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Sample records for high rate deposited

  1. High-deposition-rate ceramics synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Osterheld, T.H.; Outka, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    Parallel experimental and computational investigations are conducted in this project to develop validated numerical models of ceramic synthesis processes. Experiments are conducted in the High-Temperature Materials Synthesis Laboratory in Sandia`s Combustion Research Facility. A high-temperature flow reactor that can accommodate small preforms (1-3 cm diameter) generates conditions under which deposition can be observed, with flexibility to vary both deposition temperature (up to 1500 K) and pressure (as low as 10 torr). Both mass spectrometric and laser diagnostic probes are available to provide measurements of gas-phase compositions. Experiments using surface analytical techniques are also applied to characterize important processes occuring on the deposit surface. Computational tools developed through extensive research in the combustion field are employed to simulate the chemically reacting flows present in typical industrial reactors. These include the CHEMKIN and Surface-CHEMKIN suites of codes, which permit facile development of complex reaction mechanisms and vastly simplify the implementation of multi-component transport and thermodynamics. Quantum chemistry codes are also used to estimate thermodynamic and kinetic data for species and reactions for which this information is unavailable.

  2. Low-temperature Si epitaxy with high deposition rate using ion-assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, R. B.; Zaczek, C.; Jensen, N.; Oelting, S.; Werner, J. H.

    1998-06-01

    Ion-assisted deposition is suitable for the formation of epitaxial Si films at high deposition rate and low substrate temperature. We demonstrate epitaxial deposition of Si films on (100)-oriented Si wafers using deposition rates up to 0.3 μm/min at deposition temperatures in the range of 500-650 °C. Hall-effect measurements show a majority carrier mobility of 200 cm2/V s at a hole concentration of 1.4×1017cm-3 in our films. A minority carrier diffusion length of 4.5 μm is determined from quantum efficiency measurements in the epitaxially grown Si films.

  3. High growth rate homoepitaxial diamond film deposition at high temperatures by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vohra, Yogesh K. (Inventor); McCauley, Thomas S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The deposition of high quality diamond films at high linear growth rates and substrate temperatures for microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition is disclosed. The linear growth rate achieved for this process is generally greater than 50 .mu.m/hr for high quality films, as compared to rates of less than 5 .mu.m/hr generally reported for MPCVD processes.

  4. High-rate diamond deposition by microwave plasma CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianglin

    In this dissertation, the growth of CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond thin films is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The goal of this research is to deposit high quality HOD (Highly Oriented Diamond) films with a growth rate greater than 1 mum/hr. For the (100)-oriented HOD films, the growth rate achieved by the traditional process is only 0.3 mum/hr while the theoretical limit is ˜0.45 mum/hr. This research increases the growth rate up to 5.3 mum/hr (with a theoretical limit of ˜7 mum/hr) while preserving the crystal quality. This work builds a connection between the theoretical study of the CVD process and the experimental research. The study is extended from the growth of regular polycrystalline diamond to highly oriented diamond (HOD) films. For the increase of the growth rate of regular polycrystalline diamond thin films, a scaling growth model developed by Goodwin is introduced in details to assist in the understanding of the MPCVD (Microwave Plasma CVD) process. Within the Goodwin's scaling model, there are only four important sub-processes for the growth of diamond: surface modification, adsorption, desorption, and incorporation. The factors determining the diamond growth rate and film quality are discussed following the description of the experimental setup and process parameters. Growth rate and crystal quality models are reviewed to predict and understand the experimental results. It is shown that the growth rate of diamond can be increased with methane input concentration and the amount of atomic hydrogen (by changing the total pressure). It is crucial to provide enough atomic hydrogen to conserve crystal quality of the deposited diamond film. The experimental results demonstrate that for a fixed methane concentration, there is a minimum pressure for growth of good diamond. Similarly, for a fixed total pressure, there is a maximum methane concentration for growth of good diamond, and this maximum methane concentration increases

  5. Experimental study of porosity reduction in high deposition-rate Laser Material Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Chongliang; Gasser, Andres; Schopphoven, Thomas; Poprawe, Reinhart

    2015-12-01

    For several years, the interest in Additive Manufacturing (AM) is continuously expanding, owing to the paradigm shift that new production processes, such as Laser Material Deposition (LMD), provide over conventional manufacturing technologies. With LMD, three-dimensional, complex components out of a wide range of materials can be manufactured consecutively layer-by-layer. Despite the technological advantages of the LMD process, currently achieved deposition-rates of approx. 0.5 kg/h for Inconel 718 (IN 718) remain a major concern in regards to processing times and economic feasibility. Moreover, processing conditions need to be chosen carefully or else material defects can be systematically formed either at the interface separating two adjacent clad layers, at the bonding zone or within the bulk of the layer. In this respect, the effects of powder humidity, laser power, nominal powder particle size, powder morphology and shielding gas flow rate on the porosity in laser deposited single tracks at an increased deposition-rate of approx. 2 kg/h was investigated through experiments. Based on experimental results, several approaches of reducing porosity in high deposition-rate LMD are proposed in this paper.

  6. Experimental verification of vapor deposition rate theory in high velocity burner rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Santoro, Gilbert J.

    1985-01-01

    The main objective has been the experimental verification of the corrosive vapor deposition theory in high-temperature, high-velocity environments. Towards this end a Mach 0.3 burner-rig appartus was built to measure deposition rates from salt-seeded (mostly Na salts) combustion gases on the internally cooled cylindrical collector. Deposition experiments are underway.

  7. High-selectivity and high-deposition rate tungsten CVD freed from chamber cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Sakoh, T.; Morita, K.; Morita, M.; Ohmi, T. )

    1994-02-01

    A chemical vapor deposition method for tungsten films using a chamber with a cold susceptor is proposed for attaining excellent selectivity and a cleaning-free process. High-rate selective deposition above 1.0 [mu]m/min using the reduction of tungsten hexafluoride by silane is achieved at a substrate temperature of 210 C by using a cold susceptor chilled by water at room temperature. No deposition of tungsten or by-products on the susceptor surface and the inner surface of the chamber is observed, indicating that the newly developed system is free from cleaning. The deposited tungsten film has the alpha-type structure. The lattice constant of the tungsten is changed by the deposition temperature and the flow ratio of silane to tungsten hexafluoride.

  8. Experimental verification of corrosive vapor deposition rate theory in high velocity burner rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Santoro, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    The ability to predict deposition rates is required to facilitate modelling of high temperature corrosion by fused salt condensates in turbine engines. A corrosive salt vapor deposition theory based on multicomponent chemically frozen boundary layers (CFBL) has been successfully verified by high velocity burner rig experiments. The experiments involved internally air-impingement cooled, both rotating full and stationary segmented cylindrical collectors located in the crossflow of sodium-seeded combustion gases. Excellent agreement is found between the CFBL theory an the experimental measurements for both the absolute amounts of Na2SO4 deposition rates and the behavior of deposition rate with respect to collector temperature, mass flowrate (velocity) and Na concentration.

  9. A high power impulse magnetron sputtering model to explain high deposition rate magnetic field configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Priya; Weberski, Justin; Cheng, Matthew; Shchelkanov, Ivan; Ruzic, David N.

    2016-10-01

    High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) is one of the recent developments in the field of magnetron sputtering technology that is capable of producing high performance, high quality thin films. Commercial implementation of HiPIMS technology has been a huge challenge due to its lower deposition rates compared to direct current Magnetron Sputtering. The cylindrically symmetric "TriPack" magnet pack for a 10 cm sputter magnetron that was developed at the Center for Plasma Material Interactions was able to produce higher deposition rates in HiPIMS compared to conventional pack HiPIMS for the same average power. The "TriPack" magnet pack in HiPIMS produces superior substrate uniformity without the need of substrate rotation in addition to producing higher metal ion fraction to the substrate when compared to the conventional pack HiPIMS [Raman et al., Surf. Coat. Technol. 293, 10 (2016)]. The films that are deposited using the "TriPack" magnet pack have much smaller grains compared to conventional pack DC and HiPIMS films. In this paper, the reasons behind the observed increase in HiPIMS deposition rates from the TriPack magnet pack along with a modified particle flux model is discussed.

  10. High rate chemical vapor deposition of carbon films using fluorinated gases

    DOEpatents

    Stafford, Byron L.; Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.; Nelson, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A high rate, low-temperature deposition of amorphous carbon films is produced by PE-CVD in the presence of a fluorinated or other halide gas. The deposition can be performed at less than 100.degree. C., including ambient room temperature, with a radio frequency plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. With less than 6.5 atomic percent fluorine incorporated into the amorphous carbon film, the characteristics of the carbon film, including index of refraction, mass density, optical clarity, and chemical resistance are within fifteen percent (15%) of those characteristics for pure amorphous carbon films, but the deposition rates are high.

  11. High power pulsed magnetron sputtering: A method to increase deposition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, Priya McLain, Jake; Ruzic, David N; Shchelkanov, Ivan A.

    2015-05-15

    High power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) is a state-of-the-art physical vapor deposition technique with several industrial applications. One of the main disadvantages of this process is its low deposition rate. In this work, the authors report a new magnetic field configuration, which produces deposition rates twice that of conventional magnetron's dipole magnetic field configuration. Three different magnet pack configurations are discussed in this paper, and an optimized magnet pack configuration for HPPMS that leads to a higher deposition rate and nearly full-face target erosion is presented. The discussed magnetic field produced by a specially designed magnet assembly is of the same size as the conventional magnet assembly and requires no external fields. Comparison of deposition rates with different power supplies and the electron trapping efficiency in complex magnetic field arrangements are discussed.

  12. Method to control deposition rate instabilities—High power impulse magnetron sputtering deposition of TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kossoy, Anna E-mail: anna.kossoy@gmail.com; Magnusson, Rögnvaldur L.; Tryggvason, Tryggvi K.; Leosson, Kristjan; Olafsson, Sveinn

    2015-03-15

    The authors describe how changes in shutter state (open/closed) affect sputter plasma conditions and stability of the deposition rate of Ti and TiO{sub 2} films. The films were grown by high power impulse magnetron sputtering in pure Ar and in Ar/O{sub 2} mixture from a metallic Ti target. The shutter state was found to have an effect on the pulse waveform for both pure Ar and reactive sputtering of Ti also affecting stability of TiO{sub 2} deposition rate. When the shutter opened, the shape of pulse current changed from rectangular to peak-plateau and pulse energy decreased. The authors attribute it to the change in plasma impedance and gas rarefaction originating in geometry change in front of the magnetron. TiO{sub 2} deposition rate was initially found to be high, 1.45 Å/s, and then dropped by ∼40% during the first 5 min, while for Ti the change was less obvious. Instability of deposition rate poses significant challenge for growing multilayer heterostructures. In this work, the authors suggest a way to overcome this by monitoring the integrated average energy involved in the deposition process. It is possible to calibrate and control the film thickness by monitoring the integrated pulse energy and end growth when desired integrated pulse energy level has been reached.

  13. High-Rate Deposition of Ferrite Films in Aqueous Solution by Light-Enhanced Ferrite Plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Tomoyuki; Hori, Seiichiro; Abe, Masanori; Tamaura, Yutaka

    1990-08-01

    By irradiating the substrate surface with a Xe-lamp at 450 W/cm2, the deposition rate of Fe3O4 film in ferrite plating was increased by a factor of 10 (from ˜ 30 nm/min to ˜ 320 nm/min). The high deposition rate in light-enhanced ferrite plating cannot be simply ascribed to the increase of thermal energy.

  14. High rate, large area laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition of nickel from nickel carbonyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paserin, Vlad

    High-power diode lasers (HPDL) are being increasingly used in industrial applications. Deposition of nickel from nickel carbonyl (Ni(CO)4 ) precursor by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was studied with emphasis on achieving high deposition rates. An HPDL system was used to provide a novel energy source facilitating a simple and compact design of the energy delivery system. Nickel deposits on complex, 3-dimensional polyurethane foam substrates were prepared and characterized. The resulting "nickel foam" represents a novel material of high porosity (>95% by volume) finding uses, among others, in the production of rechargeable battery and fuel cell electrodes and as a specialty high-temperature filtration medium. Deposition rates up to ˜19 mum/min were achieved by optimizing the gas precursor flow pattern and energy delivery to the substrate surface using a 480W diode laser. Factors affecting the transition from purely heterogeneous decomposition to a combined hetero- and homogeneous decomposition of nickel carbonyl were studied. High quality, uniform 3-D deposits produced at a rate more than ten times higher than in commercial processes were obtained by careful balance of mass transport (gas flow) and energy delivery (laser power). Cross-flow of the gases through the porous substrate was found to be essential in facilitating mass transport and for obtaining uniform deposits at high rates. When controlling the process in a transient regime (near the onset of homogenous decomposition), unique morphology features formed as part of the deposits, including textured surface with pyramid-shape crystallites, spherical and non-spherical particles and filaments. Operating the laser in a pulsed mode produced smooth, nano-crystalline deposits with sub-100 nm grains. The effect of H2S, a commonly used additive in nickel carbonyl CVD, was studied using both polyurethane and nickel foam substrates. H2S was shown to improve the substrate coverage and deposit

  15. Elastic and Anelastic Behavior of TBCs Sprayed at High-Deposition Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valarezo, A.; Dwivedi, G.; Sampath, S.; Musalek, R.; Matejicek, J.

    2015-01-01

    Coatings sprayed at high-deposition rates often result in stiff, dense, and highly stressed coatings. The high deposition temperature at which the coatings are formed is responsible for these characteristics. In this paper, TBCs were sprayed at high-deposition rates, increasing the tensile quenching stresses beyond the threshold of crack opening during spraying. Dense structures were observed within a pass, in the presence of micro and macro defects specifically horizontal cracks within interpasses and vertical segmentation cracks. Mechanical properties, mainly the elastic and anelastic behavior of TBCs were significantly affected by the strain accommodation and friction occurring within intersplats and interpass interfaces. The strain tolerance obtained in as-sprayed conditions decreased as the microstructure and defects sintered during high-temperature heat cycles. The non-linearity degree decreased while the elastic modulus of the various coatings increased to a maximum value.

  16. All hot wire CVD TFTs with high deposition rate silicon nitride (3 nm/s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schropp, R. E. I.; Nishizaki, S.; Houweling, Z. S.; Verlaan, V.; van der Werf, C. H. M.; Matsumura, H.

    2008-03-01

    Using the hot wire (HW) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the deposition of silicon nitride (SiN x) and amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films we have achieved high deposition rates for device quality materials up to 7.3 nm/s and 3.5 nm/s, respectively. For thin films of SiN 1.3, deposited at 3 nm/s, the mass-density of the material reached a very high value of 3.0 g/cm 3. The silane utilization rate for this fast process is 77%. The high mass-density was consistent with the low 16BHF etch rate of 7 nm/min. We tested this SiN 1.3 in "all hot wire" thin film transistors (TFTs), along with a-Si:H material in the protocrystalline regime at 1 nm/s. Analysis shows that these "all hot wire" TFTs have a Vth = 1.7-2.4 V, an on/off ratio of 10 6, and a mobility of 0.4 cm 2/V s after a forming gas anneal. We therefore conclude that the HWCVD provides SiN x materials with dielectric properties at least as good as PECVD does, though at a much higher deposition rate and better gas utilization rates.

  17. Deposition of device quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon at high deposition rates

    DOEpatents

    Mahan, Archie Harvin; Molenbroek, Edith C.; Gallagher, Alan C.; Nelson, Brent P.; Iwaniczko, Eugene; Xu, Yueqin

    2002-01-01

    A method of fabricating device quality, thin-film a-Si:H for use as semiconductor material in photovoltaic and other devices, comprising in any order; positioning a substrate in a vacuum chamber adjacent a plurality of heatable filaments with a spacing distance L between the substrate and the filaments; heating the filaments to a temperature that is high enough to obtain complete decomposition of silicohydride molecules that impinge said filaments into Si and H atomic species; providing a flow of silicohydride gas, or a mixture of silicohydride gas containing Si and H, in said vacuum chamber while maintaining a pressure P of said gas in said chamber, which, in combination with said spacing distance L, provides a P.times.L product in a range of 10-300 mT-cm to ensure that most of the Si atomic species react with silicohydride molecules in the gas before reaching the substrate, to thereby grow a a-Si:H film at a rate of at least 50 .ANG./sec.; and maintaining the substrate at a temperature that balances out-diffusion of H from the growing a-Si:H film with time needed for radical species containing Si and H to migrate to preferred bonding sites.

  18. Highly conducting phosphorous doped Nc-Si:H thin films deposited at high deposition rate by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition method.

    PubMed

    Waman, V S; Kamble, M M; Ghosh, S S; Mayabadi, Azam; Sathe, V G; Amalnekar, D P; Pathan, H M; Jadkar, S R

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of highly conducting phosphorous doped hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) films at substantially low substrate temperature (200 degrees C) by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HW-CVD) method using pure silane (SiH4) and phosphine (PH3) gas mixture without hydrogen dilution. Structural, optical and electrical properties of these films were investigated as a function of PH3 gas-phase ratio. The characterization of these films by low-angle X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed that, the incorporation of phosphorous in nc-Si:H induces an amorphization in the nc-Si:H film structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicates that hydrogen predominately incorporated in phosphorous doped n-type nc-Si:H films mainly in di-hydrogen species (Si-H2) and poly-hydrogen (Si-H2)n bonded species signifying that the films become porous, and micro-void rich. We have observed high band gap (1.97-2.37 eV) in the films, though the hydrogen content is low (< 1.4 at.%) over the entire range of PH3 gas-phase ratio studied. Under the optimum deposition conditions, phosphorous doped nc-Si:H films with high dark conductivity (sigma Dark -5.3 S/cm), low charge-carrier activation energy (E(act) - 132 meV) and high band gap (- 2.01 eV), low hydrogen content (- 0.74 at.%) were obtained at high deposition rate (12.9 angstroms/s).

  19. High Rate Deposition of High Quality ZnO:Al by Filtered Cathodic Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Lim, S.H.N.; Milliron, D.J.; Anders, Andre

    2010-11-18

    High quality ZnO:Al (AZO) thin films were prepared on glass substrates by direct current filtered cathodic arc deposition. Substrate temperature was varied from room temperature to 425oC, and samples were grown with and without the assistance of low power oxygen plasma (75W). For each growth condition, at least 3 samples were grown to give a statistical look at the effect of the growth environment on the film properties and to explore the reproducibility of the technique. Growth rate was in the 100-400 nm/min range but was apparently random and could not be easily traced to the growth conditions explored. For optimized growth conditions, 300-600 nm AZO films had resistivities of 3-6 x 10-4 ?Omega cm, carrier concentrations in the range of 2-4 x 1020 cm3, Hall mobility as high as 55 cm2/Vs, and optical transmittance greater than 90percent. These films are also highly oriented with the c-axis perpendicular to the substrate and a surface roughness of 2-4 nm.

  20. Pulsed laser deposition of adherent hexagonal/cubic boron nitride layer systems at high growth rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weißmantel, Steffen; Reiße, Günter

    2002-09-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films were prepared by ion-beam-assisted pulsed laser deposition (IAPLD) using a KrF excimer laser for ablation. The c-BN growth rates of 50 nm/min at relatively low substrate temperatures of 250 °C were achieved by using high laser energy densities of more than 30 J/cm 2 and at ion beam energies of 600-700 eV. Main advantage of IAPLD for the deposition of c-BN films is that at high laser energy densities the ratio of ions from the ion beam to ablated atoms and ions necessary for cubic film growth can be reduced to 0.14, since the ablated boron and nitrogen species themselves have high mean kinetic energies of 130-180 eV. By using pulsed laser deposited h-BN intermediate layers, 300-420 nm thick well-adherent c-BN films can be prepared on Si and WC hard metal substrates. The maximum c-BN film thickness of some 0.5 μm is limited by the accumulation of particulates, formed during the ablation process, in the films. The microstructure, stress, hardness and adhesion of such layer systems deposited at high growth rates are presented.

  1. High-rate deposition of diamond films by oxy-acetylene torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Martin D.; Brierley, Crofton J.

    1992-12-01

    An oxy-acetylene flame can produce diamond films at significantly higher deposition rates than those associated with either microwave plasma or hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition. We have established the growth conditions necessary to achieve good quality diamond on silicon substrates. The addition of hydrogen to the gas mixture has been shown to give good quality material at enhanced growth rates. The growth rate has been increased further by using a growth-etch cycling process. This is achieved by periodically pulsing extra oxygen into the gas stream to change from depositing to etching conditions. Under etching conditions the non-diamond carbon in the film is rapidly removed leaving the diamond behind. This allows the use of high rate growth conditions that would otherwise produce poor quality material. The morphology and Raman spectra of films produced by these techniques are presented. The scale-up of the deposition system to cover areas as large as 15 X 20 mm is reported. This is accomplished by rastering a burner consisting of a line of small flames.

  2. Deposition Rates of High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering: Physics and Economics

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2009-11-22

    Deposition by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is considered by some as the new paradigm of advanced sputtering technology, yet this is met with skepticism by others for the reported lower deposition rates, if compared to rates of more conventional sputtering of equal average power. In this contribution, the underlying physical reasons for the rate changes are discussed, including (i) ion return to the target and self-sputtering, (ii) the less-than-linear increase of the sputtering yield with increasing ion energy, (iii) yield changes due to the shift of species responsible for sputtering, (iv) changes to due to greater film density, limited sticking, and self-sputtering on the substrate, (v) noticeable power losses in the switch module, (vi) changes of the magnetic balance and particle confinement of the magnetron due to self-fields at high current, and (vii) superposition of sputtering and sublimation/evaporation for selected materials. The situation is even more complicated for reactive systems where the target surface chemistry is a function of the reactive gas partial pressure and discharge conditions. While most of these factors imply a reduction of the normalized deposition rate, increased rates have been reported for certain conditions using hot targets and less poisoned targets. Finally, some points of economics and HIPIMS benefits considered.

  3. Deposition rates of high power impulse magnetron sputtering: Physics and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2010-07-15

    Deposition by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is considered by some as the new paradigm of advanced sputtering technology, yet this is met with skepticism by others for the reported lower deposition rates, if compared to rates of more conventional sputtering of equal average power. In this contribution, the underlying physical reasons for the rate changes are discussed, including (i) ion return to the target and self-sputtering, (ii) the less-than-linear increase in the sputtering yield with increasing ion energy, (iii) yield changes due to the shift of species responsible for sputtering, (iv) changes due to greater film density, limited sticking, and self-sputtering on the substrate, (v) noticeable power losses in the switch module, (vi) changes in the magnetic balance and particle confinement of the magnetron due to self-fields at high current, and (vii) superposition of sputtering and sublimation/evaporation for selected materials. The situation is even more complicated for reactive systems where the target surface chemistry is a function of the reactive gas partial pressure and discharge conditions. While most of these factors imply a reduction in the normalized deposition rate, increased rates have been reported for certain conditions using hot targets and less poisoned targets. Finally, some points of economics and HIPIMS benefits are considered.

  4. High-rate laser metal deposition of Inconel 718 component using low heat-input approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, C. Y.; Scudamore, R. J.; Allen, J.

    Currently many aircraft and aero engine components are machined from billets or oversize forgings. This involves significant cost, material wastage, lead-times and environmental impacts. Methods to add complex features to another component or net-shape surface would offer a substantial cost benefit. Laser Metal Deposition (LMD), currently being applied to the repair of worn or damaged aero engine components, was attempted in this work as an alternative process route, to build features onto a base component, because of its low heat input capability. In this work, low heat input and high-rate deposition was developed to deposit Inconel 718 powder onto thin plates. Using the optimised process parameters, a number of demonstrator components were successfully fabricated.

  5. Extremely high rate deposition of polymer multilayer optical thin film materials

    SciTech Connect

    Affinito, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper highlights a new technique for extremely high rate deposition of optical dielectric films (vacuum deposition of polymer multilayer thin films). This is a way to produce multilayer optical filters comprised of thousands of layers of either linear or nonlinear optical materials. The technique involves the flash evaporation of an acrylic monomer onto a moving substrate; the monomer is then cured. Acrylic polymers deposited to date are very clear for wavelengths between 0.35 and 2.5 [mu]m; they have extinction coefficients of k[approx]10[sup [minus]7]. Application of electric field during cross linking can polarize (''pole'') the film to greatly enhance the nonlinear optical properties. ''Poling'' films with the polymer multilayer technique offers advantages over conventional approaches, in that the polarization should not decay over time. Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratory is well suited for bringing linear and nonlinear polymer multilayer optical filter technology to manufacturing production status for batch and wide area web applications. 10 figs.

  6. Extremely high rate deposition of polymer multilayer optical thin film materials

    SciTech Connect

    Affinito, J.D.

    1993-03-01

    This paper highlights a new technique for extremely high rate deposition of optical dielectric films (vacuum deposition of polymer multilayer thin films). This is a way to produce multilayer optical filters comprised of thousands of layers of either linear or nonlinear optical materials. The technique involves the flash evaporation of an acrylic monomer onto a moving substrate; the monomer is then cured. Acrylic polymers deposited to date are very clear for wavelengths between 0.35 and 2.5 {mu}m; they have extinction coefficients of k{approx}10{sup {minus}7}. Application of electric field during cross linking can polarize (``pole``) the film to greatly enhance the nonlinear optical properties. ``Poling`` films with the polymer multilayer technique offers advantages over conventional approaches, in that the polarization should not decay over time. Battelle`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory is well suited for bringing linear and nonlinear polymer multilayer optical filter technology to manufacturing production status for batch and wide area web applications. 10 figs.

  7. Supported plasma sputtering apparatus for high deposition rate over large area

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Ronald W.; McClanahan, Jr., Edwin D.; Laegreid, Nils

    1977-01-01

    A supported plasma sputtering apparatus is described having shaped electrical fields in the electron discharge region between the cathode and anode and the sputter region between the target and substrate while such regions are free of any externally applied magnetic field to provide a high deposition rate which is substantially uniform over a wide area. Plasma shaping electrodes separate from the anode and target shape the electrical fields in the electron discharge region and the sputter region to provide a high density plasma. The anode surrounds the target to cause substantially uniform sputtering over a large target area. In one embodiment the anode is in the form of an annular ring surrounding a flat target surface, such anode being provided with a ribbed upper surface which shields portions of the anode from exposure to sputtered material to maintain the electron discharge for a long stable operation. Several other embodiments accomplish the same result by using different anodes which either shield the anode from sputtered material, remove the sputtered coating on the anode by heating, or simultaneously mix sputtered metal from the auxiliary target with sputtered insulator from the main target so the resultant coating is conductive. A radio frequency potential alone or together with a D.C. potential, may be applied to the target for a greater sputtering rate.

  8. High-rate deposition of silicon films in a magnetron discharge with liquid target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumarkin, A.; Zibrov, M.; Khodachenko, G.; Tumarkina, D.

    2016-10-01

    Silicon coatings have been deposited on substrates made of low-carbon and high- carbon steels and tungsten in a magnetron discharge with liquid target at substrate bias voltages ranging from +100 V to -600 V. The structure of obtained coatings was examined by a scanning electron microscopy. The strong influence of substrate bias voltage on the coating structure was observed. The corrosion resistance of coated steel samples was examined in concentrated sulphuric, hydrochloric and nitric acids and their solutions. The resistance of coated tungsten samples against high-temperature oxidation was examined by their exposure to O2 gas at a pressure of 0.2 Pa and a temperature of 1073 K. The coatings deposited under bias voltages of+100 V and -600 V had dense structures and showed the best protective properties among all deposited coatings.

  9. Method to grow pure nanocrystalline diamond films at low temperatures and high deposition rates

    DOEpatents

    Carlisle, John A.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Auciello, Orlando; Xiao, Xingcheng

    2009-07-07

    A method of depositing nanocrystalline diamond film on a substrate at a rate of not less than about 0.2 microns/hour at a substrate temperature less than about 500.degree. C. The method includes seeding the substrate surface with nanocrystalline diamond powder to an areal density of not less than about 10.sup.10sites/cm.sup.2, and contacting the seeded substrate surface with a gas of about 99% by volume of an inert gas other than helium and about 1% by volume of methane or hydrogen and one or more of acetylene, fullerene and anthracene in the presence of a microwave induced plasma while maintaining the substrate temperature less than about 500.degree. C. to deposit nanocrystalline diamond on the seeded substrate surface at a rate not less than about 0.2 microns/hour. Coatings of nanocrystalline diamond with average particle diameters of less than about 20 nanometers can be deposited with thermal budgets of 500.degree. C.-4 hours or less onto a variety of substrates such as MEMS devices.

  10. Photoluminescence and anti-deliquesce of cesium iodide and its sodium-doped films deposited by thermal evaporation at high deposition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jin-Cherng; Chiang, Yueh-Sheng; Ma, Yu-Sheng

    2013-03-01

    Cesium iodide (CsI) and sodium iodide (NaI) are good scintillators due to their high luminescence efficiency. These alkali halides can be excited by ultra-violet or by ionizing radiation. In this study, CsI and its Na-doped films about 8 μm thick were deposited by thermal evaporation boat without heating substrates at high deposition rates of 30, 50, 70, 90, and 110 nm/sec, respectively. The as-deposited films were sequentially deposited a silicon dioxide film to protect from deliquesce. And, the films were also post-annealed in vacuum at 150, 200, 250, and 300 °C, respectively. We calculated the packing densities of the samples according to the measurements of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and observed the luminescence properties by photoluminescence (PL) system. The surfaces and cross sections of the films were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). From the above measurements we can find the optimal deposition rate of 90 nm/sec and post-annealing temperature of 250 °C in vacuum for the asdeposited cesium iodide and its sodium-doped films.

  11. Atomic/Molecular Layer Deposition of Lithium Terephthalate Thin Films as High Rate Capability Li-Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Nisula, Mikko; Karppinen, Maarit

    2016-02-10

    We demonstrate the fabrication of high-quality electrochemically active organic lithium electrode thin films by the currently strongly emerging combined atomic/molecular layer deposition (ALD/MLD) technique using lithium terephthalate, a recently found anode material for lithium-ion battery (LIB), as a proof-of-the-concept material. Our deposition process for Li-terephthalate is shown to well comply with the basic principles of ALD-type growth including the sequential self-saturated surface reactions, a necessity when aiming at micro-LIB devices with three-dimensional architectures. The as-deposited films are found crystalline across the deposition temperature range of 200-280 °C, which is a trait highly desired for an electrode material but rather unusual for hybrid inorganic-organic thin films. Excellent rate capability is ascertained for the Li-terephthalate films with no conductive additives required. The electrode performance can be further enhanced by depositing a thin protective LiPON solid-state electrolyte layer on top of Li-terephthalate; this yields highly stable structures with capacity retention of over 97% after 200 charge/discharge cycles at 3.2 C.

  12. High-rate deposition of a-SiNx:H for photovoltaic applications by the expanding thermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessels, W. M. M.; Hong, J.; van Assche, F. J. H.; Moschner, J. D.; Lauinger, T.; Soppe, W. J.; Weeber, A. W.; Schram, D. C.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2002-09-01

    Driven by the need for improvement of the economical competitiveness of photovoltaic energy, the feasibility of high-rate (>1 nm/s) amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx):H deposited by the expanding thermal plasma (ETP) technique has been explored with respect to the application of the a-SiNx:H as functional antireflection coating on crystalline silicon solar cells. First, the deposition rate and the a-SiNx:H film properties, such as refractive index, Si, N, and H atomic density, and hydrogen bonding configurations, have been mapped for various operating conditions. From ellipsometry, elastic recoil detection, and infrared spectroscopy, it has been shown that deposition rates up to 20 nm/s can be reached with a fair film homogeneity and that the refractive index and the N/Si ratio can fully be tuned by the plasma composition while the hydrogen content can be controlled by the substrate temperature. Good antireflection coating performance of the a-SiNx:H has therefore been observed for monocrystalline silicon solar cells. These cells with ETP a-SiNx:H yielded only slightly lower conversion efficiencies than high-quality reference cells due to a much lower degree of surface passivation. This lack of surface passivation has also been shown in a separate study on the surface recombination velocity. Furthermore, it has been tested whether the a-SiNx:H films lead to silicon bulk passivation, which is essential for solar cells based on cheaper, defective silicon stock material such as multicrystalline silicon. It has been proven that bulk passivation of the cells is indeed induced by the high-rate ETP deposited a-SiNx:H after a high-temperature step in which the metal contacts of the cells are processed. These results make the ETP technique an interesting candidate for high-throughput processing of competitive silicon solar cells. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  13. Conductive ZnO:Zn Composites for High-Rate Sputtering Deposition of ZnO Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Li Qin; Dubey, Mukul; Simões, Raul; Fan, Qi Hua; Neto, Victor

    2015-02-01

    We report an electrically conductive composite prepared by sintering ZnO and metallic Zn powders. Microstructure analysis combined with electrical conductivity studies indicated that when the proportion of metallic Zn reached a threshold (˜20 wt.%), a metal matrix was formed in accordance with percolation theory. This composite has potential as a sputtering target for deposition of high-quality ZnO. Use of the ZnO:Zn composite completely eliminates target poisoning effects in reactive sputtering of the metal, and enables deposition of thin ZnO films at rates much higher than those obtained by sputtering of pure ZnO ceramic targets. The optical transmittance of the ZnO films prepared by use of this composite is comparable with that of films produced by radio frequency sputtering of pure ZnO ceramic targets. The sputtering characteristics of the conductive ZnO:Zn composite target are reported, and possible mechanisms of the high rate of deposition are also discussed.

  14. High rate deposition system for metal-cluster/SiO x C y H z -polymer nanocomposite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, T.; Rehders, S.; Schürmann, U.; Strunskus, T.; Zaporojtchenko, V.; Faupel, F.

    2013-06-01

    A system for deposition of nanocomposite materials consisting of a SiO x C y H z -polymer matrix and Ag nanoclusters is presented. Ag nanoclusters with sizes between 2 and 20 nm are produced in a gas aggregation cluster source and are deposited through a focused beam at a high rate. This cluster source is presented in detail and the characteristics of the produced nanoclusters are shown. Simultaneously, a SiO x C y H z -polymer matrix is grown from the precursor hexamethyldisiloxane in an RF plasma. The beam of clusters is deposited into the growing polymer, forming the composite material. This process allows the rapid deposition of composite material with varying metal nanocluster concentrations and properties. Since the cluster generation is separated from the matrix growth, the properties of both can be controlled independently. In this study, we present two types of nanocomposite samples, in the first the Ag nanoclusters are homogeneously distributed in the matrix, in the second type the Ag nanoclusters form a layer which is covered by the matrix. These samples are investigated using transmission electron micrography to determine the morphology. Furthermore, the optical properties are probed using optical transmission spectroscopy and the plasmonic resonance behavior is discussed.

  15. Si nanostructures grown by picosecond high repetition rate pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervolaraki, M.; Komninou, Ph.; Kioseoglou, J.; Athanasopoulos, G. I.; Giapintzakis, J.

    2013-08-01

    One-step growth of n-doped Si nanostructures by picosecond ultra fast pulsed laser deposition at 1064 nm is reported for the first time. The structure and morphology of the Si nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the shape of the Si nanostructures depends on the ambient argon pressure. Fibrous networks, cauliflower formations and Si rectangular crystals grew when argon pressure of 300 Pa, 30 Pa and vacuum (10-3 Pa) conditions were used, respectively. In addition, the electrical resistance of the vacuum made material was investigated.

  16. High-rate chemical vapor deposition of diamond films by dc arc discharge in hydrogen-methane mixture gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiang-Liu; Zhang, Fang-Qing; Li, Jiang-Qi; Yang, Bin; Chen, Guang-Hua

    1990-12-01

    Polycrystalline diamond films with high growth-rate have been synthesized by dc arc discharge plasma CVD in a mixture gas of CH4 (1) and 112 (99). The diamond films are deposited on water-cooled silicon and molybdenum substrates at gaseous pressure of about 200 Torr. The typical arc discharge is performed at 200V and 4A while the hydrogen flow rate is about 3000 3500 sccm. The crystallinity of diamond films prepared are characterized by Xray differaction (XRD) Raman scattering spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It is verified by XRD and Raman measurements that the synthesized diamond films are identified as natural cubic diamond structure and contain substantially no graphite or amorphous carbon. SEM photographs show that the crystal grain size reachs 60 80 im with good crystal habit and the average growth rate of diamond films deposited during 4 hours is about 40 - 60 pm/h. As shown by SEM photographs the diamond grain size obviously depends on the local nucleation density. 1.

  17. High rate reactive magnetron sputter deposition of Al-doped ZnO with unipolar pulsing and impedance control system

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, Yasutaka; Hirohata, Kento; Tsukamoto, Naoki; Sato, Yasushi; Oka, Nobuto; Shigesato, Yuzo

    2010-07-15

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films were deposited on quartz glass substrates, unheated and heated to 200 deg. C, using reactive sputtering with a special feedback system of discharge impedance combined with midfrequency pulsing. A planar Zn-Al alloy target was connected to the switching unit, which was operated in a unipolar pulse mode. The oxidation of the target surface was precisely controlled by a feedback system for the entire O{sub 2} flow ratio including ''the transition region''. The deposition rate was about 10-20 times higher than that for films deposited by conventional sputtering using an oxide target. A deposition rate of AZO films of 390 nm/min with a resistivity of 3.8x10{sup -4} {Omega} cm and a transmittance in the visible region of 85% was obtained when the films were deposited on glass substrates heated to 200 deg. C with a discharge power of 4 kW.

  18. Highly effective synthesis of NiO/CNT nanohybrids by atomic layer deposition for high-rate and long-life supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Wang, Guilong; Wan, Gengping; Wang, Guizhen; Lin, Shiwei; Li, Xinyue; Wang, Kan; Bai, Zhiming; Xiang, Yang

    2016-09-21

    In this work, we report an atomic layer deposition (ALD) method for the fabrication of NiO/CNT hybrid structures in order to improve electronic conductivity, enhance cycling stability and increase rate capability of NiO used as supercapacitor electrodes. A uniform NiO coating can be well deposited on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through simultaneously employing O3 and H2O as oxidizing agents in a single ALD cycle of NiO for the first time, with a high growth rate of nearly 0.3 Å per cycle. The electrochemical properties of the as-prepared NiO/CNT were then investigated. The results show that the electrochemical capacitive properties are strongly associated with the thickness of the NiO coating. The NiO/CNT composite materials with 200 cycles of NiO deposition exhibit the best electrochemical properties, involving high specific capacitance (622 F g(-1) at 2 A g(-1), 2013 F g(-1) for NiO), excellent rate capability (74% retained at 50 A g(-1)) and outstanding cycling stability. The impressive results presented here suggest a great potential for the fabrication of composite electrode materials by atomic layer deposition applied in high energy density storage systems.

  19. High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, 1 September 2001--6 March 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, X.

    2006-01-01

    The objectives for the University of Toledo are to: (1) establish a transferable knowledge and technology base for fabricating high-efficiency triple-junction a-Si-based solar cells, and (2) develop high-rate deposition techniques for the growing a-Si-based and related alloys, including poly-Si, c-Si, a-SiGe, and a-Si films and photovoltaic devices with these materials.

  20. Aerial spray deposition on corn silks applied at high and low spray rates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corn earworm is a major pest of sweet corn, especially when grown organically. Aerial application of insecticides is important for both conventionally- and organically-grown sweet corn production as sweet corn is frequently irrigated to assure return on investment given the high production costs. ...

  1. Visible-light active thin-film WO{sub 3} photocatalyst with controlled high-rate deposition by low-damage reactive-gas-flow sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Nobuto Murata, Akiyo; Nakamura, Shin-ichi; Jia, Junjun; Shigesato, Yuzo; Iwabuchi, Yoshinori; Kotsubo, Hidefumi

    2015-10-01

    A process based on reactive gas flow sputtering (GFS) for depositing visible-light active photocatalytic WO{sub 3} films at high deposition rates and with high film quality was successfully demonstrated. The deposition rate for this process was over 10 times higher than that achieved by the conventional sputtering process and the process was highly stable. Furthermore, Pt nanoparticle-loaded WO{sub 3} films deposited by the GFS process exhibited much higher photocatalytic activity than those deposited by conventional sputtering, where the photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the extent of decomposition of CH{sub 3}CHO under visible light irradiation. The decomposition time for 60 ppm of CH{sub 3}CHO was 7.5 times more rapid on the films deposited by the GFS process than on the films deposited by the conventional process. During GFS deposition, there are no high-energy particles bombarding the growing film surface, whereas the bombardment of the surface with high-energy particles is a key feature of conventional sputtering. Hence, the WO{sub 3} films deposited by GFS should be of higher quality, with fewer structural defects, which would lead to a decrease in the number of centers for electron-hole recombination and to the efficient use of photogenerated holes for the decomposition of CH{sub 3}CHO.

  2. Atmospheric deposition to high-elevation forests

    SciTech Connect

    Lovett, G.M.; Weathers, K.C.; Lindberg, S.E. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1994-06-01

    Three important phenomena characterize atmospheric deposition to high-elevation forests: (1) multiple deposition mechanisms (wet, dry, and cloud deposition), (2) high rates of deposition, and (3) high spatial variability. The high rates of deposition are caused by changes in meteorological conditions with elevation, especially increasing wind speed and cloud immersion frequency. The high spatial variability of deposition is a result of the regulation of cloud and dry deposition rates by microclimatic and canopy structure conditions, which can be extremely heterogeneous in mountain landscapes. Spruce-fir forests are often [open quotes]hot spots[close quotes] of deposition when viewed in a landscape or regional context because of their elevation, exposure, and evergreen canopy. In this talk we will consider atmospheric depositions to high-elevation forests in both the northeastern and southeastern U.S., using field data and geographic information systems to illustrate deposition patterns.

  3. Fabrication of CeO 2 buffer layer with high deposition rate on biaxially textured Ni-3%W substrate by electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. B.; Park, S. K.; Kim, B. J.; Lee, H. J.; Kim, S. S.; Moon, S. H.; Lee, H. G.; Hong, G. W.

    2011-11-01

    CeO2 has been used as a buffer layer of a coated conductor because of good chemical and structural compatibility with YBCO. But cracks were often observed at the surface for films thicker than 100 nm deposited at a high temperature because of a large difference in a thermal expansion coefficient between metal and CeO2. The deposition rate was limited to be slow for getting good epitaxy. In order to increase the film deposition rate, while maintaining the epitaxy till a final thickness, two-step deposition process was tested. The thin seed layer with a thickness less than 10 nm was deposited with a deposition rate of 3 Å/s, and the homo-epitaxial layer at a thickness more than 240 nm was deposited at a deposition rate of 30 Å/s. The resulting CeO2 films deposited at 600 °C showed a good texture with a Δφ of 5.3°, Δω of 4.2° and Ra of 2.2 nm. The two-step process may be option for a low cost buffer layer for Ni-3%W metal substrates for the coated conductor.

  4. High Growth Rate Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon-Germanium Films and Devices Using ECR-PECVD

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium films (a-SiGe:H) and devices have been extensively studied because of the tunable band gap for matching the solar spectrum and mature the fabrication techniques. a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells have great potential for commercial manufacture because of very low cost and adaptability to large-scale manufacturing. Although it has been demonstrated that a-SiGe:H thin films and devices with good quality can be produced successfully, some issues regarding growth chemistry have remained yet unexplored, such as the hydrogen and inert-gas dilution, bombardment effect, and chemical annealing, to name a few. The alloying of the SiGe introduces above an order-of-magnitude higher defect density, which degrades the performance of the a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells. This degradation becomes worse when high growth-rate deposition is required. Preferential attachment of hydrogen to silicon, clustering of Ge and Si, and columnar structure and buried dihydride radicals make the film intolerably bad. The work presented here uses the Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (ECR-PECVD) technique to fabricate a-SiGe:H films and devices with high growth rates. Helium gas, together with a small amount of H2, was used as the plasma species. Thickness, optical band gap, conductivity, Urbach energy, mobility-lifetime product, I-V curve, and quantum efficiency were characterized during the process of pursuing good materials. The microstructure of the a-(Si,Ge):H material was probed by Fourier-Transform Infrared spectroscopy. They found that the advantages of using helium as the main plasma species are: (1) high growth rate--the energetic helium ions break the reactive gas more efficiently than hydrogen ions; (2) homogeneous growth--heavy helium ions impinging on the surface promote the surface mobility of the reactive radicals, so that heteroepitaxy growth as clustering of Ge and Si, columnar structure are

  5. Characterization and Electrochemical Performance at High Discharge Rates of Tin Dioxide Thin Films Synthesized by Atomic Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximov, M. Yu.; Novikov, P. A.; Nazarov, D. V.; Rymyantsev, A. M.; Silin, A. O.; Zhang, Y.; Popovich, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    In this study, thin films of tin dioxide have been synthesized on substrates of silicon and stainless steel by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with tetraethyl tin and by inductively coupled remote oxygen plasma as precursors. Studies of the surface morphology by scanning electron microscopy show a strong dependence on synthesis temperature. According to the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, the samples contain tin in the oxidation state +4. The thickness of the thin films for electrochemical performance was approximately 80 nm. Electrochemical cycling in the voltage range of 0.01-0.8 V have shown that tin oxide has a stable discharge capacity of approximately 650 mAh/g during 400 charge/discharge cycles with an efficiency of approximately 99.5%. The decrease in capacity after 400 charge/discharge cycles was around 5-7%. Synthesized SnO2 thin films have fast kinetics of lithium ions intercalation and excellent discharge efficiency at high C-rates, up to 40C, with a small decrease in capacity of less than 20%. Specific capacity and cyclic stability of thin films of SnO2 synthesized by ALD exceed the values mentioned in the literature for pure tin dioxide thin films.

  6. Surface Passivation of MoO₃ Nanorods by Atomic Layer Deposition toward High Rate Durable Li Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, B; Shahid, Muhammad; Nagaraju, D H; Anjum, D H; Hedhili, Mohamed N; Alshareef, H N

    2015-06-24

    We demonstrate an effective strategy to overcome the degradation of MoO3 nanorod anodes in lithium (Li) ion batteries at high-rate cycling. This is achieved by conformal nanoscale surface passivation of the MoO3 nanorods by HfO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD). At high current density such as 1500 mA/g, the specific capacity of HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes is 68% higher than that of bare MoO3 electrodes after 50 charge/discharge cycles. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes exhibited specific capacity of 657 mAh/g; on the other hand, bare MoO3 showed only 460 mAh/g. Furthermore, we observed that HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes tend to stabilize faster than bare MoO3 electrodes because nanoscale HfO2 layer prevents structural degradation of MoO3 nanorods. Additionally, the growth temperature of MoO3 nanorods and the effect of HfO2 layer thickness was studied and found to be important parameters for optimum battery performance. The growth temperature defines the microstructural features and HfO2 layer thickness defines the diffusion coefficient of Li-ions through the passivation layer to the active material. Furthermore, ex situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction were carried out to explain the capacity retention mechanism after HfO2 coating.

  7. High-rate deposition of MgO by reactive ac pulsed magnetron sputtering in the transition mode

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, H.; Kleinhempel, R.; Richter, F.; Peters, C.; Krause, U.; Kopte, T.; Cheng, Y.

    2006-01-15

    A reactive ac pulsed dual magnetron sputtering process for MgO thin-film deposition was equipped with a closed-loop control of the oxygen flow rate (F{sub O2}) using the 285 nm magnesium radiation as input. Owing to this control, most of the unstable part of the partial pressure versus flowrate curve became accessible. The process worked steadily and reproducible without arcing. A dynamic deposition rate of up to 35 nm m/min could be achieved, which was higher than in the oxide mode by about a factor of 18. Both process characteristics and film properties were investigated in this work in dependence on the oxygen flow, i.e., in dependence on the particular point within the transition region where the process is operated. The films had very low extinction coefficients (<5x10{sup -5}) and refractive indices close to the bulk value. They were nearly stoichiometric with a slight oxygen surplus (Mg/O=48/52) which was independent of the oxygen flow. X-ray diffraction revealed a prevailing (111) orientation. Provided that appropriate rf plasma etching was performed prior to deposition, no other than the (111) peak could be detected. The intensity of this peak increased with increasing F{sub O{sub 2}}, indicating an even more pronounced (111) texture. The ion-induced secondary electron emission coefficient (iSEEC) was distinctly correlated with the markedness of the (111) preferential orientation. Both refractive index and (111) preferred orientation (which determines the iSEEC) were found to be improved in comparison with the MgO growth in the fully oxide mode. Consequently, working in the transition mode is superior to the oxide mode not only with respect to the growth rate, but also to most important film properties.

  8. Distributions of ionic concentrations and electric field around the three-phase contact at high rates of Langmuir-Blodgett deposition.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, M P; Zholkovskiy, E K; Kovalchuk, V I; Vollhardt, D

    2006-02-02

    A mathematical problem is formulated and numerically solved for addressing the electric field and ionic concentration distributions developing around the three-phase contact line during the Langmuir-Blodgett deposition of charged monolayers. Compared to a previous paper dealing with the same effect (J. Phys. Chem. B 2004, 108, 13449), the present analysis is not restricted to the case of low deposition rates and small concentration changes. The obtained results show that, for sufficiently high deposition rates, the subphase composition substantially changes in the immediate vicinity of the three-phase contact line. It is shown that the predicted changes in the subphase composition can drastically affect the adhesion work and the dynamic contact angle. On this basis, the influence of the concentration polarization effect on meniscus behavior is discussed.

  9. Energy harvesting based on piezoelectric AlN and AlScN thin films deposited by high rate sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frach, Peter; Barth, Stephan; Bartzsch, Hagen; Gloess, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a piezoelectric material often used as thin film in SAW/BAW devices. Furthermore, there is an increasing interest in its use for energy harvesting applications. Despite it has a relatively low piezoelectric coefficient, it is a suitable choice for energy harvesting applications and due to its low dielectric constant and good mechanical properties. In addition, it is a lead-free material. The films were deposited by reactive pulsed magnetron sputtering using the Double Ring Magnetron DRM 400. This sputter source together with suitable powering and process control allows depositing piezoelectric AlN very homogeneously on 8" substrates with deposition rates of up to 200 nm/min. With the developed technology, film thicknesses of several ten microns are technically and economically feasible. Moreover, by adjusting process parameters accordingly, it is possible to tune properties, like film stress, to application specific requirements. Additionally, it is known that the doping of AlN with Scandium results in a significantly increased piezoelectric coefficient. The influence of process parameters and Sc concentration on film properties were determined by piezometer, pulse echo, SEM, XRD, EDS and nanoindentation measurements. Energy harvesting measurements were done using an electromechanical shaker system for the excitation of defined vibrations and a laservibrometer for determination of the displacement of the samples. The generated power was measured as function of electric load at resonance. An rms power of up to 140μW using AlN films and of 350μW using AlScN films was generated on Si test pieces of 8x80mm2. Furthermore, energy harvesting measurements using manually bended steel strips of 75x25mm2 coated with AlScN were carried out as well. When using only a single actuation, energy of up to 8μJ could be measured. By letting the system vibrate freely, the damped vibration at resonance 50Hz resulted in a measured energy of 420μJ.

  10. Deposition of device quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon at high deposition rates with increased stability using the hot wire filament technique

    DOEpatents

    Molenbroek, Edith C.; Mahan, Archie Harvin; Gallagher, Alan C.

    2000-09-26

    A method or producing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate, comprising the steps of: positioning the substrate in a deposition chamber at a distance of about 0.5 to 3.0 cm from a heatable filament in the deposition chamber; maintaining a pressure in said deposition chamber in the range of about 10 to 100 millitorr and pressure times substrate-filament spacing in the range of about 10 to 100 millitorr-cm, heating the filament to a temperature in the range of about 1,500 to 2,000.degree. C., and heating the substrate to a surface temperature in the range of about 280 to 475.degree. C.; and flowing silicohydride gas into the deposition chamber with said heated filament, decomposing said silicohydride gas into silicon and hydrogen atomic species and allowing products of gas reactions between said atomic species and the silicohydride gas to migrate to and deposit on said substrate while adjusting and maintaining said pressure times substrate-filament spacing in said deposition chamber at a value in said 10 to 100 millitorr range to produce statistically about 3 to 50 atomic collisions between the silicon and hydrogen atomic species migrating to said substrate and undecomposed molecules of the silane or other silicohydride gas in the deposition chamber.

  11. Structural Characterization of Polycrystalline 3C-SiC Films Prepared at High Rates by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition Using Monomethylsilane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiuchi, Hiroaki; Ohmi, Hiromasa; Nakamura, Ryota; Aketa, Masatoshi; Yasutake, Kiyoshi

    2006-10-01

    Polycrystalline cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) films were deposited at a relatively low temperature of 1070 K on Si(001) substrates by atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition. Monomethylsilane (CH3SiH3) was used as the single source. CH4 and SiH4 dual sources were also used to compare deposition characteristics. Under the present deposition conditions, very high deposition rates of more than 3 nm/s were obtained. The structure of the SiC films was evaluated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. In addition, optical emission spectroscopy was employed to study the chemical reactions in the CH4/SiH4 and CH3SiH3 plasmas. The results showed that increasing H2 concentration is essential in forming a high quality 3C-SiC film by enhancing the hydrogen elimination reaction at the film-growing surface. From the optical emission spectra, it was found that atomic hydrogen generated by adding H2 in the plasma increase the amount of principal precursors for the film growth. The utilization of CH3SiH3 also led to a higher concentration of principal precursors in the plasma, enhancing the incorporation of Si-C bonds into the film. As a consequence of simultaneously using a high H2 concentration and the CH3SiH3 single source, the columnar growth of 3C-SiC crystallites was achieved.

  12. Deposition rates of oxidized iron on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    The reddened oxidized surface of Mars is indicative of temporal interactions between the Martian atmosphere and its surface. During the evolution of the Martian regolith, primary ferromagnesian silicate and sulfide minerals in basaltic rocks apparently have been oxidized to secondary ferric-bearing assemblages. To evaluate how and when such oxidized deposits were formed on Mars, information about the mechanisms and rates of chemical weathering of Fe(2+)-bearing minerals has been determined. In this paper, mechanisms and rates of deposition of ferric oxide phases on the Martian surface are discussed.

  13. The effect of substrate holder size on the electric field and discharge plasma on diamond-film formation at high deposition rates during MPCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Kang; Chen, Liangxian; Liu, Jinlong; Zhao, Yun; Yan, Xiongbo; Hua, Chenyi; Guo, Jianchao; Wei, Junjun; Hei, Lifu; Li, Chengming; Lu, Fanxiu

    2017-09-01

    The effect of the substrate holder feature dimensions on plasma density (n e), power density (Q mw) and gas temperature (T) of a discharge marginal plasma (a plasma caused by marginal discharge) and homogeneous plasma were investigated for the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process. Our simulations show that decreasing the dimensions of the substrate holder in a radical direction and increasing its dimension in the direction of the axis helps to produce marginally inhomogeneous plasma. When the marginal discharge appears, the maximum plasma density and power density appear at the edge of the substrate. The gas temperature increases until a marginally inhomogeneous plasma develops. The marginally inhomogeneous plasma can be avoided using a movable substrate holder that can tune the plasma density, power density and gas temperature. It can also ensure that the power density and electron density are as high as possible with uniform distribution of plasma. Moreover, both inhomogeneous and homogeneous diamond films were prepared using a new substrate holder with a diameter of 30 mm. The observation of inhomogeneous diamond films indicates that the marginal discharge can limit the deposition rate in the central part of the diamond film. The successfully produced homogeneous diamond films show that by using a substrate holder it is possible to deposit diamond film at 7.2 μm h-1 at 2.5 kW microwave power.

  14. Cubic Structure and Cation Disordering in Ybco Thin Film Deposited by High Speed Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Jeong-Dae; Sung, Gun Yong; Kang, Kwang Yong

    We have investigated the crystalline structure of high rate deposited YBa2Cu3Ox thin films prepared by high speed pulsed laser deposition. A cation disordered cubic structure with lattice parameter of 0.39 nm was found in YBCO thin film deposited at 12.2 nm/s deposition rate and 650°C substrate temperature conditions. The short range ordered cubic YBa2Cu3Ox thin film growth at high deposition rate was explained by the short migration length of Y and Ba cation atoms owing to the high incident flux rate.

  15. Nucleation of ReBa2Cu3Ox (Re = rare-earth) during high-rate metal-organic chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav F.; Li, Qiang; Chen, Y.; Guevara, A.; Shi, T.; Selvamanickam, V.

    2011-12-01

    Large-scale, high-rate epitaxial growth technology for the second-generation superconducting wire brings unique technological challenges for the thin-film coating industry. One of the most difficult steps of the process is controlling nucleation of a complex compound over a km-long low-cost oxide template. Here, we analyze early stages of industrial-scale epitaxial metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of ReBa2Cu3Ox (REBCO, Re = rare-earth) on buffered metal substrates. The nucleation event is detected by high-flux synchrotron X-ray diffraction and confirmed by atomic force microscopy. REBCO nuclei exhibit a strong preference for edges of the buffer grain, indicating that (001) steps of the buffer grains are preferred nucleation sites. It is concluded that random nucleation of REBCO is caused by agglomerates of small buffer grains.

  16. Deposition of insecticides on corn silks applied at high and low spray rates for control of corn earworm

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corn earworm is a major pest of sweet corn, especially when grown organically. Aerial application of insecticides is important for both conventionally- and organically-grown sweet corn production as sweet corn is frequently irrigated to assure return on investment given the high production costs. ...

  17. Efficient Flame Retardant Thin Films Synthesized by Atmospheric Pressure PECVD through the High Co-deposition Rate of Hexamethyldisiloxane and Triethylphosphate on Polycarbonate and Polyamide-6 Substrates.

    PubMed

    Hilt, Florian; Gherardi, Nicolas; Duday, David; Berné, Aurélien; Choquet, Patrick

    2016-05-18

    An innovative approach to produce high-performance and halogen-free flame-retardant thin films at atmospheric pressure is reported. PDMS-based coatings with embedded dopant-rich polyphosphates are elaborated thanks to a straightforward approach, using an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (AP-DBD). Deposition conditions have been tailored to elaborate various thin films that can match the fire performance requirements. Morphology, chemical composition, and structure are investigated, and results show that the coatings performances are increased by taking advantage of the synergistic effect of P and Si flame retardant compounds. More specifically, this study relates the possibility to obtain flame retardant properties on PolyCarbonate and PolyAmide-6 thanks to their covering by a 5 μm thick coating, i.e. very thin films for this field of application, yet quite substantial for plasma processes. Hence, this approach enables deposition of flame retardant coatings onto different polymer substrates, providing a versatile fireproofing solution for different natures of polymer substrates. The presence of an expanded charred layer at the surface acts as a protective barrier limiting heat and mass transfer. This latter retains and consumes a part of the PC or PA-6 degradation byproducts and then minimizes the released flammable gases. It may also insulate the substrate from the flame and limit mass transfers of remaining volatile gases. Moreover, reactions in the condensed phase have also been highlighted despite the relatively thin thickness of the deposited layers. As a result of these phenomena, excellent performances are obtained, illustrated by a decrease of the peak of the heat release rate (pHRR) and an increase of the time to ignition (TTI).

  18. Deposition Rates and Characterization of Arabian Mineral Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthan Purakkal, J.; Stenchikov, G. L.; Engelbrecht, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Airborne mineral dust directly and indirectly impacts on global climate, continental and marine biochemistry, human and animal health, agriculture, equipment, and visibility. Annual global dust emissions are poorly known with estimates differing by a factor of at least two. Local dust emission and deposition rates are even less quantified. Dust deposition rate is a key parameter, which helps to constrain the modeled dust budget of the atmosphere. However, dust deposition remains poorly known, due to the limited number of reliable measurements. Simulations and satellite observations suggest that coastal dusts contribute substantially to the total deposition flux into the Red Sea. Starting December 2014, deposition samplers, both the "frisbee" type, and passive samplers for individual particle scanning electron microscopy were deployed at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), along the Red Sea in Saudi Arabia. Sampling periods of one month were adopted. The deposition rates range from 3 g m-2 month-1 for fair weather conditions to 23 g m-2 month-1 for high dust events. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses of deposited dust samples show mineralogical compositions different from any of the parent soils, the former consisting mainly of gypsum, calcite, and smaller amounts of albite, montmorillonite, chlorite, quartz and biotite. The deposited dust samples on the other hand contain more gypsum and less quartz than the previously collected soil samples. This presentation discusses the results from XRD, chemical analysis and SEM-based individual particle analysis of the soils and the deposited dust samples. The monthly dust accumulation rates and their seasonal and spatial variability are compared with the regional model predictions. Data from this study provide an observational basis for validating the regional dust mass balance along the Arabian Red Sea coastal plain.

  19. High-Resolution Chronostratigraphic Correlation and Sedimentation Rate Calculations With Maximum Depositional Ages Derived From Large-n Detrital Zircon Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, S. M.; Coutts, D. S.; Matthews, W.; Guest, B.; Bain, H.

