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Sample records for high quality microcavities

  1. Analysis of high-quality modes in open chaotic microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, W.; Yamilov, A.; Cao, H.

    2005-08-15

    We present a numerical study of the high-quality modes in two-dimensional dielectric stadium microcavities. Although the classical ray mechanics is fully chaotic in a stadium billiard, all of the high-quality modes show a 'strong scar' around unstable periodic orbits. When the deformation (ratio of the length of the straight segments over the diameter of the half circles) is small, the high-quality modes correspond to whispering-gallery-type trajectories and their quality factors decrease monotonically with increasing deformation. At large deformation, each high-quality mode is associated with multiple unstable periodic orbits. Its quality factor changes nonmonotonically with the deformation, and there exists an optimal deformation for each mode at which its quality factor reaches a local maximum. This unusual behavior is attributed to the interference of waves propagating along different constituent orbits that could minimize light leakage out of the cavity.

  2. Modulation of high quality factors in rolled-up microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yangfu; Li, Shilong; Mei, Yongfeng

    2016-09-01

    We systematically investigate the evolution of resonant modes in a rolled-up microcavity as the overlap length between structural notches increases, which presents a modulation behavior for high Q factors. The resonant modes in the rolled-up microcavity display a deterministic mode chirality, which is well correlated to the Q factor. We derive a two-mode non-Hermitian Hamiltonian to clarify these unusual findings. It reveals that strong resonant interactions of scattered waves between the structural notches are responsible for the high mode chirality (thus high Q factor) and its modulation behavior in rolled-up microcavities.

  3. High quality UV AlGaN/AlGaN distributed Bragg reflectors and microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, Oleg; Schmult, S.; Manfra, M. J.; Siegrist, T.; Weimann, N. G.; Sergent, A. M.; Molnar, R. J.

    2007-02-01

    We demonstrate high-reflectivity crack-free Al 0.18Ga 0.82N/Al 0.8Ga 0.2N distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) and monolithic microcavities grown by molecular beam epitaxy on thick c-axis GaN templates. The elastic strain energy in the epilayer is minimized by compensating the compressive and tensile stress in every period of the DBR structure. A 25 period DBR mirror provides a 26nm-wide stop band centered at 347 nm with the maximum reflectivity higher than 99%. The high-reflectivity DBRs can be used to form high Q-factor monolithic AlGaN/AlGaN microcavities.

  4. Optically induced mode splitting in self-assembled, high quality-factor conjugated polymer microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Braam, Daniel; Kushida, Soh; Niemöller, Robert; Prinz, Günther M.; Saito, Hitoshi; Kanbara, Takaki; Kuwabara, Junpei; Yamamoto, Yohei; Lorke, Axel

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of self-assembled single microspheres. They consist of a recently developed highly fluorescent π-conjugated copolymer and exhibit excellent optical properties with Q-factors up to 104. Under continuous laser irradiation, we observe a splitting of the highly degenerate spherical WGMs into a multiplet of lines. Comparison with the calculated spectral response of a weakly distorted sphere shows that the optical excitation induces a change of the optical path length in the microcavity so that it resembles a prolate spheroid. The separation of the lines is given by the ellipticity and the azimuthal mode number. Measurements in various gaseous environments suggest that the distortion is caused by light induced oxidation of the polymer. Our findings show that photooxidation can be a beneficial mechanism for in-situ tuning of optically active polymer structures. PMID:26781838

  5. Ultra high quality factor one dimensional photonic crystal/photonic wire micro-cavities in silicon-on-insulator (SOI).

    PubMed

    Zain, Ahmad R; Johnson, Nigel P; Sorel, Marc; De La Rue, Richard M

    2008-08-04

    We present experimental results on photonic crystal/photonic wire micro-cavity structures that demonstrate further enhancement of the quality-factor (Q-factor)--up to approximately 149,000--in the fibre telecommunications wavelength range. The Q-values and the useful transmission levels achieved are due, in particular, to the combination of both tapering within and outside the micro-cavity, with carefully designed hole diameters and non-periodic hole placement within the tapered section. Our 2D Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulation approach shows good agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Hysteresis behavior of Kerr frequency comb generation in a high-quality-factor whispering-gallery-mode microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takumi; Chen-Jinnai, Akitoshi; Nagano, Takuma; Kobatake, Tomoya; Suzuki, Ryo; Yoshiki, Wataru; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2016-07-01

    A numerical and experimental study of Kerr frequency comb generation in a silica toroid microcavity is presented. We use a generalized mean-field Lugiato-Lefever equation and solve it with the split-step Fourier method. We observe that a stable mode-locked regime can be accessed when we reduce the input power after strong pumping due to the bistable nature of the nonlinear cavity system used. The experimental results agree well with the results of the numerical analysis, where we obtain a low-noise Kerr comb spectrum by gradually reducing the pumping input after strong pumping. This finding complements the results obtained by a previous wavelength scanning method and clarifies the procedure for achieving mode-locked states in such high-Q microcavity systems.

  7. On-chip three-dimensional high-Q microcavities fabricated by femtosecond laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jintian; Yu, Shangjie; Ma, Yaoguang; Fang, Wei; He, Fei; Qiao, Lingling; Tong, Limin; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2012-04-23

    We report on the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) high-Q whispering gallery microcavities on a fused silica chip by femtosecond laser microfabriction, enabled by the 3D nature of femtosecond laser direct writing. The processing mainly consists of formation of freestanding microdisks by femtosecond laser direct writing and subsequent wet chemical etching. CO(2) laser annealing is followed to smooth the microcavity surface. Microcavities with arbitrary tilting angle, lateral and vertical positioning are demonstrated, and the quality (Q)-factor of a typical microcavity is measured to be up to 1.07 × 10(6), which is currently limited by the low spatial resolution of the motion stage used during the laser patterning and can be improved with motion stages of higher resolutions.

  8. Localized high-Q modes in conical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xing; Fang, Wei

    2016-12-01

    We carry out three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulation on a conical microcavity with a half-angle of 11 degree, where there exists high-Q modes by introducing a thin high refractive index film on a conical surface. Our study reveals that, rather than the surface profile of the microcavity, the effective radius plays crucial role in whether the cavity may support localized modes. Specifically, the change of high refractive index film thickness creates an additional angular momentum barrier, so that the conical microcavity may sustain localized high-Q modes. Our study offers a new degree of freedom to control the properties of 3D microcavities, which is useful for microlaser or sensor applications.

  9. The combination of high Q factor and chirality in twin cavities and microcavity chain.

    PubMed

    Song, Qinghai; Zhang, Nan; Zhai, Huilin; Liu, Shuai; Gu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Kaiyang; Sun, Shang; Chen, Zhiwei; Li, Meng; Xiao, Shumin

    2014-09-29

    Chirality in microcavities has recently shown its bright future in optical sensing and microsized coherent light sources. The key parameters for such applications are the high quality (Q) factor and large chirality. However, the previous reported chiral resonances are either low Q modes or require very special cavity designs. Here we demonstrate a novel, robust, and general mechanism to obtain the chirality in circular cavity. By placing a circular cavity and a spiral cavity in proximity, we show that ultra-high Q factor, large chirality, and unidirectional output can be obtained simultaneously. The highest Q factors of the non-orthogonal mode pairs are almost the same as the ones in circular cavity. And the co-propagating directions of the non-orthogonal mode pairs can be reversed by tuning the mode coupling. This new mechanism for the combination of high Q factor and large chirality is found to be very robust to cavity size, refractive index, and the shape deformation, showing very nice fabrication tolerance. And it can be further extended to microcavity chain and microcavity plane. We believe that our research will shed light on the practical applications of chirality and microcavities.

  10. The combination of high Q factor and chirality in twin cavities and microcavity chain

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qinghai; Zhang, Nan; Zhai, Huilin; Liu, Shuai; Gu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Kaiyang; Sun, Shang; Chen, Zhiwei; Li, Meng; Xiao, Shumin

    2014-01-01

    Chirality in microcavities has recently shown its bright future in optical sensing and microsized coherent light sources. The key parameters for such applications are the high quality (Q) factor and large chirality. However, the previous reported chiral resonances are either low Q modes or require very special cavity designs. Here we demonstrate a novel, robust, and general mechanism to obtain the chirality in circular cavity. By placing a circular cavity and a spiral cavity in proximity, we show that ultra-high Q factor, large chirality, and unidirectional output can be obtained simultaneously. The highest Q factors of the non-orthogonal mode pairs are almost the same as the ones in circular cavity. And the co-propagating directions of the non-orthogonal mode pairs can be reversed by tuning the mode coupling. This new mechanism for the combination of high Q factor and large chirality is found to be very robust to cavity size, refractive index, and the shape deformation, showing very nice fabrication tolerance. And it can be further extended to microcavity chain and microcavity plane. We believe that our research will shed light on the practical applications of chirality and microcavities. PMID:25262881

  11. Control of lasing from a highly photoexcited semiconductor microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Feng-Kuo

    Technological advances in the fabrication of optical cavities and crystal growth have enabled the studies on macroscopic quantum states and emergent nonequilibrium phenomena of light-matter hybrids in condensed matter. Optical excitations in a semiconductor microcavity can result in a coupled electron-hole-photon (e-h-gamma) system, in which various many-body physics can be studied by varying particle densities and particle-particle interactions. Recently there have been reports of phenomena analogous to Bose-Einstein condensates or superfluids for exciton-polaritons in a microcavity. An exciton-polariton is a quasiparticle resulting from strong coupling between the cavity light field and the exciton (e-h pair) transition, and typically is only stable at a low density ( 10 11 to 1012 cm-2 or less). At a higher density, it has been theoretically predicted that pairing of electrons and holes can result in a BCS-like state at cryogenic temperatures, which can produce cooperative radiation known as superradiance. In this work, we explore cooperative phenomena caused by e-h correlation and many-body effect in a highly photoexcited microcavity at room temperature. High-density e-h plasmas in a photoexcited microcavity are studied under the following conditions: (1) the sample is photoexcited GaAs-based microcavity with large detuning between the band gap Eg of quantum well and cavity resonance to prevent carriers from radiative loss, (2) the density of e-h pairs is high enough to build long-range correlation with the assistance of cavity light field. The Fermi level of electron-hole pairs is about 80 meV above Eg, and (3) the e-h correlation is stabilized through thermal management, which includes modulating the excitation pulse laser temporally and spatially to reduce the heating and carrier diffusion effect. We have observed ultrafast (sub-10 picoseconds) spin-polarized lasing with sizable energy shifts and linewidth broadenings as pump flux is increased. With

  12. Graphene induced high-Q hybridized plasmonic whispering gallery mode microcavities.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mingming; Li, Jitao; Xu, Chunxiang; Wang, Shuangpeng; Shan, Chongxin; Xuan, Bin; Ning, Yongqiang; Shen, Dezhen

    2014-10-06

    A novel hybridized plasmonic whispering gallery mode (WGM) microcavities composed of graphene monolayer coated ZnO microrod with hexagonal cross section were proposed that operates in the ultraviolet region. π and π + σ surface plasmon modes in graphene monolayer at 4.7 eV and 14.6 eV can be used to achieve the near field coupling interaction between surface plasmonic modes and the conventional WGM microcavity modes in the ultraviolet band. Significantly, the coupling, happened in the evanescent wave field excited along the interface between ZnO and graphene, can lead to distinct optical field confinement and lasing enhancement experimentally, so as well as WGM lasing characteristics, such as the higher cavity quality factor (Q), narrower linewidth, lasing intensities enhancement. The results could provide a platform to study hybridized plasmonic cavity dynamics, and also provides the building blocks to construct graphene based novel microcavity for high performance ultraviolet laser devices with potential application to optical signal processing, biological monitoring, and so on.

  13. Ringing phenomenon in chaotic microcavity for high-speed ultra-sensitive sensing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Wei-Gang; Chou, Keng C.

    2016-01-01

    The ringing phenomenon in whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microcavities has demonstrated its great potential for highly-sensitive and high-speed sensing. However, traditional symmetric WGM microcavities have suffered from an extremely low coupling efficiency via free-space coupling because the emission of symmetric WGMs is non-directional. Here we report a new approach for high-speed ultra-sensitive sensing using the ringing phenomenon in a chaotic regime. By breaking the rotational symmetry of a WGM microcavity and introducing chaotic behaviors, we show that the ringing phenomenon in chaotic WGM microcavities extends over both the positive and the negative frequency detune, allowing the ringing phenomenon to interact with analytes over a much broader bandwidth with a reduced dead time. Because the coupling of the chaotic microcavity is directional, it produces a significantly higher signal output, which improves its sensitivity without the need of a fiber coupler. PMID:27966591

  14. Silicon nano-membrane based photonic crystal microcavities for high sensitivity bio-sensing

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wei-Cheng; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Zou, Yi; Chen, Ray T.

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrated photonic crystal microcavity based resonant sensors coupled to photonic crystal waveguides in silicon nano-membrane on insulator for chemical and bio-sensing. Linear L-type microcavities are considered. In contrast to cavities with small mode volumes, but low quality factors for bio-sensing, we showed increasing the length of the microcavity enhances the quality factor of the resonance by an order of magnitude and increases the resonance wavelength shift while retaining compact device characteristics. Q~26760 and sensitivity down to 15 ng/ml and~110 pg/mm2 in bio-sensing was experimentally demonstrated on silicon-on-insulator devices. PMID:22466197

  15. Silicon nano-membrane based photonic crystal microcavities for high sensitivity bio-sensing.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wei-Cheng; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Zou, Yi; Chen, Ray T

    2012-04-01

    We experimentally demonstrated photonic crystal microcavity based resonant sensors coupled to photonic crystal waveguides in silicon nano-membrane on insulator for chemical and bio-sensing. Linear L-type microcavities are considered. In contrast to cavities with small mode volumes, but low quality factors for bio-sensing, we showed increasing the length of the microcavity enhances the quality factor of the resonance by an order of magnitude and increases the resonance wavelength shift while retaining compact device characteristics. Q~26760 and sensitivity down to 15 ng/ml and ~110 pg/mm2 in bio-sensing was experimentally demonstrated on silicon-on-insulator devices.

  16. Highly efficient design methodology for very large scale coupled microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swillam, Mohamed A.; Ahmed, Osman S.; Bakr, Mohamed H.; Li, Xun

    2012-10-01

    We propose a novel approach for efficient design of large number of coupled microcavities. This approach is based on formulating the design problem as an convex optimization problem. This formulation allows for fast, efficient solution of the desing problem. A filter design using 150 coupled microcavities has been achieved in less than one second of simulation using personal computer. The proposed technique require no initial desing to start the optimization process.

  17. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, Haider Ahmed, Rajib; Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-23

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2–3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  18. Multiwall carbon nanotube microcavity arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Rajib; Butt, Haider; Rifat, Ahmmed A.; Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2016-03-21

    Periodic highly dense multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) arrays can act as photonic materials exhibiting band gaps in the visible regime and beyond terahertz range. MWCNT arrays in square arrangement for nanoscale lattice constants can be configured as a microcavity with predictable resonance frequencies. Here, computational analyses of compact square microcavities (≈0.8 × 0.8 μm{sup 2}) in MWCNT arrays were demonstrated to obtain enhanced quality factors (≈170–180) and narrow-band resonance peaks. Cavity resonances were rationally designed and optimized (nanotube geometry and cavity size) with finite element method. Series (1 × 2 and 1 × 3) and parallel (2 × 1 and 3 × 1) combinations of microcavities were modeled and resonance modes were analyzed. Higher order MWCNT microcavities showed enhanced resonance modes, which were red shifted with increasing Q-factors. Parallel microcavity geometries were also optimized to obtain narrow-band tunable filtering in low-loss communication windows (810, 1336, and 1558 nm). Compact series and parallel MWCNT microcavity arrays may have applications in optical filters and miniaturized optical communication devices.

  19. Numerical investigation of high-contrast ultrafast all-optical switching in low-refractive-index polymeric photonic crystal nanobeam microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zi-Ming; Zhong, Xiao-Lan; Wang, Chen; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2012-06-01

    With the development of micro- or nano-fabrication technologies, great interest has been aroused in exploiting photonic crystal nanobeam structures. In this article the design of high-quality-factor (Q) polymeric photonic crystal nanobeam microcavities suitable for realizing ultrafast all-optical switching is presented based on the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method. Adopting the pump-probe technique, the ultrafast dynamic response of the all-optical switching in a nanobeam microcavity with a quality factor of 1000 and modal volume of 1.22 (λ/n)3 is numerically studied and a switching time as fast as 3.6 picoseconds is obtained. Our results indicate the great promise of applying photonic crystal nanobeam microcavities to construct integrated ultrafast tunable photonic devices or circuits incorporating polymer materials with large Kerr nonlinearity and ultrafast response speed.

  20. Laser-machined microcavities for simultaneous measurement of high-temperature and high-pressure.

    PubMed

    Ran, Zengling; Liu, Shan; Liu, Qin; Huang, Ya; Bao, Haihong; Wang, Yanjun; Luo, Shucheng; Yang, Huiqin; Rao, Yunjiang

    2014-08-07

    Laser-machined microcavities for simultaneous measurement of high-temperature and high-pressure are demonstrated. These two cascaded microcavities are an air cavity and a composite cavity including a section of fiber and an air cavity. They are both placed into a pressure chamber inside a furnace to perform simultaneous pressure and high-temperature tests. The thermal and pressure coefficients of the short air cavity are ~0.0779 nm/°C and ~1.14 nm/MPa, respectively. The thermal and pressure coefficients of the composite cavity are ~32.3 nm/°C and ~24.4 nm/MPa, respectively. The sensor could be used to separate temperature and pressure due to their different thermal and pressure coefficients. The excellent feature of such a sensor head is that it can withstand high temperatures of up to 400 °C and achieve precise measurement of high-pressure under high temperature conditions.

  1. Silicon on-chip bandpass filters for the multiplexing of high sensitivity photonic crystal microcavity biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Hai Zou, Yi; Yang, Chun-Ju; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Wang, Zheng; Tang, Naimei; Chen, Ray T.; Fan, Donglei

    2015-03-23

    A method for the dense integration of high sensitivity photonic crystal (PC) waveguide based biosensors is proposed and experimentally demonstrated on a silicon platform. By connecting an additional PC waveguide filter to a PC microcavity sensor in series, a transmission passband is created, containing the resonances of the PC microcavity for sensing purpose. With proper engineering of the passband, multiple high sensitivity PC microcavity sensors can be integrated into microarrays and be interrogated simultaneously between a single input and a single output port. The concept was demonstrated with a 2-channel L55 PC biosensor array containing PC waveguide filters. The experiment showed that the sensors on both channels can be monitored simultaneously from a single output spectrum. Less than 3 dB extra loss for the additional PC waveguide filter is observed.

  2. Strong exciton-photon coupling in organic single crystal microcavity with high molecular orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Kaname; Yamashita, Kenichi; Yanagi, Hisao; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2016-08-08

    Strong exciton-photon coupling has been observed in a highly oriented organic single crystal microcavity. This microcavity consists of a thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) single crystal laminated on a high-reflection distributed Bragg reflector. In the TPCO crystal, molecular transition dipole was strongly polarized along a certain horizontal directions with respect to the main crystal plane. This dipole polarization causes significantly large anisotropies in the exciton transition and optical constants. Especially the anisotropic exciton transition was found to provide the strong enhancement in the coupling with the cavity mode, which was demonstrated by a Rabi splitting energy as large as ∼100 meV even in the “half-vertical cavity surface emitting lasing” microcavity structure.

  3. Silicon on-chip bandpass filters for the multiplexing of high sensitivity photonic crystal microcavity biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hai; Zou, Yi; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Yang, Chun-Ju; Wang, Zheng; Tang, Naimei; Fan, Donglei; Chen, Ray T.

    2015-03-01

    A method for the dense integration of high sensitivity photonic crystal (PC) waveguide based biosensors is proposed and experimentally demonstrated on a silicon platform. By connecting an additional PC waveguide filter to a PC microcavity sensor in series, a transmission passband is created, containing the resonances of the PC microcavity for sensing purpose. With proper engineering of the passband, multiple high sensitivity PC microcavity sensors can be integrated into microarrays and be interrogated simultaneously between a single input and a single output port. The concept was demonstrated with a 2-channel L55 PC biosensor array containing PC waveguide filters. The experiment showed that the sensors on both channels can be monitored simultaneously from a single output spectrum. Less than 3 dB extra loss for the additional PC waveguide filter is observed.

  4. High-sensitivity polarization modulation reflectance spectroscopy of cavity polaritons in a ZnO microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Takayuki; Kishimoto, Ryo; Takagi, Yoshihiro; Kawase, Toshiki; Kim, DaeGwi; Nakayama, Masaaki

    2014-03-01

    We report that polarization modulation reflectance (PMR) spectroscopy is highly sensitive to the cavity polaritons in a ZnO microcavity with HfO2/SiO2 distributed Bragg reflectors. We demonstrate that the cavity-polariton dispersion, even in the energy region of strong absorption by exciton continuum states, is clearly observed by PMR spectroscopy. The PMR spectra were quantitatively analyzed by a transfer-matrix method taking into account three types of excitons labeled A, B, and C. Line-shape analysis of the PMR spectra indicates that the anisotropy of the excitonic transitions is considerable in treating the cavity polariton in the ZnO microcavity.

  5. Magneto-exciton-polariton condensation in a sub-wavelength high contrast grating based vertical microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.; Brodbeck, S.; Worschech, L.; Kamp, M.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Zhang, B.; Wang, Z.; Deng, H.

    2014-03-03

    We comparably investigate the diamagnetic shift of an uncoupled quantum well exciton with a microcavity exciton-polariton condensate on the same device. The sample is composed of multiple GaAs quantum wells in an AlAs microcavity, surrounded by a Bragg reflector and a sub-wavelength high contrast grating reflector. Our study introduces an independent and easily applicable technique, namely, the measurement of the condensate diamagnetic shift, which directly probes matter contributions in polariton condensates and hence discriminates it from a conventional photon laser.

  6. Enhancing microcavity polaritons for technological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steger, Mark D.

    Microcavity exciton-polaritons, semiconductor quasiparticles that are a unique mixture of light and matter, are routinely used to study quantum many-body phenomena. Due to the light mass of the polariton, 10 -4 times the bare electron mass, polaritons manifest noticeable quantum effects even at room temperature. As solid state systems, microcavity polaritons are generally robust and compatible with current semiconductor technology. Microcavity chips could be integrated into electronic or optical circuits. I present a demonstration of microcavity polaritons as an all-optical transistor, where the strong nonlinearity of the system leads to a change in the re ectivity for a signal light-ray from high to low. I also discuss the promise of using strongly coupled microcavities as low-threshold polariton lasers, which could replace traditional lasers in some cases. The last two decades have seen great strides in the material systems used in microcavities, even demonstrating strong coupling at room temperature. GaN, CdZnSe, organic semiconductors and more recently, MoS2 have supported strong coupling at ambient conditions. This makes technological applications more promising. I present our current progress in this field. Also, the general quality of microcavities has advanced steadily over this time. I demonstrate that our long-lifetime polaritons persist for an order of magnitude longer than in similar samples. This opens up new regimes of study and technological application as these particles thermalize better and carry quantum coherence over macroscopic distances.

  7. High figure of merit ultra-compact 3-channel parallel-connected photonic crystal mini-hexagonal-H1 defect microcavity sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunhong; Sun, Fujun; Fu, Zhongyuan; Ding, Zhaoxiang; Wang, Chao; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Jiawen; Tian, Huiping

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a photonic crystal (PhC) butt-coupled mini-hexagonal-H1 defect (MHHD) microcavity sensor is proposed. The MHHD microcavity is designed by introducing six mini-holes into the initial H1 defect region. Further, based on a well-designed 1 ×3 PhC Beam Splitter and three optimal MHHD microcavity sensors with different lattice constants (a), a 3-channel parallel-connected PhC sensor array on monolithic silicon on insulator (SOI) is proposed. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations method is performed to demonstrate the high performance of our structures. As statistics show, the quality factor (Q) of our optimal MHHD microcavity attains higher than 7×104, while the sensitivity (S) reaches up to 233 nm/RIU(RIU = refractive index unit). Thus, the figure of merit (FOM) >104 of the sensor is obtained, which is enhanced by two orders of magnitude compared to the previous butt-coupled sensors [1-4]. As for the 3-channel parallel-connected PhC MHHD microcavity sensor array, the FOMs of three independent MHHD microcavity sensors are 8071, 8250 and 8250, respectively. In addition, the total footprint of the proposed 3-channel parallel-connected PhC sensor array is ultra-compactness of 12.5 μm ×31 μm (width × length). Therefore, the proposed high FOM sensor array is an ideal platform for realizing ultra-compact highly parallel refractive index (RI) sensing.

  8. Abnormal high-Q modes of coupled stadium-shaped microcavities.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jung-Wan; Lee, Soo-Young; Kim, Inbo; Choi, Muhan; Hentschel, Martina; Kim, Sang Wook

    2014-07-15

    It is well known that the strongly deformed microcavity with fully chaotic ray dynamics cannot support high-Q modes due to its fast chaotic diffusion to the critical line of refractive emission. Here, we investigate how the Q factor is modified when two chaotic cavities are coupled, and show that some modes, whose Q factor is about 10 times higher than that of the corresponding single cavity, can exist. These abnormal high-Q modes are the result of an optimal combination of coupling and cavity geometry. As an example, in the coupled stadium-shaped microcavities, the mode pattern extends over both cavities such that it follows a whispering-gallery-type mode at both ends, whereas a big coupling spot forms at the closest contact of the two microcavities. The pattern of such a "rounded bow tie" mode allows the mode to have a high-Q factor. This mode pattern minimizes the leakage of light at both ends of the microcavities as the pattern at both ends is similar to the whispering gallery mode.

  9. Abnormal high-Q modes of coupled stadium-shaped microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jung-Wan; Lee, Soo-Young; Kim, Inbo; Choi, Muhan; Hentschel, Martina; Kim, Sang Wook

    2014-07-01

    It is well known that the strongly deformed microcavity with fully chaotic ray dynamics cannot support high-Q modes due to its fast chaotic diffusion to the critical line of refractive emission. Here, we investigate how the Q factor is modified when two chaotic cavities are coupled, and show that some modes, whose Q factor is about 10 times higher than that of the corresponding single cavity, can exist. These abnormal high-Q modes are the result of an optimal combination of coupling and cavity geometry. As an example, in the coupled stadium-shaped microcavities, the mode pattern extends over both cavities such that it follows a whispering-gallery-type mode at both ends, whereas a big coupling spot forms at the closest contact of the two microcavities. The pattern of such a 'rounded bow tie' mode allows the mode to have a high-Q factor. This mode pattern minimizes the leakage of light at both ends of the microcavities as the pattern at both ends is similar to whispering gallery mode.

  10. Laser-Machined Microcavities for Simultaneous Measurement of High-Temperature and High-Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Zengling; Liu, Shan; Liu, Qin; Huang, Ya; Bao, Haihong; Wang, Yanjun; Luo, Shucheng; Yang, Huiqin; Rao, Yunjiang

    2014-01-01

    Laser-machined microcavities for simultaneous measurement of high-temperature and high-pressure are demonstrated. These two cascaded microcavities are an air cavity and a composite cavity including a section of fiber and an air cavity. They are both placed into a pressure chamber inside a furnace to perform simultaneous pressure and high-temperature tests. The thermal and pressure coefficients of the short air cavity are ∼0.0779 nm/°C and ∼1.14 nm/MPa, respectively. The thermal and pressure coefficients of the composite cavity are ∼32.3 nm/°C and ∼24.4 nm/MPa, respectively. The sensor could be used to separate temperature and pressure due to their different thermal and pressure coefficients. The excellent feature of such a sensor head is that it can withstand high temperatures of up to 400 °C and achieve precise measurement of high-pressure under high temperature conditions. PMID:25106018

  11. The role of group index engineering in series-connected photonic crystal microcavities for high density sensor microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yi Zhu, Liang; Chen, Ray T.; Chakravarty, Swapnajit

    2014-04-07

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient and robust method for series connection of photonic crystal microcavities that are coupled to photonic crystal waveguides in the slow light transmission regime. We demonstrate that group index taper engineering provides excellent optical impedance matching between the input and output strip waveguides and the photonic crystal waveguide, a nearly flat transmission over the entire guided mode spectrum and clear multi-resonance peaks corresponding to individual microcavities that are connected in series. Series connected photonic crystal microcavities are further multiplexed in parallel using cascaded multimode interference power splitters to generate a high density silicon nanophotonic microarray comprising 64 photonic crystal microcavity sensors, all of which are interrogated simultaneously at the same instant of time.

  12. The role of group index engineering in series-connected photonic crystal microcavities for high density sensor microarrays.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Zhu, Liang; Chen, Ray T

    2014-04-07

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient and robust method for series connection of photonic crystal microcavities that are coupled to photonic crystal waveguides in the slow light transmission regime. We demonstrate that group index taper engineering provides excellent optical impedance matching between the input and output strip waveguides and the photonic crystal waveguide, a nearly flat transmission over the entire guided mode spectrum and clear multi-resonance peaks corresponding to individual microcavities that are connected in series. Series connected photonic crystal microcavities are further multiplexed in parallel using cascaded multimode interference power splitters to generate a high density silicon nanophotonic microarray comprising 64 photonic crystal microcavity sensors, all of which are interrogated simultaneously at the same instant of time.

  13. The role of group index engineering in series-connected photonic crystal microcavities for high density sensor microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yi; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Zhu, Liang; Chen, Ray T.

    2014-04-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient and robust method for series connection of photonic crystal microcavities that are coupled to photonic crystal waveguides in the slow light transmission regime. We demonstrate that group index taper engineering provides excellent optical impedance matching between the input and output strip waveguides and the photonic crystal waveguide, a nearly flat transmission over the entire guided mode spectrum and clear multi-resonance peaks corresponding to individual microcavities that are connected in series. Series connected photonic crystal microcavities are further multiplexed in parallel using cascaded multimode interference power splitters to generate a high density silicon nanophotonic microarray comprising 64 photonic crystal microcavity sensors, all of which are interrogated simultaneously at the same instant of time.

  14. Harmonic mode locking in a high-Q whispering gallery mode microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Takasumi; Kato, Takumi; Kobatake, Tomoya; Suzuki, Ryo; Chen-Jinnai, Akitoshi

    2016-03-01

    We present a numerical and experimental study of the generation of harmonic mode locking in a silica toroid microcavity. We use a generalized mean-field Lugiato-Lefever equation and solve it with the split-step Fourier method. We found that a stable harmonic mode-locking regime can be accessed when we reduce the input power after strong pumping even if we do not carefully adjust the wavelength detuning. This is due to the bistable nature of the nonlinear cavity system. The experiment agrees well with the numerical analysis, where we obtain a low-noise Kerr comb spectrum with a narrow longitudinal mode spacing by gradually reducing the input pump power after strong pumping. This finding clarifies the procedure for generating harmonic mode locking in such high-Q microcavity systems.

  15. A hemispherical, high-solid-angle optical micro-cavity for cavity-QED studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Guoqiang; Hannigan, J. M.; Loeckenhoff, R.; Matinaga, F. M.; Raymer, M. G.; Bhongale, S.; Holland, M.; Mosor, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Gibbs, H. M.; Khitrova, G.

    2006-03-01

    We report a novel hemispherical micro-cavity that is comprised of a planar integrated semiconductor distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) mirror, and an external, concave micro-mirror having a radius of curvature 50 µm. The integrated DBR mirror containing quantum dots (QD), is designed to locate the QDs at an antinode of the field in order to maximize the interaction between the QD and cavity. The concave micro-mirror, with high-reflectivity over a large solid-angle, creates a diffraction-limited (sub-micron) mode-waist at the planar mirror, leading to a large coupling constant between the cavity mode and QD. The half-monolithic design gives more spatial and spectral tuning abilities, relatively to fully monolithic structures. This unique micro-cavity design will potentially enable us to both reach the cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) strong coupling regime and realize the deterministic generation of single photons on demand.

  16. A hemispherical, high-solid-angle optical micro-cavity for cavity-QED studies.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guoqiang; Hannigan, J M; Loeckenhoff, R; Matinaga, F M; Raymer, M G; Bhongale, S; Holland, M; Mosor, S; Chatterjee, S; Gibbs, H M; Khitrova, G

    2006-03-20

    We report a novel hemispherical micro-cavity that is comprised of a planar integrated semiconductor distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) mirror, and an external, concave micro-mirror having a radius of curvature 50 microm. The integrated DBR mirror containing quantum dots (QD), is designed to locate the QDs at an antinode of the field in order to maximize the interaction between the QD and cavity. The concave micro-mirror, with high-reflectivity over a large solid-angle, creates a diffraction-limited (sub-micron) mode-waist at the planar mirror, leading to a large coupling constant between the cavity mode and QD. The half-monolithic design gives more spatial and spectral tuning abilities, relatively to fully monolithic structures. This unique micro-cavity design will potentially enable us to both reach the cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) strong coupling regime and realize the deterministic generation of single photons on demand.

  17. Analysis of ultra-high sensitivity configuration in chip-integrated photonic crystal microcavity bio-sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit Hosseini, Amir; Xu, Xiaochuan; Zhu, Liang; Zou, Yi; Chen, Ray T.

    2014-05-12

    We analyze the contributions of quality factor, fill fraction, and group index of chip-integrated resonance microcavity devices, to the detection limit for bulk chemical sensing and the minimum detectable biomolecule concentration in biosensing. We analyze the contributions from analyte absorbance, as well as from temperature and spectral noise. Slow light in two-dimensional photonic crystals provide opportunities for significant reduction of the detection limit below 1 × 10{sup −7} RIU (refractive index unit) which can enable highly sensitive sensors in diverse application areas. We demonstrate experimentally detected concentration of 1 fM (67 fg/ml) for the binding between biotin and avidin, the lowest reported till date.

  18. High Q-factor colloidal nanocrystal-based vertical microcavity by hot embossing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiradonna, Luigi; Carbone, Luigi; De Giorgi, Milena; Manna, Liberato; Gigli, Giuseppe; Cingolani, Roberto; De Vittorio, Massimo

    2006-05-01

    We report on the fabrication and optical characterization of vertical hybrid microcavities in which a layer of colloidal nanocrystals dispersed in an organic matrix is embedded between two inorganic mirrors. The devices are fabricated by a technique based on the unconventional use of the hot embossing technology, which allows a very fine control of the cavity length. The technique exploits a λ-thick microstructured dielectric top mirror pressed onto the bottom one, previously coated with the active layer, to sandwich the cavity and precisely control its thickness. Room-temperature photoluminescence measurements show a Q factor as high as 146 for our devices.

  19. Narrowband thermal radiation from closed-end microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kohiyama, Asaka; Shimizu, Makoto; Iguchi, Fumitada; Yugami, Hiroo

    2015-10-07

    High spectral selectivity of thermal radiation is important for achieving high-efficiency energy systems. In this study, intense, narrowband, and low directional absorption/radiation were observed in closed-end microcavity which is a conventional open-end microcavity covered by a semi-transparent thin metal film. The quality factor (Q factor) of optical absorption band strongly depended on the film electrical conductivity. Asymmetric and narrow absorption band with a Q factor of 25 at 1.28 μm was obtained for a 6-nm-thick Au film. Numerical simulations suggest that the formation of a fixed-end mode at the cavity aperture contributes to the narrowband optical absorption. The closed-end microcavity filled with SiO{sub 2} exhibits intense and isotropic thermal radiation over a wide solid angle according to numerical simulation. The narrow and asymmetric absorption spectrum was experimentally confirmed in a model of closed-end microcavity.

  20. Detection of Single Nanoparticles Using the Dissipative Interaction in a High-Q Microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bo-Qiang; Yu, Xiao-Chong; Zhi, Yanyan; Wang, Li; Kim, Donghyun; Gong, Qihuang; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasensitive optical detection of nanometer-scaled particles is highly desirable for applications in early-stage diagnosis of human diseases, environmental monitoring, and homeland security, but remains extremely difficult due to ultralow polarizabilities of small-sized, low-index particles. Optical whispering-gallery-mode microcavities, which can enhance significantly the light-matter interaction, have emerged as promising platforms for label-free detection of nanoscale objects. Different from the conventional whispering-gallery-mode sensing relying on the reactive (i.e., dispersive) interaction, here we propose and demonstrate to detect single lossy nanoparticles using the dissipative interaction in a high-Q toroidal microcavity. In the experiment, detection of single gold nanorods in an aqueous environment is realized by monitoring simultaneously the linewidth change and shift of the cavity mode. The experimental result falls within the theoretical prediction. Remarkably, the reactive and dissipative sensing methods are evaluated by setting the probe wavelength on and off the surface plasmon resonance to tune the absorption of nanorods, which demonstrates clearly the great potential of the dissipative sensing method to detect lossy nanoparticles. Future applications could also combine the dissipative and reactive sensing methods, which may provide better characterizations of nanoparticles.

  1. Characterization of a high coherence, Brillouin microcavity laser on silicon.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Lee, Hansuek; Chen, Tong; Vahala, Kerry J

    2012-08-27

    Recently, a high efficiency, narrow-linewidth, chip-based stimulated Brillouin laser (SBL) was demonstrated using an ultra-high-Q, silica-on-silicon resonator. In this work, this novel laser is more fully characterized. The Schawlow Townes linewidth formula for Brillouin laser operation is derived and compared to linewidth data, and the fitting is used to measure the mechanical thermal quanta contribution to the Brillouin laser linewidth. A study of laser mode pulling by the Brillouin optical gain spectrum is also presented, and high-order, cascaded operation of the SBL is demonstrated. Potential application of these devices to microwave sources and phase-coherent communication is discussed.

  2. Optical microcavity: sensing down to single molecules and atoms.

    PubMed

    Yoshie, Tomoyuki; Tang, Lingling; Su, Shu-Yu

    2011-01-01

    This review article discusses fundamentals of dielectric, low-loss, optical micro-resonator sensing, including figures of merit and a variety of microcavity designs, and future perspectives in microcavity-based optical sensing. Resonance frequency and quality (Q) factor are altered as a means of detecting a small system perturbation, resulting in realization of optical sensing of a small amount of sample materials, down to even single molecules. Sensitivity, Q factor, minimum detectable index change, noises (in sensor system components and microcavity system including environments), microcavity size, and mode volume are essential parameters to be considered for optical sensing applications. Whispering gallery mode, photonic crystal, and slot-type microcavities typically provide compact, high-quality optical resonance modes for optical sensing applications. Surface Bloch modes induced on photonic crystals are shown to be a promising candidate thanks to large field overlap with a sample and ultra-high-Q resonances. Quantum optics effects based on microcavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) would provide novel single-photo-level detection of even single atoms and molecules via detection of doublet vacuum Rabi splitting peaks in strong coupling.

  3. Optical Microcavity: Sensing down to Single Molecules and Atoms

    PubMed Central

    Yoshie, Tomoyuki; Tang, Lingling; Su, Shu-Yu

    2011-01-01

    This review article discusses fundamentals of dielectric, low-loss, optical micro-resonator sensing, including figures of merit and a variety of microcavity designs, and future perspectives in microcavity-based optical sensing. Resonance frequency and quality (Q) factor are altered as a means of detecting a small system perturbation, resulting in realization of optical sensing of a small amount of sample materials, down to even single molecules. Sensitivity, Q factor, minimum detectable index change, noises (in sensor system components and microcavity system including environments), microcavity size, and mode volume are essential parameters to be considered for optical sensing applications. Whispering gallery mode, photonic crystal, and slot-type microcavities typically provide compact, high-quality optical resonance modes for optical sensing applications. Surface Bloch modes induced on photonic crystals are shown to be a promising candidate thanks to large field overlap with a sample and ultra-high-Q resonances. Quantum optics effects based on microcavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) would provide novel single-photo-level detection of even single atoms and molecules via detection of doublet vacuum Rabi splitting peaks in strong coupling. PMID:22319393

  4. On-Chip High-Finesse Fabry-Perot Microcavities for Optical Sensing and Quantum Information

    PubMed Central

    Bitarafan, Mohammad H.; DeCorby, Ray G.

    2017-01-01

    For applications in sensing and cavity-based quantum computing and metrology, open-access Fabry-Perot cavities—with an air or vacuum gap between a pair of high reflectance mirrors—offer important advantages compared to other types of microcavities. For example, they are inherently tunable using MEMS-based actuation strategies, and they enable atomic emitters or target analytes to be located at high field regions of the optical mode. Integration of curved-mirror Fabry-Perot cavities on chips containing electronic, optoelectronic, and optomechanical elements is a topic of emerging importance. Micro-fabrication techniques can be used to create mirrors with small radius-of-curvature, which is a prerequisite for cavities to support stable, small-volume modes. We review recent progress towards chip-based implementation of such cavities, and highlight their potential to address applications in sensing and cavity quantum electrodynamics. PMID:28758967

  5. On-Chip High-Finesse Fabry-Perot Microcavities for Optical Sensing and Quantum Information.

    PubMed

    Bitarafan, Mohammad H; DeCorby, Ray G

    2017-07-31

    For applications in sensing and cavity-based quantum computing and metrology, open-access Fabry-Perot cavities-with an air or vacuum gap between a pair of high reflectance mirrors-offer important advantages compared to other types of microcavities. For example, they are inherently tunable using MEMS-based actuation strategies, and they enable atomic emitters or target analytes to be located at high field regions of the optical mode. Integration of curved-mirror Fabry-Perot cavities on chips containing electronic, optoelectronic, and optomechanical elements is a topic of emerging importance. Micro-fabrication techniques can be used to create mirrors with small radius-of-curvature, which is a prerequisite for cavities to support stable, small-volume modes. We review recent progress towards chip-based implementation of such cavities, and highlight their potential to address applications in sensing and cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  6. Self-sustained photothermal oscillations in high-finesse Fabry-Perot microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konthasinghe, Kumarasiri; Velez, Juan Gomez; Hopkins, Adam J.; Peiris, Manoj; Profeta, Luisa T. M.; Nieves, Yamil; Muller, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    We report the experimental investigation of a regime of microscopic Fabry-Perot resonators in which competing light-induced forces—photothermal expansion and photothermal refraction—acting oppositely and on different timescales lead to self-sustained persistent oscillations. Previously concealed as ordinary thermo-optic bistability—a common feature in low-loss resonator physics—these dynamics are visible as fast pulsations in cavity transmission or reflection measurements at sufficiently high time resolution. Their underlying mathematical description is shared by many slow-fast phenomena in chemistry, biology, and neuroscience. Our observations are relevant in particular to microcavity applications in atom optics and cavity quantum electrodynamics, even in nominally rigid structures that have not undergone lithography.

  7. Optofluidic laser array based on stable high-Q Fabry-Pérot microcavities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhou, Chunhua; Zhang, Tingting; Chen, Jingdong; Liu, Shaoding; Fan, Xudong

    2015-10-07

    We report the development of an optofluidic laser array fabricated on a chip using stable plano-concave Fabry-Pérot (FP) microcavities, which are far less susceptible to optical misalignment during device assembly than the commonly used plano-plano FP microcavities. The concave mirrors in our FP microcavities were created by first generating an array of microwells of a few micrometers in depth and a few tens of micrometers in diameter on a fused silica chip using a CO2 laser, followed by coating of distributed Bragg reflection (DBR) layers. The plano-concave FP microcavity had a Q-factor of 5.6 × 10(5) and finesse of 4 × 10(3), over 100 times higher than those for the FP microcavities in existing optofluidic lasers. 1 mM R6G dye in ethanol was used to test the plano-concave FP microcavities, showing an ultralow lasing threshold of only 90 nJ mm(-2), over 10 times lower than that in the corresponding unstable plano-plano FP microcavities formed by the same DBR coatings on the same chip. Simultaneous laser emission from the optofluidic laser array on the chip and single-mode lasing operation were also demonstrated. Our work will lead to the development of optofluidic laser-based biochemical sensors and novel on-chip photonic devices with extremely low lasing thresholds (nJ mm(-2)) and mode volumes (fL).

  8. Label-free detection with high-Q microcavities: a review of biosensing mechanisms for integrated devices.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Frank; Yang, Lan

    2012-12-01

    Optical microcavities that confine light in high-Q resonance promise all of the capabilities required for a successful next-generation microsystem biodetection technology. Label-free detection down to single molecules as well as operation in aqueous environments can be integrated cost-effectively on microchips, together with other photonic components, as well as electronic ones. We provide a comprehensive review of the sensing mechanisms utilized in this emerging field, their physics, engineering and material science aspects, and their application to nanoparticle analysis and biomolecular detection. We survey the most recent developments such as the use of mode splitting for self-referenced measurements, plasmonic nanoantennas for signal enhancements, the use of optical force for nanoparticle manipulation as well as the design of active devices for ultra-sensitive detection. Furthermore, we provide an outlook on the exciting capabilities of functionalized high-Q microcavities in the life sciences.

  9. Label-free detection with high-Q microcavities: a review of biosensing mechanisms for integrated devices

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Optical microcavities that confine light in high-Q resonance promise all of the capabilities required for a successful next-generation microsystem biodetection technology. Label-free detection down to single molecules as well as operation in aqueous environments can be integrated cost-effectively on microchips, together with other photonic components, as well as electronic ones. We provide a comprehensive review of the sensing mechanisms utilized in this emerging field, their physics, engineering and material science aspects, and their application to nanoparticle analysis and biomolecular detection. We survey the most recent developments such as the use of mode splitting for self-referenced measurements, plasmonic nanoantennas for signal enhancements, the use of optical force for nanoparticle manipulation as well as the design of active devices for ultra-sensitive detection. Furthermore, we provide an outlook on the exciting capabilities of functionalized high-Q microcavities in the life sciences. PMID:26918228

  10. Hybrid plasmonic microcavity with an air-filled gap for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Liu, Binbin; Wu, Genzhu; Chen, Daru

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a novel hybrid plasmonic microcavity with air-filled regions in the low-permittivity dielectric gap is proposed for sensing applications. Compared with the conventional structure with homogeneous gap, the introduced air-filled regions could improve the key modal characteristics of the hybrid mode. Simulation results reveal that this kind of hybrid microcavity maintains low loss with high quality factor ∼3062, and high field confinement with small mode volume 0.891 μm3. Moreover, in the sensing applications, this hybrid microcavity features simultaneously large refractive index sensitivity of 100 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) and relatively high quality factor of 3062. Hence, it shows that the hybrid plasmonic microcavity has potential applications in ultra-compact refractive index sensor.

  11. High-Polarization-Discriminating Infrared Detection Using a Single Quantum Well Sandwiched in Plasmonic Micro-Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Li, ZhiFeng; Li, Ning; Chen, XiaoShuang; Chen, PingPing; Shen, XueChu; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Polarimetric imaging has proved its value in medical diagnostics, bionics, remote sensing, astronomy, and in many other wide fields. Pixel-level solid monolithically integrated polarimetric imaging photo-detectors are the trend for infrared polarimetric imaging devices. For better polarimetric imaging performance the high polarization discriminating detectors are very much critical. Here we demonstrate the high infrared light polarization resolving capabilities of a quantum well (QW) detector in hybrid structure of single QW and plasmonic micro-cavity that uses QW as an active structure in the near field regime of plasmonic effect enhanced cavity, in which the photoelectric conversion in such a plasmonic micro-cavity has been realized. The detector's extinction ratio reaches 65 at the wavelength of 14.7 μm, about 6 times enhanced in such a type of pixel-level polarization long wave infrared photodetectors. The enhancement mechanism is attributed to artificial plasmonic modulation on optical propagation and distribution in the plasmonic micro-cavities. PMID:25208580

  12. High-polarization-discriminating infrared detection using a single quantum well sandwiched in plasmonic micro-cavity.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Li, ZhiFeng; Li, Ning; Chen, XiaoShuang; Chen, PingPing; Shen, XueChu; Lu, Wei

    2014-09-11

    Polarimetric imaging has proved its value in medical diagnostics, bionics, remote sensing, astronomy, and in many other wide fields. Pixel-level solid monolithically integrated polarimetric imaging photo-detectors are the trend for infrared polarimetric imaging devices. For better polarimetric imaging performance the high polarization discriminating detectors are very much critical. Here we demonstrate the high infrared light polarization resolving capabilities of a quantum well (QW) detector in hybrid structure of single QW and plasmonic micro-cavity that uses QW as an active structure in the near field regime of plasmonic effect enhanced cavity, in which the photoelectric conversion in such a plasmonic micro-cavity has been realized. The detector's extinction ratio reaches 65 at the wavelength of 14.7 μm, about 6 times enhanced in such a type of pixel-level polarization long wave infrared photodetectors. The enhancement mechanism is attributed to artificial plasmonic modulation on optical propagation and distribution in the plasmonic micro-cavities.

  13. High-Polarization-Discriminating Infrared Detection Using a Single Quantum Well Sandwiched in Plasmonic Micro-Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Li, Zhifeng; Li, Ning; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Chen, Pingping; Shen, Xuechu; Lu, Wei

    2014-09-01

    Polarimetric imaging has proved its value in medical diagnostics, bionics, remote sensing, astronomy, and in many other wide fields. Pixel-level solid monolithically integrated polarimetric imaging photo-detectors are the trend for infrared polarimetric imaging devices. For better polarimetric imaging performance the high polarization discriminating detectors are very much critical. Here we demonstrate the high infrared light polarization resolving capabilities of a quantum well (QW) detector in hybrid structure of single QW and plasmonic micro-cavity that uses QW as an active structure in the near field regime of plasmonic effect enhanced cavity, in which the photoelectric conversion in such a plasmonic micro-cavity has been realized. The detector's extinction ratio reaches 65 at the wavelength of 14.7 μm, about 6 times enhanced in such a type of pixel-level polarization long wave infrared photodetectors. The enhancement mechanism is attributed to artificial plasmonic modulation on optical propagation and distribution in the plasmonic micro-cavities.

  14. Microcavity Laser Based on a Single Molecule Thick High Gain Layer.

    PubMed

    Palatnik, Alexander; Aviv, Hagit; Tischler, Yaakov R

    2017-04-05

    The ability to confine excitons within monolayers has led to fundamental investigations of non-radiative energy transfer, super-radiance, strong light-matter coupling, high-efficiency LEDs, and recently lasers in lateral resonator architectures. Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs), in which lasing occurs perpendicular to the device plane, are critical for telecommunications and large-scale photonics integration, however strong optical self-absorption and low fluorescence quantum yields have thus far prevented coherent emission from a monolayer microcavity device. Here we show lasing from a monolayer VCSEL using a single molecule thick film of amphiphilic fluorescent dye, assembled via Langmuir-Blodgett deposition, as the gain layer. Threshold was observed when 5% of the molecules were excited (4.4 μJ/cm(2)). At this level of excitation, the optical gain in the monolayer exceeds 1056 cm(-1). High localization of the excitons in the VCSEL gain layer can enhance their collective emission properties with Langmuir-Blodgett deposition presenting a paradigm for engineering the high gain layers on the molecular level.

  15. Ultrasmooth silver thin film electrodes with high polar liquid wettability for OLED microcavity application.

    PubMed

    Cioarec, Cristina; Melpignano, Patrizia; Gherardi, Nicolas; Clergereaux, Richard; Villeneuve, Christina

    2011-04-05

    For a lab-on-chip application, we fabricate a blue bottom emitting strong microcavity organic light emitting diode (OLED), using very smooth and optically thin (25 nm) silver film as anode on a glass substrate. To improve the hole injection in the OLED device, PEDOT-PSS (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrene sulfonic acid)) has been used, so the silver anode must present not only a very smooth surface but also a strong adherence on the glass and a high wettability to allow a good PEDOT-PSS spin coating deposition. To obtain these physical properties, different 5 nm thick nucleation layers (germanium, chromium, and hydrogenated amorphous carbon) have been used to grow the silver thin films by e-beam deposition. The Ge/Ag bilayer presents all the desired properties: this bilayer, investigated by ellipsometry, optical profilometry, contact angle measurements, and XPS analysis, highlights an ultrasmooth surface correlated with the film growth mode and a high wettability related to its surface chemical composition.

  16. Highly detuned Rabi oscillations for a quantum dot in a microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmele, Alexander; Kabuss, Julia; Chow, Weng W.

    2013-01-01

    Pronounced Rabi oscillations at large detunings are predicted for a system consisting of a semiconductor quantum dot in a microcavity. Besides an anticrossing at zero detuning, two additional anticrossings are possible at microcavity detunings of one longitudinal-optical-phonon frequency below and above the quantum-dot resonance. These phonon-assisted Rabi oscillations generally exhibit complex spectral features. The investigation is performed with a quantum-electrodynamical model, where the phonon reservoir effects are treated beyond the customary Markov, second-order Born approximation.

  17. Glass-based 1-D dielectric microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiasera, Alessandro; Scotognella, Francesco; Valligatla, Sreeramulu; Varas, Stefano; Jasieniak, Jacek; Criante, Luigino; Lukowiak, Anna; Ristic, Davor; Gonçalves, Rogeria Rocha; Taccheo, Stefano; Ivanda, Mile; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ramponi, Roberta; Martucci, Alessandro; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a reliable RF sputtering techniques allowing to fabricate glass-based one dimensional microcavities, with high quality factor. This property is strongly related to the modification of the density of states due to the confinement of the gain medium in a photonic band gap structure. In this short review we present some of the more recent results obtained by our team exploiting these 1D microcavities. In particular we present: (1) Er3+ luminescence enhancement of the 4I13/2 → 4I15/2 transition; (2) broad band filters based on disordered 1-D photonic structures; (3) threshold defect-mode lasing action in a hybrid structure.

  18. Microcavity Enhanced Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrak, Benjamin J.

    Raman scattering can accurately identify molecules by their intrinsic vibrational frequencies, but its notoriously weak scattering efficiency for gases presents a major obstacle to its practical application in gas sensing and analysis. This work explores the use of high finesse (≈50 000) Fabry-Perot microcavities as a means to enhance Raman scattering from gases. A recently demonstrated laser ablation method, which carves out a micromirror template on fused silica--either on a fiber tip or bulk substrates-- was implemented, characterized, and optimized to fabricate concave micromirror templates ˜10 mum diameter and radius of curvature. The fabricated templates were coated with a high-reflectivity dielectric coating by ion-beam sputtering and were assembled into microcavities ˜10 mum long and with a mode volume ˜100 mum 3. A novel gas sensing technique that we refer to as Purcell enhanced Raman scattering (PERS) was demonstrated using the assembled microcavities. PERS works by enhancing the pump laser's intensity through resonant recirculation at one longitudinal mode, while simultaneously, at a second mode at the Stokes frequency, the Purcell effect increases the rate of spontaneous Raman scattering by a change to the intra-cavity photon density of states. PERS was shown to enhance the rate of spontaneous Raman scattering by a factor of 107 compared to the same volume of sample gas in free space scattered into the same solid angle subtended by the cavity. PERS was also shown capable of resolving several Raman bands from different isotopes of CO2 gas for application to isotopic analysis. Finally, the use of the microcavity to enhance coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) from CO2 gas was demonstrated.

  19. Strong photocurrent enhancements in highly efficient flexible organic solar cells by adopting a microcavity configuration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kung-Shih; Yip, Hin-Lap; Salinas, José-Francisco; Xu, Yun-Xiang; Chueh, Chu-Chen; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2014-05-28

    Organic solar cells often show inefficient light harvesting due to a short absorption path length limited by the low charge mobility of organic semiconductors. We demonstrate a flexible organic solar cell in a microcavity configuration using a TeO2/Ag semitransparent electrode to confine the optical field within the device with significant performance improvements and reaching a power conversion efficiency of 8.56%.

  20. On-chip asymmetric microcavity optomechanics.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Soheil; Hudnut, Alexa W; Armani, Andrea M

    2016-12-26

    High quality factor (Q) optical resonators have enabled rapid growth in the field of cavity-enhanced, radiation pressure-induced optomechanics. However, because research has focused on axisymmetric devices, the observed regenerative excited mechanical modes are similar. In the present work, a strategy for fabricating high-Q whispering gallery mode microcavities with varying degrees of asymmetry is developed and demonstrated. Due to the combination of high optical Q and asymmetric device design, two previously unobserved modes, the asymmetric cantilever and asymmetric crown mode, are demonstrated with sub-mW thresholds for onset of oscillations. The experimental results are in good agreement with computational modeling predictions.

  1. Semiconductor microcavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, P.L.; Wendt, J.R.; Vawter, G.A.; Warren, M.E.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1994-02-01

    New kinds of semiconductor microcavity lasers are being created by modern semiconductor technologies like molecular beam epitaxy and electron beam lithography. These new microcavities exploit 3-dimensional architectures possible with epitaxial layering and surface patterning. The physical properties of these microcavities are intimately related to the geometry imposed on the semiconductor materials. Among these microcavities are surface-emitting structures which have many useful properties for commercial purposes. This paper reviews the basic physics of these microstructured lasers.

  2. Fabrication of directional nanopillars with high-aspect-ratio using a stretching imprint process with a microcavity mold.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weitao; Lei, Biao; Liu, Hongzhong; Niu, Dong; Zhao, Tingting; Chen, Bangdao; Yin, Lei; Shi, Yongsheng; Liu, Xiaokang

    2017-02-09

    Directional nanopillars with high-aspect-ratio have wide applications in home or industrial appliances and biomimetic robots. Their fabrication, however, is a challenge for conventional methods. In this study, we propose a simple stretching imprint process to prepare controllable directional (30°-90° in a slanted angle) nanopillars (200-800 nm in diameter) with high aspect ratio (>30) using a microcavity mold, beyond the conventional nanoimprint process, for 1 : 1 pattern transfer from the mold to the replica. The mechanism of the stretching imprint process is further investigated, and a rheology model for the filament evolution during the stretching process is established, which clearly shows that the aspect-ratio, diameter in submicrons, slanted angle, and also the tip profile of the free-standing nanopillars can be easily controlled by the imprint process using a microcavity mold. Further experiments indicate that the fabricated directional free-standing nanopillars show strong friction anisotropy, which may find applications in biomimetic studies.

