Simulation results show that the bending loss of the pulley-type microring resonator can be diminished by wrapping the curved waveguide around the microring, and that the energy loss from the output port can be decreased by tuning the width of the bus waveguide to achieve destructive interference. A quality factor of 1.73 × 105 is obtained in this experiment. The compact size of the pulley-type microring resonator with low bending loss is suitable for an integrated optical circuit.

  10. High Quality Factor Mechanical Resonators Based on WSe2 Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Morell, Nicolas; Reserbat-Plantey, Antoine; Tsioutsios, Ioannis; Schädler, Kevin G; Dubin, François; Koppens, Frank H L; Bachtold, Adrian

    2016-08-10

    Suspended monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) are membranes that combine ultralow mass and exceptional optical properties, making them intriguing materials for opto-mechanical applications. However, the low measured quality factor of TMD resonators has been a roadblock so far. Here, we report an ultrasensitive optical readout of monolayer TMD resonators that allows us to reveal their mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures. We find that the quality factor of monolayer WSe2 resonators greatly increases below room temperature, reaching values as high as 1.6 × 10(4) at liquid nitrogen temperature and 4.7 × 10(4) at liquid helium temperature. This surpasses the quality factor of monolayer graphene resonators with similar surface areas. Upon cooling the resonator, the resonant frequency increases significantly due to the thermal contraction of the WSe2 lattice. These measurements allow us to experimentally study the thermal expansion coefficient of WSe2 monolayers for the first time. High Q-factors are also found in resonators based on MoS2 and MoSe2 monolayers. The high quality-factor found in this work opens new possibilities for coupling mechanical vibrational states to two-dimensional excitons, valley pseudospins, and single quantum emitters and for quantum opto-mechanical experiments based on the Casimir interaction. PMID:27459399

  11. High Quality Factor Mechanical Resonators Based on WSe2 Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Suspended monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) are membranes that combine ultralow mass and exceptional optical properties, making them intriguing materials for opto-mechanical applications. However, the low measured quality factor of TMD resonators has been a roadblock so far. Here, we report an ultrasensitive optical readout of monolayer TMD resonators that allows us to reveal their mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures. We find that the quality factor of monolayer WSe2 resonators greatly increases below room temperature, reaching values as high as 1.6 × 104 at liquid nitrogen temperature and 4.7 × 104 at liquid helium temperature. This surpasses the quality factor of monolayer graphene resonators with similar surface areas. Upon cooling the resonator, the resonant frequency increases significantly due to the thermal contraction of the WSe2 lattice. These measurements allow us to experimentally study the thermal expansion coefficient of WSe2 monolayers for the first time. High Q-factors are also found in resonators based on MoS2 and MoSe2 monolayers. The high quality-factor found in this work opens new possibilities for coupling mechanical vibrational states to two-dimensional excitons, valley pseudospins, and single quantum emitters and for quantum opto-mechanical experiments based on the Casimir interaction. PMID:27459399

  12. Weld quality evaluation using a high temperature SQUID array

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. D.; Espy, M. A.; Kraus, Robert H., Jr.; Matlachov, A. N.; Lamb, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary data for evaluating weld quality using high temperature SQUIDS. The SQUIDS are integrated into an instrument known as the SQUID Array Microscope, or SAMi. The array consists of ll SQUIDs evenly distributed over an 8.25 mm baseline. Welds are detected using SAMi by using an on board coil to induce eddy currents in a conducting sample and measuring the resulting magnetic fields. The concept is that the induced magnetic fields will differ in parts of varying weld quality. The data presented here was collected from three stainless steel parts using SAMi. Each part was either solid, included a good weld, or included a bad weld. The induced magnetic field's magnitude and phase relative to the induction signal were measured. For each sample considered, both the magnitude and phase data were measurably different than the other two samples. These results indicate that it is possible to use SAMi to evaluate weld quality.

  13. High-quality-factor photonic crystal ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zeng, Cheng; Li, Danping; Gao, Ge; Huang, Zengzhi; Yu, Jinzhong; Xia, Jinsong

    2014-03-01

    A design for enhancing the quality (Q) factor of a photonic crystal ring resonator (PCRR) is introduced. The highest Q factor based on simulations is 121,000. The analysis of momentum space distributions of the electric field profile for PCRR resonance shows that a high Q factor of a PCRR is attributed to the reduction of tangential k-vector component inside the leaky region. A high Q factor of 75,200 is experimentally demonstrated for a modified PCRR on a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The high-Q-factor PCRR demonstrated here will be beneficial for channel drop filters, lasers, sensors, and other applications. PMID:24690727

  14. High-Quality Ion Beam Generation in Laser Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Toshihiro; Takano, Masahiro; Izumiyzma, Takeshi; Barada, Daisuke; Kawata, Shigeo; Gu, Yan Jun; Kong, Qing; Xiao Wang, Ping; Ma, Yan Yun; Wang, Wei Min

    We focus on a control of generation of high-quality ion beam. In this study, near-critical density plasmas are employed and are illuminated by high intensity short laser pulses; we have successfully generated high-energy ions by multiple-stages acceleration. We performed particle-in-cell simulations in this paper. Near-critical density plasmas are employed at the proton source and also in the post acceleration. A beam bunching method is also proposed to control the ion beam length.

  15. High-quality DNA from fingernails for genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Preuner, Sandra; Danzer, Martin; Pröll, Johannes; Pötschger, Ulrike; Lawitschka, Anita; Gabriel, Christian; Lion, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The availability of high-quality germline DNA is an important prerequisite for a variety of genetic analyses. We have shown previously that fingernail clippings provide an optimal source of autologous, constitutional DNA for PCR-based applications. However, most existing protocols for nucleic acid purification from nails do not provide sufficiently high yields of pure and intact DNA for more demanding downstream analyses such as next generation sequencing (NGS). We have extensively tested and systematically modified a number of different protocols for DNA purification from nail material to optimize the yield and quality. The integrity of DNA was determined by PCR amplification of short (<300 bp), mid-range (>400 bp), and long-range (>2 kb) sequences using different target genes. Among the methods tested, the Prepfiler Forensic DNA Extraction kit was identified as the most appropriate approach to isolation of high-quality DNA from nail clippings. A standardized input of 20 mg nail material (1 to 10 pieces of fingernail clippings) yielded a mean of 1 μg DNA (range, 0.5 to 2.3 μg). Subsequent PCR-analysis revealed efficient amplifiability of short and mid-range targets in 93% and 90%, and long-range fragments in 60% of the samples tested. The adequacy for next generation sequencing applications was demonstrated by successful high-resolution HLA-typing in ten transplant recipients. Hence, the protocol presented facilitates the exploitation of fingernail material even for demanding genomic analyses both in research and diagnostics.

  16. Polariton lasing vs. photon lasing in a semiconductor microcavity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hui; Weihs, Gregor; Snoke, David; Bloch, Jacqueline; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2003-01-01

    Nearly one decade after the first observation of Bose–Einstein condensation in atom vapors and realization of matter-wave (atom) lasers, similar concepts have been demonstrated recently for polaritons: half-matter, half-light quasiparticles in semiconductor microcavities. The half-light nature of polaritons makes polariton lasers promising as a new source of coherent and nonclassical light with extremely low threshold energy. The half-matter nature makes polariton lasers a unique test bed for many-body theories and cavity quantum electrodynamics. In this article, we present a series of experimental studies of a polariton laser, exploring its properties as a relatively dense degenerate Bose gas and comparing it to a photon laser achieved in the same structure. The polaritons have an effective mass that is twice the cavity photon effective mass, yet seven orders of magnitude less than the hydrogen atom mass; hence, they can potentially condense at temperatures seven orders of magnitude higher than those required for atom Bose–Einstein condensations. Accompanying the phase transition, a polariton laser emits coherent light but at a threshold carrier density two orders of magnitude lower than that needed for a normal photon laser in a same structure. It also is shown that, beyond threshold, the polariton population splits to a thermal equilibrium Bose–Einstein distribution at in-plane wave number k∥ > 0 and a nonequilibrium condensate at k∥ > 0, with a chemical potential approaching to zero. The spatial distributions and polarization characteristics of polaritons also are discussed as unique signatures of a polariton laser. PMID:14673089

  17. A high-throughput, high-quality plant genomic DNA extraction protocol.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Li, J; Cong, X H; Duan, Y B; Li, L; Wei, P C; Lu, X Z; Yang, J B

    2013-01-01

    The isolation of high-quality genomic DNA (gDNA) is a crucial technique in plant molecular biology. The quality of gDNA determines the reliability of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. In this paper, we reported a high-quality gDNA extraction protocol optimized for real-time PCR in a variety of plant species. Performed in a 96-well block, our protocol provides high throughput. Without the need for phenol-chloroform and liquid nitrogen or dry ice, our protocol is safer and more cost-efficient than traditional DNA extraction methods. The method takes 10 mg leaf tissue to yield 5-10 µg high-quality gDNA. Spectral measurement and electrophoresis were used to demonstrate gDNA purity. The extracted DNA was qualified in a restriction enzyme digestion assay and conventional PCR. The real-time PCR amplification was sufficiently sensitive to detect gDNA at very low concentrations (3 pg/µL). The standard curve of gDNA dilutions from our phenol-chloroform-free protocol showed better linearity (R(2) = 0.9967) than the phenol-chloroform protocol (R(2) = 0.9876). The results indicate that the gDNA was of high quality and fit for real-time PCR. This safe, high-throughput plant gDNA extraction protocol could be used to isolate high-quality gDNA for real-time PCR and other downstream molecular applications. PMID:24222228

  18. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy quality assurance: a practical guide

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, DA

    2006-01-01

    The widespread adoption of high dose rate brachytherapy with its inherent dangers necessitates adoption of appropriate quality assurance measures to minimize risks to both patients and medical staff. This paper is aimed at assisting someone who is establishing a new program or revising one already in place into adhere to the recently issued Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USA) regulations and the guidelines from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. PMID:21614233

  19. High quality fuel gas from biomass pyrolysis with calcium oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baofeng; Zhang, Xiaodong; Chen, Lei; Sun, Laizhi; Si, Hongyu; Chen, Guanyi

    2014-03-01

    The removal of CO2 and tar in fuel gas produced by biomass thermal conversion has aroused more attention due to their adverse effects on the subsequent fuel gas application. High quality fuel gas production from sawdust pyrolysis with CaO was studied in this paper. The results of pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) experiments indicate that the mass ratio of CaO to sawdust (Ca/S) remarkably affects the behavior of sawdust pyrolysis. On the basis of Py-GC/MS results, one system of a moving bed pyrolyzer coupled with a fluid bed combustor has been developed to produce high quality fuel gas. The lower heating value (LHV) of the fuel gas was above 16MJ/Nm(3) and the content of tar was under 50mg/Nm(3), which is suitable for gas turbine application to generate electricity and heat. Therefore, this technology may be a promising route to achieve high quality fuel gas for biomass utilization.

  20. High quality fuel gas from biomass pyrolysis with calcium oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baofeng; Zhang, Xiaodong; Chen, Lei; Sun, Laizhi; Si, Hongyu; Chen, Guanyi

    2014-03-01

    The removal of CO2 and tar in fuel gas produced by biomass thermal conversion has aroused more attention due to their adverse effects on the subsequent fuel gas application. High quality fuel gas production from sawdust pyrolysis with CaO was studied in this paper. The results of pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) experiments indicate that the mass ratio of CaO to sawdust (Ca/S) remarkably affects the behavior of sawdust pyrolysis. On the basis of Py-GC/MS results, one system of a moving bed pyrolyzer coupled with a fluid bed combustor has been developed to produce high quality fuel gas. The lower heating value (LHV) of the fuel gas was above 16MJ/Nm(3) and the content of tar was under 50mg/Nm(3), which is suitable for gas turbine application to generate electricity and heat. Therefore, this technology may be a promising route to achieve high quality fuel gas for biomass utilization. PMID:24486940

  1. Efficient numerical method for analyzing optical bistability in photonic crystal microcavities.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lijun; Lu, Ya Yan

    2013-05-20

    Nonlinear optical effects can be enhanced by photonic crystal microcavities and be used to develop practical ultra-compact optical devices with low power requirements. The finite-difference time-domain method is the standard numerical method for simulating nonlinear optical devices, but it has limitations in terms of accuracy and efficiency. In this paper, a rigorous and efficient frequency-domain numerical method is developed for analyzing nonlinear optical devices where the nonlinear effect is concentrated in the microcavities. The method replaces the linear problem outside the microcavities by a rigorous and numerically computed boundary condition, then solves the nonlinear problem iteratively in a small region around the microcavities. Convergence of the iterative method is much easier to achieve since the size of the problem is significantly reduced. The method is presented for a specific two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide-cavity system with a Kerr nonlinearity, using numerical methods that can take advantage of the geometric features of the structure. The method is able to calculate multiple solutions exhibiting the optical bistability phenomenon in the strongly nonlinear regime.

  2. Efficient numerical method for analyzing optical bistability in photonic crystal microcavities.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lijun; Lu, Ya Yan

    2013-05-20

    Nonlinear optical effects can be enhanced by photonic crystal microcavities and be used to develop practical ultra-compact optical devices with low power requirements. The finite-difference time-domain method is the standard numerical method for simulating nonlinear optical devices, but it has limitations in terms of accuracy and efficiency. In this paper, a rigorous and efficient frequency-domain numerical method is developed for analyzing nonlinear optical devices where the nonlinear effect is concentrated in the microcavities. The method replaces the linear problem outside the microcavities by a rigorous and numerically computed boundary condition, then solves the nonlinear problem iteratively in a small region around the microcavities. Convergence of the iterative method is much easier to achieve since the size of the problem is significantly reduced. The method is presented for a specific two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide-cavity system with a Kerr nonlinearity, using numerical methods that can take advantage of the geometric features of the structure. The method is able to calculate multiple solutions exhibiting the optical bistability phenomenon in the strongly nonlinear regime. PMID:23736417

  3. High quality mask storage in an advanced Logic-Fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähnert, Carmen; Fritsche, Silvio

    2012-02-01

    High efficient mask logistics as well as safe and high quality mask storage are essential requirements within an advanced lithography area of a modern logic waferfab. Fast operational availability of the required masks at the exposure tool with excellent mask condition requires a safe mask handling, safeguarding of high mask quality over the whole mask usage time without any quality degradation and an intelligent mask logistics. One big challenge is the prevention of haze on high advanced phase shift masks used in a high volume production line for some thousands of 248nm or 193nm exposures. In 2008 Infineon Dresden qualified a customer specific developed semi-bare mask storage system from DMSDynamic Micro Systems in combination with a high advanced mask handling and an interconnected complex logistic system. This high-capacity mask storage system DMS M1900.22 for more than 3000 masks with fully automated mask and box handling as well as full-blown XCDA purge has been developed and adapted to the Infineon Lithotoollandscape using Nikon and SMIF reticle cases. Advanced features for ESD safety and mask security, mask tracking via RFID and interactions with the exposure tools were developed and implemented. The stocker is remote controlled by the iCADA-RSM system, ordering of the requested mask directly from the affected exposure tool allows fast access. This paper discusses the advantages and challenges for this approach as well as the practical experience gained during the implementation of the new system which improves the fab performance with respect to mask quality, security and throughput. Especially the realization of an extremely low and stable humidity level in addition with a well controlled air flow at each mask surface, preventing masks from haze degradation and particle contamination, turns out to be a notable technical achievement. The longterm stability of haze critical masks has been improved significantly. Relevant environmental parameters like

  4. High-throughput Protein Purification and Quality Assessment for Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngchang; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Eschenfeldt, William H.; Li, Hui; Maltseva, Natalia; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Gu, Minyi; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Wu, Ruiying; An, Hao; Chhor, Gekleng; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate goal of structural biology is to understand the structural basis of proteins in cellular processes. In structural biology, the most critical issue is the availability of high-quality samples. “Structural biology-grade” proteins must be generated in the quantity and quality suitable for structure determination using X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The purification procedures must reproducibly yield homogeneous proteins or their derivatives containing marker atom(s) in milligram quantities. The choice of protein purification and handling procedures plays a critical role in obtaining high-quality protein samples. With structural genomics emphasizing a genome-based approach in understanding protein structure and function, a number of unique structures covering most of the protein folding space have been determined and new technologies with high efficiency have been developed. At the Midwest Center for Structural Genomics (MCSG), we have developed semi-automated protocols for high-throughput parallel protein expression and purification. A protein, expressed as a fusion with a cleavable affinity tag, is purified in two consecutive immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) steps: (i) the first step is an IMAC coupled with buffer-exchange, or size exclusion chromatography (IMAC-I), followed by the cleavage of the affinity tag using the highly specific Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease; [1] the second step is IMAC and buffer exchange (IMAC-II) to remove the cleaved tag and tagged TEV protease. These protocols have been implemented on multidimensional chromatography workstations and, as we have shown, many proteins can be successfully produced in large-scale. All methods and protocols used for purification, some developed by MCSG, others adopted and integrated into the MCSG purification pipeline and more recently the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID) purification pipeline, are

  5. Effects of Distributed Bragg Reflectors on Temporal Stability of CuCl Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ken-ichi Miyazaki,; DaeGwi Kim,; Toshiki Kawase,; Masanobu Kameda,; Masaaki Nakayama,

    2010-04-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of exciton polaritons in a CuCl microcavity with distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs). Two sets of multilayers, PbBr2/PbF2 and HfO2/SiO2, were adopted as the DBRs in order to study the temporal stability of the CuCl microcavity. The thickness of the CuCl active layer was fixed to an effective 3λ/2 length. Angle-resolved reflectance spectra clearly demonstrate the formation of the cavity polaritons. From the phenomenological analysis with a 3×3 Hamiltonian for the cavity-polariton modes originating from the Z3 exciton, Z1,2 exciton, and cavity photon, the Rabi splitting energies are evaluated to be 97 and 162 meV for the Z3 and Z1,2 excitons, respectively, in the fresh CuCl microcavity with the PbBr2/PbF2 DBR. However, the Rabi splitting energies remarkably decrease within 6 days from the sample preparation, which is due to the degradation of the DBR resulting from alloying of PbBr2 and PbF2. On the other hand, in the CuCl microcavity with the HfO2/SiO2 DBR, the Rabi splitting energies of 105 and 168 meV for the Z3 and Z1,2 excitons, respectively, hardly change during 360 days from the sample preparation. This indicates that the stability of the oxide materials of HfO2 and SiO2 prevents the degradation of the DBR and CuCl active layer. Thus, a stable CuCl microcavity can be prepared by adopting the multilayer of HfO2/SiO2 as the DBR, which is a merit in applications.

  6. Electrically tunable, optical microcavity based on metallized and ultra-soft PDMS gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, M.; Slowik, I.; Paschew, G.; Merkel, U.; Fröb, H.; Leo, K.; Richter, A.

    2016-04-01

    Tunable, optical microcavities (MC) gain more and more importance for display, laser or other optical applications. The setup of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) enables a simple integration of an optical cavity, since reflective electrodes can confine a cavity that is filled with a transparent elastomer. Applying a voltage to the electrodes leads to squeezing of the elastomer and, due to the cavity thickness decrease, the resonator modes of interfering light changes. In this work we present an electrically tunable, optical MC based on ultra-soft poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The PDMS gel is coated on a glass substrate with a distributed Bragg reflector, an ITO bottom electrode and a flexible, highly reflective metal electrode and mirror on top. The usage of an ultra-soft PDMS gel, with a storage modulus of about 1kPa, allows to decrease the operating voltage down to a few hundred or even several ten volts. The critical step of fabrication is the metallization of the PDMS gel layer that requires a previous oxidizing surface activation to gain reflective and conductive silver based layers on top. Therefore, the effects of oxygen plasma and UV/ozone treatment on PDMS and the created metal layer were investigated intensively. The performance of the electrically tunable, optical MC is tremendously dependent from an adequate surface activation and structuring of the top electrodes considering the mirror displacement and activation voltage. Here we could show that tunable MCs based on oxygen plasma activated PDMS show a homogenous and high thickness decrease up to 70% at 200V.

  7. Efficient high-quality volume rendering of SPH data.

    PubMed

    Fraedrich, Roland; Auer, Stefan; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2010-01-01

    High quality volume rendering of SPH data requires a complex order-dependent resampling of particle quantities along the view rays. In this paper we present an efficient approach to perform this task using a novel view-space discretization of the simulation domain. Our method draws upon recent work on GPU-based particle voxelization for the efficient resampling of particles into uniform grids. We propose a new technique that leverages a perspective grid to adaptively discretize the view-volume, giving rise to a continuous level-of-detail sampling structure and reducing memory requirements compared to a uniform grid. In combination with a level-of-detail representation of the particle set, the perspective grid allows effectively reducing the amount of primitives to be processed at run-time. We demonstrate the quality and performance of our method for the rendering of fluid and gas dynamics SPH simulations consisting of many millions of particles.

  8. Strategies for High-Quality Nutrition Therapy in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Waitzberg, Dan L; Correia, Maria Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Strategies for improving nutrition therapy (NT) are of utmost importance in any healthcare system. The identification and treatment of malnourished patients improves clinical outcome and reduces the length of hospital length of stay and the associated costs. In particular, federal policy regulating the use of NT in Brazil and reimbursement of enteral nutrition (EN) treatment were 2 powerful mechanisms that stimulated the development of nutrition care. Basic and clinical research have also contributed to best practices in NT, thereby highlighting the need for nutrition therapy teams, quality indicators, and nutrition education for the delivery of high-quality NT. It is clear that the availability of training and continuing education programs in clinical nutrition is key to improving nutrition awareness and care, as well as patient outcome. On the basis of our experience, we recommend the Brazilian model as a strategy for improving nutrition care, with appropriate and necessary adaptations made to accommodate different settings.