    2015-12-01

    In basins adjacent to continually active arcs, detrital zircon geochronology can be used to establish a high-resolution chronostratigraphic framework for deep-time strata. Large-nU-Pb geochronological datasets can yield a statistically significant signature from the youngest sub-population of detrital zircons, which we deduce from maximum depositional age (MDA) calculations. MDA is determined through numerous methods such as the mean age of three or more overlapping grain ages at 2σ error, favored in this analysis. Positive identification of the youngest detrital zircon population in a rock is the limiting factor on precision and resolution. The Campanian-Paleogene Nanaimo Group of B.C., Canada, was deposited in a forearc basin, outboard of the Coast Mountain Batholith. The record of a deep-water sediment-routing system is exhumed at Denman and Hornby islands; sandstone- and conglomerate- dominated strata compose a composite sedimentary unit 20 km across and 1.5 km thick, in strike section. Volcanic ashes are absent from the succession, which has been constrained biostratigraphically. Eleven detrital zircon samples are analyzed to define stratigraphic architecture and provide insight into sedimentation rates. Our dataset (n=3081) constrains the overall duration of channelization to ~18 Ma. A series of at least five distinct composite channel fills 3-6 km wide and 400-600 m thick are identified. The MDA of these units are statistically distinct and constrained to better than 3% precision. Sedimentation rates amongst the channel fills increase upward, from 60-100 m/Ma to >500 m/Ma. This is likely linked to the tendency of a slope channel system to be dominated by sediment bypass early in its evolution, and later dominated by aggradation as large-scale levees develop. Channel processes were not continuous, with the longest hiatus ~6 Ma. The large-n detrital zircon dataset provides unprecedented insight into long-term sediment routing, evidence for which is

  20. Increasing the Deposition Rate of Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutwack, R.; Yamakawa, K. A.

    1986-01-01

    Modified Siemens reactor enables chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon to occur simultaneously on inner and outer surfaces of hollow cylinder, resulting in increase in mass of silicon deposited per unit time. Outer reactor for silicon deposition made from quartz or stainless steel. Hollow cylinder either single resistance-heated hollow cylinder about 5 to 10 cm or greater in diameter or 1-cm-diameter rods aligned in circular channels at top and bottom, initial circles being 5 to 10 cm in diameter or greater.

  1. Effect of substrate temperature on deposition rate of rf plasma-deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andújar, J. L.; Bertran, E.; Canillas, A.; Campmany, J.; Morenza, J. L.

    1991-03-01

    We present a study about the influence of substrate temperature on deposition rate of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films prepared by rf glow discharge decomposition of pure silane gas in a capacitively coupled plasma reactor. Two different behaviors are observed depending on deposition pressure conditions. At high pressure (30 Pa) the influence of substrate temperature on deposition rate is mainly through a modification of gas density, in such a way that the substrate temperature of deposition rate is similar to pressure dependence at constant temperature. On the contrary, at low pressure (3 Pa), a gas density effect cannot account for the observed increase of deposition rate as substrate temperature rises above 450 K with an activation energy of 1.1 kcal/mole. In accordance with laser-induced fluorescence measurements reported in the literature, this rise has been ascribed to an increase of secondary electron emission from the growing film surface as a result of molecular hydrogen desorption.

  2. High population increase rates.

    PubMed

    1991-09-01

    In addition to its economic and ethnic difficulties, the USSR faces several pressing demographic problems, including high population increase rates in several of its constituent republics. It has now become clear that although the country's rigid centralized planning succeeded in covering the basic needs of people, it did not lead to welfare growth. Since the 1970s, the Soviet economy has remained sluggish, which as led to increase in the death and birth rates. Furthermore, the ideology that held that demography could be entirely controlled by the country's political and economic system is contradicted by current Soviet reality, which shows that religion and ethnicity also play a significant role in demographic dynamics. Currently, Soviet republics fall under 2 categories--areas with high or low natural population increase rates. Republics with low rates consist of Christian populations (Armenia, Moldavia, Georgia, Byelorussia, Russia, Lithuania, Estonia, Latvia, Ukraine), while republics with high rates are Muslim (Tadzhikistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kirgizia, Azerbaijan Kazakhstan). The later group has natural increase rates as high as 3.3%. Although the USSR as a whole is not considered a developing country, the later group of republics fit the description of the UNFPA's priority list. Another serious demographic issue facing the USSR is its extremely high rate of abortion. This is especially true in the republics of low birth rates, where up to 60% of all pregnancies are terminated by induced abortions. Up to 1/5 of the USSR's annual health care budget is spent on clinical abortions -- money which could be better spent on the production of contraceptives. Along with the recent political and economic changes, the USSR is now eager to deal with its demographic problems.

  3. Sediment accumulation rates and high-resolution stratigraphy of recent fluvial suspension deposits in various fluvial settings, Morava River catchment area, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedláček, Jan; Bábek, Ondřej; Kielar, Ondřej

    2016-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study concerning sedimentary processes in fluvial sediment traps within the Morava River catchment area (Czech Republic) involving three dammed reservoirs, four meanders and oxbow lakes, and several natural floodplain sites. The objective of the study was to determine sediment accumulation rates (SAR), estimate erosion rates, calculating these using a combination of the 137Cs method and historical data. Another purpose of this study was to provide insight into changing erosion and accumulation rates over the last century. Extensive water course modifications were carried out in the Morava River catchment area during the twentieth century, which likely affected sedimentation rates along the river course. Other multiproxy stratigraphic methods (X-ray densitometry, magnetic susceptibility, and visible-light reflectance spectrometry) were applied to obtain additional information about sediment infill. Sediment stratigraphy revealed distinct distal-to-proximal patterns, especially in reservoirs. Granulometrically, silts and sandy silts prevailed in sediments. Oxbow lakes and meanders contained larger amounts of clay and organic matter, which is the main difference between them and reservoirs. Pronounced 137Cs peaks were recorded in all studied cores (maximum 377 Bq·kg- 1), thus indicating Chernobyl fallout from 1986 or older events. Calculated sediment accumulation rates were lowest in distal parts of reservoirs (0.13-0.58 cm/y) and floodplains (0.45-0.88 cm/y), moderately high rates were found in proximal parts of reservoirs and oxbow lakes (2.27-4.4 cm/y), and the highest rates in some oxbow lakes located near the river (6-8 cm/y). The frequency of the inundation still can be high in some natural areas as in the Litovelské Pomoraví protected area, whereas the decreasing frequency of the inundation in other modified parts can contribute to a lower sedimentation rate. The local effects such as difference between SARs in oxbow lakes and

  4. Effects of growth temperature and target material on the growth behavior and electro-optical properties of ZnO:Al films deposited by high-rate steered cathodic arc plasma evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chih-Hao; Hwang, Weng-Sing; Wang, Wei-Lin

    2015-04-01

    ZnO:Al (AZO) films were deposited using high-rate (215 nm/min) steered cathodic arc plasma evaporation with a ceramic AZO target at various deposition temperatures (Td = 80-400 °C). AZO films were also prepared with a Zn-Al target at various Td values for comparison. The high-melting-point (1975 °C) AZO target significantly reduced the droplet size to ∼150 nm. In contrast, opaque Zn-Al microdroplets (several μm) were incorporated into the film deposited using the Zn-Al target. The incorporation of large microdroplets resulted in a rough surface and a nonuniform distribution of film thickness due to the self-shadowing effect. Using a combination of a ceramic AZO target and a steered arc to deposit AZO films significantly reduces the droplet size and maintains a high growth rate. The ratio of c- and a-axes lattice constants (c/a ratio) decreased with increasing Td. A higher c/a ratio facilitates strain relaxation via the formation of basal-plane stacking faults. The Al3+ doping efficiency was improved by increasing Td; however, the Al segregated to the grain boundary at high Td (>300 °C). The films deposited with an AZO target at 200 °C had the highest figure of merit (2.21 × 10-2 Ω-1), with a corresponding average transmittance of 87.7% and resistivity of 5.48 × 10-4 Ω cm.

  5. Analysis of the rate of wildcat drilling and deposit discovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, L.J.

    1975-01-01

    The rate at which petroleum deposits were discovered during a 16-yr period (1957-72) was examined in relation to changes in a suite of economic and physical variables. The study area encompasses 11,000 mi2 and is located on the eastern flank of the Powder River Basin. A two-stage multiple-regression model was used as a basis for this analysis. The variables employed in this model were: (1) the yearly wildcat drilling rate, (2) a measure of the extent of the physical exhaustion of the resource base of the region, (3) a proxy for the discovery expectation of the exploration operators active in the region, (4) an exploration price/cost ratio, and (5) the expected depths of the exploration targets sought. The rate at which wildcat wells were drilled was strongly correlated with the discovery expectation of the exploration operators. Small additional variations in the wildcat drilling rate were explained by the price/cost ratio and target-depth variables. The number of deposits discovered each year was highly dependent on the wildcat drilling rate, but the aggregate quantity of petroleum discovered each year was independent of the wildcat drilling rate. The independence between these last two variables is a consequence of the cyclical behavior of the exploration play mechanism. Although the discovery success ratio declined sharply during the initial phases of the two exploration plays which developed in the study area, a learning effect occurred whereby the discovery success ratio improved steadily with the passage of time during both exploration plays. ?? 1975 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  6. Atmospheric deposition of phosphorus to the everglades: concepts, constraints, and published deposition rates for ecosystem management.

    PubMed

    Redfield, Garth W

    2002-07-03

    This paper summarizes concepts underlying the atmospheric input of phosphorus (P) to ecosystems, published rates of P deposition, measurement methods, and approaches to future monitoring and research. P conveyed through the atmosphere can be a significant nutrient source for some freshwater and marine ecosystems. Particle sources and sinks at the land-air interface produce variation in P deposition from the atmosphere across temporal and spatial scales. Natural plant canopies can affect deposition rates by changing the physical environment and surface area for particle deposition. Land-use patterns can alter P deposition rates by changing particle concentrations in the atmosphere. The vast majority of P in dry atmospheric deposition is conveyed by coarse (2.5 to 10 m) and giant (10 to 100 m) particles, and yet these size fractions represent a challenge for long-term atmospheric monitoring in the absence of accepted methods for routine sampling. Most information on P deposition is from bulk precipitation collectors and wet/dry bucket sampling, both with questionable precision and accuracy. Most published annual rates of P deposition are gross estimates derived from bulk precipitation sampling in locations around the globe and range from about 5 to well over 100 mg P m(-2) year(-1), although most inland ecosystems receive between 20 and 80 mg P m(-2) year(-1). Rates below 30 mg P m(-2) year-1 are found in remote areas and near coastlines. Intermediate rates of 30 to 50 mg P m(-2) year(-1) are associated with forests or mixed land use, and rates of 50 to 100 mg P m(-2) year(-1) or more are often recorded from urban or agricultural settings. Comparison w ith other methods suggests that these bulk precipitation estimates provide crude boundaries around actual P deposition rates for various land uses. However, data screening cannot remove all positive bias caused by contamination of bucket or bulk collectors. As a consequence, continued sampling with these standard

  7. Deposition Rate and Size Distribution of Volcanic Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikida, M.

    2006-12-01

    Sakurajima Volcano has been in violent activity since 1955 and erupting large amount of volcanic ash and stones from the crater. Volcanic fallouts have caused damages to the agricaltural products in the area and denuded the mountainside of vegitation. Deposited ash and stones on the mountainside has also caused hazardrous debris flows in the rivers. Therefore, it is necessary to know the deposition rate of the fallouts in prediction of debris flow. Due to the violent volcanic activity, however, it is prohibited to enter within two kilometers of the crater, making it impossible to measure the depth of deposited fallouts in the area. Theoretical study on deposition rate of volcanic fallouts should be needed to estimate the amount of fallouts in the upstream area. At first, motion of a particle erupted from the crater into the air was computed to examine its trajectory. From the simulation of the trajectory, a particle was assumed to fall at its terminal veloctity, and theoretical equation which give the deposition rate of volcanic ash and the distribution of deposited ash were obtained. In the derivation of these equations, the probability density functions of eruption column height, the terminal velocity of the erupted particles and the wind velocity were introduced. The computed values of amount of deposited ash show good agreement with the data taken from 93 collection points around Sakurajima Volcano. The annual amount of erupted volcanic ash was estimated to be about thirteen millions tons. The sample of deposited fallouts were taken to analize the size distribution. The data was also used to check the applicability of the theory presented.

  8. Measurements of the deposition rates of radon daughters on indoor surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Toohey, R.E.; Essling, M.A.; Rundo, J.; Hengde, W.

    1983-01-01

    The deposition rates of radon daughters on indoor surfaces have been measured by exposing the window of a proportional counter to the air of a house with high concentrations of radon and its daughters. Deposition velocities for unattached RaA and RaB of approximately 4 mm sec/sup -1/ were obtained by dividing the deposition rates by the concentrations of unattached daughters in the air. These results agree with those obtained by other workers but are dependent on the assumptions made about the fractions of the daughters which are attached to the atmospheric aerosol.

  9. HIGH ENERGY RATE EXTRUSION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Thin structural shapes can now be produced by high velocity extrusion equipment. Tooling, dies, die coatings, lubricants and general processing...degrees was important in reducing the initial peak stresses to a controllable level and tooling failures were reduced by using high strength (Rc 55-60...the high inertial forces present) can be lessened and eliminated in many cases by the selection of low reduction ratios (15:1 or below) and low impact speeds. (Author)

  10. Modelling airborne concentration and deposition rate of maize pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosz, Nathalie; Loubet, Benjamin; Huber, Laurent

    2004-10-01

    The introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops has reinforced the need to quantify gene flow from crop to crop. This requires predictive tools which take into account meteorological conditions, canopy structure as well as pollen aerodynamic characteristics. A Lagrangian Stochastic (LS) model, called SMOP-2D (Stochastic Mechanistic model for Pollen dispersion and deposition in 2 Dimensions), is presented. It simulates wind dispersion of pollen by calculating individual pollen trajectories from their emission to their deposition. SMOP-2D was validated using two field experiments where airborne concentration and deposition rate of pollen were measured within and downwind from different sized maize (Zea mays) plots together with micrometeorological measurements. SMOP-2D correctly simulated the shapes of the concentration profiles but generally underestimated the deposition rates in the first 10 m downwind from the source. Potential explanations of this discrepancy are discussed. Incorrect parameterisation of turbulence in the transition from the crop to the surroundings is probably the most likely reason. This demonstrates that LS models for particle transfer need to be coupled with air-flow models under complex terrain conditions.

  11. Note: Sample holder with open area for increased deposition rate in plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flege, S.; Hatada, R.; Derepa, A.; Dietz, C.; Ensinger, W.; Baba, K.

    2017-09-01

    A sample holder with a large open area offers several benefits when used in the process of plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition in which the plasma is generated by a high voltage applied to the sample holder: The ignition voltage of the plasma is lower, and the deposition rate can be several times higher than in the case of a normal plate-like holder. There is a more pronounced edge effect regarding the film thickness. Other film properties are also affected; for diamond-like carbon films, the film structure exhibits more disorder. The hardness of the samples is similar, with the surfaces of the samples being very smooth.

  12. Energy deposition rates by charged particles. [in upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torkar, K. M.; Urban, A.; Bjordal, J.; Lundblad, J. A.; Soraas, F.; Smith, L. G.; Dumbs, A.; Grandal, B.; Ulwick, J. C.; Vancour, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of measurements of the precipitation of electrons and positive ions (in the keV-MeV range) detected aboard eight rockets launched within the Energy Budget Campaign from Northern Scandinavia is given, together with corresponding satellite data. In some cases strong temporal variations of the downgoing integral fluxes were observed. The fluxes provide the background for the calculated ion production rates and altitude profiles of the energy deposition into the atmosphere at different levels of geomagnetic disturbance and cosmic noise absorption. The derived ion production rates by eneretic particles are compared to other night-time ionisation sources.

  13. Energy deposition rates by charged particles. [in upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torkar, K. M.; Urban, A.; Bjordal, J.; Lundblad, J. A.; Soraas, F.; Smith, L. G.; Dumbs, A.; Grandal, B.; Ulwick, J. C.; Vancour, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of measurements of the precipitation of electrons and positive ions (in the keV-MeV range) detected aboard eight rockets launched within the Energy Budget Campaign from Northern Scandinavia is given, together with corresponding satellite data. In some cases strong temporal variations of the downgoing integral fluxes were observed. The fluxes provide the background for the calculated ion production rates and altitude profiles of the energy deposition into the atmosphere at different levels of geomagnetic disturbance and cosmic noise absorption. The derived ion production rates by eneretic particles are compared to other night-time ionisation sources.

  14. Solid deposit-induced high temperature oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Keeyoung

    The present study is aimed at investigating the high temperature oxidation induced by ash deposition from use of alternative fuels. The alloys and coatings being studied are typical of those used in current power generating gas turbines, as well as those that may be used in advanced systems. To achieve this objective, the alloys Rene' N5, GTD 111, and IN 738 as well as these alloys coated with platinum aluminide and CoNiCrAlY were exposed to conditions relevant to corrosion induced by using alternative fuels. The test conditions representative of deposits from use of alternative fuels were selected based upon initial experiments that involved testing the alloy Rene' N5 with a platinum aluminide coating at 750°C, 950°C, and 1150°C in a variety of environments with deposits of CaO, CaSO4, and Na 2SO4. Based upon the results from such tests, a temperature (950°C) and a deposit (CaO) were selected for the further experiments to compare the corrosion characteristics of all of the alloys and coatings. At 950°C with deposits of CaO, which are the selected experimental conditions obtained from the preliminary tests, accelerated cyclic oxidation experiments were performed with all uncoated and coated superalloys in extra dry air and wet ( pH2O = 0.1 atm) air to compare corrosion characteristics of each with one another. Experimental details will be described followed by the presentation of experimental results and discussion. Additionally, uncoated GTD 111 specimens were exposed to different contaminants and moisture level environments to study the effect of contaminant level and water vapor pressure on CaO-induced degradation. Then, CaO deposits were coated on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and specimens with TBCs were exposed to the cyclic oxidation environments. The effects of deposits other than CaO, such as Fe2O3 and SiO2, on the oxidation characteristics of the specimens were also investigated. Finally, a mechanism for high temperature oxidation induced by Ca

  15. Epitaxial growth of GaN by radical-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (REMOCVD) in the downflow of a very high frequency (VHF) N2/H2 excited plasma - effect of TMG flow rate and VHF power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi; Kondo, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Oda, Osamu; Takeda, Keigo; Sekine, Makoto; Amano, Hiroshi; Hori, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) films have been grown by using our newly developed Radical-Enhanced Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (REMOCVD) system. This system has three features: (1) application of very high frequency (60 MHz) power in order to increase the plasma density, (2) introduction of H2 gas together with N2 gas in the plasma discharge region to generate not only nitrogen radicals but also active NHx molecules, and (3) radical supply under remote plasma arrangement with suppression of charged ions and photons by employing a Faraday cage. Using this new system, we have studied the effect of the trimethylgallium (TMG) source flow rate and of the plasma generation power on the GaN crystal quality by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and double crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). We found that this REMOCVD allowed the growth of epitaxial GaN films of the wurtzite structure of (0001) orientation on sapphire substrates with a high growth rate of 0.42 μm/h at a low temperature of 800 °C. The present REMOCVD is a promising method for GaN growth at relatively low temperature and without using costly ammonia gas.

  16. A high temperature, plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Brusasco, R.M.; Britten, J.A.; Thorsness, C.B.; Scrivener, M.S.; Unites, W.G.; Campbell, J.H. ); Johnson, W.L. )

    1990-02-01

    We have designed and built a high-temperature, plasma-assisted, chemical vapor deposition system to deposit multilayer optical coatings of SiO{sub 2} and doped-SiO{sub 2} flat substrates. The coater concept and design is an outgrowth of our recent work with Schott Glasswerke demonstrating the use of plasma assisted CVD to prepare very high damage threshold optical coatings. The coater is designed to deposit up to several thousand alternating quarterwave layers of SiO{sub 2} and doped SiO{sub 2} substrate at deposition rates up to several microns per minute. The substrate is resistively heated to about 1000{degree}C during the deposition phase of the process. The plasma is driven by a 13.56 MHz RF unit capable of producing power densities of up to 140 W cm{sup {minus}3} in the reaction zone. The coater is designed to be adaptable to microwave generated plasmas, as well as RF. Reactant gas flow rates of up to 10 slm can be achieved at a 10 tar operating pressure. Reactants consist of O{sub 2}, SiCl{sub 4} and a volatile halogenated dopant. These gases react in the plasma volume producing SiO{sub 2} with dopant concentrations of up to a few percent. A variable dopant concentration is used to produce index differences between adjacent optical layers.

  17. Influence of solution deposition rate on properties of V2O5 thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Alghafour, N. M.; Ahmed, Naser M.; Hassan, Zai; Mohammad, Sabah M.

    2016-07-01

    Vanadium oxide (V2O5) thin films were deposited on glass substrates by using a cost-efficient spray pyrolysis technique. The films were grown at 350° through thermal decomposition of VCl3 in deionized water with different solution spray rates. The high resolution X-ray diffraction results revealed the formation of nanocrystalline films having orthorhombic structures with preferential orientation along (101) direction. The spray rate influenced the surface morphology and crystallite size of the films. The crystallite size was found to increase whereas the micro-strain was decreased by increasing the spray deposition rates. The increase in crystallite size and decrease in the macrostrain resulted in an improvement in the films' crystallinity. The UV-Visible spectroscopy analysis indicated that the average transmittance of all films lies in the range 75-80 %. The band gap of V2O5 film was decreased from 2.65 to 2.46 eV with increase of the spray deposition rate from 5 ml/min to 10 ml/min. first, second, and third level headings (first level heading).

  18. Modeling the influence of incident angle and deposition rate on a nanostructure grown by oblique angle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kun-Dar; Dong, Yu-Wei

    2017-02-01

    In this study, numerical approaches were applied to theoretically investigate the influence of process parameters, such as the incident angle and the deposition rate, on the nanostructural formation of thin films by oblique angle deposition (OAD). A continuum model was first developed, and the atomic diffusion, shadowing effect and steering effect were incorporated in the formation mechanisms of the surface morphology and nanostructure of the deposited films. A characteristic morphology of columnar nanorods corresponding to an OAD was well reproduced through this kinetic model. With the increase of the incident angle, the shadowing effect played a significant role in the columnar structures and the ratio of the surface area to volume was raised, implying a high level of voids in the nanostructures. When the deposition rate decreased, the porosity was notably suppressed due to the atomic diffusion in the growth process. These simulation results coincide well with many experimental observations. With the manipulation of the numerical simulations, the underlying mechanisms of the morphological formation during OAD were revealed, which also provided plentiful information to stimulate the process designs for manufacturing advanced materials.

  19. Using deposition rate to increase the thermal and kinetic stability of vapor-deposited hole transport layer glasses via a simple sublimation apparatus.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Kenneth L; Krzyskowski, Paige; Devereaux, Zachary

    2017-05-28

    Deposition rate is known to affect the relative stability of vapor-deposited glasses; slower rates give more stable materials due to enhanced mobility at the free surface of the film. Here we show that the deposition rate can affect both the thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities of N,N(')-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N(')-diphenylbenzidine (TPD) and N,N(')-di-[(1-naphthyl)-N,N(')-diphenyl]-1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (NPD) glasses used as hole transport layers for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). A simple, low-vacuum glass sublimation apparatus and a high vacuum deposition chamber were used to deposit the glass. 50 μm thick films were deposited in the sublimation apparatus and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry while 75 nm thick films were prepared in the high vacuum chamber and studied by hot-stage spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). The thermodynamic stability from both preparation chambers was consistent and showed that the fictive temperature (Tfictive) was more than 30 K lower than the conventional glass transition temperature (Tg) at the slowest deposition rates. The kinetic stability, measured as the onset temperature (Tonset) where the glass begins to transform into the supercooled liquid, was 16-17 K greater than Tg at the slowest rates. Tonset was systematically lower for the thin films characterized by SE and was attributed to the thickness dependent transformation of the glass into the supercooled liquid. These results show the first calorimetric characterization of the stability of glasses for OLED applications made by vapor deposition and the first direct comparison of deposition apparatuses as a function of the deposition rate. The ease of fabrication will create an opportunity for others to study the effect of deposition conditions on glass stability.

  20. Using deposition rate to increase the thermal and kinetic stability of vapor-deposited hole transport layer glasses via a simple sublimation apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, Kenneth L.; Krzyskowski, Paige; Devereaux, Zachary

    2017-05-01

    Deposition rate is known to affect the relative stability of vapor-deposited glasses; slower rates give more stable materials due to enhanced mobility at the free surface of the film. Here we show that the deposition rate can affect both the thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities of N ,N' -bis(3-methylphenyl)-N ,N' -diphenylbenzidine (TPD) and N ,N' -di-[(1-naphthyl)-N ,N' -diphenyl]-1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (NPD) glasses used as hole transport layers for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). A simple, low-vacuum glass sublimation apparatus and a high vacuum deposition chamber were used to deposit the glass. 50 μm thick films were deposited in the sublimation apparatus and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry while 75 nm thick films were prepared in the high vacuum chamber and studied by hot-stage spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). The thermodynamic stability from both preparation chambers was consistent and showed that the fictive temperature (Tfictive) was more than 30 K lower than the conventional glass transition temperature (Tg) at the slowest deposition rates. The kinetic stability, measured as the onset temperature (Tonset) where the glass begins to transform into the supercooled liquid, was 16-17 K greater than Tg at the slowest rates. Tonset was systematically lower for the thin films characterized by SE and was attributed to the thickness dependent transformation of the glass into the supercooled liquid. These results show the first calorimetric characterization of the stability of glasses for OLED applications made by vapor deposition and the first direct comparison of deposition apparatuses as a function of the deposition rate. The ease of fabrication will create an opportunity for others to study the effect of deposition conditions on glass stability.

  1. High rate PLD of diamond-like-carbon utilizing high repetition rate visible lasers

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, W. II; Fehring, E.J.; Dragon, E.P.; Warner, B.E.

    1994-09-15

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) has been shown to be an effective method for producing a wide variety of thin films of high-value-added materials. The high average powers and high pulse repetition frequencies of lasers under development at LLNL make it possible to scale-up PLD processes that have been demonstrated in small systems in a number of university, government, and private laboratories to industrially meaningful, economically feasible technologies. A copper vapor laser system at LLNL has been utilized to demonstrate high rate PLD of high quality diamond-like-carbon (DLC) from graphite targets. The deposition rates for PLD obtained with a 100 W laser were {approx} 2000 {mu}m{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/h, or roughly 100 times larger than those reported by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or physical vapor deposition (PVD) methods. Good adhesion of thin (up to 2 pm) films has been achieved on a small number of substrates that include SiO{sub 2} and single crystal Si. Present results indicate that the best quality DLC films can be produced at optimum rates at power levels and wavelengths compatible with fiber optic delivery systems. If this is also true of other desirable coating systems, this PLD technology could become an extremely attractive industrial tool for high value added coatings.

  2. Carbon dioxide-induced homogeneous deposition of nanometer-sized cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) on graphene as high-rate and cycle-stable anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lingyan; Zhuo, Linhai; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Fengyu

    2015-02-01

    In the preparation of metal oxide composite materials, the common organic solvents limit the homogenous dispersion of guest component on substrate for their high viscosity, surface tension and low diffusivity. Herein, we take advantage of the unique properties of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) to successfully deposit uniform CoFe2O4 nanoparticles (CFO NPs) on the surface of graphene without need of surfactants or precipitants. The obtained CFO NPs are 8-10 nm in size and homogeneously anchored on graphene sheets as spacers to reduce the degree of graphene restacking. Additionally, the effects of pressure and solvent on the crystallinity, dispersion and particle size of the NPs are discussed. The CFO@G-CE composite synthesized in scCO2-expanded ethanol exhibits excellent cyclability and significantly improved rate capability than the CFO@G-E in pure ethanol and CFO@G-NE in the mixture of high pressure nitrogen and ethanol. It is certified, by the structural and morphological analyses of the intermediates and phase observations, that the reaction medium greatly affects the dispersion and size of the particles, and thus influences their electrochemical performances. The proposed strategy is shortcut (reaction time: 2 h) and effective in execution, hence, we hope that the presented strategy would encourage further studies on other hybrid nanomaterials fabrication.

  3. TEST METHODS TO CHARACTERIZE PARTICULATE MATTER EMISSIONS AND DEPOSITION RATES IN A RESEARCH HOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses test methods to characterize particulate matter (PM) emissions and deposition rates in a research house. In a room in the research house, specially configured for PM source testing, a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-filtered air supply system, used for...

  4. TEST METHODS TO CHARACTERIZE PARTICULATE MATTER EMISSIONS AND DEPOSITION RATES IN A RESEARCH HOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses test methods to characterize particulate matter (PM) emissions and deposition rates in a research house. In a room in the research house, specially configured for PM source testing, a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-filtered air supply system, used for...

  5. High Rate Digital Demodulator ASIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghuman, Parminder; Sheikh, Salman; Koubek, Steve; Hoy, Scott; Gray, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    The architecture of High Rate (600 Mega-bits per second) Digital Demodulator (HRDD) ASIC capable of demodulating BPSK and QPSK modulated data is presented in this paper. The advantages of all-digital processing include increased flexibility and reliability with reduced reproduction costs. Conventional serial digital processing would require high processing rates necessitating a hardware implementation in other than CMOS technology such as Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) which has high cost and power requirements. It is more desirable to use CMOS technology with its lower power requirements and higher gate density. However, digital demodulation of high data rates in CMOS requires parallel algorithms to process the sampled data at a rate lower than the data rate. The parallel processing algorithms described here were developed jointly by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The resulting all-digital receiver has the capability to demodulate BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, and DQPSK at data rates in excess of 300 Mega-bits per second (Mbps) per channel. This paper will provide an overview of the parallel architecture and features of the HRDR ASIC. In addition, this paper will provide an over-view of the implementation of the hardware architectures used to create flexibility over conventional high rate analog or hybrid receivers. This flexibility includes a wide range of data rates, modulation schemes, and operating environments. In conclusion it will be shown how this high rate digital demodulator can be used with an off-the-shelf A/D and a flexible analog front end, both of which are numerically computer controlled, to produce a very flexible, low cost high rate digital receiver.

  6. Disilane as a growth rate catalyst of plasma deposited microcrystalline silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrakellis, P.; Kalampounias, A. G.; Spiliopoulos, N.; Amanatides, E.; Mataras, D.; Lahootun, V.; Coeuret, F.; Madec, A.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of small disilane addition on the gas phase properties of silane-hydrogen plasmas and the microcrystalline silicon thin films growth is presented. The investigation was conducted in the high pressure regime and for constant power dissipation in the discharge with the support of plasma diagnostics, thin film studies and calculations of discharge microscopic parameters and gas dissociation rates. The experimental data and the calculations show a strong effect of disilane on the electrical properties of the discharge in the pressure window from 2 to 3 Torr that is followed by significant raise of the electron number density and the drop of the sheaths electric field intensity. Deposition rate measurements show an important four to six times increase even for disilane mole fractions as low as 0.3 %. The deposition rate enhancement was followed by a drop of the material crystalline volume fraction but films with crystallinity above 40 % were deposited with different combinations of total gas pressure, disilane and silane molar ratios. The enhancement was partly explained by the increase of the electron impact dissociation rate of silane which rises by 40% even for 0.1% disilane mole fraction. The calculations of the gas usage, the dissociation and the deposition efficiencies show that the beneficial effect on the growth rate is not just the result of the increase of Si-containing molecules density but significant changes on the species participating to the deposition and the mechanism of the film growth are caused by the disilane addition. The enhanced participation of the highly sticking to the surface radical such as disilylene, which is the main product of disilane dissociation, was considered as the most probable reason for the significant raise of the deposition efficiency. The catalytic effect of such type of radical on the surface reactivity of species with lower sticking probability is further discussed, while it is also used to explain the restricted

  7. Disilane as a growth rate catalyst of plasma deposited microcrystalline silicon thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrakellis, P.; Amanatides, E. Mataras, D.; Kalampounias, A. G.; Spiliopoulos, N.; Lahootun, V.; Coeuret, F.; Madec, A.

    2016-07-15

    The effect of small disilane addition on the gas phase properties of silane-hydrogen plasmas and the microcrystalline silicon thin films growth is presented. The investigation was conducted in the high pressure regime and for constant power dissipation in the discharge with the support of plasma diagnostics, thin film studies and calculations of discharge microscopic parameters and gas dissociation rates. The experimental data and the calculations show a strong effect of disilane on the electrical properties of the discharge in the pressure window from 2 to 3 Torr that is followed by significant raise of the electron number density and the drop of the sheaths electric field intensity. Deposition rate measurements show an important four to six times increase even for disilane mole fractions as low as 0.3 %. The deposition rate enhancement was followed by a drop of the material crystalline volume fraction but films with crystallinity above 40 % were deposited with different combinations of total gas pressure, disilane and silane molar ratios. The enhancement was partly explained by the increase of the electron impact dissociation rate of silane which rises by 40% even for 0.1% disilane mole fraction. The calculations of the gas usage, the dissociation and the deposition efficiencies show that the beneficial effect on the growth rate is not just the result of the increase of Si-containing molecules density but significant changes on the species participating to the deposition and the mechanism of the film growth are caused by the disilane addition. The enhanced participation of the highly sticking to the surface radical such as disilylene, which is the main product of disilane dissociation, was considered as the most probable reason for the significant raise of the deposition efficiency. The catalytic effect of such type of radical on the surface reactivity of species with lower sticking probability is further discussed, while it is also used to explain the restricted

  8. High Rate GPS on Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattia, M.

    2005-12-01

    The high rate GPS data processing can be considered as the "new deal" in geodetic monitoring of active volcanoes. Before an eruption, infact, transient episodes of ground displacements related to the dynamics of magmatic fluids can be revealed through a careful analysis of high rate GPS data. In the very first phases of an eruption the real time processing of high rate GPS data can be used by the authorities of Civil Protection to follow the opening of fractures field on the slopes of the volcanoes. During an eruption large explosions, opening of vents, migration of fractures fields, landslides and other dangerous phenomena can be followed and their potential of damage estimated by authorities. Examples from the recent eruption of Stromboli volcano and from the current activities of high rate GPS monitoring on Mt. Etna are reported, with the aim to show the great potential and the perspectives of this technique.

  9. High temperature electrochemical corrosion rate probes

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2005-09-01

    Corrosion occurs in the high temperature sections of energy production plants due to a number of factors: ash deposition, coal composition, thermal gradients, and low NOx conditions, among others. Electrochemical corrosion rate (ECR) probes have been shown to operate in high temperature gaseous environments that are similar to those found in fossil fuel combustors. ECR probes are rarely used in energy production plants at the present time, but if they were more fully understood, corrosion could become a process variable at the control of plant operators. Research is being conducted to understand the nature of these probes. Factors being considered are values selected for the Stern-Geary constant, the effect of internal corrosion, and the presence of conductive corrosion scales and ash deposits. The nature of ECR probes will be explored in a number of different atmospheres and with different electrolytes (ash and corrosion product). Corrosion rates measured using an electrochemical multi-technique capabilities instrument will be compared to those measured using the linear polarization resistance (LPR) technique. In future experiments, electrochemical corrosion rates will be compared to penetration corrosion rates determined using optical profilometry measurements.

  10. Flow regime map and deposition rate uniformity in vertical rotating-disk OMVPE reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biber, Catharina R.; Wang, Christine A.; Motakef, Shahryar

    1992-10-01

    A quantitative map of flow regimes has been developed for rotating-disk organometallic vapor epitaxy reactors. Scaling laws and flow visualization experiments over a wide range of reactor geometries and processing conditions were used to generate analytical relationships for boundaries separating the plug-flow regime from the bouyancy- and rotation-induced-flow regimes. For the growth of epitaxial layers with a high degree of uniformity and interface abruptness, the plug-flow regime is preferred. The locus of maximum deposition rate uniformity within the plug-flow regime was found by numerical simulation studies. Operation at high rotation rates close to the boundary between the plug-flow and rotation-induced-flow regimes provides for nearly uniform deposition rates.

  11. Aeolian dust deposition rates in Northern French forests and inputs to their biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lequy, Émeline; Legout, Arnaud; Conil, Sébastien; Turpault, Marie-Pierre

    2013-12-01

    This study describes the Aeolian dust deposition (ADD) in 4 sites of Northern France. Between December 2009 and March 2012, we sampled (i) Aeolian dust every four weeks, and (ii) 6 episodes of forecasted high atmospheric dust load mainly from the Saharan desert, the largest source of Aeolian dust in the world. These samples were treated with oxygen peroxide to remove organic matter so as to only compare the mineral fraction of the samples in the 4 sampling sites and to analyze their mineralogy. The solid samples contained the hardly soluble part of Aeolian dust (H-ADD). Its deposition was of 1.9 ± 0.3 g m-2 year-1 with a seasonal pattern of high deposition from spring to early autumn and a low deposition in winter. H-ADD deposition during the forecasted episodes of high atmospheric load did not systematically exceed the deposition rate during the rest of the sampling period. This indicates that such episodes little contributed to the annual H-ADD rate. The mineralogy revealed a heterogeneous set of minerals dominated by silicates with a common basis of major types (quartz, feldspars, mica, chlorite, kaolinite and interlayered clay minerals in every sample) with randomly trace minerals (Fe-oxides, sulfates, amphibole, talc, gibbsite and carbonates). The chemistry of H-ADD led to a dominant input of Si (up to 4.4 kg ha-1 year-1), while the nutrients inputs of Ca, K, Mg and P from ADD and the atmospheric organics (APD) in openfield were together of 1.5 ± 0.5 kg ha-1 year-1 with a high contribution of soluble minerals and organic matter of ca. 40% for Mg and K, and of ca. 80% for Ca and P. Nutrient inputs from APD are especially an interesting source of P for forests developed on acidic soils.

  12. Role of Sputter Deposition Rate in Tailoring Nanogranular Gold Structures on Polymer Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Hinz, Alexander; Polonskyi, Oleksandr; Strunskus, Thomas; Löhrer, Franziska C; Körstgens, Volker; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Faupel, Franz; Roth, Stephan V

    2017-02-15

    The reproducible low-cost fabrication of functional polymer-metal interfaces via self-assembly is of crucial importance in organic electronics and organic photovoltaics. In particular, submonolayer and nanogranular systems expose highly interesting electrical, plasmonic, and catalytic properties. The exploitation of their great potential requires tailoring of the structure on the nanometer scale and below. To obtain full control over the complex nanostructural evolution at the polymer-metal interface, we monitor the evolution of the metallic layer morphology with in situ time-resolved grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering during sputter deposition. We identify the impact of different deposition rates on the growth regimes: the deposition rate affects primarily the nucleation process and the adsorption-mediated growth, whereas rather small effects on diffusion-mediated growth processes are observed. Only at higher rates are initial particle densities higher due to an increasing influence of random nucleation, and an earlier onset of thin film percolation occurs. The obtained results are discussed to identify optimized morphological parameters of the gold cluster ensemble relevant for various applications as a function of the effective layer thickness and deposition rate. Our study opens up new opportunities to improve the fabrication of tailored metal-polymer nanostructures for plasmonic-enhanced applications such as organic photovoltaics and sensors.

  13. ZrN coatings deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Purandare, Yashodhan Ehiasarian, Arutiun; Hovsepian, Papken; Santana, Antonio

    2014-05-15

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) coatings were deposited on 1 μm finish high speed steel and 316L stainless steel test coupons. Cathodic Arc (CA) and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) + Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering (UBM) techniques were utilized to deposit coatings. CA plasmas are known to be rich in metal and gas ions of the depositing species as well as macroparticles (droplets) emitted from the arc sports. Combining HIPIMS technique with UBM in the same deposition process facilitated increased ion bombardment on the depositing species during coating growth maintaining high deposition rate. Prior to coating deposition, substrates were pretreated with Zr{sup +} rich plasma, for both arc deposited and HIPIMS deposited coatings, which led to a very high scratch adhesion value (L{sub C2}) of 100 N. Characterization results revealed the overall thickness of the coatings in the range of 2.5 μm with hardness in the range of 30–40 GPa depending on the deposition technique. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and tribological experiments such as dry sliding wear tests and corrosion studies have been utilized to study the effects of ion bombardment on the structure and properties of these coatings. In all the cases, HIPIMS assisted UBM deposited coating fared equal or better than the arc deposited coatings, the reasons being discussed in this paper. Thus H+U coatings provide a good alternative to arc deposited where smooth, dense coatings are required and macrodroplets cannot be tolerated.

  14. Impact of deposition-rate fluctuations on thin-film thickness and uniformity

    DOE PAGES

    Oliver, Joli B.

    2016-11-04

    Variations in deposition rate are superimposed on a thin-film–deposition model with planetary rotation to determine the impact on film thickness. Variations in magnitude and frequency of the fluctuations relative to the speed of planetary revolution lead to thickness errors and uniformity variations up to 3%. Sufficiently rapid oscillations in the deposition rate have a negligible impact, while slow oscillations are found to be problematic, leading to changes in the nominal film thickness. Finally, superimposing noise as random fluctuations in the deposition rate has a negligible impact, confirming the importance of any underlying harmonic oscillations in deposition rate or source operation.

  15. Impact of deposition-rate fluctuations on thin-film thickness and uniformity

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, Joli B.

    2016-11-04

    Variations in deposition rate are superimposed on a thin-film–deposition model with planetary rotation to determine the impact on film thickness. Variations in magnitude and frequency of the fluctuations relative to the speed of planetary revolution lead to thickness errors and uniformity variations up to 3%. Sufficiently rapid oscillations in the deposition rate have a negligible impact, while slow oscillations are found to be problematic, leading to changes in the nominal film thickness. Finally, superimposing noise as random fluctuations in the deposition rate has a negligible impact, confirming the importance of any underlying harmonic oscillations in deposition rate or source operation.

  16. High Data Rate Instrument Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schober, Wayne; Lansing, Faiza; Wilson, Keith; Webb, Evan

    1999-01-01

    The High Data Rate Instrument Study was a joint effort between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The objectives were to assess the characteristics of future high data rate Earth observing science instruments and then to assess the feasibility of developing data processing systems and communications systems required to meet those data rates. Instruments and technology were assessed for technology readiness dates of 2000, 2003, and 2006. The highest data rate instruments are hyperspectral and synthetic aperture radar instruments which are capable of generating 3.2 Gigabits per second (Gbps) and 1.3 Gbps, respectively, with a technology readiness date of 2003. These instruments would require storage of 16.2 Terebits (Tb) of information (RF communications case of two orbits of data) or 40.5 Tb of information (optical communications case of five orbits of data) with a technology readiness date of 2003. Onboard storage capability in 2003 is estimated at 4 Tb; therefore, all the data created cannot be stored without processing or compression. Of the 4 Tb of stored data, RF communications can only send about one third of the data to the ground, while optical communications is estimated at 6.4 Tb across all three technology readiness dates of 2000, 2003, and 2006 which were used in the study. The study includes analysis of the onboard processing and communications technologies at these three dates and potential systems to meet the high data rate requirements. In the 2003 case, 7.8% of the data can be stored and downlinked by RF communications while 10% of the data can be stored and downlinked with optical communications. The study conclusion is that only 1 to 10% of the data generated by high data rate instruments will be sent to the ground from now through 2006 unless revolutionary changes in spacecraft design and operations such as intelligent data extraction are developed.

  17. High Data Rate Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiat, Paul; Christensen, Bradley; McCusker, Kevin; Kumor, Daniel; Gauthier, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    While quantum key distribution (QKD) systems are now commercially available, the data rate is a limiting factor for some desired applications (e.g., secure video transmission). Most QKD systems receive at most a single random bit per detection event, causing the data rate to be limited by the saturation of the single-photon detectors. Recent experiments have begun to explore using larger degree of freedoms, i.e., temporal or spatial qubits, to optimize the data rate. Here, we continue this exploration using entanglement in multiple degrees of freedom. That is, we use simultaneous temporal and polarization entanglement to reach up to 8.3 bits of randomness per coincident detection. Due to current technology, we are unable to fully secure the temporal degree of freedom against all possible future attacks; however, by assuming a technologically-limited eavesdropper, we are able to obtain 23.4 MB/s secure key rate across an optical table, after error reconciliation and privacy amplification. In this talk, we will describe our high-rate QKD experiment, with a short discussion on our work towards extending this system to ship-to-ship and ship-to-shore communication, aiming to secure the temporal degree of freedom and to implement a 30-km free-space link over a marine environment.

  18. Effect of wall shear rate on biofilm deposition and grazing in drinking water flow chambers.

    PubMed

    Paris, Tony; Skali-Lami, Salaheddine; Block, Jean-Claude

    2007-08-15

    The effect of four-wall shear rates (34.9, 74.8, 142.5, and 194.5 s(-1)) on bacterial deposition on glass slides in drinking water flow chambers was studied. Biofilm image acquisition was performed over a 50-day period. Bacterial accumulation and surface coverage curves were obtained. Microscopic observations allowed us to obtain information about the dynamics and spatial distribution of the biofilm. During the first stage of biofilm formation (210-518 h), bacterial accumulation was a function of the wall shear rate: the higher the wall shear rate, the faster the bacterial deposition (1.1 and 1.9 x 10(4) bacterial cells . cm(-2) for wall shear rates of 34.9 and 142.5 s(-1), respectively). A new similarity relationship characteristic of a non-dimensional time and function of the wall shear rate was proposed to describe initial bacterial deposition. After 50 days of exposure to drinking water, surface coverage was more or less identical under the entire wall shear rates (7.44 +/- 0.9%), suggesting that biofilm bacterial density cannot be controlled using hydrodynamics. However, the spatial distribution of the biofilm was clearly different. Under low wall shear rate, aggregates were composed of bacterial cells able to "vibrate" independently on the surface, whereas, under a high wall shear rate, aggregates were more cohesive. Therefore, susceptibility to the hydraulic discontinuities occurring in drinking water system may not be similar. In all the flow chambers, significant decreases in bacterial biomass (up to 77%) were associated with the presence of amoebae. This grazing preferentially targeted small, isolated cells.

  19. Magma Emplacement Rates and Porphyry Copper Deposits: Thermal Modelling of the Yerington Batholith, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöpa, Anne; Annen, Catherine; Dilles, John H.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Blundy, Jon D.

    2017-04-01

    Many porphyry copper deposits are associated with granitoid plutons. Their genesis is attributed to the degassing of pluton-forming intermediate to silicic magma chambers. These plutons are commonly envisioned as resulting from the slow cooling and crystallization of large magma chambers. Most of the models combine the formation of ore deposits and the cooling of a magma chamber. However, they do not consider neither how typically hundreds of cubic kilometres of magma were emplaced into the upper crust, nor the prolonged growth of plutons involving simultaneous cooling and crystallization together with the release of exsolved volatiles, which may contribute to ore formation. We use numerical simulations of thermal evolution due to pluton growth to investigate the links between pluton construction, magma accumulation, solidification, volatile exsolution, volatile release and porphyry copper formation. The Jurassic Yerington batholith in western Nevada, USA, is used as a case study because it is associated with economic porphyry copper deposits, it shows an exceptional exposure revealing the geometry of the intrusion, and petrological and geochronological analysis have shed light on its emplacement style and duration. Our conductive heat flow model simulates the growth of the ˜1000 km3 batholith emplaced at 2-8 km crustal depth by step-wise intrusions of vertically stacked sills. Different emplacement rates and repose times of no melt injection between the three main Yerington intrusions were tested. Our numerical simulations show that to comply with the conceptual model linking porphyry copper deposits with the presence of large, highly molten magma chambers, magmas must be emplaced at a high rate of several cm/yr. In plutonic records, such high rates are uncommon. It follows that either the current conceptual model is incorrect or that porphyry copper deposits are only produced by the rare, rapidly emplaced plutons. The fact that many granitoid plutons are barren

  20. High data rate optical crosslinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroson, Don M.; Bondurant, Roy S.

    1992-03-01

    Optical technologies, due to their extremely short wavelengths, can be designed to be much more compact than RF when addressing high data rate crosslinks and multiple apertures approaching the multi-Gbps operational range. Currently available optical technologies can furnish hundreds-of- Mbps in a package of less than 100 lbs and several cubic feet. Attention is presently given to communications and spatial acquisition/tracking system analysis, the character of such space-qualified optics hardware as the requisite laser transmitter, and advanced hardware prototypes.

  1. High-damage threshold antireflectors by physical-vapor-deposited amorphous fluoropolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Robert; Spragge, Maura K.; Loomis, Gary E.; Thomas, Ian M.; Rainer, Frank; Ward, Richard L.; Kozlowski, Mark R.

    1994-07-01

    High laser-resistant anti-reflective coatings were made from an amorphous fluoropolymer (Teflon AF2400) material by physical vapor deposition. Single layers of Teflon AF2400 were thermally deposited in a vacuum chamber. The refractive index and adhesion of the coatings were determined as a function of deposition rate (2 to 20 angstroms/s), substrate temperature (20 to 200 degree(s)C), and glow-discharge bias potential (-1500 to 1500 V).

  2. Paleoclimatic significance of high-latitude loess deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Beget, J.E.

    1992-03-01

    Loess deposits reflect changing environmental conditions in terrestrial regions, and contain long paleoclimatic records analogous to those found in marine sediments, lacustrine sediments, and ice sheets. Alaskan loess was deposited at rates of ca. 0.05-0.5 mm yr-l during the last 2-3 x 106 years; loess deposits contain some of the longest and most complete proxy climate records yet found. New analytical methods are used to reconstruct changes in climate and atmospheric regime including wind intensity, storminess, temperature, and precipitation. Loess also contains a history of permafrost and paleosol formation, volcanic eruptions, and paleoecologic changes in high latitude regions, as well as Quaternary fossils and early man sites and artifacts. Time-series analysis of proxy climate data from loess supports the astronomic model of climate change, although some transient climate events recorded in loess records are too short to be explained by orbital insolation forcing, and may instead correlate with rapid, short-term changes in atmospheric C02 and CH4 content.

  3. High temperature diamond film deposition on a natural diamond anvil

    SciTech Connect

    McCauley, T.S.; Vohra, Y.K.

    1995-12-31

    We report on the growth and characterization of a 100 {mu}m thick by 350 {mu}m diameter diamond layer on the culet of a type Ia brilliant cut natural diamond anvil by microwave plasma-assisted CVD (MPCVD). While our previous work [1] on diamond anvils resulted in homoepitaxial film growth at a rate of approximately 20 {mu}m/hr, the present 100 {mu}m thick diamond layer grew in less than 2 hours. This unprecedented growth rate of {approximately} 50 {mu}m/hr is believed to be the result of the extremely high substrate temperature (1800{degrees}-2100{degrees}C) during deposition. The translucent diamond layer was characterized by micro-Raman, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation spectroscopy, as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM). Raman analysis shows the deposit to be of high quality. The PL spectra show numerous features, including prominent emission bands at 575 nm (2.16 eV), 636 nm (1.95 eV), 735 nm (1.68 eV) and 777 run, (1.60 eV).

  4. Thin film growth rate effects for primary ion beam deposited diamondlike carbon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, D.; Mirtich, M.

    1986-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were grown by primary ion beam deposition and the growth rates were measured for various beam energies, types of hydrocarbon gases and their ratio to Ar, and substrate materials. The growth rate had a linear dependence upon hydrocarbon content in the discharge chamber, and only small dependence on other parameters. For given deposition conditions a threshold in the atomic ratio of carbon to argon gas was identified below which films did not grow on fused silica substrate, but grew on Si substrate and on existing DLC films. Ion source deposition parameters and substrate material were found to affect the deposition threshold and film growth rates.

  5. High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Papers and working group summaries presented at the High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video (HHV) Workshop are compiled. HHV system is intended for future use on the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom. The Workshop was held for the dual purpose of: (1) allowing potential scientific users to assess the utility of the proposed system for monitoring microgravity science experiments; and (2) letting technical experts from industry recommend improvements to the proposed near-term HHV system. The following topics are covered: (1) State of the art in the video system performance; (2) Development plan for the HHV system; (3) Advanced technology for image gathering, coding, and processing; (4) Data compression applied to HHV; (5) Data transmission networks; and (6) Results of the users' requirements survey conducted by NASA.

  6. Investigation of the Influence of the Sea Surface Microlayer on Ozone Deposition Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K.; Matrai, P.; Archer, S.

    2013-12-01

    Ozone deposition to the ocean surface represents a significant loss from the atmosphere with current best estimates, based on chemistry transport model analyses, being about one third of the global annual ozone deposition of 600-1000 Tg O3 yr-1. Such deposition likely represents the net flux to the physical ocean surface, chemical interactions in the presence or absence of a surface microlayer, and bidirectional reactions between ozone and reactive iodine dependent on the environmental light regime. A laboratory-based experimental approach is used to further explore controls on the rate of ozone deposition to seawater. We examine the influence of iodide concentration and microlayer composition or absence on ozone deposition velocity as a means to assess the role surface-active organics play in mediating ozone deposition rates. Experimental results are used to discern whether soluble and insoluble model surfactants, micro-algal exudates and natural microlayers act to physically and/or chemically enhance or suppress ozone deposition.

  7. Variable ingestion rate and its role in optimal foraging behavior of marine deposit feeders

    SciTech Connect

    Taghon, G.L.; Jumars, P.A.

    1984-04-01

    Tests of optimal foraging theory have focused generally on food item selection by mobile, high-trophic-level predators. Deposit-feeding invertebrates are aquatic organisms with limited mobility and hence limited ability to forage actively for food-rich patches. In addition, there is little evidence for a major role of behaviorally mediated food item choice in these animals, and growing evidence of mechanical limitations in food particle choice. Given such limited food-selection ability, varying ingestion rate in response to changes in food value is likely to be an important animal response affecting feeding energetics. A previously developed optimal foraging model predicted that ingestion rate and food value should covary positively in order to maximize net time rate of energy gain. To test this general prediction, the authors fed three species of deposit-feeding polychaetes artifical sediments which varied only in protein content (food value); other physical and chemical properties which might affect ingestion rate were kept constant. In support of the model, ingestion rates increased as protein levels increased.

  8. Debris-flow deposits and watershed erosion rates near southern Death Valley, CA, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, K.M.; Menges, C.M.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Debris flows from the steep, granitic hillslopes of the Kingston Range, CA are commensurate in age with nearby fluvial deposits. Quaternary chronostratigraphic differentiation of debris-flow deposits is based upon time-dependent characteristics such as relative boulder strength, derived from Schmidt Hammer measurements, degree of surface desert varnish, pedogenesis, and vertical separation. Rock strength is highest for Holocene-aged boulders and decreases for Pleistocene-aged boulders weathering to grus. Volumes of age-stratified debris-flow deposits, constrained by deposit thickness above bedrock, GPS surveys, and geologic mapping, are greatest for Pleistocene deposits. Shallow landslide susceptibility, derived from a topographically based GIS model, in conjunction with deposit volumes produces watershed-scale erosion rates of ???2-47 mm ka-1, with time-averaged Holocene rates exceeding Pleistocene rates. ?? 2003 Millpress.

  9. Effects of Process Parameters on the Deposition Rate, Hardness, and Corrosion Resistance of Tungsten Carbide Coatings Deposited by Reactive Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yunkyu; Lim, Jongmin; Lee, Chongmu

    2005-05-01

    The reactive sputter deposition of tungsten carbide (WCx) films as an alternative to chromium electroplating was studied. The effects of rf power, pressure, sputtering gas composition, and substrate temperature on the deposition rate of the WCx coatings were investigated. The effects of rf power and sputtering gas composition on the hardness and corrosion resistance of the WCx coatings were also investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analyses were performed to determine the structures and compositions of the films, respectively. The hardnesses of the films were measured using a nanoindenter. The microstructures of the films were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The corrosion resistances of the films were evaluated using a salt-spray test. The deposition rate of the films was proportional to rf power and inversely proportional to the CH4 content of the sputtering gas. The deposition rate increased linearly with increasing chamber pressure. The hardness of the WCx coatings increased as rf power increased. The highest hardness was obtained at a CH4 concentration of 10 vol.% in the sputtering gas. The hardness of the WCx film deposited under optimal conditions was much higher than that of the electroplated chromium film, although the corrosion resistance of the former was slightly lower than that of the latter.

  10. Chemical weathering within high mountain depositional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emberson, R.; Hovius, N.; Hsieh, M.; Galy, A.

    2013-12-01

    Material eroded from active mountain belts can spend extended periods in depositional structures within the mountain catchments before reaching its final destination. This can be in the form of colluvial fills, debris fans, or alluvial valley fills and terraces. The existence of these landforms is testament to the catastrophic nature of the events that lead to their formation. Sourced by landslides or debris flows, the material that forms them is in many cases either unweathered or incompletely weathered (e.g. Hsieh and Chyi 2010). Due to their porosity and permeability, these deposits likely serve as locations for extensive chemical weathering within bedrock landscapes. Recent studies considering the weathering flux from active mountain belts (e.g. Calmels et al. 2011) have distinguished between shallow and deep groundwater in terms of the contribution to the solute budget from a catchment; in this study we have attempted to more tightly constrain the sources of these groundwater components in the context of the previously mentioned depositional structures. We have collected water samples from a large number of sites within the Chen-you-lan catchment (370 km2) in central west Taiwan to elucidate the location of chemical weathering as well as how the sourcing of weathering products varies depending on the meteorological conditions. Central Taiwan has good attributes for this work considering both the extremely active tectonics and tropical climate, (including extensive cyclonic activity) which stimulate both extensive physical erosion (Dadson et al. 2003) and chemical weathering (Calmels et al. 2011). The Chen-you-lan catchment in particular contains some of the largest alluvial deposits inside the Taiwan mountain belt (Hsieh and Chyi 2010). Our preliminary results suggest that weathering within intramontane deposits may be a significant source of solutes, with the hyporheic systems within mountain rivers of particular import. This input of solutes occurs over

  11. Deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, George C.; Rohatgi, Naresh K.

    1987-01-01

    An improved deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductor material comprising placing a semiconductor substrate composed of silicon carbide in a fluidized bed silicon carbide deposition reactor, fluidizing the bed particles by hydrogen gas in a mildly bubbling mode through a gas distributor and heating the substrate at temperatures around 1200.degree.-1500.degree. C. thereby depositing a layer of silicon carbide on the semiconductor substrate.

  12. High temperature corrosion enhanced by residual fuel oil ash deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Wong-Moreno, A.; Martinez, Y.M.; Martinez, L.

    1994-12-31

    Boiler steel tubes in Mexican electric power plants are reported to be highly sensitive to high temperature corrosion enhanced by liquid phase fuel oil ash deposits. The combustion of fuel oils with high asphaltene and other vanadium and sulphur rich-compounds produces ash deposits on tube surfaces. This paper is devoted to a study of the influence of nine fuel oil ash deposits with V/(Na+S) atomic ratios ranging from 0.68 to 47.3, on the high temperature corrosion of tube stainless steels 304H, 321H, 316H, 347H, 310 and 446 and low and medium chromium steels T11, T22 and T9. The steel surfaces were exposed to the ash deposits at temperatures ranging between 440C and 650C. The deposits and the exposed surfaces were characterized employing conventional chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, SEM and X-ray microanalysis.

  13. Polyelectrolyte Coacervates Deposited as High Gas Barrier Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Haile, Merid; Sarwar, Owais; Henderson, Robert; Smith, Ryan; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2017-01-01

    Multilayer coatings consisting of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes have proven to be extraordinarily effective oxygen barriers but require many processing steps to fabricate. In an effort to prepare high oxygen barrier thin films more quickly, a polyelectrolyte complex coacervate composed of polyethylenimine and polyacrylic acid is prepared. The coacervate fluid is applied as a thin film using a rod coating process. With humidity and thermal post-treatment, a 2 µm thin film reduces the oxygen transmission rate of 0.127 mm poly(ethylene terephthalate) by two orders of magnitude, rivalling conventional oxygen barrier technologies. These films are fabricated in ambient conditions using low-cost, water-based solutions, providing a tremendous opportunity for single-step deposition of polymeric high barrier thin films. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Effects of deposition rate and thickness on the properties of YBCO films deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, D. Q.; Ko, R. K.; Song, K. J.; Chung, J. K.; Choi, S. J.; Park, Y. M.; Shin, K. C.; Yoo, S. I.; Park, C.

    2004-02-01

    YBCO films with various thicknesses from 100 nm to 1.6 µm were deposited on single crystal SrTiO3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The effects of thickness and deposition rate—by means of controlling the pulsed laser frequency—on the critical current density (Jc) were studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to examine the orientation, crystallization and surface quality. The amount of a-axis YBCO component evaluated from the ratio of XRD chi-scan intensities of the a-axis and c-axis for the YBCO (102) plane increased as the YBCO film became thicker. SEM was used to analyse the surface of YBCO film, and it was shown that the surface of YBCO film became rougher with increasing thickness. There were many large singular outgrowths and networks of outgrowths on the surface of the YBCO films with thickness greater than 0.4 µm. The increased amount of a-axis YBCO component and the coarse microstructure of the thick YBCO film caused degradation of Jc with increasing thickness.