  3. High-temperature continuous-wave laser realized in hollow microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhifeng; Zhang, Yuantao; Cui, Xijun; Zhuang, Shiwei; Wu, Bin; Dong, Xin; Zhang, Baolin; Du, Guotong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, an urgent requirement of ultraviolet (UV) semiconductor laser with lower cost and higher performance has motivated our intensive research in zinc oxide (ZnO) material owing to its wide direct band gap and large exciton binding energy. Here, we demonstrate for the first time continuous-wave laser in electrically-pumped hollow polygonal microcavities based on epitaxial ZnO/MgO-core/shell nanowall networks structures, and whispering gallery type resonant modes are responsible for the lasing action. The laser diodes exhibit an ultralow threshold current density (0.27 A/cm2), two or three orders of magnitude smaller than other reported UV-light semiconductor laser diodes to our knowledge. More importantly, the continuous-current-driven diode can achieve lasing up to ~430 K, showing a good temperature tolerance. This study indicates that nano-size injection lasers can be made from epitaxial semiconductor microcavities, which is a considerable advance towards the realization of practical UV coherent light sources, facilitating the existing applications and suggesting new potentials. PMID:25417966

  4. Enhanced nonlinear interaction in a microcavity under coherent excitation.

    PubMed

    Serna, Samuel; Oden, Jérèmy; Hanna, Marc; Caer, Charles; Le Roux, Xavier; Sauvan, Christophe; Delaye, Philippe; Cassan, Eric; Dubreuil, Nicolas

    2015-11-16

    The large field enhancement that can be achieved in high quality factor and small mode volume photonic crystal microcavities leads to strengthened nonlinear interactions. However, the frequency shift dynamics of the cavity resonance under a pulsed excitation, which is driven by nonlinear refractive index change, tends to limit the coupling efficiency between the pulse and the cavity. As a consequence, the cavity enhancement effect cannot last for the entire pulse duration, limiting the interaction between the pulse and the intra-cavity material. In order to preserve the benefit of light localization throughout the pulsed excitation, we report the first experimental demonstration of coherent excitation of a nonlinear microcavity, leading to an enhanced intra-cavity nonlinear interaction. We investigate the nonlinear behavior of a Silicon-based microcavity subject to tailored positively chirped pulses, enabling to increase the free carrier density generated by two-photon absorption by up to a factor of 2.5 compared with a Fourier-transform limited pulse excitation of equal energy. It is accompanied by an extended frequency blue-shift of the cavity resonance reaching 19 times the linear cavity bandwidth. This experimental result highlights the interest in using coherent excitation to control intra-cavity light-matter interactions and nonlinear dynamics of microcavity-based optical devices.

  5. Quantum well nonlinear microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudar, J. L.; Kuszelewicz, R.; Sfez, B.; Pellat, D.; Azoulay, R.

    We report on recent progress in reducing the power threshold of all-optical bistable quantum well vertical microcavities. Significant improvements are achieved through an increase of the cavity finesse, together with a reduction of the device active layer thickness. A critical intensity of 5 μW/μm 2 has been observed on a microcavity of finesse 250, with a nonlinear medium of only 18 GaAs quantum wells of 10 nm thickness. Further improvements of the Bragg mirror quality resulted in a finesse of 700 and a power-lifetime product of 15 fJ/μm 2. Microresonator pixellation allows to obtain 2-dimensional arrays. A thermally-induced alloy-mixing technique is described, which produced a 110 meV carrier confinement energy, together with a refractive index change of -.012, averaged over the 2.6 μm nonlinear medium thickness. The resulting electrical and optical confinement is shown to improve the nonlinear characteristics, by limiting lateral carrier diffusion and light diffraction.

  6. Highly efficient phosphor-converted white organic light-emitting diodes with moderate microcavity and light-recycling filters.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sang-Hwan; Oh, Jeong Rok; Park, Hoo Keun; Kim, Hyoung Kun; Lee, Yong-Hee; Lee, Jae-Gab; Do, Young Rag

    2010-01-18

    We demonstrate the combined effects of a microcavity structure and light-recycling filters (LRFs) on the forward electrical efficiency of phosphor-converted white organic light-emitting diodes (pc-WOLEDs). The introduction of a single pair of low- and high-index layers (SiO(2)/TiO(2)) improves the blue emission from blue OLED and the insertion of blue-passing and yellow-reflecting LRFs enhances the forward yellow emission from the YAG:Ce(3+) phosphors layers. The enhancement of the luminous efficacy of the forward white emission is 1.92 times that of a conventional pc-WOLED with color coordinates of (0.34, 0.34) and a correlated color temperature of about 4800 K.

  7. Mode control and direct modulation for waveguide-coupled square microcavity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue-De; Xiao, Zhi-Xiong; Weng, Hai-Zhong; Xiao, Jin-Long; Huang, Yong-Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Lasing mode control and direct modulation characteristics have been investigated for waveguide-coupled unidirectional-emission square microcavity lasers. A quasi-analytical model is introduced to analyze the mode field distributions and quality (Q) factors for the confined modes inside the square optical microcavities with directly coupled waveguide, where high-Q whispering-gallery-like (WG-like) modes are induced by the mode coupling between doubly-degenerate modes. AlGaInAs/InP waveguide-coupled unidirectional-emission square microcavity lasers are fabricated by using standard planar technology, and electrically-injected lasing is realized at room temperature. The lasing modes are controlled by properly designing the lasing cavity, output waveguide and injection pattern. Dual-transverse-mode lasing with a tunable wavelength interval from 0.25 to 0.39 nm is realized by using a spatially selective current injection to modulate the refractive index, as the mode field distributions of different transverse are spatially separated. The wavelength interval can be further increased to a few nanometers by reducing the cavity size and replacing the flat sidewalls with circular arcs. The field distributions of WG-like modes distribute uniformly in square microcavity, which avoid the burning-induced carrier diffusion in high-speed direct modulation. A small-signal modulation 3dB bandwidth exceeding 16 GHz, and an open eye diagram at 25 Gb/s are demonstrated for the high-speed direct modulated square microcavity laser.

  8. HIgh-Q Optical Micro-cavity Resonators as High Sensitive Bio-chemical and Ultrasonic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Tao

    Optical micro-cavity resonators have quickly emerged in the past few years as a new sensing platform in a wide range of applications, such as bio-chemical molecular detection, environmental monitoring, acoustic and electromagnetic waves detection. In this thesis, we will mainly focus on developing high sensitivity silica micro-tube resonator bio-chemical sensors and high sensitivity polymer micro-ring resonator acoustic sensors. In high sensitivity silica micro-tube resonator bio-chemical sensors part: We first demonstrated a prism coupled silica micro-tube bio-chemical sensing platform to overcome the reliability problem in a fiber coupled thin wall silica micro-tube sensing platform. In refractive index sensing experiment, a unique resonance mode with sensitivity around 600nm/refractive index unit (RIU) has been observed. Surface sensing experiments also have been performed in this platform to detect lipid monolayer, lipid bilayer, electrostatic self assemble layer-by-layer as well as the interaction between the lipid bilayer and proteins. Then a theoretical study on various sensing properties on the silica micro-tube based sensing platform has been realized. Furthermore, we have proposed a coupled cavity system to further enhance the device's sensitivity above 1000nm/RIU. In high sensitivity polymer micro-ring resonator acoustic sensors part: We first presented a simplified fabrication process and realized a polymer microring with a Q factor around 6000. The fabricated device has been used to detect acoustic wave with noise equivalent pressure (NEP) around 230Pa over 1-75MHz frequency rang, which is comparable to state-of-art piezoelectric transducer and the device's frequency response also have been characterized to be up to 90MHz. A new fabrication process combined with resist reflow and thermal oxidation process has been used to improve the Q factor up to 10 5 and the device's NEP has been tested to be around 88Pa over 1-75MHz range. Further improving the

  9. Spheroidal Fabry-Perot microcavities in optical fibers for high-sensitivity sensing.

    PubMed

    Favero, F C; Araujo, L; Bouwmans, G; Finazzi, V; Villatoro, J; Pruneri, V

    2012-03-26

    All-optical-fiber Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPIs) with microcavities of different shapes were investigated. It was found that the size and shape of the cavity plays an important role on the performance of these interferometers. To corroborate the analysis, FPIs with spheroidal cavities were fabricated by splicing a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with large voids and a conventional single mode fiber (SMF), using an ad hoc splicing program. It was found that the strain sensitivity of FPIs with spheroidal cavities can be controlled through the dimensions of the spheroid. For example, a FPI whose cavity had a size of ~10x60 μm exhibited strain sensitivity of ~10.3 pm/με and fringe contrast of ~38 dB. Such strain sensitivity is ~10 times larger than that of the popular fiber Bragg gratings (~1.2 pm/με) and higher than that of most low-finesse FPIs. The thermal sensitivity of our FPIs is extremely low (~1pm/°C) due to the air cavities. Thus, a number of temperature-independent ultra-sensitive microscopic sensors can be devised with the interferometers here proposed since many parameters can be converted to strain. To this end, simple vibration sensors are demonstrated.

  10. Patch antenna microcavity terahertz sources with enhanced emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madéo, J.; Todorov, Y.; Gilman, A.; Frucci, G.; Li, L. H.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H.; Sirtori, C.; Dani, K. M.

    2016-10-01

    We study the emission properties of an electroluminescent THz frequency quantum cascade structure embedded in an array of patch antenna double-metal microcavities. We show that high photon extraction efficiencies can be obtained by adjusting the active region thickness and array periodicity as well as high Purcell factors (up to 65), leading to an enhanced overall emitted power. Up to a 44-fold increase in power is experimentally observed in comparison with a reference device processed in conventional mesa geometry. Estimation of the Purcell factors using electromagnetic simulations and the theoretical extraction efficiency are in agreement with the observed power enhancement and show that, in these microcavities, the overall enhancement solely depends on the square of the total quality factor.

  11. High Sensitivity Detection of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dot-Labeled DNA Based on N-type Porous Silicon Microcavities.

    PubMed

    Lv, Changwu; Jia, Zhenhong; Lv, Jie; Zhang, Hongyan; Li, Yanyu

    2017-01-01

    N-type macroporous silicon microcavity structures were prepared using electrochemical etching in an HF solution in the absence of light and oxidants. The CdSe/ZnS water-soluble quantum dot-labeled DNA target molecules were detected by monitoring the microcavity reflectance spectrum, which was characterized by the reflectance spectrum defect state position shift resulting from changes to the structures' refractive index. Quantum dots with a high refractive index and DNA coupling can improve the detection sensitivity by amplifying the optical response signals of the target DNA. The experimental results show that DNA combined with a quantum dot can improve the sensitivity of DNA detection by more than five times.

  12. High efficiency optical coupling in long wavelength quantum cascade infrared detector via quasi-one-dimensional grating plasmonic micro-cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Xiong, D. Y.; Tang, Z.; Wen, J.; Li, N.; Chen, P. P.; Zhu, Z. Q.

    2017-02-01

    A combination of quasi-one-dimensional grating and plasmonic micro-cavity is proposed as a normal-illuminated optical coupler for a long wavelength quantum cascade infrared detector. A finite difference time-domain method is used to numerically simulate the reflection spectra and the field distributions of the optical coupler. The average |Ez|2 in the active layer reaches 4.1 (V/m)2 under the 13.5 μm infrared normal illumination with a strength of 1 (V/m)2. A mixed state of localized surface plasmon and surface plasmonic polariton is observed. The results confirm that the quasi-one-dimensional grating plasmonic micro-cavity structure could generate more plasma excitation source, and as a consequence, a high optical coupling efficiency of 410% in the active region is obtained. Moreover, an excellent polarization-discriminating performance is observed.

  13. High Sensitivity Detection of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dot-Labeled DNA Based on N-type Porous Silicon Microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Changwu; Jia, Zhenhong; Lv, Jie; Zhang, Hongyan; Li, Yanyu

    2017-01-01

    N-type macroporous silicon microcavity structures were prepared using electrochemical etching in an HF solution in the absence of light and oxidants. The CdSe/ZnS water-soluble quantum dot-labeled DNA target molecules were detected by monitoring the microcavity reflectance spectrum, which was characterized by the reflectance spectrum defect state position shift resulting from changes to the structures’ refractive index. Quantum dots with a high refractive index and DNA coupling can improve the detection sensitivity by amplifying the optical response signals of the target DNA. The experimental results show that DNA combined with a quantum dot can improve the sensitivity of DNA detection by more than five times. PMID:28045442

  14. Silicon on-chip side-coupled high-Q micro-cavities for the multiplexing of high sensitivity photonic crystal integrated sensors array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Daquan; Wang, Chunhong; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Bo; Yang, Yujie; Ji, Yuefeng

    2016-09-01

    A novel two-dimensional (2D) silicon (Si) photonic crystal (PC) α-H0-slot micro-cavity with high Q-factor and high sensitivity (S) is presented. Based on the proposed α-H0-Slot micro-cavities, an optimal design of photonic crystal integrated sensors array (PC-ISA) on monolithic silicon on insulator (SOI) is displayed. By using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, the simulation results demonstrate that both large S of 200 nm/RIU (RIU=refractive index unit) and high Q-factor >104 at telecom wavelength range can be achieved simultaneously. And the sensor figure of merit (FOM)>7000 is featured, an order of magnitude improvement over previous 2D PC sensors array. In addition, for the proposed 2D PC-ISA device, each sensor unit is shown to independently shift its resonance wavelength in response to the changes in refractive index (RI) and does not perturb the others. Thus, it is potentially an ideal platform for realizing ultra-compact lab-on-a-chip applications with dense arrays of functionalized spots for multiplexed sensing, and also can be used as an opto-fluidic architecture for performing highly parallel detection of biochemical interactions in aqueous environments.

  15. Fabry-Perot microcavity for diamond-based photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janitz, Erika; Ruf, Maximilian; Dimock, Mark; Bourassa, Alexandre; Sankey, Jack; Childress, Lilian

    2015-10-01

    Open Fabry-Perot microcavities represent a promising route for achieving a quantum electrodynamics (cavity-QED) platform with diamond-based emitters. In particular, they offer the opportunity to introduce high-purity, minimally fabricated material into a tunable, high quality factor optical resonator. Here, we demonstrate a fiber-based microcavity incorporating a thick (>10 μ m ) diamond membrane with a finesse of 17 000, corresponding to a quality factor Q ˜106 . Such minimally fabricated thick samples can contain optically stable emitters similar to those found in bulk diamond. We observe modified microcavity spectra in the presence of the membrane, and we develop analytic and numerical models to describe the effect of the membrane on cavity modes, including loss and coupling to higher-order transverse modes. We estimate that a Purcell enhancement of approximately 20 should be possible for emitters within the diamond in this device, and we provide evidence that better diamond surface treatments and mirror coatings could increase this value to 200 in a realistic system.

  16. Spherical silicon photonic microcavities: From amorphous to polycrystalline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenollosa, R.; Garín, M.; Meseguer, F.

    2016-06-01

    Shaping silicon as a spherical object is not an obvious task, especially when the object size is in the micrometer range. This has the important consequence of transforming bare silicon material in a microcavity, so it is able to confine light efficiently. Here, we have explored the inside volume of such microcavities, both in their amorphous and in their polycrystalline versions. The synthesis method, which is based on chemical vapor deposition, causes amorphous microspheres to have a high content of hydrogen that produces an onionlike distributed porous core when the microspheres are crystallized by a fast annealing regime. This substantially influences the resonant modes. However, a slow crystallization regime does not yield pores, and produces higher-quality-factor resonances that could be fitted to the Mie theory. This allows the establishment of a procedure for obtaining size calibration standards with relative errors of the order of 0.1%.

  17. Label-Free, Single-Molecule Detection with Optical Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armani, Andrea M.; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Fraser, Scott E.; Flagan, Richard C.; Vahala, Kerry J.

    2007-08-01

    Current single-molecule detection techniques require labeling the target molecule. We report a highly specific and sensitive optical sensor based on an ultrahigh quality (Q) factor (Q > 108) whispering-gallery microcavity. The silica surface is functionalized to bind the target molecule; binding is detected by a resonant wavelength shift. Single-molecule detection is confirmed by observation of single-molecule binding events that shift the resonant frequency, as well as by the statistics for these shifts over many binding events. These shifts result from a thermo-optic mechanism. Additionally, label-free, single-molecule detection of interleukin-2 was demonstrated in serum. These experiments demonstrate a dynamic range of 1012 in concentration, establishing the microcavity as a sensitive and versatile detector.

  18. Aqueous-filled polymer microcavity arrays: versatile & stable lipid bilayer platforms offering high lateral mobility to incorporated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Basit, Hajra; Gaul, Vinnie; Maher, Sean; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2015-05-07

    A key prerequisite in an ideal supported lipid bilayer based cell membrane model is that the mobility of both the lipid matrix and its components are unhindered by the underlying support. This is not trivial and with the exception of liposomes, many of even the most advanced approaches, although accomplishing lipid mobility, fail to achieve complete mobility of incorporated membrane proteins. This is addressed in a novel platform comprising lipid bilayers assembled over buffer-filled, arrays of spherical cap microcavities formed from microsphere template polydimethoxysilane. Prior to bilayer assembly the PDMS is rendered hydrophilic by plasma treatment and the lipid bilayer prepared using Langmuir Blodgett assembly followed by liposome/proteoliposome fusion. Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy confirmed the pore suspended lipid bilayer exhibits diffusion coefficients comparable to free-standing vesicles in solution. The bilayer modified arrays are highly reproducible and stable over days. As the bilayers are suspended over deep aqueous reservoirs, reconstituted membrane proteins experience an aqueous interface at both membrane interfaces and attain full lateral mobility. Their utility as membrane protein platforms was exemplified in two case studies with proteins of different dimensions in their extracellular and cytoplasmic domains reconstituted into DOPC lipid bilayers; Glycophorin A, and Integrin αIIbβ3. In both cases, the proteins exhibited 100% mobility with high lateral diffusion coefficients.

  19. Electromagnetically induced transparency in optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Chun; Li, Bei-Bei; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2017-08-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is a quantum interference effect arising from different transition pathways of optical fields. Within the transparency window, both absorption and dispersion properties strongly change, which results in extensive applications such as slow light and optical storage. Due to the ultrahigh quality factors, massive production on a chip and convenient all-optical control, optical microcavities provide an ideal platform for realizing EIT. Here we review the principle and recent development of EIT in optical microcavities. We focus on the following three situations. First, for a coupled-cavity system, all-optical EIT appears when the optical modes in different cavities couple to each other. Second, in a single microcavity, all-optical EIT is created when interference happens between two optical modes. Moreover, the mechanical oscillation of the microcavity leads to optomechanically induced transparency. Then the applications of EIT effect in microcavity systems are discussed, including light delay and storage, sensing, and field enhancement. A summary is then given in the final part of the paper.

  20. Technology CAD based design of semiconductor optical microcavities for single photon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streiff, Matthias; Witzigmann, Bernd; Zinoni, Carl; Alloing, Blandine; Monat, Christelle; Fiore, Andrea

    2005-07-01

    Optical microcavities that contain single quantum dots have promising applications in quantum cryptography as sources of single photons. The realisation of efficient devices relies on the ability to fabricate electrically-pumped, high Q factor (Q>2000), wavelength-sized microcavities. In this work two approaches-oxide confined and micropillar structures-are compared by optical simulation. The modification of the spontaneous emission-Purcell factor and emission coupling efficiency-in such devices is treated semiclassically here, assuming the weak coupling regime. Hence, the spontaneous emission rate and direction may be computed using the effective mode volume, resonant wavelength, and quality factor of the optical modes in the microcavity. In the context of this work, the optical modes of rotationally symmetric microcavities are determined by solving Maxwell's vectorial wave equation in the frequency domain employing vectorial finite elements, subject to an open boundary, taking into account diffraction and radiation of electromagnetic waves. Consequently, the spontaneous emission properties of realistic microcavities without any restrictions regarding structure and size may be investigated. The optical mode solver is first calibrated with measured electroluminescence spectra of an oxide confined microcavity structure with oxide diameters ranging from 2.4 um to 0.7 um. Excellent agreement is achieved between measurements and simulations, which assures the predictive capability of the optical mode solver. For oxide confinements with diameters smaller than 1 um strong degradation of the Q factor and, hence, the Purcell factor is observed. Excessive diffraction losses are identified as the main cause of this effect in the present design. Furthermore, the advantages of micropillar structures with respect to this issue are demonstrated.

  1. Exceptional points enhance sensing in an optical microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weijian; Kaya Özdemir, Şahin; Zhao, Guangming; Wiersig, Jan; Yang, Lan

    2017-08-01

    Sensors play an important part in many aspects of daily life such as infrared sensors in home security systems, particle sensors for environmental monitoring and motion sensors in mobile phones. High-quality optical microcavities are prime candidates for sensing applications because of their ability to enhance light-matter interactions in a very confined volume. Examples of such devices include mechanical transducers, magnetometers, single-particle absorption spectrometers, and microcavity sensors for sizing single particles and detecting nanometre-scale objects such as single nanoparticles and atomic ions. Traditionally, a very small perturbation near an optical microcavity introduces either a change in the linewidth or a frequency shift or splitting of a resonance that is proportional to the strength of the perturbation. Here we demonstrate an alternative sensing scheme, by which the sensitivity of microcavities can be enhanced when operated at non-Hermitian spectral degeneracies known as exceptional points. In our experiments, we use two nanoscale scatterers to tune a whispering-gallery-mode micro-toroid cavity, in which light propagates along a concave surface by continuous total internal reflection, in a precise and controlled manner to exceptional points. A target nanoscale object that subsequently enters the evanescent field of the cavity perturbs the system from its exceptional point, leading to frequency splitting. Owing to the complex-square-root topology near an exceptional point, this frequency splitting scales as the square root of the perturbation strength and is therefore larger (for sufficiently small perturbations) than the splitting observed in traditional non-exceptional-point sensing schemes. Our demonstration of exceptional-point-enhanced sensitivity paves the way for sensors with unprecedented sensitivity.

  2. Lasing from all-polymer microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canazza, G.; Scotognella, F.; Lanzani, G.; De Silvestri, S.; Zavelani-Rossi, M.; Comoretto, D.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the laser action in a microcavity where both the dielectric mirrors and the active material have a macromolecular nature, resulting in a full plastic laser device. Distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) are prepared by spin-coating of polyvinylcarbazole and cellulose acetate orthogonal solutions and the active layer consists of a highly fluorescent conjugated polymer poly(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl-co-1,4-benzo-(2,1‧-3)-thiadiazole) (F8BT) spun film. A quality factor in the range 80-180 is achieved and the cavity mode is carefully tuned on the peak of the F8BT amplified spontaneous emission spectrum. Under pulsed optical pumping, laser emission is obtained with a surprisingly low lasing threshold (<20 μJ cm-2) for a full plastic DBR optical cavity. This result opens a simple and cheap way to obtain a new class of polymer lasers.

  3. Low-threshold indium gallium nitride quantum dot microcavity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Alexander J.

    Gallium nitride (GaN) microcavities with embedded optical emitters have long been sought after as visible light sources as well as platforms for cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) experiments. Specifically, materials containing indium gallium nitride (InGaN) quantum dots (QDs) offer an outstanding platform to study light matter interactions and realize practical devices, such as on-chip light emitting diodes and nanolasers. Inherent advantages of nitride-based microcavities include low surface recombination velocities, enhanced room-temperature performance (due to their high exciton binding energy, as high as 67 meV for InGaN QDs), and emission wavelengths in the blue region of the visible spectrum. In spite of these advantages, several challenges must be overcome in order to capitalize on the potential of this material system. Such diffculties include the processing of GaN into high-quality devices due to the chemical inertness of the material, low material quality as a result of strain-induced defects, reduced carrier recombination effciencies due to internal fields, and a lack of characterization of the InGaN QDs themselves due to the diffculty of their growth and therefore lack of development relative to other semiconductor QDs. In this thesis we seek to understand and address such issues by investigating the interaction of light coupled to InGaN QDs via a GaN microcavity resonator. Such coupling led us to the demonstration of the first InGaN QD microcavity laser, whose performance offers insights into the properties and current limitations of the nitride materials and their emitters. This work is organized into three main sections. Part I outlines the key advantages and challenges regarding indium gallium nitride (InGaN) emitters embedded within gallium nitride (GaN) optical microcavities. Previous work is also discussed which establishes context for the work presented here. Part II includes the fundamentals related to laser operation, including the

  4. IMI long-range surface plasmon Bragg micro-cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Kai; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Chunliang; Wang, Meiting

    2016-10-01

    The defect layer is introduced to the insulator-metal-insulator (IMI) Bragg waveguide structure. The micro-cavity structure of long-range surface plasma is proposed based on the defect mode. The liquid crystal is the defect layer in the structure of Bragg. The energy band characteristics of the long-range surface plasmon Bragg micro-cavity structure are analyzed by using the finite difference time domain method. The influence of the period number and the length of the micro-cavity on the quality factor Q and the volume V of the Bragg grating are discussed. The results show that the photonic energy can be confined very well in the micro-cavity by the structure of the micro-cavity. By controlling the birefringence of liquid crystal, the resonance wavelength of the micro-cavity appears with redshift phenomenon. The tuning range is 42 nm. The tuning of the working window of the long-range surface plasmon filter is realized. The photonic energy is the strongest in the insulating layer and the metal interface. The increase of cycles number has certain limitation on the improvement of the quality factor Q of the cavity. The influence of the defect-cavity length on the resonant wavelength, the quality factor Q and the mode volume V is obvious. The performance of the micro-cavity can be improved by adjusting the number of the micro-cavity and the length of the defect-cavity, and the ratio of Q/V can reach 43,750 in the communication band. The nano micro-cavity provides a new design idea and basis for the fabrication of tunable long-range surface plasmon wave filter in this paper.

  5. Brillouin Optomechanics in Coupled Silicon Microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Espinel, Y. A. V.; Santos, F. G. S.; Luiz, G. O.; Alegre, T. P. Mayer; Wiederhecker, G. S.

    2017-01-01

    The simultaneous control of optical and mechanical waves has enabled a range of fundamental and technological breakthroughs, from the demonstration of ultra-stable frequency reference devices, to the exploration of the quantum-classical boundaries in optomechanical laser-cooling experiments. More recently, such an optomechanical interaction has been observed in integrated nano-waveguides and microcavities in the Brillouin regime, where short-wavelength mechanical modes scatter light at several GHz. Here we engineer coupled optical microcavities to enable a low threshold excitation of mechanical travelling-wave modes through backward stimulated Brillouin scattering. Exploring the backward scattering we propose silicon microcavity designs based on laterally coupled single and double-layer cavities, the proposed structures enable optomechanical coupling with very high frequency modes (11 to 25 GHz) and large optomechanical coupling rates (g0/2π) from 50 kHz to 90 kHz. PMID:28262814

  6. Brillouin Optomechanics in Coupled Silicon Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinel, Y. A. V.; Santos, F. G. S.; Luiz, G. O.; Alegre, T. P. Mayer; Wiederhecker, G. S.

    2017-03-01

    The simultaneous control of optical and mechanical waves has enabled a range of fundamental and technological breakthroughs, from the demonstration of ultra-stable frequency reference devices, to the exploration of the quantum-classical boundaries in optomechanical laser-cooling experiments. More recently, such an optomechanical interaction has been observed in integrated nano-waveguides and microcavities in the Brillouin regime, where short-wavelength mechanical modes scatter light at several GHz. Here we engineer coupled optical microcavities to enable a low threshold excitation of mechanical travelling-wave modes through backward stimulated Brillouin scattering. Exploring the backward scattering we propose silicon microcavity designs based on laterally coupled single and double-layer cavities, the proposed structures enable optomechanical coupling with very high frequency modes (11 to 25 GHz) and large optomechanical coupling rates (g0/2π) from 50 kHz to 90 kHz.

  7. Mechanism of directional emission from a peanut-shaped microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Shu Fangjie; Zou Changling; Sun Fangwen; Xiao Yunfeng

    2011-05-15

    Collimated directional emission is essentially required for an asymmetric resonant cavity. In this paper, we theoretically investigate a type of peanut-shaped microcavity which can support highly directional emission with a beam divergence as small as 2.5 deg. The mechanism of the collimated emission of this type of peanut-shaped microcavity is explained with a short-term ray trajectory. Moreover, the explanations are also confirmed by a numerical wave simulation. This extremely narrow divergence of the emission holds great potential in highly collimated lasing from on-chip microcavities.

  8. Cylindrical plasmonic microcavity and its excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haroyan, Hovhannes

    2015-09-01

    Cylindrical plasmonic microcavity structure is considered. The system consists of a cylindrically curved metallic structure placed above the flat metallic surface, supporting Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP) propagation, and they are separated by dielectric gap. The active coupling between SPP resonant modes and SPP modes propagating over the flat metallic surface is demonstrated. The excitation efficiency dependence on structure's geometric and electrodynamics parameters of plasmonic microcavity is investigated. The possibility of controlling (or modulating) resonant SPP modes by varying different parameters such as minimal distance between cylindrical metallic and flat surfaces, relative permittivity of the dielectric gap, as well as working wavelengths are shown. The quality factor of metallic (as the metal is chosen gold: Au) cylindrical plasmonic microcavity is estimated Q ≍ 90, for fixed values of working wavelength: λ0=690 nm, relative permittivity of the dielectric media ɛd =3, and the radius of cylinder R=2.5 μm. Considered structure shows strong dependence on the relative permittivity of the dielectric media, the change of third decimal of ɛd brings to the significant change (up to three times) of microcavity excitation efficiency. Such phenomena can be successfully used for sensors construction based on plasmonic structures.

  9. Low Insertion Loss and Highly Sensitive SH-SAW Sensors Based on 36° YX LitaO3 Through the Incorporation of Filled Microcavities: A Finite Element Study

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Mandek; Sankaranarayanan, S.K.R.S.; Bhethanabotla, V. R.

    2015-02-01

    Reduction in power consumption and improvement in mass sensitivity are important considerations for surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices used in various sensing applications. Detection of minute quantities of a particular species (clinical sensing) and power requirements (wireless sensing) are two key metrics that must be optimized. In this paper, a 3-D finite element model (FEM) was employed to compare insertion loss (IL) and mass sensitivity of SAW sensors having microcavities filled with ZnO and nanocrystalline diamond to a standard two-port SAW design. Initial simulation results show that ZnO filled cavities (depth = 5 mu m) were most effective at reducing power loss Delta IL = (6.03 dB) by increasing particle displacement (acousto-electric to mechanical transduction) at the output transducer. A 100-pg/cm(2) load was applied to the sensing area of each device to evaluate mass sensitivity. Our simulations suggest that ZnO filled cavities with shallow depth (2.5 mu m) have the greatest sensitivity. The FEM simulations are used to understand the acoustic wave propagation in microcavity-based SAW sensors. The observed enhancement in mass sensitivity and power transfer is attributed to waveguiding effects and constructive interference of the scattered acoustic waves from the microcavities. Devices fabricated with microcavities similar to 1 mu m deep decreased IL by 3.306 dB compared with a standard SAW device. Additional simulations were conducted for each device configuration using the same depth in order to make a direct comparison between measured and simulated results. Our findings offer encouraging prospects for designing low IL highly sensitive microcavity-based SAW biosensors.

  10. A small mode volume tunable microcavity: Development and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greuter, Lukas; Starosielec, Sebastian; Najer, Daniel; Ludwig, Arne; Duempelmann, Luc; Rohner, Dominik; Warburton, Richard J.

    2014-09-01

    We report the realization of a spatially and spectrally tunable air-gap Fabry-Pérot type microcavity of high finesse and cubic-wavelength-scale mode volume. These properties are attractive in the fields of opto-mechanics, quantum sensing, and foremost cavity quantum electrodynamics. The major design feature is a miniaturized concave mirror with atomically smooth surface and radius of curvature as low as 10 μm produced by CO2 laser ablation of fused silica. We demonstrate excellent mode-matching of a focussed laser beam to the microcavity mode and confirm from the frequencies of the resonator modes that the effective optical radius matches the physical radius. With these small radii, we demonstrate wavelength-size beam waists. We also show that the microcavity is sufficiently rigid for practical applications: in a cryostat at 4 K, the root-mean-square microcavity length fluctuations are below 5 pm.

  11. Elastomer based electrically tunable, optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowik, Irma; Kronenberg, Nils M.; Franke, Markus; Fischer, Axel; Richter, Andreas; Gather, Malte C.; Leo, Karl

    2016-10-01

    Tunable optical elements are mostly realized by microelectromechanical systems, which require expensive and complex lithography during processing. We demonstrate an alternative device based on an electrically tunable microcavity employing a dielectric soft elastomer actuator. The cavity resonance is varied by changing the physical cavity thickness due to electrostriction of the soft elastomer. We realize a tunable metal-elastomer-distributed Bragg reflector multi-half wavelength microcavity with a cavity layer thickness around 12 μm and quality factors up to 700. Applying a voltage up to 60 V between bottom ITO and top metal electrode tunes the wavelength of the cavity modes up to Δ λ = 14 nm, which relates to a cavity thickness change of about 200 nm. This concept allows the implementation of tunable optical elements like tunable filters or resonators with low cost and simple processing.

  12. Radiative rate modification in CdSe quantum dot-coated microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Veluthandath, Aneesh V.; Bisht, Prem B.

    2015-12-21

    Whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of the microparticles with spherical or cylindrical symmetry have exceptionally high quality factors and small mode volume. Quantum dots (QDs) are zero dimensional systems with variable band gap as well as luminescent properties with applications in photonics. In this paper, the WGMs have been observed in the luminescence spectra of CdSe QD-coated single silica microspheres. Theoretical estimations of variation of resonance frequency, electric field, and Q-values have been done for a multilayer coating of QDs on silica microspheres. Observed WGMs have been identified for their mode number and polarization using Mie theory. Broadening of modes due to material absorption has been observed. Splitting of WGMs has also been observed due to coherent coupling of counter propagating waves in the microcavity due to the presence of QDs. At room temperature, the time-resolved study indicates the modification of the radiative rate due to coupling of WGMs of the microcavity-QD hybrid system.

  13. Radiative rate modification in CdSe quantum dot-coated microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veluthandath, Aneesh V.; Bisht, Prem B.

    2015-12-01

    Whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of the microparticles with spherical or cylindrical symmetry have exceptionally high quality factors and small mode volume. Quantum dots (QDs) are zero dimensional systems with variable band gap as well as luminescent properties with applications in photonics. In this paper, the WGMs have been observed in the luminescence spectra of CdSe QD-coated single silica microspheres. Theoretical estimations of variation of resonance frequency, electric field, and Q-values have been done for a multilayer coating of QDs on silica microspheres. Observed WGMs have been identified for their mode number and polarization using Mie theory. Broadening of modes due to material absorption has been observed. Splitting of WGMs has also been observed due to coherent coupling of counter propagating waves in the microcavity due to the presence of QDs. At room temperature, the time-resolved study indicates the modification of the radiative rate due to coupling of WGMs of the microcavity-QD hybrid system.

  14. Polymer encapsulated microcavity optomechanical magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiangang; Zhao, Guangming; Savukov, Igor; Yang, Lan

    2017-08-21

    We demonstrate a magnetometer using polymer encapsulated whispering-gallery-mode microcavity actuated by a micro-magnet. The magnetic field induces force on the micro-magnet causing deformation in the polymer around the microcavity. Subsequently the microcavity detects the change in the refractive index of the polymer resulted from the deformation. This magnetometer works in the frequency range of hertz-to-kilohertz range and achieves a sensitivity of 880 pT/Hz(1/2) at 200 Hz in a micro-scale sensor volume. Polymer encapsulation of the magnetometer and fiber optical connection ensures environmental robustness and practicality of the sensor.

  15. Polymer encapsulated microcavity optomechanical magnetometer

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Jiangang; Zhao, Guangming; Savukov, Igor; ...

    2017-08-21

    We demonstrate a magnetometer using polymer encapsulated whispering-gallery-mode microcavity actuated by a micro-magnet. The magnetic field induces force on the micro-magnet causing deformation in the polymer around the microcavity. Subsequently the microcavity detects the change in the refractive index of the polymer resulted from the deformation. This magnetometer works in the frequency range of hertz-to-kilohertz range and achieves a sensitivity of 880 pT/Hz1/2 at 200 Hz in a micro-scale sensor volume. Polymer encapsulation of the magnetometer and fiber optical connection ensures environmental robustness and practicality of the sensor.

  16. Optical properties of semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Joong-Kon

    Thanks to the difference in energy gap between two semiconductors and to their different indices of refraction, semiconductor heterostructures can confine electrons as well as photons. This property makes it possible to build semiconductor-based optical resonators (microcavities) with a radiation dipole (a quantum well) in its midst to investigate the coupling between the optical modes of the microcavity with the exciton modes of the quantum well. Such an interaction, besides its intrinsic interest, is relevant to vertically-emitting semiconductor lasers, based on the quantum well- microcavity system. In this thesis, we will present experimental evidence of temperature and electric-field dependent exciton-cavity coupling in GaAs-GaAlAs microcavities.

  17. Emission from quantum-dot highmicrocavities: transition from spontaneous emission to lasing and the effects of superradiant emitter coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Kreinberg, Sören; Chow, Weng W.; Wolters, Janik; ...

    2017-02-28

    Measured and calculated results are presented for the emission properties of a new class of emitters operating in the cavity quantum electrodynamics regime. The structures are based on high-finesse GaAs/AlAs micropillar cavities, each with an active medium consisting of a layer of InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) and the distinguishing feature of having a substantial fraction of spontaneous emission channeled into one cavity mode (high β-factor). This paper demonstrates that the usual criterion for lasing with a conventional (low β-factor) cavity, that is, a sharp non-linearity in the input–output curve accompanied by noticeable linewidth narrowing, has to be reinforced by themore » equal-time second-order photon autocorrelation function to confirm lasing. The article also shows that the equal-time second-order photon autocorrelation function is useful for recognizing superradiance, a manifestation of the correlations possible in highmicrocavities operating with QDs. In terms of consolidating the collected data and identifying the physics underlying laser action, both theory and experiment suggest a sole dependence on intracavity photon number. Evidence for this assertion comes from all our measured and calculated data on emission coherence and fluctuation, for devices ranging from light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and cavity-enhanced LEDs to lasers, lying on the same two curves: one for linewidth narrowing versus intracavity photon number and the other for g(2)(0) versus intracavity photon number.« less

  18. Synthetic holography based on scanning microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Donato, A.; Farina, M.

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic optical holography (SOH) is an imaging technique, introduced in scanning microscopy to record amplitude and phase of a scattered field from a sample. In this paper, it is described a novel implementation of SOH through a lens-free low-coherence system, based on a scanning optical microcavity. This technique combines the low-coherence properties of the source with the mutual interference of scattered waves and the resonant behavior of a micro-cavity, in order to realize a high sensitive imaging system. Micro-cavity is compact and realized by approaching a cleaved optical fiber to the sample. The scanning system works in an open-loop configuration without the need for a reference wave, usually required in interferometric systems. Measurements were performed over calibration samples and a lateral resolution of about 1 μm is achieved by means of an optical fiber with a Numerical Aperture (NA) equal to 0.1 and a Mode Field Diameter (MDF) of 5.6 μm.

  19. The micro-cavity of the two dimensional plasmonic photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Kai; Zhang, Zhenguo; Yang, Qing

    2015-02-01

    In this manuscript, we proposed a novel and effective two dimensional hybrid plasmonic photonic crystal micro-cavity structure to confine the surface plasmon to a sub-wavelength scale mode volume and obtain a relatively high quality factor. By introducing a single-cell defect at the two dimensional triangular lattice photonic crystal layer, the defect cavity has been established to provide sub-wavelength scale plasmonic mode localization within the hybrid plasmonic photonic crystal structure TM band gap. Comprehensive analysis methods of three-dimensional finite difference time domain method (3D-FDTD) have been used to analyze the characteristics of the micro-cavity of this hybrid structure, including the effects of the radius of the nearest neighbor air holes around the defect, the cavity length of the defect and the thickness of the gain medium on the features of the micro-cavity. By using a quantum dots (QDs)-polymer as a gain medium for the low index thin layer, a gain threshold as low as gth = 534 cm-1 can be achieved with such structures, and deep sub-wavelength mode volume of 0.00201 (λ/n)3 is also obtained.

  20. High-Q contacted ring microcavities with scatterer-avoiding “wiggler” Bloch wave supermode fields

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yangyang Popović, Miloš A.

    2014-05-19

    High-Q ring resonators with contacts to the waveguide core provide a versatile platform for various applications in chip-scale optomechanics, thermo-, and electro-optics. We propose and demonstrate azimuthally periodic contacted ring resonators based on multi-mode Bloch matching that support contacts on both the inner and outer radius edges with small degradation to the optical quality factor (Q). Radiative coupling between degenerate modes of adjacent radial spatial order leads to imaginary frequency (Q) splitting and a scatterer avoiding high-Q “wiggler” supermode field. We experimentally measure Qs up to 258 000 in devices fabricated in a silicon device layer on buried oxide undercladding and up to 139 000 in devices fully suspended in air using an undercut step. Wiggler supermodes are true modes of the microphotonic system that offer additional degrees of freedom in electrical, thermal, and mechanical design.

  1. Integrated waveguide-DBR microcavity opto-mechanical system.

    PubMed

    Pruessner, Marcel W; Stievater, Todd H; Khurgin, Jacob B; Rabinovich, William S

    2011-10-24

    Cavity opto-mechanics exploits optical forces acting on mechanical structures. Many opto-mechanics demonstrations either require extensive alignment of optical components for probing and measurement, which limits the number of opto-mechanical devices on-chip; or the approaches limit the ability to control the opto-mechanical parameters independently. In this work, we propose an opto-mechanical architecture incorporating a waveguide-DBR microcavity coupled to an in-plane micro-bridge resonator, enabling large-scale integration on-chip with the ability to individually tune the optical and mechanical designs. We experimentally characterize our device and demonstrate mechanical resonance damping and amplification, including the onset of coherent oscillations. The resulting collapse of the resonance linewidth implies a strong increase in effective mechanical quality-factor, which is of interest for high-resolution sensing.

  2. Flip-chip light emitting diode with resonant optical microcavity

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Bogart, Katherine H.A.; Fischer, Arthur J.

    2005-11-29

    A flip-chip light emitting diode with enhanced efficiency. The device structure employs a microcavity structure in a flip-chip configuration. The microcavity enhances the light emission in vertical modes, which are readily extracted from the device. Most of the rest of the light is emitted into waveguided lateral modes. Flip-chip configuration is advantageous for light emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on dielectric substrates (e.g., gallium nitride LEDs grown on sapphire substrates) in general due to better thermal dissipation and lower series resistance. Flip-chip configuration is advantageous for microcavity LEDs in particular because (a) one of the reflectors is a high-reflectivity metal ohmic contact that is already part of the flip-chip configuration, and (b) current conduction is only required through a single distributed Bragg reflector. Some of the waveguided lateral modes can also be extracted with angled sidewalls used for the interdigitated contacts in the flip-chip configuration.

  3. Photon statistics of semiconductor microcavity lasers.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, S M; Gies, C; Ates, S; Wiersig, J; Reitzenstein, S; Hofmann, C; Löffler, A; Forchel, A; Jahnke, F; Michler, P

    2007-01-26

    We present measurements of first- and second-order coherence of quantum-dot micropillar lasers together with a semiconductor laser theory. Our results show a broad threshold region for the observed high-beta microcavities. The intensity jump is accompanied by both pronounced photon intensity fluctuations and strong coherence length changes. The investigations clearly visualize a smooth transition from spontaneous to predominantly stimulated emission which becomes harder to determine for high beta. In our theory, a microscopic approach is used to incorporate the semiconductor nature of quantum dots. The results are in agreement with the experimental intensity traces and the photon statistics measurements.

  4. Ultra-low threshold polariton lasing at room temperature in a GaN membrane microcavity with a zero-dimensional trap.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakash, R; Kalaitzakis, F G; Christmann, G; Tsagaraki, K; Hocevar, M; Gayral, B; Monroy, E; Pelekanos, N T

    2017-07-17

    Polariton lasers are coherent light sources based on the condensation of exciton-polaritons in semiconductor microcavities, which occurs either in the kinetic or thermodynamic (Bose-Einstein) regime. Besides their fundamental interest, polariton lasers have the potential of extremely low operating thresholds. Here, we demonstrate ultra-low threshold polariton lasing at room temperature, using an all-dielectric, GaN membrane-based microcavity, with a spontaneously-formed zero-dimensional trap. The microcavity is fabricated using an innovative method, which involves photo-electrochemical etching of an InGaN sacrificial layer and allows for the incorporation of optimally-grown GaN active quantum wells inside a cavity with atomically-smooth surfaces. The resulting structure presents near-theoretical Q-factors and pronounced strong-coupling effects, with a record-high Rabi splitting of 64 meV at room-temperature. Polariton lasing is observed at threshold carrier densities 2.5 orders of magnitude lower than the exciton saturation density. Above threshold, angle-resolved emission spectra reveal an ordered pattern in k-space, attributed to polariton condensation at discrete levels of a single confinement site. This confinement mechanism along with the high material and optical quality of the microcavity, accounts for the enhanced performance of our polariton laser, and pave the way for further developments in the area of robust room temperature polaritonic devices.

  5. Extremely sub-wavelength THz metal-dielectric wire microcavities.

    PubMed

    Feuillet-Palma, Cheryl; Todorov, Yanko; Steed, Robert; Vasanelli, Angela; Biasiol, Giorgio; Sorba, Lucia; Sirtori, Carlo

    2012-12-17

    We demonstrate minimal volume wire THz metal-dielectric micro-cavities, in which all but one dimension have been reduced to highly sub-wavelength values. The smallest cavity features an effective volume of 0.4 µm(3), which is ~5.10(-7) times the volume defined by the resonant vacuum wavelength (λ = 94 µm) to the cube. When combined with a doped multi-quantum well structure, such micro-cavities enter the ultra-strong light matter coupling regime, even if the total number of electrons participating to the coupling is only in the order of 10(4), thus much less than in previous studies.

  6. Optimized polaritonic modes in whispering gallery microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tao; Xie, Wei; Wu, Lin; Wang, Yafeng; Zhang, Long; Chen, Zhanghai

    2017-08-01

    We study both theoretically and experimentally the quality factor characteristic and the optimized polaritonic modes in a whispering gallery microcavity. The quality factors (Q-factors) of the resonant modes are determined by two main factors, i.e., the so called cavity loss and media loss. These two factors determine the final Q-factor and spontaneously lead to an optimized wavelength range for polariton modes. By using finite element analysis (FEA), we present the numerical simulation of resonant frequencies, field distributions and quality factors of the TE polarized whispering gallery modes (WGMs), which agree well with the experimental results. The control of optimized resonance in polaritonic system will be very useful for the development of semiconductor lasers with low threshold.

  7. Ultraviolet light detection using an optical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Harker, Audrey; Mehrabani, Simin; Armani, Andrea M

    2013-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light exposure is connected to both physical and psychological diseases. As such, there is significant interest in developing sensors that can detect UV light in the mW/cm2 intensity range with a high signal-to-noise ratio. In this Letter, we demonstrate a UV sensor based on a silica integrated optical microcavity that has a linear operating response in both the forward and backward directions from 14 to 53 mW/cm2. The sensor response agrees with the developed predictive theory based on a thermodynamic model. Additionally, the signal-to-noise ratio is above 100 at physiologically relevant intensity levels.

  8. Optical bistability in semiconductor microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Baas, A.; Karr, J.Ph.; Giacobino, E.; Eleuch, H.

    2004-02-01

    We report the observation of polaritonic bistability in semiconductor microcavities in the strong-coupling regime. The origin of bistability is the polariton-polariton interaction, which gives rise to a Kerr-like nonlinearity. The experimental results are in good agreement with a simple model taking transverse effects into account.

  9. Dressing plasmon resonance with particle-microcavity architecture for efficient nano-optical trapping and sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haixi; Zhou, Yanyan; Yu, Xia; Luan, Feng; Xu, Jianbin; Ong, Hock-Chun; Ho, Ho-Pui

    2014-02-15

    We propose a particle-microcavity scheme for efficient optical trapping and sensing. When a resonant plasmonic nanoparticle (NP) is placed inside a microcavity with high Q-factor, sensitivity is enhanced in the far-field extinction while near-field around the NP is barely affected. Stable near-field and high sensitivity for optical trapping and ultrasensitive detection of nanosized targets are therefore realized simultaneously. Such a particle-microcavity system opens up a new hybrid nanophotonic device platform that combines the unique merits of conventional and plasmonic integrated photonics.

  10. Optical spectrum measurement of a cell-adhered microcavity for the cell-cycle analysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Ryusuke; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2015-03-01

    We build a setup and demonstrate successful measurement of the transmittance spectrum of a whispering gallery mode silica optical microcavity in which NIH 3T3 cells adhered on the top surface to achieve real-time and label-free measurement of the cell cycle. Label-free measurement is expected to prevent the cells to exhibit secondary effect. We build a system that enables the control of the gap distance between the microcavity and the tapered fiber, both of which are placed in the cell culture medium. The optimization of the tapered fiber diameter is the key to measure the spectrum of a microcavity in liquid. A swept wavelength laser light at a wavelength of 766 to 780 nm is used for the measurement. The cavity exhibit a Q of 1 . 0 ×106 in air, where the value is 1 . 0 ×105 in the medium and drops to 3 . 1 ×104 after the cell-adhesion. Still the Q of the microcavity is sufficiently high to detect the change at the cavity surface. Indeed we observe slight spectrum shift toward a longer wavelength, which we believe is due to the adherence of NIH 3T3 cells on the silica microcavity.The successful measurement of the transmittance spectrum of a microcavity in cell culture medium is the first step to realize the analysis of the cell-cycle based on microcavity system.

  11. Recyclable optical microcavities for label-free sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Heather K.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2011-10-01

    High-sensitivity, label-free biosensors, such as optical microcavities, have shown tremendous potential in medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and food safety evaluation, particularly when paired with a biochemical recognition element that grants high specificity towards a target of interest. Their primary limitation is that these systems are single-use, unless the recognition element can be regenerated. Therefore, the ability to selectively functionalize the optical microcavity for a specific target molecule and then recycle the system, without degrading device performance, is extremely important. Here, we present a bioconjugation strategy that not only imparts specificity to optical microcavities, but also allows for biosensor recycling. In this approach, we selectively functionalize the surface of silica microtoroids with a biotin recognition element. We then use a non-destructive O2 plasma treatment to remove the surface chemistry, refresh the recognition element, and recycle the device. The surface chemistry and optical performance of the functionalized and recycled devices are characterized by microcavity analysis, and typical spectroscopic techniques, respectively. The resulting devices can be recycled several times without performance degradation, and show high density surface coverage of biologically active recognition elements. This work represents one of the first examples of a recyclable, bioconjugation strategy for optical microtoroid resonators.

  12. Strong light-matter coupling in bulk GaN-microcavities with double dielectric mirrors fabricated by two different methods

    SciTech Connect

    Reveret, F.; Disseix, P.; Vasson, A.; Leymarie, J.; Bejtka, K.; Edwards, P. R.; Martin, R. W.; Chenot, S.; Sellers, I. R.; Duboz, J. Y.; Leroux, M.; Semond, F.

    2010-08-15

    Two routes for the fabrication of bulk GaN microcavities embedded between two dielectric mirrors are described, and the optical properties of the microcavities thus obtained are compared. In both cases, the GaN active layer is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (111) Si, allowing use of selective etching to remove the substrate. In the first case, a three period Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N/AlN Bragg mirror followed by a {lambda}/2 GaN cavity are grown directly on the Si. In the second case, a crack-free 2 {mu}m thick GaN layer is grown, and progressively thinned to a final thickness of {lambda}. Both devices work in the strong coupling regime at low temperature, as evidenced by angle-dependent reflectivity or transmission experiments. However, strong light-matter coupling in emission at room temperature is observed only for the second one. This is related to the poor optoelectronic quality of the active layer of the first device, due to its growth only 250 nm above the Si substrate and its related high defect density. The reflectivity spectra of the microcavities are well accounted for by using transfer matrix calculations.

  13. Transport Mechanisms in Dielectric Optical Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painchaud-April, G.; Poirier, J.; Dubé, L. J.

    2008-05-01

    Optical 2D microcavities have become a source of promising new technologies over the last decades. Applications ranging from high accuracy spectrometry to laser design will benefit from the development of such devices. The versatility of the concept resides in the ray-wave correspondence [1, 2]: the short wavelength limit of the system exhibits properties of well-known billiard systems, which may include Hamiltonian chaos. Therefore, since the wave behaviour of an optical microcavity is influenced by the underlying phase-space structure, a study and characterization of this structure becomes important to predict where the electromagnetic energy will flow out of the cavity. Whereas the correspondence works reasonably well for regular (classically integrable) and completely chaotic systems, partially chaotic systems of mixed phase space show transport properties largely influenced by tunnelling and localization effects with the consequence that the correspondence is all but lost. We will present the results of our investigations, in the ray and wave dynamics, in order to shed some light on the collaborating influence of the different transport mechanisms. [1] H. G. L. Schwefel et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B21, 923--934 (2004). [2] J. Wiersig and M. Hentschel, Phys. Rev. Lett, 100, 033901 (2008).

  14. Microcavity morphology optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdous, Fahmida; Demchenko, Alena A.; Vyatchanin, Sergey P.; Matsko, Andrey B.; Maleki, Lute

    2014-09-01

    High spectral mode density of conventional optical cavities is detrimental to the generation of broad optical frequency combs and to other linear and nonlinear applications. In this work we optimize the morphology of high-Q whispering gallery (WG) and Fabry-Perot (FP) cavities and find a set of parameters that allows treating them, essentially, as single-mode structures, thus removing limitations associated with a high density of cavity mode spectra. We show that both single-mode WGs and single-mode FP cavities have similar physical properties, in spite of their different loss mechanisms. The morphology optimization does not lead to a reduction of quality factors of modes belonging to the basic family. We study the parameter space numerically and find the region where the highest possible Q factor of the cavity modes can be realized while just having a single bound state in the cavity. The value of the Q factor is comparable with that achieved in conventional cavities. The proposed cavity structures will be beneficial for generation of octave spanning coherent frequency combs and will prevent undesirable effects of parametric instability in laser gravitational wave detectors.

  15. Fermi resonance in optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chang-Hwan; Yu, Hyeon-Hye; Lee, Ji-Won; Kim, Chil-Min

    2015-04-01

    Fermi resonance is a phenomenon of quantum mechanical superposition, which most often occurs between normal and overtone modes in molecular systems that are nearly coincident in energy. We find that scarred resonances in deformed dielectric microcavities are the very phenomenon of Fermi resonance, that is, a pair of quasinormal modes interact with each other due to coupling and a pair of resonances are generated through an avoided resonance crossing. Then the quantum number difference of a pair of quasinormal modes, which is a consequence of quantum mechanical superposition, equals periodic orbits, whereby the resonances are localized on the periodic orbits. We derive the relation between the quantum number difference and the periodic orbits and confirm it in an elliptic, a rectangular, and a stadium-shaped dielectric microcavity.

  16. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF2 microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line. PMID:26901199

  17. Low Dimensional Polariton Systems in Subwavelength-Grating Based Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo

    Semiconductor microcavity exciton-polaritons have recently emerged as a unique, open system for studying non-equilibrium quantum order. Macroscopic quantum phenomenon, Bose-Einstein condensation, has been realized and observed in two dimensional polariton systems utilizing the traditional distributed-Bragg-reflector based samples. Such foundational work on two-dimensional systems has inspired theoretical schemes for polariton-based quantum circuits, quantum light sources and novel quantum phases. Experimental implementation of these schemes requires the control, confinement and coupling of polariton systems, which still remain challenging in conventional microcavity structures. In this thesis, we use the sub-wavelength grating-based microcavities to demonstrate confinement and coupling for the polariton systems. We demonstrated a zero-dimensional polariton device in the sub-wavelength grating-based microcavity. Efficient confinement has been realized in such unconventional microcavity. These confinement features have also been observed in the spectroscopic characterization with discretized energy levels from the device. In addition, the polaritons are highly linear polarized, which is unique to the sub-wavelength grating based devices. The establishment of the polariton lasing/condensation was with non-linear increase of the emission intensity, line-width narrowing and continuous energy shift. Single-mode lasing of polaritons was also demonstrated for the first time. Following the work of single zero-dimensional polariton device, we demonstrated that the coupling among multiple zero-dimensional polariton quantum devices could be readily achieved, leading to de-coupled, coupled and quasi-one-dimensional polariton systems. These coupling effects were controlled and realized by design of the tethering patterns around the sub-wavelength grating based devices. Such devices enable advanced mode engineering and provide the building blocks for polariton-based quantum

  18. Variable deflection response of sensitive CNT-on-fiber artificial hair sensors from CNT synthesis in high aspect ratio microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinker, Keith; Maschmann, Matthew R.; Kondash, Corey; Severin, Benjamin; Phillips, David; Dickinson, Benjamin T.; Reich, Gregory; Baur, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    Crickets, locusts, bats, and many other animals detect changes in their environment with distributed arrays of flow-sensitive hairs. Here we discuss the fabrication and characterization of a relatively new class of pore-based, artificial hair sensors that take advantage of the mechanical properties of structural microfibers and the electromechanical properties of self-aligned carbon nanotube arrays to rapidly transduce changes in low speed air flow. The radially aligned nanotubes are able to be synthesized along the length of the fibers inside the high aspect ratio cavity between the fiber surface and the wall of a microcapillary pore. The growth self-positions the fibers within the capillary and forms a conductive path between detection electrodes. As the hair is deflected, nanotubes are compressed to produce a typical resistance change of 1-5% per m/s of air speed which we believe are the highest sensitivities reported for air velocities less than 10 m/s. The quasi-static response of the sensors to point loads is compared to that from the distributed loads of air flow. A plane wave tube is used to measure their dynamic response when perturbed at acoustic frequencies. Correlation of the nanotube height profile inside the capillary to a diffusion transport model suggests that the nanotube arrays can be controllably tapered along the fiber. Like their biological counterparts, many applications can be envisioned for artificial hair sensors by tailoring their individual response and incorporating them into arrays for detecting spatio-temporal flow patterns over rigid surfaces such as aircraft.