  9. Laser action in microcavities of pi-conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polson, Randall C.

    Polymers, or plastics, are found in a variety of common products. They are used primarily in one of two ways, either as a container for something else or as an electrical insulator. Polymers known as pi-conjugated polymers have the remarkable property that they are electrically conductive. With some tricks, the conductivity can be pushed into the range of the best metallic conductors, such as copper. Electrically conducting pi-conjugated polymers have been the focus of much research. Along the way, other properties have been developed. The conjugated structure is the same as in several organic laser dyes. One discovered property is light emission with the application of an electric current, forming organic light emitting diodes. Another discovery is that the polymers can show stimulated emission. When placed in an optical resonance cavity, these polymers can exhibit laser action. This work is a study of a small class of conducting polymers that can be optically excited to produce laser emission. The organization is the following. Chapter 1 discusses the unique properties of conjugated polymers and reviews works concerning stimulated emission. Chapter 2 discusses the various experimental and theoretical tools necessary for investigation of laser emission and gives several recipes for creating samples. Chapter 3 is the first chapter that presents measurements of laser emission. An unconventional resonance cavity is used, a microring that consists of a thin coating of polymer on a supporting glass core. The emission spectra are measured, laser threshold is determined, coherence is established, and the emission modes are compared with a theoretical prediction. Chapter 4 discusses laser emission from microcavities formed with photolithographic techniques. The shapes investigated are a disk, a deformed disk, and connected disks. Laser emission spectra are presented with observed lasing thresholds. The deformed disk and connected disks are geometries with more complicated

  10. High Quality Down Lighting Luminaire with 73% Overall System Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Harrison; Steven C. Allen; Joseph Bernier; Robert Harrison

    2010-08-31

    This report summarizes work to develop a high flux, high efficiency LED-based downlight at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-FC26-08NT01582. A new high power LED and electronic driver were developed for these downlights. The LED achieved 100 lumens per watt efficacy and 1700 lumen flux output at a correlated color temperature of 3500K. The driver had 90% electrical conversion efficiency while maintaining excellent power quality with power factor >0.99, and total harmonic distortion <10%. Two styles of downlights using the LED and driver were shown to exceed the project targets for steady-state luminous efficacy and flux of 70 lumens per watt and 1300 lumens, respectively. Compared to similar existing downlights using compact fluorescent or LED sources, these downlights had much higher efficacy at nearly the same luminous flux.

  11. Direct laser writing for active and passive high-Q polymer microdisks on silicon.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Tobias; Schleede, Simone; Hauser, Mario; Beck, Torsten; Thiel, Michael; von Freymann, Georg; Mappes, Timo; Kalt, Heinz

    2011-06-01

    We report the fabrication of high-Q polymeric microdisks on silicon via direct laser writing utilizing two-photon absorption induced polymerization. The quality factors of the passive cavities are above 10(6) in the 1300 nm wavelength region. The flexible three-dimensional (3D) lithography method allows for the fabrication of different cavity thicknesses on the same substrate, useful for rapid prototyping of active and passive optical microcavities. Microdisk lasers are realized by doping the resist with dye, resulting in laser emission at visible wavelengths.

  12. Teacher Resilience in High-Poverty Schools: How Do High-Quality Teachers Become Resilient?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Kate Mansi

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to understand how high-quality teachers who began their career through Teach For America (TFA) became resilient while teaching in challenging, high-poverty schools. A secondary purpose of this study was to ascertain how, if at all, the teaching experiences of TFA teachers who stayed in the profession differed…

  13. High Quality Acquisition of Surface Electromyography - Conditioning Circuit Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobaki, Mohammed M.; Malik, Noreha Abdul; Khan, Sheroz; Nurashikin, Anis; Haider, Samnan; Larbani, Sofiane; Arshad, Atika; Tasnim, Rumana

    2013-12-01

    The acquisition of Surface Electromyography (SEMG) signals is used for many applications including the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases, and prosthesis control. The diagnostic quality of the SEMG signal is highly dependent on the conditioning circuit of the SEMG acquisition system. This paper presents the design of an SEMG conditioning circuit that can guarantee to collect high quality signal with high SNR such that it is immune to environmental noise. The conditioning circuit consists of four stages; consisting of an instrumentation amplifier that is used with a gain of around 250; 4th order band pass filter in the 20-500Hz frequency range as the two initial stages. The third stage is an amplifier with adjustable gain using a variable resistance; the gain could be changed from 1000 to 50000. In the final stage the signal is translated to meet the input requirements of data acquisition device or the ADC. Acquisition of accurate signals allows it to be analyzed for extracting the required characteristic features for medical and clinical applications. According to the experimental results, the value of SNR for collected signal is 52.4 dB which is higher than the commercial system, the power spectrum density (PSD) graph is also presented and it shows that the filter has eliminated the noise below 20 Hz.

  14. Fat Quality Influences the Obesogenic Effect of High Fat Diets.

    PubMed

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Cancelliere, Rosa; di Fabio, Giovanni; Zarrelli, Armando; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2015-11-16

    High fat and/or carbohydrate intake are associated with an elevated risk for obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The harmful effects of a high fat diet could be different, depending on dietary fat quality. In fact, high fat diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids are considered less deleterious for human health than those rich in saturated fat. In our previous studies, we have shown that rats fed a high fat diet developed obesity and exhibited a decrease in oxidative capacity and an increase in oxidative stress in liver mitochondria. To investigate whether polyunsaturated fats could attenuate the above deleterious effects of high fat diets, energy balance and body composition were assessed after two weeks in rats fed isocaloric amounts of a high-fat diet (58.2% by energy) rich either in lard or safflower/linseed oil. Hepatic functionality, plasma parameters, and oxidative status were also measured. The results show that feeding on safflower/linseed oil diet attenuates the obesogenic effect of high fat diets and ameliorates the blood lipid profile. Conversely, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial oxidative stress appear to be negatively affected by a diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids.

  15. Fat Quality Influences the Obesogenic Effect of High Fat Diets

    PubMed Central

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Cancelliere, Rosa; di Fabio, Giovanni; Zarrelli, Armando; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    High fat and/or carbohydrate intake are associated with an elevated risk for obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The harmful effects of a high fat diet could be different, depending on dietary fat quality. In fact, high fat diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids are considered less deleterious for human health than those rich in saturated fat. In our previous studies, we have shown that rats fed a high fat diet developed obesity and exhibited a decrease in oxidative capacity and an increase in oxidative stress in liver mitochondria. To investigate whether polyunsaturated fats could attenuate the above deleterious effects of high fat diets, energy balance and body composition were assessed after two weeks in rats fed isocaloric amounts of a high-fat diet (58.2% by energy) rich either in lard or safflower/linseed oil. Hepatic functionality, plasma parameters, and oxidative status were also measured. The results show that feeding on safflower/linseed oil diet attenuates the obesogenic effect of high fat diets and ameliorates the blood lipid profile. Conversely, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial oxidative stress appear to be negatively affected by a diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:26580650

  16. Fat Quality Influences the Obesogenic Effect of High Fat Diets.

    PubMed

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Cancelliere, Rosa; di Fabio, Giovanni; Zarrelli, Armando; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    High fat and/or carbohydrate intake are associated with an elevated risk for obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The harmful effects of a high fat diet could be different, depending on dietary fat quality. In fact, high fat diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids are considered less deleterious for human health than those rich in saturated fat. In our previous studies, we have shown that rats fed a high fat diet developed obesity and exhibited a decrease in oxidative capacity and an increase in oxidative stress in liver mitochondria. To investigate whether polyunsaturated fats could attenuate the above deleterious effects of high fat diets, energy balance and body composition were assessed after two weeks in rats fed isocaloric amounts of a high-fat diet (58.2% by energy) rich either in lard or safflower/linseed oil. Hepatic functionality, plasma parameters, and oxidative status were also measured. The results show that feeding on safflower/linseed oil diet attenuates the obesogenic effect of high fat diets and ameliorates the blood lipid profile. Conversely, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial oxidative stress appear to be negatively affected by a diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:26580650

  17. Novel technique for high-quality microstructuring with excimer lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Stephan; Geiger, Manfred

    2000-06-01

    Laser micromachining has become increasingly established in many microsystem applications during the past years. These new fields occasion higher demands on the quality of micromachiend devices combined with high resolution and working velocity. Due to the disadvantages of conventional excimer laser processing, a novel technique is required to meet these demands. The main problems of conventional excimer laser machining are the redeposition of ablated material on the irradiated work piece and the formation of a strong melting phase especially for metals. These difficulties greatly reduce the applicability of excimer laser material processing for manufacturing microsystems technology components. By applying a thin water film to the substrate surface, the redeposition of ablated material can be completely avoided, which results in a better quality of the microstructures. Usage of a water film, however, has proved to lead to a marked reduction of the ablation rate for the examined materials - ceramics and stainless steel. Therefore, one of the objectives of future research will be to raise the ablation rate in order to render excimer laser processing more interesting economically. Adding alcoholic additives, among others, has improved the wetting of the liquid films on the surface. The effect of the modified chemical composition of the liquid on ablation rate and structure quality for various materials is presented here.

  18. Extraction of high quality DNA from bloodstains using diatoms.

    PubMed

    Günther, S; Herold, J; Patzelt, D

    1995-01-01

    A simple method is described for the extraction of high quality DNA for PCR amplification. The DNA was extracted by using Chelex-100 ion exchange resin or a special cell lysis buffer containing proteinase K. For further purification the DNA was bound to silica in the presence of a chaotrophic agent. Hence it is possible to unlimitedly wash the bound DNA and inhibitory substances are removed. By using diatoms as a source of silicates, this method is very economical and can therefore be used as a routine method.

  19. High-quality Italian rice cultivars: chemical indices of ageing and aroma quality.

    PubMed

    Griglione, Alessandra; Liberto, Erica; Cordero, Chiara; Bressanello, Davide; Cagliero, Cecilia; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Bicchi, Carlo; Sgorbini, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    The volatile fractions of six Italian high-quality rice cultivars were investigated by HS-SPME-GC-MS to define fingerprinting and identify chemical markers and/or indices of ageing and aroma quality. In particular, four non-aromatic (Carnaroli, Carnise, Cerere and Antares) and two aromatic (Apollo and Venere) rices, harvested in 2010 and 2011, were monitored over 12months. Twenty-five aroma components were considered and, despite considerable inter-annual variability, some of them showed similar trends over time, including 2-(E)-octenal as a marker of ageing for all cultivars, and heptanal, octanal and 2-ethyl hexanol as cultivar-specific indicators. The area ratios 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline/1-octen-3-ol, for Venere, and 3-methyl-1-butanol/2-methyl-1-butanol, for Apollo, were also found to act as ageing indices. Additional information on release of key-aroma compounds was also obtained from quantitation and its dependence on grain shape and chemical composition. Heptanal/1-octen-3-ol and heptanal/octanal ratios were also defined as characterising the aroma quality indices of the six Italian rice cultivars investigated.

  20. Effect of Threading Dislocations on the Quality Factor of InGaN/GaN Microdisk Cavities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the theoretical advantages associated with nitride microcavities, the quality factors of devices with embedded indium gallium nitride (InGaN) or gallium nitride (GaN) optical emitters still remain low. In this work we identify threading dislocations (TDs) as a major limitation to the fabrication of high quality factor devices in the nitrides. We report on the use of cathodoluminescence (CL) to identify individual TD positions within microdisk lasers containing either InGaN quantum wells or quantum dots. Using CL to accurately count the number, and map the position, of dislocations within several individual cavities, we have found a clear correlation between the density of defects in the high-field region of a microdisk and its corresponding quality factor (Q). We discuss possible mechanisms associated with defects, photon scattering, and absorption, which could be responsible for degraded device performance. PMID:25839048

  1. Proposal for efficient mode converter based on cavity quantum electrodynamics dark mode in a semiconductor quantum dot coupled to a bimodal microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Ma, Jinyong; Wu, Ying

    2014-10-28

    The ability to engineer and convert photons between different modes in a solid-state approach has extensive technological implications not only for classical communication systems but also for future quantum networks. In this paper, we put forward a scheme for coherent mode conversion of optical photons by utilizing the intermediate coupling between a single quantum dot and a bimodal photonic crystal microcavity via a waveguide. Here, one mode of the photonic crystal microcavity is coherently driven by an external single-frequency continuous-wave laser field and the two cavity modes are not coupled to each other due to their orthogonal polarizations. The undriven cavity mode is thus not directly coupled to the input driving laser and the only way it can get light is via the quantum dot. The influences of the system parameters on the photon-conversion efficiency are analyzed in detail in the limit of weak probe field and it is found that high photon-conversion efficiency can be achieved under appropriate conditions. It is shown that the cavity dark mode, which is a superposition of the two optical modes and is decoupled from the quantum dot, can appear in such a hybrid optical system. We discuss the properties of the dark mode and indicate that the formation of the dark mode enables the efficient transfer of optical fields between the two cavity modes.

  2. Automated Theorem Proving in High-Quality Software Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Swanson, Keith (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The amount and complexity of software developed during the last few years has increased tremendously. In particular, programs are being used more and more in embedded systems (from car-brakes to plant-control). Many of these applications are safety-relevant, i.e. a malfunction of hardware or software can cause severe damage or loss. Tremendous risks are typically present in the area of aviation, (nuclear) power plants or (chemical) plant control. Here, even small problems can lead to thousands of casualties and huge financial losses. Large financial risks also exist when computer systems are used in the area of telecommunication (telephone, electronic commerce) or space exploration. Computer applications in this area are not only subject to safety considerations, but also security issues are important. All these systems must be designed and developed to guarantee high quality with respect to safety and security. Even in an industrial setting which is (or at least should be) aware of the high requirements in Software Engineering, many incidents occur. For example, the Warshaw Airbus crash, was caused by an incomplete requirements specification. Uncontrolled reuse of an Ariane 4 software module was the reason for the Ariane 5 disaster. Some recent incidents in the telecommunication area, like illegal "cloning" of smart-cards of D2GSM handies, or the extraction of (secret) passwords from German T-online users show that also in this area serious flaws can happen. Due to the inherent complexity of computer systems, most authors claim that only a rigorous application of formal methods in all stages of the software life cycle can ensure high quality of the software and lead to real safe and secure systems. In this paper, we will have a look, in how far automated theorem proving can contribute to a more widespread application of formal methods and their tools, and what automated theorem provers (ATPs) must provide in order to be useful.

  3. Environmental Quality Assessment of Built Areas with High Vacancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Yuan, Y.; Neale, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Around the world, many urban areas are challenged by vacant and abandoned residential and business property. High vacancy areas have often been associated with increasing public safety problems and declining property values and subsequent tax base. High vacancy can lead to visible signs of city decline and significant barriers to the revitalization of cities. Addressing the problem of vacancy requires knowledge of vacancy patterns and their possible contributing factors. In this study, we evaluated the ten year (2005-2015) urban environmental changes for some high vacancy areas. Social and economic variables derived from U.S. census data such as non-white population, employment rate, housing price, and environmental variables derived from National Land Cover Data such as land cover and impervious area, were used as the basis for analysis. Correlation analysis and principle components analysis were performed at the Census Block Group level. Three components were identified and interpreted as economic status, urbanness, and greenness. A synthetic Urban Environmental Quality (UEQ) index was developed by integrating the three principle components according to their weights. Comparisons of the UEQ indices between the 2005 and 2015 in the increasingly high vacancy area provided useful information for investigating the possible associations between social, economic, and environmental factors, and the vacancy status. This study could provide useful information for understanding the complex issues leading to vacancy and facilitating future rehabilitation of vacant urban area.

  4. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Ge, C.; Wang, J.; Eberwein, J. R.; Liang, L. L.; Allsman, L. A.; Grantz, D. A.; Jenerette, G. D.

    2015-01-01

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality. PMID:26556236

  5. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, P Y; Ge, C; Wang, J; Eberwein, J R; Liang, L L; Allsman, L A; Grantz, D A; Jenerette, G D

    2015-01-01

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality. PMID:26556236

  6. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, P Y; Ge, C; Wang, J; Eberwein, J R; Liang, L L; Allsman, L A; Grantz, D A; Jenerette, G D

    2015-11-10

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality.

  7. Facilitating high quality student practice in introductory physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Molly

    2001-07-01

    "Practice makes perfect, but only if you do it right." Typical physics students practice extensively through the large quantities of homework they do. But research in introductory physics instruction shows that despite this practice, students often do not learn much in introductory physics. Students often do not focus their practice on the skills (such as concept interpretation, and generating a physical representation of a problem) that they need in order to solve physics problems flexibly and reliably. They often focus their practice instead on simply getting an answer. By omitting practice of important skills, it is likely that those skills will not be learned. This paper identifies communication difficulties between students and between students and instructors as important sources of barriers to achieving high-quality student practice. Some strategies to address communication difficulties in the context of small group in-class problem solving are proposed. A classroom peer-collaborative structure, Supervised Practice, that implements these strategies is described, and the impact of the classroom design on the quality of student practice is investigated.

  8. Wind resource quality affected by high levels of renewables

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Diakov, Victor

    2015-06-17

    For solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind resources, the capacity factor is an important parameter describing the quality of the resource. As the share of variable renewable resources (such as PV and wind) on the electric system is increasing, so does curtailment (and the fraction of time when it cannot be avoided). At high levels of renewable generation, curtailments effectively change the practical measure of resource quality from capacity factor to the incremental capacity factor. The latter accounts only for generation during hours of no curtailment and is directly connected with the marginal capital cost of renewable generators for a givenmore » level of renewable generation during the year. The Western U.S. wind generation is analyzed hourly for a system with 75% of annual generation from wind, and it is found that the value for the system of resources with equal capacity factors can vary by a factor of 2, which highlights the importance of using the incremental capacity factor instead. Finally, the effect is expected to be more pronounced in smaller geographic areas (or when transmission limitations imposed) and less pronounced at lower levels of renewable energy in the system with less curtailment.« less

  9. Wind resource quality affected by high levels of renewables

    SciTech Connect

    Diakov, Victor

    2015-06-17

    For solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind resources, the capacity factor is an important parameter describing the quality of the resource. As the share of variable renewable resources (such as PV and wind) on the electric system is increasing, so does curtailment (and the fraction of time when it cannot be avoided). At high levels of renewable generation, curtailments effectively change the practical measure of resource quality from capacity factor to the incremental capacity factor. The latter accounts only for generation during hours of no curtailment and is directly connected with the marginal capital cost of renewable generators for a given level of renewable generation during the year. The Western U.S. wind generation is analyzed hourly for a system with 75% of annual generation from wind, and it is found that the value for the system of resources with equal capacity factors can vary by a factor of 2, which highlights the importance of using the incremental capacity factor instead. Finally, the effect is expected to be more pronounced in smaller geographic areas (or when transmission limitations imposed) and less pronounced at lower levels of renewable energy in the system with less curtailment.

  10. Determination of saffron quality by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Valle García-Rodríguez, M; Serrano-Díaz, Jéssica; Tarantilis, Petros A; López-Córcoles, Horacio; Carmona, Manuel; Alonso, Gonzalo L

    2014-08-13

    The aim of this work was to propose a high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) method for determining the three main compounds responsible for determining the quality of saffron (crocetin esters, picrocrocin, and safranal) by preparing an aqueous extract according to the ISO 3632 standard to solve the difficulty that this standard has for aroma and taste determination by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Toward this aim, laboratory-isolated picrocrocin, a safranal standard with a purity of ≥ 88%, trans-crocetin di(β-D-gentiobiosyl) ester (trans-4-GG) and trans-crocetin (β-D-glucosyl)-(β-D-gentiobiosyl) ester (trans-3-Gg) standards, both with a purity of ≥ 99%, and 50 different saffron spice samples from Italy, Iran, Greece, and Spain were used in the intralaboratory validation of the HPLC method. The analytical method proposed was adequate in terms of linearity, selectivity, sensitivity, and accuracy for determining the three foremost parameters that define the quality of saffron using only a saffron solution prepared according to the ISO 3632 standard.

  11. Recruiting and retaining high-quality teachers in rural areas.

    PubMed

    Monk, David H

    2007-01-01

    In examining recruitment and retention of teachers in rural areas, David Monk begins by noting the numerous possible characteristics of rural communities--small size, sparse settlement, distance from population concentrations, and an economic reliance on agricultural industries that are increasingly using seasonal and immigrant workers to minimize labor costs. Many, though not all, rural areas, he says, are seriously impoverished. Classes in rural schools are relatively small, and teachers tend to report satisfaction with their work environments and relatively few problems with discipline. But teacher turnover is often high, and hiring can be difficult. Monk observes that rural schools have a below-average share of highly trained teachers. Compensation in rural schools tends to be low, perhaps because of a lower fiscal capacity in rural areas, thus complicating efforts to attract and retain teachers. Several student characteristics, including relatively large shares of students with special needs and with limited English skills and lower shares of students attending college, can also make it difficult to recruit and retain high-quality teachers. Other challenges include meeting the needs of highly mobile children of low-income migrant farm workers. With respect to public policy, Monk asserts a need to focus on a subcategory of what might be called hard-to-staff rural schools rather than to develop a blanket set of policies for all rural schools. In particular, he recommends a focus on such indicators as low teacher qualifications, teaching in fields far removed from the area of training, difficulty in hiring, high turnover, a lack of diversity among teachers in the school, and the presence of migrant farm workers' children. Successful efforts to stimulate economic growth in these areas would be highly beneficial. He also calls attention to the potential for modern telecommunication and computing technologies to offset some of the drawbacks associated with teaching

  12. Polariton condensation in a strain-compensated planar microcavity with InGaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Cilibrizzi, Pasquale; Askitopoulos, Alexis Silva, Matteo; Lagoudakis, Pavlos G.; Bastiman, Faebian; Clarke, Edmund; Zajac, Joanna M.; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2014-11-10

    The investigation of intrinsic interactions in polariton condensates is currently limited by the photonic disorder of semiconductor microcavity structures. Here, we use a strain compensated planar GaAs/AlAs{sub 0.98}P{sub 0.02} microcavity with embedded InGaAs quantum wells having a reduced cross-hatch disorder to overcome this issue. Using real and reciprocal space spectroscopic imaging under non-resonant optical excitation, we observe polariton condensation and a second threshold marking the onset of photon lasing, i.e., the transition from the strong to the weak-coupling regime. Condensation in a structure with suppressed photonic disorder is a necessary step towards the implementation of periodic lattices of interacting condensates, providing a platform for on chip quantum simulations.