  15. Fundamental Study on Temperature Dependence of Deposition Rate of Silicic Acid - 13270

    SciTech Connect

    Shinmura, Hayata; Niibori, Yuichi; Mimura, Hitoshi

    2013-07-01

    The dynamic behavior of the silicic acid is one of the key factors to estimate the condition of the repository system after the backfill. This study experimentally examined the temperature dependence of dynamic behavior of supersaturated silicic acid in the co-presence of solid phase, considering Na ions around the repository, and evaluated the deposition rate constant, k, of silicic acid by using the first-order reaction equation considering the specific surface area. The values of k were in the range of 1.0x10{sup -11} to 1.0x10{sup -9} m/s in the temperature range of 288 K to 323 K. The deposition rate became larger with increments of temperature under the Na ion free condition. Besides, in the case of Na ions 0.6 M, colloidal silicic acid decreased dramatically at a certain time. This means that the diameter of the colloidal silicic acid became larger than the pore size of filter (0.45 μm) due to bridging of colloidal silicic acid. Furthermore, this study estimated the range of altering area and the aperture of flow-path in various value of k corresponding to temperature by using advection-dispersion model. The concentration in the flow-path became lower with increments of temperature, and when the value of k is larger than 1.0x10{sup -11} m/s, the deposition range of supersaturated silicic acid was estimated to be less than 20 m around the repository. In addition, the deposition of supersaturated silicic acid led the decrement of flow-path aperture, which was remarkable under the condition of relatively high temperature. Such a clogging in flow paths is expected as a retardation effect of radionuclides. (authors)

  16. Reactive dynamics analysis of critical Nb2O5 sputtering rate for drum-based metal-like deposition.

    PubMed

    Song, Shigeng; Li, Cheng; Chu, Hin On; Gibson, Des

    2017-02-01

    Drum-based metal-like film deposition for oxide was investigated using single wavelength in situ monitoring. The data were used to investigate the oxidation mechanism using combined second-order kinetic and parabolic models. A critical Nb2O5 deposition rate of 0.507 nm/s was found at drum rotation of 1 rev/s. However, Nb2O5 samples prepared at varying deposition rates showed that the deposition rate must be much lower than the critical deposition rate to achieve reasonable absorption. Thus simulation for the volume-fraction of metal in the oxide layer was done using effective medium approximation and a distribution function. Simulation gave high agreement with experimental results and allows the prediction of extinction coefficients at various deposition rates.

  17. 19 CFR 351.107 - Cash deposit rates for nonproducing exporters; rates in antidumping proceedings involving a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...; rates in antidumping proceedings involving a nonmarket economy country. 351.107 Section 351.107 Customs... proceedings involving a nonmarket economy country. (a) Introduction. This section deals with the establishment... involving imports from a nonmarket economy country. (b) Cash deposit rates for nonproducing...

  18. 19 CFR 351.107 - Cash deposit rates for nonproducing exporters; rates in antidumping proceedings involving a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...; rates in antidumping proceedings involving a nonmarket economy country. 351.107 Section 351.107 Customs... proceedings involving a nonmarket economy country. (a) Introduction. This section deals with the establishment... involving imports from a nonmarket economy country. (b) Cash deposit rates for nonproducing...

  19. 19 CFR 351.107 - Cash deposit rates for nonproducing exporters; rates in antidumping proceedings involving a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...; rates in antidumping proceedings involving a nonmarket economy country. 351.107 Section 351.107 Customs... proceedings involving a nonmarket economy country. (a) Introduction. This section deals with the establishment... involving imports from a nonmarket economy country. (b) Cash deposit rates for nonproducing...

  20. 19 CFR 351.107 - Cash deposit rates for nonproducing exporters; rates in antidumping proceedings involving a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...; rates in antidumping proceedings involving a nonmarket economy country. 351.107 Section 351.107 Customs... proceedings involving a nonmarket economy country. (a) Introduction. This section deals with the establishment... involving imports from a nonmarket economy country. (b) Cash deposit rates for nonproducing...

  1. 19 CFR 351.107 - Cash deposit rates for nonproducing exporters; rates in antidumping proceedings involving a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...; rates in antidumping proceedings involving a nonmarket economy country. 351.107 Section 351.107 Customs... proceedings involving a nonmarket economy country. (a) Introduction. This section deals with the establishment... involving imports from a nonmarket economy country. (b) Cash deposit rates for nonproducing...

  2. Amyloid-β deposition and regional grey matter atrophy rates in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Sarro, Lidia; Senjem, Matthew L; Lundt, Emily S; Przybelski, Scott A; Lesnick, Timothy G; Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Boeve, Bradley F; Lowe, Val J; Ferman, Tanis J; Knopman, David S; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo; Petersen, Ronald C; Jack, Clifford R; Kantarci, Kejal

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease pathology frequently coexists with Lewy body disease at autopsy in patients with probable dementia with Lewy bodies. More than half of patients with probable dementia with Lewy bodies have high amyloid-β deposition as measured with (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B binding on positron emission tomography. Biomarkers of amyloid-β deposition precede neurodegeneration on magnetic resonance imaging during the progression of Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about how amyloid-β deposition relates to longitudinal progression of atrophy in patients with probable dementia with Lewy bodies. We investigated the associations between baseline (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B binding on positron emission tomography and the longitudinal rates of grey matter atrophy in a cohort of clinically diagnosed patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (n = 20), who were consecutively recruited to the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Centre. All patients underwent (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging examinations at baseline. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging was performed after a mean (standard deviation) interval of 2.5 (1.1) years. Regional grey matter loss was determined on three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with the tensor-based morphometry-symmetric normalization technique. Linear regression was performed between baseline (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B standard unit value ratio and longitudinal change in regional grey matter volumes from an in-house modified atlas. We identified significant associations between greater baseline (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B standard unit value ratio and greater grey matter loss over time in the posterior cingulate gyrus, lateral and medial temporal lobe, and occipital lobe as well as caudate and putamen nuclei, after adjusting for age (P < 0.05). Greater baseline (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B standard unit value ratio was also associated with greater

  3. Nanocluster deposition for high density magnetic recording tape media

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Jiaoming; Xu Yunhao; Judy, Jack H.; Wang Jianping

    2005-05-15

    A technique for the fabrication of ultra-high density magnetic recording tape media with no risk of heating polymer substrate is reported. In this approach magnetic nanoparticles were generated by combining gas-phase nanocluster deposition and on-line heating techniques and deposited onto polymer substrate. Magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were optimized during their flight in vacuum prior to deposition. This technique is materials independent and it can fabricate nanocomposite films with high coercivity and very small film thickness. The fabricated magnetic nanoparticles have a uniform size distribution [for CoPt, 8.4% (standard deviation)] and well-defined spherical shape.

  4. Accumulation and variability of maize pollen deposition on leaves of European Lepidoptera host plants and relation to release rates and deposition determined by standardised technical sampling.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Frieder; Kruse-Plass, Maren; Kuhn, Ulrike; Otto, Mathias; Schlechtriemen, Ulrich; Schröder, Boris; Vögel, Rudolf; Wosniok, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Risk assessment for GMOs such as Bt maize requires detailed data concerning pollen deposition onto non-target host-plant leaves. A field study of pollen on lepidopteran host-plant leaves was therefore undertaken in 2009-2012 in Germany. During the maize flowering period, we used in situ microscopy at a spatial resolution adequate to monitor the feeding behaviour of butterfly larvae. The plant-specific pollen deposition data were supplemented with standardised measurements of pollen release rates and deposition obtained by volumetric pollen monitors and passive samplers. In 2010, we made 5377 measurements of maize pollen deposited onto leaves of maize, nettle, goosefoot, sorrel and blackberry. Overall mean leaf deposition during the flowering period ranged from 54 to 478 n/cm(2) (grains/cm(2)) depending on plant species and site, while daily mean leaf deposition values were as high as 2710 n/cm(2). Maximum single leaf-deposition values reached up to 103,000 n/cm(2), with a 95 % confidence-limit upper boundary of 11,716 n/cm(2). Daily means and variation of single values uncovered by our detailed measurements are considerably higher than previously assumed. The recorded levels are more than a single degree of magnitude larger than actual EU expert risk assessment assumptions. Because variation and total aggregation of deposited pollen on leaves have been previously underestimated, lepidopteran larvae have actually been subjected to higher and more variable exposure. Higher risks to these organisms must consequently be assumed. Our results imply that risk assessments related to the effects of Bt maize exposure under both realistic cultivation conditions and worst-case scenarios must be revised. Under common cultivation conditions, isolation buffer distances in the kilometre range are recommended rather than the 20-30 m distance defined by the EFSA.

  5. Effect of tellurium deposition rate on the properties of Cu-In-Te based thin films and solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mise, Takahiro; Nakada, Tokio

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of tellurium (Te) deposition rate on the properties of Cu-In-Te based thin films (Cu/In=0.30-0.31), the films were grown on both bare and Mo-coated soda-lime glass substrates at 200 °C by co-evaporation using a molecular beam epitaxy system. The microstructural properties were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The crystalline quality of the films was improved with increase in the deposition rate of Te, and exhibited a single CuIn 3Te 5 phase with a highly preferred (1 1 2) orientation. Te-deficient film (Te/(Cu+In)=1.07) grown with a low Te deposition rate showed a narrow bandgap of 0.99 eV at room temperature. The solar cell performance was affected by the deposition rate of Te. The best solar cell fabricated using CuIn 3Te 5 thin films grown with the highest deposition rate of Te (2.6 nm/s) yielded a total area (0.50 cm 2) efficiency of 4.4% ( Voc=309 mV, Jsc=28.0 mA/cm 2, and FF=0.509) without light soaking.

  6. High Mercury Wet Deposition at a "Clean Air" Site in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Shanley, James B; Engle, Mark A; Scholl, Martha; Krabbenhoft, David P; Brunette, Robert; Olson, Mark L; Conroy, Mary E

    2015-10-20

    Atmospheric mercury deposition measurements are rare in tropical latitudes. Here we report on seven years (April 2005 to April 2012, with gaps) of wet Hg deposition measurements at a tropical wet forest in the Luquillo Mountains, northeastern Puerto Rico, U.S. Despite receiving unpolluted air off the Atlantic Ocean from northeasterly trade winds, during two complete years the site averaged 27.9 μg m(-2) yr(-1) wet Hg deposition, or about 30% more than Florida and the Gulf Coast, the highest deposition areas within the U.S. These high Hg deposition rates are driven in part by high rainfall, which averaged 2855 mm yr(-1). The volume-weighted mean Hg concentration was 9.8 ng L(-1), and was highest during summer and lowest during the winter dry season. Rainout of Hg (decreasing concentration with increasing rainfall depth) was minimal. The high Hg deposition was not supported by gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) at ground level, which remained near global background concentrations (<10 pg m(-3)). Rather, a strong positive correlation between Hg concentrations and the maximum height of rain detected within clouds (echo tops) suggests that droplets in high convective cloud tops scavenge GOM from above the mixing layer. The high wet Hg deposition at this "clean air" site suggests that other tropical areas may be hotspots for Hg deposition as well.

  7. High mercury wet deposition at a “clean Air” site in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, James B.; Engle, Mark A.; Scholl, Martha A.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Brunette, Robert; Olson, Mark L.; Conroy, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric mercury deposition measurements are rare in tropical latitudes. Here we report on seven years (April 2005 to April 2012, with gaps) of wet Hg deposition measurements at a tropical wet forest in the Luquillo Mountains, northeastern Puerto Rico, U.S. Despite receiving unpolluted air off the Atlantic Ocean from northeasterly trade winds, during two complete years the site averaged 27.9 μg m–2 yr–1 wet Hg deposition, or about 30% more than Florida and the Gulf Coast, the highest deposition areas within the U.S. These high Hg deposition rates are driven in part by high rainfall, which averaged 2855 mm yr–1. The volume-weighted mean Hg concentration was 9.8 ng L–1, and was highest during summer and lowest during the winter dry season. Rainout of Hg (decreasing concentration with increasing rainfall depth) was minimal. The high Hg deposition was not supported by gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) at ground level, which remained near global background concentrations (<10 pg m–3). Rather, a strong positive correlation between Hg concentrations and the maximum height of rain detected within clouds (echo tops) suggests that droplets in high convective cloud tops scavenge GOM from above the mixing layer. The high wet Hg deposition at this “clean air” site suggests that other tropical areas may be hotspots for Hg deposition as well.

  8. A simplified method for assessing particle deposition rate in aircraft cabins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Ruoyu; Zhao, Bin

    2013-03-01

    Particle deposition in aircraft cabins is important for the exposure of passengers to particulate matter, as well as the airborne infectious diseases. In this study, a simplified method is proposed for initial and quick assessment of particle deposition rate in aircraft cabins. The method included: collecting the inclined angle, area, characteristic length, and freestream air velocity for each surface in a cabin; estimating the friction velocity based on the characteristic length and freestream air velocity; modeling the particle deposition velocity using the empirical equation we developed previously; and then calculating the particle deposition rate. The particle deposition rates for the fully-occupied, half-occupied, 1/4-occupied and empty first-class cabin of the MD-82 commercial airliner were estimated. The results show that the occupancy did not significantly influence the particle deposition rate of the cabin. Furthermore, the simplified human model can be used in the assessment with acceptable accuracy. Finally, the comparison results show that the particle deposition rate of aircraft cabins and indoor environments are quite similar.

  9. Regional trends in soil acidification and exchangeable metal concentrations in relation to acid deposition rates.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Carly J; Dise, Nancy B; Gowing, David J

    2009-01-01

    The deposition of high levels of reactive nitrogen (N) and sulphur (S), or the legacy of that deposition, remain among the world's most important environmental problems. Although regional impacts of acid deposition in aquatic ecosystems have been well documented, quantitative evidence of wide-scale impacts on terrestrial ecosystems is not common. In this study we analysed surface and subsoil chemistry of 68 acid grassland sites across the UK along a gradient of acid deposition, and statistically related the concentrations of exchangeable soil metals (1 M KCl extraction) to a range of potential drivers. The deposition of N, S or acid deposition was the primary correlate for 8 of 13 exchangeable metals measured in the topsoil and 5 of 14 exchangeable metals in the subsoil. In particular, exchangeable aluminium and lead both show increased levels above a soil pH threshold of about 4.5, strongly related to the deposition flux of acid compounds.

  10. The effect of device resistance and inhalation flow rate on the lung deposition of orally inhaled mannitol dry powder.

    PubMed

    Yang, Michael Y; Verschuer, Jordan; Shi, Yuyu; Song, Yang; Katsifis, Andrew; Eberl, Stefan; Wong, Keith; Brannan, John D; Cai, Weidong; Finlay, Warren H; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-11-20

    The present study investigates the effect of DPI resistance and inhalation flow rates on the lung deposition of orally inhaled mannitol dry powder. Mannitol powder radiolabeled with (99m)Tc-DTPA was inhaled from an Osmohaler™ by healthy human volunteers at 50-70L/min peak inhalation flow rate (PIFR) using both a low and high resistance Osmohaler™, and 110-130L/min PIFR using the low resistance Osmohaler™ (n=9). At 50-70L/min PIFR, the resistance of the Osmohaler™ did not significantly affect the total and peripheral lung deposition of inhaled mannitol [for low resistance Osmohaler™, 20% total lung deposition (TLD), 0.3 penetration index (PI); for high resistance Osmohaler™, 17% TLD, 0.23 PI]. Increasing the PIFR 50-70L/min to 110-130L/min (low resistance Osmohaler™) significantly reduced the total lung deposition (10% TLD) and the peripheral lung deposition (PI 0.21). The total lung deposition showed dependency on the in vitro FPF (R(2)=1.0). On the other hand, the PI had a stronger association with the MMAD (R(2)=1.0) than the FPF (R(2)=0.7). In conclusion the resistance of Osmohaler™ did not significantly affect the total and regional lung deposition at 50-70L/min PIFR. Instead, the total and regional lung depositions are dependent on the particle size of the aerosol and inhalation flow rate, the latter itself affecting the particle size distribution.

  11. Chemical vapor deposition of high T sub c superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. W.; Engelhardt, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The results are reported of an investigation into the synthesis and properties of high temperature superconducting materials. A chemical vapor deposition apparatus was designed and built which is suitable for the preparation of multicomponent metal films This apparatus was used to prepare a series of high T sub c A-15 structure superconducting films in the binary system Nb-Ge. The effect on T sub c of a variety of substrate materials was investigated. An extensive series of ternary alloys were also prepared. Conditions allowing the brittle high T sub c (approximately 18 K) A-15 structure superconductor Nb3A1 to be prepared in a low T sub c but ductile form were found. Some of the ways that the ductile (bcc) form can be cold worked or machined are described. Measurements of rate of transformation of cold worked bcc material to the high T sub c A-15 structure with low temperature annealing are given. Preliminary measurements indicate that this material has attractive high field critical current densities.

  12. Observations of atmospheric chemical deposition to high Arctic snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, Katrina M.; Sharma, Sangeeta; Toom, Desiree; Chivulescu, Alina; Hanna, Sarah; Bertram, Allan K.; Platt, Andrew; Elsasser, Mike; Huang, Lin; Tarasick, David; Chellman, Nathan; McConnell, Joseph R.; Bozem, Heiko; Kunkel, Daniel; Duan Lei, Ying; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2017-05-01

    Rapidly rising temperatures and loss of snow and ice cover have demonstrated the unique vulnerability of the high Arctic to climate change. There are major uncertainties in modelling the chemical depositional and scavenging processes of Arctic snow. To that end, fresh snow samples collected on average every 4 days at Alert, Nunavut, from September 2014 to June 2015 were analyzed for black carbon, major ions, and metals, and their concentrations and fluxes were reported. Comparison with simultaneous measurements of atmospheric aerosol mass loadings yields effective deposition velocities that encompass all processes by which the atmospheric species are transferred to the snow. It is inferred from these values that dry deposition is the dominant removal mechanism for several compounds over the winter while wet deposition increased in importance in the fall and spring, possibly due to enhanced scavenging by mixed-phase clouds. Black carbon aerosol was the least efficiently deposited species to the snow.

  13. High Throughput Atomic Layer Deposition Processes: High Pressure Operations, New Reactor Designs, and Novel Metal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousa, MoatazBellah Mahmoud

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a vapor phase nano-coating process that deposits very uniform and conformal thin film materials with sub-angstrom level thickness control on various substrates. These unique properties made ALD a platform technology for numerous products and applications. However, most of these applications are limited to the lab scale due to the low process throughput relative to the other deposition techniques, which hinders its industrial adoption. In addition to the low throughput, the process development for certain applications usually faces other obstacles, such as: a required new processing mode (e.g., batch vs continuous) or process conditions (e.g., low temperature), absence of an appropriate reactor design for a specific substrate and sometimes the lack of a suitable chemistry. This dissertation studies different aspects of ALD process development for prospect applications in the semiconductor, textiles, and battery industries, as well as novel organic-inorganic hybrid materials. The investigation of a high pressure, low temperature ALD process for metal oxides deposition using multiple process chemistry revealed the vital importance of the gas velocity over the substrate to achieve fast depositions at these challenging processing conditions. Also in this work, two unique high throughput ALD reactor designs are reported. The first is a continuous roll-to-roll ALD reactor for ultra-fast coatings on porous, flexible substrates with very high surface area. While the second reactor is an ALD delivery head that allows for in loco ALD coatings that can be executed under ambient conditions (even outdoors) on large surfaces while still maintaining very high deposition rates. As a proof of concept, part of a parked automobile window was coated using the ALD delivery head. Another process development shown herein is the improvement achieved in the selective synthesis of organic-inorganic materials using an ALD based process called sequential vapor

  14. Drastically Enhanced High-Rate Performance of Carbon-Coated LiFePO4 Nanorods Using a Green Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Method for Lithium Ion Battery: A Selective Carbon Coating Process.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ruiyuan; Liu, Haiqiang; Jiang, Yi; Chen, Jiankun; Tan, Xinghua; Liu, Guangyao; Zhang, Lina; Gu, Xiaohua; Guo, Yanjun; Wang, Hanfu; Sun, Lianfeng; Chu, Weiguo

    2015-06-03

    Application of LiFePO4 (LFP) to large current power supplies is greatly hindered by its poor electrical conductivity (10(-9) S cm(-1)) and sluggish Li+ transport. Carbon coating is considered to be necessary for improving its interparticle electronic conductivity and thus electrochemical performance. Here, we proposed a novel, green, low cost and controllable CVD approach using solid glucose as carbon source which can be extended to most cathode and anode materials in need of carbon coating. Hydrothermally synthesized LFP nanorods with optimized thickness of carbon coated by this recipe are shown to have superb high-rate performance, high energy, and power densities, as well as long high-rate cycle lifetime. For 200 C (18s) charge and discharge, the discharge capacity and voltage are 89.69 mAh g(-1) and 3.030 V, respectively, and the energy and power densities are 271.80 Wh kg(-1) and 54.36 kW kg(-1), respectively. The capacity retention of 93.0%, and the energy and power density retention of 93.6% after 500 cycles at 100 C were achieved. Compared to the conventional carbon coating through direct mixing with glucose (or other organic substances) followed by annealing (DMGA), the carbon phase coated using this CVD recipe is of higher quality and better uniformity. Undoubtedly, this approach enhances significantly the electrochemical performance of high power LFP and thus broadens greatly the prospect of its applications to large current power supplies such as electric and hybrid electric vehicles.

  15. Polyimide films from vapor deposition: toward high strength, NIF capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R C; Hsieh, E J; Letts, S A; Roberts, C C; Saculla, M

    1998-10-16

    The focus of recent efforts at LLNL has been to demonstrate that vapor deposition processing is a suitable technique to form polyimide fnms with sufficient strength for current national ignition facility target specifications. Production of polyimide films with controlled stoichiometry was acccomplished by: 1) depositing a novel co-functional monomer and 2) matching the vapor pressure of each monomer in PMDA/ODA co-depositions. The sublimation and deposition rate for the monomers was determined over a range of temperatures. Polyimide films with thicknesses up to 30 p.m were fabricated. Composition, structure and strength were assessed using FTIR, SEM and biaxial burst testing. The best films had a tensile strength of approximately 100 MPa. A qualitative relationship between the stoichiometry and tensile strength of the film was demonstrated. Thin films ({approximately}3.5 {micro}m) were typically smooth with an rms of 1.5 nm.

  16. Experimental and theoretical deposition rates from salt-seeded combustion gases of a Mach 0.3 burner rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.; Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Deposition rates on platinum-rhodium cylindrical collectors rotating in the cross streams of the combustion gases of a salt-seeded Mach 0.3 burner rig were determined. The collectors were internally air cooled so that their surface temperatures could be widely varied while they were exposed to constant combustion gas temperatures. The deposition rates were compared with those predicted by the chemically frozen boundary layer (CFBL) computer program, which is based on multicomponent vapor transport through the boundary layer. Excellent agreement was obtained between theory and experiment for the NaCl-seeded case, but the agreement lessened as the seed was changed to synthetic sea salt, NaNO3, and K2SO4, respectively, and was particularly poor in the case of Na2SO4. However, when inertial impaction was assumed to be the deposition mechanism for the Na2SO4 case, the predicted rates agreed well with the experimental rates. The former were calculated from a mean particle diameter that was derived from the measured intial droplet size distribution of the solution spray. Critical experiments showed that liquid phase deposits were blown off the smooth surface of the platinum-rhodium collectors by the aerodynamic shear forces of the high-velocity combustion gases but that rough or porous surfaces retained their liquid deposits.

  17. Preliminary Strength Measurements of High Temperature Ash Filter Deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, B.S.; Johnson, E.K.; Mallela, R.; Barberio, J.F.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this study is to develop and evaluate preliminary strength measurement techniques for high temperature candle filter ash deposits. The efficient performance of a high temperature gas filtering system is essential for many of the new thermal cycles being proposed for power plants of the future. These new cycles hold the promise of higher thermal efficiency and lower emissions of pollutants. Many of these cycles involve the combustion or gasification of coal to produce high temperature gases to eventually be used in gas turbines. These high temperature gases must be relatively free of particulates. Today, the candle filter appears to be the leading candidate for high temperature particulate removal. The performance of a candle filter depends on the ash deposits shattering into relatively large particles during the pulse cleaning (back flushing) of the filters. These relatively large particles fall into the ash hopper and are removed from the system. Therefore, these 1247 particles must be sufficiently large so that they will not be re-entrained by the gas flow. The shattering process is dictated by the strength characteristics of the ash deposits. Consequently, the objective of this research is to develop measurements for the desired strength characteristics of the ash deposits. Experimental procedures were developed to measure Young`s modulus of the ash deposit at room temperature and the failure tensile strain of ash deposits from room temperature to elevated temperatures. Preliminary data has been obtained for both soft and hard ash deposits. The qualifier ``preliminary`` is used to indicate that these measurements are a first for this material, and consequently, the measurement techniques are not perfected. In addition, the ash deposits tested are not necessarily uniform and further tests are needed in order to obtain meaningful average data.

  18. Silicon epitaxy using tetrasilane at low temperatures in ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazbun, Ramsey; Hart, John; Hickey, Ryan; Ghosh, Ayana; Fernando, Nalin; Zollner, Stefan; Adam, Thomas N.; Kolodzey, James

    2016-06-01

    The deposition of silicon using tetrasilane as a vapor precursor is described for an ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition tool. The growth rates and morphology of the Si epitaxial layers over a range of temperatures and pressures are presented. The layers were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Atomic Force Microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Based on this characterization, high quality single crystal silicon epitaxy was observed. Tetrasilane was found to produce higher growth rates relative to lower order silanes, with the ability to deposit crystalline Si at low temperatures (T=400 °C), with significant amorphous growth and reactivity measured as low as 325 °C, indicating the suitability of tetrasilane for low temperature chemical vapor deposition such as for SiGeSn alloys.

  19. Solar Flux Deposition And Heating Rates In Jupiter's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2009-09-01

    We discuss here the solar downward net flux in the 0.25 - 2.5 µm range in the atmosphere of Jupiter and the associated heating rates under a number of vertical cloud structure scenarios focusing in the effect of clouds and hazes. Our numerical model is based in the doubling-adding technique to solve the radiative transfer equation and it includes gas absorption by CH4, NH3 and H2, in addition to Rayleigh scattering by a mixture of H2 plus He. Four paradigmatic Jovian regions have been considered (hot-spots, belts, zones and Polar Regions). The hot-spots are the most transparent regions with downward net fluxes of 2.5±0.5 Wm-2 at the 6 bar level. The maximum solar heating is 0.04±0.01 K/day and occurs above 1 bar. Belts and zones characterization result in a maximum net downward flux of 0.5 Wm-2 at 2 bar and 0.015 Wm-2 at 6 bar. Heating is concentrated in the stratospheric and tropospheric hazes. Finally, Polar Regions are also explored and the results point to a considerable stratospheric heating of 0.04±0.02 K/day. In all, these calculations suggest that the role of the direct solar forcing in the Jovian atmospheric dynamics is limited to the upper 1 - 2 bar of the atmosphere except in the hot-spot areas. Acknowledgments: This work has been funded by Spanish MEC AYA2006-07735 with FEDER support and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07.

  20. Ages and Accumulation Rates of the Martian Polar Layered Deposits Estimated from Orbital Tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sori, M.; Bailey, E. A.; Perron, J.; Huybers, P. J.; Aharonson, O.; Limaye, A.

    2013-12-01

    Layers of dusty water ice in the polar caps of Mars have been hypothesized to record climate changes driven by variation of the planet's orbit and spin axis, but the time interval over which the polar layered deposits (PLDs) formed is unknown, and an orbital influence has not been conclusively demonstrated. We performed orbital tuning of reconstructed PLD stratigraphic sequences in an attempt to constrain the accumulation interval and test for the presence of an orbital signal. Our procedure uses dynamic time warping (DTW) to search for a match between two time series - the polar insolation history and brightness or topographic information in the PLDs - and then assesses the significance of potential matches using a Monte Carlo procedure. We selected 30 images of the northern PLDs from the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) aboard the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft and used Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter profiles to transform each image into a record of image brightness as a function of vertical depth. To constrain the PLD age and accumulation rate, we tuned each image record to Martian insolation records for varying time intervals. If a particular insolation interval produced the strongest match to an image, and if the match became weaker as the image was tuned to progressively longer or shorter intervals, we chose the best-fitting interval as an estimated accumulation time for that PLD sequence, and used the depth range to estimate a corresponding PLD accumulation rate. We also tuned the insolation records to synthetic records containing no orbital influence to test whether the image matches were spurious. Of the 30 MOC images analyzed, 16 produce insolation intervals that we consider strong matches. These images yield an average deposition rate of 0.5 × 0.2 mm/yr for the northern PLDs. The images represent only a fraction of the entire stratigraphy; extrapolating that deposition rate farther back in time yields an age of ~4 Ma for the entire PLD sequence present in the

  1. A high rate proportional chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.; Fraszer, W.; Openshaw, R.; Sheffer, G.; Salomon, M.; Dew, S.; Marans, J.; Wilson, P.

    1987-02-01

    Gas mixtures with high specific ionization allow the use of small interelectrode distances while still maintaining full efficiency. With the short electron drift distances the timing resolution is also improved. The authors have built and operated two 25 cm/sup 2/ chambers with small interelectrode distances. Also single wire detector cells have been built to test gas mixture lifetimes. Various admixtures of CF/sub 4/, DME, Isobutane, Ethane and Argon have been tested. Possible applications of such chambers are as beam profile monitors, position tagging of rare events and front end chambers in spectrometers.

  2. Influence of solution deposition rate on properties of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abd–Alghafour, N. M.; Ahmed, Naser M.; Hassan, Zai; Mohammad, Sabah M.

    2016-07-19

    Vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) thin films were deposited on glass substrates by using a cost-efficient spray pyrolysis technique. The films were grown at 350° through thermal decomposition of VCl{sub 3} in deionized water with different solution spray rates. The high resolution X-ray diffraction results revealed the formation of nanocrystalline films having orthorhombic structures with preferential orientation along (101) direction. The spray rate influenced the surface morphology and crystallite size of the films. The crystallite size was found to increase whereas the micro-strain was decreased by increasing the spray deposition rates. The increase in crystallite size and decrease in the macrostrain resulted in an improvement in the films’ crystallinity. The UV-Visible spectroscopy analysis indicated that the average transmittance of all films lies in the range 75-80 %. The band gap of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} film was decreased from 2.65 to 2.46 eV with increase of the spray deposition rate from 5 ml/min to 10 ml/min. first, second, and third level headings (first level heading).

  3. Influence of deposition rate on the structural properties of plasma-enhanced CVD epitaxial silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wanghua; Cariou, Romain; Hamon, Gwenaëlle; Léal, Ronan; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca I.

    2017-03-01

    Solar cells based on epitaxial silicon layers as the absorber attract increasing attention because of the potential cost reduction. In this work, we studied the influence of the deposition rate on the structural properties of epitaxial silicon layers produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (epi-PECVD) using silane as a precursor and hydrogen as a carrier gas. We found that the crystalline quality of epi-PECVD layers depends on their thickness and deposition rate. Moreover, increasing the deposition rate may lead to epitaxy breakdown. In that case, we observe the formation of embedded amorphous silicon cones in the epi-PECVD layer. To explain this phenomenon, we develop a model based on the coupling of hydrogen and built-in strain. By optimizing the deposition conditions to avoid epitaxy breakdown, including substrate temperatures and plasma potential, we have been able to synthesize epi-PECVD layers up to a deposition rate of 8.3 Å/s. In such case, we found that the incorporation of hydrogen in the hydrogenated crystalline silicon can reach 4 at. % at a substrate temperature of 350 °C.

  4. Influence of deposition rate on the structural properties of plasma-enhanced CVD epitaxial silicon

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanghua; Cariou, Romain; Hamon, Gwenaëlle; Léal, Ronan; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i

    2017-01-01

    Solar cells based on epitaxial silicon layers as the absorber attract increasing attention because of the potential cost reduction. In this work, we studied the influence of the deposition rate on the structural properties of epitaxial silicon layers produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (epi-PECVD) using silane as a precursor and hydrogen as a carrier gas. We found that the crystalline quality of epi-PECVD layers depends on their thickness and deposition rate. Moreover, increasing the deposition rate may lead to epitaxy breakdown. In that case, we observe the formation of embedded amorphous silicon cones in the epi-PECVD layer. To explain this phenomenon, we develop a model based on the coupling of hydrogen and built-in strain. By optimizing the deposition conditions to avoid epitaxy breakdown, including substrate temperatures and plasma potential, we have been able to synthesize epi-PECVD layers up to a deposition rate of 8.3 Å/s. In such case, we found that the incorporation of hydrogen in the hydrogenated crystalline silicon can reach 4 at. % at a substrate temperature of 350 °C. PMID:28262840

  5. Inclusion of Floc Growth in a Simple River Mouth Plume Model and Its Effect on Deposition Rate and Deposit Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, K.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers are the primary conduits for delivery of sediments and organic matter to the sea. This is visually evident when sediment-laden rivers enter coastal waters, producing sediment plumes. The sediment and organic material from such plumes may deposit and be preserved in estuarine and deltaic zones, or may be carried and mixed by ocean currents to deposit elsewhere on the shelf. Both of these outcomes are governed in large part by depositional mechanics that are dependent, at least in part, on the settling velocity of the sediment. This is especially true in modeling, where the settling velocity has been noted to be the primary controlling parameter for accurate prediction of depositional patters from river plumes. Settling velocity is largely controlled by grain size, shape, and density, which for mud can be quite dynamic due to the process of flocculation. Flocculation yields mud aggregates of variable size and density that may be dependent on the turbulent energy and salt levels under which they were formed. Since turbulent energy and salinity both change in river mouth jet/plumes, the dynamic flocculation process may exert significant control on the eventual distribution of sediment in these zones. In this study, two different approaches to floc modeling are integrated into a steady-state river mouth plume integral model. The two floc models are (1) a version of the Winterwerp (1998) model, and (2) a condition-dependent equilibrium floc size model similar to what is typically used in large-scale 2 and 3D hydraulic and sediment transport simulations. Inclusion of these two models into the buoyant river-mouth plume equations allows for the settling velocity of the mud to be functionally tied to the turbulent shear rate and suspended sediment concentration. The concentration and deposition rates are then compared through the plume both without and with the inclusion of the two different floc treatments. The role that entrainment of ambient fluid plays in the

  6. High-power sputtering employed for film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapovalov, V. I.

    2017-07-01

    The features of high-power magnetron sputtering employed for the films’ deposition are reviewed. The main physical phenomena accompanying high-power sputtering including ion-electron emission, gas rarefaction, ionization of sputtered atoms, self-sputtering, ion sound waves and the impact of the target heating are described.

  7. Highly Textured FeCo Thin Films Deposited by Low Temperature Pulsed Laser Deposition.

    PubMed

    Varvaro, Gaspare; Peddis, Davide; Barucca, Gianni; Mengucci, Paolo; Rodionova, Valeria; Chichay, Ksenia; Testa, Alberto Maria; Agostinelli, Elisabetta; Laureti, Sara

    2015-10-14

    The effect of the deposition temperature (Tdep) on the crystallographic orientation of pulsed laser-deposited FeCo/MgO(100) thin film was determined by means of X-ray reflectivity and high resolution trasmission electron microscopy analysis and was correlated with the magnetic anisotropy properties measured by angle dependent hysteresis loops. Highly textured films with a bcc structure and very smooth surface were obtained even at room temperature, the film being [100] and [110] oriented, at Tdep=25 °C and 150 °C, respectively. The cubic symmetry is reflected in the angular dependence of remanent magnetization, showing a 4-fold character, whose in-plane distribution is consistent with the different crystallographic orientations of the films. The high structural quality, even at room temperature, is reflected in a high value of the saturation magnetization and low coercivity, matching the requirements for technological applications.

  8. Gold nanoarray deposited using alternating current for emission rate-manipulating nanoantenna

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We have proposed an easy and controllable method to prepare highly ordered Au nanoarray by pulse alternating current deposition in anodic aluminum oxide template. Using the ultraviolet–visible-near-infrared region spectrophotometer, finite difference time domain, and Green function method, we experimentally and theoretically investigated the surface plasmon resonance, electric field distribution, and local density of states enhancement of the uniform Au nanoarray system. The time-resolved photoluminescence spectra of quantum dots show that the emission rate increased from 0.0429 to 0.5 ns−1 (10.7 times larger) by the existence of the Au nanoarray. Our findings not only suggest a convenient method for ordered nanoarray growth but also prove the utilization of the Au nanoarray for light emission-manipulating antennas, which can help build various functional plasmonic nanodevices. PMID:23799880

  9. Simulation of growth rate and deposition profile on the periodically patterned substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Byung-Joon; Kang, Sung-Ju; Kim, Jin-Taek; Pak, Bockchoon; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2007-06-01

    The growth of GaN on the patterned substances has proven favorable to achieve thick, crack-free GaN layers. Based on these methods, we specially designed periodically patterned Si substrate process, which is referred to as lateral epitaxy on patterned Si substrate (LEPS). High crystalline quality GaN are obtained by using this technique. In this paper, numerical modeling of transport and reaction of species is performed to estimate the growth rate of GaN from the reaction of trimethyl gallium (TMG) and ammonia. The effect of fabricated structure of feature scale model will be predicted by using the topography simulator, and deposition profile of the GaN on the pattern will be discussed. The effect of flow conditions and pattern shape and periodicity will also be addressed, which can be critical for the quality of crystal growth. The dependency of step coverage and conformality of patterned mask will also be discussed.

  10. Strain-Rate Dependency of Strength of Soft Marine Deposits of the Gulf of Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    abstract number: 090612-057 Strain-rate dependency of strength of soft marine deposits of the Gulf of Mexico Andrei Abelev and Philip Valent...from the Gulf of Mexico . The vane test may not always be the most accurate method of describing the undrained shear strength, mainly because it...deposits of the Gulf of Mexico 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  11. Predicting the Effects of Powder Feeding Rates on Particle Impact Conditions and Cold Spray Deposited Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Ozan C.; Widener, Christian A.; Carter, Michael J.; Johnson, Kyle W.

    2017-08-01

    As the industrial application of the cold spray technology grows, the need to optimize both the cost and the quality of the process grows with it. Parameter selection techniques available today require the use of a coupled system of equations to be solved to involve the losses due to particle loading in the gas stream. Such analyses cause a significant increase in the computational time in comparison with calculations with isentropic flow assumptions. In cold spray operations, engineers and operators may, therefore, neglect the effects of particle loading to simplify the multiparameter optimization process. In this study, two-way coupled (particle-fluid) quasi-one-dimensional fluid dynamics simulations are used to test the particle loading effects under many potential cold spray scenarios. Output of the simulations is statistically analyzed to build regression models that estimate the changes in particle impact velocity and temperature due to particle loading. This approach eases particle loading optimization for more complete analysis on deposition cost and time. The model was validated both numerically and experimentally. Further numerical analyses were completed to test the particle loading capacity and limitations of a nozzle with a commonly used throat size. Additional experimentation helped document the physical limitations to high-rate deposition.

  12. Predicting the Effects of Powder Feeding Rates on Particle Impact Conditions and Cold Spray Deposited Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Ozan C.; Widener, Christian A.; Carter, Michael J.; Johnson, Kyle W.

    2017-10-01

    As the industrial application of the cold spray technology grows, the need to optimize both the cost and the quality of the process grows with it. Parameter selection techniques available today require the use of a coupled system of equations to be solved to involve the losses due to particle loading in the gas stream. Such analyses cause a significant increase in the computational time in comparison with calculations with isentropic flow assumptions. In cold spray operations, engineers and operators may, therefore, neglect the effects of particle loading to simplify the multiparameter optimization process. In this study, two-way coupled (particle-fluid) quasi-one-dimensional fluid dynamics simulations are used to test the particle loading effects under many potential cold spray scenarios. Output of the simulations is statistically analyzed to build regression models that estimate the changes in particle impact velocity and temperature due to particle loading. This approach eases particle loading optimization for more complete analysis on deposition cost and time. The model was validated both numerically and experimentally. Further numerical analyses were completed to test the particle loading capacity and limitations of a nozzle with a commonly used throat size. Additional experimentation helped document the physical limitations to high-rate deposition.

  13. Surface Ages and Resurfacing Rates of the Polar Layered Deposits on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Plaut, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Interpretation of the polar stratigraphy of Mars in terms of global climate changes is complicated by the significant difference in surface ages between the north and south polar layered terrains inferred from crater statistics. We have reassessed the cratering record in both polar regions using Viking Orbiter and Mariner 9 images. No craters have been found in the north polar layered terrain, but the surface of most of the south polar layered deposits appears to have been stable for many of the orbital/axial cycles that are thought to have induced global climate changes on Mars. The inferred surface age of the south polar layered deposits (about 10 Ma) is two orders of magnitude greater than the surface age of the north polar layered deposits and residual cap (at most 100 ka). Similarly, modeled resurfacing rates are at least 20 times greater in the north than in the south. These results are consistent with the hypotheses that polar layered deposit resurfacing rates are highest in areas covered by perennial ice and that the differences in polar resurfacing rates result from the 6.4 km difference in elevation between the polar regions. Deposition on the portion of the south polar layered deposits that is not covered by the perennial ice cap may have ceased about 5 million years ago when the obliquity of Mars no longer exceeded 40??. ?? 2000 Academic Press.

  14. Nitrogen Accumulation and Partitioning in High Arctic Tundra from Extreme Atmospheric N Deposition Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoenix, G. K.; Osborn, A.; Blaud, A.; Press, M. C.; Choudhary, S.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic ecosystems are threatened by pollution from extreme atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition events. These events occur from the long-range transport of reactive N from pollution sources at lower latitudes and can deposit up to 80% of the annual N deposition in just a few days. To date, the fate and impacts of these extreme pollutant events has remained unknown. Using a field simulation study, we undertook the first assessment of the fate of acutely deposited N on arctic tundra. Extreme N deposition events were simulated on field plots at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard (79oN) at rates of 0, 0.04, 0.4 and 1.2 g N m-2 yr-1 applied as NH4NO3 solution over 4 days, with 15N tracers used in the second year to quantify the fate of the deposited N in the plant, soil, microbial and leachate pools. Separate applications of 15NO3- and 15NH4+ were also made to determine the importance of N form in the fate of N. Recovery of the 15N tracer at the end of the first growing season approached 100% of the 15N applied irrespective of treatment level, demonstrating the considerable capacity of High Arctic tundra to capture pollutant N from extreme deposition events. Most incorporation of the 15N was found in bryophytes, followed by the dominant vascular plant (Salix polaris) and the microbial biomass of the soil organic layer. Total recovery remained high in the second growing season (average of 90%), indicating highly conservative N retention. Between the two N forms, recovery of 15NO3- and 15NH4+ were equal in the non-vascular plants, whereas in the vascular plants (particularly Salix polaris) recovery of 15NO3- was four times higher than of 15NH4+. Overall, these findings show that High Arctic tundra has considerable capacity to capture and retain the pollutant N deposited in acute extreme deposition events. Given they can represent much of the annual N deposition, extreme deposition events may be more important than increased chronic N deposition as a pollution source. Furthermore

  15. Prediction of Chemical Vapor Deposition Rates on Monofilaments and Its Implications for Fiber Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Kuczmarski, M.; Veitch, L. C.

    1992-01-01

    Deposition rates are predicted in a cylindrical upflow reactor designed for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on monofilaments. Deposition of silicon from silane in a hydrogen carrier gas is chosen as a relevant example. The effects of gas and surface chemistry are studied in a two-dimensional axisymmetric flow field for this chemically well-studied system. Model predictions are compared to experimental CVD rate measurements. The differences in some physical and chemical phenomena between such small diameter (about 150 microns) fiber substrates and other typical CVD substrates are highlighted. The influence of the Soret mass transport mechanism is determined to be extraordinarily significant. The difficulties associated with the accurate measurement and control of the fiber temperature are discussed. Model prediction sensitivities are investigated with respect to fiber temperatures, fiber radii, Soret transport, and chemical kinetic parameters. The implications of the predicted instantaneous rates are discussed relative to the desired fiber properties for both the batch and the continuous processes.

  16. Simulating deposition of high density tailings using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaoglu, Yagmur; Simms, Paul H.

    2017-08-01

    Tailings are a slurry of silt-sized residual material derived from the milling of rock. High density (HD) tailings are tailings that have been sufficiently dewatered to a point where they exhibit a yield stress upon deposition. They form gently sloped stacks on the surface when deposited; this eliminates or minimizes the need for dams or embankments for containment. Understanding the flow behaviour of high density tailings is essential for estimating the final stack geometry and overall slope angle. This paper focuses on modelling the flow behaviour of HD tailings using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method incorporating a `bi-viscosity' model to simulate the non-Newtonian behaviour. The model is validated by comparing the numerical results with bench scale experiments simulating single or multi-layer deposits in two-dimensions. The results indicate that the model agreed fairly well with the experimental work, excepting some repulsion of particles away from the bottom boundary closer to the toe of the deposits. Novel aspects of the work, compared to other simulation of Bingham fluids by SPH, are the simulation of multilayer deposits and the use of a stopping criteria to characterize the rest state.

  17. Inkwells for on-demand deposition rate measurement in aerosol-jet based 3D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yuan; Gutierrez, David; Das, Siddhartha; Hines, D. R.

    2017-09-01

    Aerosol-jet printing (AJP) is an important direct-write printing technology based on additive manufacturing methods. Numerous research groups have utilized AJP for the fabrication of electronic circuits and devices. However, there has not been any real-time or even any on-demand method for quantitatively measuring and/or setting the deposition rate of an AJ ink stream. In this paper, we present a method for measuring the deposition rate of an AJ ink stream by printing into an array of inkwells that were fabricated using photolithography and were characterized using x-ray tomography and optical profilometry. These inkwell arrays were then used to establish a set of deposition rates namely 0.0011, 0.0024, 0.0035, 0.0046 and 0.0059 mm3 s-1 that were subsequently compared with independently-measured deposition rates obtained by printing the ink stream into a weighing pan for a specified time and calculating the resulting deposition rate from the weight of the printed sample. From this comparison, it is observed that, for a human operator, the error in setting a specific deposition rate is less for inkwell fill times greater than 3 s and greater for fill times less than 3 s. This observation indicates that the average volume of an inkwell array should be at least three times the desired deposition rate (V inkwell  >  3R). It was also observed that when the diameter of the inkwell was only slightly larger than the ink stream diameter, the ink uniformly wets the sidewall of the inkwell and results in a well filled inkwell for which the point at which it is just fully filled is easily observable. Finally, the interactions of the ink with both ‘philic’ and ‘phobic’ inkwells were studied illustrating the ability to use inkwells of various materials for setting the desired deposition rates for a variety of AJ printable inks.

  18. Deposition of model crud on boiling zircaloy surfaces at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kawayuchi, M.; Fujita, N.; Ishigure, K.; Oshima, K.

    1983-09-01

    The deposition experiments were carried out under high pressure (7 MPa) at 285/sup 0/C using model compounds (..cap alpha..-hematite) to investigate the deposition process of crud on boiling surfaces. The effects of several factors, such as the diameter of the model particles (0.15 to 2.3 ..mu..m), pH (7 to 13), and heat flux of the heated surfaces (5 to 16 W/cm/sup 2/), on the deposition rate during the initial stage were investigated. It was found that the deposition rate of the hematite particle, having a narrow particle size distribution, strongly depends on the particle diameter and pH of the crud suspension. An explanation of these results was based on the assumption that the electrokinetic interaction between the particle and the surface plays an important role in the deposition process of the crud particles. Furthermore, it was found that the deposition rate of the hematite, having a narrow particle size distribution, deviates from the linear proportionality.

  19. Electrochemical techniques for the evaluation of porosity and corrosion rate for electroless nickel deposits on steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, C.; Barker, D.; Walsh, F.

    1997-12-01

    The use of electrochemical techniques in assessing the porosity of electroless nickel deposits (1--24 {micro}m) on steel substrates from hypophosphite baths is considered. The corrosion rate of the coated samples immersed in 0.125M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at 22 C was determined using Tafel extrapolation and was found to decrease with decreasing porosity. Analysis of anodic polarization curves and current-time data at fixed potentials gave a good indication of the extent of deposit porosity. The use of galvanic coupling experiments between a non-porous coating and test samples of varying deposit thickness was also examined. The shape of the porosity vs. coating thickness curve was similar for all the methods investigated, the porosity decreasing for thicker deposits.

  20. Deposited silicon high-speed integrated electro-optic modulator.

    PubMed

    Preston, Kyle; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Gondarenko, Alexander; Poitras, Carl B; Lipson, Michal

    2009-03-30

    We demonstrate a micrometer-scale electro-optic modulator operating at 2.5 Gbps and 10 dB extinction ratio that is fabricated entirely from deposited silicon. The polycrystalline silicon material exhibits properties that simultaneously enable high quality factor optical resonators and sub-nanosecond electrical carrier injection. We use an embedded p(+)n(-)n(+) diode to achieve optical modulation using the free carrier plasma dispersion effect. Active optical devices in a deposited microelectronic material can break the dependence on the traditional single layer silicon-on-insulator platform and help lead to monolithic large-scale integration of photonic networks on a microprocessor chip.

  1. Effects of long-term grazing on sediment deposition and salt-marsh accretion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elschot, Kelly; Bouma, Tjeerd J.; Temmerman, Stijn; Bakker, Jan P.

    2013-11-01

    Many studies have attempted to predict whether coastal marshes will be able to keep up with future acceleration of sea-level rise by estimating marsh accretion rates. However, there are few studies focussing on the long-term effects of herbivores on vegetation structure and subsequent effects on marsh accretion. Deposition of fine-grained, mineral sediment during tidal inundations, together with organic matter accumulation from the local vegetation, positively affects accretion rates of marsh surfaces. Tall vegetation can enhance sediment deposition by reducing current flow and wave action. Herbivores shorten vegetation height and this could potentially reduce sediment deposition. This study estimated the effects of herbivores on 1) vegetation height, 2) sediment deposition and 3) resulting marsh accretion after long-term (at least 16 years) herbivore exclusion of both small (i.e. hare and goose) and large grazers (i.e. cattle) for marshes of different ages. Our results firstly showed that both small and large herbivores can have a major impact on vegetation height. Secondly, grazing processes did not affect sediment deposition. Finally, trampling by large grazers affected marsh accretion rates by compacting the soil. In many European marshes, grazing is used as a tool in nature management as well as for agricultural purposes. Thus, we propose that soil compaction by large grazers should be taken in account when estimating the ability of coastal systems to cope with an accelerating sea-level rise.

  2. Massive accumulation of highly polluted sedimentary deposits by river damming.

    PubMed

    Palanques, Albert; Grimalt, Joan; Belzunces, Marc; Estrada, Ferran; Puig, Pere; Guillén, Jorge

    2014-11-01

    Uncontrolled dumping of anthropogenic waste in rivers regulated by dams has created contaminated deposits in reservoirs that have remained unidentified for decades. The Flix Reservoir is located in the Ebro River, the second largest river flowing into the NW Mediterranean, has been affected by residue dumping from a chlor-alkali electrochemical plant for decades. High-resolution seismic profiles, bathymetric data, surficial sediment samples and sediment cores were obtained in the Flix Reservoir to study the characteristics of the deposit accumulated by this dumping. These data were used to reconstruct the waste deposit history. Since the construction of the Flix Dam in 1948, more than 3.6×10(5) t of industrial waste has accumulated in the reservoir generating a delta-like deposit formed by three sediment lobes of fine-grained material highly contaminated by Hg, Cd, Zn and Cr (max: 640, 26, 420 and 750 mg kg(-1), respectively). This contamination was associated with the Hg that was used for the cathode in the electrochemical plant from 1949 and with the production of phosphorite derivatives from 1973. After the construction of two large dams only a few kilometres upstream during the 1960s, the solids discharged from the industrial complex became the main sediment source to the Flix Reservoir. The deposit has remained in the reservoir forming a delta that obstructs about 50% of the river water section. Its stability only depended on the flow retention by the Flix Dam. At present, this contaminated waste deposit is being removed from the water reservoir as it is a cause of concern for the environment and for human health downriver.

  3. High rate reactive sputtering of MoN(x) coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnik, Paul J.; Graham, Michael E.; Sproul, William D.

    1991-01-01

    High rate reactive sputtering of MoN(x) films was performed using feedback control of the nitorgen partial pressure. Coatings were made at four different target powers: 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10 kW. No hysteresis was observed in the nitrogen partial pressure vs. flow plot, as is typically seen for the Ti-N system. Four phases were determined by X-ray diffraction: molybdenum, Mo-N solid solution, Beta-Mo2N and gamma-Mo2N. The hardness of the coatings depended upon composition, substrate bias, and target power. The phases present in the hardest films differed depending upon deposition parameters. For example, the Beta-Mo2N phase was hardest (load 25 gf) at 5.0 kW with a value of 3200 kgf/sq mm, whereas the hardest coatings at 10 kW were the gamma-Mo2N phase (3000 kgf/sq mm). The deposition rate generally decreased with increasing nitrogen partial pressure, but there was a range of partial pressures where the rate was relatively constant. At a target power of 5.0 kW, for example, the deposition rates were 3300 A/min for a N2 partial pressure of 0.05 - 1.0 mTorr.

  4. High rate reactive sputtering of MoN(x) coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnik, Paul J.; Graham, Michael E.; Sproul, William D.

    1991-01-01

    High rate reactive sputtering of MoN(x) films was performed using feedback control of the nitorgen partial pressure. Coatings were made at four different target powers: 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10 kW. No hysteresis was observed in the nitrogen partial pressure vs. flow plot, as is typically seen for the Ti-N system. Four phases were determined by X-ray diffraction: molybdenum, Mo-N solid solution, Beta-Mo2N and gamma-Mo2N. The hardness of the coatings depended upon composition, substrate bias, and target power. The phases present in the hardest films differed depending upon deposition parameters. For example, the Beta-Mo2N phase was hardest (load 25 gf) at 5.0 kW with a value of 3200 kgf/sq mm, whereas the hardest coatings at 10 kW were the gamma-Mo2N phase (3000 kgf/sq mm). The deposition rate generally decreased with increasing nitrogen partial pressure, but there was a range of partial pressures where the rate was relatively constant. At a target power of 5.0 kW, for example, the deposition rates were 3300 A/min for a N2 partial pressure of 0.05 - 1.0 mTorr.

  5. High Temperature Multilayer Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited Via Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harder, Bryan James; Zhu, Dongming; Schmitt, Michael P.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Si-based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) require environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments to avoid rapid material loss. Candidate EBC materials have use temperatures only marginally above current technology, but the addition of a columnar oxide topcoat can substantially increase the durability. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) allows application of these multilayer EBCs in a single process. The PS-PVD technique is a unique method that combines conventional thermal spray and vapor phase methods, allowing for tailoring of thin, dense layers or columnar microstructures by varying deposition conditions. Multilayer coatings were deposited on CMC specimens and assessed for durability under high heat flux and load. Coated samples with surface temperatures ranging from 2400-2700F and 10 ksi loads using the high heat flux laser rigs at NASA Glenn. Coating morphology was characterized in the as-sprayed condition and after thermomechanical loading using electron microscopy and the phase structure was tracked using X-ray diffraction.

  6. Modern deposition rates and patterns of organic carbon burial in Fiordland, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Michael T.; Allison, Mead A.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Cui, Xingqian; Savage, Candida; Schüller, Susanne E.; Smith, Richard W.; Vetter, Lael

    2016-11-01

    Fjords are disproportionately important for global organic carbon (OC) burial relative to their spatial extent and may be important in sequestering atmospheric CO2, providing a negative climate feedback. Within fjords, multiple locally variable delivery mechanisms control mineral sediment deposition, which in turn modulates OC burial. Sediment and OC sources in Fiordland, New Zealand, include terrigenous input at fjord heads, sediment reworking over fjord-mouth sills, and landslide events from steep fjord walls. Box cores were analyzed for sedimentary texture, sediment accumulation rate, and OC content to evaluate the relative importance of each delivery mechanism. Sediment accumulation was up to 3.4 mm/yr in proximal and distal fjord areas, with lower rates in medial reaches. X-radiograph and 210Pb stratigraphy indicate mass wasting and surface-sediment bioturbation throughout the fjords. Sediment accumulation rates are inversely correlated with %OC. Spatial heterogeneity in sediment depositional processes and rates is important when evaluating OC burial within fjords.

  7. Turnover of texture in low rate sputter-deposited nanocrystalline molybdenum films

    SciTech Connect

    Druesedau, T.P.; Klabunde, F.; Loehmann, M.; Hempel, T.; Blaesing, J.

    1997-07-01

    The crystallite size and orientation in molybdenum films prepared by magnetron sputtering at a low rate of typical 1 {angstrom}/s and a pressure of 0.45 Pa was investigated by X-ray diffraction and texture analysis. The surface topography was studied using atomic force microscopy. Increasing the film thickness from 20 nm to 3 {micro}m, the films show a turnover from a (110) fiber texture to a (211) mosaic-like texture. In the early state of growth (20 nm thickness) the development of dome-like structures on the surface is observed. The number of these structures increases with film thickness, whereas their size is weakly influenced. The effect of texture turnover is reduced by increasing the deposition rate by a factor of six, and it is absent for samples mounted above the center of the magnetron source. The effect of texture turnover is related to the bombardment of the films with high energetic argon neutrals resulting from backscattering at the target under oblique angle and causing resputtering. Due to the narrow angular distribution of the reflected argon, bombardment of the substrate plane is inhomogeneous and only significant for regions close to the erosion zone of the magnetron.

  8. Fuel deposition rates of montane and subalpine conifers in the central Sierra Nevada, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Wagtendonk, J.W.; Moore, P.E.

    2010-01-01

    Fire managers and researchers need information on fuel deposition rates to estimate future changes in fuel bed characteristics, determine when forests transition to another fire behavior fuel model, estimate future changes in fuel bed characteristics, and parameterize and validate ecosystem process models. This information is lacking for many ecosystems including the Sierra Nevada in California, USA. We investigated fuel deposition rates and stand characteristics of seven montane and four subalpine conifers in the Sierra Nevada. We collected foliage, miscellaneous bark and crown fragments, cones, and woody fuel classes from four replicate plots each in four stem diameter size classes for each species, for a total of 176 sampling sites. We used these data to develop predictive equations for each fuel class and diameter size class of each species based on stem and crown characteristics. There were consistent species and diameter class differences in the annual amount of foliage and fragments deposited. Foliage deposition rates ranged from just over 50 g m-2 year-1 in small diameter mountain hemlock stands to ???300 g m-2 year-1 for the three largest diameter classes of giant sequoia. The deposition rate for most woody fuel classes increased from the smallest diameter class stands to the largest diameter class stands. Woody fuel deposition rates varied among species as well. The rates for the smallest woody fuels ranged from 0.8 g m-2 year-1 for small diameter stands of Jeffrey pine to 126.9 g m-2 year-1 for very large diameter stands of mountain hemlock. Crown height and live crown ratio were the best predictors of fuel deposition rates for most fuel classes and species. Both characteristics reflect the amount of crown biomass including foliage and woody fuels. Relationships established in this study allow predictions of fuel loads to be made on a stand basis for each of these species under current and possible future conditions. These predictions can be used to

  9. High quality flame deposited diamond films for infrared optical windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzeng, Y.; Phillips, R.

    1991-01-01

    The IR absorption in polycrystalline diamond films deposited in oxygen-acetylene flames is characterized using FTIR. The one-phonon absorption coefficient in the region from 7 to 12 microns that is related to extrinsic defects in the diamond films shows a strong dependence on the flame conditions as well as the substrate temperature. A high degree of diamond crystalline perfection, as judged from the undetectable one-phonon absorption, is achieved under the optimized deposition conditions for our flame setup. This is further supported by the sharp Raman peak at 1332/cm as well as the high purity in crystal orientation according to the X-ray diffraction pattern measured for the high quality diamond films.

  10. Surfactant Driven Post-Deposition Spreading of Aerosols on Complex Aqueous Subphases. 1: High Deposition Flux Representative of Aerosol Delivery to Large Airways.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Amsul; Sharma, Ramankur; Corcoran, Timothy E; Garoff, Stephen; Przybycien, Todd M; Tilton, Robert D

    2015-10-01

    Aerosol drug delivery is a viable option for treating diseased airways, but airway obstructions associated with diseases such as cystic fibrosis cause non-uniform drug distribution and limit efficacy. Marangoni stresses produced by surfactant addition to aerosol formulations may enhance delivery uniformity by post-deposition spreading of medications over the airway surface, improving access to poorly ventilated regions. We examine the roles of different variables affecting the maximum post-deposition spreading of a dye (drug mimic). Entangled aqueous solutions of either poly(acrylamide) (PA) or porcine gastric mucin (PGM) serve as airway surface liquid (ASL) mimicking subphases for in vitro models of aerosol deposition. Measured aerosol deposition fluxes indicate that the experimental delivery conditions are representative of aerosol delivery to the conducting airways. Post-deposition spreading beyond the locale of direct aerosol deposition is tracked by fluorescence microscopy. Aqueous aerosols formulated with either nonionic surfactant (tyloxapol) or fluorosurfactant (FS-3100) are compared with surfactant-free control aerosols. Significant enhancement of post-deposition spreading is observed with surfactant solutions relative to surfactant-free control solutions, provided the surfactant solution surface tension is less than that of the subphase. Amongst the variables considered--surfactant concentration, aerosol flow-rate, total deposited volume, time of delivery, and total deposited surfactant mass--surfactant mass is the primary predictor of maximum spread distance. This dependence is also observed for solutions deposited as a single, microliter-scale drop with a volume comparable to the total volume of deposited aerosol. Marangoni stress-assisted spreading after surfactant-laden aerosol deposition at high fluxes on a complex fluid subphase is capable of driving aerosol contents over significantly greater distances compared to surfactant-free controls. Total

  11. Surfactant Driven Post-Deposition Spreading of Aerosols on Complex Aqueous Subphases. 1: High Deposition Flux Representative of Aerosol Delivery to Large Airways

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, Amsul; Sharma, Ramankur; Corcoran, Timothy E.; Przybycien, Todd M.; Tilton, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Aerosol drug delivery is a viable option for treating diseased airways, but airway obstructions associated with diseases such as cystic fibrosis cause non-uniform drug distribution and limit efficacy. Marangoni stresses produced by surfactant addition to aerosol formulations may enhance delivery uniformity by post-deposition spreading of medications over the airway surface, improving access to poorly ventilated regions. We examine the roles of different variables affecting the maximum post-deposition spreading of a dye (drug mimic). Methods: Entangled aqueous solutions of either poly(acrylamide) (PA) or porcine gastric mucin (PGM) serve as airway surface liquid (ASL) mimicking subphases for in vitro models of aerosol deposition. Measured aerosol deposition fluxes indicate that the experimental delivery conditions are representative of aerosol delivery to the conducting airways. Post-deposition spreading beyond the locale of direct aerosol deposition is tracked by fluorescence microscopy. Aqueous aerosols formulated with either nonionic surfactant (tyloxapol) or fluorosurfactant (FS-3100) are compared with surfactant-free control aerosols. Results: Significant enhancement of post-deposition spreading is observed with surfactant solutions relative to surfactant-free control solutions, provided the surfactant solution surface tension is less than that of the subphase. Amongst the variables considered—surfactant concentration, aerosol flow-rate, total deposited volume, time of delivery, and total deposited surfactant mass—surfactant mass is the primary predictor of maximum spread distance. This dependence is also observed for solutions deposited as a single, microliter-scale drop with a volume comparable to the total volume of deposited aerosol. Conclusions: Marangoni stress-assisted spreading after surfactant-laden aerosol deposition at high fluxes on a complex fluid subphase is capable of driving aerosol contents over significantly greater

  12. Highly sensitive wide bandwidth photodetectors using chemical vapor deposited graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goo Kang, Chang; Kyung Lee, Sang; Jin Yoo, Tae; Park, Woojin; Jung, Ukjin; Ahn, Jinho; Hun Lee, Byoung

    2014-04-01

    A photodetector generating a nearly constant photocurrent in a very wide spectral range from ultraviolet (UV) to infrared has been demonstrated using chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene. Instability due to a photochemical reaction in the UV region has been minimized using an Al2O3 passivation layer, and a responsivity comparable to that of Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite graphene photodetectors of ˜8 mA/W has been achieved at a 0.1 V bias, despite high defect density in the CVD graphene. A highly sensitive multi-band photodetector using graphene has many potential applications including optical interconnects, multi-band imaging sensors, highly sensitive motion detectors, etc.