  19. Entangled-photon generation from a quantum dot in a microcavity through pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunori; Ajiki, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically investigate fast and highly efficient entangled-photon generation by irradiating a quantum dot (QD) embedded in a microcavity with short laser pulses. We evaluate the optimized width and field strength of the pulses for achieving a high population of an excited state as an entangled-photon source. We also calculate the emission time of the entangled photon pair as a function of the cavity quality factor Q. The shortest emission time reaches 3/(4g) under the condition Q =ω0/(4g), where g is the coupling frequency between the cavity photon and excited states of the QD and ω0 is the excitation frequency of the QD. The QD-cavity system has a potential for fast and efficient generation of high-quality entangled-photon pairs.

  20. Pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, You Liang; Li, Zhi Feng; Li, Qian; Chen, Xiao Shuang; Chen, Ping Ping; Wang, Han; Li, Meng Yao; Li, Ning; Lu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Recently, plasmonics has been central to the manipulation of photons on the subwavelength scale, and superior infrared imagers have opened novel applications in many fields. Here, we demonstrate the first pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector with a single quantum well integrated between metal patches and a reflection layer. Greater than one order of magnitude enhancement of the peak responsivity has been observed. The significant improvement originates from the highly confined optical mode in the cavity, leading to a strong coupling between photons and the quantum well, resulting in the enhanced photo-electric conversion process. Such strong coupling from the localized surface plasmon mode inside the cavity is independent of incident angles, offering a unique solution to high-performance focal plane array devices. This demonstration paves the way for important infrared optoelectronic devices for sensing and imaging.

  1. Pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Jing, You Liang; Li, Zhi Feng; Li, Qian; Chen, Xiao Shuang; Chen, Ping Ping; Wang, Han; Li, Meng Yao; Li, Ning; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, plasmonics has been central to the manipulation of photons on the subwavelength scale, and superior infrared imagers have opened novel applications in many fields. Here, we demonstrate the first pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector with a single quantum well integrated between metal patches and a reflection layer. Greater than one order of magnitude enhancement of the peak responsivity has been observed. The significant improvement originates from the highly confined optical mode in the cavity, leading to a strong coupling between photons and the quantum well, resulting in the enhanced photo-electric conversion process. Such strong coupling from the localized surface plasmon mode inside the cavity is independent of incident angles, offering a unique solution to high-performance focal plane array devices. This demonstration paves the way for important infrared optoelectronic devices for sensing and imaging. PMID:27181111

  2. Rolled-up TiO₂ optical microcavities for telecom and visible photonics.

    PubMed

    Madani, Abbas; Böttner, Stefan; Jorgensen, Matthew R; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2014-01-15

    The fabrication of high-quality-factor polycrystalline TiO₂ vertically rolled-up microcavities (VRUMs) by the controlled release of differentially strained TiO₂ bilayered nanomembranes, operating at both telecom and visible wavelengths, is reported. Optical characterization of these resonators reveals quality factors as high as 3.8×10³ in the telecom wavelength range (1520-1570 nm) by interfacing a TiO₂ VRUMs with a tapered optical fiber. In addition, a splitting in the fundamental modes is experimentally observed due to the broken rotational symmetry in our resonators. This mode splitting indicates coupling between clockwise and counterclockwise traveling whispering gallery modes of the VRUMs. Moreover, we show that our biocompatible rolled-up TiO₂ resonators function at several positions along the tube, making them promising candidates for multiplexing and biosensing applications.

  3. Photothermal effects in ultra-precisely stabilized tunable microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachmann, Johannes F. S.; Kaupp, Hanno; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Hunger, David

    2016-09-01

    We study the mechanical stability of a tunable high-finesse microcavity under ambient conditions and investigate light-induced effects that can both suppress and excite mechanical fluctuations. As an enabling step, we demonstrate the ultra-precise electronic stabilization of a microcavity. We then show that photothermal mirror expansion can provide high-bandwidth feedback and improve cavity stability by almost two orders of magnitude. At high intracavity power, we observe self-oscillations of mechanical resonances of the cavity. We explain the observations by a dynamic photothermal instability, leading to parametric driving of mechanical motion. For an optimized combination of electronic and photothermal stabilization, we achieve a feedback bandwidth of $500\\,$kHz and a noise level of $1.1 \\times 10^{-13}\\,$m rms.

  4. Nonlinear magneto-optic quantum microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Robert; Andre, Regis; Flytzanis, Christos

    2002-05-01

    The study of the linear, nonlinear, and photo-induced behavior in a magneto-optic micro-cavity in the strong coupling regime is investigated using the reflectivity and magneto-optic Kerr rotation techniques. The photo-induced modifications of the strong coupling regime are traced to the light induced changes of the exciton transition by many body interactions and band filling effects. At a fluence of 1 (mu) J/cm-2 the saturation and blue shift of the quantum well exciton transition produce strong modifications of the lower polariton frequency which induce nonlinear magneto-optic Kerr rotations of 30 degrees at a magnetic field amplitude of 0.2 Tesla. With no applied magnetic field polarization rotations of more than 10 degrees are photo- induced by 1 (mu) J/cm-2 fluence circularly polarized pump pulses. Such a physical effect could be interesting for high contrast fast optical signal processing when room temperature operation becomes available.

  5. Multivalley engineering in semiconductor microcavities.

    PubMed

    Sun, M; Savenko, I G; Flayac, H; Liew, T C H

    2017-04-03

    We consider exciton-photon coupling in semiconductor microcavities in which separate periodic potentials have been embedded for excitons and photons. We show theoretically that this system supports degenerate ground-states appearing at non-zero inplane momenta, corresponding to multiple valleys in reciprocal space, which are further separated in polarization corresponding to a polarization-valley coupling in the system. Aside forming a basis for valleytronics, the multivalley dispersion is predicted to allow for spontaneous momentum symmetry breaking and two-mode squeezing under non-resonant and resonant excitation, respectively.

  6. Multivalley engineering in semiconductor microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Sun, M.; Savenko, I. G.; Flayac, H.; Liew, T. C. H.

    2017-01-01

    We consider exciton-photon coupling in semiconductor microcavities in which separate periodic potentials have been embedded for excitons and photons. We show theoretically that this system supports degenerate ground-states appearing at non-zero inplane momenta, corresponding to multiple valleys in reciprocal space, which are further separated in polarization corresponding to a polarization-valley coupling in the system. Aside forming a basis for valleytronics, the multivalley dispersion is predicted to allow for spontaneous momentum symmetry breaking and two-mode squeezing under non-resonant and resonant excitation, respectively. PMID:28367953

  7. Hafnia-plugged microcavities for thermal stability of selective emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Heon-Ju; Smyth, Katherine; Bathurst, Stephen; Chou, Jeffrey; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Joannopoulos, John; Saka, Nannaji; Kim, Sang-Gook

    2013-06-01

    Two-dimensional arrays of micro-cavities effectively control photon motion and selectively emit radiation tailored to the preferred bandgap of photovoltaic (PV) cells, thus enhancing the efficiency of thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. At the high operating temperatures, however, the micro- and nano-patterned structures of the selective emitters quickly lose their integrity--obliterating the tight tolerances required for precise spectral control. Even if oxidation, recrystallization, and grain growth could be avoided with single-crystal tungsten (W) selective emitters with vacuum packaging, surface diffusion, evaporation, and re-condensation are not avoidable in long-term operation at high temperatures. The concept of a planar array of plugged micro-cavities to suppress the curvature-dependent thermal degradation modes is proposed and tested. Based on scale-accelerated failure tests of silicon devices, the lifetime of W selective emitters operating at 1100 K is estimated to be at least 30 yr.

  8. Exciton-exciton annihilation in organic polariton microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akselrod, G. M.; Tischler, Jonathan R.; Young, E. R.; Nocera, D.G.; Bulovic, Vladimir

    2010-09-27

    We investigate the incoherent diffusion of excitons in thin films (5.1±0.1 nm thick) of a highly absorbing J-aggregated cyanine dye material (106 cm-1 absorption constant) as the excitonic component of a polariton microcavity. Under high-intensity pulsed laser excitation, the J-aggregated molecular films exhibit significant exciton-exciton annihilation, indicating a large exciton diffusion radius of more than 100 nm. When the material is strongly coupled to a cavity, the polaritonic structure also shows exciton-exciton annihilation, which is a competing process against the establishment of a threshold population of polaritons needed for polariton lasing. This study suggests that exciton-exciton annihilation is a loss process which can significantly increase the lasing threshold in polariton microcavities.

  9. Novel emission phenomena in organic microcavities (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, Karl

    2016-09-01

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLED) are today a mature techology and have reached high efficiency both in monochrome and white devices. One of the main research areas for further improvement is still the optical design which enables many new approaches to enhance efficiency and realize special emission properties. In this talk, I will review our recent work on OLED outcoupling, in particular for devices encapsulated in microcavities and patterned structures.

  10. Stokes solitons in optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qi-Fan; Yi, Xu; Yang, Ki Youl; Vahala, Kerry

    2017-01-01

    Solitons are wave packets that resist dispersion through a self-induced potential well. They are studied in many fields, but are especially well known in optics on account of the relative ease of their formation and control in optical fibre waveguides. Besides their many interesting properties, solitons are important to optical continuum generation, in mode-locked lasers, and have been considered as a natural way to convey data over great distances. Recently, solitons have been realized in microcavities, thereby bringing the power of microfabrication methods to future applications. This work reports a soliton not previously observed in optical systems, the Stokes soliton. The Stokes soliton forms and regenerates by optimizing its Raman interaction in space and time within an optical potential well shared with another soliton. The Stokes and the initial soliton belong to distinct transverse mode families and benefit from a form of soliton trapping that is new to microcavities and soliton lasers in general. The discovery of a new optical soliton can impact work in other areas of photonics, including nonlinear optics and spectroscopy.

  11. Simulation of J-aggregate microcavity photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michetti, Paolo; La Rocca, Giuseppe C.

    2008-05-01

    We have developed a model in order to account for the photoexcitation dynamics of J-aggregate films and strongly coupled J-aggregate microcavities. The J aggregates are described as a disordered Frenkel exciton system in which relaxation occurs due to the presence of a thermal bath of molecular vibrations. The correspondence between the photophysics in J-aggregate films and that in J-aggregate microcavities is obtained by introducing a model polariton wave function mixing cavity photon modes and J-aggregate super-radiant excitons. With the same description of the material properties, we have calculated both absorption and luminescence spectra for the J-aggregate film and the photoluminescence of strongly coupled organic microcavities. The model is able to account for the fast relaxation dynamics in organic microcavities following nonresonant pumping and explains the temperature dependence of the ratio between the upper polariton and the lower polariton luminescence.

  12. Exciton-polariton wakefields in semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terças, H.; Mendonça, J. T.

    2016-02-01

    We consider the excitation of polariton wakefields due to a propagating light pulse in a semiconductor microcavity. We show that two kinds of wakes are possible, depending on the constituents fraction (either exciton or photon) of the polariton wavefunction. The nature of the wakefields (pure excitonic or polaritonic) can be controlled by changing the speed of propagation of the external pump. This process could be used as a diagnostic for the internal parameters of the microcavity.

  13. Near-field optical thin microcavity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiu Hui; Hou, Jiejie

    2016-01-01

    The thin microcavity theory for near-field optics is proposed in this study. By applying the power flow theorem and the variable theorem,the bi-harmonic differential governing equation for electromagnetic field of a three-dimensional thin microcavity is derived for the first time. Then by using the Hankel transform, this governing equation is solved exactly and all the electromagnetic components inside and outside the microcavity can be obtained accurately. According to the above theory, the near-field optical diffraction from a subwavelength aperture embedded in a thin conducting film is investigated, and numerical computations are performed to illustrate the edge effect by an enhancement factor of 1.8 and the depolarization phenomenon of the near-field transmission in terms of the distance from the film surface. This thin microcavity theory is verified by the good agreement between our results and those in the previous literatures. The thin microcavity theory presented in the study should be useful in the possible applications of the thin microcavities in near-field optics and thin-film optics.

  14. Semiconductor Microcavity Flow Spectroscopy of Intracellular Protein in Human Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul; Cox, Jim; Hendricks, Judy; McDonald, Anthony; Copeland, Guild; Sasaki, Darryl; Skirboll, Steve; Curry, Mark

    2001-03-01

    The speed of light through a biofluid or biological cell is inversely related to the biomolecular concentration of proteins and other complex molecules that modify the refractive index at wavelengths accessible to semiconductor lasers. By placing a fluid or cell into a semiconductor microcavity laser, these decreases in light speed can be sensitively recorded in picoseconds as frequency red-shifts in the laser output spectrum. This biocavity laser equipped with microfluidics for transporting cells at high speed through the laser microcavity has shown potential for rapid analysis of biomolecular mass of normal and malignant human cells in their physiologic condition without time-consuming fixing, staining, or tagging. We have used biocavity laser spectroscopy to measure the optical properties of solutions of standard biomolecules (sugars, proteins, DNA, and ions) and human cells. The technique determines the frequency shift, relative to that of water, of spontaneous or stimulated emission from cavity filled with a biomolecular solution. The shift was also measured in human glioblastoma cells that had been sorted by conventional fluorescence-activated cell sorting according to protein content. The results show a direct correlation between protein measured by fluorescence and the frequency shift observed in the microcavity laser.

  15. Label-Free Microcavity Biosensors: Steps towards Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Amarie, Dragos; Glazier, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine has the potential to improve our ability to maintain health and treat disease, while ameliorating continuously rising healthcare costs. Translation of basic research findings to clinical applications within regulatory compliance is required for personalized medicine to become the new foundation for practice of medicine. Deploying even a few of the thousands of potential diagnostic biomarkers identified each year as part of personalized treatment workflows requires clinically efficient biosensor technologies to monitor multiple biomarkers in patients in real time. This paper discusses a critical component of a regulatory system, a microcavity optical biosensor for label-free monitoring of biomolecular interactions at physiologically-relevant concentrations. While most current biosensor research focuses on improving sensitivity, this paper emphasizes other characteristics a biosensor technology requires to be practical in a clinical setting, presenting robust microcavity biosensors which are easy to manufacture and integrate with microfluidics into flexible and redesignable platforms making the microcavity biosensors deployable for continuous monitoring of biomarkers in body fluids in the clinic, in dense 2D random arrays for high-throughput applications like drug-library screening in interactomics, and of the secretory behavior of single cells in the laboratory. PMID:23443397

  16. Mid-infrared silicon-on-sapphire waveguide coupled photonic crystal microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yi E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com Chen, Ray T. E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com; Chakravarty, Swapnajit E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com

    2015-08-24

    We experimentally demonstrate a photonic crystal (PC) microcavity side coupled to a W1.05 photonic crystal waveguide fabricated in silicon-on-sapphire working in mid-IR regime at 3.43 μm. Using a fixed wavelength laser source, propagation characteristics of PC waveguides without microcavity are characterized as a function of lattice constant to determine the light line position, stop gap, and guided mode transmission behavior. The resonance of an L21 PC microcavity coupled to the W1.05 PCW in the guided mode transmission region is then measured by thermal tuning of the cavity resonance across the source wavelength. Resonance quality factor ∼3500 is measured from the temperature dependency curve.

  17. Generation of low-threshold optofluidic lasers in a stable Fabry-Pérot microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tingting; Zhou, Chunhua; Wang, Wenjie; Chen, Jingdong

    2017-06-01

    We present the generation of optofluidic lasers in a Fabry-Pérot (FP) microcavity with low pumping threshold. The FP microcavity is constructed with one micro-concave mirror and another planar mirror facing each other to form a stable cavity. The two mirrors are coated with dielectric layers with reflectivity ≥99.9%. Laser behaviors are tested with gain medium, Rhodamine 6 G (R6G), dissolved in ethanol and ion water, respectively; a lowest pumping threshold as small as 0.13 μJ/mm2 is achieved in the ethanol solution, corresponding to a theoretically calculated quality value Q0 about 4×105. Meanwhile experimental results demonstrates that the lowest concentration of dye medium that can emit laser signal in the FP microcavity is 3 μM.

  18. Two-Dimensional Metal–Chalcogenide Films in Tunable Optical Microcavities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Integration of quasi-two-dimensional (2D) films of metal–chalcogenides in optical microcavities permits new photonic applications of these materials. Here we present tunable microcavities with monolayer MoS2 or few monolayer GaSe films. We observe significant modification of spectral and temporal properties of photoluminescence (PL): PL is emitted in spectrally narrow and wavelength-tunable cavity modes with quality factors up to 7400; a 10-fold PL lifetime shortening is achieved, a consequence of Purcell enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate. PMID:25375802

  19. Application of ring down measurement approach to micro-cavities for bio-sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheema, M. I.; Kirk, Andrew G.

    2011-03-01

    Optical biosensors can detect biomarkers in the blood serum caused by either infections or exposure to toxins. Until now, most work on the micro-cavity biosensors has been based on measurement of the resonant frequency shift induced by binding of biomarkers to a cavity. However, frequency domain measurements are not precise for such high Q micro-cavities. We hypothesize that more accurate measurements and better noise tolerance can be achieved by the application of the ring down measurement approach to the micro-cavity in a biosensor. To test our hypothesis, we have developed a full vectorial finite element model of a silica toroidal micro-cavity immersed in water. Our modeling results show that a toroidal cavity with a major diameter of 70μm and a minor diameter of 6μm can achieve a sensitivity of 28.6μs/RIU refractive index units (RIU) at 580nm. Therefore, our sensor would achieve the resolution of 5 x 10-8 RIU by employing a detector with picosecond resolution. Hence we propose a micro-cavity ring down biosensor with high sensitivity which will find wide applications in real time and label free bio-sensing.

  20. GaAs micro-pyramids serving as optical micro-cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, M.; Beck, T.; Li, S.; Hu, D. Z.; Schaadt, D. M.; Kalt, H.; Hetterich, M.

    2010-01-04

    An efficient light-matter coupling requires high-quality (Q) micro-cavities with small mode volume. We suggest GaAs micro-pyramids placed on top of AlAs/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors to be promising candidates. The pyramids were fabricated by molecular-beam epitaxy, electron-beam lithography and a subsequent wet-chemical etching process using a sacrificial AlAs layer. Measured Q-factors of optical modes in single pyramids reach values up to 650. A finite-difference time-domain simulation assuming a simplified cone-shaped geometry suggests possible Q-factors up to 3600. To enhance the light confinement in the micro-pyramids we intend to overgrow the pyramidal facets with a Bragg mirror--results of preliminary tests are given.

  1. Schottky MSM junctions for carrier depletion in silicon photonic crystal microcavities.

    PubMed

    Haret, Laurent-Daniel; Checoury, Xavier; Bayle, Fabien; Cazier, Nicolas; Boucaud, Philippe; Combrié, Sylvain; de Rossi, Alfredo

    2013-04-22

    Collection of free carriers is a key issue in silicon photonics devices. We show that a lateral metal-semiconductor-metal Schottky junction is an efficient and simple way of dealing with that issue in a photonic crystal microcavity. Using a simple electrode design, and taking into account the optical mode profile, the resulting carrier distribution in the structure is calculated. We show that the corresponding effective free carrier lifetime can be reduced by 50 times when the bias is tuned. This allows one to maintain a high cavity quality factor under strong optical injection. In the fabricated structures, carrier depletion is correlated with transmission spectra and directly visualized by Electron Beam Induced Current pictures. These measurements demonstrate the validity of this carrier extraction principle. The design can still be optimized in order to obtain full carrier depletion at a smaller energy cost.

  2. Telecom wavelength emitting single quantum dots coupled to InP-based photonic crystal microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kors, A.; Fuchs, K.; Yacob, M.; Reithmaier, J. P.; Benyoucef, M.

    2017-01-01

    Here we report on the fabrication and optical characterization of InP-based L3 photonic crystal (PhC) microcavities embedded with a medium density InAs/InP quantum dots (QDs) emitting at telecom wavelengths. The QDs are grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy using a ripening technique. Micro-photoluminescence (μ-PL) measurements of PhC samples reveal sharp cavity modes with quality factors exceeding 8500. QDs emit highly linear-polarized light at telecom wavelengths with resolution-limited spectral linewidth below 50 μeV. Enhanced PL intensity of QDs in PhC is observed in comparison to the PL intensity of QDs in bulk semiconductors. The combination of excitation power-dependent and polarization-resolved μ-PL measurements reveal the existence of an exciton-biexciton system with a small fine-structure splitting.

  3. Microcavity effect using nanoparticles to enhance the efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun Hee; Kim, Do-Hong; Choi, Kyung Cheol

    2015-07-27

    In this paper, in contrast with previously reported approaches, we suggest exploiting a microcavity effect using nanoparticles to improve the optical efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLED). The method to input the nanoparticles inside the OLED device is simple and cost effective by virtue of employing a solution process using a spin coating fabrication method. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were used to improve the reflection by its high refractive index. In tandem with optimized heights of the organic layers, the increased light reflectance at the anode side, which includes the TiO2 nanoparticle layer, improved the optical efficiency of the OLED device via the microcavity effect. In order to prove that the enhancement of the optical efficiency was due to an enhanced microcavity effect caused by TiO2 nanoparticles, a microcavity simulation was conducted. The electrical characteristics were not affected by the nanoparticles and a clear pixel image was maintained. The results in this paper show that a nanoparticle based microcavity effect can be exploited to enhance the optical efficiency of OLEDs.

  4. Bi-material crystalline whispering gallery mode microcavity structure for thermo-opto-mechanical stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itobe, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Mizumoto, Yuta; Kangawa, Hiroi; Kakinuma, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2016-05-01

    We fabricated a calcium fluoride (CaF2) whispering gallery mode (WGM) microcavity with a computer controlled ultra-precision cutting process. We observed a thermo-opto-mechanical (TOM) oscillation in the CaF2 WGM microcavity, which may influence the stability of the optical output when the cavity is employed for Kerr comb generation. We studied experimentally and numerically the mechanism of the TOM oscillation and showed that it is strongly dependent on cavity diameter. In addition, our numerical study suggests that a microcavity structure fabricated with a hybrid material (i.e. CaF2 and silicon), which is compatible with an ultra-high Q and high thermal conductivity, will allow us to reduce the TOM oscillation and stabilize the optical output.

  5. Tuning a microcavity-coupled terahertz laser

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Bianchi, Vezio; Vitiello, Miriam S.; Li, Lianhe; Zhu, Jingxuan; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A.; Tredicucci, Alessandro

    2015-12-28

    Tunable oscillators are a key component of almost all electronic and photonic systems. Yet, a technology capable of operating in the terahertz (THz)-frequency range and fully suitable for widescale implementation is still lacking. This issue is significantly limiting potential THz applications in gas sensing, high-resolution spectroscopy, hyper-spectral imaging, and optical communications. The THz quantum cascade laser is arguably the most promising solution in terms of output power and spectral purity. In order to achieve reliable, repeatable, and broad tunability, here we exploit the strong coupling between two different cavity mode concepts: a distributed feedback one-dimensional photonic resonator (providing gain) and a mechanically actuated wavelength-size microcavity (providing tuning). The result is a continuously tunable, single-mode emitter covering a 162 GHz spectral range, centered on 3.2 THz. Our source has a few tens of MHz resolution, extremely high differential efficiency, and unprecedented compact and simple design architecture. By unveiling the large potential that lies in this technique, our results provide a robust platform for radically different THz systems exploiting broadly tunable semiconductor lasers.

  6. Spatial solitons in semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, L.; Tissoni, G.; Brambilla, M.; Prati, F.; Lugiato, L. A.

    1998-09-01

    We consider a semiconductor microcavity driven by a coherent and stationary holding beam, in two distinct configurations. In the first, no carriers are injected in the multiple-quantum-well structure and the optical nonlinearity is governed by an excitonic resonance. The second corresponds to that of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser kept slightly below threshold. We describe both configurations using a unified model that includes both field diffraction and carrier diffusion. We calculate numerically both the time evolution and the stationary profile of the solitonic solutions, using a generalization of the radial integration technique introduced by Firth and Scroggie [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 1623 (1996)]. We analyze the instability that forms spatial patterns and especially cavity spatial solitons. We predict the existence of these solitons in various parametric domains for both configurations. We demonstrate that these results are independent of the periodic boundary conditions used in the simulations. We show that, introducing a simple phase modulation in the holding beam, one can eliminate the motions of solitons that arise from noise and from amplitude gradients. The solitons are robust with respect to parametric variations, to carrier diffusion, and even to some amount of self-defocusing. This picture points to the possibility of realizing arrays of solitonic pixels using semiconductor microresonators.

  7. Magneto-optical responses of microcavity-integrated graphene photonic crystals in the infrared spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi-Ghaleh, Reza; Sattari, Maryam

    2016-09-01

    The magneto-optical responses and photonic band gap properties of the microcavity-integrated graphene photonic crystals were numerically studied. The structure consists of a graphene sheet embedded between two mirror symmetric Bragg reflectors, under the influence of an external static magnetic field. The properties of the microcavity resonance mode were investigated, considering the right- and left-handed circular polarization transmission coefficients and their phases, together with the Faraday rotation angle and ellipticity of the output light. The effects of the repetition number of the Bragg reflectors, thickness of the microcavity central layer and refractive indices of the graphene adjacent layers were considered. The obtained results revealed that a pure linear polarized output light with no ellipticity and high transmittance enhanced Faraday rotation can be achieved. These results can be utilized in designing a variety of graphene based photonic devices and magneto-optical integrated elements, such as miniaturized isolators or circulators.

  8. Threshold reduction by multidimensional photonic confinement in metal-organic microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischok, Andreas; Brückner, Robert; Reinhardt, Christoph; Sudzius, Markas; Lyssenko, Vadim G.; Fröb, Hartmut; Leo, Karl

    2014-05-01

    Due to their geometry, optical microcavities allow strong confinement of light between the mirrors and promise single mode operation at lowest possible lasing thresholds. Nevertheless, such devices suffer from losses not only due to parasitic absorption of the active or mirror layers, but especially via outcoupling of leaky and waveguided modes within the active layer. In this work, we present an organic microcavity sandwiched between high quality dielectric distributed Bragg reflectors. A highly conductive silver layer of 40nm thickness is added next to the active layer, leading to the formation of Tamm-Plasmon-Polaritons (TPP), one replacing the original cavity mode and shifting its resonance to the red, another one emerging from the long-wavelength sideband and moving to the blue. To avoid parasitic absorption introduced by such contacts, the silver layer is structured on the micrometer-scale using photolithography, yielding separated areas supporting either original cavity mode or red shifted TPP-resonances. This separation leads to a strong spatial trapping of the modes to only their resonant regions on the sample and can in turn be exploited to achieve complete three-dimensional confinement of photons. In elliptic holes produced in the metal layer, we observe the formation of Mathieu-Modes, leading to a reduction of the lasing threshold by six times. Facilitating triangular cuts in the silver layer, highly confined standing modes develop in the system, allowing a precise optimization of the spatial mode extension and reducing the threshold even further down to one order of magnitude below the threshold of an unstructured organic cavity. These results show that the introduction of absorptive metals, needed for the realization of an electrically driven laser, can in turn be harnessed to improve the characteristics of the device.

  9. Resonance patterns in a stadium-shaped microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo-Young; Kurdoglyan, M.S.; Rim, Sunghwan; Kim, Chil-Min

    2004-08-01

    We investigate resonance patterns in a stadium-shaped microcavity around n{sub c}kR{approx_equal}10, where n{sub c} is the refractive index, k the vacuum wave number, and R the radius of the circular part of the cavity. We find that the patterns of high-Q resonances can be classified, even though the classical dynamics of the stadium system is chaotic. The patterns of the high-Q resonances are consistent with ray dynamical considerations and appear as stationary lasing modes with low pumping rate in a nonlinear dynamical model. All resonance patterns are presented in a finite range of kR.

  10. Rabi splitting enhancement in semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, James Henry, II

    The physics of the two-level atom has been the basis of research in atomic physics for much of the past several decades. One of the great successes of semiconductor physics has been its capability to mimic the phenomena of other physical systems. Many of the discoveries in atomic physics have prompted studies of the coupling between two-level atom-like structures and photonic system in semiconductor physics. Much of that work has investigated the optics of the energy exchange between atom-like systems and the electromagnetic field mode of the enclosing cavity. Since many applications of microcavities are governed by the control of the spontaneous emission from the structure, command of the emission relies on control of the coupling between the photonic and the excitonic modes of the system. When the energies of the interacting microcavity states are in resonance, the resulting degeneracy yields an energy split between the coincident modes. This energy split produces two branches of the resonant mixed states, which are called polaritons. The energy separation between the mixed state branches is called the vacuum Rabi splitting, Delta. The magnitude of the Rabi splitting is indicative of the coupling strength of the polariton modes. One of the major pursuits of this field has been to augment the control of the coupling strength between the cavity polariton modes. Comprehensive control over the polariton states, be it the modulation of the polariton energies or the suppression of one of the modes, is a key component in the development of microcavity devices. The goal of my thesis research was to discover a simple means to achieve control over the coupling between the photonic and excitonic modes of a microcavity. This entailed the parametric tuning of the Rabi splitting between the coupled modes of the microcavity. Furthermore, we hoped to attain the maximum possible Rabi splitting observed in GaAs/AlxGa1- xAs microcavities with quantum oscillators located only within

  11. Whispering gallery modes microcavities with J-aggregates and plasmonic hot spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovich, Yury P.; Melnikau, Dzmitry; Savateeva, Diana; Chuvilin, Andrey; Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2012-06-01

    We have studied the optical properties of a hybrid system consisting of cyanine dye J-aggregates (both PIC and TDBC) attached to a spherical microcavity. Instead of the commonly accepted chemical bonding of dye molecules to the surface of microspheres or deposition of dye-doped sol-gel film, in our experiments microspheres were coated with J-aggregate shell utilizing the layer-by-layer assembly of the ultrathin films. In this approach we aimed to take advantage of light confinement in the Whispering Gallery Modes (WGMs) microcavity by placing the emitter (shell of J-aggregates) just at the rim of the microsphere, where the resonant electromagnetic field reaches its maximum. A periodic structure of narrow peaks was observed in the photoluminescence spectrum of the J-aggregates, arising from the coupling between the emission of J-aggregates and the WGMs of the microcavity. The most striking result of our study is the observation of polarization sensitive mode damping caused by re-absorption of J-aggregate emission. This effect manifests itself in dominating emission from the transverse magnetic modes in the spectral region of J-aggregates absorption band where the transverse electric (TE) modes are strongly suppressed. Strong suppression of TE modes reflects preferential tangential orientation of transition dipole moment of J-aggregates in deposited microcavity shell. Observed polarization sensitive mode damping observed in the spectral region of high J-aggregate absorption can be used for suppression of unwanted modes in high Q optical resonators. We also demonstrate that the emission intensity can be further enhanced by depositing a hybrid layer of J-aggregates and Ag nanoparticles onto the spherical microcavity. Owing to the concerted action of WGMs and plasmonic hot spots in the Ag aggregates, we observe strongly enhanced Raman signal from the Jaggregates. Microcavities covered by J-aggregates and plasmonic nanoparticles could be thus useful for a variety of

  12. Microcavities with distributed Bragg reflectors based on ZnSe/MgS superlattice grown by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawara, T.; Yoshida, H.; Yogo, T.; Tanaka, S.; Suemune, I.

    2000-12-01

    Monolithic II-VI semiconductor microcavities for the blue-green region grown by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy have been demonstrated. ZnSe/MgS-superlattice (ZnSe/MgS-SL) layers were used for the distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs). The DBR with only 5 periods showed the high reflectivity of 92% at the wavelength of 510 nm due to the large difference of refractive indices between ZnSe and MgS layers. In a monolithic II-VI microcavity structure based on these DBRs, a clear cavity resonance mode was observed in the blue-green region for the first time.

  13. Optofluidic microcavities: Dye-lasers and biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Lei, L.; Zhang, K.; Shi, J.; Wang, L.; Li, H.; Zhang, X. M.; Wang, Y.; Chan, H. L. W.

    2010-01-01

    Optofluidic microcavities are integrated elements of microfluidics that can be explored for a large variety of applications. In this review, we first introduce the physics basis of optical microcavities and microflow control. Then, we describe four types of optofluidic dye lasers developed so far based on both simple and advanced device fabrication technologies. To illustrate the application potential of such devices, we present two types of laser intracavity measurements for chemical solution and single cell analyses. In addition, the possibility of single molecule detection is discussed. All these recent achievements demonstrated the great importance of the topics in biology and several other disciplines. PMID:24753719

  14. Exceptional points in anisotropic planar microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Steffen; Michalsky, Tom; Sturm, Chris; Rosenow, Bernd; Grundmann, Marius; Schmidt-Grund, Rüdiger

    2017-02-01

    Planar microcavities allow the control and manipulation of spin polarization, manifested in phenomena like the optical spin Hall effect due to the intrinsic polarization mode splitting. Here, we study a transparent microcavity with broken rotational symmetry, realized by aligning the optic axis of a uniaxial cavity material in the cavity plane, giving rise to exceptional points in the dispersion relation. These occur pairwise, are circularly polarized, and are cores of polarization vortices. The exceptional points are result of the non-Hermitian character of the system and are in close relationship to singular optic axes in absorptive biaxial systems.

  15. Open-access microcavities for chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallance, Claire; Trichet, Aurelien A. P.; James, Dean; Dolan, Philip R.; Smith, Jason M.

    2016-07-01

    The recent development of open-access optical microcavities opens up a number of intriguing possibilities in the realm of chemical sensing. We provide an overview of the different possible sensing modalities, with examples of refractive index sensing, optical absorption measurements, and optical tracking and trapping of nanoparticles. The extremely small mode volumes within an optical microcavity allow very small numbers of molecules to be probed: our current best detection limits for refractive index and absorption sensing are around 105 and 102 molecules, respectively, with scope for further improvements in the future.

  16. Solid state microcavity dye lasers fabricated by nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, D.; Nielsen, T.; Kristensen, A.

    2004-11-01

    We present a solid state polymer microcavity dye laser, fabricated by thermal nanoimprint lithography (NIL) in a dye-doped thermoplast. The thermoplast poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) is used due to its high transparency in the visible range and its robustness to laser radiation. The laser dye is Rhodamine 6G ClO4. This dye is shown to withstand temperatures up to 240 °C without bleaching, which makes it compatible with the thermal nanoimprint lithography process. The 1.55 μm thick dye-doped PMMA devices are fabricated on a SiO2 substrate, yielding planar waveguiding in the dye-doped PMMA with two propagating TE-TM modes. The laser cavity has the lateral shape of a trapezoid, supporting lasing modes by reflection on the vertical cavity walls. The solid polymer dye lasers emit laterally through one of the vertical cavity walls, when pumped optically through the top surface by means of a frequency doubled, pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Lasing in the wavelength region from 560 to 570 nm is observed from a laser with a side-length of 50 μm. In this proof of concept, the lasers are multimode with a mode wavelength separation of approximately 1.6 nm, as determined by the waveguide propagation constant(s) and cavity dimensions. The stamps used in this work were fabricated by UV-lithography, limiting the lateral dimensional control of the devices. The resolution of NIL is ultimately limited by the quality of the stamps. Using electron beam lithography for stamp fabrication, the NIL process presented here offers the possibility for adding mode-selecting elements, e.g., diffractive- or sub-wavelength optical elements.

  17. Impact of zirconium dopants on the lasing efficiency of Raman microcavity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyungwoo; Armani, Andrea M.

    2017-02-01

    Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM) silica microresonators are a particularly unique group of microcavities in the sense that they can confine light inside the device for an extended period of time while maintaining a high quality (Q) factor due to the total internal reflection. As a result, WGM resonators have high circulating optical power, which can cause nonlinear optical processes such as stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). It has been demonstrated that SRS has been observed in various WGM silica microresonators with the sub-mW Raman lasing threshold. However, in case of the Raman lasing efficiency, it is limited by the intrinsic property of silica itself, which is the Raman gain coefficient. Therefore, in the present work, we introduce a hybrid silica toroidal microcavity in order to enhance the Raman lasing efficiency. First, we synthesize a suite of silica sol-gels doped with a range of Zirconium (Zr) concentrations and integrate the material with silica toroidal microresonator. The intrinsic Raman gain of the Zr-doped silica is measured using Raman spectroscopy, and the values show a clear dependence on Zr dopant concentrations. The lasing performance is characterized using a 765 nm pump source, and the Raman emissions for the coated devices are detected at 790 nm and longer. The lasing emission and characteristic threshold curves are quantified using both an optical spectrum analyzer and an optical spectrograph. The lasing slope efficiency of exhibits a marked increase from 3.37% to 47.43% as the Zr concentration increases due to the Raman gain improvement. These values are particularly notable as they are the unidirectional, not bidirectional, lasing efficiencies.

  18. Electrically-detected ESR in silicon nanostructures inserted in microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Bagraev, Nikolay; Danilovskii, Eduard; Gets, Dmitrii; Klyachkin, Leonid; Kudryavtsev, Andrey; Kuzmin, Roman; Malyarenko, Anna; Gehlhoff, Wolfgang; Mashkov, Vladimir; Romanov, Vladimir

    2014-02-21

    We present the first findings of the new electrically-detected electron spin resonance technique (EDESR), which reveal the point defects in the ultra-narrow silicon quantum wells (Si-QW) confined by the superconductor δ- barriers. This technique allows the ESR identification without application of an external cavity, as well as a high frequency source and recorder, and with measuring the only response of the magnetoresistance, with internal GHz Josephson emission within frameworks of the normal-mode coupling (NMC) caused by the microcavities embedded in the Si-QW plane.

  19. Nonlinear emission of semiconductor microcavities in the strong coupling regime

    PubMed

    Houdre; Weisbuch; Stanley; Oesterle; Ilegems

    2000-09-25

    We report on the nonlinear laserlike emission from semiconductor microcavities in the strong coupling regime. Under resonant continuous wave excitation we observe a highly emissive state. The energy, dispersion, and spatial extent of this state is measured and is found to be dispersionless and spatially localized. This state coexists with luminescence that follows the usual cavity-polariton dispersion. It is attributed to the amplification of luminescence by a parametric gain due to cavity-polariton scattering. Despite the resonant excitation at 1.6 K, we observe no sign of Bose-Einstein condensation nor Boser action.

  20. Field instability in high-quality dielectric sphere and disk: implication to the problem of laser-induced damage of microsphere and microdisk resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruzdev, Vitali E.; Libenson, Mikhail N.

    1999-04-01

    The problem of initiating of laser-induced damage (LID) of microspherical and microdisk resonators and nature of processes limiting ultimate pump intensity of the resonators are considered. Electrodynamic processes rather than absorption-induced heating are shown to play major role in initiating of LID of ideal passive resonators. Theoretical model to describe local increasing of high-power electromagnetic field in the microresonator is presented to study the processes. It is based on idea of formation of unstable field structure in resonant dielectric microcavity connected with formation of positive feedbacks resulting in light-induced variation of quality factor and its spectrum.

  1. Demonstration of a stable ultrafast laser based on a nonlinear microcavity

    PubMed Central

    Peccianti, M.; Pasquazi, A.; Park, Y.; Little, B.E.; Chu, S.T.; Moss, D.J.; Morandotti, R.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrashort pulsed lasers, operating through the phenomenon of mode-locking, have had a significant role in many facets of our society for 50 years, for example, in the way we exchange information, measure and diagnose diseases, process materials, and in many other applications. Recently, high-quality resonators have been exploited to demonstrate optical combs. The ability to phase-lock their modes would allow mode-locked lasers to benefit from their high optical spectral quality, helping to realize novel sources such as precision optical clocks for applications in metrology, telecommunication, microchip-computing, and many other areas. Here we demonstrate the first mode-locked laser based on a microcavity resonator. It operates via a new mode-locking method, which we term filter-driven four-wave mixing, and is based on a CMOS-compatible high quality factor microring resonator. It achieves stable self-starting oscillation with negligible amplitude noise at ultrahigh repetition rates, and spectral linewidths well below 130 kHz. PMID:22473009

  2. Vertical Microcavity Organic Light-emitting Field-effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongsheng; Lin, Jie; Song, Li; Lu, Qipeng; Zhu, Wanbin; Liu, Xingyuan

    2016-03-01

    Organic light-emitting field-effect transistors (OLEFETs) are regarded as a novel kind of device architecture for fulfilling electrical-pumped organic lasers. However, the realization of OLEFETs with high external quantum efficiency (EQE) and high brightness simultaneously is still a tough task. Moreover, the design of the resonator structure in LED is far from satisfactory. Here, OLEFETs with EQE of 1.5% at the brightness of 2600 cdm-2, and the corresponding ON/OFF ratio and current efficiency reaches above 104 and 3.1 cdA-1, respectively, were achieved by introducing 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN) as a charge generation layer. Moreover, a vertical microcavity based on distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and Ag source/drain electrodes is successfully introduced into the high performance OLEFETs, which results in electroluminescent spectrum linewidth narrowing from 96 nm to 6.9 nm. The results manifest the superiority of the vertical microcavity as an optical resonator in OLEFETs, which sheds some light on achieving the electrically pumped organic lasers.

  3. Vertical Microcavity Organic Light-emitting Field-effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongsheng; Lin, Jie; Song, Li; Lu, Qipeng; Zhu, Wanbin; Liu, Xingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Organic light-emitting field-effect transistors (OLEFETs) are regarded as a novel kind of device architecture for fulfilling electrical-pumped organic lasers. However, the realization of OLEFETs with high external quantum efficiency (EQE) and high brightness simultaneously is still a tough task. Moreover, the design of the resonator structure in LED is far from satisfactory. Here, OLEFETs with EQE of 1.5% at the brightness of 2600 cdm−2, and the corresponding ON/OFF ratio and current efficiency reaches above 104 and 3.1 cdA−1, respectively, were achieved by introducing 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN) as a charge generation layer. Moreover, a vertical microcavity based on distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and Ag source/drain electrodes is successfully introduced into the high performance OLEFETs, which results in electroluminescent spectrum linewidth narrowing from 96 nm to 6.9 nm. The results manifest the superiority of the vertical microcavity as an optical resonator in OLEFETs, which sheds some light on achieving the electrically pumped organic lasers. PMID:26986944

  4. The analysis of light extraction efficiency of GaN-based LEDs with a novel micro-cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jee-Gong; Liao, Lun-De; Hwang, Chi-Chuan

    2006-08-01

    This paper demonstrates the strong enhancement of light extraction efficiency of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by a novel three-dimensionally arranged micro-cavity. There are several optimal designed parameters, including chip dimensions, absorption coefficients, the shape of the micro-cavity and package are analyzed on the basis of a Monte-Carlo ray tracing simulation. The most important that studying includes GaN LEDs which are applied to various applications, including traffic signals, backlight system for LCD and outdoor illumination by white light LEDs. The functional of the three-dimensionally arranged micro-cavity is to make the light extraction from LED with high efficiency. The shape of micro-cavities are making like hexagon solids on the top view. The structure were evaluated and simulated by TracePro software respectively. The light extraction efficiency of LED can be greatly improved by three-dimensionally arranged micro-cavity. This study shows that the micro-cavities induced on the surface rather than that inside the LED greatly enhances the light extraction efficiency. This stipulation holds for both sapphire-based and Thin-GaN LEDs. The results indeed identify the attributes of the LED, which make it possible to achieve excellent luminance performance using a GaN-based approach from the LED of "three-dimensionally arranged micro-cavity". This structure was stringent expected to allow a high-efficiency LED, since the illumination systems needed for higher luminance energy can be added independently of the effects.

  5. Planar microcavity-integrated hot-electron photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Kai; Zhan, Yaohui; Giannini, Vincenzo; Li, Xiaofeng

    2016-05-01

    Hot-electron photodetectors are attracting increasing interest due to their capability in below-bandgap photodetection without employing classic semiconductor junctions. Despite the high absorption in metallic nanostructures via plasmonic resonance, the fabrication of such devices is challenging and costly due to the use of high-dimensional sub-wavelength nanostructures. In this study, we propose a planar microcavity-integrated hot-electron photodetector (MC-HE PD), in which the TCO/semiconductor/metal (TCO: transparent conductive oxide) structure is sandwiched between two asymmetrically distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and a lossless buffer layer. Finite-element simulations demonstrate that the resonant wavelength and the absorption efficiency of the device can be manipulated conveniently by tailoring the buffer layer thickness and the number of top DBR pairs. By benefitting from the largely increased electric field at the resonance frequency, the absorption in the metal can reach 92%, which is a 21-fold enhancement compared to the reference without a microcavity. Analytical probability-based electrical calculations further show that the unbiased responsivity can be up to 239 nA mW-1, which is more than an order of magnitude larger than that of the reference. Furthermore, the MC-HE PD not only exhibits a superior photoelectron conversion ability compared to the approach with corrugated metal, but also achieves the ability to tune the near infrared multiband by employing a thicker buffer layer.

  6. Drag effects in a system of electrons and microcavity polaritons

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Oleg L.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2010-09-15

    The theory of the drag effects in the system of spatially separated electrons and excitons in coupled quantum wells (QWs) embedded in an optical microcavity is developed. It is shown that at low temperature an electron current induces the polariton flow, therefore, a transport of photons along the cavity. However, the electron current dragged by the polariton flow is strongly suppressed below polariton superfluid transition temperature and hence, the strong suppression of the induced electron current indicates the superfluidity of polaritons. Therefore, the transport properties of polaritons can be investigated by measuring the current or voltage in the electron subsystem. At high temperatures, we study the exciton-electron drag effects. At high-temperatures regime, from one hand, the existence of the electric current in an electron QW induces the exciton flow in the other QW, from the other hand, the electron current in one QW induces the exciton flow in the other QW via the drag of excitons by the electrons. The drag coefficients for the polariton-electron systems are calculated and analyzed. We discuss the possible experimental observation of the drag effects in the system of electrons and microcavity polaritons, that also allow to observe the cavity polaritons superfluidity.

  7. Optical parametric oscillation in one-dimensional microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecomte, Timothée; Ardizzone, Vincenzo; Abbarchi, Marco; Diederichs, Carole; Miard, Audrey; Lemaitre, Aristide; Sagnes, Isabelle; Senellart, Pascale; Bloch, Jacqueline; Delalande, Claude; Tignon, Jerome; Roussignol, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    We present a comprehensive investigation of optical parametric oscillation in resonantly excited one-dimensional semiconductor microcavities with embedded quantum wells. Such solid-state structures feature a fine control over light-matter coupling and produce a photonic/polaritonic mode fan that is exploited for the efficient emission of parametric beams. We implement an energy-degenerate optical parametric oscillator with balanced signal and idler intensities via a polarization-inverting mechanism. In this paper, we (i) precisely review the multimode photonic/polaritonic structure of individual emitters, (ii) provide a thorough comparison between experiment and theory, focusing on the power and the threshold dependence on the exciton-photon detuning, (iii) discuss the influence of inhomogeneous broadening of the excitonic transition and finite size, and (iv) find that a large exciton-photon detuning is a key parameter to reach a high output power and a high conversion efficiency. Our study highlights the predictive character of the polariton interaction theory and the flexibility of one-dimensional semiconductor microcavities as a platform to study parametric phenomena.

  8. Finite element method analysis of surface acoustic wave devices with microcavities for detection of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senveli, Sukru U.; Tigli, Onur

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces the use of finite element method analysis tools to investigate the use of a Rayleigh type surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor to interrogate minute amounts of liquids trapped in microcavities placed on the delay line. Launched surface waves in the ST-X quartz substrate couple to the liquid and emit compressional waves. These waves form a resonant cavity condition and interfere with the surface waves in the substrate. Simulations show that the platform operates in a different mechanism than the conventional mass loading of SAW devices. Based on the proposed detection mechanism, it is able to distinguish between variations of 40% and 90% glycerin based on phase relations while using liquid volumes smaller than 10 pl. Results from shallow microcavities show high correlation with sound velocity parameter of the liquid whereas deeper microcavities display high sensitivities with respect to glycerin concentration. Simulated devices yield a maximum sensitivity of -0.77°/(% glycerin) for 16 μm wavelength operation with 8 μm deep, 24 μm wide, and 24 μm long microcavities.

  9. Exceptional points in rolled-up tubular microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yangfu; Li, Shilong; Kiravittaya, Suwit; Mei, Yongfeng

    2017-09-01

    We observe the crossing and anti-crossing behaviors of nearly degenerate mode pairs in a rolled-up tubular microcavity, which can be explained by weak and strong couplings between the modes. Exceptional points (EPs) are thus obtained in the tubular microcavity since they are the critical point where a transition from strong to weak coupling occurs. Rolled-up tubular microcavities with a given resonant mode approaching an EP in parameter space expanded by two continuous variables are also realized without using near-field probes. Microcavities with EPs prepared in a rolled-up way could be mechanically stable and would be used for optofluidic detection.

  10. Solution processing of microcavity for BioMEMS application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Vu Nam; Ukita, Yoshiaki; Takamura, Yuzuru; Mitani, Tadaoki; Shimoda, Tatsuya; Dung Dang, Thi My; Chien Dang, Mau

    2014-09-01

    Compared to the conventional silicon-based technology, the solution process appears to be a revolution in the field of micro/nanofabrication due to its advantages of high efficiency in material and energy consumption and the use of low cost material. In this paper, we introduce a new approach to fabricate BioMEMS devices using this novel technology to make microcavity. Zirconium oxide patterns were formed on the silicon substrate simply by spin coating its precursor and thermal imprinting technique. We used poly-propylene carbonate (PPC) for the sacrificial material due to its unique pyrolysis property. The PPC was coated on the ZrO patterns and excess film was etched by oxygen plasma but retaining PPC structure between the lines of ZrO pattern. Then another ZrO layer was coated to encapsulate the PPC. The final microcavity structures were obtained by just baking the substrate by pyrolyzing the PPC. The obtained results show the approach’s prospect of becoming an ideal alternative for the current BioMEMS micro/nanofabrication technologies

  11. Optimal design of resonant enhanced quantum dot infrared photodetector based on metal-insulator-metal microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Jing, Youliang; Li, Mengyao; Li, Liang; Zhen, Honglou

    2015-11-01

    The design of quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIP) based on metal-insulator-metal (MIM) microcavity in which the quantum dot (QD) is sandwiched between a planar metallic film and a metallic stripe is reported. By a finite difference time-domain (FDTD) method, the light coupling efficiency spectra and enhancement factor are numerically calculated. The results exhibit that the total electric field concentrated in metal-metal region is strongly enhanced when the resonant frequency of microcavity is equal to the QD's peak response frequency. This enhancement effect mainly originates from the resonant coupling of incident photons into microcavity forming the surface plasmonic mode. The optimization of structural parameters for MIM microcavity is discussed, demonstrating an optimal structure of quantum dot infrared photodetector with the coupling efficiency improved nearly 7 times compared with conventional mesa QDIPs. So, it is deduced that a favorable performance of device such as high quantum efficiency and infrared responsivity is possible. Finally, the detector shows the potential application in the infrared sensing and imaging, as well as integrating with other electronic and optoelectronic device for the sub-wavelength size.

  12. 2-D photonic crystals microcavity filters based on hexagonal lattice structures embedded in ridge waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugessur, A. S.; Pottier, P.; De La Rue, R. M.; Kirk, A. G.

    2005-09-01

    Compact photonic crystal (PhC) microcavity filters in a ridge waveguide format could play a useful role for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) and de-multiplexing functionality in dense integrated photonic circuits. The microcavity filters are embedded in ridge waveguides with high lateral refractive-index contrast because good lateral confinement and efficient coupling of light into the device can be achieved using this established waveguide technology. However, this configuration leads to significant modal mismatch at the interfaces between the PhC and waveguide sections, contributing to reflection losses and reduced transmission over much of the useful spectrum. By the same token, mode-matching features consisting of two rows of PhC holes with a different filling factor and displaced to mirror-image positions with respect to the outer two rows of the main PhC mirrors have been implemented to enhance the optical transmission by more than a factor of two. Furthermore, an increase in Q-factor (more than 100 %) is achieved by the addition of two further rows of PhC holes on either side of the microcavity. Moreover, Bragg-grating concepts have been applied in several other filter designs using the same hexagonal PhC lattice configuration, in an attempt to control the filter response. This work involves the design, fabrication (using electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching) and characterization of such hexagonal-lattice PhC microcavity filters embedded in ridge waveguides.

  13. Engineering the Losses and Beam Divergence in Arrays of Patch Antenna Microcavities for Terahertz Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madéo, Julien; Pérez-Urquizo, Joel; Todorov, Yanko; Sirtori, Carlo; Dani, Keshav M.

    2017-07-01

    We perform a comprehensive study on the emission from finite arrays of patch antenna microcavities designed for the terahertz range by using a finite element method. The emission properties including quality factors, far-field pattern, and photon extraction efficiency are investigated for etched and non-etched structures as a function of the number of resonators, the dielectric layer thickness, and period of the array. In addition, the simulations are achieved for lossy and perfect metals and dielectric layers, allowing to extract the radiative and non-radiative contributions to the total quality factors of the arrays. Our study shows that this structure can be optimized to obtain low beam divergence (FWHM <10°) and photon extraction efficiencies >50% while keeping a strongly localized mode. These results show that the use of these microcavities would lead to efficient terahertz emitters with a low divergence vertical emission and engineered losses.

  14. Anomalous normal mode oscillations in semiconductor microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Hou, H.Q.; Hammons, B.E.

    1997-04-01

    Semiconductor microcavities as a composite exciton-cavity system can be characterized by two normal modes. Under an impulsive excitation by a short laser pulse, optical polarizations associated with the two normal modes have a {pi} phase difference. The total induced optical polarization is then expected to exhibit a sin{sup 2}({Omega}t)-like oscillation where 2{Omega} is the normal mode splitting, reflecting a coherent energy exchange between the exciton and cavity. In this paper the authors present experimental studies of normal mode oscillations using three-pulse transient four wave mixing (FWM). The result reveals surprisingly that when the cavity is tuned far below the exciton resonance, normal mode oscillation in the polarization is cos{sup 2}({Omega}t)-like, in contrast to what is expected form the simple normal mode model. This anomalous normal mode oscillation reflects the important role of virtual excitation of electronic states in semiconductor microcavities.

  15. Antenna-coupled microcavities for terahertz emission

    SciTech Connect

    Madéo, J. Todorov, Y.; Sirtori, C.

    2014-01-20

    We have investigated the capacitive coupling between dipolar antennas and metal-dielectric-metal wire microcavities with strong sub-wavelength confinement in the terahertz region. The coupling appears in reflectivity measurements performed on arrays of antenna-coupled elements, which display asymmetric Fano lineshapes. The experimental data are compared to a temporal coupled-mode theory and finite elements electromagnetic simulations. We show that the Fano interferences correspond to coupling between a subradiant mode (microcavity) and a superradiant mode (antennas). This phenomenon allows one to enhance and control the radiative coupling of the strongly confined mode with the vacuum. These concepts are very useful for terahertz optoelectronic devices based on deep-sub-wavelength active regions.

  16. Optical microcavity scanning 3D tomography.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, Andrea; Criante, Luigino; LoTurco, Sara; Farina, Marco

    2014-10-01

    A scanning optical microcavity is exploited to achieve lens-free 3D tomography of microfluidic channels. The microcavity, powered by a low-coherence source, is realized by approaching a cleaved fiber to few tens of micrometers over the sample. The interference of scattered waves inside the cavity shapes the transverse field distribution by focusing the beam and overcoming the diffraction limit due to the optical-fiber numerical aperture. The focusing effect is also preserved in the inner layers of the sample, allowing optical 3D tomography. Analysis of microfluidic channels was demonstrated through this noninvasive technique. Although the experimental setup recalls the well-known fiber-optic Fourier-domain common-path optical coherence tomography, the proposed method has intrinsic characteristics that distinguish it from the former one.

  17. Strain monitoring of bismaleimide composites using embedded microcavity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Amardeep; Anandan, Sudharshan; Yuan, Lei; Watkins, Steve E.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Xiao, Hai; Phan, Nam

    2016-03-01

    A type of extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) fiber optic sensor, i.e., the microcavity strain sensor, is demonstrated for embedded, high-temperature applications. The sensor is fabricated using a femtosecond (fs) laser. The fs-laser-based fabrication makes the sensor thermally stable to sustain operating temperatures as high as 800°C. The sensor has low sensitivity toward the temperature as compared to its response toward the applied strain. The performance of the EFPI sensor is tested in an embedded application. The host material is carbon fiber/bismaleimide (BMI) composite laminate that offer thermally stable characteristics at high ambient temperatures. The sensor exhibits highly linear response toward the temperature and strain. Analytical work done with embedded optical-fiber sensors using the out-of-autoclave BMI laminate was limited until now. The work presented in this paper offers an insight into the strain and temperature interactions of the embedded sensors with the BMI composites.