  13. Coexisting localized and extended optical Bloch states in a periodic deep wire array microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löchner, Franz J. F.; Mischok, Andreas; Brückner, Robert; Lyssenko, Vadim G.; Zakhidov, Alexander A.; Fröb, Hartmut; Leo, K.

    2015-09-01

    We embed periodic SiO2 wires in an organic microcavity, producing a rectangular potential by the different optical thicknesses of the active layer due to the additional SiO2 layer. By μ -photoluminescence spectroscopy, we observe the energy dispersion of the photons and obtain discrete localized below and extended Bloch states above the potential barrier, respectively, showing that electro-magnetic waves can behave like massive particles, such as electrons, in crystal lattices. We investigate the dependencies on wire width and period and use the Kronig-Penney model to describe the photon energy dispersion, including an "effective mass" of a photon propagating through a microcavity implying polarization splitting. We obtain excellent agreement between experiment, simulation and analytical calculation.

  14. Quantum Dots in H1 Photonic Crystal Microcavities for Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemeier, Jenna; Bonato, Cristian; Truong, Tuan-Anh; Kim, Hyochul; Bakker, Morten; Beirne, Gareth J.; van Exter, Martin P.; Petroff, Pierre; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2013-03-01

    Coupling semiconductor quantum dots to optical microcavities is a promising technique for implementing quantum information processing protocols in the solid-state. By placing one or more emitters in a cavity, it is possible to create an efficient source of single photons or to explore collective interactions of few-emitter systems. Our devices consist of two layers of quantum dots, embedded in the cavity region of H1 photonic crystal microcavities. One of the quantum dot layers can be frequency-tuned deterministically, allowing two resonant quantum dots to be coupled to a single cavity mode. Because good mode-matching between the cavity mode and the input/output channel is necessary for many applications, we optimize the far-field profiles of our H1 cavities and demonstrate strong enhancement of the external mode matching properties. We will discuss our far-field optimization results as well as our ongoing work to study interactions of multiple emitters in a cavity.

  15. Ultracompact biochemical sensor built with two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavity.

    PubMed

    Chow, E; Grot, A; Mirkarimi, L W; Sigalas, M; Girolami, G

    2004-05-15

    We report an experimental demonstration of an ultracompact biochemical sensor based on a two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavity. The microcavity, fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator substrate, is designed to have a resonant wavelength (lambda) near 1.5 microm. The transmission spectrum of the sensor is measured with different ambient refractive indices ranging from n = 1.0 to n = 1.5. From observation of the shift in resonant wavelength, a change in ambient refractive index of delta(n) = 0.002 is readily apparent. The correspondence between absolute refractive index and resonant wavelength agrees with numerical calculation to within 4% accuracy. The evaporation of water in a 5% glycerol mixture is also used to demonstrate the capability for in situ time-resolved sensing.

  16. Ultracompact biochemical sensor built with two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavity.

    PubMed

    Chow, E; Grot, A; Mirkarimi, L W; Sigalas, M; Girolami, G

    2004-05-15

    We report an experimental demonstration of an ultracompact biochemical sensor based on a two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavity. The microcavity, fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator substrate, is designed to have a resonant wavelength (lambda) near 1.5 microm. The transmission spectrum of the sensor is measured with different ambient refractive indices ranging from n = 1.0 to n = 1.5. From observation of the shift in resonant wavelength, a change in ambient refractive index of delta(n) = 0.002 is readily apparent. The correspondence between absolute refractive index and resonant wavelength agrees with numerical calculation to within 4% accuracy. The evaporation of water in a 5% glycerol mixture is also used to demonstrate the capability for in situ time-resolved sensing. PMID:15181996

  17. Model microcavity laser with CdSe/CdS quantum dots as lasing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveed, H. B.; Popov, S.; Shafique, M.

    2016-02-01

    A model is established for a microcavity laser with cadmium selenium/cadmium sulfide (CdSe/CdS) core/shell quantum dots (QDs) as a lasing medium. The research was organised to develop and solve the rate equations for the above mentioned microcavity laser to calculate the output parameters during lasing. Using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, the radiative life time of the lasing medium was measured along with its fluorescence and absorption spectra. A model is also established on the basis of the segment contact method (SCM) to demonstrate the threshold gain profile using the absorption spectrum of CdSe/CdS core/shell type-II QDs residing in the cavity. A laser cavity of size 1 μm was pumped with an optical source (532 nm) to achieve an optimised laser peak at 470 nm.

  18. Enhanced transmission in photonic crystals microcavity filters in ridge-waveguide format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugessur, A. S.

    2014-02-01

    The design and applications of one- or two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavity filters have been widely investigated and reported over the last several years. The functionality of these devices can be tailored to suit any specific application such as optical filters, sensors and optical memory. However, the coupling of light into these miniature devices has always been a challenge, in particular, when light transits the waveguide region to the photonic crystal structures. This modal transition results in scattering losses leading to low optical transmission. In this work, twodimensional photonic crystal microcavity filter structures with mode-matching features embedded in ridge waveguides have been designed using Finite Domain Time Difference modeling tool and fabricated on GaAs/AlGaAs substrate using Electron Beam Lithography and Reactive Ion Etching. An increase in optical transmission of about 80 % is obtained by the addition of the mode-matching features.

  19. Coherent optical spectroscopy of a strongly coupled semiconductor microcavity quantum-dot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Kartik; Painter, Oskar

    2008-03-01

    Chip-based systems involving a semiconductor microcavity coupled to an embedded quantum dot (QD) offer a scalable, stable platform for optical cavity quantum electrodynamics. To harness this potential in a manner consistent with many protocols for quantum information processing, the system must be coherently probed and manipulated. However, experiments in these systems have largely relied on incoherent excitation through photoluminescence (PL). Here, we describe recent experiments [1] in which a fiber taper waveguide is used to perform steady-state coherent linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy of a strongly coupled microcavity-QD system, probing the system on its photonic channel (rather than its matter channel, as in PL). Under weak driving, vacuum Rabi splitting is observed, while increasing the drive strength reveals saturation for an average intracavity photon number of less than one. [1] K. Srinivasan and O. Painter (2007), to appear in Nature, Dec. 6, 2007 (preprint: physics/0707.3311).

  20. Localized Surface Plasmons Selectively Coupled to Resonant Light in Tubular Microcavities.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yin; Li, Shilong; Böttner, Stefan; Yuan, Feifei; Giudicatti, Silvia; Saei Ghareh Naz, Ehsan; Ma, Libo; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2016-06-24

    Vertical gold nanogaps are created on microtubular cavities to explore the coupling between resonant light supported by the microcavities and surface plasmons localized at the nanogaps. Selective coupling of optical axial modes and localized surface plasmons critically depends on the exact location of the gold nanogap on the microcavities, which is conveniently achieved by rolling up specially designed thin dielectric films into three-dimensional microtube cavities. The coupling phenomenon is explained by a modified quasipotential model based on perturbation theory. Our work reveals the coupling of surface plasmon resonances localized at the nanoscale to optical resonances confined in microtubular cavities at the microscale, implying a promising strategy for the investigation of light-matter interactions. PMID:27391725

  1. High-frequency and high-quality silicon carbide optomechanical microresonators

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiyuan; Lee, Jonathan Y.; Lin, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) exhibits excellent material properties attractive for broad applications. We demonstrate the first SiC optomechanical microresonators that integrate high mechanical frequency, high mechanical quality, and high optical quality into a single device. The radial-breathing mechanical mode has a mechanical frequency up to 1.69 GHz with a mechanical Q around 5500 in atmosphere, which corresponds to a fm · Qm product as high as 9.47 × 1012 Hz. The strong optomechanical coupling allows us to efficiently excite and probe the coherent mechanical oscillation by optical waves. The demonstrated devices, in combination with the superior thermal property, chemical inertness, and defect characteristics of SiC, show great potential for applications in metrology, sensing, and quantum photonics, particularly in harsh environments that are challenging for other device platforms. PMID:26585637

  2. High-frequency and high-quality silicon carbide optomechanical microresonators.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiyuan; Lee, Jonathan Y; Lin, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) exhibits excellent material properties attractive for broad applications. We demonstrate the first SiC optomechanical microresonators that integrate high mechanical frequency, high mechanical quality, and high optical quality into a single device. The radial-breathing mechanical mode has a mechanical frequency up to 1.69 GHz with a mechanical Q around 5500 in atmosphere, which corresponds to a fm · Qm product as high as 9.47 × 10(12) Hz. The strong optomechanical coupling allows us to efficiently excite and probe the coherent mechanical oscillation by optical waves. The demonstrated devices, in combination with the superior thermal property, chemical inertness, and defect characteristics of SiC, show great potential for applications in metrology, sensing, and quantum photonics, particularly in harsh environments that are challenging for other device platforms. PMID:26585637

  3. Production of High-Quality Digital Facsimiles of Rare Books

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashimura, Masaaki

    The process of digitizing a rare book, which itself is an object of academic and cultural value, involves acquiring digital images from all of its pages; this set of images is called a digital facsimile. Each image in a digital facsimile should be of high quality and authenticity in order to serve for advanced studies. This is also important from the perspective of preservation reformatting of rare books as cultural property. The HUMI Project of Keio University has established a method of photographing pages of rare books for the purpose of producing facsimiles by developing various devices and methodologies such as the special book cradle. This article will present the photographing method developed by the HUMI Project. It will also outline the procedure of creating digital facsimiles from the data acquired by the photographing of rare books.

  4. (Collection of high quality acoustical records for honeybees)

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, H.T.; Buchanan, M.E.

    1987-02-19

    High quality acoustical data records were collected for both European and Africanized honeybees under various field conditions. This data base was needed for more rigorous evaluation of a honeybee identification technique previously developed by the travelers from preliminary data sets. Laboratory-grade recording equipment was used to record sounds made by honeybees in and near their nests and during foraging flights. Recordings were obtained from European and Africanized honeybees in the same general environment. Preliminary analyses of the acoustical data base clearly support the general identification algorithm: Africanized honeybee noise has significantly higher frequency content than does European honeybee noise. As this algorithm is refined, it may result in the development of a simple field-portable device for identifying subspecies of honeybees. Further, the honeybee's acoustical signals appear to be correlated with specific colony conditions. Understanding these variations may have enormous benefit for entomologists and for the beekeeping industry.

  5. High quality optically polished aluminum mirror and process for producing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, III, James J. (Inventor); Zaniewski, John J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A new technical advancement in the field of precision aluminum optics permits high quality optical polishing of aluminum monolith, which, in the field of optics, offers numerous benefits because of its machinability, lightweight, and low cost. This invention combines diamond turning and conventional polishing along with india ink, a newly adopted material, for the polishing to accomplish a significant improvement in surface precision of aluminum monolith for optical purposes. This invention guarantees the precise optical polishing of typical bare aluminum monolith to surface roughness of less than about 30 angstroms rms and preferably about 5 angstroms rms while maintaining a surface figure accuracy in terms of surface figure error of not more than one-fifteenth of wave peak-to-valley.

  6. High quality optically polished aluminum mirror and process for producing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, III, James J. (Inventor); Zaniewski, John J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A new technical advancement in the field of precision aluminum optics permits high quality optical polishing of aluminum monolith, which, in the field of optics, offers numerous benefits because of its machinability, lightweight, and low cost. This invention combines diamond turning and conventional polishing along with india ink, a newly adopted material, for the polishing to accomplish a significant improvement in surface precision of aluminum monolith for optical purposes. This invention guarantees the precise optical polishing of typical bare aluminum monolith to surface roughness of less than about 30 angstroms rms and preferably about 5 angstroms rms while maintaining a surface figure accuracy in terms of surface figure error of not more than one-fifteenth of wave peak-to-valley.

  7. Sequential interactive evolution for finding high-quality topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avigad, Gideon; Salomon, Shaul; Knopf, George

    2015-10-01

    Finding a diverse set of high-quality (HQ) topologies for a single-objective optimization problem using an evolutionary computation algorithm can be difficult without a reliable measure that adequately describes the dissimilarity between competing topologies. In this article, a new approach for enhancing diversity among HQ topologies for engineering design applications is proposed. The technique initially selects one HQ solution and then searches for alternative HQ solutions by performing an optimization of the original objective and its dissimilarity with respect to the previously found solution. The proposed multi-objective optimization approach interactively amalgamates user articulated preferences with an evolutionary search so as sequentially to produce a set of diverse HQ solutions to a single-objective problem. For enhancing diversity, a new measure is suggested and an approach to reducing its computational time is studied and implemented. To illustrate the technique, a series of studies involving different topologies represented as bitmaps is presented.

  8. High Quality Visual Hull Reconstruction by Delaunay Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Gavrilova, Marina L.

    In this paper, we employ Delaunay triangulation techniques to reconstruct high quality visual hulls. From a set of calibrated images, the algorithm first computes a sparse set of initial points with a dandelion model and builds a Delaunay triangulation restricted to the visual hull surface. It then iteratively refines the triangulation by inserting new sampling points, which are the intersections between the visual hull surface and the Voronoi edges dual to the triangulation's facets, until certain criteria are satisfied. The intersections are computed by cutting line segments with the visual hull, which is then converted to the problem of intersecting a line segment with polygonal contours in 2D. A barrel-grid structure is developed to quickly pick out possibly intersecting contour segments and thus accelerate the process of intersecting in 2D. Our algorithm is robust, fast, fully adaptive, and it produces precise and smooth mesh models composed of well-shaped triangles.

  9. Evaluation of hybrid treatments to produce high quality reuse water.

    PubMed

    Luiz, D B; Silva, G S; Vaz, E A C; José, H J; Moreira, R F P M

    2011-01-01

    Four tertiary hybrid treatments to produce high quality reused water, fulfilling Brazilian drinking water regulations, from a slaughterhouse's secondary treated effluent were evaluated. The pilot plant with a capacity of 500 L h(-1) was set up and consisted of these stages: pre-filtration system (cartridge filter 50 micron, activated carbon filter, cartridge filter 10 micron), oxidation (H2O2) or second filtration (ceramic filter, UF) followed by UV radiation (90 L h(-1)). The best combination was T4: pre-filtration followed by H2O2 addition and UV radiation (AOP H2O2/UV). Disinfection kinetics by T4 followed pseudo first-order kinetics: k(T4) = 0.00943 s(-1) or 0.00101 cm2 mJ(-1). Three different zones (A, B, C) were observed in the UV254 degradation kinetics (pseudo-first order kinetics): k' decreased over time (k'(A) > k'(B) > k'(C)).

  10. High power, high beam quality solid state lasers for materials processing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.; Hermann, M.R.

    1994-08-01

    The Laser Science and Technology Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing solid state lasers with high average power and high beam quality. Specific systems include a laser to generate 10 to 14 {angstrom} x-rays for proximity print lithography, a 400 mJ, 500 Hz laser for 130 {angstrom} projection lithography and unique systems for speckle imaging, laser radars and medical treatments.

  11. Fabrication of a three-dimensional nanoporous polymer film as a diffuser for microcavity OLEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo, Beom; Cho, Ye Ram; Suh, Min Chul

    2015-09-01

    We used a nanoporous polymer film prepared by cellulose acetate butyrate with ~40% of optical haze value as a diffuser. It was fabricated by a simple spin-coating process during continuous water mist supply by a humidifier. The pores were created by the elastic bouncing mechanism (rather than the thermocapillary convection mechanism) of the supplied water droplets. The shapes and sizes of the caves formed near the polymer surface are randomly distributed, with a relatively narrow pore size distribution (300-500 nm). Specifically, we focused on controlling the surface morphology to give a three-dimensional (3D) multi-stacked nanocave structure because we had already learnt that two-dimensional nanoporous structures showed serious loss of luminance in the forward direction. Using this approach, we found that the 3D nanoporous polymer film can effectively reduce the viewing angle dependency of strong microcavity OLEDs without any considerable decrease in the total intensity of the out-coupled light. We applied this nanoporous polymer film to microcavity OLEDs to investigate the possibility of using it as a diffuser layer. The resulting nanoporous polymer film effectively reduced the viewing angle dependency of the microcavity OLEDs, although a pixel blurring phenomenon occurred. Despite its negative effects, such as the drop in efficiency in the forward direction and the pixel blurring, the introduction of a nanoporous polymer film as a scattering medium on the back side of the glass substrate eliminated the viewing angle dependency. Thus, this approach is a promising method to overcome the serious drawbacks of microcavity OLEDs.

  12. Spin wave localization in one-dimensional magnonic microcavity comprising yttrium iron garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kanazawa, Naoki; Goto, Taichi Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2014-08-28

    We demonstrate the localization of magnetostatic surface waves, i.e., spin waves, in a one-dimensional magnonic microcavity substantialized with periodical conductivity modulation. The narrow localized state is observed inside band gaps and is responsible for a sharp transmission peak. The experimental results strongly agree with the theoretical prediction made with the shape magnetic anisotropy of the propagating medium composed of yttrium iron garnet taken into account.

  13. Microcavity with saturable nonlinearity under simultaneous resonant and nonresonant pumping: multistability, Hopf bifurcations and chaotic behaviour.

    PubMed

    Iorsh, Ivan; Alodjants, Alexander; Shelykh, Ivan A

    2016-05-30

    We studied optical response of microcavity non-equilibrium exciton-polariton Bose-Einstein condensate with saturable nonlinearity under simultaneous resonant and non-resonant pumping. We demonstrated the emergence of multistabile behavior due to the saturation of the excitonic absorption. Stable periodic Rabi-type oscillations of the excitonic and photonic condensate components in the regime of the stationary pump and their transition to the chaotic dynamics through the cascade of Hopf bifurcations by tuning of the electrical pump are revealed.

  14. Microcavity with saturable nonlinearity under simultaneous resonant and nonresonant pumping: multistability, Hopf bifurcations and chaotic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorsh, Ivan; Alodjants, Alexander; Shelykh, Ivan A.

    2016-05-01

    We studied optical response of microcavity non-equilibrium exciton-polariton Bose-Einstein condensate with saturable nonlinearity under simultaneous resonant and non-resonant pumping. We demonstrated the emergence of multistabile behavior due to the satutration of the excitonic absorbtion. Stable periodic Rabi- type oscillations of the excitonic and photonic condensate components in the regime of the stationary pump and their transition to the chaotic dynamics through the cascade of Hopf bifurcations by tuning of the electrical pump are revealed.

  15. Solvent-free enzymatic production of high quality cetyl esters.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Arnaldos, Mar; Máximo-Martín, María Fuensanta; Montiel-Morte, María Claudia; Ortega-Requena, Salvadora; Gómez-Gómez, Elisa; Bastida-Rodríguez, Josefa

    2016-04-01

    A solvent-free biocatalytic process for the synthesis of high quality cetyl laurate, myristate, palmitate and stearate has been optimized. This enzymatic procedure follows the fundamental principles of the Green Chemistry and lead to sustainable products, which can be labeled as natural and conform to the principal requirements for its use in high value-added goods. The four esters selected are the main components of spermaceti, a mixture of waxes very appreciated in cosmetic and pharmacy because of its physical properties and emolliency, which was formerly extracted from the head of the sperm whales. In this paper, the influence of the amount of biocatalyst, the commercially available Novozym(®) 435, and the temperature were studied in an open-air batch reactor before carrying out the synthesis in a high performance vacuum reactor with dry nitrogen input to shift the equilibrium towards product formation. Under optimal conditions, conversion was higher than 98.5 %. The characterization of the enzymatic cetyl esters puts in evidence that these are ultra-pure compounds, which have similar properties to the ones obtained through the conventional industrial processes with the extra benefit of being environmentally friendly. PMID:26801670

  16. Multi-technique analysis of high quality HPHT diamond crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Lorenzo, C.; Araújo, D.; González-Mañas, M.; Martín, J.; Navas, J.; Alcántara, R.; Villar, M. P.; Bagriantsev, D.

    2012-08-01

    Fabrication of high quality diamond either for gemmological or for technological applications, is still a challenge. The control of impurity incorporation for doping or to modify the crystal colour should be still improved. The present contribution reports availability of nearly defect free HPHT (high pressure high temperature) diamond in terms of dislocations and point defects. Cathodoluminescence (CL) transitions related to point defects or dislocations (A-band) are not observed and only some individual dislocations are revealed by X-ray topography (topo-X). CL spectra are dominated by the excitonic-related transistions and the boron incorporation, estimated from the phonon-replica relative intensities, is around 1016 cm-3 that corroborate the values estimated by FTIR. Such amount of B gives a pale blue colour to the diamond sintetized monocrystal. The latter crystals are grown at the Instituto de Monocristales S.L. for jewellery applications, but their use for semiconducting applications is also envisaged after the highlights of the present study.

  17. Criteria for High Quality Biology Teaching: An Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasci, Guntay

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the process under which biology lessons are taught in terms of teaching quality criteria (TQC). Teaching quality is defined as the properties of efficient teaching and is considered to be the criteria used to measure teaching quality both in general and specific to a field. The data were collected through classroom…

  18. Theory for Bose-Einstein condensation of light in nanofabricated semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leeuw, A.-W.; van der Wurff, E. C. I.; Duine, R. A.; van Oosten, D.; Stoof, H. T. C.

    2016-07-01

    We construct a theory for Bose-Einstein condensation of light in nanofabricated semiconductor microcavities. We model the semiconductor by one conduction and one valence band which consist of electrons and holes that interact via a Coulomb interaction. Moreover, we incorporate screening effects by using a contact interaction with the scattering length for a Yukawa potential and describe in this manner the crossover from exciton gas to electron-hole plasma as we increase the excitation level of the semiconductor. We then show that the dynamics of the light in the microcavities is damped due to the coupling to the semiconductor. Furthermore, we demonstrate that on the electron-hole plasma side of the crossover, which is relevant for the Bose-Einstein condensation of light, this damping can be described by a single dimensionless damping parameter that depends on the external pumping. Hereafter, we propose to probe the superfluidity of light in these nanofabricated semiconductor microcavities by making use of the differences in the response in the normal or superfluid phase to a sudden rotation of the trap. In particular, we determine frequencies and damping of the scissors modes that are excited in this manner. Moreover, we show that a distinct signature of the dynamical Casimir effect can be observed in the density-density correlations of the excited light fluid.