  13. High-resolution characterization of individual flood deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Støren, Eivind; Paasche, Øyvind; Hirt, Ann

    2014-05-01

    In most fluvial landscapes rivers transport sediments within and across catchments throughout the year. During flood events the capacity and competence of the river manifolds, and consequently more sediment are eroded and transported within the catchment. Whenever such sediment-laden rivers reach lakes, sediments are deposited at rate much faster than background sedimentation. For this reason alone, lakes can provide exceptionally rich archives of paleofloods. Flood sediments carry information not only about frequency variability through time, but also about source area(s), the time of the deposit (on a seasonal scale), as well as the evolution of the flood. In order to scrutinize the information that can be extracted from such pristine lake records we have developed an approach where high-resolution data are compared to high-precision measurements of selected samples. More specifically, data from high-resolution X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanning (Itrax) and magnetic susceptibility (Bartington MS2 point sensor) can potentially provide information on annual to decadal resolution. These fast and effective surface scanning methods are subjected to well-known uncertainties, which can impact the interpretation of individual layers. To overcome this challenge - and obtain the highest possible precision and resolution - precise quantitative analysis of discrete flood layers using magnetic hysteresis measurements and First-order reversal curves (FORCs) as well as conventional X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (Philips PW1404) have been conducted. FORCs are obtained with an Alternating Gradient Force Magnetometer and have exceptional high sensitivity (1 x 10-11 A m2) that allows samples smaller than 200 milligrams to be measured. This means that sediments representing a band of less than a couple of millimeters in the lake sediment cores can be sampled without notable contamination from adjacent non-flood sediments, and analyzed with a high degree of precision (analytical

  14. Structure of turbulence at high shear rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Moon Joo; Kim, John; Moin, Parviz

    1990-01-01

    The structure of homogeneous turbulence subject to high shear rate has been investigated by using three-dimensional, time-dependent numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. This study indicates that high shear rate alone is sufficient for generation of the streaky structures, and that the presence of a solid boundary is not necessary. Evolution of the statistical correlations is examined to determine the effect of high shear rate on the development of anisotropy in turbulence. It is shown that the streamwise fluctuating motions are enhanced so profoundly that a highly anisotropic turbulence state with a 'one-component' velocity field and 'two-component' vorticity field develops asymptotically as total shear increases. Because of high-shear rate, rapid distortion theory predicts remarkably well the anisotropic behavior of the structural quantities.

  15. High burn rate solid composite propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manship, Timothy D.

    High burn rate propellants help maintain high levels of thrust without requiring complex, high surface area grain geometries. Utilizing high burn rate propellants allows for simplified grain geometries that not only make production of the grains easier, but the simplified grains tend to have better mechanical strength, which is important in missiles undergoing high-g accelerations. Additionally, high burn rate propellants allow for a higher volumetric loading which reduces the overall missile's size and weight. The purpose of this study is to present methods of achieving a high burn rate propellant and to develop a composite propellant formulation that burns at 1.5 inches per second at 1000 psia. In this study, several means of achieving a high burn rate propellant were presented. In addition, several candidate approaches were evaluated using the Kepner-Tregoe method with hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB)-based propellants using burn rate modifiers and dicyclopentadiene (DCPD)-based propellants being selected for further evaluation. Propellants with varying levels of nano-aluminum, nano-iron oxide, FeBTA, and overall solids loading were produced using the HTPB binder and evaluated in order to determine the effect the various ingredients have on the burn rate and to find a formulation that provides the burn rate desired. Experiments were conducted to compare the burn rates of propellants using the binders HTPB and DCPD. The DCPD formulation matched that of the baseline HTPB mix. Finally, GAP-plasticized DCPD gumstock dogbones were attempted to be made for mechanical evaluation. Results from the study show that nano-additives have a substantial effect on propellant burn rate with nano-iron oxide having the largest influence. Of the formulations tested, the highest burn rate was a 84% solids loading mix using nano-aluminum nano-iron oxide, and ammonium perchlorate in a 3:1(20 micron: 200 micron) ratio which achieved a burn rate of 1.2 inches per second at 1000

  16. Characteristics of ultrafine particle sources and deposition rates in primary school classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiman, Rusdin; He, Congrong; Mazaheri, Mandana; Clifford, Samuel; Salimi, Farhad; Crilley, Leigh R.; Megat Mokhtar, Megat Azman; Morawska, Lidia

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate changes in particle number concentration (PNC) within naturally ventilated primary school classrooms arising from local sources either within or adjacent to the classrooms. We quantify the rate at which ultrafine particles were emitted either from printing, grilling, heating or cleaning activities and the rate at which the particles were removed by both deposition and air exchange processes. At each of 25 schools in Brisbane, Australia, two weeks of measurements of PNC and CO2 were taken both outdoors and in the two classrooms. Bayesian regression modelling was employed in order to estimate the relevant rates and analyse the relationship between air exchange rate (AER), particle infiltration and the deposition rates of particle generated from indoor activities in the classrooms. During schooling hours, grilling events at the school tuckshop as well as heating and printing in the classrooms led to indoor PNCs being elevated by a factor of more than four, with emission rates of (2.51 ± 0.25) × 1011 p min-1, (8.99 ± 6.70) × 1011 p min-1 and (5.17 ± 2.00) × 1011 p min-1, respectively. During non-school hours, cleaning events elevated indoor PNC by a factor of above five, with an average emission rate of (2.09 ± 6.30) × 1011 p min-1. Particles were removed by both air exchange and deposition; chiefly by ventilation when AER > 0.7 h-1 and by deposition when AER < 0.7 h-1.

  17. A numerical and experimental analysis of reactor performance and deposition rates for CVD on monofilaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Kuczmarski, M.; Veitch, L.; Tsui, P.; Chait, A.

    1990-01-01

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT is adopted to simulate a cylindrical upflow reactor designed for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on monofilaments. Equilibrium temperature profiles along the fiber and quartz reactor wall are experimentally measured and used as boundary conditions in numerical simulations. Two-dimensional axisymmetric flow and temperature fields are calculated for hydrogen and argon; the effect of free convection is assessed. The gas and surface chemistry is included for predicting silicon deposition from silane. The model predictions are compared with experimentally measured silicon CVD rates. Inferences are made for optimum conditions to obtain uniformity.

  18. The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) induced modulations in precipitation and nitrogen wet deposition rates in the continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nergui, T.; Chung, S. H.; Adam, J. C.; Evans, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The ENSO affects atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition rates through its modulation on N wet deposition. Precipitation and wet deposition measurements at 151 sites of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network and the NINO3.4 SST climate index from the NOAA's Climate Prediction Center are analyzed to determine the impacts of the ENSO on N wet deposition and precipitation rates in the continental U.S. Precipitation and N wet deposition time series are dominated by high frequency components; however, they contain a wide range of inter-annual frequency components depending on the location. At the 2-to 6-year timescale, variability of precipitation and N wet deposition rates in the Pacific Northwest, the Rocky Mountains, the Gulf States, the Northeast, and the Great Lakes regions are correlated with that of the NINO3.4 index (r2= 0.09-0.59 for precipitation and r2= 0.09-0.52 for N wet deposition, p<0.05). The spatial patterns and strength of the correlations vary by region and season. The correlations are the strongest and most spatially extensive during winter; 46-62% and 46-53% of the 2- to 6-year variability of precipitation and N wet deposition rates in the Rocky Mountains, the Gulf of Mexico, and near the Great Lakes can be explained by ENSO activity. The wintertime relationships tend to hold through springtime in the Great Lakes, the Ohio River Valley, and the Northeast. During the El Niño winters and springs, N wet deposition rates are higher than normal (greater than the 70thpercentile) in the southern Great Plains and the Gulf Coast. Winter and spring La Niña episodes bring precipitation and N wet deposition rates above normal over the Cascades, the Ohio River Valley, the Northeast and the Great Lakes regions. The ensemble mean of eleven coupled General Circulation Models (Yeh et al., 2009) shows that the weak ENSO cycles, having small to moderate amplitudes and reoccurring in shorter time intervals, are projected to dominate in the 21

  19. Growth of Nanowires by High-Temperature Glancing Angle Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Motofumi; Minamitake, Haruhiko; Kita, Ryo; Hamachi, Kenji; Hara, Hideki; Nakajima, Kaoru; Kimura, Kenji; Hsu, Chia-Wei; Chou, Li-Jen

    2013-11-01

    We have demonstrated that nanowires of various metals, Ge, and Ga2O3 can be grown by high-temperature glancing angle deposition (HT-GLAD). The nanowires of metals including Al, Cu, Ag, Au, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Zn are self-catalyzed, while the nanowires of other materials such as Ge and Ga2O3 are catalyzed by Au nanoparticles. However, once the nanowires start to grow, the growth modes of the HT-GLAD nanowires are fundamentally the same, i.e., nanowires with uniform diameter grow only when the vapor is incident at a very high glancing angle and reach a length larger than 1-8 µm even though the number of deposited atoms corresponds to the average thickness of 20-30 nm. This suggests that there is a universal growth mechanism for the nanowires grown by HT-GLAD.

  20. High-rate lithium thionyl chloride cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, F.

    1982-01-01

    A high-rate C cell with disc electrodes was developed to demonstrate current rates which are comparable to other primary systems. The tests performed established the limits of abuse beyond which the cell becomes hazardous. Tests include: impact, shock, and vibration tests; temperature cycling; and salt water immersion of fresh cells.

  1. Multichannel analyzers at high rates of input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnick, S. J.; Strauss, M. G.

    1969-01-01

    Multichannel analyzer, used with a gating system incorporating pole-zero compensation, pile-up rejection, and baseline-restoration, achieves good resolution at high rates of input. It improves resolution, reduces tailing and rate-contributed continuum, and eliminates spectral shift.

  2. Deconvolution of high rate flicker electroretinograms.

    PubMed

    Alokaily, A; Bóhorquez, J; Özdamar, Ö

    2014-01-01

    Flicker electroretinograms are steady-state electroretinograms (ERGs) generated by high rate flash stimuli that produce overlapping periodic responses. When a flash stimulus is delivered at low rates, a transient response named flash ERG (FERG) representing the activation of neural structures within the outer retina is obtained. Although FERGs and flicker ERGs are used in the diagnosis of many retinal diseases, their waveform relationships have not been investigated in detail. This study examines this relationship by extracting transient FERGs from specially generated quasi steady-state flicker and ERGs at stimulation rates above 10 Hz and similarly generated conventional flicker ERGs. The ability to extract the transient FERG responses by deconvolving flicker responses to temporally jittered stimuli at high rates is investigated at varying rates. FERGs were obtained from seven normal subjects stimulated with LED-based displays, delivering steady-state and low jittered quasi steady-state responses at five rates (10, 15, 32, 50, 68 Hz). The deconvolution method enabled a successful extraction of "per stimulus" unit transient ERG responses for all high stimulation rates. The deconvolved FERGs were used successfully to synthesize flicker ERGs obtained at the same high stimulation rates.

  3. ISS Update: High Rate Communications System

    NASA Image and Video Library

    ISS Update Commentator Pat Ryan interviews Diego Serna, Communications and Tracking Officer, about the High Rate Communications System. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include the ha...

  4. Deposition rates and lens care influence on galyfilcon A silicone hydrogel lenses.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Jason J

    2006-10-01

    exhibit clinically significant levels of deposition with galyfilcon A lenses when cleaned with Complete MoisturePlus (no-rub) multipurpose solution, and this was shown to not interfere with lens performance. The addition of a rub-and-rinse step to the care of galyfilcon lenses significantly reduces this deposition rate.

  5. Graphene-deposited microfiber photonic device for ultrahigh-repetition rate pulse generation in a fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Qi, You-Li; Liu, Hao; Cui, Hu; Huang, Yu-Qi; Ning, Qiu-Yi; Liu, Meng; Luo, Zhi-Chao; Luo, Ai-Ping; Xu, Wen-Cheng

    2015-07-13

    We report on the generation of a high-repetition-rate pulse in a fiber laser using a graphene-deposited microfiber photonic device (GMPD) and a Fabry-Perot filter. Taking advantage of the unique nonlinear optical properties of the GMPD, dissipative four-wave mixing effect (DFWM) could be induced at low pump power. Based on DFWM mode-locking mechanism, the fiber laser delivers a 100 GHz repetition rate pulse train. The results indicate that the small sized GMPD offers an alternative candidate of highly nonlinear optical component to achieve high-repetition rate pulses, and also opens up possibilities for the investigation of other abundant nonlinear effects or related fields of photonics.

  6. High-quality in situ manganite thin films by pulsed laser deposition at low background pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebano, A.; Balestrino, G.; Boggio, N. G.; Aruta, C.; Davidson, B.; Medaglia, P. G.

    2006-06-01

    We show that by decreasing the laser fluence it is possible to improve the oxidation process in manganite thin films under low background oxygen pressure, allowing the in situ use of conventional Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction diagnostic. Films deposited at low fluence (corresponding to a deposition rate per pulse lower than 10-2 unit cells per laser shot) show a two-dimensional growth mode and possess very good transport properties without the necessity of any further post-growth annealing treatment. A physical model, based on the plume-background interaction as a primary mechanism of film oxidation during growth, is proposed to explain the experimental findings.

  7. Effect of central fans and in-duct filters on deposition rates of ultrafine and fine particles in an occupied townhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Lance A.; Emmerich, Steven J.; Howard-Reed, Cynthia

    Airborne particles are implicated in morbidity and mortality of certain high-risk subpopulations. Exposure to particles occurs mostly indoors, where a main removal mechanism is deposition to surfaces. Deposition can be affected by the use of forced-air circulation through ducts or by air filters. In this study, we calculate the deposition rates of particles in an occupied house due to forced-air circulation and the use of in-duct filters such as electrostatic precipitators (ESP) and fibrous mechanical filters (MECH). Deposition rates are calculated for 128 size categories ranging from 0.01 to 2.5 μm. More than 110 separate "events" (mostly cooking, candle burning, and pouring kitty litter) were used to calculate deposition rates for four conditions: fan off, fan on, MECH installed, ESP installed. For all cases, deposition rates varied in a "U"-shaped distribution with the minimum occurring near 0.1 μm, as predicted by theory. The use of the central fan with no filter or with a standard furnace filter increased deposition rates by amounts on the order of 0.1-0.5 h -1. The MECH increased deposition rates by up to 2 h -1 for ultrafine and fine particles but was ineffective for particles in the 0.1-0.5 μm range. The ESP increased deposition rates by 2-3 h -1 and was effective for all sizes. However, the ESP lost efficiency after several weeks and needed regular cleaning to maintain its effectiveness. A reduction of particle levels by 50% or more could be achieved by use of the ESP when operating properly. Since the use of fans and filters reduces particle concentrations from both indoor and outdoor sources, it is more effective than the alternative approach of reducing ventilation by closing windows or insulating homes more tightly. For persons at risk, use of an air filter may be an effective method of reducing exposure to particles.

  8. Rapid growth rates of syndepositional marine aragonite cements in steep marginal slope deposits, Bahamas and Belize

    SciTech Connect

    Grammer, G.M.; Ginsburg, R.N.; Swart, P.K.; McNeill, D.F. . Div. of Marine Geology); Jull, A.J.T. . NSF Accelerator Facility); Prezbindowski, D.R. )

    1993-09-01

    Growth rates of marine botryoidal aragonite cements from steep (35-45[degree]) marginal slope deposits in the Bahamas and Belize have been determined by accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon dating of samples taken at the base and top of individual botryoids. The pore-filling cements, which range from approximately 11,000-13,000 years old, grew at average rates of 8-10mm/100 yr with maximum rates > 25mm/100 yr. Radiocarbon dating of coexisting skeletal components indicates that cementation was syndepositional. Microsampling transects across individual botryoids for stable-isotope analyses show little variation in [delta][sup 31]C and [delta][sup 18]O, supporting the conclusion that cementation was extremely rapid. Although the cements show a progressive depletion in isotopic composition of approximately 1[per thousand]([delta][sup 13]C) and 2[per thousand]([delta][sup 18]O) from 13 ka to 11 ka, the average variation ([delta][sub 1]) within individual pore-filling cements, ranging in size 2 mm to 32 mm (bottom to top), was 0.11[per thousand]([delta][sup 13]C) and 0.14[per thousand]([delta][sup 18]O). Results of this study provide the first quantitative data on growth rates of marine carbonate cements in a marginal slope environment. The data indicate that marginal slope deposits may lithify within several tens of years and suggest that geologically instantaneous cementation may be critical in stabilizing steep carbonate slope deposits at or above angles of repose.

  9. Optical and field-emission properties of ZnO nanostructures deposited using high-pressure pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, T; Zhou, Y S; Lu, Y F; Baskar, K

    2010-10-01

    ZnO nanostructures were deposited on GaN (0001), Al2O3 (0001), and Si (100) substrates using a high-pressure pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. Vertically aligned hexagonal-pyramidal ZnO nanorods were obtained on the Al2O3 and Si substrates whereas interlinked ZnO nanowalls were obtained on the GaN substrates. A growth mechanism has been proposed for the formation of ZnO nanowalls based on different growth rates of ZnO polar and nonpolar planes. Both ZnO nanorods and nanowalls exhibit a strong E2H vibration mode in the micro-Raman spectra. The corresponding fluorescence spectra of ZnO nanorods and nanowalls showed near band emission at 3.28 eV. The ZnO nanorods grown on the Si substrates exhibited better crystalline and optical properties compared with the ZnO structures grown on the GaN and Al2O3 substrates. The high aspect ratio, good vertical alignment, and better crystallinity of the ZnO nanorods with tapered tips exhibited promising field emission performance with a low turn-on field of 2 V/μm, a high current density of 7.7 mA/cm2, and a large field enhancement factor.

  10. High strain rate sensitivity of hardness in quinary Ti-Zr-Hf-Cu-Ni high entropy metallic glass thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shaofan; Wang, Haibin; Xiao, Lin; Guo, Nan; Zhao, Delin; Yao, Kefu; Chen, Na

    2017-10-01

    Quinary Ti-Zr-Hf-Cu-Ni high-entropy metallic glass thin films were produced by magnetron sputter deposition. Nanoindentation tests indicate that the deposited film exhibits a relatively large hardness of 10.4±0.6 GPa and a high elastic modulus of 131±11 GPa under the strain rate of 0.5 s-1. Specifically, the strain rate sensitivity of hardness measured for the thin film is 0.05, the highest value reported for metallic glasses so far. Such high strain rate sensitivity of hardness is likely due to the high-entropy effect which stabilizes the amorphous structure with enhanced homogeneity.

  11. Impact of future Arctic shipping on high-latitude black carbon deposition (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, J. J.; Browse, J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Schmidt, A.

    2013-12-01

    The retreat of Arctic sea-ice has led to renewed calls to exploit Arctic shipping routes. The diversion of ship traffic through the Arctic will shorten shipping routes and possibly reduce global shipping emissions. However, deposition of black carbon (BC) aerosol emitted by additional Arctic ships could cause a reduction in the albedo of snow and ice, accelerating snow-melt and sea-ice loss. We use recently compiled Arctic shipping emission inventories for 2004 and 2050 together with a global aerosol microphysics model GLOMAP coupled to the chemical transport model TOMCAT to quantify the contribution of future Arctic shipping to high-latitude BC deposition. Emission rates of SOx (SO2 and SO4) and particulate matter (PM) were estimated for 2050 under both business-as-usual and high-growth scenarios. BC particles are assumed to be water-insoluble at emission but can become active in cloud drop formation through soluble material accumulation. After BC particles become cloud-active they are more efficiently wet scavenged, which accounts for 80% of modeled BC deposition. Current-day Arctic shipping contributes 0.3% to the BC mass deposited north of 60N (250 Gg). About 50% of modelled BC deposition is on open ocean, suggesting that current Arctic ship traffic may not significantly contribute to BC deposition on central Arctic sea ice. However, 6 - 8% of deposited BC on the west coast of Greenland originates from local ship traffic. Moreover, in-Arctic shipping contributes some 32% to high-latitude ship-sourced deposition despite accounting for less than 1.0% of global shipping emissions. This suggests that control of in-Arctic shipping BC emissions could yield greater decrease in high-latitude BC deposition than a similar control strategy applied only to the extra-Arctic shipping industry. Arctic shipping in 2050 will contribute less than 1% to the total BC deposition north of 60N due to the much greater relative contribution of BC transported from non-shipping sources

  12. Constraints on the Martian cratering rate imposed by the SNC meteorites and Vallis Marineris layered deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandenburg, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Following two independent lines of evidence -- estimates of the age and formation time of a portion of the Martian geologic column exposed in the layered deposits and the crystallization and ejection ages of the SNC meteorites -- it appears that the Martian cratering rate must be double the lunar rate or even higher. This means models such as NHII or NHIII (Neukum and Hiller models II and III), which estimate the Martian cratering rate as being several times lunar are probably far closer to reality on Mars than lunar rates. The effect of such a shift is profound: Mars is transformed from a rather Moon-like place into a planet with vigorous dynamics, multiple large impacts, erosion, floods, and volcanism throughout its history. A strong shift upward in cratering rates on Mars apparently solves some glaring problems; however, it creates others. The period of time during which Earth-like atmospheric conditions existed, the liquid water era on Mars, persists in NHIII up to only 0.5 b.y. ago. Scenarios of extended Earth-like conditions on Mars have been discounted in the past because they would have removed many of the craters from the early bombardment era found in the south. It does appear that some process of crater removal was quite vigorous in the north during Mars' past. Evidence exists that the northern plains may have been the home of long-lived seas or perhaps even a paleo-ocean, so models exist for highly localized destruction of craters in the north. However, the question of how the ancient crater population could be preserved in the south under a long liquid-water era found in any high-cratering-rate models is a serious question that must be addressed. It does appear to be a higher-order problem because it involves low-energy dynamics acting in localized areas, i.e., erosion of craters in the south of Mars, whereas the two problems with the low-cratering-rate models involve high-energy events acting over large areas: the formation of the Vallis Marineris

  13. Constraints on the Martian cratering rate imposed by the SNC meteorites and Vallis Marineris layered deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, J. E.

    Following two independent lines of evidence -- estimates of the age and formation time of a portion of the Martian geologic column exposed in the layered deposits and the crystallization and ejection ages of the SNC meteorites -- it appears that the Martian cratering rate must be double the lunar rate or even higher. This means models such as NHII or NHIII (Neukum and Hiller models II and III), which estimate the Martian cratering rate as being several times lunar are probably far closer to reality on Mars than lunar rates. The effect of such a shift is profound: Mars is transformed from a rather Moon-like place into a planet with vigorous dynamics, multiple large impacts, erosion, floods, and volcanism throughout its history. A strong shift upward in cratering rates on Mars apparently solves some glaring problems; however, it creates others. The period of time during which Earth-like atmospheric conditions existed, the liquid water era on Mars, persists in NHIII up to only 0.5 b.y. ago. Scenarios of extended Earth-like conditions on Mars have been discounted in the past because they would have removed many of the craters from the early bombardment era found in the south. It does appear that some process of crater removal was quite vigorous in the north during Mars' past. Evidence exists that the northern plains may have been the home of long-lived seas or perhaps even a paleo-ocean, so models exist for highly localized destruction of craters in the north. However, the question of how the ancient crater population could be preserved in the south under a long liquid-water era found in any high-cratering-rate models is a serious question that must be addressed. It does appear to be a higher-order problem because it involves low-energy dynamics acting in localized areas, i.e., erosion of craters in the south of Mars, whereas the two problems with the low-cratering-rate models involve high-energy events acting over large areas: the formation of the Vallis Marineris

  14. Nickel oxide film with open macropores fabricated by surfactant-assisted anodic deposition for high capacitance supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mao-Sung; Wang, Min-Jyle

    2010-10-07

    Nickel oxide film with open macropores prepared by anodic deposition in the presence of surfactant shows a very high capacitance of 1110 F g(-1) at a scan rate of 10 mV s(-1), and the capacitance value reduces to 950 F g(-1) at a high scan rate of 200 mV s(-1).

  15. Turbulence structure at high shear rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Moon Joo; Kim, John; Moin, Parviz

    1987-01-01

    The structure of homogeneous turbulence in the presence of a high shear rate is studied using results obtained from three-dimensional time-dependent numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid of 512 x 128 x 128 node points. It is shown that high shear rate enhances the streamwise fluctuating motion to such an extent that a highly anisotropic turbulence state with a one-dimensional velocity field and two-dimensional small-scale turbulence develops asymptotically as total shear increases. Instantaneous velocity fields show that high shear rate in homogeneous turbulent shear flow produces structures which are similar to the streaks present in the viscous sublayer of turbulent boundary layers.

  16. High rate and stable cycling of lithium metal anode

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Jiangfeng; Henderson, Wesley A.; Xu, Wu; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Engelhard, Mark H.; Borodin, Oleg; Zhang, Jiguang

    2015-02-20

    Lithium (Li) metal is an ideal anode material for rechargeable batteries. However, dendritic Li growth and limited Coulombic efficiency (CE) during repeated Li deposition/stripping processes have prevented the application of this anode in rechargeable Li metal batteries, especially for use at high current densities. Here, we report that the use of highly concentrated electrolytes composed of ether solvents and the lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) salt enables the high rate cycling of a Li metal anode at high CE (up to 99.1 %) without dendrite growth. With 4 M LiFSI in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) as the electrolyte, a Li|Li cell can be cycled at high rates (10 mA cm-2) for more than 6000 cycles with no increase in the cell impedance, and a Cu|Li cell can be cycled at 4 mA cm-2 for more than 1000 cycles with an average CE of 98.4%. These excellent high rate performances can be attributed to the increased solvent coordination and increased availability of Li+ concentration in the electrolyte. Lastly, further development of this electrolyte may lead to practical applications for Li metal anode in rechargeable batteries. The fundamental mechanisms behind the high rate ion exchange and stability of the electrolytes also shine light on the stability of other electrochemical systems.

  17. High rate and stable cycling of lithium metal anode

    DOE PAGES

    Qian, Jiangfeng; Henderson, Wesley A.; Xu, Wu; ...

    2015-02-20

    Lithium (Li) metal is an ideal anode material for rechargeable batteries. However, dendritic Li growth and limited Coulombic efficiency (CE) during repeated Li deposition/stripping processes have prevented the application of this anode in rechargeable Li metal batteries, especially for use at high current densities. Here, we report that the use of highly concentrated electrolytes composed of ether solvents and the lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) salt enables the high rate cycling of a Li metal anode at high CE (up to 99.1 %) without dendrite growth. With 4 M LiFSI in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) as the electrolyte, a Li|Li cell can be cycledmore » at high rates (10 mA cm-2) for more than 6000 cycles with no increase in the cell impedance, and a Cu|Li cell can be cycled at 4 mA cm-2 for more than 1000 cycles with an average CE of 98.4%. These excellent high rate performances can be attributed to the increased solvent coordination and increased availability of Li+ concentration in the electrolyte. Lastly, further development of this electrolyte may lead to practical applications for Li metal anode in rechargeable batteries. The fundamental mechanisms behind the high rate ion exchange and stability of the electrolytes also shine light on the stability of other electrochemical systems.« less

  18. Ultra High Strain Rate Nanoindentation Testing.

    PubMed

    Sudharshan Phani, Pardhasaradhi; Oliver, Warren Carl

    2017-06-17

    Strain rate dependence of indentation hardness has been widely used to study time-dependent plasticity. However, the currently available techniques limit the range of strain rates that can be achieved during indentation testing. Recent advances in electronics have enabled nanomechanical measurements with very low noise levels (sub nanometer) at fast time constants (20 µs) and high data acquisition rates (100 KHz). These capabilities open the doors for a wide range of ultra-fast nanomechanical testing, for instance, indentation testing at very high strain rates. With an accurate dynamic model and an instrument with fast time constants, step load tests can be performed which enable access to indentation strain rates approaching ballistic levels (i.e., 4000 1/s). A novel indentation based testing technique involving a combination of step load and constant load and hold tests that enables measurement of strain rate dependence of hardness spanning over seven orders of magnitude in strain rate is presented. A simple analysis is used to calculate the equivalent uniaxial response from indentation data and compared to the conventional uniaxial data for commercial purity aluminum. Excellent agreement is found between the indentation and uniaxial data over several orders of magnitude of strain rate.

  19. Reconstruction of 20th Century Atmospheric Deposition Rates in the Sierra Nevada (California) using Spheroidal Carbonaceous Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, A.; Sickman, J. O.; Rose, N.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition is altering biogeochemical cycles and ecological processes in high-elevation aquatic ecosystems. A need for stricter standards based on measurable ecological effects has been identified as an important step towards their long-term protection. One of the challenges with identifying ecological thresholds is a lack of knowledge of background conditions (pre- industrial) and changes that may have occurred prior to extensive monitoring programs. However, this information can be obtained using paleolimnological approaches. We are investigating historic atmospheric deposition in the Sierra Nevada using spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs) in lake sediments. SCPs are strong geochemical indicators of anthropogenic atmospheric deposition because they are only produced by industrial combustion of fossil fuels---there are no natural sources. We detected SCPs as early as 1870 at Moat Lake in the eastern Sierra Nevada. SCP concentrations increased over time, peaking in the mid-1980's (2,399 gDM-1) while SCP accumulation rates peaked in the early 1920's (105 no, cm-2 yr-1) (Figure 1). Lakes along the western slope of the Sierra (Pear and Emerald) show similar patterns although differences vary by site and are likely explained by watershed characteristics and proximity to emission sources. SCP concentrations at Pear and Emerald lakes peak 10-15 years earlier than Moat. A consistent decrease was observed at Pear and Moat following the peak concentrations until present. Present day concentrations are 556 gDM-1 at Moat and 473 gDM-1 at Pear. At Emerald lake SCPs also initially decreased starting in 1964, but an increasing trend is observed from 1995 through present. These data improve our understanding of historic atmospheric deposition patterns and are being used to inform additional palaeolimnological research, including diatom analyses, with the broader objective of reconstructing historic nitrogen deposition and estimating critical loads for

  20. 3D numerical analysis of influence of the non-uniform deposition rate on the hillock density at HVPE-GaN surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xue-Feng; Lee, Jae-Hak; Lee, Yoo-Jin; Song, Jae-Ho; Yi, Kyung-Woo

    2017-09-01

    In this study, hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE), one of the feasible methods to produce the GaN thin film, has been used to conduct experiments under different temperatures. In order to study the factors affecting the distribution of the density of the hillocks along radial direction, we have conducted a 3D calculation to observe the fluid flow, mass transfer and deposition rate distribution using the CFD-ACE program. The numerical results have shown that the wafers have experienced high and low growth rate alternately. The growth rate fluctuations at different distances from the inlets are compared by standard deviation analysis. These standard deviations of deposition rates along the azimuthal direction increase from the center to the periphery, which might explain why the density of the hillocks increases from the center to the periphery in the experiments. Moreover, it is found that the non-uniform deposition rates are the result of low speed rotation of the susceptor. Increasing the rotation speed of the susceptor increases the uniformity of the gas flow pattern and deposition rate, which means that the high rotation speed can decrease the standard deviation of the deposition rate along azimuthal direction. Consequently, the density of the hillocks can be decreased.

  1. Modeling high power magnetron copper seed deposition: Effect of feature geometry on coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Phillip J.; Zhang, Da; Ventzek, Peter L. G.

    2003-05-01

    The deposition of copper using a high power magnetron (HPM) has been studied using reactor and feature scale models. Discussed are results for Cu seed HPM deposition on trench, via, and dual inlaid features with different geometries (aspect ratio and side wall angles). At low wafer powers the Cu seed feature coverage is characterized by geometric shadowing due to the broad angular distribution of the dominant Cu athermal. At high wafer powers the metal deposited at feature bottom is sputtered by Ar+ and redistributed to the side walls. The deposition rate within a feature is nonlinear with time as metal deposited at the feature opening obstructs incoming metal from reaching the inside of the feature. Competing trends of higher copper flux at wafer center versus edge and higher Ar+ flux at wafer center versus edge result in a transition of the field thickness heights from edge>center at low wafer powers to centerhigh wafer powers. The type and geometry of a feature in which metal is being deposited plays a major role in the final metal coverage. Vias have less coverage than trenches given the smaller opening for incoming metal to enter. For instance trenches with aspect ratio (AR) equal to 4 still have more Cu side wall coverage than vias of AR=1. In the dual inlaid geometry studied the via inner side wall and trench bottom corners are the most difficult regions to deposit a Cu seed. Both side wall angle and AR can have equal control of a thickness change. For instance in a via a similar side wall thickness decrease (at low wafer power) can be achieved with AR=4 and θvia=4°-0° or AR=1-4 and θvia=4°.

  2. Highly bactericidal Ag nanoparticle films obtained by cluster beam deposition.

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, Emanuele; De Cesari, Sebastiano; Landini, Giulia; Riccobono, Eleonora; Pallecchi, Lucia; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Gavioli, Luca

    2015-08-01

    The recent emergence of bacterial pathogens resistant to most or all available antibiotics is among the major global public health problems. As indirect transmission through contaminated surfaces is a main route of dissemination for most of such pathogens, the implementation of effective antimicrobial surfaces has been advocated as a promising approach for their containment, especially in the hospital settings. However, traditional wet synthesis methods of nanoparticle-based antimicrobial materials leave a number of key points open for metal surfaces: such as adhesion to the surface and nanoparticle coalescence. Here we demonstrate an alternative route, i.e. supersonic cluster beam deposition, to obtain antimicrobial Ag nanoparticle films deposited directly on surfaces. The synthesized films are simple to produce with controlled density and thickness, are stable over time, and are shown to be highly bactericidal against major Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial pathogens, including extensively drug-resistant strains. The use of silver nanoparticle in health care is getting more widespread. The authors here describe the technique of cluster beam deposition for spraying silver on surfaces used in health care sectors. This may open a new avenue for future anti-bacterial coatings. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Thrombus Formation at High Shear Rates.

    PubMed

    Casa, Lauren D C; Ku, David N

    2017-06-21

    The final common pathway in myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke is occlusion of blood flow from a thrombus forming under high shear rates in arteries. A high-shear thrombus forms rapidly and is distinct from the slow formation of coagulation that occurs in stagnant blood. Thrombosis at high shear rates depends primarily on the long protein von Willebrand factor (vWF) and platelets, with hemodynamics playing an important role in each stage of thrombus formation, including vWF binding, platelet adhesion, platelet activation, and rapid thrombus growth. The prediction of high-shear thrombosis is a major area of biofluid mechanics in which point-of-care testing and computational modeling are promising future directions for clinically relevant research. Further research in this area will enable identification of patients at high risk for arterial thrombosis, improve prevention and treatment based on shear-dependent biological mechanisms, and improve blood-contacting device design to reduce thrombosis risk.

  4. Validating Whole-Airway CFD Predictions of DPI Aerosol Deposition at Multiple Flow Rates.

    PubMed

    Longest, P Worth; Tian, Geng; Khajeh-Hosseini-Dalasm, Navvab; Hindle, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare aerosol deposition predictions of a new whole-airway CFD model with available in vivo data for a dry powder inhaler (DPI) considered across multiple inhalation waveforms, which affect both the particle size distribution (PSD) and particle deposition. The Novolizer DPI with a budesonide formulation was selected based on the availability of 2D gamma scintigraphy data in humans for three different well-defined inhalation waveforms. Initial in vitro cascade impaction experiments were conducted at multiple constant (square-wave) particle sizing flow rates to characterize PSDs. The whole-airway CFD modeling approach implemented the experimentally determined PSDs at the point of aerosol formation in the inhaler. Complete characteristic airway geometries for an adult were evaluated through the lobar bronchi, followed by stochastic individual pathway (SIP) approximations through the tracheobronchial region and new acinar moving wall models of the alveolar region. It was determined that the PSD used for each inhalation waveform should be based on a constant particle sizing flow rate equal to the average of the inhalation waveform's peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR) and mean flow rate [i.e., AVG(PIFR, Mean)]. Using this technique, agreement with the in vivo data was acceptable with <15% relative differences averaged across the three regions considered for all inhalation waveforms. Defining a peripheral to central deposition ratio (P/C) based on alveolar and tracheobronchial compartments, respectively, large flow-rate-dependent differences were observed, which were not evident in the original 2D in vivo data. The agreement between the CFD predictions and in vivo data was dependent on accurate initial estimates of the PSD, emphasizing the need for a combination in vitro-in silico approach. Furthermore, use of the AVG(PIFR, Mean) value was identified as a potentially useful method for characterizing a DPI aerosol at a constant flow rate.

  5. Pulse electrodeposition of gold-nickel alloys from a citrate bath. 1. Deposition rate and coating appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Kostin, N.A.; Kaptanovskii, V.I.

    1994-11-01

    The effect of various parameters of pulse polarizing current on the deposition rate and appearance of gold-nickel coatings used in the watch industry was studied. It was shown that the pulse conditions allow deposition-rate enhancement and production of variously colored coatings.

  6. Computer Program for the Calculation of Multicomponent Convective Diffusion Deposition Rates from Chemically Frozen Boundary Layer Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Chen, B. K.; Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The computer program based on multicomponent chemically frozen boundary layer (CFBL) theory for calculating vapor and/or small particle deposition rates is documented. A specific application to perimter-averaged Na2SO4 deposition rate calculations on a cylindrical collector is demonstrated. The manual includes a typical program input and output for users.

  7. Inspection of Powder Flow During LMD Deposition by High Speed Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Javier; Rodríguez, Ángel; Amado, José Manuel; Yáñez, Armando J.

    Laser cladding and LMD (Laser Metal Deposition) processes are continuously gaining ground in aerospace and energy industries. One of the known issues with that kind of processes is the difficulty of maintaining a constant and well distributed powder flow mass rate between the nozzle and the substrate. In this work, a method for real time inspection of powder distribution and mass flow rate is presented. Inference of mass flow rate and powder distribution is made using a high speed camera and a laser illumination device. Both on-process and off-process monitoring can be achieved. Different experimental results for the validation of the proposed method are presented.

  8. High Bit Rate Experiments Over ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A.; Gary, J. Patrick; Edelsen, Burt; Helm, Neil; Cohen, Judith; Shopbell, Patrick; Mechoso, C. Roberto; Chung-Chun; Farrara, M.; Spahr, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes two high data rate experiments chat are being developed for the gigabit NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The first is a telescience experiment that remotely acquires image data at the Keck telescope from the Caltech campus. The second is a distributed global climate application that is run between two supercomputer centers interconnected by ACTS. The implementation approach for each is described along with the expected results. Also. the ACTS high data rate (HDR) ground station is also described in detail.

  9. High Bit Rate Experiments Over ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A.; Gary, J. Patrick; Edelsen, Burt; Helm, Neil; Cohen, Judith; Shopbell, Patrick; Mechoso, C. Roberto; Chung-Chun; Farrara, M.; Spahr, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes two high data rate experiments chat are being developed for the gigabit NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The first is a telescience experiment that remotely acquires image data at the Keck telescope from the Caltech campus. The second is a distributed global climate application that is run between two supercomputer centers interconnected by ACTS. The implementation approach for each is described along with the expected results. Also. the ACTS high data rate (HDR) ground station is also described in detail.

  10. Direct Deposition of Uniform High-κ Dielectrics on Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Yang, Songbo; Sun, Qingqing; Chen, Lin; Wang, Pengfei; Ding, Shijin; Zhang, David Wei

    2014-01-01

    High quality High-κ dielectrics on graphene were achieved by atomic layer deposition directly using remote oxygen plasma surface pretreatment. The uniform coverage on graphene is illustrated by atomic force microscopy and confirmed by high resolution transmission microscopy. The possible surface lattice damage induced by plasma is limited and demonstrated by Raman spectra. The excellent Hall mobility for graphene is maintained at 2.7 × 103 cm2/V·s, which only decreases by 25%. The excellent electrical characteristic of dielectric presents the low leakage current density and high breakdown voltage. Moreover, the technology is compatible with the traditional CMOS process which brings much possibility to future graphene devices. PMID:25264077

  11. The effect of predation risk on spermatophore deposition rate of the eriophyoid mite, Aculops allotrichus.

    PubMed

    Michalska, Katarzyna

    2016-02-01

    Eriophyoids are minute herbivores in which males deposit spermatophores on a substrate while females, independent of the presence of males, pick up sperm (sex dissociation). Their most dangerous enemies are phytoseiid mites. Eriophyoids can successfully avoid the predation by, e.g., forming galls in which they live, by inhabiting narrow spaces on plants, or by climbing up leaf trichomes for the time of quiescence. All these behaviours, however, are fixed and independent of the actual risk of predation. The aim of this study was to examine whether eriophyoids can respond to the cues of predation risk and how this could affect their spermatophore deposition rate. Aculops allotrichus is a vagrant eriophyoid which inhabits leaves of the black locust tree, Robinia pseudoacacia. On leaf arenas with injured conspecifics (pierced with a fine needle which simulated the attack of phytoseiids), single males of Ac. allotrichus deposited a similar number of spermatophores as on control, 'clean' leaves. They did not respond to the cues left by the non-enemy, yeast-fed acarid mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae either. However, they deposited significantly fewer spermatophores on leaf arenas previously exposed to the presence of the eriophyoid-fed phytoseiid mite Amblyseius swirskii. This is a first report indicating that eriophyoids can respond to the cues left by predators and change their reproductive activity accordingly. The ultimate and proximate factors that may influence the behaviour of Ac. allotrichus males are discussed.

  12. TMF ultra-high rate discharge performance

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, B.

    1997-12-01

    BOLDER Technologies Corporation has developed a valve-regulated lead-acid product line termed Thin Metal Film (TMF{trademark}) technology. It is characterized by extremely thin plates and close plate spacing that facilitate high rates of charge and discharge with minimal temperature increases, at levels unachievable with other commercially-available battery technologies. This ultra-high rate performance makes TMF technology ideal for such applications as various types of engine start, high drain rate portable devices and high-current pulsing. Data are presented on very high current continuous and pulse discharges. Power and energy relationships at various discharge rates are explored and the fast-response characteristics of the BOLDER{reg_sign} cell are qualitatively defined. Short-duration recharge experiments will show that devices powered by BOLDER batteries can be in operation for more than 90% of an extended usage period with multiple fast recharges. The BOLDER cell is ideal for applications such as engine-start, a wide range of portable devices including power tools, hybrid electric vehicles and pulse-power devices. Applications such as this are very attractive, and are well served by TMF technology, but an area of great interest and excitement is ultrahigh power delivery in excess of 1 kW/kg.

  13. High-Temperature Performance of Ferritic Steels in Fireside Corrosion Regimes: Temperature and Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, T.; Hussain, T.; Simms, N. J.

    2016-11-01

    The paper reports high temperature resistance of ferritic steels in fireside corrosion regime in terms of temperature and deposits aggressiveness. Four candidate power plant steels: 15Mo3, T22, T23 and T91 were exposed under simulated air-fired combustion environment for 1000 h. The tests were conducted at 600, 650 and 700 °C according to deposit-recoat test method. Post-exposed samples were examined via dimensional metrology (the main route to quantify metal loss), and mass change data were recorded to perform the study of kinetic behavior at elevated temperatures. Microstructural investigations using ESEM-EDX were performed in order to investigate corrosion degradation and thickness of the scales. The ranking of the steels from most to the least damage was 15Mo3 > T22 > T23 > T91 in all three temperatures. The highest rate of corrosion in all temperatures occurred under the screening deposit.

  14. High-Temperature Performance of Ferritic Steels in Fireside Corrosion Regimes: Temperature and Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, T.; Hussain, T.; Simms, N. J.

    2017-01-01

    The paper reports high temperature resistance of ferritic steels in fireside corrosion regime in terms of temperature and deposits aggressiveness. Four candidate power plant steels: 15Mo3, T22, T23 and T91 were exposed under simulated air-fired combustion environment for 1000 h. The tests were conducted at 600, 650 and 700 °C according to deposit-recoat test method. Post-exposed samples were examined via dimensional metrology (the main route to quantify metal loss), and mass change data were recorded to perform the study of kinetic behavior at elevated temperatures. Microstructural investigations using ESEM-EDX were performed in order to investigate corrosion degradation and thickness of the scales. The ranking of the steels from most to the least damage was 15Mo3 > T22 > T23 > T91 in all three temperatures. The highest rate of corrosion in all temperatures occurred under the screening deposit.

  15. Subaqueous ice-contact fans: Depositional systems characterised by highly aggradational supercritical flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Joerg; Winsemann, Jutta

    2015-04-01

    Subaqueous ice-contact fans are deposited by high-energy plane-wall jets from subglacial conduits into standing water bodies. Highly aggradational conditions during flow expansion and deceleration allow for the preservation of bedforms related to supercritical flows, which are commonly considered rare in the depositional record. We present field examples from gravelly and sandy subaqueous ice-contact fan successions, which indicate that deposition by supercritical flows might be considered as a characteristic feature of these depositional systems. The studied successions were deposited in deep ice-dammed lakes, which formed along the margins of the Middle Pleistocene Scandinavian ice sheets across Northern Germany. The gravel-rich subaqueous fan deposits are dominated by large scour-fills (up to 25 m wide and 3 m) deep and deposits of turbulent hyperconcentrated flows, which are partly attributed to supercritical flow conditions (Winsemann et al., 2009). Scours (up to 4.5 m wide and 0.9 m deep) infilled by gravelly backsets are observed above laterally extensive erosional surfaces and are interpreted as deposits of cyclic steps. Laterally discontinuous beds of low-angle cross-stratified gravel are interpreted as antidune deposits. Downflow and up-section the gravel-rich deposits pass into sand-rich successions, which include deposits of chutes-and-pools, breaking antidunes, stationary antidunes and humpback dunes (Lang and Winsemann, 2013). Deposits of chutes-and-pools and breaking antidunes are characterised by scour-fills (up to 4 m wide and 1.2 m deep) comprising backsets or gently dipping sigmoidal foresets. Stationary antidune deposits consist of laterally extensive sinusoidal waveforms with long wavelengths (1-12 m) and low amplitudes (0.1-0.5 m), which formed under quasi-steady flows at the lower limit of the supercritical flow stage and high rates of sedimentation. Humpback dunes are characterised by divergent sigmoidal foresets and are interpreted as

  16. Interannual Variability in Dust Deposition, Radiative Forcing, and Snowmelt Rates in the Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiles, M.; Painter, T. H.; Deems, J. S.; Barrett, A. P.

    2011-12-01

    Dust in snow accelerates snowmelt through its direct reduction of albedo and its further reduction of albedo by accelerating the growth of snow effective grain size. Since the Anglo expansion and disturbance of the western US that began in the mid 19th century, the mountain snow cover of the Colorado River Basin has been subject to five-fold greater dust loading. Here we present the impacts of dust deposition onto alpine snow cover using a 7-year energy balance record at the alpine and subalpine towers in the Senator Beck Basin Study Area (SBBSA), San Juan Mountains in southwestern Colorado, USA. We assess the radiative and hydrologic impacts with a two-layer point snow energy balance snowmelt model that calculates snowmelt and predicts point runoff using measured inputs of energy exchanges and snow properties. By removing the radiative forcing due to dust, we can determine snowmelt under observed dusty and modeled clean conditions. Additionally, we model the relative response of melt rates to simulated increases in air temperature. Our modeling results indicate that the number of days that dust advances retreat of snow cover and cumulative radiative forcing are linearly related to total dust concentration. The greatest dust radiative impact occurred in 2009, when the highest observed end of year dust concentrations reduced visible albedo to less than 0.35 during the last three weeks of snowcover and snow cover duration was shortened by 50 days. This work also shows that dust radiative forcing has a markedly greater impact on snow cover duration than increases in temperature in terms of acceleration of snowmelt. We have completed the same analysis over a 2-year energy balance record at the Grand Mesa Study plot (GMSP) in west central Colorado, 150 km north of SBBSA. This new location allows us to assess site variability. For example, at SBBSA 2010 and 2011 were the second and third highest dust deposition years, respectively, but 2010 was a larger year with 3

  17. Evolution of high tooth replacement rates in sauropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    D'Emic, Michael D; Whitlock, John A; Smith, Kathlyn M; Fisher, Daniel C; Wilson, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-01

    Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days). Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size), and derived titanosaurs and diplodocoids independently evolved the highest known tooth replacement rates among archosaurs.

  18. Evolution of High Tooth Replacement Rates in Sauropod Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kathlyn M.; Fisher, Daniel C.; Wilson, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. Methodology/Principal Findings We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days). Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. Conclusions/Significance Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size), and derived titanosaurs and diplodocoids independently

  19. High Resolution Measurement of the Glycolytic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Carla X.; Loaiza, Anitsi; Ruminot, Iván; Larenas, Valeria; Sotelo-Hitschfeld, Tamara; Gutiérrez, Robin; Córdova, Alex; Valdebenito, Rocío; Frommer, Wolf B.; Barros, L. Felipe

    2010-01-01

    The glycolytic rate is sensitive to physiological activity, hormones, stress, aging, and malignant transformation. Standard techniques to measure the glycolytic rate are based on radioactive isotopes, are not able to resolve single cells and have poor temporal resolution, limitations that hamper the study of energy metabolism in the brain and other organs. A new method is described in this article, which makes use of a recently developed FRET glucose nanosensor to measure the rate of glycolysis in single cells with high temporal resolution. Used in cultured astrocytes, the method showed for the first time that glycolysis can be activated within seconds by a combination of glutamate and K+, supporting a role for astrocytes in neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling in the brain. It was also possible to make a direct comparison of metabolism in neurons and astrocytes lying in close proximity, paving the way to a high-resolution characterization of brain energy metabolism. Single-cell glycolytic rates were also measured in fibroblasts, adipocytes, myoblasts, and tumor cells, showing higher rates for undifferentiated cells and significant metabolic heterogeneity within cell types. This method should facilitate the investigation of tissue metabolism at the single-cell level and is readily adaptable for high-throughput analysis. PMID:20890447

  20. High rate, high reliability Li/SO2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chireau, R.

    1982-03-01

    The use of the lithium/sulfur dioxide system for aerospace applications is discussed. The high rate density in the system is compared to some primary systems: mercury zinc, silver zinc, and magnesium oxide. Estimates are provided of the storage life and shelf life of typical lithium sulfur batteries. The design of lithium cells is presented and criteria are given for improving the output of cells in order to achieve high rate and high reliability.

  1. Nitrogen Addition Significantly Affects Forest Litter Decomposition under High Levels of Ambient Nitrogen Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Peng, Yong; Xiao, Yin-long; Hu, Ting-xing; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xian-wei; Liu, Li; Tang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Background Forest litter decomposition is a major component of the global carbon (C) budget, and is greatly affected by the atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition observed globally. However, the effects of N addition on forest litter decomposition, in ecosystems receiving increasingly higher levels of ambient N deposition, are poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a two-year field experiment in five forests along the western edge of the Sichuan Basin in China, where atmospheric N deposition was up to 82–114 kg N ha–1 in the study sites. Four levels of N treatments were applied: (1) control (no N added), (2) low-N (50 kg N ha–1 year–1), (3) medium-N (150 kg N ha–1 year–1), and (4) high-N (300 kg N ha–1 year–1), N additions ranging from 40% to 370% of ambient N deposition. The decomposition processes of ten types of forest litters were then studied. Nitrogen additions significantly decreased the decomposition rates of six types of forest litters. N additions decreased forest litter decomposition, and the mass of residual litter was closely correlated to residual lignin during the decomposition process over the study period. The inhibitory effect of N addition on litter decomposition can be primarily explained by the inhibition of lignin decomposition by exogenous inorganic N. The overall decomposition rate of ten investigated substrates exhibited a significant negative linear relationship with initial tissue C/N and lignin/N, and significant positive relationships with initial tissue K and N concentrations; these relationships exhibited linear and logarithmic curves, respectively. Conclusions/Significance This study suggests that the expected progressive increases in N deposition may have a potential important impact on forest litter decomposition in the study area in the presence of high levels of ambient N deposition. PMID:24551152

  2. High Rate for Type IC Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, R.A.; Marvin-Newberg, H.J.; Pennypacker, Carl R.; Perlmutter, S.; Sasseen, T.P.; Smith, C.K.

    1991-09-01

    Using an automated telescope we have detected 20 supernovae in carefully documented observations of nearby galaxies. The supernova rates for late spiral (Sbc, Sc, Scd, and Sd) galaxies, normalized to a blue luminosity of 10{sup 10} L{sub Bsun}, are 0.4 h{sup 2}, 1.6 h{sup 2}, and 1.1 h{sup 2} per 100 years for SNe type la, Ic, and II. The rate for type Ic supernovae is significantly higher than found in previous surveys. The rates are not corrected for detection inefficiencies, and do not take into account the indications that the Ic supernovae are fainter on the average than the previous estimates; therefore the true rates are probably higher. The rates are not strongly dependent on the galaxy inclination, in contradiction to previous compilations. If the Milky Way is a late spiral, then the rate of Galactic supernovae is greater than 1 per 30 {+-} 7 years, assuming h = 0.75. This high rate has encouraging consequences for future neutrino and gravitational wave observatories.

  3. Nitrogen accumulation and partitioning in a High Arctic tundra ecosystem from extreme atmospheric N deposition events.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Sonal; Blaud, Aimeric; Osborn, A Mark; Press, Malcolm C; Phoenix, Gareth K

    2016-06-01

    Arctic ecosystems are threatened by pollution from recently detected extreme atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition events in which up to 90% of the annual N deposition can occur in just a few days. We undertook the first assessment of the fate of N from extreme deposition in High Arctic tundra and are presenting the results from the whole ecosystem (15)N labelling experiment. In 2010, we simulated N depositions at rates of 0, 0.04, 0.4 and 1.2 g Nm(-2)yr(-1), applied as (15)NH4(15)NO3 in Svalbard (79(°)N), during the summer. Separate applications of (15)NO3(-) and (15)NH4(+) were also made to determine the importance of N form in their retention. More than 95% of the total (15)N applied was recovered after one growing season (~90% after two), demonstrating a considerable capacity of Arctic tundra to retain N from these deposition events. Important sinks for the deposited N, regardless of its application rate or form, were non-vascular plants>vascular plants>organic soil>litter>mineral soil, suggesting that non-vascular plants could be the primary component of this ecosystem to undergo measurable changes due to N enrichment from extreme deposition events. Substantial retention of N by soil microbial biomass (70% and 39% of (15)N in organic and mineral horizon, respectively) during the initial partitioning demonstrated their capacity to act as effective buffers for N leaching. Between the two N forms, vascular plants (Salix polaris) in particular showed difference in their N recovery, incorporating four times greater (15)NO3(-) than (15)NH4(+), suggesting deposition rich in nitrate will impact them more. Overall, these findings show that despite the deposition rates being extreme in statistical terms, biologically they do not exceed the capacity of tundra to sequester pollutant N during the growing season. Therefore, current and future extreme events may represent a major source of eutrophication. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Modelling Deposition and Erosion rates with RadioNuclides (MODERN) - Part 1: A new conversion model to derive soil redistribution rates from inventories of fallout radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Arata, Laura; Meusburger, Katrin; Frenkel, Elena; A'Campo-Neuen, Annette; Iurian, Andra-Rada; Ketterer, Michael E; Mabit, Lionel; Alewell, Christine

    2016-10-01

    The measurement of fallout radionuclides (FRN) has become one of the most commonly used tools to quantify sediment erosion or depositional processes. The conversion of FRN inventories into soil erosion and deposition rates is done with a variety of models, which suitability is dependent on the selected FRN, soil cultivation (ploughed or unploughed) and movement (erosion or deposition). The authors propose a new conversion model, which can be easily and comprehensively used for different FRN, land uses and soil redistribution processes. The new model MODERN (Modelling Deposition and Erosion rates with RadioNuclides) considers the precise depth distribution of any FRN at the reference site, and allows adapting it for any specific site conditions. MODERN adaptability and performance in converting different FRN inventories is discussed for a theoretical case as well as for two already published case studies i.e. a (137)Cs study in an alpine and unploughed area in the Aosta valley (Italy) and a (210)Pbex study on a ploughed area located in the Transylvanian Plain (Romania). The tests highlight a highly significant correspondence (i.e. correlation factor of 0.91) between the results of MODERN and the published results of other models currently used by the FRN scientific community (i.e. the Profile Distribution Model and the Mass Balance Model). The development and the cost free accessibility of MODERN (see modern.umweltgeo.unibas.ch) will ensure the promotion of wider application of FRNs for tracing soil erosion and sedimentation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. [Hopes of high dose-rate radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Fouillade, Charles; Favaudon, Vincent; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Bourhis, Jean; Verrelle, Pierre; Devauchelle, Patrick; Patriarca, Annalisa; Heinrich, Sophie; Mazal, Alejandro; Dutreix, Marie

    2017-04-01

    In this review, we present the synthesis of the newly acquired knowledge concerning high dose-rate irradiations and the hopes that these new radiotherapy modalities give rise to. The results were presented at a recent symposium on the subject. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. Baltimore District Tackles High Suspension Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on how the Baltimore District tackles its high suspension rates. Driven by an increasing belief that zero-tolerance disciplinary policies are ineffective, more educators are embracing strategies that do not exclude misbehaving students from school for offenses such as insubordination, disrespect, cutting class, tardiness, and…

  7. Baltimore District Tackles High Suspension Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on how the Baltimore District tackles its high suspension rates. Driven by an increasing belief that zero-tolerance disciplinary policies are ineffective, more educators are embracing strategies that do not exclude misbehaving students from school for offenses such as insubordination, disrespect, cutting class, tardiness, and…

  8. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  9. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  10. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  11. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Nevada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  12. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  13. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Connecticut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  14. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  15. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  16. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  17. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Wisconsin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  18. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  19. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  20. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  1. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  2. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  3. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  4. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  5. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Montana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  6. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  7. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Vermont

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  8. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  9. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Mississippi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  10. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  11. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  12. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  13. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  14. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  15. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  16. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  17. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Maine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  18. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  19. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  20. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  1. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  2. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  3. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  4. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Wyoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  5. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  6. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  7. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  8. Field Metabolic Rate and PCB Adipose Tissue Deposition Efficiency in East Greenland Polar Bears Derived from Contaminant Monitoring Data

    PubMed Central

    Pavlova, Viola; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Dietz, Rune; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Vorkamp, Katrin; Rigét, Frank Farsø; Sonne, Christian; Letcher, Robert J.; Grimm, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Climate change will increasingly affect the natural habitat and diet of polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Understanding the energetic needs of polar bears is therefore important. We developed a theoretical method for estimating polar bear food consumption based on using the highly recalcitrant polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener, 2,2′,4,4′,55-hexaCB (CB153) in bear adipose tissue as an indicator of food intake. By comparing the CB153 tissue concentrations in wild polar bears with estimates from a purposely designed individual-based model, we identified the possible combinations of field metabolic rates (FMR) and CB153 deposition efficiencies in East Greenland polar bears. Our simulations indicate that if 30% of the CB153 consumed by polar bear individuals were deposited into their adipose tissue, the corresponding FMR would be only two times the basal metabolic rate. In contrast, if the modelled CB153 deposition efficiency were 10%, adult polar bears would require six times more energy than that needed to cover basal metabolism. This is considerably higher than what has been assumed for polar bears in previous studies though it is similar to FMRs found in other marine mammals. An implication of this result is that even relatively small reductions in future feeding opportunities could impact the survival of East Greenland polar bears. PMID:25101837

  9. Field metabolic rate and PCB adipose tissue deposition efficiency in East Greenland polar bears derived from contaminant monitoring data.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Viola; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Dietz, Rune; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Vorkamp, Katrin; Rigét, Frank Farsø; Sonne, Christian; Letcher, Robert J; Grimm, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Climate change will increasingly affect the natural habitat and diet of polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Understanding the energetic needs of polar bears is therefore important. We developed a theoretical method for estimating polar bear food consumption based on using the highly recalcitrant polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener, 2,2',4,4',55-hexaCB (CB153) in bear adipose tissue as an indicator of food intake. By comparing the CB153 tissue concentrations in wild polar bears with estimates from a purposely designed individual-based model, we identified the possible combinations of field metabolic rates (FMR) and CB153 deposition efficiencies in East Greenland polar bears. Our simulations indicate that if 30% of the CB153 consumed by polar bear individuals were deposited into their adipose tissue, the corresponding FMR would be only two times the basal metabolic rate. In contrast, if the modelled CB153 deposition efficiency were 10%, adult polar bears would require six times more energy than that needed to cover basal metabolism. This is considerably higher than what has been assumed for polar bears in previous studies though it is similar to FMRs found in other marine mammals. An implication of this result is that even relatively small reductions in future feeding opportunities could impact the survival of East Greenland polar bears.