  18. Facile synthesis of optical microcavities by a rationally designed anodization approach: tailoring photonic signals by nanopore structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Chen, Yuting; Kumeria, Tushar; Ding, Fuyuan; Evdokiou, Andreas; Losic, Dusan; Santos, Abel

    2015-05-13

    Structural engineering of porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanostructures by anodization has been extensively studied in the past two decades. However, the transition of this technique into the fabrication of AAO-based one-dimensional photonic crystal is still challenging. Herein, we report for the first time on the fabrication of AAO optical microcavities by a rationally designed anodization approach. In our study, two feasible methods are used to fabricate microcavities with tunable resonance peak across the visible and near-infrared spectra. Distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) nanostructures are first fabricated by pulse anodization approach, in which the anodization voltage was periodically manipulated to achieve pseudosinusoidal modulation of the effective refractive index gradient along the depth of the AAO nanostructures. Microcavities were created by creating a nanoporous layer of constant porosity between two AAO-DBR nanostructures, and by introducing a shift of the phase of the porosity gradient along the depth of AAO. The position of the resonance peak in these microcavities can be linearly tuned by means of the duration of the high voltage anodization. These optical nanostructures are sensitive to alterations of the effective media inside the nanopores. The AAO microcavity shows a central wavelength shift of 2.58 ± 0.37 nm when exposed to water vapor. Our research highlights the feasibility of anodization technique to fabricate AAO-based photonic nanostructures for advanced sensing applications.

  19. A porous silicon optical microcavity for sensitive bacteria detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha; Huang, Jianfeng; Cai, Lintao

    2011-10-01

    A porous silicon microcavity (PSM) is highly sensitive to subtle interface changes due to its high surface area, capillary condensation ability and a narrow resonance peak (~10 nm). Based on the well-defined optical properties of a PSM, we successfully fabricated a bacteria detection chip for molecular or subcellular analysis by surface modification using undecylenic acid (UA), and the specific recognition binding of vancomycin to the D-alanyl-D-alanine of bacteria. The red shift of the PSM resonance peak showed a good linear relationship with bacteria concentration ranging from 100 to 1000 bacteria ml - 1 at the level of relative standard deviation of 0.994 and detection limit of 20 bacteria ml - 1. The resulting PSM sensors demonstrated high sensitivity, good reproducibility, fast response and low cost for biosensing.

  20. Transient dual-energy lasing in a semiconductor microcavity

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Feng-Kuo; Xie, Wei; Lee, Yi-Shan; Lin, Sheng-Di; Lai, Chih Wei

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate sequential lasing at two well-separated energies in a highly photoexcited planar microcavity at room temperature. Two spatially overlapped lasing states with distinct polarization properties appear at energies more than 5 meV apart. Under a circularly polarized nonresonant 2 ps pulse excitation, a sub-10-ps transient circularly polarized high-energy (HE) state emerges within 10 ps after the pulse excitation. This HE state is followed by a pulsed state that lasts for 20–50 ps at a low energy (LE) state. The HE state is highly circularly polarized as a result of a spin-preserving stimulated process, while the LE state shows a significantly reduced circular polarization because of a diminishing spin imbalance. PMID:26477277

  1. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  2. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.

    1993-01-01

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  3. Dynamics of Semiconductor Microcavities Using Ultrashort Pulse Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, June-Koo

    1995-01-01

    Using femtosecond optical spectroscopy, we perform an extensive study of dynamics of an AlAs/AlGaAs/GaAs-based semiconductor quantum microcavity, which exhibit cavity -polariton behavior owing to strong coupling between the exciton and cavity modes. We explore the dynamics of time -domain vacuum Rabi oscillations, the spatial coherence transfer of cavity-polariton states, and cavity-polariton dynamics in the nonlinear regime. In the time domain, when the microcavity is impulsively excited by a short coherent optical pulse, we observe the vacuum Rabi oscillations in the radiation, corresponding to the cavity-polariton mode splitting of the microcavity. Interferometric pump-probe measurements clearly show the coherent evolution of the cavity-polaritons. At high intensity, the normal mode splitting collapses due to bleaching of the excitonic oscillator strength. The dynamics of the splitting reveal the momentum relaxation of the cavity-polaritons due to inhomogeneous broadening, and provides evidence for delayed exciton-exciton scattering due to vacuum Rabi oscillation. When the cavity is excited coherently at an oblique angle, we also observe coherent radiation in the normal direction of the substrate, with a nearly fixed delay of 450 fs. This radiation is coherent with the excitation pulse and dependent on excitation density. Specifically, the initially-excited spatial cavity-polariton state is coherently transferred to the other spatial state selected by the cavity mode. The excitation dependence suggests this coherence transfer is associated with exciton scatterings. A density-matrix analysis for two cavity-polariton systems shows our model is in good qualitative agreement with the experiment. In order to perform femtosecond semiconductor spectroscopic experiments, it was necessary to develop the ultrafast laser source. We describe a cw-argon-laser -pumped Ti:sapphire laser system and a real-time femtosecond -optical-pulse analyzer, for femtosecond spectroscopy

  4. Integrated vertical microcavity using a nano-scale deformation for strong lateral confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, Lijian Ding, Fei Stöferle, Thilo Knoll, Armin Jan Offrein, Bert Mahrt, Rainer F.

    2013-12-09

    We report on the realization of a solid state Fabry-Pérot-like microcavity that uses a small Gaussian-shaped deformation inside the cavity to achieve strong lateral photon confinement on the order of the wavelength. Cavities with a mode volume V < 0.4 μm{sup 3} and a quality factor Q > 1000 are fabricated by means of focused ion beam milling, removing the necessity for etched sidewalls as required for micropillar cavities. Perylene-diimide dye doped polystyrene was embedded in the microcavity and probed by time-resolved microphotoluminescence. A Purcell enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate by a factor of 3.5 has been observed at room temperature.

  5. High quality electron beams for high quality FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaria, E.

    2017-05-01

    Thanks to the use of seeding, modern high gain FELs can now produce high power pulses with a longitudinal coherence much higher than normally available from SASE FELs. This possibility of fully coherent FEL pulses in the X-ray spectral range has several benefits for user's experiment and also it opens the door to new experimental possibilities such as coherent control experiments. The achievement of a full coherence in the FEL pulses does not only requires a coherent seed but also needs an electron beam whose properties does not change over the length of the final FEL pulse. For this reason, requirements for electron beam quality in seeded FELs are significantly higher than for SASE FEL. Starting from the FERMI experience we report in the talk examples of small electron beam perturbations that have a large impact on FEL properties.

  6. Multistability of a coherent spin ensemble in a semiconductor microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraïso, T. K.; Wouters, M.; Léger, Y.; Morier-Genoud, F.; Deveaud-Plédran, B.

    2010-08-01

    Coherent manipulation of spin ensembles is a key issue in the development of spintronics. In particular, multivalued spin switching may lead to new schemes of logic gating and memories. This phenomenon has been studied with atom vapours 30 years ago, but is still awaited in the solid state. Here, we demonstrate spin multistability with microcavity polaritons in a trap. Owing to the spinor nature of these light-matter quasiparticles and to the anisotropy of their interactions, we can optically control the spin state of a single confined level by tuning the excitation power, frequency and polarization. First, we realize high-efficiency power-dependent polarization switching. Then, at constant excitation power, we evidence polarization hysteresis and determine the conditions for realizing multivalued spin switching. Finally, we demonstrate an unexpected regime, where our system behaves as a high-contrast spin trigger. These results open new pathways to the development of advanced spintronics devices and to the realization of multivalued logic circuits.

  7. Electrically Pumped III-N Microcavity Light Emitters Incorporating an Oxide Confinement Aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ying-Yu; Chang, Tsu-Chi; Li, Ya-Chen; Lu, Tien-Chang; Wang, Shing-Chung

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we report on electrically pumped III-N microcavity (MC) light emitters incorporating oxide confinement apertures. The utilized SiO2 aperture can provide a planar ITO design with a higher index contrast ( 1) over other previously reported approaches. The fabricated MC light emitter with a 15-μm-aperture shows a turn-on voltage of 3.3 V, which is comparable to conventional light emitting diodes (LEDs), showing a good electrical property of the proposed structure. A uniform light output profile within the emission aperture suggesting the good capability of current spreading and current confinement of ITO and SiO2 aperture, respectively. Although the quality factor ( Q) of fabricated MC is not high enough to achieve lasing action ( 500), a superlinear emission can still be reached under a high current injection density (2.83 kA/cm2) at 77 K through the exciton-exciton scattering, indicating the high potential of this structure for realizing excitonic vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) action or even polariton laser after fabrication optimization.

  8. Tuneable polaritonics at room temperature with strongly coupled Tamm plasmon polaritons in metal/air-gap microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, C.; Coulson, C.; Christmann, G.; Farrer, I.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.; Baumberg, J. J.

    2011-06-01

    We report strong coupling between Tamm plasmons and excitons in III-V quantum wells at room temperature in ultracompact sample designs. A high refractive index contrast air-gap mirror together with optical Tamm states at a metal/semiconductor interface tightly confines the intracavity field leading to substantial local field enhancements. Angular-resolved reflectivity spectra give clear evidence for anticrossing in the dispersion relation. Room temperature Rabi splittings of 10 meV are found in excellent agreement with simulations. Electrical control of the polariton modes is realized without need for doped mirror layers. Such air-gap microcavities open innovative possibilites for electrically tunable microcavities and polaritonic microelectromechanics.

  9. Evaluation of cancer cell deformability by microcavity array.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Tomoko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Seita; Negishi, Ryo; Shionoiri, Nozomi; Hosokawa, Masahito; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2017-03-01

    A cell entrapment device consisting of a microcavity array was used to analyze the deformability of MCF-10 human breast epithelial and MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Entrapment of up to 8 × 10(3) cells was achieved within 3 min. Protrusions were formed at the bottom surface of the array with a pore size of 3 μm. Protrusion length increased at higher filtration pressures and could be used to distinguish between MCF-7 and MCF-10 cells. These results indicate that our system is useful for high-throughput deformability analysis of cancer cells, which can provide insight into the mechanisms underlying tumor cell malignancy.

  10. Spin–orbit coupling of light in asymmetric microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Ma, L. B.; Li, S. L.; Fomin, V. M.; Hentschel, M.; Götte, J. B.; Yin, Y.; Jorgensen, M. R.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2016-01-01

    When spinning particles, such as electrons and photons, undergo spin–orbit coupling, they can acquire an extra phase in addition to the well-known dynamical phase. This extra phase is called the geometric phase (also known as the Berry phase), which plays an important role in a startling variety of physical contexts such as in photonics, condensed matter, high-energy and space physics. The geometric phase was originally discussed for a cyclically evolving physical system with an Abelian evolution, and was later generalized to non-cyclic and non-Abelian cases, which are the most interesting fundamental subjects in this area and indicate promising applications in various fields. Here, we enable optical spin–orbit coupling in asymmetric microcavities and experimentally observe a non-cyclic optical geometric phase acquired in a non-Abelian evolution. Our work is relevant to fundamental studies and implies promising applications by manipulating photons in on-chip quantum devices. PMID:26987401

  11. Coherence expansion and polariton condensate formation in a semiconductor microcavity.

    PubMed

    Belykh, V V; Sibeldin, N N; Kulakovskii, V D; Glazov, M M; Semina, M A; Schneider, C; Höfling, S; Kamp, M; Forchel, A

    2013-03-29

    The dynamics of the expansion of the first order spatial coherence g(1) for a polariton system in a high-Q GaAs microcavity was investigated on the basis of Young's double slit experiment under 3 ps pulse excitation at the conditions of polariton Bose-Einstein condensation. It was found that in the process of condensate formation the coherence expands with a constant velocity of about 10(8)  cm/s. The measured coherence is smaller than that in a thermal equilibrium system during the growth of condensate density and well exceeds it at the end of condensate decay. The onset of spatial coherence is governed by polariton relaxation while condensate amplitude and phase fluctuations are not suppressed.

  12. Tunable polaritonic molecules in an open microcavity system

    SciTech Connect

    Dufferwiel, S.; Li, Feng Giriunas, L.; Walker, P. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Krizhanovskii, D. N.; Trichet, A. A. P.; Smith, J. M.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2015-11-16

    We experimentally demonstrate tunable coupled cavities based upon open access zero-dimensional hemispherical microcavities. The modes of the photonic molecules are strongly coupled with quantum well excitons forming a system of tunable polaritonic molecules. The cavity-cavity coupling strength, which is determined by the degree of modal overlap, is controlled through the fabricated centre-to-centre distance and tuned in-situ through manipulation of both the exciton-photon and cavity-cavity detunings by using nanopositioners to vary the mirror separation and angle between them. We demonstrate micron sized confinement combined with high photonic Q-factors of 31 000 and lower polariton linewidths of 150 μeV at resonance along with cavity-cavity coupling strengths between 2.5 meV and 60 μeV for the ground cavity state.

  13. A Perfect Electromagnetic Cavity: High Quality Factor in Subwavelength Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginis, Vincent; Tassin, Philippe; Soukoulis, Costas M.; Veretennicoff, Irina

    2010-03-01

    Transformation optics has recently provided a new way to look at the interaction between light and matter. It uses the analogy between the macroscopic Maxwell's equations in complex dielectrics and the free-space Maxwell's equations on the background of an arbitrary metric to exploit the full potential of metamaterials, of which the most exciting examples are invisibility cloaks. In this contribution, we want to show how transformation optics can be applied to design a cavity with extraordinary properties. We have demonstrated theoretically the existence of eigenmodes whose wavelength is much larger than the characteristic dimensions of the cavity. Furthermore, our design avoids the bending losses observed in traditional microcavities, so that the quality factor is only limited by intrinsic absorption of the materials. Such a ``perfect cavity'' may be interesting for applications involving optical data storage or quantum optics, where it can be used to control the rate of spontaneous emission through the Purcell effect.

  14. Multipartite polariton entanglement in semiconductor microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, T. C. H.; Savona, V.

    2011-09-15

    We study the entanglement of multiple polariton modes, which results in continuous variable cluster states suitable for quantum computation. Schemes are based on parametric scattering between spin-polarized lower and upper polariton branches in planar microcavities or spin-polarized orbital angular momentum states in mesa structures. Such systems are modeled by numerical solution of truncated density matrices and compared to the solution of the Heisenberg equations for the set of field correlators up to third order. Four-body entanglement is evidenced by violation of the van Loock-Furusawa quadripartite inequalities. We show that the entanglement is able to withstand a realistic strength of pure dephasing present in typical systems.

  15. Coupled spatial multimode solitons in microcavity wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavcheva, G.; Gorbach, A. V.; Pimenov, A.

    2016-12-01

    A modal expansion approach is developed and employed to investigate and elucidate the nonlinear mechanism behind the multistability and formation of coupled multimode polariton solitons in microcavity wires. With pump switched on and realistic dissipation parameters, truncating the expansion up to the second-order wire mode, our model predicts two distinct coupled soliton branches: stable and unstable. Modulational stability of the stationary homogeneous solution and soliton branches stability are studied. Our simplified 1D model is in remarkably good agreement with the full 2D mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii model, reproducing correctly the soliton existence domain upon variation of pump amplitude and the onset of multistability.

  16. Optical microcavity sensing: from reactive to dissipative interactions (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Yanyan; Shen, Bo-Qiang; Yu, Xiao-Chong; Wang, Li; Kim, Donghyun; Gong, Qihuang; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasensitive optical detection of nanoparticles is highly desirable for applications in early-stage diagnosis of human diseases, environmental monitoring and homeland security, but remains extremely difficult due to ultralow polarizabilities of small-sized, low-index particles. Optical whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microcavities, with high Q factors up to 108, provide a promising platforms for label-free detection of nano-scaled objects, due to significantly enhanced light-matter interaction. The mechanisms of the conventional WGM sensors, based on the reactive (or dispersive) interaction, measure the mode shift induced by the environmental variations of refractive index, which may fail to detect low-index nanoparticles. In this work, we propose a different dissipative sensing scheme, reacting as linewidth change of WGMs, to detect single nanoparticle using a silica toroidal microcavity fabricated on a silicon substrate. In experiment, detection of single gold nanorods in aqueous environment is realized by monitoring simultaneously the linewidth change and shift of cavity mode. Besides a good consistent with the theoretical predictions, the experimental result shows that the dissipative sensing achieves a better signal-to-noise-ratio compared to the dispersive mechanism. Remarkably, by setting the probe wavelength on and off the surface plasmon resonance of the gold nanoparticles, the great potential of the dissipative sensing method to detect single lossy nanoparticles is demonstrated. This dissipative sensing method holds great potential in detecting lossy nanoparticles, and may become a promising lab-on-a-chip platform for detecting small-sized, low-index particles with ultralow polarizabilities.

  17. Nanoparticle trapping and characterization with open microcavities (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichet, Aurelien; Dolan, Philip R.; James, Dean; Hughes, Gareth M.; Vallance, Claire; Smith, Jason M.

    2017-03-01

    Thanks to their low mode volume and high finesse, optical microresonators have emerged as a promising avenue to detect and measure properties of single nanoparticles such as viruses or gold nanoparticles. Thanks to the resulting electromagnetic field enhancement, small nanoparticles, viruses and even single proteins have been trapped in hollow resonators such as photonic crystals or plasmonic tweezers. Such trapping devices with sensing capabilities are on the verge of finding powerful applications in interdisciplinary science. However, the quest for a candidate bringing together in-situ detection, trapping and multiple quantitative measurements of the particle properties supported by a comprehensive understanding still remain elusive. In this work, we show that open-access microcavities fulfil these criteria. Such resonators are made up of two micro-mirrors facing each other separated by a fluid medium in which nanoparticles can diffuse. We have recorded the cavity mode spectra while nanoparticles were optically trapped. Our results demonstrate that these microcavities can be used as optical tweezers with in-situ force calibration and nanoparticle sensing capabilities, including measurement of shape anisotropy. The shift in cavity mode wavelength during a trapping event provides information on both the nanoparticle and trap properties, as well as on the trapping force holding the particle in the trap. We are able to determine in real-time the nanoparticle polarizability, i.e. its optical response to an electromagnetic field, its coefficient of friction and characterize its shape anisotropy. The high level of control in this device makes it a robust analytical tool for real-time nanoparticle characterisation and monitoring.

  18. Intensity modulated SMF cascaded tapers with a hollow core PCF based microcavity for curvature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dass, Sumit; Narayan Dash, Jitendra; Jha, Rajan

    2016-03-01

    We propose a highly sensitive curvature sensor based on cascaded single mode fiber (SMF) tapers with a microcavity. The microcavity is created by splicing a small piece of hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) at the end of an SMF to obtain a sharp interference pattern. Experimental results show that two SMF tapers enhance the curvature sensitivity of the system and by changing the tapering parameters of the second taper, the curvature sensitivity of the system can be tailored, together with the fringe contrast of the interference pattern. A maximum curvature sensitivity of 10.4 dB/m-1 is observed in the curvature range 0 to 1 m-1 for a second taper diameter of 18 μm. The sensing setup is highly stable and shows very low temperature sensitivity. As the interrogation is intensity based, a low cost optical power meter can be utilized to determine the curvature.

  19. Scalable photonic quantum computing assisted by quantum-dot spin in double-sided optical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2013-07-29

    We investigate the possibility of achieving scalable photonic quantum computing by the giant optical circular birefringence induced by a quantum-dot spin in a double-sided optical microcavity as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We construct a deterministic controlled-not gate on two photonic qubits by two single-photon input-output processes and the readout on an electron-medium spin confined in an optical resonant microcavity. This idea could be applied to multi-qubit gates on photonic qubits and we give the quantum circuit for a three-photon Toffoli gate. High fidelities and high efficiencies could be achieved when the side leakage to the cavity loss rate is low. It is worth pointing out that our devices work in both the strong and the weak coupling regimes.

  20. Rabi-like splitting from large area plasmonic microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alast, Fatemeh Hosseini; Li, Guixin; Cheah, K. W.

    2017-08-01

    Rabi-like splitting was observed from a hybrid plasmonic microcavity. The splitting comes from the coupling of cavity mode with the surface plasmon polariton mode; anti-crossing was observed alongside the modal conversional channel on the reflection light measurement. The hybrid device consists of a 10x10 mm2 ruled metal grating integrated onto the Fabry-Perot microcavity. The 10x10 mm2 ruled metal grating fabricated from laser interference and the area is sufficiently large to be used in the practical optical device. The larger area hybrid plasmonic microcavity can be employed in polariton lasers and biosensors.

  1. Modulation bandwidth enhancement for coupled twin-square microcavity lasers.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhi-Xiong; Huang, Yong-Zhen; Yang, Yue-De; Tang, Min; Xiao, Jin-Long

    2017-08-15

    Modulation bandwidth enhancements are investigated for coupled twin-square microcavity lasers due to photon-photon resonance effect. For a coupled twin-square microcavity laser with the square side length of 20 μm, we demonstrate the increase of 3-dB modulation bandwidth from 9.6 GHz to 19.5 GHz, by adjusting the resonance mode wavelength interval between two square microcavities. The enhanced modulation bandwidth is explained by rate equation analysis, and numerical simulations are conducted for large signal modulation with improved eye-diagrams at 40 Gbit/s.

  2. Electrically-detected magnetic resonance in semiconductor nanostructures inserted in microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Bagraev, Nikolay; Danilovskii, Eduard; Gets, Dmitrii; Klyachkin, Leonid; Kudryavtsev, Andrey; Kuzmin, Roman; Malyarenko, Anna; Gehlhoff, Wolfgang; Mashkov, Vladimir; Romanov, Vladimir

    2013-12-04

    We present the first findings of the new electrically-detected electron spin resonance technique (EDESR), which reveal the point defects in the ultra-narrow silicon quantum wells (Si-QW) confined by the superconductor δ-barriers. This technique allows the ESR identification without application of an external cavity, as well as a high frequency source and recorder, and with measuring the only response of the magnetoresistance caused by the microcavities embedded in the Si-QW plane.

  3. 3D PIC Modeling of Microcavity Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald; Moore, Christopher; Yee, Benjamin; Moorman, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    We present a number of techniques and challenges in simulating the transient behavior of a microcavity discharge. Our microcavities are typically cylindrical with diameters approximately 50 - 100 μm, heights of 50 - 200 μm, pressure near atmospheric, and operate at a few hundred volts. We employ a fully kinetic simulation methodology, the Particle-in-Cell (PIC) method, with interparticle collisions handled via methods based on direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). In particular, we explicitly include kinetic electrons. Some of the challenges we encounter include variations in number densities, external circuit coupling, and time step resolution constraints. By employing dynamic particle weighting (particle weights vary over time by species and location) we can mitigate some of the challenges modeling systems with 107 variations in number densities. Smoothing mechanisms have been used to attempt to mitigate external circuit response. We perform our simulations on hundreds or thousands of processing cores to accommodate the computational work inherent in using relatively small time step sizes (e.g., 50 fs for a 100 ns calculation). In addition, particle weighting issues inherent to three-dimensional low temperature plasma systems will be mentioned. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Hydatid detection using the near-infrared transmission angular spectra of porous silicon microcavity biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Jia, Zhenhong; Lü, Guodong

    2017-01-01

    Hydatid, which is a parasitic disease, occurs today in many regions worldwide. Because it can present a serious threat to people’s health, finding a fast, convenient, and economical means of detection is important. This paper proposes a label- and spectrophotometer-free apparatus that uses optical biological detection based on porous silicon microcavities. In this approach, the refractive index change induced by the biological reactions of a sample in a porous silicon microcavity is detected by measuring the change in the incidence angle corresponding to the maximum transmitted intensity of a near-infrared probe laser. This paper reports that the proposed method can achieve the label-free detection of 43 kDa molecular weight hydatid disease antigens with high sensitivity. PMID:28317861

  5. Plasmonic optical convergence microcavity based on the metal-insulator-metal microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, J.; Wang, W. J.; Li, N.; Li, Z. F.; Lu, W.

    2017-06-01

    With the increasing demand of low noise detection, the dimension of detectors are becoming smaller and smaller to reduce the dark current while sacrificing the detection efficiency. Here, a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) optical microcavity is proposed to converge light from tens of micrometers to several micrometers with little divergence. The measured transmission peaks show obvious dependence on the top metallic grating parameters, indicating the surface plasmon polariton resonance inside the cavity. Scanning near-field optical microscopy reveals the output profile around the exit holes. Polarization selective transmission has been demonstrated. If combined with a photodetector, the MIM microcavity, due to its light convergence capability, would provide a possibility to reduce the detector's active dimension down to 1-2 μm while retaining high quantum efficiency by keeping a large light collection area.

  6. Room temperature current injection polariton light emitting diode with a hybrid microcavity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tien-Chang; Chen, Jun-Rong; Lin, Shiang-Chi; Huang, Si-Wei; Wang, Shing-Chung; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2011-07-13

    The strong light-matter interaction within a semiconductor high-Q microcavity has been used to produce half-matter/half-light quasiparticles, exciton-polaritons. The exciton-polaritons have very small effective mass and controllable energy-momentum dispersion relation. These unique properties of polaritons provide the possibility to investigate the fundamental physics including solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics, and dynamical Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). Thus far the polariton BEC has been demonstrated using optical excitation. However, from a practical viewpoint, the current injection polariton devices operating at room temperature would be most desirable. Here we report the first realization of a current injection microcavity GaN exciton-polariton light emitting diode (LED) operating under room temperature. The exciton-polariton emission from the LED at photon energy 3.02 eV under strong coupling condition is confirmed through temperature-dependent and angle-resolved electroluminescence spectra.

  7. Hydatid detection using the near-infrared transmission angular spectra of porous silicon microcavity biosensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Jia, Zhenhong; Lü, Guodong

    2017-03-20

    Hydatid, which is a parasitic disease, occurs today in many regions worldwide. Because it can present a serious threat to people's health, finding a fast, convenient, and economical means of detection is important. This paper proposes a label- and spectrophotometer-free apparatus that uses optical biological detection based on porous silicon microcavities. In this approach, the refractive index change induced by the biological reactions of a sample in a porous silicon microcavity is detected by measuring the change in the incidence angle corresponding to the maximum transmitted intensity of a near-infrared probe laser. This paper reports that the proposed method can achieve the label-free detection of 43 kDa molecular weight hydatid disease antigens with high sensitivity.

  8. Hydatid detection using the near-infrared transmission angular spectra of porous silicon microcavity biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Jia, Zhenhong; Lü, Guodong

    2017-03-01

    Hydatid, which is a parasitic disease, occurs today in many regions worldwide. Because it can present a serious threat to people’s health, finding a fast, convenient, and economical means of detection is important. This paper proposes a label- and spectrophotometer-free apparatus that uses optical biological detection based on porous silicon microcavities. In this approach, the refractive index change induced by the biological reactions of a sample in a porous silicon microcavity is detected by measuring the change in the incidence angle corresponding to the maximum transmitted intensity of a near-infrared probe laser. This paper reports that the proposed method can achieve the label-free detection of 43 kDa molecular weight hydatid disease antigens with high sensitivity.

  9. Electrical investigations of hybrid OLED microcavity structures with novel encapsulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Stefan; Brückner, Robert; Fröb, Hartmut; Leo, Karl

    2016-04-01

    An electrical driven organic solid state laser is a very challenging goal which is so far well beyond reach. As a step towards realization, we monolithically implemented an Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) into a dielectric, high quality microcavity (MC) consisting of two Distributed Bragg Reectors (DBR). In order to account for an optimal optical operation, the OLED structure has to be adapted. Furthermore, we aim to excite the device not only electrically but optically as well. Different OLED structures with an emission layer consisting of Alq3:DCM (2 wt%) were investigated. The External Quantum Efficiencies (EQE) of this hybrid structures are in the range of 1-2 %, as expected for this material combination. Including metal layers into a MC is complicated and has a huge impact on the device performance. Using Transfer-Matrix-Algorithm (TMA) simulations, the best positions for the metal electrodes are determined. First, the electroluminescence (EL) of the adjusted OLED structure on top of a DBR is measured under nitrogen atmosphere. The modes showed quality factors of Q = 60. After the deposition of the top DBR, the EL is measured again and the quality factors increased up to Q = 600. Considering the two 25-nm-thick-silver contacts a Q-factor of 600 is very high. The realization of a suitable encapsulation method is important. Two approaches were successfully tested. The first method is based on the substitution of a DBR layer with a layer produced via Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). The second method uses a 0.15-mm-thick cover glass glued on top of the DBR with a 0.23-μm-thick single-component glue layer. Due to the working encapsulation, it is possible to investigate the sample under ambient conditions.

  10. Directional emission micro-cavity lasers with different device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chang-ling; Shi, Jian-wei; Feng, Yuan; Hao, Yong-qin; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jian-jia; Li, Peng; Wang, Jia-bin

    2016-10-01

    The micro-cavity lasers support the ultra-low threshold and ultrahigh Q-factor, but several disadvantages impede further development, such as isotropic far-field profile pattern and low optical power output. To overcome the intrinsic problems, several deformed structures were proposed and investigated. In this paper we present directional emission micro-cavity lasers with limason-shaped, triangle-shaped, and ellipse shaped cavity structures. In experiment, mid-infrared InGaAs/InAlAs quantum cascade material was employed to fabricate these micro-cavity lasers, due to its advantages of lack of surface recombination, and inherently in-plane with transverse magnetic (TM) mode emission. The micro-cavity lasers with different device structures were operated and compared at room temperature, and a higher output power was also achieved by increasing the device structure size.

  11. Dark Vibronic Polaritons and the Spectroscopy of Organic Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Felipe; Spano, Frank C.

    2017-06-01

    Organic microcavities are photonic nanostructures that strongly confine the electromagnetic field, allowing exotic quantum regimes of light-matter interaction with disordered organic semiconductors. The unambiguous interpretation of the spectra of organic microcavities has been a long-standing challenge due to several competing effects involving electrons, vibrations, and cavity photons. Here we present a theoretical framework that is able to describe the main spectroscopic features of organic microcavities consistently. We introduce a class of light-matter excitations called dark vibronic polaritons, which strongly emit but only weakly absorb light in the same frequency region of the bare electronic transition. A successful comparison with experimental data demonstrates the applicability of our theory. The proposed microscopic understanding of organic microcavities paves the way for the development of optoelectronic devices enhanced by quantum optics.

  12. Microcavity effects in the photoluminescence of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpenguzel, Ali; Aydinli, Atilla; Bek, Alpan

    1998-07-01

    Fabry-Perot microcavities are used for the alteration of photoluminescence in hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride grown with and without ammonia. The photoluminescence is red-near-infrared for the samples grown without ammonia, and blue-green for the samples grown with ammonia. In the Fabry- Perot microcavities, the amplitude of the photoluminescence is enhanced, while its linewidth is reduced with respect to the bulk hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride. The microcavity was realized by a metallic back mirror and a hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride--air or a metallic front mirror. The transmittance, reflectance, and absorbance spectra were also measured and calculated. The calculated spectra agree well with the experimental spectra. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride microcavity has potential for becoming a versatile silicon based optoelectronic device such as a color flat panel display, a resonant cavity enhanced light emitting diode, or a laser.

  13. On-chip quantum optics with quantum dot microcavities.

    PubMed

    Stock, E; Albert, F; Hopfmann, C; Lermer, M; Schneider, C; Höfling, S; Forchel, A; Kamp, M; Reitzenstein, S

    2013-02-06

    A novel concept for on-chip quantum optics using an internal electrically pumped microlaser is presented. The microlaser resonantly excites a quantum dot microcavity system operating in the weak coupling regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics. This work presents the first on-chip application of quantum dot microlasers, and also opens up new avenues for the integration of individual microcavity structures into larger photonic networks.

  14. Photonic Crystal Microcavities for Quantum Information Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemeier, Jenna Nicole

    Quantum information science and technology is a broad and fascinating field, encompassing diverse research areas such as materials science, atomic physics, superconductors, solid-state physics, and photonics. A goal of this field is to demonstrate the basic functions of information initialization, manipulation, and read-out in systems that take advantage of quantum physics to greatly enhance computing performance capabilities. In a hybrid quantum information network, different systems are used to perform different functions, to best exploit the advantageous properties of each system. For example, matter quantum bits (qubits) can be used for local data storage and manipulation while photonic qubits can be used for long-distance communication between storage points of the network. Our research focuses on the following two solid-state realizations of a matter qubit for the purpose of building such a hybrid quantum network: the electronic spin of a self-assembled indium arsenide quantum dot and the electronic spin of a nitrogen-vacancy defect center in diamond. Light--matter interactions are necessary to transfer the information from the matter qubit to the photonic qubit, and this interaction can be enhanced by embedding the spin system in an optical cavity. We focus on photonic crystal microcavities for this purpose, and we study interactions between the optical cavity modes and incorporated spin systems. To improve the performance of this spin--photon interface, it is important to maximize the coupling strength between the spin and photonic systems and to increase the read-out efficiency of information stored in the cavity. In this thesis, we present our work to deterministically couple a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond to a photonic crystal microcavity in gallium phosphide. This is achieved by nanopositioning a pre-selected diamond nanocrystal in the intensity maximum of the optical cavity mode. We also present an optimized design of a photonic crystal

  15. Pool boiling on surfaces with mini-fins and micro-cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuszko, Robert; Piasecka, Magdalena

    2012-11-01

    The experimental studies presented here focused on pool boiling heat transfer on mini-fin arrays, mini-fins with perforated covering and surfaces with micro-cavities. The experiments were carried out for water and fluorinert FC-72 at atmospheric pressure. Mini-fins of 0.5 and 1 mm in height were uniformly spaced on the base surface. The copper foil with holes of 0.1 mm in diameter (pitch 0.2/0.4 mm), sintered with the fin tips, formed a system of connected perpendicular and horizontal tunnels. The micro-cavities were obtained through spark erosion. The maximal depth of the craters of these cavities was 15 - 30 μm and depended on the parameters of the branding-pen settings. At medium and small heat fluxes, structures with mini-fins showed the best boiling heat transfer performance both for water and FC-72. At medium and high heat fluxes (above 70 kW/m2 for water and 25 kW/m2 for FC-72), surfaces with mini-fins without porous covering and micro-cavities produced the highest heat transfer coefficients. The surfaces obtained with spark erosion require a proper selection of geometrical parameters for particular liquids - smaller diameters of cavities are suitable for liquids with lower surface tension (FC-72).

  16. Microcavity surface plasmon resonance bio-sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosavian, Nazanin

    This work discusses a miniature surface plasmon biosensor which uses a dielectric sub- micron diameter core with gold spherical shell. The shell has a subwavelength nanoaperture believed to excite stationary plasmon resonances at the biosensor's surface. The sub-micron cavity enhances the measurement sensitivity of molecules binding to the sensor surface. We used visible-range optical spectroscopy to study the wavelength shift as bio-molecules absorbed-desorbed at the shell surface. We also used Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Focused Ion Beam (FIB) ablation to study the characteristics of microcavity surface plasmon resonance sensor (MSPRS) and the inner structure formed with metal deposition and its spectrum. We found that resonances at 580 nm and 670 nm responded to bound test agents and that Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensor intensity could be used to differentiate between D-glucose and L-glucose. The responsiveness of the system depended upon the mechanical integrity of the metallic surface coating.

  17. Recent results and latest views on microcavity LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbuch, Claude; David, Aurelien; Fujii, Tetsuo; Schwach, C.; DenBaars, Steven P.; Nakamura, Shuji; Rattier, M.; Benisty, Henri; Houdré, Romuald; Stanley, R.; Carlin, Jean-Francois; Krauss, Thomas F.; Smith, Christopher J. M.

    2004-06-01

    We are progressively approaching the physical limits of microcavity LEDs (MC-LEDs) for high brightness, high efficiency LEDs. They are promising high efficiency devices and they offer the very attractive prospect of full planar fabrication process. However, to compete with other high efficiency LED schemes, they need to approach or surpass the 50 % efficiency mark. We first explore the limits of planar MC-LEDs in both the GaAlInAsP and GaInAlN materials systems, and show that the single-step extraction limit is in the 40 % range at best, depending on the materials system used, with the largest part of the non-extracted light being emitted into guided modes. The waveguided light can itself be extracted by photon recycling, when the internal quantum efficiency is high. Otherwise, another extraction scheme for that light is provided by various photonic-crystal-assisted extraction schemes. Simple photonic crystals (PCs) appear to lack the omnidirectional extraction properties required. However, more rotation-invariant PCs like Archimedean tilings allow to obtain such extraction with added efficiencies already in the 10% range. We discuss the further improvements to such structures.

  18. Fiber-tip bubble-structure microcavity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Luo, S.; Ma, X.; Jiang, X.; Feng, G.; Yang, J.

    2014-11-01

    A Fabry-Perot interferometer sensor based on a fiber-tip bubble-structure micro-cavity is proposed, fabricated, and demonstrated for hydrostatic pressure sensing and transverse load sensing. A segment of a well-cleaved multimode fiber with a core diameter of 62.5μm is processed with chemical etching based on a solution of HF 40% and the bubblestructure micro-cavity is fabricated by using arc discharge at the end of the processed multimode fiber. The sensor can be considered as a two-beam Fabry-Perot interferometer with one beam from the silica-air interface on the left side of the bubble and the other from the air-silica interface on the right side of the bubble. The broadband light is injected into the fiber-tip bubble-structure micro-cavity by splicing the multimode fiber with the bubble-structure micro-cavity to a 3- dB optical coupler and the reflective spectrum of the bubble-structure micro-cavity is measured by an optical spectrum analyzer. Both hydrostatic pressure sensing with a sensitivity of ~0.1 nm/MPa and transverse load sensing with sensitivity of 3.64 nm/N are experimentally demonstrated based the proposed fiber-tip bubble-structure micro-cavity sensor. The proposed sensor is demonstrated with a relative low temperature sensitivity of about 2 pm/°C. Properties of the fiber-tip bubble-structure micro-cavitys with different sizes are investigated. The sensor has the advantages of lowcost, ease of fabrication and compact size, which make it a promising candidate for hydrostatic pressure sensing or transverse load sensing in harsh environments.

  19. Electroluminescence Studies on Longwavelength Indium Arsenide Quantum Dot Microcavities Grown on Gallium Arsenide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    ELECTROLUMINESCENCE STUDIES ON LONG WAVELENGTH INDIUM ARSENIDE QUANTUM DOT MICROCAVITIES GROWN ON GALLIUM ARSENIDE THESIS John C...11-46 ELECTROLUMINESCENCE STUDIES ON LONGWAVELENGTH INDIUM ARSENIDE QUANTUM DOT MICROCAVITIES GROWN ON GALLIUM ARSENIDE THESIS...58 1 ELECTROLUMINESCENCE STUDIES ON LONGWAVELENGTH INDIUM ARSENIDE QUANTUM DOT MICROCAVITIES GROWN ON GALLIUM ARSENIDE I

  20. Excellence through High-Quality Individualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Richard W.; Klingstedt, Joe Lars

    1988-01-01

    Proposes a strategy employing challenge, functionalism, high-order learning, and originality to achieve high-quality individualization in course work. Asserts that individualized instruction better prepares students to solve problems, make decisions, and produce original ideas. (MM)

  1. Design and fabrication of microcavity-array superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Cattani, M.; Oliveira, M. R. S.; Teixeira, F. S.; Brown, I. G.

    2010-07-01

    We have modeled, fabricated, and characterized superhydrophobic surfaces with a morphology formed of periodic microstructures which are cavities. This surface morphology is the inverse of that generally reported in the literature when the surface is formed of pillars or protrusions, and has the advantage that when immersed in water the confined air inside the cavities tends to expel the invading water. This differs from the case of a surface morphology formed of pillars or protrusions, for which water can penetrate irreversibly among the microstructures, necessitating complete drying of the surface in order to again recover its superhydrophobic character. We have developed a theoretical model that allows calculation of the microcavity dimensions needed to obtain superhydrophobic surfaces composed of patterns of such microcavities, and that provides estimates of the advancing and receding contact angle as a function of microcavity parameters. The model predicts that the cavity aspect ratio (depth-to-diameter ratio) can be much less than unity, indicating that the microcavities do not need to be deep in order to obtain a surface with enhanced superhydrophobic character. Specific microcavity patterns have been fabricated in polydimethylsiloxane and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and contact angle measurements. The measured advancing and receding contact angles are in good agreement with the predictions of the model.

  2. Organic Fabry-Perot micro-cavity for electro-optic sampling by amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaborit, G.; Martin, G.; Duvillaret, L.; Coutaz, J.-L.; Nguyen, C.; Hierle, R.; Zyss, J.

    2006-02-01

    We present herein a original concept of electro-optic (EO) probe for high frequency electric field measurements. This sensors is based on a thin organic layer of DR1-PMMA embedded in a high finesse Fabry-Perot cavity. The optimal orientation of DRl molecules, parallel to the face of the micro-cavity, has been obtained thanks to a lateral poling method. A r 33 of 2.5 pm/V has been reached for a 16 μm thick polymer layer. The final probe exhibits high sensitivity of 2V.cm -1.Hz -1/2.

  3. Open optical microcavities for CQED experiments and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jason; Trichet, Aurelien; Dolan, Philip; Coles, David; Flatten, Lucas; Johnson, Sam; Patel, Robin; Schwarz, Stefan; Li, Feng; Krizhanovskii, Dimitrii; Tartakovskii, Alexander; Skolnick, Maurice; Vallance, Claire; Hunger, David

    Open microcavities have emerged in recent years as flexible tools for quantum optics and engineered light matter coupling. Fabry Perot resonators with concave mirrors on the micrometre scale, highly resonant optical modes can be generated with volumes of order 1-10λ3, along with facile tunability and efficient external coupling. Here we will describe our latest advances in open cavity fabrication using focused ion beam milled templates on which high reflectivity mirrors can be deposited providing measured finesses up to 50,000 with surfaces that deviate by less than 2 nm rms from the design. This degree of control provides opportunities for engineering optical modes to suit a wide variety of applications. We will describe the fabrication of cavities with radius of curvature from 2 μm to 1 mm, and the realisation of coupled cavities with controlled mode overlap. We will further describe some of the applications of these open cavity devices to particle sensing, exciton-polariton physics with quantum wells and 2D materials, tunable lasers, and spin-photon interfaces using diamond colour centres.

  4. Stroing single-photons in microcavities arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Imran M.; Enk, S. J. Van; Kimble, H. J.

    2014-03-01

    Coupling light to arrays of microcavities is one of the most promising avenues to store/delay classical light pulses [F. Krauss, Nat. Phot. 2, 448-450 (2008)]. However, from the perspective of benefiting quantum communication protocols, the same ideas in principle can be extended down to the single-photon (quantum) level as well. Particularly, for the purposes of entanglement purification and quantum repeaters a reliable storage of single photons is needed. We consider in our work [I. M. Mirza, S. Van Enk, H. Kimble JOSA B, 30,10 (2013)] cavities that are coupled through an optical fiber which is assumed to be forming a Markovian bath. For this study two powerful open quantum system techniques, Input-Output theory for cascaded quantum systems and the Quantum Trajectory approach are used in combination. For the confirmation of photon delays the Time-Dependent Spectrum of such a single photon is obtained. Interestingly this leads to a hole-burning effect showing that only certain frequency components in the single photon wavepackets are stored inside the cavities and hence are delayed in time. Since on-demand production of single photons is not an easy task we include in our description the actual generation of the single photon by assuming a single emitter in one the resonators.

  5. GaN hemispherical micro-cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiyun; Feng, Cong; Wang, T.; Choi, H. W.

    2016-01-01

    GaN-based micro-dome optical cavities supported on Si pedestals have been demonstrated by dry etching through gradually shrinking microspheres followed by wet-etch undercutting. Optically pumped whispering-gallery modes (WGMs) have been observed in the near-ultraviolet within the mushroom-like cavities, which do not support Fabry-Pérot resonances. The WGMs blue-shift monotonously as the excitation energies are around the lasing threshold. Concurrently, the mode-hopping effect is observed as the gain spectrum red-shifts under higher excitations. As the excitation energy density exceeds ˜15.1 mJ/cm2, amplified spontaneous emission followed by optical lasing is attained at room temperature, evident from a super-linear increase in emission intensity together with linewidth reduction to ˜0.7 nm for the dominant WGM. Optical behaviors within these WGM microcavities are further investigated using numerical computations and three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations.

  6. Modal analysis of spontaneous emission in a planar microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Rigneault, H.; Monneret, S.

    1996-09-01

    A complete set of cavity modes in planar dielectric microcavities is presented which naturally includes guided modes. We show that most of these orthonormal fields can be derived from a coherent superposition of plane waves incoming on the stack from the air and from the substrate. Spontaneous emission of a dipole located inside the microcavity is analyzed, in terms of cavity modes. Derivation of the radiation pattern in the air and in the substrate is presented. The power emitted into the guided modes is also determined. Finally, a numerical analysis of the radiative properties of an erbium atom located in a Fabry-P{acute e}rot multilayer dielectric microcavity is investigated. We show that a large amount of light is emitted into the guided modes of the structure, in spite of the Fabry-P{acute e}rot resonance, which increases the spontaneous emission rate in a normal direction. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Spin noise amplification and giant noise in optical microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhov, I. I.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Kozlov, G. G.; Zapasskii, V. S.; Kavokin, A. V.; Lagoudakis, P. V.

    2015-06-14

    When studying the spin-noise-induced fluctuations of Kerr rotation in a quantum-well microcavity, we have found a dramatic increase of the noise signal (by more than two orders of magnitude) in the vicinity of anti-crossing of the polariton branches. The effect is explained by nonlinear optical instability of the microcavity giving rise to the light-power-controlled amplification of the polarization noise signal. In the framework of the developed model of built-in amplifier, we also interpret the nontrivial spectral and intensity-related properties of the observed noise signal below the region of anti-crossing of polariton branches. The discovered effect of optically controllable amplification of broadband polarization signals in microcavities in the regime of optical instability may be of interest for detecting weak oscillations of optical anisotropy in fundamental research and for other applications in optical information processing.

  8. Microcavity single virus detection and sizing with molecular sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantham, V. R.; Holler, S.; Kolchenko, V.; Wan, Z.; Arnold, S.

    2013-02-01

    We report the label-free detection and sizing of the smallest individual RNA virus, MS2 by a spherical microcavity. Mass of this virus is ~6 ag and produces a theoretical resonance shift ~0.25 fm upon adsorbing an individual virus at the equator of the bare microcavity, which is well below the r.m.s background noise of 2 fm. However, detection was accomplished with ease (S/N = 8, Q = 4x105) using a single dipole stimulated plasmonic-nanoshell as a microcavity wavelength shift enhancer. Analytical expressions based on the "reactive sensing principle" are developed to extract the radius of the virus from the measured signals. Estimated limit of detection for these experiments was ~0.4 ag or 240 kDa below the size of all known viruses, largest globular and elongated proteins [Phosphofructokinase (345 kDa) and Fibrinogen (390 kDa), respectively].

  9. Toluene optical fibre sensor based on air microcavity in PDMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacik, Daniel; Martincek, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    We prepared and demonstrated a compact, simple-to-fabricate, air microcavity in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) placed at the end of a single-mode optical fibre. This microcavity creates a Fabry-Perot interferometer sensor able to measure concentrations of toluene vapour in air. Operation of the sensor is provided by diffusion of the toluene vapour to the PDMS, and the consequent extension of length d of the air microcavity in PDMS. The sensor response for the presence of vapours is fast and occurs within a few seconds. By using the prepared sensor toluene vapour concentration in air can be measured in the range from about 0.833 g.m-3 to saturation, with better sensitivity than 0.15 nm/g.m-3 up to maximal sensitivity 1.4 nm/g.m-3 at around concentration 100 g.m-3 in time 5 s.

  10. Dynamics of supersolid crystals in microcavity polariton condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisa, M. H.; Abdalla, A. S.

    The possible existence of quantum crystals phase of polariton condensate in two-dimensional microcavity polariton was studied by using mean-field method for bosons at zero temperature. In this study, we observe the supersolid crystallized (hexagonal, square) and a quantized winding number of the phase in a regime of strong- field interaction in rotating exciton-polariton condensates. First, the ground state of the condensate was found; and the solution was further extended for dynamics state to reach the equilibrium steady-state as well as their density profile and energy diagrams. The supersolid crystal is the result of the considerable deviation induced by the interaction of polaritons of both ground and dynamic states of a dressed dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate. Here, the researchers demonstrated the formation of a hexagonal lattice in the nonlinear regime at high polariton-density where polariton-polariton interactions dominate the behavior of the system. It was identified that stability regimes for ground state increases as the polariton-polariton interaction strength increases. The phase diagram for the stable vortex state will be useful for conducting experimental and theoretical studies on rotating dipolar quantum gases and many other exotic systems.

  11. First results with a microcavity plasma panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, Robert; Ben Moshe, M.; Benhammou, Yan; Chapman, J. Wehrley; Etzion, E; Ferretti, Claudio; Friedman, Dr. Peter S.; Levin, Daniel S.; Silver, Yiftah; Varner Jr, Robert L; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing; Bensimon, R; Davies, Merlin

    2015-01-01

    A new type of gaseous micropattern particle detector based on a closed-cell microcavity plasma panel sensor is reported. The first device was fabricated with 1 x 1 x 2 mm cells. It has shown very clean signals of 0.6-2.5 V amplitude, fast rise time of approximately 2 ns and FWHM of about 2 ns with very uniform signal shapes across all pixels. From initial measurements with beta particles from a radioactive source, a maximum pixel efficiency greater than 95% is calculated, for operation of the detector over a 100 V wide span of high voltages (HV). Over this same HV range, the background rate per pixel was measured to be 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than the rate with which the cell was illuminated by the beta source. Pixel-to-pixel count rate uniformity is within 3% and stable within 3% for many days. The time resolution is 2.4 ns, and a very low cell-to-cell crosstalk has been measured between cells separated by 2 mm. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigation on spectral response of micro-cavity structure by symmetrical tapered fiber tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Li, Yang; Yan, Xiaojun; Li, Weidong

    2016-06-01

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a micro-cavity structure made of symmetrical tapered fiber tips. The waist of a conventional fiber taper fabricated from heating and stretching technique is symmetrically cleaved, and the aligned fiber tips with air gap constitute a Fabry-Perot micro-cavity due to the reflection at the tip facet. The spectral responses of such micro-cavity structure have been investigated both in beam propagation models and experiments. The multibeam interference in the micro-cavity and the impact of the waist diameter and cavity length on the spectral response has been successfully demonstrated. And a micro-cavity structure with 45 μm waist diameter was experimentally achieved, the measured spectra agree well with the simulation ones, indicating that the spectral response of the micro-cavity structure is contributed by both the multibeam interference and the Fabry-Perot micro-cavity.

  13. Microcavity-embedded, colour-tuneable, transparent organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Hong; Chen, Chang-Wen; Huang, Zheng-Yu; Lin, Wei-Chieh; Lin, Li-Yen; Lin, Francis; Wong, Ken-Tsung; Lin, Hao-Wu

    2014-02-01

    In this work microcavity-capped colour-tuneable SMOSCs are evaluated. By adopting a microcavity-structured cathode with optical spacer layers of different thicknesses fabricated in a Ag/NPB/Ag structure, the transmission spectra of complete devices can be tuned over the entire visible-light region (400-750 nm). The fabricated semitransparent colour-tuneable solar cells show an average efficiency of 4.78% under 1-sun illumination. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Acoustic trapping in bubble-bounded micro-cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahoney, P.; McDougall, C.; Glynne-Jones, P.; MacDonald, M. P.

    2016-12-01

    We present a method for controllably producing longitudinal acoustic trapping sites inside microfluidic channels. Air bubbles are injected into a micro-capillary to create bubble-bounded `micro-cavities'. A cavity mode is formed that shows controlled longitudinal acoustic trapping between the two air/water interfaces along with the levitation to the centre of the channel that one would expect from a lower order lateral mode. 7 μm and 10 μm microspheres are trapped at the discrete acoustic trapping sites in these micro-cavities.We show this for several lengths of micro-cavity.

  15. Standing-wave nonlinear optics in an integrated semiconductor microcavity.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Alex; Orenstein, Meir

    2007-10-01

    We present a concept of standing-wave optical frequency conversion in dispersive microcavities theoretically and experimentally, allowing efficient ultracompact nonlinear photonics. We developed a time-dependent model, incorporating the dispersion into the structure of the spatial cavity modes, where the conversion efficiency is enhanced by the optimization of a nonlinear cavity mode overlap. We designed and fabricated integrated double-resonance semiconductor microcavities for standing-wave second-harmonic generation. The measured efficiency exhibits a significant maximum near the cavity resonance owing to the intracavity power enhancement and the dispersion-induced wavelength detuning effect on the mode overlap, in good agreement with our theoretical predictions.

  16. Low dimensional GaAs/air vertical microcavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gessler, J.; Steinl, T.; Fischer, J.; Höfling, S.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Mika, A.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.

    2014-02-24

    We report on the fabrication of gallium arsenide (GaAs)/air distributed Bragg reflector microresonators with indium gallium arsenide quantum wells. The structures are studied via momentum resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy which allows us to investigate a pronounced optical mode quantization of the photonic dispersion. We can extract a length parameter from these quantized states whose upper limit can be connected to the lateral physical extension of the microcavity via analytical calculations. Laser emission from our microcavity under optical pumping is observed in power dependent investigations.

  17. Antenna-coupled microcavities for enhanced infrared photo-detection

    SciTech Connect

    Nga Chen, Yuk; Todorov, Yanko Askenazi, Benjamin; Vasanelli, Angela; Sirtori, Carlo; Biasiol, Giorgio; Colombelli, Raffaele

    2014-01-20

    We demonstrate mid-infrared detectors embedded into an array of double-metal nano-antennas. The antennas act as microcavities that squeeze the electric field into thin semiconductor layers, thus enhancing the detector responsivity. Furthermore, thanks to the ability of the antennas to gather photons from an area larger than the device's physical dimensions, the dark current is reduced without hindering the photo-generation rate. In these devices, the background-limited performance is improved with a consequent increase of the operating temperature. Our results illustrate how the antenna-coupled microcavity concept can be applied to enhance the performances of infrared opto-electronic devices.

  18. Single-cell bacterium identification with a SOI optical microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardif, M.; Jager, J.-B.; Marcoux, P. R.; Uchiyamada, K.; Picard, E.; Hadji, E.; Peyrade, D.

    2016-09-01

    Photonic crystals and microcavities act as on-chip nano-optical tweezers for identification and manipulation of biological objects. Until now, optical trapping of virus and bacteria has been achieved and their presence in the vicinity of the optical resonator is deduced by the shift in the resonant wavelength. Here, we show trapping and identification of bacteria through a properly tuned silicon on insulator microcavity. Through the spatial and temporal observations of bacteria-cavity interaction, the optical identification of three different kinds of bacteria is demonstrated.

  19. What Is High-Quality Instruction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Iris R.; Pasley, Joan D.

    2004-01-01

    Schools of United States fall short of providing high quality mathematics and science education to all the students. The factors distinguishing the most effective lessons from the least effective ones are stated.

  20. A compact dual-band bandpass filter based on porous silicon dual-microcavity of one-dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Zhang, Hong-yan

    2015-03-01

    We propose a compact dual-band bandpass filter (BPF) based on one-dimensional porous silicon (PS) photonic crystal by electrochemical etching. By inserting three periods of high and low reflective index layers in the center of porous silicon microcavity (PSM), two sharp resonant peaks appear in the high reflectivity stop band on both sides of the resonance wavelength. Through simulation and experiment, the physical mechanisms of the two resonance peaks and the resonance wavelength are also studied. It is found that the resonance wavelength can be tuned only by adjusting the effective optical thickness (EOT) of each PS layer, in which different resonance wavelengths have different widths between the two sharp resonance peaks. Besides, the analysis indicates that oxidization makes the blue shift become larger for high wavelength than that for low wavelength. Such a fabricated BPF based on PS dual-microcavity is easy to be fabricated and low cost, which benefits the application of integrated optical devices.

  1. Assuring quality in high-consequence engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, Marcey L.; Kolb, Rachel R.

    2014-03-01

    In high-consequence engineering organizations, such as Sandia, quality assurance may be heavily dependent on staff competency. Competency-dependent quality assurance models are at risk when the environment changes, as it has with increasing attrition rates, budget and schedule cuts, and competing program priorities. Risks in Sandia's competency-dependent culture can be mitigated through changes to hiring, training, and customer engagement approaches to manage people, partners, and products. Sandia's technical quality engineering organization has been able to mitigate corporate-level risks by driving changes that benefit all departments, and in doing so has assured Sandia's commitment to excellence in high-consequence engineering and national service.

  2. Multi-state lasing in self-assembled ring-shaped green fluorescent protein microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, Christof P. Höfling, Sven; Gather, Malte C.

    2014-12-08

    We demonstrate highly efficient lasing from multiple photonic states in microcavities filled with self-assembled rings of recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in its solid state form. The lasing regime is achieved at very low excitation energies of 13 nJ and occurs from cavity modes dispersed in both energy and momentum. We attribute the momentum distribution to very efficient scattering of incident light at the surface of the eGFP rings. The distribution of lasing states in energy is induced by the large spectral width of the gain spectrum of recombinant eGFP (FWHM ≅ 25 nm)

  3. A proposal for the generation of optical frequency comb in temperature insensitive microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xun; Bian, Dandan; Chen, Shaowu

    2016-11-01

    We numerically simulate the generation of an optical frequency comb (OFC) in a microring based on the traditional Si3N4 strip waveguide and a temperature compensated slot waveguide. The results show that OFCs are susceptible to temperature with strip waveguide while they can keep stable when temperature changes 10 K in either low-Q (105) or high-Q (106) microcavity with the well-designed slot waveguide, which has great superiority in practical applications where the temperature drift of the cavity due to the intense pump or surrounding change is unavoidable. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61435002, 61527823, and 61321063).

  4. Polariton condensation phase diagram in wide-band-gap planar microcavities: GaN versus ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamadi, O.; Réveret, F.; Mallet, E.; Disseix, P.; Médard, F.; Mihailovic, M.; Solnyshkov, D.; Malpuech, G.; Leymarie, J.; Lafosse, X.; Bouchoule, S.; Li, F.; Leroux, M.; Semond, F.; Zuniga-Perez, J.