  19. Formation and all-optical control of optical patterns in semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, R.; Tsang, C. Y.; Tse, Y. C.; Luk, M. H.; Kwong, N. H.; Chan, Chris K. P.; Leung, P. T.; Lewandowski, P.; Schumacher, Stefan; Lafont, O.; Baudin, E.; Tignon, J.

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductor microcavities offer a unique way to combine transient all-optical manipulation of GaAs quantum wells with the benefits of structural advantages of microcavities. In these systems, exciton-polaritons have dispersion relations with very small effective masses. This has enabled prominent effects, for example polaritonic Bose condensation, but it can also be exploited for the design of all-optical communication devices. The latter involves non-equilibrium phase transitions in the spatial arrangement of exciton-polaritons. We consider the case of optical pumping with normal incidence, yielding a spatially homogeneous distribution of exciton-polaritons in optical cavities containing the quantum wells. Exciton-exciton interactions can trigger instabilities if certain threshold behavior requirements are met. Such instabilities can lead, for example, to the spontaneous formation of hexagonal polariton lattices (corresponding to six-spot patterns in the far field), or to rolls (corresponding to two-spot far field patterns). The competition among these patterns can be controlled to a certain degree by applying control beams. In this paper, we summarize the theory of pattern formation and election in microcavities and illustrate the switching between patterns via simulation results.

  20. Photoluminescence from a Tb-doped photonic crystal microcavity for white light generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yigang; Almeida, Rui M.

    2010-11-01

    Terbium-doped one-dimensional triple microcavities have been prepared by sol-gel processing. The photoluminescence (PL) of Tb3+ ions outside a microcavity structure, when excited by blue laser light at 488 nm, consisted of three distinct peaks at 542, 587 and 619 nm. When embedded in the microcavities, the three Tb3+ PL peaks were enhanced, balanced and broadened by the photonic crystal structure and combined into a continuous broad band. An analysis in the CIE colour space showed that white light can be obtained by mixing the modified Tb3+ PL with the blue exciting light, while this is impossible with the original PL profile. This novel technique may improve white light generation by enhancing and modifying the spontaneous emission of current phosphors. It may also lead to the development of new rare-earth phosphor materials based on 4f-4f transitions, able to generate white light more efficiently, via simpler and cheaper alternatives to the current phosphor compositions. A novel configuration to combine this kind of structure with a white light-emitting-diode (LED) is also proposed.

  1. Realization of Plasmonic Microcavity with Full Transverse and Longitudinal Mode Selection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ju; Chen, Yue-Gang; Gan, Lin; Xiao, Ting-Hui; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) manipulation is of vital importance to construct ultracompact integrated micro/nano-optical devices and systems. Here we report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a SPP microcavity with full transverse and longitudinal mode selection and control on the surface of gold film. The designed microcavity supports the fundamental and first-order transverse modes of Gaussian mode beam with controllable longitudinal modes, respectively. The transverse mode is determined by two holographic mirrors made from deliberately designed groove patterns via the surface electromagnetic wave holography methodology, while the longitudinal mode is determined by the length of cavity. Both numerical simulations and leaky-wave SPP mode observations confirm the realization of full mode selection in the fabricated cavity. Our work opens up a powerful way to fully explore longitudinal and transverse mode control in SPP microcavities, which will be beneficial for light-matter interaction enhancement, construction of novel SPP nanolaser and microlaser, optical sensing, and optical information processing. PMID:27273163

  2. Phase sensitive properties and coherent manipulation of a photonic crystal microcavity.

    PubMed

    Quiring, Wadim; Jonas, Björn; Förstner, Jens; Rai, Ashish K; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D; Zrenner, Artur

    2016-09-01

    We present phase sensitive cavity field measurements on photonic crystal microcavities. The experiments have been performed as autocorrelation measurements with ps double pulse laser excitation for resonant and detuned conditions. Measured E-field autocorrelation functions reveal a very strong detuning dependence of the phase shift between laser and cavity field and of the autocorrelation amplitude of the cavity field. The fully resolved phase information allows for a precise frequency discrimination and hence for a precise measurement of the detuning between laser and cavity. The behavior of the autocorrelation amplitude and phase and their detuning dependence can be fully described by an analytic model. Furthermore, coherent control of the cavity field is demonstrated by tailored laser excitation with phase and amplitude controlled pulses. The experimental proof and verification of the above described phenomena became possible by an electric detection scheme, which employs planar photonic crystal microcavity photo diodes with metallic Schottky contacts in the defect region of the resonator. The applied photo current detection was shown to work also efficiently at room temperature, which make electrically contacted microcavities attractive for real world applications. PMID:27607671

  3. Realization of Plasmonic Microcavity with Full Transverse and Longitudinal Mode Selection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju; Chen, Yue-Gang; Gan, Lin; Xiao, Ting-Hui; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) manipulation is of vital importance to construct ultracompact integrated micro/nano-optical devices and systems. Here we report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a SPP microcavity with full transverse and longitudinal mode selection and control on the surface of gold film. The designed microcavity supports the fundamental and first-order transverse modes of Gaussian mode beam with controllable longitudinal modes, respectively. The transverse mode is determined by two holographic mirrors made from deliberately designed groove patterns via the surface electromagnetic wave holography methodology, while the longitudinal mode is determined by the length of cavity. Both numerical simulations and leaky-wave SPP mode observations confirm the realization of full mode selection in the fabricated cavity. Our work opens up a powerful way to fully explore longitudinal and transverse mode control in SPP microcavities, which will be beneficial for light-matter interaction enhancement, construction of novel SPP nanolaser and microlaser, optical sensing, and optical information processing. PMID:27273163

  4. Valley-Polarized Exciton-Polaritons in a Monolayer Semiconductor Embedded in a Microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-J.; Stanev, Teodor K.; Stern, Nathaniel P.; Cain, Jeffrey D.; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are semiconductors that exhibit degenerate, but inequivalent, valleys at their K-point band gaps which selectively couple to circularly-polarized light fields. Coherent hybrid states of light and matter, exciton-polaritons, have been observed when monolayer TMDs strongly interact with photon fields in a microcavity. The degree of polarization is determined by the relative rates of exciton and intervalley relaxation, which can be modified for microcavity exciton-polaritons. Preservation of valley-polarization in a microcavity at room temperature is compared to the nearly zero polarization for bare monolayer MoS2 on SiO2, demonstrating cavity-modified relaxation dynamics of the coherent valley-specific exciton-polaritons. These results suggest promising opto-electronic applications for valley-based polaritonic and photonic devices integrating monolayer TMDs. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (BES DE-SC0012130) and the National Science Foundation MRSEC program (DMR-1121262). N.P.S. is an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow.

  5. Which Combination of High Quality Infant-Toddler and Preschool Care Best Promotes School Readiness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weilin; Farkas, George; Duncan, Greg J.; Burchinal, Margaret R.; Vandell, Deborah L.; Ruzek, Erik A.; Dang, Tran T.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to test the following hypotheses: Hypothesis 1 (H1): Everything else the same, high quality infant-toddler care will increase children's cognitive scores immediately (i.e. at 24 months of age). However, without subsequent high quality preschool, children with high quality infant-toddler care will not have higher cognitive and…

  6. Effect of high pressure-high temperature process on meat product quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duranton, Frédérique; Marée, Elvire; Simonin, Hélène; Chéret, Romuald; de Lamballerie, Marie

    2011-03-01

    High pressure/high temperature (HPHT) processing is an innovative way to sterilize food and has been proposed as an alternative to conventional retorting. By using elevated temperatures and adiabatic compression, it allows the inactivation of vegetative microorganisms and pathogen spores. Even though the microbial inactivation has been widely studied, the effect of such process on sensorial attributes of food products, especially meat products, remains rare. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of using HPHT process (500 MPa/115 °C) instead of conventional retorting to stabilize Toulouse sausages while retaining high organoleptic quality. The measurements of texture, color, water-holding capacity and microbial stability were investigated. It was possible to manufacture stable products at 500 MPa/115 °C/30 min. However, in these conditions, no improvement of the quality was found compared with conventional retorting.

  7. Low-quality birds do not display high-quality signals: The cysteine-pheomelanin mechanism of honesty

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Ismael; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Camarero, Pablo R; Mateo, Rafael; Alonso-Alvarez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that make that the costs of producing high-quality signals are unaffordable to low-quality signalers are a current issue in animal communication. The size of the melanin-based bib of male house sparrows Passer domesticus honestly signals quality. We induced the development of new bibs while treating males with buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO), a substance that depletes the levels of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and the amino acid cysteine, two elements that switch melanogenesis from eumelanin to pheomelanin. Final bib size is negatively related to pheomelanin levels in the bib feathers. BSO reduced cysteine and GSH levels in all birds, but improved phenotypes (bibs larger than controls) were only expressed by high-quality birds (BSO birds with largest bibs initially). Negative associations between final bib size and cysteine levels in erythrocytes, and between pheomelanin and cysteine levels, were observed in high-quality birds only. These findings suggest that a mechanism uncoupling pheomelanin and cysteine levels may have evolved in low-quality birds to avoid producing bibs of size not corresponding to their quality and greater relative costs. Indeed, greater oxidative stress in cells was not observed in low-quality birds. This may represent the first mechanism maintaining signal honesty without producing greater relative costs on low-quality signalers. PMID:25330349

  8. High-Quality Seismic Observations of Sonic Booms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurman, G.; Haering, E. A.; Price, M.

    2011-12-01

    The SonicBREWS project (Sonic Boom Resistant Earthquake Warning Systems) is a collaborative effort between Seismic Warning Systems, Inc. and NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. This project aims to evaluate the effects of sonic booms on Earthquake Warning Systems in order to prevent such systems from experiencing false alarms due to sonic booms. The airspace above the Antelope Valley, California includes the High Altitude Supersonic Corridor and the Black Mountain Supersonic Corridor. These corridors are among the few places in the US where supersonic flight is permitted, and sonic booms are commonplace in the Antelope Valley. One result of this project is a rich dataset of high-quality accelerometer records of sonic booms which can shed light on the interaction between these atmospheric phenomena and the solid earth. Nearly 100 sonic booms were recorded with low-noise triaxial MEMS accelerometers recording 1000 samples per second. The sonic booms had peak overpressures ranging up to approximately 10 psf and were recorded in three flight series in 2010 and 2011. Each boom was recorded with up to four accelerometers in various array configurations up to 100 meter baseline lengths, both in the built environment and the free field. All sonic booms were also recorded by nearby microphones. We present the results of the project in terms of the potential for sonic-boom-induced false alarms in Earthquake Warning Systems, and highlight some of the interesting features of the dataset.

  9. A Novel Process to Synthesize High-Quality Ferrovanadium Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue-Dong; Zhang, Guo-Hua; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, high-quality ferrovanadium nitride, which has a relative high nitrogen content and a low carbon content, has been prepared by roasting the mixture of vanadium pentoxide, carbon, and ferric oxide under N2 atmosphere in the temperature range from 1673 K to 1873 K (1400 °C to 1600 °C). The effects of carbon addition, reaction temperature, and heat treatment process were discussed. It was found that the carbon addition had a great effect on the nitrogen content and residual carbon, and the optimum carbon content was established to obtain the maximum nitrogen content and low carbon content. The reaction temperature in the range from 1673 K to 1873 K (1400 °C to 1600 °C) has a smaller effect on the final nitrogen content, and it also affects the degree of agglomeration of particles, which were observed by scanning electron microscope. From the results of thermodynamic calculation, energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), it was deduced that the reaction sequence of V2O5 with N2 from 1673 K to 1873 K (1400 °C to 1600 °C) was V2O5 → VO2 → V2O3 → V(N, C, O) → V(N, C). There is a little solid solubility of carbon in the final product VN.

  10. High-quality remote interactive imaging in the operating theatre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimstead, Ian J.; Avis, Nick J.; Evans, Peter L.; Bocca, Alan

    2009-02-01

    We present a high-quality display system that enables the remote access within an operating theatre of high-end medical imaging and surgical planning software. Currently, surgeons often use printouts from such software for reference during surgery; our system enables surgeons to access and review patient data in a sterile environment, viewing real-time renderings of MRI & CT data as required. Once calibrated, our system displays shades of grey in Operating Room lighting conditions (removing any gamma correction artefacts). Our system does not require any expensive display hardware, is unobtrusive to the remote workstation and works with any application without requiring additional software licenses. To extend the native 256 levels of grey supported by a standard LCD monitor, we have used the concept of "PseudoGrey" where slightly off-white shades of grey are used to extend the intensity range from 256 to 1,785 shades of grey. Remote access is facilitated by a customized version of UltraVNC, which corrects remote shades of grey for display in the Operating Room. The system is successfully deployed at Morriston Hospital, Swansea, UK, and is in daily use during Maxillofacial surgery. More formal user trials and quantitative assessments are being planned for the future.

  11. High-Quality Seismic Observations of Sonic Booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurman, Gilead; Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Price, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The SonicBREWS project (Sonic Boom Resistant Earthquake Warning Systems) is a collaborative effort between Seismic Warning Systems, Inc. and NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. This project aims to evaluate the effects of sonic booms on Earthquake Warning Systems in order to prevent such systems from experiencing false alarms due to sonic booms. The airspace above the Antelope Valley, California includes the High Altitude Supersonic Corridor and the Black Mountain Supersonic Corridor. These corridors are among the few places in the US where supersonic flight is permitted, and sonic booms are commonplace in the Antelope Valley. One result of this project is a rich dataset of high-quality accelerometer records of sonic booms which can shed light on the interaction between these atmospheric phenomena and the solid earth. Nearly 100 sonic booms were recorded with low-noise triaxial MEMS accelerometers recording 1000 samples per second. The sonic booms had peak overpressures ranging up to approximately 10 psf and were recorded in three flight series in 2010 and 2011. Each boom was recorded with up to four accelerometers in various array configurations up to 100 meter baseline lengths, both in the built environment and the free field. All sonic booms were also recorded by nearby microphones. We present the results of the project in terms of the potential for sonic-boom-induced false alarms in Earthquake Warning Systems, and highlight some of the interesting features of the dataset.

  12. Systems and processes that ensure high quality care.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Sally; Westmore, Kathryn

    2012-10-01

    This is the second in a series of articles examining the components of good corporate governance. It considers how the structures and processes for quality governance can affect an organisation's ability to be assured about the quality of care. Complex information systems and procedures can lead to poor quality care, but sound structures and processes alone are insufficient to ensure good governance, and behavioural factors play a significant part in making sure that staff are enabled to provide good quality care. The next article in this series looks at how the information reporting of an organisation can affect its governance. PMID:23252087

  13. Systems and processes that ensure high quality care.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Sally; Westmore, Kathryn

    2012-10-01

    This is the second in a series of articles examining the components of good corporate governance. It considers how the structures and processes for quality governance can affect an organisation's ability to be assured about the quality of care. Complex information systems and procedures can lead to poor quality care, but sound structures and processes alone are insufficient to ensure good governance, and behavioural factors play a significant part in making sure that staff are enabled to provide good quality care. The next article in this series looks at how the information reporting of an organisation can affect its governance.

  14. Effective W-state fusion strategies for electronic and photonic qubits via the quantum-dot-microcavity coupled system.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue; Hu, Shi; Guo, Qi; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2015-01-01

    We propose effective fusion schemes for stationary electronic W state and flying photonic W state, respectively, by using the quantum-dot-microcavity coupled system. The present schemes can fuse a n-qubit W state and a m-qubit W state to a (m + n - 1)-qubit W state, that is, these schemes can be used to not only create large W state with small ones, but also to prepare 3-qubit W states with Bell states. The schemes are based on the optical selection rules and the transmission and reflection rules of the cavity and can be achieved with high probability. We evaluate the effect of experimental imperfections and the feasibility of the schemes, which shows that the present schemes can be realized with high fidelity in both the weak coupling and the strong coupling regimes. These schemes may be meaningful for the large-scale solid-state-based quantum computation and the photon-qubit-based quantum communication.

  15. Effective W-state fusion strategies for electronic and photonic qubits via the quantum-dot-microcavity coupled system

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xue; Hu, Shi; Guo, Qi; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2015-01-01

    We propose effective fusion schemes for stationary electronic W state and flying photonic W state, respectively, by using the quantum-dot-microcavity coupled system. The present schemes can fuse a n-qubit W state and a m-qubit W state to a (m + n − 1)-qubit W state, that is, these schemes can be used to not only create large W state with small ones, but also to prepare 3-qubit W states with Bell states. The schemes are based on the optical selection rules and the transmission and reflection rules of the cavity and can be achieved with high probability. We evaluate the effect of experimental imperfections and the feasibility of the schemes, which shows that the present schemes can be realized with high fidelity in both the weak coupling and the strong coupling regimes. These schemes may be meaningful for the large-scale solid-state-based quantum computation and the photon-qubit-based quantum communication. PMID:26242356

  16. Tunable high quality factor in two multimode plasmonic stubs waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiquan; Li, Hongjian; Zhan, Shiping; Li, Boxun; He, Zhihui; Xu, Hui; Zheng, Mingfei

    2016-04-01

    We numerically investigate the optical characteristics of a metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) waveguide side-coupled with two identical multimode stub resonators. Double plasmon-induced transparency (PIT) peaks with narrow full width at half maximum (FWHM) and high quality factor (Q-factor) can be observed in this structure. The Q-factors of PIT peaks in two stub resonators system are larger than those in single stub resonator system. A multimode coupled-radiation oscillator theory (MC-ROT), which is derived from ROT, is proposed to analyze the spectral response in the multimode system for the first time. The analytical results are confirmed by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation results. We can also find that the Q-factors of the two PIT peaks have an opposite evolution tendency with the change of the stubs parameters and the maximum can reach to 427. These results may provide some applications for ultrasensitive sensors, switches and efficient filters.

  17. Tunable high quality factor in two multimode plasmonic stubs waveguide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiquan; Li, Hongjian; Zhan, Shiping; Li, Boxun; He, Zhihui; Xu, Hui; Zheng, Mingfei

    2016-04-14

    We numerically investigate the optical characteristics of a metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) waveguide side-coupled with two identical multimode stub resonators. Double plasmon-induced transparency (PIT) peaks with narrow full width at half maximum (FWHM) and high quality factor (Q-factor) can be observed in this structure. The Q-factors of PIT peaks in two stub resonators system are larger than those in single stub resonator system. A multimode coupled-radiation oscillator theory (MC-ROT), which is derived from ROT, is proposed to analyze the spectral response in the multimode system for the first time. The analytical results are confirmed by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation results. We can also find that the Q-factors of the two PIT peaks have an opposite evolution tendency with the change of the stubs parameters and the maximum can reach to 427. These results may provide some applications for ultrasensitive sensors, switches and efficient filters.

  18. Quality Factor for the Hadronic Calorimeter in High Luminosity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seixas, J. M.; ATLAS Tile Calorimeter System

    2015-05-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS experiment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and has about 10,000 eletronic channels. An Optimal Filter (OF) has been used to estimate the energy sampled by the calorimeter and applies a Quality Factor (QF) for signal acceptance. An approach using Matched Filter (MF) has also been pursued. In order to cope with the luminosity rising foreseen for LHC operation upgrade, different algorithms have been developed. Currently, the OF measurement for signal acceptance is implemented through a chi-square test. At a low luminosity scenario, such QF measurement has been used as a way to describe how the acquired signal is compatible to the pulse shape pattern. However, at high-luminosity conditions, due to pile up, this QF acceptance is no longer possible when OF is employed, and the QF becomes a measurement to indicate whether the reconstructed signal suffers or not from pile up. Methods are being developed in order to recover the superimposed information, and the QF may be used again as signal acceptance criterion. In this work, a new QF measurement is introduced. It is based on divergence statistics, which measures the similarity of probability density functions.

  19. High quality factor platinum silicide microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szypryt, P.; Mazin, B. A.; Ulbricht, G.; Bumble, B.; Meeker, S. R.; Bockstiegel, C.; Walter, A. B.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the development of microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) using platinum silicide as the sensor material. MKIDs are an emerging superconducting detector technology, capable of measuring the arrival times of single photons to better than two microseconds and their energies to around ten percent. Previously, MKIDs have been fabricated using either sub-stoichiometric titanium nitride or aluminum, but TiN suffers from the spatial inhomogeneities in the superconducting critical temperature and Al has a low kinetic inductance fraction, causing low detector sensitivity. To address these issues, we have instead fabricated the PtSi microresonators with the superconducting critical temperatures of 944 ± 12 mK and high internal quality factors ( Q i ≳ 10 6 ). These devices show typical quasiparticle lifetimes of τ q p ≈ 30 - 40 μ s and spectral resolution, R = λ / Δ λ , of 8 at 406.6 nm. We compare PtSi MKIDs to those fabricated with TiN and detail the substantial advantages that PtSi MKIDs have to offer.

  20. Characterization of non equilibrium effects on high quality critical flows

    SciTech Connect

    Camelo, E.; Lemonnier, H.; Ochterbeck, J.

    1995-09-01

    The appropriate design of various pieces of safety equipment such as relief systems, relies on the accurate description of critical flow phenomena. Most of the systems of industrial interest are willing to be described by one-dimensional area-averaged models and a large fraction of them involves multi-component high gas quality flows. Within these circumstances, the flow is very likely to be of an annular dispersed nature and its description by two-fluid models requires various closure relations. Among the most sensitive closures, there is the interfacial area and the liquid entrained fraction. The critical flowrate depends tremendously on the accurate description of the non equilibrium which results from the correctness of the closure equations. In this study, two-component flows are emphasized and non equilibrium results mainly form the differences in the phase velocities. It is therefore of the utmost importance to have reliable data to characterize non equilibrium phenomena and to assess the validity of the closure models. A comprehensive description of air-water nozzle flows, with emphasis on the effect of the nozzle geometry, has been undertaken and some of the results are presented here which helps understanding the overall flow dynamics. Besides the critical flowrate, the presented material includes pressure profiles, droplet size and velocity, liquid film flowrate and liquid film thickness.