  10. Fabrication of highly ultramicroporous carbon nanofoams by SF6-catalyzed laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Shuhara, Ai; Kondo, Atsushi; Utsumi, Shigenori; Tanaka, Hideki; Ohba, Tomonori; Kanoh, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Kunimitsu; Vallejos-Burgos, Fernando; Kaneko, Katsumi

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) method for preparing nanocarbons with the aid of SF6. This method would offer advantages for the production of aggregates of nanoscale foams (nanofoams) at high rates. Pyrolysis of the as-grown nanofoams induced the high surface area (1120 m2 g-1) and significantly enhanced the adsorption of supercritical H2 (16.6 mg g-1 at 77 K and 0.1 MPa). We also showed that the pyrolized nanofoams have highly ultramicroporous structures. The pyrolized nanofoams would be superior to highly microporous nanocarbons for the adsorption of supercritical gases.

  11. Chemical Vapor Deposition at High Pressure in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, Sonya; Bachmann, Klaus; LeSure, Stacie; Sukidi, Nkadi; Wang, Fuchao

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present an evaluation of critical requirements of organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) at elevated pressure for a channel flow reactor in a microgravity environment. The objective of using high pressure is to maintain single-phase surface composition for materials that have high thermal decomposition pressure at their optimum growth temperature. Access to microgravity is needed to maintain conditions of laminar flow, which is essential for process analysis. Based on ground based observations we present an optimized reactor design for OMCVD at high pressure and reduced gravity. Also, we discuss non-intrusive real-time optical monitoring of flow dynamics coupled to homogeneous gas phase reactions, transport and surface processes. While suborbital flights may suffice for studies of initial stages of heteroepitaxy experiments in space are essential for a complete evaluation of steady-state growth.

  12. Pulsed laser deposition of compact high adhesion polytetrafluoroethylene thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smausz, Tomi; Hopp, Béla; Kresz, Norbert

    2002-08-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) thin films were prepared from pressed powder pellets via pulsed laser deposition by using ArF (193 nm) excimer laser. The applied laser fluences were in the 1.6-10 J cm-2 range, the substrate temperature was varied between 27°C and 250°C and post-annealing of the films was carried out in air at temperatures between 320°C and 500°C. Films deposited at 250°C substrate temperature were found to be stoichiometric while those prepared at lower temperatures were fluorine deficient. Morphological analyses proved that the film thickness did not significantly depend on the substrate temperature and the post annealing at 500°C resulted in a thickness reduction of approximately 50%. It was demonstrated that the films prepared at 8.2 J cm-2 fluence and annealed at 500°C followed by cooling at 1°C min-1 rate were compact, pinhole-free layers. The adherence of films to the substrates was determined by tensile strength measurements. Tensile strength values up to 2.4 MPa were obtained. These properties are of great significance when PTFE films are fabricated for the purpose of protecting coatings.

  13. The effect of Be and Cr electrode deposition rate on the performance of MIS solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moharram, A. H.; Panayotatos, P.; Yeh, J. L.; Lalevic, B.

    1985-07-01

    An experimental study has been performed on MIS solar cells with Be, Cr and layered Cr-Be electrodes on single crystal Si, Wacker and Monsanto poly-Si substrates. Electrical characterization in the dark and under illumination was correlated to X-ray and Auger spectroscopy results. It was found that the electrode deposition rate directly affects the oxygen content of the electrodes for all metal-substrate configurations. This oxygen is believed to originate from the deposition ambient as well as from the SiO2 layer. In the case of cells with Cr and layered Cr-Be electrodes oxygen acts to reduce the electrode work function (thus increasing the open-circuit voltage) in direct proportion to the relative content of oxygen to chromium.

  14. Nitrogen Deposition Reduces Decomposition Rates Through Shifts in Microbial Community Composition and Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, M.; Zak, D.; Sinsabaugh, R.

    2002-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition may alter soil biological activity in northern hardwood forests by repressing phenol oxidase enzyme activity and altering microbial community composition, thereby slowing decomposition and increasing the export of phenolic compounds. We tested this hypothesis by adding 13C-labelled cellobiose, vanillin, and catechol to control and N fertilized soils (30 and 80 kg ha-1) collected from three forests; two dominated by Acer Saccharum and one dominated by Quercus Alba and Quercus Velutina. While N deposition increased total microbial respiration, it decreased soil oxidative enzyme activities, resulting in slower degradation rates of all compounds, and larger DOC pools. This effect was larger in the oak forest, where fungi dominate C-cycling processes. DNA and 13C-phospolipid analyses showed that N addition altered the fungal community and reduced the activity of fungal and bacterial populations in soil, potentially explaining reduced soil enzyme activities and incomplete decomposition.

  15. A new experimental procedure of outgassing rate measurement to obtain more precise deposition properties of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Eiji; Shimazaki, Kazunori; Numata, Osamu; Waki, Miyuki; Yamanaka, Riyo; Kimoto, Yugo

    2016-09-01

    Outgassing rate measurement, or dynamic outgassing test, is used to obtain outgassing properties of materials, i.e., Total Mass Loss, "TML," and Collected Volatile Condensed Mass, "CVCM." The properties are used as input parameters for executing contamination analysis, e.g., calculating a prediction of deposition mass on a surface in a spacecraft caused by outgassed substances from contaminant sources onboard. It is likely that results obtained by such calculations are affected by the input parameters. Thus, it is important to get a sufficient experimental data set of outgassing rate measurements for extract good outgassing parameters of materials for calculation. As specified in the standard, ASTM E 1559, TML is measured by a QCM sensor kept at cryogenic temperature; CVCMs are measured at certain temperatures. In the present work, the authors propose a new experimental procedure to obtain more precise VCMs from one run of the current test time with the present equipment. That is, two of four CQCMs in the equipment control the temperature to cool step-by-step during the test run. It is expected that the deposition rate, that is sticking coefficient, with respect to temperature could be discovered. As a result, the sticking coefficient can be obtained directly between -50 and 50 degrees C with 5 degrees C step. It looks like the method could be used as an improved procedure for outgassing rate measurement. The present experiment also specified some issues of the new procedure. It will be considered in future work.

  16. Method for depositing layers of high quality semiconductor material

    DOEpatents

    Guha, Subhendu; Yang, Chi C.

    2001-08-14

    Plasma deposition of substantially amorphous semiconductor materials is carried out under a set of deposition parameters which are selected so that the process operates near the amorphous/microcrystalline threshold. This threshold varies as a function of the thickness of the depositing semiconductor layer; and, deposition parameters, such as diluent gas concentrations, must be adjusted as a function of layer thickness. Also, this threshold varies as a function of the composition of the depositing layer, and in those instances where the layer composition is profiled throughout its thickness, deposition parameters must be adjusted accordingly so as to maintain the amorphous/microcrystalline threshold.

  17. A miniature high repetition rate shock tube.

    PubMed

    Tranter, R S; Lynch, P T

    2013-09-01

    A miniature high repetition rate shock tube with excellent reproducibility has been constructed to facilitate high temperature, high pressure, gas phase experiments at facilities such as synchrotron light sources where space is limited and many experiments need to be averaged to obtain adequate signal levels. The shock tube is designed to generate reaction conditions of T > 600 K, P < 100 bars at a cycle rate of up to 4 Hz. The design of the apparatus is discussed in detail, and data are presented to demonstrate that well-formed shock waves with predictable characteristics are created, repeatably. Two synchrotron-based experiments using this apparatus are also briefly described here, demonstrating the potential of the shock tube for research at synchrotron light sources.

  18. Role of high shear rate in thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Casa, Lauren D C; Deaton, David H; Ku, David N

    2015-04-01

    Acute arterial occlusions occur in high shear rate hemodynamic conditions. Arterial thrombi are platelet-rich when examined histologically compared with red blood cells in venous thrombi. Prior studies of platelet biology were not capable of accounting for the rapid kinetics and bond strengths necessary to produce occlusive thrombus under these conditions where the stasis condition of the Virchow triad is so noticeably absent. Recent experiments elucidate the unique pathway and kinetics of platelet aggregation that produce arterial occlusion. Large thrombi form from local release and conformational changes in von Willebrand factor under very high shear rates. The effect of high shear hemodynamics on thrombus growth has profound implications for the understanding of all acute thrombotic cardiovascular events as well as for vascular reconstructive techniques and vascular device design, testing, and clinical performance. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. High surface area graphene foams by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drieschner, Simon; Weber, Michael; Wohlketzetter, Jörg; Vieten, Josua; Makrygiannis, Evangelos; Blaschke, Benno M.; Morandi, Vittorio; Colombo, Luigi; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Garrido, Jose A.

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based structures combine the unique physical properties of graphene with the opportunity to get high electrochemically available surface area per unit of geometric surface area. Several preparation techniques have been reported to fabricate 3D graphene-based macroscopic structures for energy storage applications such as supercapacitors. Although reaserch has been focused so far on achieving either high specific capacitance or high volumetric capacitance, much less attention has been dedicated to obtain high specific and high volumetric capacitance simultaneously. Here, we present a facile technique to fabricate graphene foams (GF) of high crystal quality with tunable pore size grown by chemical vapor deposition. We exploited porous sacrificial templates prepared by sintering nickel and copper metal powders. Tuning the particle size of the metal powders and the growth temperature allow fine control of the resulting pore size of the 3D graphene-based structures smaller than 1 μm. The as-produced 3D graphene structures provide a high volumetric electric double layer capacitance (165 mF cm-3). High specific capacitance (100 Fg-1) is obtained by lowering the number of layers down to single layer graphene. Furthermore, the small pore size increases the stability of these GFs in contrast to the ones that have been grown so far on commercial metal foams. Electrodes based on the as-prepared GFs can be a boost for the development of supercapacitors, where both low volume and mass are required.

  20. High temperature corrosion behavior of commercial high temperature alloys under deposits of alkali salts

    SciTech Connect

    Kloewer, J.

    1995-12-31

    Corrosive deposits containing high amounts of alkali sulphates, chlorides and/or carbonates are encountered by heat exchanger tubes in a variety of industrial processes. Due to their low melting point the alkali salts can cause basic or acidic dissolution of the subjacent material, which results in rapid wastage of the tube. In order to select appropriate materials for application in heat recovery systems eight commercial high temperature materials (alloy 800H, Alloy 31, Alloy AC66, alloy 45-TM, Alloy 625, Alloy 59 and Alloy C-4) were investigated in sulphate, sulphate/chloride and sulphate/chloride/carbonate salt mixtures. The temperature range was between 550 and 750 C. In agreement with field tests the corrosion attack was high for most of the alloys tested with the corrosion rate depending sensitively on salt composition, test temperature and alloy composition. High molybdenum contents were found to be detrimental. Chromium did not effect the corrosion behavior significantly, whereas silicon had a beneficial effect on the corrosion resistance in molten alkali salts.

  1. High strain rate behaviour of polypropylene microfoams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-del Río, T.; Garrido, M. A.; Rodríguez, J.; Arencón, D.; Martínez, A. B.

    2012-08-01

    Microcellular materials such as polypropylene foams are often used in protective applications and passive safety for packaging (electronic components, aeronautical structures, food, etc.) or personal safety (helmets, knee-pads, etc.). In such applications the foams which are used are often designed to absorb the maximum energy and are generally subjected to severe loadings involving high strain rates. The manufacture process to obtain polymeric microcellular foams is based on the polymer saturation with a supercritical gas, at high temperature and pressure. This method presents several advantages over the conventional injection moulding techniques which make it industrially feasible. However, the effect of processing conditions such as blowing agent, concentration and microfoaming time and/or temperature on the microstructure of the resulting microcellular polymer (density, cell size and geometry) is not yet set up. The compressive mechanical behaviour of several microcellular polypropylene foams has been investigated over a wide range of strain rates (0.001 to 3000 s-1) in order to show the effects of the processing parameters and strain rate on the mechanical properties. High strain rate tests were performed using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus (SHPB). Polypropylene and polyethylene-ethylene block copolymer foams of various densities were considered.

  2. High photoactivity in ultrathin as-grown hematite films prepared by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, Jeffrey; Becker, Nicholas; Riha, Shannon; Martinson, Alex; Elam, Jeffrey; Pellin, Michael; Proslier, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Nanostructured hematite (α-Fe2O3) has been widely studied for use in a variety of thin film applications including solar energy conversion, water oxidation, catalysis, and gas sensing. Among established deposition methods, atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a leading technique for large-scale, controlled synthesis of a wide range of nanostructured materials. In this work, ALD of Fe2O3 is demonstrated using FeCl3 and H2O precursors at growth temperatures between 200 -350° C. Self-limiting growth of Fe2O3 is observed with a growth rate of ~ 0 . 06 nm/cycle. As-deposited, films are nanocrystalline with low Cl impurities and a mixture of α- and γ-Fe2O3. Post-deposition annealing in O2 leads to phase-pure hematite with increased out-of-plane grain size. Photoelectrochemical measurements under simulated solar illumination reveal high photoactivity toward water oxidation in both as-deposited and post-annealed films. Planar films deposited at low temperature (235°C) exhibit remarkably high photocurrent densities ~ 0 . 71 mA/cm2 at 1.53 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) without further processing. Films annealed in air at 500°C show current densities of up to 0.84 mA/cm2 (1.53V vs. RHE). This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) through the US Department of Energy, Office of High Energy Physics.

  3. Highly stable high-rate discriminator for nuclear counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, J. J.; Howard, R. H.; Rudnick, S. J.

    1969-01-01

    Pulse amplitude discriminator is specially designed for nuclear counting applications. At very high rates, the threshold is stable. The output-pulse width and the dead time change negligibly. The unit incorporates a provision for automatic dead-time correction.

  4. Chemical vapor deposition modeling for high temperature materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goekoglu, Sueleyman

    1992-01-01

    The formalism for the accurate modeling of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes has matured based on the well established principles of transport phenomena and chemical kinetics in the gas phase and on surfaces. The utility and limitations of such models are discussed in practical applications for high temperature structural materials. Attention is drawn to the complexities and uncertainties in chemical kinetics. Traditional approaches based on only equilibrium thermochemistry and/or transport phenomena are defended as useful tools, within their validity, for engineering purposes. The role of modeling is discussed within the context of establishing the link between CVD process parameters and material microstructures/properties. It is argued that CVD modeling is an essential part of designing CVD equipment and controlling/optimizing CVD processes for the production and/or coating of high performance structural materials.

  5. High-Rate Capable Floating Strip Micromegas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bender, Michael; Biebel, Otmar; Danger, Helge; Flierl, Bernhard; Hertenberger, Ralf; Lösel, Philipp; Moll, Samuel; Parodi, Katia; Rinaldi, Ilaria; Ruschke, Alexander; Zibell, André

    2016-04-01

    We report on the optimization of discharge insensitive floating strip Micromegas (MICRO-MEsh GASeous) detectors, fit for use in high-energy muon spectrometers. The suitability of these detectors for particle tracking is shown in high-background environments and at very high particle fluxes up to 60 MHz/cm2. Measurement and simulation of the microscopic discharge behavior have demonstrated the excellent discharge tolerance. A floating strip Micromegas with an active area of 48 cm × 50 cm with 1920 copper anode strips exhibits in 120 GeV pion beams a spatial resolution of 50 μm at detection efficiencies above 95%. Pulse height, spatial resolution and detection efficiency are homogeneous over the detector. Reconstruction of particle track inclination in a single detector plane is discussed, optimum angular resolutions below 5° are observed. Systematic deviations of this μTPC-method are fully understood. The reconstruction capabilities for minimum ionizing muons are investigated in a 6.4 cm × 6.4 cm floating strip Micromegas under intense background irradiation of the whole active area with 20 MeV protons at a rate of 550 kHz. The spatial resolution for muons is not distorted by space charge effects. A 6.4 cm × 6.4 cm floating strip Micromegas doublet with low material budget is investigated in highly ionizing proton and carbon ion beams at particle rates between 2 MHz and 2 GHz. Stable operation up to the highest rates is observed, spatial resolution, detection efficiencies, the multi-hit and high-rate capability are discussed.

  6. Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill--Part III: Atmospheric deposition rates (pilot test).

    PubMed

    Thomas, P A

    2000-06-01

    Atmospheric deposition rates of uranium series radionuclides were directly measured at three sites near the operating Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Sites impacted by windblown tailings and mill dusts had elevated rates of uranium deposition near the mill and elevated 226Ra deposition near the tailings compared to a control site. Rainwater collectors, dust jars, and passive vinyl collectors previously used at the Ranger Mine in Australia were pilot-tested. Adhesive vinyl surfaces (1 m2) were oriented horizontally, vertically, and facing the ground as a means of measuring gravitational settling, wind impaction, and soil resuspension, respectively. Although the adhesive glue on the vinyls proved difficult to digest, relative differences in deposition mode were found among radionuclides and among sites. Dry deposition was a more important transport mechanism for uranium, 226Ra, and 210Pb than rainfall, while more 210Po was deposited with rainfall.

  7. Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 3: Atmospheric deposition rates (pilot test)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.A.

    2000-06-01

    Atmospheric deposition rates of uranium series radionuclides were directly measured at three sites near the operating Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Sites impacted by windblown tailings and mill dusts had elevated rates of uranium deposition near the mill and elevated {sup 226}Ra deposition near the tailings compared to a control site. Rainwater collectors, dust jars, and passive vinyl collectors previously used at the Ranger Mine in Australia were pilot-tested. Adhesive vinyl surfaces (1 m{sup 2}) were oriented horizontally, vertically, and facing the ground as a means of measuring gravitational settling, wind impaction, and soil resuspension, respectively. Although the adhesive glue on the vinyls proved difficult to digest, relative differences in deposition mode were found among radionuclides and among sites. Dry deposition was a more important transport mechanism for uranium, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb than rainfall, while more {sup 210}Po was deposited with rainfall.

  8. Comparison of elemental accumulation rates between ferromanganese deposits and sediments in the South Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kraemer, T.; Schornick, J.C.

    1974-01-01

    Rates of accumulation of Fe and Mn, as well as Cu, Ni, Co, Pb, Zn, Hg, U and Th have been determined for five ferromanganese deposits from four localities in the South Pacific Ocean. Manganese is accumulating in nodules and crusts at a rate roughly equivalent to that found to be accumulating in sediments in the same area. Iron shows a deficiency in accumulation in nodules and crusts with respect to sediments, especially near the continents, but also in the central and south-central Pacific. Copper is accumulating in nodules and crusts at a rate one order of magnitude less than the surrounding sediments. This is interpreted as meaning that most of the Mn is supplied as an authigenic phase to both sediments and nodules while Fe is supplied mostly by ferromanganese micro-nodules and by detrital and adsorbed components of sediments; and Cu is enriched in sediments relative to nodules and crusts most probably through biological activity. ?? 1974.

  9. Phosphor thermometry at high repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, N.; Brübach, J.; Dreizler, A.

    2013-09-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilizing the luminescence properties of thermographic phosphors. Typically these ceramic materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Photomultipliers and high-speed camera systems are used to transiently detect the subsequently emitted luminescence decay point wise or two-dimensionally resolved. Based on appropriate calibration measurements, the luminescence lifetime is converted to temperature. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. For the first time, the authors realized a high-speed phosphor thermometry system combining a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterized regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating in terms of heating effects has been investigated. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of one sample per crank angle degree at an engine speed of 1000 rpm. This experiment has proven that high-speed phosphor thermometry is a promising diagnostic tool for the resolution of surface temperature transients.

  10. Hydrodynamic control of inorganic calcite precipitation in Huanglong Ravine, China: Field measurements and theoretical prediction of deposition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaihua, Liu; Svensson, U.; Dreybrodt, W.; Daoxian, Yuan; Buhmann, D.

    1995-08-01

    Hydrochemical and hydrodynamical investigations are presented to explain tufa deposition rates along the flow path of the Huanglong Ravine, located in northwestern Sichuan province, China, on an altitude of about 3400 m asl. Due to outgassing of CO 2 the mainly spring-fed stream exhibits, along a valley of 3.5 km, calcite precipitation rates up to a few mm/year. We have carried out in situ experiments to measure calcite deposition rates at rimstone dams, inside of pools and in the stream-bed. Simultaneously, the downstream evolution of water chemistry was investigated at nine locations with respect to Ca 2+, Mg 2+, Na +, Cl -, SO 42-, and alkalinity. Temperature, pH, and conductivity were measured in situ, while total hardness, Ca T, and alkalinity have been determined immediately after sampling, performing standard titration methods. The water turned out to be of an almost pure CaMgHCO 3 type. The degassing of CO 2 causes high supersaturation with respect to calcite and due to calcite precipitation the Ca 2+ concentration decreases from 6·10 -3 mole/1 upstream down to 2.5·10 -3 mole/1 at the lower course. Small rectangular shaped tablets of pure marble were mounted under different flow regimes, i.e., at the dam sites with fast water flow as well as inside pools with still water. After the substrate samples had stayed in the water for a period of a few days, the deposition rates were measured by weight increase, up to several tens of milligrams. Although there were no differences in hydrochemistry, deposition rates in fast flowing water were higher by as much as a factor of four compared to still water, indicating a strong influence of hydrodynamics. While upstream rates amounted up to 5 mm/year, lower rates of about 1 mm/year were observed downstream. Inspection of the marble substrate surfaces by EDAX and SEM (scanning electron microscope) revealed authigeneously grown calcite crystals of about 10 μm. Their shape and habit are indicative of a chemically

  11. Key factors influencing rates of heterotrophic sulfate reduction in hydrothermal massive sulfide deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, K. L.; Rogers, D.; Girguis, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    Despite sulfate reduction's ubiquity in marine systems, relatively little is known about how environmental or ecological factors influence rates of sulfate reduction. While numerous studies have considered how sulfate reduction and methanogenesis compete for reductants in natural and human-made systems, less is known about how temperature or metabolite concentration, such as sulfate and sulfide concentrations, affects rates of sulfate reduction. Here we use a factorial experimental design to evaluate the effects of key variables on sulfate reduction kinetics in sulfide deposits recovered from hydrothermal vents in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca ridge. Microbial sulfate reduction rates were measured by 35-S tracer techniques over a range of environmentally relevant chemical conditions (pH, H2S, SO42-, and organic carbon concentrations) and temperatures (4, 50 and 90°C). Maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C, and sulfate reduction rates had significant positive correlations with increasing sulfide, pH and sulfate. However, sulfate reduction rates did not correlate to exogenous dissolved organic carbon, implicating exogenous hydrogen or endogenous organic matter as the reductant (or even sulfur disproportionation). This research presents an opportunity to better understand the key variables that influence the rates of microbial sulfate reduction in hydrothermal environments and provides a framework for modeling sulfate reduction in mid-ocean ridge systems.

  12. Hazards in determination and extrapolation of depositional rates of recent sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Isphording, W.C. . Dept. of Geology-Geography); Jackson, R.B. )

    1992-01-01

    Calculation of depositional rates for the past 250 years in estuarine sediments at sites in the Gulf of Mexico have been carried out by measuring changes that have taken place on bathymetric charts. Depositional rates during the past 50 to 100 years can similarly be estimated by this method and may be often confirmed by relatively abrupt changes at depth in the content of certain heavy metals in core samples. Analysis of bathymetric charts of Mobile Bay, Alabama, dating back to 1858, disclosed an essentially constant sedimentation rate of 3.9 mm/year. Apalachicola Bay, Florida, similarly, was found to have a rate of 5.4 mm/year. Though, in theory, these rates should provide reliable estimates of the influx of sediment into the estuaries, considerable caution must be used in attempting to extrapolate them to any depth in core samples. The passage of hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico is a common event and can rapidly, and markedly, alter the bathymetry of an estuary. The passage of Hurricane Elena near Apalachicola Bay in 1985, for example, removed over 84 million tons of sediment from the bay and caused an average deepening of nearly 50 cm. The impact of Hurricane Frederick on Mobile Bay in 1979 was more dramatic. During the approximate 7 hour period when winds from this storm impacted the estuary, nearly 290 million tons of sediment was driven out of the bay and an average deepening of 46 cm was observed. With such weather events common in the Gulf Coast, it is not surprising that when radioactive age dating methods were used to obtain dates of approximately 7,500 years for organic remains in cores from Apalachicola Bay, that the depths at which the dated materials were obtained in the cores corresponded to depositional rates of only 0.4 mm/year, or one-tenth that obtained from historic bathymetric data. Because storm scour effects are a common occurrence in the Gulf, no attempt should be made to extrapolate bathymetric-derived rates to beyond the age of the charts.

  13. High strain rate characterization of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siviour, Clive R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the response of polymers to high strain rate deformation. The main focus is on the experimental techniques used to characterize this response. The paper includes a small number of examples as well as references to experimental data over a wide range of rates, which illustrate the key features of rate dependence in these materials; however this is by no means an exhaustive list. The aim of the paper is to give the reader unfamiliar with the subject an overview of the techniques available with sufficient references from which further information can be obtained. In addition to the `well established' techniques of the Hopkinson bar, Taylor Impact and Transverse impact, a discussion of the use of time-temperature superposition in interpreting and experimentally replicating high rate response is given, as is a description of new techniques in which mechanical parameters are derived by directly measuring wave propagation in specimens; these are particularly appropriate for polymers with low wave speeds. The vast topic of constitutive modelling is deliberately excluded from this review.

  14. Sweep Rate and Concentration Effects on Metastable Structures Formed in the Underpotential Deposition of Silver on Pt(111)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Sweep Rate and Concentration Effects on Metastable Structures 0) Formed in the Underpotential Deposition of Silver on Pt(111) _Vm D. L. Taylor and H...process of underpotential deposition (UPD) of metals on foreign metal substrates continues to be the subject of intense investigation [1] through the...1" 0•- There are several parameters involved in the underpotential deposition of metals which 1 1 S•. may affect the growth mechanism of the metal

  15. Analytical Modeling of High Rate Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    TYPE AND DATES COVERED 1 13 Apr 98 Final (01 Sep 94 - 31 Aug 97) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS Analytical Modeling of High Rate Processes...20332- 8050 FROM: S. E. Jones, University Research Professor Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics University of Alabama SUBJECT: Final...Mr. Sandor Augustus and Mr. Jeffrey A. Drinkard. There are no outstanding commitments. The balance in the account, as of July 31 , 1997, was $102,916.42

  16. HIGH ENERGY RATE EXTRUSION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, L.

    1963-07-23

    A method of extruding uranium at a high energy rate is described. Conditions during the extrusion are such that the temperature of the metal during extrusion reaches a point above the normal alpha to beta transition, but the metal nevertheless remains in the alpha phase in accordance with the Clausius- Clapeyron equation. Upon exiting from the die, the metal automatically enters the beta phase, after which the metal is permitted to cool. (AEC)

  17. A comprehensive study on different modelling approaches to predict platelet deposition rates in a perfusion chamber

    PubMed Central

    Pallarès, Jordi; Senan, Oriol; Guimerà, Roger; Vernet, Anton; Aguilar-Mogas, Antoni; Vilahur, Gemma; Badimon, Lina; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Cito, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Thrombus formation is a multiscale phenomenon triggered by platelet deposition over a protrombotic surface (eg. a ruptured atherosclerotic plaque). Despite the medical urgency for computational tools that aid in the early diagnosis of thrombotic events, the integration of computational models of thrombus formation at different scales requires a comprehensive understanding of the role and limitation of each modelling approach. We propose three different modelling approaches to predict platelet deposition. Specifically, we consider measurements of platelet deposition under blood flow conditions in a perfusion chamber for different time periods (3, 5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes) at shear rates of 212 s−1, 1390 s−1 and 1690 s−1. Our modelling approaches are: i) a model based on the mass-transfer boundary layer theory; ii) a machine-learning approach; and iii) a phenomenological model. The results indicate that the three approaches on average have median errors of 21%, 20.7% and 14.2%, respectively. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of using an empirical data set as a proxy for a real-patient scenario in which practitioners have accumulated data on a given number of patients and want to obtain a diagnosis for a new patient about whom they only have the current observation of a certain number of variables. PMID:26391513

  18. Reserve, flowing electrolyte, high rate lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskar, M.; Harris, P.

    Flowing electrolyte Li/SOCl2 tests in single cell and multicell bipolar fixtures have been conducted, and measurements are presented for electrolyte flow rates, inlet and outlet temperatures, fixture temperatures at several points, and the pressure drop across the fixture. Reserve lithium batteries with flowing thionyl-chloride electrolytes are found to be capable of very high energy densities with usable voltages and capacities at current densities as high as 500 mA/sq cm. At this current density, a battery stack 10 inches in diameter is shown to produce over 60 kW of power while maintaining a safe operating temperature.

  19. Experimental investigation on the energy deposition and expansion rate under the electrical explosion of aluminum wire in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zongqian; Wang, Kun; Shi, Yuanjie; Wu, Jian; Han, Ruoyu

    2015-12-28

    Experimental investigations on the electrical explosion of aluminum wire using negative polarity current in vacuum are presented. Current pulses with rise rates of 40 A/ns, 80 A/ns, and 120 A/ns are generated for investigating the influence of current rise rate on energy deposition. Experimental results show a significant increase of energy deposition into the wire before the voltage breakdown with the increase of current rise rate. The influence of wire dimension on energy deposition is investigated as well. Decreasing the wire length allows more energy to be deposited into the wire. The energy deposition of a 0.5 cm-long wire explosion is ∼2.5 times higher than the energy deposition of a 2 cm-long wire explosion. The dependence of the energy deposition on wire diameter demonstrates a maximum energy deposition of 2.7 eV/atom with a diameter of ∼18 μm. Substantial increase in energy deposition is observed in the electrical explosion of aluminum wire with polyimide coating. A laser probe is applied to construct the shadowgraphy, schlieren, and interferometry diagnostics. The morphology and expansion trajectory of exploding products are analyzed based on the shadowgram. The interference phase shift is reconstructed from the interferogram. Parallel dual wires are exploded to estimate the expansion velocity of the plasma shell.

  20. Fabrication of AIN Nano-Structures Using Polarity Control by High Temperature Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Eom, Daeyong; Kim, Jinwan; Lee, Kyungjae; Jeon, Minhwan; Heo, Cheon; Pyeon, Jaedo; Nam, Okhyun

    2015-07-01

    This study investigates the crystallographic polarity transition of AIN layers grown by high temperature metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (HT-MOCVD), with varying trimethylaluminum (TMAI) pre-flow rates. AIN layers grown without TMAI pre-flow had a mixed polarity, consisting of Al- and N-polarity, and exhibited a rough surface. With an increasing rate of TMAI pre-flow, the AIN layer was changed to an Al-polarity, with a smooth surface morphology. Finally, AIN nano-pillars and nano-rods of Al-polarity were fabricated by etching a mixed polarity AIN layer using an aqueous KOH solution.

  1. Soil calcium status and the response of stream chemistry to changing acidic deposition rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.; Lovett, Gary M.; Murdoch, Peter S.; Burns, Douglas A.; Stoddard, J.L.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Porter, J.H.; Thompson, A.W.

    1999-01-01

    Despite a decreasing trend in acidic deposition rates over the past two to three decades, acidified surface waters in the northeastern United States have shown minimal changes. Depletion of soil Ca pools has been suggested as a cause, although changes in soil Ca pools have not been directly related to long-term records of stream chemistry. To investigate this problem, a comprehensive watershed study was conducted in the Neversink River Basin, in the Catskill Mountains of New York, during 1991-1996. Spatial variations of atmospheric deposition, soil chemistry, and stream chemistry were evaluated over an elevation range of 817-1234 m to determine whether these factors exhibited elevational patterns. An increase in atmospheric deposition of SO4 with increasing elevation corresponded with upslope decreases of exchangeable soil base concentrations and acid-neutralizing capacity of stream water. Exchangeable base concentrations in homogeneous soil incubated within the soil profile for one year also decreased with increasing elevation. An elevational gradient in precipitation was not observed, and effects of a temperature gradient on soil properties were not detected. Laboratory leaching experiments with soils from this watershed showed that (1) concentrations of Ca in leachate increased as the concentrations of acid anions in added solution increased, and (2) the slope of this relationship was positively correlated with base saturation. Field and laboratory soil analyses are consistent with the interpretation that decreasing trends in acid-neutralizing capacity in stream water in the Neversink Basin, dating back to 1984, are the result of decreases in soil base saturation caused by acidic deposition.

  2. Spatial and temporal variability in sedimentation rates associated with cutoff channel infill deposits: Ain River, France

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piegay, H.; Hupp, C.R.; Citterio, A.; Dufour, S.; Moulin, B.; Walling, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    Floodplain development is associated with lateral accretion along stable channel geometry. Along shifting rivers, the floodplain sedimentation is more complex because of changes in channel position but also cutoff channel presence, which exhibit specific overflow patterns. In this contribution, the spatial and temporal variability of sedimentation rates in cutoff channel infill deposits is related to channel changes of a shifting gravel bed river (Ain River, France). The sedimentation rates estimated from dendrogeomorphic analysis are compared between and within 14 cutoff channel infills. Detailed analyses along a single channel infill are performed to assess changes in the sedimentation rates through time by analyzing activity profiles of the fallout radionuclides 137Cs and unsupported 210Pb. Sedimentation rates are also compared within the channel infills with rates in other plots located in the adjacent floodplain. Sedimentation rates range between 0.65 and 2.4 cm a -1 over a period of 10 to 40 years. The data provide additional information on the role of distance from the bank, overbank flow frequency, and channel geometry in controlling the sedimentation rate. Channel infills, lower than adjacent floodplains, exhibit higher sedimentation rates and convey overbank sediment farther away within the floodplain. Additionally, channel degradation, aggradation, and bank erosion, which reduce or increase the distance between the main channel and the cutoff channel aquatic zone, affect local overbank flow magnitude and frequency and therefore sedimentation rates, thereby creating a complex mosaic of sedimentation zones within the floodplain and along the cutoff channel infills. Last, the dendrogeomorphic and 137Cs approaches are cross validated for estimating the sedimentation rate within a channel infill. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Comparisons of Solar Wind Coupling Parameters with Auroral Energy Deposition Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsen, R.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Fillingim, M. O.; Parks, G. K.; Germany G. A.; Spann, J. F., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Measurement of the global rate of energy deposition in the ionosphere via auroral particle precipitation is one of the primary goals of the Polar UVI program and is an important component of the ISTP program. The instantaneous rate of energy deposition for the entire month of January 1997 has been calculated by applying models to the UVI images and is presented by Fillingim et al. In this session. A number of parameters that predict the rate of coupling of solar wind energy into the magnetosphere have been proposed in the last few decades. Some of these parameters, such as the epsilon parameter of Perrault and Akasofu, depend on the instantaneous values in the solar wind. Other parameters depend on the integrated values of solar wind parameters, especially IMF Bz, e.g. applied flux which predicts the net transfer of magnetic flux to the tail. While these parameters have often been used successfully with substorm studies, their validity in terms of global energy input has not yet been ascertained, largely because data such as that supplied by the ISTP program was lacking. We have calculated these and other energy coupling parameters for January 1997 using solar wind data provided by WIND and other solar wind monitors. The rates of energy input predicted by these parameters are compared to those measured through UVI data and correlations are sought. Whether these parameters are better at providing an instantaneous rate of energy input or an average input over some time period is addressed. We also study if either type of parameter may provide better correlations if a time delay is introduced; if so, this time delay may provide a characteristic time for energy transport in the coupled solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere system.

  4. Comparisons of Solar Wind Coupling Parameters with Auroral Energy Deposition Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsen, R.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Fillingim, M. O.; Parks, G. K.; Germany G. A.; Spann, J. F., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Measurement of the global rate of energy deposition in the ionosphere via auroral particle precipitation is one of the primary goals of the Polar UVI program and is an important component of the ISTP program. The instantaneous rate of energy deposition for the entire month of January 1997 has been calculated by applying models to the UVI images and is presented by Fillingim et al. In this session. A number of parameters that predict the rate of coupling of solar wind energy into the magnetosphere have been proposed in the last few decades. Some of these parameters, such as the epsilon parameter of Perrault and Akasofu, depend on the instantaneous values in the solar wind. Other parameters depend on the integrated values of solar wind parameters, especially IMF Bz, e.g. applied flux which predicts the net transfer of magnetic flux to the tail. While these parameters have often been used successfully with substorm studies, their validity in terms of global energy input has not yet been ascertained, largely because data such as that supplied by the ISTP program was lacking. We have calculated these and other energy coupling parameters for January 1997 using solar wind data provided by WIND and other solar wind monitors. The rates of energy input predicted by these parameters are compared to those measured through UVI data and correlations are sought. Whether these parameters are better at providing an instantaneous rate of energy input or an average input over some time period is addressed. We also study if either type of parameter may provide better correlations if a time delay is introduced; if so, this time delay may provide a characteristic time for energy transport in the coupled solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere system.

  5. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, K. L.; Rogers, K. L.; Rogers, D.; Johnston, D. T.; Girguis, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep fluctuations in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, SO42-, DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in a hydrothermal flange recovered from the Grotto vent in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate reducing organisms at Grotto may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate within the complex gradients inherent to hydrothermal deposits.

  6. A Longitudinal Evaluation of the Rate of Flow of Freshman Applications and Freshman Tuition Deposits. SAIR Conference Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, Michael

    Freshmen recruitment and admissions trends at Trinity University, a small, independent Texas university, are described. Attention is directed to the weekly rates at which freshman applications and tuition deposits were received over a 4-year time period. The patterns of the receipt of applications and deposits were consistent across years. The…

  7. High speed deposition of SiO2 film by slot-type microwave CVD system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Masaki; Suzuki, Haruka

    2016-09-01

    High density microwave plasma is attractive because of its ability for high-throughput processing. So far, we have successfully produced large-area surface wave excited plasma (SWP) and have applied it to plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD) of silicon films. However, the SWP requires a dielectric plate for the surface wave propagation, and high density plasma sometimes erodes the dielectric plate to produce oxygen contamination. To avoid such problem, we propose the PE-CVD using the microwave plasma produced inside slots of a waveguide without using the dielectric plate. A 2.45 GHz pulsed microwave (repetition: 20 kHz, duty ratio: 20%, average power: 40 W) is introduced to a rectangular waveguide through an isolator, a tuner, and a vacuum window. A slot of 4 mm in length and 0.2 mm in width is placed at the end of the waveguide, and is connected to a vacuum chamber. Both the waveguide and the chamber are evacuated by a turbomolecular pump. Oxygen and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) gases are introduced from the waveguide and from the outside of the waveguide, respectively, to deposit SiO2 film on Si substrates at a pressure of 15 Torr and a slot-substrate distance of 1.1 cm. Deposition rate as high as 80 nm/s is observed at a TEOS flow rate of 0.8 sccm. The result suggests that the present PE-CVD system is promising as a new high-speed film deposition technique. Part of this work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25286079.

  8. High temperature solar selective absorber coating deposited by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xuming

    2017-09-01

    In order to prepare high temperature stability cermets solar selective absorbing coating, single- layer Ni/Mo–TiC cermets coatings were firstly deposited on stainless steel substrate using laser cladding method and surface coating method. The result shows that the performance of the laser cladding coating is far superior to the coating fabricated by the surface coating method with thermal emittance decreased from 44.6% to 5.5%. Furthermore, the spectrally selective coating fabricated by laser cladding shows the excellent thermal stability. The solar absorptance and thermal emittance of the coating are 80.7% and 6.0% at 600 °C, 80% and 5.5% at room temperature, respectively. This result indicates that TiC-based cermets are more propitious solar selective absorber materials. More importantly, laser cladding, as a representative of new techniques, could be applied to the field of the solar selective absorber coating.

  9. High conductivity transparent carbon nanotube films deposited from superacid.

    PubMed

    Hecht, David S; Heintz, Amy M; Lee, Roland; Hu, Liangbing; Moore, Bryon; Cucksey, Chad; Risser, Steven

    2011-02-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were deposited from a chlorosulfonic superacid solution onto PET substrates by a filtration/transfer method. The sheet resistance and transmission (at 550 nm) of the films were 60 Ω/sq and 90.9% respectively, which corresponds to a DC conductivity of 12,825 S cm(-1) and a DC/optical conductivity ratio of 64.1. This is the highest DC conductivity reported for CNT thin films to date, and attributed to both the high quality of the CNT material and the exfoliation/doping by the superacid. This work demonstrates that CNT transparent films have not reached the conductivity limit; continued improvements will enable these films to be used as the transparent electrode for applications in solid state lighting, LCD displays, touch panels, and photovoltaics.

  10. Deposition rate and etching rate due to neutral radicals and dust particles measured using QCMs together with a dust eliminating filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Ryu; Koga, Kazunori; Yamashita, Daisuke; Kamataki, Kunihiro; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Shiratani, Masaharu; Ashikawa, Naoko; Tokitani, Masayuki; Masuzaki, Suguru; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Sagara, Akio; the LHD experimental Group Team

    2015-09-01

    We have developed an in-situ method for measuring deposition rate of radicals and dust particles using quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) together with a dust eliminating filter. The QCMs have three channels of quartz crystals. Channel 1 was used to measure total deposition rate due to radicals and dust particles. Channel 2 was covered with a dust eliminating filter. Channel 3 was covered with a stainless-steel plate. Moreover, all QCMs are covered with a grounded stainless steel mesh for suppressing influx of charged particles. The measurements were conducted in the Large Helical Device in the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. Although the deposition measurements during the discharges were difficult, we obtained deposition rate and etching rate by comparing the data before and after each discharge. The frequency difference for channel 1 changes from 0.1 Hz (etching) to -0.5 Hz (deposition), while those for channels 2 and 3 are within a range of +/-0.1 Hz and +/-0.05 Hz, respectively. The QCM method gives information on deposition rate and etching rate due to neutral radicals and dust particles.

  11. High rate pulse processing algorithms for microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, Michael; Hoover, Andrew S; Bacrania, Mnesh K; Tan, Hui; Breus, Dimitry; Henning, Wolfgang; Sabourov, Konstantin; Collins, Jeff; Warburton, William K; Dorise, Bertrand; Ullom, Joel N

    2009-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that microcalorimeter spectrometers based on superconducting transition-edge-sensor can readily achieve sub-100 eV energy resolution near 100 keV. However, the active volume of a single microcalorimeter has to be small to maintain good energy resolution, and pulse decay times are normally in the order of milliseconds due to slow thermal relaxation. Consequently, spectrometers are typically built with an array of microcalorimeters to increase detection efficiency and count rate. Large arrays, however, require as much pulse processing as possible to be performed at the front end of the readout electronics to avoid transferring large amounts of waveform data to a host computer for processing. In this paper, they present digital filtering algorithms for processing microcalorimeter pulses in real time at high count rates. The goal for these algorithms, which are being implemented in the readout electronics that they are also currently developing, is to achieve sufficiently good energy resolution for most applications while being (a) simple enough to be implemented in the readout electronics and (b) capable of processing overlapping pulses and thus achieving much higher output count rates than the rates that existing algorithms are currently achieving. Details of these algorithms are presented, and their performance was compared to that of the 'optimal filter' that is the dominant pulse processing algorithm in the cryogenic-detector community.

  12. High Strain Rate Behavior of Polyurea Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vasant; Milby, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    Polyurea has been gaining importance in recent years due to its impact resistance properties. The actual compositions of this viscoelastic material must be tailored for specific use. It is therefore imperative to study the effect of variations in composition on the properties of the material. High-strain-rate response of three polyurea compositions with varying molecular weights has been investigated using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar arrangement equipped with titanium bars. The polyurea compositions were synthesized from polyamines (Versalink, Air Products) with a multi-functional isocyanate (Isonate 143L, Dow Chemical). Amines with molecular weights of 1000, 650, and a blend of 250/1000 have been used in the current investigation. The materials have been tested up to strain rates of 6000/s. Results from these tests have shown interesting trends on the high rate behavior. While higher molecular weight composition show lower yield, they do not show dominant hardening behavior. On the other hand, the blend of 250/1000 show higher load bearing capability but lower strain hardening effects than the 600 and 1000 molecular weight amine based materials. Refinement in experimental methods and comparison of results using aluminum Split Hopkinson Bar is presented.

  13. High strain rate behavior of polyurea compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vasant S.; Milby, Christopher

    2012-03-01

    High-strain-rate response of three polyurea compositions with varying molecular weights has been investigated using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar arrangement equipped with aluminum bars. Three polyurea compositions were synthesized from polyamines (Versalink, Air Products) with a multi-functional isocyanate (Isonate 143L, Dow Chemical). Amines with molecular weights of 1000, 650, and a blend of 250/1000 have been used in the current investigation. These materials have been tested to strain rates of over 6000/s. High strain rate results from these tests have shown varying trends as a function of increasing strain. While higher molecular weight composition show lower yield, they do not show dominant hardening behavior at lower strain. On the other hand, the blend of 250/1000 show higher load bearing capability but lower strain hardening effects than the 600 and 1000 molecular weight amine based materials. Results indicate that the initial increase in the modulus of the blend of 250/1000 may lead to the loss of strain hardening characteristics as the material is compressed to 50% strain, compared to 1000 molecular weight amine based material.

  14. High Strain Rate Behavior of Nanoporous Tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruestes, Carlos J.; Bringa, Eduardo M.; Stukowski, Alexander; Rodriguez Nieva, Joaquin F.; Bertolino, Graciela; Tang, Yizhe; Meyers, Marc A.

    2012-02-01

    Nano-scale failure under extreme conditions is not well understood. In addition to porosity arising from mechanical failure at high strain rates, porous structures also develop due to radiation damage. Therefore, understanding the role of porosity on mechanical behavior is important for the assessment and development of materials like metallic foams, and materials for new fission and fusion reactors, with improved mechanical properties. We carry out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a Tantalum (a model body-centered cubic metal) crystal with a collection of nanovoids under compression. The effects of high strain rate, ranging from 10^7s-1 to 10^10s-1, on the stress strain curve and on dislocation activity are examined. We find massive total dislocation densities, and estimate a much lower density of mobile dislocations, due to the formation of junctions. Despite the large stress and strain rate, we do not observe twin formation, since nanopores are effective dislocation production sources. A significant fraction of dislocations survive unloading, unlike what happens in fcc metals, and future experiments might be able to study similar recovered samples and find clues to their plastic behavior during loading.

  15. High strain-rate magnetoelasticity in Galfenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domann, J. P.; Loeffler, C. M.; Martin, B. E.; Carman, G. P.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the experimental measurements of a highly magnetoelastic material (Galfenol) under impact loading. A Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar was used to generate compressive stress up to 275 MPa at strain rates of either 20/s or 33/s while measuring the stress-strain response and change in magnetic flux density due to magnetoelastic coupling. The average Young's modulus (44.85 GPa) was invariant to strain rate, with instantaneous stiffness ranging from 25 to 55 GPa. A lumped parameters model simulated the measured pickup coil voltages in response to an applied stress pulse. Fitting the model to the experimental data provided the average piezomagnetic coefficient and relative permeability as functions of field strength. The model suggests magnetoelastic coupling is primarily insensitive to strain rates as high as 33/s. Additionally, the lumped parameters model was used to investigate magnetoelastic transducers as potential pulsed power sources. Results show that Galfenol can generate large quantities of instantaneous power (80 MW/m3 ), comparable to explosively driven ferromagnetic pulse generators (500 MW/m3 ). However, this process is much more efficient and can be cyclically carried out in the linear elastic range of the material, in stark contrast with explosively driven pulsed power generators.

  16. High strain rate deformation of layered nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Veysset, David; Singer, Jonathan P; Retsch, Markus; Saini, Gagan; Pezeril, Thomas; Nelson, Keith A; Thomas, Edwin L

    2012-01-01

    Insight into the mechanical behaviour of nanomaterials under the extreme condition of very high deformation rates and to very large strains is needed to provide improved understanding for the development of new protective materials. Applications include protection against bullets for body armour, micrometeorites for satellites, and high-speed particle impact for jet engine turbine blades. Here we use a microscopic ballistic test to report the responses of periodic glassy-rubbery layered block-copolymer nanostructures to impact from hypervelocity micron-sized silica spheres. Entire deformation fields are experimentally visualized at an exceptionally high resolution (below 10 nm) and we discover how the microstructure dissipates the impact energy via layer kinking, layer compression, extreme chain conformational flattening, domain fragmentation and segmental mixing to form a liquid phase. Orientation-dependent experiments show that the dissipation can be enhanced by 30% by proper orientation of the layers.

  17. High strain rate deformation of layered nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Veysset, David; Singer, Jonathan P.; Retsch, Markus; Saini, Gagan; Pezeril, Thomas; Nelson, Keith A.; Thomas, Edwin L.

    2012-11-01

    Insight into the mechanical behaviour of nanomaterials under the extreme condition of very high deformation rates and to very large strains is needed to provide improved understanding for the development of new protective materials. Applications include protection against bullets for body armour, micrometeorites for satellites, and high-speed particle impact for jet engine turbine blades. Here we use a microscopic ballistic test to report the responses of periodic glassy-rubbery layered block-copolymer nanostructures to impact from hypervelocity micron-sized silica spheres. Entire deformation fields are experimentally visualized at an exceptionally high resolution (below 10 nm) and we discover how the microstructure dissipates the impact energy via layer kinking, layer compression, extreme chain conformational flattening, domain fragmentation and segmental mixing to form a liquid phase. Orientation-dependent experiments show that the dissipation can be enhanced by 30% by proper orientation of the layers.

  18. Civilian residential fire fatality rates: Six high-rate states versus six low-rate states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, J. R., Jr.; Helzer, S. G.

    1983-08-01

    Results of an analysis of 1,600 fire fatalities occurring in six states with high fire-death rates and six states with low fire-death rates are presented. Reasons for the differences in rates are explored, with special attention to victim age, sex, race, and condition at time of ignition. Fire cause patterns are touched on only lightly but are addressed more extensively in the companion piece to this report, "Rural and Non-Rural Civilian Residential Fire Fatalities in Twelve States', NBSIR 82-2519.

  19. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon; Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram

    2016-11-01

    Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al2O3 were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al2O3 shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al2O3, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al2O3 on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  20. High frame-rate digital radiographic videography

    SciTech Connect

    King, N.S.P.; Cverna, F.H.; Albright, K.L.; Jaramillo, S.A.; Yates, G.J.; McDonald, T.E.; Flynn, M.J.; Tashman, S.

    1994-09-01

    High speed x-ray imaging can be an important tool for observing internal processes in a wide range of applications. In this paper we describe preliminary implementation of a system having the eventual goal of observing the internal dynamics of bone and joint reactions during loading. Two Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) gated and image intensified camera systems were used to record images from an x-ray image convertor tube to demonstrate the potential of high frame-rate digital radiographic videography in the analysis of bone and joint dynamics of the human body. Preliminary experiments were done at LANL to test the systems. Initial high frame-rate imaging (from 500 to 1000 frames/s) of a swinging pendulum mounted to the face of an X-ray image convertor tube demonstrated high contrast response and baseline sensitivity. The systems were then evaluated at the Motion Analysis Laboratory of Henry Ford Health Systems Bone and Joint Center. Imaging of a 9 inch acrylic disk with embedded lead markers rotating at approximately 1000 RPM, demonstrated the system response to a high velocity/high contrast target. By gating the P-20 phosphor image from the X-ray image convertor with a second image intensifier (II) and using a 100-microsecond wide optical gate through the second II, enough prompt light decay from the x-ray image convertor phosphor had taken place to achieve reduction of most of the motion blurring. Measurement of the marker velocity was made by using video frames acquired at 500 frames/s. The data obtained from both experiments successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the technique. Several key areas for improvement are discussed along with salient test results and experiment details.

  1. High-frame-rate digital radiographic videography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Nicholas S. P.; Cverna, Frank H.; Albright, Kevin L.; Jaramillo, Steven A.; Yates, George J.; McDonald, Thomas E.; Flynn, Michael J.; Tashman, Scott

    1994-10-01

    High speed x-ray imaging can be an important tool for observing internal processes in a wide range of applications. In this paper we describe preliminary implementation of a system having the eventual goal of observing the internal dynamics of bone and joint reactions during loading. Two Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) gated and image intensified camera systems were used to record images from an x-ray image convertor tube to demonstrate the potential of high frame-rate digital radiographic videography in the analysis of bone and joint dynamics of the human body. Preliminary experiments were done at LANL to test the systems. Initial high frame-rate imaging (from 500 to 1000 frames/s) of a swinging pendulum mounted to the face of an X-ray image convertor tube demonstrated high contrast response and baseline sensitivity. The systems were then evaluated at the Motion Analysis Laboratory of Henry Ford Health Systems Bone and Joint Center. Imaging of a 9 inch acrylic disk with embedded lead markers rotating at approximately 1000 RPM, demonstrated the system response to a high velocity/high contrast target. By gating the P-20 phosphor image from the X-ray image convertor with a second image intensifier (II) and using a 100 microsecond wide optical gate through the second II, enough prompt light decay from the x-ray image convertor phosphor had taken place to achieve reduction of most of the motion blurring. Measurement of the marker velocity was made by using video frames acquired at 500 frames/s. The data obtained from both experiments successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the technique. Several key areas for improvement are discussed along with salient test results and experiment details.

  2. Inferred NO2 Dry Deposition Rate at Nighttime in Arid Climate Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goliff, W. S.; Gonzalez, T. D.; Stockwell, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    Measurements were made under arid conditions in Reno, Nevada during the summer of 2008 to allow NO, NO2, and NO3 mixing ratios to be observed under conditions of a wider range of relative humidity then in previous studies. The conversion of NO3 to N2O5 and the subsequent reaction of N2O5 with liquid water on aerosol particles, places a significant limit on the NO3 lifetime. Liquid water on aerosol particles is related to relative humidity therefore arid conditions allowed the study of NO3 behavior under a wider range of aerosol and other surface conditions, Differential Optical Absorbance Spectrometry (DOAS) was used to measure mixing ratios of NO2 and HCHO; other instrumentation was used to measure ozone, volatile organic compounds (including aldehydes), nitrogen oxides, SO2, SO42-, aerosol size and number density, and meteorological variables . Model simulations of selected measurement periods indicate an underestimation of dry deposition rates for NO2 using both a box model (SBOX; Seefeld, 1997) and a 1-D Model (the University of Alabama Huntsville one-dimensional chemical Transport Model). Simulations performed for this study indicate that current estimates of rates of dry deposition for NO2 are under-estimated for nighttime arid conditions.

  3. Fuel droplet burning rates at high pressures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canada, G. S.; Faeth, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    Combustion of methanol, ethanol, propanol-1, n-pentane, n-heptane, and n-decane was observed in air under natural convection conditions, at pressures up to 100 atm. The droplets were simulated by porous spheres, with diameters in the range from 0.63 to 1.90 cm. The pressure levels of the tests were high enough so that near-critical combustion was observed for methanol and ethanol. Due to the high pressures, the phase-equilibrium models of the analysis included both the conventional low-pressure approach as well as high-pressure versions, allowing for real gas effects and the solubility of combustion-product gases in the liquid phase. The burning-rate predictions of the various theories were similar, and in fair agreement with the data. The high-pressure theory gave the best prediction for the liquid-surface temperatures of ethanol and propanol-1 at high pressure. The experiments indicated the approach of critical burning conditions for methanol and ethanol at pressures on the order of 80 to 100 atm, which was in good agreement with the predictions of both the low- and high-pressure analysis.

  4. Corrosion and runoff rates of Cu and three Cu-alloys in marine environments with increasing chloride deposition rate.

    PubMed

    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Zhang, Xian; Goidanich, Sara; Le Bozec, Nathalie; Herting, Gunilla; Leygraf, Christofer

    2014-02-15

    Bare copper sheet and three commercial Cu-based alloys, Cu15Zn, Cu4Sn and Cu5Al5Zn, have been exposed to four test sites in Brest, France, with strongly varying chloride deposition rates. The corrosion rates of all four materials decrease continuously with distance from the coast, i.e. with decreasing chloride load, and in the following order: Cu4Sn>Cu sheet>Cu15Zn>Cu5Al5Zn. The patina on all materials was composed of two main layers, Cu2O as the inner layer and Cu2(OH)3Cl as the outer layer, and with a discontinuous presence of CuCl in between. Additional minor patina constituents are SnO2 (Cu4Sn), Zn5(OH)6(CO3)2 (Cu15Zn and Cu5Al5Zn) and Zn6Al2(OH)16CO3·4H2O/Zn2Al(OH)6Cl·2H2O/Zn5Cl2(OH)8·H2O and Al2O3 (Cu5Al5Zn). The observed Zn- and Zn/Al-containing corrosion products might be important factors for the lower sensitivity of Cu15Zn and Cu5Al5Zn against chloride-induced atmospheric corrosion compared with Cu sheet and Cu4Sn. Decreasing corrosion rates with exposure time were observed for all materials and chloride loads and attributed to an improved adherence with time of the outer patina to the underlying inner oxide. Flaking of the outer patina layer was mainly observed on Cu4Sn and Cu sheet and associated with the gradual transformation of CuCl to Cu2(OH)3Cl of larger volume. After three years only Cu5Al5Zn remains lustrous because of a patina compared with the other materials that appeared brownish-reddish. Significantly lower release rates of metals compared with corresponding corrosion rates were observed for all materials. Very similar release rates of copper from all four materials were observed during the fifth year of marine exposure due to an outer surface patina that with time revealed similar constituents and solubility properties.

  5. Microalgal separation from high-rate ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Nurdogan, Y.

    1988-01-01

    High rate ponding (HRP) processes are playing an increasing role in the treatment of organic wastewaters in sunbelt communities. Photosynthetic oxygenation by algae has proved to cost only one-seventh as much as mechanical aeration for activated sludge systems. During this study, an advanced HRP, which produces an effluent equivalent to tertiary treatment has been studied. It emphasizes not only waste oxidation but also algal separation and nutrient removal. This new system is herein called advanced tertiary high rate ponding (ATHRP). Phosphorus removal in HRP systems is normally low because algal uptake of phosphorus is about one percent of their 200-300 mg/L dry weights. Precipitation of calcium phosphates by autofluocculation also occurs in HRP at high pH levels, but it is generally not complete due to insufficient calcium concentration in the pond. In the case of Richmond where the studies were conducted, the sewage is very low in calcium. Therefore, enhancement of natural autoflocculation was studied by adding small amounts of lime to the pond. Through this simple procedure phosphorus and nitrogen removals were virtually complete justifying the terminology ATHRP.

  6. Numerical study on the deposition rate of hematite particle on polypropylene walls: role of surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Henry, Christophe; Minier, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Grégory; Hurisse, Olivier

    2011-04-19

    test case. These new numerical results show that nonzero deposition rates are now obtained even in repulsive conditions, which confirms that surface roughness is a relevant aspect to introduce in general approaches to deposition. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Innovations in high rate condensate polishing systems

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, M.

    1995-01-01

    Test work is being conducted at two major east coast utilities to evaluate flow distribution in high flow rate condensate polishing service vessels. The work includes core sample data used to map the flow distribution in vessels as originally manufactured. Underdrain modifications for improved flow distribution are discussed with data that indicates performance increases of the service vessel following the modifications. The test work is on going, with preliminary data indicating that significant improvements in cycle run length are possible with underdrain modifications. The economic benefits of the above modifications are discussed.

  8. High Gradient Accelerator Cavities Using Atomic Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, Robert Lawrence; Parsons, Gregory; Williams, Philip; Oldham, Christopher; Mundy, Zach; Dolgashev, Valery

    2014-12-09

    In the Phase I program, Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR), in collaboration with North Carolina State University (NCSU), fabricated copper accelerator cavities and used Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to apply thin metal coatings of tungsten and platinum. It was hypothesized that a tungsten coating would provide a robust surface more resistant to arcing and arc damage. The platinum coating was predicted to reduce processing time by inhibiting oxides that form on copper surfaces soon after machining. Two sets of cavity parts were fabricated. One was coated with 35 nm of tungsten, and the other with approximately 10 nm of platinum. Only the platinum cavity parts could be high power tested during the Phase I program due to schedule and funding constraints. The platinum coated cavity exhibit poor performance when compared with pure copper cavities. Not only did arcing occur at lower power levels, but the processing time was actually longer. There were several issues that contributed to the poor performance. First, machining of the base copper cavity parts failed to achieve the quality and cleanliness standards specified to SLAC National Accelerator Center. Secondly, the ALD facilities were not configured to provide the high levels of cleanliness required. Finally, the nanometer coating applied was likely far too thin to provide the performance required. The coating was ablated or peeled from the surface in regions of high fields. It was concluded that the current ALD process could not provide improved performance over cavities produced at national laboratories using dedicated facilities.