    2016-03-01

    The polariton condensation phase diagram is compared in GaN and ZnO microcavities grown on mesa-patterned silicon substrate. Owing to a common platform, these microcavities share similar photonic properties with large quality factors and low photonic disorder, which makes it possible to determine the optimal spot diameter and to realize a thorough phase diagram study. Both systems have been investigated under the same experimental conditions. The experimental results and the subsequent analysis reveal clearly that longitudinal optical phonons have no influence in the thermodynamic region of the condensation phase diagram, while they allow a strong (slight) decrease of the polariton lasing threshold in the trade-off zone (kinetic region). Phase diagrams are compared with numerical simulations using Boltzmann equations, and are in satisfactory agreement. A lower polariton lasing threshold has been measured at low temperature in the ZnO microcavity, as is expected due to a larger Rabi splitting. This study highlights polariton relaxation mechanisms and their importance in polariton lasing.

  5. Subjective sleep quality alterations at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Robert K; Sitek, Emilia J; Sławek, Jarosław W; Basiński, Andrzej; Siemiński, Mariusz; Wieczorek, Dariusz

    2009-01-01

    Sleep pattern at high altitude has been studied, mainly with the use of polysomnography. This study aimed to analyze subjective sleep quality at high altitude using the following standardized scales: the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS-8). Thirty-two members of 2 expeditions--28 males and 4 females (mean age 31 years)--participated in this study conducted in Nepal, Himalayas (Lobuche East, 6119 m above sea level [masl]), Kyrgyzstan, Pamirs (Lenin Peak, 7134 masl), and Poland (sea level). The scales were administered twice, at high altitude (mean altitude 4524 masl) and at sea level. Both measures showed a decrease in sleep quality at high altitude (statistical significance, P < .001). Sleep problems affected general sleep quality and sleep induction. Sleep disturbances due to awakenings during the night, temperature-related discomfort, and breathing difficulties were reported. High altitude had no statistically significant effect on sleep duration or daytime dysfunction as measured by PSQI. The overall results of PSQI and AIS-8 confirm the data based on the climbers' subjective accounts and polysomnographic results reported in previous studies. The introduction of standardized methods of subjective sleep quality assessment might resolve the problem of being able to perform precise evaluations and research in the field of sleep disturbances at high altitude.

  6. Bacterial sensing using phage-functionalized whispering gallery microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghali, Hala; Hibli, Hicham; Bianucci, Pablo; Nadeau, Jay; Peter, Yves-Alain

    2012-02-01

    Whispering gallery optical microcavities are structures which can efficiently confine light at the micro scale. This confinement is based on total internal reflection of light at the interface between the cavity and the surrounding medium. Devices based on optical microcavities have a wide range of applications, such as microlasers, quantum optical devices and much more. In this work, we describe a biosensing application of these optical microcavities for the label-free detection of bacteria. In order for the sensor to be specific to a particular species of bacteria, we need to properly functionalize its surface so that only that kind of bacteria will produce a signal. The microcavity surface is first functionalized using PEGylated aminosilane. We then introduce phage-derived proteins that are specific to the bacteria we want to detect. The binding between the bacteria and the phage proteins creates a perturbation to the cavity field that leads to a thermo-optic effect. This effect is then observed as a shift in the resonance features of the transmission spectrum. We performed experimental measurements using a tapered fiber to couple the light from red laser (635 nm) into the resonator.

  7. Progress Toward Single-Photon-Level Nonlinear Optics in Crystalline Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowligy, Abijith S.

    Over the last two decades, the emergence of quantum information science has uncovered many practical applications in areas such as communications, imaging, and sensing where harnessing quantum features of Nature provides tremendous benefits over existing methods exploiting classical physical phenomena. In this effort, one of the frontiers of research has been to identify and utilize quantum phenomena that are not susceptible to environmental and parasitic noise processes. Quantum photonics has been at the forefront of these studies because it allows room-temperature access to its inherently quantum-mechanical features, and allows leveraging the mature telecommunication industry. Accompanying the weak environmental influence, however, are also weak optical nonlinearities. Efficient nonlinear optical interactions are indispensible for many of the existing protocols for quantum optical computation and communication, e.g. high-fidelity entangling quantum logic gates rely on large nonlinear responses at the one- or few-photon-level. While this has been addressed to a great extent by interfacing photons with single quantum emitters and cold atomic gases, scalability has remained elusive. In this work, we identify the macroscopic second-order nonlinear polarization as a robust platform to address this challenge, and utilize the recent advances in the burgeoning field of optical microcavities to enhance this nonlinear response. In particular, we show theoretically that by using the quantum Zeno effect, low-noise, single-photon-level optical nonlinearities can be realized in lithium niobate whispering-gallery-mode microcavities, and present experimental progress toward this goal. Using the measured strength of the second-order nonlinear response in lithium niobate, we modeled the nonlinear system in the strong coupling regime using the Schrodinger picture framework and theoretically demonstrated that the single-photon-level operation can be observed for cavity lifetimes in

  8. Plasmon coupled Fabry-Perot lasing enhancement in graphene/ZnO hybrid microcavity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jitao; Jiang, Mingming; Xu, Chunxiang; Wang, Yueyue; Lin, Yi; Lu, Junfeng; Shi, Zengliang

    2015-01-01

    The response of graphene surface plasmon (SP) in the ultraviolet (UV) region and the realization of short-wavelength semiconductor lasers not only are two hot research areas of great academic and practical significance, but also are two important issues lacked of good understanding. In this work, a hybrid Fabry-Perot (F-P) microcavity, comprising of monolayer graphene covered ZnO microbelt, was constructed to investigate the fundamental physics of graphene SP and the functional extension of ZnO UV lasing. Through the coupling between graphene SP modes and conventional optical microcavity modes of ZnO, improved F-P lasing performance was realized, including the lowered lasing threshold, the improved lasing quality and the remarkably enhanced lasing intensity. The underlying mechanism of the improved lasing performance was proposed based on theoretical simulation and experimental characterization. The results are helpful to design new types of optic and photoelectronic devices based on SP coupling in graphene/semiconductor hybrid structures. PMID:25786359

  9. Nonlinear optics of multi-mode planar photonic crystal microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutcheon, Murray William

    The nonlinear properties of multi-mode InP and Si planar photonic crystal microcavities are investigated in experiments relevant to integrated schemes for classical and quantum optical information processing. Normally incident, short laser pulses are used to coherently initialize the relative phase and amplitudes of two modes of a single-missing-hole InP microcavity. The two modes are orthogonally polarized, and separated by less than the bandwidth of the ˜ 130 fs excitation pulses. The relative amplitudes of the two modes can be controlled by adjusting the polarization and the centre frequency of the excitation beam. Cross-polarized detection of the resonantly scattered light reveals a well-defined relative phase between the modes that is characteristic of their coherence. When the short-pulse excitation is used to coherently excite two modes in a three-hole line-defect (L3) InP microcavity, second-order harmonic radiation is observed due to the interactions of the resonant fields with the second-order nonlinear susceptibility (chi(2)) of the host InP slab. Second-harmonic and sum-frequency generated signals are observed due to the intra- and inter-mode nonlinear mixing of the microcavity fields. When a separate non-resonant pulse is focussed onto an InP microcavity, sum-frequency light is generated conditional to the resonant mode population of the microcavity. The conditionally generated signals can be tuned by tuning the frequency of the non-resonant pulse. All of the results can be explained with reference to the bulk chi(2) properties of the InP slab. While the transient, multi-mode response of the microcavities is harnessed with the short-pulse technique, a continuous wave excitation laser exploits the local-field enhancement intrinsic to these wavelength-scale microcavities. A single-mode InP L3-microcavity with Q = 3,800 is pumped on resonance with a CW laser, and the 2D pattern of far-field second-harmonic radiation is directly imaged. The second

  10. Q-factor of (In,Ga)N containing III-nitride microcavity grown by multiple deposition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Gačević, Ž. Calleja, E.; Réveret, F.

    2013-12-21

    A 3λ/2 (In,Ga)N/GaN resonant cavity, designed for ∼415 nm operation, is grown by molecular beam epitaxy and is sandwiched between a 39.5-period (In,Al)N/GaN distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), grown on c-plane GaN-on-sapphire pseudo-substrate by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and an 8-period SiO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} DBR, deposited by electron beam evaporation. Optical characterization reveals an improvement in the cavity emission spectral purity of approximately one order of magnitude due to resonance effects. The combination of spectrophotometric and micro-reflectivity measurements confirms the strong quality (Q)-factor dependence on the excitation spot size. We derive simple analytical formulas to estimate leak and residual absorption losses and propose a simple approach to model the Q-factor and to give a quantitative estimation of the weight of cavity disorder. The model is in good agreement with both transfer-matrix simulation and the experimental findings. We point out that the realization of high Q-factor (In,Ga)N containing microcavities on GaN pseudo-substrates is likely to be limited by the cavity disorder.

  11. Enhancement of the blue photoluminescence intensity for the porous silicon with HfO2 filling into microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ran; Du, Xianghao; Sun, Weideng; Han, Zuyin; Wu, Zhengran

    2015-10-01

    With HfO2 filled into the microcavities of the porous single-crystal silicon, the blue photoluminescence was greatly enhanced at room temperature. On one hand, HfO2 contributes to the light emission with the transitions of the defect levels for oxygen vacancy. On the other hand, the special filling-into-microcavities structure of HfO2 leads to the presence of ferroelectricity, which greatly enhances the blue emission from porous silicon. Since both HfO2 and Si are highly compatible with Si-based electronic industry, combined the low-cost and convenient process, the HfO2-filled porous Si shows a promising application prospect.

  12. Enhancement of the blue photoluminescence intensity for the porous silicon with HfO2 filling into microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ran; Du, Xianghao; Sun, Weideng; Han, Zuyin; Wu, Zhengran

    2015-01-01

    With HfO2 filled into the microcavities of the porous single-crystal silicon, the blue photoluminescence was greatly enhanced at room temperature. On one hand, HfO2 contributes to the light emission with the transitions of the defect levels for oxygen vacancy. On the other hand, the special filling-into-microcavities structure of HfO2 leads to the presence of ferroelectricity, which greatly enhances the blue emission from porous silicon. Since both HfO2 and Si are highly compatible with Si-based electronic industry, combined the low-cost and convenient process, the HfO2-filled porous Si shows a promising application prospect. PMID:26503804

  13. Near-field radiative heat transfer between two parallel SiO{sub 2} plates with and without microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ijiro, T.; Yamada, N.

    2015-01-12

    Near-to-far-field radiative heat transfer between two macroscopic SiO{sub 2} plates—with and without microcavities—was observed using a highly precise and accurate optical gap-measurement method. The experiments, conducted near 300 K, measured heat transfer as a function of gap separation from 1.0 μm to 50 μm and also as a function of temperature differences between 4.1 and 19.5 K. The gap-dependent heat flux was in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the effects of microcavities on the plate surfaces were clearly observed and significant enhancement of near-field radiative heat transfer was confirmed between gold-coated microcavities with narrow vacuum separation.

  14. Germanium-on-silicon Vernier-effect photonic microcavities for the mid-infrared.

    PubMed

    Troia, Benedetto; Penades, Jordi Soler; Khokhar, Ali Z; Nedeljkovic, Milos; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos; Passaro, Vittorio M N; Mashanovich, Goran Z

    2016-02-01

    We present Vernier-effect photonic microcavities based on a germanium-on-silicon technology platform, operating around the mid-infrared wavelength of 3.8 μm. Cascaded racetrack resonators have been designed to operate in the second regime of the Vernier effect, and typical Vernier comb-like spectra have been successfully demonstrated with insertion losses of ∼5  dB, maximum extinction ratios of ∼23  dB, and loaded quality factors higher than 5000. Furthermore, an add-drop racetrack resonator designed for a Vernier device has been characterized, exhibiting average insertion losses of 1 dB, extinction ratios of up to 18 dB, and a quality factor of ∼1700.

  15. Bose-Einstein condensation of photons in an optical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Klaers, Jan; Schmitt, Julian; Vewinger, Frank; Weitz, Martin

    2010-11-25

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC)-the macroscopic ground-state accumulation of particles with integer spin (bosons) at low temperature and high density-has been observed in several physical systems, including cold atomic gases and solid-state quasiparticles. However, the most omnipresent Bose gas, blackbody radiation (radiation in thermal equilibrium with the cavity walls) does not show this phase transition. In such systems photons have a vanishing chemical potential, meaning that their number is not conserved when the temperature of the photon gas is varied; at low temperatures, photons disappear in the cavity walls instead of occupying the cavity ground state. Theoretical works have considered thermalization processes that conserve photon number (a prerequisite for BEC), involving Compton scattering with a gas of thermal electrons or photon-photon scattering in a nonlinear resonator configuration. Number-conserving thermalization was experimentally observed for a two-dimensional photon gas in a dye-filled optical microcavity, which acts as a 'white-wall' box. Here we report the observation of a Bose-Einstein condensate of photons in this system. The cavity mirrors provide both a confining potential and a non-vanishing effective photon mass, making the system formally equivalent to a two-dimensional gas of trapped, massive bosons. The photons thermalize to the temperature of the dye solution (room temperature) by multiple scattering with the dye molecules. Upon increasing the photon density, we observe the following BEC signatures: the photon energies have a Bose-Einstein distribution with a massively populated ground-state mode on top of a broad thermal wing; the phase transition occurs at the expected photon density and exhibits the predicted dependence on cavity geometry; and the ground-state mode emerges even for a spatially displaced pump spot. The prospects of the observed effects include studies of extremely weakly interacting low-dimensional Bose gases and

  16. SERS-active ZnO/Ag hybrid WGM microcavity for ultrasensitive dopamine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Junfeng; Xu, Chunxiang; Nan, Haiyan; Zhu, Qiuxiang; Qin, Feifei; Manohari, A. Gowri; Wei, Ming; Zhu, Zhu; Shi, Zengliang; Ni, Zhenhua

    2016-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a potential neuro modulator in the brain which influences a variety of motivated behaviors and plays a key role in life science. A hybrid ZnO/Ag microcavity based on Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM) effect has been developed for ultrasensitive detection of dopamine. Utilizing this effect of structural cavity mode, a Raman signal of R6G (5 × 10-3 M) detected by this designed surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-active substrate was enhanced more than 10-fold compared with that of ZnO film/Ag substrate. Also, this hybrid microcavity substrate manifests high SERS sensitivity to rhodamine 6 G and detection limit as low as 10-12 M to DA. The Localized Surface Plasmons of Ag nanoparticles and WGM-enhanced light-matter interaction mainly contribute to the high SERS sensitivity and help to achieve a lower detection limit. This designed SERS-active substrate based on the WGM effect has the potential for detecting neurotransmitters in life science.

  17. Intimate effects of surface functionalization of porous silicon microcavities on biosensing performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M.; Massif, L.; Estephan, E.; Saab, M.-b.; Cloitre, T.; Larroque, C.; Agarwal, V.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.; Le Lay, G.; Gergely, C.

    2011-10-01

    We study the effect of different surface functionalization methods on the sensing performances of porous silicon (PSi) microcavities when used for detection of biomolecules. Previous research on porous silicon demonstrated versatility of these devices for sensor applications based on their photonic responses. The interface between biological molecules and the Si semiconductor surface is a key issue for improving biomolecular recognition in these devices. PSi microcavities were fabricated to reveal reflectivity pass-band spectra in the visible and near-infrared domain. To assure uniform infiltration of proteins the number of layers of Bragg mirrors was limited to five, the first layer being of high porosity. In one approach the devices were thermally oxidized and functionalized to assure covalent binding of molecules. Secondly, the as etched PSi surface was modified with adhesion peptides isolated via phage display technology and presenting high binding capacity for Si. Functionalization and molecular binding events were monitored via reflectometric interference spectra as shifts in the resonance peaks of the cavity structure due to changes in the refractive index when a biomolecule is attached to the large internal surface of PSi. Improved sensitivity is obtained due to the peptide interface linkers between the PSi and biological molecules compared to the silanized devices. We investigate the formation of peptide-Si interface layer via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  18. Single-molecule nucleic acid interactions monitored on a label-free microcavity biosensor platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaske, Martin D.; Foreman, Matthew R.; Vollmer, Frank

    2014-11-01

    Biosensing relies on the detection of molecules and their specific interactions. It is therefore highly desirable to develop transducers exhibiting ultimate detection limits. Microcavities are an exemplary candidate technology for demonstrating such a capability in the optical domain and in a label-free fashion. Additional sensitivity gains, achievable by exploiting plasmon resonances, promise biosensing down to the single-molecule level. Here, we introduce a biosensing platform using optical microcavity-based sensors that exhibits single-molecule sensitivity and is selective to specific single binding events. Whispering gallery modes in glass microspheres are used to leverage plasmonic enhancements in gold nanorods for the specific detection of nucleic acid hybridization, down to single 8-mer oligonucleotides. Detection of single intercalating small molecules confirms the observation of single-molecule hybridization. Matched and mismatched strands are discriminated by their interaction kinetics. Our platform allows us to monitor specific molecular interactions transiently, hence mitigating the need for high binding affinity and avoiding permanent binding of target molecules to the receptors. Sensor lifetime is therefore increased, allowing interaction kinetics to be statistically analysed.

  19. Tunable open-access microcavities for on-chip cavity quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, C. A.; Melnyk, A.; Ramp, H.; Bitarafan, M. H.; Vick, D.; LeBlanc, L. J.; Davis, J. P.; DeCorby, R. G.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the development of on-chip microcavities and show their potential as a platform for cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. Microcavity arrays were formed by the controlled buckling of SiO2/Ta2O5 Bragg mirrors and exhibit a reflectance-limited finesse of 3500 and mode volumes as small as 35 λ 3 . We show that the cavity resonance can be thermally tuned into alignment with the D2 transition of 87Rb and outline two methods for providing atom access to the cavity. Owing to their small mode volume and high finesse, these cavities exhibit single-atom cooperativities as high as C 1 = 65 . A unique feature of the buckled-dome architecture is that the strong-coupling parameter g 0 / κ is nearly independent of the cavity size. Furthermore, strong coupling should be achievable with only modest improvements in mirror reflectance, suggesting that these monolithic devices could provide a robust and scalable solution to the engineering of light-matter interfaces.

  20. Multiplexed specific label-free detection of NCI-H358 lung cancer cell line lysates with silicon based photonic crystal microcavity biosensors.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Drabkin, Harry A; Gemmill, Robert M; Simon, George R; Chin, Steve H; Chen, Ray T

    2013-05-15

    We experimentally demonstrate label-free photonic crystal (PC) microcavity biosensors in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) to detect the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) transcription factor, ZEB1, in minute volumes of sample. Multiplexed specific detection of ZEB1 in lysates from NCI-H358 lung cancer cells down to an estimated concentration of 2 cells per micro-liter is demonstrated. L13 photonic crystal microcavities, coupled to W1 photonic crystal waveguides, are employed in which resonances show high Q in the bio-ambient phosphate buffered saline (PBS). When the sensor surface is derivatized with a specific antibody, the binding of the corresponding antigen from a complex whole-cell lysate generates a change in refractive index in the vicinity of the photonic crystal microcavity, leading to a change in the resonance wavelength of the resonance modes of the photonic crystal microcavity. The shift in the resonance wavelength reveals the presence of the antigen. The sensor cavity has a surface area of ∼11μm(2). Multiplexed sensors permit simultaneous detection of many binding interactions with specific immobilized antibodies from the same bio-sample at the same instant of time. Specificity was demonstrated using a sandwich assay which further amplifies the detection sensitivity at low concentrations. The device represents a proof-of-concept demonstration of label-free, high throughput, multiplexed detection of cancer cells with specificity and sensitivity on a silicon chip platform.

  1. Multiplexed Specific Label-Free Detection of NCI-H358 Lung Cancer Cell Line Lysates with Silicon Based Photonic Crystal Microcavity Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Drabkin, Harry A.; Gemmill, Robert M.; Simon, George R.; Chin, Steve H.; Chen, Ray T.

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate label-free photonic crystal (PC) microcavity biosensors in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) to detect the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) transcription factor, ZEB1, in minute volumes of sample. Multiplexed specific detection of ZEB1 in lysates from NCI-H358 lung cancer cells down to an estimated concentration of 2 cells per micro-liter is demonstrated. L13 photonic crystal microcavities, coupled to W1 photonic crystal waveguides, are employed in which resonances show high Q in the bio-ambient phosphate buffered saline (PBS). When the sensor surface is derivatized with a specific antibody, the binding of the corresponding antigen from a complex whole-cell lysate generates a change in refractive index in the vicinity of the photonic crystal microcavity, leading to a change in the resonance wavelength of the resonance modes of the photonic crystal microcavity. The shift in the resonance wavelength reveals the presence of the antigen. The sensor cavity has a surface area of ~11 μm2. Multiplexed sensors permit simultaneous detection of many binding interactions with specific immobilized antibodies from the same bio-sample at the same instant of time. Specificity was demonstrated using a sandwich assay which further amplifies the detection sensitivity at low concentrations. The device represents a proof-of-concept demonstration of label-free, high throughput, multiplexed detection of cancer cells with specificity and sensitivity on a silicon chip platform. PMID:23274197

  2. Producing high-quality slash pine seeds

    Treesearch

    James Barnett; Sue Varela

    2003-01-01

    Slash pine is a desirable species. It serves many purposes and is well adapted to poorly drained flatwoods and seasonally flooded areas along the lower Coastal Plain of the Southeastern US. The use of high-quality seeds has been shown to produce uniform seedlings for outplanting, which is key to silvicultural success along the Coastal Plain and elsewhere. We present...

  3. ICP polishing of silicon for high-quality optical resonators on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laliotis, A.; Trupke, M.; Cotter, J. P.; Lewis, G.; Kraft, M.; Hinds, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Miniature concave hollows, made by wet etching silicon through a circular mask, can be used as mirror substrates for building optical micro-cavities on a chip. In this paper, we investigate how inductively coupled plasma (ICP) polishing improves both shape and roughness of the mirror substrates. We characterize the evolution of the surfaces during the ICP polishing using white-light optical profilometry and atomic force microscopy. A surface roughness of 1 nm is reached, which reduces to 0.5 nm after coating with a high reflectivity dielectric. With such smooth mirrors, the optical cavity finesse is now limited by the shape of the underlying mirror.

  4. Full color organic light-emitting devices with microcavity structure and color filter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Hongyu; Sun, Runguang

    2009-05-11

    This letter demonstrated the fabrication of the full color passive matrix organic light-emitting devices based on the combination of the microcavity structure, color filter and a common white polymeric OLED. In the microcavity structure, patterned ITO terraces with different thickness were used as the anode as well as cavity spacer. The primary color emitting peaks were originally generated by the microcavity and then the second resonance peak was absorbed by the color filter.

  5. Detecting single DNA molecule interactions with optical microcavities (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2015-09-01

    as the detection of less than 1 kDa intercalating small molecules[1]. [1] M. D. Baaske, M. R. Foreman, and F. Vollmer, "Single molecule nucleic acid interactions monitored on a label-free microcavity biosensing platform," Nature Nanotechnology, vol. 9, pp. 933-939, 2014. [2] Y. Wu, D. Y. Zhang, P. Yin, and F. Vollmer, "Ultraspecific and Highly Sensitive Nucleic Acid Detection by Integrating a DNA Catalytic Network with a Label-Free Microcavity," Small, vol. 10, pp. 2067-2076, 2014. [3] M. R. Foreman, W.-L. Jin, and F. Vollmer, "Optimizing Detection Limits in Whispering Gallery Mode Biosensing," Optics Express, vol. 22, pp. 5491-5511, 2014. [4] M. A. Santiago-Cordoba, S. V. Boriskina, F. Vollmer, and M. C. Demirel, "Nanoparticle-based protein detection by optical shift of a resonant microcavity," Applied Physics Letters, vol. 99, Aug 2011. [5] M. R. Foreman and F. Vollmer, "Theory of resonance shifts of whispering gallery modes by arbitrary plasmonic nanoparticles," New Journal of Physics, vol. 15, p. 083006, Aug 2013. [6] M. R. Foreman and F. Vollmer "Level repulsion in hybrid photonic-plasmonic microresonators for enhanced biodetection" Phys. Rev. A 88, 023831 (2013).

  6. A low-threshold high-index-contrast grating (HCG)-based organic VCSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayesteh, Mohammad Reza; Darvish, Ghafar; Ahmadi, Vahid

    2015-12-01

    We propose a low-threshold high-index-contrast grating (HCG)-based organic vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (OVCSEL). The device has the feasibility to apply both electrical and optical excitation. The microcavity of the laser is a hybrid photonic crystal (HPC) in which the top distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) is replaced by a sub-wavelength high-contrast-grating layer, and provides a high-quality factor. The simulated quality factor of the microcavity is shown to be as high as 282,000. We also investigate the threshold behavior and the dynamics of the OVCSEL optically pumped with sub-picosecond pulses. Results from numerical simulation show that lasing threshold is 75 nJ/cm2.

  7. Microcavity substrates casted from self-assembled microsphere monolayers for spheroid cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Keyue; Lee, Jungwoo; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids are an important 3-dimensional cell culture model that reflects many key aspects of in vivo microenvironments. This paper presents a scalable, self-assembly based approach for fabricating microcavity substrates for multicellular spheroid cell culture. Hydrophobic glass microbeads were self-assembled into a tightly packed monolayer through the combined actions of surface tension, gravity, and lateral capillary forces at the water-air interface of a polymer solution. The packed bead monolayer was subsequently embedded in the dried polymer layer. The surface was used as a template for replicating microcavity substrates with perfect spherical shapes. We demonstrated the use of the substrate in monitoring the formation process of tumor spheroids, a proof-of-concept scale-up fabrication procedure into standard microplate formats, and its application in testing cancer drug responses in the context of bone marrow stromal cells. The presented technique offers a simple and effective way of forming high-density uniformlysized spheroids without microfabrication equipment for biological and drug screening applications. PMID:24781882

  8. Light-matter interaction in a microcavity-controlled graphene transistor.

    PubMed

    Engel, Michael; Steiner, Mathias; Lombardo, Antonio; Ferrari, Andrea C; Löhneysen, Hilbert V; Avouris, Phaedon; Krupke, Ralph

    2012-06-19

    Graphene has extraordinary electronic and optical properties and holds great promise for applications in photonics and optoelectronics. Demonstrations including high-speed photodetectors, optical modulators, plasmonic devices, and ultrafast lasers have now been reported. More advanced device concepts would involve photonic elements such as cavities to control light-matter interaction in graphene. Here we report the first monolithic integration of a graphene transistor and a planar, optical microcavity. We find that the microcavity-induced optical confinement controls the efficiency and spectral selection of photocurrent generation in the integrated graphene device. A twenty-fold enhancement of photocurrent is demonstrated. The optical cavity also determines the spectral properties of the electrically excited thermal radiation of graphene. Most interestingly, we find that the cavity confinement modifies the electrical transport characteristics of the integrated graphene transistor. Our experimental approach opens up a route towards cavity-quantum electrodynamics on the nanometre scale with graphene as a current-carrying intra-cavity medium of atomic thickness.

  9. Light–matter interaction in a microcavity-controlled graphene transistor

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Michael; Steiner, Mathias; Lombardo, Antonio; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Löhneysen, Hilbert v.; Avouris, Phaedon; Krupke, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Graphene has extraordinary electronic and optical properties and holds great promise for applications in photonics and optoelectronics. Demonstrations including high-speed photodetectors, optical modulators, plasmonic devices, and ultrafast lasers have now been reported. More advanced device concepts would involve photonic elements such as cavities to control light–matter interaction in graphene. Here we report the first monolithic integration of a graphene transistor and a planar, optical microcavity. We find that the microcavity-induced optical confinement controls the efficiency and spectral selection of photocurrent generation in the integrated graphene device. A twenty-fold enhancement of photocurrent is demonstrated. The optical cavity also determines the spectral properties of the electrically excited thermal radiation of graphene. Most interestingly, we find that the cavity confinement modifies the electrical transport characteristics of the integrated graphene transistor. Our experimental approach opens up a route towards cavity-quantum electrodynamics on the nanometre scale with graphene as a current-carrying intra-cavity medium of atomic thickness. PMID:22713748

  10. Microstructured optical fiber-based micro-cavity sensor for chemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongkyun; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang; Chung, Youngjoo

    2014-02-01

    The studies on microstructured optical fibers (MOF) have drawn considerable interest and played an important role in many applications. MOFs provide unique optical properties and controllable modal properties because of their flexibilities on manipulation of the transmission spectrum and the waveguide dispersion properties. MOFs are especially useful for optical sensing applications because the micro-structured air channels in MOF can host various types of analytes such as liquids, gases, and chemical molecules. Recently, many studies have focused on the development of MOF-based optical sensors for various gases and chemical molecules. We propose a compact, and highly sensitive optical micro-cavity chemical sensor using microstructured fiber. The sensor probe is composed of a hollow optical fiber and end cleaved microstructured fiber with a solid core. The interference spectrum resulting from the reflected light at the silica and air interfaces changes when the micro-cavity is infiltrated with external chemical molecules. This structure enables the direct detection of chemical molecules such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) without the introduction of any permeable material.

  11. Applications of Optical Microcavity Resonators in Analytical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wade, James H; Bailey, Ryan C

    2016-06-12

    Optical resonator sensors are an emerging class of analytical technologies that use recirculating light confined within a microcavity to sensitively measure the surrounding environment. Bolstered by advances in microfabrication, these devices can be configured for a wide variety of chemical or biomolecular sensing applications. We begin with a brief description of optical resonator sensor operation, followed by discussions regarding sensor design, including different geometries, choices of material systems, methods of sensor interrogation, and new approaches to sensor operation. Throughout, key developments are highlighted, including advancements in biosensing and other applications of optical sensors. We discuss the potential of alternative sensing mechanisms and hybrid sensing devices for more sensitive and rapid analyses. We conclude with our perspective on the future of optical microcavity sensors and their promise as versatile detection elements within analytical chemistry.

  12. Nonlinear resonance-assisted tunneling induced by microcavity deformation.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hojeong; Shin, Younghoon; Moon, Songky; Lee, Sang-Bum; Yang, Juhee; An, Kyungwon

    2015-03-11

    Noncircular two-dimensional microcavities support directional output and strong confinement of light, making them suitable for various photonics applications. It is now of primary interest to control the interactions among the cavity modes since novel functionality and enhanced light-matter coupling can be realized through intermode interactions. However, the interaction Hamiltonian induced by cavity deformation is basically unknown, limiting practical utilization of intermode interactions. Here we present the first experimental observation of resonance-assisted tunneling in a deformed two-dimensional microcavity. It is this tunneling mechanism that induces strong inter-mode interactions in mixed phase space as their strength can be directly obtained from a separatrix area in the phase space of intracavity ray dynamics. A selection rule for strong interactions is also found in terms of angular quantum numbers. Our findings, applicable to other physical systems in mixed phase space, make the interaction control more accessible.

  13. Nonlinear resonance-assisted tunneling induced by microcavity deformation

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hojeong; Shin, Younghoon; Moon, Songky; Lee, Sang-Bum; Yang, Juhee; An, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    Noncircular two-dimensional microcavities support directional output and strong confinement of light, making them suitable for various photonics applications. It is now of primary interest to control the interactions among the cavity modes since novel functionality and enhanced light-matter coupling can be realized through intermode interactions. However, the interaction Hamiltonian induced by cavity deformation is basically unknown, limiting practical utilization of intermode interactions. Here we present the first experimental observation of resonance-assisted tunneling in a deformed two-dimensional microcavity. It is this tunneling mechanism that induces strong inter-mode interactions in mixed phase space as their strength can be directly obtained from a separatrix area in the phase space of intracavity ray dynamics. A selection rule for strong interactions is also found in terms of angular quantum numbers. Our findings, applicable to other physical systems in mixed phase space, make the interaction control more accessible. PMID:25759322

  14. Strong light-matter coupling in plasmonic microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijian; Xi, Fuchun; Xu, Jie; Qian, Qinbai; Gou, Peng; An, Zhenghua

    2014-11-01

    We numerically study the strong coupling between quantum well (QW) intersubband transitions (ISBT) and the plasmonic resonance of metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) microcavities. In this system, the lowest-order energy state of plasmonic resonance is a hybrid mode of propagating surface plasmons (PSP) and localized surface plasmons (LSP). For a given lowest-order resonance, the mode transformation can be realized between PSP mode and LSP mode by varying the plasmonic microcavity structure, which opens a new freedom to modulate the coupling interaction of light and matter. With the cavity mode transforming from LSP mode to PSP mode, the coupling strength increases from 20.75% to 25.75%, which is mainly dominated by the polarization conversion ratio / of plasmonic modes.

  15. Coupling polariton quantum boxes in sub-wavelength grating microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Zhaorong; Deng, Hui; Brodbeck, Sebastian; Kamp, Martin; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven

    2015-02-02

    We report the construction of decoupled, coupled, and quasi-one dimensional polariton systems from zero dimensional polariton quantum boxes using microcavities with sub-wavelength gratings as the top mirror. By designing the tethering patterns around the suspended sub-wavelength gratings, we control the coupling between individual quantum boxes through different optical potentials. Energy levels and real-space or momentum space distributions of the confined modes were measured, which agreed well with simulations.

  16. Behavior of three modes of decay channels and their self-energies of elliptic dielectric microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyu-Won; Kim, Jaewan; Jeong, Kabgyun

    2016-09-01

    The Lamb shift (self-energy) of an elliptic dielectric microcavity is studied. We show that the size of the Lamb shift, which is a small energy shift due to the system-environment coupling in the quantum regime, is dependent on the geometry of the boundary conditions. It shows a global transition depending on the eccentricity of the ellipsis. These transitions can be classified into three types of decay channels known as whispering-gallery modes, stable-bouncing-ball modes, and unstable-bouncing-ball modes. These modes are manifested through the Poincaré surface of section with the Husimi distribution function in classical phase space. It is found that the similarity (measured in Bhattacharyya distance) between the Husimi distributions below critical lines of two different modes increases as the difference of their self-energies decreases when the quality factors of the modes are on the same order of magnitude.

  17. Design and analysis of photonic crystal micro-cavity based optical sensor platform

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit Kumar Dutta, Hemant Sankar Pal, Suchandan

    2016-04-13

    In this paper, the design of a two-dimensional photonic crystal micro-cavity based integrated-optic sensor platform is proposed. The behaviour of designed cavity is analyzed using two-dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. The structure is designed by deliberately inserting some defects in a photonic crystal waveguide structure. Proposed structure shows a quality factor (Q) of about 1e5 and the average sensitivity of 500nm/RIU in the wavelength range of 1450 – 1580 nm. Sensing technique is based on the detection of shift in upper-edge cut-off wavelength for a reference signal strength of –10 dB in accordance with the change in refractive index of analyte.

  18. Ultra-sensitive chemical vapor detection using micro-cavity photothermal spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Juejun

    2010-10-11

    In this paper, I systematically investigated Micro-Cavity PhotoThermal Spectroscopy (MC-PTS), a novel technique for ultra-sensitive detection of chemical molecular species. I first derive the photothermal enhancement factor and noise characteristics of the technique using a generic theoretical model, followed by numerical analysis of a design example using chalcogenide glass micro-disk cavities. Guidelines for sensor material selection and device design are formulated based on the theoretical insight. The numerical analysis shows that this technique features a record photothermal enhancement factor of 10(4) with respect to conventional cavity-enhanced (multi-pass) infrared absorption spectroscopy, and is capable of detecting non-preconcentrated chemical vapor molecules down to the ppt level with a moderate cavity quality factor of 10(5) and a pump laser power of 0.1 W. Such performance qualifies this technique as one of the most sensitive methods for chemical vapor spectroscopic analysis.

  19. Effect of physisorption and chemisorption of water on resonant modes of rolled-up tubular microcavities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Both blue- and redshifts of resonant modes are observed in the rolled-up Y2O3/ZrO2 tubular microcavity during a conformal oxide coating process. Our investigation based on spectral analyses suggests that there are two competitive processes during coating: desorption of both chemically and physically absorbed water molecules and increase of the tube wall thickness. The redshift is due to the increase of the wall thickness and corresponding light confinement enhancement. On the other hand, desorption of water molecules by heating leads to a blueshift. The balance of these two factors produces the observed bi-directional shift of the modes while they both contribute to promoted quality factor after coating. PMID:24344644

  20. Decreased sleep quality in high myopia children

    PubMed Central

    Ayaki, Masahiko; Torii, Hidemasa; Tsubota, Kazuo; Negishi, Kazuno

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate sleep quality in myopic children and adults. This cross sectional study surveyed 486 participants aged from 10 to 59 years with refractive errors using a questionnaire containing the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Children (< 20 years) in the high myopia group exhibited the poorest PSQI scores (P < 0.01), while the adults showed no such correlations. Subscales of PSQI and HADS in children disclosed that the high myopia groups had the shortest sleep duration (P < 0.01), worst subjective sleep scores (P < 0.001), and latest bedtime (P < 0.05). Regression analyses in children significantly correlated myopic errors with PSQI (P < 0.05), sleep duration (P < 0.01), and bedtime (P < 0.01). Sleep efficacy (P < 0.05) and daytime dysfunction (P < 0.05) were significantly better in contact-lens users compared to the respective non-user groups across all participants. In conclusion, sleep quality in children was significantly correlated with myopic error, with the high myopia group worst affected. PMID:27650408

  1. Lanthanide luminescence enhancements in porous silicon resonant microcavities.

    PubMed

    Jenie, S N Aisyiyah; Pace, Stephanie; Sciacca, Beniamino; Brooks, Robert D; Plush, Sally E; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2014-08-13

    In this paper, the covalent immobilization and luminescence enhancement of a europium (Eu(III)) complex in a porous silicon (pSi) layer with a microcavity (pSiMC) structure are demonstrated. The alkyne-pendant arm of the Eu(III) complex was covalently immobilized on the azide-modified surface via ligand-assisted "click" chemistry. The design parameters of the microcavity were optimized to obtain an efficient luminescence-enhancing device. Luminescence enhancements by a factor of 9.5 and 3.0 were observed for Eu(III) complex bound inside the pSiMC as compared to a single layer and Bragg reflector of identical thickness, respectively, confirming the increased interaction between the immobilized molecules and the electric field in the spacer of the microcavity. When comparing pSiMCs with different resonance wavelength position, luminescence was enhanced when the resonance wavelength overlapped with the maximum emission wavelength of the Eu(III) complex at 614 nm, allowing for effective coupling between the confined light and the emitting molecules. The pSiMC also improved the spectral color purity of the Eu(III) complex luminescence. The ability of a pSiMC to act as an efficient Eu(III) luminescence enhancer, combined with the resulting sharp linelike emission, can be exploited for the development of ultrasensitive optical biosensors.

  2. The Coupling of Zero-Dimensional Exciton and Photon States: A Quantum Dot in a Spherical Microcavity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    the electric 179 180 Microcavity and Photonic Cristal (a) (b) _..•rQ Fig. 1. (a) A schematic diagram of a spherical microcavity with a quantum dot at...core is 2.7 while the refractive indices 182 Microcavity and Photonic Cristal of the layers forming the Bragg reflector are 1.45 and 2.7 and correspond

  3. High quality factor indium oxide mechanical microresonators

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolomé, Javier Cremades, Ana; Piqueras, Javier

    2015-11-09

    The mechanical resonance behavior of as-grown In{sub 2}O{sub 3} microrods has been studied in this work by in-situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) electrically induced mechanical oscillations. Indium oxide microrods grown by a vapor–solid method are naturally clamped to an aluminum oxide ceramic substrate, showing a high quality factor due to reduced energy losses during mechanical vibrations. Quality factors of more than 10{sup 5} and minimum detectable forces of the order of 10{sup −16} N/Hz{sup 1/2} demonstrate their potential as mechanical microresonators for real applications. Measurements at low-vacuum using the SEM environmental operation mode were performed to study the effect of extrinsic damping on the resonators behavior. The damping coefficient has been determined as a function of pressure.

  4. Whispering gallery modes in a spherical microcavity with a photoluminescent shell

    SciTech Connect

    Grudinkin, S. A. Dontsov, A. A.; Feoktistov, N. A.; Baranov, M. A.; Bogdanov, K. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Golubev, V. G.

    2015-10-15

    Whispering-gallery mode spectra in optical microcavities based on spherical silica particles coated with a thin photoluminescent shell of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide are studied. The spectral positions of the whispering-gallery modes for spherical microcavities with a shell are calculated. The dependence of the spectral distance between the TE and TM modes on the shell thickness is examined.

  5. Facile design and stabilization of a novel one-dimensional silicon-based photonic crystal microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Mohamed Shaker; Ibrahim, Shaimaa Moustafa; Amin, Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    A novel silicon-based optical microcavity composed of a defect layer sandwiched between two parallel rugate mirrors is created by the electrochemical anodization of silicon in a hydrofluoric acid-based electrolyte using a precisely controlled current density profile. The profile consists of two sinusoidally modulated current waveforms separated by a fixed current that is applied to produce a defect layer between the mirrors. The spectral response of the rugate-based microcavity is simulated using the transfer matrix method and compared to the conventional Bragg-based microcavity. It is found that the resonance position of both microcavities is unchanged. However, the rugate-based microcavity exhibits a distinct reduction of the sidebands' intensity. Further attenuation of the sidebands' intensity is obtained by creating refractive index matching layers with optimized thickness at the bottom and top of the rugate-based microcavity. In order to stabilize the produced microcavity against natural oxidation, atomic layer deposition of an ultra-thin titanium dioxide layer on the pore wall is carried out followed by thermal annealing. The microcavity resonance position shows an observable sensitivity to the deposition and annealing processes.

  6. Optical trapping of metal-dielectric nanoparticle clusters near photonic crystal microcavities.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Camilo A; Huang, Ningfeng; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2012-09-01

    We predict the formation of optically trapped, metal-dielectric nanoparticle clusters above photonic crystal microcavities. We determine the conditions on particle size and position for a gold particle to be trapped above the microcavity. We then show that strong field redistribution and enhancement near the trapped gold nanoparticle results in secondary trapping sites for a pair of dielectric nanoparticles.

  7. Quality indicators for high acuity pediatric conditions.

    PubMed

    Stang, Antonia S; Straus, Sharon E; Crotts, Jennifer; Johnson, David W; Guttmann, Astrid

    2013-10-01

    Identifying gaps in care and improving outcomes for severely ill children requires the development of evidence-based performance measures. We used a systematic process involving multiple stakeholders to identify and develop evidence-based quality indicators for high acuity pediatric conditions relevant to any emergency department (ED) setting where children are seen. A prioritized list of clinical conditions was selected by an advisory panel. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify existing indicators, as well as guidelines and evidence that could be used to inform the creation of new indicators. A multiphase, Rand-modified Delphi method consisting of anonymous questionnaires and a face-to-face meeting of an expert panel was used for indicator selection. Measure specifications and evidence grading were created for each indicator, and the feasibility and reliability of measurement was assessed in a tertiary care pediatric ED. The conditions selected for indicator development were diabetic ketoacidosis, status asthmaticus, anaphylaxis, status epilepticus, severe head injury, and sepsis. The majority of the 62 selected indicators reflect ED processes (84%) with few indicators reflecting structures (11%) or outcomes (5%). Thirty-seven percent (n = 23) of the selected indicators are based on moderate or high quality evidence. Data were available and interrater reliability acceptable for the majority of indicators. A systematic process involving multiple stakeholders was used to develop evidence-based quality indicators for high acuity pediatric conditions. Future work will test the reliability and feasibility of data collection on these indicators across the spectrum of ED settings that provide care for children.

  8. Production of high quality hydrographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charo, M.; Piola, A. R.

    2016-02-01

    The ocean is the dominant reservoir of heat and carbon in the climate system on time scales from years to centuries. Thus, historical ocean observations are essential to understand the processes that control the variability in environmental conditions and climate on these time scales. High quality observations are essential to address both regional and global problems. Because environmental changes involve a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, and given the high cost of oceanographic surveys, calibration protocols and widely documented procedures are necessary to ensure the highest possible data quality and to preserve the information for future use. Vertical quasi-continuous conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profiles have become the backbone of ocean hydrographic observations. Factory CTD sensor calibrations are not always easy to carry out. Especially in these cases, in situ discrete bottle data are of crucial importance as complementary information of the water column for the analysis of vertical changes in highly variable temperature-salinity structures. This work will address CTD data processing steps and describe the laboratory and field calibrations and the associated documentation required for future users.

  9. Particle trapping and impedance measurement using bilayer electrodes integrated with microcavity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guan-Ting; Liu, Chia-Feng; Jang, Ling-Sheng; Li, Shun-Lai; Wang, Min-Haw

    2017-03-01

    Traditional planar electrodes for single-particle impedance measurement have difficulty in trapping and positioning particles. This paper proposes a microfluidic device for single-particle trapping and impedance measurement with a microcavity configuration. A carbon dioxide (CO2) laser technique was used to fabricate the microcavity structure, which can capture 15 µm diameter particles without requiring additional trapping structures. The measurement electrodes on both sides of the microcavity were fabricated using electroplating and deposition techniques. The advantages of the microcavity structure and electrodes are discussed. The bottom electrode spreads into the microcavity to increase measurement sensitivity and shrink the exit aperture to around 10 µm for particle trapping. The experimental results show that the device successfully captured particles and distinguished the impedance of a particle from that of phosphate-buffered saline solution.

  10. Porous silicon optical microcavity for chemical sensing application using tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardaoui, A.; Bchir, R.; Hamzaoui, H.; Chtourou, R.

    2010-09-01

    The present paper reports the study of a porous silicon based microcavity for a potential chemical sensing application using tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) molecules. Porous silicon based planar microcavity was first designed and fabricated using the electrochemical etching technique. Photoluminescence emission of a single porous silicon layer after immersion in an Alq3 solution was first carried out in order to verify that the Alq3 molecules were bound to the porous surface. A wide green band centered at 519 nm, typical of a nano-structured Alq3 film, was observed. Reflectivity measurements of the porous silicon microcavity were then performed for different aluminum concentrations of the Alq3 solution. The microcavity device showed a good sensibility for the Alq3 molecules and an important shift of the microcavity photonic resonance was observed. This device might be considered for a potential aluminiun sensing application.

  11. A fiber inclinometer using a fiber microtaper with an air-gap microcavity fiber interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhongyao; Gang, Tingting; Hu, Manli; Qiao, Xueguang; Liu, Nan; Rong, Qiangzhou

    2016-04-01

    A micro-inclinometer is proposed and demonstrated experimentally; the device consists of a micro-fiber taper followed by an air-gap microcavity. A part of the core mode can couple to cladding modes via the taper. These cladding modes and residual core modes transmitted to downstream of the Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer. A fraction of these modes are reflected back to the SMF by two surfaces of the FP cavity and eventually recoupled to the leading-in SMF, resulting in a well-defined interference spectrum. The fringe contrast of the interferometer is highly sensitive to fiber bending with direction-independence and thus is capable of measuring tilt angles in high resolution. In addition, the interference wavelength always remains unchanged during the fiber bending.

  12. [Quality management is associated with high quality services in health care].

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Tenna Hassert; Riis, Allan; Mainz, Jan; Jensen, Anne-Louise Degn

    2013-12-09

    In these years, quality management has been the focus in order to meet high quality services for the patients in Danish health care. This article provides information on quality management and quality improvement and it evaluates its effectiveness in achieving better organizational structures, processes and results in Danish health-care organizations. Our findings generally support that quality management is associated with high quality services in health care.

  13. All-optical diode structure based on asymmetrical coupling by a micro-cavity and FP cavity at two sides of photonic crystal waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bin Liu, Yun-Feng; He, Xing-Dao; Jia, Chen

    2016-06-15

    A high efficiency all-optical diode based on photonic crystal (PC) waveguide has been proposed and numerically investigated by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The structure is asymmetrically coupled by a micro-cavity containing nonlinear Kerr medium and a FP cavity at sides of PC waveguide. Because of interference between two cavities, Fano peak and FP peak can both appear in transmission spectra and unidirectional transmission can be achieved. The working wavelength can set between two peaks and near to the Fano peak. For forward launch with suitable light intensity, nonlinear Kerr effect of micro-cavity can been excited. It will result in red shift of Fano peak and achieving forward transmission. But for backward launch, a stronger incidence light is needed to the excite Kerr effect due to the design of asymmetric structure. This design has many advantages, including high maximum transmittance, high transmittance contrast ratio, low power threshold, short response time, and ease of integration.

  14. Strong photoluminescence of the porous silicon with HfO2-filled microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ran; Wu, Zhengran; Du, Xianghao; Han, Zuyin; Sun, Weideng

    2015-06-01

    Greatly enhanced blue emission was observed at room temperature in the single-crystal silicon with HfO2 filled into its microcavities. The broad blue band light was emitted from both the HfO2 dielectric and the porous Si. The ferroelectricity of HfO2 enhances the blue emission from Si by its filling into the microcaivities. At the same time, HfO2 contributes to the light emission for the transitions of the defect levels for oxygen vacancy. The observation of greatly enhanced blue light emission of the porous Si filled with HfO2 dielectric is remarkable as both HfO2 and Si are highly compatible with Si-based electronic industry.

  15. Monolithic single GaN nanowire laser with photonic crystal microcavity on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Junseok; Guo, Wei; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2011-01-01

    Optically pumped lasing at room temperature in a silicon based monolithic single GaN nanowire with a two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavity is demonstrated. Catalyst-free nanowires with low density (˜108 cm-2) are grown on Si by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High resolution transmission electron microscopy images reveal that the nanowires are of wurtzite structure and they have no observable defects. A single nanowire laser fabricated on Si is characterized by a lasing transition at λ =371.3 nm with a linewidth of 0.55 nm. The threshold is observed at a pump power density of ˜120 kW/cm2 and the spontaneous emission factor β is estimated to be 0.08.

  16. Far off-resonant coupling between photonic crystal microcavity and single quantum dot with resonant excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Banihashemi, Mehdi; Ahmadi, Vahid; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Kojima, Takanori; Kojima, Kazunobu; Noda, Susumu

    2013-12-16

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate that with sub-nanowatt coherent s-shell excitation of a single InAs quantum dot, off-resonant coupling of 4.1 nm is possible between L3 photonic crystal microcavity and the quantum dot at 50 K. This resonant excitation reduces strongly the effect of surrounding charges to quantum dot, multiexciton complexes and pure dephasing. It seems that this far off-resonant coupling is the result of increased number of acoustical phonons due to high operating temperature of 50 K. The 4.1 nm detuning is the largest amount for this kind of coupling.

  17. Strong photoluminescence of the porous silicon with HfO{sub 2}-filled microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Ran; Wu, Zhengran; Du, Xianghao; Han, Zuyin; Sun, Weideng

    2015-06-22

    Greatly enhanced blue emission was observed at room temperature in the single-crystal silicon with HfO{sub 2} filled into its microcavities. The broad blue band light was emitted from both the HfO{sub 2} dielectric and the porous Si. The ferroelectricity of HfO{sub 2} enhances the blue emission from Si by its filling into the microcaivities. At the same time, HfO{sub 2} contributes to the light emission for the transitions of the defect levels for oxygen vacancy. The observation of greatly enhanced blue light emission of the porous Si filled with HfO{sub 2} dielectric is remarkable as both HfO{sub 2} and Si are highly compatible with Si-based electronic industry.

  18. Hybrid quantum gates between flying photon and diamond nitrogen-vacancy centers assisted by optical microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Lu Long, Gui

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid quantum gates hold great promise for quantum information processing since they preserve the advantages of different quantum systems. Here we present compact quantum circuits to deterministically implement controlled-NOT, Toffoli, and Fredkin gates between a flying photon qubit and diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers assisted by microcavities. The target qubits of these universal quantum gates are encoded on the spins of the electrons associated with the diamond NV centers and they have long coherence time for storing information, and the control qubit is encoded on the polarizations of the flying photon and can be easily manipulated. Our quantum circuits are compact, economic, and simple. Moreover, they do not require additional qubits. The complexity of our schemes for universal three-qubit gates is much reduced, compared to the synthesis with two-qubit entangling gates. These schemes have high fidelities and efficiencies, and they are feasible in experiment. PMID:26271899

  19. Phase-space views into dye-microcavity thermalized and condensed photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marelic, Jakov; Walker, Benjamin T.; Nyman, Robert A.

    2016-12-01

    We have observed momentum- and position-resolved spectra and images of the photoluminescence from thermalized and condensed dye-microcavity photons. The spectra yield the dispersion relation and the potential energy landscape for the photons. From this dispersion relation, below condensation threshold, we find that the effective mass is that of a bare cavity photon, not a polariton. Above threshold, we place an upper bound on the dimensionless two-dimensional interaction strength of g ˜≲10-3 , which is compatible with existing estimates. Both photon-photon and photon-molecule interactions are weak. The temperature is found to be independent of momentum, but dependent on pump spot size, indicating that the system is ergodic but not perfectly at thermal equilibrium. Condensation always happens first in the mode with lowest potential and lowest kinetic energy, although at very high pump powers multimode condensation occurs into other modes.

  20. Enhancement of second harmonic generation in nanocrystalline SiC films based natural microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. V.; Skorik, S. N.; Jedryka, J.; Ozga, K.; Kityk, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    We explore second harmonic generation (SHG) features of nanocrystalline SiC films based natural microcavities (MC) with resonance modes in the vicinity of the fundamental radiation at 1064 nm wavelength for nanocrystalline films of 24R, 27R polytypes characterized by high radiation doubling frequency coefficients. The natural walls of the SiC NC serve a role of cavities. To learn the nonlinear resonance features of the MC near the fundamental wavelength 1064 nm three series of the nc-SiC films indicated as 7495, 7517 and 7522 with thicknesses varying within 250-600 nm were fabricated. The role of the coherent and non-coherent contributions with taking into an account of cavity resonance modes is discussed. The giant increase of the SHG was achieved which may be used for further fabrication of the frequency transducers and nonlinear optical triggers.

  1. Strong Exciton-Photon Coupling in a Nanographene Filled Microcavity.

    PubMed

    Coles, David M; Chen, Qiang; Flatten, Lucas C; Smith, Jason M; Müllen, Klaus; Narita, Akimitsu; Lidzey, David G

    2017-09-13

    Dibenzo[hi,st]ovalene (DBOV)-a quasi-zero-dimensional "nanographene"-displays strong, narrow, and well-defined optical-absorption transitions at room temperature. On placing a DBOV-doped polymer film into an optical microcavity, we demonstrate strong coupling of the 0 → 0' electronic transition to a confined cavity mode, with a coupling energy of 126 meV. Photoluminescence measurements indicate that the polariton population is distributed at energies approximately coincident with the emission of the DBOV, indicating a polariton population via an optical pumping mechanism.

  2. Faraday rotation in bilayer graphene-based integrated microcavity.

    PubMed

    Da, Hai-Xia; Yan, Xiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Bernal-stacked bilayer graphene has rich ground states with various broken symmetries, allowing the existence of magneto-optical (MO) effects even in the absence of an external magnetic field. Here we report controllable Faraday rotation (FR) of bilayer graphene induced by electrostatic gate voltage, whose value is 10 times smaller than the case of single layer graphene with a magnetic field. A proposed bilayer graphene-based microcavity configuration enables the enhanced FR angle due to the large localized electromagnetic field. Our results offer unique opportunities to apply bilayer graphene for MO devices.

  3. Quantum well in a microcavity with injected squeezed vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Erenso, Daniel; Vyas, Reeta; Singh, Surendra

    2003-01-01

    A quantum well with a single exciton mode in a microcavity driven by squeezed vacuum is studied in the low exciton density regime. By solving the quantum Langevin equations, we study the intensity, spectrum, and intensity correlation function for the fluorescent light. An expression for the Q function of the field inside the cavity is derived from the solutions of the quantum Langevin equations. Using the Q function, the intracavity photon number distribution and the quadrature fluctuations for both the cavity and fluorescent fields are studied. Several interesting and new effects due to squeezed vacuum are found.

  4. Resonant self-pulsations in coupled nonlinear microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Victor; Biancalana, Fabio

    2011-04-15

    A different point of view on the phenomenon of self-pulsations is presented, which shows that they are a balanced state formed by two counteracting processes: beating of modes and bistable switching. A structure based on two coupled nonlinear microcavities provides a generic example of a system with enhanced ability to support this phenomenon. The specific design of such a structure in the form of multilayered media is proposed, and the coupled-mode theory is applied to describe its dynamical properties. It is emphasized that the frequency of self-pulsations is related to the frequency splitting between resonant modes and can be adjusted over a broad range.

  5. Spatiotemporal Chaos Induces Extreme Events in an Extended Microcavity Laser.

    PubMed

    Selmi, F; Coulibaly, S; Loghmari, Z; Sagnes, I; Beaudoin, G; Clerc, M G; Barbay, S

    2016-01-08

    Extreme events such as rogue waves in optics and fluids are often associated with the merging dynamics of coherent structures. We present experimental and numerical results on the physics of extreme event appearance in a spatially extended semiconductor microcavity laser with an intracavity saturable absorber. This system can display deterministic irregular dynamics only, thanks to spatial coupling through diffraction of light. We have identified parameter regions where extreme events are encountered and established the origin of this dynamics in the emergence of deterministic spatiotemporal chaos, through the correspondence between the proportion of extreme events and the dimension of the strange attractor.

  6. Stable single-wavelength emission from fully chaotic microcavity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunada, Satoshi; Fukushima, Takehiro; Shinohara, Susumu; Harayama, Takahisa; Adachi, Masaaki

    2013-07-01

    We experimentally and numerically show that single-wavelength emission can be stably observed for a fully chaotic microcavity laser with a stadium shape under continuous wave condition. The emission pattern is asymmetric with respect to the symmetry axes of the laser cavity, and it cannot be explained by a single cavity mode. On the basis of numerical analysis, we interpret such a lasing as the result of frequency-locking interaction among several low-loss cavity modes. Moreover, we experimentally investigate the optical spectral properties of the laser under pulsed-pumping condition, and discuss the pulse-width dependence on the number of lasing modes.