  1. Tunable high quality factor in two multimode plasmonic stubs waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiquan; Li, Hongjian; Zhan, Shiping; Li, Boxun; He, Zhihui; Xu, Hui; Zheng, Mingfei

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the optical characteristics of a metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) waveguide side-coupled with two identical multimode stub resonators. Double plasmon-induced transparency (PIT) peaks with narrow full width at half maximum (FWHM) and high quality factor (Q-factor) can be observed in this structure. The Q-factors of PIT peaks in two stub resonators system are larger than those in single stub resonator system. A multimode coupled-radiation oscillator theory (MC-ROT), which is derived from ROT, is proposed to analyze the spectral response in the multimode system for the first time. The analytical results are confirmed by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation results. We can also find that the Q-factors of the two PIT peaks have an opposite evolution tendency with the change of the stubs parameters and the maximum can reach to 427. These results may provide some applications for ultrasensitive sensors, switches and efficient filters. PMID:27075935

  2. Quality Assurance Roadmap for High Performance Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    2008-10-05

    This report outlines the approach to quality assurance in the construction process for new residential construction, including seven process steps from the assessment of current construction practice, through design and documentation changes, to training and quality control for on-site personnel.

  3. Efficient analysis of mode profiles in elliptical microcavity using dynamic-thermal electron-quantum medium FDTD method.

    PubMed

    Khoo, E H; Ahmed, I; Goh, R S M; Lee, K H; Hung, T G G; Li, E P

    2013-03-11

    The dynamic-thermal electron-quantum medium finite-difference time-domain (DTEQM-FDTD) method is used for efficient analysis of mode profile in elliptical microcavity. The resonance peak of the elliptical microcavity is studied by varying the length ratio. It is observed that at some length ratios, cavity mode is excited instead of whispering gallery mode. This depicts that mode profiles are length ratio dependent. Through the implementation of the DTEQM-FDTD on graphic processing unit (GPU), the simulation time is reduced by 300 times as compared to the CPU. This leads to an efficient optimization approach to design microcavity lasers for wide range of applications in photonic integrated circuits.

  4. Second-harmonic generation using -quasi-phasematching in a GaAs whispering-gallery-mode microcavity

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Paulina S.; Bravo-Abad, Jorge; Solomon, Glenn S.

    2014-01-01

    The crystal symmetry in materials such as GaAs can enable quasi-phasematching for efficient optical frequency conversion without poling, twinning or other engineered domain inversions. symmetry means that a 90° rotation is equivalent to a crystallographic inversion. Therefore, when light circulates about the axis, as in GaAs whispering-gallery-mode microdisks, it encounters effective domain inversions that can produce quasi-phasematching. Microdisk resonators also offer resonant field enhancement, resulting in highly efficient frequency conversion in micrometre-scale volumes. These devices can be integrated in photonic circuits as compact frequency convertors, sources of radiation or entangled photons. Here we present the first experimental observation of second-harmonic generation in a whispering-gallery-mode microcavity utilizing -quasi-phasematching. We use a tapered fibre to couple into the 5-μm diameter microdisk resonator, resulting in a normalized conversion efficiency η≈5 × 10−5 mW−1. Simulations indicate that when accounting for fibre-cavity scattering, the normalized conversion efficiency is η≈3 × 10−3 mW−1. PMID:24434576

  5. Molecular beam deposition of high quality silicon oxide dielectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chand, Naresh; Johnson, J. E.; Osenbach, J. W.; Liang, W. C.; Feldman, L. C.; Tsang, W. T.; Krautter, H. W.; Passlack, M.; Hull, R.; Swaminathan, V.

    1995-03-01

    We report a method for depositing clean, uniform and stable SiO x dielectric films with high control and reproducibility. The technique uses a molecular or chemical beam epitaxy system (MBE or CBE). The technique offers many advantages over the conventional methods such as load lock facility, accurate determination of the flux, low background contamination, in-situ process monitoring tools, and heating, rotation and tilting of the substrate. Rutherford backscattering (RBS) shows that the films deposited without oxygen are stoichiometric, 50% oxygen and 50% Si, irrespective of the deposition rate or temperature. Such SiO films have a resistivity of ≥10 13 Ω · cm and a nominal refractive index of 2 at 632.8 nm. The refractive index can be reduced by introducing a controlled amount of oxygen into the chamber to result in SiO x ( x = 1-2) films. The SiO films have uniform density and composition, and are free from voids, or any inclusions of different crystalline or amorphous phases. These SiO films are easy to pattern and their erosion rate is slower than that of SiO 2 deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). During 192 h soak in 99°C deionized (DI) water, no moisture absorption was observed in SiO films deposited at a rate of 2 Å/s. Even in films deposited at 11 Å/s, the moisture content after 192 h soak in 99°C DI water was about one third the moisture content of an as-deposited typical PECVD SiO 2 film, indicating that the SiO films are highly resistant to moisture absorption and the film quality improves with reducing deposition rate. The insulating, mechanical and optical properties of SiO x films make them suitable for many applications such as surface passivation, mask for processing and facet coating of lasers. The process can be easily integrated with MBE/CBE which would greatly simplify and improve the III-V semiconductor processing. It may also be possible to deposit such dielectric films by CBE using gaseous compound sources.

  6. Consumers' expected quality and intention to purchase high quality pork meat.

    PubMed

    Papanagiotou, P; Tzimitra-Kalogianni, I; Melfou, K

    2013-03-01

    Expected quality is believed to be one of the most important factors that influence consumers' intention to purchase food. The present study seeks to explore the concept of pork meat expected quality and compare it with self-stated consumer intention to purchase pork meat. The aim is attempted by means of a field research conducted in Greece, following a conjoint analytic procedure. Results show that quality expectations comply with intention to buy pork, in many aspects. However, several differences have been identified. More specifically, country of origin and marbling appear to be more important for respondents' purchase decisions than they are for their quality evaluations, while the opposite appears to be true for price. Finally, socio-demographic factors such as gender, level of education, place of purchase and consumption habits seem to influence perceptions. PMID:23273449

  7. Strong coupling of light with A and B excitons in GaN microcavities grown on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, I. R.; Semond, F.; Leroux, M.; Massies, J.; Disseix, P.; Henneghien, A-L.; Leymarie, J.; Vasson, A.

    2006-01-15

    We present experimental results demonstrating strong-light matter coupling at low and room temperature in bulk GaN microcavities with epitaxial (Al,Ga)N Bragg mirrors grown on silicon (111). At low temperature, the strong coupling of both the A and B excitonic features of GaN with the cavity mode is clearly resolved in the microcavity. At room temperature a Rabi energy of 50 meV is observed and well reproduced using transfer-matrix reflectivity calculations describing the interaction of both the A and B excitonic states with the photonic mode.

  8. Preparation and properties of magneto-optical micro-cavities composed of Co thin film and dielectric multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, M.; Matsumoto, K.; Arai, K. I.; Fujii, T.; Abe, M.

    1999-05-01

    Magneto-optical (MO) Kerr effect of micro-cavities composed of a Co thin film and SiO 2/SiN multilayer films was investigated theoretically and experimentally. The micro-cavity structure was found to be very effective for enhancing the MO Kerr effect: the MO Kerr rotation angle exceeding 10° at a designated wavelength of light was obtained, the value of which is more than 100 times larger than that of a Co single-layer film. The large MO Kerr effect is caused by the localization of light originating from the multilayer structure.

  9. Red single-photon emission from an InP /GaInP quantum dot embedded in a planar monolithic microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roßbach, Robert; Reischle, Matthias; Beirne, Gareth J.; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter

    2008-02-01

    Using micro-photoluminescence, we demonstrate single-photon emission in the visible (red) spectral range using self-assembled InP quantum dots embedded in a planar microcavity realized by monolithically grown high reflectivity AlGaAs distributed Bragg reflectors. A full width at half maximum of 130μeV at 5K was observed from a single quantum dot coupled to the fundamental cavity resonance. Photon correlation measurements performed under continuous wave excitation show a clear antibunching behavior [g(2)(0)=0.13] as expected for a single-photon emitter. Saturation count rates up to 1.5MHz (8.1MHz into the first lens, with an extraction efficiency of 4.1%) were observed.

  10. High throughput electrospinning of high-quality nanofibers via an aluminum disk spinneret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guokuo

    In this work, a simple and efficient needleless high throughput electrospinning process using an aluminum disk spinneret with 24 holes is described. Electrospun mats produced by this setup consisted of fine fibers (nano-sized) of the highest quality while the productivity (yield) was many times that obtained from conventional single-needle electrospinning. The goal was to produce scaled-up amounts of the same or better quality nanofibers under variable concentration, voltage, and the working distance than those produced with the single needle lab setting. The fiber mats produced were either polymer or ceramic (such as molybdenum trioxide nanofibers). Through experimentation the optimum process conditions were defined to be: 24 kilovolt, a distance to collector of 15cm. More diluted solutions resulted in smaller diameter fibers. Comparing the morphologies of the nanofibers of MoO3 produced by both the traditional and the high throughput set up it was found that they were very similar. Moreover, the nanofibers production rate is nearly 10 times than that of traditional needle electrospinning. Thus, the high throughput process has the potential to become an industrial nanomanufacturing process and the materials processed by it may be used as filtration devices, in tissue engineering, and as sensors.

  11. Modular plant recovers high quality fuel from slurry pond

    SciTech Connect

    Batanian, D.C.; Terry, R.L.; Watters, L.A.

    1999-07-01

    fine coal recovery plant can recover an average of 100 tons per hour of high quality coal suitable for use as feedstock to the pellet plants operated at this site.

  12. Quantum Vacuum Radiation Spectra from a Semiconductor Microcavity with a Time-Modulated Vacuum Rabi Frequency

    SciTech Connect

    De Liberato, Simone; Ciuti, Cristiano; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2007-03-09

    We develop a general theory of the quantum vacuum radiation generated by an arbitrary time modulation of the vacuum Rabi frequency of an intersubband transition in a doped quantum well system embedded in a planar microcavity. Both nonradiative and radiative losses are included within an input-output quantum Langevin framework. The intensity and the spectral signatures of the extra-cavity emission are characterized versus the modulation properties. For realistic parameters, the photon pair emission is predicted to largely exceed the blackbody radiation in the mid and far infrared. For strong and resonant modulation a parametric oscillation regime is achievable.

  13. Spin Textures of Exciton-Polaritons in a Tunable Microcavity with Large TE-TM Splitting.

    PubMed

    Dufferwiel, S; Li, Feng; Cancellieri, E; Giriunas, L; Trichet, A A P; Whittaker, D M; Walker, P M; Fras, F; Clarke, E; Smith, J M; Skolnick, M S; Krizhanovskii, D N

    2015-12-11

    We report an extended family of spin textures of zero-dimensional exciton-polaritons spatially confined in tunable open microcavity structures. The transverse-electric-transverse-magnetic (TE-TM) splitting, which is enhanced in the open cavity structures, leads to polariton eigenstates carrying quantized spin vortices. Depending on the strength and anisotropy of the cavity confining potential and of the TE-TM induced splitting, which can be tuned via the excitonic or photonic fractions, the exciton-polariton emissions exhibit either spin-vortex-like patterns or linear polarization, in good agreement with theoretical modeling.

  14. Microcavity with saturable nonlinearity under simultaneous resonant and nonresonant pumping: multistability, Hopf bifurcations and chaotic behaviour.

    PubMed

    Iorsh, Ivan; Alodjants, Alexander; Shelykh, Ivan A

    2016-05-30

    We studied optical response of microcavity non-equilibrium exciton-polariton Bose-Einstein condensate with saturable nonlinearity under simultaneous resonant and non-resonant pumping. We demonstrated the emergence of multistabile behavior due to the saturation of the excitonic absorption. Stable periodic Rabi-type oscillations of the excitonic and photonic condensate components in the regime of the stationary pump and their transition to the chaotic dynamics through the cascade of Hopf bifurcations by tuning of the electrical pump are revealed. PMID:27410078

  15. Temporal Behavior of Radiation-Pressure-Induced Vibrations of an Optical Microcavity Phonon Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmon, Tal; Rokhsari, Hossein; Yang, Lan; Kippenberg, Tobias J.; Vahala, Kerry J.

    2005-06-01

    We analyze experimentally and theoretically mechanical oscillation within an optical cavity stimulated by the pressure of circulating optical radiation. The resulting radio frequency cavity vibrations (phonon mode) cause modulation of the incident, continuous-wave (cw) input pump beam. Furthermore, with increasing cw pump power, an evolution from sinusoidal modulation to random oscillations is observed in the pump power coupled from the resonator. The temporal evolution with pump power is studied, and agreement was found with theory. In addition to applications in quantum optomechanics, the present work suggests that radiation-pressure-induced effects can establish a practical limit for the miniaturization of optical silica microcavities.

  16. Analogies between optical propagation and heat diffusion: applications to microcavities, gratings and cloaks

    PubMed Central

    Amra, C.; Petiteau, D.; Zerrad, M.; Guenneau, S.; Soriano, G.; Gralak, B.; Bellieud, M.; Veynante, D.; Rolland, N.

    2015-01-01

    A new analogy between optical propagation and heat diffusion in heterogeneous anisotropic media has been proposed recently by three of the present authors. A detailed derivation of this unconventional correspondence is presented and developed. In time harmonic regime, all thermal parameters are related to optical ones in artificial metallic media, thus making possible to use numerical codes developed for optics. Then, the optical admittance formalism is extended to heat conduction in multilayered structures. The concepts of planar microcavities, diffraction gratings and planar transformation optics for heat conduction are addressed. Results and limitations of the analogy are emphasized. PMID:26730214

  17. Three-dimensional spatial resolution of the nonlinear photoemission from biofunctionalized porous silicon microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M.; Palestino, G.; Cloitre, T.; Agarwal, V.; Zimányi, L.; Gergely, C.

    2009-06-01

    Infiltration of biomacromolecules into porous silicon photonic architectures results in biofunctionalized structures with unique properties. Characterization of their optical response and performance optimization in biomacromolecular detection and biophotonic application require a combination of optical and structural studies. Nonlinear optical microscopy is applied to study porous silicon microcavities with and without infiltrated glucose oxidase. The infiltrated protein acts as an internal two-photon-excited fluorescence emitter and second harmonic generator, enabling the in-depth visualization of the porous structure. Enhanced second harmonic generation and fluorescence emission by the porous silicon structure is experimentally associated with the defect layer.

  18. Enhancement of photon intensity in forced coupled quantum wells inside a semiconductor microcavity.

    PubMed

    Eleuch, Hichem; Prasad, Awadhesh; Rotter, Ingrid

    2013-02-01

    We study numerically the photon emission from a semiconductor microcavity containing N≥2 quantum wells under the influence of a periodic external forcing. The emission is determined by the interplay between external forcing and internal interaction between the wells. While the external forcing synchronizes the periodic motion, the internal interaction destroys it. The nonlinear term of the Hamiltonian supports the synchronization. The numerical results show a jump of the photon intensity to very large values at a certain critical value of the external forcing when the number of quantum wells is not too large. We discuss the dynamics of the system across this transition. PMID:23496600

  19. Dipolar polaritons in microcavity-embedded coupled quantum wells in electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, J.; Muljarov, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    We present a microscopic calculation of spatially indirect exciton states in semiconductor coupled quantum wells and polaritons formed from their coupling to the optical mode of a microcavity. We include the presence of electric and magnetic fields applied perpendicular to the quantum well plane. Our model predicts the existence of polaritons that are in the strong-coupling regime and at the same time possess a large static dipole moment. We demonstrate, in particular, that a magnetic field can compensate for the reduction in light-matter coupling that occurs when an electric field impresses a dipole moment on the polariton.

  20. Spin Textures of Exciton-Polaritons in a Tunable Microcavity with Large TE-TM Splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufferwiel, S.; Li, Feng; Cancellieri, E.; Giriunas, L.; Trichet, A. A. P.; Whittaker, D. M.; Walker, P. M.; Fras, F.; Clarke, E.; Smith, J. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Krizhanovskii, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    We report an extended family of spin textures of zero-dimensional exciton-polaritons spatially confined in tunable open microcavity structures. The transverse-electric-transverse-magnetic (TE-TM) splitting, which is enhanced in the open cavity structures, leads to polariton eigenstates carrying quantized spin vortices. Depending on the strength and anisotropy of the cavity confining potential and of the TE-TM induced splitting, which can be tuned via the excitonic or photonic fractions, the exciton-polariton emissions exhibit either spin-vortex-like patterns or linear polarization, in good agreement with theoretical modeling.

  1. Building High-Performing and Improving Education Systems: Quality Assurance and Accountability. Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Liz

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring, evaluation, and quality assurance in their various forms are seen as being one of the foundation stones of high-quality education systems. De Grauwe, writing about "school supervision" in four African countries in 2001, linked the decline in the quality of basic education to the cut in resources for supervision and support.…

  2. Does High School Facility Quality Affect Student Achievement? A Two-Level Hierarchical Linear Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Alex J.; Urick, Angela

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to isolate the independent effects of high school facility quality on student achievement using a large, nationally representative U.S. database of student achievement and school facility quality. Prior research on linking school facility quality to student achievement has been mixed. Studies that relate overall…

  3. The Physician Quality Improvement Initiative: Engaging Physicians in Quality Improvement, Patient Safety, Accountability and their Provision of High-Quality Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Wentlandt, Kirsten; Degendorfer, Niki; Clarke, Cathy; Panet, Hayley; Worthington, Jim; McLean, Richard F; Chan, Charlie K N

    2016-01-01

    University Health Network has been working to become a high-reliability organization, with a focus on safe, quality patient care. In response, the Medical Affairs Department has implemented several strategic initiatives to drive accountability, quality improvement and engagement with our physician population. One of these initiatives, the Physician Quality Improvement Initiative (PQII) is a physician-led project designed to provide active medical staff, in collaboration with their physician department chiefs, a comprehensive approach to focused and practical quality improvement in their practice. In this document, we outline the project, including its implementation strategy, logic model and outcomes, and provide discussion on how it fits into UHN's global strategy to provide safe, quality patient care. PMID:27009706

  4. High Yield Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of High Quality Large-Area AB Stacked Bilayer Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Hailong; Cheng, Rui; Yu, Woo Jong; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Yu; Shaw, Jonathan; Zhong, Xing; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-01-01

    Bernal stacked (AB stacked) bilayer graphene is of significant interest for functional electronic and photonic devices due to the feasibility to continuously tune its band gap with a vertical electrical field. Mechanical exfoliation can be used to produce AB stacked bilayer graphene flakes but typically with the sizes limited to a few micrometers. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been recently explored for the synthesis of bilayer graphene but usually with limited coverage and a mixture of AB and randomly stacked structures. Herein we report a rational approach to produce large-area high quality AB stacked bilayer graphene. We show that the self-limiting effect of graphene growth on Cu foil can be broken by using a high H2/CH4 ratio in a low pressure CVD process to enable the continued growth of bilayer graphene. A high temperature and low pressure nucleation step is found to be critical for the formation of bilayer graphene nuclei with high AB stacking ratio. A rational design of a two-step CVD process is developed for the growth of bilayer graphene with high AB stacking ratio (up to 90 %) and high coverage (up to 99 %). The electrical transport studies demonstrated that devices made of the as-grown bilayer graphene exhibit typical characteristics of AB stacked bilayer graphene with the highest carrier mobility exceeding 4,000 cm2/V·s at room temperature, comparable to that of the exfoliated bilayer graphene. PMID:22906199

  5. Quality of health care: the responsibility of health care professionals in delivering high quality services.

    PubMed

    Giangrande, A

    1998-11-01

    According to a recent definition, quality of care consists of the degree to which health services increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge; a definition that introduces both requirements of outcomes and the appropriateness of the process used. Clearly many different figures are interested in quality assessment initiatives in the health care field and these include patients, administrators and doctors each having different perspective. Doctors obviously pay greater attention to technical quality and results, giving greater emphasis to the health of the individual patient, tending to give priority to technical excellence and interaction between patient and doctor. Although the perspective of health care professionals is widely acknowledged to be important and useful, other perspectives on quality have been emphasised in recent years. The most important of these is the recognition that care must be responsive to the preferences and values of the consumers of health care services. In complete harmony with one's own professional commitment, the attention to the perspectives of patients must give physician the chance to identify methods of measuring and verifying quality which take account of the expectations of the many groups with an interest in improving the functioning of the health system. A global approach in the health field is needed the more specialization advances. The quality of medicine lies in its capacity to integrate what science says is appropriate and to be recommended, what can be reconciled with human rights and the self determination of the patient and what can be achieved by optimising available resources. In this complex context, the doctor could take on both the role of the person who decides on the use of resources and the one of social mediator. PMID:9894749

  6. Innovation in Business Education: Developing a High Quality Online MBA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roe, C. William; Toma, Alfred G.; Yallapragada, RamMohan R.

    2015-01-01

    Online degree programs were probably pioneered by for-profit universities such as University of Phoenix. Many online degree programs were initially considered low quality academic programs compared to traditional programs. Therefore, many public and private universities were slow to adopt the online programs. However, gradually more and more…

  7. Water Quality: A Field-Based Quality Testing Program for Middle Schools and High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Water Resources Authority, Boston.