  9. High crystalline quality single crystal chemical vapour deposition diamond.

    PubMed

    Martineau, P M; Gaukroger, M P; Guy, K B; Lawson, S C; Twitchen, D J; Friel, I; Hansen, J O; Summerton, G C; Addison, T P G; Burns, R

    2009-09-09

    Homoepitaxial chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) synthetic diamond substrates allows the production of diamond material with controlled point defect content. In order to minimize the extended defect content, however, it is necessary to minimize the number of substrate extended defects that reach the initial growth surface and the nucleation of dislocations at the interface between the CVD layer and its substrate. X-ray topography has indicated that when type IIa HPHT synthetic substrates are used, the density of dislocations nucleating at the interface can be less than 400  cm(-2). X-ray topography, photoluminescence imaging and birefringence microscopy of HPHT grown synthetic type IIa diamond clearly show that the extended defect content is growth sector dependent. ⟨111⟩ sectors contain the highest concentration of both stacking faults and dislocations but ⟨100⟩ sectors are relatively free of both. It has been shown that HPHT treatment of such material can significantly reduce the area of stacking faults and cause dislocations to move. This knowledge, coupled with an understanding of how growth sectors develop during HPHT synthesis, has been used to guide selection and processing of substrates suitable for CVD synthesis of material with high crystalline perfection and controlled point defect content.

  10. Application of high-resolution depositional modeling to reservoir characterisation

    SciTech Connect

    Keyu, L.; Paterson, L.

    1995-08-01

    As hydrocarbon producing basins and fields become more intensely developed, conventional stratigraphic analysis methods can sometimes no longer meet the resolution required by petroleum geologists and engineers. High-resolution depositional modeling provides a quantitative alternative to the conventional approach of sequence stratigraphic analysis. A computer program, SEDPAK, which was designed primarily according to the basic premise of the sequence stratigraphic concept, was here used to conduct high-resolution simulations for two sedimentary sequences. One is a Pliocene to Recent shelf margin sediment sequence of the offshore Sydney Basin continental shelf, Australia; the other is the Early Cretaceous (Aptian) Windalia Sand reservoir of the Barrow Island Field, North West Shelf, Australia. In both instances, the simulations have well mimicked the variations of the sedimentary facies temporally and spatially in fine detail with each time step representing 10 ka and a vertical resolution of one meter. The reservoir heterogeneities and the observed cyclicity in the Windalia Sand were particularly well documented by the SEDPAK simulation using a locally derived sealevel curve. The simulation result suggested that high-frequency sealevel variations ?associated with Milankovitch cyclicity were probably the primary cause that controlled the reservoir heterogeneities of the Windalia Sand. This finding provides a working model for the Cretaceous coeval reservoirs in the North West Shelf, Australia.

  11. Sinks for inorganic nitrogen deposition in forest ecosystems with low and high nitrogen deposition in China.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Wenping; Yu, Guirui; Fang, Huajun; Jiang, Chunming; Yan, Junhua; Zhou, Mei

    2014-01-01

    We added the stable isotope (15)N in the form of ((15)NH4)2SO4 and K(15)NO3 to forest ecosystems in eastern China under two different N deposition levels to study the fate of the different forms of deposited N. Prior to the addition of the (15)N tracers, the natural (15)N abundance ranging from -3.4‰ to +10.9‰ in the forest under heavy N deposition at Dinghushan (DHS), and from -3.92‰ to +7.25‰ in the forest under light N deposition at Daxinganling (DXAL). Four months after the tracer application, the total (15)N recovery from the major ecosystem compartments ranged from 55.3% to 90.5%. The total (15)N recoveries were similar under the ((15)NH4)2SO4 tracer treatment in both two forest ecosystems, whereas the total (15)N recovery was significantly lower in the subtropical forest ecosystem at DHS than in the boreal forest ecosystem at DXAL under the K(15)NO3 tracer treatment. The (15)N assimilated into the tree biomass represented only 8.8% to 33.7% of the (15)N added to the forest ecosystems. In both of the tracer application treatments, more (15)N was recovered from the tree biomass in the subtropical forest ecosystem at DHS than the boreal forest ecosystem at DXAL. The amount of (15)N assimilated into tree biomass was greater under the K(15)NO3 tracer treatment than that of the ((15)NH4)2SO4 treatment in both forest ecosystems. This study suggests that, although less N was immobilized in the forest ecosystems under more intensive N deposition conditions, forest ecosystems in China strongly retain N deposition, even in areas under heavy N deposition intensity or in ecosystems undergoing spring freezing and thawing melts. Compared to ammonium deposition, deposited nitrate is released from the forest ecosystem more easily. However, nitrate deposition could be retained mostly in the plant N pool, which might lead to more C sequestration in these ecosystems.

  12. Sinks for Inorganic Nitrogen Deposition in Forest Ecosystems with Low and High Nitrogen Deposition in China

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Wenping; Yu, Guirui; Fang, Huajun; Jiang, Chunming; Yan, Junhua; Zhou, Mei

    2014-01-01

    We added the stable isotope 15N in the form of (15NH4)2SO4 and K15NO3 to forest ecosystems in eastern China under two different N deposition levels to study the fate of the different forms of deposited N. Prior to the addition of the 15N tracers, the natural 15N abundance ranging from −3.4‰ to +10.9‰ in the forest under heavy N deposition at Dinghushan (DHS), and from −3.92‰ to +7.25‰ in the forest under light N deposition at Daxinganling (DXAL). Four months after the tracer application, the total 15N recovery from the major ecosystem compartments ranged from 55.3% to 90.5%. The total 15N recoveries were similar under the (15NH4)2SO4 tracer treatment in both two forest ecosystems, whereas the total 15N recovery was significantly lower in the subtropical forest ecosystem at DHS than in the boreal forest ecosystem at DXAL under the K15NO3 tracer treatment. The 15N assimilated into the tree biomass represented only 8.8% to 33.7% of the 15N added to the forest ecosystems. In both of the tracer application treatments, more 15N was recovered from the tree biomass in the subtropical forest ecosystem at DHS than the boreal forest ecosystem at DXAL. The amount of 15N assimilated into tree biomass was greater under the K15NO3 tracer treatment than that of the (15NH4)2SO4 treatment in both forest ecosystems. This study suggests that, although less N was immobilized in the forest ecosystems under more intensive N deposition conditions, forest ecosystems in China strongly retain N deposition, even in areas under heavy N deposition intensity or in ecosystems undergoing spring freezing and thawing melts. Compared to ammonium deposition, deposited nitrate is released from the forest ecosystem more easily. However, nitrate deposition could be retained mostly in the plant N pool, which might lead to more C sequestration in these ecosystems. PMID:24586688

  13. Age determinations and growth rates of Pacific ferromanganese deposits using strontium isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingram, B.L.; Hein, J.R.; Farmer, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    87Sr 86Sr ratios, trace element and REE compositions, and textural characteristics were determined for three hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts, one hydrothermal deposit, and two mixed hydrothermalhydrogenetic crusts from the Pacific. The Sr isotope data are compared to the Sr seawater curve for the Cenozoic to determine the ages and growth rates of the crusts. The 87Sr 86Sr in the crusts does not increase monotonically with depth as expected if the Sr were solely derived from seawater and perfectly preserved since deposition. This indicates post-depositional exchange of Sr or heterogeneous sources for the Sr originally contained in the crusts. Textures of hydrogenetic crusts generally correlate with Sr isotopic variations. The highest porosity intervals commonly exhibit the highest 87Sr 86Sr ratios, indicating exchange with younger seawater. Intervals with the lowest porosity commonly have lower 87Sr 86Sr and may preserve the original Sr isotopic ratios. Minimum ages of crust growth inception were calculated from dense, low porosity intervals. Growth of the hydrogenetic crusts began at or after 23 Ma, although their substrates are Cretaceous. Estimated average growth rates of the three hydrogenetic crusts vary between 0.9 and 2.7 mm/Ma, consistent with published rates determined by other techniques. Within the Marshall Islands crust, growth rates for individual layers varied greatly between 1.0 and 5.4 mm/Ma. For one crust, very low 87Sr 86Sr ratios occurred in detrital-rich intervals. Hydrothermal Fe-Mn oxide from the active Lau Basin back-arc spreading axis (Valu Fa Ridge) has an 87Sr 86Sr ratio with a predominantly seawater signature ( 87Sr 86Sr 0.709196), indicating a maximum age of 0.9 Ma. One crust from an off-axis seamount west of Gorda Ridge may have begun precipitating hydrogenetically at 0.5 Ma (0.709211), and had increasing hydrothermal or volcanic input in the top half of the crust, indicated by a significantly lower 87Sr 86Sr ratio (0.709052). ?? 1990.

  14. Reaction rates, depositional history and sources of indium in sediments from Appalachian and Canadian Shield lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessier, André; Gobeil, Charles; Laforte, Lucie

    2014-07-01

    Sediment cores were collected at the deepest site of twelve headwater lakes from the Province of Québec, Canada that receive contaminants only from atmospheric deposition, either directly to the lake surface or indirectly from the watershed. Several of the lakes are located within relatively short distance (<40 km) and others at more than 200 km from potential sources of contamination. The sediments were dated and analyzed for In and other elements including Fe, Mn, Al and organic C. Fe-rich authigenic material was collected on Teflon sheets inserted vertically into the sediments at the only study site whose hypolimnion remains perennially oxic. Porewater samples collected at the coring site of four of the lakes were also analyzed for In and other solutes including sulfide, sulfate, Fe, Mn, inorganic and organic C and major ions. The porewater In profiles display concentration gradients at or below the sediment-water interface. Modeling these profiles with a one-dimensional transport-reaction equation assuming steady state allows definition of depth intervals (zones) where In is either released to or removed from porewater and quantification of net In reactions rates in each zone. The position of the In consumption zones, the shape of the vertical profiles of dissolved In, sulfide and iron, as well as thermodynamic calculations of saturation states collectively suggest that In(OH)3(s) and In2S3(s) do not precipitate in the sediments and that adsorption of In onto sedimentary FeS(s) does not occur. However, similarities in the In and Fe porewater profiles, and the presence of In in the authigenic Fe-rich solids, reveal that part of the In becomes associated with authigenic Fe oxyhydroxides in the perennially oxic lake and is coupled to the Fe redox cycling. Comparison of the In/Corg and In/Fe molar ratios in the authigenic Fe-rich material and in surface sediments (0-0.5 cm) of this lake suggests that most non-lithogenic In was bound to humic substances. From the

  15. Solar Energy Deposition Rates in the Mesosphere Derived from Airglow Measurements: Implications for the Ozone Model Deficit Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Roble, Raymond G.; Hagan, Maura

    2000-01-01

    We derive rates of energy deposition in the mesosphere due to the absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation by ozone. The rates are derived directly from measurements of the 1.27-microns oxygen dayglow emission, independent of knowledge of the ozone abundance, the ozone absorption cross sections, and the ultraviolet solar irradiance in the ozone Hartley band. Fifty-six months of airglow data taken between 1982 and 1986 by the near-infrared spectrometer on the Solar-Mesosphere Explorer satellite are analyzed. The energy deposition rates exhibit altitude-dependent annual and semi-annual variations. We also find a positive correlation between temperatures and energy deposition rates near 90 km at low latitudes. This correlation is largely due to the semiannual oscillation in temperature and ozone and is consistent with model calculations. There is also a suggestion of possible tidal enhancement of this correlation based on recent theoretical and observational analyses. The airglow-derived rates of energy deposition are then compared with those computed by multidimensional numerical models. The observed and modeled deposition rates typically agree to within 20%. This agreement in energy deposition rates implies the same agreement exists between measured and modeled ozone volume mixing ratios in the mesosphere. Only in the upper mesosphere at midlatitudes during winter do we derive energy deposition rates (and hence ozone mixing ratios) consistently and significantly larger than the model calculations. This result is contrary to previous studies that have shown a large model deficit in the ozone abundance throughout the mesosphere. The climatology of solar energy deposition and heating presented in this paper is available to the community at the Middle Atmosphere Energy Budget Project web site at http://heat-budget.gats-inc.com.

  16. Solar Energy Deposition Rates in the Mesosphere Derived from Airglow Measurements: Implications for the Ozone Model Deficit Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Roble, Raymond G.; Hagan, Maura

    2000-01-01

    We derive rates of energy deposition in the mesosphere due to the absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation by ozone. The rates are derived directly from measurements of the 1.27-microns oxygen dayglow emission, independent of knowledge of the ozone abundance, the ozone absorption cross sections, and the ultraviolet solar irradiance in the ozone Hartley band. Fifty-six months of airglow data taken between 1982 and 1986 by the near-infrared spectrometer on the Solar-Mesosphere Explorer satellite are analyzed. The energy deposition rates exhibit altitude-dependent annual and semi-annual variations. We also find a positive correlation between temperatures and energy deposition rates near 90 km at low latitudes. This correlation is largely due to the semiannual oscillation in temperature and ozone and is consistent with model calculations. There is also a suggestion of possible tidal enhancement of this correlation based on recent theoretical and observational analyses. The airglow-derived rates of energy deposition are then compared with those computed by multidimensional numerical models. The observed and modeled deposition rates typically agree to within 20%. This agreement in energy deposition rates implies the same agreement exists between measured and modeled ozone volume mixing ratios in the mesosphere. Only in the upper mesosphere at midlatitudes during winter do we derive energy deposition rates (and hence ozone mixing ratios) consistently and significantly larger than the model calculations. This result is contrary to previous studies that have shown a large model deficit in the ozone abundance throughout the mesosphere. The climatology of solar energy deposition and heating presented in this paper is available to the community at the Middle Atmosphere Energy Budget Project web site at http://heat-budget.gats-inc.com.

  17. Cervix cancer brachytherapy: high dose rate.

    PubMed

    Miglierini, P; Malhaire, J-P; Goasduff, G; Miranda, O; Pradier, O

    2014-10-01

    Cervical cancer, although less common in industrialized countries, is the fourth most common cancer affecting women worldwide and the fourth leading cause of cancer death. In developing countries, these cancers are often discovered at a later stage in the form of locally advanced tumour with a poor prognosis. Depending on the stage of the disease, treatment is mainly based on a chemoradiotherapy followed by uterovaginal brachytherapy ending by a potential remaining tumour surgery or in principle for some teams. The role of irradiation is crucial to ensure a better local control. It has been shown that the more the delivered dose is important, the better the local results are. In order to preserve the maximum of organs at risk and to allow this dose escalation, brachytherapy (intracavitary and/or interstitial) has been progressively introduced. Its evolution and its progressive improvement have led to the development of high dose rate brachytherapy, the advantages of which are especially based on the possibility of outpatient treatment while maintaining the effectiveness of other brachytherapy forms (i.e., low dose rate or pulsed dose rate). Numerous innovations have also been completed in the field of imaging, leading to a progress in treatment planning systems by switching from two-dimensional form to a three-dimensional one. Image-guided brachytherapy allows more precise target volume delineation as well as an optimized dosimetry permitting a better coverage of target volumes.

  18. High resolution Ge/Li/ spectrometer reduces rate-dependent distortions at high counting rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, R.; Larsen, R. N.; Mann, H. M.; Rudnick, S. J.; Sherman, I. S.; Strauss, M. G.

    1968-01-01

    Modified spectrometer system with a low-noise preamplifier reduces rate-dependent distortions at high counting rates, 25,000 counts per second. Pole-zero cancellation minimizes pulse undershoots due to multiple time constants, baseline restoration improves resolution and prevents spectral shifts.

  19. Solid-solution CrCoCuFeNi high-entropy alloy thin films synthesized by sputter deposition

    DOE PAGES

    An, Zhinan; Jia, Haoling; Wu, Yueying; ...

    2015-05-04

    The concept of high configurational entropy requires that the high-entropy alloys (HEAs) yield single-phase solid solutions. However, phase separations are quite common in bulk HEAs. A five-element alloy, CrCoCuFeNi, was deposited via radio frequency magnetron sputtering and confirmed to be a single-phase solid solution through the high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The formation of the solid-solution phase is presumed to be due to the high cooling rate of the sputter-deposition process.

  20. Enhanced high intensity focused ultrasound heat deposition for more efficient hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labuda, Cecille Pemberton

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is currently being developed for hemorrhage control since it provides rapid energy deposition in the form of heat in the HIFU focal region. When the HIFU focus is targeted on soft tissue wounds, the resulting elevation of tissue temperature cauterizes the tissues thus stopping the bleeding. If HIFU is targeted near blood vessels with millimeter-range diameter, the rate of heat deposition is limited by loss of heat to the blood flow. Maximizing the local heat deposition is important for the achievement of HIFU-induced hemorrhage control, or "hemostasis", near large vessels. In this study, the effect of a fiber device on the heat deposition in the HIFU focal region is investigated in tissue-mimicking flow phantoms with liquid albumen as the heat-sensitive denaturing flow fluid. The effect of the embedded fiber on albumen coagulation in the flow phantom is compared to the degree and rate of albumen coagulation when no fiber is present. The effect of the fiber device on the size of lesions formed in a heat-sensitive tissue-mimicking phantom is also investigated. Finally, finite difference time domain simulations are performed to determine the heat deposition in a tissue-mimicking phantom with a nylon disc embedded and a phantom with the nylon disc removed. The results of this study are quite promising for the possibility of increased efficacy of hemostasis for such a device in concert with HIFU in vessel-containing tissue volumes where HIFU alone is not completely effective.

  1. Distinctive features of kinetics of plasma at high specific energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepikhin, Nikita; Popov, Nikolay; Starikovskaia, Svetlana

    2016-09-01

    A nanosecond capillary discharge in pure nitrogen at moderate pressures is used as an experimental tool for plasma kinetics studies at conditions of high specific deposited energy up to 1 eV/molecule. Experimental observations based on electrical (back current shunts, capacitive probe) and spectroscopic measurements (quenching rates; translational, rotational and vibrational temperature measurements) demonstrate that high specific deposited energy, at electric fields of 200-300 Td, can significantly change gas kinetics in the discharge and in the afterglow. The numerical calculations in 1D axially symmetric geometry using experimental data as input parameters show that changes in the plasma kinetics are caused by extremely high excitation degree: up to 10% of molecular nitrogen is electronically excited at present conditions. Distinctive features of kinetics of plasma at high specific energy deposition as well as details of the experimental technique and numerical calculations will be present. The work was partially supported by French National Agency, ANR (PLASMAFLAME Project, 2011 BS09 025 01), AOARD AFOSR, FA2386-13-1-4064 grant (Program Officer Prof. Chiping Li), LabEx Plas@Par and Linked International Laboratory LIA KaPPA (France-Russia).

  2. High-Rate Digital Receiver Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghuman, Parminder; Bialas, Thomas; Brambora, Clifford; Fisher, David

    2004-01-01

    A high-rate digital receiver (HRDR) implemented as a peripheral component interface (PCI) board has been developed as a prototype of compact, general-purpose, inexpensive, potentially mass-producible data-acquisition interfaces between telemetry systems and personal computers. The installation of this board in a personal computer together with an analog preprocessor enables the computer to function as a versatile, highrate telemetry-data-acquisition and demodulator system. The prototype HRDR PCI board can handle data at rates as high as 600 megabits per second, in a variety of telemetry formats, transmitted by diverse phase-modulation schemes that include binary phase-shift keying and various forms of quadrature phaseshift keying. Costing less than $25,000 (as of year 2003), the prototype HRDR PCI board supplants multiple racks of older equipment that, when new, cost over $500,000. Just as the development of standard network-interface chips has contributed to the proliferation of networked computers, it is anticipated that the development of standard chips based on the HRDR could contribute to reductions in size and cost and increases in performance of telemetry systems.

  3. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    YamazakI, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. PMID:23179377

  4. High-temperature ductility of electro-deposited nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dini, J. W.; Johnson, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Work done during the past several months on high temperature ductility of electrodeposited nickel is summarized. Data are presented which show that earlier measurements made at NASA-Langley erred on the low side, that strain rate has a marked influence on high temperature ductility, and that codeposition of a small amount of manganese helps to improve high temperature ductility. Influences of a number of other factors on nickel properties were also investigated. They included plating solution temperature, current density, agitation, and elimination of the wetting agent from the plating solution. Repair of a large nozzle section by nickel plating is described.

  5. Sediment data for computation of deposition rates in the tidal Potomac system, Maryland and Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glenn, J.L.; Martin, E.A.; Rice, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Sixty-two cores ranging in length from 33 to 1002 cm were collected from the tidal Potomac system and from selected tributaries downstream from the local head-of-tides between June 1978 and July 1981. Segments from selected depths below the sediment surface have been analyzed for a variety of constituents, including lead-210, trace metals, nutrients, and particle size. The core sites were positioned throughout the hydrologic divisions and geomorphic units of the tidal Potomac system and in water depths ranging from 1 to 30 cm. Cores collected by divers were mostly for historical deposition-rate computations. Vibra cores, as much as 12 m long, were collected primarily to provide data on long-term (pre-historical) sedimentation rates and conditions. Benthos cores were used to provide samples rapidly in locations where divers were not available. Alpha counting methods were used to determine the polonium-210 radioactivity and secular equilibrium was assumed between lead-210 and polonium-210. The alpha decay of polonium-210 provides a measure of the lead-210 radioactivity of the lead-210 produced by in-situ decay of radium-226 in the sediment column (background lead-210) and the lead-210 from external sources (unsupported lead-210). Only the unsupported lead-210 was used in computations of the deposition rate. The count error is based on the counting statistics alone and varies from 3 to 5% of the total number of counts. The background level of lead-210 in tidal Potomac system sediment cores usually is based on in-situ measurements of total lead-210 at depths below which no unsupported lead-210 is believed to be present, and the lead-210 concentrations are relatively constant. (Lantz-PTT)

  6. Processing and characterization of high temperature superconductor thin films deposited by electron beam co-evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jeong-Uk

    Ever since the high temperature superconductors (HTS) were discovered in the late 1980s, there have been enormous efforts to make this into applications such as power transmission cables, transformers, motors and generators. However, many obstacles in performance and high manufacturing cost made this difficult. The first generation HTS wires had low critical current density and were expensive to fabricate. The motivation of this research was to make high performance and low cost second generation HTS coated conductor. Electron beam co-evaporation technique was used to deposit YBCO(YBa2Cu3O7-x ) film at a high rate (10nm/s and higher) on single crystals and metal tapes. The oxygen pressure at the stage of depositing Y, Ba, Cu was 5x10 -5 Torr and the process temperature was 810-840°C. In-situ Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to monitor the optical properties of the YBCO during and after deposition. The deposit transformed to a glassy amorphous mixture of Y, Ba and Cu at 3 mTorr of oxygen. YBCO crystallization occurred after extra oxygen was applied to several Torr. FTIR showed almost the same signature during the formation of YBCO and liquid Ba-Cu-O during deposition, which indicates the liquid played an important role in determining the properties of YBCO in terms of providing epitaxy and fast transport of atoms to nucleate on the film-metal interface. The transformation was very rapid---seconds to minutes, compared to minutes to hours for other post-reaction processes. The oxygen partial pressure and the rate of oxidation (supersaturation) in the liquid region defined in the YBCO phase stability diagram determined the electrical and microstructural properties. In-situ X-ray diffraction heating stage with ambient control was utilized to study this supersaturation effect and explore the temperature-pressure space during YBCO growth. With all the information gathered from FTIR and XRD in-situ experiments and also with nano-engineering during

  7. Nanoparticle layer deposition for highly controlled multilayer formation based on high- coverage monolayers of nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yue; Williams, Mackenzie G.; Miller, Timothy J.; Teplyakov, Andrew V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper establishes a strategy for chemical deposition of functionalized nanoparticles onto solid substrates in a layer-by-layer process based on self-limiting surface chemical reactions leading to complete monolayer formation within the multilayer system without any additional intermediate layers – nanoparticle layer deposition (NPLD). This approach is fundamentally different from previously established traditional layer-by-layer deposition techniques and is conceptually more similar to well-known atomic and molecular – layer deposition processes. The NPLD approach uses efficient chemical functionalization of the solid substrate material and complementary functionalization of nanoparticles to produce a nearly 100% coverage of these nanoparticles with the use of “click chemistry”. Following this initial deposition, a second complete monolayer of nanoparticles is deposited using a copper-catalyzed “click reaction” with the azide-terminated silica nanoparticles of a different size. This layer-by-layer growth is demonstrated to produce stable covalently-bound multilayers of nearly perfect structure over macroscopic solid substrates. The formation of stable covalent bonds is confirmed spectroscopically and the stability of the multilayers produced is tested by sonication in a variety of common solvents. The 1-, 2- and 3-layer structures are interrogated by electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy and the thickness of the multilayers formed is fully consistent with that expected for highly efficient monolayer formation with each cycle of growth. This approach can be extended to include a variety of materials deposited in a predesigned sequence on different substrates with a highly conformal filling. PMID:26726273

  8. High counting rate resistive-plate chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peskov, V.; Anderson, D. F.; Kwan, S.

    1993-05-01

    Parallel-plate avalanche chambers (PPAC) are widely used in physics experiments because they are fast (less than 1 ns) and have very simple construction: just two parallel metallic plates or mesh electrodes. Depending on the applied voltage they may work either in spark mode or avalanche mode. The advantage of the spark mode of operation is a large signal amplitude from the chamber, the disadvantage is that there is a large dead time (msec) for the entire chamber after an event. The main advantage of the avalanche mode is high rate capability 10(exp 5) counts/mm(sup 2). A resistive-plate chamber (RPC) is similar to the PPAC in construction except that one or both of the electrodes are made from high resistivity (greater than 10(exp 10) Omega(cm) materials. In practice RPC's are usually used in the spark mode. Resistive electrodes are charged by sparks, locally reducing the actual electric field in the gap. The size of the charged surface is about 10 mm(sup 2), leaving the rest of the detector unaffected. Therefore, the rate capability of such detectors in the spark mode is considerably higher than conventional spark counters. Among the different glasses tested the best results were obtained with electron type conductive glasses, which obey Ohm's law. Most of the work with such glasses was done with high pressure parallel-plate chambers (10 atm) for time-of-flight measurements. Resistive glasses have been expensive and produced only in small quantities. Now resistive glasses are commercially available, although they are still expensive in small scale production. From the positive experience of different groups working with the resistive glasses, it was decided to review the old idea to use this glass for the RPC. This work has investigated the possibility of using the RPC at 1 atm and in the avalanche mode. This has several advantages: simplicity of construction, high rate capability, low voltage operation, and the ability to work with non-flammable gases.

  9. Deposition rates, mixing intensity and organic content in two contrasting submarine canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, R.; van Oevelen, D.; Soetaert, K.; Thomsen, L.; De Stigter, H. C.; Epping, E.

    2008-02-01

    The hydrographically different conditions characterising the Western Iberian Margin (NE Atlantic) and the Gulf of Lions (Mediterranean) may play an important role in determining the biogeochemical characteristics of the sediments. To investigate this, we compared the Nazaré and Cap de Creus canyons, and their respective adjacent open slopes in terms of the organic carbon (C org) contents, chlorophyll- a (chl- a) concentrations, C:N and chl- a:phaeopigment ratios, and also in terms of modelled mixing intensities, chl- a and 210Pb deposition and background concentrations in sediments. Chlorophyll- a and 210Pb profiles were fitted simultaneously with a reactive transport model to estimate mixing intensity, deposition and background concentrations. Further, to account for the possibility that the decay of chl- a may be lower in the deep sea than in shallow areas, we estimated the model parameters with two models. In one approach (model 1), the temperature dependent decay rate of chl- a as given by Sun et al. [Sun, M.Y., Lee, C., Aller, R.C. (1993) Laboratory Studies of Oxic and Anoxic Degradation of chlorophyll- a in Long-Island sound sediments. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 57, 147-157] for estuaries was used. In the other approach (model 2), an extra parameter was estimated to derive the chlorophyll- a degradation rate. An F-test, taking into account the different number of parameters in the models, was used to single out the model that significantly fitted the data best. In most cases, the model parameters were best-explained with model 1, indicating the empirical relationship by Sun et al. (1993) is a valid means to estimate the chlorophyll- a degradation rate in deep sea sediments. To assess the robustness with which the model parameters were estimated we provide a first application of Bayesian analysis in the modelling of tracers in sediments. Bayesian analysis allows calculating the mean and standard deviation for each model parameter and correlations among

  10. [Difference of lung deposition rate of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) among three kinds of electric nebulizer].

    PubMed

    Murayama, N; Kameda, M; Takamatsu, I; Inoue, T; Doi, S; Toyoshima, K

    1996-01-01

    We examined the lung deposition rate of DSCG with three kinds of electric nebulizer (NE-U03, Pari-Master, Nisshou) on 5 pediatrician skilled with inhalation therapy (31-54 years of age). Excretion of DSCG for 4 hours after inhalation in urine were highest in NE-U03 group, second in Pari-Master group and least in Nisshou group. And then we studied bronchodilating effect of sulbutamol on 18 children (7-17 years of age) with acute exacerbation of bronchial asthma with NE-U03 and Pari-Master. Asthmatic symptom score, SaO2 and pulmonary function were examined before and after inhalation. The delta %FVC, delta %FEV1.0, delta %PEF, delta %V50 and delta %V25 using NE-U03 were 10.3%, 19.1%, 25.5%, 32.5%, and 29.3% in NE-U03 group and 10.6%, 15.9%, 24.1%, 25.4% and 21.3% in Pari-Master group. The data of pulmonary obstraction in NE-03 group were better than that in Pari-Master group. From our data it is obvious that 3 kinds of electric nebulizers have different efficacy in regard to the lung deposition dose of inhaled drugs. When we compare the efficacy of drugs. When we compare the efficacy of drugs for nebulizer inhalation therapy, we should use the drug dose attained to lung and not nominal drug dose in principle.

  11. Lacustrine responses to decreasing wet mercury deposition rates: results from a case study in northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brigham, Mark E.; Sandheinrich, Mark B.; Gay, David A.; Maki, Ryan P.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Wiener, James G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a case study comparing metrics of methylmercury (MeHg) contamination for four undeveloped lakes in Voyageurs National Park to wet atmospheric deposition of mercury (Hg), sulfate (SO4–2), and hydrogen ion (H+) in northern Minnesota. Annual wet Hg, SO4–2, and H+ deposition rates at two nearby precipitation monitoring sites indicate considerable decreases from 1998 to 2012 (mean decreases of 32, 48, and 66%, respectively). Consistent with decreases in the atmospheric pollutants, epilimnetic aqueous methylmercury (MeHgaq) and mercury in small yellow perch (Hgfish) decreased in two of four lakes (mean decreases of 46.5% and 34.5%, respectively, between 2001 and 2012). Counter to decreases in the atmospheric pollutants, MeHgaq increased by 85% in a third lake, whereas Hgfish increased by 80%. The fourth lake had two disturbances in its watershed during the study period (forest fire; changes in shoreline inundation due to beaver activity); this lake lacked overall trends in MeHgaq and Hgfish. The diverging responses among the study lakes exemplify the complexity of ecosystem responses to decreased loads of atmospheric pollutants.

  12. A comparison of rates of hornblende etching in soils in glacial deposits of the northern Rocky Mountains: Influence of climate and characteristics of parent material

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, L.L. . Dept. of Geology); Hall, R.D. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Etching rates of hornblende grains in the soil matrix of glacial deposits in the Northern Rocky Mountains are dependent primarily upon the influences on soil moisture of the climate and texture of the parent materials. Etching is measured as the deepest penetration of weathering along cleavages. Previous works have shown that hornblende etching is a logarithmic function of depth. Hornblende etching is also a logarithmic function of age of the parent material, with etching rates declining rapidly after initially high rates during the first 10 to 15 kyr after deposition. A comparison of etching rates was made among four chronosequences from the Wind River Range, Wyoming and the Tobacco Root Range, Montana, which have differences in mean annual precipitation (MAP) and texture of the till parent materials. Using rates calculated from both ranges for the first 12 kyr after deposition, etching is slowest (0.02 [mu]m/1,000 yrs) in coarse-textured granitic parent materials where the MAP is 25--40 cm. In contrast, etching is faster by an order of magnitude (0.21 [mu]m/1,000 yrs) where MAP is 110--150 cm and the parent material is finer textured due to about 15% sedimentary rock material mixed with a granitic component. Within individual chronosequences, deposits at higher elevations have accelerated etching rates due to higher orographic precipitation or the influence of late-lying snow. These factors result in higher soil moisture content.

  13. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits.

    PubMed

    Frank, Kiana L; Rogers, Karyn L; Rogers, Daniel R; Johnston, David T; Girguis, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, [Formula: see text], DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits.

  14. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Kiana L.; Rogers, Karyn L.; Rogers, Daniel R.; Johnston, David T.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, SO42−, DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits. PMID:26733984

  15. High-resolution stratigraphy and depositional model of wind- and water-laid deposits in the ordovician Guaritas rift (Southernmost Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paim, Paulo S. G.; Scherer, Claiton M. S.

    2007-12-01

    The upper portion of the Pedra Pintada Alloformation includes about 100 m of mostly eolian deposits. This paper emphasizes the vertical succession and lateral association of sedimentary facies, based on analysis of outcrop data and aerial photographs, as well as the hierarchy and origin of bounding surfaces. It aims to propose a high-resolution stratigraphic and depositional model that may be useful to exploitation of eolian reservoirs. The succession has been preserved due to basin subsidence, and is described in terms of four facies associations that constitute three dominantly eolian units. These units are sharply bounded by major flooding surfaces (super surfaces) that, in turn, are overlain by 1 to 2 m thick, dominantly water-laid facies (lacustrine, fluvial, deltaic and eolian). Both their internal organization and boundaries were controlled by changes in the base level rise rate. The basal Eolian Unit is composed of crescentic eolian dunes and damp interdune deposits ascribed to a wet eolian system. On the other hand, eolian units II and III, also characterized by crescentic eolian dunes (simple and compound) deposits, were related to dry eolian systems, since they comprise dry (eventually wet) interdune facies. Eolian Unit III is truncated by basinwide unconformity, which is then overlain by the ephemeral fluvial deposits (Varzinha Alloformation). This second type of super surface is related to climate-induced wind erosion (deflation) down to the water table level (regional Stokes surface) followed by fluvial incision linked to tectonic activity.

  16. Evolution of radioactive dose rates in fresh sediment deposits along coastal rivers draining Fukushima contamination plume.

    PubMed

    Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Patin, Jeremy; Lepage, Hugo; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie; Ottlé, Catherine; Bonté, Philippe

    2013-10-29

    Measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand provides a solution to address the lack of continuous river monitoring in Fukushima Prefecture after Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. We show that coastal rivers of Eastern Fukushima Prefecture were rapidly supplied with sediment contaminated by radionuclides originating from inland mountain ranges, and that this contaminated material was partly exported by typhoons to the coastal plains as soon as by November 2011. This export was amplified during snowmelt and typhoons in 2012. In 2013, contamination levels measured in sediment found in the upper parts of the catchments were almost systematically lower than the ones measured in nearby soils, whereas their contamination was higher in the coastal plains. We thereby suggest that storage of contaminated sediment in reservoirs and in coastal sections of the river channels now represents the most crucial issue.

  17. Evolution of radioactive dose rates in fresh sediment deposits along coastal rivers draining Fukushima contamination plume

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Patin, Jeremy; Lepage, Hugo; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie; Ottlé, Catherine; Bonté, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand provides a solution to address the lack of continuous river monitoring in Fukushima Prefecture after Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. We show that coastal rivers of Eastern Fukushima Prefecture were rapidly supplied with sediment contaminated by radionuclides originating from inland mountain ranges, and that this contaminated material was partly exported by typhoons to the coastal plains as soon as by November 2011. This export was amplified during snowmelt and typhoons in 2012. In 2013, contamination levels measured in sediment found in the upper parts of the catchments were almost systematically lower than the ones measured in nearby soils, whereas their contamination was higher in the coastal plains. We thereby suggest that storage of contaminated sediment in reservoirs and in coastal sections of the river channels now represents the most crucial issue. PMID:24165695

  18. On the Strain Rate Sensitivity of Abs and Abs Plus Fused Deposition Modeling Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vairis, A.; Petousis, M.; Vidakis, N.; Savvakis, K.

    2016-09-01

    In this work the effect of strain rate on the tensile strength of fused deposition modeling parts built with Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and ABS plus material is presented. ASTM D638-02a specimens were built with ABS and ABS plus and they were tested on a Schenck Trebel Co. tensile test machine at three different test speeds, equal, lower, and higher to the test speed required by the ASTM D638-02a standard. The experimental tensile strength results were compared and evaluated. The fracture surfaces of selected specimens were examined with a scanning electron microscope, to determine failure mode of the filament strands. It was found that, as the test speed increases, specimens develop higher tensile strength and have higher elastic modulus. Specimens tested in the highest speed of the experiment had on average about 10% higher elastic modulus and developed on average about 11% higher tensile strength.

  19. Auroral energy deposition rate, characteristic electron energy, and ionospheric parameters derived from Dynamics Explorer 1 images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. H.; Lummerzheim, D.; Roble, R. G.; Winningham, J. D.; Craven, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    Auroral images obtained by the Spin Scan Auroral Imager (SAI) aboard the DE-1 satellite were used to derive auroral energy deposition rate, characteristic electron energy, and ionospheric parameters. The principles involved in the imaging technique and the physical mechanisms that underlie the relationship between the spectral images and the geophysical parameters are discussed together with the methodology for implementing such analyses. It is shown that images obtained with the SAI provide global parameters at 12-min temporal resolution; the spatial resolution is limited by the field of view of a pixel. The analysis of the 12-min images presented yielded a representation of ionospheric parameters that was better than can be obtained using empirical models based on local measurements averaged over long periods of time.

  20. Particle emission rates during electrostatic spray deposition of TiO2 nanoparticle-based photoactive coating.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, Antti J; Jensen, Alexander C Ø; Kling, Kirsten I; Kling, Jens; Budtz, Hans Christian; Koponen, Ismo K; Tuinman, Ilse; Hussein, Tareq; Jensen, Keld A; Nørgaard, Asger; Levin, Marcus

    2018-01-05

    Here, we studied the particle release rate during Electrostatic spray deposition of anatase-(TiO2)-based photoactive coating onto tiles and wallpaper using a commercially available electrostatic spray device. Spraying was performed in a 20.3m(3) test chamber while measuring concentrations of 5.6nm to 31μm-size particles and volatile organic compounds (VOC), as well as particle deposition onto room surfaces and on the spray gun user hand. The particle emission and deposition rates were quantified using aerosol mass balance modelling. The geometric mean particle number emission rate was 1.9×10(10)s(-1) and the mean mass emission rate was 381μgs(-1). The respirable mass emission-rate was 65% lower than observed for the entire measured size-range. The mass emission rates were linearly scalable (±ca. 20%) to the process duration. The particle deposition rates were up to 15h(-1) for <1μm-size and the deposited particles consisted of mainly TiO2, TiO2 mixed with Cl and/or Ag, TiO2 particles coated with carbon, and Ag particles with size ranging from 60nm to ca. 5μm. As expected, no significant VOC emissions were observed as a result of spraying. Finally, we provide recommendations for exposure model parameterization. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. High spin rate magnetic controller for nanosatellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavinskis, A.; Kvell, U.; Kulu, E.; Sünter, I.; Kuuste, H.; Lätt, S.; Voormansik, K.; Noorma, M.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a study of a high rate closed-loop spin controller that uses only electromagnetic coils as actuators. The controller is able to perform spin rate control and simultaneously align the spin axis with the Earth's inertial reference frame. It is implemented, optimised and simulated for a 1-unit CubeSat ESTCube-1 to fulfil its mission requirements: spin the satellite up to 360 deg s-1 around the z-axis and align its spin axis with the Earth's polar axis with a pointing error of less than 3°. The attitude of the satellite is determined using a magnetic field vector, a Sun vector and angular velocity. It is estimated using an Unscented Kalman Filter and controlled using three electromagnetic coils. The algorithm is tested in a simulation environment that includes models of space environment and environmental disturbances, sensor and actuator emulation, attitude estimation, and a model to simulate the time delay caused by on-board calculations. In addition to the normal operation mode, analyses of reduced satellite functionality are performed: significant errors of attitude estimation due to non-operational Sun sensors; and limited actuator functionality due to two non-operational coils. A hardware-in-the-loop test is also performed to verify on-board software.

  2. Application of high-rate cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, John L., Jr.

    1989-03-01

    Widespread application of the newest high-rate cutting tools to the most appropriate jobs is slowed by the sheer magnitude of developments in tool types, materials, workpiece applications, and by the rapid pace of change. Therefore, a study of finishing and roughing sizes of coated carbide inserts having a variety of geometries for single point turning was completed. The cutting tools were tested for tool life, chip quality, and workpiece surface finish at various cutting conditions with medium alloy steel. An empirical wear-life data base was established, and a computer program was developed to facilitate technology transfer, assist selection of carbide insert grades, and provide machine operating parameters. A follow-on test program was implemented suitable for next generation coated carbides, rotary cutting tools, cutting fluids, and ceramic tool materials.

  3. An accurate derivation of the air dose-rate and the deposition concentration distribution by aerial monitoring in a low level contaminated area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Yukiyasu; Sugita, Takeshi; Sanada, Yukihisa; Torii, Tatsuo

    2015-04-01

    Since 2011, MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan) have been conducting aerial monitoring to investigate the distribution of radioactive cesium dispersed into the atmosphere after the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), Tokyo Electric Power Company. Distribution maps of the air dose-rate at 1 m above the ground and the radioactive cesium deposition concentration on the ground are prepared using spectrum obtained by aerial monitoring. The radioactive cesium deposition is derived from its dose rate, which is calculated by excluding the dose rate of the background radiation due to natural radionuclides from the air dose-rate at 1 m above the ground. The first step of the current method of calculating the dose rate due to natural radionuclides is calculate the ratio of the total count rate of areas where no radioactive cesium is detected and the count rate of regions with energy levels of 1,400 keV or higher (BG-Index). Next, calculate the air dose rate of radioactive cesium by multiplying the BG-Index and the integrated count rate of 1,400 keV or higher for the area where the radioactive cesium is distributed. In high dose-rate areas, however, the count rate of the 1,365-keV peak of Cs-134, though small, is included in the integrated count rate of 1,400 keV or higher, which could cause an overestimation of the air dose rate of natural radionuclides. We developed a method for accurately evaluating the distribution maps of natural air dose-rate by excluding the effect of radioactive cesium, even in contaminated areas, and obtained the accurate air dose-rate map attributed the radioactive cesium deposition on the ground. Furthermore, the natural dose-rate distribution throughout Japan has been obtained by this method.

  4. Consideration of wear rates at high velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Chad S.

    The development of the research presented here is one in which high velocity relative sliding motion between two bodies in contact has been considered. Overall, the wear environment is truly three-dimensional. The attempt to characterize three-dimensional wear was not economically feasible because it must be analyzed at the micro-mechanical level to get results. Thus, an engineering approximation was carried out. This approximation was based on a metallographic study identifying the need to include viscoplasticity constitutive material models, coefficient of friction, relationships between the normal load and velocity, and the need to understand wave propagation. A sled test run at the Holloman High Speed Test Track (HHSTT) was considered for the determination of high velocity wear rates. In order to adequately characterize high velocity wear, it was necessary to formulate a numerical model that contained all of the physical events present. The experimental results of a VascoMax 300 maraging steel slipper sliding on an AISI 1080 steel rail during a January 2008 sled test mission were analyzed. During this rocket sled test, the slipper traveled 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s. This type of environment was never considered previously in terms of wear evaluation. Each of the features of the metallography were obtained through micro-mechanical experimental techniques. The byproduct of this analysis is that it is now possible to formulate a model that contains viscoplasticity, asperity collisions, temperature and frictional features. Based on the observations of the metallographic analysis, these necessary features have been included in the numerical model, which makes use of a time-dynamic program which follows the movement of a slipper during its experimental test run. The resulting velocity and pressure functions of time have been implemented in the explicit finite element code, ABAQUS. Two-dimensional, plane strain models

  5. Method for depositing high-quality microcrystalline semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Guha, Subhendu; Yang, Chi C.; Yan, Baojie

    2011-03-08

    A process for the plasma deposition of a layer of a microcrystalline semiconductor material is carried out by energizing a process gas which includes a precursor of the semiconductor material and a diluent with electromagnetic energy so as to create a plasma therefrom. The plasma deposits a layer of the microcrystalline semiconductor material onto the substrate. The concentration of the diluent in the process gas is varied as a function of the thickness of the layer of microcrystalline semiconductor material which has been deposited. Also disclosed is the use of the process for the preparation of an N-I-P type photovoltaic device.

  6. Depositing highly adhesive optical thin films on acrylic substrates.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tomoaki; Harada, Toshinori; Murotani, Hiroshi; Matumoto, Shigeharu

    2014-02-01

    Optical thin films are used to control the reflectance and transmittance of optical components. However, conventional deposition technologies applicable to organic (plastic) substrates typically result in weak adhesion. We overcame this problem by using vacuum deposition in combination with sputtering to directly deposit a SiO2 optical thin film onto an acrylic resin substrate. We observed neither yellowing nor deformation. The hardness of the film is 2H as measured by the pencil hardness test, indicating successful modulation of optical properties without sacrificing substrate hardness.

  7. Diamond detector for high rate monitors of fast neutrons beams

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Rebai, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Fazzi, A.; Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Frost, C. D.; Rhodes, N.; Schooneveld, E.; Gorini, G.

    2012-06-19

    A fast neutron detection system suitable for high rate measurements is presented. The detector is based on a commercial high purity single crystal diamond (SDD) coupled to a fast digital data acquisition system. The detector was tested at the ISIS pulsed spallation neutron source. The SDD event signal was digitized at 1 GHz to reconstruct the deposited energy (pulse amplitude) and neutron arrival time; the event time of flight (ToF) was obtained relative to the recorded proton beam signal t{sub 0}. Fast acquisition is needed since the peak count rate is very high ({approx}800 kHz) due to the pulsed structure of the neutron beam. Measurements at ISIS indicate that three characteristics regions exist in the biparametric spectrum: i) background gamma events of low pulse amplitudes; ii) low pulse amplitude neutron events in the energy range E{sub dep}= 1.5-7 MeV ascribed to neutron elastic scattering on {sup 12}C; iii) large pulse amplitude neutron events with E{sub n} < 7 MeV ascribed to {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}){sup 9}Be and 12C(n,n')3{alpha}.

  8. High mobility n-type organic thin-film transistors deposited at room temperature by supersonic molecular beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarella, F. Barra, M.; Ciccullo, F.; Cassinese, A.; Toccoli, T.; Aversa, L.; Tatti, R.; Verucchi, R.

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, we report on the fabrication of N,N′-1H,1H-perfluorobutil dicyanoperylenediimide (PDIF-CN{sub 2}) organic thin-film transistors by Supersonic Molecular Beam Deposition. The devices exhibit mobility up to 0.2 cm{sup 2}/V s even if the substrate is kept at room temperature during the organic film growth, exceeding by three orders of magnitude the electrical performance of those grown at the same temperature by conventional Organic Molecular Beam Deposition. The possibility to get high-mobility n-type transistors avoiding thermal treatments during or after the deposition could significantly extend the number of substrates suitable to the fabrication of flexible high-performance complementary circuits by using this compound.

  9. High Data Rate Architecture (HiDRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, Alan; Raible, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    high-rate laser terminals. These must interface with the existing, aging data infrastructure. The High Data Rate Architecture (HiDRA) project is designed to provide networked store, carry, and forward capability to optimize data flow through both the existing radio frequency (RF) and new laser communications terminal. The networking capability is realized through the Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN) protocol, and is used for scheduling data movement as well as optimizing the performance of existing RF channels. HiDRA is realized as a distributed FPGA memory and interface controller that is itself controlled by a local computer running DTN software. Thus HiDRA is applicable to other arenas seeking to employ next-generation communications technologies, e.g. deep space. In this paper, we describe HiDRA and its far-reaching research implications.

  10. High Levels of Gadolinium Deposition in the Skin of a Patient With Normal Renal Function.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Donna R; Lindhorst, Scott M; Welsh, Cynthia T; Maravilla, Kenneth R; Herring, Mary N; Braun, K Adam; Thiers, Bruce H; Davis, W Clay

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess gadolinium deposition in the skin of a patient with normal renal function, based on estimated glomerular filtration rate values greater than 59 mL/min/1.73 m(2) after exposure to large cumulative doses of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). The patient underwent 61 contrasted brain MRI scans over the course of 11 years. Skin biopsies from the forearm and lower extremity were analyzed with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), laser ablation ICP-MS, and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography ICP-MS. The ICP-MS demonstrated high levels of gadolinium deposition (14.5 ± 0.4 μg/g), similar to previously reported gadolinium levels within the skin of patients with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The laser ablation ICP-MS demonstrated deposition of gadolinium within the deep layers of skin. Speciation analysis using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography ICP-MS demonstrated the presence of intact gadolinium-chelate species, although most of the gadolinium present could not be further characterized. Light microscopy demonstrated increased CD34 immunoreactivity in the connective tissue septations of the subcutaneous adipose tissue. The patient had no history of skin disorders and did not have a history of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis but did have severe joint contractures of unknown etiology. Our results, in contradiction to published literature, suggest that in patients with normal renal function, exposure to GBCAs in extremely high cumulative doses can lead to significant gadolinium deposition in the skin. This finding is in line with more recent reports of gadolinium deposition in the brain of patients with normal renal function. Future studies are required to address possible clinical consequences of gadolinium deposition in the skin, brain, and potentially other organs in patients with normal renal function. We recommend, in addition to following current US Food and Drug Administration and

  11. [High vaccination rates among children of Amsterdam].

    PubMed

    van der Wal, M F; Diepenmaat, A C; Pauw-Plomp, H; van Weert-Waltman, M L

    2001-01-20

    To examine if in Amsterdam there are social or cultural groups of children with a relatively low vaccination coverage for diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus and poliomyelitis (DPTP) and mumps, measles and rubella (MMR). Descriptive cross-sectional study. In the Department of Child Health Care of the Municipal Health Service of Amsterdam all 83,217 children aged 2-12 years living in Amsterdam on the 1st of January 2000 were analysed for vaccination and sociodemographic data collected routinely by the Department of Child Health Care. The sociodemographic data concerned sex, year of birth, country of birth of the mother and child, name of the school and postal code of the home address. Schools were grouped by (religious) affiliation on the basis of the Amsterdam school guide 1999/2000. Based on postal codes children were classified by the neighbourhoods in which they were living. Neighbourhoods were grouped by socio-economic status based on data from the Central Bureau for Statistics. The overall vaccination rates of DPTP and MMR were 92.4% and 93.5% respectively. No important variation in vaccination coverage was identified between more and less affluent neighbourhoods. The uptake rate among foreign children was sometimes slightly higher and sometimes slightly lower compared with native children. Especially foreign children born abroad (Surinam, Antilles, Morocco, Turkey) were not fully vaccinated: 70.9% were fully immunized for DPTP, 79.5% for MMR. Children who visited anthroposophical schools were considerably less frequently fully immunized compared with children visiting other schools: for DPTP and MMR 81.0 and 59.9% respectively versus 94.4 en 95.3% for children attending general municipal schools. The vaccination coverage was high in children in Amsterdam. Further improvement of the vaccination uptake might be achieved by a more outreaching attitude to children born abroad, and by more intensely informing sceptical parents about the benefits and (supposed) dangers

  12. A short pulse, high rep-rate microdischarge VUV source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Jacob; Fierro, Andrew; Dickens, James; Neuber, Andreas; CenterPulsed Power; Power Electronics Team

    2013-09-01

    A MOSFET based high voltage pulser is utilized to excite a microdischarge (MD), or microdischarge array (MDA) with pulsed voltages of up to 1 kV, with risetime and FWHM on the order of 10 ns and 30 ns, respectively. Additionally, the pulser is capable of pulsing at rep-rates in excess of 35 MHz. However, for these experiments the rep-rate was set on the order of 1 MHz, so as to limit excess energy deposition into the background gas and optimize the energy efficiency of VUV generation. Using VUV capable spectral diagnostics, the VUV emission of the MDs for various pressures (50-800 + Torr) and gases, focused on argon, argon-hydrogen mixtures, and neon-hydrogen mixtures (all of which provide strong emission at λ < 130 nm) is studied, for pulsed, MHz rep-rated excitation. Using a photomultiplier tube the time dependent behavior of the VUV emission is characterized and compared to results from transient fluid modeling of the MDA. For instance, the MDA turn-on time is recorded to be about 15 ns, which matches the full plasma development time in the model, and the MDA self- capacitance largely determines the turn-off behavior. This research was supported by an AFOSR grant on the Physics of Distributed Plasma Discharges and fellowships from the National Physical Sciences Consortium, supported by Sandia National Laboratories.

  13. Simulation of Cooling Rate Effects on Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb Crack Formation in Direct Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lei; Li, Wei; Chen, Xueyang; Zhang, Yunlu; Newkirk, Joe; Liou, Frank; Dietrich, David

    2017-03-01

    Transient temperature history is vital in direct laser deposition (DLD) as it reveals the cooling rate at specific temperatures. Cooling rate directly relates to phase transformation and types of microstructure formed in deposits. In this paper, finite element analysis simulation was employed to study the transient temperature history and cooling rate at different experimental setups in the Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb DLD process. An innovative prediction strategy was developed to model with a moving Gaussian distribution heat source and element birth and death technology in ANSYS®, and fabricate crack-free deposits. This approach helps to understand and analyze the impact of cooling rate and also explain phase information gathered from x-ray diffraction.

  14. Photocathodes for High Repetition Rate Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2014-04-20

    This proposal brought together teams at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Stony Brook University (SBU) to study photocathodes for high repetition rate light sources such as Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). Below details the Principal Investigators and contact information. Each PI submits separately for a budget through his corresponding institute. The work done under this grant comprises a comprehensive program on critical aspects of the production of the electron beams needed for future user facilities. Our program pioneered in situ and in operando diagnostics for alkali antimonide growth. The focus is on development of photocathodes for high repetition rate Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), including testing SRF photoguns, both normal-­conducting and superconducting. Teams from BNL, LBNL and Stony Brook University (SBU) led this research, and coordinated their work over a range of topics. The work leveraged a robust infrastructure of existing facilities and the support was used for carrying out the research at these facilities. The program concentrated in three areas: a) Physics and chemistry of alkali-­antimonide cathodes (BNL – LBNL) b) Development and testing of a diamond amplifier for photocathodes (SBU -­ BNL) c) Tests of both cathodes in superconducting RF photoguns (SBU) and copper RF photoguns (LBNL) Our work made extensive use of synchrotron radiation materials science techniques, such as powder-­ and single-­crystal diffraction, x-­ray fluorescence, EXAFS and variable energy XPS. BNL and LBNL have many complementary facilities at the two light sources associated with these laboratories (NSLS and ALS, respectively); use of these will be a major thrust of our program and bring our understanding of these complex materials to a new level. In addition, CHESS at Cornell will be used to continue seamlessly throughout the NSLS dark period and

  15. Deposition of Na2SO4 from salt-seeded combustion gases of a high velocity burner rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.; Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    With a view to developing simulation criteria for the laboratory testing of high-temperature materials for gas turbine engines, the deposition rates of sodium sulfate from sodium salt-seeded combustion gases were determined experimentally using a well instrumented high-velocity burner. In the experiments, Na2SO4, NaCl, NaNO3, and simulated sea salt solutions were injected into the combustor of the Mach 0.3 burner rig operating at constant fuel/air ratios. The deposits formed on an inert rotating collector were then weighed and analyzed. The experimental results are compared to Rosner's vapor diffusion theory. Some additional test results, including droplet size distribution of an atomized salt spray, are used in interpreting the deposition rate data.

  16. Numerical analysis of the effect of electrode spacing on deposition rate profiles in a capacitively coupled plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2016-12-01

    The effect of reactor dimension on deposition rate profiles is analyzed with a two-dimensional (2D) fluid simulation of a capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) reactor to deposit a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN x H y ) film with a SiH4/NH3/N2/He gas mixture. We focus on the complex function of electrode spacing to reveal the physical relation between reactor geometry and deposition rate profiles. The simulation demonstrates that the localization of electron density is concentrated close to the powered electrode periphery for electrode spacing of 9 mm. However, the plasma distribution becomes bulk dominated with electrode spacing of 15 mm by relaxing the localization. As a result, the increase in the electrode spacing creates a more uniform electron power density profile, and the deposition rate profile of SiN x H y film changes from convex to concave in a radial direction. The change in the deposition rate profile is validated through comparison with the experimental observation, which agrees well with the simulation results with errors of less than 5%. The deposition rate profile with electrode spacing of 9 mm is very sensitive to the non-uniform gas density condition applied to the showerhead inlet. However, the deposition rate profile with electrode spacing of 15 mm is not sensitive to the inlet gas profile because of the increasing residence time. The increase of the electrode spacing promotes molecule-molecule gas phase reactions and consequently weakens the effect of the inlet boundary condition.

  17. Influence of travel speed on spray deposition uniformity from an air-assisted variable-rate sprayer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A newly developed LiDAR-guided air-assisted variable-rate sprayer for nursery and orchard applications was tested at various travel speeds to compare its spray deposition and coverage uniformity with constant-rate applications. Spray samplers, including nylon screens and water-sensitive papers (WSP)...

  18. Effect of trichloroethylene enhancement on deposition rate of low-temperature silicon oxide films by silicone oil and ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horita, Susumu; Jain, Puneet

    2017-08-01

    A low-temperature silcon oxide film was deposited at 160 to 220 °C using an atmospheric pressure CVD system with silicone oil vapor and ozone gases. It was found that the deposition rate is markedly increased by adding trichloroethylene (TCE) vapor, which is generated by bubbling TCE solution with N2 gas flow. The increase is more than 3 times that observed without TCE, and any contamination due to TCE is hardly observed in the deposited Si oxide films from Fourier transform infrared spectra.

  19. Pulsed Laser Deposition of High Temperature Protonic Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred W.; Berger, M. H.; Sayir, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition has been used to fabricate nanostructured BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3- sigma) films. Protonic conduction of fabricated BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) films was compared to sintered BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma). Sintered samples and laser targets were prepared by sintering BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) powders derived by solid state synthesis. Films 1 to 8 micron thick were deposited by KrF excimer laser on porous Al2O3 substrates. Thin films were fabricated at deposition temperatures of 700 to 950 C at O2 pressures up to 200 mTorr using laser pulse energies of 0.45 - 0.95 J. Fabricated films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and electrical impedance spectroscopy. Single phase BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) films with a columnar growth morphology are observed with preferred crystal growth along the [100] or [001] direction. Results indicate [100] growth dependence upon laser pulse energy. Electrical conductivity of bulk samples produced by solid state sintering and thin film samples were measured over a temperature range of 100 C to 900 C. Electrical conduction behavior was dependent upon film deposition temperature. Maximum conductivity occurs at deposition temperature of 900 oC; the electrical conductivity exceeds the sintered specimen. All other deposited films exhibit a lower electrical conductivity than the sintered specimen. Activation energy for electrical conduction showed dependence upon deposition temperature, it varied

  20. High Invasive Pollen Transfer, Yet Low Deposition on Native Stigmas in a Carpobrotus-invaded Community

    PubMed Central

    Bartomeus, Ignasi; Bosch, Jordi; Vilà, Montserrat

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Invasive plants are potential agents of disruption in plant–pollinator interactions. They may affect pollinator visitation rates to native plants and modify the plant–pollinator interaction network. However, there is little information about the extent to which invasive pollen is incorporated into the pollination network and about the rates of invasive pollen deposition on the stigmas of native plants. Methods The degree of pollinator sharing between the invasive plant Carpobrotus affine acinaciformis and the main co-flowering native plants was tested in a Mediterranean coastal shrubland. Pollen loads were identified from the bodies of the ten most common pollinator species and stigmatic pollen deposition in the five most common native plant species. Key Results It was found that pollinators visited Carpobrotus extensively. Seventy-three per cent of pollinator specimens collected on native plants carried Carpobrotus pollen. On average 23 % of the pollen on the bodies of pollinators visiting native plants was Carpobrotus. However, most of the pollen found on the body of pollinators belonged to the species on which they were collected. Similarly, most pollen on native plant stigmas was conspecific. Invasive pollen was present on native plant stigmas, but in low quantity. Conclusions Carpobrotus is highly integrated in the pollen transport network. However, the plant-pollination network in the invaded community seems to be sufficiently robust to withstand the impacts of the presence of alien pollen on native plant pollination, as shown by the low levels of heterospecific pollen deposition on native stigmas. Several mechanisms are discussed for the low invasive pollen deposition on native stigmas. PMID:18593688

  1. Highly conductive and flexible nylon-6 nonwoven fiber mats formed using tungsten atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Kalanyan, Berç; Oldham, Christopher J; Sweet, William J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2013-06-12

    Low-temperature vapor-phase tungsten atomic layer deposition (ALD) using WF6 and dilute silane (SiH4, 2% in Ar) can yield highly conductive coatings on nylon-6 microfiber mats, producing flexible and supple nonwovens with conductivity of ∼1000 S/cm. We find that an alumina nucleation layer, reactant exposure, and deposition temperature all influence the rate of W mass uptake on 3D fibers, and film growth rate is calibrated using high surface area anodic aluminum oxide. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals highly conformal tungsten coatings on nylon fibers with complex "winged" cross-section. Using reactant gas "hold" sequences during the ALD process, we conclude that reactant species can transport readily to reactive sites throughout the fiber mat, consistent with conformal uniform coverage observed by TEM. The conductivity of 1000 S/cm for the W-coated nylon is much larger than found in other conductive nonwovens. We also find that the nylon mats maintain 90% of their conductivity after being flexed around cylinders with radii as small as 0.3 cm. Metal ALD coatings on nonwovens make possible the solvent-free functionalization of textiles for electronic applications.