  7. Scarred resonances and steady probability distribution in a chaotic microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo-Young; Rim, Sunghwan; Kim, Chil-Min; Ryu, Jung-Wan; Kwon, Tae-Yoon

    2005-12-15

    We investigate scarred resonances of a stadium-shaped chaotic microcavity. It is shown that two components with different chirality of the scarring pattern are slightly rotated in opposite ways from the underlying unstable periodic orbit, when the incident angles of the scarring pattern are close to the critical angle for total internal reflection. In addition, the correspondence of emission pattern with the scarring pattern disappears when the incident angles are much larger than the critical angle. The steady probability distribution gives a consistent explanation about these interesting phenomena and makes it possible to expect the emission pattern in the latter case.

  8. Method for synthesis of high quality graphene

    DOEpatents

    Lanzara, Alessandra [Piedmont, CA; Schmid, Andreas K [Berkeley, CA; Yu, Xiaozhu [Berkeley, CA; Hwang, Choonkyu [Albany, CA; Kohl, Annemarie [Beneditkbeuern, DE; Jozwiak, Chris M [Oakland, CA

    2012-03-27

    A method is described herein for the providing of high quality graphene layers on silicon carbide wafers in a thermal process. With two wafers facing each other in close proximity, in a first vacuum heating stage, while maintained at a vacuum of around 10.sup.-6 Torr, the wafer temperature is raised to about 1500.degree. C., whereby silicon evaporates from the wafer leaving a carbon rich surface, the evaporated silicon trapped in the gap between the wafers, such that the higher vapor pressure of silicon above each of the wafers suppresses further silicon evaporation. As the temperature of the wafers is raised to about 1530.degree. C. or more, the carbon atoms self assemble themselves into graphene.

  9. Spoked-ring microcavities: enabling seamless integration of nanophotonics in unmodified advanced CMOS microelectronics chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Mark T.; Shainline, Jeffrey M.; Orcutt, Jason S.; Ram, Rajeev J.; Stojanovic, Vladimir; Popovic, Milos A.

    2014-03-01

    We present the spoked-ring microcavity, a nanophotonic building block enabling energy-efficient, active photonics in unmodified, advanced CMOS microelectronics processes. The cavity is realized in the IBM 45nm SOI CMOS process - the same process used to make many commercially available microprocessors including the IBM Power7 and Sony Playstation 3 processors. In advanced SOI CMOS processes, no partial etch steps and no vertical junctions are available, which limits the types of optical cavities that can be used for active nanophotonics. To enable efficient active devices with no process modifications, we designed a novel spoked-ring microcavity which is fully compatible with the constraints of the process. As a modulator, the device leverages the sub-100nm lithography resolution of the process to create radially extending p-n junctions, providing high optical fill factor depletion-mode modulation and thereby eliminating the need for a vertical junction. The device is made entirely in the transistor active layer, low-loss crystalline silicon, which eliminates the need for a partial etch commonly used to create ridge cavities. In this work, we present the full optical and electrical design of the cavity including rigorous mode solver and FDTD simulations to design the Qlimiting electrical contacts and the coupling/excitation. We address the layout of active photonics within the mask set of a standard advanced CMOS process and show that high-performance photonic devices can be seamlessly monolithically integrated alongside electronics on the same chip. The present designs enable monolithically integrated optoelectronic transceivers on a single advanced CMOS chip, without requiring any process changes, enabling the penetration of photonics into the microprocessor.

  10. Vertical Single-Crystalline Organic Nanowires on Graphene: Solution-Phase Epitaxy and Optical Microcavities.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian-Yao; Xu, Hongjun; Wang, Jing Jing; Winters, Sinéad; Motta, Carlo; Karademir, Ertuğrul; Zhu, Weigang; Varrla, Eswaraiah; Duesberg, Georg S; Sanvito, Stefano; Hu, Wenping; Donegan, John F

    2016-08-10

    Vertically aligned nanowires (NWs) of single crystal semiconductors have attracted a great deal of interest in the past few years. They have strong potential to be used in device structures with high density and with intriguing optoelectronic properties. However, fabricating such nanowire structures using organic semiconducting materials remains technically challenging. Here we report a simple procedure for the synthesis of crystalline 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl) anthracene (BPEA) NWs on a graphene surface utilizing a solution-phase van der Waals (vdW) epitaxial strategy. The wires are found to grow preferentially in a vertical direction on the surface of graphene. Structural characterization and first-principles ab initio simulations were performed to investigate the epitaxial growth and the molecular orientation of the BPEA molecules on graphene was studied, revealing the role of interactions at the graphene-BPEA interface in determining the molecular orientation. These free-standing NWs showed not only efficient optical waveguiding with low loss along the NW but also confinement of light between the two end facets of the NW forming a microcavity Fabry-Pérot resonator. From an analysis of the optical dispersion within such NW microcavities, we observed strong slowing of the waveguided light with a group velocity reduced to one-tenth the speed of light. Applications of the vertical single-crystalline organic NWs grown on graphene will benefit from a combination of the unique electronic properties and flexibility of graphene and the tunable optical and electronic properties of organic NWs. Therefore, these vertical organic NW arrays on graphene offer the potential for realizing future on-chip light sources.

  11. Vertically aligned rolled-up SiO2 optical microcavities in add-drop configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttner, Stefan; Li, Shilong; Jorgensen, Matthew R.; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2013-06-01

    A significant step towards integrated vertically rolled-up microcavities is demonstrated by interfacing an as-fabricated SiO2 microtube optical ring resonator with tapered fibers. In this transmission configuration, resonant filtering of optical signals at telecommunication wavelengths is shown in subwavelength thick walled microcavities. Moreover, we present a four-port add-drop filter based on a lifted doubly interfaced vertically rolled-up microcavity. Our work opens opportunities for vertical resonant light transfer in 3D multi-level optical data processing as well as for massively parallel optofluidic analysis of biomaterials in lab-on-a-chip systems.

  12. Composite modulation of Fano resonance in plasmonic microstructures by electric-field and microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Wu, Chenyun; Yang, Hong; Hu, Xiaoyong Gong, Qihuang

    2014-11-03

    Composite modulation of Fano resonance by using electric-field and microcavity simultaneously is realized in a plasmonic microstructure, which consists of a gold nanowire grating inserted into a Fabry-Perot microcavity composited of a liquid crystal layer sandwiched between two indium tin oxide layers. The Fano resonance wavelength varies with the applied voltage and the microcavity resonance. A large shift of 48 nm in the Fano resonance wavelength is achieved when the applied voltage is 20 V. This may provide a new way for the study of multi-functional integrated photonic circuits and chips based on plasmonic microstructures.

  13. Directional emission from dye-functionalized plasmonic DNA superlattice microcavities.

    PubMed

    Park, Daniel J; Ku, Jessie C; Sun, Lin; Lethiec, Clotilde M; Stern, Nathaniel P; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2017-01-17

    Three-dimensional plasmonic superlattice microcavities, made from programmable atom equivalents comprising gold nanoparticles functionalized with DNA, are used as a testbed to study directional light emission. DNA-guided nanoparticle colloidal crystallization allows for the formation of micrometer-scale single-crystal body-centered cubic gold nanoparticle superlattices, with dye molecules coupled to the DNA strands that link the particles together, in the form of a rhombic dodecahedron. Encapsulation in silica allows one to create robust architectures with the plasmonically active particles and dye molecules fixed in space. At the micrometer scale, the anisotropic rhombic dodecahedron crystal habit couples with photonic modes to give directional light emission. At the nanoscale, the interaction between the dye dipoles and surface plasmons can be finely tuned by coupling the dye molecules to specific sites of the DNA particle-linker strands, thereby modulating dye-nanoparticle distance (three different positions are studied). The ability to control dye position with subnanometer precision allows one to systematically tune plasmon-excition interaction strength and decay lifetime, the results of which have been supported by electrodynamics calculations that span length scales from nanometers to micrometers. The unique ability to control surface plasmon/exciton interactions within such superlattice microcavities will catalyze studies involving quantum optics, plasmon laser physics, strong coupling, and nonlinear phenomena.

  14. Raman discrimination of bacterial strains using multilayered microcavity substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shiv K.; Dykes, Ava C.; Misra, Anupam K.; Kamemoto, Lori E.; Bates, David E.

    2011-05-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) utilizing colloidal silver and gold has been demonstrated to provide a rapid means of measuring the Raman spectra of microorganisms in the fingerprint region. In this study, we have introduced microcavity substrates coated with alternating layers of silver and gold thin films for measuring the Raman spectra of four strains of E. coli. These microcavitiy substrates have been prepared by placing glass microspheres between two polished aluminum substrates and pressing them together using a standard lab press. After removing the glass microspheres from the substrates, the substrates have been coated with 15 to 70 nm thick films of chromium, silver and gold in a precise order. The cavities were evaluated for SERS enhancement by measuring Raman spectra of dilute rhodamine 6G (R6G) down to 10-8 M. With these microcavities, we have investigated the SERS spectra of four chemically competent strains of E. coli (One Shot OmniMAX 2-T1, Mach1-T1, Stbl3, and TOP10). Replicate SERS spectra of all the four e-coli strains show excellent reproducibility. Visual examination of the spectra, however, reveals differences in the spectra of these strains. To confirm this observation, we have used multivariate analysis for positive identification and discrimination between the strains.

  15. Directional emission from dye-functionalized plasmonic DNA superlattice microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Park, Daniel J.; Ku, Jessie C.; Sun, Lin; Lethiec, Clotilde M.; Stern, Nathaniel P.; Schatz, George C.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional plasmonic superlattice microcavities, made from programmable atom equivalents comprising gold nanoparticles functionalized with DNA, are used as a testbed to study directional light emission. DNA-guided nanoparticle colloidal crystallization allows for the formation of micrometer-scale single-crystal body-centered cubic gold nanoparticle superlattices, with dye molecules coupled to the DNA strands that link the particles together, in the form of a rhombic dodecahedron. Encapsulation in silica allows one to create robust architectures with the plasmonically active particles and dye molecules fixed in space. At the micrometer scale, the anisotropic rhombic dodecahedron crystal habit couples with photonic modes to give directional light emission. At the nanoscale, the interaction between the dye dipoles and surface plasmons can be finely tuned by coupling the dye molecules to specific sites of the DNA particle-linker strands, thereby modulating dye–nanoparticle distance (three different positions are studied). The ability to control dye position with subnanometer precision allows one to systematically tune plasmon–excition interaction strength and decay lifetime, the results of which have been supported by electrodynamics calculations that span length scales from nanometers to micrometers. The unique ability to control surface plasmon/exciton interactions within such superlattice microcavities will catalyze studies involving quantum optics, plasmon laser physics, strong coupling, and nonlinear phenomena. PMID:28053232

  16. Multiplexed refractive index-based sensing using optical fiber microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren-Smith, Stephen C.; André, Ricardo M.; Dellith, Jan; Bartelt, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Optical fibers are promising tools for performing biological and biomedical sensing due to their small cross section and potential for multiplexing. In particular, fabricating ultra-small sensing devices is of increasing interest for measuring biological material such as cells. A promising direction is the use of interferometric techniques combined with optical fiber post-processing. In this work we present recent progress in the development of Fabry-Perot micro-cavities written into optical fiber tapers using focused ion beam (FIB) milling. We first demonstrate that FIB milled optical fiber microcavities are sensitive enough to measure polyelectrolyte layer deposition. We then present new results on the fabrication and optical characterization of serially-multiplexed dual cavity micro-sensors. Two cavities were written serially along the fiber with two different cavity lengths, producing a total of four reflecting surfaces and thus six possible interferometric pairs/cavities. By using fast Fourier transform it is possible to obtain de-multiplexed measurements for each cavity. This will be particularly important for bioassays where positive and negative controls are required to be measured within close spatial proximity.

  17. Plasmonic improvement of microcavity biomedical sensor spectroscopic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Saetchnikov, Anton V.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas; Ghadiri, Reza

    2014-03-01

    New opportunity to improve a sensetivity of a label-free biomolecule detection in sensing systems based on microcavity evanescent wave optical sensors has been recently found and is being under intensive development. Novel technique based on combination of optical resonance on microring structures with plasmon resonance. Recently developed tools based on neural network data processing can realize real-time identification of biological agents. So combining advantages of plasmon enhancing optical microcavity resonance with identification tools can give a new platform for ulta sensitive label-free biomedical sensor. Our developed technique used standard glass and polymer microspheres as sensetive elements. They are fixed in the solution flow by adhesive layer on the surface being in the field of evanescence wave. Sensitive layer have been treated by gold nanoparticel (GN) solution. Another technique used thin film gold layers deposited on the substrate below adhesive. The light from a tuneable diode laser is coupled into the microsphere through a prism and was sharply focussed on the single microsphere. Images were recorded by CMOS camera. Normalized by free spectral range resonance shift of whispering gallery mode (WGM) and a relative efficiency of their excitation were used as input data for biomolecule classification. Both biomolecules and NP injection was obtained caused WGM spectra modification. But after NP treatment spectral shift and intensity of WGM resonances in biomolecule solutions increased. WGM resonances in microspheres fixed on substrate with gold layer with optimized layer thickness in biomolecule solutions also had higher intensity and spectra modification then without gold layer.

  18. Principles for high-quality, high-value testing.

    PubMed

    Power, Michael; Fell, Greg; Wright, Michael

    2013-02-01

    A survey of doctors working in two large NHS hospitals identified over 120 laboratory tests, imaging investigations and investigational procedures that they considered not to be overused. A common suggestion in this survey was that more training was required. And, this prompted the development of a list of core principles for high-quality, high-value testing. The list can be used as a framework for training and as a reference source. The core principles are: (1) Base testing practices on the best available evidence. (2) Apply the evidence on test performance with careful judgement. (3) Test efficiently. (4) Consider the value (and affordability) of a test before requesting it. (5) Be aware of the downsides and drivers of overdiagnosis. (6) Confront uncertainties. (7) Be patient-centred in your approach. (8) Consider ethical issues. (9) Be aware of normal cognitive limitations and biases when testing. (10) Follow the 'knowledge journey' when teaching and learning these core principles.

  19. Homoepitaxial nonpolar (10-10) ZnO/ZnMgO monolithic microcavities: Towards reduced photonic disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Zuniga-Perez, J. Kappei, L.; Deparis, C.; Chenot, S.; Leroux, M.; Reveret, F.; Jamadi, O.; Leymarie, J.; Grundmann, M.; Prado, E. de

    2016-06-20

    Nonpolar ZnO/ZnMgO-based optical microcavities have been grown on (10-10) m-plane ZnO substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Reflectivity measurements indicate an exponential increase of the cavity quality factor with the number of layers in the distributed Bragg reflectors. Most importantly, microreflectivity spectra recorded with a spot size in the order of 2 μm show a negligible photonic disorder (well below 1 meV), leading to local quality factors equivalent to those obtained by macroreflectivity. The anisotropic character of the nonpolar heterostructures manifests itself both in the surface features, elongated parallel to the in-plane c direction, and in the optical spectra, with two cavity modes being observed at different energies for orthogonal polarizations.

  20. Integrating Quality into the Textile and Apparel High School Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Deborah J. C.; Kadolph, Sara J.; Cosbey, Sarah; Hillery, Julie; Haar, Sherry; Day, Marla; Keiser, Sandra; Brandes, Kendra

    2001-01-01

    Explains the importance of quality assurance in high school textiles and apparel instruction. Describes educational activities that integrate quality assurance concepts (teamwork, continuous improvement, customer focus, and empowerment). (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  1. Light diffusing effects of nano and micro-structures on OLED with microcavity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Doo-Hee; Shin, Jin-Wook; Joo, Chul Woong; Lee, Jonghee; Park, Seung Koo; Moon, Jaehyun; Cho, Nam Sung; Chu, Hye Yong; Lee, Jeong-Ik

    2014-10-20

    We examined the light diffusing effects of nano and micro-structures on microcavity designed OLEDs. The results of FDTD simulations and experiments showed that the pillar shaped nano-structure was more effective than the concave micro-structure for light diffusing of microcavity OLEDs. The sharp luminance distribution of the microcavity OLED was changed to near Lambertian luminance distribution by the nano-structure, and light diffusing effects increased with the height of the nano-structure. Furthermore, the nano-structure has advantages including light extraction of the substrate mode, reproducibility of manufacturing process, and minimizing pixel blur problems in an OLED display panel. The nano-structure is a promising candidate for a light diffuser, resolving the viewing angle problems in microcavity OLEDs.

  2. Optical devices and methods employing nanoparticles, microcavities, and semicontinuous metal films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Robert L. (Inventor); Shalaev, Vladimir M. (Inventor); Smith, Harold V. (Inventor); Sarychev, Andrey K. (Inventor); Ying, Z. Charles (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An optical sensing enhancing material (and corresponding method of making) comprising: a medium, the medium comprising a plurality of aggregated nanoparticles comprising fractals; and a microcavity, wherein the medium is located in a vicinity of the microcavity. Also an optical sensor and sensing method comprising: providing a doped medium, the medium comprising a plurality of aggregated nanoparticles comprising fractals, with the material; locating the doped medium in the vicinity of a microcavity; exciting the doped medium with a light source; and detecting light reflected from the doped medium. Also an optical sensing enhancing material comprising a medium, the medium comprising a semicontinuous metal film of randomly distributed metal particles and their clusters at approximately their percolation threshold. The medium preferably additionally comprises a microcavity/microresonator. Also devices and methods employing such material.

  3. Raman scattering enhancement in photon-plasmon resonance mediated metal-dielectric microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Guddala, Sriram; Narayana Rao, D. E-mail: dnrsp@uohyd.ernet.in; Dwivedi, Vindesh K.; Vijaya Prakash, G.

    2013-12-14

    Here, we report the photon-plasmon interaction scheme and enhanced field strengths resulted into the amplification of phonon in a novel microcavity. A metal-dielectric microcavity, with unified cavity photonic mode and localized surface plasmon resonances, is visualized by impregnating the gold nanoparticles into the deep see-through nano-sized pores of porous silicon microcavity. The intense optical field strengths resulting from the photon-plasmon interactions are probed by both resonant and non-resonant Raman scattering experiments. Due to photon-plasmon-phonon interaction mechanism, several orders of enhancement in the intensity of scattered Raman Stokes photon (at 500 cm{sup −1}) are observed. Our metal nanoparticle-microcavity hybrid system shows the potential to improve the sensing figure of merit as well as the applications of plasmonics for optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and related technologies.

  4. Microcavity design for low threshold polariton condensation with ultrashort optical pulse excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Poellmann, C.; Leierseder, U.; Huber, R.; Galopin, E.; Lemaître, A.; Amo, A.; Bloch, J.; Ménard, J.-M.

    2015-05-28

    We present a microcavity structure with a shifted photonic stop-band to enable efficient non-resonant injection of a polariton condensate with spectrally broad femtosecond pulses. The concept is demonstrated theoretically and confirmed experimentally for a planar GaAs/AlGaAs multilayer heterostructure pumped with ultrashort near-infrared pulses while photoluminescence is collected to monitor the optically injected polariton density. As the excitation wavelength is scanned, a regime of polariton condensation can be reached in our structure at a consistently lower fluence threshold than in a state-of-the-art conventional microcavity. Our microcavity design improves the polariton injection efficiency by a factor of 4, as compared to a conventional microcavity design, when broad excitation pulses are centered at a wavelength of λ = 740 nm. Most remarkably, this improvement factor reaches 270 when the excitation wavelength is centered at 750 nm.

  5. Synchronous characterization of semiconductor microcavity laser beam.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Lippi, G L

    2015-06-01

    We report on a high-resolution double-channel imaging method used to synchronously map the intensity- and optical-frequency-distribution of a laser beam in the plane orthogonal to the propagation direction. The synchronous measurement allows us to show that the laser frequency is an inhomogeneous distribution below threshold, but that it becomes homogeneous across the fundamental Gaussian mode above threshold. The beam's tails deviations from the Gaussian shape, however, are accompanied by sizeable fluctuations in the laser wavelength, possibly deriving from manufacturing details and from the influence of spontaneous emission in the very low intensity wings. In addition to the synchronous spatial characterization, a temporal analysis at any given point in the beam cross section is carried out. Using this method, the beam homogeneity and spatial shape, energy density, energy center, and the defects-related spectrum can also be extracted from these high-resolution pictures.

  6. Synchronous characterization of semiconductor microcavity laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T. Lippi, G. L.

    2015-06-15

    We report on a high-resolution double-channel imaging method used to synchronously map the intensity- and optical-frequency-distribution of a laser beam in the plane orthogonal to the propagation direction. The synchronous measurement allows us to show that the laser frequency is an inhomogeneous distribution below threshold, but that it becomes homogeneous across the fundamental Gaussian mode above threshold. The beam’s tails deviations from the Gaussian shape, however, are accompanied by sizeable fluctuations in the laser wavelength, possibly deriving from manufacturing details and from the influence of spontaneous emission in the very low intensity wings. In addition to the synchronous spatial characterization, a temporal analysis at any given point in the beam cross section is carried out. Using this method, the beam homogeneity and spatial shape, energy density, energy center, and the defects-related spectrum can also be extracted from these high-resolution pictures.

  7. Developing high quality low cost healthcare goods.

    PubMed

    Fox, Stephen

    2002-06-01

    The quality and cost of healthcare is a major concern in both Britain and America. Yet, despite much debate and many initiatives, the provision of healthcare is often unreliable and expensive (Goldsmith, 2001). In this article by Dr Stephen Fox, it is proposed that wider application of design methodologies during the development of healthcare goods could make a significant contribution to increasing quality and reducing costs.

  8. Exciton-like electromagnetic excitations in non-ideal microcavity supercrystals.

    PubMed

    Rumyantsev, Vladimir; Fedorov, Stanislav; Gumennyk, Kostyantyn; Sychanova, Marina; Kavokin, Alexey

    2014-11-06

    We study localized photonic excitations in a quasi-two-dimensional non-ideal binary microcavity lattice with use of the virtual crystal approximation. The effect of point defects (vacancies) on the excitation spectrum is investigated by numerical modelling. We obtain the dispersion and the energy gap of the electromagnetic excitations which may be considered as Frenkel exciton-like quasiparticles and analyze the dependence of their density of states on the defect concentrations in a microcavity supercrystal.

  9. Local observation and spectroscopy of optical modes in an active photonic-crystal microcavity.

    PubMed

    Louvion, N; Gérard, D; Mouette, J; de Fornel, F; Seassal, C; Letartre, X; Rahmani, A; Callard, S

    2005-03-25

    We report the direct, room-temperature, near-field mapping and spectroscopy of the optical modes of a photonic-crystal microcavity containing quantum wells. We use a near-field optical probe to reveal the imprint of the cavity mode structure on the quantum-well emission. Furthermore, near-field spectroscopy allows us to demonstrate the strong spatial and spectral dependence of the coupling between the sources and the microcavity. This knowledge will be essential in devising future nanophotonic devices.

  10. Exciton-like electromagnetic excitations in non-ideal microcavity supercrystals

    PubMed Central

    Rumyantsev, Vladimir; Fedorov, Stanislav; Gumennyk, Kostyantyn; Sychanova, Marina; Kavokin, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    We study localized photonic excitations in a quasi-two-dimensional non-ideal binary microcavity lattice with use of the virtual crystal approximation. The effect of point defects (vacancies) on the excitation spectrum is investigated by numerical modelling. We obtain the dispersion and the energy gap of the electromagnetic excitations which may be considered as Frenkel exciton-like quasiparticles and analyze the dependence of their density of states on the defect concentrations in a microcavity supercrystal. PMID:25374150

  11. Cooling and Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Electronically-Excited He2 in a Supersonic Microcavity Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Rui; Mironov, Andrey; Houlahan, Thomas, Jr.; Eden, J. Gary; LaboratoryOptical Physics; Engineering Team

    2016-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) resulting from transitions between different electronic states of helium dimers generated within a microcavity plasma jet was studied with rotational resolution. In particular, the d3Σu+ , e3Πg and f3Σu+ states, all having electronic energies above 24 eV, are populated by a microplasma in 4 bar of helium gas and rotationally cooled through supersonic expansion. Analysis of two dimensional maps (spectrograms) of dimer emission spectra as a function of distance from the nozzle orifice indicates collisional coupling during the expansion between the lowest rotational levels of the e3Πg , f3Σu+ states and high rotational levels (around N=11) of the d3Σu+ state (all of which are in the v = 0 vibrational state). In an attempt to verify the coupling, a scanning dye laser (centered near 596 nm) pumps the b3Πg -> f3Σu+ transition of the molecule several hundred micrometers downstream of the nozzle. As a result, the emission intensities of relevant rotational lines are observed to be enhanced. This research shows the potential of utilizing microcavity plasma jets as a tool to study and manipulate the collisional dynamics of highly-excited diatomic molecules.

  12. Fabrication of InAs quantum dots in AlAs/GaAs DBR pillar microcavities for single photon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Bingyang; Solomon, Glenn S.; Pelton, Matthew; Plant, Jocelyn; Santori, Charles; Vuckovic, Jelena; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2005-04-01

    We report the molecular beam epitaxy growth of low-density strain-induced InAs quantum dots (QD) embedded in an AlAs/GaAs distributed Bragg reflector structure for a triggered photon source. By optimal selection of growth temperature, InAs deposited thickness and other experimental parameters, it is possible to grow low density (10/{mu}m{sup 2}) InAs quantum dots with a suitable emission wavelength for a triggered photon source. The empirical formulas for the refractive indices of AlAs and GaAs materials at high temperature over a wide wavelength range are constructed by combining high resolution x-ray diffraction, dynamic optical reflectivity, and optical reflectivity spectrum techniques. Utilizing the electron-beam lithography and electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma etching techniques, a micropost microcavity with the top diameter of 0.6 {mu}m and the post height of 4.2 {mu}m has been fabricated. Narrow, spectrally limited single QD emission embedded in a micropost microcavity is observed in the photoluminescence.

  13. Simple and rapid CD4 testing based on large-field imaging system composed of microcavity array and two-dimensional photosensor.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Tatsuya; Sugamura, Yuriko; Hosokawa, Masahito; Yoshino, Tomoko; Lim, Tae-Kyu; Harada, Manabu; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2015-05-15

    This study presents a novel method for CD4 testing based on one-shot large-field imaging. The large-field imaging system was fabricated by a microcavity array and a two-dimensional (2D) photosensor within the desk-top-sized instrument. The microcavity array was employed to separate leukocytes from whole blood based on differences in the size of leukocytes and other blood cells. The large-field imaging system with lower side irradiation enabled acquisition of cell signatures with high signal-to-noise ratio, because the metallic substrate of the microcavity array obstructed excessive excitation light. In this setting, dual-color imaging of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells was achieved within the entire image area (64 mm(2)) in 2s. The practical performance of the large-field imaging system was demonstrated by determining the CD4/CD8 ratio in a few microliter of control whole blood as small as those obtained by a finger prick. The CD4/CD8 ratios measured using the large-field imaging system correlated well with those measured by microscopic analysis. These results indicate that our proposed system provides a simple and rapid CD4 testing for the application of HIV/AIDS treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. High Efficiency, Illumination Quality OLEDs for Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Shiang; James Cella; Kelly Chichak; Anil Duggal; Kevin Janora; Chris Heller; Gautam Parthasarathy; Jeffery Youmans; Joseph Shiang

    2008-03-31

    The goal of the program was to demonstrate a 45 lumen per watt white light device based upon the use of multiple emission colors through the use of solution processing. This performance level is a dramatic extension of the team's previous 15 LPW large area illumination device. The fundamental material system was based upon commercial polymer materials. The team was largely able to achieve these goals, and was able to deliver to DOE a 90 lumen illumination source that had an average performance of 34 LPW a 1000 cd/m{sup 2} with peak performances near 40LPW. The average color temperature is 3200K and the calculated CRI 85. The device operated at a brightness of approximately 1000cd/m{sup 2}. The use of multiple emission colors particularly red and blue, provided additional degrees of design flexibility in achieving white light, but also required the use of a multilayered structure to separate the different recombination zones and prevent interconversion of blue emission to red emission. The use of commercial materials had the advantage that improvements by the chemical manufacturers in charge transport efficiency, operating life and material purity could be rapidly incorporated without the expenditure of additional effort. The program was designed to take maximum advantage of the known characteristics of these material and proceeded in seven steps. (1) Identify the most promising materials, (2) assemble them into multi-layer structures to control excitation and transport within the OLED, (3) identify materials development needs that would optimize performance within multilayer structures, (4) build a prototype that demonstrates the potential entitlement of the novel multilayer OLED architecture (5) integrate all of the developments to find the single best materials set to implement the novel multilayer architecture, (6) further optimize the best materials set, (7) make a large area high illumination quality white OLED. A photo of the final deliverable is shown. In

  15. Observation of optically induced transparency in a micro-cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuanlin; Cao, Jianjun; Wan, Wenjie

    2016-03-01

    We report on the observation of optically induced transparency (OIT) in a compact microresonator in an ambient environment by introducing a four-wave mixing gain to nonlinearly couple two separated resonances of the micro-cavity. Its optical-controlling capacity and non-reciprocity characteristics at the transparency windows are also demonstrated. Active-controlling of the OIT can be achieved by varying a strong pump beam, while a small frequency-detuning of the pump can lead to a Fano-like asymmetric resonance justifying the interference nature of OIT. Furthermore, OIT observed here is a non-reciprocal one, since FWM gain is a unidirectional one owing to the conservation law of momentum.

  16. Optical switching of polariton density patterns in a semiconductor microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, N. H.; Tsang, C. Y.; Luk, Samuel M. H.; Tse, Y. C.; Chan, Chris K. P.; Lewandowski, P.; Leung, P. T.; Schumacher, Stefan; Binder, R.

    2017-03-01

    Phase-conjugate scattering can trigger modulational instabilities in a fluid of exciton-polaritons created in a pumped semiconductor quantum-well microcavity. These instabilities can settle into density patterns, e.g. hexagons and stripes, which produce corresponding patterns in the emitted light. The density patterns can be switched by relatively weak control optical beams. This paper reviews progress in our theoretical understanding of the physical processes that regulate the competitions among various patterns and drive the optical switching. Simulation results of pattern switching using a microscopic model of polariton dynamics are shown, and the mechanisms underlying competitions and switching are analyzed using reduced models that restrict the polariton motions to a limited number of relevant modes. We also briefly indicate the effects of the spin dependence of the polariton dynamics on the patterns.

  17. On-Chip Optical Nonreciprocity Using an Active Microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaoshun; Yang, Chao; Wu, Hongya; Hua, Shiyue; Chang, Long; Ding, Yang; Hua, Qian; Xiao, Min

    2016-12-01

    Optically nonreciprocal devices provide critical functionalities such as light isolation and circulation in integrated photonic circuits for optical communications and information processing, but have been difficult to achieve. By exploring gain-saturation nonlinearity, we demonstrate on-chip optical nonreciprocity with excellent isolation performance within telecommunication wavelengths using only one toroid microcavity. Compatible with current complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor process, our compact and simple scheme works for a very wide range of input power levels from ~10 microwatts down to ~10 nanowatts, and exhibits remarkable properties of one-way light transport with sufficiently low insertion loss. These superior features make our device become a promising critical building block indispensable for future integrated nanophotonic networks.

  18. On-Chip Optical Nonreciprocity Using an Active Microcavity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoshun; Yang, Chao; Wu, Hongya; Hua, Shiyue; Chang, Long; Ding, Yang; Hua, Qian; Xiao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Optically nonreciprocal devices provide critical functionalities such as light isolation and circulation in integrated photonic circuits for optical communications and information processing, but have been difficult to achieve. By exploring gain-saturation nonlinearity, we demonstrate on-chip optical nonreciprocity with excellent isolation performance within telecommunication wavelengths using only one toroid microcavity. Compatible with current complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor process, our compact and simple scheme works for a very wide range of input power levels from ~10 microwatts down to ~10 nanowatts, and exhibits remarkable properties of one-way light transport with sufficiently low insertion loss. These superior features make our device become a promising critical building block indispensable for future integrated nanophotonic networks. PMID:27958356

  19. Hybrid polaritons in a resonant inorganic/organic semiconductor microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Höfner, M. Sadofev, S.; Henneberger, F.; Kobin, B.; Hecht, S.

    2015-11-02

    We demonstrated the strong coupling regime in a hybrid inorganic-organic microcavity consisting of (Zn,Mg)O quantum wells and ladder-type oligo(p-phenylene) molecules embedded in a polymer matrix. A Fabry-Pérot cavity is formed by an epitaxially grown lower ZnMgO Bragg reflector and a dielectric mirror deposited atop of the organic layer. A clear anticrossing behavior of the polariton branches related to the Wannier-Mott and Frenkel excitons, and the cavity photon mode with a Rabi-splitting reaching 50 meV, is clearly identified by angular-dependent reflectivity measurements at low temperature. By tailoring the structural design, an equal mixing with weights of about 0.3 for all three resonances is achieved for the middle polariton branch at an incidence angle of about 35°.

  20. PT symmetry breaking and nonlinear optical isolation in coupled microcavities.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Chong, Y D

    2016-04-04

    We perform a theoretical study of the nonlinear dynamics of nonlinear optical isolator devices based on coupled microcavities with gain and loss. This reveals a correspondence between the boundary of asymptotic stability in the nonlinear regime, where gain saturation is present, and the PT -breaking transition in the underlying linear system. For zero detuning and weak input intensity, the onset of optical isolation can be rigorously derived, and corresponds precisely to the transition into the PT -broken phase of the linear system. When the couplings to the external ports are unequal, the isolation ratio exhibits an abrupt jump at the transition point, whose magnitude is given by the ratio of the couplings. This phenomenon could be exploited to realize an actively controlled nonlinear optical isolator, in which strong optical isolation can be turned on and off by tiny variations in the inter-resonator separation.

  1. Higher-order photon bunching in a semiconductor microcavity.

    PubMed

    Assmann, M; Veit, F; Bayer, M; van der Poel, M; Hvam, J M

    2009-07-17

    Quantum mechanically indistinguishable particles such as photons may show collective behavior. Therefore, an appropriate description of a light field must consider the properties of an assembly of photons instead of independent particles. We have studied multiphoton correlations up to fourth order in the single-mode emission of a semiconductor microcavity in the weak and strong coupling regimes. The counting statistics of single photons were recorded with picosecond time resolution, allowing quantitative measurement of the few-photon bunching inside light pulses. Our results show bunching behavior in the strong coupling case, which vanishes in the weak coupling regime as the cavity starts lasing. In particular, we verify the n factorial prediction for the zero-delay correlation function of n thermal light photons.

  2. Optical characterization of porous silicon microcavities for glucose oxidase biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palestino, G.; Agarwal, V.; Garcia, D. B.; Legros, R.; Pérez, E.; Gergely, C.

    2008-04-01

    PSi microcavity (PSiMc) is characterized by a narrow resonance peak in the optical spectrum that is very sensitive to small changes in the refractive index. We report that the resonant optical cavities of PSi structures can be used to enhance the detection of labeled fluorescent biomolecules. Various PSi configurations were tested in order to compare the optical response of the PSi devices to the capture of organic molecules. Morphological and topographical analyses were performed on PSiMc using Atomic Force (AFM) and Scanning Electron (SEM) microscopies. The heterogeneity in pores lengths resulting from etching process assures a better penetration of larger molecules into the pores and sensor sensitivity depends on the pore size. Molecular detection is monitored by the successive red shifts in the reflectance spectra after the stabilization of PSiMc with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). The glucose oxidase was cross linked into the PSiMc structures following a silane-glutaraldehyde (GTA) chemistry.

  3. Spatial Patterns of Dissipative Polariton Solitons in Semiconductor Microcavities.

    PubMed

    Chana, J K; Sich, M; Fras, F; Gorbach, A V; Skryabin, D V; Cancellieri, E; Cerda-Méndez, E A; Biermann, K; Hey, R; Santos, P V; Skolnick, M S; Krizhanovskii, D N

    2015-12-18

    We report propagating bound microcavity polariton soliton arrays consisting of multipeak structures either along (x) or perpendicular (y) to the direction of propagation. Soliton arrays of up to five solitons are observed, with the number of solitons controlled by the size and power of the triggering laser pulse. The breakup along the x direction occurs when the effective area of the trigger pulse exceeds the characteristic soliton size determined by polariton-polariton interactions. Narrowing of soliton emission in energy-momentum space indicates phase locking between adjacent solitons, consistent with numerical modeling which predicts stable multihump soliton solutions. In the y direction, the breakup originates from inhomogeneity across the wave front in the transverse direction which develops into a stable array only in the solitonic regime via phase-dependent interactions of propagating fronts.

  4. Extraction of high-quality RNA from human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Le Bleu, Heather K; Kamal, Fadia A; Kelly, Meghan; Ketz, John P; Zuscik, Michael J; Elbarbary, Reyad A

    2017-02-01

    Extracting high-quality RNA from articular cartilage is challenging due to low cellularity and high proteoglycan content. This problem hinders efficient application of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis in studying cartilage homeostasis. Here we developed a method that purifies high-quality RNA directly from cartilage. Our method optimized the collection and homogenization steps so as to minimize RNA degradation, and modified the conventional TRIzol protocol to enhance RNA purity. Cartilage RNA purified using our method has appropriate quality for RNA-seq experiments including an RNA integrity number of ∼8. Our method also proved efficient in extracting high-quality RNA from subchondral bone.

  5. 36 CFR 910.31 - High architectural quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... architectural quality. Development must maintain a uniformly high standard of architecture, representative of... architectural treatment of new buildings, particularly in terms of massing, facade design (including...

  6. Motivating medical employees toward high quality work.

    PubMed

    Zinober, J W

    1992-01-01

    In her continuing series on human relation, Joan Wagner Zinober, Ph.D., M.B.A., discusses the intricacies of motivating medical staff. This article looks at the principles of motivation and provides ideas for improving the quality and quantity of employee work.

  7. Enhanced green fluorescent protein in optofluidic Fabry-Perot microcavity to detect laser induced temperature changes in a bacterial culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahoz, F.; Martín, I. R.; Walo, D.; Freire, R.; Gil-Rostra, J.; Yubero, F.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A. R.

    2017-09-01

    Thermal therapy using laser sources can be used in combination with other cancer therapies to eliminate tumors. However, high precision temperature control is required to avoid damage in healthy surrounding tissues. Therefore, in order to detect laser induced temperature changes, we have used the fluorescence signal of the enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) over-expressed in an E. coli bacterial culture. For that purpose, the bacteria expressing eGFP are injected in a Fabry-Perot (FP) optofluidic planar microcavity. In order to locally heat the bacterial culture, external infrared or ultraviolet lasers were used. Shifts in the wavelengths of the resonant FP modes are used to determine the temperature increase as a function of the heating laser pump power. Laser induced local temperature increments up to 6-7 °C were measured. These results show a relatively easy way to measure laser induced local temperature changes using a FP microcavity and using eGFP as a molecular probe instead of external nanoparticles, which could damage/alter the cell. Therefore, we believe that this approach can be of interest for the study of thermal effects in laser induced thermal therapies.

  8. Photon echoes from (In,Ga)As quantum dots embedded in a Tamm-plasmon microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salewski, M.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Kapitonov, Yu. V.; Vondran, J.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.; Oulton, R.; Akimov, I. A.; Kavokin, A. V.; Bayer, M.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the coherent optical response from an ensemble of (In,Ga)As quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a planar Tamm-plasmon microcavity with a quality factor of approximately 100. Significant enhancement of the light-matter interaction is demonstrated under selective laser excitation of those quantum dots which are in resonance with the cavity mode. The enhancement is manifested through Rabi oscillations of the photon echo, demonstrating coherent control of excitons with picosecond pulses at intensity levels more than an order of magnitude smaller as compared with bare quantum dots. The decay of the photon echo transients is weakly changed by the resonator, indicating a small decrease of the coherence time T2 which we attribute to the interaction with the electron plasma in the metal layer located close (40 nm) to the QD layer. Simultaneously we see a reduction of the population lifetime T1, inferred from the stimulated photon echo, due to an enhancement of the spontaneous emission by a factor of 2, which is attributed to the Purcell effect, while nonradiative processes are negligible, as confirmed from time-resolved photoluminescence.

  9. Estimation of Purcell factor from mode-splitting spectra in an optical microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Oezdemir, Sahin Kaya; Zhu Jiangang; He, Lina; Yang, Lan

    2011-03-15

    We investigate scattering process in an ultrahigh-Q optical microcavity coupled to subwavelength scatterers by introducing splitting quality Q{sub sp}, a dimensionless parameter defined as the ratio of the scatterer-induced mode splitting to the total loss of the coupled system. A simple relation is introduced to directly estimate the Purcell factor from single-shot measurement of transmission spectrum of scatterer-coupled cavity. Experiments with polystyrene (PS) and gold (Au) nanoparticles, erbium ions, and Influenza A virions show that Purcell-factor-enhanced preferential funneling of scattering into the cavity mode takes place regardless of the scatterer type. Experimentally determined highest Q{sub sp} for single PS and Au nanoparticles are 9.4 and 16.19 corresponding to Purcell factors with lower bounds of 353 and 1049, respectively. The highest observed Q{sub sp} was 31.2 for an ensemble of Au particles. These values are the highest Q{sub sp} and Purcell factors reported up to date.

  10. Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Schools

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    High performance schools are facilities that improve the learning environment while saving energy, resources, and money. The key is understanding the lifetime value of high performance schools and effectively managing priorities, time, and budget.

  11. Toward automatic recognition of high quality clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Kilicoglu, Halil; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Rindflesch, Thomas C; Wilczynski, Nancy L; Haynes, R Brian

    2008-11-06

    Automatic methods for recognizing topically relevant documents supported by high quality research can assist clinicians in practicing evidence-based medicine. We approach the challenge of identifying articles with high quality clinical evidence as a binary classification problem. Combining predictions from supervised machine learning methods and using deep semantic features, we achieve 73.5% precision and 67% recall.

  12. 36 CFR 910.31 - High architectural quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false High architectural quality. 910.31 Section 910.31 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION... architectural quality. Development must maintain a uniformly high standard of architecture, representative...

  13. 36 CFR 910.31 - High architectural quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false High architectural quality. 910.31 Section 910.31 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION... architectural quality. Development must maintain a uniformly high standard of architecture, representative...

  14. Quality Assurance Strategy for Existing Homes: Final Quality Management Primer for High Performing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Del Bianco, M.; Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wood, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guide is designed to help Building America (BA) Teams understand quality management and its role in transitioning from conventional to high performance home building and remodeling. It explains what quality means, the value of quality management systems, the unique need for QMS when building high performing homes, and the first steps to a implementing a comprehensive QMS. This document provides a framework and context for BA teams when they encounter builders and remodelers.

  15. Quality Assurance Strategy for Existing Homes. Final Quality Management Primer for High Performing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Del Bianco, M.; Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wood, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guide is designed to help Building America (BA) teams understand quality management and its role in transitioning from conventional to high performance home building and remodeling. It explains what quality means, the value of quality management systems, the unique need for QMS when building high performing homes, and the first steps to a implementing a comprehensive QMS. This document provides a framework and context for BA teams when they encounter builders and remodelers.

  16. Inequality in Preschool Quality? Community-Level Disparities in Access to High-Quality Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassok, Daphna; Galdo, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, unequal access to high-quality preschool has emerged as a growing public policy concern. Because of data limitations, it is notoriously difficult to measure disparities in access to early learning opportunities across communities and particularly challenging to quantify gaps in access to "high-quality" programs. Research…

  17. Inequality in Preschool Quality? Community-Level Disparities in Access to High-Quality Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassok, Daphna; Galdo, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, unequal access to high-quality preschool has emerged as a growing public policy concern. Because of data limitations, it is notoriously difficult to measure disparities in access to early learning opportunities across communities and particularly challenging to quantify gaps in access to "high-quality" programs. Research…

  18. High-quality continuous random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkema, G. T.; Mousseau, Normand

    2000-08-01

    The continuous random network (CRN) model is an idealized model for perfectly coordinated amorphous semiconductors. The quality of a CRN can be assessed in terms of topological and configurational properties, including coordination, bond-angle distributions, and deformation energy. Using a variation on the sillium approach proposed 14 years ago by Wooten, Winer, and Weaire, we present 1000-atom and 4096-atom configurations with a degree of strain significantly less than the best CRN available at the moment and comparable to experimental results. The low strain is also reflected in the electronic properties. The electronic density of state obtained from ab initio calculation shows a perfect band gap, without any defect, in agreement with experimental data.

  19. Boiler for generating high quality vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H.; Marto, P. J.; Joslyn, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Boiler supplies vapor for use in turbines by imparting a high angular velocity to the liquid annulus in heated rotating drum. Drum boiler provides a sharp interface between boiling liquid and vapor, thereby, inhibiting the formation of unwanted liquid droplets.

  20. Development of L-lactate dehydrogenase biosensor based on porous silicon resonant microcavities as fluorescence enhancers.

    PubMed

    Jenie, S N Aisyiyah; Prieto-Simon, Beatriz; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-12-15

    The up-regulation of L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), an intracellular enzyme present in most of all body tissues, is indicative of several pathological conditions and cellular death. Herein, we demonstrate LDH detection using porous silicon (pSi) microcavities as a luminescence-enhancing optical biosensing platform. Non-fluorescent resazurin was covalently attached onto the pSi surface via thermal hydrocarbonisation, thermal hydrosylilation and acylation. Each surface modification step was confirmed by means of FTIR and the optical shifts of the resonance wavelength of the microcavity. Thermal hydrocarbonisation also afforded excellent surface stability, ensuring that the resazurin was not reduced on the pSi surface. Using a pSi microcavity biosensor, the fluorescence signal upon detection of LDH was amplified by 10 and 5-fold compared to that of a single layer and a detuned microcavity, respectively, giving a limit of detection of 0.08 U/ml. The biosensor showed a linear response between 0.16 and 6.5 U/ml, covering the concentration range of LDH in normal as well as damaged tissues. The biosensor was selective for LDH and did not produce a signal upon incubation with another NAD-dependant enzyme L-glutamic dehydrogenase. The use of the pSi microcavity as a sensing platform reduced reagent usage by 30% and analysis time threefold compared to the standard LDH assay in solution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Numerical modeling of exciton-polariton Bose-Einstein condensate in a microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronych, Oksana; Buraczewski, Adam; Matuszewski, Michał; Stobińska, Magdalena

    2017-06-01

    A novel, optimized numerical method of modeling of an exciton-polariton superfluid in a semiconductor microcavity was proposed. Exciton-polaritons are spin-carrying quasiparticles formed from photons strongly coupled to excitons. They possess unique properties, interesting from the point of view of fundamental research as well as numerous potential applications. However, their numerical modeling is challenging due to the structure of nonlinear differential equations describing their evolution. In this paper, we propose to solve the equations with a modified Runge-Kutta method of 4th order, further optimized for efficient computations. The algorithms were implemented in form of C++ programs fitted for parallel environments and utilizing vector instructions. The programs form the EPCGP suite which has been used for theoretical investigation of exciton-polaritons. Catalogue identifier: AFBQ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AFBQ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: BSD-3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2157 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 498994 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ with OpenMP extensions (main numerical program), Python (helper scripts). Computer: Modern PC (tested on AMD and Intel processors), HP BL2x220. Operating system: Unix/Linux and Windows. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes (OpenMP) RAM: 200 MB for single run Classification: 7, 7.7. Nature of problem: An exciton-polariton superfluid is a novel, interesting physical system allowing investigation of high temperature Bose-Einstein condensation of exciton-polaritons-quasiparticles carrying spin. They have brought a lot of attention due to their unique properties and potential applications in polariton-based optoelectronic integrated circuits. This is an out-of-equilibrium quantum system confined

  2. Work environment characteristics of high-quality home health agencies.

    PubMed

    Tullai-McGuinness, Susan; Riggs, Jennifer S; Farag, Amany A

    2011-10-01

    This concurrent mixed-method study examines the nurse work environment of high-quality Medicare-certified home health agencies. High-quality (n=6) and low-quality (n=6) home health agencies were recruited using agency-level publicly reported patient outcomes. Direct care registered nurses (RNs) from each agency participated in a focus group and completed the Practice Environment Scale of the Nurse Work Index (PES-NWI). No significant differences were found in the PES-NWI results between nurses working in high- and low-quality agencies, though nurses in high-quality agencies scored higher on all subscales. Nurses working in all the high-quality agencies identified themes of adequate staffing, supportive managers, and team work. These themes were not consistently identified in low-quality agencies. Themes of supportive managers and team work are reflective of effective leadership at the manager level. Agencies struggling to improve quality of care might consider developing their managers' leadership skills.

  3. High quality tunable Brillouin optoelectronic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousa, Mohamed; Ahmed, Mahmoud H.; Hassan, Kamel M. M.; Abouelatta, Mohamed; Afifi, Abdelrahman E.

    2016-09-01

    An optical scheme to improve the quality of an RF signal is proposed. The 6 dB linewidth is reduced to sub hertz and the low frequency noise below 1 KHz is reduced about 10 dB. The scheme utilizes a Brillouin-semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) ring laser fitted with an RF intensity modulator and an APD detector. The experimental results show cavity modes with FSR of 30.57 KHz due to Brillouin fiber length of 6.6 km and 6 dB bandwidth of 780 mHz typical of Brillouin lasers. The gain of the SOA balances out most of the losses in the ring mainly that due to the RF modulator. The modulated optical signal beats at the APD. The optical loop acts as a cavity filter to the RF signal. A jitter in the cavity resonances due to temperature variations is completely eliminated from the output beat signal. There is a 10 dB increase in the phase noise at the FSR frequency and its harmonics. The setup is tested with signals generated by different sources and to frequencies up to 10 GHz, the limit of the APD. Sources with RF linewidth less than the optical FSR produces one output mode with sub-hertz line width. For larger line width signals more than one RF frequency is produced, separated by the FSR, each showing the Brillouin linewidth.

  4. Condensation phase diagram of cavity polaritons in GaN-based microcavities: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levrat, Jacques; Butté, Raphaël; Feltin, Eric; Carlin, Jean-François; Grandjean, Nicolas; Solnyshkov, Dmitry; Malpuech, Guillaume

    2010-03-01

    The evolution of the polariton condensation threshold (Pthr) under incoherent optical pumping is investigated both theoretically and experimentally over a wide range of temperatures (4-340 K) and exciton-cavity photon detunings (-120-0meV) in a multiple quantum-well GaN-based microcavity. The condensation phase diagram of these bosonic quasiparticles is first theoretically described within the framework of Bose-Einstein condensation of polaritons in the thermodynamic limit. Then a qualitative picture of cavity polariton relaxation kinetics including the impact of detuning and temperature is given before introducing a modeling of cavity polariton relaxation kinetics with semiclassical Boltzmann equations. The results of the theoretical modeling are finally compared with systematic measurements of Pthr . At low temperature and negative detunings, the polariton gas is far from thermal equilibrium and the condensation threshold is governed by the efficiency of the relaxation kinetics of the particles. Conversely, at high temperature and for less negative detunings, the relaxation kinetics is efficient enough to allow the achievement of a thermal polariton distribution function with a critical density for condensation given by the thermodynamic theory of Bose-Einstein condensation. For temperatures ranging between ˜140 and 340 K, an optimum detuning is found experimentally, where the condensation threshold power is minimized. At high temperatures, polariton detrapping effects from the bottom of the trap formed in k∥ space by the lower polariton branch are found to play a supplementary role among the processes governing Pthr .

  5. Tunable, narrow, and enhanced electroluminescent emission from porous-silicon-reflector-based organic microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, X. J.; Tan, X. W.; Wang, Z.; Liu, G. Y.; Xiong, Z. H.

    2006-10-01

    Microcavity organic light-emitting diodes (MC-OLEDs) based on porous silicon distributed Bragg reflectors (PS-DBRs) have been realized, and improved structural, optical, and electrical properties have been observed. In the device, a multilayer OLED functions as the central active element, sandwiched between a top silver film and a bottom PS-DBR formed by electrochemical etching of a p++-Si substrate. Field-emission scanning-electron-microscopy cross-sectional images show that there exist nanoscale layered structures and flat interfaces inside the cavity. Widths of green and red electroluminescent (EL) peaks emitted from the MC-OLEDs are 8 and 12nm, respectively, greatly reduced in comparison with 85 and 70nm measured from noncavity structures. The narrowed EL emission from the MC-OLEDs is directional and in single mode, with off-resonant optical modes highly suppressed, which is mainly due to the good optical properties of PS-DBR with high reflectivity in a wide smooth stop band. Further increases in the green and red EL intensities by factors of about 6 and 4, respectively, are achievable. The improvement is physically attributable to the spatial redistribution of the photon density of states in the cavities. In addition, current-brightness-voltage properties and lifetime-related parameters of the devices are discussed. Such device structure and emission patterns of the MC-OLEDs should be useful in silicon compatible optical interconnects and light-emitting diode array printing.

  6. Silicon photonic crystal microarrays for high throughput label-free detection of lung cancer cell line lysates with sensitivity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Gemmill, Robert M.; Chen, Ray T.

    2013-03-01

    Detection of biomolecules on microarrays based on label-free on-chip optical biosensors is very attractive since this format avoids complex chemistries caused by steric hindrance of labels. Application areas include the detection of cancers and allergens, and food-borne pathogens to name a few. We have demonstrated photonic crystal microcavity biosensors with high sensitivity down to 1pM concentrations (67pg/ml). High sensitivities were achieved by slow light engineering which reduced the radiation loss and increased the stored energy in the photonic crystal microcavity resonance mode. Resonances with high quality factor Q~26,760 in liquid ambient, coupled with larger optical mode volumes allowed enhanced interaction with the analyte biomolecules which resulted in sensitivities down to 10 cells per micro-liter to lung cancer cell lysates. The specificity of detection was ensured by multiplexed detections from multiple photonic crystal microcavities arrayed on the arms of a multimode interference power splitter. Specific binding interactions and control experiments were performed simultaneously at the same instant of time with the same 60 microliter sample volume. Specificity is further ensured by sandwich assay methods in the multiplexed experiment. Sandwich assay based amplification increased the sensitivity further resulting in the detection of lung cancer cell lysates down to concentrations of 2 cells per micro-liter. The miniaturization enabled by photonic crystal biosensors coupled with waveguide interconnected layout thus offers the potential of high throughput proteomics with high sensitivity and specificity.

  7. Highly Integrated Quality Assurance – An Empirical Case

    SciTech Connect

    Drake Kirkham; Amy Powell; Lucas Rich

    2011-02-01

    Highly Integrated Quality Assurance – An Empirical Case Drake Kirkham1, Amy Powell2, Lucas Rich3 1Quality Manager, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 M/S 6122, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6122 2Quality Engineer, RPS Program, Idaho National Laboratory 3Quality Engineer, RPS Program, Idaho National Laboratory Contact: Voice: (208) 533-7550 Email: Drake.Kirkham@inl.gov Abstract. The Radioisotope Power Systems Program of the Idaho National Laboratory makes an empirical case for a highly integrated Quality Assurance function pertaining to the preparation, assembly, testing, storage and transportation of 238Pu fueled radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Case data represents multiple campaigns including the Pluto/New Horizons mission, the Mars Science Laboratory mission in progress, and other related projects. Traditional Quality Assurance models would attempt to reduce cost by minimizing the role of dedicated Quality Assurance personnel in favor of either functional tasking or peer-based implementations. Highly integrated Quality Assurance adds value by placing trained quality inspectors on the production floor side-by-side with nuclear facility operators to enhance team dynamics, reduce inspection wait time, and provide for immediate, independent feedback. Value is also added by maintaining dedicated Quality Engineers to provide for rapid identification and resolution of corrective action, enhanced and expedited supply chain interfaces, improved bonded storage capabilities, and technical resources for requirements management including data package development and Certificates of Inspection. A broad examination of cost-benefit indicates highly integrated Quality Assurance can reduce cost through the mitigation of risk and reducing administrative burden thereby allowing engineers to be engineers, nuclear operators to be nuclear operators, and the cross-functional team to operate more efficiently. Applicability of this case

  8. Total quality management: A management philosophy for providing high quality construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Paul D.

    Total Quality Management (TQM) is not a new concept. Only recently (within the past ten years or so) have American companies started to realize the potential of TQM as a means of ensuring high quality products and services. With this realization has come implementation in manufacturing and service companies. A commercial construction company, like any other business, must provide a top quality finished product to its customer if it intends to stay in business. TQM is one way to work to that end. This report explores the quality problems facing my fictitious construction company, which I believe are fairly typical among the commercial construction industry, existing management methods, and the TQM method to ensure top quality production. It will be shown why I believe TQM or a variation thereof is the best method for controlling the quality of products and service during the construction process. Under the philosophy of TQM, we build quality into the finished product.

  9. Extraction of high-quality genomic DNA from Ectocarpus.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Susana M; Scornet, Delphine; Rousvoal, Sylvie; Peters, Nick; Dartevelle, Laurence; Peters, Akira F; Cock, J Mark

    2012-03-01

    For some applications, such as genome sequencing and high-throughput genotyping with multiple markers, it is necessary to use high-quality genomic DNA. This article describes how to obtain several micrograms of high-quality, cesium chloride-purified DNA from 1 g of Ectocarpus filaments. We also recommend using DNA of this quality for quantitative RT-PCR control reactions. However, simpler, more rapid, kit-based methods are preferable for experiments that involve the treatment of large numbers of individuals, such as genotyping large populations with a small number of markers or PCR screening of large populations.