    This manual contains background information, lesson ideas, procedures, data collection and reporting forms, suggestions for interpreting results, and extension activities to complement a water quality field testing program. Information on testing water temperature, water pH, dissolved oxygen content, biochemical oxygen demand, nitrates, total…

  8. Manufacturing High-Quality Carbon Nanotubes at Lower Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeanette M.; Lidecker, Henning

    2004-01-01

    A modified electric-arc welding process has been developed for manufacturing high-quality batches of carbon nanotubes at relatively low cost. Unlike in some other processes for making carbon nanotubes, metal catalysts are not used and, consequently, it is not necessary to perform extensive cleaning and purification. Also, unlike some other processes, this process is carried out at atmospheric pressure under a hood instead of in a closed, pressurized chamber; as a result, the present process can be implemented more easily. Although the present welding-based process includes an electric arc, it differs from a prior electric-arc nanotube-production process. The welding equipment used in this process includes an AC/DC welding power source with an integral helium-gas delivery system and circulating water for cooling an assembly that holds one of the welding electrodes (in this case, the anode). The cathode is a hollow carbon (optionally, graphite) rod having an outside diameter of 2 in. (approximately equal to 5.1 cm) and an inside diameter of 5/8 in. (approximately equal to 1.6 cm). The cathode is partly immersed in a water bath, such that it protrudes about 2 in. (about 5.1 cm) above the surface of the water. The bottom end of the cathode is held underwater by a clamp, to which is connected the grounding cable of the welding power source. The anode is a carbon rod 1/8 in. (approximately equal to 0.3 cm) in diameter. The assembly that holds the anode includes a thumbknob- driven mechanism for controlling the height of the anode. A small hood is placed over the anode to direct a flow of helium downward from the anode to the cathode during the welding process. A bell-shaped exhaust hood collects the helium and other gases from the process. During the process, as the anode is consumed, the height of the anode is adjusted to maintain an anode-to-cathode gap of 1 mm. The arc-welding process is continued until the upper end of the anode has been lowered to a specified height

  9. Numerical determination of injector design for high beam quality

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.K.

    1985-10-15

    The performance of a free electron laser strongly depends on the electron beam quality or brightness. The electron beam is transported into the free electron laser after it has been accelerated to the desired energy. Typically the maximum beam brightness produced by an accelerator is constrained by the beam brightness deliverd by the accelerator injector. Thus it is important to design the accelerator injector to yield the required electron beam brightness. The DPC (Darwin Particle Code) computer code has been written to numerically model accelerator injectors. DPC solves for the transport of a beam from emission through acceleration up to the full energy of the injector. The relativistic force equation is solved to determine particle orbits. Field equations are solved for self consistent electric and magnetic fields in the Darwin approximation. DPC has been used to investigate the beam quality consequences of A-K gap, accelerating stress, electrode configuration and axial magnetic field profile.

  10. Diabetes care quality is highly correlated with patient panel characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Steffani; O’Malley, Jean P.; Gold, Rachel; Heintzman, John; Likumahuwa, Sonja; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Health care reimbursement is increasingly based on quality. Little is known about how clinic-level patient characteristics affect quality performance, particularly in community health centers (CHCs). Methods Using electronic health record data for 4,019 diabetic patients from 23 CHC primary care clinics in the OCHIN practice-based research network, we calculated correlations between a clinic’s patient panel characteristics and delivery rates of diabetes preventive services in 2007. Using regression models, we estimated the proportion of clinic variability in clinics’ preventive services rates associated with the variability in the clinics’ patient panel characteristics. We also explored whether clinics’ performance rates were affected by how patient panel denominators were defined. Results Clinic rates of glycosylated hemoglobin testing, influenza immunizations, and lipid screening were positively associated with the percentage of patients with continuous health insurance coverage, and negatively associated with the percentage uninsured. Microalbumin screening rates were positively associated with the percentage of racial minorities in a clinic’s panel. Associations remained consistent with different panel denominators. Conclusions Clinic variability in delivery rates of preventive services correlates with differences in clinics’ patient panel characteristics, particularly the percentage of patients with continuous insurance coverage. Quality scores that do not account for these differences could create disincentives to diabetes care for vulnerable patients. PMID:24204063

  11. Health-Related Quality of Life in Children with High-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potvin, Marie-Christine; Snider, Laurie; Prelock, Patricia A.; Wood-Dauphinee, Sharon; Kehayia, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The health-related quality of life of school-aged children with high-functioning autism is poorly understood. The objectives of this study were to compare the health-related quality of life of children with high-functioning autism to that of typically developing peers and to compare child-self and parent-proxy reports of health-related quality of…

  12. High Fidelity System Modeling for High Quality Image Reconstruction in Clinical CT

    PubMed Central

    Do, Synho; Karl, William Clem; Singh, Sarabjeet; Kalra, Mannudeep; Brady, Tom; Shin, Ellie; Pien, Homer

    2014-01-01

    Today, while many researchers focus on the improvement of the regularization term in IR algorithms, they pay less concern to the improvement of the fidelity term. In this paper, we hypothesize that improving the fidelity term will further improve IR image quality in low-dose scanning, which typically causes more noise. The purpose of this paper is to systematically test and examine the role of high-fidelity system models using raw data in the performance of iterative image reconstruction approach minimizing energy functional. We first isolated the fidelity term and analyzed the importance of using focal spot area modeling, flying focal spot location modeling, and active detector area modeling as opposed to just flying focal spot motion. We then compared images using different permutations of all three factors. Next, we tested the ability of the fidelity terms to retain signals upon application of the regularization term with all three factors. We then compared the differences between images generated by the proposed method and Filtered-Back-Projection. Lastly, we compared images of low-dose in vivo data using Filtered-Back-Projection, Iterative Reconstruction in Image Space, and the proposed method using raw data. The initial comparison of difference maps of images constructed showed that the focal spot area model and the active detector area model also have significant impacts on the quality of images produced. Upon application of the regularization term, images generated using all three factors were able to substantially decrease model mismatch error, artifacts, and noise. When the images generated by the proposed method were tested, conspicuity greatly increased, noise standard deviation decreased by 90% in homogeneous regions, and resolution also greatly improved. In conclusion, the improvement of the fidelity term to model clinical scanners is essential to generating higher quality images in low-dose imaging. PMID:25390888

  13. Optical properties of single infrared resonant circular microcavities for surface phonon polaritons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Li, Peining; Hauer, Benedikt; Chigrin, Dmitry N; Taubner, Thomas

    2013-11-13

    Plasmonic antennas are crucial components for nano-optics and have been extensively used to enhance sensing, spectroscopy, light emission, photodetection, and others. Recently, there is a trend to search for new plasmonic materials with low intrinsic loss at new plasmon frequencies. As an alternative to metals, polar crystals have a negative real part of permittivity in the Reststrahlen band and support surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs) with weak damping. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the resonance of single circular microcavities in a thin gold film deposited on a silicon carbide (SiC) substrate in the mid-infrared range. Specifically, the negative permittivity of SiC leads to a well-defined, size-tunable SPhP resonance with a Q factor of around 60 which is much higher than those in surface plasmon polariton (SPP) resonators with similar structures. These infrared resonant microcavities provide new possibilities for widespread applications such as enhanced spectroscopy, sensing, coherent thermal emission, and infrared photodetectors among others throughout the infrared frequency range.

  14. Theoretical and experimental study of nanoporous silicon photonic microcavity optical sensor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, P. N.; Mishra, Vivekanand; Panchal, A. K.

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports the theoretical and experimental study of one-dimensional (1D) multilayer nanoporous silicon (NPS) photonic band gap (PBG) microcavity (MC) structures for optical sensor device applications. A theoretical framework to model the reflectance spectra relying on the Bruggeman's effective medium approximation (BEMA) and the transfer matrix method (TMM) was established for the 1D nanoporous silicon microcavity (1D-NPSMC) optical sensor device structures. Based on the theoretical background, 1D-NPSMC sensor device structures were fabricated using electrochemical dissolution of silicon wafer in hydrofluoric (HF) acid. The refractive index of the 1D-NPSMC structures was tuned by changing current density and the thickness was tuned by changing the etching time. Wavelength shifts (Δλ) in the measured reflectance spectra were analyzed for the detection of the analyte in the porous structure. The sensing device performance was tested by different organic solvents, which showed good linear relation between the refractive index of analyte inside the pores and the wavelength shift. The application of proposed structures can be extended for the optical sensing of chemicals, gas, environmental pollutants, pathogens etc.

  15. Photonic lattices in organic microcavities: Bloch states and control of lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischok, Andreas; Brückner, Robert; Fröb, Hartmut; Lyssenko, Vadim G.; Leo, Karl

    2015-09-01

    Organic microcavities comprising the host:guest emitter system Alq3:DCM offer an interesting playground to experimentally study the dispersion characteristics of laterally patterned microlasers due to the broad emission spectrum and large oscillator strength of the organic dye. By structuring of metallic or dielectric sublayers directly on top of the bottom mirror, we precisely manipulate the mode structure and influence the coherent emission properties of the device. Embedding silver layers into a microcavity leads to an interaction of the optical cavity-state in the organic layer and the neighboring metal which red-shifts the cavity resonance, creating a Tamm-plasmon-polariton state. A patterning of the metal can in turn be exploited to fabricate deep photonic wells of micron-size, efficiently confining light in lateral direction. In periodic arrays of silver wires, we create a Kronig-Penney-like optical potential in the cavity and in turn observe optical Bloch states spanning over several photonic wires. We modify the Kronig-Penney theory to analytically describe the full far-field emission dispersion of our cavities and show the emergence of either zero- , π-, or 2π- phase-locking in the system. By investigating periodic SiO2 patterns, we experimentally observe stimulated emission from the ground and different excited discrete states at room temperature and are able to directly control the laser emission from both extended and confined modes of the photonic wires at room-temperature.

  16. Observation of a hybrid state of Tamm plasmons and microcavity exciton polaritons

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, SK. Shaid-Ur; Klein, Thorsten; Klembt, Sebastian; Gutowski, Jürgen; Hommel, Detlef; Sebald, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    We present evidence for the existence of a hybrid state of Tamm plasmons and microcavity exciton polaritons in a II-VI material based microcavity sample covered with an Ag metal layer. The bare cavity mode shows a characteristic anticrossing with the Tamm-plasmon mode, when microreflectivity measurements are performed for different detunings between the Tamm plasmon and the cavity mode. When the Tamm-plasmon mode is in resonance with the cavity polariton four hybrid eigenstates are observed due to the coupling of the cavity-photon mode, the Tamm-plasmon mode, and the heavy- and light-hole excitons. If the bare Tamm-plasmon mode is tuned, these resonances will exhibit three anticrossings. Experimental results are in good agreement with calculations based on the transfer matrix method as well as on the coupled-oscillators model. The lowest hybrid eigenstate is observed to be red shifted by about 13 meV with respect to the lower cavity polariton state when the Tamm plasmon is resonantly coupled with the cavity polariton. This spectral shift which is caused by the metal layer can be used to create a trapping potential channel for the polaritons. Such channels can guide the polariton propagation similar to one-dimensional polariton wires. PMID:27698359

  17. Optofluidic Modulation of Self-Associated Nanostructural Units Forming Planar Bragg Microcavities.

    PubMed

    Oliva-Ramirez, Manuel; Barranco, Angel; Löffler, Markus; Yubero, Francisco; González-Elipe, Agustin R

    2016-01-26

    Bragg microcavities (BMs) formed by the successive stacking of nanocolumnar porous SiO2 and TiO2 layers with slanted, zigzag, chiral, and vertical configurations are prepared by physical vapor deposition at oblique angles while azimuthally varying the substrate orientation during the multilayer growth. The slanted and zigzag BMs act as wavelength-selective optical retarders when they are illuminated with linearly polarized light, while no polarization dependence is observed for the chiral and vertical cavities. This distinct optical behavior is attributed to a self-nanostructuration mechanism involving a fence-bundling association of nanocolumns as observed by focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy in the slanted and zigzag microcavities. The outstanding retarder response of the optically active BMs can be effectively modulated by dynamic infiltration of nano- and mesopores with liquids of different refraction indices acting as a switch of the polarization behavior. The unprecedented polarization and tunable optofluidic properties of these nanostructured photonic systems have been successfully simulated with a simple model that assumes a certain birefringence for the individual stacked layers and accounts for the light interference phenomena developed in the BMs. The possibilities of this type of self-arranged nanostructured and optically active BMs for liquid sensing and monitoring applications are discussed. PMID:26653767

  18. Observation of a hybrid state of Tamm plasmons and microcavity exciton polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Sk. Shaid-Ur; Klein, Thorsten; Klembt, Sebastian; Gutowski, Jürgen; Hommel, Detlef; Sebald, Kathrin

    2016-10-01

    We present evidence for the existence of a hybrid state of Tamm plasmons and microcavity exciton polaritons in a II-VI material based microcavity sample covered with an Ag metal layer. The bare cavity mode shows a characteristic anticrossing with the Tamm-plasmon mode, when microreflectivity measurements are performed for different detunings between the Tamm plasmon and the cavity mode. When the Tamm-plasmon mode is in resonance with the cavity polariton four hybrid eigenstates are observed due to the coupling of the cavity-photon mode, the Tamm-plasmon mode, and the heavy- and light-hole excitons. If the bare Tamm-plasmon mode is tuned, these resonances will exhibit three anticrossings. Experimental results are in good agreement with calculations based on the transfer matrix method as well as on the coupled-oscillators model. The lowest hybrid eigenstate is observed to be red shifted by about 13 meV with respect to the lower cavity polariton state when the Tamm plasmon is resonantly coupled with the cavity polariton. This spectral shift which is caused by the metal layer can be used to create a trapping potential channel for the polaritons. Such channels can guide the polariton propagation similar to one-dimensional polariton wires.

  19. Microheater-integrated silicon coupled photonic crystal microcavities for low-power thermo-optic switching over a wide spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingyu; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Chung, Chi-Jui; Pan, Zeyu; Yan, Hai; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-03-01

    We design, fabricate and experimentally demonstrate a compact thermo-optic gate switch comprising a 3.78μm-long coupled L0-type photonic crystal microcavities on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. A nanohole is inserted in the center of each individual L0 photonic crystal microcavity. Coupling between identical microcavities gives rise to bonding and antibonding states of the coupled photonic molecules. The coupled photonic crystal microcavities are numerically simulated and experimentally verified with a 6nm-wide flat-bottom resonance in its transmission spectrum, which enables wider operational spectrum range than microring resonators. An integrated micro-heater is in direct contact with the silicon core to efficiently drive the device. The thermo-optic switch is measured with an optical extinction ratio of 20dB, an on-off switching power of 18.2mW, a therm-optic tuning efficiency of 0.63nm/mW, a rise time of 14.8μsec and a fall time of 18.5μsec. The measured on-chip loss on the transmission band is as low as 1dB.

  20. Ultra-compact and wide-spectrum-range thermo-optic switch based on silicon coupled photonic crystal microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingyu; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Chung, Chi-Jui; Pan, Zeyu; Yan, Hai; Chen, Ray T.

    2015-11-01

    We design, fabricate, and experimentally demonstrate a compact thermo-optic gate switch comprising a 3.78 μm-long coupled L0-type photonic crystal microcavities on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. A nanohole is inserted in the center of each individual L0 photonic crystal microcavity. Coupling between identical microcavities gives rise to bonding and anti-bonding states of the coupled photonic molecules. The coupled photonic crystal microcavities are numerically simulated and experimentally verified with a 6 nm-wide flat-bottom resonance in its transmission spectrum, which enables wider operational spectrum range than microring resonators. An integrated micro-heater is in direct contact with the silicon core to efficiently drive the device. The thermo-optic switch is measured with an optical extinction ratio of 20 dB, an on-off switching power of 18.2 mW, a thermo-optic tuning efficiency of 0.63 nm/mW, a rise time of 14.8 μs, and a fall time of 18.5 μs. The measured on-chip loss on the transmission band is as low as 1 dB.

  1. Ultra-compact and wide-spectrum-range thermo-optic switch based on silicon coupled photonic crystal microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xingyu E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com Chung, Chi-Jui; Pan, Zeyu; Yan, Hai; Chakravarty, Swapnajit E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com; Chen, Ray T. E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com

    2015-11-30

    We design, fabricate, and experimentally demonstrate a compact thermo-optic gate switch comprising a 3.78 μm-long coupled L0-type photonic crystal microcavities on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. A nanohole is inserted in the center of each individual L0 photonic crystal microcavity. Coupling between identical microcavities gives rise to bonding and anti-bonding states of the coupled photonic molecules. The coupled photonic crystal microcavities are numerically simulated and experimentally verified with a 6 nm-wide flat-bottom resonance in its transmission spectrum, which enables wider operational spectrum range than microring resonators. An integrated micro-heater is in direct contact with the silicon core to efficiently drive the device. The thermo-optic switch is measured with an optical extinction ratio of 20 dB, an on-off switching power of 18.2 mW, a thermo-optic tuning efficiency of 0.63 nm/mW, a rise time of 14.8 μs, and a fall time of 18.5 μs. The measured on-chip loss on the transmission band is as low as 1 dB.

  2. Roadmap for High School Feedback Reports: Key Focus Areas to Ensure Quality Implementation. Data for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2014

    2014-01-01

    High school feedback reports let school and district leaders know where their students go after graduation and how well they are prepared for college and beyond. This roadmap discusses the seven key focus areas the Data Quality Campaign (DQC) recommends states work on to ensure quality implementation of high school feedback reports.

  3. Measurement system with high accuracy for laser beam quality.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yi; Zeng, Ciling; Xie, Peiyuan; Jiang, Qingshan; Liang, Ke; Yang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Ming

    2015-05-20

    Presently, most of the laser beam quality measurement system collimates the optical path manually with low efficiency and low repeatability. To solve these problems, this paper proposed a new collimated method to improve the reliability and accuracy of the measurement results. The system accuracy controlled the position of the mirror to change laser beam propagation direction, which can realize the beam perpendicularly incident to the photosurface of camera. The experiment results show that the proposed system has good repeatability and the measuring deviation of M2 factor is less than 0.6%.

  4. One step high quality poly(dimethylsiloxane)-hydrocarbon plastics bonding.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bi-Yi; Yan, Xiao-Na; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, one-step air plasma treatment is successfully used for poly(dimethylsiloxane)(PDMS)-plastic chip bonding. The technique is green, cheap, and requires no other reagent other than air. Hydrocarbon plastics: polystyrene (PS), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), and polypropylene (PP) have all been successfully bonded to PDMS irreversibly. The corresponding compressed air resistances are measured to be around 500 kPa for PDMS-PS, PDMS-COC, and PDMS-PP hybrid chips. The bondings are also of good quality even after storage under different temperatures and subject to solutions from acid to base.

  5. High-quality healthcare workplaces: a vision and action plan.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Graham S

    2002-01-01

    Looking into a future marked by intense competition for talent, growing numbers of employers are striving to create "workplaces of choice." Yet, despite the consensus that health human resources are a vital piece of the healthcare reform puzzle, few health service organizations have developed comprehensive strategies to address work environment issues. The cumulative impact of years of cost-cutting, downsizing and restructuring have left Canada's healthcare workforce demoralized, overworked and coping with working conditions that diminish both the quality of working life and organizational performance. PMID:12357573

  6. Measurement system with high accuracy for laser beam quality.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yi; Zeng, Ciling; Xie, Peiyuan; Jiang, Qingshan; Liang, Ke; Yang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Ming

    2015-05-20

    Presently, most of the laser beam quality measurement system collimates the optical path manually with low efficiency and low repeatability. To solve these problems, this paper proposed a new collimated method to improve the reliability and accuracy of the measurement results. The system accuracy controlled the position of the mirror to change laser beam propagation direction, which can realize the beam perpendicularly incident to the photosurface of camera. The experiment results show that the proposed system has good repeatability and the measuring deviation of M2 factor is less than 0.6%. PMID:26192526

  7. Publishing high-quality climate data on the semantic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Andrew; Haller, Armin; Lefort, Laurent; Taylor, Kerry

    2013-04-01

    The effort over more than a decade to establish the semantic web [Berners-Lee et. al., 2001] has received a major boost in recent years through the Open Government movement. Governments around the world are seeking technical solutions to enable more open and transparent access to Public Sector Information (PSI) they hold. Existing technical protocols and data standards tend to be domain specific, and so limit the ability to publish and integrate data across domains (health, environment, statistics, education, etc.). The web provides a domain-neutral platform for information publishing, and has proven itself beyond expectations for publishing and linking human-readable electronic documents. Extending the web pattern to data (often called Web 3.0) offers enormous potential. The semantic web applies the basic web principles to data [Berners-Lee, 2006]: using URIs as identifiers (for data objects and real-world 'things', instead of documents) making the URIs actionable by providing useful information via HTTP using a common exchange standard (serialised RDF for data instead of HTML for documents) establishing typed links between information objects to enable linking and integration Leading examples of 'linked data' for publishing PSI may be found in both the UK (http://data.gov.uk/linked-data) and US (http://www.data.gov/page/semantic-web). The Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) is Australia's national meteorological agency, and has a new mandate to establish a national environmental information infrastructure (under the National Plan for Environmental Information, NPEI [BoM, 2012a]). While the initial approach is based on the existing best practice Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) architecture, linked-data is being explored as a technological alternative that shows great promise for the future. We report here the first trial of government linked-data in Australia under data.gov.au. In this initial pilot study, we have taken BoM's new high-quality reference surface

  8. High Quality Factor Metallodielectric Hybrid Plasmonic-Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xindi; Shi, Lei; Han, Dezhuan; Zi, Jian; Braun, Paul V.

    2010-05-11

    A 2D polystyrene colloidal crystal self-assembled on a flat gold surface supports multiple photonic and plasmonic propagating resonance modes. For both classes of modes, the quality factors can exceed 100, higher than the quality factor of surface plasmons (SP) at a polymer–gold interface. The spatial energy distribution of those resonance modes are carefully studied by measuring the optical response of the hybrid plasmonic–photonic crystal after coating with dielectric materials under different coating profiles. Computer simulations with results closely matching those of experiments provide a clear picture of the field distribution of each resonance mode. For the SP modes, there is strong confinement of electromagnetic energy near the metal surface, while for optical modes, the field is confined inside the spherical particles, far away from the metal. Coating of dielectric material on the crystal results in a large shift in optical features. A surface sensor based on the hybrid plasmonic–photonic crystal is proposed, and it is shown to have atomic layer sensitivity. An example of ethanol vapor sensing based on physisorption of ethanol onto the sensor surface is demonstrated.