  2. Insights into Proximal-Medial Pyroclastic Density Current Deposits at a High-Risk Glaciated Volcano: Mt Ruapehu, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowlyn, J.; Kennedy, B.; Gravley, D. M.; Cronin, S. J.; Pardo, N.; Wilson, T. M.; Leonard, G.; Townsend, D.; Dufek, J.

    2014-12-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are a destructive volcanic hazard. Quantifying the types, frequency and magnitudes of PDC events in the geological record is essential for effective risk management. However small-medium volume valley-confined PDC deposits have low preservation potential, especially when emplaced in active drainages or onto snow or ice. Where PDC deposits are preserved they can be difficult to distinguish from other surficial deposits and are frequently misinterpreted or overlooked. This is the case at Mt. Ruapehu; a much visited, high-risk active volcano in New Zealand with no historical PDCs. Through systematic field observations we identified several young proximal-medial andesitic PDC deposits exposed on Ruapehu's eastern flanks. The oldest deposits (Ohinewairua PDCs, <13.6 ka) are massive pumice-rich deposits that are preserved at least 7km from source (North Crater) and correlate with Ruapehu's largest plinian eruptions. Overlying these, the pumice-rich Pourahu PDC deposit reaches >10km from source (South Crater) and correlates with Ruapehu's last known plinian eruption (~11.6 ka). Several younger locally preserved PDC deposits (Tukino PDCs) with denser juvenile clasts represent proximal PDCs from smaller eruptions at South Crater. Finally, a variably welded, bedded deposit containing clasts of welded spatter is interpreted to represent multiple failures of near-vent (North Ruapehu) accumulations of erupted material. Here, PDC initiation appears to have been controlled by the topographic gradient and deposition rate, without requiring a collapsing eruption column. The Ruapehu deposits highlight the limited preservation of PDC deposits, which appears to be favoured at PDC margins. Lateral and vertical flow stratification means the resulting deposits may not then represent the bulk flow. Additionally, deposit textures, distributions, and associations with moraines indicate that many of Ruapehu's PDCs encountered glacial ice during transport

  3. Study on the effect of film formation process and deposition rate on the orientation of the CsI:Tl thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiaochuan; Liu, Shuang; Xie, Yijun; Guo, Lina; Ma, Shijun; Wang, Tianyu; Liu, Yong; Zhong, Zhiyong

    2017-10-01

    Although many new scintillation materials are developed, CsI:Tl is still prevailing because of its high scintillation efficiency. In this work, CsI:Tl thin films were fabricated by vacuum thermal evaporative deposition method and their morphology properties and growth orientation were observed by SEM and XRD. Photoluminescent spectra were used to measure the luminescent properties of the CsI:Tl thin film. The results show us the film formation process of CsI:Tl thin film and analyze the effect of film formation process and the deposition rate on the orientation of the CsI:Tl thin film.

  4. The Metastable Persistence of Vapor-Deposited Amorphous Ice at Anomalously High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.; Jenniskens, Peter; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Studies of the gas release, vaporization behavior and infrared (IR) spectral properties of amorphous and crystalline water ice have direct application to cometary and planetary outgassing phenomena and contribute to an understanding of the physical properties of astrophysical ices. Several investigators report anomalous phenomena related to the warming of vapor-deposited astrophysical ice analogs. However gas release, ice volatilization and IR spectral features are secondary or tertiary manifestations of ice structure or morphology. These observations are useful in mimicking the bulk physical and chemical phenomena taking place in cometary and other extraterrestrial ices but do not directly reveal the structural changes which are their root cause. The phenomenological interpretation of spectral and gas release data is probably the cause of somewhat contradictory explanations invoked to account for differences in water ice behavior in similar temperature regimes. It is the microstructure, micromorphology and microchemical heterogeneity of astrophysical ices which must be characterized if the mechanisms underlying the observed phenomena are to be understood. We have been using a modified Transmission Electron Microscope to characterize the structure of vapor-deposited astrophysical ice analogs as a function of their deposition, temperature history and composition. For the present experiments, pure water vapor is deposited at high vacuum onto a 15 K amorphous carbon film inside an Hitachi H-500H TEM. The resulting ice film (approx. 0.05 micrometers thick) is warmed at the rate of 1 K per minute and diffraction patterns are collected at 1 K intervals. These patterns are converted into radial intensity distributions which are calibrated using patterns of crystalline gold deposited on a small part of the carbon substrate. The small intensity contributed by the amorphous substrate is removed by background subtraction. The proportions of amorphous and crystalline material

  5. High resolution, high rate x-ray spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Landis, D.A.

    1983-07-14

    It is an object of the invention to provide a pulse processing system for use with detected signals of a wide dynamic range which is capable of very high counting rates, with high throughput, with excellent energy resolution and a high signal-to-noise ratio. It is a further object to provide a pulse processing system wherein the fast channel resolving time is quite short and substantially independent of the energy of the detected signals. Another object is to provide a pulse processing system having a pile-up rejector circuit which will allow the maximum number of non-interfering pulses to be passed to the output. It is also an object of the invention to provide new methods for generating substantially symmetrically triangular pulses for use in both the main and fast channels of a pulse processing system.

  6. 78 FR 64183 - Change to Existing Regulation Concerning the Interest Rate Paid on Cash Deposited To Secure...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ...The Department of Homeland Security proposes to amend its regulations addressing the payment of interest on cash bond deposits to explicitly provide that the Department of the Treasury (Treasury) will set the interest rate. In the future, Treasury will notify the public of its interest rate determinations by publishing the rates on the Treasury Web site or via another mechanism. The current rate of interest paid on deposits securing cash bonds is 3 percent per annum. 8 U.S.C. 1363(a); 8 CFR 293.2. This action is consistent with the requirement of 8 U.S.C. 1363(a) that interest payments shall be ``at a rate determined by the Secretary of the Treasury, except that in no case shall the interest rate exceed 3 per centum per annum.''

  7. A High Fidelity Multiphysics Framework for Modeling CRUD Deposition on PWR Fuel Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Daniel John

    Corrosion products on the fuel cladding surfaces within pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies have had a significant impact on reactor operation. These types of deposits are referred to as CRUD and can lead to power shifts, as a consequence of the accumulation of solid boron phases on the fuel rod surfaces. Corrosion deposits can also lead to fuel failure resulting from localized corrosion, where the increased thermal resistance of the deposit leads to higher cladding temperatures. The prediction of these occurrences requires a comprehensive model of local thermal hydraulic and chemical processes occurring in close proximity to the cladding surface, as well as their driving factors. Such factors include the rod power distribution, coolant corrosion product concentration, as well as the feedbacks between heat transfer, fluid dynamics, chemistry, and neutronics. To correctly capture the coupled physics and corresponding feedbacks, a high fidelity framework is developed that predicts three-dimensional CRUD deposition on a rod-by-rod basis. Multiphysics boundary conditions resulting from the coupling of heat transfer, fluid dynamics, coolant chemistry, CRUD deposition, neutron transport, and nuclide transmutation inform the CRUD deposition solver. Through systematic parametric sensitivity studies of the CRUD property inputs, coupled boundary conditions, and multiphysics feedback mechanisms, the most important variables of multiphysics CRUD modeling are identified. Moreover, the modeling framework is challenged with a blind comparison of plant data to predictions by a simulation of a sub-assembly within the Seabrook nuclear plant that experienced CRUD induced fuel failures. The physics within the computational framework are loosely coupled via an operator-splitting technique. A control theory approach is adopted to determine the temporal discretization at which to execute a data transfer from one physics to another. The coupled stepsize selection is viewed as a

  8. PS foams at high pressure drop rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammaro, Daniele; De Maio, Attilio; Carbone, Maria Giovanna Pastore; Di Maio, Ernesto; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report data on PS foamed at 100 °C after CO2 saturation at 10 MPa in a new physical foaming batch that achieves pressure drop rates up to 120 MPa/s. Results show how average cell size of the foam nicely fit a linear behavior with the pressure drop rate in a double logarithmic plot. Furthermore, foam density initially decreases with the pressure drop rate, attaining a constant value at pressure drop rates higher than 40 MPa/s. Interestingly, furthermore, we observed that the shape of the pressure release curve has a large effect on the final foam morphology, as observed in tests in which the maximum pressure release rate was kept constant but the shape of the curve changed. These results allow for a fine tuning of the foam density and morphology for specific applications.

  9. High voltage high repetition rate pulse using Marx topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakki, A.; Kashapov, N.

    2015-06-01

    The paper describes Marx topology using MOSFET transistors. Marx circuit with 10 stages has been done, to obtain pulses about 5.5KV amplitude, and the width of the pulses was about 30μsec with a high repetition rate (PPS > 100), Vdc = 535VDC is the input voltage for supplying the Marx circuit. Two Ferrite ring core transformers were used to control the MOSFET transistors of the Marx circuit (the first transformer to control the charging MOSFET transistors, the second transformer to control the discharging MOSFET transistors).

  10. High damage threshold anti-reflectors by physical vapor deposited amorphous fluoropolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R.; Spragge, M.K.; Loomis, G.E.; Thomas, I.M.; Rainer, F.; Ward, R.L.; Kozlowski, M.R.

    1993-11-01

    High laser-resistant anti-reflective coatings were made from an amorphous fluoropolymer (Teflon AF2400) material by physical vapor deposition. Single layers of Teflon AF2400 were thermally deposited in a vacuum chamber. Refractive index and adhesion of the coatings were determined as a function of deposition rate (2 to 20 {Angstrom}/s), substrate temperature (20 to 200C), and glow-discharge bias potential ({minus}1500 to 1500 V). An anti-reflective coating of an amorphous fluoropolymer (Teflon AF2400) had a laser resistance of > 47 J/cm{sup 2} (1.06 {mu}m, 3-ns pulselength) and is transparent from 200 nm to 1600 nm. The majority of the coatings had a 1.30 refractive index, similar to that of the bulk material. Scanning electron microscopy and preliminary nuclear magnetic resonance observations indicated that morphological changes caused the variations in the refractive index rather than compositional changes. The coatings adhered to fused silica and silicon wafers under normal laboratory handling conditions. Scotch tape with 12.6 gr/mm tension was sufficient to pull off every coating from fused silica substrates.

  11. Highly sensitive NO2 sensors by pulsed laser deposition on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodu, Margus; Berholts, Artjom; Kahro, Tauno; Avarmaa, Tea; Kasikov, Aarne; Niilisk, Ahti; Alles, Harry; Jaaniso, Raivo

    2016-09-01

    Graphene as a single-atomic-layer material is fully exposed to environmental factors and has therefore a great potential for the creation of sensitive gas sensors. However, in order to realize this potential for different polluting gases, graphene has to be functionalized—adsorption centers of different types and with high affinity to target gases have to be created at its surface. In the present work, the modification of graphene by small amounts of laser-ablated materials is introduced for this purpose as a versatile and precise tool. The approach has been demonstrated with two very different materials chosen for pulsed laser deposition (PLD)—a metal (Ag) and a dielectric oxide (ZrO2). It was shown that the gas response and its recovery rate can be significantly enhanced by choosing the PLD target material and deposition conditions. The response to NO2 gas in air was amplified up to 40 times in the case of PLD-modified graphene, in comparison with pristine graphene, and it reached 7%-8% at 40 ppb of NO2 and 20%-30% at 1 ppm of NO2. The PLD process was conducted in a background gas (5 × 10-2 mbar oxygen or nitrogen) and resulted in the atomic areal densities of the deposited materials of about 1015 cm-2. The ultimate level of NO2 detection in air, as extrapolated from the experimental data obtained at room temperature under mild ultraviolet excitation, was below 1 ppb.

  12. High rate copper and energy recovery in microbial fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodenas Motos, Pau; ter Heijne, Annemiek; van der Weijden, Renata; Saakes, Michel; Buisman, Cees J. N.; Sleutels, Tom H. J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) are a novel, promising technology for the recovery of metals. The prerequisite for upscaling from laboratory to industrial size is that high current and high power densities can be produced. In this study we report the recovery of copper from a copper sulfate stream (2 g L-1 Cu2+) using a laboratory scale BES at high rate. To achieve this, we used a novel cell configuration to reduce the internal voltage losses of the system. At the anode, electroactive microorganisms produce electrons at the surface of an electrode, which generates a stable cell voltage of 485 mV when combined with a cathode where copper is reduced. In this system, a maximum current density of 23 A m-2 in combination with a power density of 5.5 W m-2 was produced. XRD analysis confirmed 99% purity in copper of copper deposited onto cathode surface. Analysis of voltage losses showed that at the highest current, most voltage losses occurred at the cathode, and membrane, while anode losses had the lowest contribution to the total voltage loss. These results encourage further development of BESs for bioelectrochemical metal recovery. PMID:26150802

  13. High rate copper and energy recovery in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Rodenas Motos, Pau; Ter Heijne, Annemiek; van der Weijden, Renata; Saakes, Michel; Buisman, Cees J N; Sleutels, Tom H J A

    2015-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) are a novel, promising technology for the recovery of metals. The prerequisite for upscaling from laboratory to industrial size is that high current and high power densities can be produced. In this study we report the recovery of copper from a copper sulfate stream (2 g L(-1) Cu(2+)) using a laboratory scale BES at high rate. To achieve this, we used a novel cell configuration to reduce the internal voltage losses of the system. At the anode, electroactive microorganisms produce electrons at the surface of an electrode, which generates a stable cell voltage of 485 mV when combined with a cathode where copper is reduced. In this system, a maximum current density of 23 A m(-2) in combination with a power density of 5.5 W m(-2) was produced. XRD analysis confirmed 99% purity in copper of copper deposited onto cathode surface. Analysis of voltage losses showed that at the highest current, most voltage losses occurred at the cathode, and membrane, while anode losses had the lowest contribution to the total voltage loss. These results encourage further development of BESs for bioelectrochemical metal recovery.

  14. Advances in high-rate uncooled detector fabrication at Raytheon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, S. H.; Kraft, R.; Medrano, A.; Kocian, T.; Bradstreet, D.; Williams, R.; Yang, T.

    2010-04-01

    Over the past two years Raytheon has made a major investment aimed at establishing a high volume uncooled manufacturing capability. This effort has addressed three elements of the uncooled value stream, namely bolometer fabrication, packaging and calibration/test. To facilitate a low cost / high volume source of bolometers Raytheon has formed a partnership with a high volume 200mm commercial silicon wafer fabrication. Over a 12 month period Raytheon has installed 200mm VOx deposition equipment, matched the metrology used on the Raytheon 150mm line, transferred the process flow used to fabricate Raytheon's double layer bolometer process and qualified the product. In this paper we will review the process transfer methodology and bolometer performance. To reduce bolometer packaging cost and increase production rates, Raytheon has implemented an automated packaging line. This line utilizes automated adhesive dispense, component pick and place, wire bonding and solder seal. In this paper we will review the process flow, qualification process and line capacity Calibration and test has traditionally been performed using a number of temperature chambers, with increased throughput being obtained by adding more chambers. This comes at the expense of increased test labor required to feed the chambers and an increased energy and floor space foot print. To avoid these collateral costs, Raytheon has implemented an automated robotic calibration cell capable of performing in excess of 5,000 calibrations a month. In this paper we will provide an overview of the calibration cell along with takt time and throughput data.

  15. Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition and etching of high-k gadolinium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Vitale, Steven A.; Wyatt, Peter W.; Hodson, Chris J.

    2012-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of high-quality gadolinium oxide thin films is achieved using Gd(iPrCp){sub 3} and O{sub 2} plasma. Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth is observed from 150 to 350 deg. C, though the optical properties of the film improve at higher temperature. True layer-by-layer ALD growth of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} occurred in a relatively narrow window of temperature and precursor dose. A saturated growth rate of 1.4 A/cycle was observed at 250 deg. C. As the temperature increases, high-quality films are deposited, but the growth mechanism appears to become CVD-like, indicating the onset of precursor decomposition. At 250 deg. C, the refractive index of the film is stable at {approx}1.80 regardless of other deposition conditions, and the measured dispersion characteristics are comparable to those of bulk Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. XPS data show that the O/Gd ratio is oxygen deficient at 1.3, and that it is also very hygroscopic. The plasma etching rate of the ALD Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} film in a high-density helicon reactor is very low. Little difference is observed in etching rate between Cl{sub 2} and pure Ar plasmas, suggesting that physical sputtering dominates the etching. A threshold bias power exists below which etching does not occur; thus it may be possible to etch a metal gate material and stop easily on the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate dielectric. The Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} film has a dielectric constant of about 16, exhibits low C-V hysteresis, and allows a 50 x reduction in gate leakage compared to SiO{sub 2}. However, the plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) process causes formation of an {approx}1.8 nm SiO{sub 2} interfacial layer, and generates a fixed charge of -1.21 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, both of which may limit use of PE-ALD Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a gate dielectric.

  16. ENHANCED GROWTH RATE AND SILANE UTILIZATION IN AMORPHOUS SILICON AND NANOCRYSTALLINE-SILICON SOLAR CELL DEPOSITION VIA GAS PHASE ADDITIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgeway, R G; Hegedus, S S; Podraza, N J

    2012-08-31

    Air Products set out to investigate the impact of additives on the deposition rate of both CSi and Si-H films. One criterion for additives was that they could be used in conventional PECVD processing, which would require sufficient vapor pressure to deliver material to the process chamber at the required flow rates. The flow rate required would depend on the size of the substrate onto which silicon films were being deposited, potentially ranging from 200 mm diameter wafers to the 5.7 m2 glass substrates used in GEN 8.5 flat-panel display tools. In choosing higher-order silanes, both disilane and trisilane had sufficient vapor pressure to withdraw gas at the required flow rates of up to 120 sccm. This report presents results obtained from testing at Air Products electronic technology laboratories, located in Allentown, PA, which focused on developing processes on a commercial IC reactor using silane and mixtures of silane plus additives. These processes were deployed to compare deposition rates and film properties with and without additives, with a goal of maximizing the deposition rate while maintaining or improving film properties.

  17. HIgh Rate X-ray Fluorescence Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Grudberg, Peter Matthew

    2013-04-30

    The purpose of this project was to develop a compact, modular multi-channel x-ray detector with integrated electronics. This detector, based upon emerging silicon drift detector (SDD) technology, will be capable of high data rate operation superior to the current state of the art offered by high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, without the need for liquid nitrogen. In addition, by integrating the processing electronics inside the detector housing, the detector performance will be much less affected by the typically noisy electrical environment of a synchrotron hutch, and will also be much more compact than current systems, which can include a detector involving a large LN2 dewar and multiple racks of electronics. The combined detector/processor system is designed to match or exceed the performance and features of currently available detector systems, at a lower cost and with more ease of use due to the small size of the detector. In addition, the detector system is designed to be modular, so a small system might just have one detector module, while a larger system can have many you can start with one detector module, and add more as needs grow and budget allows. The modular nature also serves to simplify repair. In large part, we were successful in achieving our goals. We did develop a very high performance, large area multi-channel SDD detector, packaged with all associated electronics, which is easy to use and requires minimal external support (a simple power supply module and a closed-loop water cooling system). However, we did fall short of some of our stated goals. We had intended to base the detector on modular, large-area detectors from Ketek GmbH in Munich, Germany; however, these were not available in a suitable time frame for this project, so we worked instead with pnDetector GmbH (also located in Munich). They were able to provide a front-end detector module with six 100 m^2 SDD detectors (two monolithic arrays of three elements each) along with

  18. Bipolar high-repetition-rate high-voltage nanosecond pulser

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Fuqiang; Wang Yi; Shi Hongsheng; Lei Qingquan

    2008-06-15

    The pulser designed is mainly used for producing corona plasma in waste water treatment system. Also its application in study of dielectric electrical properties will be discussed. The pulser consists of a variable dc power source for high-voltage supply, two graded capacitors for energy storage, and the rotating spark gap switch. The key part is the multielectrode rotating spark gap switch (MER-SGS), which can ensure wider range modulation of pulse repetition rate, longer pulse width, shorter pulse rise time, remarkable electrical field distortion, and greatly favors recovery of the gap insulation strength, insulation design, the life of the switch, etc. The voltage of the output pulses switched by the MER-SGS is in the order of 3-50 kV with pulse rise time of less than 10 ns and pulse repetition rate of 1-3 kHz. An energy of 1.25-125 J per pulse and an average power of up to 10-50 kW are attainable. The highest pulse repetition rate is determined by the driver motor revolution and the electrode number of MER-SGS. Even higher voltage and energy can be switched by adjusting the gas pressure or employing N{sub 2} as the insulation gas or enlarging the size of MER-SGS to guarantee enough insulation level.

  19. Bipolar high-repetition-rate high-voltage nanosecond pulser.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fuqiang; Wang, Yi; Shi, Hongsheng; Lei, Qingquan

    2008-06-01

    The pulser designed is mainly used for producing corona plasma in waste water treatment system. Also its application in study of dielectric electrical properties will be discussed. The pulser consists of a variable dc power source for high-voltage supply, two graded capacitors for energy storage, and the rotating spark gap switch. The key part is the multielectrode rotating spark gap switch (MER-SGS), which can ensure wider range modulation of pulse repetition rate, longer pulse width, shorter pulse rise time, remarkable electrical field distortion, and greatly favors recovery of the gap insulation strength, insulation design, the life of the switch, etc. The voltage of the output pulses switched by the MER-SGS is in the order of 3-50 kV with pulse rise time of less than 10 ns and pulse repetition rate of 1-3 kHz. An energy of 1.25-125 J per pulse and an average power of up to 10-50 kW are attainable. The highest pulse repetition rate is determined by the driver motor revolution and the electrode number of MER-SGS. Even higher voltage and energy can be switched by adjusting the gas pressure or employing N(2) as the insulation gas or enlarging the size of MER-SGS to guarantee enough insulation level.

  20. Apparent Decreases in Colloid Deposition Rate Coefficients with Distance of Transport under Unfavorable Deposition Conditions: A General Phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiqing; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Johnson, William P.

    2004-11-01

    The transport of polystyrene microspheres of two different diameters (1.1-?m and 5.7-?m) was examined in packed glass beads (-?m) under a variety of environmentally relevant ionic strength and flow conditions. Numerical models accounting for advection, dispersion, attachment, and limited detachment were capable of simulating the observed breakthrough-elution data, but were incapable of simulating the observed profile of numbers of attached microspheres versus distance from the column entrance, which was much steeper than expected based on a constant rate of attachment across the length of the column. The ubiquity of apparent decreases in attachment rate with distance of transport among microspheres, bacteria, and viruses leads to the conclusion that such effects reflect processes that are fundamental to filtration. Potential processes hypothesized to contribute to the apparent decrease in attachment rate with distance of transport include: distributed interaction potentials among the microsphere population; straining; and depletion of the colloid concentration in the pore water adjacent to grain surfaces. It is shown that all three mechanisms are viable contributors to apparent decreases in attachment rate with distance of transport, and that direct observations are needed to determine the conditions under which each of these potential contributors is relevant.

  1. Sediment data for computations of deposition rates in the tidal Potomac system, Maryland and Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, J.L.; Martin, E.A.; Rice, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Sixty-two cores ranging in length from 33 to 1,002 cm were collected from the tidal Potomac system and from selected tributaries downstream from the local head-of-tides between June 1978 and July 1981. Segments from selected depths below the sediment surface have been analyzed for a variety of constituents, including lead-210, trace metals, nutrients, and particle size. The core sites were positioned throughout the hydrologic divisions and geomorphic units of the tidal Potomac system and in water depths ranging from 1 to 30 cm. Alpha counting methods were used to determine the polonium-210 radioactivity and secular equilibrium was assumed between lead-210 and polonium-210. The alpha decay of polonium-210 provides a measure of the lead-210 radioactivity of the lead-210 produced by in-situ decay of radium-226 in the sediment column and the lead-210 from external sources. Only the unsupported lead-210 was used in computations of the deposition rate. The background level of lead-210 in tidal Potomac system sediment cores usually is based on in-situ measurements of total lead-210 at depths below which no unsupported lead-210 is believed to be present, and the lead-210 concentrations are relatively constant. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Cheetah: A high frame rate, high resolution SWIR image camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neys, Joel; Bentell, Jonas; O'Grady, Matt; Vermeiren, Jan; Colin, Thierry; Hooylaerts, Peter; Grietens, Bob

    2008-10-01

    A high resolution, high frame rate InGaAs based image sensor and associated camera has been developed. The sensor and the camera are capable of recording and delivering more than 1700 full 640x512pixel frames per second. The FPA utilizes a low lag CTIA current integrator in each pixel, enabling integration times shorter than one microsecond. On-chip logics allows for four different sub windows to be read out simultaneously at even higher rates. The spectral sensitivity of the FPA is situated in the SWIR range [0.9-1.7 μm] and can be further extended into the Visible and NIR range. The Cheetah camera has max 16 GB of on-board memory to store the acquired images and transfer the data over a Gigabit Ethernet connection to the PC. The camera is also equipped with a full CameralinkTM interface to directly stream the data to a frame grabber or dedicated image processing unit. The Cheetah camera is completely under software control.

  3. High data rate systems for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitwood, John

    1991-01-01

    Information systems in the next century will transfer data at rates that are much greater than those in use today. Satellite based communication systems will play an important role in networking users. Typical data rates; use of microwave, millimeter wave, or optical systems; millimeter wave communication technology; modulators/exciters; solid state power amplifiers; beam waveguide transmission systems; low noise receiver technology; optical communication technology; and the potential commercial applications of these technologies are discussed.

  4. Depositing High-T(sub c) Superconductors On Normal-Conductor Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirlin, Peter S.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments have demonstrated feasibility of depositing thin layers of high-T(sub c) superconductor on normally electrically conductive wires. Superconductivity evident at and below critical temperature (T{sub c}) of 71 K. OMCVD, organometallic vapor deposition, apparatus coats Ag wire with layer high-T(sub c) superconductor. Superconductive phase of this material formed subsequently by annealing under controlled conditions.

  5. Selective deposition of a crystalline Si film by a chemical sputtering process in a high pressure hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Hiromasa; Kakiuchi, Hiroaki; Yasutake, Kiyoshi

    2015-07-01

    The selective deposition of Si films was demonstrated using a chemical sputtering process induced by a high pressure hydrogen plasma at 52.6 kPa (400 Torr). In this chemical sputtering process, the initial deposition rate (Rd) is dependent upon the substrate type. At the initial stage of Si film formation, Rd on glass substrates increased with elapsed time and reached to a constant value. In contrast, Rd on Si substrates remained constant during the deposition. The selective deposition of Si films can be achieved by adjusting the substrate temperature (Tsub) and hydrogen concentration (CH2) in the process atmosphere. For any given deposition time, it was found that an optimum CH2 exists for a given Tsub to realize the selective deposition of a Si film, and the optimum Tsub value tends to increase with decreasing CH2. According to electron diffraction patterns obtained from the samples, the selectively prepared Si films showed epitaxial-like growth, although the Si films contained many defects. It was revealed by Raman scattering spectroscopy that some of the defects in the Si films were platelet defects induced by excess hydrogen incorporated during Si film formation. Raman spectrum also suggested that Si related radicals (SiH2, SiH, Si) with high reactivity contribute to the Si film formation. Simple model was derived as the guideline for achieving the selective growth.

  6. DETERMINATION OF PARTICLE DEPOSITION RATES FOR COOKING AND OTHER INDOOR SOURCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residential indoor particle concentrations are dependent on indoor sources, penetration of outdoor particles, air change with outdoors, and deposition of particles on indoor surfaces as well as other loss mechanisms. Of these factors, few data are available on deposition of pa...

  7. DETERMINATION OF PARTICLE DEPOSITION RATES FOR COOKING AND OTHER INDOOR SOURCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residential indoor particle concentrations are dependent on indoor sources, penetration of outdoor particles, air change with outdoors, and deposition of particles on indoor surfaces as well as other loss mechanisms. Of these factors, few data are available on deposition of pa...

  8. Colloidal asphaltene deposition in laminar pipe flow: Flow rate and parametric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashmi, S. M.; Loewenberg, M.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2015-08-01

    Deposition from a suspended phase onto a surface can aversely affect everyday transport processes on a variety of scales, from mineral scale corrosion of household plumbing systems to asphaltene deposition in large-scale pipelines in the petroleum industry. While petroleum may be a single fluid phase under reservoir conditions, depressurization upon production often induces a phase transition in the fluid, resulting in the precipitation of asphaltene material which readily aggregates to the colloidal scale and deposits on metallic surfaces. Colloidal asphaltene deposition in wellbores and pipelines can be especially problematic for industrial purposes, where cleanup processes necessitate costly operational shutdowns. In order to better understand the parametric dependence of deposition which leads to flow blockages, we carry out lab-scale experiments under a variety of material and flow conditions. We develop a parametric scaling model to understand the fluid dynamics and transport considerations governing deposition. The lab-scale experiments are performed by injecting precipitating petroleum fluid mixtures into a small metal pipe, which results in deposition and clogging, assessed by measuring the pressure drop across the pipe. Parametric scaling arguments suggest that the clogging behavior is determined by a combination of the Peclet number, volume fraction of depositing material, and the volume of the injection itself.

  9. High Heat Flux Surface Coke Deposition and Removal Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    deposited over the course of multiple missions. Therefore, there is a need for a method to survey coke layer thicknesses and locations in the cooling...thin coke layers makes this a difficult and challenging problem. Reaction Systems, Inc. has developed a low temperature oxidation method that can...rapidly remove the coke layers in the cooling channels and at the same time map their location. We demonstrated this technique in a recent SBIR Phase II

  10. The use of bulk collectors in monitoring wet deposition at high-altitude sites in winter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ranalli, A.J.; Turk, J.T.; Campbell, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved ions from samples collected by wet/dry collectors were compared to those collected by bulk collectors at Halfmoon Creek and Ned Wilson Lake in western Colorado to determine if bulk collectors can be used to monitor wet deposition chemistry in remote, high-altitude regions in winter. Hydrogen-ion concentration was significantly lower (p 0.05) at Halfmoon Creek. Wet deposition concentrations were predicated from bulk deposition concentrations through linear regression analysis. Results indicate that anions (chloride, nitrate and sulfate) can be predicted with a high degree of confidence. Lack of significant differences between seasonal (winter and summer) ratios of bulk to wet deposition concentrations indicates that at sites where operation of a wet/dry collector during the winter is not practical, wet deposition concentrations can be predicted from bulk collector samples through regression analysis of wet and bulk deposition data collected during the summer.

  11. A Tropical Paradox - High Mercury Deposition, but Low Mercury Bioaccumulation in Northeastern Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanley, J. B.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Lane, O.; Arendt, W.; Hall, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    At a "clean air" trade winds site in tropical northeastern Puerto Rico, atmospheric total mercury (THg) deposition averaged 28 µg m-2 yr-1, higher than any site in the USA Mercury Deposition Network, driven by efficient capture of upper tropospheric Hg by high rain-forming clouds. The elevated THg in deposition is reflected in high THg concentrations and flux in streams, but assimilation into the local food web was quite low. There are few mammalian or freshwater fish predators on the island, but 30 faunal samples including fly larvae, freshwater shrimp, spiders, tadpoles, coqui frogs, anole lizards, a scorpion, and a boa constrictor had a median THg concentration of 0.032 µg g-1 (dry weight basis), with the three highest values (near 0.14 µg g-1) from spiders. Avian blood THg concentrations (n=31, from 8 species in various foraging guilds) were also quite low, ranging widely from 0.0002 to 0.032 µg g-1 wet weight, with a median of 0.0043 µg g-1. THg levels in biota were severalfold to more than an order of magnitude lower than comparable values in the continental U.S. These results were surprising given the high Hg inputs and watershed features that would seem to favor methylmercury (MeHg) production (Hg(II)-methylation) - high soil moisture with anoxic zones, ample organic matter and sulfur, and year-round warm temperatures. However, organic soil (0-10 cm) along a hillslope to riparian transect averaged only 0.45 ng/g MeHg, with an average MeHg/THg of only 0.34%. Incubations (n=6) to assess methylation and demethylation indicated that rate constants for demethylation were 6-60 fold greater than those for Hg(II)-methylation, and calculated potential rates of demethylation were 3-9 fold greater than those for Hg(II)-methylation. Thus, the apparent paradox may be resolved by the difference between these rates, whereby MeHg degradation outpaces MeHg production in surface soil and sediment. The interplay of these microbial processes shields the island food web

  12. Deposition-rate dependence of granular size distribution in Cu aggregate on liquid substrate studied by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Miao-Gen; Yu, Sen-Jiang; Jiao, Zhi-Wei; Yu, Ming-Zhou; Bao, Fu-Bing

    2012-03-01

    In this article, we report an atomic force microscopy study on the microstructure and the deposition-rate dependence of granular size distribution in copper (Cu) ramified aggregates on a liquid substrate. This study shows that the ramified Cu aggregates are composed of Gaussian size distribution granules, which form immediately after the Cu atoms are deposited. The interesting phenomenon is that the mean diameter Φm of the granules exponentially decays and approaches a stable value Φc with an increase in the deposition rate f. The granular mean diameter Φm slightly changes with the time interval Δt during which the film is kept in the vacuum chamber, owing to the large diffusion coefficient of the Cu granules on the liquid substrates. The experimental behavior strongly depends on the properties of the liquid substrate.

  13. Improving age-depth models using sedimentary proxies for accumulation rates in fluvio-lacustrine deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minderhoud, Philip S. J.; Cohen, Kim M.; Toonen, Willem. H. J.; Erkens, Gilles; Hoek, Wim Z.

    2017-04-01

    Lacustrine fills, including those of oxbow lakes in river floodplains, often hold valuable sedimentary and biological proxy records of palaeo-environmental change. Precise dating of accumulated sediments at levels throughout these records is crucial for interpretation and correlation of (proxy) data existing within the fills. Typically, dates are gathered from multiple sampled levels and their results are combined in age-depth models to estimate the ages of events identified between the datings. In this paper, a method of age-depth modelling is presented that varies the vertical accumulation rate of the lake fill based on continuous sedimentary data. In between Bayesian calibrated radiocarbon dates, this produces a modified non-linear age-depth relation based on sedimentology rather than linear or spline interpolation. The method is showcased on a core of an infilled palaeomeander at the floodplain edge of the river Rhine near Rheinberg (Germany). The sequence spans from 4.7 to 2.9 ka cal BP and consists of 5.5 meters of laminated lacustrine, organo-clastic mud, covered by 1 meter of peaty clay. Four radiocarbon dates provide direct dating control, mapping and dating in the wider surroundings provide additional control. The laminated, organo-clastic facies of the oxbow fill contains a record of nearby fluvial-geomorphological activity, including meander reconfiguration events and passage of rare large floods, recognized as fluctuations in coarseness and amount of allochthonous clastic sediment input. Continuous along-core sampling and measurement of loss-on-ignition (LOI) provided a fast way of expressing the variation in clastic sedimentation influx from the nearby river versus autochthonous organic deposition derived from biogenic production in the lake itself. This low-cost sedimentary proxy data feeds into the age-depth modelling. The sedimentology-modelled age-depth relation (re)produces the distinct lithological boundaries in the fill as marked changes in

  14. Multiple channels of ADCs for high bit rate coherent optical OFDM with low sampling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, He; Cheng, Lin; Zheng, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hanyi; Guo, Yili

    2009-11-01

    Multiple channels of ADCs for high bit rate CO-OFDM system is proposed by jointly processing outputs of all channels with a simple algorithm. The required sampling rate of ADCs is reduced lower than Nyquist rate.

  15. Development of compact CW-IR laser deposition system for high-throughput growth of organic single crystals.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Yoko; Maruyama, Shingo; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2011-10-01

    We developed a compact continuous-wave infrared (CW-IR) laser deposition system for the high-throughput growth of organic single crystals. In this system, two CW-IR lasers are used for the sample heating and thermal evaporation of materials. The CW-IR laser heating is simple and allows good control of the deposition rate and growth temperature, in response to the on/off laser switching. Six samples can be loaded simultaneously in a chamber, which allows one-by-one sequential deposition for high-throughput experiments, without breaking the vacuum. Using this setup, we studied the effect of ionic liquids on the growth of C60 crystals in vacuum.

  16. Technology of High-speed Direct Laser Deposition from Ni-based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimova-Korsmik, Olga; Turichin, Gleb; Zemlyakov, Evgeniy; Babkin, Konstantin; Petrovsky, Pavel; Travyanov, Andrey

    Recently, additive manufacturing is the one of most perspective technologies; it can replace conventional methods of casting and subsequent time-consuming machining. One of the most interesting additive technologies - high-speed direct laser deposition (HSDLD) allows realizing heterophase process during the manufacturing, which there is process takes place with a partial melting of powder. This is particularly important for materials, which are sensitive to strong fluctuations of temperature treatment regimes, like nickel base alloys with high content of gamma prime phase. This alloys are interested for many industrial areas, mostly there are used in engine systems, aircraft and shipbuilding, aeronautics. Heating and cooling rates during the producing process determine structure and affect on its properties. Using HSDLD process it possible to make a products from Ni superalloys with ultrafine microstructure and satisfactory mechanical characteristics without special subsequent heatreatment.

  17. Dependence of the structural, electrical and magnetic properties of the superconductive YBCO thin films on the deposition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karci, A. B.; Tepe, M.; Sozeri, H.

    2009-03-01

    In this study, YBCO thin films on single crystal LaAlO3 (100) substrates have been grown using DC inverted cylindrical magnetron sputtering technique and the effect of the deposition rate on these films is investigated. Three different deposition rates are used to produce superconducting YBCO thin films with 150 nm of thickness on (100) LaAlO3 single crystal substrate at 780 0C. The samples are analyzed in detail by means of XRD, R-T, χ-T, M-H and AFM characterizations and also the critical current densities (Jc) are derived from the magnetic hysteresis curves using the modified Bean formula [1]. The critical current density at 50 K was found to be in the range of 3.107 A/m2 to 8. 107 A/m2 with a deposition rate between 2nm/min and 1.2nm/min. A correlation has been obtained so that as the film deposition rate increases, the surface smoothness and crystalline quality of the films significantly deteriorate, resulting in a significant decrease in Jc.

  18. 210Pb mass accumulation rates in the depositional area of the Magra River (Mediterranean Sea, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbono, I.; Barsanti, M.; Schirone, A.; Conte, F.; Delfanti, R.

    2016-08-01

    Nine sediment cores were collected between 2009 and 2012 in the inner continental shelf (Mediterranean Sea, Italy) mainly influenced by the Magra River, at water depths ranging from 11 to 64 m. Mass Accumulation Rates (MARs) were calculated through 210Pb analysed by Gamma spectrometry. Three different dating models (single and two-layer CF-CS, CRS) were applied to clay normalised 210Pbxs profiles and 137Cs was used to validate the 210Pb geochronology. The maximum MAR values (>2 g cm-2 yr-1) were found in the region adjacent to the Magra River mouth and outside the Gulf of La Spezia (0.9±0.1 g cm-2 yr-1 at St. 3-C6 and 4-C4). Results from 137Cs/210Pbxs ratios calculated in Surface Mixed Layers (SMLs) evidenced the coastal boundaries of the Magra River depositional area, which is very limited towards south. Differently, in the north-west sector, fine sediments are generally driven by the Ligurian Current and move towards north-west: at the deepest and most distant station from the River mouth, the MAR value is the lowest one in the study area. Few major Magra River floods occurred during the sediment core sampling period. By using the short-lived radioisotope 7Be as a tracer of river floods, a clear 7Be signature of 2009 flood is present at St. 1-SA1C. Finally, by analyzing the clay normalised 210Pbxs profiles, a decrease of its activity dating the years 1999 and 2000 is observed in four cores, corresponding to two major Magra River floods occurring in those years.

  19. The Combustion of HMX. [burning rate at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggs, T. L.; Price, C. F.; Atwood, A. I.; Zurn, D. E.; Eisel, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The burn rate of HMX was measured at high pressures (p more than 1000 psi). The self deflagration rate of HMX was determined from 1 atmosphere to 50,000 psi. The burning rate shows no significant slope breaks.

  20. The Combustion of HMX. [burning rate at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggs, T. L.; Price, C. F.; Atwood, A. I.; Zurn, D. E.; Eisel, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The burn rate of HMX was measured at high pressures (p more than 1000 psi). The self deflagration rate of HMX was determined from 1 atmosphere to 50,000 psi. The burning rate shows no significant slope breaks.

  1. Focused electron beam induced deposition of copper with high resolution and purity from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandiarpour, Samaneh; Boehme, Lindsay; Hastings, J. Todd

    2017-03-01

    Electron-beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures is desirable for nanoscale rapid prototyping, interconnection of chemically synthesized structures, and integrated circuit editing. However, metalorganic, gas-phase precursors for copper introduce high levels of carbon contamination. Here we demonstrate electron beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures from aqueous solutions of copper sulfate. The addition of sulfuric acid eliminates oxygen contamination from the deposit and produces a deposit with ∼95 at% copper. The addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Triton X-100, or polyethylene glycole (PEG) improves pattern resolution and controls deposit morphology but leads to slightly reduced purity. High resolution nested lines with a 100 nm pitch are obtained from CuSO4–H2SO4–SDS–H2O. Higher aspect ratios (∼1:1) with reduced line edge roughness and unintended deposition are obtained from CuSO4–H2SO4–PEG–H2O. Evidence for radiation-chemical deposition mechanisms was observed, including deposition efficiency as high as 1.4 primary electrons/Cu atom.

  2. Focused electron beam induced deposition of copper with high resolution and purity from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Esfandiarpour, Samaneh; Boehme, Lindsay; Hastings, J Todd

    2017-03-24

    Electron-beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures is desirable for nanoscale rapid prototyping, interconnection of chemically synthesized structures, and integrated circuit editing. However, metalorganic, gas-phase precursors for copper introduce high levels of carbon contamination. Here we demonstrate electron beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures from aqueous solutions of copper sulfate. The addition of sulfuric acid eliminates oxygen contamination from the deposit and produces a deposit with ∼95 at% copper. The addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Triton X-100, or polyethylene glycole (PEG) improves pattern resolution and controls deposit morphology but leads to slightly reduced purity. High resolution nested lines with a 100 nm pitch are obtained from CuSO4-H2SO4-SDS-H2O. Higher aspect ratios (∼1:1) with reduced line edge roughness and unintended deposition are obtained from CuSO4-H2SO4-PEG-H2O. Evidence for radiation-chemical deposition mechanisms was observed, including deposition efficiency as high as 1.4 primary electrons/Cu atom.

  3. Enthalpy and high temperature relaxation kinetics of stable vapor-deposited glasses of toluene.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Deepanjan; Sadtchenko, Vlad

    2014-09-07

    Stable non-crystalline toluene films of micrometer and nanometer thicknesses were grown by vapor deposition at distinct rates and probed by fast scanning calorimetry. Fast scanning calorimetry is shown to be extremely sensitive to the structure of the vapor-deposited phase and was used to characterize simultaneously its kinetic stability and its thermodynamic properties. According to our analysis, transformation of vapor-deposited samples of toluene during heating with rates in excess 10(5) K s(-1) follows the zero-order kinetics. The transformation rate correlates strongly with the initial enthalpy of the sample, which increases with the deposition rate according to sub-linear law. Analysis of the transformation kinetics of vapor-deposited toluene films of various thicknesses reveal a sudden increase in the transformation rate for films thinner than 250 nm. The change in kinetics seems to correlate with the surface roughness scale of the substrate. The implications of these findings for the formation mechanism and structure of vapor-deposited stable glasses are discussed.

  4. Enthalpy and high temperature relaxation kinetics of stable vapor-deposited glasses of toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Deepanjan; Sadtchenko, Vlad

    2014-09-07

    Stable non-crystalline toluene films of micrometer and nanometer thicknesses were grown by vapor deposition at distinct rates and probed by fast scanning calorimetry. Fast scanning calorimetry is shown to be extremely sensitive to the structure of the vapor-deposited phase and was used to characterize simultaneously its kinetic stability and its thermodynamic properties. According to our analysis, transformation of vapor-deposited samples of toluene during heating with rates in excess 10{sup 5} K s{sup −1} follows the zero-order kinetics. The transformation rate correlates strongly with the initial enthalpy of the sample, which increases with the deposition rate according to sub-linear law. Analysis of the transformation kinetics of vapor-deposited toluene films of various thicknesses reveal a sudden increase in the transformation rate for films thinner than 250 nm. The change in kinetics seems to correlate with the surface roughness scale of the substrate. The implications of these findings for the formation mechanism and structure of vapor-deposited stable glasses are discussed.

  5. 77 FR 5416 - Financial Derivatives Transactions To Offset Interest Rate Risk; Investment and Deposit Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL CREDIT UNION... Deposit Activities AGENCY: National Credit Union Administration. ACTION: Advance notice of proposed...) requests additional public comments to identify the conditions for federal credit unions (FCUs) to...

  6. Accretion rate of extraterrestrial matter: Iridium deposited over the last 70 million years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.

    1988-01-01

    In order to quantify the accretion rate of extraterrestrial matter during the Cenozoic, Ir concentrations were measured in a continuous series of 450 samples across most of the length of piston core LL44-GPC3. LL44-GPC3 is a 25-meter-long, large-diameter piston core of abyssal clay from the central North Pacific. This core contains a nearly continuous record of sedimentation over the last 70 Ma, as this site migrated from a region near the Equator in the late Cretaceous to its present position north of Hawaii. The first-cut survey across the core is nearing completion, and all of the conclusions of the earlier study, in which was reported the concentrations of Ir, Co, and Sb across 9 meters of this core, remain unchanged. The only strongly enhanced Ir concentrations occur at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary and outside the K-T boundary Ir correlates well with Co, a terrestrial element which is largely present in hydrogenous ferromanganese oxide precipitates from seawater. Concentrations of both elements appear to be inversely correlated with the sedimentation rate. Although the K-T Ir anomaly is unique in magnitude in this core, there are several small bumps in the Ir profile which may reflect smaller accretionary events. The most promising Ir enhancement was observed in a 30 cm section approximately 1 m below the K-T boundary. Preliminary data suggest deposition of an excess across this interval at a time estimate to be approximate 1 Ma before the K-T impact event, but there is insufficient evidence at present to prove that this reflects enhanced accretion of extraterrestrial matter. A detailed model is being prepared of the chemical record of sedimentation in this core using a combined database of 39 elements in approximately 450 samples across the Cenozoic. Preliminary working model indicates that the only sedimentary sources which contribute significantly to the Ir budget in this core are the hydrogenous precipitates and extraterrestrial particulates.

  7. On the suitability of high vacuum electrospray deposition for the fabrication of molecular electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temperton, Robert H.; O'Shea, James N.; Scurr, David J.

    2017-08-01

    We present a series of three studies investigating the potential application of high vacuum electrospray deposition to construct molecular electronic devices. Through the use of time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry we explore the use of this novel deposition technique to fabricating multilayer structures using materials that are compatible with the same solvents and films containing a mixture of molecules from orthogonal solvents. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy we study the deposition of a polymer blend using electrospray and find evidence of preferential deposition of one of the components.

  8. A suitable deposition method of CdS for high performance CdS-sensitized ZnO electrodes: Sequential chemical bath deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haining; Li, Weiping; Liu, Huicong; Zhu, Liqun

    2010-07-15

    A suitable deposition method of CdS is necessary for the high performance CdS-sensitized ZnO electrodes. In this paper, chemical bath deposition (CBD) and sequential chemical bath deposition (S-CBD) methods were used to deposit CdS on ZnO mesoporous films for ZnO/CdS electrodes. The analysis results of XRD patterns and UV-vis spectroscopy indicated that CBD deposition method leaded to the dissolving of ZnO mesoporous films in deposition solution and thickness reduction of ZnO/CdS electrodes. Absorption in visible region by the ZnO/CdS electrodes with CdS deposition by S-CBD was enhanced as deposition cycles increased due to the stability of ZnO mesoporous films in the S-CBD deposition solutions. The results of photocurrent-voltage (I-V) measurement showed that the performance of ZnO/CdS electrodes with CdS deposition by CBD first increased and then decreased as deposition time increased, and the greatest short-circuit current (J{sub sc}) was obtained at the deposition time of 4 min. The performance of ZnO/CdS electrodes with CdS deposition by S-CBD increased as deposition cycles increased, and both open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) and J{sub sc} were greater than those electrodes with CdS deposition by CBD when the deposition cycles of S-CBD were 10 or greater. These results indicated that S-CBD is a more suitable method for high performance ZnO/CdS electrodes. (author)

  9. A 3D object-based model to simulate highly-heterogeneous, coarse, braided river deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, E.; Huggenberger, P.; Caers, J.

    2016-12-01

    There is a critical need in hydrogeological modeling for geologically more realistic representation of the subsurface. Indeed, widely-used representations of the subsurface heterogeneity based on smooth basis functions such as cokriging or the pilot-point approach fail at reproducing the connectivity of high permeable geological structures that control subsurface solute transport. To realistically model the connectivity of high permeable structures of coarse, braided river deposits, multiple-point statistics and object-based models are promising alternatives. We therefore propose a new object-based model that, according to a sedimentological model, mimics the dominant processes of floodplain dynamics. Contrarily to existing models, this object-based model possesses the following properties: (1) it is consistent with field observations (outcrops, ground-penetrating radar data, etc.), (2) it allows different sedimentological dynamics to be modeled that result in different subsurface heterogeneity patterns, (3) it is light in memory and computationally fast, and (4) it can be conditioned to geophysical data. In this model, the main sedimentological elements (scour fills with open-framework-bimodal gravel cross-beds, gravel sheet deposits, open-framework and sand lenses) and their internal structures are described by geometrical objects. Several spatial distributions are proposed that allow to simulate the horizontal position of the objects on the floodplain as well as the net rate of sediment deposition. The model is grid-independent and any vertical section can be computed algebraically. Furthermore, model realizations can serve as training images for multiple-point statistics. The significance of this model is shown by its impact on the subsurface flow distribution that strongly depends on the sedimentological dynamics modeled. The code will be provided as a free and open-source R-package.

  10. High-frequency depositional sequences and stratal stacking patterns in lower pliocene coastal deltas, mid-Norwegian continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, S.; Weimer, P.

    1996-12-01

    Extensive deltaic and coastal progradation occurred along the mid-Norwegian continental shelf during the early Pliocene. Thirty-eight well-developed, high-frequency (fourth-order) sequences are identified within the deltaic complex on multifold seismic data. The fourth-order sequences are arranged in four oblique progradational and two sigmoid progradational sequence sets. Deposition of the high-frequency sequences and their stacking patterns probably were in response to high-frequency cycles of relative changes in sea level cycles produced by variable rates of subsidence and uplift, superimposed on ;high-frequency eustatic cycles within a lower frequency eustatic system. The mixed aggrading/prograding sequence sets are interpreted to represent increased space-added accommodation rates and deposition within third-order highstand systems tracts. Conversely, the progradational sequence sets are interpreted to represent decreasing space-added accommodation rates and deposition within the third-order low-stand systems tracts. The recognition of multiple sequence sets likely reflects the effect of long-term relative fall in sea level (tectonic uplift?) super-imposed on high-frequency eustatic cycles.

  11. High Concentration of Zinc in Sub-retinal Pigment Epithelial Deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel,I.; Flinn, J.; Peto, T.; Linkous, D.; Cano, K.; Bird, A.; Lanzirotti, A.; Frederickson, C.; van Kuijk, F.

    2007-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in Western societies, is the accumulation of sub-retinal pigment epithelial deposits (sub-RPE deposits), including drusen and basal laminar deposits, in Bruch's membrane (BM). The nature and the underlying mechanisms of this deposit formation are not fully understood. Because we know that zinc contributes to deposit formation in neurodegenerative diseases, we tested the hypothesis that zinc might be involved in deposit formation in AMD. Using zinc specific fluorescent probes and microprobe synchrotron X-ray fluorescence we showed that sub-RPE deposits in post-mortem human tissues contain unexpectedly high concentrations of zinc, including abundant bio-available (ionic and/or loosely protein bound) ions. Zinc accumulation was especially high in the maculae of eyes with AMD. Internal deposit structures are especially enriched in bio-available zinc. Based on the evidence provided here we suggest that zinc plays a role in sub-RPE deposit formation in the aging human eye and possibly also in the development and/or progression of AMD.

  12. Field investigation of surface-deposited radon progeny as a possible predictor of the airborne radon progeny dose rate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kainan; Steck, Daniel J; Field, R William

    2009-08-01

    The quantitative relationships between radon gas concentration, the surface-deposited activities of various radon progeny, the airborne radon progeny dose rate, and various residential environmental factors were investigated through actual field measurements in 38 selected Iowa houses occupied by either smokers or nonsmokers. Airborne dose rate was calculated from unattached and attached potential alpha energy concentrations (PAECs) using two dosimetric models with different activity-size weighting factors. These models are labeled Pdose and Jdose, respectively. Surface-deposited 218Po and 214Po were found significantly correlated to radon, unattached PAEC, and both airborne dose rates (p < 0.0001) in nonsmoking environments. However, deposited 218Po was not significantly correlated to the above parameters in smoking environments. In multiple linear regression analysis, natural logarithm transformation was performed for airborne dose rate as the dependent variable, as well as for radon and deposited 218Po and 214Po as predictors. An interaction effect was found between deposited 214Po and an obstacle in front of the Retrospective Reconstruction Detector (RRD) in predicting dose rate (p = 0.049 and 0.058 for Pdose and Jdose, respectively) for nonsmoking environments. After adjusting for radon and deposited radon progeny effects, the presence of either cooking, usage of a fireplace, or usage of a ceiling fan significantly, or marginally significantly, reduced the Pdose to 0.65 (90% CI 0.42-0.996), 0.54 (90% CI 0.28-1.02), and 0.66 (90% CI 0.45-0.96), respectively. For Jdose, only the usage of a ceiling fan significantly reduced the dose rate to 0.57 (90% CI 0.39-0.85). In smoking environments, deposited 218Po was a significant negative predictor for Pdose (RR 0.68, 90% CI 0.55-0.84) after adjusting for long-term 222Rn and environmental factors. A significant decrease of 0.72 (90% CI 0.64-0.83) in the mean Pdose was noted, after adjusting for the radon and radon

  13. Field Investigation of the Surface-deposited Radon Progeny as a Possible Predictor of the Airborne Radon Progeny Dose Rate

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kainan; Steck, Daniel J.; Field, R. William

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative relationships between radon gas concentration, the surface-deposited activities of various radon progeny, the airborne radon progeny dose rate, and various residential environmental factors were investigated through actual field measurements in 38 selected Iowa houses occupied by either smokers or nonsmokers. Airborne dose rate was calculated from unattached and attached potential alpha energy concentrations (PAECs) using two dosimetric models with different activity-size weighting factors. These models are labeled Pdose and Jdose, respectively. Surface-deposited 218Po and 214Po were found significantly correlated to radon, unattached PAEC, and both airborne dose rates (p < 0.0001) in nonsmoking environments. However, deposited 218Po was not significantly correlated to the above parameters in smoking environments. In multiple linear regression analysis, natural logarithm transformation was performed for airborne dose rate as the dependent variable, as well as for radon and deposited 218Po and 214Po as predictors. An interaction effect was found between deposited 214Po and an obstacle in front of the Retrospective Reconstruction Detector (RRD) in predicting dose rate (p = 0.049 and 0.058 for Pdose and Jdose, respectively) for nonsmoking environments. After adjusting for radon and deposited radon progeny effects, the presence of either cooking, usage of a fireplace, or usage of a ceiling fan significantly, or marginal significantly, reduced the Pdose to 0.65 (90% CI 0.42–0.996), 0.54 (90% CI 0.28–1.02) and 0.66 (90% CI 0.45–0.96), respectively. For Jdose, only the usage of a ceiling fan significantly reduced the dose rate to 0.57 (90% CI 0.39–0.85). In smoking environments, deposited 218Po was a significant negative predictor for Pdose (RR 0.68, 90% CI 0.55–0.84) after adjusting for long-term 222Rn and environmental factors. A significant decrease of 0.72 (90% CI 0.64–0.83) in the mean Pdose was noted, after adjusting for the radon and

  14. High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon can be produced at MPa pressures from silane without the use of plasma at temperatures as low as 345 °C. High pressure chemical vapor deposition may open a new way to low cost deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells and other thin film structures over very large areas in very compact, simple reactors.

  15. New high rate lead acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juergens, Tristan; Ruderman, Michael A.; Brodd, Ralph J.

    1994-05-01

    A new approach to the design of lead acid batteries has been developed based on the use of very thin lead foil current collectors. The basic cell construction and the performance characteristics for the new cell are described. Spiral wrap cells based on this electrode concept exhibit extremely high power output with excellent capacity maintenance. Additionally, these cells exhibit very flat voltage at all currents, and are capable of very rapid recharge. Applications for this high power technology cover a broad spectrum such as portable power tools, UPS systems, electrically heated catalytic converters, military pulse power applications, and electric and hybrid vehicles.

  16. Impact of aerosol composition and foliage characteristics on forest canopy deposition rates: A laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornsby, K. E.; Pryor, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Forests are a major sink for atmospheric aerosols. Hence it has been suggested that (i) increased tree planting in urban areas might lead to a reduction in aerosol particle concentrations and thus a reduction in respiratory conditions and heart complications, and (ii) forests may be responsible for removing a disproportionately large fraction of potentially climate-relevant fine and ultra-fine aerosol particles from the atmosphere. However, larger uncertainties remain with respect to controls on uptake rates for forests. E.g. the deposition flux partitioning between foliage and non-foliage elements, the influence of particle size and composition, the role of leaf surface morphology and stomatal aperture in surface uptake. Improved understanding of the relative importance of these factors and the variability across different tree species should help determine how much of a sink naturally occurring and planted forests can provide downstream of fine particle production. In this study, a sample of trees native to southern Indiana were exposed to ultra-fine aerosol particle populations in a 1.5 m x 1.5 m x 1.5 m Teflon chamber. Stable particle size distributions (PSD) with geometric mean diameters (GMD) ranging from 40 to 80 nm were generated from sodium chloride, ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and sodium sulfite solutions using a TSI model 3940 Aerosol Generation System (AGS). The aerosol stream was diluted using scrubbed and dried zero air to allow a variation of total number concentration across two orders of magnitude. PSD in the chamber are continuously measured using a TSI Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS) comprising an Electrostatic Classifier (EC model 3080) attached to a Long DMA (LDMA model 3081) and a TSI model 3025A Butanol Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) operated with both the internal diffusion loss and multiple charge corrections turned on. The composition of the chamber air was also monitored for carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor

  17. Characterization of the ion cathode fall region in relation to the growth rate in plasma sputter deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmero, A.; van Hattum, E. D.; Rudolph, H.; Habraken, F. H. P. M.

    2007-02-01

    In plasma-assisted magnetron sputtering, the ion cathode fall region is the part of the plasma where the DC electric field and ion current evolve from zero to their maximum values at the cathode. These quantities are straightforwardly related to the deposition rate of the sputtered material. In this work we derive simple relations for the measurable axially averaged values of the ion density and the ion current at the ion cathode fall region and relate them with the deposition rate. These relations have been tested experimentally in the case of an argon plasma in a magnetron sputtering system devoted to depositing amorphous silicon. Using a movable Langmuir probe, the profiles of the plasma potential and ion density were measured along an axis perpendicularly to the cathode and in front of the so-called race-track. The deposition rate of silicon, under different conditions of pressure and input power, has been found to compare well with those determined with the relations derived.

  18. High Count Rate Electron Probe Microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Geller, Joseph D; Herrington, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Reducing the measurement uncertainty of quantitative analyses made using electron probe microanalyzers (EPMA) requires a careful study of the individual uncertainties from each definable step of the measurement. Those steps include measuring the incident electron beam current and voltage, knowing the angle between the electron beam and the sample (takeoff angle), collecting the emitted x rays from the sample, comparing the emitted x-ray flux to known standards (to determine the k-ratio) and transformation of the k-ratio to concentration using algorithms which includes, as a minimum, the atomic number, absorption, and fluorescence corrections. This paper discusses the collection and counting of the emitted x rays, which are diffracted into the gas flow or sealed proportional x-ray detectors. The representation of the uncertainty in the number of collected x rays collected reduces as the number of counts increase. The uncertainty of the collected signal is fully described by Poisson statistics. Increasing the number of x rays collected involves either counting longer or at a higher counting rate. Counting longer means the analysis time increases and may become excessive to get to the desired uncertainty. Instrument drift also becomes an issue. Counting at higher rates has its limitations, which are a function of the detector physics and the detecting electronics. Since the beginning of EPMA analysis, analog electronics have been used to amplify and discriminate the x-ray induced ionizations within the proportional counter. This paper will discuss the use of digital electronics for this purpose. These electronics are similar to that used for energy dispersive analysis of x rays with either Si(Li) or Ge(Li) detectors except that the shaping time constants are much smaller.

  19. High-speed growth of YBa2Cu3O7 - δ film with high critical temperature on MgO single crystal substrate by laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pei; Ito, Akihiko; Tu, Rong; Goto, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    a-axis- and c-axis-oriented YBa2Cu3O7 - δ films were prepared on a (100) MgO single crystal substrate by chemical vapor deposition enhanced by a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser. A c-axis-oriented YBCO film with a critical temperature of 89 K was prepared at a high deposition rate of 57 µm h - 1, about 2-600 times higher than that of conventional chemical vapor deposition.