  10. The Equitable Distribution of High-Quality Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumgardner, Stan

    2010-01-01

    A new report by the National Comprehensive Center for Teacher Quality (TQ Center) highlights efforts across the nation to address a key point in the No Child Left Behind law and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)--the equitable distribution of high-quality teachers across all schools. Research consistently has pointed to effective…

  11. Can high quality cane be delivered to the mill economically

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cane quality is becoming increasingly important to the Louisiana sugarcane industry, with some processors offering premiums for high quality cane. Using a Cameco® 3500, we tested ground speeds of 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5 mph and fan speeds of 650, 850, and 1050 rpm. Ground speed had no effect on can...

  12. Developing High-Quality Teachers: Teacher Evaluation for Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looney, Janet

    2011-01-01

    As countries aim to ensure high achievement for all students, improving and sustaining the quality of the teacher workforce is a vital policy priority. Several studies have found that well-designed teacher evaluation systems, aligned with professional learning and development, can contribute to improvements in the quality of teaching and raise…

  13. High quality transparent conducting oxide thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Duenow, Joel N.; Barnes, Teresa; Coutts, Timothy J.

    2012-08-28

    A transparent conducting oxide (TCO) film comprising: a TCO layer, and dopants selected from the elements consisting of Vanadium, Molybdenum, Tantalum, Niobium, Antimony, Titanium, Zirconium, and Hafnium, wherein the elements are n-type dopants; and wherein the transparent conducting oxide is characterized by an improved electron mobility of about 42 cm.sup.2/V-sec while simultaneously maintaining a high carrier density of .about.4.4e.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3.

  14. Scalable quantum computing based on stationary spin qubits in coupled quantum dots inside double-sided optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-12-01

    Quantum logic gates are the key elements in quantum computing. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving a scalable and compact quantum computing based on stationary electron-spin qubits, by using the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We design the compact quantum circuits for implementing universal and deterministic quantum gates for electron-spin systems, including the two-qubit CNOT gate and the three-qubit Toffoli gate. They are compact and economic, and they do not require additional electron-spin qubits. Moreover, our devices have good scalability and are attractive as they both are based on solid-state quantum systems and the qubits are stationary. They are feasible with the current experimental technology, and both high fidelity and high efficiency can be achieved when the ratio of the side leakage to the cavity decay is low.

  15. Scalable quantum computing based on stationary spin qubits in coupled quantum dots inside double-sided optical microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-01-01

    Quantum logic gates are the key elements in quantum computing. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving a scalable and compact quantum computing based on stationary electron-spin qubits, by using the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We design the compact quantum circuits for implementing universal and deterministic quantum gates for electron-spin systems, including the two-qubit CNOT gate and the three-qubit Toffoli gate. They are compact and economic, and they do not require additional electron-spin qubits. Moreover, our devices have good scalability and are attractive as they both are based on solid-state quantum systems and the qubits are stationary. They are feasible with the current experimental technology, and both high fidelity and high efficiency can be achieved when the ratio of the side leakage to the cavity decay is low. PMID:25518899

  16. Scalable quantum computing based on stationary spin qubits in coupled quantum dots inside double-sided optical microcavities.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-12-18

    Quantum logic gates are the key elements in quantum computing. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving a scalable and compact quantum computing based on stationary electron-spin qubits, by using the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We design the compact quantum circuits for implementing universal and deterministic quantum gates for electron-spin systems, including the two-qubit CNOT gate and the three-qubit Toffoli gate. They are compact and economic, and they do not require additional electron-spin qubits. Moreover, our devices have good scalability and are attractive as they both are based on solid-state quantum systems and the qubits are stationary. They are feasible with the current experimental technology, and both high fidelity and high efficiency can be achieved when the ratio of the side leakage to the cavity decay is low.

  17. Comparative performance of wavelets and JPEG coders at high quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algazi, V. Ralph; Estes, Robert R., Jr.

    1997-04-01

    In recent work, we have examined the performance of wavelet coders using a perceptually relevant image quality metric, the picture quality scale (PQS). In that study, we considered some of the design options available with respect to choice of wavelet basis, quantizer, and method for error- free encoding of the quantized coefficients, including the EZW methodology. A specific combination of these design options provides the best trade off between performance and PQS quality. Here, we extend this comparison by evaluating the performance of JPEG and the previously chosen optimal wavelet scheme, focusing principally on the high quality range.

  18. Photonic confinement in laterally structured metal-organic microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischok, Andreas; Brückner, Robert; Sudzius, Markas; Reinhardt, Christoph; Lyssenko, Vadim G.; Fröb, Hartmut; Leo, Karl

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the formation of optical modes in organic microcavities with an incorporated perforated silver layer. The metal leads to a formation of Tamm-plasmon-polaritons and thus separates the sample into metal-free or metal-containing areas, supporting different resonances. This mode splitting is exploited to confine photons in elliptic holes and triangular cuts, forming distinctive standing wave patterns showing the strong lateral confinement. A comparison with a Maxwell-Bloch based rate equation model clearly shows the nonlinear transition into the lasing regime. The concentration of the electric field density and inhibition of lateral loss channels in turn decreases the lasing threshold by up to one order of magnitude, to 0.1 nJ. By spectroscopic investigation of such a triangular wedge, we observe the transition from the unperturbed cavity state to a strongly confined complex transversal mode. Such a structured silver layer can be utilized in future for charge carrier injection in an electrically driven organic solid state laser.

  19. Luminescence spectra of quantum dots in microcavities. II. Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Valle, Elena; Laussy, Fabrice P.; Tejedor, Carlos

    2009-06-01

    We discuss the luminescence spectra of coupled light-matter systems realized with semiconductor heterostructures in microcavities in the presence of a continuous, incoherent pumping, when the matter field is fermionic. The linear regime—which has been the main topic of investigation both experimentally and theoretically—converges to the case of coupling to a bosonic material field, and has been amply discussed in the first part of this work. We address here the nonlinear regime, and argue that, counter to intuition, it is better observed at low pumping intensities. We support our discussion with particular cases representative of, and beyond, the experimental state of the art. We explore the transition from the quantum to the classical regime, by decomposing the total spectrum into individual transitions between the dressed states of the light-matter coupling Hamiltonian, reducing the problem to the positions and broadenings of all possible transitions. As the system crosses to the classical limit, rich multiplet structures mapping the quantized energy levels melt and turn to cavity lasing and to an incoherent Mollow triplet in the direct exciton emission for very good structure. Less ideal figures of merit can still betray the quantum regime, with a proper balance of cavity versus electronic pumping.

  20. Parametric inversion of spin currents in semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flayac, H.; Solnyshkov, D. D.; Malpuech, G.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2013-02-01

    The optical spin-Hall effect results in the formation of an antisymmetric real-space polarization pattern giving birth to spin currents. In this work, we show that the exciton-polariton parametric scattering allows us to reverse the sign of these currents. We describe the pulsed resonant excitation of a strongly coupled microcavity with a linearly polarized pump at normal incidence. The energy of the pulse is set to be close to the inflexion point of the lower polariton dispersion branch and the focusing in real space populates the reciprocal space on a ring. Above threshold, the parametric scattering towards the idler and the signal state is triggered on the whole elastic circle. The injected particles are scattered toward these states while propagating radially all over the plane, gaining a cross-linear polarization with respect to that of the pump during the nonlinear process. Consequently, the propagation of the polaritons within the effective magnetic field results in the optical spin-Hall effect, with inverted polarization domains.

  1. Phase diagram of microcavity exciton-polariton condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Dinh-Hoi; Phan, Van-Nham

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we study the exciton-polariton condensate phase transition in a microcavity matter-light system in which electron-hole Coulomb interaction and matter-light coupling effects are treated on an equal footing. In the framework of the unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation applying the two-dimensional exciton-polariton model, we derive the self-consistent equations determining simultaneously the excitonic and the photonic condenstate order parameters. In the thermal-equilibrium limit, we find a condensed state of the exciton-polariton systems and phase diagrams are then constructed. At a given low temperature, the condensate by its nature shows a crossover from an excitonic to a polaritonic and finally photonic condensed state as the excitation density increases at large detuning. Without the detuning, the excitonic condensed state disappears whereas the polaritonic or photonic phases dominate. The crossover is also found by lowering the Coulomb interaction at a finite matter-light coupling. Lowering the Coulomb interaction or increasing the temperature, the excitonic Mott transition occurs, at which the exciton-polariton condensates dissociate to free electron-hole/photon. Depending on temperature and excitation density, the phase transition of the exciton-polariton condensates is also addressed in signatures of photoluminescence mapping to the photonic momentum distribution.

  2. Dissipative soliton protocols in semiconductor microcavities at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, D. V.; Savenko, I. G.; Flayac, H.; Rosanov, N. N.

    2015-08-01

    We consider exciton polaritons in a semiconductor microcavity with a saturable absorber in the growth direction of the heterostructure. This feature promotes additional nonlinear losses of the system with the emergence of bistability of the condensate particles number on the nonresonant (electrical or optical) excitation intensity. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new type of bright spatial dissipative exciton-polariton soliton which emerges in the equilibrium between the regions with different particle density. We develop protocols of soliton creation and destruction. The switch to a solitonlike behavior occurs if the cavity is exposed by a short strong laser pulse with certain energy and duration. We estimate the characteristic times of soliton switch on and off and the time of return to the initial cycle. In particular, we demonstrate surprising narrowing of the spatial profile of the soliton and its vanishing at certain temperature due to interaction of the system with the thermal bath of acoustic phonons. We also address the role of polariton-polariton interaction (Kerr-like nonlinearity) on formation of dissipative solitons and show that the soliton may exist both in its presence and its absence.

  3. Photonic confinement in laterally structured metal-organic microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Mischok, Andreas Brückner, Robert; Sudzius, Markas; Reinhardt, Christoph; Lyssenko, Vadim G.; Fröb, Hartmut; Leo, Karl

    2014-08-04

    We investigate the formation of optical modes in organic microcavities with an incorporated perforated silver layer. The metal leads to a formation of Tamm-plasmon-polaritons and thus separates the sample into metal-free or metal-containing areas, supporting different resonances. This mode splitting is exploited to confine photons in elliptic holes and triangular cuts, forming distinctive standing wave patterns showing the strong lateral confinement. A comparison with a Maxwell-Bloch based rate equation model clearly shows the nonlinear transition into the lasing regime. The concentration of the electric field density and inhibition of lateral loss channels in turn decreases the lasing threshold by up to one order of magnitude, to 0.1 nJ. By spectroscopic investigation of such a triangular wedge, we observe the transition from the unperturbed cavity state to a strongly confined complex transversal mode. Such a structured silver layer can be utilized in future for charge carrier injection in an electrically driven organic solid state laser.

  4. Random nanostructure scattering layer for suppression of microcavity effect and light extraction in OLEDs.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin-Wook; Cho, Doo-Hee; Moon, Jaehyun; Joo, Chul Woong; Lee, Jonghee; Huh, Jin Woo; Park, Seung Koo; Han, Jun-Han; Cho, Nam Sung; Hwang, Joohyun; Chu, Hye Yong; Lee, Jeong-Ik

    2014-06-15

    In this study, we investigated the effect of a random nanostructure scattering layer (RSL) on the microcavity and light extraction in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). In the case of the conventional OLED, the optical properties change with the thickness of the hole transporting layer (HTL) because of the presence of a microcavity. However, OLEDs equipped with the an RSL showed similar values of external quantum efficiency and luminous efficacy regardless of the HTL thickness. These phenomena can be understood by the scattering effect because of the RSL, which suppresses the microcavity effect and extracts the light confined in the device. Moreover, OLEDs with the RSL led to reduced spectrum and color changes with the viewing angle.

  5. Non-Hermitian Hamiltonian and Lamb shift in circular dielectric microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyu-Won; Kim, Jaewan; Jeong, Kabgyun

    2016-06-01

    We study the normal modes and quasi-normal modes (QNMs) in circular dielectric microcavities through non-Hermitian Hamiltonian, which come from the modifications due to system-environment coupling. Differences between the two types of modes are studied in detail, including the existence of resonances tails. Numerical calculations of the eigenvalues reveal the Lamb shift in the microcavity due to its interaction with the environment. We also investigate relations between the Lamb shift and quantized angular momentum of the whispering gallery mode as well as the refractive index of the microcavity. For the latter, we make use of the similarity between the Helmholtz equation and the Schrödinger equation, in which the refractive index can be treated as a control parameter of effective potential. Our result can be generalized to other open quantum systems with a potential term.

  6. Magneto-photonic crystal microcavities based on magnetic nanoparticles embedded in Silica matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocini, Abdesselam; Moukhtari, Riad; Khedrouche, Djamel; Kahlouche, Ahmed; Zamani, Mehdi

    2017-02-01

    Using the three-dimensional finite difference time domain method (3D FDTD) with perfectly matched layers (PML), optical and magneto-optical properties of two-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals micro-cavity is studied. This micro-cavity is fabricated by SiO2/ZrO2 or SiO2/TiO2 matrix doped with magnetic nanoparticles, in which the refractive index varied in the range of 1.51-1.58. We demonstrate that the Q factor for the designed cavity increases as the refractive index increases, and we find that the Q factor decreases as the volume fraction VF% due to off-diagonal elements increases. These magnetic microcavities may serve as a fundamental structure in a variety of ultra compact magneto photonic devices such as optical isolators, circulators and modulators in the future.

  7. Laser excitation induced modifications on distributed feedback microcavities using organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tingting; Zhang, Xinping

    2017-06-01

    Distributed feedback (DFB) lasers can be achieved by spin-coating semiconductor polymers onto the top surface of a photoresist grating with designed periods. Optical pumping using lasers within the absorption spectrum of the polymer induced strong modification on the morphological distribution of the polymer film and consequently on the spectroscopic response of the DFB microcavities. The corresponding modification processes resulted mainly from the pump-laser-induced cross-linking of the polymer molecules, which led to the reduction in both the thickness and refractive index of the polymer layer. The location of the polymer laser was lowered from the top to the bottom surface of the DFB grating. Concise modeling on the angle-resolved tuning properties of the output spectrum of the DFB microcavity was achieved with excellent agreement with the experimental observation, which provided clear physical insights into the operation mechanisms of a DFB microcavity.

  8. Phase-locked coherent modes in a patterned metal-organic microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückner, R.; Zakhidov, A. A.; Scholz, R.; Sudzius, M.; Hintschich, S. I.; Fröb, H.; Lyssenko, V. G.; Leo, K.

    2012-05-01

    Organic microcavities offer tantalizing prospects for studying the interactions of light and matter. For electrical excitation of these processes, electrodes must be integrated. However, the large absorption properties of metals are generally considered fatal for optical coherence. With this in mind, we embedded a thin silver grating into an organic microcavity to generate periodic arrays of localized cavity modes and metal-based Tamm plasmon polaritons. These excited states are capable of phase coupling across the grating. At room temperature and under non-resonant pumping, we selectively stimulated coherent emission from in- and out-of-phase locked arrays. We show that an absorptive metal inside an optical cavity is compatible with coherent emission. Most importantly, the inherently low residual absorption of the organic layer enables coherence to spread over macroscopic distances, even at room temperature. Our strategy of embedding metal patterns into an organic microcavity yields a viable route towards electrically driven organic solid-state lasers.

  9. A printable color filter based on the micro-cavity incorporating a nano-grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yan; Xu, Fengchuan; Wu, Shangliang; Wan, Wenqiang; Huang, Wenbin; Liu, Yanhua; Pu, Donglin; Wei, Guojun; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Yanyan; Qiao, Wen; Xu, Yishen; Chen, Linsen

    2016-10-01

    A printable color filter based on the photonic micro-cavity incorporating a nanostructure is proposed, which consists of a nano-metallic grating, a dielectric layer and aluminum (Al) film. According to the resonance induced by different dielectric depths of the micro-cavity, two dielectric heights for the same resonant wavelength are chosen to form the grating heights relative to the Al film. With the contribution of the cavity resonance and the surface plasmon resonance, the proposed structure performs enhanced broadband filtering characteristics with good angular tolerance up to 48° compared to the one of the micro-cavity as well as the one of the metallic grating. Therefore, reflective filters for RGB colors are designed incorporating the proposed structure. Furthermore, for the proposed structure shows great polarization dependence even at normal incidence, it can also be utilized as an anticounterfeiting certificate.

  10. External pumping of hybrid nanostructures in microcavity with Frenkel and Wannier-Mott excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovskiy, O. A.; Agranovich, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    The exciton-exciton interaction in hybrid nanostructures with resonating Frenkel and Wannier-Mott excitons was investigated in many publications. In microcavity the hybrid nanostructures can be exposed to different types of optical pumping, the most common one being pumping through one of the microcavity side. However, not investigated and thus never been discussed the hybrid excitons generation by pumping of confined quantum wells from the side of empty microcavity without nanostructures in a wave guided configuration. Here, we consider the hybrid excitations in cavity with organic and inorganic quantum wells and with different types of pumping from external source. The frequency dependence for intensity of excitations in hybrid structure is also investigated. The results may be used for search of most effective fluorescence and relaxation processes. The same approach may be used when both quantum wells are organic or inorganic.

  11. Fabry-Perot microcavity sensor for H2-breath-test analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenti, Maria Antonietta; De Sario, Marco; Petruzzelli, V.; D'Orazio, Antonella; Prudenzano, Francesco; de Ceglia, Domenico; Scalora, Michael

    2007-10-01

    Leak detection of hydrogen for medical purposes, based on the monitoring of the optical response of a simple Fabry-Perot microcavity, is proposed to investigate either the occurrence of lactose intolerance, or lactose malabsorption condition. Both pathologic conditions result in bacterial overgrowth in the intestine, which causes increased spontaneous emission of H2 in the human breath. Two sensitivity figures of merit are introduced to inspect changes in the sensor response, and to relate the microcavity response to a pathologic condition, which is strictly related to a different level of exhaled hydrogen. Different sensor configurations using a metal-dielectric microcavity are reported and discussed in order to make the most of the well-known ability of palladium to spontaneously absorb hydrogen.

  12. Diode-pumped distributed-feedback dye laser with an organic inorganic microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, H.; Yamashita, K.; Takeuchi, H.; Tomiki, M.

    2008-08-01

    We present a diode-pumped microcavity dye laser composed of a top organic reflector and a bottom inorganic reflector. The top organic reflector consists of alternate thin films of cellulose acetate and poly(N-vinylcarbazole) doped with coumarin 540A to construct a distributed-feedback (DFB) resonator. Pumped directly by an InGaN-based blue laser diode (LD) with a pulse duration of 4 ns, the microcavity dye laser exhibited a single-mode oscillation at 563 nm with a threshold pump LD power of 290 mW/pulse. The emission of the microcavity dye laser was measured through an optical fiber, resulting in a peak power of 2.5 mW for a pump LD power of 320 mW.

  13. Promoting High-Quality Family Child Care: A Policy Perspective for Quality 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modigliani, Kathy

    Although family child care has the potential to offer young children individual attention and customized, educational programs to help them thrive, the quality of these programs is dependent upon a workforce that is at the bottom of the occupational status and pay hierarchy. This report examines ways to promote high quality in family child care…

  14. Emblems of Quality in Higher Education. Developing and Sustaining High-Quality Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Jennifer Grant; Conrad, Clifton F.

    This book proposes an "engagement" theory of program quality to evaluate and improve higher education programs at all degree levels. Based on interviews with 781 participants in a national study of Masters degree programs, it focuses on the interactive roles of students, faculty, and administrators in developing high-quality programs…

  15. Integrated asymmetric whispering gallery mode resonator microcavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Soheil; Hudnut, Alexa W.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2017-02-01

    Ultra high quality optical resonators have enabled accumulation of exceptionally high intensities of light from low input powers. This feature opens new horizons in low power observation of physical phenomena such as lasing, sensing and radiation pressure driven oscillations. Radiation pressure instability facilitates transfer of energy from photons to mechanical degree of freedom in optical resonators. In high quality toroidal micro cavities, radiation pressure is demonstrated in the form of "dynamic back action" and results mechanical oscillations with sub-Hz linewidth. Since the toroidal cavities are symmetrical in nature, the exerted radiation pressure can mainly excite radially symmetric modes such as the first cantilever mode and the radially breathing mode. Study of these modes reveals important information about interaction of light and mechanical mode as well as intrinsic properties of the resonator as a mechanical oscillator. However, there are some unexcited mechanical modes that in some cases have even higher mechanical quality factors compared to the usually excited ones. Most of the properties of these mechanical modes remain unknown because the radially symmetric force does not provide a component to excite them. In this research, we have developed a novel method to fabricate asymmetric toroidal resonators (minor and major diameters), which enables us to regeneratively excite unobserved asymmetric modes. One key feature is that the optical quality factor is relatively high despite the asymmetry. As a result, we are able to excite the asymmetric modes with sub-mW threshold powers. Complementary modeling is also performed, confirming the experimental findings.

  16. Detection of MMP-8 via porous silicon microcavity devices functionalized with human antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Marta; Taleb Bendiab, Chakib; Massif, Laurent; Cuisinier, Frédéric J. G.; Gergely, Csilla

    2010-04-01

    In this work we report on the fabrication of functionalized PSiMc scaffolds that can be used to enhance the detection of MMP-8. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are the major enzymes that degrade extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and play a key role in diverse physiological and pathological processes. We are interested in detecting the collagenase-type MMP-8 that is an inflammatory marker in gingival fluid for predicting tooth movement during orthodontic treatment. As presence of an increasing amount of MMP-8 in saliva is directly related with the tooth movement during orthodontic treatment, monitoring continuously the MMP-8 variation is primordial. Porous silicon microcavity (PSiMc) structures were prepared as multilayered stacks of low and high refractive indices and with layer thicknesses in the order of visible light wavelength. Then the PSi surface was functionalized with human antibodies. Both functionalization and MMP-8 infiltration were monitored by specular reflectometry. PSiMc is characterized by a narrow resonance peak in the optical spectrum that is very sensitive to a small change in the refractive index, such as that obtained when a molecule is attached to the large internal surface of porous silicon. The pore dimensions of the used PSiMc structures were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  17. Electrical pumping and tuning of exciton-polaritons in carbon nanotube microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Arko; Held, Martin; Zakharko, Yuriy; Tropf, Laura; Gather, Malte C.; Zaumseil, Jana

    2017-09-01

    Exciton-polaritons are hybrid light-matter particles that form upon strong coupling of an excitonic transition to a cavity mode. As bosons, polaritons can form condensates with coherent laser-like emission. For organic materials, optically pumped condensation was achieved at room temperature but electrically pumped condensation remains elusive due to insufficient polariton densities. Here we combine the outstanding optical and electronic properties of purified, solution-processed semiconducting (6,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a microcavity-integrated light-emitting field-effect transistor to realize efficient electrical pumping of exciton-polaritons at room temperature with high current densities (>10 kA cm-2) and tunability in the near-infrared (1,060 nm to 1,530 nm). We demonstrate thermalization of SWCNT polaritons, exciton-polariton pumping rates ~104 times higher than in current organic polariton devices, direct control over the coupling strength (Rabi splitting) via the applied gate voltage, and a tenfold enhancement of polaritonic over excitonic emission. This powerful material-device combination paves the way to carbon-based polariton emitters and possibly lasers.

  18. Cooling of Electronically-Excited He2 Molecules in a Microcavity Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Rui; Houlahan, Thomas J., Jr.; Eden, J. Gary

    2016-06-01

    Helium dimers in the d3Σ+u excited electronic state with potential energy >24 eV and radiative lifetime of 25 ns have been generated in a microcavity plasma jet and rotationally cooled by supersonic expansion in vacuum. The dynamic process of cooling is recorded by imaging the axis of expansion onto the slit of Czerny-Turner spectrometer, yielding spatial-temporal spectrograms of d3Σ+u→b3Πg (v', v'')=(0, 0) emission. Analysis of the data shows the spatial-temporal evolution of the rotational temperature to be a damped sinusoid that reaches a minimum value of 100K. This reproducible behavior is attributed to the reflection of electrons from a virtual cathode located downstream of the nozzle and indicates that the spatially-averaged electron density is 108 cm-3. We present this observed rotational temperature oscillation during the supersonic cooling process as an example of the potential of our supersonic microplasma expansion as a tool to explore physical dynamics in diatomic molecules having high excitation energies and small lifetimes.

  19. Electrical pumping and tuning of exciton-polaritons in carbon nanotube microcavities.

    PubMed

    Graf, Arko; Held, Martin; Zakharko, Yuriy; Tropf, Laura; Gather, Malte C; Zaumseil, Jana

    2017-09-01

    Exciton-polaritons are hybrid light-matter particles that form upon strong coupling of an excitonic transition to a cavity mode. As bosons, polaritons can form condensates with coherent laser-like emission. For organic materials, optically pumped condensation was achieved at room temperature but electrically pumped condensation remains elusive due to insufficient polariton densities. Here we combine the outstanding optical and electronic properties of purified, solution-processed semiconducting (6,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a microcavity-integrated light-emitting field-effect transistor to realize efficient electrical pumping of exciton-polaritons at room temperature with high current densities (>10 kA cm(-2)) and tunability in the near-infrared (1,060 nm to 1,530 nm). We demonstrate thermalization of SWCNT polaritons, exciton-polariton pumping rates ∼10(4) times higher than in current organic polariton devices, direct control over the coupling strength (Rabi splitting) via the applied gate voltage, and a tenfold enhancement of polaritonic over excitonic emission. This powerful material-device combination paves the way to carbon-based polariton emitters and possibly lasers.

  20. Near-infrared exciton-polaritons in strongly coupled single-walled carbon nanotube microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Arko; Tropf, Laura; Zakharko, Yuriy; Zaumseil, Jana; Gather, Malte C.

    2016-10-01

    Exciton-polaritons form upon strong coupling between electronic excitations of a material and photonic states of a surrounding microcavity. In organic semiconductors the special nature of excited states leads to particularly strong coupling and facilitates condensation of exciton-polaritons at room temperature, which may lead to electrically pumped organic polariton lasers. However, charge carrier mobility and photo-stability in currently used materials is limited and exciton-polariton emission so far has been restricted to visible wavelengths. Here, we demonstrate strong light-matter coupling in the near infrared using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a polymer matrix and a planar metal-clad cavity. By exploiting the exceptional oscillator strength and sharp excitonic transition of (6,5) SWCNTs, we achieve large Rabi splitting (>110 meV), efficient polariton relaxation and narrow band emission (<15 meV). Given their high charge carrier mobility and excellent photostability, SWCNTs represent a promising new avenue towards practical exciton-polariton devices operating at telecommunication wavelengths.

  1. A microcavity-controlled, current-driven, on-chip nanotube emitter at infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fengnian; Steiner, Mathias; Lin, Yu-Ming; Avouris, Phaedon

    2008-10-01

    Recent studies of the optical properties of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes suggest that these truly nanometre-scale systems have a promising future in nanophotonics, in addition to their well-known potential in electronics. Semiconducting single-walled nanotubes have a direct, diameter-dependent bandgap and can be excited readily by current injection, which makes them attractive as nano-emitters. The electroluminescence is spectrally broad, spatially non-directional, and the radiative yield is low. Here we report the monolithic integration of a single, electrically excited, semiconducting nanotube transistor with a planar lambda/2 microcavity, thus taking an important first step in the development of nanotube-based nanophotonic devices. The spectral full-width at half-maximum of the emission is reduced from approximately 300 to approximately 40 nm at a cavity resonance of 1.75 microm, and the emission becomes highly directional. The maximum enhancement of the radiative rate is estimated to be 4. We also show that both the optically and electrically excited luminescence of single-walled nanotubes involve the same E11 excitonic transition.

  2. Near-infrared exciton-polaritons in strongly coupled single-walled carbon nanotube microcavities.

    PubMed

    Graf, Arko; Tropf, Laura; Zakharko, Yuriy; Zaumseil, Jana; Gather, Malte C

    2016-10-10

    Exciton-polaritons form upon strong coupling between electronic excitations of a material and photonic states of a surrounding microcavity. In organic semiconductors the special nature of excited states leads to particularly strong coupling and facilitates condensation of exciton-polaritons at room temperature, which may lead to electrically pumped organic polariton lasers. However, charge carrier mobility and photo-stability in currently used materials is limited and exciton-polariton emission so far has been restricted to visible wavelengths. Here, we demonstrate strong light-matter coupling in the near infrared using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a polymer matrix and a planar metal-clad cavity. By exploiting the exceptional oscillator strength and sharp excitonic transition of (6,5) SWCNTs, we achieve large Rabi splitting (>110 meV), efficient polariton relaxation and narrow band emission (<15 meV). Given their high charge carrier mobility and excellent photostability, SWCNTs represent a promising new avenue towards practical exciton-polariton devices operating at telecommunication wavelengths.

  3. Near-infrared exciton-polaritons in strongly coupled single-walled carbon nanotube microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Arko; Tropf, Laura; Zakharko, Yuriy; Zaumseil, Jana; Gather, Malte C.

    2016-01-01

    Exciton-polaritons form upon strong coupling between electronic excitations of a material and photonic states of a surrounding microcavity. In organic semiconductors the special nature of excited states leads to particularly strong coupling and facilitates condensation of exciton-polaritons at room temperature, which may lead to electrically pumped organic polariton lasers. However, charge carrier mobility and photo-stability in currently used materials is limited and exciton-polariton emission so far has been restricted to visible wavelengths. Here, we demonstrate strong light-matter coupling in the near infrared using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a polymer matrix and a planar metal-clad cavity. By exploiting the exceptional oscillator strength and sharp excitonic transition of (6,5) SWCNTs, we achieve large Rabi splitting (>110 meV), efficient polariton relaxation and narrow band emission (<15 meV). Given their high charge carrier mobility and excellent photostability, SWCNTs represent a promising new avenue towards practical exciton-polariton devices operating at telecommunication wavelengths. PMID:27721454

  4. Management of data quality of high level waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-12

    Over the past 10 years, the Hanford Site has been transitioning from nuclear materials production to Site cleanup operations. High-level waste characterization at the Hanford Site provides data to support present waste processing operations, tank safety programs, and future waste disposal programs. Quality elements in the high-level waste characterization program will be presented by following a sample through the data quality objective, sampling, laboratory analysis and data review process. Transition from production to cleanup has resulted in changes in quality systems and program; the changes, as well as other issues in these quality programs, will be described. Laboratory assessment through quality control and performance evaluation programs will be described, and data assessments in the laboratory and final reporting in the tank characterization reports will be discussed.

  5. [Spectrum characterization and fine structure of copper phthalocyanine-doped TiO2 microcavities].

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-lin; Zhang, Xin-yi; Zhong, Ju-hua; Zhu, Yi-hua; He, Bo; Wei, Shi-qiang

    2007-10-01

    Copper phthalocyanine-doped TiO2 microcavities were fabricated by chemistry method. Their spectrum characterization was studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, and their fine structure was analyzed by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The results show that there is interaction of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and TiO2 microcavities after TiO2 microcavities was doped with CuPc. For example, there is absorption at 900.76 cm(-1) in FTIR spectra, and the "red shift" of both OH vibration at 3392.75 cm(-1) and CH vibration at 2848.83 cm(-1). There exist definite peak shifts and intensity changes in infrared absorption in the C-C or C-N vibration in the planar phthalocyanine ring, the winding vibration of C-H inside and C-N outside plane of benzene ring. In Raman spectrum, there are 403.4, 592.1 and 679.1 cm(-1) characterized peaks of TiO2 in CuPc-doped TiO2 microcavities, but their wave-numbers show shifts to anatase TiO2. The vibration peaks at 1586.8 and 1525.6 cm(-1) show that there exists the composite material of CuPc and TiO2. These changes are related to the plane tropism of the molecule structure of copper phthalocyanine. XAFS showed tetrahedron TiO4 structure of Ti in TiO2 microcavities doped with copper phthalocyanine, and the changes of inner "medial distances" and the surface structure of TiO2 microcavities.

  6. High-quality learning: harder to achieve than we think?

    PubMed

    Mattick, Karen; Knight, Lynn

    2007-07-01

    High-quality learning in the context of medical education can be defined by current conceptions of a deep approach to learning and studying, in combination with metacognitive skills such as personal organisation and reflection on learning. Modern undergraduate education aims to provide an environment that will promote high-quality learning, but this is not as easy to achieve as it might at first seem. Part of the difficulty arises because it is student perceptions of the learning and assessment environment that determine the adopted approach to studying and these are notoriously hard to predict. To generate a detailed understanding of aspects that facilitate and inhibit high-quality learning within an innovative, undergraduate medical programme. We carried out semi-structured interviews with Year 2 undergraduate students. Self-directed, problem-based and vocationally relevant activities appeared to promote high-quality learning. Unanticipated barriers to high-quality learning in this setting included a perceived lack of useful feedback on learning, the assessment of applied medical knowledge for a subset of underperforming students, anatomy as a curricular topic and the quantity of information to be assimilated in medicine. Only by understanding the barriers as they are perceived by students can we design evidence-based modifications to curricula that are likely to be successful in promoting high-quality learning.

  7. Quantum correlation control for two semiconductor microcavities connected by an optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, A.-B. A.; Eleuch, H.

    2017-06-01

    We explore the quantum correlations for two coupled quantum wells. Each quantum well is inside a semiconductor microcavity. The two cavities are connected by an optical fiber. The study of quantum correlations, namely the geometric quantum discord, measurement-induced non-locality and negativity, reveals sudden death and sudden birth phenomena. These effects depend not only on the initial states, coupling strengths of the cavity-fiber and cavity-exciton constants, but also on the dissipation rates of the semiconductor microcavities. We show that the coupling constants control the quantum correlations.

  8. Hydrostatic pressure sensor based on micro-cavities developed by the catastrophic fuse effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingues, M. F.; Paixão, T.; Mesquita, E.; Alberto, N.; Antunes, P.; Varum, H.; André, P. S.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, an optical fiber hydrostatic pressure sensor based in Fabry-Perot micro-cavities is presented. These micro structures were generated by the recycling of optical fiber previously damaged by the fiber fuse effect, resulting in a cost effective solution when compared with the traditional methods used to produce similar micro-cavities. The developed sensor was tested for pressures ranging from 20.0 to 190.0 cmH2O and a sensitivity of 53.7 +/- 2.6 pm/cmH2O for hydrostatic pressures below to 100 cmH2O was achieved.

  9. Black phosphorus-based one-dimensional photonic crystals and microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriegel, Ilka; Toffanin, Stefano; Scotognella, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    The latest achievements in the fabrication of black phosphorus thin layers, towards the technological breakthrough of a phosphorene atomically thin layer, are paving the way for a their employment in electronics, optics, and optoelectronics. In this work, we have simulated the optical properties of one-dimensional photonic structures, i.e. photonic crystals and microcavities, in which few-layer black phosphorus is one of the components. The insertion of the 5 nm black phosphorous layers leads to a photonic band gap in the photonic crystals and a cavity mode in the microcavity interesting for light manipulation and emission enhancement.

  10. Microcavity organic light-emitting diodes for strongly directed pure red, green, and blue emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokito, Shizuo; Tsutsui, Tetsuo; Taga, Yasunori

    1999-09-01

    In this article we demonstrate strongly directed pure red, green, and blue emissions in the organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with a planar microcavity defined by a pair of dielectric mirror and a metal mirror. By careful control of the cavity mode and the position of the resonance wavelength, the strong directionality in the forward direction as well as the spectral narrowing and the intensity enhancement are realized in the microcavity OLEDs. The intensity enhancements at the resonance wavelength are 1.5-5 compared to the noncavity OLEDs, and the chromaticity coordinates of the emission colors are the ideal primary colors. The experimental results are compared to theoretically calculated ones.

  11. Black phosphorus-based one-dimensional photonic crystals and microcavities.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Ilka; Toffanin, Stefano; Scotognella, Francesco

    2016-11-10

    The latest achievements in the fabrication of thin layers of black phosphorus (BP), toward the technological breakthrough of a phosphorene atomically thin layer, are paving the way for their use in electronics, optics, and optoelectronics. In this work, we have simulated the optical properties of one-dimensional photonic structures, i.e., photonic crystals and microcavities, in which few-layer BP is one of the components. The insertion of the 5-nm black phosphorous layers leads to a photonic band gap in the photonic crystals and a cavity mode in the microcavity that is interesting for light manipulation and emission enhancement.

  12. Strong coupling and polariton lasing in Te based microcavities embedding (Cd,Zn)Te quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Rousset, J.-G. Piętka, B.; Król, M.; Mirek, R.; Lekenta, K.; Szczytko, J.; Borysiuk, J.; Suffczyński, J.; Kazimierczuk, T.; Goryca, M.; Smoleński, T.; Kossacki, P.; Nawrocki, M.; Pacuski, W.

    2015-11-16

    We report on properties of an optical microcavity based on (Cd,Zn,Mg)Te layers and embedding (Cd,Zn)Te quantum wells. The key point of the structure design is the lattice matching of the whole structure to MgTe, which eliminates the internal strain and allows one to embed an arbitrary number of unstrained quantum wells in the microcavity. We evidence the strong light-matter coupling regime already for the structure containing a single quantum well. Embedding four unstrained quantum wells results in further enhancement of the exciton-photon coupling and the polariton lasing in the strong coupling regime.

  13. Case mix, quality and high-cost kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Englesbe, M J; Dimick, J B; Fan, Z; Baser, O; Birkmeyer, J D

    2009-05-01

    A better understanding of high-cost kidney transplant patients would be useful for informing value-based purchasing strategies by payers. This retrospective cohort study was based on the Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MEDPAR) files from 2003 to 2006. The focus of this analysis was high-cost kidney transplant patients (patients that qualified for Medicare outlier payments and 30-day readmission payments). Using regression techniques, we explored relationships between high-cost kidney transplant patients, center-specific case mix, and center quality. Among 43 393 kidney transplants in Medicare recipients, 35.2% were categorized as high-cost patients. These payments represented 20% of total Medicare payments for kidney transplantation and exceeded $200 million over the study period. Case mix was associated with these payments and was an important factor underlying variation in hospital payments high-cost patients. Hospital quality was also a strong determinant of future Medicare payments for high-cost patients. Compared to high-quality centers, low-quality centers cost Medicare an additional $1185 per kidney transplant. Payments for high-cost patients represent a significant proportion of the total costs of kidney transplant surgical care. Quality improvement may be an important strategy for reducing the costs of kidney transplantation.

  14. Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: The Critical Role of Quality Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Spinks, Tracy; Ganz, Patricia A.; Sledge, George W.; Levit, Laura; Hayman, James A.; Eberlein, Timothy J.; Feeley, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    In 1999, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published Ensuring Quality Cancer Care, an influential report that described an ideal cancer care system and issued ten recommendations to address pervasive gaps in the understanding and delivery of quality cancer care. Despite generating much fervor, the report’s recommendations—including two recommendations related to quality measurement—remain largely unfulfilled. Amidst continuing concerns regarding increasing costs and questionable quality of care, the IOM charged a new committee with revisiting the 1999 report and with reassessing national cancer care, with a focus on the aging US population. The committee identified high-quality patient-clinician relationships and interactions as central drivers of quality and attributed existing quality gaps, in part, to the nation’s inability to measure and improve cancer care delivery in a systematic way. In 2013, the committee published its findings in Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis, which included two recommendations that emphasize coordinated, patient-centered quality measurement and information technology enhancements: Develop a national quality reporting program for cancer care as part of a learning health care system; and,Develop an ethically sound learning health care information technology system for cancer that enables real-time analysis of data from cancer patients in a variety of care settings. These recommendations underscore the need for independent national oversight, public-private collaboration, and substantial funding to create robust, patient-centered quality measurement and learning enterprises to improve the quality, accessibility, and affordability of cancer care in America. PMID:24839592

  15. Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: The Critical Role of Quality Measurement.

    PubMed

    Spinks, Tracy; Ganz, Patricia A; Sledge, George W; Levit, Laura; Hayman, James A; Eberlein, Timothy J; Feeley, Thomas W

    2014-03-01

    In 1999, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published Ensuring Quality Cancer Care, an influential report that described an ideal cancer care system and issued ten recommendations to address pervasive gaps in the understanding and delivery of quality cancer care. Despite generating much fervor, the report's recommendations-including two recommendations related to quality measurement-remain largely unfulfilled. Amidst continuing concerns regarding increasing costs and questionable quality of care, the IOM charged a new committee with revisiting the 1999 report and with reassessing national cancer care, with a focus on the aging US population. The committee identified high-quality patient-clinician relationships and interactions as central drivers of quality and attributed existing quality gaps, in part, to the nation's inability to measure and improve cancer care delivery in a systematic way. In 2013, the committee published its findings in Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis, which included two recommendations that emphasize coordinated, patient-centered quality measurement and information technology enhancements: Develop a national quality reporting program for cancer care as part of a learning health care system; and,Develop an ethically sound learning health care information technology system for cancer that enables real-time analysis of data from cancer patients in a variety of care settings. These recommendations underscore the need for independent national oversight, public-private collaboration, and substantial funding to create robust, patient-centered quality measurement and learning enterprises to improve the quality, accessibility, and affordability of cancer care in America.

  16. Coupling of a single diamond nanocrystal to a whispering-gallery microcavity: Photon transport benefitting from Rayleigh scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yongchun; Xiao Yunfeng; Li Beibei; Jiang Xuefeng; Li Yan; Gong Qihuang

    2011-07-15

    We study the Rayleigh scattering induced by a diamond nanocrystal in a whispering-gallery-microcavity-waveguide coupling system and find that it plays a significant role in the photon transportation. On the one hand, this study provides insight into future solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics aimed at understanding strong-coupling physics. On the other hand, benefitting from this Rayleigh scattering, effects such as dipole-induced transparency and strong photon antibunching can occur simultaneously. As a potential application, this system can function as a high-efficiency photon turnstile. In contrast to B. Dayan et al. [Science 319, 1062 (2008)], the photon turnstiles proposed here are almost immune to the nanocrystal's azimuthal position.

  17. Coupling of a single diamond nanocrystal to a whispering-gallery microcavity: Photon transport benefitting from Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Chun; Xiao, Yun-Feng; Li, Bei-Bei; Jiang, Xue-Feng; Li, Yan; Gong, Qihuang

    2011-07-01

    We study the Rayleigh scattering induced by a diamond nanocrystal in a whispering-gallery-microcavity-waveguide coupling system and find that it plays a significant role in the photon transportation. On the one hand, this study provides insight into future solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics aimed at understanding strong-coupling physics. On the other hand, benefitting from this Rayleigh scattering, effects such as dipole-induced transparency and strong photon antibunching can occur simultaneously. As a potential application, this system can function as a high-efficiency photon turnstile. In contrast to B. Dayan [ScienceSCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1152261 319, 1062 (2008)], the photon turnstiles proposed here are almost immune to the nanocrystal’s azimuthal position.

  18. Accurate simulation of two-dimensional optical microcavities with uniquely solvable boundary integral equations and trigonometric Galerkin discretization.

    PubMed

    Boriskina, Svetlana V; Sewell, Phillip; Benson, Trevor M; Nosich, Alexander I

    2004-03-01

    A fast and accurate method is developed to compute the natural frequencies and scattering characteristics of arbitrary-shape two-dimensional dielectric resonators. The problem is formulated in terms of a uniquely solvable set of second-kind boundary integral equations and discretized by the Galerkin method with angular exponents as global test and trial functions. The log-singular term is extracted from one of the kernels, and closed-form expressions are derived for the main parts of all the integral operators. The resulting discrete scheme has a very high convergence rate. The method is used in the simulation of several optical microcavities for modern dense wavelength-division-multiplexed systems.

  19. Teleportation of a Toffoli gate among distant solid-state qubits with quantum dots embedded in optical microcavities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shi; Cui, Wen-Xue; Wang, Dong-Yang; Bai, Cheng-Hua; Guo, Qi; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2015-07-30

    Teleportation of unitary operations can be viewed as a quantum remote control. The remote realization of robust multiqubit logic gates among distant long-lived qubit registers is a key challenge for quantum computation and quantum information processing. Here we propose a simple and deterministic scheme for teleportation of a Toffoli gate among three spatially separated electron spin qubits in optical microcavities by using local linear optical operations, an auxiliary electron spin, two circularly-polarized entangled photon pairs, photon measurements, and classical communication. We assess the feasibility of the scheme and show that the scheme can be achieved with high average fidelity under the current technology. The scheme opens promising perspectives for constructing long-distance quantum communication and quantum computation networks with solid-state qubits.

  20. High quality factor, fully switchable terahertz superconducting metasurface

    SciTech Connect

    Scalari, G. Maissen, C.; Faist, J.; Cibella, S.; Leoni, R.

    2014-12-29

    We present a complementary THz metasurface realised with Niobium thin film which displays a quality factor Q = 54 and a fully switchable behaviour as a function of the temperature. The switching behaviour and the high quality factor are due to a careful design of the metasurface aimed at maximising the ohmic losses when the Nb is above the critical temperature and minimising the radiative coupling. The superconductor allows the operation of the cavity with high Q and the use of inductive elements with a high aspect ratio. Comparison with three dimensional finite element simulations highlights the crucial role of the inductive elements and of the kinetic inductance of the Cooper pairs in achieving the high quality factor and the high field enhancement.

  1. Concrete Waste Recycling Process for High Quality Aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikura, Takeshi; Fujii, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-15

    Large amount of concrete waste generates during nuclear power plant (NPP) dismantling. Non-contaminated concrete waste is assumed to be disposed in a landfill site, but that will not be the solution especially in the future, because of decreasing tendency of the site availability and natural resources. Concerning concrete recycling, demand for roadbeds and backfill tends to be less than the amount of dismantled concrete generated in a single rural site, and conventional recycled aggregate is limited of its use to non-structural concrete, because of its inferior quality to ordinary natural aggregate. Therefore, it is vital to develop high quality recycled aggregate for general uses of dismantled concrete. If recycled aggregate is available for high structural concrete, the dismantling concrete is recyclable as aggregate for industry including nuclear field. Authors developed techniques on high quality aggregate reclamation for large amount of concrete generated during NPP decommissioning. Concrete of NPP buildings has good features for recycling aggregate; large quantity of high quality aggregate from same origin, record keeping of the aggregate origin, and little impurities in dismantled concrete such as wood and plastics. The target of recycled aggregate in this development is to meet the quality criteria for NPP concrete as prescribed in JASS 5N 'Specification for Nuclear Power Facility Reinforced Concrete' and JASS 5 'Specification for Reinforced Concrete Work'. The target of recycled aggregate concrete is to be comparable performance with ordinary aggregate concrete. The high quality recycled aggregate production techniques are assumed to apply for recycling for large amount of non-contaminated concrete. These techniques can also be applied for slightly contaminated concrete dismantled from radiological control area (RCA), together with free release survey. In conclusion: a technology on dismantled concrete recycling for high quality aggregate was developed

  2. High quality genomic DNA extraction from postmortem fetal tissue.

    PubMed

    Addison, S; Sebire, N J; Taylor, A M; Abrams, D; Peebles, D; Mein, C; Munroe, P B; Thayyil, S

    2012-11-01

    We examined the yield and quality of genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from various postmortem fetal tissues. Fetal tissues were collected at the time of autopsy, and DNA was subsequently extracted. The yield and DNA quality was assessed using ultraviolet spectrometry and agarose gel electrophoresis. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assess the DNA extracted for genomic testing. The median (range) gestation of the fetuses was 22 (16-41) weeks and the postmortem interval was 5.5 (2-10) days. Non-degraded genomic DNA was successfully extracted from all fetal tissues. Liver tissue had the lowest quality and muscle the highest quality. DNA yield or purity was not influenced by the postmortem interval. High quality genomic DNA can be extracted from fetal muscle, despite postmortem intervals of several days.

  3. Broken symmetry dielectric resonators for high quality factor Fano metasurfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Campione, Salvatore; Liu, Sheng; Basilio, Lorena I.; ...

    2016-10-25

    We present a new approach to dielectric metasurface design that relies on a single resonator per unit cell and produces robust, high quality factor Fano resonances. Our approach utilizes symmetry breaking of highly symmetric resonator geometries, such as cubes, to induce couplings between the otherwise orthogonal resonator modes. In particular, we design perturbations that couple “bright” dipole modes to “dark” dipole modes whose radiative decay is suppressed by local field effects in the array. Our approach is widely scalable from the near-infrared to radio frequencies. We first unravel the Fano resonance behavior through numerical simulations of a germanium resonator-based metasurfacemore » that achieves a quality factor of ~1300 at ~10.8 μm. Then, we present two experimental demonstrations operating in the near-infrared (~1 μm): a silicon-based implementation that achieves a quality factor of ~350; and a gallium arsenide-based structure that achieves a quality factor of ~600, the highest near-infrared quality factor experimentally demonstrated to date with this kind of metasurface. Importantly, large electromagnetic field enhancements appear within the resonators at the Fano resonant frequencies. Here, we envision that combining high quality factor, high field enhancement resonances with nonlinear and active/gain materials such as gallium arsenide will lead to new classes of active optical devices.« less

  4. Broken symmetry dielectric resonators for high quality factor Fano metasurfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Campione, Salvatore; Liu, Sheng; Basilio, Lorena I.; Warne, Larry K.; Langston, William L.; Luk, Ting S.; Wendt, Joel R.; Reno, John L.; Keeler, Gordon A.; Brener, Igal; Sinclair, Michael B.

    2016-10-25

    We present a new approach to dielectric metasurface design that relies on a single resonator per unit cell and produces robust, high quality factor Fano resonances. Our approach utilizes symmetry breaking of highly symmetric resonator geometries, such as cubes, to induce couplings between the otherwise orthogonal resonator modes. In particular, we design perturbations that couple “bright” dipole modes to “dark” dipole modes whose radiative decay is suppressed by local field effects in the array. Our approach is widely scalable from the near-infrared to radio frequencies. We first unravel the Fano resonance behavior through numerical simulations of a germanium resonator-based metasurface that achieves a quality factor of ~1300 at ~10.8 μm. Then, we present two experimental demonstrations operating in the near-infrared (~1 μm): a silicon-based implementation that achieves a quality factor of ~350; and a gallium arsenide-based structure that achieves a quality factor of ~600, the highest near-infrared quality factor experimentally demonstrated to date with this kind of metasurface. Importantly, large electromagnetic field enhancements appear within the resonators at the Fano resonant frequencies. Here, we envision that combining high quality factor, high field enhancement resonances with nonlinear and active/gain materials such as gallium arsenide will lead to new classes of active optical devices.

  5. Polariton lasing vs. photon lasing in a semiconductor microcavity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hui; Weihs, Gregor; Snoke, David; Bloch, Jacqueline; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2003-01-01

    Nearly one decade after the first observation of Bose–Einstein condensation in atom vapors and realization of matter-wave (atom) lasers, similar concepts have been demonstrated recently for polaritons: half-matter, half-light quasiparticles in semiconductor microcavities. The half-light nature of polaritons makes polariton lasers promising as a new source of coherent and nonclassical light with extremely low threshold energy. The half-matter nature makes polariton lasers a unique test bed for many-body theories and cavity quantum electrodynamics. In this article, we present a series of experimental studies of a polariton laser, exploring its properties as a relatively dense degenerate Bose gas and comparing it to a photon laser achieved in the same structure. The polaritons have an effective mass that is twice the cavity photon effective mass, yet seven orders of magnitude less than the hydrogen atom mass; hence, they can potentially condense at temperatures seven orders of magnitude higher than those required for atom Bose–Einstein condensations. Accompanying the phase transition, a polariton laser emits coherent light but at a threshold carrier density two orders of magnitude lower than that needed for a normal photon laser in a same structure. It also is shown that, beyond threshold, the polariton population splits to a thermal equilibrium Bose–Einstein distribution at in-plane wave number k∥ > 0 and a nonequilibrium condensate at k∥ > 0, with a chemical potential approaching to zero. The spatial distributions and polarization characteristics of polaritons also are discussed as unique signatures of a polariton laser. PMID:14673089

  6. Coherent spin dynamics of polaritons in semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renucci, P.; Amand, T.; Marie, X.

    2003-10-01

    The influence of the strong light-matter coupling in semiconductor III-V microcavities on polariton spin dynamics is studied in the spontaneous emission regime. Under resonant pulsed excitation, we observe a quenching of spin and alignment relaxation when the polariton is photon-like. These behaviours are attributed to the very small value of the long-range electron-hole exchange term of Coulomb interaction within the excitonic component of the quasi-particle and to the weakness of polariton-polariton Coulomb scattering via the inter-exciton short-range exchange interaction. We investigate then the polariton coherent spin dynamics. Coherence decay occurs in two steps: at short time delay, the polariton keeps the phase memory of the excitation pulse. We show that it is thus possible to manipulate the polariton spin and alignment within the optical dephasing time T2 using the temporal coherent control technique. In a second step (t > T2), optical coherence vanishes, but spin coherences survive and spin quantum beats experiments can be performed within the spin relaxation time under transverse magnetic field. We observe an electron-hole spin correlation within the excitonic component of the quasi-particle under resonant excitation; an increase of the absolute value of the electron effective transverse Landé g-factor with the excitonic character of polaritons is evidenced, which is the consequence of the strong coupling regime. The main experimental features are well accounted by a model taking into account only two classes of excitations in the lower polariton branch.

  7. A procedure for high resolution satellite imagery quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Mattia; De Vendictis, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Data products generated from High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) are routinely evaluated during the so-called in-orbit test period, in order to verify if their quality fits the desired features and, if necessary, to obtain the image correction parameters to be used at the ground processing center. Nevertheless, it is often useful to have tools to evaluate image quality also at the final user level. Image quality is defined by some parameters, such as the radiometric resolution and its accuracy, represented by the noise level, and the geometric resolution and sharpness, described by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). This paper proposes a procedure to evaluate these image quality parameters; the procedure was implemented in a suitable software and tested on high resolution imagery acquired by the QuickBird, WorldView-1 and Cartosat-1 satellites.

  8. A Procedure for High Resolution Satellite Imagery Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Mattia; De Vendictis, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Data products generated from High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) are routinely evaluated during the so-called in-orbit test period, in order to verify if their quality fits the desired features and, if necessary, to obtain the image correction parameters to be used at the ground processing center. Nevertheless, it is often useful to have tools to evaluate image quality also at the final user level. Image quality is defined by some parameters, such as the radiometric resolution and its accuracy, represented by the noise level, and the geometric resolution and sharpness, described by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). This paper proposes a procedure to evaluate these image quality parameters; the procedure was implemented in a suitable software and tested on high resolution imagery acquired by the QuickBird, WorldView-1 and Cartosat-1 satellites. PMID:22412312

  9. Developing Visions of High-Quality Mathematics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munter, Charles

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces an interview-based instrument that was created for the purposes of characterizing the visions of high-quality mathematics instruction of teachers, principals, mathematics coaches, and district leaders and tracking changes in those visions over time. The instrument models trajectories of perceptions of high-quality…

  10. Quality Assurance and Statistics. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirsbinski, William

    This high technology quality assurance and statistics training module is a part of the statistics unit for an algebra I or algebra II course. This module fits into high school math classes in which students compute and display measures of central tendency and variability. The module contains a description, objectives, and content outline--phase I…

  11. Developing Visions of High-Quality Mathematics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munter, Charles

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces an interview-based instrument that was created for the purposes of characterizing the visions of high-quality mathematics instruction of teachers, principals, mathematics coaches, and district leaders and tracking changes in those visions over time. The instrument models trajectories of perceptions of high-quality…

  12. Realization of high quality production schedules: Structuring quality factors via iteration of user specification processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamazaki, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an architecture for realizing high quality production schedules. Although quality is one of the most important aspects of production scheduling, it is difficult, even for a user, to specify precisely. However, it is also true that the decision as to whether a scheduler is good or bad can only be made by the user. This paper proposes the following: (1) the quality of a schedule can be represented in the form of quality factors, i.e. constraints and objectives of the domain, and their structure; (2) quality factors and their structure can be used for decision making at local decision points during the scheduling process; and (3) that they can be defined via iteration of user specification processes.

  13. Process to Continuously Melt, Refine and Cast High Quality Steel

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to conduct research and development targeted at designing a revolutionary steelmaking process. This process will deliver high quality steel from scrap to the casting mold in one continuous process and will be safer, more productive, and less capital intensive to build and operate than conventional steelmaking. The new process will produce higher quality steel faster than traditional batch processes while consuming less energy and other resources.

  14. FDTD and transfer matrix methods for evaluating the performance of photonic crystal based microcavities for exciton-polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Cheng; Byrnes, Tim

    2016-11-01

    We investigate alternative microcavity structures for exciton-polaritons consisting of photonic crystals instead of distributed Bragg reflectors. Finite-difference time-domain simulations and scattering transfer matrix methods are used to evaluate the cavity performance. The results are compared with conventional distributed Bragg reflectors. We find that in terms of the photon lifetime, the photonic crystal based microcavities are competitive, with typical lifetimes in the region of ∼20 ps being achieved. The photonic crystal microcavities have the advantage that they are compact and are frequency adjustable, showing that they are viable to investigate exciton-polariton condensation physics.

  15. Quality of service on high-speed data networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Ezio; Antonelli, Ferruccio

    1995-02-01

    Since the beginning of this century the issue of `quality' has been gaining increasing importance in a number of fields of human activities. For telecommunication services, too, the quality perceived by customers has been taken into account early on as an issue of strategic importance. Whilst for telephony the Quality of Service (QoS) has been already investigated and identified in terms of parameters and related test methodology, the situation for high speed data services (i.e. CBDS/SMDS, Frame Relay, etc.), provided by means of high speed network based on Asynchronous Transfer Moe (ATM) or Metropolitan Area Network technologies, can still be considered `under study'. There is a death of experience not only in terms of measurement instruments and procedures, but also in terms of knowledge of the relationship between the QoS provided at a network level and the quality perceived by the user on his or her terminal. The complexity of the equipment involved in setting up an end-to-end solution based on high speed data communications makes the problems of knowledge and supply of quality very hard to solve. Starting from the experience gained in carrying out high- speed network field trials based on Metropolitan Area Networks and, more recently, on ATM technology, the paper mainly deals with the problem of defining, measuring and then offering a specific QoS. First, the issue of what the user expects from the `high-speed network' is addressed. This analysis is carried out trying to gather what is peculiar to high-speed data communications from the user standpoint. Next, the focus is on how to cope with the requirements due to users' expectations, while carefully considering the basic principles of quality. Finally, a solution is proposed, starting from the experience gained from high speed networks installed in Italy.