  9. The high cost of low quality in R D (research and development)

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, C.V.

    1990-10-01

    The principles of quality assurance and quality control yield high payoffs when applied to research activities. Researchers are usually highly motivated individuals who earnestly desire to produce excellent results. The nature of research and the temperament of researchers are such that considerable freedom and latitude are usually required so that the creative processes are not impeded. These are approaches that can be used in applying quality assurance and control that researchers will accept and use when they see the payoff. Some examples are given, with particular emphasis on quality cost systems applied to measurement processes in R D. 14 refs.

  10. High-Quality Preschool Programs Found to Improve Adult Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weikart, David

    1996-01-01

    The longitudinal High Scope/Perry Preschool Study of 123 African Americans in poverty and at high risk of school failure interviewed 95% of participants at age 27. Profiles indicate that participants had fewer criminal arrests, higher earnings and property wealth, and greater commitment to marriage than nonparticipants, suggesting significant…

  11. High quality Gaussian basis sets for fourth-row atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Faegri, Knut, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Energy optimized Gaussian basis sets of triple-zeta quality for the atoms Rb-Xe have been derived. Two series of basis sets are developed: (24s 16p 10d) and (26s 16p 10d) sets which were expanded to 13d and 19p functions as the 4d and 5p shells become occupied. For the atoms lighter than Cd, the (24s 16p 10d) sets with triple-zeta valence distributions are higher in energy than the corresponding double-zeta distribution. To ensure a triple-zeta distribution and a global energy minimum, the (26s 16p 10d) sets were derived. Total atomic energies from the largest basis sets are between 198 and 284 (mu)E(sub H) above the numerical Hartree-Fock energies.

  12. High quality exchange rotations in spin qubits using symmetric gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Malinowski, F. K.; Nissen, P. D.; Marcus, C. M.; Kuemmeth, F.; Barnes, E.; Gardner, G. C.; Fallahi, S.; Manfra, M. J.

    We present results on a singlet-triplet qubit implemented in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure and we show that exchange oscillations can be realized either by tilting the double well potential, the conventional method, or by symmetrically lowering the barrier, as originally suggested by Loss and DiVincenzo. The two methods are compared here. We find that lowering the barrier between dots has much less relative exchange noise compared to tilting the potential. Since exchange rotations are sensitive to electrical noise and relatively insensitive to nuclear noise, this yields significantly enhanced free induction decay times and quality factors. Our results are comparable to those reported recently in silicon quantum dot devices, obtained using similar techniques. Support through IARPA-MQCO, LPS-MPO-CMTC, Army Research Office, and the Danish National Research Foundation is acknowledged.

  13. Cost-effective multi-camera array for high quality video with very high dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keinert, Joachim; Wetzel, Marcus; Schöberl, Michael; Schäfer, Peter; Zilly, Frederik; Bätz, Michel; Fößel, Siegfried; Kaup, André

    2014-03-01

    Temporal bracketing can create images with higher dynamic range than the underlying sensor. Unfortunately, moving objects cause disturbing artifacts. Moreover, the combination with high frame rates is almost unachiev­ able since a single video frame requires multiple sensor readouts. The combination of multiple synchronized side-by-side cameras equipped with different attenuation filters promises a remedy, since all exposures can be performed at the same time with the same duration using the playout video frame rate. However, a disparity correction is needed to compensate the spatial displacement of the cameras. Unfortunately, the requirements for a high quality disparity correction contradict the goal to increase dynamic range. When using two cameras, disparity correction needs objects to be properly exposed in both cameras. In contrast, a dynamic range in­crease needs the cameras to capture different luminance ranges. As this contradiction has not been addressed in literature so far, this paper proposes a novel solution based on a three camera setup. It enables accurate de­ termination of the disparities and an increase of the dynamic range by nearly a factor of two while still limiting costs. Compared to a two camera solution, the mean opinion score (MOS) is improved by 13.47 units in average for the Middleburry images.

  14. High-quality lossy compression: current and future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Steven W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is concerned with current and future trends in the lossy compression of real sources such as imagery, video, speech and music. We put all lossy compression schemes into common framework where each can be characterized in terms of three well-defined advantages: cell shape, region shape and memory advantages. We concentrate on image compression and discuss how new entropy constrained trellis-based compressors achieve cell- shape, region-shape and memory gain resulting in high fidelity and high compression.

  15. Clitoria ternatea L. as a Potential High Quality Forage Legume.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Matheus Lima Corrêa; Vieira, Ricardo Augusto Mendonça; Rocha, Norberto Silva; Araujo, Raphael Pavesi; Glória, Leonardo Siqueira; Fernandes, Alberto Magno; de Lacerda, Paulo Drude; Júnior, Antonio Gesualdi

    2014-02-01

    Samples of Clitoria ternatea L. (Cunhã) were harvested at 35, 50, 70, and 90 d after a uniformity harvest in a field study designed as a completely randomized design with a total of 18 experimental plots. The dry matter yield of the whole plant was separated quantitatively into leaves, stems, and pods at each harvesting age. Chemical analyses and in vitro gas production kinetics were performed to assess the quality of the plant parts. Yields, chemical composition, and estimates of gas production parameters were analyzed by fitting a mixed statistical model with two types of covariance structures as follows: variance components and an unrestricted structure with heterogeneous variances. Fast and slow gas yielding pools were detected for both leaves and stems, but only a single pool was detected for pods. The homoscedasticity assumption was more likely for all variables, except for some parameters of the gas production kinetics of leaves and stems. There was no presence of typical pods at 35 and 50 d. In the leaves, the fibrous fractions were affected, whereas the non-fibrous fractions were unaffected by the harvesting age. The harvesting age affected the majority of the chemical constituents and gas kinetic parameters related to the stems. The leaves of this legume were the least affected part by the aging process. PMID:25049940

  16. Clitoria ternatea L. as a Potential High Quality Forage Legume

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Matheus Lima Corrêa; Vieira, Ricardo Augusto Mendonça; Rocha, Norberto Silva; Araujo, Raphael Pavesi; Glória, Leonardo Siqueira; Fernandes, Alberto Magno; de Lacerda, Paulo Drude; Júnior, Antonio Gesualdi

    2014-01-01

    Samples of Clitoria ternatea L. (Cunhã) were harvested at 35, 50, 70, and 90 d after a uniformity harvest in a field study designed as a completely randomized design with a total of 18 experimental plots. The dry matter yield of the whole plant was separated quantitatively into leaves, stems, and pods at each harvesting age. Chemical analyses and in vitro gas production kinetics were performed to assess the quality of the plant parts. Yields, chemical composition, and estimates of gas production parameters were analyzed by fitting a mixed statistical model with two types of covariance structures as follows: variance components and an unrestricted structure with heterogeneous variances. Fast and slow gas yielding pools were detected for both leaves and stems, but only a single pool was detected for pods. The homoscedasticity assumption was more likely for all variables, except for some parameters of the gas production kinetics of leaves and stems. There was no presence of typical pods at 35 and 50 d. In the leaves, the fibrous fractions were affected, whereas the non-fibrous fractions were unaffected by the harvesting age. The harvesting age affected the majority of the chemical constituents and gas kinetic parameters related to the stems. The leaves of this legume were the least affected part by the aging process. PMID:25049940

  17. SCALED SIMULATION DESIGN OF HIGH QUALITY LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR STAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Leemans, W.P.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Cowan, B.; Nieter, C.; Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.

    2009-05-04

    Design of efficient, high gradient laser driven wakefield accelerator (LWFA) stages using explicit particle-incell simulations with physical parameters scaled by plasma density is presented. LWFAs produce few percent energy spread electron bunches at 0.1-1 GeV with high accelerating gradients. Design tools are now required to predict and improve performance and efficiency of future LWFA stages. Scaling physical parameters extends the reach of explicit simulations to address applications including 10 GeV stages and stages for radiation sources, and accurately resolves deep laser depletion to evaluate efficient stages.

  18. Isolation of high quality RNA from Phyllanthus emblica and its evaluation by downstream applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Avneesh; Singh, Kashmir

    2012-11-01

    Next generation sequencing is a high-throughput technique widely used for transcriptome profiling. Isolation of high quality RNA is a prerequisite for such large scale transcriptome analysis. Phyllanthus emblica is an important medicinal plant having high amount of metabolites like vitamin C, flavonoids, polyphenolic compounds, tannins, which are responsible for its wondered medicinal properties. High concentration of secondary metabolites like polysaccharides and polyphenols proved to be an obstacle in isolating RNA of good quality. Any compromise with quality of RNA affects the downstream applications and requires extra cleaning steps that further reduce RNA quantity. We have developed a protocol for isolation of high quality RNA from P. embilca. RNA was successfully assessed for downstream applications like reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, rapid amplification of cDNA ends, mRNA library preparation, and sequencing using HiSeq(™) 2000 sequencing technology. The protocol is simple and can be completed in 4-5 h.

  19. Large-scale high quality glass microlens arrays fabricated by laser enhanced wet etching.

    PubMed

    Tong, Siyu; Bian, Hao; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Deng, Zefang; Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2014-11-17

    Large-scale high quality microlens arrays (MLAs) play an important role in enhancing the imaging quality of CCD and CMOS as well as the light extraction efficiency of LEDs and OLEDs. To meet the requirement in MLAs' wide application areas, a rapid fabrication method to fabricate large-scale MLAs with high quality, high fill factor and high uniformity is needed, especially on the glass substrate. In this paper, we present a simple and cost-efficient approach to the development of both concave and convex large-scale microlens arrays (MLAs) by using femtosecond laser wet etching method and replication technique. A large-scale high quality square-shaped microlens array with 512 × 512 units was fabricated.The unit size is 20 × 20 μm² on the whole scale of 1 × 1 cm². Its perfect uniformity and optical performance are demonstrated. PMID:25402166

  20. Bust economics: foragers choose high quality habitats in lean times.

    PubMed

    Bleicher, Sonny S; Dickman, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    In environments where food resources are spatially variable and temporarily impoverished, consumers that encounter habitat patches with different food density should focus their foraging initially where food density is highest before they move to patches where food density is lower. Increasing missed opportunity costs should drive individuals progressively to patches with lower food density as resources in the initially high food density patches deplete. To test these expectations, we assessed the foraging decisions of two species of dasyurid marsupials (dunnarts: Sminthopsis hirtipes and S. youngsoni) during a deep drought, or bust period, in the Simpson Desert of central Australia. Dunnarts were allowed access to three patches containing different food densities using an interview chamber experiment. Both species exhibited clear preference for the high density over the lower food density patches as measured in total harvested resources. Similarly, when measuring the proportion of resources harvested within the patches, we observed a marginal preference for patches with initially high densities. Models analyzing behavioral choices at the population level found no differences in behavior between the two species, but models analyzing choices at the individual level uncovered some variation. We conclude that dunnarts can distinguish between habitat patches with different densities of food and preferentially exploit the most valuable. As our observations were made during bust conditions, experiments should be repeated during boom times to assess the foraging economics of dunnarts when environmental resources are high. PMID:26839751

  1. Bust economics: foragers choose high quality habitats in lean times

    PubMed Central

    Dickman, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    In environments where food resources are spatially variable and temporarily impoverished, consumers that encounter habitat patches with different food density should focus their foraging initially where food density is highest before they move to patches where food density is lower. Increasing missed opportunity costs should drive individuals progressively to patches with lower food density as resources in the initially high food density patches deplete. To test these expectations, we assessed the foraging decisions of two species of dasyurid marsupials (dunnarts: Sminthopsis hirtipes and S. youngsoni) during a deep drought, or bust period, in the Simpson Desert of central Australia. Dunnarts were allowed access to three patches containing different food densities using an interview chamber experiment. Both species exhibited clear preference for the high density over the lower food density patches as measured in total harvested resources. Similarly, when measuring the proportion of resources harvested within the patches, we observed a marginal preference for patches with initially high densities. Models analyzing behavioral choices at the population level found no differences in behavior between the two species, but models analyzing choices at the individual level uncovered some variation. We conclude that dunnarts can distinguish between habitat patches with different densities of food and preferentially exploit the most valuable. As our observations were made during bust conditions, experiments should be repeated during boom times to assess the foraging economics of dunnarts when environmental resources are high. PMID:26839751

  2. Health-related quality of life in children with high-functioning autism.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Marie-Christine; Snider, Laurie; Prelock, Patricia A; Wood-Dauphinee, Sharon; Kehayia, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The health-related quality of life of school-aged children with high-functioning autism is poorly understood. The objectives of this study were to compare the health-related quality of life of children with high-functioning autism to that of typically developing peers and to compare child-self and parent-proxy reports of health-related quality of life of children. A cross-sectional study of children with high-functioning autism (n = 30) and peers (n = 31) was conducted using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 Generic Core Scales. Children with high-functioning autism had significantly poorer health-related quality of life than peers whether reported by themselves (p < .001) or their parents (p < .001), although disagreement (intra-class coefficient = -.075) between children and parental scores suggested variance in points of view. This study specifically investigated health-related quality of life in children with high-functioning autism as compared to a sample of peers, from the child's perspective. It strengthens earlier findings that children with high-functioning autism experience poorer health-related quality of life than those without this disorder and points to the importance of clinicians working with families to identify areas in a child's life that promote or hinder their sense of well-being.

  3. Submicron Positioning of Single Atoms in a Microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Nussmann, Stefan; Hijlkema, Markus; Weber, Bernhard; Rohde, Felix; Rempe, Gerhard; Kuhn, Axel

    2005-10-21

    The coupling of individual atoms to a high-finesse optical cavity is precisely controlled and adjusted using a standing-wave dipole-force trap, a challenge for strong atom-cavity coupling. Ultracold Rubidium atoms are first loaded into potential minima of the dipole trap in the center of the cavity. Then we use the trap as a conveyor belt that we set into motion perpendicular to the cavity axis. This allows us to repetitively move atoms out of and back into the cavity mode with a repositioning precision of 135 nm. This makes it possible to either selectively address one atom of a string of atoms by the cavity, or to simultaneously couple two precisely separated atoms to a higher mode of the cavity.

  4. A Project to Enhance Superintendents' Knowledge and Application of Characteristics of High Quality Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pummill, Bret L.; Edson, Jerry C.; Loftin, Michelle M.; Robinson, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a problem based learning project focusing on superintendents' knowledge of the characteristics of high quality teachers. Current research findings offer evidence teacher quality is an important school variable related to student achievement. School district leaders are faced with the problem of identifying the characteristics…

  5. Student Future Outlook and Counseling Quality in a Rural Minority High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dellana, Scott A.; Snyder, David

    2004-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether differences in future outlook among students in a predominantly minority, rural North Carolina High School were impacted by 5 variables: quality of counseling, race, gender, grade level, and academic performance. We found that quality of counseling and self-reported grades were positively associated with…

  6. Providers, Children, and Families Experience the Impact of High Quality Care Giving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsalia, Joan

    2005-01-01

    The National Association for Family Child Care (NAFCC), a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting quality child care, believes that family child care accreditation is the true measure of high-quality family based care. In this article, the author presents the steps made by the NAFCC to accreditation. NAFCC Accreditation is a formal system…

  7. Preparing and Licensing High Quality Teachers in Pacific Region Jurisdictions. Issues & Answers. REL 2007-No. 031

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heine, Hilda C.; Emesiochl, Masa Akii

    2007-01-01

    The provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001 for teacher quality direct that all students in U.S. public schools be taught by highly qualified teachers. Although the Pacific Region entities are trying to meet this teacher-quality mandate, most are still far from fulfilling the minimum education requirements for their teachers. By…

  8. The Role of Central Level Staff in Supporting High Quality Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Matthew Tanner

    2013-01-01

    The central office manages and directs a school system. In the wake of district and school reforms, the impact of the central office on schools and quality instruction has not been fully dissected. This study explores the role of the central office in the support of high quality instruction. Further, it analyzes the perceptions of those central…

  9. Representations of a High-Quality System of Undergraduate Education in English Higher Education Policy Documents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashwin, Paul; Abbas, Andrea; McLean, Monica

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the ways in which a high-quality system of undergraduate education is represented in recent policy documents from a range of actors interested in higher education. Drawing on Basil Bernstein's ideas, the authors conceptualise the policy documents as reflecting a struggle over competing views of quality that are expressed…

  10. Building a High-Quality Teaching Profession: Lessons from around the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "International Summit on the Teaching Profession" brings together education ministers, union leaders and other teacher leaders from high-performing and rapidly improving education systems to review how best to improve teacher quality and the quality of teaching and learning. This background report, taking up the four themes of the summit in…

  11. Photoelastic ultrasound detection using ultra-high-Q silica optical resonators.

    PubMed

    Chistiakova, Maria V; Armani, Andrea M

    2014-11-17

    As a result of its non-invasive and non-destructive nature, ultrasound imaging has found a variety of applications in a wide range of fields, including healthcare and electronics. One accurate and sensitive approach for detecting ultrasound waves is based on optical microcavities. Previous research using polymer microring resonators demonstrated detection based on the deformation of the cavity induced by the ultrasound wave. An alternative detection approach is based on the photoelastic effect in which the ultrasound wave induces a strain in the material that is converted to a refractive index change. In the present work, photoelastic-based ultrasound detection is experimentally demonstrated using ultra high quality factor silica optical microcavities. As a result of the increase in Q and in coupled power, the noise equivalent pressure is reduced, and the device response is increased. A finite element method model that includes both the acoustics and optics components of this system is developed, and the predictive accuracy of the model is determined. PMID:25402057

  12. High crystalline quality single crystal chemical vapour deposition diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martineau, P. M.; Gaukroger, M. P.; Guy, K. B.; Lawson, S. C.; Twitchen, D. J.; Friel, I.; Hansen, J. O.; Summerton, G. C.; Addison, T. P. G.; Burns, R.

    2009-09-01

    Homoepitaxial chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) synthetic diamond substrates allows the production of diamond material with controlled point defect content. In order to minimize the extended defect content, however, it is necessary to minimize the number of substrate extended defects that reach the initial growth surface and the nucleation of dislocations at the interface between the CVD layer and its substrate. X-ray topography has indicated that when type IIa HPHT synthetic substrates are used, the density of dislocations nucleating at the interface can be less than 400 cm-2. X-ray topography, photoluminescence imaging and birefringence microscopy of HPHT grown synthetic type IIa diamond clearly show that the extended defect content is growth sector dependent. lang111rang sectors contain the highest concentration of both stacking faults and dislocations but lang100rang sectors are relatively free of both. It has been shown that HPHT treatment of such material can significantly reduce the area of stacking faults and cause dislocations to move. This knowledge, coupled with an understanding of how growth sectors develop during HPHT synthesis, has been used to guide selection and processing of substrates suitable for CVD synthesis of material with high crystalline perfection and controlled point defect content.

  13. High quality epoxysilane substrate for clinical multiplex serodiagnostic proteomic microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewart, Tom; Carmichael, Stuart; Lea, Peter

    2005-09-01

    Polylysine and aminopropylsilane treated glass comprised the majority of substrates employed in first generation genetic microarray substrates. Second generation single stranded long oligo libraries with amino termini provided for controlled terminal specific attachment, and rationally designed unique sequence libraries with normalized melting temperatures. These libraries benefit from active covalent coupling surfaces such as Epoxysilane. The latter's oxime ring shows versatile reactivity with amino-, thiol- and hydroxyl- groups thus encompassing small molecule, oligo and proteomic microarray applications. Batch-to-batch production uniformity supports entry of the Epoxysilane process into clinical diagnostics. We carried out multiple print runs of 21 clinically relevant bacterial and viral antigens at optimized concentrations, plus human IgG and IgM standards in triplicate on multiple batches of Epoxysilane substrates. A set of 45 patient sera were assayed in a 35 minute protocol using 10 microliters per array in a capillary-fill format (15 minute serum incubation, wash, 15 minute incubation with Cy3-labeled anti-hIgG plus Dy647-labeled anti-hIgM, final wash). The LOD (3 SD above background) was better than 1 microgram/ml for IgG, and standard curves were regular and monotonically increasing over the range 0 to 1000 micrograms/ml. Ninety-five percent of the CVs for the standards were under 10%, and 90% percent of CVs for antigen responses were under 10% across all batches of Epoxysilane and print runs. In addition, where SDs are larger than expected, microarray images may be readily reviewed for quality control purposes and pin misprints quickly identified. In order to determine the influence of stirring on sensitivity and speed of the microarray assay, we printed 10 common ToRCH antigens (H. pylori, T. gondii, Rubella, Rubeola, C. trachomatis, Herpes 1 and 2, CMV, C. jejuni, and EBV) in Epoxysilane-activated slide-wells. Anti-IgG-Cy3 direct binding to printed Ig

  14. Generation of Antibunched Light by Excited Molecules in a Microcavity Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMartini, F.; DiGiuseppe, G.; Marrocco, M.

    1996-01-01

    The active microcavity is adopted as an efficient source of non-classical light. By this device, excited by a mode-locked laser at a rate of 100 MHz, single-photons are generated over a single field mode with a nonclassical sub-poissonian distribution. The process of adiabatic recycling within a multi-step Franck-Condon molecular optical-pumping mechanism, characterized in our case by a quantum efficiency very close to one, implies a pump self-regularization process leading to a striking n-squeezing effect. By a replication of the basic single-atom excitation process a beam of quantum photon (Fock states) can be created. The new process represents a significant advance in the modern fields of basic quantum-mechanical investigation, quantum communication and quantum cryptography.