  20. High pressure, high strain rate material strength studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, B. A.; Arsenlis, A.; Barton, N.; Belof, J.; Cavallo, R.; Maddox, B.; Park, H.-S.; Prisbrey, S.; Rudd, R.; Comley, A.; Meyers, M.; Wark, J.

    2011-10-01

    Constitutive models for material strength are currently being tested at high pressures by comparing 2D simulations with experiments measuring the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability evolution in solid-state samples of vanadium (V), tantalum (Ta), and iron (Fe). The multiscale strength models being tested combine molecular dynamics, dislocation dynamics, and continuum simulations. Our analysis for the V experiments suggests that the material deformation at these conditions falls into the phonon drag regime, whereas for Ta, the deformation resides mainly in the thermal activation regime. Recent Fe-RT experiments suggest perturbation growth about the alpha-epsilon (bcc-hcp) phase transition threshold has been observed. Using the LLNL multiscale models, we decompose the strength as a function of strain rate into its dominant components of thermal activation, phonon drag, and work hardening. We have also developed a dynamic diffraction diagnostic technique to measure strength directly from shock compressed single crystal samples. Finally, recovery experiments allow a comparison of residual dislocation density with predictions from the multiscale model. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DoE by LLNL Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. High performance interconnection between high data rate networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, K.; Overstreet, C. M.; Zhang, L.; Sun, W.

    1992-01-01

    The bridge/gateway system needed to interconnect a wide range of computer networks to support a wide range of user quality-of-service requirements is discussed. The bridge/gateway must handle a wide range of message types including synchronous and asynchronous traffic, large, bursty messages, short, self-contained messages, time critical messages, etc. It is shown that messages can be classified into three basic classes, synchronous and large and small asynchronous messages. The first two require call setup so that packet identification, buffer handling, etc. can be supported in the bridge/gateway. Identification enables resequences in packet size. The third class is for messages which do not require call setup. Resequencing hardware based to handle two types of resequencing problems is presented. The first is for a virtual parallel circuit which can scramble channel bytes. The second system is effective in handling both synchronous and asynchronous traffic between networks with highly differing packet sizes and data rates. The two other major needs for the bridge/gateway are congestion and error control. A dynamic, lossless congestion control scheme which can easily support effective error correction is presented. Results indicate that the congestion control scheme provides close to optimal capacity under congested conditions. Under conditions where error may develop due to intervening networks which are not lossless, intermediate error recovery and correction takes 1/3 less time than equivalent end-to-end error correction under similar conditions.

  2. Pulsed laser deposition of SrRuO3 thin-films: The role of the pulse repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schraknepper, H.; Bäumer, C.; Gunkel, F.; Dittmann, R.; De Souza, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    SrRuO3 thin-films were deposited with different pulse repetition rates, fdep, epitaxially on vicinal SrTiO3 substrates by means of pulsed laser deposition. The measurement of several physical properties (e.g., composition by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the out-of-plane lattice parameter, the electric conductivity, and the Curie temperature) consistently reveals that an increase in laser repetition rate results in an increase in ruthenium deficiency in the films. By the same token, it is shown that when using low repetition rates, approaching a nearly stoichiometric cation ratio in SrRuO3 becomes feasible. Based on these results, we propose a mechanism to explain the widely observed Ru deficiency of SrRuO3 thin-films. Our findings demand these theoretical considerations to be based on kinetic rather than widely employed thermodynamic arguments.

  3. Characterization of high temperature deposited Ti-containing hydrogenated carbon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, B.; Meng, W. J.; Evans, R. D.

    2004-12-01

    A detailed structural and mechanical characterization was performed on Ti-containing hydrogenated amorphous carbon (Ti-C:H) thin films deposited at ˜600°C by plasma assisted hybrid chemical/physical vapor deposition. The structural and mechanical characteristics of these specimens were compared to those deposited at the lower temperature of ˜250°C. The results indicated that Ti-C :H consisted of a nanocrystalline TiC phase and a hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) phase, and that Ti atoms were incorporated into Ti-C :H predominantly as B1-TiC. Deposition at ˜600°C promoted TiC precipitation, resulting in little Ti dissolution within the a-C :H matrix. High temperature deposited Ti-C :H specimens were found to possess lower modulus and hardness values as compared to low temperature deposited specimens, especially at low Ti compositions. This is rationalized by electron microscopy evidence of increased short and medium range graphitic order within the a-C :H matrix of high temperature deposited Ti-C :H, and supported by additional Raman spectroscopic observations. Heat treatments at 600 °C combined with Raman scattering measurements showed that the a-C :H matrix in high temperature deposited Ti-C :H specimens appears to be less structurally sensitive to additional annealing.

  4. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zuzuarregui, Ana Gregorczyk, Keith E.; Coto, Borja; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier; Rodríguez, Jorge; Knez, Mato

    2015-08-10

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  5. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana; Coto, Borja; Rodríguez, Jorge; Gregorczyk, Keith E.; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier; Knez, Mato

    2015-08-01

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  6. Influence of variable rates of neritic carbonate deposition on atmospheric carbon dioxide and pelagic sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. C.; Opdyke, B. C.

    1995-01-01

    Short-term imbalances in the global cycle of shallow water calcium carbonate deposition and dissolution may be responsible for much of the observed Pleistocene change in atmospheric carbon dioxide content. However, any proposed changes in the alkalinity balance of the ocean must be reconciled with the sedimentary record of deep-sea carbonates. The possible magnitude of the effect of shallow water carbonate deposition on the dissolution of pelagic carbonate can be tested using numerical simulations of the global carbon cycle. Boundary conditions can be defined by using extant shallow water carbonate accumulation data and pelagic carbonate deposition/dissolution data. On timescales of thousands of years carbonate deposition versus dissolution is rarely out of equilibrium by more than 1.5 x 10(13) mole yr-1. Results indicate that the carbonate chemistry of the ocean is rarely at equilibrium on timescales less than 10 ka. This disequilibrium is probably due to sea level-induced changes in shallow water calcium carbonate deposition/dissolution, an interpretation that does not conflict with pelagic sedimentary data from the central Pacific.

  7. Influence of variable rates of neritic carbonate deposition on atmospheric carbon dioxide and pelagic sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. C.; Opdyke, B. C.

    1995-01-01

    Short-term imbalances in the global cycle of shallow water calcium carbonate deposition and dissolution may be responsible for much of the observed Pleistocene change in atmospheric carbon dioxide content. However, any proposed changes in the alkalinity balance of the ocean must be reconciled with the sedimentary record of deep-sea carbonates. The possible magnitude of the effect of shallow water carbonate deposition on the dissolution of pelagic carbonate can be tested using numerical simulations of the global carbon cycle. Boundary conditions can be defined by using extant shallow water carbonate accumulation data and pelagic carbonate deposition/dissolution data. On timescales of thousands of years carbonate deposition versus dissolution is rarely out of equilibrium by more than 1.5 x 10(13) mole yr-1. Results indicate that the carbonate chemistry of the ocean is rarely at equilibrium on timescales less than 10 ka. This disequilibrium is probably due to sea level-induced changes in shallow water calcium carbonate deposition/dissolution, an interpretation that does not conflict with pelagic sedimentary data from the central Pacific.

  8. Influence of variable rates of neritic carbonate deposition on atmospheric carbon dioxide and pelagic sediments.

    PubMed

    Walker, J C; Opdyke, B C

    1995-06-01

    Short-term imbalances in the global cycle of shallow water calcium carbonate deposition and dissolution may be responsible for much of the observed Pleistocene change in atmospheric carbon dioxide content. However, any proposed changes in the alkalinity balance of the ocean must be reconciled with the sedimentary record of deep-sea carbonates. The possible magnitude of the effect of shallow water carbonate deposition on the dissolution of pelagic carbonate can be tested using numerical simulations of the global carbon cycle. Boundary conditions can be defined by using extant shallow water carbonate accumulation data and pelagic carbonate deposition/dissolution data. On timescales of thousands of years carbonate deposition versus dissolution is rarely out of equilibrium by more than 1.5 x 10(13) mole yr-1. Results indicate that the carbonate chemistry of the ocean is rarely at equilibrium on timescales less than 10 ka. This disequilibrium is probably due to sea level-induced changes in shallow water calcium carbonate deposition/dissolution, an interpretation that does not conflict with pelagic sedimentary data from the central Pacific.

  9. High repetition rate ultrashort laser cuts a path through fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cruz, Lorena; Schubert, Elise; Mongin, Denis; Klingebiel, Sandro; Schultze, Marcel; Metzger, Thomas; Michel, Knut; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that the transmission of a 1030 nm, 1.3 ps laser beam of 100 mJ energy through fog increases when its repetition rate increases to the kHz range. Due to the efficient energy deposition by the laser filaments in the air, a shockwave ejects the fog droplets from a substantial volume of the beam, at a moderate energy cost. This process opens prospects for applications requiring the transmission of laser beams through fogs and clouds.

  10. High dose rate brachytherapy source measurement intercomparison.

    PubMed

    Poder, Joel; Smith, Ryan L; Shelton, Nikki; Whitaker, May; Butler, Duncan; Haworth, Annette

    2017-06-01

    This work presents a comparison of air kerma rate (AKR) measurements performed by multiple radiotherapy centres for a single HDR (192)Ir source. Two separate groups (consisting of 15 centres) performed AKR measurements at one of two host centres in Australia. Each group travelled to one of the host centres and measured the AKR of a single (192)Ir source using their own equipment and local protocols. Results were compared to the (192)Ir source calibration certificate provided by the manufacturer by means of a ratio of measured to certified AKR. The comparisons showed remarkably consistent results with the maximum deviation in measurement from the decay-corrected source certificate value being 1.1%. The maximum percentage difference between any two measurements was less than 2%. The comparisons demonstrated the consistency of well-chambers used for (192)Ir AKR measurements in Australia, despite the lack of a local calibration service, and served as a valuable focal point for the exchange of ideas and dosimetry methods.

  11. High Strain Rate Response of an Elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Tong; Clifton, Rodney J.; Grunschel, Stephen E.

    2006-07-01

    Pressure-shear plate impact experiments are used to study the nonlinear dynamic response of an elastomer at shearing rates of 105 - 106 s-1. Samples with thicknesses in the range 100 μm - 400 μm are cast between two hard steel plates. Because of the comparatively low impedance of the elastomer, longitudinal waves reverberating through the thickness of the sample — and recorded with a laser interferometer — are used to determine the isentrope of the material under uniaxial strain compression. Once the sample is fully compressed a shear wave arrives and imposes a simple shearing deformation. From the transverse velocity, measured interferometrically at the rear surface of the sandwich target, the shear stress and the transverse velocity at the rear surface of the sample are determined. These measurements provide an indication of the shearing resistance of the material under pressure. When the longitudinal unloading wave arrives from the rear surface of the target, these same measurements provide an indication of the shearing resistance of the material at zero pressure. Because the sample adheres to the bounding plates the reflection of unloading waves from both the rear surface of the flyer and the rear surface of the target allows the sample to be strained in uniaxial extension. Thus, from a single experiment, one obtains the response of the elastomer in uniaxial strain compression, simple shear and uniaxial strain extension.

  12. Atomic layer deposition of ultrathin platinum films on tungsten atomic layer deposition adhesion layers: Application to high surface area substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Clancey, Joel W.; Cavanagh, Andrew S.; Kukreja, Ratandeep S.; Kongkanand, Anusorn; George, Steven M.

    2015-01-15

    Platinum (Pt) atomic layer deposition (ALD) usually yields Pt nanoparticles during initial film growth. In contrast, deposition of continuous and ultrathin Pt films is needed for many important applications, such as the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. A continuous and high radius of curvature Pt film is more stable and has a higher area-specific activity than the Pt nanoparticles commonly used in PEM fuel cells. However, the Pt film must be ultrathin and have a large surface area to be cost effective. In this paper, a review of earlier Pt ALD studies on flat substrates is presented that demonstrates that tungsten, with a higher surface energy than platinum, can serve as an adhesion layer to achieve Pt ALD films that are continuous at ultrathin thicknesses of ∼1.5 nm. This work utilized MeCpPtMe{sub 3} and H{sub 2} plasma as the Pt ALD reactants. The deposition of continuous and ultrathin Pt ALD films using MeCpPtMe{sub 3} and H{sub 2} plasma as the reactants is then studied on two high surface area substrate materials: TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and 3M nanostructured thin film (NSTF). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed uniform and continuous Pt films with thicknesses of ∼4 nm on the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. TEM with electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis revealed W ALD and Pt ALD films with thicknesses of ∼3 nm that were continuous and conformal on the high aspect ratio NSTF substrates. These results demonstrate that cost effective use of Pt ALD on high surface area substrates is possible for PEM fuel cells.

  13. Stress reduction in sputter deposited films using nanostructured compliant layers by high working-gas pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Tansel; Senkevich, Jay. J.; Wang, Gwo-Ching; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2005-07-01

    We present a strategy of stress reduction in sputter deposited films by a nano-compliant layer at the substrate using physically self-assembled nanostructures obtained at high working-gas pressures prior to the deposition of a continuous film. This technique is all in situ, and the nanostructures are made of the same material as the deposited thin film and requires no lithography process. This nanostructured layer has a lower material density and can act as a compliant layer to reduce the stress of the subsequently deposited continuous film grown under low gas pressure. By using this approach we were able to reduce stress values significantly in sputter deposited tungsten films and the strategy of alternating high and low Ar gas pressures leads to the growth of much thicker films without delamination.

  14. Highly efficient photocatalytic TiO2 coatings deposited by open air atmospheric pressure plasma jet with aerosolized TTIP precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhouri, H.; Ben Salem, D.; Carton, O.; Pulpytel, J.; Arefi-Khonsari, F.

    2014-07-01

    A simple method to deposit photocatalytic TiO2 coatings, at a high rate (20-40 µm s-1), and with a high porosity, is reported in this paper. This method, which allows the treatment of membranes (with an 800 nm pore size), is based on the introduction of a liquid precursor sprayed into an open-air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ). The photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 thin films prepared by APPJ have been compared with our best N-doped TiO2 thin films, deposited by reactive radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering, previously reported in the literature. The morphology, chemical composition, photoelectrochemical, and photocatalytic properties of the coatings have been studied in this paper. Significant control of the porosity and crystallinity was achieved by varying the deposition parameters and the annealing temperature. Under optimized conditions, the TiO2 coatings deposited by APPJ are characterized by a higher photocatalytic activity as compared to the optimized thin films deposited by RF sputtering. This difference can be explained by the higher specific surface of the APPJ coatings. Finally, the most interesting characteristic of this APPJ-liquid spray process is its capacity to treat membranes without blocking the pores, and to produce photocatalytic membranes which can efficiently combine filtration and photocatalysis for water treatment.

  15. Optical coatings of variable refractive index and high laser-resistance from physical-vapor-deposited perfluorinated amorphous polymer

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Robert; Loomis, Gary E.; Thomas, Ian M.

    1999-01-01

    Variable index optical single-layers, optical multilayer, and laser-resistant coatings were made from a perfluorinated amorphous polymer material by physical vapor deposition. This was accomplished by physically vapor depositing a polymer material, such as bulk Teflon AF2400, for example, to form thin layers that have a very low refractive index (.about.1.10-1.31) and are highly transparent from the ultra-violet through the near infrared regime, and maintain the low refractive index of the bulk material. The refractive index can be varied by simply varying one process parameter, either the deposition rate or the substrate temperature. The thus forming coatings may be utilized in anti-reflectors and graded anti-reflection coatings, as well as in optical layers for laser-resistant coatings at optical wavelengths of less than about 2000 nm.

  16. Optical coatings of variable refractive index and high laser-resistance from physical-vapor-deposited perfluorinated amorphous polymer

    DOEpatents

    Chow, R.; Loomis, G.E.; Thomas, I.M.

    1999-03-16

    Variable index optical single-layers, optical multilayer, and laser-resistant coatings were made from a perfluorinated amorphous polymer material by physical vapor deposition. This was accomplished by physically vapor depositing a polymer material, such as bulk Teflon AF2400, for example, to form thin layers that have a very low refractive index (ca. 1.10--1.31) and are highly transparent from the ultra-violet through the near infrared regime, and maintain the low refractive index of the bulk material. The refractive index can be varied by simply varying one process parameter, either the deposition rate or the substrate temperature. The thus forming coatings may be utilized in anti-reflectors and graded anti-reflection coatings, as well as in optical layers for laser-resistant coatings at optical wavelengths of less than about 2000 nm. 2 figs.

  17. Using deposition rate as a means to alter the properties of small molecule organic glasses for OLED applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, Kenneth; Krzyskowski, Paige; Devereaux, Zachary

    2015-03-01

    Organic light emitting diode (OLED) devices rely on vapor-deposited, small molecule organic glasses. Recent work has shown that deposition condition plays a critical role in altering OLED device performance. Here it will be shown that the deposition rate alters the onset and fictive temperatures measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) of the deposited glass. Glasses of the common hole transport materials NPD and TPD were prepared with onset temperatures 17 and 16 K higher, respectively, than the ordinary glass prepared by cooling the supercooled liquid. The thermal stability of glasses in functioning devices can be underestimated due to increases in onset temperature relative to Tg. The fictive temperatures for NPD and TPD were 32 and 27 K lower, respectively, than the Tg of the ordinary glass. These results are consistent with literature reports on other non-OLED glasses where enhanced surface mobility allowed for glasses with similar properties to be made. Ellipsometry studies on NPD showed that the fictive and onset temperatures were consistent with the DSC results. Additionally, the modeled birefringence of the as-deposited NPD glass was non-zero and quickly decreased upon heating above the onset temperature, which has implications for device performance. Formerly at Department of Chemistry, Saginaw Valley State University.

  18. High rate fabrication of compression molded components

    DOEpatents

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Dykstra, William C.; Smith, Glen L.; Miller, Robert J.

    2016-04-19

    A method for fabricating a thermoplastic composite component comprises inductively heating a thermoplastic pre-form with a first induction coil by inducing current to flow in susceptor wires disposed throughout the pre-form, inductively heating smart susceptors in a molding tool to a leveling temperature with a second induction coil by applying a high-strength magnetic field having a magnetic flux that passes through surfaces of the smart susceptors, shaping the magnetic flux that passes through surfaces of the smart susceptors to flow substantially parallel to a molding surface of the smart susceptors, placing the heated pre-form between the heated smart susceptors; and applying molding pressure to the pre-form to form the composite component.

  19. Determination of silica deposition rates and thresholds applied towards protection of injection reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Geothermal Development Associates; Don Michels Associates

    1999-07-01

    This program was instituted to quantify certain aspects of silica scaling deposition processes at the Miravalles Geothermal Field, Costa Rica. The program objective was to identify the highest temperature at which silica scale will develop from partially evaporated and significantly cooled geothermal liquid under operating conditions. Integral to the study objective was the quantification of certain aspects of silica deposition processes at the Miravalles Geothermal Field, Costa Rica. There, the objective was to reduce the scaling risk associated with adding a bottoming-cycle to generate more electricity from the liquids already being produced.

  20. Hysteresis-free high rate reactive sputtering of niobium oxide, tantalum oxide, and aluminum oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Särhammar, Erik Berg, Sören; Nyberg, Tomas

    2014-07-01

    This work reports on experimental studies of reactive sputtering from targets consisting of a metal and its oxide. The composition of the targets varied from pure metal to pure oxide of Al, Ta, and Nb. This combines features from both the metal target and oxide target in reactive sputtering. If a certain relation between the metal and oxide parts is chosen, it may be possible to obtain a high deposition rate, due to the metal part, and a hysteresis-free process, due to the oxide part. The aim of this work is to quantify the achievable boost in oxide deposition rate from a hysteresis-free process by using a target consisting of segments of a metal and its oxide. Such an increase has been previously demonstrated for Ti using a homogeneous substoichiometric target. The achievable gain in deposition rate depends on transformation mechanisms from oxide to suboxides due to preferential sputtering of oxygen. Such mechanisms are different for different materials and the achievable gain is therefore material dependent. For the investigated materials, the authors have demonstrated oxide deposition rates that are 1.5–10 times higher than what is possible from metal targets in compound mode. However, although the principle is demonstrated for oxides of Al, Ta, and Nb, a similar behavior is expected for most oxides.

  1. High Strain Rate Tensile and Compressive Effects in Glassy Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-08

    polymers under high strain rates has been determined in compression. Some research programs have studied the combined effects of temperature and strain rate...glassy polymers to high strain rate loading in compression. More recently, research programs that study the combined effects of temperature and strain...Force Materiel Command  United States Air Force  Eglin Air Force Base AFRL-RW-EG-TP-2013-006 High Strain Rate

  2. High-rate reactive magnetron sputtering of zirconia films for laser optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juškevičius, K.; Audronis, M.; Subačius, A.; Drazdys, R.; Juškėnas, R.; Matthews, A.; Leyland, A.

    2014-09-01

    ZrO2 exhibits low optical absorption in the near-UV range and is one of the highest laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) materials; it is, therefore, very attractive for laser optics applications. This paper reports explorations of reactive sputtering technology for deposition of ZrO2 films with low extinction coefficient k values in the UV spectrum region at low substrate temperature. A high deposition rate (64 % of the pure metal rate) process is obtained by employing active feedback reactive gas control which creates a stable and repeatable deposition processes in the transition region. Substrate heating at 200 °C was found to have no significant effect on the optical ZrO2 film properties. The addition of nitrogen to a closed-loop controlled process was found to have mostly negative effects in terms of deposition rate and optical properties. Open-loop O2 gas-regulated ZrO2 film deposition is slow and requires elevated (200 °C) substrate temperature or post-deposition annealing to reduce absorption losses. Refractive indices of the films were distributed in the range n = 2.05-2.20 at 1,000 nm and extinction coefficients were in the range k = 0.6 × 10-4 and 4.8 × 10-3 at 350 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis showed crystalline ZrO2 films consisted of monoclinic + tetragonal phases when produced in Ar/O2 atmosphere and monoclinic + rhombohedral or a single rhombohedral phase when produced in Ar/O2 + N2. Optical and physical properties of the ZrO2 layers produced in this study are suitable for high-power laser applications in the near-UV range.

  3. Stratigraphy of the north polar layered deposits of Mars from high-resolution topography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becerra, Patricio; Byrne, Shane; Sori, Michael M.; Sutton, Sarah; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    The stratigraphy of the layered deposits of the polar regions of Mars is theorized to contain a record of recent climate change linked to insolation changes driven by variations in the planet's orbital and rotational parameters. In order to confidently link stratigraphic signals to insolation periodicities, a description of the stratigraphy is required based on quantities that directly relate to intrinsic properties of the layers. We use stereo Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) to derive a characteristic of North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD) strata that can be correlated over large distances: the topographic protrusion of layers exposed in troughs, which is a proxy for the layers’ resistance to erosion. Using a combination of image analysis and a signal-matching algorithm to correlate continuous depth-protrusion signals taken from DTMs at different locations, we construct a stratigraphic column that describes the upper ~500 m of at least 7% of the area of the NPLD, and find accumulation rates that vary by factors of up to two. We find that, when coupled with observations of exposed layers in orbital images, the topographic expression of the strata is consistently continuous through large distances in the top 300 – 500 m of the NPLD, suggesting it is better related to intrinsic layer properties than brightness alone.

  4. Stratigraphy of the north polar layered deposits of Mars from high-resolution topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Patricio; Byrne, Shane; Sori, Michael M.; Sutton, Sarah; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.

    2016-08-01

    The stratigraphy of the layered deposits in the polar regions of Mars is theorized to contain a record of recent climate change linked to insolation changes driven by variations in the planet's orbital and rotational parameters. In order to confidently link stratigraphic signals to insolation periodicities, a description of the stratigraphy is required based on quantities that directly relate to intrinsic properties of the layers. We use stereo digital terrain models (DTMs) from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment to derive a characteristic of north polar layered deposit (NPLD) strata that can be correlated over large distances: the topographic protrusion of layers exposed in troughs, which is a proxy for the layers' resistance to erosion. Using a combination of image analysis and a signal-matching algorithm to correlate continuous depth-protrusion signals taken from DTMs at different locations, we construct a stratigraphic column that describes the upper 500 m of at least 7% of the area of the NPLD and find accumulation rates that vary by factors of up to 2. We find that, when coupled with observations of exposed layers in images, the topographic expression of the strata is consistently continuous across large distances in the top 300-500 m of the NPLD, suggesting that it is better related to intrinsic layer properties than the brightness of exposed layers alone.

  5. First high-resolution stratigraphic column of the Martian north polar layered deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishbaugh, K.E.; Hvidberg, C.S.; Byrne, S.; Russell, P.S.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Winstrup, M.; Kirk, R.

    2010-01-01

    This study achieves the first high-spatial-resolution, layer-scale, measured stratigraphic column of the Martian north polar layered deposits using a 1m-posting DEM. The marker beds found throughout the upper North Polar Layered Deposits range in thickness from 1.6 m-16.0 m +/-1.4 m, and 6 of 13 marker beds are separated by ???25-35 m. Thin-layer sets have average layer separations of 1.6 m. These layer separations may account for the spectral-power-peaks found in previous brightness-profile analyses. Marker-bed layer thicknesses show a weak trend of decreasing thickness with depth that we interpret to potentially be the result of a decreased accumulation rate in the past, for those layers. However, the stratigraphic column reveals that a simple rhythmic or bundled layer sequence is not immediately apparent throughout the column, implying that the relationship between polar layer formation and cyclic climate forcing is quite complex. Copyright ?? 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. High data rate optical transceiver terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, E. S.

    1973-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) to design a 400 Mbps optical transceiver terminal to operate from a high-altitude balloon-borne platform in order to permit the quantitative evaluation of a space-qualifiable optical communications system design, (2) to design an atmospheric propagation experiment to operate in conjunction with the terminal to measure the degrading effects of the atmosphere on the links, and (3) to design typical optical communications experiments for space-borne laboratories in the 1980-1990 time frame. As a result of the study, a transceiver package has been configured for demonstration flights during late 1974. The transceiver contains a 400 Mbps transmitter, a 400 Mbps receiver, and acquisition and tracking receivers. The transmitter is a Nd:YAG, 200 Mhz, mode-locked, CW, diode-pumped laser operating at 1.06 um requiring 50 mW for 6 db margin. It will be designed to implement Pulse Quaternary Modulation (PQM). The 400 Mbps receiver utilizes a Dynamic Crossed-Field Photomultiplier (DCFP) detector. The acquisition receiver is a Quadrant Photomultiplier Tube (QPMT) and receives a 400 Mbps signal chopped at 0.1 Mhz.

  7. Chemically frozen multicomponent boundary layer theory of salt and/or ash deposition rates from combustion gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Chen, B.-K.; Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    There is increased interest in, and concern about, deposition and corrosion phenomena in combustion systems containing inorganic condensible vapors and particles (salts, ash). To meet the need for a computationally tractable deposition rate theory general enough to embrace multielement/component situations of current and future gas turbine and magnetogasdynamic interest, a multicomponent chemically 'frozen' boundary layer (CFBL) deposition theory is presented and its applicability to the special case of Na2SO4 deposition from seeded laboratory burner combustion products is demonstrated. The coupled effects of Fick (concentration) diffusion and Soret (thermal) diffusion are included, along with explicit corrections for effects of variable properties and free stream turbulence. The present formulation is sufficiently general to include the transport of particles provided they are small enough to be formally treated as heavy molecules. Quantitative criteria developed to delineate the domain of validity of CFBL-rate theory suggest considerable practical promise for the present framework, which is characterized by relatively modest demands for new input information and computer time.

  8. Chemically frozen multicomponent boundary layer theory of salt and/or ash deposition rates from combustion gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Chen, B.-K.; Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    There is increased interest in, and concern about, deposition and corrosion phenomena in combustion systems containing inorganic condensible vapors and particles (salts, ash). To meet the need for a computationally tractable deposition rate theory general enough to embrace multielement/component situations of current and future gas turbine and magnetogasdynamic interest, a multicomponent chemically 'frozen' boundary layer (CFBL) deposition theory is presented and its applicability to the special case of Na2SO4 deposition from seeded laboratory burner combustion products is demonstrated. The coupled effects of Fick (concentration) diffusion and Soret (thermal) diffusion are included, along with explicit corrections for effects of variable properties and free stream turbulence. The present formulation is sufficiently general to include the transport of particles provided they are small enough to be formally treated as heavy molecules. Quantitative criteria developed to delineate the domain of validity of CFBL-rate theory suggest considerable practical promise for the present framework, which is characterized by relatively modest demands for new input information and computer time.

  9. Hydrodynamic Instability in High-speed Direct Laser Deposition for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, Gleb; Zemlyakov, Evgeny; Klimova, Olga; Babkin, Konstantin

    High speed direct laser deposition, when product forms from metal powder, transferred by gas-powder jet, supplied coaxially or non-coaxially to focused laser beam, in one of most prospective additive technologies for production parts for aircraft engines. The limit of process productivity is connected with development of hydrodynamic instability of the melt pool in conditions of high power laser action and material supply by gas-powder jet. Theoretical analysis and experiments allowed clarified a physical nature of instability appearance, determine a stability conditions and invent a methods which allow avoid instability in deposition process. Nozzles for direct laser deposition, designed with consideration of stability conditions, allow get a level of process productivity more then 2 kg/h. The developed technology of deposition and technological equipment, based on high power fiber laser, has been used for manufacturing of parts for "high temperature" unit of aircraft engine.

  10. Measurements and comparisons of gamma radiation doses in a high and a low (137)Cs deposition area in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Almgren, Sara; Barregård, Lars; Isaksson, Mats

    2008-11-01

    Sweden is one of the countries affected by the Chernobyl fallout. The aim of the present study was to investigate the average radiation dose to people living in a high-deposition area (the parish of Hille) in Sweden for comparison with dose rates previously measured in a low-deposition area in western Sweden. Individual measurements (personal and dwelling dose rates) were performed using thermoluminescence dosimeters in 24 randomly chosen individuals. Dwelling and personal dose rates in Hille were 0.12 and 0.11 microSv/h, respectively. The dose rates in Hille were slightly higher than in western Sweden (difference for detached houses=0.024 microSv/h for personal and 0.030 microSv/h for dwelling dose rates), partly because of the higher (137)Cs deposition. In wooden houses, the difference was somewhat greater. Our results indicate a current contribution to personal gamma radiation in this area of about 0.2 mSv per year from the Chernobyl fallout.

  11. Contemporary rates of atmospheric inorganic nitrogen (N) deposition to Latin American cities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent efforts to develop and evaluate regional and global chemical transport models reveal major gaps in atmospheric deposition monitoring. First, in contrast to northern North America, western Europe, and Asia, vast land areas in Latin America, Africa, and Australia remain unde...

  12. Surface Ages and Resurfacing Rates of the Polar Layered Deposits on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Plaut, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    The martian polar layered deposits (PLD) are probably the best source of information about the recent climate history of Mars, but their origin and the mechanisms of accumulation are still a mystery. The polar layers are sedimentary deposits that most planetary scientists believe are composed of water ice and varying amounts of wind-blown dust, but their composition is poorly constrained. Interpretation of the observed polar stratigraphy in terms of global climate changes is complicated by the significant difference in surface ages between the north and south PLD inferred from crater statistics. While no craters have been found in the north PLD, the surface of the south PLD appears to have been stable for many of the orbital/axial cycles that are thought to have induced global climate changes on Mars. Using medium-resolution Viking imagery, Plaut et al. found at least 15 impact craters in the southern layered deposits and concluded that their surface is 120 +/- 40 million years old. In contrast, Cutts et al. found no fresh impact craters larger than about 300 meters in summertime images of the north polar layered deposits. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Surface Ages and Resurfacing Rates of the Polar Layered Deposits on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Plaut, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    The martian polar layered deposits (PLD) are probably the best source of information about the recent climate history of Mars, but their origin and the mechanisms of accumulation are still a mystery. The polar layers are sedimentary deposits that most planetary scientists believe are composed of water ice and varying amounts of wind-blown dust, but their composition is poorly constrained. Interpretation of the observed polar stratigraphy in terms of global climate changes is complicated by the significant difference in surface ages between the north and south PLD inferred from crater statistics. While no craters have been found in the north PLD, the surface of the south PLD appears to have been stable for many of the orbital/axial cycles that are thought to have induced global climate changes on Mars. Using medium-resolution Viking imagery, Plaut et al. found at least 15 impact craters in the southern layered deposits and concluded that their surface is 120 +/- 40 million years old. In contrast, Cutts et al. found no fresh impact craters larger than about 300 meters in summertime images of the north polar layered deposits. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Energy deposition rates by charged particles measured during the energy budget campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, A.; Torkar, K. M.; Bjordal, J.; Lundblad, J. A.; Soraas, F.; Grandal, B.; Smith, L. G.; Ulwick, J. C.; Vancour, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of the precipitation of electrons and positive ions (in the keV to MeV range) detected aboard eight rockets launched from Northern Scandinavia are reported together with corresponding satellite data. The downgoing integral fluxes indicate the temporal fluctuations during each flight. Height profiles of the energy deposition into the atmosphere at different levels of geomagnetic disturbance are given.

  15. Energy deposition rates by charged particles measured during the energy budget campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, A.; Torkar, K. M.; Bjordal, J.; Lundblad, J. A.; Soraas, F.; Grandal, B.; Smith, L. G.; Ulwick, J. C.; Vancour, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of the precipitation of electrons and positive ions (in the keV to MeV range) detected aboard eight rockets launched from Northern Scandinavia are reported together with corresponding satellite data. The downgoing integral fluxes indicate the temporal fluctuations during each flight. Height profiles of the energy deposition into the atmosphere at different levels of geomagnetic disturbance are given.

  16. High speed low deposition submerged arc welding apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, A.J.

    1993-05-25

    A method of arc welding a base metal with electrodes, the method is described comprising the steps of: providing electrodes E[sub DC], E[sub AC1], E[sub AC2], and E[sub AC3]; aligning the electrodes E[sub DC], E[sub AC1], E[sub AC2], and E[sub AC3] in a row from front to rear in a welding direction; supplying electrode E[sub DC] with direct current; supplying electrodes E[sub AC1], E[sub AC2], and E[sub AC3] with alternating current having a phase angle; maintaining a difference in the phase angle of the alternating current supplied to electrodes E[sub AC2] and E[sub AC3], and to electrodes E[sub AC3] and E[sub AC1] at 90[degree][plus minus] 15[degree]; maintaining a difference in the phase angle of the alternating current supplied to electrodes E[sub AC1] and E[sub AC2] at 180[degree] [plus minus] 30[degree]; generating an arc with electrode EDC, when direct current is supplied, that penetrates the base metal and initiates a weld; and generating an arc with electrodes E[sub AC1], E[sub AC2], and E[sub AC3], when alternating current is supplied, that primarily achieves the required deposit and shapes the weld.

  17. Alunite in the Pascua-Lama high-sulfidation deposit: Constraints on alteration and ore deposition using stable isotope geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deyell, C.L.; Leonardson, R.; Rye, R.O.; Thompson, J.F.H.; Bissig, T.; Cooke, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    The Pascua-Lama high-sulfidation system, located in the El Indio-Pascua belt of Chile and Argentina, contains over 16 million ounces (Moz) Au and 585 Moz Ag. The deposit is hosted primarily in granite rocks of Triassic age with mineralization occurring in several discrete Miocene-age phreatomagmatic breccias and related fracture networks. The largest of these areas is Brecha Central, which is dominated by a mineralizing assemblage of alunite-pyrite-enargite and precious metals. Several stages of hydrothermal alteration related to mineralization are recognized, including all types of alunite-bearing advanced argillic assemblages (magmatic-hydrothermal, steam-heated, magmatic steam, and supergene). The occurrence of alunite throughout the paragenesis of this epithermal system is unusual and detailed radiometric, mineralogical, and stable isotope studies provide constraints on the timing and nature of alteration and mineralization of the alunite-pyiite-enargite assemblage in the deposit. Early (preore) alteration occurred prior to ca. 9 Ma and consists of intense silicic and advanced argillic assemblages with peripheral argillic and widespread propylitic zones. Alunite of this stage occurs as fine intergrowths of alunite-quartz ?? kaolinite, dickite, and pyrophyllite that selectively replaced feldspars in the host rock. Stable isotope systematics suggest a magmatic-hydrothermal origin with a dominantly magmatic fluid source. Alunite is coeval with the main stage of Au-Ag-Cu mineralization (alunite-pyrite-enargite assemblage ore), which has been dated at approximately 8.8 Ma. Ore-stage alunite has an isotopic signature similar to preore alunite, and ?? 34Salun-py data indicate depositional temperatures of 245?? to 305??C. The ??D and ?? 18O data exclude significant involvement of meteoric water during mineralization and indicate that the assemblage formed from H2S-dominated magmatic fluids. Thick steam-heated alteration zones are preserved at the highest elevations in

  18. The Effect of Minimum Wage Rates on High School Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, John Robert; Hamrock, Caitlin

    2010-01-01

    Does increasing the minimum wage reduce the high school completion rate? Previous research has suffered from (1. narrow time horizons, (2. potentially inadequate measures of states' high school completion rates, and (3. potentially inadequate measures of minimum wage rates. Overcoming each of these limitations, we analyze the impact of changes in…

  19. The Effect of Minimum Wage Rates on High School Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, John Robert; Hamrock, Caitlin

    2010-01-01

    Does increasing the minimum wage reduce the high school completion rate? Previous research has suffered from (1. narrow time horizons, (2. potentially inadequate measures of states' high school completion rates, and (3. potentially inadequate measures of minimum wage rates. Overcoming each of these limitations, we analyze the impact of changes in…

  20. High Yield Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of High Quality Large-Area AB Stacked Bilayer Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Hailong; Cheng, Rui; Yu, Woo Jong; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Yu; Shaw, Jonathan; Zhong, Xing; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-01-01

    Bernal stacked (AB stacked) bilayer graphene is of significant interest for functional electronic and photonic devices due to the feasibility to continuously tune its band gap with a vertical electrical field. Mechanical exfoliation can be used to produce AB stacked bilayer graphene flakes but typically with the sizes limited to a few micrometers. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been recently explored for the synthesis of bilayer graphene but usually with limited coverage and a mixture of AB and randomly stacked structures. Herein we report a rational approach to produce large-area high quality AB stacked bilayer graphene. We show that the self-limiting effect of graphene growth on Cu foil can be broken by using a high H2/CH4 ratio in a low pressure CVD process to enable the continued growth of bilayer graphene. A high temperature and low pressure nucleation step is found to be critical for the formation of bilayer graphene nuclei with high AB stacking ratio. A rational design of a two-step CVD process is developed for the growth of bilayer graphene with high AB stacking ratio (up to 90 %) and high coverage (up to 99 %). The electrical transport studies demonstrated that devices made of the as-grown bilayer graphene exhibit typical characteristics of AB stacked bilayer graphene with the highest carrier mobility exceeding 4,000 cm2/V·s at room temperature, comparable to that of the exfoliated bilayer graphene. PMID:22906199

  1. Substate and evaporation rate dependent orientation and crystalline organization of sexithiophene films vacuum deposited onto Au and HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ardhaoui, M.; Lang, P.; Garnier, F.; Roger, J. P.

    1998-06-01

    The orientation and the crystalline organization of the films depend largely on the nature of the substrate and the deposition rate. The substrate effect is related to its interactions with the oligomers and also to the molecular mobility at the surface. It depends also largely on the deposition rate. L'orientation et l'organisation structurale des films de sexithiophène évaporés sous vide sont fortement liées à la nature du substrat (Au, HOPG) et à la vitesse de dépôt. L'effet du substrat est lié aux interactions avec les oligomères ainsi qu'à la mobilité de ces derniers sur la surface. Cet effet dépend largement de la vitesse d'évaporation.

  2. Pulsed external magnetic fields increase the deposition rate in reactive HiPIMS while preserving stoichiometry: An application to amorphous HfO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, R.; Treverrow, B.; Denniss, P.; McCulloch, D. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2016-09-01

    We compare the use of externally applied pulsed and steady magnetic fields for the enhancement of deposition rate in reactive High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS), using the deposition of amorphous hafnium oxide (a-HfO2) on Si as an example. The external magnetic fields were applied by a solenoidal coil, placed above the magnetron target. In the case of a steady magnetic field, a higher voltage was required to initiate the HiPIMS discharge, a longer delay time was observed for current onset, and the films became substoichiometric. For the pulsed magnetic field, film stoichiometry was maintained under all applied external magnetic field strengths. Varying the duration and delay times of the magnetic field after the application of HiPIMS voltage pulse revealed that the afterglow of the plasma between HiPIMS pulses was actively quenched by the presence of the magnetic field. Therefore, the optimum operation with the highest plasma density was obtained by applying the external magnetic field only when the plasma was established and removing it at the end of the HiPIMS pulse. A model to explain the findings is presented in which the target poisoning by oxide formation is determined by the conditions in the afterglow. We describe an approach to achieve maximum deposition rate while maintaining film stoichiometry and high film quality. Amorphous HfO2 films with leakage current through the film of less than 5 × 10-5 A/cm2 at 0.1 MV/cm were obtained at the maximum deposition rate. The refractive index, at a wavelength of 500 nm, of the film prepared with pulsed magnetic field was 2.05 with a very low extinction coefficient of 8 × 10-5.

  3. High rates of bedload transport measured from infilling rate of large strudelscour craters in the Beaufort Sea, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimnitz, Erk; Kempema, E.W.

    1982-01-01

    Strudel scours are craters as much as 20 m wide and 4 m deep, that are excavated by vertical drainage flow during the yearly spring flooding of vast reaches of fast ice surrounding arctic deltas; they form at a rate of about 2.5 km^-2 yr^-1. Monitoring two such craters in the Beaufort Sea, we found that in relatively unprotected sites they fill in by deposition from bedload in 2 to 3 years. Net westward sediment transport results in sand layers dipping at the angle of repose westward into the strudel-scour crater, whereas the west wall of the crater remains steep to vertical. Initially the crater traps almost all bedload: sand, pebbles, and organic detritus; as infilling progresses, the materials are increasingly winnowed, and bypassing must occur. Over a 20-m-wide sector, an exposed strudel scour trapped 360 m3 of bedload during two seasons; this infilling represents a bedload transport rate of 9 m3 yr^-1 m^-1. This rate should be applicable to a 4.5-km-wide zone with equal exposure and similar or shallower depth. Within this zone, the transport rate is 40,500 m3 yr^-1, similar to estimated longshore transport rates on local barrier beaches. On the basis of the established rate of cut and fill, all the delta-front deposits should consist of strudel-scour fill. Vibracores typically show dipping interbedded sand and lenses of organic material draped over very steep erosional contacts, and an absence of horizontal continuity of strata--criteria that should uniquely identify high-latitude deltaic deposits. Given a 2- to 3-year lifespan, most strudel scours seen in surveys must be old. The same holds true for ice gouges and other depressions not adjusted to summer waves and currents, although these features record events of only the past few years. In view of such high rates of bottom reworking of the shallow shelf, any human activities creating turbidity, such as dredging, would have little effect on the environment. However, huge amounts of transitory material

  4. Novel in situ method for locating virtual source in high-rate electron-beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, M. S.

    1994-07-01

    The concept of virtual source simplifies calculation of thickness distribution on extended substrates in high rate vacuum coating employing electron-beam heating. The height of the point (virtual source), from which vapor can be assumed to emanate in accordance with Knudsen's cosine law, to yield the experimentally obtained thickness distribution, is calculated and this establishes the position of virtual source. Such as post facto determination is cumbersome as it is valid for the prescribed material evaporating at a certain rate in a specified geometry. A change in any of these entails a fresh measurement. Experimenters who use a large number of materials and deposit at different rates therefore have to carry out a number of trials before they can locate the virtual source at the desired deposition parameters. An in situ method for obtaining virtual source position can go a long way in reducing the labor of these experiments. A novel in situ method is described to locate the virtual source.

  5. Sediment facies and Holocene deposition rate of near-coastal fluvial systems: An example from the Nobi Plain, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Kazuaki; Usami, Shogo; Ueda, Hiroki

    2011-05-01

    Floodplains are a major component of present near-coastal fluvial systems that have evolved in response to postglacial changes in climate and sea level. Knowledge of sedimentary facies and deposition rates on a centennial to millennial time scale is required for considering floodplain evolution. Two cores, AP1 and AP2, were acquired from an abandoned channel of the Ibi River and its natural levee on the Nobi Plain, central Japan. Sediment facies analysis, electrical conductivity, and radiocarbon dating of borehole samples showed that in both cores organic-rich dark gray floodbasin mud overlies deltaic deposits dating to after approximately 3200 years calibrated radiocarbon age (cal BP) in relation to delta progradation. The accumulation of floodbasin mud continued at the both sites until about 400 cal BP. Around 400 cal BP, the mud was eroded by the overlying channel sand and gravel at AP1 and was covered by fine-grained natural levee deposits at AP2 with an abrupt contact. This timing is concordant with the historical record of avulsion of the Ibi River during the Keicho Era (AD 1596-1615). Averaged aggradation rates at the AP1 and AP2 sites were approximately 2.2 and 3.2 mm/yr, respectively. Faulting-related subsidence along the western edge of the plain has influenced these rates by creating accommodation. Averaged deposition rates differed greatly between the floodbasin and the levee, suggesting that rapid aggradation of the natural levee also occurred on a centennial to millennial scale. These empirical data may be useful for testing models of the architecture and evolution of near-coastal fluvial systems.

  6. Dose rate in brachytherapy using after-loading machine: pulsed or high-dose rate?

    PubMed

    Hannoun-Lévi, J-M; Peiffert, D

    2014-10-01

    Since February 2014, it is no longer possible to use low-dose rate 192 iridium wires due to the end of industrial production of IRF1 and IRF2 sources. The Brachytherapy Group of the French society of radiation oncology (GC-SFRO) has recommended switching from iridium wires to after-loading machines. Two types of after-loading machines are currently available, based on the dose rate used: pulsed-dose rate or high-dose rate. In this article, we propose a comparative analysis between pulsed-dose rate and high-dose rate brachytherapy, based on biological, technological, organizational and financial considerations.

  7. Zn-doped AlInAs grown at high temperature by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateno, K.; Amano, C.

    2000-12-01

    Zn-doped AlInAs growth at high temperature, mainly at 750°C, by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is investigated. When introducing DEZn during AlInAs growth, it is necessary to increase the TMAl flow rate in order to make the layer lattice-matched to InP. This is due to the enhanced In incorporation rather than the large covalent radius of Zn. To clarify the electrical characteristics, the dependence of the DEZn flow rate, the V/III ratio, and the growth temperature are investigated using the van der Pauw Hall method. In our growth system, a GaInAs intermediate layer is effective in preventing n-type inversion in Zn-doped AlInAs, which occurs when it is grown directly on an InP buffer layer. In addition, a large DEZn flow rate is effective for reducing carrier compensation in Zn-doped AlInAs layers grown at 750°C. Si impurities are apparently the cause of the type-inversion and compensation in Zn-doped AlInAs.

  8. Process for the deposition of high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, V.K.

    1991-07-30

    A process is disclosed for depositing a high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coating on a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based substrate body. A gas mixture is passed over the substrate at about 900--1500 C and about 1 torr to about ambient pressure. The gas mixture includes one or more halide vapors with other suitable reactant gases. The partial pressure ratios, flow rates, and process times are sufficient to deposit a continuous, fully dense, adherent coating. The halide and other reactant gases are gradually varied during deposition so that the coating is a graded coating of at least two layers. Each layer is a graded layer changing in composition from the material over which it is deposited to the material of the layer and further to the material, if any, deposited thereon, so that no clearly defined compositional interfaces exist. The gases and their partial pressures are varied according to a predetermined time schedule and the halide and other reactant gases are selected so that the layers include (a) an adherent, continuous intermediate layer about 0.5-20 microns thick of an aluminum nitride or an aluminum oxynitride material, over and chemically bonded to the substrate body, and (b) an adherent, continuous first outer layer about 0.5-900 microns thick including an oxide of aluminum or zirconium over and chemically bonded to the intermediate layer.

  9. Process for the deposition of high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod K.

    1991-01-01

    A process for depositing a high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coating on a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based substrate body. A gas mixture is passed over the substrate at about 900.degree.-1500.degree. C. and about 1 torr to about ambient pressure. The gas mixture includes one or more halide vapors with other suitable reactant gases. The partial pressure ratios, flow rates, and process times are sufficient to deposit a continuous, fully dense, adherent coating. The halide and other reactant gases are gradually varied during deposition so that the coating is a graded coating of at least two layers. Each layer is a graded layer changing in composition from the material over which it is deposited to the material of the layer and further to the material, if any, deposited thereon, so that no clearly defined compositional interfaces exist. The gases and their partial pressures are varied according to a predetermined time schedule and the halide and other reactant gases are selected so that the layers include (a) an adherent, continuous intermediate layer about 0.5-20 microns thick of an aluminum nitride or an aluminum oxynitride material, over and chemically bonded to the substrate body, and (b) an adherent, continuous first outer layer about 0.5-900 microns thick including an oxide of aluminum or zirconium over and chemically bonded to the intermediate layer.

  10. Recent ice-rich deposits formed at high latitudes on Mars by sublimation of unstable equatorial ice during low obliquity.

    PubMed

    Levrard, Benjamin; Forget, François; Montmessin, Franck; Laskar, Jacques

    2004-10-28

    Observations from the gamma-ray spectrometer instrument suite on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft have been interpreted as indicating the presence of vast reservoirs of near-surface ice in high latitudes of both martian hemispheres. Ice concentrations are estimated to range from 70 per cent at 60 degrees latitude to 100 per cent near the poles, possibly overlain by a few centimetres of ice-free material in most places. This result is supported by morphological evidence of metres-thick layered deposits that are rich in water-ice and periglacial-like features found only at high latitudes. Diffusive exchange of water between the pore space of the regolith and the atmosphere has been proposed to explain this distribution, but such a degree of concentration is difficult to accommodate with such processes. Alternatively, there are suggestions that ice-rich deposits form by transport of ice from polar reservoirs and direct redeposition in high latitudes during periods of higher obliquity, but these results have been difficult to reproduce with other models. Here we propose instead that, during periods of low obliquity (less than 25 degrees), high-latitude ice deposits form in both hemispheres by direct deposition of ice, as a result of sublimation from an equatorial ice reservoir that formed earlier, during a prolonged high-obliquity excursion. Using the ice accumulation rates estimated from global climate model simulations we show that, over the past ten million years, large variations of Mars' obliquity have allowed the formation of such metres-thick, sedimentary layered deposits in high latitude and polar regions.

  11. Direct measurement technique for determining ventilation rate in the deposit-feeding clam Macoma nasuta (bivalvia, tellinaceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, D.T.; Lee, H.

    1989-01-01

    An exposure chamber, the 'clambox', was developed to measure ventilation rate, sediment processing rate, and efficiency of pollutant uptake by Macoma nasuta, Conrad, a surface-deposit-feeding clam. Clams, collected from Yaquina Bay, Oregon, USA, were cemented into a hole in a piece of rubber dental dam so that the inhalant siphons were separated by a membrane. The dental dam was then clamped between two glass chambers. The inhalant and exhalant siphons were thus diirected into separate chambers of the device so that the amount of water or feces discharged into the exhalant camber provided direct measure ventilation rate and sediment processing rate, respectively. The short-term pattern was for ventilation to be intermittently interrupted, essentially ceasing for 12 to 120 min, followed by a short period of active ventilation and then a resumption of the normal rate.

  12. Highly conductive and pure gold nanostructures grown by electron beam induced deposition

    PubMed Central

    Shawrav, Mostafa M.; Taus, Philipp; Wanzenboeck, Heinz D.; Schinnerl, M.; Stöger-Pollach, M.; Schwarz, S.; Steiger-Thirsfeld, A.; Bertagnolli, Emmerich

    2016-01-01

    This work introduces an additive direct-write nanofabrication technique for producing extremely conductive gold nanostructures from a commercial metalorganic precursor. Gold content of 91 atomic % (at. %) was achieved by using water as an oxidative enhancer during direct-write deposition. A model was developed based on the deposition rate and the chemical composition, and it explains the surface processes that lead to the increases in gold purity and deposition yield. Co-injection of an oxidative enhancer enabled Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition (FEBID)—a maskless, resistless deposition method for three dimensional (3D) nanostructures—to directly yield pure gold in a single process step, without post-deposition purification. Gold nanowires displayed resistivity down to 8.8 μΩ cm. This is the highest conductivity achieved so far from FEBID and it opens the possibility of applications in nanoelectronics, such as direct-write contacts to nanomaterials. The increased gold deposition yield and the ultralow carbon level will facilitate future applications such as the fabrication of 3D nanostructures in nanoplasmonics and biomolecule immobilization. PMID:27666531

  13. Highly conductive and pure gold nanostructures grown by electron beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawrav, Mostafa M.; Taus, Philipp; Wanzenboeck, Heinz D.; Schinnerl, M.; Stöger-Pollach, M.; Schwarz, S.; Steiger-Thirsfeld, A.; Bertagnolli, Emmerich

    2016-09-01

    This work introduces an additive direct-write nanofabrication technique for producing extremely conductive gold nanostructures from a commercial metalorganic precursor. Gold content of 91 atomic % (at. %) was achieved by using water as an oxidative enhancer during direct-write deposition. A model was developed based on the deposition rate and the chemical composition, and it explains the surface processes that lead to the increases in gold purity and deposition yield. Co-injection of an oxidative enhancer enabled Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition (FEBID)—a maskless, resistless deposition method for three dimensional (3D) nanostructures—to directly yield pure gold in a single process step, without post-deposition purification. Gold nanowires displayed resistivity down to 8.8 μΩ cm. This is the highest conductivity achieved so far from FEBID and it opens the possibility of applications in nanoelectronics, such as direct-write contacts to nanomaterials. The increased gold deposition yield and the ultralow carbon level will facilitate future applications such as the fabrication of 3D nanostructures in nanoplasmonics and biomolecule immobilization.

  14. Measured density of copper atoms in the ground and metastable states in argon magnetron discharge correlated with the deposition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghshara, H.; Sobhanian, S.; Khorram, S.; Sadeghi, N.

    2011-01-01

    In a dc-magnetron discharge with argon feed gas, densities of copper atoms in the ground state Cu(2S1/2) and metastable state Cu*(2D5/2) were measured by the resonance absorption technique, using a commercial hollow cathode lamp as light source. The operating conditions were 0.3-14 µbar argon pressure and 10-200 W magnetron discharge power. The deposition rate of copper in a substrate positioned at 18 cm from the target was also measured with a quartz microbalance. The gas temperature, in the range 300-380 K, was deduced from the emission spectral profile of N2(C 3Πu - B 3Πg) 0-0 band at 337 nm when trace of nitrogen was added to the argon feed gas. The isotope-shifts and hyperfine structures of electronic states of Cu have been taken into account to deduce the emission and absorption line profiles, and hence for the determination of atoms' densities from the measured absorption rates. To prevent error in the evaluation of Cu density, attributed to the line profile distortion by auto-absorption inside the lamp, the lamp current was limited to 5 mA. Density of Cu(2S1/2) atoms and deposition rate both increased with the enhanced magnetron discharge power. But at fixed power, the copper density augmented with argon pressure whereas the deposition rate followed the opposite trend. Whatever the gas pressure, the density of Cu*(2D5/2) metastable atoms remained below the detection limit of 1 × 1010 cm-3 for magnetron discharge powers below 50 W and hence increased much more rapidly than the density of Cu(2S1/2) atoms, over passing this later at some discharge power, whose value decreases with increasing argon pressure. This behaviour is believed to result from the enhancement of plasma density with increasing discharge power and argon pressure, which would increase the excitation rate of copper into metastable states. At fixed pressure, the deposition rate followed the same trend as the total density of copper atoms in the ground and metastable states. Two important

  15. High dietary protein decreases fat deposition induced by high-fat and high-sucrose diet in rats.

    PubMed

    Chaumontet, Catherine; Even, Patrick C; Schwarz, Jessica; Simonin-Foucault, Angélique; Piedcoq, Julien; Fromentin, Gilles; Azzout-Marniche, Dalila; Tomé, Daniel

    2015-10-28

    High-protein diets are known to reduce adiposity in the context of high carbohydrate and Western diets. However, few studies have investigated the specific high-protein effect on lipogenesis induced by a high-sucrose (HS) diet or fat deposition induced by high-fat feeding. We aimed to determine the effects of high protein intake on the development of fat deposition and partitioning in response to high-fat and/or HS feeding. A total of thirty adult male Wistar rats were assigned to one of the six dietary regimens with low and high protein, sucrose and fat contents for 5 weeks. Body weight (BW) and food intake were measured weekly. Oral glucose tolerance tests and meal tolerance tests were performed after 4th and 5th weeks of the regimen, respectively. At the end of the study, the rats were killed 2 h after ingestion of a calibrated meal. Blood, tissues and organs were collected for analysis of circulating metabolites and hormones, body composition and mRNA expression in the liver and adipose tissues. No changes were observed in cumulative energy intake and BW gain after 5 weeks of dietary treatment. However, high-protein diets reduced by 20 % the adiposity gain induced by HS and high-sucrose high-fat (HS-HF) diets. Gene expression and transcriptomic analysis suggested that high protein intake reduced liver capacity for lipogenesis by reducing mRNA expressions of fatty acid synthase (fasn), acetyl-CoA carboxylase a and b (Acaca and Acacb) and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1c (Srebf-1c). Moreover, ketogenesis, as indicated by plasma β-hydroxybutyrate levels, was higher in HS-HF-fed mice that were also fed high protein levels. Taken together, these results suggest that high-protein diets may reduce adiposity by inhibiting lipogenesis and stimulating ketogenesis in the liver.

  16. Optical experiments on thermophoretically augmented submicron particle deposition from 'dusty' high temperature gas flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.; Kim, Sang-Soo

    1984-01-01

    A real-time laser reflectivity method and Pt ribbon targets are used to obtain experimental data on the initial deposition rate of MgO(s) particles of approximately 700 nm diameter from otherwise clean combustion products as a function of target temperature (about 950-1450 K) and mainstream gas temperature (about 1500-1600 K). These preliminary data are used to demonstrate the dominant role of thermophoresis (particle drift down a temperature gradient) and to assess the utility of recently developed theoretical methods for predicting and correlating the temperature dependence of thermophoretically augmented convective-diffusion 'dust' deposition rates from flowing hot gases.

  17. A Method for Observing Soil Re-Deposition and Soil Loss Rates in Large Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Y. P.; Bugna, G. C.; Nemours, D.

    2014-12-01

    The lack of quality soil erosion field data, which is required for the verification and calibration of soil erosion models, has been one of the serious problems in the soil conservation modeling today. Observing soil erosion of a relatively large field under truly unobstructed runoff conditions has rarely been done and doccumented. Report here is the results of our observation of soil erosion in a 7.3 ha peanut-cotton cropping system in the Mears Farm of Grand Ridge, FL. We used the mesh-pad method to quantify soil loss from the field and soil re-deposition in the field over the cropping season of 2010. The main slope (1-3 %) of the field is about 210 m long. We show that the amount of soil re-deposition was 50-150 times of the soil loss from the slope. The corresponding organic matter, nitrogen, phosphorous and silt and clay contents of the lost soil, however, were 20.9%, 21%, 17.6% and 14.2%, respectively, of the total amounts re-deposited on the slope. The amounts of soil loss predicted by a SWAT model was 10-20 times greater than our observed values. Soil erosion process was quite heterogeneous, as shown by the mesh-pad method, even on a seemingly uniform cultivated field. Soil erosion models need to be verified and calibrated by extensive quality field data in order to improve their performance.

  18. DSN acquisition of Magellan high-rate telemetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.; Au, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Magellan Project levied the stringent requirement of a 98-percent high-rate telemetry data capture rate on the Deep Space Network (DSN) during the Magellan Prime Mapping Mission. To meet this requirement, the DSN undertook extensive development of the DSN Telemetry System, as well as extensive DSN operations planning and test and training. In actuality, the DSN substantially exceeded the requirement by achieving a Prime Mapping Mission high-rate telemetry data capture rate of 99.14 percent. This article details the DSN telemetry system development and DSN operations planning and test and training. In addition, the actual high-rate telemetry data outages are comprehensively presented and analyzed.

  19. DSN acquisition of Magellan high-rate telemetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.; Au, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Magellan Project levied the stringent requirement of a 98 percent high-rate telemetry data capture rate on the Deep Space Network (DSN) during the Magellan Prime Mapping Mission. To meet this requirement, the DSN undertook extensive development of the DSN Telemetry System, as well as extensive DSN operation planning and test and training. In actuality, the DSN substantially exceeded the requirement by achieving a Prime Mapping Mission high-rate telemetry data capture rate of 99.14 percent. This article details the DSN telemetry system development, and DSN operations planning and test and training. In addition, the actual high-rate telemetry data outages are comprehensively presented and analyzed.

  20. Pulsed Laser Deposition of High Tc Superconducting Thin Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-15

    de- temperature thermal detectors such as the pyroelectric ec sign of imaging arrays of high-T, bolometers for wave- tector, the thermopile , or the... concepts to discuss materials and fabrication considerations. The thermal con- the sensitivity of imaging arrays of high-T, bolometers as a ductance G to...any conceived IR detector . In addition, flux motion studies have been made by this group using our films of YBCO grown on 0.003" thick silicon wafers