  16. Multi-channel biodetection via resonant microcavities coupled to a photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillermain, Elisa; Fauchet, Philippe M.

    2009-02-01

    Photonic crystal (PhC) microcavities present multiple advantages for rapid, accurate, label-free, and sensitive detection. But their principle of operation (observation of a peak in transmission) makes their integration in serial arrays difficult. Here we report on multiple resonant cavities coupled to a single photonic crystal waveguide. The device configuration consists of a PhC waveguide with a defect line along which light is guided. Several resonant microcavities, created by modifying the radius of a hole adjacent to the defect line, are coupled to the waveguide. This PhC device, operating as a multi-channel sensor, maintains the advantages of the PhC microcavities and allows for serial arrays: Light is globally transmitted through the waveguide, except for the wavelengths corresponding to the resonant modes of the microcavities. The transmission spectrum shows as many dips as there are cavities. Simulations show that the sensitivity of such structures allows the detection of single particles -typically a virus. Preliminary results show the fabrication and characterization of a double-channel structure with small defects as a solvent sensor.

  17. Efficient numerical method for analyzing optical bistability in photonic crystal microcavities.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lijun; Lu, Ya Yan

    2013-05-20

    Nonlinear optical effects can be enhanced by photonic crystal microcavities and be used to develop practical ultra-compact optical devices with low power requirements. The finite-difference time-domain method is the standard numerical method for simulating nonlinear optical devices, but it has limitations in terms of accuracy and efficiency. In this paper, a rigorous and efficient frequency-domain numerical method is developed for analyzing nonlinear optical devices where the nonlinear effect is concentrated in the microcavities. The method replaces the linear problem outside the microcavities by a rigorous and numerically computed boundary condition, then solves the nonlinear problem iteratively in a small region around the microcavities. Convergence of the iterative method is much easier to achieve since the size of the problem is significantly reduced. The method is presented for a specific two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide-cavity system with a Kerr nonlinearity, using numerical methods that can take advantage of the geometric features of the structure. The method is able to calculate multiple solutions exhibiting the optical bistability phenomenon in the strongly nonlinear regime.

  18. Optimisation of the prism coupling of optical whispering-gallery-mode microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demchenko, Yu A.; Bilenko, I. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.

    2017-08-01

    The methods for increasing the coupling efficiency of a prism with spheroidal microcavities, aimed at exciting whisperinggallery modes, have been analytically investigated. Optimal angles of incidence and incident beam parameters are obtained for a spheroidal cavity. The cavity eigenfrequency shift caused by the presence of a prism and the introduced loss by it is calculated.

  19. Two open access, high-quality datasets from anesthetic records.

    PubMed

    Cumin, David; Newton-Wade, Vanessa; Harrison, Michael J; Merry, Alan F

    2013-01-01

    To provide a set of high-quality time-series physiologic and event data from anesthetic cases formatted in an easy-to-use structure. With ethics committee approval, data from surgical operations under general anesthesia were collected, including physiologic data, drug administrations, events, and clinicians' comments. These data were de-identified, formatted in a combined CSV/XML structure and made publicly available. Two separate datasets were collected containing physiologic time-series data and time-stamped events for 34 patients. For 20 patients, the data included 400 physiologic signals collected over 20 h, 274 events, and 597 drug administrations. For 14 patients, the data included 23 physiologic signals collected over 69 h, with 286 time stamped comments. Data reuse potentially saves significant time and financial costs. However, there are few high-quality repositories for accessible physiologic data and clinical interventions from surgical cases. De-identifying records assists with overcoming problems of privacy and storing the data in a format which is easily manipulated with computing resources facilitates access by the wider research community. It is hoped that additional high-quality data will be added. Future work includes developing tools to explore and visualize the data more efficiently, and establishing quality control measures. An approach to collecting and storing high-quality datasets from surgical operations under anesthesia such that they can be easily accessed by others for use in research has been demonstrated.

  20. Physician incentives to improve quality and the delivery of high quality ambulatory medical care

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Tara F.; Federman, Alex D.; Ross, Joseph S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of physician incentives for quality and to test the hypothesis that quality of ambulatory medical care is better by physicians with these incentives. Study Design Cross-sectional study using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Method We examined the association between physician compensation based on quality, physician compensation based on satisfaction, and public reporting of practice measures and twelve measures of high quality ambulatory care. Results Overall, 20.8% of visits were to physicians whose compensation was partially based on quality, 17.7% of visits were to physicians whose compensation was partially based on patient satisfaction, and 10.0% of visits were to physicians who publicly reported performance measures. Quality of ambulatory care varied: weight reduction counseling occurred in 12.0% of preventative care visits by obese patients whereas urinalysis was not performed in 93.0% of preventative care visits. In multivariable analyses, there were no statistically significant associations between compensation for quality and delivery of any of the 12 measures, nor between compensation for satisfaction and 11 of the 12 measures; the exception was BMI screening in preventative visits (47.8% vs. 56.2%, adjusted p=0.004). There was also no statistically significant association between public reporting and delivery of 11 of 12 measures; the exception was weight reduction counseling for overweight patients (10.0% vs. 25.5%, adjusted p=0.01). Conclusions We found no consistent association between incentives for quality and 12 measures of high quality ambulatory care. PMID:22554038

  1. High quality factor etchless silicon photonic ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lian-Wee; Wiederhecker, Gustavo S; Cardenas, Jaime; Poitras, Carl; Lipson, Michal

    2011-03-28

    We demonstrate high quality factor etchless silicon photonic ring resonators fabricated by selective thermal oxidation of silicon without the silicon layer being exposed to any plasma etching throughout the fabrication process. We achieve a high intrinsic quality factor of 510,000 in 50 µm-radius ring resonators, corresponding to a ring loss of 0.8 dB/cm. The device has a total chip insertion loss of 2.5 dB, achieved by designing etchless silicon inverse nanotapers at both the input and output of the chip.

  2. Can patients reliably identify safe, high quality care?

    PubMed Central

    Tevis, Sarah E.; Schmocker, Ryan K.; Kennedy, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey is a publicly reported tool that measures patient satisfaction. As both patients and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) reimbursement rely on survey results as a metric of quality of care, we reviewed the current literature to determine if patient satisfaction correlates with quality, safety, or patient outcomes. We found varying associations between safety culture, process of care measure compliance, and patient outcomes with patient satisfaction on the HCAHPS survey. Some studies found inverse relationships between quality and safety metrics and patient satisfaction. The measure that most reliably correlated with high patient satisfaction was low readmission rate. Future studies using patient specific data are needed to better identify which factors most influence patient satisfaction and to determine if patient satisfaction is a marker of safer and better quality care. Furthermore, the HCAHPS survey should continue to undergo evaluations to assure it generates predictable results. PMID:26413179

  3. Study of high dynamic range video quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narwaria, Manish; Perreira Da Silva, Matthieu; Le Callet, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, High Dynamic Range (HDR) imaging has attracted significant attention from industry and academia. As a result, there are currently several on-going efforts towards standardization and benchmarking of existing tools for HDR image and video, and one of the key aspects is that of video quality measurement (both subjective and objective approaches). Therefore, this paper aims to identify few key challenges in the said area and then discuss existing solutions. Specifically, we first discuss a few important practical aspects that make HDR video quality measurement potentially challenging. Second, we report our recent efforts towards developing HDR video datasets that have been subjectively annotated for visual quality. Finally, we analyze and compare the effectiveness of existing solutions for objective quality prediction.

  4. Providing high-quality care in primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Geneau, Robert; Grande, Claudio Del; Denis, Jean-Louis; Hudon, Éveline; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Bonin, Lucie; Duplain, Réjean; Goudreau, Johanne; Hogg, William

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To gain a deeper understanding of how primary care (PC) practices belonging to different models manage resources to provide high-quality care. Design Multiple-case study embedded in a cross-sectional study of a random sample of 37 practices. Setting Three regions of Quebec. Participants Health care professionals and staff of 5 PC practices. Methods Five cases showing above-average results on quality-of-care indicators were purposefully selected to contrast on region, practice size, and PC model. Data were collected using an organizational questionnaire; the Team Climate Inventory, which was completed by health care professionals and staff; and 33 individual interviews. Detailed case histories were written and thematic analysis was performed. Main findings The core common feature of these practices was their ongoing effort to make trade-offs to deliver services that met their vision of high-quality care. These compromises involved the same 3 areas, but to varying degrees depending on clinic characteristics: developing a shared vision of high-quality care; aligning resource use with that vision; and balancing professional aspirations and population needs. The leadership of the physician lead was crucial. The external environment was perceived as a source of pressure and dilemmas rather than as a source of support in these matters. Conclusion Irrespective of their models, PC practices’ pursuit of high-quality care is based on a vision in which accessibility is a key component, balanced by appropriate management of available resources and of external environment expectations. Current PC reforms often create tensions rather than support PC practices in their pursuit of high-quality care. PMID:24829023

  5. Electrically tunable, optical microcavity based on metallized and ultra-soft PDMS gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, M.; Slowik, I.; Paschew, G.; Merkel, U.; Fröb, H.; Leo, K.; Richter, A.

    2016-04-01

    Tunable, optical microcavities (MC) gain more and more importance for display, laser or other optical applications. The setup of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) enables a simple integration of an optical cavity, since reflective electrodes can confine a cavity that is filled with a transparent elastomer. Applying a voltage to the electrodes leads to squeezing of the elastomer and, due to the cavity thickness decrease, the resonator modes of interfering light changes. In this work we present an electrically tunable, optical MC based on ultra-soft poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The PDMS gel is coated on a glass substrate with a distributed Bragg reflector, an ITO bottom electrode and a flexible, highly reflective metal electrode and mirror on top. The usage of an ultra-soft PDMS gel, with a storage modulus of about 1kPa, allows to decrease the operating voltage down to a few hundred or even several ten volts. The critical step of fabrication is the metallization of the PDMS gel layer that requires a previous oxidizing surface activation to gain reflective and conductive silver based layers on top. Therefore, the effects of oxygen plasma and UV/ozone treatment on PDMS and the created metal layer were investigated intensively. The performance of the electrically tunable, optical MC is tremendously dependent from an adequate surface activation and structuring of the top electrodes considering the mirror displacement and activation voltage. Here we could show that tunable MCs based on oxygen plasma activated PDMS show a homogenous and high thickness decrease up to 70% at 200V.

  6. Monitoring reservoir water quality with Formosat-2 high spatiotemporal imagery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hua; Liu, Cheng-Chien; Wen, Ching-Gung; Cheng, I-Fan; Tam, Chi-Kin; Huang, Ching-Shiang

    2009-11-01

    Water reservoirs are the primary source of freshwater for most cities around the world. To monitor the dynamic changes in reservoir water quality, however, we need an innovative platform that is able to observe the entire reservoir with both high-spatial- and high-temporal-resolution. Formosat-2 is the first commercial satellite dedicated to site surveillance with a high-spatial-resolution sensor placed in a daily revisit orbit (2 m in panchromatic and 8 m in multispectral). In this research, we developed two empirical algorithms to map the water contents of Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and suspended solids (SS) from Formosat-2 multispectral imagery. These algorithms are derived from a total of 53 pairs of water-quality and surface-reflectance data collected during 14 field campaigns at Tsengwen Reservoir from 2005 to 2006. A total of 15 Formosat-2 images were selected from all available images of Tsengwen Reservoir taken in 2006 to generate water quality maps of Chl-a and SS using our new algorithms. Results from this study indicate that the Chl-a and SS concentrations can be retrieved from Formosat-2 imagery with deviations of 56% and 43%, respectively. This is the first time that the reservoir water quality can be mapped from a high-spatial-resolution satellite image at such a high-temporal-resolution. To facilitate the administration of water resources, this research encourages the application of Formosat-2 high spatiotemporal imagery in identifying areas of poor water quality and monitoring the dispersal pattern of pollutant plumes.

  7. Attracting and Retaining High-Quality Professionals in Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weld, Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    To attract and retain high-quality teachers, the education system must address science teachers' sense of professional isolation, administrators' lack of receptivity to thoughtful teachers' ideas, egalitarian salary compensation schemes, and lack of professional recognition. An outstanding chemistry teacher-turned-pharmaceutical saleswoman is…

  8. Measuring the Impact of High Quality Instant Feedback on Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutbrown, Stephen; Higgins, Colin; Beesley, Su

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of a novel assessment technique that has been used to improve the feedback given to second year Computer Science students at the University of Nottingham. Criteria for effective, high quality feedback are discussed. An automated marking system (The Marker's Apprentice--TMA) produces instant feedback in synergy with…

  9. The Nature of Spontaneity in High Quality Mathematics Learning Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Gaye

    2004-01-01

    Spontaneity has been linked to high quality learning experiences in mathematics (Csikszentmihalyi & Csikszentmihalyi, 1992; Williams, 2002).This paper shows how spontaneity can be identified by attending to the nature of social elements in the process of abstracting (Dreyfus, Hershkowitz, & Schwarz, 2001). This process is elaborated…

  10. Improved electrode gives high-quality biological recordings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, J. L.; Lippitt, M. W.

    1964-01-01

    To obtain high quality waveforms from a subject engaged in physical activity, an improved electrode assembly has been devised. This consists of a cup containing an electrically conductive paste and a silver electrode. The paste maintains contact between the skin and the plate.

  11. Total Quality Management (TQM): High School/College Course Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, David

    This Total Quality Management (TQM) course was designed to introduce students to the principles and tools of TQM in a full-semester course in high schools or community colleges. The course includes all the competencies found in TQM and is intended to be taught with an interactive method in which students are involved in the learning process. This…

  12. Learning Disabilities and Achieving High-Quality Education Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartland, Debi; Strosnider, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    This is an official document of the National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities (NJCLD), of which Council for Learning Disabilities is a long-standing, active member. With this position paper, NJCLD advocates for the implementation of high-quality education standards (HQES) for students with learning disabilities (LD) and outlines the…

  13. Cultivating High-Quality Teaching through Induction and Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartell, Carol A.

    2004-01-01

    The first few years of teaching are the most challenging. During these years, teachers are most likely to become discouraged and disillusioned. Yet these early years are also the time when teachers establish practices that last throughout their careers. This book focuses on new teachers' needs while emphasizing high-quality teaching through the…

  14. High-quality Health Information Provision for Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hong-Sheng; Ma, Jing-Jian; Li, Mu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: High-quality information provision can allow stroke patients to effectively participate in healthcare decision-making, better manage the stroke, and make a good recovery. In this study, we reviewed information needs of stroke patients, methods for providing information to patients, and considerations needed by the information providers. Data Sources: The literature concerning or including information provision for patients with stroke in English was collected from PubMed published from 1990 to 2015. Study Selection: We included all the relevant articles on information provision for stroke patients in English, with no limitation of study design. Results: Stroke is a major public health concern worldwide. High-quality and effective health information provision plays an essential role in helping patients to actively take part in decision-making and healthcare, and empowering them to effectively self-manage their long-standing chronic conditions. Different methods for providing information to patients have their relative merits and suitability, and as a result, the effective strategies taken by health professionals may include providing high-quality information, meeting patients’ individual needs, using suitable methods in providing information, and maintaining active involvement of patients. Conclusions: It is suggested that to enable stroke patients to access high-quality health information, greater efforts need to be made to ensure patients to receive accurate and current evidence-based information which meets their individual needs. Health professionals should use suitable information delivery methods, and actively involve stroke patients in information provision. PMID:27569241

  15. Why America Needs High-Quality Early Care and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business Roundtable, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Business Roundtable (BRT) and Corporate Voices for Working Families (CVWF) believe federal and state efforts to develop early care and education systems for children birth through age five must be based on a set of guiding Principles that define the components of a successful system and high-quality programs. These Principles draw on current early…

  16. Attracting and Retaining High-Quality Professionals in Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weld, Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    To attract and retain high-quality teachers, the education system must address science teachers' sense of professional isolation, administrators' lack of receptivity to thoughtful teachers' ideas, egalitarian salary compensation schemes, and lack of professional recognition. An outstanding chemistry teacher-turned-pharmaceutical saleswoman is…

  17. Calculating and scoring high quality multiple flexible protein structure alignments.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, David W

    2016-09-01

    Calculating multiple protein structure alignments (MSAs) is important for understanding functional and evolutionary relationships between protein families, and for modeling protein structures by homology. While incorporating backbone flexibility promises to circumvent many of the limitations of rigid MSA algorithms, very few flexible MSA algorithms exist today. This article describes several novel improvements to the Kpax algorithm which allow high quality flexible MSAs to be calculated. This article also introduces a new Gaussian-based MSA quality measure called 'M-score', which circumvents the pitfalls of RMSD-based quality measures. As well as calculating flexible MSAs, the new version of Kpax can also score MSAs from other aligners and from previously aligned reference datasets. Results are presented for a large-scale evaluation of the Homstrad, SABmark and SISY benchmark sets using Kpax and Matt as examples of state-of-the-art flexible aligners and 3DCOMB as an example of a state-of-the-art rigid aligner. These results demonstrate the utility of the M-score as a measure of MSA quality and show that high quality MSAs may be achieved when structural flexibility is properly taken into account. Kpax 5.0 may be downloaded for academic use at http://kpax.loria.fr/ dave.ritchie@inria.fr Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Method for producing high quality thin layer films on substrates

    DOEpatents

    Strongin, Myron; Ruckman, Mark; Strongin, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    A method for producing high quality, thin layer films of inorganic compounds upon the surface of a substrate is disclosed. The method involves condensing a mixture of preselected molecular precursors on the surface of a substrate and subsequently inducing the formation of reactive species using high energy photon or charged particle irradiation. The reactive species react with one another to produce a film of the desired compound upon the surface of the substrate.

  19. Method for producing high quality thin layer films on substrates

    DOEpatents

    Strongin, M.; Ruckman, M.; Strongin, D.

    1994-04-26

    A method for producing high quality, thin layer films of inorganic compounds upon the surface of a substrate is disclosed. The method involves condensing a mixture of preselected molecular precursors on the surface of a substrate and subsequently inducing the formation of reactive species using high energy photon or charged particle irradiation. The reactive species react with one another to produce a film of the desired compound upon the surface of the substrate. 4 figures.

  20. Extraction of high-quality RNA from rubber tree leaves.

    PubMed

    Deng, Liu-Hong; Luo, Ming-Wu; Zhang, Chun-Fa; Zeng, Hui-Cai

    2012-01-01

    A specific technique capable of producing high-quality RNA for rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) was established for challenging tissues: leaves of the rubber tree. Total RNA was extracted by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-LiCl combined with TRIzol reagent. The isolated RNA was highly intact. With RNA as template, full-length cDNA was obtained (NCBI, AY461413) by RACE.

  1. Highly qualified does not equal high quality: A study of urban stakeholders' perceptions of quality in science teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Rommel Joseph

    By employing qualitative methods, this study sought to determine the perceptions that urban stakeholders hold about what characteristics should distinguish a high school science teacher whom they would consider to demonstrate high quality in science teaching. A maximum variation sample of six science teachers, three school administrators, six parents and six students from a large urban public school district were interviewed using semi-structured, in-depth interview techniques. From these data, a list of observable characteristics which urban stakeholders hold as evidence of high quality in science teaching was generated. Observational techniques were utilized to determine the extent to which six urban high school science teachers, who meet the NCLB Act criteria for being "highly qualified", actually possessed the characteristics which these stakeholders hold as evidence of high quality in science teaching. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyze the data set. The findings suggest that urban stakeholders perceive that a high school science teacher who demonstrates high quality in science teaching should be knowledgeable about their subject matter, their student population, and should be resourceful; should possess an academic background in science and professional experience in science teaching; should exhibit professionalism, a passion for science and teaching, and a dedication to teaching and student learning; should be skillful in planning and preparing science lessons and in organizing the classroom, in presenting the subject matter to students, in conducting a variety of hands-on activities, and in managing a classroom; and should assess whether students complete class goals and objectives, and provide feedback about grades for students promptly. The findings further reveal that some of the urban high school science teachers who were deemed to be "highly qualified", as defined by the NCLB Act, engaged in practices that threatened quality in science

  2. High quality digital holographic reconstruction on analog film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelsen, B.; Hartmann, P.

    2017-05-01

    High quality real-time digital holographic reconstruction, i.e. at 30 Hz frame rates, has been at the forefront of research and has been hailed as the holy grail of display systems. While these efforts have produced a fascinating array of computer algorithms and technology, many applications of reconstructing high quality digital holograms do not require such high frame rates. In fact, applications such as 3D holographic lithography even require a stationary mask. Typical devices used for digital hologram reconstruction are based on spatial-light-modulator technology and this technology is great for reconstructing arbitrary holograms on the fly; however, it lacks the high spatial resolution achievable by its analog counterpart, holographic film. Analog holographic film is therefore the method of choice for reconstructing highquality static holograms. The challenge lies in taking a static, high-quality digitally calculated hologram and effectively writing it to holographic film. We have developed a theoretical system based on a tunable phase plate, an intensity adjustable high-coherence laser and a slip-stick based piezo rotation stage to effectively produce a digitally calculated hologram on analog film. The configuration reproduces the individual components, both the amplitude and phase, of the hologram in the Fourier domain. These Fourier components are then individually written on the holographic film after interfering with a reference beam. The system is analogous to writing angularly multiplexed plane waves with individual component phase control.

  3. Detection of High Quality Rainfall Data to Improve Flood Resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, T. C.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Schertzer, D. J.; Lovejoy, S.

    2012-12-01

    European flood management systems require reliable rainfall statistics, e.g. the Intensity-duration-Frequency curves for shorter and shorter durations and for a larger and larger range of return periods. Preliminary studies showed that the number of floods depends on the quality of available data, e.g. the time resolution quality. These facts suggest that a particular attention should be paid to the rainfall data quality in order to adequately investigate flood risk aiming to achieve flood resilience. The potential consequences of changes in measuring and recording techniques have been somewhat discussed in the literature with respect to a possible introduction of artificial inhomogeneities in time series. In this direction, we developed a first version of a SERQUAL procedure to automatically detect the effective time resolution of highly mixed data. We show that most of the rainfall time series have a lower recording frequency than that is assumed. This question is particularly important for operational hydrology, because an error on the effective recording high frequency introduces biases in the corresponding statistics. It is therefore essential to quantify the quality of the rainfall time series before their use. Due to the fact that the multiple scales and possible scaling behaviour of hydrological data are particularly important for many applications, including flood resilience research, this paper first investigates the sensitivity of the scaling estimates and methods to the deficit of short duration rainfall data, and consequently propose a few simple criteria for a reliable evaluation of the data quality. The SERQUAL procedure enable us to extract high quality sub-series from longer time series that will be much more reliable to calibrate and/or validate short duration quantiles and hydrological models.

  4. Compact pulley-type microring resonator with high quality factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dong-Po; Lu, Jyun-Hong; Chen, Chii-Chang; Lee, Chien-Chieh; Lin, Chu-En; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2014-11-01

    A pulley-type microring resonator with ultra-small dimensions and ultra-high quality factor on a silicon-on-insulator wafer is fabricated and characterized. Simulation results show that the bending loss of the pulley-type microring resonator can be diminished by wrapping the curved waveguide around the microring, and that the energy loss from the output port can be decreased by tuning the width of the bus waveguide to achieve destructive interference. A quality factor of 1.73 × 105 is obtained in this experiment. The compact size of the pulley-type microring resonator with low bending loss is suitable for an integrated optical circuit.

  5. Isolation of high-quality RNA from stented blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, Christophe J; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Fransen, Erik; Vrints, Christiaan J; Hoymans, Vicky Y

    2013-09-01

    Stents have become a standard of care for the treatment of coronary artery disease. A series of cellular and molecular processes contribute to the vascular response following stent placement. For the purpose of local gene expression studies, metallic stent struts are usually removed from the vessel wall with forceps under a dissection microscope prior to RNA extraction. Main drawbacks of the manual dissection are that it may cause additional tissue damage and compromise the quality of RNA through prolonged tissue handling. In this technical note, we report the recovery of high-quality RNA from atherosclerotic vessels with stent struts left in situ. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. High Quality Factor Mechanical Resonators Based on WSe2 Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Morell, Nicolas; Reserbat-Plantey, Antoine; Tsioutsios, Ioannis; Schädler, Kevin G; Dubin, François; Koppens, Frank H L; Bachtold, Adrian

    2016-08-10

    Suspended monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) are membranes that combine ultralow mass and exceptional optical properties, making them intriguing materials for opto-mechanical applications. However, the low measured quality factor of TMD resonators has been a roadblock so far. Here, we report an ultrasensitive optical readout of monolayer TMD resonators that allows us to reveal their mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures. We find that the quality factor of monolayer WSe2 resonators greatly increases below room temperature, reaching values as high as 1.6 × 10(4) at liquid nitrogen temperature and 4.7 × 10(4) at liquid helium temperature. This surpasses the quality factor of monolayer graphene resonators with similar surface areas. Upon cooling the resonator, the resonant frequency increases significantly due to the thermal contraction of the WSe2 lattice. These measurements allow us to experimentally study the thermal expansion coefficient of WSe2 monolayers for the first time. High Q-factors are also found in resonators based on MoS2 and MoSe2 monolayers. The high quality-factor found in this work opens new possibilities for coupling mechanical vibrational states to two-dimensional excitons, valley pseudospins, and single quantum emitters and for quantum opto-mechanical experiments based on the Casimir interaction.

  7. High Quality Factor Mechanical Resonators Based on WSe2 Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Suspended monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) are membranes that combine ultralow mass and exceptional optical properties, making them intriguing materials for opto-mechanical applications. However, the low measured quality factor of TMD resonators has been a roadblock so far. Here, we report an ultrasensitive optical readout of monolayer TMD resonators that allows us to reveal their mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures. We find that the quality factor of monolayer WSe2 resonators greatly increases below room temperature, reaching values as high as 1.6 × 104 at liquid nitrogen temperature and 4.7 × 104 at liquid helium temperature. This surpasses the quality factor of monolayer graphene resonators with similar surface areas. Upon cooling the resonator, the resonant frequency increases significantly due to the thermal contraction of the WSe2 lattice. These measurements allow us to experimentally study the thermal expansion coefficient of WSe2 monolayers for the first time. High Q-factors are also found in resonators based on MoS2 and MoSe2 monolayers. The high quality-factor found in this work opens new possibilities for coupling mechanical vibrational states to two-dimensional excitons, valley pseudospins, and single quantum emitters and for quantum opto-mechanical experiments based on the Casimir interaction. PMID:27459399

  8. High quality videoconferencing system for wide area IP networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Ruibiao; Kuhns, Fred; Cox, Jerome R., Jr.; Horn, Craig

    2002-12-01

    High quality video conferencing is an efficient tool for interactive scientific collaboration in the research community, especially for researchers separated by substantial distance. With the wide deployment of broadband wide area IP networks such as the Internet2, there is an increasing demand for improved remote collaboration with these networks. In order to make the high quality video-conferencing toolkits for local high-speed networks available over wide area IP networks, issues that are usually insignificant on local area networks must be considered. To this end, we have developed called Adaptation Layer Translator (ALX) in order to address these issues and solve the problems associated with real-time video and audio transmission over wide area IP networks. A conference control protocol is developed to coordinate the participants in an ALX-based conference. The ALX is also designed to be able to adapt to heterogeneous network environments at different deployment sites.

  9. Weld quality evaluation using a high temperature SQUID array

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. D.; Espy, M. A.; Kraus, Robert H., Jr.; Matlachov, A. N.; Lamb, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary data for evaluating weld quality using high temperature SQUIDS. The SQUIDS are integrated into an instrument known as the SQUID Array Microscope, or SAMi. The array consists of ll SQUIDs evenly distributed over an 8.25 mm baseline. Welds are detected using SAMi by using an on board coil to induce eddy currents in a conducting sample and measuring the resulting magnetic fields. The concept is that the induced magnetic fields will differ in parts of varying weld quality. The data presented here was collected from three stainless steel parts using SAMi. Each part was either solid, included a good weld, or included a bad weld. The induced magnetic field's magnitude and phase relative to the induction signal were measured. For each sample considered, both the magnitude and phase data were measurably different than the other two samples. These results indicate that it is possible to use SAMi to evaluate weld quality.

  10. Two-Phase Flow Pressure Drop of High Quality Steam

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, J. M.; Coffield, R. D.

    2001-10-01

    Two-phase pressure drop across a straight test pipe was experimentally determined for high Reynolds (Re) number steam flow for a flow quality range of 0.995 to 1.0. The testing described has been performed in order to reduce uncertainties associated with the effects of two-phase flow on pressure drop. Two-phase flow develops in steam piping because a small fraction of the steam flow condenses due to heat loss to the surroundings. There has been very limited two-phase pressure drop data in open literature for the tested flow quality range. The two-phase pressure drop data obtained in this test has enabled development of a correlation between friction factor, Reynolds number, and flow quality.

  11. Family Perspectives on High-Quality Pediatric Subspecialty Referrals.

    PubMed

    Ray, Kristin N; Ashcraft, Laura Ellen; Kahn, Jeremy M; Mehrotra, Ateev; Miller, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Although children are frequently referred to subspecialist physicians, many inadequacies in referral processes have been identified from physician and system perspectives. Little is known, however, about how to comprehensively measure or improve the quality of the referral systems from a family-centered perspective. To foster family-centered improvements to pediatric subspecialty referrals, we sought to develop a framework for high-quality, patient-centered referrals from the perspectives of patients and their families. We used stakeholder-informed qualitative analysis of parent, caregiver, and patient interviews to identify outcomes, processes, and structures of high-quality pediatric subspecialty referrals as perceived by patients and their family members. We interviewed 21 informants. Informants identified 5 desired outcomes of subspecialty referrals: improved functional status or symptoms; improved long-term outcomes; improved knowledge of their disease; informed expectations; and reduced anxiety about the child's health status. Processes that informants identified as supporting these outcomes centered around 6 key steps in subspecialty referrals, including the referral decision, previsit information transfer, appointment scheduling, subspecialist visit, postvisit information transfer, and ongoing care integration and communication. Health care delivery structures identified by informants as supporting these processes included physical infrastructure, human resources, and information technology systems. We identified family-centered outcomes, processes, and structures of high-quality pediatric subspecialty referrals. These domains can be used not only to improve measurement of the quality of existing referral systems but also to inform future interventions to improve patient-centered outcomes for children in need of specialty care. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Radar Backscatter and Coherence Information Supporting High Quality Urban Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.; Perski, Z.; Wannemacher, S.

    2004-06-01

    The potential of a synergetic use of different data sources for a high quality mapping of urban features is described in this paper. In the urban application domain, beside the different EO-sensors and products there are a lot of high resolution and high quality GIS- and digital map databases available (e.g. ATKIS in Germany), provided by public authorities but also by private industry. Fusing this ground-based data with remotely sensed information is resulting in high quality thematic datasets. Using ATKIS Geodata, IKONOS multispectral- and ERS-SAR / ENVISAT-ASAR data as input, in the research described we implemented a GIS-based expert system to derive in a first step the degree of sealing in the regions of interest (ROI). Joining the reclassified ATKIS-data with a vegetation index, the backscatter- and the coherence information, the output of the processing chain is a vector data layer dividing the ROI in different classes of sealing. Adding the SAR-/ASAR derived backscatter and coherence data into the spatial analysis results in a partial improvement of the classification process, especially in rural areas.

  13. Towards high-quality optical ceramic YAG fibers for high-energy laser (HEL) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, HeeDong; Keller, Kristin; Sirn, Brian

    2012-06-01

    There is a critical demand for high quality, transparent ceramic YAG fibers for high powered fiber lasers. The production of laser quality ceramic fibers hinges on advanced ceramic processing technology, along with the availability of highly sinterable powder with high phase and chemical purity. These two fundamental technologies have been successfully developed at UES. Nd (1.1 a/o) and Yb (1.0 a/o)-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) fibers with high optical quality were produced by combining UES's tailored powders with advanced consolidation processes including fiber extrusion and vacuum sintering. The as-sintered and as-annealed fibers, approximately 30 microns in diameter, appeared transparent and successfully transmitted laser beams; further development will allow for the production of doped ceramic YAG fiber lasers for advanced high power and high energy fiber laser systems.

  14. A high-throughput, high-quality plant genomic DNA extraction protocol.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Li, J; Cong, X H; Duan, Y B; Li, L; Wei, P C; Lu, X Z; Yang, J B

    2013-10-15

    The isolation of high-quality genomic DNA (gDNA) is a crucial technique in plant molecular biology. The quality of gDNA determines the reliability of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. In this paper, we reported a high-quality gDNA extraction protocol optimized for real-time PCR in a variety of plant species. Performed in a 96-well block, our protocol provides high throughput. Without the need for phenol-chloroform and liquid nitrogen or dry ice, our protocol is safer and more cost-efficient than traditional DNA extraction methods. The method takes 10 mg leaf tissue to yield 5-10 µg high-quality gDNA. Spectral measurement and electrophoresis were used to demonstrate gDNA purity. The extracted DNA was qualified in a restriction enzyme digestion assay and conventional PCR. The real-time PCR amplification was sufficiently sensitive to detect gDNA at very low concentrations (3 pg/µL). The standard curve of gDNA dilutions from our phenol-chloroform-free protocol showed better linearity (R(2) = 0.9967) than the phenol-chloroform protocol (R(2) = 0.9876). The results indicate that the gDNA was of high quality and fit for real-time PCR. This safe, high-throughput plant gDNA extraction protocol could be used to isolate high-quality gDNA for real-time PCR and other downstream molecular applications.

  15. Proposal for efficient mode converter based on cavity quantum electrodynamics dark mode in a semiconductor quantum dot coupled to a bimodal microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Ma, Jinyong; Wu, Ying

    2014-10-28

    The ability to engineer and convert photons between different modes in a solid-state approach has extensive technological implications not only for classical communication systems but also for future quantum networks. In this paper, we put forward a scheme for coherent mode conversion of optical photons by utilizing the intermediate coupling between a single quantum dot and a bimodal photonic crystal microcavity via a waveguide. Here, one mode of the photonic crystal microcavity is coherently driven by an external single-frequency continuous-wave laser field and the two cavity modes are not coupled to each other due to their orthogonal polarizations. The undriven cavity mode is thus not directly coupled to the input driving laser and the only way it can get light is via the quantum dot. The influences of the system parameters on the photon-conversion efficiency are analyzed in detail in the limit of weak probe field and it is found that high photon-conversion efficiency can be achieved under appropriate conditions. It is shown that the cavity dark mode, which is a superposition of the two optical modes and is decoupled from the quantum dot, can appear in such a hybrid optical system. We discuss the properties of the dark mode and indicate that the formation of the dark mode enables the efficient transfer of optical fields between the two cavity modes.

  16. Auto Spell Suggestion for High Quality Speech Synthesis in Hindi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabra, Shikha; Agarwal, Ritika

    2014-02-01

    The goal of Text-to-Speech (TTS) synthesis in a particular language is to convert arbitrary input text to intelligible and natural sounding speech. However, for a particular language like Hindi, which is a highly confusing language (due to very close spellings), it is not an easy task to identify errors/mistakes in input text and an incorrect text degrade the quality of output speech hence this paper is a contribution to the development of high quality speech synthesis with the involvement of Spellchecker which generates spell suggestions for misspelled words automatically. Involvement of spellchecker would increase the efficiency of speech synthesis by providing spell suggestions for incorrect input text. Furthermore, we have provided the comparative study for evaluating the resultant effect on to phonetic text by adding spellchecker on to input text.

  17. High Quality Transferable AlN Thin Film by PLD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Heng; Lu, Xiaoli; Li, Xin; Zhang, JinCheng; Hao, Yue

    2017-06-01

    AlN thin film was epitaxial grown on c-plane sapphire substrate by pulsed laser deposition. To reduce structural defects from largely lattice mismatched substrate, MgO or ZnO buffer layer was inserted between AlN and sapphire. Crystal structure and surface morphology of as prepared AlN were characterized by XRD, AFM, and SEM. It was found that buffer layers significantly improve crystalline quality of AlN, especially using ZnO. Furthermore, a general and steady wet chemical process was developed to selectively etch away ZnO layer, so that high quality free-standing AlN thin film was obtained. This film could be transferred onto any other host substrates such as Si, quartz, etc. Moreover, with no clamping effect from the substrate, the as-prepared free-standing AlN thin films may find potential applications in high sensitivity piezoelectric devices, flexible wearable detectors and so on.

  18. The High Flying Leadership Qualities: What Matters the Most

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    IATIO N THE HIGH FLYING Leadership Qualities: What Matters the Most? Col Robert L. Tremaine, USAF (Ret.) Like many U.S. companies , the Department...continue to do things the way they have always been done .… Our leadership needs to be able to recognize positive change and be willing to accomplish that...customer. Pleasing the boss or some other higher level executive always took a back seat to doing the right thing for the project or the company (Behavior

  19. High-quality microcutting in silicon by advanced laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallus, E.; Castelli, Paolo

    2003-11-01

    This paper reports on the potentialities of innovative lasers in microcutting of silicon, one of the most important materials in the field of microelectronics. In recent years, novel laser based micromachining methods have played an increasingly important role in the ongoing miniaturization of consumer electronics. Here, high-quality microcutting in silicon using a "green" laser, whose wavelength is readily absorbed by silicon, is presented.

  20. High quality fuel gas from biomass pyrolysis with calcium oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baofeng; Zhang, Xiaodong; Chen, Lei; Sun, Laizhi; Si, Hongyu; Chen, Guanyi

    2014-03-01

    The removal of CO2 and tar in fuel gas produced by biomass thermal conversion has aroused more attention due to their adverse effects on the subsequent fuel gas application. High quality fuel gas production from sawdust pyrolysis with CaO was studied in this paper. The results of pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) experiments indicate that the mass ratio of CaO to sawdust (Ca/S) remarkably affects the behavior of sawdust pyrolysis. On the basis of Py-GC/MS results, one system of a moving bed pyrolyzer coupled with a fluid bed combustor has been developed to produce high quality fuel gas. The lower heating value (LHV) of the fuel gas was above 16MJ/Nm(3) and the content of tar was under 50mg/Nm(3), which is suitable for gas turbine application to generate electricity and heat. Therefore, this technology may be a promising route to achieve high quality fuel gas for biomass utilization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Localized Surface Plasmons Selectively Coupled to Resonant Light in Tubular Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yin; Li, Shilong; Böttner, Stefan; Yuan, Feifei; Giudicatti, Silvia; Saei Ghareh Naz, Ehsan; Ma, Libo; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2016-06-01

    Vertical gold nanogaps are created on microtubular cavities to explore the coupling between resonant light supported by the microcavities and surface plasmons localized at the nanogaps. Selective coupling of optical axial modes and localized surface plasmons critically depends on the exact location of the gold nanogap on the microcavities, which is conveniently achieved by rolling up specially designed thin dielectric films into three-dimensional microtube cavities. The coupling phenomenon is explained by a modified quasipotential model based on perturbation theory. Our work reveals the coupling of surface plasmon resonances localized at the nanoscale to optical resonances confined in microtubular cavities at the microscale, implying a promising strategy for the investigation of light-matter interactions.

  2. Suppression of span in sealed microcavity Fabry-Perot pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Shivam; Rajappa, Balasubramaniam; Chandra, Sudhir

    2017-01-01

    Optical microelectromechanical system pressure sensors working on the principle of extrinsic Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer are designed and fabricated for pressure range of 1-bar absolute. Anodic bonding of silicon with glass is performed under atmospheric pressure to form FP cavity. This process results in entrapment of gas in the sealed microcavity. The effect of trapped gas is investigated on sensor characteristics. A closed-loop solution is derived for the deflection of the diaphragm of a sealed microcavity pressure sensor. Phenomenon of "suppression of span" is brought out. The sensors are tested using white light interferometry technique. The residual pressure of the trapped gas is estimated from the experiments. The developed model has been used to estimate the deflection sensitivity of the free diaphragm and the extent of suppression of span after bonding.

  3. Monolithic polymer microcavity lasers with on-top evaporated dielectric mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persano, Luana; Carro, Pompilio Del; Mele, Elisa; Cingolani, Roberto; Pisignano, Dario; Zavelani-Rossi, Margherita; Longhi, Stefano; Lanzani, Guglielmo

    2006-03-01

    We report on a monolithic polymeric microcavity laser with all dielectric mirrors realized by low-temperature electron-beam evaporation. The vertical heterostructure was realized by 9.5 TiOx/SiOx pairs evaporated onto an active conjugated polymer, that was previously spincast onto the bottom distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). The cavity supports single-mode lasing at 509nm, with a linewidth of 1.8nm, and a lasing threshold of 84μJ/cm2. We also report on the emission properties of the polymer we used, investigated by a pump-probe technique. These results show that low-temperature electron-beam evaporation is a powerful and straightforward fabrication technique for molecular-based fully integrable microcavity resonators.

  4. Polariton condensation in a strain-compensated planar microcavity with InGaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Cilibrizzi, Pasquale; Askitopoulos, Alexis Silva, Matteo; Lagoudakis, Pavlos G.; Bastiman, Faebian; Clarke, Edmund; Zajac, Joanna M.; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2014-11-10

    The investigation of intrinsic interactions in polariton condensates is currently limited by the photonic disorder of semiconductor microcavity structures. Here, we use a strain compensated planar GaAs/AlAs{sub 0.98}P{sub 0.02} microcavity with embedded InGaAs quantum wells having a reduced cross-hatch disorder to overcome this issue. Using real and reciprocal space spectroscopic imaging under non-resonant optical excitation, we observe polariton condensation and a second threshold marking the onset of photon lasing, i.e., the transition from the strong to the weak-coupling regime. Condensation in a structure with suppressed photonic disorder is a necessary step towards the implementation of periodic lattices of interacting condensates, providing a platform for on chip quantum simulations.

  5. Numerical Investigation on Micro-Cavity Effect of Top-Emitting Organic Light Emitting Diode.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeongi; Hwang, Youngwook; Won, Taeyoung

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we report our numerical investigation on the top-emitting OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diodes) with micro-cavity. Our numerical model includes an ensemble of radiating dipole antennas for light emission as well as Poisson Equation for carrier injection and transportation. We formulated a set of differential equations by the Finite Element Method. Our simulation revealed that the recombination rate is affected by the thickness of each layer comprising the OLED structure and the amount of emission is determined by the total thickness of the OLED structure due to micro-cavity effect which is observed in between the total reflection layer and the half reflection layer. Our numerical solver enables us to optimize the OLED structure and thereby improve the external quantum efficiency.

  6. Model microcavity laser with CdSe/CdS quantum dots as lasing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveed, H. B.; Popov, S.; Shafique, M.

    2016-02-01

    A model is established for a microcavity laser with cadmium selenium/cadmium sulfide (CdSe/CdS) core/shell quantum dots (QDs) as a lasing medium. The research was organised to develop and solve the rate equations for the above mentioned microcavity laser to calculate the output parameters during lasing. Using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, the radiative life time of the lasing medium was measured along with its fluorescence and absorption spectra. A model is also established on the basis of the segment contact method (SCM) to demonstrate the threshold gain profile using the absorption spectrum of CdSe/CdS core/shell type-II QDs residing in the cavity. A laser cavity of size 1 μm was pumped with an optical source (532 nm) to achieve an optimised laser peak at 470 nm.

  7. High quality mask storage in an advanced Logic-Fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähnert, Carmen; Fritsche, Silvio

    2012-02-01

    High efficient mask logistics as well as safe and high quality mask storage are essential requirements within an advanced lithography area of a modern logic waferfab. Fast operational availability of the required masks at the exposure tool with excellent mask condition requires a safe mask handling, safeguarding of high mask quality over the whole mask usage time without any quality degradation and an intelligent mask logistics. One big challenge is the prevention of haze on high advanced phase shift masks used in a high volume production line for some thousands of 248nm or 193nm exposures. In 2008 Infineon Dresden qualified a customer specific developed semi-bare mask storage system from DMSDynamic Micro Systems in combination with a high advanced mask handling and an interconnected complex logistic system. This high-capacity mask storage system DMS M1900.22 for more than 3000 masks with fully automated mask and box handling as well as full-blown XCDA purge has been developed and adapted to the Infineon Lithotoollandscape using Nikon and SMIF reticle cases. Advanced features for ESD safety and mask security, mask tracking via RFID and interactions with the exposure tools were developed and implemented. The stocker is remote controlled by the iCADA-RSM system, ordering of the requested mask directly from the affected exposure tool allows fast access. This paper discusses the advantages and challenges for this approach as well as the practical experience gained during the implementation of the new system which improves the fab performance with respect to mask quality, security and throughput. Especially the realization of an extremely low and stable humidity level in addition with a well controlled air flow at each mask surface, preventing masks from haze degradation and particle contamination, turns out to be a notable technical achievement. The longterm stability of haze critical masks has been improved significantly. Relevant environmental parameters like

  8. Sleep quality among elderly high-altitude dwellers in Ladakh.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ryota; Okumiya, Kiyohito; Norboo, Tsering; Tsering, Norboo; Yamaguchi, Takayoshi; Nose, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Shinya; Tsukihara, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Motonao; Nakajima, Shun; Wada, Taizo; Fujisawa, Michiko; Imai, Hissei; Ishimoto, Yasuko; Kimura, Yumi; Fukutomi, Eriko; Chen, Wenling; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Matsubayashi, Kozo

    2017-03-01

    It has been already known that people who temporarily stay at high altitude may develop insomnia as a symptom of acute mountain sickness. However, much less is known about people living at high altitude. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of high altitude environment on sleep quality for the elderly who have been living at high altitude for their whole lives. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Domkhar valley at altitudes of 2800-4200m, Ladakh. Sleep quality was assessed using Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Measurement items include body mass index, blood pressure, blood sugar, hemoglobin, timed Up and Go test, oxygen saturation during wakefulness, respiratory function test, Oxford Knee Score (OKS), and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and so on. The participants were Ladakhi older adults aged 60 years or over (n=112) in Domkhar valley. The participation rate was 65.1% (male: female=47:65, mean age: 71.3 years and 67.9 years, respectively). The prevalence of the high score of ISI (8 or more) was 15.2% (17 out of 112). Altitude of residence was significantly correlated with ISI. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that OKS and altitude of residence were significantly related with ISI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Spin wave localization in one-dimensional magnonic microcavity comprising yttrium iron garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kanazawa, Naoki; Goto, Taichi Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2014-08-28

    We demonstrate the localization of magnetostatic surface waves, i.e., spin waves, in a one-dimensional magnonic microcavity substantialized with periodical conductivity modulation. The narrow localized state is observed inside band gaps and is responsible for a sharp transmission peak. The experimental results strongly agree with the theoretical prediction made with the shape magnetic anisotropy of the propagating medium composed of yttrium iron garnet taken into account.

  10. Near-field observation of subwavelength confinement of photoluminescence by a photonic crystal microcavity.

    PubMed

    Louvion, Nicolas; Rahmani, Adel; Seassal, Christian; Callard, Ségolène; Gérard, Davy; de Fornel, Frédérique

    2006-07-15

    We present a direct, room-temperature near-field optical study of light confinement by a subwavelength defect microcavity in a photonic crystal slab containing quantum-well sources. The observations are compared with three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain calculations, and excellent agreement is found. Moreover, we use a subwavelength cavity to study the influence of a near-field probe on the imaging of localized optical modes.

  11. Stable integrated hyper-parametric oscillator based on coupled optical microcavities.

    PubMed

    Armaroli, Andrea; Feron, Patrice; Dumeige, Yannick

    2015-12-01

    We propose a flexible scheme based on three coupled optical microcavities that permits us to achieve stable oscillations in the microwave range, the frequency of which depends only on the cavity coupling rates. We find that the different dynamical regimes (soft and hard excitation) affect the oscillation intensity, but not their periods. This configuration may permit us to implement compact hyper-parametric sources on an integrated optical circuit with interesting applications in communications, sensing, and metrology.

  12. Divergent Petermann factor of interacting resonances in a stadium-shaped microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soo-Young; Ryu, Jung-Wan; Shim, Jeong-Bo; Lee, Sang-Bum; Kim, Sang Wook; An, Kyungwon

    2008-07-01

    It is numerically shown that the Petermann excess noise factor diverges to infinity at an exceptional point (EP) found near an avoided resonance crossing in a stadium-shaped dielectric microcavity. Square-root singularity of eigenvalue at the EP is explicitly demonstrated in two-dimensional parameter space spanned by refractive index and deformation parameter. The results imply that mode-mode interaction makes the Petermann factor large.

  13. Fabrication of a three-dimensional nanoporous polymer film as a diffuser for microcavity OLEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo, Beom; Cho, Ye Ram; Suh, Min Chul

    2015-09-01

    We used a nanoporous polymer film prepared by cellulose acetate butyrate with ~40% of optical haze value as a diffuser. It was fabricated by a simple spin-coating process during continuous water mist supply by a humidifier. The pores were created by the elastic bouncing mechanism (rather than the thermocapillary convection mechanism) of the supplied water droplets. The shapes and sizes of the caves formed near the polymer surface are randomly distributed, with a relatively narrow pore size distribution (300-500 nm). Specifically, we focused on controlling the surface morphology to give a three-dimensional (3D) multi-stacked nanocave structure because we had already learnt that two-dimensional nanoporous structures showed serious loss of luminance in the forward direction. Using this approach, we found that the 3D nanoporous polymer film can effectively reduce the viewing angle dependency of strong microcavity OLEDs without any considerable decrease in the total intensity of the out-coupled light. We applied this nanoporous polymer film to microcavity OLEDs to investigate the possibility of using it as a diffuser layer. The resulting nanoporous polymer film effectively reduced the viewing angle dependency of the microcavity OLEDs, although a pixel blurring phenomenon occurred. Despite its negative effects, such as the drop in efficiency in the forward direction and the pixel blurring, the introduction of a nanoporous polymer film as a scattering medium on the back side of the glass substrate eliminated the viewing angle dependency. Thus, this approach is a promising method to overcome the serious drawbacks of microcavity OLEDs.

  14. Transverse strain response of in-fibre Fabry-Perot microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manders, Mark; Partridge, Matthew; Correia, Ricardo N.; James, Stephen W.; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2014-05-01

    In-fibre microcavity Fabry-Perot interferometers were constructed by splicing single mode fibre to polarisation maintaining photonic crystal fibre (PCF), with the air in the PCF pressurised to 5.000±0.005bar. The response to transverse load was characterised, along with the influence of rotational orientation and the repeatability of the fabrication process. It was found that the features of the channelled reflected spectrum exhibited a blue wavelength shift with increasing applied transverse load.

  15. High-throughput Protein Purification and Quality Assessment for Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngchang; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Eschenfeldt, William H.; Li, Hui; Maltseva, Natalia; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Gu, Minyi; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Wu, Ruiying; An, Hao; Chhor, Gekleng; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate goal of structural biology is to understand the structural basis of proteins in cellular processes. In structural biology, the most critical issue is the availability of high-quality samples. “Structural biology-grade” proteins must be generated in the quantity and quality suitable for structure determination using X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The purification procedures must reproducibly yield homogeneous proteins or their derivatives containing marker atom(s) in milligram quantities. The choice of protein purification and handling procedures plays a critical role in obtaining high-quality protein samples. With structural genomics emphasizing a genome-based approach in understanding protein structure and function, a number of unique structures covering most of the protein folding space have been determined and new technologies with high efficiency have been developed. At the Midwest Center for Structural Genomics (MCSG), we have developed semi-automated protocols for high-throughput parallel protein expression and purification. A protein, expressed as a fusion with a cleavable affinity tag, is purified in two consecutive immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) steps: (i) the first step is an IMAC coupled with buffer-exchange, or size exclusion chromatography (IMAC-I), followed by the cleavage of the affinity tag using the highly specific Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease; [1] the second step is IMAC and buffer exchange (IMAC-II) to remove the cleaved tag and tagged TEV protease. These protocols have been implemented on multidimensional chromatography workstations and, as we have shown, many proteins can be successfully produced in large-scale. All methods and protocols used for purification, some developed by MCSG, others adopted and integrated into the MCSG purification pipeline and more recently the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID) purification pipeline, are

  16. High quality factor resonance at room temperature with nanostrings under high tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbridge, Scott S.; Parpia, Jeevak M.; Reichenbach, Robert B.; Bellan, Leon M.; Craighead, H. G.

    2006-06-01

    Quality factors as high as 207 000 are demonstrated at room temperature for radio-frequency silicon nitride string resonators with cross sectional dimensions on the scale of 100 nm, made with a nonlithographic technique. A product of quality factor and surface to volume ratio greater than 6000 nm-1 is presented, the highest yet reported. Doubly clamped nanostring resonators are fabricated in high tensile-stress silicon nitride using a nonlithographic electrospinning process. We fabricate devices with an electron beam process, and demonstrate frequency and quality factor results identical to those obtained with the nonlithographic technique. We also compare high tensile-stress doubly clamped beams with doubly clamped and cantilever resonators made of a lower stress material, as well as cantilever beams made of the high stress material. In all cases, the doubly clamped high stress beams have the highest quality factors. We therefore attribute the high quality factors to high tensile stress. Potential dominant loss mechanisms are discussed, including surface and clamping losses, and thermoelastic dissipation. Some practical advantages offered by these nanostrings for mass sensing are discussed.

  17. 2020 vision for a high-quality, high-value maternity care system.

    PubMed

    Carter, Martha Cook; Corry, Maureen; Delbanco, Suzanne; Foster, Tina Clark-Samazan; Friedland, Robert; Gabel, Robyn; Gipson, Teresa; Jolivet, R Rima; Main, Elliott; Sakala, Carol; Simkin, Penny; Simpson, Kathleen Rice

    2010-01-01

    A concrete and useful way to create an action plan for improving the quality of maternity care in the United States is to start with a view of the desired result, a common definition and a shared vision for a high-quality, high-value maternity care system. In this paper, we present a long-term vision for the future of maternity care in the United States. We present overarching values and principles and specific attributes of a high-performing maternity care system. We put forth the "2020 Vision for a High-Quality, High-Value Maternity Care System" to serve as a positive starting place for a fruitful collaborative process to develop specific action steps for broad-based maternity care system improvement.

  18. High quality (In)GaN films on homoepitaxial substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Yong; Yin, Yian

    2017-02-01

    High quality GaN and InGaN epitaxial thin films were deposited by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Two sets of thin film samples were prepared by varying the substrates and temperatures under a proper condition for achieving better optical properties. The morphological, crystalline quality and optical property of epitaxial layers were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) and Raman spectra, respectively. It was found that the epitaxial layers grown on GaN homoepitaxial substrate have higher quality than those grown on sapphire substrate. The root mean square (RMS) of GaN film and InGaN film in AFM morphological were 0.5 nm, 2.7 nm respectively. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of (102) in GaN film on GaN substrate was 33arcsec and the FWHM of (002) in InGaN film on GaN substrate was 50.58arcsec by XRD. The PL peaks of GaN film and InGaN film were 361 nm, 458 nm respectively. The E2 (high) of GaN film and InGaN film in Raman were both 567.08 cm-1.

  19. Formation and all-optical control of optical patterns in semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, R.; Tsang, C. Y.; Tse, Y. C.; Luk, M. H.; Kwong, N. H.; Chan, Chris K. P.; Leung, P. T.; Lewandowski, P.; Schumacher, Stefan; Lafont, O.; Baudin, E.; Tignon, J.

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductor microcavities offer a unique way to combine transient all-optical manipulation of GaAs quantum wells with the benefits of structural advantages of microcavities. In these systems, exciton-polaritons have dispersion relations with very small effective masses. This has enabled prominent effects, for example polaritonic Bose condensation, but it can also be exploited for the design of all-optical communication devices. The latter involves non-equilibrium phase transitions in the spatial arrangement of exciton-polaritons. We consider the case of optical pumping with normal incidence, yielding a spatially homogeneous distribution of exciton-polaritons in optical cavities containing the quantum wells. Exciton-exciton interactions can trigger instabilities if certain threshold behavior requirements are met. Such instabilities can lead, for example, to the spontaneous formation of hexagonal polariton lattices (corresponding to six-spot patterns in the far field), or to rolls (corresponding to two-spot far field patterns). The competition among these patterns can be controlled to a certain degree by applying control beams. In this paper, we summarize the theory of pattern formation and election in microcavities and illustrate the switching between patterns via simulation results.

  20. Electromagnetic resonant properties of metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) cylindrical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Hang; Wang, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Optical metamaterials can concentrate light into extremely tiny volumes to enhance their interaction with quantum objects. In this paper, a cylindrical microcavity based on the Au-dielectric-Au sandwiched structure is proposed. Numerical study shows that the cylindrical microcavity has the strong ability of localizing light and confining 103- 104-fold enhancement of the electromagnetic energy density, which contains the most energy of the incoming light. The enhancement factor of energy density G inside the cavity shows the regularities as the change in the thickness of the dielectric slab, dielectric constant, and the radius of gold disk. At the normal incidence of electromagnetic radiation, the obtained reflection spectra operate in the range from 4.8 μm to 6 μm and with the absorption efficiency C (C=1-R min), which can reach 99% by optimizing the structure's geometry parameters, and the dielectric constant. Due to the symmetry of the cylindrical microcavities, this structure is insensitive to the polarization of the incident wave. The proposed optical metamaterials will have potential applications in the surface enhanced spectroscopy, new plasmonic detectors, bio-sensing, solar cells, etc.