  15. Interaction-induced hopping phase in driven-dissipative coupled photonic microcavities.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, S R K; Amo, A; Sagnes, I; Le Gratiet, L; Galopin, E; Lemaître, A; Bloch, J

    2016-01-01

    The Bose-Hubbard model (BHM) describes bosons hopping across sites and interacting on-site. Inspired by the success of BHM simulators with atoms in optical lattices, proposals for implementing the BHM with photons in coupled nonlinear cavities have recently emerged. Two coupled semiconductor microcavities constitute a model system where the hopping, interaction and decay of exciton polaritons-mixed light-matter quasiparticles-can be engineered in combination with site-selective coherent driving to implement the driven-dissipative two-site optical BHM. Here we explore the interplay of interference and nonlinearity in this system, in a regime where three distinct density profiles can be observed under identical driving conditions. We demonstrate how the phase acquired by polaritons hopping between cavities can be controlled through polariton-polariton interactions. Our results open new perspectives for synthesizing density-dependent gauge fields using polaritons in two-dimensional multicavity systems. PMID:27307038

  16. Distinguishing autocrine and paracrine signals in hematopoietic stem cell culture using a biofunctional microcavity platform

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Eike; Wang, Weijia; Qiao, Wenlian; Bornhäuser, Martin; Zandstra, Peter W.; Werner, Carsten; Pompe, Tilo

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the mammalian bone marrow stem cell niche is regulated by signals of the local microenvironment. Besides juxtacrine, endocrine and metabolic cues, paracrine and autocrine signals are involved in controlling quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of HSC with strong implications on expansion and differentiation ex vivo as well as in vivo transplantation. Towards this aim, a cell culture analysis on a polymer microcavity carrier platform was combined with a partial least square analysis of a mechanistic model of cell proliferation. We could demonstrate the discrimination of specific autocrine and paracrine signals from soluble factors as stimulating and inhibitory effectors in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell culture. From that we hypothesize autocrine signals to be predominantly involved in maintaining the quiescent state of HSC in single-cell niches and advocate our analysis platform as an unprecedented option for untangling convoluted signaling mechanisms in complex cell systems being it of juxtacrine, paracrine or autocrine origin. PMID:27535453

  17. Controlled Strong Coupling and Absence of Dark Polaritons in Microcavities with Double Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivalertporn, K.; Muljarov, E. A.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate an efficient switching between strong and weak exciton-photon coupling regimes in microcavity-embedded asymmetric double quantum wells, controlled by an applied electric field. We show that a fine-tuning of the electric field leads to drastic changes in the polariton properties, with the polariton ground state being redshifted by a few meV and having acquired prominent features of a spatially indirect dipolar exciton. We study the properties of dipolar exciton polaritons, called dipolaritons, on a microscopic level and show that, unlike recent findings, they are not dark polaritons but, owing to the finite size of the exciton, are mixed states with a comparable contribution of the cavity photon, bright direct, and long-living indirect exciton modes.

  18. Theoretical Study of Optical Microcavities Coupled by a Modulated Bragg Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, A. G.; Santos, M. França; Guimarães, P. S. S.; Vasco, J. P.; Romero, K. M. Fonseca; Vinck-Posada, H.

    2011-12-01

    We study the change in coupling between two GaAs lambda-microcavities embedded in a one-dimensional photonic crystal composed of GaAs-AlGaAs Bragg mirrors when the refractive index of the region between the cavities is externally modulated in several diferent ways. We show that the coupling of the cavities can be significantly changed when the refractive index in the intercavity region is modulated with a Gaussian profile, such as could be obtained by illuminating the intercavity region with a strong laser pulse. This opens the way for the implementation of a full optical switch device. For this system we find that it is possible to delocalize an excited cavity mode whilst the fundamental mode remains confined.

  19. Formulation for scalable optimization of microcavities via the frequency-averaged local density of states.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiangdong; Johnson, Steven G

    2013-12-16

    We present a technique for large-scale optimization of optical microcavities based on the frequency-averaged local density of states (LDOS), which circumvents computational difficulties posed by previous eigenproblem-based formulations and allows us to perform full topology optimization of three-dimensional (3d) leaky cavity modes. We present theoretical results for both 2d and fully 3d computations in which every pixel of the design pattern is a degree of freedom ("topology optimization"), e.g. for lithographic patterning of dielectric slabs in 3d. More importantly, we argue that such optimization techniques can be applied to design cavities for which (unlike silicon-slab single-mode cavities) hand designs are difficult or unavailable, and in particular we design minimal-volume multi-mode cavities (e.g. for nonlinear frequency-conversion applications). PMID:24514656

  20. Manipulation of exciton and photon lasing in a membrane-type ZnO microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Ying-Yu; Chen, Jee-Wei; Chang, Tsu-Chi; Lu, Tien-Chang; Chou, Yu-Hsun

    2015-03-30

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a membrane-type ZnO microcavity (MC). The ZnO membrane was cut from a single crystalline ZnO substrate by using focused ion beam milling, and was then placed onto a SiO{sub 2} substrate by using glass microtweezers. Through changing the pumping regime, manipulation of P-band exciton lasing and whispering-gallery mode (WGM) photon lasing could be easily achieved. P-band exciton lasing was observed only when the pumping laser was focused at the center of the ZnO MC with a small pumping size because of the innate ring-shaped WGM distribution. Furthermore, the lasing threshold of the ZnO MC could be reduced to an order lower by using a larger pumping spot because of the more favorable spatial overlap between the optical gain and WGM.

  1. Local Intensity Enhancements in Spherical Microcavities: Implications for Photonic Chemical and Biological Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Kirk A.

    2005-01-01

    In this report, we summarize recent findings regarding the use spherical microcavities in the amplification of light that is inelastically scattered by either fluorescent or Raman-active molecules. This discussion will focus on Raman scattering, with the understanding that analogous processes apply to fluorescence. Raman spectra can be generated through the use of a very strong light source that stimulates inelastic light scattering by molecules, with the scattering occurring at wavelengths shifted from that of the source and being most prominent at shifts associated with the molecules natural vibrational frequencies. The Raman signal can be greatly enhanced by exposing a molecule to the intense electric fields that arise near surfaces (typically of gold or silver) exhibiting nanoscale roughness. This is known as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). SERS typically produces gain factors of 103 - 106, but under special conditions, factors of 1010 - 1014 have been achieved.

  2. Interaction-induced hopping phase in driven-dissipative coupled photonic microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, S. R. K.; Amo, A.; Sagnes, I.; Le Gratiet, L.; Galopin, E.; Lemaître, A.; Bloch, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Bose-Hubbard model (BHM) describes bosons hopping across sites and interacting on-site. Inspired by the success of BHM simulators with atoms in optical lattices, proposals for implementing the BHM with photons in coupled nonlinear cavities have recently emerged. Two coupled semiconductor microcavities constitute a model system where the hopping, interaction and decay of exciton polaritons—mixed light-matter quasiparticles—can be engineered in combination with site-selective coherent driving to implement the driven-dissipative two-site optical BHM. Here we explore the interplay of interference and nonlinearity in this system, in a regime where three distinct density profiles can be observed under identical driving conditions. We demonstrate how the phase acquired by polaritons hopping between cavities can be controlled through polariton-polariton interactions. Our results open new perspectives for synthesizing density-dependent gauge fields using polaritons in two-dimensional multicavity systems. PMID:27307038

  3. Microfluidic Devices Integrating Microcavity Surface-Plasmon-Resonance Sensors: Glucose Oxidase Binding-Activity Detection

    PubMed Central

    Amarie, Dragos; Alileche, Abdelkrim; Dragnea, Bogdan; Glazier, James A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed miniature (≈1 μm diameter) microcavity surface-plasmon-resonance sensors (MSPRS), integrated them with microfluidics and tested their sensitivity to refractive-index changes. We tested their biosensing capability by distinguishing the interaction of glucose oxidase (Mr 160 kDa) with its natural substrate (β-D-glucose, Mr 180 Da) from its interactions with non-specific substrates (L-glucose, D-mannose and 2-deoxy-D-glucose). We ran the identical protocol we had used with the MSPRS on a Biacore 3000 instrument using their bare gold chip. Only the MSPRS was able to detect β-D-glucose binding to glucose oxidase. Each MSPRS can detect the binding to its surface of fewer than 35,000 glucose-oxidase molecules (representing 9.6 fg or 60 zmol of protein), about 106 times fewer than classical surface-plasmon-resonance biosensors. PMID:19968248

  4. Interaction-induced hopping phase in driven-dissipative coupled photonic microcavities.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, S R K; Amo, A; Sagnes, I; Le Gratiet, L; Galopin, E; Lemaître, A; Bloch, J

    2016-06-16

    The Bose-Hubbard model (BHM) describes bosons hopping across sites and interacting on-site. Inspired by the success of BHM simulators with atoms in optical lattices, proposals for implementing the BHM with photons in coupled nonlinear cavities have recently emerged. Two coupled semiconductor microcavities constitute a model system where the hopping, interaction and decay of exciton polaritons-mixed light-matter quasiparticles-can be engineered in combination with site-selective coherent driving to implement the driven-dissipative two-site optical BHM. Here we explore the interplay of interference and nonlinearity in this system, in a regime where three distinct density profiles can be observed under identical driving conditions. We demonstrate how the phase acquired by polaritons hopping between cavities can be controlled through polariton-polariton interactions. Our results open new perspectives for synthesizing density-dependent gauge fields using polaritons in two-dimensional multicavity systems.

  5. Modeling and analysis of the temperature sensitivity in two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocini, Abdesselam; Harhouz, Ahlam

    2016-01-01

    We propose a temperature sensor design based on the two-dimensional (2-D) photonic crystals (PhCs) microcavity coupled to two waveguides. We consider a Si 2-D PhC, and the refractive index (RI) of distilled water in holes has been taken as temperature dependent. The resonant wavelength will shift when temperature variation induces change in the RIs of the distilled water. The temperature variation causes the shifting of defect modes. The transmission characteristics of light in the sensor under different RIs that correspond to the change in temperatures are simulated by using the finite-difference time-domain method. A sensitivity of 84 pm/°C was achieved with the structure proposed. This property can be exploited in the design of a temperature sensor.

  6. Polarization dependence of nonlinear wave mixing of spinor polaritons in semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Przemyslaw; Lafont, Ombline; Baudin, Emmanuel; Chan, Chris K. P.; Leung, P. T.; Luk, Samuel M. H.; Galopin, Elisabeth; Lemaître, Aristide; Bloch, Jacqueline; Tignon, Jerome; Roussignol, Philippe; Kwong, N. H.; Binder, Rolf; Schumacher, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    The pseudospin dynamics of propagating exciton-polaritons in semiconductor microcavities are known to be strongly influenced by TE-TM splitting. As a vivid consequence, in the Rayleigh scattering regime, the TE-TM splitting gives rise to the optical spin Hall effect (OSHE). Much less is known about its role in the nonlinear optical regime in which four-wave mixing, for example, allows the formation of spatial patterns in the polariton density, such that hexagons and two-spot patterns are observable in the far field. Here we present a detailed analysis of spin-dependent four-wave mixing processes, by combining the (linear) physics of TE-TM splitting with spin-dependent nonlinear processes, i.e., exciton-exciton interaction and fermionic phase-space filling. Our combined theoretical and experimental study elucidates the complex physics of the four-wave mixing processes that govern polarization and orientation of off-axis modes.

  7. Distinguishing autocrine and paracrine signals in hematopoietic stem cell culture using a biofunctional microcavity platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Eike; Wang, Weijia; Qiao, Wenlian; Bornhäuser, Martin; Zandstra, Peter W.; Werner, Carsten; Pompe, Tilo

    2016-08-01

    Homeostasis of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the mammalian bone marrow stem cell niche is regulated by signals of the local microenvironment. Besides juxtacrine, endocrine and metabolic cues, paracrine and autocrine signals are involved in controlling quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of HSC with strong implications on expansion and differentiation ex vivo as well as in vivo transplantation. Towards this aim, a cell culture analysis on a polymer microcavity carrier platform was combined with a partial least square analysis of a mechanistic model of cell proliferation. We could demonstrate the discrimination of specific autocrine and paracrine signals from soluble factors as stimulating and inhibitory effectors in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell culture. From that we hypothesize autocrine signals to be predominantly involved in maintaining the quiescent state of HSC in single-cell niches and advocate our analysis platform as an unprecedented option for untangling convoluted signaling mechanisms in complex cell systems being it of juxtacrine, paracrine or autocrine origin.

  8. Ultrastrong light-matter coupling in electrically doped microcavity organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzeo, M.; Genco, A.; Gambino, S.; Ballarini, D.; Mangione, F.; Sanvitto, D.; Di Stefano, O.; Patanè, S.; Savasta, S.; Gigli, G.

    2014-06-09

    The coupling of the electromagnetic field with an electronic transition gives rise, for strong enough light-matter interactions, to hybrid states called exciton-polaritons. When the energy exchanged between light and matter becomes a significant fraction of the material transition energy an extreme optical regime called ultrastrong coupling (USC) is achieved. We report a microcavity embedded p-i-n monolithic organic light emitting diode working in USC, employing a thin film of squaraine dye as active layer. A normalized coupling ratio of 30% has been achieved at room temperature. These USC devices exhibit a dispersion-less angle-resolved electroluminescence that can be exploited for the realization of innovative optoelectronic devices. Our results may open the way towards electrically pumped polariton lasers.

  9. Mass and Momentum Transport in Microcavities for Diffusion-Dominant Cell Culture Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yew, Alvin G.; Pinero, Daniel; Hsieh, Adam H.; Atencia, Javier

    2012-01-01

    For the informed design of microfluidic devices, it is important to understand transport phenomena at the microscale. This letter outlines an analytically-driven approach to the design of rectangular microcavities extending perpendicular to a perfusion microchannel for microfluidic cell culture devices. We present equations to estimate the spatial transition from advection- to diffusion-dominant transport inside cavities as a function of the geometry and flow conditions. We also estimate the time required for molecules, such as nutrients or drugs to travel from the microchannel to a given depth into the cavity. These analytical predictions can facilitate the rational design of microfluidic devices to optimize and maintain long-term, physiologically-based culture conditions with low fluid shear stress.

  10. Strong coupling and stimulated emission in single parabolic quantum well microcavity for terahertz cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Tzimis, A.; Savvidis, P. G.; Trifonov, A. V.; Ignatiev, I. V.; Christmann, G.; Tsintzos, S. I.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Kavokin, A. V.

    2015-09-07

    We report observation of strong light-matter coupling in an AlGaAs microcavity (MC) with an embedded single parabolic quantum well. The parabolic potential is achieved by varying aluminum concentration along the growth direction providing equally spaced energy levels, as confirmed by Brewster angle reflectivity from a reference sample without MC. It acts as an active region of the structure which potentially allows cascaded emission of terahertz (THz) light. Spectrally and time resolved pump-probe spectroscopy reveals characteristic quantum beats whose frequencies range from 0.9 to 4.5 THz, corresponding to energy separation between relevant excitonic levels. The structure exhibits strong stimulated nonlinear emission with simultaneous transition to weak coupling regime. The present study highlights the potential of such devices for creating cascaded relaxation of bosons, which could be utilized for THz emission.

  11. Absorptive lasing mode suppression in ZnO nano- and microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wille, M.; Michalsky, T.; Krüger, E.; Grundmann, M.; Schmidt-Grund, R.

    2016-08-01

    We conclusively explain the different lasing mode energies in ZnO nano- and microcavities observed by us and reported in literature. The limited penetration depth of usually used excitation lasers results in an inhomogeneous spatial gain region depending on the structure size and geometry. Hence, weakly or even nonexcited areas remain present after excitation, where modes are instantaneously suppressed by excitonic absorption. We compare the effects for ZnO microwires, nanowires, and tetrapod-like structures at room temperature and demonstrate that the corresponding mode selective effect is most pronounced for whispering-gallery modes in microwires with a hexagonal cross section. Furthermore, the absorptive lasing mode suppression will be demonstrated by correlating the spot size of the excitation laser and the lasing mode characteristic of a single ZnO nanowire.

  12. Ultrastrong light-matter coupling in electrically doped microcavity organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzeo, M.; Genco, A.; Gambino, S.; Ballarini, D.; Mangione, F.; Di Stefano, O.; Patanè, S.; Savasta, S.; Sanvitto, D.; Gigli, G.

    2014-06-01

    The coupling of the electromagnetic field with an electronic transition gives rise, for strong enough light-matter interactions, to hybrid states called exciton-polaritons. When the energy exchanged between light and matter becomes a significant fraction of the material transition energy an extreme optical regime called ultrastrong coupling (USC) is achieved. We report a microcavity embedded p-i-n monolithic organic light emitting diode working in USC, employing a thin film of squaraine dye as active layer. A normalized coupling ratio of 30% has been achieved at room temperature. These USC devices exhibit a dispersion-less angle-resolved electroluminescence that can be exploited for the realization of innovative optoelectronic devices. Our results may open the way towards electrically pumped polariton lasers.

  13. Atom Detection and Photon Production in a Scalable, Open, Optical Microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Trupke, M.; Goldwin, J.; Darquie, B.; Dutier, G.; Eriksson, S.; Ashmore, J.; Hinds, E. A.

    2007-08-10

    A microfabricated Fabry-Perot optical resonator has been used for atom detection and photon production with less than 1 atom on average in the cavity mode. Our cavity design combines the intrinsic scalability of microfabrication processes with direct coupling of the cavity field to single-mode optical waveguides or fibers. The presence of the atom is seen through changes in both the intensity and the noise characteristics of probe light reflected from the cavity input mirror. An excitation laser passing transversely through the cavity triggers photon emission into the cavity mode and hence into the single-mode fiber. These are first steps toward building an optical microcavity network on an atom chip for applications in quantum information processing.

  14. A simple method for characterizing and engineering thermal relaxation of an optical microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weijian; Zhu, Jiangang; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Peng, Bo; Yang, Lan

    2016-08-01

    Thermal properties of a photonic resonator are determined not only by intrinsic properties of materials, such as thermo-optic coefficient, but also by the geometry and structure of the resonator. Techniques for characterization and measurement of thermal properties of individual photonic resonator will benefit numerous applications. In this work, we demonstrate a method to optically measure the thermal relaxation time and effective thermal conductance of a whispering gallery mode microcavity using optothermal effect. Two nearby optical modes within the cavity are optically probed, which allows us to quantify the thermal relaxation process of the cavity by analyzing changes in the transmission spectra induced by optothermal effect. We show that the effective thermal conductance can be experimentally deduced from the thermal relaxation measurement, and it can be tailored by changing the geometric parameters of the cavity. The experimental observations are in good agreement with the proposed analytical modeling. This method can be applied to various resonators in different forms.

  15. Tuning microcavities in thermally rearranged polymer membranes for CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Han, S H; Kwon, H J; Kim, K Y; Seong, J G; Park, C H; Kim, S; Doherty, C M; Thornton, A W; Hill, A J; Lozano, A E; Berchtold, K A; Lee, Y M

    2012-04-01

    Microporous materials have a great importance in catalysis, delivery, storage and separation in terms of their performance and efficiency. Most microporous materials are comprised of inorganic frameworks, while thermally rearranged (TR) polymers are a microporous organic polymer which is tuned to optimize the cavity sizes and distribution for difficult separation applications. The sub-nano sized microcavities are controlled by in situ thermal treatment conditions which have been investigated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The size and relative number of cavities increased from room temperature to 230 °C resulting in improvements in both permeabilities and selectivities for H(2)/CO(2) separation due to the significant increase of gas diffusion and decrease of CO(2) solubility. The highest performance of the well-tuned TR-polymer membrane was 206 Barrer for H(2) permeability and 6.2 of H(2)/CO(2) selectivity, exceeding the polymeric upper bound for gas separation membranes.

  16. Distinguishing autocrine and paracrine signals in hematopoietic stem cell culture using a biofunctional microcavity platform.

    PubMed

    Müller, Eike; Wang, Weijia; Qiao, Wenlian; Bornhäuser, Martin; Zandstra, Peter W; Werner, Carsten; Pompe, Tilo

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the mammalian bone marrow stem cell niche is regulated by signals of the local microenvironment. Besides juxtacrine, endocrine and metabolic cues, paracrine and autocrine signals are involved in controlling quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of HSC with strong implications on expansion and differentiation ex vivo as well as in vivo transplantation. Towards this aim, a cell culture analysis on a polymer microcavity carrier platform was combined with a partial least square analysis of a mechanistic model of cell proliferation. We could demonstrate the discrimination of specific autocrine and paracrine signals from soluble factors as stimulating and inhibitory effectors in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell culture. From that we hypothesize autocrine signals to be predominantly involved in maintaining the quiescent state of HSC in single-cell niches and advocate our analysis platform as an unprecedented option for untangling convoluted signaling mechanisms in complex cell systems being it of juxtacrine, paracrine or autocrine origin. PMID:27535453

  17. Non-Hamiltonian dynamics in optical microcavities resulting from wave-inspired corrections to geometric optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, E. G.; DelMagno, G.; Hentschel, M.

    2008-10-01

    We introduce and investigate billiard systems with an adjusted ray dynamics that accounts for modifications of the conventional reflection of rays due to universal wave effects. We show that even small modifications of the specular reflection law have dramatic consequences on the phase space of classical billiards. These include the creation of regions of non-Hamiltonian dynamics, the breakdown of symmetries, and changes in the stability and morphology of periodic orbits. Focusing on optical microcavities, we show that our adjusted dynamics provides the missing ray counterpart to previously observed wave phenomena and we describe how to observe its signatures in experiments. Our findings also apply to acoustic and ultrasound waves and are important in all situations where wavelengths are comparable to system sizes, an increasingly likely situation considering the systematic reduction of the size of electronic and photonic devices.

  18. The use of ion beam cleaning to obtain high quality cold welds with minimal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sater, B. L.; Moore, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    A variation of cold welding is described which utilizes an ion beam to clean mating surfaces prior to joining in a vacuum environment. High quality solid state welds were produced with minimal deformation.

  19. An Innovative Approach To Teaching High School Students about Indoor Air Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Catherine M.; Bloomfield, Molly M.; Harding, Anna K.; Sherburne, Holly

    1999-01-01

    Describes an innovative approach used to help high school students develop critical thinking and real-world problem-solving skills while learning about indoor air quality. (Contains 13 references.) (Author/WRM)

  20. Surgery at High-Quality Hospitals a Money-Saver for Medicare

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160864.html Surgery at High-Quality Hospitals a Money-Saver for Medicare Savings is more than $2, ... much of health care, better care costs more money but surgery may be one situation in which ...